<%BANNER%>

The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:01998

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:01998

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

By DEREK GILLIAM dgilliam@lakecityreporter.com Planning for the proposed Columbia County events center entered Phase Two Thursday with a public meeting of the Events Center Advisory Board at Lake Shore Hospital Authority. Before the move to Phase Two, the board acted as a fact finding committee. Fact finding commit tees are not required to provide notice of meetings or record min utes. With the move to a delib erative committee, the advisory board will be required to follow open-record laws. District 1 County Commissioner Ron Williams said theres a per ception by the public that plan ning for the events center has occurred in a closed-door secret process. Williams is the representative By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com Sheryl Crow, Rodney Atkins, Easton Corbin, Randy Houser, The Eli Young Band and the LoCash Cowboys are among the art ists headlin ing the 2013 Suwannee River Jam. There will be over 20 artists per forming and they will consist of national, regional and local art ists, said Teena Peavey, Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park marketing director. Well be announcing the remainder of the lineup in weeks to come. The Suwannee River Jam, a country music festival on the Suwannee River, will take place May 1-4 at the Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park in Live Oak. Suwannee River Jam gen eral admission tickets will be on sale today until midnight at a Opinion ............... 4A People ................. 2A Obituaries ............. 5A Advice & Comics ....... 4-5B Puzzles ............... 4-5B TODAY IN PEOPLE Perry offers rewards. COMING SUNDAY Local news roundup. 80 56 Partly cloudy WEATHER, 2A Lake City ReporterFRIDAY & SATURDAY, JANUARY 11 & 12, 2013 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | 75LAKECITYREPORTER COM WEEKEND EDITION CALL US: (386) 752-1293 SUBSCRIBE TO THE REPORTER: Voice: 755-5445 Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 138, No 248 1A Friday Classic cars Southern Knights Streetrodders will hold a cruise-in for classic and collector cars from 6 to 8 p.m. at Hardees on U.S. 90 West. The public is invited. For more information, call Bob McGraw at 984-6573. Saturday Chili cook-off The fourth annual Branford Chili Cook-off will be from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hatch Park on Craven Street in Branford. The event will include a silent auction for adults and kids, door prizes, live music, an antique car show, moon walk, Home Depot Kids Workshop and a variety of homemade chili. Admission is $5 and includes all the chili you can eat. Proceeds will benefit Herrys Kids Pediatric Services, a pro gram of Hospice of the Nature Coast. To register to compete in the chili cookoff, call the hospice at (386) 755-7714 or visIt online at www.hospiceofcitrus.org. School fundraiser New Generation Christian School will have a fundraiser from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. at Bob Evans Restaurant on U.S. 90 West. The restaurant will donate 15 percent of all sales to the school for its building campaign when customers present a Bob Evans/New Gen Community Fundraiser flyer at checkout. To get a flyer, or for more informa tion, contact any student or staff of New Generation or call (386) 758-4710 or visit the school at www.new generationschool.org. Gospel sing, supper A gospel sing and pot luck supper will be held to celebrate Mary Lou Flynn Lasseters 75th birthday, beginning at 6 p.m. at Lee Worship Center Church Fellowship Hall, 471 SE Magnolia Drive in Lee. Supper will be at 6 p.m., and the open-mic gospel sing will start at 7. To con firm attendance or for more information, call Brenda Lasseter McCormick at (850) 869-9976. Gospel sing, bonfire Brush Arbour Church will have a gospel sing, bonfire and marshmallow and wiener roast at 3 p.m. Bring hot dogs or buns or soft drinks. Take Route 441 north to Cheshire Road, turn right; go to Tripple Run Road, turn left; go to Manattee Place, turn right; church is on the left. For more call the Rev. Pearl Reed at (386) 729-6783. Sunday Free concert The Ball Brothers will perform a free concert at 6 p.m. at Wellborn Baptist Church. The church is on U.S. 90 West between Lake City and Live Oak at the intersection of Lowe Lake Road in Wellborn. A love offering for the group will be received. Jam headliners named Crow, Atkins, Corbin and more to appear in Live Oak May 1-4. BIDEN continued on 3A JAM continued on 3A EVENTS continued on 3A THEFT continued on 3A Picture perfect Biden butts heads with NRA Sketches out gun control plan hell present Obama. By ERICA WERNER and JULIE PACE Associated Press WASHINGTON Despite fresh opposition from the National Rifle Association, the Obama administration is assembling proposals to curb gun vio lence that would include a ban on sales of assault weap ons, limits on high-capac ity ammunition magazines and universal background checks for gun buyers. Sketching out details of the plan Thursday, Vice President Joe Biden said he would give President Barack Obama a set of recommendations by next Tuesday. The NRA, one of the pro-gun groups that met with Biden during the day, rejected the effort to limit ammunition and dug in on its opposition to an assault weapons ban, which Obama has previously said he will propose to Congress. The vice president made it clear, made it explicitly clear, that the president had already made up his mind on those issues, NRA president David Keene said following the meeting. We made it clear that we dis agree with them. Opposition from the wellfunded and politically pow erful NRA underscores the challenges that await the White House if it seeks con gressional approval for lim iting guns and ammunition. Obama can use his execu tive powers to act alone on some gun measures, but his options on the propos als opposed by the NRA are limited without Congress cooperation. Obama has pushed reduc ing gun violence to the top of his domestic agenda fol lowing last months massa cre of 20 children and six adults at a Connecticut ele mentary school. The presi dent put Biden in charge of an administration-wide task force and set a late-January deadline for proposals. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter John Rice, owner of The Frame Shop & Gallery in Live Oak, works on an oil painting of the law office of Foreman, McInnis and Douglas at 207 S Marion Ave. in Lake City on Thursday. Rice advises novice painters to dig in and do it. If youre a painter, youve got to paint. Crow Atkins Corbin Events center: Phase 2 begins Bank teller charged with theft By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com A Bank of America employee was arrested Wednesday and faces felony charges for allegedly short changing customers and pocketing the money. Kristoffer Michael Newbern, 23, 521 SW Foxboro Lane, was charged with grand theft in connection with the crime. He was booked into the Columbia County Citizens Police Academy TONY BRITT/ Lake City Reporter Lake City Police Chief Argatha Gilmore addresses the crowd Thursday night during the departments Citizens Police Academy. Newbern

PAGE 2

CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Producer Grant Tinker is 88. Actor Rod Taylor is 83. Composer Mary Rodgers is 82. The former prime minister of Canada, Jean Chretien, is 79. Actor Mitchell Ryan is 79. Actor Felix Silla is 76. Movie director Joel Zwick is 71. Country singer Naomi Judd is 67. AROUND FLORIDA ACLU pans state on civil liberties TALLAHASSEE American Civil Liberties Union officials say Gov. Rick Scott and the Florida Legislature have mounted an unprecedented attack on civil liberties over the past two years. The ACLU of Florida issued a report Thursday on actions by the group and others in the courts of law and public opinion and at the ballot box to protect voting, free speech and other rights. The organization has been involved in 11 law suits as part of that effort. They include four still pending cases challeng ing drug testing of wel fare applicants and state employees, a limitation on doctors asking patients about gun ownership and a purge of noncitizens from voting rolls. An ACLU lawyer said Florida has been kind of a petri dish for social exper iments being copied and watched by other states. Broward ponders name change FORT LAUDERDALE Fort Lauderdale home of the iconic 1960s Spring Break film Where the Boys Are boasts 23 miles of sugar sand beaches where bath ing suit-clad tourists sip daiquiris under lazy palm trees. And then theres Broward County, known for hanging chads, election debacles and a namesake who championed draining the Everglades. So which one has the name recognition to bring in the most tour ism dollars? County and city stakeholders met Thursday to discuss pos sibly changing the name of Broward County, the second largest in the state with 1.8 million residents, to Fort Lauderdale County. When it comes to rec ognition, Fort Lauderdale has the juice literally and figuratively, said Jordan Zimmerman, chairman of Fort Lauderdale-based Zimmerman Advertising. About 15 years ago, Floridas largest county changed its name from Dade to Miami-Dade to capitalize on the name of its most famous city. But critics counter the name change is a waste of money that will cost big bucks to change street signs, libraries, courthous es, ports and vehicles. The city of Fort Lauderdale is part of Broward County, which drew more than 12 million tourists last year. Man held in death of mother over TV WEST PALM BEACH A Palm Beach County man has been charged with the murder of his mother after allegedly stabbing her over a dis pute about a TV show. Twenty-three-year-old Alan Farajian reported the death of his 62-yearold mother to police late Tuesday. According to an affida vit, an argument over a TV show spurred the suspect to slit her throat with a steak knife, then stab her in the throat and chest at his Palm Beach Gardens home. Police say the man told them he had stopped taking medications for psychological problems including bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. He described his moth er, Gloria Farajian, as god fearing and himself as the devil. He remains held without bail. Its not known if he has obtained an attorney. UF president search costly The University of Floridas president is stay ing put, but the search for a successor still wound up costing the school. UF President Bernie Machen, who has led the school since 2004, agreed this week to remain on the job at the urging of Gov. Rick Scott and the chair man of the universitys board. But the university which began a search for a replacement last year will pay at least $41,000 to the Miramar Beach firm hired to help find a new president. UFs contract with Greenwood/Asher & Associates called for a total payment of $95,000 in three installments plus up to $9,500 in expenses. The university has already made the first payment of more than $31,000 and expects to pay the full amount in expenses. But Janine Sikes, a university spokeswoman, said the school does not expect to pay the full con tract amount because the search was suspended. Sex trafficker gets life in prison FORT LAUDERDALE A convicted Florida sex trafficker who recruited runaway teenagers to work as prostitutes has been sentenced to life in federal prison. Trial testimony showed that 49-year-old Van Lawson Williams of Fort Lauderdale would promise runaway girls shelter and food at his home but then demand they help pay the bills. Six of the girls testified they were forced into prostitution and given drugs. Thought for Today Finish each day and be done with it. You have done what you could. Ralph Waldo Emerson, American essayist, poet and philosopher (1803-1882) Perry offers reward in cold cases NAPLES F ilmmaker Tyler Perry is offering a $100,000 reward for information in the decade-old case of two men who went miss ing after separate encounters with a sheriffs deputy. Perry joined the Rev. Al Sharpton and Ben Jealous of the NAACP at a news conference Thursday in Naples to discuss the missing-person inves tigations of Terrance Williams and Felipe Santos. Santos and Williams disappeared three months apart in the Naples area in 2003 after crossing paths with Collier County Sheriffs Deputy Steven Calkins. He was never charged but was fired the next year. Perry said the media was not paying enough attention to missingperson cases involving minorities. Williams was black and Santos was an illegal immigrant from Mexico. He called the cases an outrage followed by cheers of Amen and yes by the crowd. When he announced the reward, a man stepped from the front of the crowd to tell Perry something, indicating he had information to offer. Just like this man has come for ward, I am sure there are others, Perry said. You are being watched around the world and you are safe. Source: Britney Spears out of X Factor LOS ANGELES A person familiar with plans for Foxs The X Factor says Britney Spears is out of the show. Spears was a mentor on the sing ing contest for one season, report edly drawing a $15 million paycheck but failing to pull reviews to match. The person who confirmed reports of her departure wasnt authorized to comment publicly, speaking Thursday on condi tion of anonymity. The person said that over the holi days, producers dis cussed replacements for Spears and for another X Factor panelist, record exec utive Antonio L.A. Reid. Reid previ ously announced he would leave the show after two seasons. Its yet another shake-up for The X Factor, Simon Cowells attempt to strike magic with a U.S. version of his successful U.K. series. Cowell replaced panelists Paula Abdul and Nicole Scherzinger after a disap pointing first season. Timberlake hints return to music in video NEW YORK Is Justin Timberlake bringing his music career back? The 31-year-old superstar has concentrated almost exclusively on his acting career over the last few years. But on Thursday, he posted a video on his website that showed him walking into a studio, putting on headphones and saying: Im ready. Timberlake hasnt made an album since 2006s Grammy-winning FutureSex/LoveSounds. In the video, Timberlake is also heard saying that he obsesses over his music and doesnt want to put music out that he doesnt love and that you have to wait for music you love. The video ends with a countdown to midnight Sunday. Saturday: Afternoon: 1-5-8 Evening: N/A Saturday: Afternoon: 9-6-8-9 Evening: N/A Saturday: 12-14-16-24-29 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAIL Y BRIEFING FRIDAY & SATURDAY, JANUARY 11 & 12, 2013 HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter 2A Daily Scripture But just as he who called you is holy, so be holy in all you do; for it is written: Be holy, because I am holy. 1 Peter 1:15-16 ASSOCIATED PRESS Filmmaker Tyler Perry speaks at a news conference to discuss the special miss ing-person investigations of Terrance Williams and Felipe Santos onThursdayat the Collier County South Regional Library in East Naples. Perry offered a $100,000 reward for information in the cases. Associated Press Associated Press Spears Timberlake

PAGE 3

Detention Center in lieu of $5,000 bond. According to Lake City Police Department reports, investigator David Greear was called to the Bank of America branch on U.S. 90 Wednesday afternoon in reference to a case of employee theft. When he arrived at the bank Greear spoke to the bank manager and Newbern and was told that Newbern openly admitted to short-chang-ing customers who cashed paychecks. Reports said Newbern would cash the checks and then give the custom-er with a lesser amount. Greear was told that over a four-month period, Newbern allegedly pocketed between $1,500 and $3,000. The bank manager told Greear that the customers were refunded their earn-ings, which made Bank of America the victim of the offense. Newbern was then arrested. LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, JANUARY 11 & 12, 2013 3A3A THEFT: Bank teller chargedContinued From Page 1A EVENTS: Advisory board begins discussions Continued From Page 1Afrom the county commis-sion on the Events Center Advisory Board and will act as chair of the board. “It’s important that due process should take its course, and that’s what this committee is for,” he said. John O’Neal, a member of the advisory board, said that committee members should make sure they are there for the right reasons, and that his company, O’Neal Roofing, would not do any of the construction on the event center if the project makes it to that point. “Make sure we’re here for our county,” he said. Joel Foreman, attorney for the group, presented the open-records laws that the group is required to follow. “The short version of it is don’t deliberate outside of the public view...,” he said. “We will be transparent. There will be scrutiny.” Anything the board does pursue will need to be approved by the coun-ty commission, including expenditures of money, Foreman said. Williams said the public should be part of the process, and that the progress of the organization may be slow. “It’s important that due process should take its course, and that’s what this committee is for,” Williams said. The Events Center Advisory Board will meet the first Tuesday of each month at 6 p.m. at Lake Shore Hospital Authority. The next meeting will be Feb. 5. JAM: Top musical artists scheduled to perform Continued From Page 1Aspecial price of $75, which includes all four days’ admission beginning with the Wednesday night pre-party. Suwannee River Jam tickets may also be pur-chased at any S&S Food Store. “It’s four days of music entertainment,” said Peavey. “It’s camping, swimming, golf-cart riding, canoeing and enjoying your favorite artists.” In addition to the country music, the 2013 Suwannee River Jam includes the first Ultimate Redneck Wedding, Ms. Suwannee River Jam Daisy Dukes-style contest, letters from home to sol-diers overseas and Hope Notes, a silent auction fund-raiser with several items up for bids to help area high school bands. Winners of the Suwannee River Jam auditions will also perform all over the Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park dur-ing the Suwannee River Jam. The 2013 edition of the Jam marks the 23rd year the festival has been held. Artist bios:• Sheryl Crow — Freespirited, fearless and fierce, Sheryl Crow has garnered nine Grammys, performed duets with musical lumi-naries such as Sting and Mick Jagger, released seven studio albums which sold more than 35 million records worldwide, saw the launch of her own cloth-ing line, Bootheel Trading Co., is a cancer survivor and passionate humanitar-ian and has performed for President Obama. From humble beginnings as a jingle and back-up singer, Crow has reached the pin-nacle of professional solo success; • The Eli Young Band — Four musicians who met during their college days in Texas — The Eli Young Band is now 11 years into a career built on touring without a single lineup change. That dedication is paying off big-time as the band enjoys a crazy new level of success. • Rodney Atkins — The East Tennessee native has an impressive track record with hitting on sentiments that strike a chord with the country listener: He’s had five number one hits from his first three albums, from “Watching You” and “These Are My People” to his most recent smash, “Farmer’s Daughter” (which quickly skyrocketed to platinum), and he’s sold over four mil-lion singles in the past five years alone. • Easton Corbin — Corbin, a native of Trenton, is the first country male artist in 17 years to have his first two consecutive singles reach No. 1 – “A Little More Country Than That” and “Roll With It.” In a six-month period, he received 13 country music award nominations and won three country music trophies. Most recently, he received three nominations from the Academy of Country Music Awards, Top New Solo Vocalist as well as Single and Song of the Year for his debut hit, “A Little More Country Than That.” • Randy Houser — Houser’s own past contains no shortage of achieve-ment, including multiple nominations for Academy of Country Music and Country Music Association Awards, a No. 2 single in the form of “Boots On,” and songwriting cred-its for major names such as Trace Adkins, Justin Moore and Chris Young. In 2008—mere months after the release of his debut single, “Anything Goes”—Houser was even asked by David Letterman himself to appear on the Late Show. • LoCash Cowboys — It was April of 2008, and the LoCash Cowboys were doing what they do best — rocking a packed house. They were at Nashville’s Wildhorse Saloon, where the two of them, Preston Brust and Chris Lucas, had met a few years earlier. Along the way they had sold more than 60,000 cop-ies of their homemade CD, earned endorsements from the likes of Budweiser, shared bills with artists including Charlies Daniels, ZZ Top, performed at half-time of NBA and U.S. Olympic team basketball games and earned televi-sion appearances ranging from Tanya Tucker’s real-ity show “Tuckerville” to “Pageant School: Becoming Miss America,” writing the theme songs for both. BIDEN: Task force moving quickly on proposals Continued From Page 1A“I committed to him I’d have these recommendations to him by Tuesday,” Biden said Thursday, during a separate White House meeting with sportsmen and wildlife groups. “It doesn’t mean it’s the end of the discussion, but the public wants us to act.” The vice president later huddled privately with the NRA and other gun owner groups for more than 90 minutes. Participants in the meeting described it as an open and frank discussion, but one that yielded little movement from either side on long-held positions. Richard Feldman, the president of the Independent Firearm Owners Association, said all were in agree-ment on a need to keep guns out of the hands of criminals and people with mental health issues. But when the conversation turned to broad restric-tions on high capacity magazines and assault weapons, Feldman said Biden suggested the president had already made up his mind to seek a ban. “Is there wiggle room and give?” Feldman said. “I don’t know.” White House officials said the vice president didn’t expect to win over the NRA and other gun groups on those key issues. But the administration was hoping to soften their opposition in order to rally support from pro-gun lawmakers on Capitol Hill. Biden’s proposals are also expected to include recommendations to address mental health care and vio-lence on television and in movies and video games. Those issues have wide support from gun rights groups and pro-gun lawmakers. The vice president also met Thursday with representatives from the entertainment industry, includ-ing Comcast Corp. and the Motion Picture Association of America. He’ll hold talks Friday with the video game industry. During his meeting with sporting and wildlife groups, Biden said that while no recommendations would eliminate all future shootings, “there has got to be some common ground, to not solve every problem but dimin-ish the probability that our children are at risk in their schools and dimin-ish the probability that firearms will be used in violent behavior in our society.” As the meetings took place in Washington, a student was shot and wounded at a rural California high school and another student was taken into custody. Biden also talked about holes in NICS — the National Instant Criminal Background Check System — when states don’t relay information to the database used by dealers to check pur-chasers. Advocates blame Congress for not fully funding a law that provides money to help states send records to the database. Gun control backers see plenty of room for executive action when it comes to improving background checks and other areas. For example, advocates say Obama could order the Justice Department to prosecute more people flagged by background checks as prohibited pur-chasers when they try to buy guns; expand a rule that requires dealers to notify the Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco Firearms and Explosives when some-one tries to buy multiple semiauto-matic rifles, a program now confined to Mexico border states, and increase enforcement actions at gun shows. The group Mayors Against Illegal Guns has sent the White House 40 steps it says would save lives and dramatically improve enforcement of existing laws without any action by Congress. Several Cabinet members have also taken on an active role in Biden’s gun violence task force, including Attorney General Eric Holder. He met Thursday with Wal-Mart, the nation’s largest firearms seller, along with other retail-ers such as Bass Pro Shops and Dick’s Sporting Goods. The president hopes to announce his administration’s next steps to tack-le gun violence shortly after he is sworn in for a second term. Ex-inmate: Snitch lied for leniencyBy CURT ANDERSONAP Legal Affairs WriterMIAMI — Hoping for a reduced prison sentence, the star prosecution wit-ness in the case of missing foster child Rilya Wilson concocted a story about the girl’s former caretaker con-fessing to killing the child, a jury was told Thursday. Cindy McCloud, 41, testified that the key witness, Robin Lunceford, told her while both were in state prison that she made up her story about caretaker Geralyn Graham smoth-ering Rilya with a pillow and disposing of the girl’s remains near water. The 4-year-old’s remains have never been found. Graham, 66, faces life in prison if convicted of mur-der, kidnapping and child abuse charges. Graham insists she is innocent and that Rilya was taken from her home by a child welfare worker for mental tests and never returned. Investigators have testified that no evidence has sur-faced to back that up. McCloud, who has been convicted of 27 felonies and was most recently released from prison in June, said Lunceford appeared upset one time when they were incarcer-ated at a prison near Ocala and McCloud asked what was wrong. Lunceford said she was going to tes-tify about the purported confession and that none of it was true. “Me and her were standing there and she said, ‘you know, it’s all lies. All of it,”’ McCloud testified. “She just basically told me ‘it’s all lies and it’s making me crazy.’ That’s what stresses her out.” Graham attorney Scott Sakin asked why Lunceford would make that up. “To get out. To go home,” said McCloud, who now lives in Lakeland. In addition, McCloud said she overheard Lunceford and another jailhouse informant, Maggie Carr, come up with a way for Carr to also testify against Graham in hopes of getting some benefit. Carr testified earlier that she also met Graham behind bars and that Graham had indicated Rilya’s body would never be found because it had gone to “the elements.” At one point in prison, McCloud said Lunceford tapped on a stack of Graham trial documents and said, “One more big fat lie,” in reference to Carr’s testimony. Lunceford, a career criminal, had been sentenced to life in prison before agree-ing to testify, which result-ed in a plea deal cutting the sentence to 10 years. Carr, who is serving 25 years to life for murder, has no plea deal in exchange for her testimony but will soon become eligible for parole. McCloud said she has nothing to gain and was made no promises in exchange for her testimony on Graham’s behalf. ASSOCIATED PRESSVice President Joe Biden, second from right, gestur es as he speaks during a meeting with sportsmen and women and wildlife interest groups and member of the Cabinet on Thursd ay in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on t he White House complex in Washington. Biden is leading an effort to d evelop policy proposals in response to the Newtown, Conn., school shooting.

PAGE 4

4AOPINION Q Fort Lauderdale Sun Sentinel I t’s true—Life is a story. It has a begin-ning, middle, and an end. In the middle, the plot gets complicated. We are the central character in our own story, but may not even realize it. Why not? We’re always there; we don’t have a chance to look at our own life from another’s point of view. We can get caught up in day-to-day stuff, and don’t take time to see the “big picture.” It’s easier to see other people’s stories than our own. As a preschooler, I lived in Biloxi, Mississippi. Every day an older boy riding a bicycle delivered a newspaper to our home. Freddy lived at the end of our block, and we got to know our paperboy well. One day he helped us, by climbing a tree in our yard and hanging a tire swing from a limb. Some 20 years later, little Freddy Hayes was one of three astronauts aboard a rocket ship to the moon! I later attended high school in California. The class clown, voted least likely to succeed, became a writer. He conceptual-ized the “Cops” televi-sion series, probably the first reality show. Then, with other high school friends, he helped develop and write the popular “Simpsons” series! My parents took me to piano lessons when I was in the first grade. I always loved music, and dabbled in it off and on during my life. Half a century later, I bought a piano and pursued my music. Then, two years ago I found a group that needed a piano player. I joined “Cowboy Dave and Friends,” and we have performed at least once a week for the last two years. “Cowboy Dave” spent his life as a rodeo cowboy, and always sang and played guitar. He became a popular and successful musician and band leader, with lots of performances for most of his life. Now we play at hospitals, nursing homes, senior centers, and AARP meetings. This month we began performing at the “Blue Moon” caf here in High Springs Florida. What’s my story? Like many young folks, I had challenges growing up. I took up the field of psy-chology, to help me under-stand human behavior and how to deal with life’s chal-lenges. Throughout my life, I’ve worked to build a better life for myself and for those close to me. Since choosing that path toward happiness, I chose a career as a licensed mental health counselor, to work with troubled youth and families, during a long and satisfying career. Ten years ago I started teaching college, as a way to reach out to college students along their paths. I began writing, to reach even more folks. I believe that everyone has a story—something unique, different, or spe-cial. What’s your story? Sharing your anonymous story might just be the thing to help someone else to be a little happier. Robert DennyBob.Denny8@gmail.com Q Bob Denny teaches psychology at Florida Gateway College. Contact him at (386) 454-4950. OPINION Friday & Saturday, January 11 & 12, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A House could cause chaos with shutdown Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Jim Barr, Associate Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman O f all the reaction to Washington’s last-min-ute compromise for averting the “fiscal cliff,” the most clarifying message comes from China, our biggest foreign creditor. The United States, said China’s Xingu news agency, must deal with a budget deficit that threatens not just a “fiscal cliff,” but a “fiscal abyss.” “In a democracy like the United States, tax increases and spending cuts — the exact dose of medicine needed to cure its chronic debt disease — have long proved hugely unpopular among voters. So the politi-cians have chosen to kick the can down the road again and again. But as we all know, the can will never disap-pear. Sometime and somewhere, you might trip over it and fall hard on the ground, or in the U.S. case, into an abyss you can never come out of.” China’s reaction is important because it has become our major foreign banker, our dealer, and at some point, it could turn off the tap. For how long will a dealer give a junkie his fix — on credit? And what will happen to the United States when the banks refuse to lend us any more money? At that point, our nation must address our spending jones. Must we face an abyss to act? Many of us took a measure of relief in Congress having passed a New Year’s Day compromise bill to avert dramatic spending cuts and tax hikes, a “fiscal cliff” combination that economists said would have shocked our tattered economy back into recession. Most notably, the compromise will raise taxes on families that make more than $450,000 a year, which seems fair in this era of growing income inequality. The higher threshold — up from $250,000 a year — also better passes the smell test for what constitutes being rich in America today. What happened to the promised two-for-one spending-cuts-to-tax-hikes once promised by the Democrats? President Obama says there’s more to be done on spending cuts, but where are the specifics? If the cuts proposed for the Pentagon and other government pro-grams were too severe, where, exactly, will we pare back? The compromise legislation is characterized as a win for Obama, but compromise generally means no one gets everything he or she wants. In averting the cliff, it appears the Democrats won the battle, but lost the war for the hearts and minds of average Americans, who are keenly aware of the threat our national debt poses to our national security. The budget war is not over. In February, the new Congress will convene to decide on spending cuts. And in March, it will decide whether to increase the federal borrowing limit. Let us not go to the brink again. Let us not rattle the markets and the psyches of business owners, who need stability before deciding whether to invest or hire. Let us vigorously address the spending choices we face now. Do we continue unemployment compensation indefinitely? Do we adjust cost-of-living raises for Social Security recipients? Do we change pension plans for government employees? Do we end certain tax credits? Do we raise the age of eligibility for Medicare? Do we pare back Pentagon spending? These are some of the tough choices we took a pass on in the New Year’s Day compromise. Now, avert ‘fiscal abyss’ What’s your story? ANOTHER VIEW LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.comY ou have to admire the quirkiness of the ideas being put forward to solve our fiscal mess, in lieu of doing the real work of governing. The most interesting is the trillion dollar coin, which would be minted out of pure platinum and stored by the Treasury Department as an asset. Presumably, we would all go to our safety deposit boxes and pull out our platinum jewelry and take off our wedding rings and send them to Washington. (Just sorting the real from the fake would be quite a feat.) The resulting coin would be so gigantic it would need a cavernous new government facility, which every legislator would want in his/her state. It would never get built because that would take an act of Congress, and it’s clear Congress doesn’t know how to act. Strangely, the White House did not immediately ridicule this idea. Then there is the let’s-makefriends-with-China policy. Since every dollar we spend that isn’t related to entitlement spending such as Medicare or Social Security is borrowed from China, the idea is to become best buddies so China will keep lending money to us. Eventually, we would all have to speak Mandarin, forget about the Internet and give them the West Coast. Of real currency (ha ha) in the House at least, is the idea of refus-ing to raise the debt ceiling and shutting down the government. This would cause worldwide reces-sion and financial instability but, no matter, those spendthrift bureaucrats would be taught a lesson. When their offices had no heat or power and all activity by govern-ment ceased -inspecting food, watching out for terrorists, keeping airplanes in the air, making the big boys play fair — they’d be sorry. This idea comes from people who were elected to Congress apparent-ly without ever taking Economics 101 or learning what the debt ceil-ing actually means. They think failing to raise the debt ceiling means sticking it to President Barack Obama and not letting him spend more money. There are a few problems with this thesis: The debt ceiling refers to paying for what Congress already has spent. The president of the United States does not spend money; Congress does. No Congress has ever voted against raising the debt ceiling. The nation would have no money to pay its debts. No one would lend to us. We would lose all financial respect. Soon we would be living in a banana republic without the bananas. Many believe Washington wastes so much money the only way to stop it is to close it all down. That may sound appealing. But it would mean chaos. There would be no Social Security checks, no grants to researchers on the brink of new dis-coveries, no air traffic controllers, no disaster relief, no pay to soldiers or their families, no safety standards for hospital equipment or bioengi-neered new foods or air pollution standards. If civil unrest broke out in cities, no Army reserves would move in to quell the violence. Armed gangs would patrol election booths. Nobody would resolve dis-putes among states. Goodbye to flu vaccines and major road improve-ment projects. To avoid a government shutdown if the debt ceiling is not raised, some want the president to invoke the 14th Amendment and go ahead with borrowing. This undoubtedly would invite another impeachment crisis. Some want Obama to issue IOUs or scrip to government workers and contractors, Social Security recipients and hospitals and doctors treating the elderly. When Treasury got enough money, scrip could be redeemed for cash. The precedent is California, which ran out of money in 2009 and issued scrip until the legislature got its act together to permit redemption. One wonders how many grocery stores and power companies would be sympathetic to people clutching handfuls of paper scrip waiting for Congress to authorize its debts to be paid. There is a more reasonable solution. It’s called compromise. Ann McFeattersamcfeatters@nationalpress.com Q Scripps Howard columnist Ann McFeatters has covered the White House and national politics since 1986. is “poorly for in abyss.

PAGE 5

LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY & SATURDAY, JANUARY 11 & 12, 2013 5A5ALeona Lee Little BondsLeona Lee Little Bonds,Age 98, Born August 9, 1914 Lake City, FL Died January 5, 2013 Dowl-ing Park, FL. Preceded in death by her husband, Ran-dall Joseph Bonds, Sr., her parents Ol-lie and Julian Little as well as brothers Ar-thur, Clifton, Woodrow, George and Carl Little and her sister Louise Little McCall Mahood.She is survived by her children: Patricia Bonds Rose, Barbara Bonds Gibbs, Randall Joseph Bonds, Jr., and David Julian Bonds; two sisters Ellen Little Ward, Rose Little Wilder and two brothers: Finley Little and Ralph Little; nine grandchildren a whole passel of great grandchildren and great, great grandchildren.She was a lover of fam-ily and friends. Although her passing is mourned we rejoice at her victory.A celebration of her life will be held at Pleasant Grove Method-ist Church, Pastor Dusty Bailey RIFLDWLQJ6:6WDWH5G/DNH&LW\)/Saturday, January 12, 2013 at 1:00 p.m. Family and friends are invited to attend.,QOLHXRIRZHUVGRQDWLRQVmay be made to the Pleasant Grove Methodist Cemetery Fund, Pleasant Grove Methodist Kitchen Fund or your charity of choice.Arrangements are under the direction of GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN FUNERAL HOME 3596 South U.S. Hwy 441, Lake &LW\)ORULGD1954. Please sign the family registry at www.gatewayforestlawn.com Willie Smith Willie Saulsby Smith (Chillie Willie) was born February 15, 1938 to the late Willie S. Smith and Leslie Scott Harris in Jacksonville, Florida. Willie transitioned from this life to be with the Lord on Janu-ary 5, 2013. He was educated in the Public Schools of Columbia County, graduating from Richardson High School with the class of 1956. He was employed by the City of Jacksonville Motor Pool Division with 38 years of ser-vice. He was a member of King Solomon United Baptist Church, serving on the trustee board. Wil-lie was also a member of Masonic Lodge #65 and Rabia Temple #8. Left to cherish fond memories; his loving and devoted wife, Juanita D. Smith; sons, Vardrick Webb (Sondra), Brune’ Williams (Stef-fany), Ricky Calloway (Dora), Tyrone Smith; daughter, Takita Williams; (22) grandchildren; (9) great-grandchildren; hosts of other relatives and friends. Funeral services for Mr. Smith will be held at 12:00 noon Sat-urday, January 12, 2013 at King Solomon United Baptist Church. 2240 Forest St. Jack-sonville, FL. The family will receive friends Friday, Janu-ary 11, 2013 from 6:00 – 8:00 p.m. at St. Thomas Life Center. 2119 Rowe Ave. Jacksonville, FL. Arrangements entrusted to A.B. Coleman Mortuary. Obituary compliments of COMBS FUNERAL HOME 292 NE Washington Street. /DNH&LW\)/“The Caring Professionals” Obituaries are paid advertise-ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporter’s classified department at 752-1293. OBITUARIES COMMUNITY CALENDAR Q To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at ljbarr@lakecityreporter.com.Jan. 11History programActor Chaz Mena will perform a program, “Claiming La Florida for King and Cross,” at 6:30 p.m. at the Columbia County Main Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave. Mena will portray Pedro Menendez de Aviles, the founder of St. Augustine and first Spanish gover-nor of Florida. Tickets are required, and are avail-able free of charge at any county library location. Funding for the program was provided by the Florida Humanities Council and the state Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs, as part of the 500th anniversary of the state’s founding.Computer classesRegistration is now open for free basic com-puter classes to be given by the Greater Lake City Community Development Corp. Inc. The five-week, 20-hour course will begin Monday, Jan. 14, and class-es will be from 6 to 8 p.m. each Monday and Tuesday for five weeks. To register or for more information, contact Ann at (386) 752-9785 or (904) 635-2021 or visit the CDC office at 363 NW Bascom Norris Drive.Fish dinnerOur Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5056 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, pre-pares fish dinners every Friday from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The dinner is $6 for two Alaskan pollock filets, corn, baked beans, hush-puppies, cole slaw and tarter sauce. Take out or eat in.Classic cars cruise-inSouthern Knights Streetrodders will hold a cruise-in for classic and collector cars from 6 to 8 p.m. at Hardee’s on U.S. 90 West. The public is invited to view participants’ classic vehicles. For more infor-mation, call Bob McGraw at 984-6573.Disaster assistanceWorld Renew will be in Columbia and Suwannee counties will open walk-in centers through Jan.16, from 9 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. to assist households affected by Tropical Storm Debbie. Suwannee County resi-dents can visit the walk-in center at Suwannee County Emergency Management, 617 Ontario Avenue SW, Suite 200, in Live Oak. Columbia County residents can visit the walk-in cen-ter at Columbia County Senior Services LifeStyle Enrichment Center, 628 SE Allison Court, in Lake City. World Renew is sponsored by the Suwannee County Long Term Recovery Group and the Suwannee Valley Long Term Recovery Committee, convened by United Way of Suwannee Valley. Call the Suwannee County center at (386) 364-3405 or the Columbia County center at (386) 438-8621.Jan. 12Chili cook-offThe fourth annual Branford Chili Cook-off will be from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hatch Park on Craven Street in Branford. The event will include a silent auction for adults and kids, door prizes, live music, an antique car show, moon walk, Home Depot Kids Workshop and a variety of homemade chili. Admission is $5 and includes all the chili you can eat. Proceeds will benefit Herry’s Kids Pediatric Services, a pro-gram of Hospice of the Nature Coast. To register to compete in the chili cook-off, call the hospice at (386) 755-7714 or visIt online at www.hospiceof citrus.org.School fundraiserNew Generation Christian School will have a fundraiser from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. at Bob Evans Restaurant on U.S. 90 West. The restaurant will donate 15 percent of all sales to the school for its building campaign when customers present a Bob Evans/New Gen Community Fundraiser flyer at checkout. To get a flyer, or for more informa-tion, contact any student or staff of New Generation or call (386) 758-4710 or visit the school at www.new generationschool.org.Gospel sing, supperA gospel sing and potluck supper will be held to celebrate Mary Lou Flynn Lasseter’s 75th birthday, beginning at 6 p.m. at Lee Worship Center Church Fellowship Hall, 471 SE Magnolia Drive in Lee. Supper will be at 6 p.m., and the open-mic gospel sing will start at 7. To con-firm attendance or for more information, call Brenda Lasseter McCormick at (850) 869-9976.Gospel sing, bonfireBrush Arbour Church will have a gospel sing, bonfire and marshmallow and wiener roast at 3 p.m. Bring hot dogs or buns or soft drinks. Directions: Take Route 441 north to Cheshire Road, turn right; go to Tripple Run Road, turn left; go to Manattee Place, turn right; church is on the left. For more infor-mation, call the Rev. Pearl Reed at (386) 729-6783.Jan. 13Music concertThe Ball Brothers will perform a free concert at 6 p.m. at Wellborn Baptist Church. The church is on U.S. 90 West between Lake City and Live Oak at the intersection of Lowe Lake Road in Wellborn. A love offering for the group will be received.Baseball tryoutsThe Columbia Timber Rattlers 8U travel machine pitch baseball team will have tryouts at 2 p.m. at the Southside Baseball Complex (blue fields). For details, call Jason Dumas at 965-8530 or Todd Gustavson at 365-2133.Jan. 14SCORE workshopSCORE of Lake City will hold a free entrepreneurs’ interactive workshop from 6 to 8 p.m. at Columbia County Main Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave.. Participants will have an opportunity to meet other entrepreneurs, get advice and receive free educa-tional materials from the federal Small Business Administration and other sources. Participants also will be able to arrange one-on-one business coun-seling with SCORE volun-teers. To reserve a seat, call (386) 752-2000 or email scorelakecity@gmail.com.Budgeting workshopColumbia County Extension will have a work-shop, Budgeting Basics and Credit Repair,” from 6:30 to 7:30 pm. The dead-line to register is Jan. 11. It is the first in a series of Living Well workshop to be held on the second Monday of each month. Cost is $10 per person for the year, $15 per couple or $3 a session. Workshop will be at the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane, at the Columbia County Fairgrounds. To register or for more information, contact Jenny Jump at (386)752-5384.Grief support groupHaven Hospice will have a grief support meeting each Monday for six weeks at 11 a.m. at Haven Suwannee Valley Care Center, 6037 West U.S. 90. There is no charge. For more informa-tion, call (352) 692-5123.Republican WomenThe Columbia Federated Republican Women will meet at 7 p.m. at Beef O’Brady’s in the meeting room. Come at 6 p.m. to eat before the meeting. For more information, call Betty Ramey at (386) 935-4111. Jan. 15Pageant entriesToday is the deadline for contestants to enter the 2013 Olustee Festival Pageant. The pageant is open to girls ages 3 months to 20 years who live in or attend school in Baker, Columbia, Gilcrist, Hamilton, Union and Suwannee counties. Age divisions are 3 to 12 months, 13 to 23 months, 2 to 3 years, 4 to 6 years, 7 to 9 years, 10 to 12 years, 13 to 15 years and 16 to 20 years. Contestants may compete in beauty, sports-wear, talent and photogenic categories. Each pageant contestant will receive a tiara. First-place winners will ride in the Olustee Festival parade. The pag-eant will be held Jan. 26 at the Columbia County Schools Administrative Complex. Applications may be obtained at the Columbia County Library, the Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of Commerce, Emily Taber Library, Suwannee Regional Library, Hamilton County Library or by contacting Elaine Owens at (386) 965-2787.Historical SocietyThe Columbia County Historical Society will meet at 7 p.m. at the Columbia County Main Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave. The topic will be the Heritage Park Village in Macclenny. The meeting is open to the public. For more information, contact Sean McMahon at 754-4293.Plant clinicUniversity of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon at the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane, to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. NARFE meetingThe National Active and Retired Federal Employees will meet at 1 p.m. in the LifeStyle Enrichment Center at 628 SE Allison Court. Guest speaker will ve Cody Gray, represent-ing the Blue/Gray Army, to talk about the upcoming Olustee Festival. For more information, call Jim Purvis at 752-8570 or 292 9361.Art league meetingThe Art League of North Florida will meet at 6:30 pm at First Presbyterian Church on US 90 west. The community is invited. There will be refresh-ments, fellowship, a short meeting and speaker. The speaker this month is Don Sloan, well known teacher and artist, who will demon-strate the simplicity of tem-pera paint. Kailey Kiss will assist, presenting a demon-stration of art techniques for tempera. Sloan is an art teacher at Lake City Middle School. He has a degree in art education from the University of North Florida in Jacksonville. He special-izes in creation of highly secure documents. His hobbies include restoring old cars and trucks, fishing and painting swamps and Florida wildlife.Jan. 16Festival planningThe Blue-Grey Army will meet at 5:30 p.m. to plan the Olustee Battle Festival. The meeting will be at the school district central building, room 153, 409 SW St. Johns St.Plant clinicUniversity of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Wednesday from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Fort White Public Library on Route 47to answer ques-tions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384.Soil testingColumbia County Master Gardeners do free soil test-ing each Wednesday morn-ing at the Columbia County Agricultural Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane. If interested in analy-sis of your property’s soil, Ddop off samples at the office during normal work hours; leave name and a phone number, so you can be called with the results. For more information, call Gayle Rogers at 758-2408.Jan. 17Retired educatorsColumbia County Retired Educators will meet at 1 p.m. at the School Board Adult Center, room 120. For more information, contact Will Brown at 752-2431. Any retired person interested in education is welcome. ABOVE: Officers of Cherry Hill Lodge 12 at Fort White for 2013 are: (front row, from left) Ronald E. Ward, marshal; Ronald E. Hall, master; (second row) Rolf Burkhardt, senior deacon; Mark Nelson, junior warden; Michael Burrows, senior steward; Robert Shotwell, junior steward; (third row) Donald Cadrain, tyler; Lester Hall, installing marshal; Kenneth Croft, installing officer; Steven Khachigan, outgoing master; Ray Metrick, junior deacon; (back row) Arnold Gibson, secretary. Not pictured are Robert Breyer, chaplain, and Brian Kosko, senior warden. RIGHT: Outgoing Master Steven Khachigan presenting the gavel to Incoming Master Ronald E.Hall. Masonic lodge installs officers COURTESY PHOTOS

PAGE 6

FAITH & VALUES Friday & Saturday, January 11 & 12, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com 6A6AF&V The wise decision for life’s journeyHaving contentment and joy in adverse times W hile praying and asking God’s leadership for this article, I began to think about decisions we make today effect our tomorrows. I began to realize we, as Christians, ought to seek God’s wisdom in our decision making process. There are several Greek words used for wisdom, wise, and prudence in the New Testament according to W. E. Vine. Of all the words Phronesis and Sophia seem to be the words used most often. We may also use the Latin meaning of decision to help us understand the wisdom that God intended for us to use. The word “deci-sion” is of interesting derivation. The de is a Latin prefix meaning “away”, while the cis is a Latin root meaning “cut.” The ion is a Latin suffix meaning “the act of.” A “decision” then, is the act of cutting away one choice from all other possible choices. What is decided upon is singled out or isolated from everything else. Making the right decisions is not always easy. First, you have to know what is right. Second, you have to desire to do what is right. Furthermore, your desire must be strong enough to cause you to act without fearing the con-sequences. Decisions are very important because they deter-mine destiny. Popular culture says “my life is my life, I can live it as I please.” Clearly, many people, if not most people, believe that life’s journey is lived between their birth and their death. This explains there interest in reli-gion. Eternity in heaven would be like winning the ultimate grand prize … endless bonus years. However, it is important for the Church to reject the basic assumption that “this is my life.” The following scriptures stand in contradiction to this assertion: “I have been crucified with Christ; it is no longer I who lives, but Christ lives in me;” (Gal 2:20a). “Or do you not know that your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit who is in you, whom you have from God, and that you are not your own? For you have been bought with a price: there-fore glorify God in your body” (I Cor. 6:19-20). “Then Jesus said to His disciples, ‘If anyone wishes to come after Me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow Me.’” (Matthew 16:24,25). The following are some recommendations for the wise decision for life’s journey. First, we humbly recognize that we are not the “logos” of God (John 1:1). This means all convictions are held by faith and may need to be revised as we mature in faith. Second, we affirm together that the Bible is a faith-ful witness of God’s activity and revelation. Of course, this still leaves us with the command to study the Bible (2 Tim. 2:15). This leads to a third suggestion for affirmation. Let us affirm together that when we assemble together in the name of Christ (and according to His purpose). We can be confident that God is present among us for the pur-pose of discernment. Fourth, let us recognize such an endeavor calls for the wisdom of God. This wisdom is available when we ask in faith (James 1:5-8). Finally, let us display an urgency which manifests that we are about God’s business and not our own. O ne does not have to live very long to know that some days are more dif-ficult than others. These adverse times cause us stress and problems with not only ourselves but also those around us. We all experience adverse times in our life. What Job said is so true, “Man, who is born of woman, is short-lived and full of turmoil” (Job 14:1). What will be our disposition while we are going through such troubled times? How will we deal with these difficult times? What will be our attitude during these adverse times? Will our attitude be like the one the wife of Job had after she had lost her children? Will we “curse God and die” (Job 2:9)? Will we be like the friends of Job and “sympathize” with our neigh-bors? Or, we can take the attitude of Job and Solomon. Job did not sin when he said to his wife, “Shall we indeed accept good from God and not accept adversity” (Job 2:10). Solomon said, “In the day of prosperity be happy, but in the day of adversity consider — God has made the one as well as the other so that man may not dis-cover anything that will be after him” (Ecclesiastes 7:14). These two statements, one by a very godly man and the other by a very wise man, tell us how we should deal with adverse times. We should recognize that having an adverse day is a part of life as much as having an extremely good day. We do not need to let it upset us. We need to be content or emotionally satisfied with the day. Having this type of attitude towards an adverse day is some-thing that we must learn to do. It is not something that will come naturally or easily. It will require hard work. Learning to be content with adversity means that we will acquire an ability to see that “this too will pass.” It means that we have learned that our “adversity” will not last forever. It means that in a “few” days things will be better. Following the directive given by James (1:2) of “consider it all joy, my brethren, when you encounter various trials,” may be a lot harder to do. The obvious question is how does one have “joy” when they “encounter vari-ous trials”? It is all in our attitude. It is not that one will leap up for joy like they would when their favorite sports team has scored a point or won the championship. It is more of an inner joy or peace that you know that you have the knowledge and support to get through adverse times. You can be content with your situation because you understand how adverse times work. You possibly have been there before or you know someone who has been there before. But even if you have not been there before, or personally known someone who has gone through it before, you have the understanding that there is “nothing new under the sun” (consult the book of Ecclesiastes for this popular phrase). Do any of us like going through adverse times? The obvi-ous answer is, no. Do we have to have a negative attitude while we are experiencing such times? No. Can we have contentment and joy during these adverse times? Yes. Having contentment and joy during adverse times makes it easier to deal with such times. Hopefully they will not last long. Q Hugh Sherrill is an ordained minister and Bible teacher at Eastside Baptist Church. Hugh Sherrillems-hugh43@comcast.net BIBLE STUDIES BIBLICAL MEDITATION Carlton McPeakcarlton_mc@msn.com Q Carlton G. McPeak is an evangelist working in the Lake City area. All Scriptural quotations are from the New American Standard Bible, Holman Bible Publishers, unless otherwise noted.

PAGE 7

LAKE CITY REPORTER FAITH & VALUES FRIDAY & SATURDAY, JANUARY 11 & 12, 2013 7A7AReligionW e begin our study by looking at what Paul says in Ephesians 4:27-32. “and do not give the devil a foothold. 28 Anyone who has been stealing must steal no longer, but must work, doing something useful with their own hands, that they may have something to share with those in need. 29 Do not let any unwhole-some talk come out of your mouths, but only what is helpful for building oth-ers up according to their needs, that it may benefit those who listen. 30 And do not grieve the Holy Spirit of God, with whom you were sealed for the day of redemption. 31 Get rid of all bitterness, rage and anger, brawling and slander, along with every form of malice. 32 Be kind and compassionate to one another, forgiving each other, just as in Christ God forgave you” Over the years, my life and teaching on this sub-ject have changed. Recently we were looking through dad’s papers. My wife was helping, and she found an article of dad’s which really changed my thinking. As we get into this series, there are three things I need to mention: 1.) People and life are complex, and when prob-lems come in the form of other people, whether strangers, friends or loved ones… then the answers just are not that simple. 2.) There is a real danger in being too simplistic, when dealing with other people’s problems, which I have not experienced. (I used to think that I had all the answers. Well, over time, I have learned I have more questions than I do answers.) The old adage “You don’t know how I feel!” is true in many cases ‘cause I don’t, so I won’t pretend to neither ‘know it all’ nor to ‘understand all the feelings’. However, I believe when Bible solu-tions are applied, that people can find the healing they are seeking. 3.) Paul and other writers, may seem to be ‘sim-plistic’ in their approach to dealing with people’s problems, but they are not. In the passages above, Paul issues warnings about certain things, and the God inspired corrective actions to take. (Who knows, maybe our solutions do not really need thousands of pages to be written, for us to find an answer. Maybe “our Father (really) knows best!” Paul gives us the reason why certain things, along with bitterness, are danger-ous. He says, “And do not give the devil a foothold.” A “foothold” gives the moun-tain climber something to keep from falling, while moving up the mountain. A “foothold” gives the soldier a place to stand and fight and move forward. To give the devil a foot-hold, means he has been given a place to begin his work, a place which he has captured, and can operate from in order to ‘take the rest’ of the ‘heart and life’. No Christian should want this, and all should want to do everything in their power to avoid it. Prejudice never travels aloneW hen someone is really important to us, we will go to great lengths to be with them, or even just to see them or hear their voice. A young man recently told me about how his girlfriend, who is not a morn-ing person, came out at 7a.m. to cheer him on in a 5K he was running. Going out of her way to be there was a loud and clear statement to him that he is valu-able to her. A Samaritan woman shared a similar experience as Jesus contradicted the cultural norm between the Jews and Samaritans to find her at the well: “So He (Jesus) came to a town in Samaria called Sychar, near the plot of ground Jacob had given to his son Joseph. Jacob’s well was there, and Jesus, tired as He was from His journey, sat down by the well. It was about the sixth hour. When a Samaritan woman came to draw water, Jesus said to her, “Will you give me a drink?” (His dis-ciples had gone into the town to buy food.) The Samaritan woman said to Him, “You are a Jew and I am a Samaritan woman. How can you ask me for a drink?” (For Jews do not associate with Samaritans.) John 4:5-9 As the writer of this gospel, John was inspired by the Holy Spirit to tell us of the prejudice between the Jews and Samaritans that we may see beyond the surface of what is taking place. One thing is cer-tain: The Scriptures do not con-done prejudice in this passage, but simply reflect the condition that was present. Jesus went out of His way to pursue her despite this condition. By definition, the word prejudice means to pre-judge. This happens when we arrive at an opinion of a person or group of people without any input on their part. This being the case, the origins of prejudice can usually be traced to the past. In II Kings 17:21-24, the Old Testament records the Assyrian conquest and resettlement of the nation of Israel by bringing in people from many other countries. This mix-ture of people came to be known as Samaritans and was despised by the Jews, so much so that the typical travel routes involved going the long way around the region of Samaria, avoiding the area at all costs. Prejudice can be a difficult subject to discuss, because it often evokes strong emotions. However, it is unlikely that any of us avoid stopping by the store for fear of bumping into a Samaritan, so this passage can help us look at prejudice a little more objectively. Here are a few truths we can observe: Prejudice is a waste of time and energy. Prejudice may not cause us to travel completely around an entire town, but it will never work for the building up of the kingdom of God. Sadly, we have all witnessed evidence of how it works against it. Prejudice never travels alone; pride and fear are constant com-panions. Consider why prejudice demands isolation. If we get to know someone personally, those pre-judged ideas become harder to justify. Walking with Christ will expose any prejudice in our thinking. In the parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:25-37) Jesus pushed the issue of a Samaritan being the “neighbor” to the Jew. It is God’s desire that none should perish, but that all will have eternal life…prejudice gets in the way by preventing the spread of the gospel to every-one. As we seek to walk with Christ, let’s make sure we only go out of our way to pursue, not avoid, because every heart matters. Blessings, Angie Jan. 11Fish dinnerOur Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5056 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, pre-pares fish dinners every Friday from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The dinner is $6 for two Alaskan pollock filets, corn, baked beans, hush-puppies, cole slaw and tart-er sauce. Jan. 12School fundraiserNew Generation Christian School will have a fundraiser from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. at Bob Evans Restaurant on U.S. 90 West. The restaurant will donate 15 percent of all sales to the school for its building campaign when customers present a Bob Evans/New Gen Community Fundraiser flyer at checkout. To get a flyer, or for more informa-tion, contact any student or staff of New Generation or call (386) 758-4710 or visit the school at www.new generationschool.org.Gospel sing, supperA gospel sing and potluck supper will be held to celebrate Mary Lou Flynn Lasseter’s 75th birthday, beginning at 6 p.m. at Lee Worship Center Church Fellowship Hall, 471 SE Magnolia Drive in Lee. Supper will be at 6 p.m., and the open-mic gospel sing will start at 7. To con-firm attendance or for more information, call Brenda Lasseter McCormick at (850) 869-9976.Gospel sing, bonfireBrush Arbour Church will have a gospel sing, bonfire and marshmallow and wiener roast at 3 p.m. Bring hot dogs or buns or soft drinks. Directions: Take Route 441 north to Cheshire Road, turn right; go to Tripple Run Road, turn left; go to Manattee Place, turn right; church is on the left. For more infor-mation, call the Rev. Pearl Reed at (386) 729-6783.Jan. 13Music concertThe Ball Brothers will perform a free concert at 6 p.m. at Wellborn Baptist Church. The church is on U.S. 90 West between Lake City and Live Oak at the intersection of Lowe Lake Road in Wellborn. A love offering for the group will be received.Jan. 18173rd anniversarySalem Primitive Baptist Church will celebrate its 173rd anniversary and annual meeting beginning at 6:30 p.m., with addition-al services Saturday and Sunday at 10:30 a.m. Guest ministers will be Elder Charles Tyson of Tifton, Ga., Elder Gordon Smith of Jacksonville and others. All descendants of Salem Primitive Baptist Church and those who love the original Baptist doctrines are invited. The church is at 199 SW Salem Church Court, off County Road 250 (Lake Jeffrey Road). For more information, call Pastor Herman W. Griffin at 752-4198.Jan. 19MLK Jr. programThe Columbia County Branch of NAACP will hold its 30th annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. pro-gram at 4 p.m. at Mount Pisgah AME Church, 529 NE Washington St. Judge Julian Collins will be key-note speaker. The NAACP choir, directed by Dr. Tony Buzzella, will perform.Jan. 20Gospel concertGospel music singer Ken Turner and the group Valor III of Statesville, N.C., will perform a free concert at Glad Tiding Assembly at 10:30 A.M. Turner traveled for 25 years as the bass singer with the Blackwood Brothers Quartet and is the recipient of five Grammy and10 Dove awards. A love offering for the group will be received. The church is at 1571 E. Duval St. (U.S. 90) Turner and Valor III can be found on Facebook or at www.valoriii.com. For more information, call (386) 365-1533.Deacon to be honoredChurch of Faith and Deliverance Through Christ, 379 NW Long St., will honor its beloved Deacon Anthony Gomes at 4p.m. Guest speaker will be Minister Clyde Douglas III of Community Revival Center, Lake City.Jan. 24Gospel concertSouthern gospel singer Ivan Parker will give a concert in Suwannee County at 7 p.m. at the Westwood Baptist Church in Live Oak. The concert is a fundraiser for Love INC, the Suwannee County social services agency and food pantry. General admission tickets are $10 and “Artist Circle” tickets are $25. Only 750 tickets will be sold. Parker is per-haps best known as a reg-ular artist at the Gaither Homecoming events, and is featured on most of the Gaither videos. He has been voted favorite male vocalist 12 times and solo-ist of the year nine times. The “Artist’s Circle” tick-ets entitle the holders to meet Parker a half-hour before the concert and reserved seating. Tickets are available by calling the Love INC office at (386) 330-2671 or the Rev. Dr. Everett L. Parker at (386) 754-8524. Tickets can be picked up at the Love INC office in Live Oak or mailed. If not sold out, tickets also will be avail-able at the door beginning an hour before the perfor-mance.Jan. 26Prayer breakfastThe Pastor’s Care Committeeof Antioch Missionary Baptist of Fort White will have a prayer breakfast at 9 a.m. Guest speaker will be the Rev. Ronald Walters of Olivet Missionary Baptist Church of Lake City. Cost is $10 for aduts and $5 for chil-dren 5 and younger. For more information, contact Marilyn Frazier at (386) 318-3441, Allonia Griffin at (386) 497-3062, Francis Legree at (386) 497-1748 or Evangilist Gloria Jackson at (352) 538-0352.Jan. 27Church anniversaryShiloh Missionary Baptist Church will have its 71st anniversary cel-ebration. The speaker for the morning service will be the Rev. Dr. Dwight Pollock. The speaker for the 3 p.m. service will be the Rev. Billy Simon, pastor of Greater Popular Springs MB Church.OngoingSunday school beginsFalling Creek Chapel, 1290 Falling Creek Road in Lake City, has just begun a Sunday school for all ages. It is 9:30 a.m. Sunday mornings. For more infor-mation call (386) 755-0580 or email fallingcreekcha-pel@gmail.com. Winning over bitterness is not easy Jack Exum Jr.jackexumjr@yahoo.com HEART MATTERS Angie Landangieland3@windstream.net Q Heart Matters is a weekly column written by Angie Land, direc tor of the Family Life Ministries of the Lafayette Baptist Association, where she teaches bible studies, leads marriage and family confer ences, and offers biblical counsel ing to individuals, couples and families. Q Jack Exum Jr. Is a freelance writer who lives in Lake City. To find more articles (by Jack Exum Jr. as well as Jack Exum Sr.), Exum books for sale, family pictures, Bible studies, spe cial “For Teens Only” area and more, visit Exum’s new website, www. jackexum.com. SC Episcopalians’breakup has beenlong time coming CHURCH CALENDAR Q To submit your Church Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr@lakecity reporter.com.By BRUCE SMITHAssociated PressCONWAY, S.C. — Beyond the headlines, the story of the Diocese of South Carolina’s split from the national Episcopal church is the story of people like Rebecca Lovelace. For most of her 64 years, she worshipped at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in this quiet farming town and bedroom community about a dozen miles from the high-rise condominiums of Myrtle Beach. That was until about three months ago, when Lovelace and a small group of other parishioners decided they could not go along when their church followed the Diocese of South Carolina in breaking ties with the national church over ordi-nation of gays and other issues. Lovelace told her priests she couldn’t stay: “I really truly felt like there was a death in the family.” Now, her fledgling congregation of about 35 peo-ple known as the Conway Worship Group gathers each Sunday at the chapel at Coastal Carolina University. Usually with a retired priest or one on loan from anoth-er church, they pray, sing, celebrate communion and make plans for the future. The schism has been years in the making, dat-ing to the national church’s consecration of its first openly gay bishop in 2003, which upset conservative Episcopalians. “I think everybody reached a point where they couldn’t go any fur-ther,” said Dan Ennis, one of the organizers of the new congregation and who is dean of the university’s College of Humanities and Fine Arts. “A lot of us saw this coming and a lot of us dreaded it, but now at least we know what to do.” The diocese in eastern South Carolina had 70 congregations with about 29,000 parishioners. It dates to the 1700s and is one of the originals that joined others to form the Episcopal Church. The dispute isn’t over yet, now that the break-away diocese has sued the national church. It is ask-ing a judge to declare that the national church has no right to either the identity of the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina or its prop-erty. “We seek to protect more than $500 million in real property, including churches, rectories and other buildings that South Carolinians built, paid for, maintained and expanded — and in some cases died to protect — without any support from The Episcopal Church,” said the Rev. Jim Lewis, an assistant to Bishop Mark Lawrence. One expert likened the fight to the final days of the Civil War: a lingering skir-mish after years of contro-versy among Episcopalians that will have little effect on the national church. “At Appomattox, Grant and Lee signed the final surrender but there were places where the fighting went on for months. The news didn’t reach Arkansas and Texas the war was over. I think in South Carolina you are seeing something like that,” said Frank Kirkpatrick a professor of religion at Trinity College in Hartford, Conn., and author of “The Episcopal Church in Crisis: How Sex, the Bible and Authority are Dividing the Faithful.” He estimates perhaps 5 percent of Episcopalians nationally may have left the church in recent years because of the theological disputes. ( EDITOR’S NOTE: This is the first of six related columns. The others will be published over the next five weeks.)

PAGE 8

8A LAKE CITY REPORTER STATE FRIDAY & SATURDAY, JANUARY 11 & 12, 20138A NORTH FLORIDA HOME &PATIO SHOW PRESENTED BYROTARY CLUBOF LAKE CITYDOWNTOWN As promised, the Rotary Club of Lake CityDowntown now invites you to join us for the upcoming 2013 North Florida Home & Patio Show. Vendor indoor booths, and Outdoor space set-up, will be on Friday March 1st. 2013 (beginning at 8:00 AM). Please plan to complete your set-up by 4:00 PM on Friday March 1st. Show times are: Saturday 9AM-5PM; Sunday 10 AM4PM. ATTENTION VENDORS trr1PUFOUJBM$VTUPNFSTt'SFF1BSLJOHBOE"ENJUUBODFGPSBMMt"MMnQSPDFFETGPSUIFFWFOUHPCBDLUPDPNNVOJUZ If we receive your check post marked by 1/25/2013, you will receive a FREE 1/8 page ad in the Home Show Program published by Lake City ReporterPlease mail checks and contracts to:5)&305"3:$-6#0'-",&$*5:%08/508/PO Box 2334 Lake City, Florida 32056http://rotarydowntown.com 5IFOVNCFSPGWFOEPSTCZJOEVTUSZHSPVQBSFMJNJUFE %POU%FMBZ4JHO6Q5PEBZ Austin Seay (386) 288-8217 10THANNUAL PRESENTEDBYROTARYCLUBOFLAKECITYDOWNTOWN NORTH FLORIDA HOME &PATIO SHOW P RESENTED B Y R OTARY C LUBOF L AKE C ITY D OWNTOWN AROUND FLORIDAScott defends costs estimate FORT LAUDERDALE — Gov. Rick Scott says he wants to know what the real numbers are when it comes to paying for the federal health care over-haul. Scott told federal officials this week the overhaul could cost state taxpay-ers as much as $26 billion over the next decade even though his budget staff had been cautioned about the estimates. After much pressure, state health offi-cials revised their figures Wednesday, drastically reducing the cost to $3 bil-lion. Critics accused Scott of overstating the figures to support his opposition of so-called “ObamaCare.” But Scott defended his projections Thursday, say-ing he’s trying to figure out the government’s real costs are and what they’re actu-ally going to pay for. Scott said he doesn’t want to expand Medicaid and later stop it due to lack of funds.Boy, 6, killed by hit-and-run driver MIRAMAR — Police say a hit-and-run driver struck and killed a 6-year-old boy who was crossing a road with his uncle after leaving a McDonald’s restaurant. Authorities say the uncle was holding a baby in his arms Wednesday night as he crossed Miramar Parkway with the boy. A car hit the child and the boy was thrown onto the vehicle’s hood. According to police, the driver swerved a couple of times and the child fell off the car and run over. The boy was taken to Memorial Regional Hospital, where he was pronounced dead. The uncle and the baby were not injured. Police were searching for a white sedan with dam-age to the front.Police: Teen shoots self, dies ST. PETERSBURG — Police say a St. Petersburg teen shot himself in the head after telling friends he keeps one round out of the firing chamber to prevent an accidental discharge. According to police 18-year-old Alexander Shaw was sitting on the back patio with friends Wednesday evening when he decided to demonstrate the gun’s safety by holding it to his head and pulling the trigger. But the .38-cali-ber weapon discharged and the teen died at the scene. Shaw’s grandparents and uncle were home at the time. The incident is being investigated by homicide detectives and the medical examiner’s office. Police say Shaw’s father was killed during a home invasion robbery in June.Cattle prod used by robbery TALLAHASSEE — Authorities say they’ve arrested a Panhandle man who unsuccessfully tried to rob a convenience store with a cattle prod. The Leon County Sheriff’s Office reports that 26-year-old Lance Tomberlin was arrested Tuesday and charged with armed robbery and aggra-vated battery. The sheriff’s office reports that Tomberlin went into a store just outside Tallahassee on January 2, produced the cattle prod and demanded money from the clerk. Officials say he shocked the clerk several times before the clerk pulled a handgun. State schools rank 6th nationallyBy BILL KACZORAssociated PressTALLAHASSEE — Florida’s public schools have returned to the top 10 in a national ranking at sixth place due to high marks for coordinating kindergarten through 12th grade education with early learning, post-second-ary education and the state’s workforce. Education Week on Thursday gave Florida an A for transitions and alignment, one of six catego-ries that make up the publication’s annual “Quality Counts” rankings for the 50 states and District of Columbia. Florida’s overall grade went up from C-plus to B-minus. This year’s national average is C-plus. The state had dropped from fifth to 11th last year largely due to weaker student performance and spending cuts. Last year’s decline interrupted a rapid climb from 31st to fifth place in just four years. “We obviously are very proud of the fact that we have made this rapid move up over the last number of years,” said interim Education Commissioner Pam Stewart, who also serves as public schools chancellor. Stewart also criticized the methodology that resulted in Florida’s lower school finance grade of D-plus and predicted its C-minus for student achievement would improve next year. Gov. Rick Scott, business leaders, lawmakers and State Board of Education members also hailed Florida’s ranking as evidence the state’s efforts to set high stan-dards and hold schools account-able for reaching those goals are working. Florida’s improvement in the rankings has coincided with those efforts spearheaded by for-mer Gov. Jeb Bush as well as class size limits that were ordered by voters but opposed by Bush and most other Republican politicians. Education Week updates three of the six categories every year. Florida’s C-minus for student achievement another A for stan-dards assessments and account-ability and a B for the quality of the state’s teaching profession were carried over from 2012. Florida this year improved its grade for transitions and align-ment from B-minus and 14th nationally to A and fourth place. The state’s grades in the other two categories revised this year, though, remain unchanged with a C for chance of success — 34th nationally — and a D-plus for finance — 39th. Florida’s school spending had been in steady decline for several years including a $1.3 billion cut in the 2011-12 budget year, which ended on June 30. Scott, who had sought an even bigger reduction, has since reversed course. Lawmakers approved his request to restore $1 billion to public schools for the cur-rent budget year. “For the upcoming session, we’ll continue working with the Legislature to enhance Florida’s education system,” Scott said in a statement. Florida ranks 49th in the number of students funded at or above the $11,824 national average and 40th in per student funding at $9,572. The dollar figures are adjusted to account for regional cost differ-ences. While the state gets high marks for equity in school spending, another drag on Florida’s finance grade is that it devotes only 3 per-cent of its taxable resources to K-12 education — 42nd nationally. Stewart, though, noted 17.3 percent of Florida’s population was 65 or older in the 2010 census, the highest in the nation. “That statistic alone could explain why Florida might spend a smaller proportion of state taxable revenues on the K-12 age popula-tion than other states do,” Stewart said. She also said Florida squeezes more out of the dollars it does spend on education. “This is in large part a reflection of Florida’s philosophy that what matters most is not how much we spend but how we spend the dol-lars we allocate,” Stewart said. “A high per pupil expenditure does not automatically produce high achieving pupils.” Stewart suggested Education Week take that into account by adding an efficiency index to its finance grading formula. Florida’s C-minus for student achievement was still good enough to rank 12th nationally. The achieve-ment grades are based on previous-ly announced National Assessment of Educational Progress read-ing and math scores, Advanced Placement exams and high school graduation rates for 2008. Associated PressTALLAHASSEE — Florida law-enforcement authorities are closing sev-eral voter fraud investiga-tions, although there are major cases from the 2012 election still pending. The Florida Department of Law Enforcement found no wrongdoing with the registration of 20 people who signed up through the Rock the Vote web-site. Agents interviewed the people and said the information they gave was accurate. Additionally, FDLE has closed one case against a person accused of voting in the states of Florida and Rhode Island due to a lack of evidence that the per-son existed. The case was initiated by a group called True the Vote. FDLE is still investigating alleged fraud involving a company hired by the state’s Republican Party to register voters. Authorities are also looking into fake letters that questioned the citizenship of voters. Five-place jump resumes climb from 31st four years ago.“We obviously are very proud of the fact that we have made this rapid move up over the last number of years.”— Pam Stewart, state education commissioner No voter fraud foundFlorida enhances program for care of disabled childrenBy BILL KACZORAssociated PressTALLAHASSEE — Florida is enhancing its efforts to get severely disabled children out of nursing facilities and back home, though the head of the state agency that oversees their care said Thursday she couldn’t find the conditions that are being criticized by families and federal officials. The accusations come from families of more than a dozen children who have filed a lawsuit and the Department of Justice, which also has threatened to sue the state. Agency for Health Care Administration Secretary Liz Dudek said she has vis-ited the six nursing homes involved and couldn’t find any of the problems that have been alleged. “What I found was way better than I even thought of what I would find,” Dudek said at a news conference to outline the new Enhanced Care Coordination program. “The Department of Justice may be confusing medically complex chil-dren with some other chil-dren that get served in the process,” Dudek later added. “We don’t know for sure because they haven’t told us exactly who they are talking about.” Dudek said her agency has been in constant discussion with Justice Department officials but so far the names of chil-dren who are allegedly being deprived and their locations have not been provided. She also said no parents have stepped for-ward. The new program assigns a medical nurse care coordinator to each child. They coordinator’s duties include monitoring nursing home care and helping parents who want to bring their children home find services they’ll need such private duty nursing, transportation and medical equipment and supplies. Some 200 Florida children are in nursing homes, including 17 foster children. Department of Children and Families Secretary David Wilkins said the number of foster children has dropped from about 30 since officials began inves-tigating the situation. He said the department is try-ing to recruit more foster parents with the medical expertise to take care of children at home so more can be removed from nurs-ing facilities. Removing them from nursing facilities is goal. Q Associated Press

PAGE 9

Lake City Reporter SPORTS Friday & Saturday, January 11 & 12, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B CHEAP SEATS Tim KirbyPhone: (386) 754-0421 tkirby@lakecityreporter.com Story ideas? Contact Tim KirbySports Editor 754-0421 tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 4316 US Highway 90 West Lake City, Florida Please join us for our GRAND R EOPENIN G CELEBRATI O N of Rountree Moore Nissan in a brand new indoor showroom Enjoy Jazz music by Wayne Levy, heavy hors devours and wine January 14, 4-7 p.m. See the all-new 2013 Nissan lineup RSVP to (386) 752-6933 or communications@RountreeMoore.com Monster game for Edwards C olumbia High graduate Sharmayne Edwards is making waves with the Florida State College BlueWave basketball team. Edwards was recently selected as the NJCAA Region 8/FCSAA Womens Basketball Player of the Week. During the two games in the voting period, Edwards averaged 27 points, 5 1 2 rebounds and 1 1 2 steals. Included was a 43-point game in the Mid-Florida Conference opener on Jan. 5 a 90-81 win over Santa Fe College. Edwards was 15-of-31 shooting against the Saints and pulled down nine rebounds. Adding in an 11-point performance against East Georgia State, Edwards shot 38.3 percent from the floor for the week. She was 6 of 22 on 3-pointers and 12 of 12 from the free throw line. Florida State improved to 13-6 overall and is ranked No. 5 in the state in the latest coaches poll. Fort White faced three Class 5A football teams and five players who made the all-state team. Wakulla offensive lineman Chris Griffin was named first team, as was linebacker Kevin James. Offensive lineman Caleb Brown was named to the third team. Rickards defensive lineman Brian Denmark also made third team. Travon Holmes was honorable mention as a utility player. Holmes hurt Fort White the most. He had three receptions for 116 yards including TDs of 70 and six years. Columbia knocks off Lafayette, 60-51, at home. Indians pull even in district play with victory. Tim Kirby is sports editor of the Lake City Reporter JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Fort Whites Rykia Jackson drives down the court during a game earlier this season. Ladies take court By TIM KIRBY tkirby@lakecityreporter.com FORT WHITE Fort White Highs girls basket ball team pulled even in District 5-4A with a 59-24 home win over Interlachen High on Thursday. Facing a Lady Rams team that was winless (0-11, 08), Fort White head coach DeShay Harris mixed up his starting lineup and gave all eight Lady Indians some court time. Fort White had a big height advantage and Cenise Armstrong made it work for her. Armstrong scored 17 points in the first three quarters to lead Fort White. Kasha Cook also dominated under the bas ket, scoring 12 points including eight in the sec ond quarter. Hailey Shook took over down low in the fourth quar ter and scored six points. Tasha Robinson hit dou ble figures with 13 points that included one 3-pointer. Rykia Jackson scored six points and Desma Blake scored five. Interlachen scored the first five points of the sec ond quarter to pull even at 14-14. Fort White finished the quarter with a 17-0 run. Fort White also held the Lady Rams to five points in both the third and fourth quarters. Lauren Hill led Interlachen with 10 points and two 3-pointers. Jayda Perez had a trey among her seven points. Brooklyn Burns also had a 3-point er and scored five points. Brittany Sheridan had a basket. This is seven wins in a row, Harris said. We have two to go to beat the school record. If we beat Santa Fe we are guaranteed the third seed for the district tourna ment. Fort White (11-5, 4-4) hosts Santa Fe High at 6 p.m. Tuesday. The Lady Indians final district game is 6 p.m. Jan. 18 at Williston High. Bradford High is undefeat ed in district play and has nailed down the top seed and will host the district tournament. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter A group of Columbia High defenders go after a loose ball while playing against Lafayette on Thursday. By BRANDON FINLEY bfinley@lakecityreporter.com Columbia Highs Lady Tigers basketball team had a tough time getting in front of Lafayette High at home on Thursday. Once the Lady Tigers gained their first lead at 7-6 with 2:54 remaining in the first quarter, however, there was no looking back for Columbia in a 60-51 win against Lafayette. The Lady Tigers went on to score 15 points in the opening quarter and matched it in the second quarter to pull out to a 30-21 advantage at the half. The only quarter Columbia was outscored in came to start the second half as Lafayette outpaced the Lady Tigers, 17-14, but Columbia still held a 44-38 lead heading into the final quarter. In their first game since the Christmas break, it looked like the Lady Tigers had been playing all along. We had everybody play tonight and it was a total team effort, Columbia head coach David Tompkins said. Im proud of the work theyve put in over the Christmas break and it showed. Were still working hard and even the games we have lost weve been in down to the end. Were just putting together team efforts. Columbia will look for another team effort tonight when the Lady Tigers host Stanton Prep at 7:30 p.m. in a district contest. This is a big game for us as it could determine our seeding in the district tournament, Tompkins said. The Lady Tigers are 5-9 on the year with an 0-3 dis trict mark. Columbia was led by Justice Campbell in the game as the only Lady Tiger in double figures with 11 points in the contest. Lona Wilson had eight points in the game, Stephanie Silva had seven points for the Lady Tigers and Arnereanna Bryant scored six points.

PAGE 10

SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today AUTO RACING 2 a.m. NBCSN — Dakar Rally, stage 7, Calama, Chile to Salta, Argentina (delayed tape) BOXING 9 p.m. ESPN2 — John Molina (24-2-0) vs. Dannie Williams (22-2-0), for vacant NABO lightweight title, at Santa Fe, N.M. GOLF 11 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Volvo Champions, second round, at Durban, South Africa (same-day tape) 7 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Sony Open, second round, at Honolulu MEN’S COLLEGE HOCKEY 7:30 p.m. NBCSN — Union at Princeton 10 p.m. NBCSN — Nebraska-Omaha at Denver NBA BASKETBALL 8 p.m. ESPN — Chicago at New York 10:30 p.m. ESPN — Oklahoma City at L.A. Lakers ——— Saturday AUTO RACING 2 a.m. NBCSN — Dakar Rally, stage 8, Salta to San Miguel de Tucuman, Argentina (delayed tape) GOLF 9 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Volvo Champions, third round, at Durban, South Africa (same-day tape) 7 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Sony Open, third round, at Honolulu MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 11 a.m. ESPN2 — Georgetown at St. John’s Noon ESPN — Duke at NC State 1 p.m. ESPN2 — Tennessee at Alabama 2 p.m. ESPN — North Carolina at Florida State NBCSN — Butler at Dayton 3 p.m. ESPN2 — Oklahoma St. at Oklahoma 4 p.m. NBCSN — Drexel at James Madison 6 p.m. NBCSN — Penn at Princeton 8 p.m. NBCSN — Colorado St. at San Diego State 11 p.m. FSN — Washington at Stanford NBA BASKETBALL 8 p.m. WGN — Phoenix at Chicago NFL FOOTBALL 4:30 p.m. CBS — AFC Divisional Playoff, Baltimore at Denver 8 p.m. FOX — NFC Divisional Playoff, Green Bay at San Francisco PREP BASKETBALL 4 p.m. ESPN — Huntington Prep (W.Va.) vs. Cape Henry (Va.), at Portsmouth, Va. WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 4 p.m. FSN — West Virginia at Kansas St.FOOTBALLNFL postseason Wild-card Playoffs Houston 19, Cincinnati 13Green Bay 24, Minnesota 10Indianapolis at BaltimoreSeattle 24, Washington 14 Divisional Playoffs Saturday Baltimore at Denver, 4:30 p.m. (CBS)Green Bay at San Francisco, 8 p.m. (FOX) Sunday Seattle at Atlanta, 1 p.m. (FOX)Houston at New England, 4:30 p.m. (CBS) Conference Championships Sunday, Jan. 20 AFC, TBA (CBS); NFC, TBA (FOX) Pro Bowl Sunday, Jan. 27 At HonoluluAFC vs. NFC, 7 p.m. (NBC) Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 3 At New OrleansAFC champion vs. NFC champion, 6 p.m. (CBS)Super Bowl odds CURRENT OPENINGTEAM ODDS ODDSDenver 5-2 18-1New England 3-1 5-1San Francisco 5-1 9-1Atlanta 6-1 25-1Green Bay 6-1 6-1Seattle 8-1 50-1Houston 20-1 12-1Baltimore 22-1 15-1 College all-star games Saturday, Jan. 19 RAYCOM College Football All-Star Classic At Montgomery, Ala.Stars vs. Stripes, 3 p.m. (CBSSN) East-West Shrine Classic At St. PetersburgEast vs. West, 4 p.m. (NFLN) Saturday, Jan. 26 Senior Bowl At Mobile, Ala.North vs. South, 4 p.m. (NFLN)BASKETBALLNBA schedule Today’s Games Charlotte at Toronto, 7 p.m.Houston at Boston, 7:30 p.m.Utah at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.Phoenix at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.San Antonio at Memphis, 8 p.m.Minnesota at New Orleans, 8 p.m.Chicago at New York, 8 p.m.Detroit at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.Cleveland at Denver, 9 p.m.Portland at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.Oklahoma City at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m. Saturday’s Games Orlando at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m.Charlotte at Indiana, 7 p.m.Atlanta at Washington, 7 p.m.Utah at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.Houston at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.Phoenix at Chicago, 8 p.m.Memphis at Dallas, 9 p.m.Miami at Sacramento, 10 p.m. AP Top 25 schedule Today’s Game No. 13 Creighton at Missouri State, 8:05 p.m. Saturday’s Games No. 1 Duke at No. 20 N.C. State, Noon No. 3 Louisville vs. South Florida, 4 p.m. No. 4 Arizona at Oregon State, 8 p.m.No. 5 Indiana vs. No. 8 Minnesota, Noon No. 6 Kansas at Texas Tech, 4 p.m.No. 7 Syracuse vs. Villanova, NoonNo. 10 Missouri at Mississippi, 8 p.m.No. 11 Florida at LSU, 4 p.m.No. 12 Illinois at Wisconsin, 2:15 p.m.No. 14 Butler at Dayton, 2 p.m.No. 16 San Diego State vs. Colorado State, 8 p.m. No. 17 Notre Dame vs. UConn, 2 p.m. No. 18 Kansas State at West Virginia, 1:30 p.m. No. 19 Georgetown at St. John’s, 11 a.m. No. 21 Cincinnati at Rutgers, 8 p.m.No. 24 UNLV vs. Air Force, 10 p.m.No. 25 New Mexico vs. Fresno State, 3 p.m. Sunday’s Games No. 2 Michigan at No. 15 Ohio State, 1:30 p.m. No. 22 Michigan State vs. Nebraska, 6 p.m. No. 23 Wichita State at Evansville, 4:35 p.m.Florida 77, Georgia 44 At Gainesville GEORGIA (6-8) Morris 1-5 2-2 4, Djurisic 1-4 3-4 5, Florveus 1-2 0-1 2, Caldwell-Pope 4-10 3-3 11, Mann 1-3 4-6 6, Dixon 2-2 0-0 4, Echols 0-2 0-0 0, V. Williams 2-3 0-0 5, Brantley 0-1 2-2 2, Cannon 2-4 1-1 5. Totals 14-36 15-19 44.FLORIDA (11-2) Prather 5-7 0-0 10, Young 5-5 1-2 11, Boynton 2-8 2-2 7, Rosario 6-10 4-4 19, Wilbekin 3-7 0-0 8, Kurtz 2-2 0-0 5, Ogbueze 0-1 0-0 0, Graham 0-1 0-0 0, Yeguete 0-0 0-0 0, Frazier II 2-3 0-0 6, Walker 0-2 0-0 0, Murphy 4-9 0-0 11. Totals 29-55 7-8 77. Halftime—Florida 28-15. 3-Point Goals—Georgia 1-10 (V. Williams 1-2, Brantley 0-1, Djurisic 0-1, Morris 0-1, Echols 0-2, Caldwell-Pope 0-3), Florida 12-26 (Rosario 3-6, Murphy 3-6, Frazier II 2-2, Wilbekin 2-4, Kurtz 1-1, Boynton 1-7). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Georgia 25 (Morris 4), Florida 26 (Prather 7). Assists—Georgia 4 (Mann 2), Florida 17 (Wilbekin 6). Total Fouls—Georgia 9, Florida 14. A—11,366.Florida St. 65, Maryland 62 At College Park, Md. FLORIDA ST. (10-5) White 7-13 6-7 20, Turpin 0-4 0-0 0, Brandon 0-4 2-2 2, Snaer 5-8 3-4 15, Whisnant II 2-5 0-0 5, Bookert 0-1 2-2 2, Shannon 1-4 0-4 2, Bojanovsky 0-2 0-0 0, Thomas 3-9 1-2 7, Miller 4-10 1-2 12, Ojo 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 22-60 15-23 65.MARYLAND (13-2) Mitchell 2-2 0-0 4, Wells 2-9 1-2 5, Len 5-11 5-7 15, Faust 5-10 0-0 14, Howard 0-3 0-0 0, Aronhalt 1-6 0-0 3, Allen 4-10 3-4 13, Layman 1-4 0-0 3, Padgett 2-4 1-1 5, Cleare 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 22-60 10-14 62. Halftime—Maryland 36-27. 3-Point Goals—Florida St. 6-20 (Miller 3-6, Snaer 2-4, Whisnant II 1-3, Thomas 0-1, Turpin 0-1, Brandon 0-2, White 0-3), Maryland 8-22 (Faust 4-6, Allen 2-4, Layman 1-3, Aronhalt 1-5, Wells 0-1, Howard 0-3). Fouled Out—Len. Rebounds—Florida St. 39 (White 9), Maryland 42 (Len 10). Assists—Florida St. 9 (Snaer 3), Maryland 13 (Aronhalt, Wells 3). Total Fouls—Florida St. 16, Maryland 21. A—14,157.BASEBALLHall of Fame voting 569 votes cast, 427 needed Craig Biggio 388 (68.2%), Jack Morris 385 (67.7%), Jeff Bagwell 339 (59.6%), Mike Piazza 329 (57.8%), Tim Raines 297 (52.2%), Lee Smith 272 (47.8%), Curt Schilling 221 (38.8%), Roger Clemens 214 (37.6%), Barry Bonds 206 (36.2%), Edgar Martinez 204 (35.9%), Alan Trammell 191 (33.6%), Larry Walker 123 (21.6%), Fred McGriff 118 (20.7%), Dale Murphy 106 (18.6%), Mark McGwire 96 (16.9%), Don Mattingly 75 (13.2%), Sammy Sosa 71 (12.5%), Rafael Palmeiro 50 (8.8%). By receiving fewer than 29 votes (less than 5 percent), Bernie Williams 19 (3.3%), Kenny Lofton 18 (3.2%), Sandy Alomar Jr. 16 (2.8%), Julio Franco 6 (1.1%), David Wells 5 (0.9%), Steve Finley 4 (0.7%), Shawn Green 2 (0.4%), Aaron Sele 1 (0.2%), Jeff Cirillo 0, Royce Clayton 0, Jeff Conine 0, Roberto Hernandez 0, Ryan Klesko 0, Jose Mesa 0, Reggie Sanders 0, Mike Stanton 0, Todd Walker 0, Rondell White 0 and Woody Williams 0 are no longer eligible for election by the BBWAA. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, JANUARY 11 & 12, 2013 nrnnrnrnrnnnrnnnn nnnnrn r !nrnnn nnnnnn"#$n nrrnrrnrnnrn nnn%rr"nrnnrn&'n('n)'nnn nr*! nnnn rnrnr+nrnrrnn ,n rnn r-nnn nnn('%n .rr% n-//n nnrn n rr % nrrnrrnr n r n!" (904) 600-0940 BRIEFS ADULT SOFTBALL League sign-up ends today Registration for adult softball winter leagues for women, men and co-ed ends today. There is a coaches meeting at 6 p.m. today at Southside Sports Complex. For details, call Pete Bonilla at 623-6561 or Casandra Wheeler at 365-2168. WOLVES BASKETBALL Breakfast at Richardson CC The Columbia County Recreation Department and Richardson Middle School is sponsoring a pancake breakfast at the Richardson Community Center cafeteria from 7-11:30 a.m. Saturday. The menu will consist of pancakes, Nettles sausage, eggs and orange juice. Tickets are $5 and may be purchased at Richardson Middle School or the Columbia County Recreation Department. All proceeds benefit the boys basketball programs. For details, call Mario Coppock at 754-7095. YOUTH BASEBALL North Florida Outlaws tryouts The North Florida Outlaws 8U travel machine pitch baseball team will have tryouts at 1 p.m. Saturday at the Southside Baseball Complex blue fields. For details, call Tommy Boston at 965-9311 or Drew Law at 965-8447.Lake City Babe Ruth registration Lake City Babe Ruth Baseball has online registration for its spring league at lcccyb.com. For details, call Jessica Langley at 867-1897. CHS TENNIS Lady Tiger tryouts Monday Columbia High’s girls tennis has tryouts at 3:30 p.m. Monday at the CHS tennis courts. All interested girls must have completed paperwork. For details, call coach Tabatha McMahon at 755-8103. CHS FOOTBALL Football banquet on Thursday The Columbia County Quarterback Club is hosting its annual football banquet at 6:30 p.m. Thursday at the school cafeteria. The keynote speaker will be Larry Vettel, host of the Larry Vettel show on ESPN 850/900. Tickets are $12 in advance or $15 at the door. Advanced tickets are at Hunter Printing. Players should see Ms. Sweat at CHS for their tickets. For details, call club president Allen Masters at 292-0725. YOUTH SOFTBALL Spring sign-up is under way The Girls Softball Associaton of Columbia County has registration open for its spring softball season for girls ages 4-17. Sign-up is at Brian’s Sports or Impact Zone. Cost is $55 for a single player and $75 for siblings. Registration deadline is Feb. 1, but a $10 savings is offered for players who sign up before Friday. For details, call 755-4271. PREP SPORTS Deadline for non-traditionals Non-traditional students must declare their intention to try out for public school sports. The deadlines to declare for baseball and Classes 3A -4A track and field is Monday. Students must register at the school in the zone where they live. For details, call John Wilson at (352) 317-5865. ADULT BASKETBALL Charity games moved to Feb. 2 Richardson Community Center/Annie Mattox North, Inc., has their third annual charity basketball games at the Lake City Middle School gym on Feb. 2. The games feature adult women and men teams — Live Oak vs. Lake City. Game times are 6 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Admission is $5, with all proceeds going to the USSSA youth basketball program. For details, call Nicole Smith at 754-7095. BOYS CLUB Registration for basketball league The Boys Club of Columbia County is taking registration for its basketball program. Three leagues are offered. Cost is $45. For details, call the club at 752-4184.Q From staff reports Jaguars fire Mularkey after team’s worst season By MARK LONGAssociated PressJACKSONVILLE — The Jacksonville Jaguars fired coach Mike Mularkey on Thursday after just one sea-son, the worst in franchise history. New general manager David Caldwell made the announcement two days after he was hired, giving him a clean slate heading into 2013. Caldwell said he wants to immediately explore every avenue pos-sible to turn the Jaguars around. “For that to happen as seamlessly as we want, and as quickly as our fans deserve, I feel it is in everyone’s best interests for an immediate and clean restart,” Caldwell said. Mularkey, who went 214 this season, became the eighth head coach fired since the end of the regular season. He looked like he would be one and done when owner Shad Khan parted ways with general manager Gene Smith last week and gave Mularkey’s assistants permission to seek other jobs. Even though Khan ultimately hired Mularkey, Smith directed the coach-ing search last January that started and ended with the former Atlanta Falcons offensive coordinator. “Mike Mularkey is leaving our organization with my utmost respect,” Khan said. “Mike gave the Jaguars everything he had on and off the field, and his efforts as our head coach will always be appreciated.” Mularkey’s brief tenure — he didn’t even last a year — was filled with mistakes. His biggest one may have been his loyalty to Smith, who assembled a roster that lacked talent on both sides of the ball. Mularkey probably stuck with Smith’s franchise quar-terback, Blaine Gabbert, longer than he should have. And the coach’s insistence that the team was closer than outsiders thought and his strong stance that he had the roster to turn things around became comical as the losses mounted. The Jaguars lost eight games by at least 16 points, a stag-gering number of lopsid-ed losses in a parity-filled league. Mularkey would have been better served had he said publicly what he voiced privately: that the Jaguars didn’t have enough playmakers or a starting-caliber quarterback. Instead, he never conceded that Jacksonville was a rebuilding project that needed time. Mularkey signed a three-year contract on Jan. 11, 2012, getting a second chance to be a head coach six years after resigning with the Buffalo Bills. Cristobal returning to Miami ASSOCIATED PRESSThis Dec. 23 file photo shows Jacksonville Jaguars head coach Mike Mularkey yelling for his team to spike the b all to stop the clock during the final seconds against the New England Patriots in Jacksonville. The Jaguars have fired Mularkey after one season, the worst in franchise history. By TIM REYNOLDSAssociated PressCORAL GABLES — Mario Cristobal is returning to the Miami Hurricanes. The school said that Cristobal was hired on Thursday as the Hurricanes’ associate head coach and tight ends coach. It’s Cristobal’s fourth stint at Miami: He played for two national-championship teams there between 1988 and 1992, was a graduate assistant from 1998 through 2000 and then returned as an assistant coach from 2004 through 2006. Cristobal spent the past six seasons as the head coach at Florida International, which fired him last month after two bowl appearances. Rainey cut after arrest By WILL GRAVESAssociated PressPITTSBURGH — The Pittsburgh Steelers have cut rookie running back Chris Rainey following his arrest on a battery charge in Florida. Gainesville (Fla.) police officers charged Rainey with a single count of mis-demeanor simple battery following an incident with his girlfriend. Police say in a news release that Rainey was arguing with his girl-friend over his cellphone. His girlfriend got into a vehicle and the former Florida Gator tried to pull her out. Witnesses told detectives that Rainey slapped his girlfriend across the face and then chased her when she ran away with his phone in her purse. Rainey’s agent, Joel Segal, didn’t return a phone call for comment. Steelers general manager Kevin Colbert called Rainey’s actions “extreme-ly disappointing.” The Steelers selected Rainey in the fifth round of the 2012 NFL Draft.

PAGE 11

LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, JANUARY 11 & 12, 2013 3B FRIDAY EVENING JANUARY 11, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Last Man StandingMalibu Country (N) Shark Tank (N) (DVS) (:01) 20/20 News at 11Jimmy Kimmel Live 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) omg! Insider 5-PBS 5 -Journal Nightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Washington WeekNeed to Know (N) The Barnes Collection -PBS ArtsMind of a ChefMind of a ChefBBC World NewsTavis Smiley 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge Judy Two and Half MenUndercover Boss (N) CSI: NY “Civilized Lies” (N) Blue Bloods “Front Page News” (N) Friday Night BlitzLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneNikita Alex begins to unravel. Arrow “Year’s End” TMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ce The Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family Guy Family Guy The SimpsonsKitchen Nightmares “Mama Maria’s” Fringe “The Boy Must Live” (N) NewsAction News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) 1600 Penn 1600 Penn Dateline NBC A nursing student disappears from work. (N) NewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(2:00) Politics & Public Policy Today Politics & Public Policy Today Politics & Public Policy Today WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304Andy Grif th Show(:24) M*A*S*HM*A*S*H M*A*S*H The Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Police Women of Cincinnati Police Women of Cincinnati Police Women of Cincinnati Police Women of Cincinnati Police Women of Cincinnati Police Women of Cincinnati A&E 19 118 265Parking WarsParking WarsDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyStorage WarsStorage Wars(:01) Storage Wars(:31) Storage Wars HALL 20 185 312The Brady BunchThe Brady BunchThe Brady BunchThe Brady Bunch“The Seven Year Hitch” (2012) Natalie Hall, Darin Brooks, Ryan Doom. Frasier Frasier Frasier “IQ” Frasier “Dr. Nora” FX 22 136 248Two and Half MenTwo and Half Men “The Other Guys” (2010, Comedy) Will Ferrell, Mark Wahlberg, Eva Mendes. “The Other Guys” (2010, Comedy) Will Ferrell, Mark Wahlberg, Eva Mendes. CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245The Mentalist “Red Queen” The Mentalist “Bloodstream” “Inglourious Basterds” (2009, War) Brad Pitt, Mlanie Laurent. Soldiers seek Nazi scalps in German-occupied France. (DVS) Edge of Darkness NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBob “Rugrats in Paris: The Movie” (2000, Adventure) SpongeBobSee Dad RunFull House The Nanny The Nanny Friends (:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241(5:58) Gangland The Zetas of Phoenix. (6:59) Gangland “Blood in the Streets” “The Shawshank Redemption” (1994, Drama) Tim Robbins. An innocent man goes to a Maine penitentiary for life in 1947. Rounders MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*H M*A*S*H Monk Natalie helps a thief steal a bike. Monk Monk befriends an older woman. Seinfeld Frasier The Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Good Luck CharlieJessie A.N.T. Farm Jessie A.N.T. Farm (N) Jessie (N) Phineas and FerbGravity Falls Dog With a BlogGood Luck CharlieJessie A.N.T. Farm LIFE 32 108 252Hoarders “Doug & Ruth” Hoarders “Judy; Jerry” Hoarders “Billy Bob; Jean” Hoarders “Roy; Loretta” Teen Trouble “Lexi” (N) (:01) Teen Trouble “Asmara” USA 33 105 242Law & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims Unit “The 40-Year-Old Virgin” (2005) Steve Carell. Three co-workers unite to help their buddy get a sex life. “Dan in Real Life” (2007) BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live Hit music and a live audience; Bow Wow. (N) One Mic StandOne Mic StandOne Mic Stand “All About the Benjamins” (2002, Action) Ice Cube, Mike Epps, Eva Mendes. ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) NBA Countdownd NBA Basketball Chicago Bulls at New York Knicks. From Madison Square Garden in New York. (N)d NBA Basketball: Thunder at Lakers ESPN2 36 144 209SportsNation (N) NFL Kickoff (N) (Live) s Boxing Friday Night Fights. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SUNSP 37 Tennis Champions Series: Boston. Sampras vs. McEnroe. Bolts Bash ’13Boxing From Oct. 24, 2009. TaylorMade: Outside the RopesMountain DISCV 38 182 278Gold Rush Dave pushes his crew. Gold Rush “Up Smith Creek” Gold Rush (N) Gold Rush “Dozer Wars” (N) Bering Sea Gold (N) Gold Rush “Dozer Wars” TBS 39 139 247King of QueensSeinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Better WorseBetter WorseBetter WorseBetter Worse “Norbit” (2007, Comedy) Eddie Murphy, Thandie Newton. HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace MysteriesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesNancy Grace Mysteries FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236Love You, Mean ItThe SoupE! News (N) Sex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CityE! SpecialFashion Police (N) Chelsea LatelyE! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernGhost Adventures “Pico House Hotel” Ghost Adventures “Home Sweet Hell” Ghost Adventures (N) The Dead Files “Death Sentence” The Dead Files HGTV 47 112 229HGTV Dream Home 2013 Hunters Int’lHunters Int’lMotor HomesMotor HomesRetro Roadhomes: RV’s Gone CrazyHouse Hunters (N) Hunters Int’lHunters Int’lHunters Int’l TLC 48 183 280Say Yes, DressSay Yes, DressRandy KnowsRandy KnowsSay Yes, DressSay Yes, DressSay Yes, DressSay Yes, DressRandy KnowsRandy KnowsSay Yes, DressSay Y es, Dress HIST 49 120 269Modern Marvels “Tiny Weapons” American Pickers “Frank’s Big Shot” American Pickers American Pickers “Sturgis or Bust” American Pickers “Mike’s Holy Grail” (:02) American Pickers ANPL 50 184 282Monsters Inside Me Infested! An invasion of cockroaches. Infested! “Midnight Terror” Infested! “Surrounded” (N) Fatal Attractions “Tigers Unleashed!” Infested! “Surrounded” FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveRestaurant: Impossible “Meglio’s” Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveMystery Diners (N) Mystery DinersDiners, DriveDiners, Drive TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the Lord Sid Roth It’s SuThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesHal LindseyThe HarvestPerry StonePraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -Game TimeHalls of FameWorld Poker Tour: Season 10 Boxing Golden Boy: Daniel Ponce De Len vs. Eduardo Lazcano. (Taped) Sports UnlimitedBlading Cup 2012 SYFY 58 122 244(5:30) “The Mist” (2007, Horror) Thomas Jane, Marcia Gay Harden. WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) Merlin “Arthur’s Bane” (N) Being Human Sally’s mother returns. AMC 60 130 254(4:30) “The Patriot” (2000, War) Mel Gibson, Heath Ledger. “The Fugitive” (1993, Suspense) Harrison Ford. An innocent man must evade the law as he pursues a killer. “True Lies” (1994, Action) COM 62 107 249(5:55) South Park(:26) Tosh.0 The Colbert ReportDaily Show(7:57) Tosh.0 (:28) Tosh.0 (8:58) Jeff Dunham: Spark of Insanity Gabriel Iglesias: Hot and Fluffy Kevin Hart: Grown CMT 63 166 327Reba Reba Reba Reba Reba Reba Ron White’s Comedy Salute to the Troops 2011 Ron White’s Comedy Salute to the Troops 2012 NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer “Hounds From Hell” Great Migrations “Born to Move” Expl.: National Geographic at 125Untamed Americas “Forests” Untamed Americas “Mountains” Expl.: National Geographic at 125 NGC 109 186 276America Before Columbus The country before Europeans arrived. Expl.: National Geographic at 125Titanic: The Final Word With James Cameron Expl.: National Geographic at 125 SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeUnearthing Ancient Secrets Unearthing Ancient Secrets Unearthing Ancient Secrets Unearthing Ancient Secrets (N) Unearthing Ancient Secrets ID 111 192 285Deadly Women “Killer Kids” Deadly Women “Parents Peril” Deadly Women “Death Bene ts” Pretty Bad Girls (N) Pretty Bad Girls (N)Deadly Women “Bury the Boyfriend” Deadly Women “Death Bene ts” HBO 302 300 501(5:45) “The New World” (2005, Historical Drama) Colin Farrell. ‘PG-13’ “Safe House” (2012, Action) Denzel Washington, Ryan Reynolds. ‘R’ “Transit” (2012) Jim Caviezel. Premiere. ‘R’ Rise of Apes MAX 320 310 515(:05) “Horrible Bosses” (2011, Comedy) Jason Bateman. ‘NR’ (7:50) “Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows” (2011) ‘PG-13’ Banshee “Pilot” (Series Premiere) (N) (:05) Banshee “Pilot” SHOW 340 318 545Three Musk. “Our Idiot Brother” (2011) Paul Rudd. ‘R’ “The Iron Lady” (2011, Biography) Meryl Streep. Premiere. ‘PG-13’ Billy Gardell Presents Road Dogs (N)s Boxing ShoBox: The New Generation. SATURDAY EVENING JANUARY 12, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Tonight (N) 20/20 Miss America hopefuls prepare. The 2013 Miss America Competition Women vie for the crown. (N) (Live) News at 11Crook & Chase 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsBeauty30 Rock 30 Rock Rules/EngagementRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryNewsInside EditionChann 4 NewsFirst Baptist 5-PBS 5 -The Lawrence Welk Show Show tunes. Andy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th Show “Bedazzled” (1967, Comedy) Peter Cook, Dudley Moore, Eleanor Bron. Austin City Limits “Rodrigo y Gabriela” Live From the Artists Den “Adele” 7-CBS 7 47 47e NFL Football AFC Divisional Playoff -Baltimore Ravens at Denver Broncos. (N) CSI: Crime Scene InvestigationCriminal Minds “The Fallen” 48 Hours (N) Action Sports 360Two and Half Men 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneDaryl’s HouseLike, LoveThe Crook and Chase Show (N) YourJax MusicJacksonvilleI Know JaxLocal Haunts 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?The First FamilyMr. Box Of ceFOX NFL Pregamee NFL Football NFC Divisional Playoff -Green Bay Packers at San Francisco 49ers. (N Subject to Blackout) Action News JaxAction Sports 360 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneNBC Nightly NewsThe Biggest Loser Adults and teens try to lose weight. Deception “Pilot” NewsSat. Night Live CSPAN 14 210 350Washington This CommunicatorsWashington This Week WGN-A 16 239 307Law & Order: Criminal Intent Funny VideosBulls Eye d NBA Basketball Phoenix Suns at Chicago Bulls. From the United Center in Chicago. (N) WGN News at NineBones A body is found in a crater. TVLAND 17 106 304The Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279The Will: Family Secrets RevealedThe Will: Family Secrets RevealedThe Will: Family Secrets RevealedStaten Island LawStaten Island LawSix Little McGhees The Will: Family Secrets Revealed A&E 19 118 265Storage-TexasStorage-TexasStorage WarsStorage-TexasStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage: NYStorag e: NYStorage: NYStorage: NY HALL 20 185 312(5:00) “Backyard Wedding” (2010) “I Married Who?” (2012, Romance-Comedy) Kellie Martin, Ethan Erickson. “The Nearlyweds” (2013) Danielle Panabaker, Naomi Judd. Premiere. “The Nearlyweds” (2013) FX 22 136 248(5:00) “Star Trek” (2009, Science Fiction) Chris Pine, Zachary Quinto. “Iron Man” (2008) Robert Downey Jr., Terrence Howard. A billionaire dons an armored suit to ght criminals. “Tooth Fairy” (2010) Ashley Judd CNN 24 200 202The Situation RoomCNN Newsroom (N) The Coming StormPiers Morgan TonightPiers Morgan TonightThe Coming Storm TNT 25 138 245(5:30) “Inglourious Basterds” (2009) Brad Pitt. Soldiers seek Nazi scalps in German-occupied France. (DVS) “The Bourne Identity” (2002, Suspense) Matt Damon, Franka Potente. (:15) “The Bourne Identity” (2002) NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobVictorious (N) Marvin Marvin (N) Supah NinjasSupah NinjasThe Nanny The Nanny Friends (:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241(4:30) “The Shawshank Redemption” (1994, Drama) Tim Robbins. “Scarface” (1983, Crime Drama) Al Pacino, Michelle Pfeiffer. A Cuban immigrant ghts to the top of Miami’s drug trade. From Paris MY-TV 29 32 -Hogan’s HeroesHogan’s HeroesBatmanBatmanLost in Space “The Space Creature” Star Trek “Whom Gods Destroy” “Island of Lost Souls” (2007) Lucas Munk Billing, Nicolaj Kopernikus. DISN 31 172 290Austin & Ally A.N.T. Farm Jessie Jessie A.N.T. FarmJessieShake It Up!Dog With a BlogA.N.T. Farm A.N.T. Farm A.N.T. Farm Austin & Ally LIFE 32 108 252(5:30) “Orphan” (2009, Horror) Vera Farmiga, Peter Sarsgaard. “In the Dark” (2013, Suspense) Elizabeth Rohm, Sam Page. Premiere. “An Amish Murder” (2013, Mystery) Neve Campbell, Christian Campbell. USA 33 105 242NCIS “Jeopardy” NCIS “Smoked” NCIS Reopened investigation. NCIS “Obsession” NCIS Tony searches for answers. CSI: Crime Scene Investigation BET 34 124 329 “All About the Benjamins” (2002, Action) Ice Cube, Mike Epps, Eva Mendes. “Love & Basketball” (2000, Romance) Sanaa Lathan, Omar Epps, Alfre Woodard. “Not Easily Broken” (2009) ESPN 35 140 206(5:30) The Fab Five SportsCenter (N) 30 for 30 30 for 30 SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209Strongest ManStrongest ManStrongest ManStrongest ManStrongest ManStrongest ManStrongest ManStrongest ManStrongest ManStrongest ManWorld’s Strongest Man Competition (N) SUNSP 37 -d College Basketball Vanderbilt at Arkansas. (N) Inside the HeatInside the HeatInside the HEATBolts Bash ’13 College Basketball Boston College at Wake Forest. DISCV 38 182 278Bering Sea Gold Amish Ma a “Fire From the Lord” Amish Ma a Secret MMA barn ght. Amish Ma a “Fall From Grace” Amish Ma a “Holy War” Amish Ma a “Fall From Grace” TBS 39 139 247King of QueensKing of QueensKing of QueensKing of QueensBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryWedding Band “Personal Universe” (N) Cougar TownWedding Band HLN 40 202 204Mystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesNancy Grace Mysteries FNC 41 205 360America’s News Headquarters (N) FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Justice With Judge Jeanine (N) Geraldo at Large Journal EditorialFOX News Watch E! 45 114 236 “She’s Out of My League” (2010) Jay Baruchel, Alice Eve, T.J. Miller. “I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry” (2007, Comedy) Adam Sandler, Kevin James. Fashion PoliceChelsea Lately TRAVEL 46 196 277Meatloaf Paradise Big Beef Paradise Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures “Tooele Hospital” Ghost Adventures “Tor House” HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lHouse Hunters Renovation Love It or List It “Olmstead” Love It or List It “The O’Hara Family” House HuntersHunters Int’lHouse HuntersHunters Int’l TLC 48 183 28020/20 on TLC 48 Hours: Hard Evidence 48 Hours: Hard Evidence 48 Hours: Hard Evidence (N) 48 Hours: Hard Evidence (N) 48 Hours: Hard Evidence HIST 49 120 269Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars (:31) Pawn Stars(:02) Pawn Stars(:32) Pawn Stars ANPL 50 184 282Pit Bulls and Parolees “Boiling Point” Too Cute! “Fuzzy Polar Puppies” Too Cute! “Super Fluffy Puppies” Pit Boss “Shorty’s Master Plan” (N) Pit Bulls and Parolees “Buried Alive” Pit Boss “Shorty’s Master Plan” FOOD 51 110 231Rachael vs. Guy Celebrity Cook-OffDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveIron Chef America “Flay vs. Pham” TBN 52 260 372TenGods At WarGaither: Precious MemoriesIn Touch With Dr. Charles StanleyHour of Power Billy Graham Classic CrusadesNot a FanTravel the Road FSN-FL 56 -Magic Live! (Live) Inside the MagicInside the MagicHalls of Famed College Basketball Missouri at Mississippi. (N) The Game 365Halls of Famed College Basketball SYFY 58 122 244(5:00) “The Terror Beneath” (2011) “Metal Tornado” (2011) Greg Evigan, Lou Diamond Phillips. Premiere. “Super Cyclone” (2012, Action) Nicholas Turturro, Ming-Na. Premiere. “Ice Twisters” (2009) AMC 60 130 254(5:30) “Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome” (1985) Mel Gibson. “Starship Troopers” (1997) Casper Van Dien. Premiere. Young troops battle a vicious army of gigantic insects. “Starship Troopers” (1997) COM 62 107 249Gabriel Iglesias: Hot and Fluffy (:01) Jeff Dunham: Spark of Insanity (:33) “Of ce Space” (1999) Ron Livingston, Jennifer Aniston. (:35) “Dumb & Dumber” (1994) Jim Carrey. CMT 63 166 327(5:30) “Pure Country” (1992, Drama) George Strait, Lesley Ann Warren, Isabel Glasser. “Deliverance” (1972) Jon Voight. An Appalachian canoe trip turns bad for four businessmen. “Pure Country” (1992) NGWILD 108 190 283Ultimate SharkDog Whisperer “Hounded By Fear” The Incredible Dr. PolThe Incredible Dr. Pol “Gallop Pol” (N) Cesar Millan’s Leader of the Pack (N) Dog Whisperer “Hounded By Fear” NGC 109 186 276Wild Justice “Hike From Hell” Alaska State TroopersAlaska State TroopersDoomsday PreppersDoomsday PreppersBachelors Abroad (N) SCIENCE 110 193 284(5:12) Fringe Fringe Olivia dreams about a suicide. (:40) Fringe “Midnight” Mutilated bodies are discovered. (8:50) Fringe “The Road Not Taken” Fringe David Robert Jones returns. Fringe A deadly mystery is uncovered. ID 111 192 285Nightmare Next Door Nightmare Next Door Deadly Women “Sins of the Sister” Deadly Sins “Addicted to Darkness” Fatal Vows “The Edge of Love” (N) Deadly Women “Sins of the Sister” HBO 302 300 501 “Unknown” (2011, Suspense) Liam Neeson, Diane Kruger. ‘PG-13’ “American Reunion” (2012, Comedy) Jason Biggs. Premiere. ‘R’ “Green Lantern” (2011, Action) Ryan Reynolds, Blake Lively. ‘PG-13’ MAX 320 310 515(4:50) I, Robot (:45) “Cowboys & Aliens” (2011, Science Fiction) Daniel Craig, Harrison Ford. ‘NR’ Banshee “Pilot” “Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows” (2011) Robert Downey Jr. SHOW 340 318 545(5:55) “The Twilight Saga: Eclipse” (2010) Kristen Stewart. ‘PG-13’ “The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 1” (2011) Kristen Stewart. ‘PG-13’ Strikeforce: Marquardt vs. Saf edine (N) Patriots to repeat rompBy BARRY WILNERAssociated PressBill Belichick insists the rematch of a December game with the Texans will be different. Not too much different, of course, because he fully expects his Patriots to win the divisional-round playoff game and advance to the AFC title match. As for another 42-14 outcome, New England’s coach is having none of it. “The plays will match up differently and I’m sure there will be new plays that weren’t in that game,” Belichick said. “I don’t think you can overanalyze that game. We’re playing a team, we have our team, they have their team and it’s a big picture thing.” The big picture is that the AFC East champion Patriots (12-4) come off their playoff bye as 9 12 -point favorites against the AFC South winners. Houston (13-4) beat Cincinnati 19-13 in the wild-card round, not looking particu-larly overwhelming. It’s pretty simple what the Texans must do at the outset Sunday: stay close. They fell behind so quickly on Dec. 10 that the outcome was decided after one quarter. “We know that our effort and how we performed last time wouldn’t give us a chance against anybody on the road,” coach Gary Kubiak said. “It’s about right now refocusing on all the things we have to do to go down there and have a chance to be successful, and I’m sure that’s what they’re thinking about.” It won’t be as bad as 42-14, but ...Best bet: Patriots, 41-14Green Bay (plus 3) at San FranciscoThe Packers have no fear about going on the road in the postseason. A similar crew to this year’s group won three away games two years ago, then beat Pittsburgh in the Super Bowl. And the NFC North champion Packers who the West-winning 49ers face Saturday night have gotten healthier as the playoffs approached. They have a decent running game to go with that deep receiving corps Aaron Rodgers throws to. But Green Bay has two significant questions: —Can the spotty offensive line neutralize one of the NFL’s most dangerous pass rushes, something it couldn’t do in the season opener? —Can a defense that has been gorged on the ground at times slow down the league’s fourth-best rushing attack, led by Frank Gore. The Niners also have some uncertainties, notably how second-year QB Colin Kaepernick will handle the playoff pres-sure for the first time. They do have a sec-ondary that matches up well with Green Bay’s receivers. The Pack has been through this before and succeeded. Why not again? Upset special: Packers, 30-27Baltimore (plus 9 12 ) at DenverFor the Ray Lewis Tribute Tour to keep rolling, the Ravens must beat Peyton Manning and the NFL’s hottest team, the AFC West champion Broncos. In the Mile High City. It’s a lot more imposing a task than the AFC North champ Ravens faced at home against the Colts. “There’s probably an element that we’ll carry forward because you’re always building on what you are,” coach John Harbaugh said. “Hopefully we take all the things that happened and we take it into that game emotionally and carry it with us. But this is a new game. It’s a whole new environment. It’s a whole new situation for us. So I think the slate is wiped clean in that sense. This will be a new challenge for us.” Too big a challenge.BRONCOS, 27-20Seattle (plus 3) at AtlantaSeattle has become the fashionable choice, the outsider that could emulate the Giants of last season, the Packers of the previous year, and so on. The Falcons, meanwhile, have been stamped by many as the shaky favorite because of an 0-3 postseason record under Mike Smith. There’s also the feeling that no team fears going into the Georgia Dome, and with the Seahawks having erased their road woes in the last month or so, they are a formidable foe. Still, these Falcons are better than the previous three playoff editions, and they have the big, physical and versatile receiv-ers to deal with Seattle’s big, physical and versatile secondary. Like the other NFC game, this will be close. FALCONS, 22-20 ——— 2012 RECORD : Against spread: 2-2 (114-126-7). Straight up: 3-1 (162-93-1) Best Bet : 8-8-2 against spread, 12-6 straight up. Upset special : 11-7 against spread, 9-9 straight up.

PAGE 12

4B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & PUZZLES FRIDAY & SATURDAY, JANUARY 11-12, 2013 DEAR ABBY: I used to be close friends with “Colette.” We were so close that I asked her to be a bridesmaid in my April wedding. Over the last several years of our friendship, Colette became selfish and domineering. It didn’t bother me so much before, because I felt her positive qualities outweighed the negative. However, after several recent incidents, I finally told her I was upset. She offered a cop-out response, and we have not communicated since then. That was a month ago. How do I let her know that I want to withdraw my request for her to be a bridesmaid? I don’t want to hurt her feelings, but my wedding will be a small, private affair, and her presence would be pain-ful and disruptive to me and another bridesmaid who recently had a similar experience with her. Colette may not be burning with desire to come anyway, given our falling out, and hasn’t yet incurred any of the expenses or spent any of the time and effort associated with being a bridesmaid. I don’t want to act unkindly, even though I don’t plan on rekindling the friendship. -NEEDS PERSPECTIVE IN KANSAS DEAR NEEDS: Tell Colette politely that your plans have changed and that you have decided to “scale back” the wedding; therefore your wedding party will be smaller and you won’t need her after all. It’s euphemistic enough that it could be taken to mean that financ-es have dictated your decision, which would be face-saving for her. If she feels as you suspect she does, she may be relieved to be let off the hook. And if not, well -you don’t plan on con-tinuing your friendship with her in any case. Do not make the conversation anything but polite and brief. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: My moth-er had to be placed in a nursing home a year and a half ago. It has been a dif-ficult time in our lives. She had two small, adorable dogs that kept her compa-ny for many years. I have kept them at her home and provide daily care and love to them. I tried to find them a loving home, to no avail. I can’t bring them to my home because I’m allergic to dogs. They’re accus-tomed to being indoors, and the elderly one can’t stand the extreme heat in our area. My problem is my brother. He knows I need a good home for Mom’s dogs, but he went out and BOUGHT another dog for his family. I was hurt and angry when he told me, but tried not to show it. I’m bitter about it because Mom’s pets still need a home. I’m finding it hard to speak to my brother now. I have never had a mean bone in my body or felt this way before, but I don’t understand how he could do this. Am I wrong to feel this way? I respect your opinion, so could you advise me? -DOGGONE IT! DEAR DOGGONE IT!: Your feelings are under-standable. However, before you let them degenerate into lasting antipathy, have a frank talk with your brother. Tell him your feel-ings and find out why he didn’t volunteer to take in your mother’s dogs. There is nothing to be gained by stewing in silence, and he may have had a reason. You might have better luck finding a home for your mother’s dogs if you contact no-kill shelters and rescue groups in your area. The dogs might be ideal companions for another senior if they are loving and housebroken. Most shelters offer a “senior for senior” discount where qualified senior citizens can adopt a senior companion animal, usually seven years old or older, with all fees waived. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: I am in high school and have always been able to get whatever guy I wanted. My reputation at school is sort of “loose and easy.” I haven’t had sex in eight months because I met a sweet, amazing guy who I want to marry. He’s a virgin, and I think he thinks I’m one, too. He doesn’t go to my school, so he doesn’t know about my old reputation. Should I let him keep thinking I’m still innocent? I feel like a worthless used rag. When I’m with him, I am worth something -I’m the whole world to him. I want it to stay like that. But I know that by not telling him, I’m lying. He doesn’t deserve that -and I feel I don’t deserve him. Please help. -NEW “ME” IN ARIZONA DEAR NEW YOU: Before I answer your question, there are some things I would like you to understand. First, you ARE “worth something” wheth-er you are with this boy or not. It is dangerous to judge yourself through the eyes of another person. It is far more important that you can look at yourself in a mirror and know you are a good person because you try every day to do what is moral and right. Practice that, and no one will ever again make you feel like a used rag. You are still in high school, and that’s early to be thinking about mar-riage. I’m advising you to tell this boy the truth because if you don’t, there is a good chance that even-tually he will hear it from someone else. If he drops you because of it, it will not be because you don’t deserve him, but because he doesn’t deserve you. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: I’m wondering if you can help me. I have been friendly with couples, and when an argument arises I have been caught in the middle. Sometimes I have felt forced to take sides. Then what happened was, they wound up mending fences and repeating to the other what I said dur-ing their split. It has put me in an awkward posi-tion when we’re together. How should I handle this in the future? -TORN IN DALLAS DEAR TORN: In the future, when your friends have a spat with a spouse or significant other and start to dump on you, politely decline to listen. Say, “If you have a com-plaint about ( ), you should work it out with him/her because I’m not comfortable hearing this.” Either that, or do a lot of listening and comment, “Oh, that must be painful.” Period. That way you’re saying nothing you won’t later regret. The exception would be if you were told about an abusive relationship, in which case you should recommend a domestic-violence hotline. ** ** ***DEAR ABBY: My husband of 30 years is easily startled. If I enter a room without a warning, he reacts as though he is in danger. He yells, “Don’t do that, or you’ll give me a heart attack!” Since our retirements, this has become an issue. I don’t understand his reaction -he wasn’t in the military, didn’t have a dan-gerous job and hasn’t been in a disaster. He doesn’t think he has a problem. Your thoughts? -WIFE OF A JUMPY HUBBY DEAR WIFE: Has your husband always been this way, or is this new behav-ior? If it’s new behavior, it should be discussed with his doctor. He may suf-fer from a hearing loss or some other problem. And because he finds being “surprised” upsetting, try to accommodate him and not take it personally. HOROSCOPES DEAR ABBY ARIES (March 21April 19): Wisdom will be required when dealing with superiors or those in a position to influence your future. Listen carefully before you make a motion to quit or to do or say something you may regret. Take care of your health and your finances. ++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Relax and enjoy doing the things that make you happy. Getting together with friends or traveling to a destination that is conducive to your peace of mind should be on your agenda. Love is in the stars. +++++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Focus on getting your finances in order. Deals can be made and dollars saved if you invest wisely. A serious approach to the way you spend and the amount of work you are willing to do will deter-mine your financial future. Assess your situation real-istically. +++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): There will be plenty to balance in both your home and professional dealings. Share your concerns and your plans for the future and you will get the feed-back required to make the best decision. Impulsive action must be avoided. +++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You will dazzle the people you meet with your showmanship, but when it comes to getting the opportunity to move ahead, only hard work will win you the right of passage. Talk is cheap. Actions will lead to victory. +++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Put greater effort into your image, looks and the way you present what you have to offer. You can mesmerize others if you polish and fine-tune your skills and talents. A little romance should be planned for late in the day. +++++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Don’t share your thoughts or make a move you think will attract atten-tion or trouble. Problems at home will escalate if you are insensitive to what someone is experiencing. Keep an open mind but don’t display your true feelings just yet. ++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Share thoughts, travel to visit someone you enjoy spending time with, or make plans to get involved in a community event. It’s best to get out and interact with other creative people who can inspire your imagination. Love is on the rise. ++++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): A lot will depend on how much you have learnt from your past mistakes. Honesty and integrity will weigh heavy when it comes to opening discussions with people looking for a reason to make accusations. Focus on home, family and posi-tive change. +++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Emotions will surface and must be dealt with diplomatically in order to avoid an argu-ment with someone you need to get along with. Don’t let impulsivity take over even if you do feel threatened by what some-one does. Hold your posi-tion with dignity. +++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): There will be plenty of hidden matters to deal with. Confinement or restriction is apparent if you take a risk. Keep your dealings above board and stick to the game plan you agreed on to avoid being blamed or criticized. +++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Share your thoughts in an open forum or par-ticipate in a function that allows you to use your skills and expertise while dealing with people likely to need your help in the future. Love is highlighted and better times are ahead. ++++ THE LAST WORD Eugenia Last Perplexed bride ponders how to let bridesmaid gently go Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com Puzzle Solutions on the next page.

PAGE 13

FRIDAY & SATURDAY, JANUARY 11-12, 2013 PUZZLES & COMICS LAKE CITY REPORTER 5B DILBERT BABY BLUES BLONDIE BEETLE BAILEY B.C. FRANK & ERNEST FOR BETTER OR WORSE ZITS HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH GARFIELD CELEBRITY CIPHER CLASSIC PEANUTS PUZZLE ANSWERS

PAGE 14

6B LAKE CITY REPORTER NASCAR FRIDAY & SATURDAY, JANUARY 11 & 12, 2013 The new year ushered in some significant shuffling in NASCAR’s Nationwide Series. JR Motorsports announced that it had signed Great Clips to a 28-race sponsorship deal for the2013 season,and along with the deal comesdrivers Kasey Kahne and Brad Sweet. They’ll join Regan Smith at the team coowned by Dale Earnhardt Jr. Great Clips also will sponsor Kahne’s No.5 Chevrolet on the Cup circuit for three races thisseason. The changes mean that JR Motorsports will have one team,the No.7,with Smith hoping torun the full schedule,another,the No.5,withKahne and Sweet that will run at least 27races,and a third for Earnhardt Jr.,who plansto run at least four races in a car numbered 88,to match his Cup ride. Earnhardt is scheduled to run the Nationwide races at Daytona on Feb.23 and at Las Vegason March 9,with the remainder of his scheduleyet to be announced. Sweet is the only newcomer in the group.He’s raced open-wheel cars in the United States AutoClub and joined Kasey Kahne’s team in 2007.Since then he’s won seven major events,includ-ing the Belleville Midget Nationals,KnoxvilleMidget Nationals and Four Crown Nationals atEldora Speedway. “I’m looking forward to this new opportunity with JR Motorsports and to continue represent-ing Great Clips,both on and off the track,”Sweet said in a team release.“They have beenextremely supportive of me over the last couple of years,so taking this step with them is veryspecial for me.As a young driver in this sport,having the chance to drive under the JRMotorsports banner is an amazing opportunity that I plan to make the most of.” Turner Motorsports,which had Great Clips as a sponsor for the past two seasons,also was inthe news last week.Reports indicate thatDanica Patrick,who raced in Nationwide for JRMotorsports last year,will run 10 races forTurner in 2013. Turner also announced that its driver James Buescher will return to the Camping WorldTruck Series to defend his 2012 title while alsorunning a limited Nationwide schedule. There also have been changes behind the scenes at Turner as Harry Scott Jr.,longtimeminority owner of the team,will join SteveTurner as a co-owner.The new team will becalled Turner Scott Motorsports.A team releaseindicates that Scott will be in charge of market-ing,public relations and business developmentefforts while Turner will manage the competi-tion side of the business. Travis Pastrana,a champion of rally racing and motocross as well as a multiple X Gamesgold medalist,announced that he’ll race full-time in the Nationwide Series this season. He’ll drive Roush Fenway Racing’s No.60 Ford,with veteran crew chief Chad Norris ashis crew chief. “I am very serious about making this move, running competitively and ultimately winningraces in NASCAR,”Pastrana said in a teamrelease. Pastrana ran nine Nationwide races last year, including one for Roush,and had a best finish of13th at Indianapolis Motor Speedway. NOTEBOOK Paralyzed driver to drive againShane Hmiel,who turned to USAC openwheel racing after being suspended fromNASCAR for failing drug tests,nearly lost hislife and was paralyzed in a crash at TerraHaute,Ind.,in 2010. But later this month,he’s expected to get back behind the wheel of a race car. Officials from Rockingham Speedway say Hmiel,who won a Camping World Truck Seriesrace at Las Vegas in 2004,will drive a speciallyequipped car built by Accessible Racing,a com-pany that works to create therapeutic experi-ences for disabled Veterans and civilians.Racing loses two former drivers Two former race drivers passed recently.David “Salt”Walther,best known for suffering major injuries in a spectacular,fiery crashat the start of the 1973 Indianapolis 500,diedDec.27 at the age of 65. The Dayton,Ohio native ran four races in the series now known as Sprint Cup from 1975-77with a best finish of 12th in the 1976 Daytona500. Roz Howard from Milledgeville,Ga.,died on Jan.1,his birthday,at the age of 91.Howardwas a regular competitor at tracks across theSouth from the 1940s through 1960,until ahighway accident ended his racing career.Hewon the MARC (now ARCA) Southern Late-Model Points championship title in 1957 andalso ran in six Cup races with a best finish ofseventh at Columbia Speedway,the popularSouth Carolina dirt track.Festival to feature classic‘shineNASCAR fans can get a taste,so to speak,of the sport’s past during NASCAR AccelerationWeekend in Charlotte Feb.8-10. A ticket to the fan festival includes the opportunity to visit Junior Johnson’s Midnight MoonShine and Bar at the NASCAR Hall of Fame. The event,on Saturday,Feb.9,will feature a fan question and answer session with Johnson,a Hall of Fame driver and car owner and one-time moonshiner,plus a free tasting at theMidnight Moon moonshine bar. Midnight Moon’s brews are based on Johnson’s family recipes.The whiskey is madein single batches and is available in traditionalmoonshine flavors. Johnson spent a year in federal prison in the 1950s after being caught with an illegal liquorstill,but in 1986,President Ronald Reagangranted him a presidential pardon. Tickets,$20 each,are available now at www.nascaracceleration.com and the NASCARHall of Fame box office. Also that weekend,the 2013 NASCAR Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony will be held at theCharlotte Convention Center on Friday night.This year’s inductees are Buck Baker,CottonOwens,Herb Thomas,Rusty Wallace andLeonard Wood. Tickets for that event start at $45. NUMERICALLYSPEAKING Most wins in a season forNASCAR Hall of Fame inductee Buck Baker (in 1956,theyear he won the first of his two Cuptitles) Most wins in a season as adriver for Hall of Fame inductee Cotton Owens (in 1961,ayear in which he only started 17races) Seasons in which Hall ofFame inductee Herb Thomas finished first or second in the Cuppoints standings (he ran just onefull season,in 1953,and won 12races and the championship) Car owners for which Hall ofFame inductee Rusty Wallace won Cup races (37 for RogerPenske and 18 – plus the 1989title – for Raymond Beadle)4 14 2 5 By RICK MINTER / Universal Uclick By RICK MINTER / Universal Uclick It’s back to work for Sprint Cup drivers and teams as the annual preseason test ses-sion at Daytona International Speedway willbe held Jan.10-12. Some years,the Preseason Thunder sessions offer marginal rewards for teams anddrivers as the cars they test are littlechanged from the ones they raced the previ-ous season. But this year is different because the Cup circuit will be running significantly changedrace cars.The cars not only look different,they’ve been changed mechanically as well. This year’s Daytona test takes on added significance for both the teams and NASCARitself,as none of the sport’s major playerswant problems with the cars to put adamper on the sport’s biggest race,the sea-son-opening Daytona 500 on Feb.24. The look of the new 2013 models already has gotten good reviews from fans and driv-ers.All the time the Cup drivers were run-ning the Car of Tomorrow,which made itsdebut in 2007,many fans complained thatthe cars looked the same no matter whichmanufacturer they represented. That’s not an issue with the 2013 models, as Fords,Chevrolets and Toyotas all bear agreat resemblance to the street versions ofthe cars. Other changes made in an effort to be more fanand sponsor-friendly include: – The driver’s last name featured on the windshield. – No sponsor decals on the headlights and taillights so that key areas for distinguishingone manufacturer from the next won’t beobscured,and car numbers will be movedfrom the lights to the bumpers front andrear. – Sponsor decals will be permitted to extend past the front edge of the b-post,andthe size of the car numbers will be reducedby 10 percent,and other smaller sponsordecals will be smaller as well since the caritself is slightly smaller. But those changes won’t affect the speed and handling of the cars.It’s the mechanicalchanges that will be on the minds of driversand mechanics at the Daytona test. Former driver Darrell Waltrip,who will cover the test for the SPEED network,toldreporters recently that he expects someserious work once the track opens for test-ing. He said teams likely will begin by taking last year’s chassis setups and applying themto the new car. “They have to find out if there are things from the old car that will work on this one,”Waltrip said.“You go through the process ofelimination of things you’ve done in the pastto make your car good at Daytona … “Teams will go through a number of verifications on the car to see what it likes anddoesn’t like … The crew chiefs and engineersmay discover things about the car that theydidn’t know before and something that justmight make some of the unknowns a littleeasier to navigate.” And while some in the sport have expressed concerns about the increasedspeeds shown by the new car in test sessionslast year,Waltrip isn’t looking for a reductionof speed at Daytona. “Maybe some of the mile-and-a-half track races would be better if the car was slower,but at Daytona,Talladega,California andMichigan,I want to see them go fast,”hesaid.“Those tracks were designed for thecars to go 200 miles per hour or more.Talladega and Daytona were built so thecars could run more than 200.So,when I goto the superspeedways,I want to see super-fast speeds. “When I go to some of the intermediate and smaller tracks,I could buy into somesort of reduction in horsepower to slow thecars down.” In the past,when speeds at Daytona and Talladega topped 200 mph in test sessions,NASCAR made changes to lower the speedback below the 200 barrier,to speeds thathave historically been slow enough to keepcars from become airborne in crashes. Waltrip said he hopes the 200-mph barrier is not an issue,as he believes too muchspeed reduction at Daytona and Talladega,the two giant speedways on the circuit,makes for a less-exciting race. “Are we going to let them run over 200 miles per hour or are we going to see a reac-tion where they slow the cars down to thepoint the racing won’t be as good at those bigtracks?”he said.“We need those fast speedsat Daytona and Talladega to put on a goodshow.” Another unknown as NASCAR moves away from having all cars essentially alike iswhether one manufacturer will wind up witha distinct aerodynamic advantage.Muchtesting has been done in an attempt to keepthat from happening,but no one will knowfor sure until the cars are actually in compe-tition. “There are no guarantees these cars will be equal,”Waltrip said.“When you look atthe variances in the bodies this year com-pared to what they’ve been in the past,onemanufacturer could wind up with a hugeadvantage at Daytona,and that’s somethingNASCAR will be keeping an eye on.” There also has been considerable debate over which drivers will benefit from thechange to the 2013 cars,which have moredownforce than the Cars of Tomorrow they’rereplacing. Many drivers,who had much success in the conventional cars run prior to 2007,oftenstruggled with the COT and its relative lackof downforce.Those drivers should be morecompetitive more often in the new car. Dale Earnhardt Jr.said he’s among those looking forward to more downforce. “I like it already leaps and bounds beyond the COT or the old car we ran,”Earnhardtsaid after a test session at Charlotte MotorSpeedway late last year.“This car reallygives me a lot of sensations that are similarto the old car that we ran four years ago …” Earnhardt won 17 Cup races prior to the introduction of the COT and two since,so it’sunderstandable that he’d like a car thatbehaves like the pre-2007 cars. “Those were some pretty good race cars back then,”he said.“The car really drivesdown in the corner,turns in the corner andturns off in the corner good.I really don’tmiss all the stuff we were moving around inthe back of these cars last year,I don’t missany of that stuff … “This was awesome for me personally.I kind of like going in the corner with the cargoing straight,like it’s supposed to.I’menjoying this.” The 2012 Preseason Thunder.This year,the annual tes ting session at Daytona International Speedway will involve significantly redesigned cars,seen below from testi ng last November.(NASCAR photos)Rolling ‘Thunder’New year brings new drivers, teams and sponsors Brad Sweet signs autographs for fans before qualifying for the Nationwide Series STP 300 at Chicagoland Speedw ay on July 22,2012.(NASCAR photo) Junior Johnson at the NASCAR Hall of Fame in 2011. (NASCAR photo) New cars to bemain focus at preseason test

PAGE 15

FRIDAY& SATURDAY, JANUARY11 & 12, 2013 CLASSIFIEDLAKE CITYREPORTER 7B Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 ServicesWhite's Trucking Services You call & We Haul! Fill Dirt, Lime Rock. AsphaltMillings, Granite, Road Rock.386-362-8763 LegalPublic Auction to be held FEBRUARY16, 2013 at 8AM at Ozzie’s Towing & Auto, LLC 2492 SE Baya Ave. Lake City FL, 32025.(386)719-5608Following Vin Number:2002 CHRYSLERVin# 1C4GJ25372B6523111995 CHRYSLERVin# 1C3EJ56HXSN53165105536746JANUARY11, 2012 REGISTRATION OFFICTITIOUS NAMESWethe undersigned, being duly sworn, do hereby declare under oath that the names of all persons interest-ed in the business or profession carried on under the name of UPHOLSTERYMASTERS, 1524 N.W. MAIN BLVD, LAKE CITY, FLORIDA32055.Contact Phone Number: (386)288-6133 or 365-1528 and the extent of the interest of each, is as follows:Name: ALBERTM. JOHNSONExtent of Interest: 100%by:/s/ ALBERTM. JOHNSONSTATE OF FLORIDACOUNTYOF COLUMBIASworn to and subscribed before me this 9TH day of JANUARY, A.D. 2013.By:/s/ KATHLEEN A. RIOTTO05536751JANUARY11, 2012 NOTICE OFPUBLIC HEARINGSCONCERNING SPECIALEXCEP-TIONS AS PROVIDED FOR IN THE COLUMBIACOUNTYLAND DEVELOPMENTREGULATIONSBYTHE BOARD OF ADJUST-MENTOF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN that, pursuant to the Colum-bia County Land Development Reg-ulations as amended, hereinafter re-ferred to as the Land Development Regulations, comments, objections and recommendations concerning the special exceptions, as described be-low, will be heard by the Board of Adjustment of Columbia County, Florida, at public hearings on Janu-ary 24, 2013 at 7:00 p.m., or as soon thereafter as the matters can be heard, in the School Board Adminis-trative Complex located at 372 West Duval Street, Lake City, Florida.Application SE 0522 was previously noticed for a public hearing on No-vember 30, 2012.(1)SE 0522, a petition by Louis Thomas Spell, as agent for Eva E. Harrison, to request a special excep-tion be granted as provided for in Section 4.5.7 of the Land Develop-ment Regulations to allow for heavy equipment and related machinery sales, and automotive repair and re-pair of agricultural equipment within an AGRICULTURAL3 (A-3) zon-ing district and in accordance with a site plan dated November 15, 2012, and submitted as part of a petition dated November 15, 2012, to be lo-cated on property described, as fol-lows:Aparcel of land lying within Sec-tions 30 and 31, Township 4 South, Range 17 East, Columbia County, Florida.Being more particularly de-scribed, as follows: Commence at the Southwest corner of the Southeast 1/4 of said Section 30, said corner al-so being the Point of Beginning; thence North 0011'51" East, along the West line of said Southwest 1/4 of Section 30, a distance of 1,598.78 feet to the Southwesterly right-of-way line of Interstate 75 (State Road 93); thence South 2604’17” East, along said Southwesterly right-of-way line of Interstate 75 (State Road 93) a distance of 2,476.03 feet; thence North 8134’08” West 602.55 feet; thence North 8455’38” West508.63 feet to the East right-of-way line of Southwest Wester Drive; thence North 0317’48” East, along said East right-of-way line of South-west Wester Drive, 427.63 feet to the North right-of-way line of said Southwest Wester Drive; thence North 8847’17” West, along said North right-of-way line of Southwest Wester Drive, 19.99 feet to the said West line of the Southeast 1/4 of Section 30; thence North 0352’16” East, along said West line of the Southeast 1/4 of Section 30, a dis-tance of 64.79 feet to the Point of Beginning.Containing 26.07 acres, more or less. (2)SE 0523, a petition by Bryan M. Rucker and Linda G. Rucker, to re-quest a special exception be granted as provided for in Section 4.5.7 of the Land Development Regulations to allow gunsmithing and sale of firearms as a home occupation with-in an AGRICULTURAL-3 (A-3) zoning district and in accordance Legalwith a site plan submitted as part of a petition dated December 5, 2012, to be located on property described, as follows:Aparcel of land lying within Section 22, Township 5 South, Range 17 East, Columbia County, Florida. Be-ing more particularly described, as follows: Commence at the Northwest corner of the Southwest 1/4 of said Section 22, said corner also being the Point of Beginning; thence East, along the North line of the Southwest 1/4 of said Section 22, a distance of 1,336.60 feet; thence South 0033'40" West 844.44 feet; thence West, parallel to the North line of the Southwest 1/4 of said Section 22 a distance of 1,337.99 feet; thence North 0039'30" East 817.45 feet to the Point of Beginning.Containing 25.00 acres, more or less. The public hearings may be contin-ued to one or more future dates.Any interested party shall be advised that the date, time and place of any con-tinuation of the public hearings shall be announced during the public hear-ings and that no further notice con-cerning the matters will be publish-ed.At the aforementioned public hear-ings, all interested parties may ap-pear to be heard with respect to the special exceptions.Copies of the special exceptions are available for public inspection at the Office of the County Planner, Coun-ty Administrative Offices, 135 Northeast Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida, during regular business hours.All persons are advised that if they decide to appeal any decision made at the above referenced public hear-ings, they will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such pur-pose, they may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the tes-timony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons need-ing a special accommodation or an interpreter to participate in the pro-ceeding should contact Lisa K. B. Roberts, at least seven (7) days prior to the date of the hearing.Ms. Rob-erts may be contacted by telephone at (386)758-1005 or by Telecommu-nication Device for Deaf at (386)758-2139.05536711January 11, 2013 020Lost & Found Found Nintendo 3D In vicinity of Troy St & Elementary School. Need to Provide Birth date & Serial I.D. Info. 243-8135 Found on Ichetucknee Rd Small female short hair brown dog, No collar. Very Sweet, Sweet, Sweet. Contact 984-6796 100Job Opportunities05536728Retail Sales Associate at Camping World, Lake City High School education or equivalent Previous Retail experience preferred Ability to established strong product knowledge and sell to customers. Superior customer service skills and excellent communication skills both written and verbal Must maintain a professional demeanor and work ethic Available to start immediately. Apply in person. 05536752T eachers Join our team of over 100 professional teachers! Want to make a difference in the lives of children? Infant/T oddler Positions: 12 Mo Ft Teacher (Jennings) And 12 MO PTTeacher (Jasper) Child Development Associate (CDA) or equivalent credential (FCCPC or ECPC) required Three years experience with birth to 3 preferred. High School Diploma/ GED Required. Must be able to pass DCF background screenings. Excellent Benefits, Paid Holidays, Sick/Annual Leave, Health/Dental Insurance, and more. Apply at 236 SW Columbia Ave, Lake City, FLor send resume to: employment@sv4cs.or g Fax (386) 754-2220 or Call 754-2225 EOE Auto Mechanic Wanted. Call to make an Appointment. 965-6343 100Job OpportunitiesConstruction Salesman Needed. Excellent Pay. Experience Required. 866-959-7663 Farm workers planting, maintenance, harvest of fruits and vegs; from mid March – mid Dec. 3 months experience required. There will be work for at least 3/4 of work period. Tools provided.For workers whose permanent residence is out of area: housing provided; and subsistence and transportation expenses to the worksite paid no later than upon completion of 50% of the work contract. Job openings for 8 temporary workers in central Maryland. $10.34/hr. Employer: Lynn Moore, 2415 Woodbine Rd., Woodbine, MD 21797, phone 410-489-7034. Apply for this job at the nearest Maryland Department of Labor Office, 410-290-2601, using job number MD 264531. Housekeeping positions @ Camp Kulaqua Please call Jacalyn @ 386-454-7960 LaborerPosition Must be able to read Tape Measurer Apply in person Grizzly Mfg. 174 NE Cortez Terrace Lake City FL32055 Mechanic needed with tools and experience. Southern Specialize Truck & Trailer. 386-752-9754 Must have a minimum of 5 yrs Exp. selling HVAC Equipment. Excellent benefits &Great pay. Call Allen 386-628-1093 Real Estate Co. looking for Office Staff Computer knowledge required. Real Estate Exp. is a plus! Fax resume to 386-496-4309 Sales Help at Florida Visitors Center. Benefits, hourly wage plus commission. Excellent opportunity with National company. Westgate Resorts. Call Ed 904-540-2314 or email Ed_Newman@wgresorts.com SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 Truck Repair facility Service Writer needed. Computer literate and understanding of truck repair and parts procurement. Southern Special Truck & Trailer 752-9754 120Medical Employment05536623Referral Coordinator/ Checkout Clerk Medical Office is seeking qualified candidate with Good Multi-tasking skills and professionalism. Must have exp. w/Med. Term & Ins. Referrals & Auth. Send resume by Email to jsmith@ccofnf.com. No Calls Please. 05536657RN/LPN 3-11 Shift and PRN Avalon Healthcare Center is currently accepting applications for the part time positions of RN/LPN for 3-11 Shift and PRN Please apply at Avalon Healthcare and Rehabilitation Center. 1270 S.W. Main Blvd. Lake City, Florida 32025 or fax resume to 386-752-8556 EOE Billing Specialist : Complete knowledge of insurance, Follow Up and Follow Thru of Accts Receivable, Billing, Posting and Collection, Sage Software a plus. Fax resume to 758-5628. CMA experience preferred in Peds/ Family Practice. Experience injections & taking accurate vital signs. Excellent communication & documentation, organization & assessment skills. Fax resume to 758-5628 DIET AR Y MANAGER Needed CDM, Chef, LTC, 2 years experience preferred Must be able to manage large staff and oversee daily food preparation for a 180 bed SNF. Full time with excellent benefits. E-mail resume to Greg Roberts: groberts@gulfcoasthealthcare.com or fax to: (386)362-4417. Live Oak, FLEOE/V/D/M/F GREATOPPORTUNITY•Full Time Experienced C.N.A’s All Shifts Apply in person at Suwannee Health Care & Rehab. 1620 Helevenston Street S.E. Live Oak, FL32064 EOE/m/f/d/v 120Medical EmploymentMassage Therapist Needed in a 180 Beds SNF Licensed, 1-2 years Experience preferred. Part-time weekend position. E-mail resume to Greg Roberts: groberts@gulfcoasthealthcare.com or fax to: (386) 362-4417 Live Oak, FLEOE/V/D/M/F 240Schools & Education05536525Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class1/7/2013• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-1/14/13• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies CKC American Bulldog 1 yr old, 110 lbs, spayed and neutered, shots,Free to the right home. 386-935-4473 Free to Good Home 1yr old Med. mix breed Male dog, good w/ children and other dogs, does not do well with cats. Call 752-4481 FREE TO THE RIGHTHOME Small dachshund mix, short hair. Very energetic. 1 yr old Contact 984-6796 PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. Puppy 8 wks old Cream Poodle Health Certificate $350.00 Contact 752-4890 407Computers HPComputer $75.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 408Furniture SOFABED, new decking, springs, and mattress $100. 386-754-1595 414Needlecraft & SewingSERIOUS DEAL For Serious Sewers. Too Much to List. 754-6783 420Wanted to Buy WANTED Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans. $300 & up No title Needed Free Pickup 386-878-9260 After5pm 386752-3648 430Garage Sales Must Sell -Lrg Capacity W/D, Refrig., D/W, Freezer, TV, Roll Top Desk, End Table, & Coffee tables. Contact for more info. 752-1092 PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 440Miscellaneous Baseball & Coin Collection Babe Ruth, Hank Aaron, Mickey Mantle & Many More 386-752-6724 Bill Fitness Center Equipment Treadmills, Ellipticals, Stair Masters & Bikes Cybex, Nautilus & Free Weight Equipment. Tanning Beds, Office Chairs, Desk, Copiers & more. Must sell quick. Call for prices (386)365-2047 or (386)752-1652 Troy-Bilt 5550 Watt Generator, 10HPOHVBriggs & Stratton, $400, 386-754-1595 630Mobile Homes forRent2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $700. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 3 BR/1 BA, close to town, fenced in yard, private well $800 month. & $800 deposit 386-752-7578 & 386-288-8401 3 BR/2 BA, completely refurbished, appliances furnished, $795 month. & $795 deposit 386-752-7578 3BR/2BA DWMH on 2.5 Acres North of Lake City $500 Dep $700 Mth Call 386-623-0232 and leave msg 3Br/2Ba Mod 1/2acre (nice subd) concrete drive, wrap around deck appl's,energysaver, &thermo's ready (386) 984-5341 $800 mo Lots for Rent for your RVor your own Cabin. Between Lake City & G’ville. Access to I-75 & 441 (352)317-1326. Quiet Country Park 3bd/2ba $525, 2bd/1ba $425. Very clean. NO PETS! References & Deposit required 386-758-2280 640Mobile Homes forSale$44,900. 1,600+ sqft, 3/2 DWMH Country setting on 2 acres. Good Condition. Concrete block work shop. David Mincey Poole Realty 386-590-0157 MLS 82068 1958 home. Hardwood and tile flooring, split plan with 2 master suites, formal dining, office. $167,500, Kellie Shirah, Poole Realty 386-208-3847. MLS#81895 2006 16X80 3/2 $25,400 --2007 32x44 3/2 $33,500--BOTH HOMES INCLUDE DELIVERY TOYOUR LAND. Several Repo’s Coming In The Next 10 Days--Call North Pointe Homes For Details. Call 352-872-5566 2013 DOUBLEWIDE $33,995 inc. set-up, trim-out & A/C Call 386-288-8379. 3 DWELLINGS on 5+ aces, main house approx 2453 sqft, 2 story, wrap around porch. $397,000. Anita Handy, 386-208-5877 Poole Realty MLS#82510 3/2 DWMH, Spacious great room, kitchen w/ breakfast nook. Corner lot w/12x24 storage bldg $54,000. Sherrel McCall, 386-208-5244 Poole Realty MLS 82361 3BR/2BA28X64 in a great location, a lot of upgrades, fireplace. Only $2,500 down $399 a month. Call Paula at 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com 5 LIKENew Mobile Homes!!! For under $30,000. MUSTSEE Call John T. 386-752-1452 BANK REPO 3BR/2BADoublewide ’09 Excellent condition. Only $999 down $377 a month. Call Paula 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com Palm HarborHomes 4/2 From 499 Mo Loaded3/2 From 399 Mo Loaded Homes on Your Lot 0 Down 800-622-2832 ext 210 MUSTSEE 2013 2x6 walls, R30 insulation, OSB wrap, house wrap, real wood cabinets, and thermal pain windows. Payment $399 per month call John T386-752-1452. New 2013-28x483/2 JACOBSEN $35,400 Delivered Only. OR $39,995 Delivered and Set up. Big Rooms. North Pointe Homes, 4545 NW13th St., Gainesville, 352-872-5566 Nice Location,Older 3/2 DWMH in need of some repairs. Large covered back porch. $43,600. William Golightly, Poole Realty 386-590-6681 MLS 82213 REDUCED !GREATLOCATION between Live Oak & Lake City. 3/2 DWMH on 1 acre. $35,000. Call Vicki Prickitt. Poole Realty 386-590-1402 MLS 82366 Suwannee River Front Home Very Nice 4br/2ba, fireplace, large deck, $149,800 Owner Broker. 1.8 acres (mol) 386-935-1482 WANTED…CASH PAID for your Mobile Home, Singlewide or Doublewide flood homes welcome. Call 386-288-8379 650Mobile Home & Land2br/2ba on 3.51 ac, 1512 sqft DW perfect Rental, Nice and Clean Large deck, MLS # 82216, $65,000 Results Realty 386-397-3473 Brittany Stoeckert FSBO 5 ac lot w/ 1995 refurb. MH. 66ft long w/ new roof & wheel chair ramp. $5,000 down Owner Fin. on Balance Approx 5 miles N. of LC. 386-752-4597 650Mobile Home & LandNICE 2/2 SWAND 740 sf frame house/studio/outbuilding, country acre 8 mi to VA. $39,000 firm cash only 386.961.9181 OwnerFinanced 3/22.5 ac.River Access. Small down $585 mo 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com Reduced Out of State owner, Anxious to sell. Nice 2br/2ba, 1996 DW, Energy Efficient, 3/4 frnshd, 3 yr old roof, 1/2 ac lot in Oak Wd subdv in Live Oak $38,900 or best resonable offer. Call 309-645-2659 SW2BD/1.5BA, 1 acre, Updated Kitchen. $3,500 down, $350 mth Contact 305-304-4028 705Rooms forRent RV for Rent $450 mth + Security Utilities Included, Avail now. 386-497-3524 or 386-288-9110 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05536760 $89 Deposit Pools, B-ball, gym & more! *FREE afterschool programWindsong Apts386-758-8455 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Amberwood Hills Apts. Private Patio area. Beautiful yard. Washer/dryer hkup. Free water & sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special. 386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com BRANFORD VILLAS 386-935-2319 2br/1ba Apts. Now available.$570. mo. TDD number 1-800-955-8771 Equal Housing Opportunity Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2 mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet Friendly. Pool laundry & balcony. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A$530 month $530 deposit garbage included. No pets. 386-344-2170 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Greentree Townhouse Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free water & sewer. Balcony & patio. Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled 1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living room. $450. mo plus sec. 386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951 Redwine Apartments Pets welcome. with 5 complexes, we have a home for you. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 Wayne ManorApts. Spacious 2bedroom washer/dryer. Behind Kens off Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 www .myflapts.com WindsorArms Apartments. Move in! 2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free 200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent3 bedroom 1 bath $630 mth and $630 deposit. CH/A Contact 377-2170 3/2 in Woodcrest lrg fenced yrd, beautiful neighborhood, 1st, last & deposit, references & credit check. 386-984-6796 3bd/1ba very clean, CH/A, carport, screened back porch, fenced back yard. $700 mth & $700 Deposit. Call 386-344-5065 3bdrm very spacious, 2ba, garage, CH/AFenced in backyard. $1,400 mth & $1,400 dep. Contact 386-344-1914 ForLease ,3Br/2bth DWon ten acres S.of Columbia City.Contact At 727-289-2172 $800.00 mo.$350.00 security. Print Template 375 copy.indd 1 1/10/13 2:09:33 PM

PAGE 16

8B LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY& SATURDAY, JANUARY11 & 12, 2013 2001 Dodge Ram 3500 V10 Magnum, extended cab, SLT, 4 WD, DRW, AT PW, PS, red w/tan interior, 137,000 miles, good condition. $7,900 386-984-6606 or 386-758-6800 2000 Lincoln To wncar Med. blue, leather, power seats & more. 147,400 miles. Excellent condition. $2,990 386-623-2848 Present Sheryl Crow R odney A tkins Eli Young Band R andy Houser L o Cash Cowboys Easton Corbin MORE ARTISTS TO BE ANNOUNCED www. SuwanneeRiverJam .com Tickets Available at M s. Suwannee River Ja m Competition Ultimate Redneck Wedding Hope Notes Auction & So Much More! Advertiser Lake City 730 Unfurnished Home ForRent NICE 3/2 brick home w/garage in quiet neighborhood. 489 SWBrandy. $900 plus sec. dep. 386-438-4600 750 Business & Office Rentals Medical, Retail and Professional Office space on East Baya near Old Country Club Rd. Call 386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622 (cell) 805 Lots forSale Nice 2 acre lot in Timberlake S/D. New Owner will have fishing rights. MLS #79025 Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473 $13,500 Nice vacant lot in Desirable River Community, Priced to sell! MLS #73268 $15,000 Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert397-3473 810 Home forSale Access Realty Gorgeous views 3bd/3ba on Lake Montgomery. Elevator, fishing dock & jacuzzi. MLS 81438 $249,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access RealtySpacious 4 bd/3ba Cypress Lake w/ 3643 sqft 1.25 acres on lake. Vaulted ceilings. MLS 81314 $279,900. Patti Taylor386-623-6896 Access RealtyTw o story 1895 V ictorian house w/ electrical upgrades throughout. double -deck porches, MLS 71594 $149,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Affordable 4/2 on 10 acres in Bell. Home features over 2,200 heated sqft. MLS# 76585, Results Realty $67,500. Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Nice mini farm on 2 Ac. fenced and cross fenced w/water for livestock. 2B/2B. MLS# 82569, Results Realty $44,900. Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 820 Farms & Acreage 4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com Access Realty10 acre square tract, High & Dry, OF Avail. w/ 25% down. Convenient Location MLS 81258$39,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access Realty43.64 acres wooded acreage in N.Columbia County. Scenic & Private. MLS 74429 $89,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Owner financed land 1/2 to 10 acre lots. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 830 Commercial Property Industrial warehouse 7+ acres fenced 17,000 sq ft Barn $1,500 mo. Tom Eagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor 860 Investment Property 2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870 Real Estate W anted I Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 930 Motorcycles 2008 HARLEY Electra Glide, 24,000 miles, Black, Touring Model. Call 619-952-9715 950 Cars forSale 2000 Lincoln Town Car; Med blue, leather, power seats & more. 147,400 miles, Exc condition. $2,990. 386-623-2848 5 a week days Lake City Reporter SOLD IT FAST IN THE CLASSIFIEDS Selling your stuff is simple with a little help from the Lake City Reporter Classifieds. Let our sales team help you place an ad today, in print and online! Call 386-755-5440 or go to www.lakecityreporter.com For You! Call 755-5440 T oday NEED HELP! Let Us Write Y our Classified Ad