<%BANNER%>

The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:01995

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:01995

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comAuthorities in Seattle, Wash., suspended their ground search for missing Lake City skydiver Kurt Ruppert Jr. Sunday night after combing portions of Mount Si for the better part of four days. King County Sheriff Office officials said the search will mostly be done by heli-copter from this point on, as long as the weather permits. They said the chances of finding Ruppert alive have dwindled. “We just don’t think he survived at this point,” said Sgt. Cindi West, King County Sheriff’s Office public information officer. Dozens of searchers were out four days “calling and call-ing,” West said. “If he survived he wasn’t con-scious enough to yell to us.” She said if Ruppert survived the jump and was caught in a tree or lost in the forest, he likely died of hypothermia. Searchers have been looking for Ruppert since Thursday afternoon after he jumped out a helicopter and failed to show up at a landing zone. Ruppert, 29, was with two other skydivers and the three were taking turns jump-ing out of a helicopter near Mount Si, about 40 miles east of Seattle in Washington’s Cascade foothills. He was wearing a wing suit and no one saw whether his parachute deployed. By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comTwo Jacksonville men were found dead Saturday night in a Denver Street home they were renovating. Authorities said the men may have died from carbon monoxide poisoning. Authorities found Willie Saulsby Smith, 74 and John Thomas Rawls, 48, both of Jacksonville, in the home after they came to make a well-being check on the men. Authorities said Smith owned the home and Rawls, his friend, was helping, though he also owned some type of construction business. Rawls’ sign was in the front yard. The bodies were sent to the medical exam-iner’s office in Jacksonville where the cause of death will be determined. According to Lake City Police Department reports, around 9:53 p.m. Saturday, officers Nikki Gunter and Peter Michaels were dispatched to 805 NE Denver St. for a well-being check. Juanita Smith, who lives in Jacksonville, called police Opinion ................ 4APeople.................. 2AObituaries .............. 5A Advice & Comics ......... 3B Puzzles ................. 4B TODAY IN PEOPLE Letterman on the couch. COMING WEDNESDAY Local news roundup. 71 55 Partly cloudy WEATHER, 2A CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 138, No. 245Lake City ReporterTUESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2013 | YOUR COMMUNITY N EWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | 75¢ LAKECITYREPORTER.COM 1 Hope fading for skydiver Wash. authorities hold little hope of finding Lake City man alive. Smith SKYDIVER continued on 6A DEATHS continued on 6A2 founddead inhome Carbon monoxidepoisoning possible culprit, say police. Rawls Local woman faces charges in stabbingBy TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comA Lake City woman, arrested Sunday morning, faces felony charges after she allegedly stabbed a relative with a steak knife multiple times following an argument. Shakeira Standreka Maxwell, 22, 435 NW Bascom Norris Drive, was charged with aggravated battery in con-nection with the case. She was booked into the Columbia County STABBING continued on 6A Going, going...JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterMembers of a demolition crew work on salvaging steel a nd aluminum from an awning after bringing down a BP ga s station for the future site of a Chick-fil-A on Monday. Michael Sexton, owner and op erator of the new Chick-fil-A in Lake City, said the restau rant will have a indoor play area, 85 parking spots and dual lane entry points for the drive-thru. “We’re definitely excited about bringing Chi ck-fil-A to Lake City,” Sexton said. Tentative plans has Chick-Fil-A opening for business on May 16, but Sexton said the plan could change dependin g on how fast construction starts. Kurt Ruppert Jr. Maxwell POLICE JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterThree migrating white pelicans come in for a landing at the retention pond in front of Columbia High School on Monday. Touchdown Man tased, arrested for drugsBy DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comA Lake City Man ran from deputies and was shot twice with a stun gun after deputies found drugs in his jacket, according to a sheriff’s arrest report Michael Akeem Harper, 19, of Lake City, faces charges of possession of a controlled substance, possession of marijuana with the intent to sell and resisting an officer. Deputy Shane Foote saw a blue Pontiac DRUGS continued on 6AEvents center: Phase 2 starts ThursdayBy DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comThe events center planning committee will now be subject to the Sunshine Laws with all meetings noticed, and the minutes of those meetings recorded. A meeting of the committee is scheduled for 6 p.m. Thursday at the Lake Shore Hospital Authority. The move to a more transparent structure came after the county commission approved to enter phase two of the events center project at a November meeting. When the committee was formed it was tasked as a fact finding committee to develop information to be used by the county commission on the feasibility of a events center in Columbia County. On Nov. 15 the county commission approved to enter phase two of the proposed events center. The events center planning committee esti-mates the project’s cost to be about $28 million. Jody DuPree, former chairman of the committee, estimated phase two’s cost at between $150,000 and $200,000. Joel Foreman, attorney for the events center planning committee, said the com-mittee at first participated in a fact-finding capacity, which does not require the same open-records standards as other governmental groups. But now that the county has entered phase two, the committee will take a more deliberative and transparent role, he said. Foreman said he will present requirements the committee is required to follow at Thursday’s meeting. “The process is more formal at this step,” he said. He said transparency will “strip away some of the questions” regarding how the events center planning committee reaches its recommendations to the county com-mission. “Hopefully the public will get a lot more information,” he said.

PAGE 2

CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Former Independent Counsel Lawrence E. Walsh is 101. Actor-comedian Larry Storch is 90. Actor Ron Moody is 89. Broadcast journalist Sander Vanocur is 85. CBS newsman Charles Osgood is 80. Singer Shirley Bassey is 76. Game show host Bob Eubanks is 75. Country-gospel singer Cristy Lane is 73. Rhythm-and-blues singer Anthony Gourdine (Little Anthony and the Imperials) is 72. Actress Yvette Mimieux is 71. AROUND FLORIDA Scott, Sebelius meet in DC WASHINGTON Both sides are saying it was a productive meeting after Florida Gov. Rick Scott sat down with the Obama administrations top health care official Monday to talk coverage, costs and Medicaid reforms. Scott met with Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius to discuss the federal health law and two pending requests from Florida for changes to its Medicaid program. Sebelius encouraged Scott to partner with Washington in setting up a new health insur ance market for Florida. Scott pressed for approval of Floridas Medicaid requests. And the two discussed Scotts concerns about the cost of expand ing Medicaid to cover more low-income people under the new health care law. The Republican gover nor softened his criticism of so-called Obamacare after the election, saying he is willing to work with federal officials. Semi full of bulls crashes on I-75 GAINESVILLE A crash on I-75 in central Florida has snarled traffic after a semitrailer hauling 32 bulls blew a tire and slammed into a tree. Florida Highway Patrol said three of the bulls got loose after Saturdays accident and one had to be shot because it was too aggressive. News outlets reported a crew of people, including cowboys, veterinarians and state troopers, set up chutes with portable metal fences to offload the bulls from the semi into trailers that would transport them to South Florida. Bryan Martin said he and driver Travis Carr were hauling the bulls from Texas to Indiantown. The truck driver was taken to the hospital with non-life-threatening inju ries. No decision yet on nuke plant TALLAHASSEE Progress Energy is still undecided on whether to repair or shut down its crippled nuclear power plant in Crystal River. That means that the states second-largest power company could have to refund customers $100 million under a prior settle ment between the utility and consumer advocates. That settlement calls for the refund if repairs had not begun by the end of 2012. A lawyer for the utility told state regulators that Progress expects to have a decision about the plant by this coming summer although he didnt rule out an announcement before then. The reactor has been down since late 2009, when its concrete contain ment building cracked dur ing an upgrade project. Officials say fixing the plant would likely take sev eral years and cost billions. Mom found dead in bathroom JACKSONVILLE Authorities are inves tigating a suspicious death after a 22-year-old Jacksonville woman was found dead in her home near her 18-month old son. Friends forced their way into the womans home Saturday night because they hadnt heard from her in two days. They found the unidentified woman unresponsive on the bath room floor. Her son was also found in the bath room, but was not injured. Sheriffs Sgt. Shawn Coarsey said evidence at the scene may indicate foul play. No arrests have been made. Bartender killed at restaurant BOCA RATON Police are searching for four sus pects they say robbed a Boca Raton restaurant, ter rorized patrons and fatally shot the bartender. Authorities said upscale Josephines restaurant closed at 10 p.m. Friday night, but the owner, sev eral employees and diners remained. Bartender Rafael Rodriguez and a waiter went out back, where four armed men with face masks knocked them to the ground, authorities said. The waiter allegedly was pistol whipped. Police said the suspects then entered the restau rant and stole wallets, jew elry and cellphones from diners. As the robbers were leaving, Rodriguez exchanged words with one of the suspects. The Palm Beach Post reports Rodriguez was shot once. He died at the hospital. 3 fires break out in neighborhood TAMPA Officials are investigating suspi cious fires at three Tampa homes on the same block. Tampa Police and fire officials responded to the first fire at a small resi dence early Monday morn ing. They then saw that two other nearby houses were on fire. All three houses were vacant. Letterman says he sees psychiatrist PASADENA, Calif. D avid Letterman says he sees a psychiatrist once a week, part of his attempt to be the person he once believed he was. The late-night talk show host gave an extraordinary interview to Oprah Winfrey in which he talked about his feuds with her and Jay Leno, and his own effort to make amends for the affairs that became public three years ago when a man tried to extort him. The interview aired Sunday night on Winfreys OWN network after it was done in November. The CBS host says his wife has forgiven him for his transgressions and his life is more joyful than ever, but he hasnt necessarily forgiven himself. Letterman also called his latenight rival Leno the funniest guy hes ever known. Bette Midler set to return to Broadway NEW YORK The Divine Miss M is returning to Broadway, and not as just a producer. Bette Midler will star in John Logans new play Ill Eat You Last: A Chat With Sue Mengers in the spring, mark ing the first time the Grammy, Tony and Golden Globe winner has been on Broadway in 30 years. The show opens April 24 at a Shubert theatre to be announced later. Midler will play the legendary Hollywood agent Sue Mengers in the one-character play by Logan, who won a Tony for Red and wrote the screenplay for the James Bond movie Skyfall. Midler made her Broadway debut in the chorus of Fiddler on the Roof and won a Tony in Clams on the Half Shell. Josh Brolin arrested for public intoxication SANTA MONICA, Calif. Josh Brolin spent some of New Years Day and the following morning in a Southern California jail cell after getting arrested for misdemeanor public intoxication. Santa Monica Police Lt. Darrell Lowe says the actor was not given a citation for the Tuesday arrest, which means he likely wont have to appear in court. Lowe says Brolin was arrested just before midnight January 1, when officers found him heavily intoxicated on a Santa Monica sidewalk. He was booked into jail and released about six hours later after he had sobered up. Sun day: 11-15-20-23-26 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAIL Y BRIEFING TUESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 Mon day: Afternoon: 6-9-8-5 Evening: N/A Mon day: Afternoon: 1-4-6 Evening: N/A Saturday: 8-19-21-23-36-40 x4 HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter 2AWEATHER Daily Scripture Follow Gods example, there fore, as dearly loved children and walk in the way of love, just as Christ loved us and gave himself up for us as a fragrant offering and sacrifice to God. Ephesians 5:1-2 ASSOCIATED PRESS David Letterman, host of CBSs Late Show, and Oprah Winfrey pose for photos after an interview at Ball State University in Muncie, Ind., in November. The latenight talk show host gave an extraordinary interview to Winfrey, in which he talked about his feuds with her and Jay Leno and his own effort to make amends for the affairs that became public three years ago. Associated Press Associated Press Midler Brolin

PAGE 3

ByCHARLES BABINGTON Associated Press WASHINGTON President Barack Obama, meet Congressman Michael Burgess. The president says he absolutely will not let Republicans threaten a national debt ceiling crisis as a way to extract deeper federal spending cuts. Burgess take? Its the most preposter ous thing Ive ever heard, the Texas Republican says. Hes going to have to nego tiate. Both sides may be bluff ing, of course. They may reach an agreement before the debt-limit matter becomes a crisis in March, or possibly late February. But the tough talk sug gests this years political fight could be even nas tier and more nerve-grat ing than the recent fiscal cliff showdown, or the July 2011 brinkmanship that trig gered the first-ever ratings downgrade of the nations credit-worthiness. Asked about the White Houses apparent assump tion that Republicans will back down, Burgess said: Im not going to foreclose on anything, but thats just not going to happen. He is hardly alone. On NBCs Meet the Press Sunday, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., repeated ly declined to say he would rule out a government shut down, prompted by a debtceiling impasse, in the effort to force Obama to swallow large spending cuts. Its a shame that we have to use whatever leverage we have in Congress to force the White House to negoti ate, he said. In fact, congressional Republicans of all stripes say Obama has no choice but to accept spending cuts they want in exchange for a hike in the debt ceiling, which will reach its limit in about two months. Said McConnell: We simply cannot increase the nations borrowing limit without committing to long-overdue reforms to spending programs that are the very cause of our debt. Obama says hes will ing to discuss spending cuts in some programs. But that discussion, he says, must not be tied to GOP threats to keep the government from borrowing the money it needs to keep paying its bills, including interest on foreign-held debt. ASSOCIATED PRESS Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (left) and Sen. Pat Roberts, R-Kansas, leave the Senate chamber on Capitol Hill in Washington. Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION TUESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2013 3A 3A No Runaround -No Hassle We can help. Denied Social Security Disability? GBIS Disability, Inc. Free Consultation 1-800-782-0059 20 years of Social Security Disability Experience www.GBISOnline.com 1001306 As life changes, so do your needs. Let State Farm Bank help with a mortgage that ts your life and your budget. Let us help you make the right move. Bank with a Good Neighbor CALL ME TODAY FOR MORE INFORMATION. Shopping for a mortgage? State Farm Bank, F.S.B., Bloomington, IL We have a great selection. Some products and services not available in all areas. John Kasak, Agent State Farm Agent 904 SW SR 247 Branford Hwy Lake City, FL 32025 Bus: 386-752-7521 NMLS # 382656 Let us help your business SHINE! COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL Janitorial Services Tile, Grout and General Floor Maintenance Fire, Water and Storm Restoration Upholstery Cleaning Emergency Water Extraction & Dry Down Carpet & Rug Cleaning Odor Control 24 hours a day 7 days a week emergency call out (386) 362-2244 (386) 755-6142 1-888-849-8234 email: bayway1@windstream.net Fax: (386) 362-6822 636 Helvenston St. SE, Live Oak, Florida www.baywayservices.biz The Bayway Group, LLC dba Bayway Services Free hearing tests are being offered in Lake City, FL on Tues., Jan 8 through Fri., Jan. 11. Factory trained Hearing & Balance Specialists (licensed by the State of Florida) will perform these free tests. The tests will be given at the Heaing & Balance Centers listed below. Appointments are preferred and can be made by calling the office at 754-6711. Everyone who has trouble hearing is welcome to have a test using the latest electronic equipment to determine if they have a correctable hearing loss. Everyone should have a hearing test at least once a year if there is any trouble at all hearing clearly. Most hearing problems gradually get worse. An annual test will help you to keep track of a progressive loss. No hearing problem of any consequence should ever be ignored. We will also be giving service on all makes and models of hearing aids. Call for an appointment to avoid waiting. Are you tired of constantly adjusting your hearing aid in order to hear comfortably? Meet the Hearing & Balance Digital! Its SMART LISTENING feature means that it automatically adapts to varying sound levels as you move from one listening environment to another. Trade up to the new Digital with this Special Offer! During this special Two Day Event, well give you up to 50% of the price you paid for your current hearing instrument, regardless of brand or age, off the price of a Digital System. Up to $1,000 per aid. 132 SW Columbia Ave., Suite 101 Lake City 386-754-6711 Associated Press WASHINGTON U.S. banks have taken another step to clear away the wreck age of the 2008 financial cri sis by agreeing to pay $8.5 billion to settle charges that they wrongfully foreclosed on millions of homeowners. The deal announced Monday could compensate hundreds of thousands of Americans whose homes were seized because of abus es such as robo-signing, when banks automatically signed off on foreclosures without properly reviewing documents. The agreement will also help eliminate huge potential liabilities for the banks. But consumer advocates complained that regulators settled for too low a price by letting banks avoid full responsibility for foreclo sures that victimized fami lies and fueled an exodus from neighborhoods across the country. The settlement ends an independent review of loan files required under a 2011 action by regulators. Bruce Marks, CEO of the advo cacy group Neighborhood Assistance Corp. of America, noted that ending the review will cut short investigations into the banks practices. The question of whos to blame the homeowners or the lenders if you stop this investigation now, that will always be an open-ended question, Marks said. The banks, which include JPMorgan Chase, Bank of America and Wells Fargo, will pay about $3.3 billion to homeowners. By JULIE PACE AP White House Correspondent WASHINGTON President Barack Obama on Monday will nominate Chuck Hagel as his next defense secretary and counter terrorism adviser John Brennan to lead the Central Intelligence Agency, two potentially contro versial picks for his second-term national security team. Hagel, even before being nomi nated, has faced tough criticism from congressional lawmakers who say the former GOP sena tor is anti-Israel and soft on Iran. And Brennan, a 25-year CIA vet eran, withdrew from consider ation for the spy agencys top job in 2008 amid questions about his connection to harsh interrogation techniques used during the George W. Bush administration. The White House said Obama will announce both nomina tions Monday afternoon. Along with secretary of state nominee Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., Hagel and Brennan would play key roles implementing and shaping Obamas national security priori ties in a second term. All three men must be confirmed by the Senate. In nominating Hagel, Obama signaled he is willing to take on a tough confirmation fight. Once Hagel emerged as Obamas likely nominee, GOP lawmakers began sharply questioning his commit ment to Israel and his willingness to take a hard line with Iran over its disputed nuclear program. Hagel, a 66-year-old moderate Nebraska Republican, has criti cized discussion of a military strike by either the U.S. or Israel against Iran. He also irritated some Israel backers with his reference to the Jewish lobby in the United States. And he has backed efforts to bring Iran to the table for future peace talks in Afghanistan. White House officials say Hagels positions on Israel and Iran have been misrepresented. They cite his Senate votes for billions in military assistance to Israel and his support for multilat eral sanctions on Tehran. Ben Rhodes, Obamas deputy national security adviser, said Hagel will be completely in line with the president on both issues. The president has a record of unprecedented security coopera tion with Israel and thats going to continue no matter who the defense secretary is, Rhodes said. The National Jewish Democratic Council said Monday that while it has expressed concern in the past about Hagel, the group expects him to following the presidents lead in providing unrivaled sup port for Israel. President Barack Obamas unprecedented pro-Israel creden tials are unquestionable, and set ting policy starts and stops with the president, the group said in a statement. But Matt Brooks, executive director of the Republican Jewish Coalition, said Hagels appoint ment would be a slap in the face for every American who is con cerned about the safety of Israel. Brennan Critics jump on Obamas picks for Pentagon, CIA Ex-senator Hagel, counterterrorism advisor chosen. GOP scoffs at Obamas vow Hagel Banks OK foreclosure settlement

PAGE 4

O K, so I like to save stuff. That’s what I told my wife after she cleaned out the desk drawers in her home study and found two of them filled with my stuff. Obviously, she hadn’t needed those drawers because my stuff had been the only occupant for several decades. Mind you, I am not a hoarder. I’ve seen hoard-ers on television, and I do not pile up in our living quarters sheetrock-putty buckets, worn-out cush-ions and cans filled with screws. Everybody knows they belong in the base-ment. But I do like to file articles from various news-papers and magazines. I am also bad to scribble notes on a piece of paper and stick it in a file. I have several files labeled “Column Ideas.” I have a file marked “The South and Other Good Things.” I have one labeled “A Little of Everything.” I like being specific so I can find what I need. My wife confiscated my collection of quarterly magazines called Nieman Reports, which date back to 1974. That’s only 152 magazines, of course. These irreplaceable gems now reside sadly in the back seat of my pickup truck, a place once used for passengers, but now a library. Those publications might be worth some-thing. I looked through one of the “Column Ideas” files tonight and read some of my cryptic notes to see if I remembered anything. One piece of paper con-tained 11 ideas, including “Gremlin owner,” “smok-ing class” and “being born.” I did do a column on the orange Gremlin auto-mobile I drove for about 10 years. The Gremlin, you’ll remember, had no rear end, and my younger daughter was ashamed to be seen in an orange car that had no rear end. Slumped down in the pas-senger’s seat, she would duck her head toward the floorboard if she spotted one of her friends as we drove by. The stop-smoking class turned into an interest-ing story, but no column, best I remember. I do recall one great quote from the story, however. I approached a gradu-ate of the class and said something like, “Well, I guess it feels good not to crave cigarettes anymore, doesn’t it?” He looked at me solemnly and said, “I could smoke one as long as your leg right now.” I’m not sure what I was thinking when I wrote “being born,” because I don’t remember being born. I’m told I was born at home, delivered by Dr. Raleigh Garner, a handsome, debonair man who drove a bright red Cadillac convertible. Nobody was home at the time but me and my daddy. My mama had gone shopping. My wife cleared out Lord knows how many books, many of which belonged to me. I went through a few but left the bulk of the culling to her. She kept some and boxed up the rest to give to a used-book store. I’d rather not know what books were in those boxes. I’ll probably need one of them tomorrow. You never know. That’s why I save stuff. Q Phil Hudgins is senior editor of Community Newspapers Inc. Phil Hudginsphudgins@cninewspapers.com OPINION Tuesday, January 8, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A4AOPINION Scott’s assaults on environment Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman I n defending his “No” vote on aid to victims of Hurricane Sandy, Congressman Ted Yoho said Friday the federal government “has no business in the insurance business.” The bill, which passed 354-67, replenished the coffers of FEMA’s National Flood Insurance Program. Without the infusion of $9.7 billion in federal funds, claims of more than 115,000 Sandy victims, who’ve been suffering since October, would have been even further delayed. So let’s get this straight: Responsible homeowners buy flood insurance through a federal program – the only way flood insurance is sold in the U.S. – only to see at least one member of Congress vote to delay their claims because he has philosophical differences with the very idea of national flood insurance. Talk about being caught between the devil and the deep blue sea. That wasn’t Yoho’s only beef with the relief package. He also complained about an abundance of pork in the bill and noted there were no offsets elsewhere to make up the nearly $10 billion extra in outlays. As for the pork, Yoho didn’t get into specifics. But we do know that earmarks “for unrelated items such as commercial fisheries in American Samoa,” which Rep. Paul Ryan found offensive in the original Senate version of the bill, weren’t present in the package passed Friday. Regardless, we agree the habit of plundering the treasury every time there’s a major disaster is a national disgrace that ought to be brought to an end, or at least radically curtailed. As to the offsets, that’s arguably a good idea – though a hard sell in an emergency, especially when the victims have already been left to linger for more than two months. But while we share Rep. Yoho’s genuine concern with runaway federal spending, and know well that a reckless, spendthrift Congress must be reined in for the good of all, here’s our question for him: What if it happened here? Had Florida’s District 3 been hit as hard as the Northeast was by Sandy, would you really vote to delay aid to your constituents? For that matter, had FEMA run short of cash after Tropical Storm Debby, and you been in office, what then? More importantly, we wonder what kind of precedent you and your 66 colleagues have already set, come the next Sunshine State hurri-cane, tornado or flood. Given Florida’s propensity for natural disaster, we may not have to wait long to find out. Congressman, we applaud your fiscal conservatism. We believe you have the best interests of your constituents, and of our nation, at heart. We see good things in your political future. But frankly, sir, you missed the mark badly on this one. What if Sandy had hit here, Rep. Yoho? Pitfalls of saving stuff OUR OPINION LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.comI n his 1998 book “Some Kind of Paradise: A Chronicle of Man and the Land in Florida,” environmentalist Mark Derr wrote that “in these past one hundred years, man has reshaped and re-landscaped the peninsula, leveling forests, draining the marshes. The process continues at such a rapid rate that many residents of more than a decade barely recognize the areas around their homes.” Since Derr wrote those observations, the process of destruction has gone on at breakneck speed. Two out of three Florida residents come from other states or for-eign countries, and they have no memory of our old natural beauty and too often little respect for that beauty. Most have no qualms about electing lawmakers who dismiss the intrinsic value of our environment. As a result, Derr wrote, the “tale of Florida’s development often is sordid, marked by the greed of people intent on taking whatever the land offered and leaving nothing in return.” Gov. Rick Scott is an outsider, and he is proving to be no friend of the envi-ronment in almost every move he makes. Most recently, as suggested by an article in the Tampa Bay Times, the future of Florida’s natural environment was put in jeopardy when Hershel Vinyard, secre-tary of the Department of Environmental Protection, laid off 58 employees who have what is described as a “history and knowledge” of the state’s critical envi-ronmental problems. It is no secret that Vinyard, like the gover-nor, is a pro-business cru-sader who has little use for environmental regula-tions. “The majority of positions they were eliminat-ing are compliance and enforcement positions,” Jerry Phillips, a former attorney for the advocacy group Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility, told the Times. “They want to essentially turn the agen-cy over to the regulated industries.” Phillips is right, of course. In addition to the layoffs in November, Vinyard brought in sever-al new top administrators who had been high-level consultants or engineers for companies the depart-ment regulates. Before the layoffs, Scott appointed Juan Portuondo to oversee the South Florida Water Management District, the board ostensibly responsible for protect-ing South Florida’s water supply and wetlands from pollution. Portuondo once operated a trash incinerator in Miami that Greenpeace and other organizations showed was “a major source of mer-cury emissions” that were responsible “for much of the contamination in the Everglades.” He also was linked to air and water pol-lution in Miami-Dade, and the company was heavily fined for violations. No matter. Scott deemed Portuondo the best person for the board. In another travesty, the Department of Environmental Protection suspended wetlands expert Connie Bersok from her job after she bucked politics and denied a permit to Highlands Ranch, formed in 2008 as a joint venture between a Jacksonville company and the Carlyle Group, a powerful private equity firm. Highlands wanted to turn a pine plantation, which was mostly high and dry, into a business that makes up for wetlands that are destroyed by new roads and development. If Bersok had granted the permit, the company potentially could have col-lected millions of dollars in wetlands “credits” that could be sold to the gov-ernment and developers. The Scott administration’s assaults on the environment keep piling up. Common sense, if not a little pragmatism, should show rational lawmakers and other offi-cials that threatening our fragile environment also threatens our economy. They do not seem to know that our natural environment creates our tourism, our most lucra-tive industry, attracting nearly 90 million visitors annually who put $67 billion into the state’s economy. In fact, Florida is the top travel destina-tion in the world, accord-ing to www.stateofflorida.com/florquickfac. People come here to experience our parks, beaches, wetlands, wood-lands and amusement venues. They come to swim, scuba dive, fish, bird watch, kayak, boat and hike. More business leaders and state lawmakers need to realize that viable tour-ism is directly connected not only to our pleasant weather but also to the health of our waters, beaches, greenery and clean air. We need leaders who respect this interconnec-tion. They need to be stewards of the environ-ment, not profiteers who destroy and leave nothing in return. Bill Maxwellbmaxwell@sptimes.com Q Bill Maxwell is a columnist and editorial writer for the Tampa BayTimes.

PAGE 5

Jan. 8 Medicare seminar LifeStyle Enrichment Center is sponsoring a free Medicare seminar from 5 to 6 p.m. The semi nar will be moderated by Irv Crowetz of C/C & Associates. Subjects to be covered include: what you need to know about Medicare, when to enroll, whats covered and when a supplement is needed. Call 755-3476 ext. 107 to reserve a seat. Native plant society The Sparkleberry Chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society will meet at 6:30 p.m. at Hatch Park, 403 SE Craven St., Branford. Beau Willsey, an environmental scientist with the Suwannee River Management District, will give a program about exotic invasive plants and what can be done to pre vent and/or eliminate them. The chapter mees the second Tuesday of each month, except June, July, and August, at Hatch Park. For mor information, contact chapter President Mae Brandt by email at maebrandt@bellsouth.net or phone (386) 466-0915. Computer classes Registration is now open for free basic com puter classes to be given by the Greater Lake City Community Development Corp. Inc. The five-week, 20-hour course will begin Monday, Jan. 14, and class es will be from 6 to 8 p.m. each Monday and Tuesday for five weeks. To register for the course or for more information, contact Ann at (386) 752-9785 or (904) 635-2021 or visit the CDC office at 363 NW Bascom Norris Drive. Jan. 9 Newcomers meeting The Lake City Newcomers will meet at 11 a.m. at Guang Dong Chinese Restaurant in the Lake City Mall. Lunch costs $11. Sale of 50-50 tickets will end at 11:25. The guest speaker will be Leandra Lily Johnson, the first female judge in the Third Judicial Circuit. Formore information, call Barbara Test at 754-7227 or Rose Taylor at 755-2175. Medicare information SHINE will present a program to inform seniors about Medicare from 1:30 tpo 3:30 p.m. at the Lake City Public Library on Columbia Avenue. For more information, call (800) 262-2243. Jan. 10 Builders Association The Columbia County Builders Association will hold its first General Council lunch at 11:30 a.m. at Guang Dong res taurant in the Lake City Mall. The meeting will start at noon.The speaker will be Columbia County Superintendent of Schools Terry Huddleston. If you are considering joining our builders association, this is a good time to join us for lunch, meet our members and learn more of what we are all about. Cost of lunch for members is $12 and non-members fee is $15. A HammerClaw jackpot is now $275. To make a reser vation or for more informa tion, emai colcountybuild@ comcast.net or phone (386) 867-1998. Medicare information SHINE will present a program to inform seniors about Medicare from 9 a.m. to noon at the TOPS Health Fair at First Advent Christian Church, Live Oak, and from 1:30 tp 3:30 p.m. at Live Oak City Hall. For more information, call (800) 262-2243. DAR meeting The Edward Rutledge Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution will hold its monthly meet ing at 10:30 a. m. at the LifeStyle Enrichment Center, 28 SE Allison Court (off Baya Avenue). Kathleen Cooper will be speaking about Lyme dis ease. Visitors are welcome. Garden Club to meet Lake City Garden Club will meet at the Clubhouse, 257 SE Hernando Ave. Social time will begin at 9:30 a.m., and the meeting will start at 10. Jo Carver will give a talk about landscaping. Center elections Bethlehem Community Center will hold its annual election of officers at 6:30 p.m. The center is a 835 SW Bethlehem Ave. in Fort White. For more informa tion, call Rudolph Freeney at (386) 454-1880. Jan. 11 History program Actor Chaz Mena will per form a program, Claiming La Florida for King and Cross, at 6:30 p.m. at the Columbia County Main Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave. Mena will portray Pedro Menendez de Aviles, the founder of St. Augustine and first Spanish gover nor of Florida. Tickets are required, and are available free of charge at any county library location. Jan. 12 Chili cook-off The fourth annual Branford Chili Cook-off will be from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hatch Park on Craven Street in Branford. The event will include a silent auction for adults and kids, door prizes, live music, an antique car show, moon walk, Home Depot Kids Workshop and a variety of homemade chili. Admission is $5 and includes all the chili you can eat. Proceeds will benefit Herrys Kids Pediatric Services, a pro gram of Hospice of the Nature Coast. To register to compete in the chili cook-off, call the hospice at (386) 755-7714 or visIt online at www.hospiceof citrus.org. Gospel sing, supper A gospel sing and pot luck supper will be held to celebrate Mary Lou Flynn Lasseters 75th birthday, beginning at 6 p.m. at Lee Worship Center Church Fellowship Hall, 471 SE Magnolia Drive in Lee. Supper will be at 6 p.m., and the open-mic gospel sing will start at 7. To con firm attendance or for more information, call Brenda Lasseter McCormick at (850) 869-9976. Jan. 13 Music concert The Ball Brothers will perform a free concert at 6 p.m. at Wellborn Baptist Church. The church is on U.S. 90 West between Lake City and Live Oak at the intersection of Lowe Lake Road in Wellborn. A love offering for the group will be received. Jan. 14 SCORE workshop SCORE of Lake City will hold a free entrepreneurs interactive workshop from 6 to 8 p.m. at Columbia County Main Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave.. Participants will have an opportunity to meet other entrepreneurs, get advice and receive free educa tional materials from the federal Small Business Administration and other sources. Participants also will be able to arrange one-on-one business coun seling with SCORE volun teers. To reserve a seat, call (386) 752-2000 or email scorelakecity@gmail.com. Jan. 15 Pageant entries Today is the deadline for contestants to enter the 2013 Olustee Festival Pageant. The pageant is open to girls ages 3 months to 20 years who live in or attend school in Baker, Columbia, Gilcrist, Hamilton, Union and Suwannee counties. Age divisions are 3 to 12 months, 13 to 23 months, 2 to 3 years, 4 to 6 years, 7 to 9 years, 10 to 12 years, 13 to 15 years and 16 to 20 years. Contestants may compete in beauty, sportswear, tal ent and photogenic catego ries. The pageant awards include educational schol arships, trophies, crowns and banners. Each pageant contestant will receive a tiara. First-place winners will ride in the Olustee Festival parade. The pag eant will be held Jan. 26 at the Columbia County Schools Administrative Complex. Applications may be obtained at the Columbia County Library, the Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of Commerce, Emily Taber Library, Suwannee Regional Library, Hamilton County Library or by contacting Elaine Owens at (386) 965-2787. Historical Society The Columbia County Historical Society will meet at 7 p.m. at the Columbia County Main Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave. The topic will be the Heritage Park Village in Macclenny. The meeting is open to the public. For more information, contact Sean McMahon at 754-4293. Jan. 16 Olustee planning The Blue-Grey Army will meet at 5:30 p.m. to plan the Olustee Battle Festival. The meeting will be at the school district central building, room 153, 409 SW St. Johns St. Jan. 18 Medicare information SHINE will present a program to inform seniors about Medicare from 10 a.m. to noon at the Branford Public Library. For more information, call (800) 2622243. Music concert Southern rock band Steel Bridge will perform at the Florida Gateway College Levy Performing Arts Center, 149 SE College Place. The show will begin at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $15. Steel Bridge is a Cross Citybased band that has opened for Mel Tillis and Chris Young. The band opened for Easton Corbin during the inaugural season of FGC Entertainment. For more information, visit www. fgcentertainment.com. Masonic banquet Gold Standard Lodge 167 will have its annual Masonic banquet at the Winfield Community Center. For tickets and more informa tion, call Chirs Mirra at (386) 623-3611 or Mike Kelly at (386) 867-6675. Jan. 19 Chili cook-off The Lake DeSoto Farmers Market will have its second annual chili cookoff during market hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Funds raised from the sale of chili sam ples will benefit Church of the Way. Registration is $10, and there will be a cash prize for the win ner. For registration infor mation and contest rules, visit online at market.lcfla. com. The farmers market is held along Lake DeSoto between the Columbia County Courthouse and Shands Lakeshore Hospital in downtown Lake City. For more information, call (386) 719-5766 or visit market.lcfla.com. MLK Jr. program The Columbia County Branch of NAACP will hold its 30th annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. pro gram at 4 p.m. at Mount Pisgah AME Church, 529 NE Washington St. Judge Julian Collins will be key note speaker. The NAACP choir, directed by Dr. Tony Buzzella, will perform. Jan. 20 Bridal show The third annual Your Perfect Day Bridal Show will be from noon to 4 p.m. at the Holiday Inn and Suites, 213 SW Commerce Drive. The show will include a variety of local vendors focused on bridal fashions, weddings and related activities. Tickets are $5 in advance or $7 at the door. Tickets may be purchased at the Holiday Inn and Suites. For ticket sales and vendor informa tion, all Amanda Daye at (386) 754-1411. Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL TUESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2013 5A 5A Fifth Generation Farms offers exceptional quality, down-home prices and a little southern charm, too! Monday Friday 8am 7pm | Saturday 8am -6pm | Sunday CLOSED Offering Local & Fresh Foods THE MARKE T M EA T PRODUCE and M ORE 3739 WEST HWY. 90, LAKE CITY, FL (386) 243-8335 Why Not Fresh? Prices good thru 01-12-13, while supplies last. No rainchecks. GREAT FOR GRILLIN G P RO DUC E NORT H FLORI D A NAT U RAL B LA CK AN GUS P remium quality beef from our family farm. NFNB A is raised on green pastures and natural grains with N O added hormones, antibiotics or animal by-products. NFN is locally processed, U S DA certied and dry aged for tenderness and full avor. We are committed to producing beef for our family and friends that is nutritious and delicious Naturally! SPECIAL E VENT ROOM A VAILABLE USD A CH OI C E C ILANTRO 59 BU N CH J U M B O S WEET P OTATOE S 49 L B $ 8 99 L B B ONELE SS NEW YOR K S TRI P S TEA KS D ELI C IO US P OR K CU TLET S $ 1 99 L B G REAT D EAL! ALL NAT U RAL NO ANTI B IOTI CS NO A DD E D H ORMONE S B I S ON A PP LE G ATE NAT U RAL S LU N CH MEAT AN D C H EE S E (NO NITRATE S ) K IN D C EREAL B AR S A SS ORTE D FLAVOR S 4/ $ 6.99 A LL P A U LA D EEN S A UC E S M ARINA D E S & SEA S ONIN G 50 % OFF SP RIN G MIX & B A B Y SP INA CH OFF P ER L B $ 1 SMO K E D C & J FARM S P OR K S A US A G E $ 3 99 1 L B P A CK (LO C AL G RAIN FE D ) A PP LE S ROME & F U JI 3 L B B A G $ 3 69 S NA P B EAN S L B $ 1 59 N AT U RAL BLA CK A N GUS GO U RMET BU R G ER S I TALIAN, B L U E CH EE S E, B A C ON CH E DD AR $ 4 99 NAT U RAL L B Leona Lee Little Bonds Leona Lee Little Bonds, Age 98 Born August 9, 1914 Lake City, FL Died Janu ary 5, 2013 Dowling Park, FL Preceded in death by her husband, Randall Jo seph Bonds, Sr., her parents Ollie and Julian Little as well as brothers Ar thur, Clifton, Woodrow, George and Carl Little and her sister Louise Little McCall Mahood. She is survived by her children: Patricia Bonds Rose, Barbara Bonds Gibbs, Randall Joseph Bonds, Jr., and David Julian Bonds; two sisters Ellen Little Ward, Rose Little Wilder and two brothers: Finley Little and Ralph Little; nine grandchil dren a whole passel of great grandchildren and great, great grandchildren. She was a lover of fam ily and friends. Although her passing is mourned we rejoice at her victory. A celebration of her life will be held at Pleasant Grove Method ist Church, Pastor Dusty Bailey Saturday, January 12, 2013 at 1:00 p.m. Family and friends are invited to attend. may be made to the Pleasant Grove Methodist Cemetery Fund, Pleasant Grove Methodist Kitchen Fund or your charity of choice. Emma Lou (Herlong) Worth Emma Lou (Herlong) Worth died suddenly at her home in Lake City, FL, on the afternoon of December 31, 2012. She was born September 2, 1925, in Jasper, FL, and attended public schools in Columbia County. Bachelors Degree in Social Studies and Education from the Florida State College for Women (now FSU). She then returned to Lake City and became a social worker for the Department of Public Welfare, where she met Hal McMahan Worth, a native of Sevierville, TN. They wed December 4, 1948. The Worths were married for 63 years, and reared two children as well as two grandchildren. Their devo tion and deep love remained pal atable throughout their lives, and still serves as a model and inspi ration of what a true partnership can achieve. Once her children were in school, Mrs. Worth began her teaching career. From in Columbia County; the sto ries and success of her students remained an important source of pride and happi ness throughout her life. Mrs. Worth was an attentive mother and grandmother, a member of the First United Methodist Church, and a Silver Sister of the local chapter of Alpha Delta Kappa. She loved gardening, reading, local history, and retreating to the familys cabin on the Santa Fe River. After retirement, she and her husband became avid travelers, and alongside their dear friends the Colsons, MacCalebs, and others, they visited 49 states and Canada. She will be remem bered for her deep convictions and enthusiasm for the simple joys of life, her loyal friendship, and the stability and caring home she made for her entire family. Mrs. Worth was preceded in death by her loving parents, William Vastine Willie Her long and Marietta Floyd (Ellis) Herlong, husband Hal McMa han Worth, brother-in-law J.A. Nub Worth, and sister-in-law Nell (Fields) Worth. She is sur vived by her sister-in-law Geor gia Nell (Worth) Runyan (James) of Sevierville, TN; son George W. Bill Worth (Linda) of Ches apeake, VA; daughter Betsey (Worth) Ward (Larry) of Lake City, FL; 4 grandchildren: Jacob Hill, Ginger Hill, Stefanie WardCerny (Mark); and Kelly Rippard (Jason); and 2 great grandchil dren: Alyssa Hill and Emma Hill. Visitation with the family will be p.m. at the funeral home. Fu neral services will be conducted at 2:00 p.m. on Tuesday, Janu ary 8, 2013, at the First United Methodist Church of Lake City, be made to Outreach Minis tries, First United Methodist Lake City, FL 32025; or the ADK Scholarship Fund, 409 NW Zack Drive, Lake City, FL 32055. Ar rangements are under the direc tion of GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN FUNERAL HOME AND CREMATORY, INC. 3596 S. US Hwy 441, Lake City, words of comfort to the family at www.gatewayforestlawn.com. OBITUARIES Obituaries are paid advertise ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporters classified depart ment at 752-1293. COMMUNITY CALENDAR To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0427 or by email at jbarr @lakecityreporter.com.

PAGE 6

concerned for her husband whom she had not heard from since around noon Saturday. Earlier in the day on Saturday, Mrs. Smith con tacted her sister-in-law, Eddie Mae McKenzie of Lake City, and asked that she go to the Denver Street home and try to contact her husband and friend who were both in town to make renovations on the home. Even though their vehi cle was in the driveway, no one responded to Mrs. Smiths knocking, authori ties said. When police officers arrived, Gunter attempted to make contact with the two men by knocking on the front door and window, but got no response. Michaels proceeded to conduct a visual check through the surrounding windows of the home, at which time he saw an unre sponsive man sitting in a chair in the living room. Officers requested that EMS personnel and fire department units respond to the scene and first responders forced their way into the home. Immediately upon entry, first responders deter mined there were high levels of carbon monoxide inside due to a possible gas leak. A man found in a chair was pronounced dead at 10:11 p.m. by paramedics and identified as Smith. The home was then evacu ated until the scene could be made safe. We used forcible entry to get into the home and thats when there was the odor of natural gas, said Frank Armijo, Lake City Fire Department chief. Once they (firefighters) got the smell of the odor, thats when they went ahead and put their masks on. After the gas meter was pulled from the home and the site was deemed safe for re-entry by LCFD, a second unresponsive man was found in the bathroom and pronounced dead at 10:24 p.m. The man was identified as Rawls. Due to the odor of the gas, its possible that either carbon monoxide or gas poisoning was the possible cause of death, Armijo said, noting the home was exten sively checked by authori ties after they smelled the natural gas. We ventilated the house. Armijo said carbon mon oxide is odorless, taste less and cant be seen, and noted that it often causes headaches, nausea and confusion before causing death. Its a silent killer, he said. And the presence of natural gas, at high concen trations, above 50 parts per million, is lethal also. He said natural gas is lighter than air, so it rises and once it rises it gets to the ceiling and falls. Its strongly recommend that if people have gas appliances in their home, that they have a carbon monoxide detector that can pick up a leak and notify you. Its no different than a smoke detector. No evidence of foul play was found at the scene and the investigation into Smith and Rawls death is ongo ing. The source of the leak is being investigated, Armijo said. Were still looking into the source of the gas leak. Its too soon to specu late whether it (cause of death) was ventilation, a leak or anything like that. 6A LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS TUESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 6A WILSONS CONTAINERS Construction/Debris Containers Available 755-7060 Delivered to your job site today Bring your unwanted Gold, Silver & Platinum to someone you can trust Precious metals are seeing record values. Please call me for a private and con dential appointment to sell or trade your unwanted gold, silver and platinum. George R. Ward Downtown Lake City (386) 752-5470 Longer you stay, Less you pay Monthly Unlimited See store for details. SKYDIVER: Little hope held out for Lake City man Continued From Page 1A DEATHS: Two Jacksonville men found dead here Continued From Page 1A DRUGS: Man faces charges Continued From Page 1A STABBING: Arrest made Continued From Page 1A The other two skydivers were from Alaska and Arizona. Reports said Ruppert and the others were jumping from the helicopter at an altitude of about 6,500 feet. West said officials decided to sus pend the ground search for Ruppert Sunday night. We decided to suspend the ground search late (Sunday night) when we were pulling the searchers off the mountain, she said. We had about 386 searchers over the four days and spent about 4,000 hours searching about nine square miles. We covered every area in that nine square miles on foot. The only other points of inter est or areas that have a probability that hes in cant be reached on foot. There are cliffs and ravines, so what were doing now is wait until the weather clears and check those areas from above. Reports said the men were going up one at a time in a small helicopter and jumping in rotation. It was his second jump out of the helicopter that day, West said. They started the second rotation and he was the second jumper in the rotation. Ruppert was on his second jump when he disappeared. The webbed wing suit allows a sky diver to glide at up to 100 miles per hour, so Ruppert could have gone far off course, West said. Friends in Florida say Ruppert had been skydiving seven or eight years and was experienced in a wing suit. West said there are also challenges to searching with helicopter. Its been really foggy the last cou ple of days. The helicopter cant see and the winds have been really bad so we cant get one in there, she said. This is a heavily wooded area. Its difficult to see anything from above. Well check those areas as best we can. If the helicopters see anything well check those areas with ground crews. It snowed Thursday night and tem peratures have been in the 30s and 40s around Mount Si, a steep and heavily forested 4,200-foot peak about 30 miles east of Seattle. Searchers covered nine square miles before the ground search was suspended Sunday. Fog on Monday prevented a helicopter search. West said the chances of finding Ruppert alive are dwindling. We hoped that we could find him find him alive, but the longer the search goes on, the lower the pos sibility that he survived, she said. It snowed the first night when he went missing and the weather has been cold and rainy the rest of the eve nings and much of the daytime. Theres a record of Rupperts cell phone signal until he went up in the air and jumped or shut it off, West said. That information led to an exten sive search of a quarter-square mile area, which found no sign of him. Outlying areas where Ruppert might have landed are heavily wood ed or mountain cliffs. Ruppert carried a blue parachute in a black pack. He was dressed in a tan and green wing suit, which would make him hard to spot in the woods. Friends of Rupperts were with ground searchers over the weekend, but did not want to talk with report ers, West said. King County Sheriffs Office offi cials said they are still reviewing data from helicopter flight path and cell phone data to see if they can get something new to go on to do another ground search. West said some of Rupperts family and friends were reportedly at the mountain Monday. People that are out there are having a little memorial today on the mountain, said Skydive Palatka owner Art Shaffer, Rupperts friend. Theres a lot of sad people here. A visitor to the home of Rupperts parents in Lake City on Monday said the family would be making a state ment at a later date. This was a large search, West said. The amount of manpower was the biggest one weve had for awhile and we do lots of search and rescue missions over here. Everyone was disappointed to say the least. We were definitely wanting to find him and we all still hope there is a pos sibility that we will find him. The Associated Press contributed to this story. Detention Center in lieu of $10,000 bond. According to Lake City Police Department reports, Officer Michael Delcastillo was dispatched to an Albright Place address in reference to a stabbing. Once at the scene a witness told Delcastillo her relatives were in an argument and about to fight because the victim wanted Maxwell to leave his home, but she refused. The witness told Delcastillo that Maxwell grabbed a steak knife out of her car and she saw her stab him several times. When Delcastillo interviewed Maxwell she report edly said the victim pushed her up against her car and thats when she grabbed the knife and started to stab him. Maxwell told the officer she thought it was self defense because she thought her cousin was about to stab her. Delcastillo said the victim was bleeding from his chest area and his right arm. He told the officer that Maxwell was in his face, so he grabbed her by the arms because she was trying to hit him. Delcastillo reported the victim had two deep, bloody stab wounds to his bicep, his upper arm and his left clavicle. The victim also had a bruised eye socket, a cut on the left ear and an abrasion on his nose. An ambulance responded to the scene and carried the victim to a Gainesville-area hospital. Another woman who was cut on the hand during the altercation was treated at the scene by EMS personnel, reports said. Delcastillo identified Maxwell as the primary aggres sor and arrested her. driving down Baya with people in the front not wearing their seatbelts and turned on his lights to make a traffic stop, according to the arrest report. After the car stopped, Foote walked to the passenger side of the Pontiac where Harper was seated and knocked. Harper opened the door and Foote could immediately smell the odor of marijuana emitting from inside the vehicle, according to the arrest report. When backup arrived, Foote asked Harper to step outside of the car where he asked him why he smelled of marijuana. According to the arrest report, Harper told Foote that smoked marijuana ear lier. Foote asked Harper if he had any Marijuana. Harper said no. Foote then performed a pat down of Harper, who was wearing a blue puffy style vest jacket. When Foote felt the left side of the jacket, he felt a cluster of small baggies. Foote pulled out one large baggie containing several smaller baggies from a hole on the inside lining of the jacket. As Foote was putting the baggie on the hood of his patrol car, he grabbed Harpers arm, according to the arrest report. Harper then pulled away from Foote and started to run, according to the arrest report. Foote chased after Harper and told Harper to stop or he would be tased. Foote then shot his stun gun at Harper. According to the arrest report, the stun guns probes stuck into Harpers jacket, which deflected the probes from penetrat ing (Harpers) skin. Harper then took off his jacket and continued to run. Foote reload ed his stun gun and told Harper to stop again. This time one of the stun guns probes struck Harper in the back, which appeared to have a successful effect, according the arrest report. The other probe stuck into Harpers baggy pants and did not produce an effective result, but the first probe did slow Harper, accord ing to the arrest report. Foote was able to grab Harpers arm and shirt, he then told Harper to get on the ground, but he refused, according to the arrest report. Foote took Harper to the ground then put him in handcuffs, accord ing to the arrest report. Foote then walked Harper back to the patrol car and requested that an ambulance come to the scene because Harper was tased. It was determined that Harper did not need to be trans ported to the hospital. After an inspection of the Pontiac where Harper was a passenger, found nothing illegal, the driver was allowed to leave. Foote then inspected the baggy he found on Harper. Inside the large baggy was six smaller baggies of marijuana and another large baggy containing smaller baggies that had white substance inside them. Harper told Foote that the white substance was Molly, according to the arrest report. The substance field tested posi tive for MDMA, which is a classified as a controlled substance. The drug has multiple street names including Ecstasy, E and Love Drug. Harper was booked into Columbia County Detention Facility in lieu of $49,000 bail. Mock Mars trek finds some down-to-Earth sleep woes By SETH BORENSTEIN AP Science Writer WASHINGTON Astronauts have a down-toEarth problem that could be even worse on a long trip to Mars: They cant get enough sleep. And over time, the lack of slumber can turn intrepid space travelers into drowsy couch potatoes, a new study shows. In a novel experiment, six volunteers were confined in a cramped mock spaceship in Moscow to simulate a 17month voyage. It made most of the would-be spacemen lethar gic, much like birds and bears heading into winter, gearing up for hibernation. The men went into a pro longed funk. Four had consid erable trouble sleeping, with one having minor problems and the sixth mostly unaf fected. Some had depression issues. Sometimes, a few of the men squirreled themselves away into the most private nooks they could find. They didnt move much. They avoided cru cial exercise. This looks like something you see in birds in the winter, said lead author David Dinges, a sleep expert at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. The experiment was run and funded by Russian and European space agencies. A report on the simulations effect on the men was published online Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Dinges said scientists cant tell if the mens lethargy was just lack of sleep or was also caused by other factors: the close quarters, lack of privacy with so many cameras or being away from their families for so long. Its a problem that has to be fixed and can be before astronauts are sent to Mars, as President Barack Obama proposes for the mid-2030s, Dinges said. The trip to Mars, Earths closest neighbor, would take about six months each way. The world record for con tinuous time in space 14 months is held by Dr. Valery Polyakov, who was on the Russian space station Mir in 1994 and 1995. American astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko are sched uled to spend an entire year in space on the International Space Station, starting in 2015. When leaving confinement in November 2011, the six volunteers three Russians, a Frenchman, an ItalianColombian and a Chinese called their experience suc cessful: We can go forward and now plan to go to Mars and move confidently, said volunteer Romain Charles of France. The data scientists collected wasnt as rosy. Devices on the volunteers wrists measured their movements and showed that when they were asleep and awake they were moving much less than they should have been, an unexpected and disturbing finding, Dinges said. One of the six volunteers who were paid $100,000 to live in the mock spaceship with limited and time-delayed contact with the outside world slept nearly half an hour less each night than he did when he started the mission, affecting how he went about his day, Dinges said. The loss of sleep matters because astronauts will have to perform intricate tasks on the way to Mars and while on the red planet. And they have to do vigor ous exercises daily to fight the toll that near-zero gravity takes on the bones and other parts of the body. And most of the volunteers werent doing that. The Moscow study, based on the ground, couldnt take into account the added diffi culty of near-zero gravity.

PAGE 7

Today Q Teacher work day; student holiday. Q Fort White High School — Indian var-sity girls basketball vs.. Keystone Heights, 6 p.m., home; Indian junior var-sity/varsity boys basket-ball vs. Keystone Heights, 6/7:30 p.m., away; Indian varsity girls/boys soccer vs. Hamilton, 5/7 p.m., home. Q Fort White Middle School — Indians girls/boys basketball vs. Bell, 5/6:30 p.m., away Q Clumbia County School Board eeting, 7 p.m. Administrative Complex auditoriun. Wednesday Q First day of classes for 2013; begin second semes-ter. Q Eastside Elementary School — Science Fair judging. Q Summers Elementary School —Faculty meeting in Media Center, 2:30 p.m. Q Niblack Elementary School — faculty meeting in Media Center Thursday Q Eastside Elementary — Family Reading Night in Media Center, 2:15 to 8 p.m. Q Richardson Middle School — Wolf soccer vs. Suwannee, 5/6:15 p.m., away. Q FWHS — Indian varsity girls basketball vs. Interlachen, 6 p.m., home; Indian junior varsity/varsity boys basketball vs. inter-lachen, 6/7:30 p.m., away; Indian varsity girls soccer vs. Lafayette, 7 p.m., away; Indian boys varsity soccer vs. St. Johns Lutheran, 7 p.m., away.Friday Q Melrose Park Elementary School — Pred-kindergarten Donuts for Dads in classes. Q Eastside Elementary — Science Fair Awards. Q RMS — Wolf basketball vs. FWMS, 5/6:30 p.m., away Q FWMS — Indian girls/ boys basketball vs. RMS, 5/6:30 p.m., homeSaturday Q RMS Wolf wrestling, Bear Claw vs. Wakulla.Wednesday-Friday Q Lake City Middle School — Falcon softball conditioning and tryouts, 3:15 to 5:15 p.m. (Bring a glove, bat, cleats and run-ning shoes, if possible.)Monday Q Boys baseball tryouts. ON CAMPUS CLASS NOTESQ To leave an anonymous message about a possible dangerous situation concerning Columbia County schools, call toll-free, (866) 295-7303.Q To leave an anonymous message about a possible truancy problem in Columbia County schools, call 758-4947.Q Items for the school page should be dropped off or mailed to: Jim Barr, Lake City Reporter 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, FL 32055; faxed to (386) 752-9400; or emailed to jbarr@lakecityreporter.com by 5 p.m. Thursdays. BulletinBoard NEWS ABOUT OUR SCHOOLS Five Points Elementary SchoolScience projectsWe want to congratulate our Science Project win-ners. They are: Second grade — Class winner, Mrs. Leighty for “The Only Class Project;” Carroll’s class, first place, Terrance Mackey for “Floating Egg: A Pre-Breakfast Experiment;” Carroll’s class, second place, Jacob Priest for “Backed Up;” Carroll’s class, third place, Cynthia Maples for “Inky Fingers;” Kamback’s class, honor-able mention, Brinsleigh Feagle for “Super Soaker.” Third grade — Mrs. Hill’s class first place, Ayden Smith for “Which Battery Will Last the Longest?”; Mrs. VanBennekom’s class, sec-ond place, Austin Keene for “Where is the Best Place to Store Microwave Popcorn?”; Mrs. Smith’s class, third place, Liam Horsnell for “Battery Value Tester;” Mrs. Smith’s class, honorable men-tion, Tristin Washington for “Liquids on the Windowsill.” Fourth grade — Mrs. Green’s class, first place, Obie Smith for “To Dip or To Double Dip;” Mrs. Green’s class, second place, Josef Walker for “Into the Wild Blue Yonder;” Miss Sherrell Jones’ class, third place, Gracee Priest for “Major Turn Off;” Miss Sherrell Jones’ class, honorable mention, Trey Crowder for “Fishin’ Frenzy.” Fifth grade — Miss McCullough’s class, first place, Darius Kimble for “Oooo ...What A Relief;” Mrs. Fulwood’s class, second place, Kaelynn Dees for “Mud Bud’s Paw Preference;” Miss McCullough’s class, third place, Austin Pitts for “Is New Better?;” Mr. Perry’s class, honorable mention, T.J. Hall for “Flamin.”Spelling beeSpelling bee winners: third place, Stacey Jones; second place, Rodney Grant; first place, Molly Tomlinson. Congratulations to all! Westside Elementary SchoolCupstacking teamWestside Elementary School students who made the cupstacking team are: Caroline Lewis, Grayson Martin, Kiersten Tracy, Mason Gray, Jordan Teran, Bailey Rogers, Gracey Rogers, Darren Eubank, Zach Shaw, Jenna Burns, Skyla Hill, Dayton Oats, Angel Bognar, Kyli Vega, Kyli Nichols, Corey Wilson, and Marissa Frost.Richardson Middle SchoolScience fair winnersThe following Richardson Middle School students’ science fair projects were chosen to be in the Columbia County Science Fair, which will be held later this month: Kaden Jones, Ethan Goodrich, Charlie Perry, Eva Kirby, Dylan Thomas, Garet Dicks, Victoria Whilden, Brianna Carmen, Terrell Francis, Dykan McMahon, Mariah Jenkins, Jessica Harris, Trace Lee, Joshua Robertson, Allison Truesdale, Jordan Fraze, Chris Caldwell, Jameson Carter, Kolton Biehl, Rachiel Chapman, Carla Nater, Katy Tomlinson and Brandon Morse.‘Sonny’s kids’The following students were chosen by their teach-ers as “Sonny’s Kids With Character” for the first nine weeks of the school year: Sixth grade — Allysa Sodders, Tyrec Williamson and Jeffrye Parker; seventh grade — Teon Dollard and Marcus Blalock; eighth grade — Charisha Booker, Ryan Maxwell and Abigail Adams. The students were selected because of the admi-rable citizenship qualities they exhibit. They were treated to lunch, courtesy of Sonny’s Restaurant. Accomplished student COURTESY PHOTOYoung artists of DecemberFort White Elementary School’s Young Artists of the Month for December are (front row, from left): Riley Moseley, grade five; Westin Mills, gra de one; Haden James, grade three; Katie Dugan, grade two; Anissa Penniman, grade four; and Aljerneria Stephens, kindergarten. Behind them are art teacher Stephanie Willcox and principa l Wanda Conner. The Young Artist of the Month program is a business partnership activity be tween the Columbia County School District and Sunstate Federal Credit Union, Mix 94.3, Lake C ity Advertiser and Pizza Boy Pizza. CALENDAR 7A LAKE CITY REPORTER SCHOOLS TUESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04247ASCHOOL 234 SW Main Blvd. • 752-5866 Af_e9liej#@@@ 8^\ek DXip?%Jldd\iXcc =`eXeZ`XcJ\im`Z\jI\g% For Life Insurance Go With Someone You Know From staff reportsHome Education students are eligible to take state mandated assess-ment tests with the Columbia County School District at no charge. Testing dates will be scheduled as follows: Q Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT) Writing for grades four, eight and 10 will be Feb. 26 and 27. Q FCAT Reading for grades three through 10, FCAT Mathematics for grades three through eight, and FCAT Science for grades five and eight will be April 15 to 26. Q End of Course exams for U.S. History will be April 22 to May 10; for geometry, biology and algebra I, they will be April 29 to May 17. If you are interested in participating in these test sessions, contact the district Home Education office at 758-4935 or email simmons_m@firn.edu by Feb. 15. Information on the testing site and daily schedule will be determined prior to the administration of tests and sent to you in writing. Home education student testing slated by district COURTESY PHOTORichardson Middle School eighth-grader Eva Kirby recently achieved two special accomplishments. TOP: Eva displays the certificate she received for winning the RMS spelling bee on Dec. 7. She won out over nearly 30 other students, and will represent the school at the countywide spelling bee on Jan. 17 at the Columbia County School Board Administrative Complex. ABOVE: Eva poses with her saxophone after being selected for the All-State Middle School Honor Band. One of six sax play ers selected, she will perform with the band at the Florida Music Educators Association state conference Saturday in Tampa. COURTESY PHOTOYoung writers of DecemberFive Points Elementary School’s Young Writers of the Month for December are: (front row, from left) Cole Raymer, grade three; Savannah Ch arles, grade one; Maya Goswami, grade two; Darbie Thomas, grade four; (back row) Rachel Dixon (left), ESE; and Austin Pitts (right), grade five. Scott Berns, Mix 94.3 mornin g host, is at center of the back row. The Young Writers of the Month program is a business partnership activity between the Columbia County School District and Sunstate Federal Cred it Union, Mix 94.3 and Burger King of Lake City.

PAGE 8

8A LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT TUESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2013 8A

PAGE 9

By RALPH D. RUSSOAssociated PressMIAMI GARDENS — Alabama rolled to its second consecutive BCS championship, and third in four seasons, beating No. 1 Notre Dame 42-14 in a BCS championship game that was no classic after all. AJ McCarron threw four touchdown passes and Eddie Lacy ran for 140 yards and scored twice for the second-ranked Crimson Tide, which scored on its first three drives and cruised from there. Alabama (13-1) became the third team to win three national titles in four seasons since polls start-ed being used to crown champions in 1936, and the first since Nebraska from 1994-97. Tide coach Nick Saban now has won four nation-al championships. Only Alabama’s Paul “Bear” Bryant, with six, has more. The Fighting Irish (12-1) didn’t score until they were down 35-0 late in the third quarter. The Crimson Tide marched with ease on the opening drive, going 82 yards on five plays to take a 7-0 lead on Eddie Lacy’s 20-yard touchdown run up the middle with 12:03 left in the first quarter. Notre Dame had allowed only two rushing touch-downs in its surprising run to the championship game. The Fighting Irish were the first team to reach the BCS championship game after starting the season unranked. They were try-ing to become the first team to go from unranked to national champion since BYU in 1984. Alabama quickly made the Fighting Irish look as if they were in over their heads. The Alabama fans seemed outnumbered at Sun Life Stadium by Fighting Irish followers, pumped to see their team try to win its first national title in 24 years. But the folks in Crimson were making all the noise as the Tide rolled. By TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comMajor League Baseball players from the Lake City area average about one per century. Based on the tal-ent at his baseball camp, Michael Kirkman said that trend may be headed upwards. Columbia High graduate Kirkman, a pitcher for the Texas Rangers, participat-ed in a couple of camps at Impact Zone on Monday. The camp for ages 6-11 was in the morning and Kirkman was impressed. “This is the best young group baseball-wise I have ever seen,” Kirkman said. “I attribute it to all the good coaching that has come about in the last 10 years. When I started out, there were 1-2 teams you could play on and now there are By TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comFORT WHITE — Fort White High’s boys soccer team closed out its District 5-2A season with a bang. The Indians defeated host Newberry High, 8-1, on Thursday. Anthony Gonzalez added to his team lead with four goals and two assists. For the season, Gonzalez has scored 10 goals and recorded six assists. Billy Whitney scored two goals and had two assists against the Panthers. He has eight goals and four assists on the season. Matt Otto and Max Jovel also scored goals. Otto is third on the Indians with five goals and second with five assists. Fort White is 4-8-2 overall and 3-6-1 in district (win and tie vs. Newberry, splits with Interlachen High and P.K. Yonge School, dou-ble losses to Santa Fe High and Keystone Heights High). The Lady Indians soccer team has completed district play for the regular season and are awaiting the tournament seeding. District 5-2A girls has eight teams to six for the boys. Fort White’s girls are 2-9-3 in district play. Today, Fort White hosts Hamilton County High for Senior Night at 5 p.m. (girls) and 7 p.m. (boys). Fort White’s girls basketball team returns to play today with a District 5-4A home game against Keystone Heights. Tip-off is 6 p.m. The Lady Indians are 9-5 overall and 2-4 in district play. Fort White’s boys basketball team looks to stay unbeaten with a game at Keystone Heights at 7:30 p.m. today. The Indians are 8-0 with five wins in District 5-4A.Columbia HighColumbia High’s wrestling team competed in a tournament at Clay High in Green Cove Springs on Friday and Saturday. Two Tigers placed. Daniel Devers was third in the 160-pound weight class with a 5-1 record. Kaleb Warner was fifth in the 126-pound weight class with a 4-2 record. Cole Horton and Dustin Regar were 3-2 at 106 pounds and 145 pounds, respectively. Christian Little was 2-2 at 132 pounds. Kody Waldron was 1-2 at 138 pounds. Josh Wine suffered an injury default in his only match at 113 pounds. Austin Chapman was 0-2 at 152 pounds. Cole Schreiber and Marcus Zeigler missed the tournament because of injury. Columbia will wrestle at Lake City Reporter SPORTS Tuesday, January 8, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS BRIEFS Michael Kirkman conducts pitching camps for youth. CAMP continued on 6B Tide rolls to third championship in four years, 42-14. PREP continued on 2B Fort White soccer has Senior Night against Hamilton County. GAMES Today Q Fort White High girls basketball vs. Keystone Heights High, 6 p.m. Q Columbia High boys soccer at Suwannee High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Q Fort White High soccer vs. Hamilton County High, 7 p.m. (girls-5) Q Columbia High boys basketball at Wolfson High, 7 p.m. (JV-5:30) Q Fort White High boys basketball at Keystone Heights High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Wednesday Q Columbia High girls weightlifting in sub-sectional meet at Godby High, 3 p.m. Thursday Q Fort White High girls basketball vs. Interlachen High, 6 p.m. Q Fort White High girls soccer at Lafayette High, 7 p.m. Q Fort White High boys soccer at St. Johns Lutheran School, 7 p.m. Q Columbia High girls basketball vs. Lafayette High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Q Fort White High boys basketball at Interlachen High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Friday Q Columbia High boys soccer at Wolfson High, 5:30 p.m. Q Columbia High girls soccer at Oak Hill School, 6 p.m. Q Columbia High girls basketball vs. Stanton Prep, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Q Columbia High wrestling at Suwannee High meet, TBA Q Columbia High JV soccer in Tallahassee tournament, TBA Saturday Q Columbia High wrestling at Suwannee High meet, TBA Q Columbia High JV soccer in Tallahassee tournament, TBA Q Columbia High boys basketball vs. Atlantic Coast High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) CHS FOOTBALL Football banquet set for Jan. 17 The Columbia High football banquet is 6:30 p.m. Jan. 17 at the school cafeteria. Tickets are $12 in advance or $15 at the door. Ticket contacts are Eva Martino or Mrs. Sweat. For details, call Allen Masters at 292-0725. CHS SOFTBALL Lady Tiger tryouts today Columbia High softball tryouts are 2:45 p.m. today at the CHS field. Participants must meet academic requirements and have completed paperwork. For details, call Jimmy Williams at 303-1192. ADULT SOFTBALL Winter league sign-up ongoing Adult softball winter leagues begin on Jan. 21. Women, men and co-ed leagues will be offered. Registration deadline is Friday. There will be a coaches meeting at 6 p.m. Friday at Southside Sports Complex. For details, call Pete Bonilla at 623-6561.Q From staff reports Making a pitch ASSOCIATED PRESSAlabama quarterback AJ McCarron drops back to pass during practice in Miami Shores on Friday.JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterTexas Rangers pitcher Michael Kirkman shows a group of young baseball players how to grip the ball to throw a fastball during a camp at Impact Zone on Monday. School sports get back to business FILEFort White High’s Rykia Jackson (10) drives around Col umbia High’s Marnae Gaskins during a game on Nov. 15’Bama, big time

PAGE 10

SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today AUTO RACING 2 a.m. NBCSN — Dakar Rally, stage 4, Nazca to Arequipa, Peru (delayed tape) MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN — Alabama at MissouriESPN2 — Baylor at Texas Tech 9 p.m. ESPN — Ohio St. at PurdueFOOTBALLNFL postseason Wild-card Playoffs Saturday Houston 19, Cincinnati 13Green Bay 24, Minnesota 10 Sunday Indianapolis at BaltimoreSeattle 24, Washington 14 Divisional Playoffs Saturday, Jan. 12 Baltimore at Denver, 4:30 p.m. (CBS)Green Bay at San Francisco, 8 p.m. (FOX) Sunday, Jan. 13 Seattle at Atlanta, 1 p.m. (FOX)Houston at New England, 4:30 p.m. (CBS) Conference Championships Sunday, Jan. 20 AFC, TBA (CBS)NFC, TBA (FOX) Pro Bowl Sunday, Jan. 27 At HonoluluAFC vs. NFC, 7 p.m. (NBC) Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 3 At New OrleansAFC champion vs. NFC champion, 6 p.m. (CBS)NFL calendar Sunday — Assistant coaches under contract to playoff clubs that won wild-card games may be interviewed for head coaching positions through the conclusion of divisional playoff games. Jan. 15 — Deadline for underclassmen to petition for special eligibility for the 2013 NFL draft.BASKETBALLNBA schedule EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct GB New York 23 11 .676 — Brooklyn 19 15 .559 4Boston 17 17 .500 6 Philadelphia 15 20 .429 8 12 Toronto 12 22 .353 11 Southeast Division W L Pct GB Miami 23 9 .719 — Atlanta 20 12 .625 3 Orlando 12 21 .364 11 12 Charlotte 9 24 .273 14 12 Washington 5 28 .152 18 12 Central Division W L Pct GB Chicago 19 13 .594 —Indiana 20 14 .588 — Milwaukee 16 16 .500 3Detroit 13 23 .361 8 Cleveland 8 28 .222 13 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct GB San Antonio 27 10 .730 — Memphis 21 10 .677 3 Houston 20 14 .588 5 12 Dallas 13 22 .371 13 New Orleans 9 25 .265 16 12 Northwest Division W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 26 8 .765 — Denver 20 16 .556 7Portland 18 15 .545 7 12 Utah 18 18 .500 9 Minnesota 15 15 .500 9 Pacific Division W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 27 8 .771 — Golden State 22 11 .667 4 L.A. Lakers 15 18 .455 11Sacramento 13 21 .382 13 12 Phoenix 12 23 .343 15 Monday’s Games Washington 101, Oklahoma City 99Boston 102, New York 96Chicago 118, Cleveland 92New Orleans 95, San Antonio 88Utah 100, Dallas 94Orlando at Portland (n)Memphis at Sacramento (n) Today’s Games Brooklyn at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.Miami at Indiana, 7 p.m.L.A. Lakers at Houston, 8 p.m.Atlanta at Minnesota, 8 p.m.Phoenix at Milwaukee, 8 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Atlanta at Cleveland, 7 p.m.Utah at Charlotte, 7 p.m.Philadelphia at Toronto, 7 p.m.Phoenix at Boston, 7:30 p.m.Milwaukee at Chicago, 8 p.m.Houston at New Orleans, 8 p.m.Minnesota at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.L.A. Lakers at San Antonio, 8 p.m.Orlando at Denver, 9 p.m.Memphis at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.Dallas at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. AP Top 25 The top 25 teams in The Associated Press ’ college basketball poll, with firstplace votes in parentheses, records through Jan. 6, total points (25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote) and last week’s ranking: Record Pts Prv 1. Duke (62) 14-0 1,622 1 2. Michigan (3) 15-0 1,553 2 3. Louisville 13-1 1,447 4 4. Arizona 14-0 1,442 3 5. Indiana 13-1 1,381 5 6. Kansas 12-1 1,322 6 7. Syracuse 14-1 1,211 7 8. Minnesota 14-1 1,121 9 9. Gonzaga 15-1 1,064 1010. Missouri 11-2 1,006 1211. Florida 10-2 922 1312. Illinois 14-2 881 1113. Creighton 14-1 789 1614. Butler 12-2 761 1715. Ohio St. 11-3 710 816. San Diego St. 12-2 591 1917. Notre Dame 13-1 547 2118. Kansas St. 12-2 472 2519. Georgetown 10-2 441 1520. NC State 12-2 438 2321. Cincinnati 13-2 375 1422. Michigan St. 12-3 267 1823. Wichita St. 14-1 135 —24. UNLV 13-2 113 —25. New Mexico 13-2 102 20 Others receiving votes: VCU 94, Wyoming 87, Oklahoma St. 64, Marquette 41, UCLA 41, Maryland 29, Kentucky 27, Temple 13, Oregon 11, North Carolina 4, Pittsburgh 1.AP Top 25 schedule Today’s Games No. 1 Duke vs. Clemson, 7 p.m.No. 10 Missouri vs. Alabama, 7 p.m.No. 13 Creighton vs. Drake, 8:05 p.m.No. 15 Ohio State at Purdue, 9 p.m.No. 19 Georgetown vs. Pittsburgh, 9 p.m. Wednesday’s Games No. 2 Michigan vs. Nebraska, 7 p.m.No. 3 Louisville at Seton Hall, 7 p.m.No. 6 Kansas vs. Iowa State, 7 p.m.No. 7 Syracuse at Providence, 7 p.m.No. 8 Minnesota at No. 12 Illinois, 9 p.m. No. 11 Florida vs. Georgia, 7 p.m.No. 14 Butler at Saint Joseph’s, 7 p.m.No. 16 San Diego State at Fresno State, 11:30 p.m. No. 20 N.C. State vs. Georgia Tech, 8 p.m. No. 23 Wichita State vs. Southern Illinois, 8 p.m. No. 24 UNLV at No. 25 New Mexico, 10 p.m. Thursday’s Games No. 4 Arizona at Oregon, 9 p.m.No. 9 Gonzaga vs. Saint Mary’s (Cal), 11 p.m. No. 22 Michigan State at Iowa, 7 p.m. USA Today/ESPN Top 25 The top 25 teams in the USA Today ESPN men’s college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Jan. 6, points and last week’s ranking: Record Pts Pvs 1. Duke (30) 14-0 774 1 2. Michigan (1) 15-0 744 2 3. Arizona 14-0 691 3 4. Louisville 13-1 677 4 5. Indiana 13-1 649 5 6. Kansas 12-1 640 6 7. Syracuse 14-1 585 7 8. Gonzaga 15-1 511 10 9. Florida 10-2 496 9 10. Minnesota 14-1 488 1311. Creighton 14-1 469 1112. Missouri 11-2 447 1213. Illinois 14-2 366 1414. Ohio State 11-3 355 815. San Diego State 12-2 314 1716. Notre Dame 13-1 285 1917. Butler 12-2 274 2018. Michigan State 12-3 190 1819. UNLV 13-2 170 2420. Cincinnati 13-2 165 1521. N.C. State 12-2 153 2522. Georgetown 10-2 138 1623. Kansas State 12-2 131 —24. VCU 12-3 85 —25. Wyoming 13-0 70 — Others receiving votes: New Mexico 48, Wichita State 47, Kentucky 43, Oklahoma State 34, Maryland 10, Pittsburgh 7, North Carolina 5, Marquette 3, UCLA 3, Colorado State 2, Saint Mary’s 2, Arizona State 1, Temple 1, Utah State 1, Virginia 1.Florida 79, Yale 58 At New Haven, Conn. FLORIDA (10-2) Yeguete 6-8 2-3 14, Young 4-7 0-1 8, Boynton 9-12 2-2 28, Rosario 5-10 2-2 13, Wilbekin 2-3 0-0 4, Kurtz 0-2 0-0 0, Ogbueze 0-0 0-0 0, Graham 0-1 0-0 0, Frazier II 0-1 3-3 3, Prather 4-6 1-2 9, Walker 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 30-50 10-13 79.YALE (5-11) Sears 7-11 1-3 15, Kreisberg 2-5 0-0 4, Morgan 0-3 3-4 3, Grace 1-5 3-4 5, Cotton 4-5 3-4 12, Montague 0-0 0-0 0, Duren 5-8 2-3 14, Victor 0-1 0-0 0, Martin 0-3 0-0 0, Kelley 1-4 0-0 2, Childs-Klein 0-1 0-0 0, Townsend 1-3 1-2 3. Totals 21-49 13-20 58. Halftime—Florida 35-23. 3-Point Goals—Florida 9-17 (Boynton 8-10, Rosario 1-5, Graham 0-1, Wilbekin 0-1), Yale 3-14 (Duren 2-3, Cotton 1-2, Kreisberg 0-1, Grace 0-1, Morgan 0-2, Kelley 0-2, Martin 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Florida 29 (Yeguete 9), Yale 24 (Cotton 5). Assists—Florida 19 (Wilbekin 10), Yale 9 (Duren, Grace, Kreisberg 2). Total Fouls—Florida 16, Yale 15. A—2,532.FSU 71, Clemson 66 At Clemson, S.C. FLORIDA ST. (9-5) White 5-12 2-2 15, Turpin 2-2 0-0 4, Brandon 3-5 0-2 6, Snaer 2-7 2-2 8, Whisnant II 4-6 0-0 11, Bookert 0-2 1-2 1, Shannon 3-10 5-7 11, Bojanovsky 2-2 0-0 4, Thomas 2-3 0-0 4, Miller 2-4 1-2 7, Ojo 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 25-53 11-17 71.CLEMSON (8-5) Jennings 3-6 1-2 10, McDaniels 5-12 4-6 15, Booker 8-11 3-7 19, Hall 2-6 2-2 6, Harrison 0-4 0-0 0, Filer 0-6 5-7 5, Roper 3-9 3-4 11, Sullivan 0-0 0-2 0, Nnoko 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 21-54 18-30 66. Halftime—Florida St. 38-25. 3-Point Goals—Florida St. 10-23 (Whisnant II 3-5, White 3-6, Miller 2-4, Snaer 2-6, Bookert 0-1, Brandon 0-1), Clemson 6-20 (Jennings 3-5, Roper 2-6, McDaniels 1-4, Harrison 0-1, Booker 0-1, Filer 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Florida St. 33 (Shannon 8), Clemson 37 (Booker 11). Assists—Florida St. 16 (Thomas 4), Clemson 9 (Hall 3). Total Fouls—Florida St. 24, Clemson 17. A—7,635 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2013 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-04212BAGATE TUESDAY EVENING JANUARY 8, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Modern Family(:31) The MiddleHappy Endings (N) Apartment 23Private Practice (N) News at 11Jimmy Kimmel Live 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) omg! Insider 5-PBS 5 -JournalNightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) History Detectives (N) The Abolitionists: AmericanFrontline (N) BBC World NewsTavis Smiley 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge Judy Two and Half MenNCIS Ziva’s father visits. (N) NCIS: Los Angeles “Drive” (N) Vegas Sheriff Lamb is abducted. (N) Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneHart of Dixie Emily Owens, M.D. TMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ce The Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family Guy Family Guy The SimpsonsRaising Hope (N) Ben and Kate (N) New Girl “Cabin” The Mindy ProjectNewsAction News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) Off Their RockersOff Their RockersGo On The New NormalParenthood “Small Victories” (N) NewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(5:00) Public Affairs Capitol Hill Hearings WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H The Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Solved Grandparents slain. Solved A mother of two is found dead. Unfaithful: Stories of Betrayal Unfaithful: Stories of Betrayal In the Bedroom With Dr. Laura BermanUnfaithful: Stories of Betrayal A&E 19 118 265Storage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage-TexasStorage-TexasStorage: NYStora ge: NYStorage: NYStorage: NY HALL 20 185 312The Brady BunchThe Brady BunchThe Brady BunchThe Brady BunchHappy Days Happy Days Happy Days Happy Days Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier FX 22 136 248(4:30) “Iron Man” (2008, Action) Robert Downey Jr. “Iron Man 2” (2010, Action) Robert Downey Jr., Gwyneth Paltrow, Don Cheadle. Premiere. Justi ed “Hole in the Wall” Justi ed “Hole in the Wall” CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245Castle Castle Woman is drowned in motor oil. Castle “Poof, You’re Dead” Castle Castle and Beckett grow closer. Castle A murdered lottery winner. CSI: NY Death of a guidance counselor. NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobDrake & JoshDrake & JoshFull House Full House Full House Full House The Nanny The Nanny Friends (:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241Repo GamesRepo GamesRepo GamesRepo Games “Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story” (2004) Vince Vaughn. Premiere. The Joe Schmo Show The Joe Schmo Show (N) MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*H M*A*S*H House Dr. House treats a nun. House “The Socratic Method” Seinfeld Frasier The Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Good Luck CharlieJessie A.N.T. Farm Dog With a Blog “The Lion King” (1994) Voices of Rowan Atkinson. (:40) A.N.T. Farm(:05) Jessie Good Luck CharlieJessie A.N.T. Farm LIFE 32 108 252Wife Swap Free-spirited mother. Wife Swap Mothers swap. Dance Moms Dance Moms (N) America’s Supernanny To Be Announced USA 33 105 242Law & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims Unit BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Top 10 Countdown” (N) “Soul Plane” (2004, Comedy) Kevin Hart, Tom Arnold, Method Man. “35 & Ticking” (2011) Nicole Ari Parker. Friends try to gure out where their lives are heading. ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) d College Basketball Alabama at Missouri. (N)d College Basketball Ohio State at Purdue. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209SportsNation (N) d College Basketball Baylor at Texas Tech. (N) NBA Coast to Coast (N) (Live) NFL Live (N) SUNSP 37 -Inside the HeatBoxing From Oct. 24, 2009. XTERRA World ChampionshipFuture PhenomsInside the HeatInside the HeatInside the HeatInside the Heat DISCV 38 182 278Dual Survival “Panic in the Jungle” Dual Survival “Unbraided” Dual Survival “Mars on Earth” Dual Survival “On the Menu” (N) Africa “Kalahari” (Series Premiere) (N) Dual Survival “On the Menu” TBS 39 139 247Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Big Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryCougar TownBig Bang TheoryConan Kaley Cuoco; Anthony Mackie. HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) Dr. Drew on Call (N) Nancy GraceShowbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236You’ve Got MailE! SpecialE! News (N) Ice Loves CocoKardashianKardashianKeeping Up With the KardashiansKardashianChelsea Lately (N) E! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. Food Man v. Food Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernExtreme Yachts Extreme Yachts Dangerous Grounds (N) HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHouse HuntersHunters Int’lHouse HuntersLove It or List It “McPherson” Property VirginsProperty VirginsHouse Hunters (N) Hunters Int’lScoring the DealScoring the Deal TLC 48 183 280Island MediumIsland MediumTotally T-Boz “Starting Off New Again” Totally T-Boz “Back to My Roots” (N) The Sisterhood (N) Sin City Rules “A Nice Little Ambush” The Sisterhood HIST 49 120 269Ancient Aliens “Underwater Worlds” Ancient Aliens “Aliens and Evil Places” Ancient Aliens “The Time Travelers” Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens (:02) Ancient Aliens ANPL 50 184 282Gator Boys: Xtra Bites Frozen Planet Frozen Planet “Spring” Frozen Planet “Summer” River Monsters: Unhooked Frozen Planet “Spring” FOOD 51 110 231Chopped Smoked turkey leg dishes. Chopped “Frozen Fries With That?” Chopped “Belly Up” Chopped The judges have concerns. Chopped Recipes to use with leftovers. Chopped “Own It!” TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the Lord Way Of MasterThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesJoyce MeyerJoseph PrinceRod ParsleyPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -The Game 365Halls of Fame College Football AT&T Cotton Bowl -Oklahoma vs. Texas A&M. From Arlington, Texas. Premier League Review ShowThe Best of Pride SYFY 58 122 244(5:30) “Dawn of the Dead” (2004, Horror) Sarah Polley, Ving Rhames. “Shutter Island” (2010) Leonardo DiCaprio, Mark Ruffalo. A 1950s lawman hunts an escaped murderess. “The Amityville Horror” (1979) AMC 60 130 254(4:00) “The Green Mile” (1999, Drama) Tom Hanks, David Morse. “Jerry Maguire” (1996) Tom Cruise. An attack of conscience changes an L.A. sports agent’s life. (:01) “Jerry Maguire” (1996) COM 62 107 249South Park Tosh.0 The Colbert ReportDaily ShowWorkaholics Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 The Burn-JeffDaily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327Reba Reba Reba Reba “Pilot” Reba Reba “Blue Collar Comedy Tour: One for the Road” (2006, Comedy) Blue Collar NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer “High Anxiety” Cesar Millan: The Real StoryCesar Millan’s Leader of the PackThe Incredible Dr. PolThe Incredible Dr. Pol “Got Your Goat” Cesar Millan’s Leader of the Pack NGC 109 186 276DiggersDiggersDoomsday PreppersDoomsday PreppersDoomsday Preppers (N) Diggers (N) Diggers (N) Doomsday Preppers SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeFringe Peter’s otherworldly origins. Fringe (N) Fringe “White Tulip” Fringe Peter’s otherworldly origins. ID 111 192 285Nightmare Next Door Nightmare Next Door “Dead of Night” Nightmare Next Door Nightmare Next Door (N) Evil Twins “Tribe of Two” (N) Nightmare Next Door HBO 302 300 501 “Green Lantern” (2011, Action) Ryan Reynolds, Blake Lively. ‘PG-13’ “Puss in Boots” (2011) Voices of Antonio Banderas. “The Three Stooges” (2012) Sean Hayes. ‘PG’ Promised LandGeorge Lopez MAX 320 310 515(5:35) “Wanderlust” (2012) ‘R’ (:15) “Troy” (2004, Adventure) Brad Pitt, Eric Bana. Achilles leads Greek forces in the Trojan War. ‘R’ “Fast Five” (2011, Action) Vin Diesel, Paul Walker. ‘PG-13’ SHOW 340 318 545(5:30) “The Pianist” (2002, Historical Drama) Adrien Brody. ‘R’ “Brake” (2012, Action) Stephen Dorff. ‘R’ (:35) “The Samaritan” (2012) Samuel L. Jackson. ‘R’ (:10) “The Black Dahlia” (2006) COLLEGE BOWL GAMES PREP: Columbia teams on the road Continued From Page 1B New Mexico Bowl Arizona 49, Nevada 48Famous Idaho Potato BowlUtah State 41, Toledo 15 Poinsettia Bowl BYU 23, San Diego State 6 Beef ’O’ Brady’s Bowl UCF 38, Ball State 17 New Orleans Bowl Louisiana-Lafayette 43, E. Carolina 34 Las Vegas Bowl Boise State 28, Washington 26 Hawaii Bowl SMU 43, Fresno State 10 Little Caesars Pizza Bowl Central Michigan 24, W. Kentucky 21 Military Bowl San Jose State 29, Bowling Green 20 Belk Bowl Cincinnati 48, Duke 34 Holiday Bowl Baylor 49, UCLA 26 Independence Bowl Ohio 45, Louisiana-Monroe 14 Russell Athletic Bowl Virginia Tech 13, Rutgers 10, OT Meineke Car Care Bowl Texas Tech 34, Minnesota 31 Armed Forces Bowl Rice 33, Air Force 14 Fight Hunger Bowl Arizona State 62, Navy 28 Pinstripe Bowl Syracuse 38, West Virginia 14 Alamo Bowl Texas 31, Oregon State 27 Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl Michigan State 17, TCU 16 Music City Bowl Vanderbilt 38, N.C. State 24 Sun Bowl Georgia Tech 21, Southern Cal 7 Liberty Bowl Tulsa 31, Iowa State 17 Chick-fil-A Bowl Clemson 25, LSU 24 Heart of Dallas Bowl Oklahoma State 58, Purdue 14 Gator Bowl Northwestern 34, Mississippi State 20 Capital One Bowl Georgia 45, Nebraska 31 Outback Bowl South Carolina 33, Michigan 28 Rose Bowl Stanford 20, Wisconsin 14 Orange Bowl Florida State 31, N. Illinois 10 Sugar Bowl Louisville 33, Florida 23 Fiesta Bowl Oregon 35, Kansas State 17 Cotton Bowl Texas A&M 41, Oklahoma 13 BBVA Compass Bowl Mississippi 38, Pittsburgh 17 Sunday GoDaddy.com Bowl Arkansas State 17, Kent State 13 Monday BCS National Championship Alabama 42, Notre Dame 14 Saturday, Jan. 19 RAYCOM College Football All-Star Classic At Montgomery, Ala.Stars vs. Stripes, 3 p.m. (CBSSN) East-West Shrine Classic At St. PetersburgEast vs. West, 4 p.m. (NFLN) Saturday, Jan. 26 Senior Bowl At Mobile, Ala.North vs. South, 4 p.m. (NFLN) Suwannee High this Friday and Saturday. Columbia High’s boys soccer team (8-6-3, 1-4-3 district) plays at Suwannee at 7 p.m. today. The Tigers basketball team (8-4, 4-0) has a District 4-6A game at Wolfson High at 7:30 p.m. today. Columbia’s girls weightlifters travel to Godby High on Wednesday for a sub-sectional meet. Lady Tigers basketball’s first game back is 7:30 p.m. Thursday at home against Lafayette High. Columbia’s girls soccer plays at 6 p.m. Friday at Oak Hall School. COURTESY PHOTOShrine Club Texas Hold ’em fundraiserThe Lake City Shrine Club had its first Texas Hold ’em fu ndraiser of 2013 on Friday. The club raised $475 and paid out $660. Chris Costello, third place, (from left) Irene Cook, second place, and Mike Housh, first placed, chopped the p rize fund. PGA year finally gets goingAssociated PressKAPALUA, Hawaii — Dustin Johnson got off to a good start Monday in the Tournament of Champions. Then again, just starting was good. Three days behind schedule because of high wind, the PGA Tour finally got its 2013 season started on the day its first tourna-ment was supposed to fin-ish. Johnson, who showed up on Maui a week before the tournament and played just about every day, three-putted three times in five holes and still had a 4-under 69. That gave him a share of the lead with Mark Wilson and Nick Watney, who rolled in a long eagle putt on his last hole. The 69s matched the highest score to lead after one round in 15 years this tournament has been held on the Plantation Course at Kapalua. But there were no complaints. At least they were playing. As long as Johnson has been at Kapalua, this was his first time playing a full round in five days. He was among four players who had not even teed off when the first round was scuttled on Friday and Sunday. It was too windy to even try to start on Saturday. “Today was the first day I got on the course, but defi-nitely felt good,” Johnson said.

PAGE 11

DEAR ABBY: My husband, “Arthur,” and I are planning a trip. One stop will be to see some friends of his, “Mac” and “Annie,” from years back. I am dreading the visit. Last year, Arthur had a heart attack. I called some of our closest friends to let them know he was in the hospital. One couple knew Mac and Annie, and told them about his illness. Mac and Annie then called me and yelled at me for “allowing” my husband to get ill. I hung up, but they called back when I was at the hospital and left another hate-filled message on our answer-ing machine. Not want-ing Arthur to get upset, I erased it and never told him. Should I tell my husband about my last encounter with them, or trust that they have enough sense not to bring up the matter? -DREADING THE VISIT IN TEXAS DEAR DREADING: What exactly is it that you should have done to pre-vent your husband from having the heart attack -thrown your body over his fork so he couldn’t eat the “wrong” foods, nagged him into quitting smoking, or “forced” him to exercise and adopt a different life-style? You’re his wife, not his mother. You should ABSOLUTELY tell your husband about those out-rageous phone calls. Do not assume that folks with such an absence of com-mon sense that they would attack you during a family crisis wouldn’t do some-thing equally inappropriate during the visit. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: My husband and I are on an extremely tight budget since I lost my job and he was forced to retire early because of health issues. We have a nice home (paid for) and older vehicles, and we have no complaints about our lifestyle other than being more penny-conscious to cover our basic expenses. We receive numerous wedding invitations from our grown children’s friends, whom we have known and loved since they were all in high school together. Our prob-lem is what to do about a gift for them when we don’t have the money for one. We love to attend the weddings and receptions, but I feel bad about not taking a gift. What’s the right thing to do? Do we go and not take anything, offer an explanation or decline the invitation? I always send a card and I don’t want any-one to think we are cheap. My son was married last year, and people were very generous with their gifts, which I really appreciated. I’d really appreciate some advice. -TIGHTENING OUR BELTS IN MISSOURI DEAR TIGHTENING: When you receive a wed-ding invitation from one of your children’s former high school friends, pick up the phone and explain your current circum-stances and the fact that they, regrettably, prevent you from attending. That will leave the door open for them to invite you to come anyway. If the invitation is a sincere wish to share their special day with you and not a gift grab, they’ll tell you your presence is all the “gift” they need. However, if they don’t, send a card extending your good wishes. DILBERT BABY BLUES HOROSCOPES DEAR ABBY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Pay attention and prepare to intervene when it comes to your personal or professional reputa-tion. Offer help instead of complaining about the way something is done. Sensitive situations must be handled delicately. Plan to reunite with someone from your past. +++++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Speak up. Love is in the stars and spending time with someone special will enhance your relation-ship. Travel plans or get-ting together with peers or friends will improve your outlook and encourage you to make a positive personal change. +++ GEMINI (May 21June 20): Sell off items you don’t use. Budget and spend time working toward a better future and lifestyle. Less of every-thing will help you get back on track. Exercise and knowledge will help you build strength, cour-age and the desire to do better. +++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Do everything in your power to nurture impor-tant relationships. Use your ingenuity and good memory to please others as well as to make self and home improvements that will make your life better and less stressful. Ignore pressure tactics. +++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Enjoy the moment, get out with friends or participate in activities that you feel passionate about. A change in the way you view some-one will lead to a much closer bond. Romance is highlighted and travel plans will help to seal a deal. +++++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Spend time with the older or younger people in your life who appreci-ate you or share your interests. Sharing common joys will help you develop a special bond that will encourage trust, loyalty and a lifelong connection. Your kindness and affec-tion will be reciprocated. ++++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Don’t run from adver-sity. You have to face trou-bles head-on if you want to alleviate stress. Taking action will show everyone that you will not be pushed around or pressured by bullies. A change of heart is apparent. Follow your instincts. ++++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Focus on positive relationships. Get out of the house and associate with individuals who show enthusiasm regarding your plans or projects. Use caution when engaging in physical activities or travel. Embrace change if it will help you advance emotion-ally. +++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Personal secrets must be kept to avoid accu-sations. Put more empha-sis on what you are doing instead of talking about what others do. Too much of anything will work against you. +++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Your gestures will be appreciated and reward-ed. A chance to improve or change your direction will pay off. Gather informa-tion from people you have worked alongside in the past. +++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): You’ve got what it takes to improve your lifestyle or build a better life through the connec-tions you make. Greater involvement in educational pursuits or revisiting your philosophic beliefs will help you gain perspective regarding future projects. ++++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Offer positive sugges-tions and lend a helping hand if it will secure your position or help you con-nect with people you feel can contribute to a venture you wish to pursue. Love is moving in a favorable direction that will improve your life. ++ CELEBRITY CIPHER Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com BLONDIE BEETLE BAILEY B.C. FRANK & ERNEST FOR BETTER OR WORSE ZITS HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH GARFIELD THE LAST WORD Eugenia Last Visit with man’s old friends won’t seem like old times Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. CLASSIC PEANUTS Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS TUESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2013 3B

PAGE 12

LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTUESDAY, JANUARY8, 2013 Classified Department: 755-5440 4B Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 ServicesWhite's Trucking Services You call & We Haul! Fill Dirt, Lime Rock. AsphaltMillings, Granite, Road Rock.386-362-8763 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAGENERALJURISDICTION DIVI-SIONCase No. 12-420CACitiMortgage, Inc.,Plaintiff,vs.Jeffrey Rodgers AKAJeffrey Rodg-ers; Patricia Rodgers; Unknown Ten-ant #1; Unknown Tenant #2,Defendants.NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated 12/5/2012, en-tered in Case No. 12-420CAof the Circuit Court of the Third Judicial Circuit, in and for Columbia County, Florida, wherein CitiMortgage, Inc. is the Plaintiff and Jeffrey Rodgers AKAJeffery Rodgers; Patricia Rodgers; Unknown Tenant #1; Un-known Tenant #2 are the Defendants, that I will sell o the highest and best bidder for cash at the Columbia County Courthouse, 173 NE Hernan-do Ave, Lake City, FL32055, begin-ning at 11:00 AM on the 16th day of Jan., 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit:LOT5, BLOCK 6 OF SHADYOAK ACRES UNIT2 ADDITION, AC-CORDING TO THE PLATTHERE-OF, AS RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 4, PAGE 34 OF THE PUB-LIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.Dated this 6th day of Dec., 2012.P. Dewitt CasonAs Clerk of the CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioAs Deputy ClerkSEALIf you are a person with a disability who requires accommodations in or-der to participate in a court proceed-ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of certain assis-tance. Individuals with a disability who require special accommodations in order to participate in a court pro-ceeding should contact the ADACo-ordinator, 173 NE Hernando Ave-nue, Room 408, Lake City, FL32055, (386) 719-7428, within two (2) business days of receipt of notice to appear. Individuals who are voice impaired should call (800) 955-8771. Individuals who are voice impaired should call (800) 955-8770.05536435January 1, 8, 2013 IN THECIRCUITCOURT, THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO. 12-597-CARODNEYS. DICKS and NORMAR. DICKS, husband and wife,Plaintiffs,vs.DONITAGAYHANNA, a/k/a DO-NITAGAYHANNAH, f/k/a DONI-TAHANNANICHOLSON,DefendantNOTICE OF PUBLIC SALENotice is hereby given that the fol-lowing described real property:Lot 2, “DUCK POND” a subdivi-sion recorded in Plat Book 5, page 66, Section 10, Township 7 South, Range 17 East, Columbia County, Florida.shall be sold by the Clerk of this Court, at public sale, pursuant to the Final Judgment in the above styled action dated January 2, 2013, at the Columbia County Courthouse in Lake City, Columbia County, Flori-da, at 11:00 A.M., on Wednesday, February 6, 2013, to the best and highest bidder for cash. Any person claiming an interest in any surplus from the sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the notice of lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.WITNESS my hand and official seal in the State and County aforesaid this 2nd day of January, 2013.P. DEWITTCASONClerk of Court By /s/ S. Sands Deputy ClerkSEAL05536621January 8, 15, 2013 PUBLIC AUCTION 1994 HONDAVIN# 1HGCD5667RA042586CREAMER’S WRECKER SERVICE 290 NE SUNNYBROOK ST.LAKE CITY, FL32055COLUMBIACOUNTY386-752-2861SALE DATE: January 21, 20138:00 AM05536598January 8, 2013 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAGENERALJURISDICTION DIVI-SIONCase No. 122012CA000402CAXXXXBank of America, N.A.,Plaintiff,vs.Donna C. Tripp, et al,DefendantsNOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated December 17, 2012, entered in Case No. 122012CA000402CAXXXX of the Circuit Court of the Third Judicial Circuit, in and for Columbia County, Florida, wherein Bank of America, N.A. is the Plaintiff and Donna C. Tripp; Bernard A. Tripp; Neighbor-hood Housing and Development Corporation; Unknown Tenant #1; Unknown Tenant #2 are the Defend-ants, that I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at, the Columbia County Courthouse, 173 NE Hernan-do Avenue, Lake City, FL32055, beginning at 11:00 AM on the 23 day of January, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit:BEGIN ATTHE SOUTHWESTCORNER OF THE NE 1/4 OF THE NE 1/4, SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP7 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, CO-LUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND RUN THENCE EASTERLYALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID NE 1/4 OF NE 1/4, 500.00 FEET, THENCE NORTHERLYPARALLELTO THE WESTLINE OF SAID NE 1/4 OF NE 1/4, 330.00 FEET, THENCE WESTERLYPAR-ALLELTO SAID SOUTH LINE OF NE 1/4 OF NE 1/4, 500.00 FEETTO THE WESTLINE OF SAID NE 1/4 OF NE 1/4, THENCE SOUTHER-LYALONG SAID WESTLINE, 330.00 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING. THE SOUTH 30 OF SAID LANDS BEING SUBJECTTOAN EASEMENTFOR IN-GRESS AND EGRESS. ALSO SAID LANDS SUBJECTTO RIGHTOF WAYFOR FRYROAD (ACOUNTYMAINTAINED GRADED ROAD) ALONG THE WESTSIDE THEREOF.TOGETHER WITH A1970 JHGLOBALSERVICE MOBILE HOME ID #GJMFXMF010470, Ti-tle #4038967Dated this 17 day of December, 2012.P. Dewitt CasonAs Clerk of the CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioAs Deputy ClerkIf you are a person with a disability who requires accommodations in or-der to participate in a court proceed-ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of certain assis-tance. Individuals with a disability who require special accommodations in order to participate in a court pro-ceeding should contact the ADACo-ordinator, 173 NE Hernando Ave-nue, Room 408, Lake City, FL32055, (386) 719-7428, within two (2) business days of receipt of notice to appear. Individuals who are hear-ing impaired should call (800) 955-8771. Individuals who are voice im-paired should call (800) 955-8770.05536457January 1,8, 2013 White Springs Tower Construction Public NoticeBudd Broadcasting Co., Inc. hereby proposes the construction of new 927' AGLguyed lattice broadcast tower having FAAASN: 2012-ASO-7034-OE. The tower is proposed to be located at NAD83: 30.27’37.5” N. Latitude and 82.39’11.2”W. Lon-gitude or approximately 1km North of intersection of Cone Bridge Road and 441. Please submit any written comments by 2/11/2013 regarding potential effects on historic proper-ties including their location pursuant to Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act to Ryan Wilhour, Kessler and Gehman Associates, Inc. 507 NW60th Street Suite D, Gainesville, FL32607.05536650January 8 2013 NOTICE OFPUBLIC SALE: AUTO EMPORIUM OF LAKE CITYINC. gives Notice of Foreclo-sure of Lien and intent to sell these vehicles on 01/15/2013, 10:00 am at 2832 SWMAIN BLVD, LAKE CITY, FL32025, pursuant to subsec-tion 713.78 of the Florida Statues. AUTO EMPORIUM OF LAKE CITYINC. reserves the right to ac-cept or reject any and/or all bids.YV1LS5502P20423221993 VOLVO05536658JANUARY8, 2013 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILDIVISIONCase #: 2011-CA-000568Bank of American, National Associ-ationPlaintiff,vs.Rosa M. Payan a/k/a Rosa Payan; Unknown Parties in Possession #1, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Un-known Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, grantees, or Other ClaimantsDefendant(s).NOTICE OF SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated December 18, 2012, entered in Civil Case No. 2011-CA-000568 of the Circuit Court of the 3rd Judicial Circuit in and for Columbia County, Florida, wherein Bank of America, National Association, Plaintiff and Rosa M. Payan a/k/a Rosa Payan are defend-ant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ATTHE COURTROOM ONE OF THE CO-LUMBIACOUNTYCOURT-HOUSE, LOCATED AT173 HER-NANDO AVENUE, LAKE CITY, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AT11:00 A.M. on February 20, 2013, the following described prop-erty ass et forth in said Final Judg-ment, to-wit:PARTOF THE SOUTHEAST1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST1/4 OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP7 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, CO-LUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRI-BED AS FOLLOWS:BEGIN ATTHE SOUTHEASTCORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST1/4 OF SAID SECTION 13; THENCE NORTH 0131’17” WESTALONG THE EASTLINE OF SAID SOUTHEAST1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST1/4, ADISTANCE O 383.10 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 8811’59” WEST, 569.55 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 0136’19” EAST, 383.45 FEETTO APOINTON THE SOUTH LINE OF THE AFOREMENTIONED SOUTH-EAST1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST1/4; THENCE NORTH 8809’53” EASTALONG SAID SOUTH LINE, ADISTANCE OF 568.99 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGIN-NING, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA. LESS AND EXCEPT: EXISTING MAINTAINED RIGHTOF WAYOF SHILOH CHURCH ROAD ALONG THE EASTSIDE OF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED LANDS. SUBJECTTO AN EASE-MENTFOR INGRESS AND EGRESS OVER AND ACROSS THE NORTH 15.00 FEETOF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED LANDS.ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN IN-TERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceed-ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assis-tance. Please contact the ADACoor-dinator; 173 Northeast Hernando Street, Room 408, Lake City, Florida 32056; (386) 719-7576 at least 7 days before your scheduled court ap-pearance, or immediately upon re-ceiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711.P. DEWITTCASONCLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURTColumbia County, Florida/s/ B. ScippioDEPUTYCLERK OF COURTSEAL05536475JANUARY1, 8, 2013 PUBLIC AUCTIONWill be held by Gainey Automotive, Inc, in Columbia County at 3468 S.W. CR 138, Fort White, Fl. 32038Date 01/22/2013Time: 8:00 A.M.1993 NissanVin #1N6SD11YXPC36213805536661JANUARY8, 15, 2013 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE 3RD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILDIVISION:CASE NO.: 12-2011-CA-000531BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,Plaintiff,vs.DAVID VELAZQUEZ; THE HILLS ATROSE CREEK HOMEOWN-ERS ASSOCIATION, INC.Defendants.NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to Final Judgment of Foreclo-sure dated the 17th day of December, 2012, and entered in Case No. 12Legal2011-CA-0900531, of the Circuit Court of the 3RD Judicial Circuit in and for Columbia County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is the Plaintiff and DAVID VE-LAZQUEZ; THE HILLS ATROSE CREEK HOMEOWNERS ASSOCI-ATION, INC., are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the, Columbia County Courthouse, 173 N.E. HERNANDO AVENUE, LAKE CITY, FL32055, 11:00 AM on the 23 day of January, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit:LOT2, HILLS ATROSE CREEK PHASE 2, ASUBDIVISION, AC-CORDING TO THE PLATTHERE-OF, RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 7, PAGES 154-155, OF THE PUB-LIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN IN-TERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-TIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who requires accommo-dations in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of cer-tain assistance. Individuals with disa-bility who require special accommo-dations in order to participate in a court proceeding should contact the ADACoordinator, 173 NE Hernan-do Avenue, Room 408, Lake City, FL32055, (836) 719-7428, within two (2) business days of receipt of notice to appear. Individuals who are hearing impaired should call (800) 955-8771. Individuals who are voice impaired should call (800) 955-8770.Dated this 17th days of December, 2012.P. DEWITTCASONClerk Of The Circuit CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkSEAL05536459January 1, 8, 2013 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTFOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAPROBATE DIVISIONFile No. 12-172 CPIN RE: ESTATE OF RICHARD MI-CHAELDIPIETRO,Deceased.NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of RICHARD MICHAELDIPIETRO, deceased, whose date of death was April 10, 2012, and whose social se-curity number is *** ** 7932, is pending in the Circuit Court for Co-lumbia County, Florida, Probate Di-vision, the address of which is PO Box 2069, Lake City, FL32056-2069. the names and addresses if the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below.All creditors of the decedent and oth-er persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF Legal3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this c court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUB-LICATION OF THIS NOTICE.ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITH-IN THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED.NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.The date of first publication of this 755-5440Toplace your classified ad call REPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Linewww.lakecityreporter.com

PAGE 13

LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTUESDAY, JANUARY8, 2013 5B Classified Department: 755-5440 2001 Dodge Ram 3500V10 Magnum, extended cab, SLT, 4 WD, DRW, AT, PW, PS, red w/tan interior, 137,000 miles, good condition.$7,900386-984-6606 or 386-758-6800 Legalnotice is January 4, 2013.Personal Representative:/s/ Pamela H. DiPietro aka Pamela Holly DiPietro821 Fairway DriveNew Smyrna Beach, FL32168Attorney for Personal Representa-tive:William N. GambertFlorida Bar No. 218642Daytona Beach, FL32118Tele: (386) 257-9873Fax: (386) 254-0747email: wsrjg@aol.com05536600January 8, 15, 2013 IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILACTIONCASE NO.: 12-2012-CA-000153JAMES B. NUTTER & COMPA-NY,Plaintiff,vs.GLOVENE DORSETTA/K/AGLOVENE COBB DORSETTA/K/AGLOVENE COBB A/K/AGLOVENE D. COBB, et al,Defendant(s).NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to a Final Judgment of Mort-gage Foreclosure dated December 19, 2012 and entered in Case No. 12-2012-CA-000153 of the Circuit Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit in and for COLUMBIACounty, Florida wherein JAMES B. NUT-TER & COMPANYis the Plaintiff and GLOVENE DORSETTA/K/AGLOVENE COBB DORSETTA/K/AGLOVENE COBB A/K/AGLOVENE D. COBB; UNITED STATES OF AMERICAON BE-HALF OF U.S. DEPARTMENTOF HOUSING ND URBAN DEVEL-OPMENTMIDDLE; TENANT#1 N/K/AAPRILCOBB are the De-fendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONTSTEPS OF THE COLUMBIACOUNTYCOURT-HOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the 23rd day of Jan., 2013, the following de-scribed property as set forth in said Final Judgment:COMMENCE ATTHE SOUTH-EASTCORNER OF THE WEST1/2 OF SOUTHWEST1/4 OF NORTHWEST1/4, SECTION 30, TOWNSHIP3 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 00 MI-NUTES 40 SECONDS WESTALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID NORTHWEST1/4, 436.48 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGIN-NING; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 00 MI-NUTES 40 SECONDS WESTALONG SAID SOUTH LINE, 117.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 0 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 53 SEC-ONDS WEST, 399.83 FEETTO THE SOUTH RIGHTOF WAYLINE OF COUNTYROAD C-250; THENCE SOUTH 65 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EASTALONG SAID SOUTH RIGHTOF WAYLINE, 6.81 FEETTO THE P.C. OF ACURVE; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLYALONG SAID CURVE CONCAVE TO THE LEFTHAVING ARADIUS OF 2914.79 FEETALONG ACHORD BEAR-ING SOUTH 66 DEGREES 18 MI-NUTES 17 SECONDS EAST, 121.24 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 0 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 53 SEC-ONDS EAST, 346.22 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING.TOGETHER WITH ANON-EX-CLUSIVE PERPETUALEASE-MENTOF 30 FEETON THE EX-ISTING DIRTDRIVEWAYPRO-VIDING INGRESS AND EGRESS TOTHE ABOVE-DESCRIBED ONE ACRE PARCELOF REALPROPERTYAND FORMER MAR-ITALHOME.A/K/A1376 NWLAKE JEFFERYROAD, LAKE CITY, FL32055Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-er than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on 12/19/2012.P. DeWitt CasonClerk of the Circuit CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkSEALNOTICEIn accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons need-ing a special accommodation to par-ticipate in this proceeding should contact the Deputy Court Adminis-trator whose office is located at 3301 East Tamiami Trial, Building L, Na-ples, Florida 33962, telephone num-ber (813) 774-8124; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD), or 1-800-955-8770 (v), via Florida Relay Service, not later than seven (7) days prior to this proceed-ing.05536473January 1, 8, 2013 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITOF FLORIDAIN AND FOR COLUM-BIACOUNTYGENERALJURISDICTION DIVI-SIONCASE NO. 11-430-CACITIMORTGAGE, INC.,Plaintiff,vs.UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIA-RIES, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CRED-ITORS, TRUSTEES, AND ALLOTHER PARTIES CLAIMING AN INTERESTBY, THROUGH, UN-DER OR AGAINSTTHE ESTATE OF ALBERTCLEMENTS, et al.Defendant(s),NOTICE OF ACTION CON-STRUCTIVE SERVICETO: UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFI-CIARIES, DEVISEES, GRANT-EES, ASSIGNEES, LINERS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, AND ALLOTHER PARTIES CLAIM-ING AN INTERESTBY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTTHE ESTATE OF AL-BERTCLEMENTS whose residence is unknown if he/she/they be living; and if he/she/they be dead, the un-known defendants who may be spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, as-signees, lienors, creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against the De-fendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property described in the mortgage being foreclosed here-in.YOU ARE HEREBYNOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mort-gage on the following property: LegalTHE S 1/2 OF THE E 1/2 OF N 1/2 OF BLOCK 48, MASON CITYSUBDIVISION, ASUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO PLATTHERE-OF RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 1, PAGE 31, PUBLIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLOR-IDA. AND THATCERTAIN MO-BILE HOME SITUATED ON THE PROPERTY.has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on counsel for Plaintiff, whose address is 3010 North Military Trail, Suite 300, Boca Raton, Florida 33431 on or before January 14, 2013 (30 days from Date of First Publication of this Notice) and file the original with the clerk of this court either before serv-ice on Plaintiff's attorney or immedi-ately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition filed herein.WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court at County, Florida, this 14 day of December, 2012.CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURTBY: /s/ B. ScippioDEPUTYCLERKROBERTSON, ASCHULTZ and SCHNEID, PLATTORNEYFOR PLAINTIFF 3010 NORTH MILITARYTRAIL, SUITE 300BOCARATON, FL3343105536456January 1, 8, 2013 020Lost & Found Found Nintendo 3D In vicinity of Troy St & Elementary School. Need to Provide Birth date & Serial I.D. Info. 243-8135 Found on Ichetucknee Rd Small female short hair brown dog, No collar. Very Sweet, Sweet, Sweet. Contact 984-6796 100Job Opportunities3 Temp Diversified Farm Workers needed 2/1/13 – 12/1/13. Workers will perform any combo of duties including planting, cultivating, harvesting and pruning; vegetables, blueberries and nursery stock including container & field grown plants, trees, & shrubs. Guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours. All tools, supplies, equip. provided at no cost. Free housing provided for non-commuting workers. Transportation & subsistence reimbursed to worker upon completion of 50% of contract or earlier. Random drug testing at employer’s expense. Worksite in Mobile Co, AL. $9.39/hr Report or send resume to the nearest FLAgency of Workforce Innovation office & ref. job order # 936592 or call (386) 7559026. Oak Hill Tree Farm – Grand Bay, AL 30 TEMPPotato Equip Operators needed 1/21/13 – 8/15/13. 24 mo. verifiable exp required operating & performing main. on GPS equipped 245+ HPPotato equip. Workers will drive, operate, and perform routine maintenance on GPS equipped farm machines. Workers must be physically able to perform all job duties. Guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours. Tools provided at no cost. Free housing provided for non-commuting workers. Transportation & subsistence reimbursed to worker upon completion of 50% of contract or earlier if appropriate. $13.42/hr. Worksites in Aiken Co. SC. Report/send a resume to nearest local FLAgency of Workforce Innovation Office or call 386-755-9026 & ref Job # 546332. L. Walther & Sons #6.05536524Frito Lay Route Sales $40,000+ Full Time Open House Info Session Jan. 11th Call (386) 867-1913 to RSVP Equal Opportunity Employment M/F/D/V 05536646HOLIDAYINN & SUITESLake City’s only full service hotel is seeking the following : Room Attendant P/TExperience Preferred Apply in person Mon-Fri 12-5pm 213 SWCommerce Dr. EOE/DFWP. Construction Salesman Needed. Excellent Pay. Experience Required. 866-959-7663 ConsumerLender-SunState FCUFull-Time Position in Lake City. Experience selling financial products, proven customer relations expertise, and lending experience REQUIRED. Great pay and benefits! Application Required and available at www.sunstatefcu.org. Fax to 386-462-4686. DFWP, EOE 20 Temp Farm Workers needed 2/4/13 – 9/25/13. Workers will perform various tasks involved in planting, thinning, pruning, cultivating & harvesting fruit according to supervisor’s instructions. 3 months verifiable experience pruning fruit bearing trees. Random drug testing at employer’s expense. Guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours. All tools, supplies, & equipment provided at no cost. Free housing provided for noncommuting workers. Transportation & subsistence reimbursed to worker upon completion of 50% of contract, or earlier if appropriate. Worksites in Glouchester Co. NJ. $10.34/hr. Applicants report or send a resume to the nearest FL Agency of Workforce Innovation office or call 386-755-9026 & reference job order # 5517989. DeEugenio & Sons – Glassboro, NJ Experienced Restaurant Managers Day one medical, dental and vision. Paid vacation, 401K and bonuses. EOE. email resume to: sfl_careers@steaknshake.com Needed CNC Machinist Must be familiar with Lathes and Mills, send resume to Grizzly Mfg. 174 NE Cortez Ter. Lake City FL32055, or Email: guy@qiagroup.com NO PHONE CALLS/WALK-INS 100Job OpportunitiesIndustrial Structural/ Mechanical Designer-Draftsman Must have experience in design and detailing Material Handling Equipment (conveyor systems) & related structural steel support systems. Proficiency in AutoCAD is necessary. DO NOTAPPLYIN PERSON Send resume to Draftsman 3631 US Highway 90 East Lake City, Fl 32055 Mechanic needed with tools and experience. Southern Specialize Truck & Trailer. 386-752-9754 Must have a minimum of 5 yrs Exp. selling HVAC Equipment. Excellent benefits &Great pay. Call Allen 386-628-1093 Sales Help at Florida Visitors Center. Benefits, hourly wage plus commission. Excellent opportunity with National company. Westgate Resorts. Call Ed 904-540-2314 or email Ed_Newman@wgresorts.com SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 Service Techs & Installers Must be EPA& NATE certified. Excellent benefits & great pay. Call Allen (386) 628-1093 52 Temp Nursery Workers needed 1/28/13-11/22/13. Wrkrs will perform any combo of duties to plant, cultivate, and harvest nursery stock. Wrkrs will be required to harvest both container and field grown plants, trees and shrubs. 1 month verifiable experience working in agriculture/horticulture Guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours. All tools, supplies, equipment provided at no cost. Free housing provided for non-commuting workers. Transportation & subsistence reimbursed to worker upon completion of 50% of contract, or earlier if appropriate. Random drug testing at employer’s expense. Pay rate is the highest $9.39/hr or applicable piece rates depending on crop activity. Worksite in Mobile Co AL. Applicants should report or send a resume to the nearest FLAgency of workforce Innovation office ref job order # AL933755 or call (386) 7559026. T.A.S. Inc DBACottage Hill Nursery – Irvington, AL Truck Repair facility Service Writer needed. Computer literate and understanding of truck repair and parts procurement. Southern Special Truck & Trailer 752-9754 120Medical Employment05536594Medical Billing Manager Several years experience in all aspects in medical insurance billing required. Salary based on experience. Email resume in confidence to mafaisal05@yahoo.com or fax to 386-758-5987. 05536623Referral Coordinator/ Checkout Clerk Medical Office is seeking qualified candidate with Good Multi-tasking skills and professionalism. Must have exp. w/Med. Term & Ins. Referrals & Auth. Send resume by Email to jsmith@ccofnc.com. No Calls Please. DIET AR Y MANAGER Needed CDM, Chef, LTC, 2 years experience preferred Must be able to manage large staff and oversee daily food preparation for a 180 bed SNF. Full time with excellent benefits. E-mail resume to Greg Roberts: groberts@gulfcoasthealthcare.com or fax to: (386)362-4417. Live Oak, FLEOE/V/D/M/F GREATOPPORTUNITY•Full Time Experienced C.N.A’s All Shifts Apply in person at Suwannee Health Care & Rehab. 1620 Helevenston Street S.E. Live Oak, FL32064 EOE/m/f/d/v Massage Therapist Needed in a 180 Beds SNF Licensed, 1-2 years Experience preferred. Part-time weekend position. E-mail resume to Greg Roberts: groberts@gulfcoasthealthcare.com or fax to: (386) 362-4417 Live Oak, FLEOE/V/D/M/F 240Schools & Education05536525Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class1/7/2013• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-1/14/13• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. Puppy 8 wks old Cream Poodle Health Certificate $350.00 Contact 752-4890 408Furniture SOFABED, new decking, springs, and mattress $100. 386-754-1595 414Needlecraft & SewingSERIOUS DEAL For Serious Sewers. Too Much to List. 754-6783 416Sporting Goods TREADMILLProScan quiet, excellent condition. $250 CASH 386-755-7045 420Wanted to Buy WANTED Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans. $300 & up No title Needed Free Pickup 386-878-9260 After5pm 386752-3648 430Garage Sales PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 440Miscellaneous Falling Creek Chapel will be having a six week Bible Study on the Anti-Christ on Tuesdays at 7:00 p.m. It will run from January 8th to February 12th. Any questions call 755-0580. Troy-Bilt 5550 Watt Generator, 10HPOHVBriggs & Stratton, $400, 386-754-1595 630Mobile Homes forRent1/1 Cabin $475 & Lots for your RVor your own Cabin. Between Lake City & G’ville. Access to I-75 & 441 (352)317-1326. 2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $700. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 2/1 Furnished S/WMH washer/dryer, Dep & referrences Incl: cable, water, elect. & garb. For more info. 386-965-3477 3 BR/1 BA, close to town, fenced in yard, private well $800 month. & $800 deposit 386-752-7578 & 386-288-8401 3 BR/2 BA, completely refurbished, appliances furnished, $795 month. & $795 deposit 386-752-7578 3Br/2Ba Mod 1/2acre (nice subd) concrete drive, wrap around deck appl's,energysaver, &thermo's ready (386) 984-5341 $800 mo Quiet Country Park 3bd/2ba $525, 2bd/1ba $425. Very clean. NO PETS! References & Deposit required 386-758-2280 640Mobile Homes forSalePalm HarborHomes 4/2 From 499 Mo Loaded3/2 From 399 Mo Loaded Homes on Your Lot 0 Down 800-622-2832 ext 210 Suwannee River Front Home Very Nice 4br/2ba, fireplace, large deck, $149,800 Owner Broker. 1.8 acres (mol) 386-935-1482 650Mobile Home & LandFSBO 5 ac lot w/ 1995 refurb. MH. 66ft long w/ new roof & wheel chair ramp. $5,000 down Owner Fin. on Balance Approx 5 miles N. of LC. 386-752-4597 OwnerFinanced 3/22.5 ac.River Access. Small down $585 mo 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com SW2BD/1.5BA, 1 acre, Updated Kitchen. $3,500 down, $350 mth Contact 305-304-4028 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05535481We’ve got it all!$89 Deposit Limited Avail. Call Today! Windsong Apts. *Free afterschool program386-758-8455 BRANFORD VILLAS 386-935-2319 2br/1ba Apts. Now available.$570. mo. TDD number 1-800-955-8771 Equal Housing Opportunity Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A$530 month $530 deposit garbage included. No pets. 386-344-2170 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled 1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living room. $450. mo plus sec. 386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951 UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent3 bedroom 1 bath $630 mth and $630 deposit. CH/A Contact 377-2170 3bdrm very spacious, 2ba, garage, CH/AFenced in backyard. $1,400 mth & $1,400 dep. Contact 386-344-1914 3br/1.5ba. Very clean, Brick great area w/bonus room. Carport, shed & Fenced (privacy) back yard. $825. mo $825. dep. Ref’s req’d. (941)920-4535 ForLease ,3Br/2bth DWon ten acres S.of Columbia City.Contact At 727-289-2172 $800.00 mo.$350.00 security. NICE 3/2 brick home w/garage in quiet neighborhood. 489 SWBrandy. $900 plus sec. dep. 386-438-4600 750Business & Office RentalsMedical, Retail and Professional Office space on East Baya near Old Country Club Rd. Call 386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622 (cell) 820Farms & Acreage4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com Owner financed land 1/2 to 10 acre lots. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 830Commercial PropertyIndustrial warehouse7+ acres fenced 17,000 sq ft Barn $1,500 mo. TomEagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 We’re on target! days a weekSubscribe Today 386-755-5445 755-5440Toplace your classified ad call BEST WAY ...to never miss a day’s worth of all the Lake City Reporter has to offer: Home delivery Tosubscribe call 755-5445

PAGE 14

6B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2013 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421 6BSPORTS JMP G. W. HUNTER, INC. 1130 US Hwy 90 W (386) 752-5890 WE NOW HAVE ETHANOL FREE PLUS GASOLINE ONLY AT INTENDED USES: BOATS & WATERCRAFTS COLLECTABLE VEHICLES OFF-ROAD VEHICLES MOTORCYCLES SMALL ENGINES Lake City Reporter Located at SHANDS Lake City, Live Oak & Starke Womens Center of Florida ALL MAJOR INSURANCES ACCEPTED INCLUDING MEDICAID & MEDICARE FREE Pregnancy Ultrasound WITH THIS AD* *Insurance billing may occur if necessary. Some Restrictions apply. OBSTRETRICS & GYNECOLOGY PRENATAL CARE & ULTRASOUNDS STDS & HPV TESTING BIRTH CONTROL & INFERTILITY MENOPAUSE & INCONTINENCE WEIGHT LOSS & 4D ULTRASOUNDS BOTOX & LASER HAIR REMOVAL NO INSURANCE VISITS ASK ABOUT OUR $ 50 CHANDLER MOHAN, MD EMAD ATTA, MD NOW HIRING MID-LEVEL PROVIDERS 386-466-1106 SERVICES: OB-GYN www.myobcare.com New Patient Exam and Necessary X-rays DO150, DO330 First-time patient Reg. $136 $ 29 SAVINGS OF $107 Expires January 31, 2013 ASPEN DENTAL GROUP ADVANCE DRY CLEANERS Branford Crossing Across from the fairgrounds Patel 386-755-5571 FULL SERVICE CLEANER Wash, Fold, & Alternation Services Available CAMP: Pitching tips from a Ranger Continued From Page 1B 10-12 with coaches who know the game. Impact Zone owners Josh Wehinger and Patrick Jernigan manned a couple of stations. We worked on them pitching from the windup and stretch, Wehinger said. A lot of them know how to pitch, but not get in a defen sive position. They are part of the defense, too. Jernigan, who caught Kirkman for his pitching demonstration, worked on pick-off moves. They have to come set, then step off the rubber going towards the target, Jernigan said. At his station Kirkman answered questions and showed various grips for dif ferent pitches, and watched the young pitchers throw. Columbia High player Sam Bass was catcher for the campers. There is no need to throw 100 percent, just know the basic fundamen tals and have good mechan ics, Kirkman said. They were about as good as you can ask for at this very beginning of pitching. Kirkman signed balls, bats and gloves and posed for pictures after the camp. He had already won over the campers. It was cool, Coyle Giebeig, 11, said. We learned how to pitch and the speed and technique of it. I loved it, pitching and meeting Michael Kirkman, Mason Gray, 9, said. It was pretty weird, like they (Major Leaguers) should be playing but theyre not. It was really cool, Danon Dumas, 12, said. I recom mend it to people who dont know how to pitch as well. We learned how to grip the ball the right way and fol low through after the throw. It was cool he could fit us into his spare time. Awesome and spec tacular and very fun, were the ratings of Bryant Green, Joshua Ramirez and Kade Jackson, respectively. Kirkman said he had about one month left before reporting to Texas spring training, which is in Arizona. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Michael Kirkman watches as a camper pitches the ball on Monday. ASSOCIATED PRESS Green Bay Packers fullback John Kuhn (30) collides with Minnesota Vikings strong safety Jamarca Sanford (33) as he dives into the end zone for a touchdown during the second half of the NFL wild-card game in Green Bay, Wisc., on Saturday. NFL playoffs: Here comes the big boys By BARRY WILNER Associated Press Here come the big boys. The NFLs wild-card weekend is over, with nary an upset. Moving on are division winners Green Bay, Houston and Baltimore, along with NFC West runner-up Seattle and the only rookie quarterback still standing: Russell Wilson. Ahead are some daunting challenges as the Ravens visit Denver, the Texans go to New England, the Packers head to San Francisco and the Seahawks journey to Atlanta. Only the SeahawksFalcons isnt a rematch. Seattle isnt intimidated one bit about facing the NFCs top seed. Despite the fact that we have a nobody team, Seattle cornerback Richard Sherman said after Sundays convincing 24-14 comeback win at Washington, a team not full of first-rounders and things like that, we have a lot of guys that play at a high level. Of course, so do the Falcons (13-3), Broncos (13-3), Patriots (12-4) and 49ers (11-4-1). The playoffs continue Saturday with Baltimore (11-6) at Denver, followed by Green Bay (12-5) at San Francisco. The Broncos beat the Ravens 34-17 three weeks ago, while the 49ers knocked off the Packers 30-22 in the season opener. On Sunday, its Seattle (12-5) at Atlanta, followed by Houston (13-4) visiting New England. Ravens at Broncos Not only is Baltimore thrilled to keep playing and keep star linebacker Ray Lewis career going, but the Ravens got the opponent they sought for the divi sional round. I wanted Denver, said Anquan Boldin, who set a franchise record with 145 yards receiving, includ ing the clinching touch down against Indianapolis (11-6). Because they beat us. Well make it different. Lewis made 13 tackles in his first game back in nearly three months. Joe Flacco became the first quarterback to win a postseason game in each of his first five seasons and John Harbaugh is the first coach to do so. The loss ended the Colts turnaround season in which they went from 2-14 to the playoffs in coach Chuck Paganos first year in Indianapolis. Andrew Luck completed 28 of 54 passes, the most attempts by a rookie in a playoff game, for 288 yards. Packers at 49ers Its been a long time since these teams met on kickoff weekend, and much has changed. Green Bay has become a bit more balanced on offense and somewhat stingier on defense than it was back in September. San Francisco has secondyear quarterback Colin Kaepernick instead of Alex Smith, and receiver Michael Crabtree finally has devel oped into a threat. The Packers held league rushing king Adrian Peterson to 99 yards in beat ing the Vikings (10-7), 100 yards less than he got on them the previous week. I dont think we had our identity at that point, QB Aaron Rodgers said of the Packers team San Francisco beat. We were trying a lot of different things. Seahawks at Falcons Atlanta has flopped in its last three playoff games, including losing at home to Green Bay two years ago in a similar scenario. Seattle wont bring as high-powered an offense as the Packers did to Atlanta, but its versatile enough with the creative Wilson, bulldozing halfback Marshawn Lynch and a deep group of receivers. The most significant challenge for the Falcons, though, will be a defense that completely shut down the Redskins and a hob bling Robert Griffin III for the final three quarters of their wild-card game. Washington (10-7) had 129 yards in the first quar ter and 74 for the rest of the game. Seventy yards in 3 1 2 quarters is ridiculously good defense, coach Pete Carroll said after his Seahawks won their sixth straight and snapped Washingtons seven-game winning streak. Texans at Patriots Both teams say the Monday night romp by New England on Dec. 10 is not an indicator of whats ahead. For their sake, the Texans better hope that is true. We didnt play our best football up there and we hurt ourselves with pen alties and mistakes, said Foster, who rushed for 140 yards and a TD against the Bengals (10-7). Anytime you give (the Patriots) opportunities, theyll take advantage of them. But well play our best up there. They have no choice, and Patriots coach Bill Belichick fully expects a tighter game. When you play a team twice during the season, the games are totally different. They never go the same way, Belichick said. Well be able to certainly look at some of the matchups individually, guys that faced each (other) in the game. As far as plays and calls and things like that matching up, Im sure theyll have some new wrinkles. Im sure well have some, too. It will be totally different.