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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
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Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:01996

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:01996

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

By DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comA Lake City man allegedly stole scrap transmissions, engines and metal from a local scrap yard and then sold them to a different scrap yard. Earntraevis Antonio Claridy, 23, 297 SE Avalon Ave. 108, faces felony charges of deal-ing in stolen property, pos-sessing burglary tools, bur-glary and larceny, according to a Columbia County Sheriff’s Office arrest report. Deputy Ted Wooley responded to Wilson’s Salvage on Hope Henry Road in refer-ence to a burglary around 9 p.m. on Monday. Carlos Wilson, owner of Wilson’s Salvage, told the deputy that he had been out of town since Dec. 21, and his brother notified him that he saw a white Ford truck drive past him on Saturday with what looked like his scrap metal, according to the arrest report. Wilson said when he arrived back at his lot, he noticed that the chain that locked his fence was cut, and that between 50 to 60 engines, 50 to 60 trans-missions, 50 to 60 drive shafts By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comA family-friendly atmosphere, big-screen televisions, a menu that includes wings, ribs and seafood, and a huge outside eating area will be the calling cards for Gator’s Dockside Restaurant, set to open in Lake City in March. The restaurant will be in the Lake City Commons shopping plaza and will occupy the suite that formerly housed Kazbor’s Grille. “We’ve been looking at coming to Lake City for about five years, and we considered this location about five years ago before Kazbor’s, but the landlord at the time choose Kazbor’s over us,” said Jerry Roberts, owner of the new Gator’s Dockside location. Roberts described Gator’s Dockside Restaurant as a familyfriendly, casual, sports-bar themed restaurant. There are 20 Gator’s Dockside Restaurants around the state. Roberts opened the Gator’s Dockside Restaurant in Gainesville about 10 years ago. He said he’s looking forward to a Lake City site to comple-ment it. He said he met several people from the area who visited the Gainesville location and asked about opening a store in the Lake City area. Gator’s Dockside, which is open for lunch and dinner only, will be open daily from 11 a.m. Opinion ................ 4APeople.................. 2AObituaries .............. 5A Advice & Comics ......... 4B Puzzles ................. 2B TODAY IN PEOPLE Carey: ‘Idol’ feud ‘trumped up.’ 79 58 Partly cloudy WEATHER, 2A Lake City ReporterWEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2013 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | 75¢ LAKECITYREPORTER.COM CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 138, No. 246 1A COMING THURSDAY Local news roundup. Gator’s Dockside coming soon Restaurant set to open in Lake Cityplaza in March. JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterIncoming Third Circuit Public Defender Blair Payne (cen ter) recites the oath of office as he is sworn in by Circ uit Judge David Fina on Tuesday at the Suwannee County Courthouse. Alisa Bergmann holds a Bib le for Payne. Payne replaces Dennis Roberts, who held th e post for the past 24 years. Changing of the guard U.S. roasts to hottest year on recordBy SETH BORENSTEINAP Science WriterWASHINGTON — America set an off-thecharts heat record in 2012. A brutal combination of a widespread drought and a mostly absent winter pushed the average annual U.S. temperature last year up to 55.32 degrees Fahrenheit, the government announced Tuesday. That’s a full degree warmer than the old record set in 1998. Breaking temperature records by an entire degree is unprecedented, scientists say. Normally, records are broken by a tenth of a degree or so. “It was off the chart,” said Deke Arndt, head of climate monitoring at the National Climatic Data Center in Asheville, N.C., which calculated the temperature records. Last year, he said, will go down as “a huge exclamation point at the end of a couple decades of warming.” The data center’s figures for the entire world won’t come out until next week, but through the first 11 months of 2012, the world was on pace to have its eighth warmest year on record. Scientists say the U.S. heat is part global warming in action and natural weather variations. The drought that struck almost Powerco-opraisesratesBy TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comClay Electric Cooperative members will notice an increase in their January util-ity bills, but the new rate will be lower than last year’s aver-age rate. The rate Clay Electric is charged for energy and the rate its customers are charged changes throughout the year. Wayne Mattox, Clay Electric manager of communications, said the rates are reviewed monthly. “We do a monthly assessment at the first of each month,” he said. “We look at what our power costs are pro-jected to be, which typically remains very stable through-out the year. We look at operational expenses and lots of other factors and then go ahead and set the power costs at the first of the month.” Tuesday, Clay Electric Cooperative officials announced the rate Clay charg-es for 1,000 kilowatt hours of electricity would increase to $109. The rate for November and December was $105. Clay Electric officials said the $109 charge is lower than Clay’s average cost for 1,000 kilowatt hours for 2012, which was just a little more than $110. Mattox said the new rate is basically setting the rate back to where it was previously, but a little lower. “In 2012 we had two months, in November and December, where we lowered our power cost as a benefit to our members,” he said. “We provide service at cost. We are a not for-profit utility. We saw that our margins were getting a little bit larger than we felt comfortable with, so we decided to go ahead and lower our power cost through our power cost adjustment feature in our bill statement. That allowed the members to take the money rather than paying a higher electric bill.” Clay Electric, which is headquartered in Keystone Heights, serves approximate-ly 165,000 customers in 14 counties with district offices in Keystone Heights, Orange Park, Lake City, Gainesville, Salt Spring and Palatka. Mattox said the power cost increase will impact all of its customers. “We enjoyed — thanks Clay Electric’srates will be near earlier levels. THEFT continued on 3A RECORD continued on 3A GATOR’S continued on 3A CLAY continued on 3A That’s a wrapJASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterColumbia County Tourist Development Council marketing d irector Paulette Lord (left), executive director Harvey Campbell and admi nistrative assistant Lori Regan stand in front of a van adorned with a new wr ap-around. ‘This van is one of the many marketing tools we have at our di sposal,’ Campbell said. City man arrested in theft of auto scrap JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterFuture site of Gator’s Dockside. Claridy

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State rests in foster child case MIAMI The prosecu tion rested Tuesday in the case of a woman accused of killing a young foster child after a former fellow jail inmate testified that the woman tearfully admit ted killing the girl when the two shared a cell one night. Two other inmates have also said the woman confessed behind bars. Ramona Tavia, a 41-yearold serving life for a 1994 robbery and murder, said she befriended Geralyn Graham in a womans jail annex in downtown Miami and was briefly moved into Grahams cell in November 2003. Tavia said Graham seemed upset after a phone call and was crying when corrections officers led her into the cell. Graham, Tavia said, kept repeating that she killed the baby to protect her former live-in lover, Pamela Graham. She said she had to protect Pam. Pam is sick and weak, Tavia testified. After Tavias testimony capped some five weeks of trial, Assistant State Attorney Joshua Weintraub said the state rested its case. Graham, 66, faces life in prison if convicted of murder, kidnapping and child abuse charges in the disappearance of 4-year-old Rilya Wilson, whose body has never been found. Rilya was not discovered to be missing from the Graham home until 15 months after authorities believe she was killed, leading to changes in the state foster care system and a high-level shakeup at the Department of Children and Families. The defense will begin today with police investi gators who were unable to find Rilyas remains, eyewitnesses to a slaying or any forensic evidence. Pamela Graham testified earlier that she does not know what happened to Rilya. Tampa schools get more security BRADENTON Bradenton police will investigate security at schools and officials in Polk County will step up patrols following the deadly shootings Dec. 14 at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn. Beginning Tuesday, a team of officers will investigate about a dozen schools within Bradentons city limits. Along with the task force, increased patrols of elementary schools will continue. In Polk County, law enforcement countywide will step up patrols at elementary schools when students return to school Tuesday. The additional law enforcement and increased patrol will be at no cost to the district. Hillsborough County has moved to put a higher presence of law enforce ment at schools since the Connecticut shooting. Pasco and Pinellas coun ties have not opted to do the same. School reopens after shooting FORT MYERS Classes are scheduled to resume at a southwest Florida Christian school where a man was shot and killed in the parking lot. Authorities say 27-yearold Kristopher Smith was dropping his children off Monday at the Apostolic Revival Center and Christian School when he was killed. No children were injured, and it doesnt appear any children were in the parking lot to wit ness the shooting. The Fort Myers NewsPress reports that school was closed Tuesday because of the shooting and classes will resume Wednesday. Authorities are investi gating the homicide and have not yet made an arrest. CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Author Judith Krantz is 85. Football Hall-of-Famer Bart Starr is 79. Sportscaster Dick Enberg is 78. Actress K. Callan is 77. Folk singer Joan Baez is 72. Rockabilly singer Roy Head is 72. Rock musician Jimmy Page (Led Zeppelin) is 69. Singer David Johansen (aka Buster Poindexter) is 63. Singer Crystal Gayle is 62. Actor J.K. Simmons is 58. Nobel Peace laureate Rigoberto Menchu is 54. Rock musician Eric Erlandson is 50. Actress Joely Richardson is 48. AROUND FLORIDA New Idol team disagrees about feud PASADENA, Calif. F ive minutes into their sea son-opening news confer ence and the new team at American Idol were hav ing their first disagreement about their disagreements. Asked Tuesday whether a sup posed feud between new judges Mariah Carey and Nicki Minaj was a publicity stunt, Fox network execu tive Mike Darnell said it was authen tic. He said there was a lot of passion within the group, which also includes country star Keith Urban and return ing judge Randy Jackson. He said there were also a lot of disagree ments. Carey, however, called the story some trumped-up thing. Minaj later called Carey one of her favorite all-time artists who has shaped a generation of singers. Fishburne granted restraining order LOS ANGELES Court records show Laurence Fishburne has obtained a temporary restraining order against an ex-convict who claims to own the actors home. Fishburnes attorney obtained an order Thursday requiring Anthony Francis, whose real name is Mark Francisco, to stay 100 yards away from the actor, his wife and daughter. Francisco went to the actors home on Jan. 1 and told Fishburnes wife that they were living there illegally. The filings state he also recently left a handwritten letter telling them to vacate the property and called police to try to get the Fishburnes evicted. The filings state police told the actor to obtain a restraining order because Francis was agitated and had recently been paroled for a cyber stalking and criminal threats case. David Bowie readies 1st album in 10 years NEW YORK David Bowie cel ebrated his birthday by releasing new music. The English singer announced Tuesday, his 66th birthday, that he has released his first song in 10 years titled Where Are We Now? A new album, The Next Day, will be out March 11 and 12 in the United Kingdom and the United States, respectively. The slow groove was released on iTunes and in 119 countries. It was produced by longtime collaborator Tony Visconti. Bowies last album was 2003s Reality. The fashion forward singer debuted in the 1960s, releasing mul tiple successful albums with sounds that range from rock to pop to glam rock to soul and funk. The Rock and Roll Hall of Famers hits include Lets Dance, China Girl, Fame and Dancing In the Street. GH actor joins Young and the Restless NEW YORK Theres heartbreak ahead for some General Hospital fans. Steve Burton, who played Jason Morgan on the ABC soap opera for nearly 21 years and left the show last fall to relocate his family to Tennessee, is joining the cast of The Young and the Restless. Tuesday: Afternoon: 4-8-5 Evening: N/A Tuesday: Afternoon: 9-1-0-8 Evening: N/A Monday: 2-10-11-14-35 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAIL Y BRIEFING WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter 2AWEATHER Daily Scripture Seek good, not evil, that you may live. Then the Lord God Almighty will be with you, just as you say he is. Hate evil, love good; maintain justice in the courts. Perhaps the Lord God Almighty will have mercy on the remnant of Joseph. Amos 5:14-15 ASSOCIATED PRESS American Idol judges (from left) Mariah Carey, Keith Urban and Nicki Minaj partici pate in a news conference Monday in Pasadena, Calif. Associated Press Associated Press ASSOCIATED PRESS Animals rescued Bearded dragon lizards scurry around a pen at the SPCA in Largo. The exotic critters were among 299 animals seized Monday from an Oldsmar home. The two residents were arrested Sunday on charges of animal cruelty and child abuse. Bowie Fishburne

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Page Editor: J im Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2013 3A 3A Call today to RSVP! 386.269.4973 www.HearingSolutionInc.com THE E AR E XPER T S Lake City Live Oak Dowling Park 10820 Marvin Jones Blvd Our Services $ 500 off hearing system. Expires 1/3 1 /1 3 two-thirds of the nation and a La Nina weather event helped push temperatures higher, along with climate change from man-made greenhouse gas emissions, said Katharine Hayhoe, director of the Climate Science Center at Texas Tech University. She said temperature increases are happening faster than sci entists predicted. These records do not occur like this in an unchanging climate, said Kevin Trenberth, head of climate analysis at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colo. And they are costing many billions of dollars. Global warming is caused by the burning of fossil fuels coal, oil and natural gas which sends heat-trapping gases, such as carbon dioxide, into the air, changing the climate, scientists say. Whats happening with temperatures in the United States is consistent with the long-term pattern of big heat events that reach into new levels of inten sity, Arndt said. Last year was 3.2 degrees warmer than the average for the entire 20th century. Last July was the hottest month on record. Nineteen states set year ly heat records in 2012, though Alaska was cooler than average. U.S. temperature records go back to 1895 and the yearly average is based on reports from more than 1,200 weather stations across the Lower 48 states. RECORD: Jump in heat startling Continued From Page 1A to our generation (and) transmission utility that provides us with wholesale power, Seminole Electric thanks to their choice of generation mix, natural gas and coal, weve been able to hold our rates down and be very competitive with utilities across the state. That has helped us hold the lines on our rates and power bills for our members. He said every utility has a certain amount of prof it margin, called margin by Clay Electric officials. Margins represent money left over at the end of the year after expenses are paid. This rate for January is actually lower than our average for last year, Mattox said. While (the rate) has come up from what we were charging in November and December, its still lower than the average for last year. Clay Electric returned $5.25 million in capi tal credits to entitled members last year, and that helped reduce mem bers cost of power. We want to provide service at cost, but that doesnt mean zero mar gins, said Mark Maxwell, Clay Electrics director of the finance department, in a prepared statement. We need certain margins to obtain lower-cost financ ing. These margins will eventually be returned to members in the form of capital credits while main taining financial stability. CLAY: Electric rates up slightly Continued From Page 1A to midnight. Plans are to employ 40-50 people at the restaurant. The restaurants floor plan is new, featuring all new interior decor, as well as additional eating space. Roberts said the res taurant will feature 20, big screen high-definition tele vision sets, a large outdoor patio eating area approx imately 1,000 square feet and a bar. Our wings are what has made us famous, he said. Our wings are fresh, they arent frozen and our famous sauce is Scooter Sauce thats very, very good. He said Monday nights will be an all you can eat wing night in Lake City. The restaurant also offers grilled, gator and buffalo style wings with 15 sauces. The menu includes entrees, sandwiches, burgers, wraps, salads and desserts. Well be able to feed the everyday person, every thing from high school and college kids all the way up to 60and 70-year-olds, Roberts said. The restaurant will be able to host large parties, but it wont have a separate eating area to accommodate parties. Were really spending quite a bit of money to get it to the point that it needs to be, Roberts said, noting the restaurant will also offer dine-in and take out cater ing services. GATORS: Another family-dining option Continued From Page 1A THEFT: Car motors, transmissions taken Continued From Page 1A and more than 3,000 pounds of metal mate rial was missing, according to the arrest report. Wilson said he had already contacted two other recycling and salvage centers, and that the operators of those centers told him that they had video of someone selling scrap metal matching what he was describ ing being sold at their centers. On Wilsons lot there was something he didnt recognize. A car motor was sitting on top of a dolly that he had never seen and was not his. The dolly was taken into custody for evidence and will be tested for DNA and fingerprints, according to the arrest report. He then visited the Recycling Center, where there was video of two men selling scrap that matched the description of what Wilson said he was missing, according to the arrest report. The deputy gathered copies of the receipts for the scrap metal with the Claridys name and pictures of the truck that was there. Wooley then went to Claridys home where he was able to identify him as the suspect who sold the metal. He detained him for further questioning and took him to the Sheriffs Office. Deputies asked Claridy where he got the scrap metal. Claridy said he owned 12 vehicles and blew all the engines driving too rough. He said hes scrapped them over the past month, according to the arrest report. Deputies informed him that he had scrapped about 10,000 pounds of metal in a month. When deputies asked him what type of cars he owned, he said he didnt know the make or model of any of the cars he used to own, according to the arrest report. Wilson said the transmissions that Claridy scrapped were his after he went to the Recycling Center. Claridy was taken to jail in lieu of $80,000 bail. By DAN ELLIOTT Associated Press CENTENNIAL, Colo. It was just hours after a deadly Colorado movie the ater shooting, and James Holmes was not acting like a man accused of methodi cally planning the attack and booby trapping his apartment. As a police detective interviewed the suspect theyd picked up outside the theater, he started pretending the paper bags on his hands meant to preserve gunshot residue were puppets. The former neurosci ence graduate student tried to jam a staple into an elec trical outlet. He played with a cup on the table. At least two officers noted that his eyes were dilated. The description came Tuesday as prosecutors tried to show that Holmes should be tried for the July 20 attack. He faces more than 160 felony charges for allegedly killing 12 and injuring 70. Defense attorneys say Holmes is mentally ill, and have used their questions to try to make that point. They havent elaborated but plan to call at least two witnesses later in the week who could discuss Holmes mental health. The description of Holmes after the attack, given by police Detective Craig Appel, seemed to undercut prosecutors attempts to show Holmes as methodical, spending two months to assemble his arsenal. The first recorded pur chase: Two tear gas gre nades, ordered online May 10. Holmes also bought two Glock handguns, a shotgun and an AR-15 rifle, along with 6,295 rounds of ammu nition, targets, body armor and chemicals, prosecutors said. He dyed his hair bright orange, then bought a scope and plastic bullets on July 1, the visit and the new hair color documented in security video. Finally, he purchased glycerin and potassium permanganate chemi cals that could combine to create fire and sparks from a Denver science store. At some point, he also improvised napalm, as well as thermite, a sub stance which burns so hot that water cant extinguish the blaze. Holmes purchases were split between two planned attacks, prosecutors said the theater shooting and a booby-trapped apartment that wouldve blown up if anyone had entered. The bottle of glycerin was meant to fall into the per manganate when the door to his apartment opened, to cause an explosion and fire, prosecutors said. The manager of The Science Co., Steve Grebe, confirmed the purchase, noting the amount was small and the materials are common in junior high experiments. The setup in Holmes apartment had deadly potential, though. Parts of Holmes carpet were soaked with gasoline and oil and ammonium chlo ride, a white powder, was poured onto the floor in strips, FBI bomb techni cian Garrett Gumbinner said. It would have ignited and the whole apartment would have exploded or caught fire, Gumbinner said. He said the system had two other initiating sys tems. One was a pyrotech nics firing box that would have been triggered by the remote control unit of a toy car left along with a boom box set to play loud music. Gumbinner said Holmes told him he hoped the music would lure someone and lead them to play with the car, thereby detonating the explosives The other initiating sys tem was a model rocket launch box which operated by means of infrared light, but Holmes told investi gators it wasnt armed, Gumbinner said. The attempt at a distrac tion speaks to a plan to escape but the traps werent triggered. Holmes, clad from head to toe in body armor, was found stand ing by his car outside the theater. He told investiga tors that the booby trapped apartment was an effort to pull police away from the theater so, under that sce nario, he wouldnt expect to see police so quickly. Police said he volun teered information about the booby traps. Authorities went to the apartment and carefully dismantled them. Prosecutors also used Holmes dating website profiles to try to prove he knew the consequenc es of his actions. On two social networking web sites Match.com and FriendFinder.com Holmes asked: Will you visit me in prison? The Match profile was created in April; the FriendFinder account was opened on July 5. Holmes last accessed the sites two days before the July 20 shooting at a midnight showing of The Dark Knight Rises, detective Tom Welton testified. As prosecutors lay out their case, Holmes law yers have been asking questions throughout the hearing that suggest a mental health defense. Attorney Tamara Brady asked Steven Beggs, an ATF agent who testified, whether there was any thing to prevent a severely mentally ill person from purchasing things like chemicals, ammunition and handcuffs. He replied no. Defense attorney Daniel King asked Appel if Holmes was tested for drugs or other substances. I saw no indication that he was under the influence of anything, Appel said. Holmes lawyers could have waived the first public airing of the case against him, but legal analysts say they may see the mini-trial as a chance to gauge the prosecutions case or tac tics to prepare for a pos sible plea agreement. Cases rarely advance to this stage without a judge agreeing to set a trial. If Holmes is found sane and goes to trial and is con victed, his attorneys can try to stave off a possible death penalty by arguing he is mentally ill. Police: Shooting suspect behaved oddly ASSOCIATED PRESS This courtroom sketch shows James Holmes being escorted by a sheriffs deputy at a prelimi nary hearing in Centennial, Colo., on Monday. Holmes is accused of opening fire during the midnight showing of a Batman movie on July 20, killing 12 people and wounding dozens. Hearing held for suspect in Colo. movie massacre.

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I t is time to look at the root cause of mass killings. The horror of Newtown has already resulted in an outcry for more gun control. This is an understandable reaction, but to focus on it prevents us from doing the hard work of analyz-ing the fundamental, root cause of mass killings. While there is no question that we must take serious measures to prevent guns from falling into the hands of those who would mis-use them, such as requir-ing background checks for all gun purchases, out-lawing the instrumentality of the Newtown killings will not stop the massacres. The worst killing of elementary school chil-dren in the United States occurred in 1927 at Bath Consolidated School in Bath Township, Michigan. A mentally ill farmer used explosives to kill 38 children. In 1995, Timothy McVeigh killed 168 people in Oklahoma City, includ-ing 19 small children, using fertilizer, diesel fuel and a rental truck. Mass killings are perpetrated by those who are mentally ill and who are willing to give up their own life to accomplish the task. They are planned. More gun control will not serve to stop them anymore than tighter controls on diesel fuel and rental trucks will. Now is not the time to focus the discussion on gun control; we must find and solve the root causes of mass killings. The starting point is the question, “What causes someone to do this?” The next question is, “How can we recognize them before they act and intervene to prevent it?” These are hard and complex ques-tions but until we answer them, we are not going to reduce or stop horrific tragedies like Oklahoma City, Virginia Tech, and Newtown. Most of the mass killers are males who have at least a high school educa-tion. They are mentally ill to the point of suicide. Whether they were born with mental illness or it developed as they grew older, we must ask our-selves how we have failed as a society to recognize it and to intervene timely. Here are some areas where we can look for answers along with some suggestions on steps we can take to stop mass kill-ings.ParentingParenting has always been important. Now, with the instability in our mobile society, the importance of parenting has increased. The state of our economy often requires that both parents work. So who is raising the children? Television? The Internet? Their friends? When our economy is in such a state that working people with children have to get Food Stamps to feed their fami-lies, things are way out of balance. Our economy must be structured so that it gives working people a good living without both parents having to spend so much time at work that there is no time left to parent. There is great wisdom in the words of the Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young song “Teach Your Children Well.” If you are over 40, you may remember how it goes — “Teach your children well … Teach your chil-dren what you believe in. Make a world that we can live in.” There is no sub-stitute for parents. Education systemSchool is a wonderful place for most children. It is a very cruel place for the children who are left out of the social circles, activities, and friendships that most children enjoy. We have made great prog-ress against bullying in schools. Now, it is time to train our teachers and school personnel to rec-ognize the children who are not included in social activities, those who are “left out”, who are socially ostracized, and to come up with appropriate inter-ventions to diagnose and treat these cases before they develop into person-alities who become so anti-social that they harm themselves and others. Church attendanceOver the last two decades, church atten-dance has dropped dramatically in the United States. With very few exceptions, the Judeo-Christian based faiths have the same core beliefs. One of them is the Golden Rule “Do Unto Others as You Would Have Them Do Unto You”. It is well documented that the more examples and mes-sages of good behavior that people are exposed to, the better their own behavior becomes. I submit that you would be hard-pressed to find an agnostic or even an atheist who would argue that we should not teach our children to treat others as they would want to be treated. We would all benefit if parents of every faith would participate regularly in their faith with their children.Mental healthAmerica has the best trauma care in the world. We rank below some third world countries in most other areas of health care. The philosophy of “fix it instead of prevent it” has pervaded all disciplines of health care, includ-ing mental health. Ready access to health care for all Americans regardless of financial means, includ-ing mental health care, is long overdue. A word about cost — if other first world countries (Taiwan, Canada, England) can find a way to pay for it, we can. The price we cannot pay is another Newtown mas-sacre. America is not an “everyman for himself society”. We cannot expect to enjoy the benefits of a free, stable, and secure society without taking our share of the responsibility for building and maintaining that society. Part of that responsibility is that on some levels we must all look out for and take care of each other. The fabric of our society is woven with many threads. Three of the most important are our moral code, our education system, and our economic system. On Dec. 14, we suffered a violent and horrific tear in our fabric. It has left a painful, gaping hole. If we don’t do the hard work to start repair-ing it now, that tear will rip through the fabric of our society until it is torn in two. Q Carlton “Duke” Fagan is an attorney in Jacksonville. His primary areas of prac-tice are criminal trial, civil trial, and personal injury. OPINION Wednesday, January 9, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A4AOPINIONPolice can use drones, but sparingly HIGHLIGHTS IN HISTORY Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman A t this point there are more ques-tions than answers surrounding Columbia County’s proposed events center. How much will it cost? How will we pay for it?Where will it be built?Tentative proposals have been offered for some of these queries, but nothing’s yet set in stone. The process of nailing down facts and making tough choices begins tomorrow at 6 p.m., when events center planning enters Phase 2. During Phase 2, which may cost up to $200,000, planners will hammer out details such as access, utilities and – the real hot-button issue for many – location. Thursday’s meeting, the first of many, will be somewhat organizational in scope and won’t necessarily see all the big ques-tions addressed. But there is an item on the agenda called “discussion of next steps,” which does sound promising. We encourage everyone with a stake in this matter – meaning every county resident – to attend. Then put subsequent meetings on your calendar. There’s a lot at stake here and we need all the input we can get. The meeting starts at 6 at Lake Shore Hospital Authority. Save the date The fabric of society is torn OUR OPINION LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com On this date:In 1788, Connecticut became the fifth state to ratify the U.S. Constitution. In 1793, Frenchman Jean Pierre Blanchard, using a hot-air balloon, flew between Philadelphia and Woodbury, N.J. In 1861, Mississippi became the second state to secede from the Union, the same day the Star of the West, a merchant vessel bringing reinforcements and supplies to Federal troops at Fort Sumter, S.C., retreat-ed because of artillery fire. In 1913, Richard Milhous Nixon, the 37th president of the United States, was born in Yorba Linda, Calif. In 1931, Bobbi Trout and Edna May Cooper broke an endurance record for female aviators as they returned to Mines Field in Los Angeles after flying a Curtiss Robin monoplane continuously for 122 hours and 50 minutes. In 1945, during World War II, American forces began landing at Lingayen Gulf in the Philippines. In 1960, on his 47th birthday, Vice President Richard Nixon became a candidate for the Republican presiden-tial nomination. In 1968, the Surveyor 7 space probe made a soft landing on the moon, marking the end of the American series of unmanned explorations of the lunar surface. Q Associated Press Duke FaganT V’s “Person of Interest” revolves around a simple but troubling premise: Uncle Sam is spying on us. Feds use a sophisticated machine that watches everyone’s every move by monitor-ing telephone lines and tapping into bank, traffic, and police surveillance cameras. Far-fetched Orwellian paranoia?Wisely, state Sen. Joe Negron isn’t inclined to head down that road. So that life doesn’t remotely imitate art, the Stuart Republican wants to put strict limits on law enforcement’s eyes in the sky. Under a bill he filed, Florida police agencies could deploy unmanned drones if there’s a risk of a terrorist attack. And Negron plans to carve out another exception to his “Freedom from Unwarranted Surveillance Act” by permitting the use of drones if a judge grants a search warrant. Otherwise, drones would be prohibited from routinely spying on Floridians, and anyone who is ille-gally targeted could sue the violat-ing agency. “If the police get a search warrant, and they have probable cause to believe a crime’s occurring, that’s fine,” Negron recently told the News Service of Florida. “But I’m very opposed to making it a gen-eral practice to spy on law-abiding Floridians.” As are we. The Federal Aviation Administration is drafting rules to expand access to civilian airspace by 2015, and Space Florida, the state’s aerospace economic develop-ment agency, has agreed to spend up to $1.4 million to vie for the FAA’s designation as a national drone test site. Given that, Negron deserves credit for getting ahead of the issue before emerging technology turns privacy worries into intrusive reali-ties. Law-abiders shouldn’t have to worry about being stalked by a sky-high private eye. Neither should bikini-clad backyarders fear Big Brother peeping from above. Q Orlando Sentinel

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Jan. 9 Newcomers meeting The Lake City Newcomers will meet at 11 a.m. at Guang Dong Chinese Restaurant in the Lake City Mall. Lunch costs $11. Sale of 50-50 tickets will end at 11:25. The guest speaker will be Leandra Lily Johnson, the first female judge in the Third Judicial Circuit. Formore information, call Barbara Test at 754-7227 or Rose Taylor at 755-2175. Medicare information SHINE will present a program to inform seniors about Medicare from 1:30 tpo 3:30 p.m. at the Lake City Public Library on Columbia Avenue. For more information, call (800) 262-2243. Computer classes Registration is now open for free basic com puter classes to be given by the Greater Lake City Community Development Corp. Inc. The five-week, 20-hour course will begin Monday, Jan. 14, and class es will be from 6 to 8 p.m. each Monday and Tuesday for five weeks. To register or for more information, contact Ann at (386) 7529785 or (904) 635-2021 or visit the CDC office at 363 NW Bascom Norris Drive. Disaster assessment World Renew, formerly Christian Reformed World Relief Committee, will be in Columbia and Suwannee counties will open walkin centers today through Jan.16, from 9 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. to assist house holds affected by Tropical Storm Debbie. Suwannee County residents can visit the walk-in cen ter at Suwannee County Emergency Management, 617 Ontario Avenue SW, Suite 200, in Live Oak. Columbia County residents can visit the walk-in cen ter at Columbia County Senior Services LifeStyle Enrichment Center, 628 SE Allison Court, in Lake City. World Renew volunteers also will be going door-todoor in the affected areas between 9 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. World Renew teams will be wearing green shirts with the World Renew logo and will also have identi fication name tags. World Renew is sponsored by the Suwannee County Long Term Recovery Group and the Suwannee Valley Long Term Recovery Committee, convened by United Way of Suwannee Valley. Suwannee County residents may contact the walk-in center in Live Oak by calling (386) 364-3405. Columbia County residents may contact the walk-in center in Lake City by call ing (386) 438-8621. Jan. 10 Builders Association The Columbia County Builders Association will hold its first General Council lunch at 11:30 a.m. at Guang Dong res taurant in the Lake City Mall. The meeting will start at noon.The speaker will be Columbia County Superintendent of Schools Terry Huddleston. If you are considering joining our builders association, this is a good time to join us for lunch, meet our members and learn more of what we are all about. Cost of lunch for members is $12 and non-members fee is $15. A HammerClaw jackpot is now $275. To make a reser vation or for more informa tion, emai colcountybuild@ comcast.net or phone (386) 867-1998. Medicare information SHINE will present a program to inform seniors about Medicare from 9 a.m. to noon at the TOPS Health Fair at First Advent Christian Church, Live Oak, and from 1:30 tp 3:30 p.m. at Live Oak City Hall. For more information, call (800) 262-2243. DAR meeting The Edward Rutledge Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution will hold its monthly meet ing at 10:30 a. m. at the LifeStyle Enrichment Center, 28 SE Allison Court (off Baya Avenue). Kathleen Cooper will be speaking about Lyme dis ease. Visitors are welcome. Garden Club to meet Lake City Garden Club will meet at the Clubhouse, 257 SE Hernando Ave. Social time will begin at 9:30 a.m., and the meeting will start at 10. Jo Carver will give a talk on landscap ing. Center elections Bethlehem Community Center will hold its annual election of officers at 6:30 p.m. The center is a 835 SW Bethlehem Ave. in Fort White. For more informa tion, call Rudolph Freeney at (386) 454-1880. Tea Party meeting The North Central Florida Tea Party will meet at 7 p.m. at the Taylor Building, 128 SW Birley Ave. in Lake City. Adrian Wyllie, a Libertarian can didate for governor, will be guest speaker. There also will be information on what the Columbia andSuwan nee county commissions are doing, as well as upcom ing meetings and events. For more information, call John at (386) 935-0126, Sharon at (386) 935-0821 or visit online at www.north centralfloridateaparty.org. Jan. 11 History program Actor Chaz Mena will per form a program, Claiming La Florida for King and Cross, at 6:30 p.m. at the Columbia County Main Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave. Mena will portray Pedro Menendez de Aviles, the founder of St. Augustine and first Spanish gover nor of Florida. Tickets are required, and are available free of charge at any county library location. Fish dinner Our Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5056 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, pre pares fish dinners every Friday from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The dinner is $6 for two Alaskan pollock filets, corn, baked beans, hush puppies, cole slaw and tarter sauce. Take out or eat in. Classic cars Southern Knights Streetrodders will hold a cruise-in for classic and collector cars from 6 to 8 p.m. at Hardees on U.S. 90 West. The public is invited to view participants classic vehicles. For more infor mation, call Bob McGraw at 984-6573. Jan. 12 Chili cook-off The fourth annual Branford Chili Cook-off will be from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hatch Park on Craven Street in Branford. The event will include a silent auction for adults and kids, door prizes, live music, an antique car show, moon walk, Home Depot Kids Workshop and a variety of homemade chili. Admission is $5 and includes all the chili you can eat. Proceeds will ben efit Herrys Kids Pediatric Services, a program of Hospice of the Nature Coast. To register to com pete in the chili cook-off, call the hospice at (386) 755-7714 or visIt online at www.hospiceofcitrus.org. Gospel sing, supper A gospel sing and pot luck supper will be held to celebrate Mary Lou Flynn Lasseters 75th birthday, beginning at 6 p.m. at Lee Worship Center Church Fellowship Hall, 471 SE Magnolia Drive in Lee. Supper will be at 6 p.m., and the open-mic gospel sing will start at 7. To con firm attendance or for more information, call Brenda Lasseter McCormick at (850) 869-9976. Jan. 13 Music concert The Ball Brothers will perform a free concert at 6 p.m. at Wellborn Baptist Church. The church is on U.S. 90 West between Lake City and Live Oak at the intersection of Lowe Lake Road in Wellborn. A love offering for the group will be received. Baseball tryouts The Columbia Timber Rattlers 8U travel machine pitch baseball team will have tryouts at 2 p.m. at the Southside Baseball Complex (blue fields). For details, call Jason Dumas at 965-8530 or Todd Gustavson at 365-2133. Jan. 14 SCORE workshop SCORE of Lake City will hold a free entrepreneurs interactive workshop from 6 to 8 p.m. at Columbia County Main Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave.. Participants will get advice and receive free education al materials. Participants also will be able to arrange one-on-one business coun seling with SCORE volun teers. To reserve a seat, call (386) 752-2000 or email scorelakecity@gmail.com. Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2013 5A 5A 1-866-742-1373 Get your business noticed One Call One Order One Payment Almost 4 million readers statewide are waiting to see your advertising message. Dont make them wait any longer. Call us today! www.AdNetworksFlorida.com Colon cancer is the 2nd leading cause of cancer deaths in Florida. 7 out of 10 cancer deaths can be prevented through screening and lifestyle changes. 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C enturaOnline.com Leona Lee Little Bonds Leona Lee Little Bonds, Age 98, Born August 9, 1914 Lake City, FL Died January 5, 2013 Dowling Park, FL. Preceded in death by her hus band, Randall Joseph Bonds, Sr., her parents Ol lie and Julian Little as well as brothers Arthur, Clif ton, Woodrow, George and Carl Little and her sister Louise Little McCall Mahood. She is survived by her children: Patricia Bonds Rose, Barbara Bonds Gibbs, Randall Joseph Bonds, Jr., and David Julian Bonds; two sisters Ellen Little Ward, Rose Little Wilder and two brothers: Finley Little and Ralph Little; nine grandchildren a whole passel of great grandchildren and great, great grandchildren. She was a lover of fam ily and friends. Although her passing is mourned we rejoice at her victory. A celebration of her life will be held at Pleasant Grove Method ist Church, Pastor Dusty Bailey Saturday, January 12, 2013 at 1:00 p.m. Family and friends are invited to attend. may be made to the Pleasant Grove Methodist Cemetery Fund, Pleasant Grove Methodist Kitchen Fund or your charity of choice. Arrangements are under the direction of GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN FUNERAL HOME 3596 South U.S. Hwy 441, Lake 1954. Please sign the family registry at www.gatewayforestlawn.com Stephen Micheal Cordle Stephen Micheal Cordle, age 22, of Ft. White, Florida passed from this life Monday, December 24, 2012 from inju ries sustained in an automobile accident near White Springs. Micheal was born in Jasper, Florida on April 23, 1990 and was employed by Industry Services in Lake City, FL. He was a loving husband, father, son, brother and friend and loved spending time with them. He was preceded in death by grandparents whom he loved dearly, James and Hazel Farnell. Survivors include his wife, Ginny W. Cordle and step-daughter, Payten Kay Corbett; a son, Mason Cordle; his father, Stephen S. Cordle and step-mother Ginger, of Live Oak, FL.; his mother, Yvonne M. Farnell, Cherokee, N.C.; two brothers, Keith Cordle, Live Oak, FL. and Dillon Putnel, Temecula, CA; two step sisters, Traci McCormick (Rick) and Amy Steed (Aaron) of Lake City, FL. grandparents, Wil liam T. Cordle, Ocala and Susan Cordle, Gainesville, FL. Stephen was so proud of his new family that included sister-in-law, Katlyn Mitchell and grandfatherin-law, John Wagoner all of Jasper. Funeral services were held Wednesday, January 2, 2012 at the First Presbyterian Church in Jasper, FL. Inter ment followed in Live Oak Cemetery, Live Oak, Florida. HARRY T REID FUNERAL HOME Jasper, FL. was in charge of arrangements Adelphia Delphi Coleman W illiams Mrs. Adelphia Delphi long resident of Lake City, died 2013 in the Haven Hospice of the Suwannee Valley follow ing an extended illness. Mrs. Williams was the daughter of the late Ben L. Coleman Sr. and Alma McGee Coleman. Mrs. Williams very much enjoyed being able to be a stayat-home mom and homemaker until her children were teenag ers when she began her clerical career in the electrical supply industry where she worked until retiring in 2001. Mrs. Williams word puzzles, spending time with her family and watching her son-in-law, Randy Combs race his stock car. She was a mem ber of Southside Baptist Church. Mrs. Williams was preceded in death by her husband, V. La mar Williams, her brother, Ben L. Roy Coleman Jr., and sis ters, Annette Coleman and Edna Coleman Summers. Mrs. Williams is survived by her daughter, Kim Williams Combs (Randy )of Lake City; her son, Michael Williams of Lake City; her sisters, Charlotte Sand and Faye DuPree (Lamar) of Lake City; brother-in-law, John Williams of Lake Butler, Florida and sisters-in-law, Joan Coleman of Lake City and Glenda Smith (Wayne) of Lake Butler, Flori da. Her grandson, Jared Combs (Amy) and her great-grandchil dren, Jayden and Chloe Combs also survive. Mrs. Williams has numerous other family members and friends that also survive. Funeral services for Mrs. Williams will be conducted at 11:00 A.M. Friday, January 11, 2013 in the Southside Bap tist Church with Pastor Ralph ment will follow in the Hopeful Baptist Church Cemetery. The family will receive friends from at the funeral home. In lieu of memorial donations be made to the Hopeful Baptist Church Cemetery Fund, 289 S.E. Hope ful Drive, Lake City, FL 32025. Or The Suwannee Valley Care US HWY 90 West Lake City, FL 32055. Arrangements are under the direction of the DEES-P ARRISH F AMIL Y FUNERAL HOME 458 S. Marion Ave., Lake City, FL our on-line family guestbook at parrishfamilyfuneralhome.comRobert Lee W ilsey Robert Lee Wilsey, Colonel Bob passed away 12-23-2012. Born in Live Oak, FL on June 16,1929. Raised in Jacksonville, FL, graduated from Andrew Jackson High School. After attending Bradley University Col lege of Horology in Peoria, IL, he pursued a career as a watchmaker He is survived by his sister: Janet Roberts of St. Petersburg, FL.; his 3 children: Stephen, Phillip, Cynthia; and stepdaugh ter Robin; nieces: Laura Rob erts Carroll and Mary Roberts Bowers, as well as his step children, and many grandchil dren and greatgrandchildren. He was a Veteran, having served in the Army as Sergeant for two years in Korea. He was greatly loved and will be missed by many, his family, his church family, and his Lake City fam ily. Pastor Robert Johnson will be presiding at a memorial ser vice to be held Thursday, 12Chapel. Arrangements are by A DESIGN CREMATION .Larry Michael Y eager Larry Michael Yeager, age 58, passed away on December 20, 2012 at the Lake City Medical Center. He was born in Massachu setts on Janu ary 19, 1954 but spent his younger years living between Illinois and Tennessee. He is survived by his wife Mary Sue Yeager of Lake City, FL, son Skylar Dichter of Medford, OR, two step children, Sam Cook of Keenesburg, CO, Christina Madewell of Lake City, FL, eight step grandchildren and two great grandchildren. He fol lows to heaven his parents James Rogers and Reny Imogene Yea ger of Lawrenceburg, TN He was Native American by heart and wrote songs and poetry of h is experiences with the culture. He played the guitar, banjo, and Southern IL University and re ceived his Bachelors Degree in Psychology, then got his Mas ters Degree in Administrative Psychology at the University of San Francisco. Services are still pending but will be held at the home on a date to be determined. Obituaries are paid advertise ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporters classified depart ment at 752-1293. OBITUARIES COMMUNITY CALENDAR To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr @lakecityreporter.com.

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6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 20136A Columbia County officials re-elected in November took th eir oaths of office during a mass ceremony Tuesday in Courtroom One at the county courthou se. Taking their oaths (clockwise from top left): Sheriff Mark Hunter is sworn in by Thi rd Circuit Chief Judge Lerandra G. Johnson, while his wife, Marilyn, holds the Bible and hi s daughters, Leslie Skeen (right) and Natalie Hunter look on. County Tax Collector Ronnie Bran non repeats the oath as recited by Third Circuit Judge E. Vernon Douglas swears him into o ffice and his wife Tracy holds the Bible. Supervisor of Elections Liz P. Horne takes the oath of office from County Judge Tom Coleman; her son, Skibo (left center), and husband, Leo, sta nd beside her. County Property Appraiser Doyle Crews repeats the oath for the eighth time from Judge Johnson; standing beside him is his wife, Diane. Columbia County Clerk of the Courts P. DeWitt Cason listens as Circuit Judge Julian E. Collins recites the oath; hold ing the Bible is his wife, Sherri, and his son, Matt, and Matt’s wife, Carrie, look on. COLUMBIA COUNTY OFFICERS SWORN IN Photos by DEREK GILLIAMLake City Reporter Machen rescinds retirement from UF Associated PressGAINESVILLE — Cancel the retirement party for University of Florida President Bernie Machen. Machen agreed to stay on Tuesday at the urging of Gov. Rick Scott and the chairman of the university’s board of trustees. Machen last June had announced he would retire in 2013. In a statement, Machen said he agreed to remain at his post after Scott com-mitted to support his goal of making Florida a top 10 university. Florida is listed 17th among national public uni-versities in the annual high-er education rankings by U.S. News & World Report. Machen said reaching top 10 status has been his high-est priority since become UF’s president in 2004. The announcement came just four days before the board had planned to select a new president. Potash Corp. supports education programsDEREK GILLIAM /Lake City ReporterTerry Baker, general manager for the Potash Corp. in Whi te Springs (back row, center), poses with Columbia County School District students and adminis trators after donating $55,000 to the district Tuesday at the Columbia County School Board Administrative Complex Auditorium. The four checks were made out for: $30,000 for school-base d technology, $10,000 to the Fort White High School agriculture program, $10,000 to the Co lumbia High School agriculture program and $5,000 to the Columbia High School robotics program. Panel hears Casey Anthony’s appealBy MIKE SCHNEIDERAssociated PressDAYTONA BEACH — A Florida appellate court was asked Tuesday to decide whether Casey Anthony was in police custody when she made statements that led to her being convicted of four counts of lying to law enforcement officers. Anthony’s attorneys appealed the misdemeanor convictions on the grounds that her statements were inadmissible at her murder trial since she hadn’t been read her Miranda rights, which warn suspects that they can remain silent and that their statements can be used against them in court. The three judges on the Fifth District Court of Appeals didn’t rule Tuesday. Anthony was acquitted in 2011 of murdering her 2-year-old daughter, Caylee. After Caylee disappeared in the summer of 2008, Anthony told inves-tigators that a babysitter named Zenaida Gonzalez had kidnapped her daugh-ter, that she worked at Universal Studios, that she had told co-workers about Caylee’s disappearance and that she had recently received a phone call from her daughter. All of the statements were lies and were the basis for her misdemeanor convictions. Anthony’s attorneys argued that because Anthony had been hand-cuffed and placed in a squad car, she was effec-tively under arrest and should have had her Miranda rights read to her. They also argue that her convictions on four similar charges stemming from a single encounter with police represent dou-ble jeopardy — violating constitutional protections against being punished multiple times for one offense.

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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Wednesday, January 9, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS BRIEFS GAMES Today Q Columbia High girls weightlifting in sub-sectional meet at Godby High, 3 p.m. Thursday Q Fort White High girls basketball vs. Interlachen High, 6 p.m. Q Fort White High girls soccer at Lafayette High, 7 p.m. Q Fort White High boys soccer at St. Johns Lutheran School, 7 p.m. Q Columbia High girls basketball vs. Lafayette High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Q Fort White High boys basketball at Interlachen High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Friday Q Columbia High boys soccer at Wolfson High, 5:30 p.m. Q Columbia High girls soccer at Oak Hill School, 6 p.m. Q Columbia High girls basketball vs. Stanton Prep, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Q Columbia High wrestling at Suwannee High meet, TBA Q Columbia High JV soccer in Tallahassee tournament, TBA Saturday Q Columbia High wrestling at Suwannee High meet, TBA Q Columbia High JV soccer in Tallahassee tournament, TBA Q Columbia High boys basketball vs. Atlantic Coast High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) CHS FOOTBALL Football banquet set for Jan. 17 The Columbia County Quarterback Club is hosting its annual football banquet at 6:30 p.m. Jan. 17 at the school cafeteria. The keynote speaker will be Larry Vettel, host of the Larry Vettel show on ESPN 850/900. Tickets are $12 in advance or $15 at the door. Advanced tickets are at Hunter Printing. Players should see Ms. Sweat at CHS for their tickets. For details, call Allen Masters at 292-0725. RUNNING Blue Grey 5k sign-up open The 2013 Olustee Blue Grey 5k is 7:30 a.m. Feb. 16. This year’s theme is “Celebrate Life” and the race is for all ages and fitness levels. There will be an award for the runner/walker with the most outgoing and fun-filled outfit. The first runner to break 19 minutes will receive $100, and there will be raffle prizes. Registration is open at active.com ; the fee will increase the day of the race. For details, call Michelle at 208-2447. ADULT SOFTBALL League sign-up ends Friday Adult softball league registration for women, men and co-ed ends Friday. There is a coaches meeting at 6 p.m. Friday at Southside Sports Complex. For details, call Pete Bonilla at 623-6561 or Casandra Wheeler at 365-2168.Q From staff reportsSplit senior night Photos by BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterABOVE : Fort White High’s boys soccer team poses for a shot of the seniors before playing Hamilton County High on Tuesday. Pictured are ( front row, from left) Anthony Gonzalez, Dalton Wilder, Cody Moniz and Joel Co nreras. Back row (from left) are Edwin Alexander, Billy Whitney, coach Pete Blanchard, Ma tt Otto and Brent Edwards. BELOW : Fort White High head girls soccer coach Perry Sauls ( center) stands with seniors Caralee Morrow (front), Ashley Beckman (left) and Lync Stalnaker before senior night. Lady Indians working back up district ladderBy TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comFORT WHITE — After starting out 0-4, Fort White High’s girls basketball team is working its way back up the District 5-2A ladder. The Lady Indians moved up another notch with a 43-32 home win against Keystone Heights High on Tuesday. Keystone Heights (6-9, 2-5) won the first meet-ing. “We wanted revenge night,” Fort White head coach DeShay Harris said. “That was our main goal all week — not letting teams beat us twice.” The Lady Indians used defense to forge a halftime lead. Fort White held the visiting Indians to four points in the second quar-ter. After a 6-6 first quarter, Tasha Robinson and Desma Blake scored the first two baskets of the second quarter off steals. Robinson added a 3-pointer and Kasha Cook scored four points, two on an offensive rebound. Cenise Armstrong closed out the quarter with a putback bucket for a 19-10 lead. It was back to low scoring in the third quarter, with Fort White increasing its lead by one, 27-17. Keystone cut into the lead by making nine free throws in the first half of the fourth quarter. Fort White got two baskets from Cook and a free throw by Rykia Jackson during the stretch, but the lead was cut to 32-26. Jackson stopped the bleeding with a jumper and later added a three-point play, as Fort White finished on an 11-6 run. Robinson had a couple of baskets down the stretch and Khadijah Ingram scored off a rebound on a missed free throw for the final points. Cook led the Lady Indians with 14 points, and Robinson scored 13. Jackson finished with eight points, with four from Armstrong and two each from Blake and Fort White gets revenge against Keystone Heights. TIM KIRBY /Lake City ReporterFort White High girls basketball head coach DeShay Harr is (from left) and captains Khadijah Ingram and Rykia Jackson listen to the instructi on by the head official before the home game against Keystone Heights High on Tuesday. INDIANS continued on 2B Boys defeat Hamilton County while girls fall By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comFORT WHITE — Fort White High had a rough start to senior night as the Lady Indians lost to visiting Hamilton County High in a 2-1 contest on Tuesday. The boys rebounded to split senior night as the Indians defeated Hamilton County, 4-2, on the strength of a strong first-half performance. After introducing seniors Ashley Beckman, Caralee Morrow and Lync Stalnaker, the Lady Indians came out hot. Fort White controlled the first-half tempo and went into the locker room up 1-0 after Stalnaker connected on a goal from 22-yards out with 2:48 remaining in the first half. The kick was a floater over the Hamilton County keepers head and was the only score for the Lady Indians on the night. The second half was spent on the wrong side of the field for the Lady Indians and Hamilton County tied the game early in the half with a free kick at the 37:57 mark. The game remained tied until 2:49 remaining when Hamilton County took a 2-1 lead and that’s the way the game would end. “All the seniors played their hearts out,” Fort White head coach Perry Sauls said. “Our keeper (Morrow) has only had a game and a half of expe-rience and she’s filling in after our regular keeper was suspended. There’s 10 other girls that they had to get by first. She did a good job and Lync always plays heard. You can never ques-tion her effort.” The Lady Indians are 5-11-3 on the year with a 2-9-3 district record. The boys ended the night with some revenge for Fort White. Senior Billy Whitney scored the first two goals of the game and Cody Owens added a third goal to send Fort White into the half with a 3-0 lead. Hamilton cut the advantage to 3-2 with 22:25 remaining, but senior Anthony Gonzalez gave the Indians a win by the final of 4-2 after a goal with eight minutes remaining in the contest. “The second half wasn’t as good as the first half, but the seniors still came out with a win in their final home game,” Fort White head coach Pete Blanchard said. “We really stepped the intensity back up in the final few minutes.” Seniors Dalton Wilder, Cody Moniz, Joel Contreras, Edwin Alexander, Matt Otto and Bent Edwards were also honored.

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Terry Hunter and Jim Carr got the year off to a good start with a first-place tie at +5 in the New Years Day blitz. Second place also ended in a tie among Al Alvarado, Bruce Gibson and Steve Thomas at +3. Thomas led the skins game with two winners. Dave Mehl, Eli Witt, Carr and Thomas had one apiece. Timmy Rogers romped to a five shot victory at +7 in the A flight of Saturday’s blitz. Bob Randall (+2) took second place and Mike McCranie (+1) was third. Steve Peters (+3) had a tougher go in B flight before taking a one-point win over Jim Carr. Dave Mehl finished another point back. Scott Kishton and Jonathan Allen shared the skins with Carr, McCranie and Rogers. Ties were the order of business in Wednesday’s blitz. Don Howard and Joe Paul led the scoring with a +6 tie for first. Shelton Keen and Pete Skantos followed the trend with a second-place tie at +5, fol-lowed by Mike McCranie and Mickey Willcox tied for fifth at +3. Dennis Crawford picked up a skin to share the pot with McCranie and Willcox. In LGA play, Dottie Rogers dominated the nine-hole “low net” contest. Her 32.5 finish was good for first place ahead of Cathy Steen’s net 34. Rogers bumped up her take with chip-ins on Nos. 2 and 9. Steen had a chip-in on No. 1. Mike Gough blew away the field with a +10 score in Sunday’s blitz. Russ Adams (+3) and Dell Sanders (+2) were in second and third place. Ricky Lovvorn and Mickey Willcox pulled their points on the nose for a fourth place tie. Gough wrapped a good day with two skins. Bob Randall, Dave Mehl, Timmie Rogers and Steve Patterson each had a skin. Closest to the pin winners were Steve Thomas on No. 5, Gough on No. 7, Dell Sanders on No. 15 and Patterson on No. 17. The Good Old Boys started action with two close matches. The team of Don Howard, Joe Persons, Merle Hibbard and Dan Stephens held off the team of Ed Snow, Stan Woolbert, Dave Cannon and Bobby Simmons, 6-4, in match one. Match two went to the team of Monty Montgomery, Emerson Darst, Tom Elmore and Hugh Sherrill over the team of Jim Carr, Rhea Hart, Eli Witt and Bill Rogers by a 7-5 count. Match three provided the week’s only lopsided score, as the team of Marc Risk, Arnold Terry, Dennis Hendershot and Jim Bell pounded the team of Jerry West, Rob Brown, Paul Davis and Bob McGraw by a score of 10-2. Risk (37-37-74) secured the medalist spot with the aid of an eagle on No. 4. Montgomery (37-38-75) and Howard (39-37-76) pro-vided the closest competi-tion. Bell and Stephens both posted 78, a stroke ahead of Snow and Woolbert. Upcoming events:Q Jan. 19, MGA tournament, four-man blind draw teams will play in a sham-ble format; Q Jan. 25, Chamber of Commerce tournament, lunch will be at noon, fol-lowed by a 1 p.m. shotgun start. Frog Niewisch used two birdies and solid play to take the Wednesday Blitz with a +8 performance. Niewisch also picked up a closest to the pin at 3-feet-8 inches on hole No. 15. Chet Carter was second at +5 and Tony Johnson was third at +4. Other closest to pin winners were Chet Carter on No. 3, Randy Heavrin on No. 5, Ralph Minster on No. 11, and Gerald Smithy on No. 17. Skin winners were Johnson (No. 1), Chet Carter (No. 3), Brandon Goss (No. 7), Barney Hart (No. 8) and Pete Sapienza (No. 18). The pot hole was won by Chet Carter with his birdie, skin, and closest to the pin on No. 3 for a very lucrative payday. Friday Dogfight results were: first, Tony Johnson +6; second, Joe Herring +4; third, Ralph Minster +2. Closest to the pin winners were Brandon Goss on Nos. 3, 11 and 15, and Todd Carter on Nos. 5 and 17. Skin winners were Tony Johnson (Nos. 6 and 7) and Todd Carter on Nos. 12 and 18. Top of the Hill results were: first, Tim Tortorice +2; second, Bill Ryan -3; third, Joe Herring -7. The Sunday Scramble was a wet affair. The team of Brooke Russell, Jerry Connell and Chet Carter took the win with a score of 5 under. The teams of Tiara Carter, Todd Carter and Richard Simmons, and Phillip Russell, Luke Soucinek and Ralph Minster tied for second at 3 under. SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today AUTO RACING 2 a.m. NBCSN — Dakar Rally, stage 5, Arequipa, Peru, to Arica, Chile (delayed tape) MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN2 — Louisville at Seton Hall 9 p.m. ESPN2 — West Virginia at Texas 11 p.m. ESPN2 — Washington at California MEN’S COLLEGE HOCKEY 7 p.m. NBCSN — Harvard at Boston U. NBA BASKETBALL 8 p.m. ESPN — L.A. Lakers at San Antonio 10:30 p.m. ESPN — Dallas at L.A. ClippersFOOTBALLNFL postseason Wild-card Playoffs Houston 19, Cincinnati 13Green Bay 24, Minnesota 10Indianapolis at BaltimoreSeattle 24, Washington 14 Divisional Playoffs Saturday Baltimore at Denver, 4:30 p.m. (CBS)Green Bay at San Francisco, 8 p.m. (FOX) Sunday Seattle at Atlanta, 1 p.m. (FOX)Houston at New England, 4:30 p.m. (CBS) Conference Championships Sunday, Jan. 20 AFC, TBA (CBS); NFC, TBA (FOX) Pro Bowl Sunday, Jan. 27 At HonoluluAFC vs. NFC, 7 p.m. (NBC) Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 3 At New OrleansAFC champion vs. NFC champion, 6 p.m. (CBS)USA Today Top 25 The USA Today Top 25 football coaches poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, final records, total points based on 25 points for first place through one point for 25th, and previous ranking: Record Pts Pvs 1. Alabama (56) 13-1 1,400 2 2. Oregon 12-1 1,322 3 3. Notre Dame 12-1 1,253 1 4. Georgia 12-2 1,213 5 5. Texas A&M 11-2 1,171 9 6. Stanford 12-2 1,167 8 7. South Carolina 11-2 1,064 10 8. Florida State 12-2 942 12 9. Clemson 11-2 916 1310. Florida 11-2 886 411. Kansas State 11-2 841 612. LSU 10-3 775 713. Louisville 11-2 772 1814. Boise State 11-2 633 1515. Oklahoma 10-3 600 1116. Northwestern 10-3 580 1717. Utah State 11-2 444 2018. Texas 9-4 398 2519. Oregon State 9-4 366 1420. Vanderbilt 9-4 248 NR21. San Jose State 11-2 244 2422. Cincinnati 10-3 186 NR23. Nebraska 10-4 175 2124. Northern Illinois 12-2 156 1625. Tulsa 11-3 110 NR Others receiving votes: Michigan 101; UCLA 75; Baylor 52; Oklahoma State 36; Wisconsin 18; UCF 15 ; Arkansas State 13; Arizona State 10; Rutgers 9; Kent State 5; Louisiana Tech 2; Arizona 1; Ohio 1.AP Top 25 The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press college football poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, final records, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote, and previous ranking: Record Pts Pv 1. Alabama (59) 13-1 1,475 2 2. Oregon 12-1 1,358 5 3. Ohio St. 12-0 1,302 3 4. Notre Dame 12-1 1,288 1 5. Georgia 12-2 1,230 6 5. Texas A&M 11-2 1,230 10 7. Stanford 12-2 1,169 8 8. South Carolina 11-2 1,038 11 9. Florida 11-2 933 410. Florida St. 12-2 922 1311. Clemson 11-2 889 1412. Kansas St. 11-2 871 713. Louisville 11-2 781 2214. LSU 10-3 756 915. Oklahoma 10-3 615 1216. Utah St. 11-2 456 1817. Northwestern 10-3 443 2118. Boise St. 11-2 419 2019. Texas 9-4 358 NR20. Oregon St. 9-4 303 15 21. San Jose St. 11-2 243 2422. N. Illinois 12-2 227 1623. Vanderbilt 9-4 180 NR24. Michigan 8-5 147 1925. Nebraska 10-4 119 23 Others receiving votes: Baylor 95, Penn St. 90, Cincinnati 78, Oklahoma St. 42, Tulsa 34, UCLA 31, Arkansas St. 28, TCU 9, UCF 9 Wisconsin 6, N. Dakota St. 1.College bowl final New Mexico Bowl Arizona 49, Nevada 48Famous Idaho Potato BowlUtah State 41, Toledo 15 Poinsettia Bowl BYU 23, San Diego State 6 Beef ’O’ Brady’s Bowl UCF 38, Ball State 17 New Orleans Bowl Louisiana-Lafayette 43, E. Carolina 34 Las Vegas Bowl Boise State 28, Washington 26 Hawaii Bowl SMU 43, Fresno State 10 Little Caesars Pizza Bowl Central Michigan 24, W. Kentucky 21 Military Bowl San Jose State 29, Bowling Green 20 Belk Bowl Cincinnati 48, Duke 34 Holiday Bowl Baylor 49, UCLA 26 Independence Bowl Ohio 45, Louisiana-Monroe 14 Russell Athletic Bowl Virginia Tech 13, Rutgers 10, OT Meineke Car Care Bowl Texas Tech 34, Minnesota 31 Armed Forces Bowl Rice 33, Air Force 14 Fight Hunger Bowl Arizona State 62, Navy 28 Pinstripe Bowl Syracuse 38, West Virginia 14 Alamo Bowl Texas 31, Oregon State 27 Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl Michigan State 17, TCU 16 Music City Bowl Vanderbilt 38, N.C. State 24 Sun Bowl Georgia Tech 21, Southern Cal 7 Liberty Bowl Tulsa 31, Iowa State 17 Chick-fil-A Bowl Clemson 25, LSU 24 Heart of Dallas Bowl Oklahoma State 58, Purdue 14 Gator Bowl Northwestern 34, Mississippi State 20 Capital One Bowl Georgia 45, Nebraska 31 Outback Bowl South Carolina 33, Michigan 28 Rose Bowl Stanford 20, Wisconsin 14 Orange Bowl Florida State 31, N. Illinois 10 Sugar Bowl Louisville 33, Florida 23 Fiesta Bowl Oregon 35, Kansas State 17 Cotton Bowl Texas A&M 41, Oklahoma 13 BBVA Compass Bowl Mississippi 38, Pittsburgh 17 GoDaddy.com Bowl Arkansas State 17, Kent State 13 BCS National Championship Alabama 42, Notre Dame 14 Conference recordsConference W L Pct.Western Athletic 2 0 1.000Conference USA 4 1 .800 Southeastern 6 3 .667Atlantic Coast 4 2 .667Big East 3 2 .600Pac-12 4 4 .500Sun Belt 2 2 .500Big 12 4 5 .444Independents 1 2 .333Big Ten 2 5 .286Mid-American 2 5 .286Mountain West 1 4 .200College all-star games Saturday, Jan. 19 RAYCOM College Football All-Star Classic At Montgomery, Ala.Stars vs. Stripes, 3 p.m. (CBSSN) East-West Shrine Classic At St. PetersburgEast vs. West, 4 p.m. (NFLN) Saturday, Jan. 26 Senior Bowl At Mobile, Ala.North vs. South, 4 p.m. (NFLN)BASKETBALLNBA schedule Today’s Games Atlanta at Cleveland, 7 p.m.Utah at Charlotte, 7 p.m.Philadelphia at Toronto, 7 p.m.Phoenix at Boston, 7:30 p.m.Milwaukee at Chicago, 8 p.m.Houston at New Orleans, 8 p.m.Minnesota at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.L.A. Lakers at San Antonio, 8 p.m.Orlando at Denver, 9 p.m.Memphis at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.Dallas at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. Thursday’s Games New York at Indiana, 8 p.m.Dallas at Sacramento, 10 p.m.Miami at Portland, 10:30 p.m. AP Top 25 schedule Today’s Games No. 2 Michigan vs. Nebraska, 7 p.m.No. 3 Louisville at Seton Hall, 7 p.m.No. 6 Kansas vs. Iowa State, 7 p.m.No. 7 Syracuse at Providence, 7 p.m.No. 8 Minnesota at No. 12 Illinois, 9 p.m. No. 11 Florida vs. Georgia, 7 p.m.No. 14 Butler at Saint Joseph’s, 7 p.m.No. 16 San Diego State at Fresno State, 11:30 p.m. No. 20 N.C. State vs. Georgia Tech, 8 p.m. No. 23 Wichita State vs. Southern Illinois, 8 p.m. No. 24 UNLV at No. 25 New Mexico, 10 p.m. Thursday’s Games No. 4 Arizona at Oregon, 9 p.m.No. 9 Gonzaga vs. Saint Mary’s (Cal), 11 p.m. No. 22 Michigan State at Iowa, 7 p.m. Friday’s Game No. 13 Creighton at Missouri State, 8:05 p.m. Saturday’s Games No. 1 Duke at No. 20 N.C. State, Noon No. 3 Louisville vs. South Florida, 4 p.m. No. 4 Arizona at Oregon State, 8 p.m.No. 5 Indiana vs. No. 8 Minnesota, Noon No. 6 Kansas at Texas Tech, 4 p.m.No. 7 Syracuse vs. Villanova, NoonNo. 10 Missouri at Mississippi, 8 p.m.No. 11 Florida at LSU, 4 p.m.No. 12 Illinois at Wisconsin, 2:15 p.m.No. 14 Butler at Dayton, 2 p.m.No. 16 San Diego State vs. Colorado State, 8 p.m. No. 17 Notre Dame vs. UConn, 2 p.m. No. 18 Kansas State at West Virginia, 1:30 p.m. No. 19 Georgetown at St. John’s, 11 a.m. No. 21 Cincinnati at Rutgers, 8 p.m.No. 24 UNLV vs. Air Force, 10 p.m.No. 25 New Mexico vs. Fresno State, 3 p.m. Sunday’s Games No. 2 Michigan at No. 15 Ohio State, 1:30 p.m. No. 22 Michigan State vs. Nebraska, 6 p.m. No. 23 Wichita State at Evansville, 4:35 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2013 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-04212BSPORTS AGATE QUAIL HEIGHTS COUNTRY CLUB Chet Carter COUNTRY CLUB at LAKE CITY Ed Goff GOLF REPORTS INDIANS From Page 1B Niewisch leads blitz field Hunter, Carr tie on Jan. 1 Ingram. “We were trying to get the rust off and I liked our effort,” Harris said. “They battled pretty hard. We showed we can play with-out Tasha scoring 50 points. Everybody can get into the game.” Madyson Maxwell scored 10 points for Keystone Heights, followed by Holly Strassberger with seven, Hannah Hamilton with six, Cailyn Gonzales with five, Sierra Moore with three and Bailey Zinkel with one. Fort White (10-5, 3-4) stays in district with a home game against Interlachen High at 6 p.m. Thursday. The Lady Indians started their district win streak against the Lady Rams on Dec. 14. RG3 to have knee surgeryAssociated PressWASHINGTON — Robert Griffin III is having surgery Wednesday on a torn ligament in his right knee — and to see if there’s a second ligament that also needs to be repaired. Baylor coach Art Briles confirmed to USA Today and The Associated Press on Tuesday night that the Washington Redskins rook-ie has a torn lateral collat-eral ligament. He said the surgery also will determine whether Griffin has dam-aged his ACL in that knee. A person close to Griffin, speaking on condition of anonymity because the Redskins have not made an announcement.

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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2013 3B3BSPORTS WEDNESDAY EVENING JANUARY 9, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) The Middle (N) The Neighbors (N) Modern Family (N) (:31) SuburgatoryNashville Juliette and Sean elope. (N) News at 11Jimmy Kimmel Live 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) omg! Insider 5-PBS 5 -Journal Nightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Nature Cuba’s biodiversity. NOVA “Decoding Neanderthals” (N) Life on Fire “Volcano Doctors” (N) BBC World NewsTavis Smiley 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge Judy Two and Half MenI Get That a Lot Celebrities pull pranks. People’s Choice Awards 2013 Fans’ favorites in movies, music and TV. 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(Live)d NBA Basketball Orlando Magic at Denver Nuggets. From the Pepsi Center in Denver. Magic Live! (Live) SYFY 58 122 244(5:00) “Shutter Island” (2010) Leonardo DiCaprio, Mark Ruffalo. Ghost Hunters “O.K. Corral” Ghost Hunters “Irish Ruins” Ghost Hunters Burlington County Jail. Ghost Hunters “House of Spirits” AMC 60 130 254CSI: Miami Murder in the Everglades. CSI: Miami “Bombshell” “Bring It On” (2000, Comedy) Kirsten Dunst, Eliza Dushku. (:01) “The Truman Show” (1998) Jim Carrey, Laura Linney. COM 62 107 249South Park Tosh.0 The Colbert ReportDaily ShowChappelle’s ShowChappelle’s ShowSouth Park South Park Workaholics South Park Daily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327Reba Reba Reba Reba Reba Reba Extreme Makeover: Home EditionExtreme Makeover: Home EditionExtreme Makeover: Home Edition NGWILD 108 190 283Dog WhispererMonster Fish Nile perch in Uganda. Monster Fish of MongoliaMonster Fish Australia’s Murray Cod. 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Alabama won 42-14.Saban quickly turns to challenges of 2013 seasonBy JOHN ZENORAssociated PressFORT LAUDERDALE — It’s becoming a famil-iar January scene for Nick Saban. The Alabama coach plastered a smile on his face for a series of posed photos next to the various trophies awarded to college foot-ball’s national champions and then proceeded to talk about the challenges facing his team. Maybe Saban let the Gatorade dry from the cel-ebratory drenching before thinking about the 2013 season. Maybe. “The team next year is 0-0,” Saban, who is on a 61-7 run over the past five sea-sons, said Tuesday morn-ing. “Even though I really appreciate what this team accomplished and am very, very proud of what they accomplished, we need to prepare for the challeng-es of the new season very quickly with the team we have coming back. “ It didn’t take Saban long to refocus after Monday night’s 42-14 demolition of Notre Dame that secured a second straight BCS title, the Crimson Tide’s third in four seasons and the seventh straight for Southeastern Conference teams. Shortly after the game, he was already talking about getting back to the office by Wednesday morning. Alabama players, meanwhile, finally were able to voice the “D-word.” Center Barrett Jones said he had a Sports Illustrated cover from a couple of years ago after his last college game. “It says, ‘Dynasty. Can anybody stop Alabama?’ I’ll never forget looking at that thing and wondering if we really could be a dynasty,” said Jones, who mainly put it on the wall because he’s featured. “I think three out of four, I’m no dynasty expert, but that seems like a dynasty to me. I guess I can say that now that I’m gone. Don’t tell coach I said that.” The 2013 team will almost certainly be regard-ed among the preseason favorites to get back to the summit, even though three Tide stars — tailback Eddie Lacy, cornerback Dee Milliner and right tackle D.J. Fluker — could decide to skip their senior seasons and turn pro. Saban also emphatically tried to end speculation that he might return to the NFL, where he spent two years with the Miami Dolphins before returning to the SEC. It was a question that really made him bristle dur-ing the 30-plus minute news conference. “How many times do you think I’ve been asked to put it to rest?” Saban said. “And I’ve put it to rest, and you continue to ask it. So I’m going to say it today, that — you know, I think some-where along the line you’ve got to choose. You learn a lot from the experiences of what you’ve done in the past. I came to the Miami Dolphins, what, eight years ago for the best owner, the best person that I’ve ever had the opportunity to work for. And in the two years that I was there, I had a very, very difficult time thinking that I could impact the orga-nization in the way that I wanted to or the way that I was able to in college, and it was very difficult for me.” He said that experience taught him that the college ranks “is where I belong, and I’m really happy and at peace with all that.” As for the players, AllAmerica linebacker C.J. Mosley has already said he’ll return. So has quar-terback AJ McCarron, who had his second straight star turn in a BCS title game. “We certainly have to build the team around him,” Saban said, adding that a late-game spat with Jones showed the quar-terback’s competitive fire. “I’ve talked a lot about it’s difficult to play quarterback when you don’t have good players around you. I think we should have, God willing and everybody stay-ing healthy, a pretty good receiver corps. We’ll have to do some rebuilding in the offensive line. Regardless of what Eddie decides to do, we’ll probably still have some pretty decent run-ners. But I think AJ can be a really good player, maybe the best quarterback in the country next year.” The biggest question mark is replacing three, maybe four, starters on an offensive line that paved the way. Amari Cooper, who broke several of Julio Jones’ Alabama freshman receiving marks, and fel-low freshman running back T.J. Yeldon give McCarron and the Tide a couple of potent weapons, even if Lacy doesn’t return. “I am going to try to win three or four,” said Cooper, who had 105 yards and two touchdowns in the title game. “This season was good, but I expected it to be even more. There is so much more that I can do.” Saban emphasized the difficulty of repeating and said he showed the play-ers a video of NBA Hall of Famer Michael Jordan say-ing that the first title isn’t the hardest — it’s the ones after that. Rose, Sugar will host first semifinals in playoffBy RALPH D. RUSSOAssociated PressKEY BISCAYNE — The first semifinal games in the new college football play-off system will be played in the Rose Bowl and the Sugar Bowl on Jan. 1, 2015. The BCS conference commissioners announced the dates and rotation for all 12 years of the upcom-ing postseason format after a meeting in Key Biscayne on Monday, the day after the BCS championship game in Miami. “It was not a one-year decision, it had to be a 12-year decision,” BCS executive director Bill Hancock said. “Calendar issues, days of rest. Sugar and Rose were paired together because of the days of rest since they are playing the same day.” Whether they are hosting a semifinal or just a marquee bowl game, the Rose Bowl and the Sugar Bowl will always be played on Jan. 1, or Jan. 2 in years in which New Year’s Day falls on a Sunday. In the eight years in which the Rose and Sugar do not host the semifinals, the four playoff teams will kick off on New Year’s Eve or Saturday, Dec. 30. “Those days will belong to college football,” Hancock said. The Rose Bowl will also be the site of the last BCS championship game on Jan. 1, 2014. The site of the first championship game in the new system is still to be picked, though Cowboys Stadium in Arlington, Texas, seems to be the front-runner. The title games will always be played on Mondays, at least seven days after the semifinals. The first one will be played Jan. 12, 2015. The earliest the championship game will be played is Monday, Jan. 7, 2019. The latest the champion-ship game will be played is Jan. 13, and that will happen twice, in 2020 and 2025. In the second year of the playoff, the Orange Bowl will host a semifinal on Dec. 31, 2015, along with one of three other sites still to be determined. The preference is to have three more sites in three times zones, and they are expected to be Atlanta (Chick-fil-A Bowl), Arlington, Texas (Cotton Bowl) and Glendale, Ariz. (Fiesta). Hancock said the commissioners are on track to have those sites locked in by the end of their late April meetings in Pasadena. The site for the first champion-ship game is expected to be chosen sooner. “This was really a basic meeting,” Hancock said. “The balls that are still in the air are the (selec-tion) committee, protocol and structure, what we’re going to call it.”Tide’s winning formula: Run, and run wellMIAMI GARDENS — When Alabama runs, Alabama wins. That axiom held true once again Monday night in the BCS title game — for the 50th straight time. The Crimson Tide have rushed for at least 150 yards in a game on 50 dif-ferent occasions since the start of the 2008 season. And they’ve won every one of those contests, after rushing for 265 yards on the way to a 42-14 win over Notre Dame. The last time Alabama ran for more than 150 yards and lost was Nov. 17, 2007, when the Crimson Tide was beaten by Louisiana-Monroe 21-14. Alabama finished 7-6 that season. In the five sea-sons that have followed, the Tide now have 61 wins, tying Boise State for the most in major college foot-ball over that span. And, most notably, Alabama now has three of the last four BCS national titles. Naturally, the Tide ran for at least 150 yards in all three of those title tilts.TrendingAlabama quarterback AJ McCarron’s model girl-friend, Katherine Webb, became a hot topic on Twitter as her guy was helping the Tide blow out Notre Dame.

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DEAR ABBY: My husband is now involved in his third computer affair. He’s a teacher, and his first one was with a student. He was almost fired over it. He apologized to me and to his supervisor and prom-ised it would never happen again. Last week I found an email he had sent to anoth-er former student, and the things he said to her were disgusting. The current one is a student, too. I have a nice home and my husband is good to me except for his wan-dering eye. He gives me anything I want and takes me with him whenever he travels. But he is a Jekyll and Hyde when it comes to a computer and young girls -all younger than his daughter, I might add. I know if this gets back to his boss he’ll be fired. He’s a brilliant man and an excellent teacher. So what do I do? If he gets caught let him suffer the conse-quences. Or, I can confront him and try to get him to see a counselor before he ruins his career, and makes me a laughingstock of the community. Any suggestions would be appreciated. -NOT LAUGHING IN WASHINGTON STATE DEAR NOT LAUGHING: Your husband has a serious prob-lem. He is playing Russian roulette with his career -and it’s only a matter of time until he acts inap-propriately with the wrong student. If you love him at all, confront him and insist that he talk to a counselor and learn to strengthen his impulse control. When his activities become public knowledge, as is sure to happen, you won’t be the laughingstock of the com-munity, but your husband WILL be scorned and job-less. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: I’m a divorced “empty nester” who would like to meet a nice man to spend time with. I’m attractive, slim and active. A year and a half ago I was diagnosed with stage 4 breast cancer. I have excel-lent medical care and my doctor is optimistic. She told me she has treated many women who have survived 10 years and are still doing fine. I intend to do everything in my power to be one of those women. I have tried meeting men on the Internet or through groups I belong to. I explain on the first date about my health issues because I don’t want anyone to think I’m dishonest. Unfortunately, several men I would have liked to see again told me flat-out that they “can’t deal with the cancer thing.” I hope to find someone with enough compassion willing to take the chance? -HEALTHY NOW IN WISCONSIN DEAR HEALTHY NOW: Compassion? How about someone intelligent enough to grasp that nobody has a guarantee about how long someone will live -including him? The appropriate time to discuss your medical history is after you have gotten to know someone well enough that you can talk frankly about it, and the relationship is beyond casual. First dates do not fall into that category. No man who cares about you would ever walk away. And any man who would isn’t worth having, so con-sider yourself lucky. DILBERT BABY BLUES HOROSCOPES DEAR ABBY ARIES (March 21-April 19): You will have to ease your way in to whatever you want to pursue. Size up your situation and con-sider your options. Don’t feel pressured to make a hasty decision if you are not sure what you want to do next. Do your research. +++++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Sign up for courses or attend a conference that will keep you up to speed regarding the latest technology or research in your chosen field. Put love at the top of your list and socialize or make special plans for two. +++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Turn your interests into a financial solution. Invest in your skills and what you love to do. Check out what your community needs, utilize your talents to fit the demand and you will find your way to finan-cial prosperity. +++ CANCER (June 21July 22): Take a creative, imaginative approach to whatever you pursue. Partnerships will be ben-eficial and can be initiated through networking func-tions you attend. Live in the moment personally and professionally and you will excel. Love is on the rise and personal changes will be positive. +++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Accept a challenge that will alter the way you do things or where you reside. Focus on what will make you happy and how you can best serve your needs. A change in attitude will take anyone opposing you by surprise. +++++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Emotional issues will surface with regard to love or your domestic situation. Go somewhere where you can think and consider your options. Sticking around home will lead to a force-play that you are best to avoid for the time being. ++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Being inquisitive is a good thing, but if you meddle in someone’s affairs you will meet with opposition that will alter your personal position forever. Respond with cau-tion. You are best to listen, but refrain from making judgments or suggestions. ++++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Check your options and take the path that offers the coolest, most unusual direction possible. You will thrive on being unique or getting involved with creative people. Participate in programs, courses or activities that you find engaging. Love is in the stars. +++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Honesty will raise emotional questions, but in the end will relieve stress. Knowing your options will help you make changes necessary to improve your personal life. A chance to downsize or to sell unneeded possessions should be considered. +++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You’ve got more leverage than you realize. Speak up, show how responsible you are, and you will be rewarded for your actions. Don’t get angry when what’s required is a cool, detached attitude and get-ting the job done. +++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Focus on what you can accomplish. Home and family will make a dif-ference to the outcome of an endeavor you want to pursue. Trust in what and whom you know to make a difference in the outcome you are striving to reach. ++++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Get serious about what you can offer and follow through. What you present now will make a difference when you need a favor. A change in your personal or professional status is likely, and you should do your best to pro-tect your reputation. ++ CELEBRITY CIPHER Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com BLONDIE BEETLE BAILEY B.C. FRANK & ERNEST FOR BETTER OR WORSE ZITS HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH GARFIELD THE LAST WORD Eugenia Last Online affairs with pupils put teacher’s job at risk Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. CLASSIC PEANUTS Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2013 4B

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDWEDNESDAY, JANUARY9, 2013 5B Classified Department: 755-5440 Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 ServicesWhite's Trucking Services You call & We Haul! Fill Dirt, Lime Rock. AsphaltMillings, Granite, Road Rock.386-362-8763 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURT, THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAPROBATE DIVISION CASE NO. 12-306-CPIN RE: ESTATE OFMELODYLYNN SCHRAM WHITE,deceasedNOTICE T O CREDIT ORS The administration of the estate of MELODYLYNN SCHRAM WHITE, deceased, whose date of death was September 2, 2012; File Number 12-306-CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for Columbia County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 173 NE Her-nando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below.All creditors of the decedent and oth-er persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICA-TION OF THIS NOTICE.ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITH-IN THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED.NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.The date of first publication of this notice is: January 9, 2013.Personal Representative: /s/ Donald White DONALD WHITE6804 SW53rd AvenueGainesville, Florida 32608Attorneys for Personal Representa-tive:FEAGLE & FEAGLE, ATTOR-NEYS, P.A.By: /s/ Mark E. Feagle Mark E. FeagleFlorida Bar No. 0576905153 NE Madison StreetPost Office Box 1653Lake City, Florida 32056-1653386/752-719105536630JANUARY9, 16, 2013 In February 1976 for 1967 or 1968 corps and in June 1978 for 1969, 1971 or 1972 crops Flue Cured To-bacco Cooperative Stabilization Cor-poration (”Stabilization” now known as U S Tobacco Cooperative) issued Certificates of Interest in Capital Re-serve, to its members who delivered tobacco to Stabilization for any year listed above (”Certificate”)Weare pleased to offer to redeem the Certificate of any member who voluntarily accepts this offer. This is not a mandatory redemption, it is an offer, which may be accepted only at your election. You are under no obli-gation to accept it, and if you elect not to accept it, you will retain all rights in and to the Certificate, and your Certificate will be subject to re-demption in the same manner as if there had been no offer.Any Certificate holder (including heirs, beneficiaries and/or estate ad-ministrators of deceased Certificate holders) who would like to accept this redemption offer should call 1-877-277-7422 for more information. Toobtain a redemption application form go to www.tobaccocheck.com and click on the application form. You may also request a redemption application form by mail, by sending a self-addressed stamped envelope to:Certificate RedemptionP.O. Box 12300 Raleigh, N.C. 27605THE DEADLINE FOR SUBMIT-TING APROPERTYDOCUMENT-ED REDEMPTION APPLICATION IS March 29, 2013. Applications postmarked after March 29, 2013, or faxed or emailed after March 29, 2013 or not properly completed or sufficiently documented by March 29, 2013 will not be processed.Tommy BunnPresident/SecretaryU.S. Tobacco Cooperative05536651January 9, 2013 LegalIN THE CIRCUITCOURT, THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAPROBATE DIVISION CASE NO. 12-277-CPIN RE: ESTATE OFT. PATDANIELSa/k/a THOMAS PATRICK DAN-IELS,deceased.NOTICE TO CREDITORSThe administration of the estate of T. PATDANIELS, deceased, whose date of death was November 17, 2012; File Number 12-277-CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for Co-lumbia County, Florida, Probate Di-vision, the address of which is 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055. The names and ad-dresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's at-torney are set forth below.All creditors of the decedent and oth-er persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICA-TION OF THIS NOTICE.ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITH-IN THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED.NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.The date of first publication of this notice is: January 9, 2013.Personal Representatives:/s/ Kris P. Daniels KRIS P. DANIELS808 Kirsten Jane CourtLawrenceville, GA30045 /s/ Brandi O’Neal BRANDI O’NEAL1068 South Marion AvenueLake City, Florida 32025Attorneys for Personal Representa-tives:FEAGLE & FEAGLE, ATTOR-NEYS, P.A.By: /s/ Mark E. FeagleMark E. FeagleFlorida Bar No. 0576905153 NE Madison StreetPost Office Box 1653Lake City, Florida 32056-1653386/752-7191mefeagle@bellsouth.net05536655January 9, 16, 2013 COLUMBIACOUNTYBOARD OF COUNTYCOMMISSIONERSPROJECTNUMBER 2012-10County Road 252 – SWPinemount Rd.NOTICE TO CONTRACTORSNotice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received in the Columbia County Manager’s office until 11:00 A.M. on January 11, 2013, for Co-lumbia County Project No. 2012-10. This office is located on the second floor of the Courthouse Annex at 135 Hernando Avenue, Room 203 Lake City FL32055.This project consists of approximate-ly 27,480 LF of milling existing as-phalt pavement and placement of new asphalt pavement in two layers (structural and surface).Scope of work includes milling, as-phaltic concrete pavement, erosion control, and incidental items.The Bid Forms and Construction specifications may be obtained from the County’s web site at http://www .columbiacountyfla.com/ PurchasingBids.asp Deadline for questions regarding construction plans, specifications, and/or bid documents must be received before 11:00 P.M. on January 7, 2013.The successful bidder will be re-quired to furnish the County Manag-er with a bid bond, performance bond, and liability insurance prior to commencing work.The Columbia County Commission reserves the right to reject any or all bids and to add to the contract or de-lete from the contract to stay within their funding capabilities.Columbia County Board of County CommissionersStephen E. Bailey, Chair05536575January 2, 9, 2013 NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION1994 NISSAN ALTIMAVIN# 1N4BU31DXRC166513To be held on JANUARY28, 2013At Daniel’s Towing & RecoveryArrowhead Road Lake City, Florida 32056-3026At 9:00 am05536667JANUARY9, 2013 LegalCOLUMBIACOUNTYBOARD OF COUNTYCOMMISSIONERSPROJECTNUMBER 2013-03NWLake City AvenueNOTICE TO CONTRACTORSNotice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received in the Columbia County Manager’s office until 11:00 A.M. on January 11, 2013, for Co-lumbia County Project No. 2013-03. This office is located on the second floor of the Courthouse Annex at 135 Hernando Avenue, Room 203 Lake City FL32055.This project consists of approximate-ly +/-1000 LF of mixing existing as-phalt pavement and placement of new asphalt pavement in two layers at 75 lb/sy leveling and 140 lb/sy surface.Scope of work includes mixing, as-phaltic concrete pavement, erosion control, and incidental items.The Bid Forms and Construction specifications may be obtained from the County’s web site at http://www .columbiacountyfla.com/ PurchasingBids.asp Deadline for questions regarding construction plans, specifications, and/or bid documents must be received before 11:00 P.M. on January 7, 2013.The successful bidder will be re-quired to furnish the County Manag-er a performance bond and liability insurance prior to commencing work.The Columbia County Commission reserves the right to reject any or all bids and to add to the contract or de-lete from the contract to stay within their funding capabilities.Columbia County Board of County CommissionersStephen E.Bailey, Chair05536576January 2, 9, 2013 NOTICE OFSUSPENSIONTO: Jesse R. CusterCase No: 201205680ANotice of Suspension to suspend your license and eligibility for licen-sure has been filed against you. You have the right to request a hearing pursuant to Sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes, by mailing a request for same to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Licensing, Post Office Box 3168, Tallahassee, Florida 32315-3168. If a request for hearing is not received by 21 days from the date of the last publication, the right to hearing in this matter will be waived and the Department will dispose of this cause in accordance with law.05536520January 2, 9, 16, 23, 2013 NOTICE OFSUSPENSIONTO: Lonnie BucchiCase No: 201203835ANotice of Suspension to suspend your license and eligibility for licen-sure has been filed against you. You have the right to request a hearing pursuant to Sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes, by mailing a request for same to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Licensing, Post Office Box 3168, Tallahassee, Florida 32315-3168. If a request for hearing is not received by 21 days from the date of the last publication, the right to hearing in this matter will be waived and the Department will dispose of this cause in accordance with law.05536521January 2, 9, 16, 23, 2013 020Lost & Found Found Nintendo 3D In vicinity of Troy St & Elementary School. Need to Provide Birth date & Serial I.D. Info. 243-8135 Found on Ichetucknee Rd Small female short hair brown dog, No collar. Very Sweet, Sweet, Sweet. Contact 984-6796 100Job OpportunitiesAuto Mechanic Wanted. Call to make an Appointment. 965-6343 Industrial Structural/ Mechanical Designer-Draftsman Must have experience in design and detailing Material Handling Equipment (conveyor systems) & related structural steel support systems. Proficiency in AutoCAD is necessary. DO NOTAPPLYIN PERSON Send resume to Draftsman 3631 US Highway 90 East Lake City, Fl 32055 ConsumerLender-SunState FCUFull-Time Position in Lake City. Experience selling financial products, proven customer relations expertise, and lending experience REQUIRED. Great pay and benefits! Application Required and available at www.sunstatefcu.org. Fax to 386-462-4686. DFWP, EOE 100Job Opportunities05536515EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COLUMBIACOUNTY Columbia County is accepting applications for a 9-1-1 Communications Center Manager. Employee will perform responsible administrative and professional work in developing, coordinating, maintaining, and enhancing the daily operations of the County’s Emergency 9-1-1 System. Minimum requirements: Graduation from an accredited high school or possession of an equivalency diploma and at least four (4) years experience in System Analysis, Communications, or a closely related field, or any equivalent combination of training and experience which provides the required skills, knowledge and abilities to perform the job. Must be a resident of Columbia County within the first six (6) months of employment. Must possess a valid Florida Drivers License. Salary negotiable depending upon qualifications/experience. Successful applicant must pass pre-employment physical, criminal history check and drug screening. Applications may be obtained at the Human Resources Office, Board of County Commissioners, 135 NE Hernando, Suite 203, Lake City, FL32055, (386)719-2025, TDD (386)758-2139 or our website (www.columbiacountyfla.com). Review of applications will begin on 1/21/2013 and will continue until the position is filled. AA/EEO/ADA/VP Employer. 05536644EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COLUMBIACOUNTY Columbia County is accepting applications for Equipment Operator I, Public Works. Position’s primary responsibility is skilled work in the operation of several types of automotive vehicles and mobile motorized equipment. Light maintenance of vehicles and equipment operated. Operates or drives a dump truck, participates in the loading and unloading of materials. Minimum Experience: High School education or G.E.D. preferred and one year experience in vehicle and or equipment operation, or an equivalent combination of training and experience. Valid Fl CDLClass B Drivers License required within the first ninety (90) days of initial employment. Salary is $9.55 per hr. plus benefits. Successful applicant must pass pre-employment physical & drug screening. Applications may be obtained at the Human Resources Office or online at www.columbiacountyfla.com, Board of County Commissioners, 135 NE Hernando Ave., Suite 203. Lake City, FL32055, (386) 719-2025, TDD (386) 758-2139. Deadline: 01/25/13. Columbia County is an AA/EEO/ADA/VPEmployer. 05536646HOLIDAYINN & SUITESLake City’s only full service hotel is seeking the following : Room Attendant P/TExperience Preferred Apply in person Mon-Fri 12-5pm 213 SWCommerce Dr. EOE/DFWP. Construction Salesman Needed. Excellent Pay. Experience Required. 866-959-7663 Earn approx $250/wk delivering USATODAYin Lake City, M-F, approx 3AM-9AM. Must be avail on Mondays for collections. No wknds or holiday. Must have good credit, valid FLDL, ins., reliable vehicle. To apply call 800-627-6485 option 2. Mechanic needed with tools and experience. Southern Specialize Truck & Trailer. 386-752-9754 100Job OpportunitiesExperienced Restaurant Managers Day one medical, dental and vision. Paid vacation, 401K and bonuses. EOE. email resume to: sfl_careers@steaknshake.com Needed CNC Machinist Must be familiar with Lathes and Mills, send resume to Grizzly Mfg. 174 NE Cortez Ter. Lake City FL32055, or Email: guy@qiagroup.com NO PHONE CALLS/WALK-INS LaborerPosition Must be able to read Tape Measurer Apply in person Grizzly Mfg. 174 NE Cortez Terrace Lake City FL32055 Must have a minimum of 5 yrs Exp. selling HVAC Equipment. Excellent benefits &Great pay. Call Allen 386-628-1093 Sales Help at Florida Visitors Center. Benefits, hourly wage plus commission. Excellent opportunity with National company. Westgate Resorts. Call Ed 904-540-2314 or email Ed_Newman@wgresorts.com SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 Service Techs & Installers Must be EPA& NATE certified. Excellent benefits & great pay. Call Allen (386) 628-1093 Truck Repair facility Service Writer needed. Computer literate and understanding of truck repair and parts procurement. Southern Special Truck & Trailer 752-9754 120Medical Employment05536623Referral Coordinator/ Checkout Clerk Medical Office is seeking qualified candidate with Good Multi-tasking skills and professionalism. Must have exp. w/Med. Term & Ins. Referrals & Auth. Send resume by Email to jsmith@ccofnf.com. No Calls Please. DIET AR Y MANAGER Needed CDM, Chef, LTC, 2 years experience preferred Must be able to manage large staff and oversee daily food preparation for a 180 bed SNF. Full time with excellent benefits. E-mail resume to Greg Roberts: groberts@gulfcoasthealthcare.com or fax to: (386)362-4417. Live Oak, FLEOE/V/D/M/F GREATOPPORTUNITY•Full Time Experienced C.N.A’s All Shifts Apply in person at Suwannee Health Care & Rehab. 1620 Helevenston Street S.E. Live Oak, FL32064 EOE/m/f/d/v Massage Therapist Needed in a 180 Beds SNF Licensed, 1-2 years Experience preferred. Part-time weekend position. E-mail resume to Greg Roberts: groberts@gulfcoasthealthcare.com or fax to: (386) 362-4417 Live Oak, FLEOE/V/D/M/F 240Schools & Education05536525Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class1/7/2013• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-1/14/13• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies Free to Good Home 1yr old Med. mix breed Male dog, good w/ children and other dogs, does not do well with cats. Call 752-4481 PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. Puppy 8 wks old Cream Poodle Health Certificate $350.00 Contact 752-4890 407Computers HPComputer $75.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 408Furniture SOFABED, new decking, springs, and mattress $100. 386-754-1595 414Needlecraft & SewingSERIOUS DEAL For Serious Sewers. Too Much to List. 754-6783 420Wanted to Buy WANTED Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans. $300 & up No title Needed Free Pickup 386-878-9260 After5pm 386752-3648 430Garage Sales Must Sell -Lrg Capacity W/D, Refrig., D/W, Freezer, TV, Roll Top Desk, End Table, & Coffee tables. Contact for more info. 752-1092 PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 440Miscellaneous Troy-Bilt 5550 Watt Generator, 10HPOHVBriggs & Stratton, $400, 386-754-1595 630Mobile Homes forRent1/1 Cabin $475 & Lots for your RVor your own Cabin. Between Lake City & G’ville. Access to I-75 & 441 (352)317-1326. 2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $700. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 2/1 Furnished S/WMH washer/dryer, Dep & referrences Incl: cable, water, elect. & garb. For more info. 386-965-3477 3 BR/1 BA, close to town, fenced in yard, private well $800 month. & $800 deposit 386-752-7578 & 386-288-8401 3 BR/2 BA, completely refurbished, appliances furnished, $795 month. & $795 deposit 386-752-7578 3BR/2BA DWMH on 2.5 Acres North of Lake City $500 Dep $700 Mth Call 386-623-0232 and leave msg 3Br/2Ba Mod 1/2acre (nice subd) concrete drive, wrap around deck appl's,energysaver, &thermo's ready (386) 984-5341 $800 moREPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Linewww.lakecityreporter.com

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDWEDNESDAY, JANUARY9, 2013 Classified Department: 755-5440 6B Business Opportunities _____________________________ START NOW! OPEN RED HOT DOLLAR, DOLLAR PLUS, MAILBOX, DISCOUNT PARTY, $10 CLOTHING STORE, TEEN STORE, FITNESS CENTER FROM $51,900 WORLDWIDE! WWW.DRSS20.COM (800)518-3064 _____________________________ For Sale _____________________________ LEATHER LIVING ROOM SET, NEW, never used-$975. CHERRY BEDROOM SET, Solid Wood, new in factory boxes--$895. Orig. price $6500 Can Deliver. Bill (813)298-0221. _____________________________ Health & Medical _____________________________ Got Rheumatoid Arthritis? Local doctors researching study drug for rheumatoid arthritis. Free study drug and care and up to $1,200 compensation. Please call: (866)653-1703 _____________________________ Help Wanted _____________________________ Driver Daily or Weekly Pay. $0.01 increase per mile after 6 months and 12 months. $0.03 Quarterly Bonus. Requires 3 months recent experience. (800)414-9569 www.driveknight.com _____________________________ Top Pay for Limited Experience! 34 cpm for 1 Mos OTR Exp Plus Benets, New Equip & 401K (877)258-8782 www.ad-drivers.com _____________________________ DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for Schneider National! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 _____________________________ Medical Supplies _____________________________ CATHETERS just for women individually prelubricated in discreet attractive containers and covered by Medicare and most insurance. FREE SAMPLE if qualied. (888)257-1031, www.catheasy.com _____________________________ PRE-LUBRICATED CATHETERS for men, Fast & easy to use, less pain, less discomfort. Covered by Medicare and insurance. FREE SAMPLE if qualied. (888)280-9787 www.cathbest.com _____________________________ Miscellaneous _____________________________ AIRLINE CAREERS – Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualied – Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-314-3769 _____________________________ NURSING CAREERS begin here – Train in months, not years. Financial aid if qualied. Housing available. Job Placement assistance. Call Centura Institute Orlando (877) 206-6559 _____________________________ ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualied. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-203-3179 www.CenturaOnline.com _____________________________ MEDICAL CAREERS begin here – Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualied. SCHEV authorized. Call 888-203-3179 www.CenturaOnline.com _____________________________ AIRLINES ARE HIRING – Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualied – Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 _____________________________ OTR Drivers Wanted _____________________________ Drivers Class A Flatbed. HOME EVERY WEEKEND! Pay 37¢/mi, Both ways, FULL BENEFITS, Requires 1 year OTR Flatbed experience. (800)572-5489 x227, SunBelt Transport, Jacksonville, FL _____________________________ TIRED OF LIVING PAYCHECK TO PAYCHECK? There’s great earning potential as a Professional Truck Driver! The average Professional Truck Driver earns over $700/wk*! 16-Day CDL Training @ NFCC/Roadmaster! Approved for Veterans Training. CALL TODAY! (866)467-0060 *DOL/BLS 2012 _____________________________ Real Estate/ Land for Sale _____________________________ 20 ACRES FREE! Own 60 acres for 40 acre price/payment. $0 Down, $168/mo. Money Back Guarantee, NO CREDIT CHECKS. Beautiful Views, West Texas. 1-800-843-7537 www.sunsetranches.com _____________________________ Schools & Instruction _____________________________ “Can You Dig It?” Heavy Equipment School. 3wk Training Program. Backhoes, Bulldozers, Excavators. Local Job Placement Asst. VA BenetsApproved. 2 National Certications.(866)362-6497 Week of January 7, 2013 2001 Dodge Ram 3500V10 Magnum, extended cab, SLT, 4 WD, DRW, AT, PW, PS, red w/tan interior, 137,000 miles, good condition.$7,900386-984-6606 or 386-758-6800 630Mobile Homes forRentQuiet Country Park 3bd/2ba $525, 2bd/1ba $425. Very clean. NO PETS! References & Deposit required 386-758-2280 640Mobile Homes forSale2006 16X80 3/2 $25,400 --2007 32x44 3/2 $33,500--BOTH HOMES INCLUDE DELIVERY TOYOUR LAND. Several Repo’s Coming In The Next 10 Days--Call North Pointe Homes For Details. Call 352-872-5566 Palm HarborHomes 4/2 From 499 Mo Loaded3/2 From 399 Mo Loaded Homes on Your Lot 0 Down 800-622-2832 ext 210 New 2013-28x483/2 JACOBSEN $35,400 Delivered Only. OR $39,995 Delivered and Set up. Big Rooms. North Pointe Homes, 4545 NW13th St., Gainesville, 352-872-5566 Suwannee River Front Home Very Nice 4br/2ba, fireplace, large deck, $149,800 Owner Broker. 1.8 acres (mol) 386-935-1482 650Mobile Home & LandFSBO 5 ac lot w/ 1995 refurb. MH. 66ft long w/ new roof & wheel chair ramp. $5,000 down Owner Fin. on Balance Approx 5 miles N. of LC. 386-752-4597 OwnerFinanced 3/22.5 ac.River Access. Small down $585 mo 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com SW2BD/1.5BA, 1 acre, Updated Kitchen. $3,500 down, $350 mth Contact 305-304-4028 705Rooms forRent RV for Rent $450 mth + Security Utilities Included, Avail now. 386-497-3524 or 386-288-9110 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05535481We’ve got it all!$89 Deposit Limited Avail. Call Today! Windsong Apts. *Free afterschool program386-758-8455 BRANFORD VILLAS 386-935-2319 2br/1ba Apts. Now available.$570. mo. TDD number 1-800-955-8771 Equal Housing Opportunity Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A$530 month $530 deposit garbage included. No pets. 386-344-2170 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled 1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living room. $450. mo plus sec. 386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951 UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent3 bedroom 1 bath $630 mth and $630 deposit. CH/A Contact 377-2170 3bdrm very spacious, 2ba, garage, CH/AFenced in backyard. $1,400 mth & $1,400 dep. Contact 386-344-1914 3br/1.5ba. Very clean, Brick great area w/bonus room. Carport, shed & Fenced (privacy) back yard. $825. mo $825. dep. Ref’s req’d. (941)920-4535 ForLease ,3Br/2bth DWon ten acres S.of Columbia City.Contact At 727-289-2172 $800.00 mo.$350.00 security. NICE 3/2 brick home w/garage in quiet neighborhood. 489 SWBrandy. $900 plus sec. dep. 386-438-4600 750Business & Office RentalsMedical, Retail and Professional Office space on East Baya near Old Country Club Rd. Call 386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622 (cell) 820Farms & AcreageOwner financed land 1/2 to 10 acre lots. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 820Farms & Acreage4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com 830Commercial PropertyIndustrial warehouse7+ acres fenced 17,000 sq ft Barn $1,500 mo. TomEagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 950Cars forSale 2000 Lincoln Town Car; Med blue, leather, power seats & more. 147,400 miles, Exc condition. $2,990. 386-623-2848 RECYCLE YOUR Lake City Reporter We’re on target! days a weekSubscribe Today 386-755-5445 180 East Duval St. Lake City, FLorida 32055Contact us at the paper.Mon.-Fri.: 8 a.m.5:00 p.m.CLASSIFIED ADS 386-755-5440 SUBSCRIPTION 386-755-5445 ALL OTHER DEPARTMENTS 386-752-1293 ELECTRONIC ADS SEND TOads@lakecityreporter.com THIS REPORTER WORKS FOR YOU! Lake City Reporter