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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
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Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:01997

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:01997

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comT he local real estate board hon-ored its members for last year’s achievements and geared up for this year’s business and challenges during a luncheon Wednesday. The Lake City Board of Realtors/North Florida Multiple Listing Services held its annual installation of officers and directors luncheon Wednesday at the Holiday Inn and Suites. More than 60 people attended the event, which featured a brief installation of officers ceremony and an announcement of the 2012 Realtor of the Year, Darrell Hunt. Hunt also won the award in 1986.“Winning the award was a really a surprise,” Hunt said. “We’ve got so many talent-ed and involved people in this organization that winning this award came as a surprise for me.” Hunt reflected on winning the award in today’s economic climate compared to more than 20 years ago. “I think the reason that you win this award is not only your involvement in the real estate industry, but your involvement in the community,” he said. “It’s the things that you do and the boards that you serve on. It’s not just the real estate industry that this award comes from, it comes from your By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comOn what would have been his 30th birthday, the parents of missing Lake City sky-diver Kurt Ruppert Jr. memorialized him Wednesday and acknowledged his passing. Ruppert went missing Thursday, Jan. 3, after jumping from a helicopter in a wing suit over Washington’s Cascade Mountains foothills. Ruppert was taking turns with two other skydivers jumping out of a heli-copter near Mount Si, about 40 miles east of Seattle. More than 350 searchers, many of them volunteers, spent more than 4,000 man-hours looking him. Ruppert’s father, Kurt Ruppert Sr., said the realization hit him Wednesday morning that Kurt Jr. was gone. He shared his thoughts in a Facebook posting, which he gave permission to be reprinted here: “Upon waking this sixth morning after the phone call from North Bend, Wash., I realized that no, this has not been a dream,” he wrote. “As my heart sank and my tears began to wash my eyes, the awful real-ity hit me on the head again. And, no, you won’t get to say ‘happy birthday’ to your Opinion ................ 4APeople.................. 2AObituaries .............. 5A Advice & Comics ......... 3B Puzzles ................. 4B TODAY IN PEOPLE Armstrong, Oprah to talk. COMING FRIDAY Local news roundup. 78 57 Fog early WEATHER, 2A Lake City ReporterTHURSDAY, JANUARY 10, 2013 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | 75¢ LAKECITYREPORTER.COM CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 138, No. 247 1 Family says goodbye to Kurt Jr. Memorializes missing son on what would have been his 30th birthday.COURTESY THE RUPPERT FAMILYKurt Ruppert Jr. is seen wearing his wing suit in freefall in this file photo. Realtor of the Year JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterSandy Kishton, the outgoing 2012 Lake City Board of Realto rs president, hugs Darrell Hunt after announcing Hunt as 2012 Realtor of the Year during the Lake City Board of Realtors/North Florida Multiple Listi ng Service installation luncheon on Wednesday. ‘This co mes as a complete surprise for me,’ Hunt said. KURT JR. continued on 6A LCBR continued on 6A Fire guts homeTONY BRITT/ Lake City ReporterNo one was hurt in this fire that gutted a home on SR 47 Wednesday afternoon. The cause is under investigation. US 90 project under wayHunt takes top honors at LCBR luncheonEconboardplots acourse Goal for 2013 is to bring a $20 million project to Lake City. J ASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterKaren Naylor (right), a resident of the Forest Meadow subdivision, speaks with Laurie Windham, public information officer for the lane-widening project on U.S. 90. By DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comColumbia County Economic Development Advisory Board set a goal Wednesday to bring a project to Columbia County that will invest at least $20 mil-lion and create 20 new jobs. Economic Development Director Jesse Quillen said the main goal for 2013 is to “bring in outside investment and create new jobs.” The board approved the road map for how the organization plans on bringing that outside invest-ment and creating those jobs. Quillen said he thought the goal of a $20 million capital investment project was realistic for the Economic Development Department to accomplish. He said that larger goals were also possible. “I don’t want to get so carried away with it that we can’t find a way to achieve it ...,” Quillen said. “Until we do $20 million, we can’t do $100 mil-lion.” Also, the board decided to move the time of its monthly meetings to 8:30 a.m. on the first Wednesday of the month. The board had previously met on the first Wednesday at 4 p.m. The plan adopted by the Economic Development Advisory Board is essensially the same as the plan from 2012 with a few exceptions, Quillen said at the meeting. Some additions to the 2013 plan were: •Create an advisory committee of local real estate agents to help with market-ing the advantages of existing industrial sites for additional investment. •In addition to an industrial building inventory, a complimentary inventory of office buildings should be established. •Meet with the Lake CityColumbia County Chamber of Commerce board at least twice to focus on education, workforce and local issues that have an impact on business. The next meeting of the Economic Development Advisory Board will be Feb. 6 at 8:30 a.m. Quillen By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comA construction project designed to alleviate traffic congestion on west U.S. 90 by adding additional lanes will impact local traffic for at least 18 months. The project calls for the fourlaning of U.S. 90 from west of Lake City Avenue to Brown Road, approxi-mately 1.3 miles, at an estimated cost of $11.1 million. The project is slated to be completed in summer 2014. ROADWORK continued on 6A

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CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Blues artist Eddy Clearwater is 78. Rock singer-musician Ronnie Hawkins is 78. Baseball Hall-of-Famer Willie McCovey is 75. Movie director Walter Hill is 73. Singer Frank Sinatra Jr. is 69. Singer Rod Stewart is 68. AROUND FLORIDA Scott: eliminate equipment tax JACKSONVILLE Gov. Rick Scott wants to elimi nate Floridas sales tax on equipment and machinery bought by businesses. Scott on Wednesday in Jacksonville said he will ask the Legislature this year to fully exempt such purchases from sales tax. Florida currently offers a sales tax exemption on equipment purchased for industrial use if it expands a manufacturers output by at least 5 percent. The productive out put requirement had been 10 percent, but the Legislature reduced it to 5 percent last year. Scott says the tax puts Florida at a competitive disadvantage with other states that already exempt such equipment. The estimated cost to the state would be $51 mil lion the first year and $115 million annually after that. Scott says the change would encourage business es to expand and create jobs in Florida. AIG insurance customers sought TALLAHASSEE Florida is seeking the rightful owners of $25 mil lion in unclaimed life insur ance benefits obtained through a settlement with American International Group Inc. Chief Financial Officer Jeff Atwater said Wednesday that the 61,271 unclaimed accounts are the first batch of several expected to be turned over by AIG. The settlement is the fifth that Florida has reached with national life insurers. In each case the company failed to use the Social Security Administrations Death Master File to locate life and annuity beneficiaries although many have used the file to stop making annuity payments. Floridas Bureau of Unclaimed Property now will attempt to return the money to owners or heirs. People can search for unclaimed property on the bureaus web page www.FLTreasureHunt. org or by calling 1-888258-2253. Drunk horseman changes plea BUNNELL A man accused of riding his horse while intoxicated during a police chase has changed his plea and was sentenced to time served. The Daytona Beach News-Journal reports 29year-old Charles Larkin Cowart pleaded no contest Tuesday to obstructing an officer without violence and interfering with rail road tracks. He originally pleaded not guilty to the Sept. 24 horseback ride through Bunnell. Circuit Judge David Walsh sentenced Cowart to 90 days in jail and three years of probation. He had been held in the Flagler County Jail on $7,000 bail. Police say Cowart told them he was on his way to his grandmothers house. He refused their request to get off the horse, and took off. Eventually, the horse became exhausted and Cowart ran. He was arrested a short time later. Manatee deaths down in 2012 TALLAHASSEE State researchers credit mild winter temperatures for a decline in manatee deaths last year. A preliminary report issued Tuesday by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission lists 392 manatee deaths for 2012. Thats the few est since 2008, when 337 deaths were confirmed. Oprah to interview Armstrong LOS ANGELES L ance Armstrong has agreed to an interview with Oprah Winfrey and is to address allegations he used perfor mance-enhancing drugs during a career in which he won seven Tour de France titles. According to Winfreys website on Tuesday, this will be a no holdsbarred interview. It will be the first with Armstrong since his cycling career crumbled under the weight of a massive report by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency. The report detailed accusations of drug use by Armstrong and teammates on his U.S. Postal Service teams. Its unclear if the interview at Armstrongs home in Austin, Texas, has already been taped. Nicole Nichols, a spokeswoman for Oprah Winfrey Network & Harpo Studios, declined comment. She said Armstrong has not been paid for his appearance and there are no restric tions on whats discussed. The show will be broadcast Jan. 17 at 9 p.m. EST on OWN and Oprah. com. Bama QBs girlfriend in spotlight after title win TUSCALOOSA, Ala. After ESPN cameras lingered on her, announc ers piled on compliments and at least one pro athlete made an online pass at her, Twitter was still abuzz about former Miss Alabama USA Katherine Webb, who is dating Crimson Tide championship quarterback AJ McCarron. Webb gained tens of thousands of Twitter followers during and after Alabamas 42-14 win over Notre Dame on Monday to claim its third national championship in four sea sons. For her part, the surprised beauty pageant queen isnt taking it too seriously. Its been actually kind of fun, the 23-year-old model and Miss Alabama USA 2012 told The Associated Press. ESPN announcer Brent Musburger remarked that Webb was a beautiful woman as the cam eras revisited her. Wow, Im telling you quarterbacks: You get all the good-looking women, he said. Some found the remarks from the 73-year-old Musburger out of line. On Tuesday, ESPN released this state ment: We always try to capture inter esting storylines and the relationship between an Auburn grad who is Miss Alabama and the current Alabama quarterback certainly met that test. However, we apologize that the com mentary in this instance went too far and Brent understands that. But Webb said Musburgers comments didnt bother her. Family life grounds Matthew McConaughey NEW YORK Actor Matthew McConaughey credits his grow ing family for the success that 2012 brought him. One, they ground you. Two, when you have that kind of structure at home and you feel stable at home it makes it much easier to fly higher and wider when youre outside of home, McConaughey said Monday at the New York Film Critics Circle Awards. The 43-year-old received the best supporting actor honor for Magic Mike and Bernie. He garnered critical success in 2012 for Mud and The Paperboy, both shown in competition at the Cannes Film Festival. Saturday: Afternoon: 1-2-8 Evening: N/A Saturday: Afternoon: 7-4-5-0 Evening: N/A Saturday: 1-17-21-22-28 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAIL Y BRIEFING THURSDAY, JANUARY 10, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 2AWEATHER Daily Scripture Do not store up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moths and vermin destroy, and where thieves break in and steal. But store up for your selves treasures in heaven, where moths and vermin do not destroy, and where thieves do not break in and steal. For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also. Matthew 6:19-21 HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter ASSOCIATED PRESS Disgraced cycling champion Lance Armstrong has agreed to a unrestricted inter view with Oprah Winfrey to be aired Jan. 17. It will be his first public interview since he was stripped of his seven Tour de France titles for using performanceenhancing drugs. Associated Press Associated Press Webb ASSOCIATED PRESS A 2-week-old African elephant calf walks with its mother at the Lowry Park Zoo in Tampa on Tuesday. It was the calfs first exposure to the public since her birth.

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BySTEPHEN OHLEMACHERAssociated PressWASHINGTON — Too intimidated to fill out your tax return without help? Join the club. At nearly 4 million words, the U.S. tax law is so thick and complicated that businesses and indi-viduals spend more than 6 billion hours a year com-plying with filing require-ments, according to a report Wednesday by an independent government watchdog. That’s the equivalent of 3 million people working full-time, year-round. “If tax compliance were an industry, it would be one of the largest in the United States,” says the report by Nina E. Olson, the National Taxpayer Advocate. The days of most taxpayers sitting down with a pencil and a calculator to figure out their taxes are long gone, Olson said. Since 2001, Congress has made almost 5,000 changes to U.S. tax law. That’s an average of more than one a day. As a result, almost 60 percent of filers will pay someone to prepare their tax returns this spring. An additional 30 percent will use commercial software. Without the help, Olson says, most taxpayers would be lost. “On the one hand, taxpayers who honestly seek to comply with the law often make inadvertent errors, causing them to either over-pay their tax or become subject to IRS enforcement action for mistaken under-payments,” Olson said. “On the other hand, sophisti-cated taxpayers often find loopholes that enable them to reduce or eliminate their tax liabilities.” Olson ranks complexity as the most serious tax problem facing taxpayers and the Internal Revenue Service in her annual report to Congress. She urges lawmakers to overhaul the nation’s tax laws, making them simpler, clearer and easier to comply with. Momentum is building in Congress to over-haul the tax code for the first time since 1986. But Washington’s divided gov-ernment has yet to show it can successfully tackle such a task. President Barack Obama and Republican leaders in Congress say they are onboard, though they have rarely seen eye to eye on tax policy. They struggled mightily just to avoid the year-end fiscal cliff, pass-ing a bill that makes rela-tively small changes in the nation’s tax laws. Undaunted, the top tax writer in the House says he is determined to pass reform legislation this year. “This report confirms that the code is 10 times the size of the Bible with none of the good news,” said Rep. Dave Camp, chair-man of the House and Ways and Means Committee. “Our broken tax code has become a nightmare of loopholes and special interest provisions that create added complexities and costs for hardworking taxpayers and small busi-nesses.” “Comprehensive tax reform will make sure everyone is playing by the same rules and help busi-nesses create more jobs and invest in their work-ers,” Camp said. The general formula for tax reform is widely embraced on Capitol Hill: Eliminate or reduce some tax credits, exemptions and deductions and use the additional revenue to pay for lower income tax rates for everyone. There is, however, no consensus on which tax breaks to scale back. That’s because Americans like their cred-its, deductions and exemp-tions — the provisions that make the tax law so com-plicated in the first place. Would workers want to pay taxes on employer-provided health benefits or on con-tributions to their retire-ment plans? How would homeowners feel about los-ing the mortgage interest deduction? Those are the three biggest tax breaks in the tax code, according to congres-sional estimates. Together, they are projected to save taxpayers nearly $450 bil-lion this year. Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION THURSDAY, JANUARY 10, 2013 3A3A Lake City 183 SW Bascom Norris Dr.G’ville E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunter’s Walk 5115 NW 43rd St. Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St. Shands at UF Room H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Alachua 14759 NW 157th Ln. Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E. Silver Springs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. Summer eld 17950 US Hwy. 441 Tallahassee 1511 Killearn Center Blvd.1 Offer only available on 1/1/13-4/15/13 and may no t be combined with any other offer. Credit approval and initial $5 deposit required. APR=Annual Percen tage Rate. There are costs associated with the use of this card. For specific information call 800-367-6440 or write us at P.O. Box 147029, Gain esville, FL 32614. Mention this ad and we’ll waive the $15 new membership fee. 7 98 %BALANCE TRANSFER SPECIAL APR1for the life of the balance transfer when you trans fer a balance from your “bank” credit card to a CAMPUS VISA Platinum Card.CAMPUS CMN VISA Platinum Card No annual fee No balance transfer fee Free design-your-own-cardPlus!OFFER IS FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY! This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration.Apply today at campuscu.com! Taxpayer advocate: Simplify Tax code longer than Bible, with no good news.ASSOCIATED PRESSNational Taxpayer Advocate Nina Olson issued a new report saying, ‘‘The existing tax code makes compliance difficult, requiring taxpayers to devote excessive time to preparing and filing their returns.’ The Associated PressU.S. tax law is filled with so many credits, deductions and exemptions that Americans will be able to reduce their tax bills by about $1.1 trillion this year, according to congressional estimates. The biggest tax breaks, and the amount they will save taxpayers this year: Q Employer contributions toward workers’ medical insurance premiums and medical care are not taxed: $181 billion. Q Retirement plan contributions and earnings are not taxed: $165 billion. Q Mortgage interest deduction: $101 billion. — Lower tax rates on long-term capital gains and qualified dividends: $84 billion. Q Deduction for state and local taxes: $69 billion. Q Deduction for charitable contributions: $46 billion. Q Most Social Security and veterans’ benefits are not taxed: $45 billion. Q Interest on tax-exempt state and local government bonds is not taxed: $26 billion. Q When someone dies, the capital gains on his investments is not taxed: $24 billion. Q Income from some life insurance products is not taxed: $23 billion. Sources: National Taxpayer Advocate; Joint Committee on Taxation. Top tax breaks for individuals Violence plays role in shorter life expectancyBy KEVIN FREKINGAssociated PressWASHINGTON — The United States suffers far more violent deaths than any other wealthy nation, due in part to the widespread posses-sion of firearms and the practice of storing them at home in a place that is often unlocked, accord-ing to a report released Wednesday by two of the nation’s leading health research institutions. Gun violence is just one of many factors contribut-ing to lower U.S. life expec-tancy, but the finding took on urgency because the report comes less than a month after the shoot-ing deaths of 26 people at an elementary school in Newtown, Conn. The United States has about six violent deaths per 100,000 residents. None of the 16 other countries included in the review came anywhere close to that ratio. Finland was closest to the U.S. ranking with slightly more than two violent deaths per 100,000 residents. For many years, Americans have been dying at younger ages that people in almost all other wealthy countries. In addi-tion to the impact of gun violence, Americans con-sume the most calories among peer countries and get involved in more acci-dents that involve alcohol. The U.S. also suffers high-er rates of drug-related deaths, infant mortality and AIDS. The result is that the life expectancy for men in the United States ranked the lowest among the 17 countries reviewed, at 75.6 years, while the life expec-tancy for U.S. women ranked second lowest at 80.7 years. The countries reviewed included Canada, Japan, Australia and much of Western Europe. The U.S. has long lagged in life expectancy com-pared with other economi-cally developed nations. In this study, researchers culled existing studies to examine why. Most statis-tics in the report are from the late 1990s through 2008. The report found that U.S. health disadvan-tages aren’t limited to the poor and uninsured. Even white, college-educated, and wealthier Americans tend to be in worse health than their peers in other developed countries. The nation’s health disadvantages have econom-ic consequences. They lead to higher costs for consumers and taxpayers as well as a workforce that remains less healthy than that of other high-income countries. “With lives and dollars at stake, the United States cannot afford to ignore this problem,” said the report from the National Research Council and the Institute of Medicine. In attempting to explain why Americans are so unhealthy, the researchers looked at three categories: the nation’s health care system, harmful behaviors and social and economic conditions. Researchers noted that the U.S. has a large uninsured popula-tion compared to other countries with comparable economies, and more limit-ed access to primary care. The United States also has a higher level of poverty, especially among children.

PAGE 4

OPINION Thursday, January 10, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A4AOPINIONA few years back, I was interviewed by a reporter from Al Arabiya, the Saudi-owned television news channel. Afterward, we sat for a while and talked journal-ism. He mentioned that he had previously worked for Al Jazeera. I asked why he had left. “Too many Islamists,” he said. “They made me uncomfortable.” We used to know a lot about Al Jazeera. At what point did amnesia set in? The station was launched in November 1996. Two months after al-Qaida’s attacks on New York and Washington, Fouad Ajami, the Lebanese-born American scholar analyzed its product in the pages of The New York Times Magazine. Al Jazeera, he wrote, “may not officially be the Osama bin Laden Channel, but he is clearly its star ... A huge, glamor-ous poster of bin Laden’s silhouette hangs in the background of the main studio set at Al Jazeera’s headquarters in Doha, the capital city of Qatar.” Ajami added: “Although Al Jazeera has sometimes been hailed in the West for being an autonomous Arabic news outlet, it would be a mistake to call it a fair or responsible one. Day in and day out, Al Jazeera deliberately fans the flames of Muslim outrage.” Five years later Al Jazeera launched an English language version. To be fair, it is editorially distinct from AJ-Arabic. But, also to be fair, two questions must be asked: Are there serious dis-agreements between these sister stations? Or do they have what Ayman Mohyeldin, once AJ-English’s Cairo correspon-dent (and now a reporter at NBC), called a “shared vision,” with the Al Jazeera Network’s owners understanding their vari-ous audiences and what is required to influence each of them? The Al Jazeera Network is owned by the royal fam-ily of Qatar — an emirate that is rated by Freedom House as “not free.” Qatar’s Wahhabi religious establishment is hard-core, but more indulgent of foreigners than are the clerics of Saudi Arabia, where Wahhabism also is the state religion. The sale of oil keeps Qatar’s rulers fabulously wealthy so AJ will never need to turn a profit. If making money is not AJ’s purpose, what is? Al Gore thinks he knows. As you have doubt-less heard by now, the for-mer vice president is sell-ing to AJ the Current TV cable network he co-found-ed. Estimated price: $500 million. That will make what is to be known as Al Jazeera America available in about 50 million homes across the country. In a statement issued Jan. 2, Current TV co-founder Joel Hyatt, said that he and Gore were “thrilled and proud” that their project was being acquired by Al Jazeera which “was founded with the same goals we had for Current: To give voice to those whose voices are not typically heard; to speak truth to power; to provide independent and diverse points of view; and to tell the important stories that no one else is telling.” The Current/AJ deal brims with ironies. To cite just one: Al Gore, Internet pioneer, paladin of global warming and archenemy of carbon fuels is about to have his bank account inflated by an estimated hundred million petro-dol-lars, and he will “proudly” serve on the advisory board of a media outlet owned by a dictatorship that advocates government censorship of the Internet. Quite a few of my journalistic colleagues have been cheerily asserting that Al Jazeera America will make a net contribu-tion to the free market in ideas. I’m less confident. Among the reasons: Sheikh Yusuf al-Qaradawi is the host of Al Jazeera Arabic’s most popular program “Sharia and Life.” Qaradawi endorsed Ayatollah Khomeini’s call to execute novelist Salman Rushdie for blasphemy, called what Hitler did to Europe’s Jews “divine punishment” (adding: “Allah willing, the next time will be at the hand of the believers”), and in 1991, one of his aco-lytes, Mohamed Akram, a leader of the Muslim Brotherhood in America, wrote a memorandum, later obtained by the FBI, asserting that Brothers “must understand that their work in America is a kind of grand jihad in elim-inating and destroying the Western civilization from within and sabotaging its miserable house by their hands and the hands of the believers so that it is elimi-nated and God’s religion is made victorious over all other religions.” Is Al Gore really “thrilled and proud” to be associated with such “inde-pendent and diverse points of view?” Is this really what he means by “speaking truth to power?” Might asking him be a net contri-bution to the free market in ideas?Education — the national security priority Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Jim Barr, Associate Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman Gov. Rick Scott has been unable to deliver on a cam-paign promise to eliminate corporate taxes in Florida, but on Wednesday he did make a pitch to offer manufacturing interests here some relief. During a visit to Jacksonville Scott announced his wish to eliminate sales tax on the purchase of equipment by manufacturing companies in Florida. Until last year, sales tax exemptions were offered on equipment for industrial use provided it expanded a manufacturer’s output by at least 10 percent. In 2012, the Legislature low-ered that requirement to 5 percent, which should result in a savings to those companies of about $46 million per year. Now Scott wants lawmakers to exempt such purchases across the board. “Florida’s current policy puts our state at a competitive disadvantage because most states do not force manufacturers to pay taxes on the pur-chase of equipment or require them to adhere to regulations for tax exemp-tions,” he said in a prepared statement. “In order to build up our manufactur-ing jobs in Florida, we must remove these barriers to investment.” There are some who would say enough is enough. No more tax cuts for business; spend more on educa-tion, infrastructure and other areas of critical concern. That’s a debate worth having.But how about we first get our industrial sector back on its feet, put our fel-low Floridians back to work, and shake off the last vestiges of the nastiest eco-nomic downturn in recent memory? A healthy economy is the first step toward better schools, better roads and a better Florida. Scott’s tax pitch a worthy one Al Jazeera wrong for America OUR OPINION LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.comP resident Barack Obama completed his national security team this week, naming his choices for secretaries of state and defense and the director of the CIA. But he forgot to announce one official who, by his own words, will be key to setting America’s global security priorities. Namely, his secretary of education. It is a proposition the president signed on to two years ago. But it hasn’t been discussed much since then. Not nearly enough, in fact. It was on Oct. 12, 2010, in an arena not usually associated with policysetting that Obama was asked to consider a new way of looking at U.S. education policy priorities. The president was performing like the ringmaster in a one-ring circus at a town hall webcast at The George Washington University, just weeks before the midterm election. Obama called on a young woman in the front row, Francesca Yabraian from Texas, who is now a career employee at the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and who that day asked a question you’d expect to hear at a think tank symposium, not a cam-paign event. “Mr. President, you have pointed out that U.S. students have fallen from the top 20 nations in math and science and test scores -and jobs and contracts are going overseas,” Yabraian began. “You’ve called edu-cation a national priority. But do you think it is time to label education funding a national security priority?” It was a question and proposition Obama clearly hadn’t anticipated. “I think it’s a national security priority,” he began; he had that fur-rowed-brow look he gets when he knows it’s time to be thinking on his feet. The more he thought, the more he warmed to the proposition. “Look, there has never been a nation on earth that lost its econom-ic edge and maintained its military edge,” Obama said. “And the reason we have the most effective military on earth, in the history of the world, is first and foremost because we have unbelievable men and women in uniform who make sacrifices on our behalf every single day. “But the second reason is that we’ve had the biggest economy in the world that can support this incredible armed force that we have. And if we start falling behind economically, we will start falling behind from a national security per-spective — there’s no doubt about it. And the single-most important determinant of how we do economi-cally is going to be the skills of our workforce. ...” Hopefully, Obama will soon announce that his excellent educa-tion secretary, Arne Duncan, will be staying for another four years. Duncan is not one who seeks to solve our education problems by just throwing money at them. But he knows the security of our coming generations depends upon us spend-ing wisely, and sufficiently, now. As Official Washington is just weeks away from another of its self-inflicted deadline crises about the debt ceiling and budget cutting, we must never again forget the real-ity that earnest young questioner brought to the president’s attention, and ours, two years ago. Cliff May Q Clifford D. May is president of the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies, a policy insti-tute focusing on terrorism. Q Martin Schram writes political analysis for Scripps Howard News Service. Martin Schrammartin.schram@gmail.com

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Leona Lee Little BondsLeona Lee Little Bonds,Age 98, Born August 9, 1914 Lake City, FL Died January 5, 2013 Dowling Park, FL. Preceded in death by her husband, Ran-dall Joseph Bonds, Sr., her parents Ol-lie and Julian Little as well as brothers Ar-thur, Clifton, Woodrow, George and Carl Little and her sister Louise Little McCall Mahood.She is survived by her children: Patricia Bonds Rose, Barbara Bonds Gibbs, Randall Joseph Bonds, Jr., and David Julian Bonds; two sisters Ellen Little Ward, Rose Little Wilder and two brothers: Finley Little and Ralph Little; nine grandchildren a whole passel of great grandchildren and great, great grandchildren.She was a lover of fam-ily and friends. Although her passing is mourned we rejoice at her victory.A celebration of her life will be held at Pleasant Grove Method-ist Church, Pastor Dusty Bailey RIFLDWLQJ6:6WDWH5G/DNH&LW\)/Saturday, January 12, 2013 at 1:00 p.m. Family and friends are invited to attend.,QOLHXRIRZHUVGRQDWLRQVmay be made to the Pleasant Grove Methodist Cemetery Fund, Pleasant Grove Methodist Kitchen Fund or your charity of choice.Arrangements are under the direction of GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN FUNERAL HOME 3596 South U.S. Hwy 441, Lake &LW\)ORULGD 1954. Please sign the family registry at www.gatewayforestlawn.comGladys Irene Perry EvansMrs. Gladys Irene Perry Evans, DJHUHVLGHQWRI/DNH&LW\)/Transition from Earth to Heaven Thursday, Jan-uary 3, 2013 at Haven Hospice in Lake City, FL. She was the daughter of the late Lu-ella Davis and Lucious Perry who proceeded her in death. She was born in Columbia County and attended the Public Schools where she graduated from Rich-ardson High School class of 1954. She was a faithful employee of Northeast Florida State Hospital LQ0DFFOHQQ\)OIRU\HDUVShe was a former and long time member of New Day Springs Baptist Church. She joined Shiloh Missionary Baptist Church and served on the Missionary Board until her health failed and would not allow active engagement.She was united in Holy Matri-mony to Richard Evans, Jr. for 40 years who preceded her in death.Her memories will be forever cherished by her loving children (1) daughter, Brenda F. Perry (Jessie) of Lake City, FL., (2) sons, Belgin A. Perry (Joann), Virginia Beach, VA., and Rich-ard A. Evans (Deeshah) Jackson-ville, FL., Step-Mother, Mattie Perry Coleman (Mother-Dear) of New York. (5) grandchildren, Jami, Jamal, Rene, Richard III, and Ramon. (4) great grandchil-dren, Jahlaiah, Jami Jr., Kira and Courtney. (5) sisters, Mertis Bell of Orlando, FL., Mary Ford, of Jamaica, NY, Irma Bullock of New Carrollton, MD., Rosalind Merrick (Rev. Johnnie) of Lake City, FL., and Wanda Perry of Lake City, FL., (4) brothers, Clarence and Mickey Perry who preceded her in death, Charles L. Perry, Upper Malboro, MD., and Billy J. Perry (Sandra) of Douglas, GA., and a host of nieces, nephews, cousins, and relatives and sorrowing friends.Funeral for the late Mrs. Gladys Irene Perry Evans will be 1:00pm Saturday, January 12, 2013 at the New Day Springs Baptist Church with Rev. Dr. Dwight Pollock and Rev. Lantz Mills Sr., RIFLDWLQJ,QWHUPHQWZLOOIROORZat Philadelphia Memorial Gar-den Cemetery. The family will receive friends Friday, January 11, 2103 from 6:00pm-8:00pm at Cooper Funeral Home Chapel.Arrangements entrusted to COOPER FUNERAL HOME 251 NE Washington Street, Lake City, FL 32055William Robert “Billy” Foe Mr. William Robert “Billy” Foe 80, died early morning January 9, 2013 in Lake City after an extended illness. He was the son of the late John Foe and Nellie English. He was of the Penta-costal faith and a faithful church member of First Full Gospel Church. He was dedicated to his church and lived his life for Je-sus he was a loving husband and IDWKHU+HDOVRHQMR\HGVKLQJand spending time with his dog Faith. He graduated from Rosi-clare High School in 1954.He had worked for PCS for the Past twenty-six years as a Lab Super-visor. He served in the United States Army during the Korean War. He was preceded in death E\KLVUVWZLIH3HJJ\$QQ)RHand a second wife Judy Foe, and one daughter Angie Foe one son Robert Benjamin Foe.He is survived by his wife of seventeen years Betty Foe, Lake City, FL; three sons Douglas Keith Foe, Lake City, FL; Clay William Foe (Lenora) Wellborn, FL; and Joe Foe, St. Pete, FL; also surviving are eight grand-children, and eight great-grand-children, And several nieces and nephews and cousins in Illinois, also surviving are one step-son and one step-daughter and three step grandchildren from Ft. White, FL and High Springs, FL. Funeral services for Mr. Foe will be conducted on Saturday, January 12, 2013 at 2:00P.M at First Full Gospel Church in Lake City, FL with Reverend Stan El-OLVRIFLDWLQJ9LVLWDWLRQZLWKWKHfamily will be held Friday, Janu-DU\IURP308QWLO9P.M. at Dees-Parrish Family Funeral Home. Lake City, FL Interment will follow in Memo-rial Cemetery in Lake City. Ar-rangements are under the direction of the DEES-PARRISH FAMILY FUNERAL HOME 458 S. Marion Ave., Lake City, FL SOHDVHVLJQour on-line family guestbook atparrishfamilyfuneralhome.com LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, JANUARY 10, 2013 5A5A White’s Trucking Services For more information or a quote please call 386-362-8763 or e-mail us at whitestruckingservice@gmail.com or visit our website at www.whitestruckingservice.weebly.comNeed somelthing hauled call us:Fill DirtLime RockAsphaltMillingsGraniteRoad RockMisc. Hauling to meet your needsSemi Services also availableYou Call & We Haul! Obituaries are paid advertise-ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporter’s classified department at 752-1293. OBITUARIES COMMUNITY CALENDAR Q To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0427 or by email at jbarr@lakecityreporter.com.Jan. 10Builders AssociationThe Columbia County Builders Association will hold it’s first General Council lunch at 11:30 a.m. at Guang Dong res-taurant in the Lake City Mall. The meeting will start at noon.The speaker will be Columbia County Superintendent of Schools Terry Huddleston. If you are considering joining our builders association, this is a good time to join us for lunch, meet our members and learn more of what we are all about. Cost of lunch for members is $12 and non-members fee is $15. A HammerClaw jackpot is now $275. To make a reser-vation or for more informa-tion, emai colcountybuild@comcast.net or phone (386) 867-1998.Medicare informationSHINE will present a program to inform seniors about Medicare from 9 a.m. to noon at the TOPS Health Fair at First Advent Christian Church, Live Oak, and from 1:30 tp 3:30 p.m. at Live Oak City Hall. For more information, call (800) 262-2243.Computer classesRegistration is now open for free basic com-puter classes to be given by the Greater Lake City Community Development Corp. Inc. The five-week, 20-hour course will begin Monday, Jan. 14, and class-es will be from 6 to 8 p.m. each Monday and Tuesday for five weeks. To register or for more information, contact Ann at (386) 752-9785 or (904) 635-2021 or visit the CDC office at 363 NW Bascom Norris Drive.DAR meetingThe Edward Rutledge Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution will hold its monthly meet-ing at 10:30 a. m. at the LifeStyle Enrichment Center, 28 SE Allison Court (off Baya Avenue). Kathleen Cooper will be speaking about Lyme dis-ease. Visitors are welcome. Garden Club to meetLake City Garden Club will meet at the Clubhouse, 257 SE Hernando Ave. Social time will begin at 9:30 a.m., and the meet-ing will start at 10. Jo Carver will give a talk on landscaping.Center electionsBethlehem Community Center will hold its annual election of officers at 6:30 p.m. The center is a 835 SW Bethlehem Ave. in Fort White. For more informa-tion, call Rudolph Freeney at (386) 454-1880.Tea Party meetingThe North Central Florida Tea Party will meet at 7 p.m. at the Taylor Building, 128 SW Birley Ave. in Lake City. Adrian Wyllie, a Libertarian can-didate for governor, will be guest speaker. There also will be information on what the Columbia andSuwan-nee county commissions are doing, as well as upcom-ing meetings and events. For more information, call John at (386) 935-0126, Sharon at (386) 935-0821 or visit online at www.north centralfloridateaparty.org. Jan. 11History programActor Chaz Mena will perform a program, “Claiming La Florida for King and Cross,” at 6:30 p.m. at the Columbia County Main Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave. Mena will portray Pedro Menendez de Aviles, the founder of St. Augustine and first Spanish gover-nor of Florida. Tickets are required, and are avail-able free of charge at any county library location. Funding for the program was provided by the Florida Humanities Council and the state Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs, as part of the 500th anniversary of the state’s founding.Fish dinnerOur Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5056 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, pre-pares fish dinners every Friday from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The dinner is $6 for two Alaskan pollock filets, corn, baked beans, hush-puppies, cole slaw and tart-er sauce.Classic car cruise-inSouthern Knights Streetrodders will hold a cruise-in for classic and collector cars from 6 to 8 p.m. at Hardee’s on U.S. 90 West. The public is invited to view participants’ classic vehicles. For more infor-mation, call Bob McGraw at 984-6573.Jan. 12Chili cook-offThe fourth annual Branford Chili Cook-off will be from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hatch Park on Craven Street in Branford. The event will include a silent auction for adults and kids, door prizes, live music, an antique car show, moon walk, Home Depot Kids Workshop and a variety of homemade chili. Admission is $5 and includes all the chili you can eat. Proceeds will benefit Herry’s Kids Pediatric Services, a pro-gram of Hospice of the Nature Coast. To register to compete in the chili cook-off, call the hospice at (386) 755-7714 or visIt online at www.hospiceof citrus.org.School fundraiserNew Generation Christian School will have a fundraiser from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. at Bob Evans Restaurant on U.S. 90 West. The restaurant will donate 15 percent of all sales to the school for its building campaign when customers present a Bob Evans/New Gen Community Fundraiser flyer at checkout. To get a flyer, or for more informa-tion, contact any student or staff of New Generation or call (386) 758-4710 or visit the school at www.newgen-erationschool.org.Gospel sing, supperA gospel sing and potluck supper will be held to celebrate Mary Lou Flynn Lasseter’s 75th birthday, beginning at 6 p.m. at Lee Worship Center Church Fellowship Hall, 471 SE Magnolia Drive in Lee. Supper will be at 6 p.m., and the open-mic gospel sing will start at 7. To con-firm attendance or for more information, call Brenda Lasseter McCormick at (850) 869-9976.Gospel sin, bonfireBrush Arbour Church will have a gospel sing, bonfire and marshmallow and wiener roast at 3 p.m. Bring hot dogs or buns or soft drinks. Directions: Take Route 441 north to Cheshire Road, turn right; go to Tripple Run Road, turn left; go to Manattee Place, turn right; church is on the left. For more infor-mation, call the Rev. Pearl Reed at (386) 729-6783.Jan. 13 Music concertThe Ball Brothers will perform a free concert at 6 p.m. at Wellborn Baptist Church. The church is on U.S. 90 West between Lake City and Live Oak at the intersection of Lowe Lake Road in Wellborn. A love offering for the group will be received.Baseball tryoutsThe Columbia Timber Rattlers 8U travel machine pitch baseball team will have tryouts at 2 p.m. at the Southside Baseball Complex (blue fields). For details, call Jason Dumas at 965-8530 or Todd Gustavson at 365-2133.Jan. 14SCORE workshopSCORE of Lake City will hold a free entrepreneurs’ interactive workshop from 6 to 8 p.m. at Columbia County Main Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave.. Participants will have an opportunity to meet other entrepreneurs, get advice and receive free educa-tional materials from the federal Small Business Administration and other sources. Participants also will be able to arrange one-on-one business coun-seling with SCORE volun-teers. To reserve a seat, call (386) 752-2000 or email scorelakecity@gmail.com.Budgeting workshopColumbia County Extension will have a work-shop, Budgeting Basics and Credit Repair,” from 6:30 to 7:30 pm. The dead-line to register is Jan. 11. It is the first in a series of Living Well workshop to be held on the second Monday of each month. Cost is $10 per person for the year, $15 per couple or $3 a session. Workshop will be at the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane, at the Columbia County Fairgrounds. To register or for more information, contact Jenny Jump at (386)752-5384.Jan. 15Pageant entriesToday is the deadline for contestants to enter the 2013 Olustee Festival Pageant. The pageant is open to girls ages 3 months to 20 years who live in or attend school in Baker, Columbia, Gilcrist, Hamilton, Union and Suwannee counties. Age divisions are 3 to 12 months, 13 to 23 months, 2 to 3 years, 4 to 6 years, 7 to 9 years, 10 to 12 years, 13 to 15 years and 16 to 20 years. The pageant will be held Jan. 26 at the Columbia County Schools Administrative Complex. Applications may be obtained at the Columbia County Library, the Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of Commerce, Emily Taber Library, Suwannee Regional Library, Hamilton County Library or by contacting Elaine Owens at (386) 965-2787.Historical SocietyThe Columbia County Historical Society will meet at 7 p.m. at the Columbia County Main Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave. The topic will be the Heritage Park Village in Macclenny. The meeting is open to the public. For more information, contact Sean McMahon at 754-4293.Plant clinicUniversity of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon at the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane, to answer questions about lawns and plants. For more information, call 752-5384. NARFE meetingThe National Active and Retired Federal Employees will meet at 1 p.m. in the LifeStyle Enrichment Center at 628 SE Allison Court. Guest speaker will ve Cody Gray, represent-ing the Blue/Gray Army, to talk about the upcoming Olustee Festival. For more information, call Jim Purvis at 752-8570 or 292 9361.Jan. 16Olustee planningThe Blue-Grey Army will meet at 5:30 p.m. to plan the Olustee Battle Festival. The meeting will be at the school district central building, room 153, 409 SW St. Johns St.Plant clinicUniversity of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Wednesday from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Fort White Public Library on Route 47to answer ques-tions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384.Soil testingColumbia County Master Gardeners do free soil test-ing each Wednesday morn-ing at the Columbia County Agricultural Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane. Drop off soil samples at the office during normal work hours; leave name and a phone number, so you can be called with the results. For more informa-tion, call Gayle Rogers at 758-2408.Jan. 17Retired educatorsColumbia County Retired Educators will meet at 1 p.m. at the School Board Adult Center, room 120. For more information, contact Will Brown at 752-2431. Any retired person interested in education is welcome.Propagation classColumbia County Master Gardeners will give a class on propagation at 5:45 p.m. at the Fort White Library. Learn to increas plant stock by cuttings, root division and seeds. For more infor-mation, call Gayle Rogers at 758-2408.Jan. 18Medicare informationSHINE will present a program to inform seniors about Medicare from 10 a.m. to noon at the Branford Public Library. For more information, call (800) 262-2243.Music concertSouthern rock band Steel Bridge will perform at the Florida Gateway College Levy Performing Arts Center, 149 SE College Place. The show will begin at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $15. Steel Bridge is a Cross City-based band that has opened for Mel Tillis and Chris Young. The band opened for Easton Corbin during the inaugural sea-son of FGC Entertainment. For more information, visit www.fgcentertainment.com.

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involvement in the com-munity.” Hunt, who has been a local Realtor since 1980, said winning the award won’t change the way he does business. “I’m just going to keep doing what I’ve been doing,” he said. “There’s so much that I’ve got to give back to this commu-nity that’s been so good to me for so many years. This is place that I grew up on a cattle farm in Columbia City and was gone for about 10 years. “All I could think of was getting away from that farm when I was a kid, but as soon as I left, I found out what a wonderful place it was. It’s been a joy for me to be able to come back here and raise my family. It’s a very special place.” The keynote speaker during the event was Sherri Meadows, the 2013 Florida Realtors president elect. Meadows said in Columbia County, pend-ing sales, closed sales and median prices all rose for single family homes last year and closed sales in the local market were up 44 percent in November compared to a year ago. “Our chief economist puts it, everything that should be going up in the market is going up and everything that should be going down is going down,” she said. Stan Batten was named the 2013 president of the Lake City Board of Realtors. In 2006 Batten served as board president and in 2007 he served as district vice president. “I think it’s going to be a great year in real estate,” he said. “We have a lot of great ideas to share with our members. We have a lot of local training. We’re going to try to utilize the talents within our orga-nization to see if we can get people who will share their knowledge with the apps on the iPad, iPhone and any type of new tech-nologies to get older guys like me up to snuff. I’m a re-run but I’m very thrilled about being here and I look forward to doing a great job for our Realtors.” Dan Gherna, executive vice president of the Lake City Board of Realtors, said the meeting went great. “We’re very optimistic about 2013,” he said. “Our inventory is down, sales are up and we have some new members coming back in. I think 2013 looks great for the board and for real estate locally.” wonderful friend/boss/mentor... Then I realized that Kurt would really give me a talking to, by saying ‘Come on, Dad!! You have to pull it together. Mom needs you to help her hold it together, and you need her to help you hold it together!’ This is what I need to do, this is what I need to always remem-ber.... “So my present to Jr. today is to start the long healing, getting back to being a part of the good side of humanity, showing one another that yes, it was a tragedy that occurred. So while he is now in Blue Skies forever, I need to remember that he is still a part of each new day!! I love you, Kurt!! Happy Birthday!!” Many other family membrs and friends posted messages in a similar vein on the newly-established Facebook page, Praying for Kurt Ruppert, Jr. Monday night King County Sheriff’s Office officials in Washington said the search will mostly be done by helicopter from this point on, as long as the weather permits. However, they believe Ruppert is no longer alive. Maureen Walsh, a family friend and the Ruppert family spokesperson, said they have not spoken to anyone from the King County Sheriff’s Office since Tuesday, but officials there attempted to contact the family recently. “We got a phone call Tuesday,” she said, not-ing the officials were call-ing to check on the family. “They’ve gotten personally and emotionally involved in this case, for whatever reason and they were call-ing to check on the family. They said once the weather cleared up it there will be an air search. They really feel like there is nowhere else for them to look. There will be an air search after the current snowstorm sub-sides, but by that time Kurt will have been out there in the wilderness for a week. He is a remarkable young man, but it’s a lot of ask even of him to survive those cir-cumstances for that amount of time.” Walsh thanked the search volunteers for their efforts and for the additional aide that came from Sen. Bill Nelson’s office. “Sen. Nelson’s office has been calling out there two and three times a day and made a lot of resources avail-able out to the King County Sheriff’s Office,” she said. “We are really grateful for the people in Sen. Nelson’s office for their efforts and everything they did to help us find Kurt.” Walsh also spoke of the unrelenting efforts of the volunteers who gave of their personal time to help search for Ruppert. “There were about 145 volunteers every day on that mountain,” she said. “All of those people had rope training and survival training and they gave up four days of their lives and risked their lives to help find Kurt. In many cases they spent the night on the mountain in 20-30 degree temperatures because they were committed to finding Kurt and that’s remarkable. They are the heroes.” Ruppert owned several local business in Columbia County, includ-ing Grass Soldier, Ruppert’s Tree Service and Tower Mechanics. Art Shaffer, Ruppert’s friend from Skydive Palatka, said a memorial will be held in honor of Ruppert on Saturday, after sunset, at Skydive Palatka, 4015 Reid St. in Palatka. 6A LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS THURSDAY, JANUARY 10, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04246APoliceman’s ball set for March 23From staff reportsThe Lake City Police Department will hold its 20th annual Policeman’s Ball and Charity Gala 7 p.m. Saturday, March 23 at the Florida Gateway College Conference Center. The event will feature a night of entertainment, fine dining and police officer recognition. The attire for the event is formal and the tickets are $50 per person. Proceeds from the event will be given to a local chari-table organization yet to be selected. Any 501.c.3 organizations wishing to be considered for the charitable funding from the 2013 Policeman’s Ball Charity Gala or those businesses who wish to spon-sor a table is asked to contact Audre Washington at (386) 719-5742 for additional information. Table reservations (for groups of 4, 6, or 8) for the Ball are also being accepted. Business groups and friends are invited to join together and reserve a table for the 20th Annual Policeman’s Ball. JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterNewly installed officers and directors of the Lake City B oard of Realtors and North Florida Multiple Listing Servi ce pose for a photograph after a luncheon on Wednesday. Pictured are ( front row, from left) LCBR director Pam Beauchamp; outgoing president Sandy Kishton; incoming president Stan Batten, NFMLS p resident Robin Schwartz; director Elaine Tolar; LCBR dir ector Samantha Prueter; (second row, from left) president-elect Su san Eagle; director Darrell Hunt; NFMLS director Amber Ro berts Crawford; vice president/secretary Lisa Hicks; director Ma rtha Jo Khachigan; (back row, from left) LCBR directors Je ff Taylor Vic Lantroop; NFMLS directors Gary Thomas; Nancy Rogers; a nd Missy Zecher. Not pictured are LCBR secretary Susan Sloan, directors Anita Handy and Kellie Shirah and NFML S directors Thom Duncan and Joe Perez. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterStan Batten (left), 2013 LCBR president, laughs as Sandy Kishton, outgoing 2012 LCBR president, hoists a plaque denoting her service.COURTESY THE RUPPERT FAMILYKurt Ruppert Jr. stands next to a small helicopter. The high ly experienced skydiver went missing during a jump in Washington State on Jan. 3. LCBR: Area real estate agents looking for more success in 2013 Continued From Page 1A ROADWORK: Under way Continued From Page 1AWednesday afternoon approximately 50 people, including local residents and business owners along the roadway, attended a Florida Department of Transportation informa-tion meeting where DOT officials answered ques-tions about the project. John and Lorraine Zarrella were two of sev-eral local residents who visited the DOT tent in the Harvey’s grocery store parking lot to learn more information about the project and how the construction work would impact them. The Zarrellas said the roadway needs widening. “I thought the visit was very informative,” John Zarrella said. “We just wanted find out how the work was going to affect our neighborhood. Hopefully, the project will impact our neighborhood for the better. Hopefully the road is going to make it an easier egress in and out of our development onto U.S. Highway 90.” Gina Busscher, DOT spokeswoman, said the drive-through open house setting allowed DOT offi-cials to discuss the con-struction plan and answer their concerns. An aerial map showing the projected impact area was used to answer ques-tions about specific areas of concern. Busscher said some of the primary concerns dealt with the relative location of a retention pond and how it would impact prop-erty of people who at the rear of the Cypress Lake Subdivision. Busscher said another common concern dealt with the general duration of the job. “A lot of people wanted to know why it would take so long,” she said. “We’ve explained that’s because of drainage. There is an extensive drainage system that’s going to be put in, plus there has to be some consideration for traffic.” Busscher said during certain times of the day there can’t be lane clo-sures and the contractor only plans to work five days per week on the project — two other factors that will impact the projected construction time. KURT JR.: On birthday, family faces reality Continued From Page 1A By Maureen Walsh The Ruppert family has been touched beyond description by the massive out-pouring of support and affection for them and for Kurt. Literally hundreds of you have reached out to pray and send your love. It has been wonderful and they are very, very grateful. But their grief now is quite profound and it is something that they will need to handle privately, as a family. I am sure that the thought of sharing that grief with literally a thousand people is over-whelming to them. It is more than they can bear and more than we should ask of them. For that reason, I am asking you to give them privacy right now. They have asked for that as well. If you want to post thoughts, prayers and remembrances on the Praying for Kurt Ruppert Jr. page on Facebook.com, I think that would be wonder-ful. When the family is ready they can read the posts and hopefully it will help them through their pain to know we share their love for Kurt Jr. and we know just how remarkable he was. But please don’t expect or pursue a response from them right now. They will contact us when they are ready. And they know we will be here when they need us. We know that the last time we saw him he was doing the thing he loved to do most in the world: flying fast and free over one of the most beautiful spots on earth, Mount Si, Washington. It was his dream. We should all be grateful for Kurt and, loving him, we should all be grateful he realized his dream. So few do. But he was a special man, with special gifts and a spirit that would not stay grounded. It had to fly. He had to fly. And now he always will. God bless you, Kurt Ruppert Jr. Maureen Walsh is a Ruppert family friend and spokesperson. Saying goodbye to Kurt “We just wanted find out how the work was going to affect our neighborhood. Hopefully the proj-ect will impact our neighborhood for the better. Hopefully the road is going to make it an easier egress in and out of our devel-opment onto U.S. Highway 90.”— John Zarrella, neighborhood resident

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By JAY LINDSAYAssociated PressBOSTON — An independent trustee must be appointed to oversee the bankruptcy of a Massachusetts phar-macy linked to a meningitis outbreak because of the firm’s “gross misman-agement,” among other reasons, a Justice Department official argued Tuesday. U.S. Trustee William Harrington also argued in his motion that an accountant the New England Compounding Center hired to lead it through the Chapter 11 process had a hopeless conflict of interest because the NECC’s board can fire him at any time. Harrington accused the NECC of hiring Keith Lowey and appointing him to its board just before it filed for bankruptcy “in an apparent attempt to forestall the appointment of a trust-ee.” “Creditors and victims of the (NECC’s) conduct should have an independent, conflict free party devel-oping a reorganization or liquidation strategy,” Harrington wrote in the motion filed in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Massachusetts. Daniel Cohn, the NECC bankruptcy attorney, said the company would oppose the motion for appointment of a trustee because it would hinder progress toward the purpose of its bankruptcy filing, which the com-pany has said was to set up a fund to fairly compensate victims. “Our primary concern is that appointment of a trustee would be a setback to our efforts, working coop-eratively with the claimants’ lawyers, to establish a compensation fund for the claimants at the earliest possible date and with the least expense,” he said. “Appointment of a trustee would result in significant delay and expense, with no offsetting benefit.” A tainted steroid made by the NECC has been linked to a fungal meningitis outbreak that has killed 40 and sickened more than 600 since this summer. The Trustee Program is a part of the U.S. Justice Department that is responsible for overseeing bank-ruptcy cases and private trustees. The program has 21 regional offices, and Harrington is trustee for Region One. The Framingham-based New England Compounding Center has been shut down since the outbreak was discovered in Tennessee in September. It said in its bankruptcy filing last month that it was facing at least 130 lawsuits by people claiming injury from the contaminated ste-roid. On Tuesday, Harrington filed a motion for the appointment of an independent Chapter 11 trustee and an objection to the NECC’s applica-tion to hire Lowey and his firm. In the motion, Harrington noted that “gross mismanagement” by a debtor is among the factors that, if shown, require the court to appoint an independent trustee. To show gross mismanagement, Harrington cited a Massachusetts state report that detailed results of an inspection conducted after the outbreak, which found a failure to meet cleanliness standards and said the company shipped out drugs before tests results confirmed they were sterile. He also cited the fatal outbreak. By LAURAN NEERGAARDAP Medical WriterWASHINGTON — For years, doctors have lamented that there’s no Pap test for deadly ovarian cancer. Wednesday, sci-entists reported encouraging signs that one day, there might be. Researchers are trying to retool the Pap, a test for cervical cancer that millions of women get, so that it could spot early signs of other gynecologic cancers, too. How? It turns out that cells can flake off of tumors in the ovaries or the lining of the uterus, and float down to rest in the cervix, where Pap tests are performed. These cells are too rare to recog-nize under the microscope. But researchers from Johns Hopkins University used some sophisti-cated DNA testing on the Pap samples to uncover the evidence — gene mutations that show can-cer is present. In a pilot study, they analyzed Pap smears from 46 women who already were diagnosed with either ovarian or endometrial cancer. The new technique found all the endometrial cancers and 41 percent of the ovarian tumors, the team reported Wednesday in the journal Science Translational Medicine. This is very early-stage research, and women shouldn’t expect any change in their rou-tine Paps. It will take years of additional testing to prove if the so-called PapGene technique really could work as a screen-ing tool, used to spot cancer in women who thought they were healthy. “Now the hard work begins,” said Hopkins oncologist Dr. Luis Diaz, whose team is collecting hundreds of additional Pap sam-ples for more study and is explor-ing ways to enhance the detec-tion of ovarian cancer. But if it ultimately pans out, “the neat part about this is, the patient won’t feel anything differ-ent,” and the Pap wouldn’t be per-formed differently, Diaz added. The extra work would come in a lab. The gene-based technique marks a new approach toward cancer screening, and specialists are watching closely. “This is very encouraging, and it shows great potential,” said American Cancer Society genet-ics expert Michael Melner. “We are a long way from being able to see any impact on our patients,” cautioned Dr. Shannon Westin of the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. She reviewed the research in an accompanying editorial, and said the ovarian cancer detection would need improvement if the test is to work. But she noted that ovarian cancer has poor survival rates because it’s rarely caught early. “If this screening test could iden-tify ovarian cancer at an early stage, there would be a profound impact on patient outcomes and mortality,” Westin said. More than 22,000 U.S. women are diagnosed with ovarian cancer each year, and more than 15,000 die. Symptoms such as pain and bloating seldom are obvious until the cancer is more advanced, and numerous attempts at screening tests have failed. Endometrial cancer affects about 47,000 women a year, and kills about 8,000. There is no screening test for it either, but most women are diagnosed early because of postmenopausal bleeding. The Hopkins research piggybacks on one of the most suc-cessful cancer screening tools, the Pap, and a newer technology used along with it. With a stan-dard Pap, a little brush scrapes off cells from the cervix, which are stored in a vial to examine for signs of cervical cancer. Today, many women’s Paps undergo an additional DNA-based test to see if they harbor the HPV virus, which can spur cervical cancer. So the Hopkins team, funded largely by cancer advocacy groups, decided to look for DNA evidence of other gynecologic tumors. It developed a method to rapidly screen the Pap samples for those mutations using standard genetics equipment that Diaz said wouldn’t add much to the cost of a Pap-plus-HPV test. He said the technique could detect both early-stage and more advanced tumors. Importantly, tests of Paps from 14 healthy women turned up no false alarms. The endometrial cancers may have been easier to find because cells from those tumors don’t have as far to travel as ovarian cancer cells, Diaz said. Researchers will study whether inserting the Pap brush deeper, testing during different times of the menstrual cycle, or other fac-tors might improve detection of ovarian cancer. Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, JANUARY 10, 2013 7A7AHEALTH ASSOCIATED PRESSMelanie Norwood talks about the condition of her mother i n Nashville, Tenn., while her attorney, Mark Chalos, looks on. Marjorie Norw ood, 59, became sick with fungal meningitis after getting steroid shots produced by the New England Compounding Center. Federal lawsuits in five states have b een filed against the company, which has filed for bankruptcy. Promising process worked in testing to find other types. Pap test retooled to spot more cancers Trustee sought in bankruptcy of pharmacy at root of problem By GARY FINEOUTAssociated PressTALLAHASSEE — Gov. Rick Scott is again facing criticism that he is over-stating the potential cost to Florida taxpayers of the fed-eral health care overhaul. Scott met Monday with Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius to express his concerns about the overhaul, which includes an expansion of the state’s safety-net health care program. The Republican governor told Sebelius that state taxpayers will have to pay near $26 billion over the next 10 years to implement the overhaul. That figure ‚ drawn up last month by the state’s main health care agency ‚ is three times higher than one drawn up by state economists back in August. Internal emails show that the state’s top economist and a legislative budget ana-lyst back in December chal-lenged the assumptions the Scott administration used to reach its figure. The administration assumed that Congress would change the federal law and reduce the amount of money that the state would receive to expand Medicaid. The existence of the emails was first reported by Health News Florida. The news triggered a sharp response from Democrats, who say Scott is pushing up the cost to justify his opposition to the Medicaid expansion. “Not only did Gov. Scott manufacture flawed cost estimates, but it appears he had been advised that the numbers were flawed and used them anyway,” said U.S. Rep. Kathy Castor, D-Tampa. Scott was a constant and vocal critic of the health care overhaul, but he toned down his rhetoric after President Obama won re-election. Still the Scott administration is defending the revised fig-ures, saying that past expe-rience has shown that pre-vious federal estimates for entitlement programs have been wrong. Scott spokeswoman Melissa Sellers said admin-istration officials “look for-ward to reviewing” other cost estimates. “There are three things the governor has stressed that remain unchang-ing in this important discussion about cost estimates,” Sellers said in a statement. “First, growing government is never free. Second, the number of people in Medicaid would nearly double with the new law (from approximately 3.3 million today to over 6 mil-lion). And third, once gov-ernment grows, it is almost never undone.” Michelle Dahnke, a spokeswoman for the Agency for Health Care Administration, which over-sees the state’s Medicaid program, said the federal fiscal climate and federal government’s track record shows “it is important for the state to consider the potential ramifications of expanding Medicaid as it relates to federal and state fiscal liability.” This marks the second time, however, that Scott has come under fire for overstating the cost of the overall. Last summer he was forced to backtrack after cit-ing incorrect estimates on national television. Medicaid is a $21 billion safety net program for the poor in Florida and current-ly the federal government picks up about 58 percent of the cost. Obama’s health care law called for states in 2014 to expand eligibility of Medicaid to those making up to 133 percent of the poverty level, or $29,326 for a family of four in Florida. The changes would also require adding people who are below the poverty level but not eligible for Medicaid such as childless adults. The U.S. Supreme Court ruled this summer, however, that expansion of Medicaid is not mandatory and that states can opt out if they choose. Most of the Medicaid expansion and other costs are being paid by the federal government. But the state has been trying to gauge the full financial impact to state taxpayers of both expanding Medicaid as well as paying higher reimbursement rates to health care providers. Meningitis Outbreak ScottScott under fire for health care cost estimate

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By KATIE ZEZIMA Associated Press NEWARK, N.J. The levels of harmful contami nants at Superstorm Sandy cleanup sites in New York and New Jersey have so far not exceeded federal workplace exposure limits, officials said Wednesday. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration tested dozens of cleanup sites, measuring worker exposure to toxic substanc es. The agency fanned out to workplaces and debris sites ranging from beaches to landfills, testing for air borne contaminants and taking samples from debris and storm water. Some sites showed the presence of contaminants including asbestos, carbon monoxide, lead and silica. Others had increased lev els of noise. None, howev er, were above OSHAs per missible exposure limits. Among the jobs being done include debris and sand removal, tree cut ting and other cleanup. Other testing came after an employee complained about fumes or air quality. Results of some tests of the test sites which include private businesses, parks and roads are still pending. The agency test ed residential demolition sites, but not inside private homes. These initial results should not be taken by employers as an all clear signal regarding potential exposure to health haz ards, said Robert Kulick, OSHAs regional adminis trator in New York, in a statement. It is important that each employer contin ually ensure that workers are not overexposed. Testing began Nov. 5. The agency said it contin ues to monitor sites and look for additional poten tial contamination left behind in structures as well as in cleanup and recov ery process areas where workers may be exposed to additional health hazards. It will post results on its Hurricane Sandy page. OSHA representatives have also been talking to employees at worksites about workplace rights and safety. OSHA did not test sites that were previously known to be contaminated, such as an oil refinery where a spill occurred. If a spill happened inside a business that handles hazardous materials, it is up to the employer to clean it, assess employee exposure, pro vide protective equipment or deem the site safe to return to work. 8A LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, JANUARY 10, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 8AHealth Dr. Robert J. Harvey 752-2336 Open 6 Days A Week Mon. Sat. Evening Appointments Available 1788 S.W. Barnett WayHwy. 47 South www.theaspendentalgroup.com Dr. Rameek McNair We are now a Cigna PPO Dental Network Savings Provider They fit like a GLOVE, better even than before. They are STRAIGHT!!! No more buck teeth! Did I say how much I LOVE MY TEETH? I just keep smiling and saying that to myself. Thank you EVERYONE for your incredible grace and for HEARING me! This is EXACTLY what I wanted. I couldnt ask for better. Thank you again, ALL of you. Many blessing for the upcoming week. I... LOVE... MY... Teeth Before Before After After Accepting New Patients Medicare, Blue Cross, Tri-Care and most insurance plans accepted Specializing in adult medical care including: Primary Care High Blood Pressure Heart Disease Lung Disease Gastrointestinal High Cholesterol Diabetes Headache Evaluation and Treatment Arthritis Low Back Problems Evaluation and Treatment Optifast Weight Loss System Full Dizziness, vertigo and balance diagnosis and treatment Womens Health Allergy Testing & Treatment Accepting New Patients SOUTHERN INTERNAL MEDICINE Located in the Lake City Mediplex Building 404 N.W. Hall of Fame Drive, Lake City, FL Visit our website at www.SouthernInternalMedicineLC.com 386-719-2540 Allison B. Baris, ARNP Stephanie K. Finnell, ARNP Stefanie Jackson, ARNP New Patients New Patients INTERNAL MEDICINE Dr. Guy S. Strauss, D.O.,F.A.C.O.I ASSOCIATED PRESS A playground is fenced off in an area where high levels of lead were recorded following Superstorm Sandy in Laurence Harbor, N.J. Federal and state officials said Sandys floodwa ters didnt cause problems at any of the 147 toxic waste or Superfund sites in the New YorkNew Jersey area. Agencys tests find relatively little danger. OSHA: Sandy contamination within limits Report: Death rates from cancer still inching down ByLAURAN NEERGAARD AP Medical Writer WASHINGTON Death rates from cancer are continuing to inch down, researchers reported Monday. Now the question is how to hold onto those gains, and do even better, even as the population gets older and fatter, both risks for developing cancer. There has been clear progress, said Dr. Otis Brawley of the American Cancer Society, which com piled the annual cancer report with government and cancer advocacy groups. But bad diets, lack of physical activity and obesity together wield incredible forces against this decline in mortality, Brawley said. He warned that over the next decade, that trio could surpass tobacco as the lead ing cause of cancer in the U.S. Overall, deaths from can cer began slowly dropping in the 1990s, and Mondays report shows the trend holding. Among men, can cer death rates dropped by 1.8 percent a year between 2000 and 2009, and by 1.4 percent a year among women. The drops are thanks mostly to gains against some of the leading types lung, colorectal, breast and prostate can cers because of treat ment advances and better screening. The news isnt all good. Deaths still are rising for certain cancer types includ ing liver, pancreatic and, among men, melanoma, the most serious kind of skin cancer. Preventing cancer is better than treating it, but when it comes to new cases of cancer, the picture is more complicated. Cancer incidence is drop ping slightly among men, by just over half a percent a year, said the report published by the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Prostate, lung and colorectal cancers all saw declines. But for women, earlier drops have leveled off, the report found. That may be due in part to breast can cer. There were decreases in new breast cancer cases about a decade ago, as many women quit using hormone therapy after menopause.

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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Thursday, January 10, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas? Contact Tim Kirby Sports Editor 754-0421 tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS G. W. HUNTER, INC. 1130 US Hwy 90 W (386) 752-5890 WE NOW HAVE ETHANOL FREE PLUS GASOLINE ONLY AT INTENDED USES: BOATS & WATERCRAFTS COLLECTABLE VEHICLES OFF-ROAD VEHICLES MOTORCYCLES SMALL ENGINES Located at SHANDS Lake City, Live Oak & Starke Womens Center of Florida ALL MAJOR INSURANCES ACCEPTED INCLUDING MEDICAID & MEDICARE FREE Pregnancy Ultrasound WITH THIS AD* *Insurance billing may occur if necessary. Some Restrictions apply. OBSTRETRICS & GYNECOLOGY PRENATAL CARE & ULTRASOUNDS STDS & HPV TESTING BIRTH CONTROL & INFERTILITY MENOPAUSE & INCONTINENCE WEIGHT LOSS & 4D ULTRASOUNDS BOTOX & LASER HAIR REMOVAL NO INSURANCE VISITS ASK ABOUT OUR $ 50 CHANDLER MOHAN, MD EMAD ATTA, MD NOW HIRING MID-LEVEL PROVIDERS 386-466-1106 SERVICES: OB-GYN www.myobcare.com New Patient Exam and Necessary X-rays DO150, DO330 First-time patient Reg. $136 $ 29 SAVINGS OF $107 Expires January 31, 2013 ASPEN DENTAL GROUP ADVANCE DRY CLEANERS Branford Crossing Across from the fairgrounds Patel 386-755-5571 FULL SERVICE CLEANER Wash, Fold, & Alternation Services Available After Years Of Simulated Use, We Maintained Support 4 Times Better Than Other Leading Brands Wholesale Sleep Distributors FURNITURE SHOWPLACE CATALOG SHOWROOM FOR COMPLETE HOME FURNISHINGS Mon.-Fri. 9:30 a.m. 6:00 p.m. Sat. 9:30 a.m. 4:00 p.m. Destiny Opti Cool Memory Foam Queen 2-pc Set $ 799 95 Heathrow Queen 2-pc Set Bay Island Memory Foam Queen 2-pc Set $ 1299 95 $ 699 95 BLUE BELL ICE CREAM 2/ $ 11 00 Half Gallon Assorted Flavors Shop The Best! Try Our BREAKFAST COMBO! NEW! Try Our BREAKFAST COMBO! NEW! Sausage or Chicken Biscuit Large or Medium Fine Coffee FOR $ 2.99 Plus Tax and Fruit Crisp Bars or Pop Tarts (2 Pk) Assorted Flavors Buy One Get One FREE! Prices in effect thru 1/31/13 FILE Fort White Highs Melton Sanders (22) takes a shot while being guarded by Columbia Highs Dillan Hall (10) during a game on Dec. 17. Tigers lose first district game By BRANDON FINLEY bfinley@lakecityreporter.com Columbia High traveled into Jacksonville with a chance to take the district lead after entering tied with Wolfson High, but the Wolfpack defended its turf with a 54-53 win. The Tigers struggled early in the contest fall ing behind 15-8 in the first quarter and went into the half with a 28-21 deficit. A strong third quarter brought the Tigers back to life, however, and Columbia entered the final quarter deadlocked in a 40-40 tie with the Wolfpack. Trailing by one with the ball in their hands, the Tigers werent able to come away with the final shot, however, and Wolfson took a one-game lead in the District 4-6A race over Columbia. We had the last shot and the kids played as hard as they could, Columbia head coach Horace Jefferson said. We just couldnt put the last one in. We fought and fought to get back in the game. We had a cold spell early, but were able to tie it. At the end, we had a chance to win and as a coach that is all you can ask for. Morris Marshall led the Tigers to the comeback with 17 points in the con test, however, Columbias Big 3 as Jefferson refers to them all scored in double digits. Tre Simmons had 13 points and Javonta Foster had 11 points. Wayne Broom chipped in seven points for the Tigers. We did a good job of limiting them to only four three-pointers after they had averaged nearly 17 a game, Jefferson said. It was a tough district game. Columbia falls to 9-5 (5-1, district) while Wolfson improves to 15-2 (6-0, district) on the year. Columbia falls at Wolfson High with shot at win.

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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today AUTO RACING 2 a.m. NBCSN — Dakar Rally, stage 6, Arica to Calama, Chile (delayed tape) GOLF 11 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Volvo Champions, first round, at Durban, South Africa (same-day tape) 7 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Sony Open, first round, at Honolulu MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN — Miami at North CarolinaESPN2 — Michigan State at IowaNBCSN — Old Dominion at George Mason 9 p.m. ESPN — Kentucky at VanderbiltESPN2 — Arizona at Oregon 11 p.m. ESPN2 — Saint Mary’s at Gonzaga NBA BASKETBALL 8 p.m. TNT — New York at Indiana 10:30 p.m. TNT — Miami at PortlandFOOTBALLNFL postseason Wild-card Playoffs Houston 19, Cincinnati 13Green Bay 24, Minnesota 10Indianapolis at BaltimoreSeattle 24, Washington 14 Divisional Playoffs Saturday Baltimore at Denver, 4:30 p.m. (CBS)Green Bay at San Francisco, 8 p.m. (FOX) Sunday Seattle at Atlanta, 1 p.m. (FOX)Houston at New England, 4:30 p.m. (CBS) Conference Championships Sunday, Jan. 20 AFC, TBA (CBS)NFC, TBA (FOX) Pro Bowl Sunday, Jan. 27 At HonoluluAFC vs. NFC, 7 p.m. (NBC) Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 3 At New OrleansAFC champion vs. NFC champion, 6 p.m. (CBS)College all-star games Saturday, Jan. 19 RAYCOM College Football All-Star Classic At Montgomery, Ala.Stars vs. Stripes, 3 p.m. (CBSSN) East-West Shrine Classic At St. PetersburgEast vs. West, 4 p.m. (NFLN)BASKETBALLNBA schedule Today’s Games New York at Indiana, 8 p.m.Dallas at Sacramento, 10 p.m.Miami at Portland, 10:30 p.m. Friday’s Games Charlotte at Toronto, 7 p.m.Houston at Boston, 7:30 p.m.Utah at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. Phoenix at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.San Antonio at Memphis, 8 p.m.Minnesota at New Orleans, 8 p.m.Chicago at New York, 8 p.m.Detroit at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.Cleveland at Denver, 9 p.m.Portland at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.Oklahoma City at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.AP Top 25 schedule Today’s Games No. 4 Arizona at Oregon, 9 p.m.No. 9 Gonzaga vs. Saint Mary’s (Cal), 11 p.m. No. 22 Michigan State at Iowa, 7 p.m. Friday’s Game No. 13 Creighton at Missouri State, 8:05 p.m. Saturday’s Games No. 1 Duke at No. 20 N.C. State, Noon No. 3 Louisville vs. South Florida, 4 p.m. No. 4 Arizona at Oregon State, 8 p.m.No. 5 Indiana vs. No. 8 Minnesota, Noon No. 6 Kansas at Texas Tech, 4 p.m.No. 7 Syracuse vs. Villanova, NoonNo. 10 Missouri at Mississippi, 8 p.m.No. 11 Florida at LSU, 4 p.m.No. 12 Illinois at Wisconsin, 2:15 p.m.No. 14 Butler at Dayton, 2 p.m.No. 16 San Diego State vs. Colorado State, 8 p.m. No. 17 Notre Dame vs. UConn, 2 p.m. No. 18 Kansas State at West Virginia, 1:30 p.m. No. 19 Georgetown at St. John’s, 11 a.m. No. 21 Cincinnati at Rutgers, 8 p.m.No. 24 UNLV vs. Air Force, 10 p.m.No. 25 New Mexico vs. Fresno State, 3 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, JANUARY 10, 2013 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04202BAGATE THURSDAY EVENING JANUARY 10, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Last Resort A coup forces alliances. 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Farm LIFE 32 108 252To Be AnnouncedTo Be AnnouncedProject Runway All Stars Project Runway All Stars (N) Double DivasDouble Divas (N) (:01) Double Divas(:31) Double Divas USA 33 105 242NCIS “Sharif Returns” NCIS “Blowback” NCIS A young sailor’s body is found. NCIS A Navy lieutenant is poisoned. NCIS “Skeletons” CSI: Crime Scene Investigation BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Top 10 Countdown” (N) “Above the Rim” (1994, Drama) Duane Martin, Leon. Premiere. “National Security” (2003, Comedy) Martin Lawrence, Steve Zahn. ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) d College Basketball Teams TBA. (N)d College Basketball Teams TBA. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209SportsNation (N) d College Basketball Teams TBA. (N)d College Basketball Teams TBA. (N)d College Basketball SUNSP 37 -how to Do oridaDriven:58 Flat (N) (Live) Women’s College Basketball Florida at Mississippi State. (N) American Ski ClassicAlong the Way Wm. Basketball DISCV 38 182 278Amish Ma a “Holy War” Property WarsProperty WarsProperty WarsProperty WarsMoonshiners “Adios, Mr. Still” Property WarsProperty WarsMoonshiners “Adios, Mr. Still” TBS 39 139 247King of QueensSeinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryConan (N) HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) What Would You Do?What Would You Do?Showbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236Kourtney & KhloKourtney & KhloE! News (N) The Soup “You’ve Got Mail” (1998) Tom Hanks. Two bitter business rivals conduct an online love affair. Chelsea Lately (N) E! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. Food Man v. Food Mysteries at the Museum Mysteries at the Museum (N) Mysteries at the Museum The Dead Files HGTV 47 112 229Selling New YorkSelling New YorkHunters Int’lHouse HuntersSalvage DawgsSalvage DawgsRehab AddictRehab AddictHouse Hunters (N) Hunters Int’lHouse HuntersHunters Int’l TLC 48 183 280Island MediumIsland MediumTo Be AnnouncedTo Be AnnouncedFour Weddings “...and a Giraffe” (N) What Not to Wear “Nicole” (N) Four Weddings “...and a Giraffe” HIST 49 120 269(5:00) Jesse James’ Hidden TreasurePawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Cajun Pawn StarsCajun Pawn StarsCajun Pawn StarsCajun Pawn Stars(:02) Ax Men “Cage Match” ANPL 50 184 282Gator Boys: Xtra BitesRattlesnake RepublicAlaska Wildlife Troopers North Woods Law: On the Hunt (N) Law on the Border “Human Trade” (N) North Woods Law: On the Hunt FOOD 51 110 231Chopped “Belly Up” Cupcake Wars “Cowboy Cupcakes” Chopped “All American Competition” Chopped “Unsung Heroes” Sweet Genius Space-themed desserts. Rachael vs. Guy Celebrity Cook-Off TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the Lord Always Good NewThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesJoel Osteen Joseph PrinceHillsong TVPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -Halls of FameGame TimeWorld Poker Tour: Season 10 Tennis Champions Series: Boston. Sampras vs. McEnroe. Action Sports World TourWorld Poker Tour: Season 10 SYFY 58 122 244Face Off“Ghost Storm” (2012, Suspense) Crystal Allen, Carlos Bernard, Aaron Douglas. “The Mist” (2007, Horror) Thomas Jane. A deadly fog engulfs terri ed townspeople. Ghost Town AMC 60 130 254 “Bring It On” (2000, Comedy) Kirsten Dunst, Eliza Dushku. “Signs” (2002, Suspense) Mel Gibson. A widower investigates huge circles in his crop elds. (:31) “Signs” (2002) Mel Gibson, Joaquin Phoenix. COM 62 107 249South Park Tosh.0 The Colbert ReportDaily Show “Of ce Space” (1999, Comedy) Ron Livingston, Jennifer Aniston. Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Daily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327Reba Reba Reba Reba Reba Reba World’s Strictest Parents World’s Strictest Parents World’s Strictest Parents NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer “Bull-Whipped” The Rise of Black WolfWild AlaskaBig Sur: Wild CaliforniaClimbing Redwood GiantsWild Alaska NGC 109 186 276DiggersDiggersWicked Tuna: Hooked UpWicked Tuna: Hooked Up (N) Rocket CityRocket CityDiggersAbandonedRocket CityRocket City SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s Made (N) How It’s MadeThey Do It?They Do It?How It’s MadeHow It’s Made ID 111 192 285Deadly Women “Ruthless Revenge” Deadly Women “Pleasure from Pain” Fatal Vows “Your Cheatin Heart” The Will: Family Secrets Revealed (N) FrenemiesFrenemiesFatal Vows “Your Cheatin Heart” HBO 302 300 501(4:30) “Hemingway & Gellhorn” (2012) (:15) “Bruce Almighty” (2003, Comedy) Jim Carrey. ‘PG-13’ “Big Miracle” (2012, Adventure) John Krasinski, Kristen Bell. ‘PG’ Cathouse: Cat CallCathouse: Come MAX 320 310 515(:15) “Patch Adams” (1999, Comedy-Drama) Robin Williams. ‘PG-13’ (:15) “American Wedding” (2003, Comedy) Jason Biggs. ‘NR’ “The Hangover Part II” (2011) Bradley Cooper. ‘R’ The Erotic Traveler SHOW 340 318 545(4:45) Few Options(:25) “The Final Cut” (2004) Robin Williams. ‘PG-13’ “Our Idiot Brother” (2011) Paul Rudd. ‘R’ “50/50” (2011, Comedy-Drama) Joseph Gordon-Levitt. ‘R’ SuicideGirls (N) J A C K S O N V I L L E L o c a l physicians at a new medicalclinic in suburban Jacksonville are so sure their medicationwill help men with erectiledysfunction, they are offering the first 37 callers a free in-office medication dose. Erectile dysfunction and premature ejaculation have long been a problem for millions of men, in spite of the popularity of Viagra, Cialis and Levitra. Many men aren't helped by these pills or cannot take them due to adverse side effects. Florida Men's Medical Clinic custom blends over 180 combinations of medications for each patient. 'That's why our success rate is so /0./B:(@:9,=05 695:)@',/,374,5as old as ninety-four, with diabetes, prostate surgery and heart conditions. Regardless of t heir age or medical history our results everyday are (4(A05.B 334,+0*(;065:(9, approved, andn os u r g e r yis i n v o l v e d ',(+1<:; t h e p r e s c r i p t i o nf o raman's performance to 45-minutes, an hour, 90-minutes or 365.,9B(**69+05.;69 695:)@(5+ patients see results right in our office.After climax the patient stays erect the entire period of time. This allows them to achieve a second climax and adequately satisfyt h e i rp a r t n e r N oo t h e rmedication can do;/0:',6--,9(:0473,.<(9antee: If you don't respond to the medication on the first =0:0;;/,6--0*,=0:0;0:-9,,B '0;/;/(;.<(9(5;,,36*(3 patients have nothing to lose. Openings are filling quickl y for the free in-office medication dose, after that the normal feesw i llbe charged. P a t i e n t sa rea s s u r edo fu t m o s tprivacy and professionalism with private waiting rooms and an all-male staff. Further information is available by calling (904) 600-0560. Florida Men's Medical Clinic, 4651 Salisbury Rd., Suite 151 in the lobby,Jacksonville, FL, at I-95 & Butler/Rt. 202. For patients more than 60 miles away the doctor will pay your gas. www.FloridaMensClinic.comA d v e r t o r i a lF R E EM E D I C A T I O ND O S EErecti l eD y s f u n ction Cl i n i cOpensinJ a c k s onvi l l e BY STEVE MUELLER s Health Consultant (904) 600-0940 Patients are assured of utmost BRIEFS GAMES Today Q Fort White High girls basketball vs. Interlachen High, 6 p.m. Q Fort White High girls soccer at Lafayette High, 7 p.m. Q Fort White High boys soccer at St. Johns Lutheran School, 7 p.m. Q Columbia High girls basketball vs. Lafayette High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Q Fort White High boys basketball at Interlachen High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Friday Q Columbia High boys soccer at Wolfson High, 5:30 p.m. Q Columbia High girls soccer at Oak Hill School, 6 p.m. Q Columbia High girls basketball vs. Stanton Prep, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Q Columbia High wrestling at Suwannee High meet, TBA Q Columbia High JV soccer in Tallahassee tournament, TBA Saturday Q Columbia High boys basketball vs. Atlantic Coast High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) CHS TENNIS Lady Tiger tryouts Monday Columbia High’s girls tennis has tryouts at 3:30 p.m. Monday at the CHS tennis courts. All interested girls must have completed paperwork with them in order to try out. For details, call coach Tabatha McMahon at 755-8103. YOUTH BASEBALL North Florida Outlaws tryouts The North Florida Outlaws 8U travel machine pitch baseball team will have tryouts at 1 p.m. Saturday at the Southside Baseball Complex blue fields. For details, call Tommy Boston at 965-9311 or Drew Law at 965-8447.Lake City Babe Ruth registration Lake City Babe Ruth Baseball has opened online registration for its spring league. Go to lcccyb.com to sign up. For details, call Jessica Langley at 867-1897.Q From staff reports Bonds, Clemens rejected; no one elected to HallBy RONALD BLUMAssociated PressNEW YORK — Steroidtainted stars Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens and Sammy Sosa were denied entry to baseball’s Hall of Fame, with voters failing to elect any candidates for only the second time in four decades. In a vote that keeps the game’s career home run leader and one of its greatest pitchers out of Cooperstown — at least for now — Bonds received just 36.2 percent of the vote and Clemens 37.6 in totals announced Wednesday by the Hall and the Baseball Writers’ Association of America, both well short of the 75 percent necessary. Sosa, eighth on the career home run list, got 12.5 per-cent. “Curt Schilling made a good point, everyone was guilty. Either you used PEDs, or you did nothing to stop their use,” Hall of Famer Mike Schmidt said in an email to The Associated Press. “This generation got rich. Seems there was a price to pay.” Bonds, Clemens and Sosa were eligible for the first time and have up to 14 more years on the writ-ers’ ballot to gain baseball’s highest honor. “After what has been written and said over the last few years I’m not overly surprised,” Clemens said in a statement he posted on Twitter. Craig Biggio, 20th on the career list with 3,060 hits, topped the 37 candi-dates with 68.2 percent of the 569 ballots, 39 shy of election. Among other first-year eligibles, Mike Piazza received 57.8 percent and Schilling 38.8. Jack Morris led holdovers with 67.7 percent. He will make his final bal-lot appearance next year, when fellow pitchers Greg Maddux and Tom Glavine along with slugger Frank Thomas are eligible for the first time. Two-time NL MVP Dale Murphy received 18.6 per-cent in his 15th and final appearance. “With 53 percent you can get to the White House, but you can’t get to Cooperstown,” BBWAA secretary-treasurer Jack O’Connell said. “It’s the 75 percent that makes it dif-ficult.” It was the eighth time the BBWAA failed to elect any players. There were four fewer votes than last year and five members submit-ted blank ballots. “It’s a tough period for evaluation, that’s what this chalks up to,” Hall President Jeff Idelson said. “Honestly, I think that any group you put this to would have the same issues. ... There’s always going to be discus-sion and concern about players who didn’t get in, but at the end of the day it’s a process and again, a snapshot in time isn’t one year, it’s 15 with this exer-cise.” Bonds, baseball’s only seven-time Most Valuable Player, hit 762 home runs, including a record 73 in 2001. “It is unimaginable that the best player to ever play the game would not be a unanimous first-ballot selection,” said Jeff Borris of the Beverly Hills Sports Council, Bonds’ longtime agent. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High captain Dylan Sessions (7) heads the ba ll during a game against Eastside High on Dec. 20.Tigers take down Suwannee in rivalry gameFrom staff reportsColumbia High picked up a rivalry win against Suwannee High on the road on Tuesday. The Tigers edged the Bulldogs 3-1 to improve to 9-6-3 on the season. Alex Rhea opened the scoring for the Tigers off an assist from Dylan Sessions in the 30th min-ute of the first half. Sessions came back with his own goal on an assist from Tucker Stanton later in the half before turning it back over to Rhea. Rhea scored his second goal off another assist by Sessions to give Columbia the 3-1 win. “We had some good saves frm our keeper Ty Williams,” Columbia head coach Trevor Tyler said. “Our back four of Dakota Waters, Tristan O’Steen, Travis Berry and Rogelio Sosa played well. It was a team victory.”

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DEAR ABBY: This is in response to “Had It in Hartford” (Oct. 6), who has been unhappily mar-ried to her husband for 20 years. She said she married him for all the wrong reasons and “has never loved him the way a woman should love a man.” After I had been married for seven years, I went to my pastor concerned that the grass on the other side was looking greener than mine. As we spoke, I began to realize the extent of the investment I had put into my marriage and that I didn’t want to start over again on a new one. My mom always told me, “Marriage is not easy. You will always have to work on it. There will be times when you won’t feel that you like him or love him.” I have been married for 36 years now. Do I notice handsome men, or appreciate a man who treats me kindly? Of course. I’m not blind or dead. Love isn’t just a feeling, but a choice and a com-mitment. I’m committed to my husband not because I’m “supposed” to be, but because I CHOOSE to be. It seems to me that “Had It” never made that choice or worked toward it, but expected it to just happen eventually. She has a foundation of trust and friendship that helps a marriage through the rough times. Many marriages that end in divorce rely on sexual attraction and passion to carry them instead of friendship. We’re told that marriage is 50-50. That’s not true. It’s 100-100. I’m respon-sible for my 100 percent, and my spouse is respon-sible for his. “Had It” should take another look at what she’s about to lose and tally up the costs to her family. Is she really trapped? Or has she just been unwill-ing to choose to love? -BARBARA IN MOUNT VERNON, WASH. DEAR BARBARA: Thank you for writing. I advised “Had It” to think long and hard before leav-ing her husband, but that if she truly cannot love him the way he deserves, she should move on. My readers’ comments: DEAR ABBY: “Had It” doesn’t feel love toward her husband because she spends her time and energy ruminating about a “mistake” she thinks she made 20 years ago. She says he is doing every-thing right and they get along fine. If she tried something positive, like reminding herself about the qualities she likes about him, and doing things she knows make him happy instead of fan-tasizing about other men, she might find the love she craves in her marriage. Loving feelings come from loving behavior, not the other way around. The sooner she realizes this, the sooner she’ll see that what she really wants is right there at home with her family. And it has been there all along. -DR. PEGGY B. DEAR ABBY: I have this message for “Had It”: I felt like you and acted on my feelings. Don’t do it! Wait until your kids are older. As much as you want a more intimate relationship, you cannot begin to imag-ine the impact straying will have on your kids. -REGRETTING IT IN NEW YORK DILBERT BABY BLUES HOROSCOPES DEAR ABBY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Look before you leap. Digest what everyone else is saying and doing before you proceed. Put time and effort into self-improve-ment or helping a worthy cause. Restrict anyone taking advantage of you or trying to make you look bad. ++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): A business trip will lead to financial gains. Follow your plans through to the end. Don’t trust anyone to do a job for you. Love and romance are on the rise, and sharing your thoughts will lead to a very special promise. +++++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Do whatever it takes to push through a settle-ment, contract or any other deal you have on the table. Don’t delay seeking help if you develop a health issue. Address whatever pending matter you have quickly and efficiently and move on. +++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Welcome change, sug-gestions and whatever else comes your way. Learn from unusual situations. Take a creative but no-nonsense approach to both personal and business partnerships. Don’t shy away from someone who comes from a different background. Love is in the stars. +++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Do your best to get along with others. Added respon-sibility is likely to unfold at home. Be ready to step into action and be willing to accept the changes that are initiated. Compromise will show your ability to adapt and work with oth-ers. +++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Embrace change and jump into action. Share your thoughts and take part in an event or activity that interests you the first chance you get. Love is on the rise, and spending time with someone special or socializing more will improve your personal life. +++++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Keep a low profile. You are best to keep your thoughts a secret until you are sure you know what you want and see a clear passage to move forward. You will be criticized if you make a motion to do some-thing prematurely. ++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Communication will be the key to getting your way. Develop a creative concept you’ve been con-templating and present what you intend to do. Your ideas will be well received and options will be proposed that will give you hope for future opportunities. +++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Think about past mistakes and how you handled situations and you will find a better way to deal with similar situations that appear to be develop-ing. Keep a lid on extrava-gance, exaggeration and excess. Stick close to home and avoid trouble. +++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Draw on your experience and exercise your rights. What and whom you know will help you reach your goals. An unusual approach to an old idea will give it new life. Romance is highlighted. Make plans to enhance your love life. +++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Not everyone will be honest. You have to weed out the bad informa-tion and individuals before you make any decisions that will affect your future personally or profession-ally. Put more effort into your surroundings and personal comfort. +++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Be prepared for change. Know what you have to offer and set a price or value on your time and talent. Contracts and agreements will favor you at the end of the day. Savor your victory and share your joy with loved ones. ++++ CELEBRITY CIPHER Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com BLONDIE BEETLE BAILEY B.C. FRANK & ERNEST FOR BETTER OR WORSE ZITS HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH GARFIELD THE LAST WORD Eugenia Last Readers urge wife to work through problems at home Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. CLASSIC PEANUTS Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, JANUARY 10, 2013 3B

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTHURSDAY, JANUARY10, 2013 Classified Department: 755-5440 4B Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 Services White's Trucking Services You call & We Haul! Fill Dirt, Lime Rock. AsphaltMillings, Granite, Road Rock.386-362-8763 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO.: 122009CA000808CAXXXXBAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LPFKACOUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS,Plaintiff, v.JESSICAD. CASSELL; JOHN D. CASSELL; ANYAND ALLUN-KNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINSTTHE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUALDEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAYCLAIM AN INTERESTAS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIM-ANTS; STATE OF FLORIDADE-PARTMENTS OF REVENUE; AND UNKNOWN TENANT/S OWNERS N/K/ALISADILL,Defendant(s).AMENDED NOTICE OF SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to an Order on Plaintiff’s Amended Motion to Reschedule Foreclosure Sale dated 11/20/12, en-tered in Civil Case No. 122009CA000808CAXXXX of the Circuit Court of the third Judicial Circuit in and for Columbia County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Cir-cuit Court will sell to the highest bid-der for cash on 23rd day of Jan., 2013 at 11:00 a.m. on the Third Floor of the Columbia County Court-house, 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit:LOT5, BLOCK 7, COUNTRYCLUB ESTATES REPLATAC-CORDING TO THE MAPOR PLATTHEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 3, PAGE 32, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CO-LUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-er than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file aclaim within 60 days after the sale.ATTENTION: PERSONS WITH DISABILITIESIf you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceed-ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you to the provision of certain assis-tance.Please contact:ADACoordinator173 NE Hernando Avenue, Room 408Lake City, FL32055Phone: (386) 719-7428DATED ATLAKE CITY, FLORI-DATHIS 20TH DAYOF NOV., 2012/s/ B. ScippioP. DEWITTCASONCLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURTCOLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDASEAL05535989January 10, 17, 2013 020Lost & Found Found Nintendo 3D In vicinity of Troy St & Elementary School. Need to Provide Birth date & Serial I.D. Info. 243-8135 Found on Ichetucknee Rd Small female short hair brown dog, No collar. Very Sweet, Sweet, Sweet. Contact 984-6796 100Job Opportunities05536728Retail Sales Associate at Camping World, Lake City High School education or equivalent Previous Retail experience preferred Ability to established strong product knowledge and sell to customers. Superior customer service skills and excellent communication skills both written and verbal Must maintain a professional demeanor and work ethic Available to start immediately. Apply in person. Auto Mechanic Wanted. Call to make an Appointment. 965-6343 100Job OpportunitiesConstruction Salesman Needed. Excellent Pay. Experience Required. 866-959-7663 Needed CNC Machinist Must be familiar with Lathes and Mills, send resume to Grizzly Mfg. 174 NE Cortez Ter. Lake City FL32055, or Email: guy@qiagroup.com NO PHONE CALLS/WALK-INS Housekeeping positions @ Camp Kulaqua Please call Jacalyn @ 386-454-7960 Industrial Structural/ Mechanical Designer-Draftsman Must have experience in design and detailing Material Handling Equipment (conveyor systems) & related structural steel support systems. Proficiency in AutoCAD is necessary. DO NOTAPPLYIN PERSON Send resume to Draftsman 3631 US Highway 90 East Lake City, Fl 32055 LaborerPosition Must be able to read Tape Measurer Apply in person Grizzly Mfg. 174 NE Cortez Terrace Lake City FL32055 Mechanic needed with tools and experience. Southern Specialize Truck & Trailer. 386-752-9754 Must have a minimum of 5 yrs Exp. selling HVAC Equipment. Excellent benefits &Great pay. Call Allen 386-628-1093 Real Estate Co. looking for Office Staff Computer knowledge required. Real Estate Exp. is a plus! Fax resume to 386-496-4309 Sales Help at Florida Visitors Center. Benefits, hourly wage plus commission. Excellent opportunity with National company. Westgate Resorts. Call Ed 904-540-2314 or email Ed_Newman@wgresorts.com SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 Service Techs & Installers Must be EPA& NATE certified. Excellent benefits & great pay. Call Allen (386) 628-1093 Truck Repair facility Service Writer needed. Computer literate and understanding of truck repair and parts procurement. Southern Special Truck & Trailer 752-9754 120Medical Employment05536623Referral Coordinator/ Checkout Clerk Medical Office is seeking qualified candidate with Good Multi-tasking skills and professionalism. Must have exp. w/Med. Term & Ins. Referrals & Auth. Send resume by Email to jsmith@ccofnf.com. No Calls Please. 05536657RN/LPN 3-11 Shift and PRN Avalon Healthcare Center is currently accepting applications for the part time positions of RN/LPN for 3-11 Shift and PRN Please apply at Avalon Healthcare and Rehabilitation Center. 1270 S.W. Main Blvd. Lake City, Florida 32025 or fax resume to 386-752-8556 EOE Billing Specialist : Complete knowledge of insurance, Follow Up and Follow Thru of Accts Receivable, Billing, Posting and Collection, Sage Software a plus. Fax resume to 758-5628. CMA experience preferred in Peds/ Family Practice. Experience injections & taking accurate vital signs. Excellent communication & documentation, organization & assessment skills. Fax resume to 758-5628 DIET AR Y MANAGER Needed CDM, Chef, LTC, 2 years experience preferred Must be able to manage large staff and oversee daily food preparation for a 180 bed SNF. Full time with excellent benefits. E-mail resume to Greg Roberts: groberts@gulfcoasthealthcare.com or fax to: (386)362-4417. Live Oak, FLEOE/V/D/M/F 120Medical EmploymentGREATOPPORTUNITY•Full Time Experienced C.N.A’s All Shifts Apply in person at Suwannee Health Care & Rehab. 1620 Helevenston Street S.E. Live Oak, FL32064 EOE/m/f/d/v Massage Therapist Needed in a 180 Beds SNF Licensed, 1-2 years Experience preferred. Part-time weekend position. E-mail resume to Greg Roberts: groberts@gulfcoasthealthcare.com or fax to: (386) 362-4417 Live Oak, FLEOE/V/D/M/F 240Schools & Education05536525Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class1/7/2013• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-1/14/13• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies Free to Good Home 1yr old Med. mix breed Male dog, good w/ children and other dogs, does not do well with cats. Call 752-4481 PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. Puppy 8 wks old Cream Poodle Health Certificate $350.00 Contact 752-4890 407Computers HPComputer $75.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 408Furniture SOFABED, new decking, springs, and mattress $100. 386-754-1595 414Needlecraft & SewingSERIOUS DEAL For Serious Sewers. Too Much to List. 754-6783 420Wanted to Buy WANTED Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans. $300 & up No title Needed Free Pickup 386-878-9260 After5pm 386752-3648 430Garage Sales Must Sell -Lrg Capacity W/D, Refrig., D/W, Freezer, TV, Roll Top Desk, End Table, & Coffee tables. Contact for more info. 752-1092 PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 440Miscellaneous Fitness Center Equipment Treadmills, Ellipticals, Stair Masters & Bikes Cybex, Nautilus & Free Weight Equipment. Tanning Beds, Office Chairs, Desk, Copiers & more. Must sell quick. Call for prices (386)365-2047 or (386)752-1652 Troy-Bilt 5550 Watt Generator, 10HPOHVBriggs & Stratton, $400, 386-754-1595 630Mobile Homes forRent2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $700. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 3 BR/1 BA, close to town, fenced in yard, private well $800 month. & $800 deposit 386-752-7578 & 386-288-8401 3 BR/2 BA, completely refurbished, appliances furnished, $795 month. & $795 deposit 386-752-7578 3BR/2BA DWMH on 2.5 Acres North of Lake City $500 Dep $700 Mth Call 386-623-0232 and leave msg 3Br/2Ba Mod 1/2acre (nice subd) concrete drive, wrap around deck appl's,energysaver, &thermo's ready (386) 984-5341 $800 mo Lots for Rent for your RVor your own Cabin. Between Lake City & G’ville. Access to I-75 & 441 (352)317-1326. Quiet Country Park 3bd/2ba $525, 2bd/1ba $425. Very clean. NO PETS! References & Deposit required 386-758-2280 640Mobile Homes forSale$44,900. 1,600+ sqft, 3/2 DWMH Country setting on 2 acres. Good Condition. Concrete block work shop. David Mincey Poole Realty 386-590-0157 MLS 82068 1958 home. Hardwood and tile flooring, split plan with 2 master suites, formal dining, office. $167,500, Kellie Shirah, Poole Realty 386-208-3847. MLS#81895 2006 16X80 3/2 $25,400 --2007 32x44 3/2 $33,500--BOTH HOMES INCLUDE DELIVERY TOYOUR LAND. Several Repo’s Coming In The Next 10 Days--Call North Pointe Homes For Details. Call 352-872-5566 2013 DOUBLEWIDE $33,995 inc. set-up, trim-out & A/C Call 386-288-8379. 3 DWELLINGS on 5+ aces, main house approx 2453 sqft, 2 story, wrap around porch. $397,000. Anita Handy, 386-208-5877 Poole Realty MLS#82510 640Mobile Homes forSale3/2 DWMH, Spacious great room, kitchen w/ breakfast nook. Corner lot w/12x24 storage bldg $54,000. Sherrel McCall, 386-208-5244 Poole Realty MLS 82361 3BR/2BA28X64 in a great location, a lot of upgrades, fireplace. Only $2,500 down $399 a month. Call Paula at 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com 5 LIKENew Mobile Homes!!! For under $30,000. MUSTSEE Call John T. 386-752-1452 BANK REPO 3BR/2BADoublewide ’09 Excellent condition. Only $999 down $377 a month. Call Paula 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com 640Mobile Homes forSalePalm HarborHomes 4/2 From 499 Mo Loaded3/2 From 399 Mo Loaded Homes on Your Lot 0 Down 800-622-2832 ext 210 MUSTSEE 2013 2x6 walls, R30 insulation, OSB wrap, house wrap, real wood cabinets, and thermal pain windows. Payment $399 per month call John T386-752-1452. New 2013-28x483/2 JACOBSEN $35,400 Delivered Only. OR $39,995 Delivered and Set up. Big Rooms. North Pointe Homes, 4545 NW13th St., Gainesville, 352-872-5566 Nice Location,Older 3/2 DWMH in need of some repairs. Large covered back porch. $43,600. William Golightly, Poole Realty 386-590-6681 MLS 82213

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTHURSDAY, JANUARY10, 2013 5B Classified Department: 755-5440 2001 Dodge Ram 3500V10 Magnum, extended cab, SLT, 4 WD, DRW, AT, PW, PS, red w/tan interior, 137,000 miles, good condition.$7,900386-984-6606 or 386-758-6800 2000 Lincoln TowncarMed. blue, leather, power seats & more. 147,400 miles. Excellent condition.$2,990 386-623-2848 640Mobile Homes forSaleREDUCED !GREATLOCATION between Live Oak & Lake City. 3/2 DWMH on 1 acre. $35,000. Call Vicki Prickitt. Poole Realty 386-590-1402 MLS 82366 Suwannee River Front Home Very Nice 4br/2ba, fireplace, large deck, $149,800 Owner Broker. 1.8 acres (mol) 386-935-1482 WANTED…CASH PAID for your Mobile Home, Singlewide or Doublewide flood homes welcome. Call 386-288-8379 650Mobile Home & Land1/2acre, 3/2 modular, wrap around deck, concrete foundation & drive, energy standards high, 1mile from Lake city.$565 mo.(owner finance)20 yrs w/ $5k dn. Marginal credit. Gary Hamilton (386) 984-5341 2br/2ba on 3.51 ac, 1512 sqft DW perfect Rental, Nice and Clean Large deck, MLS # 82216, $65,000 Results Realty 386-397-3473 Brittany Stoeckert FSBO 5 ac lot w/ 1995 refurb. MH. 66ft long w/ new roof & wheel chair ramp. $5,000 down Owner Fin. on Balance Approx 5 miles N. of LC. 386-752-4597 OwnerFinanced 3/22.5 ac.River Access. Small down $585 mo 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com Reduced Out of State owner, Anxious to sell. Nice 2br/2ba, 1996 DW, Energy Efficient, 3/4 frnshd, 3 yr old roof, 1/2 ac lot in Oak Wd subdv in Live Oak $38,900 or best resonable offer. Call 309-645-2659 SW2BD/1.5BA, 1 acre, Updated Kitchen. $3,500 down, $350 mth Contact 305-304-4028 705Rooms forRent RV for Rent $450 mth + Security Utilities Included, Avail now. 386-497-3524 or 386-288-9110 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05535481We’ve got it all!$89 Deposit Limited Avail. Call Today! Windsong Apts. *Free afterschool program386-758-8455 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Amberwood Hills Apts. Private Patio area. Beautiful yard. Washer/dryer hkup. Free water & sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special. 386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com BRANFORD VILLAS 386-935-2319 2br/1ba Apts. Now available.$570. mo. TDD number 1-800-955-8771 Equal Housing Opportunity Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2 mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet Friendly. Pool laundry & balcony. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A$530 month $530 deposit garbage included. No pets. 386-344-2170 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Greentree Townhouse Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free water & sewer. Balcony & patio. Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled 1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living room. $450. mo plus sec. 386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951 Redwine Apartments Pets welcome. with 5 complexes, we have a home for you. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 Wayne ManorApts. Spacious 2bedroom washer/dryer. Behind Kens off Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 www .myflapts.com WindsorArms Apartments. Move in! 2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free 200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent3 bedroom 1 bath $630 mth and $630 deposit. CH/A Contact 377-2170 3bd/1ba very clean, CH/A, carport, screened back porch, fenced back yard. $700 mth & $700 Deposit. Call 386-344-5065 3bdrm very spacious, 2ba, garage, CH/AFenced in backyard. $1,400 mth & $1,400 dep. Contact 386-344-1914 3br/1.5ba. Very clean, Brick great area w/bonus room. Carport, shed & Fenced (privacy) back yard. $825. mo $825. dep. Ref’s req’d. (941)920-4535 ForLease ,3Br/2bth DWon ten acres S.of Columbia City.Contact At 727-289-2172 $800.00 mo.$350.00 security. NICE 3/2 brick home w/garage in quiet neighborhood. 489 SWBrandy. $900 plus sec. dep. 386-438-4600 750Business & Office RentalsMedical, Retail and Professional Office space on East Baya near Old Country Club Rd. Call 386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622 (cell) 805Lots forSale Nice 2 acre lot in Timberlake S/D. New Owner will have fishing rights. MLS #79025 Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473 $13,500 Nice vacant lot in Desirable River Community, Priced to sell! MLS #73268 $15,000 Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert397-3473 810Home forSale Access Realty Gorgeous views 3bd/3ba on Lake Montgomery. Elevator, fishing dock & jacuzzi. MLS 81438 $249,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access RealtySpacious 4 bd/3ba Cypress Lake w/ 3643 sqft 1.25 acres on lake. Vaulted ceilings. MLS 81314 $279,900. Patti Taylor386-623-6896 Access RealtyTwo story 1895 Victorian house w/ electrical upgrades throughout. double -deck porches, MLS 71594 $149,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Affordable 4/2 on 10 acres in Bell. Home features over 2,200 heated sqft. MLS# 76585, Results Realty $67,500. Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Nice mini farm on 2 Ac. fenced and cross fenced w/water for livestock. 2B/2B. MLS# 82569, Results Realty $44,900. Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 820Farms & Acreage4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com Access Realty10 acre square tract, High & Dry, OF Avail. w/ 25% down. Convenient Location MLS 81258$39,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access Realty43.64 acres wooded acreage in N.Columbia County. Scenic & Private. MLS 74429 $89,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Owner financed land 1/2 to 10 acre lots. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 830Commercial PropertyIndustrial warehouse7+ acres fenced 17,000 sq ft Barn $1,500 mo. TomEagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 930Motorcycles 2008 HARLEY Electra Glide, 24,000 miles, Black, Touring Model. Call 619-952-9715 950Cars forSale 2000 Lincoln Town Car; Med blue, leather, power seats & more. 147,400 miles, Exc condition. $2,990. 386-623-2848ADVERTISE YOUR Job Opportunities in the Lake City Reporter Classifieds. Enhance Your Ad with Your Individual Logo For just pennies a day. Call today, 755-5440. 755-5440Toplace your classified ad call We’re on target! days a weekSubscribe Today 386-755-5445 LAKE CITY REPORTER This Reporter Works For You! 755-5440Classifieds 755-5445 Circulation

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