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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
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Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:01994

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:01994

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comTwo Columbia County men, arrested Friday afternoon, face multiple charges stemming from a string of residential burglaries in northern Columbia County. The men stole more than $4,000 worth of televi-sions and other electron-ics and more than $1,000 cash, according to sher-iff’s reports. According to information released from the Columbia County Sheriff’s Office Friday evening, Jail records indicate Christopher A. Jezewski, 25, 1925 SW King St. was charged with grand theft and four counts of burglary in connection with the case. He was booked into the Columbia County Detention Facility with-out bond. Billy J. Tomlinson Jr., 25, Scottish Inn, CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Opinion ................ 4ABusiness ................ 5AObituaries .............. 6A Advice & Comics ......... 8B Puzzles ................. 2B TODAY IN PEOPLE ‘McDreamy’ is ‘McSteamy.’ COMING TUESDAY Local news roundup. 91 64 T-Storm Chance WEATHER, 2A Opinion ................ 4ABusiness ................ 1CObituaries .............. 5AAdvice.................. 5DPuzzles .............. 5B, 5D 61 43 Showers WEATHER, 8A Lake City ReporterSUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013 | YOUR COMMUNITY NE WSPAPER SINCE 1874 | $1.00 LAKECITYREPORTER.COM Job seekersout in forcehere in 2013. Obesity’s a problem, but we want our junk food anyway. SUNDAYEDITION Vol. 138, No. 244 1D 1C 1A Search is on for skydiver Photos by ASSOCIATED PRESSTOP: Search and rescue workers gather Friday at the Mount Si trailhead near North Bend, Wash. Searchers in the air a nd on the ground were looking for 29-year-old Kurt Ruppert Jr. of Lake City, who has bee n missing since a skydiving trip on Thursday. ABOVE: A King County Sheriff’s Department helicopter flies over rugged terrain near Mount Si in N orth Bend, Wash. Searchers in the air and on the ground were looking for Ruppert. SEARCH continued on 3A ROADWORK continued on 3A BURGLARIES continued on 3A Lake City man was on trip to Seattle area. Tomlinson Jezewski US 90 widening starts Monday Two busted in multipleburglaries CRIME ABOVE: A motorist passes by a bar-ricade along U.S. 90 on Friday where the Florida Department of Transportation will begin work Monday widening the road to four lanes. LEFT: The $11.1 million project will take place on 90 from Lake City Avenue to Brown Road. COURTESY FDOT JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterBy TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comLake City residents who live on the west side of town can expect traffic delays, traffic impacts and construction along the U.S. 90 West corridor for at least 18 months. The Florida Department of Transportation has contracted with a construction company for a widening project along U.S. 90 West that won’t be completed until mid-2014. Gina Busscher, FDOT public information officer, said the project calls for the four-lan-ing of U.S. 90 from west of Lake City Avenue to Brown Road, approximately 1.3 miles. Southern Development Corp. of Jacksonville is slated to begin work Monday. Southern Development has 550 days to com-plete the project, and projections call for the work to be completed in summer 2014. The estimated cost of the project is $11.1 million. FDOT also has scheduled an open house to get information to the public about the project. The open house will take place from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. in the Harvey’s Supermarket parking lot. “In order to be more accessible to our customers — those who live, work or drive along this section of U.S. 90 — we will be available under a tent pitched in the middle of the parking lot in front of Harvey’s Supermarket so people can either walk or drive up to get their information,” Busscher said. The four-lane project includes building an extensive underground drainage system with the stormwater piped to a retention pond on By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comAuthorities in Seattle, Wash., are set to begin a fourth day of searching for missing Lake City skydiver Kurt Ruppert Jr. Ruppert, 29, went miss-ing after he jumped from a helicopter and failed to land in the designated landing zone Thursday. The search was set to resume today at dawn. Officials at the King County Sheriff’s Office in Washington said searchers have been look-ing for Ruppert since Thursday afternoon. “We got a call about 2:30 p.m. (PST) and had people on the scene around 2:45 p.m.,” said Sgt. Cindi West, King County Sheriff’s Office public informa-tion officer. The call went out from the chartered helicopter Kurt Ruppert Jr.

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PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Actress Bonnie Franklin is 69. Accordionist Joey, the CowPolka King, of Riders in the Sky is 64. Singer Kim Wilson of the Fabulous Thunderbirds is 62. Country singer Jett Williams is 60. Guitarist Malcolm Young of AC/DC is 60. Actor-comedian Rowan Atkinson (Mr. Bean) is 58. Singer Kathy Sledge of Sister Sledge is 54. Singer Eric Williams of BLACKstreet is 53. Director John Singleton is 45. CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading. AROUND FLORIDA Friday: 9-17-35-37 16 Friday: 1-4-8-10-27 Saturday: Afternoon: 1-4-6 Evening: N/A Saturday: Afternoon: -4-6-3 Evening: N/A Wednesday: 9-17-27-44-48-51 x2 State child abuse deaths decrease in 2011 TALLAHASSEE A total of 130 children were fatally abused in Florida in 2011, a decrease from the previous year. A new state report released Friday shows that the number of veri fied child abuse or neglect deaths has continued to drop the last few years. Most of the children who died were under the age of five. A state committee that reviewed nearly all of the verified deaths concluded that the most of the chil dren died from neglect, with 32 children dying from drowning and 30 chil dren dying as a result of unsafe sleeping practices that can lead to suffoca tion. The state review con cluded that most of the children who died from abuse had been previously abused. Scott makes case for a second term ORLANDO Gov. Rick Scott pointed to the states improving economy Saturday as he encouraged Republicans to begin work ing now to make sure he and other party members are elected in 2014. Even though President Barack Obama won Florida and Republicans lost seats in Congress and the Legislature, Scott predicted the next election will be different. I dont understand why everybodys not a Republican, Scott told party activists gathered for the state GOPs annual meeting. Anybody who believes that they want to improve themselves should be a Republican. Scott pointed out that before he took office, Floridas unemployment had skyrocketed and the housing market had col lapsed. He said since hes taken office, Floridas unemployment rate has dropped faster than every other state but one, and home values and sales are increasing. We cut property taxes, we cut business taxes, we cut regulation, Scott said. Were doing the right thing. Were getting back to work. Scott said that party activists need to start working now to ensure success in the next elec tion. Woman kills son, shoots herself OCALA Authorities say a 20-year-old woman shot her infant son and then turned the gun on herself. The Marion County Sheriffs Office reports that 6-month-old Jonah Mendoza was pronounced dead Friday afternoon. His mother, Melanie Reyes, was in critical condition at an area hospital. The Ocala Star-Banner reports that a relative of the mother saw a Facebook posting con cerning the woman and a suicide. The relative called authorities, and deputies went to the home of the young womans parents, which is where the young woman and her baby lived. Deputies arrived about 11:15 a.m. to find the woman and baby in a back bedroom. No one else was home. A handgun was recov ered. Investigators were processing the shooting scene. Missing boaters body recovered OVIEDO Authorities say theyve found the body of the second boater who went missing this past weekend on Lake Jesup in central Florida. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission reports that 26-year-old Charles T. Jacksons body was found floating in the lake Friday about halfway between Black Hammock and Bird Island in about 6 feet of water. He and 30-year-old Jason M. Cobb went miss ing early Saturday when they took a 15-foot boat onto the lake. FWC investigators say the men were likely eject ed from their boat shortly after 1:30 a.m. Saturday. A friend found their boat empty about 12 hours later. Cobbs body was found Wednesday. Officials say there were no apparent signs of trauma to either body. Robbery suspects killed by police MIAMI Miami-Dade police say officers killed a man and woman who were suspects in a pharmacy robbery. Officers responded to a Kendall CVS Friday after noon, and a security guard pointed out a car that was attempting to flee. When two officers tried to approach the vehicle, police say, the woman driv ing the car tried to hit an officer. Both officers fired into the car, killing the woman and wounding the man. The man was taken to a nearby hospital, where he died Friday evening. The names of the dead suspects werent immedi ately released. The officers were not injured. Man charged in womans death PORT RICHEY Authorities have charged a handyman with killing a 35-year-old Port Richey woman in her home. The Pasco Sheriffs Office said Kelly Bennett was killed sometime after midnight Saturday by homicidal violence. Her son came home to find his mothers body in the living room and called police. Authorities did not say how she died. Authorities were also investigating reports of a white male act ing suspiciously while walking down a road near Bennetts home around that time. Steven Clairmont Jr., 40, was charged with first-degree murder after investigators said they connected him to the crime scene. Deputies did not release information about what evidence led to Clairmont being charged. Pasco officials said Clairmont had been liv ing at Bennetts home for about three weeks work ing as a handyman. A motive was not given. SEATTLE A ctor Patrick Dempsey of Greys Anatomy may be the real McSteamy. The actor, who was dubbed McDreamy as a star of the hospital drama while his co-star was called McSteamy, may soon be serving hot, steaming cups of Joe. Dempsey won a bankruptcy auc tion to buy Tullys Coffee, a small coffee chain based in Seattle. Among those he beat out is Tullys much bigger Seattle neighbor, Starbucks Corp., which is known for its ubiqui tous white cups with a circular green mermaid logo. Dempsey, whose Global Baristas LLC plans to keep the Tullys name, declared victory on the social media site Twitter: We met the green monster, looked her in the eye, and ... SHE BLINKED! We got it! Thank you Seattle! The win for Dempsey deals a rare setback for Starbucks on its home turf. Starbucks has long been both praised for bringing coffeehouse culture to the U.S. and criticized for crushing smaller chains. The coffee giant, which had planned to convert the Tullys cafes to its own brand, last month announced plans to expand its global footprint to 20,000 cafes over the next two years, up from the current 18,000. Ex-La. gov. convicted of corruption gets TV show NEW ORLEANS Former Louisiana Gov. Edwin Edwards will star on a new cable TV show with the woman he married after his release from federal prison on a corruption convic tion. In a Facebook exchange Friday, Trina Scott Edwards told The Associated Press shes currently filming for The Governors Wife, which will showcase the 34-year-old wife of the octogenarian former gov ernor. According to A&E, the series will follow Trina Edwards as she tries to fit into the former governors upscale world while trying to get along with step-daughters almost twice her age and corral her teenage sons. He was last elected governor in 1991, when he defeated former Ku Klux Klan wizard David Duke in a landslide. Oscars to celebrate Bonds 50th anniversary LOS ANGELES Oscar wont be the only chiseled man in the spotlight at the 85th Academy Awards. Telecast produc ers say the show will also feature a celebration of Bond, James Bond. Producers Craig Zadan and Neil Meron announced Friday that the show will pay tribute to the 50th anniversary of the James Bond film franchise, which they describe as the longest-running motion picture franchise in history and a beloved global phenomenon. The most recent Bond film, Skyfall, starring Daniel Craig, was released in November and has made more than $1 billion worldwide a franchise record. The Oscars will be presented Feb. 24 at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles. R&B singer Frank Ocean cited for pot possession BRIDGEPORT, Calif. Grammynominated R&B singer Frank Ocean has temporarily lost his drivers license and faces a marijuana posses sion charge after police say he was pulled over twice for driving more than 90 mph in 65 mph zones. The Mono County Sheriffs Department said officers first stopped Oceans black BMW on Dec. 30 as he was heading north bound on U.S. 395 near Keoughs, and cited him for speeding. Ocean was pulled over again on New Years Eve at about 4:30 p.m. as he was heading southbound on U.S. 395 at about the same speed. The second time, sheriffs spokes woman Jennifer Hansen said a strong odor of marijuana wafted out as a deputy approached Oceans vehicle. McDreamy wins bid for coffee chain Wednesday: 18-20-28-35-53 PB 20 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter 2A Daily Scripture Wash and make yourselves clean. Take your evil deeds out of my sight; stop doing wrong. Learn to do right; seek justice. Defend the oppressed. Take up the cause of the fatherless; plead the case of the widow. Isaiah 1:16-17 ASSOCIATED PRESS Three dead in plane crash A police officer surveys the wreckage of a house in Palm Coast after a small airplane that crashed into it Friday, killing the planes three occupants, two men from Kentucky and a woman from Indiana. Florida Highway Patrol said the pilot reported engine trouble and was trying to land at a nearby airport. Homeowner Susan Crockett was taken to a hospital. Associated Press Associated Press ASSOCIATED PRESS Greys Anatomy actor Patrick Dempsey (right) jokes with employees of a Tullys Coffee franchise in Seattle on Friday, after his investment group won a bid to pur chase the coffeehouse chain. Craig Edwards

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U.S. 90, was charged with grand theft, four counts of burglary and violation of probation in relation to the crime. He was also booked into jail without bond. According to Columbia County Sheriffs reports, on Jan. 3 several residen tial burglaries occurred on Northwest Taylor Magee Lane in northern Columbia County. Jezewski and Tomlinson were identified as suspects as a result of an investiga tion launched by sheriffs deputies and detectives. Authorities arrested Jezewski at a residence at 447 NW Lake City Avenue and Tomlinson was found at the Scottish Inn where he was arrested. Sgt. Ed Seifert, Columbia County Sheriffs Office pub lic information officer, said approximately $4,600 in sto len property and $1,106 in cash has been recovered by detectives. Tomlinson is on proba tion from a previous bur glary charge. Additional charges and arrests are possible as this investigation moves for ward, Seifert said, noting the burglary cases would not have been solved so quickly without the coopera tion of the community. The partnership between the sheriffs office and the citi zens of Columbia County continues to have a posi tive impact in the solving of crime in our community. Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013 3A 3A Columbia County Tobacco Free Partnership Meeting The Columbia County Tobacco Free Partnership and the Columbia County Health Depart ment have come together to form a partnership in order to create a tobacco free community. The partnership focuses on policies that effect our youth. In the New Year, we would like to focus on multi-unit housing cessation programs and promote the various tobacco cessation programs available to our community. We invite all community members, service workers, and school aged youth to attend the upcoming meeting to discuss tobaccorelated issues in our county. Columbia County Tobacco Free Partnership Meeting All partnership meetings are open to the public. For more information on how to make a difference in your community through your local Tobacco Free Partnership, please contact: Lauren Pinchouck Columbia County Health Department Sunglasses ...30% off Sandals ...20-30% off WILSONS O UTFITTERS 1291 SE Baya Dr, Lake City (386) 755-7060 WilsonsOutfitters@comcast.net Insulated Camo Bibs & Coveralls ...40% off BURGLARIES: Two arrested Continued From Page 1A ROADWORK: Starts Monday Continued From Page 1A From staff reports Volunteers from World Renew, formerly Christian Reformed World Relief Committee, will be in Columbia and Suwannee counties beginning Monday to assist house holds affected by Tropical Storm Debby who may need additional assis tance. World Renew will open walk-in centers Wednesday through Jan. 16, from 9 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. Suwannee County residents can visit the walk-in center at Suwannee County Emergency Management, 617 Ontario Ave. SW, Suite 200, in Live Oak. Columbia County residents can visit the walk-in center at Columbia County Senior Services LifeStyle Enrichment Center, 628 SE Allison Court, Lake City. World Renew volunteers also will be going door-todoor in the affected areas between 9 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. World Renew teams will be wearing green shirts with the World Renew logo and will have identification name tags. World Renew is spon sored by the Suwannee County Long Term Recovery Group and the Suwannee Valley Long Term Recovery Committee, convened by United Way of Suwannee Valley as a result of the 2004 hurricanes. The World Renew needs assessment is a vital step in working with affected households to ensure long-term needs have been identified. Suwannee County resi dents may contact the World Renew walk-in cen ter in Live Oak by calling (386) 364-3405. Columbia County residents may contact the World Renew walk-in center in Lake City by calling (386) 438-8621. Flood victim assistance assessment effort to start the south side of U.S. 90 near Pinemount Road. Busscher said the drainage work will start Monday, and there may be minor traffic impacts to motorists along Pinemount Road, as well as those who travel U.S. 90 west of Brown Road. In order to reduce the impact on traffic, the proj ect will be constructed in phases. Busscher said while traffic is using the exist ing lanes, the two new eastbound lanes will be built. Then traffic will be switched to the two east bound lanes while the new westbound lanes are built. A new traffic signal will be added at Lake City Avenue, Busscher said, and turn lanes will be provided at all of the major intersections, such as Turner Avenue and Pinemount, Brown Road and Lake City Avenue. Directional median openings will be added at the Forest Meadows intersection. The final phase is when traffic is divided into two lanes on both sides of the raised grassed median. Its more of a safety thing, Busscher said of the widening projects purpose. Its reducing the amount of congestion and crashes caused by congestion. Its going to be a safer road and it will help with the flow of traffic for people going to school, work and getting to their destinations. Busscher said the proj ect is needed and has been in the planning stages for more than 20 years. Its been a longtime priority of the county com mission and the City of Lake City, she said. The project is needed because of traffic counts, develop ment in the area, growth, future development and safety. Signs will be posted about the project begin ning Monday, along with other preliminary project work. Busscher said the proj ect will be an economic benefit for the area. Theyll possibly hire new workers, subcontract businesses and purchase local products such as sod, concrete and asphalt, piping and gasoline and diesel fuel, she said. pilot after Ruppert jumped but failed to show up at the landing zone. She said Ruppert was with two other skydivers, and the three were taking turns jumping out of a heli copter near Mount Si, about 40 miles east of Seattle in Washingtons Cascade Mountains foothills. The other two skydiv ers were from Alaska and Arizona. Reports said Ruppert and the others were jumping from the helicopter at an altitude of about 6,500 feet. Complicating the search is the fact that Ruppert was wearing a wing suit with fabric under the arms to allow him to glide like a flying squirrel, meaning he could have gone far off course before landing. West said she was told wing suit flyers dont deploy parachutes until they reach an altitude of 2,000 feet. The speed and height of the jump would enable him to travel a large distance in a short amount of time, West said. The suit is brown and green, and likely blends into the terrain, though his parachute was reportedly blue. We still have searchers on the mountain, and at about 4:15 p.m. (PST) we started calling them in, West said Saturday at about 5 p.m. Pacific time. She said there were 145 people and dogs involved in the search Saturday. Searchers were able to narrow the search area Saturday to about a quarter-mile-square area near the summit by using data from Rupperts cell phone just before the jump, and the flight path of the helicopter. Its just an area of prob ability based on the heli copters flight path, West said. Were still searching the area, and well resume the search tomorrow, but we havent found him yet. Art Shaffer, the owner of Skydive Palatka, said Ruppert is a friend and theyve made many jumps together the latest was a midnight jump on New Years Eve. He has more than 1,000 jumps, Shaffer said. Shaffer said he has jumped with Ruppert many times but is not familiar with the area where Ruppert jumped in Washington. Shaffer said before a per son can jump in a wing suit, they have to have 200 jumps. He (Ruppert) has been jumping a wing suit about seven or eight years, Shaffer said. Its basically an extension of him, since hes been jumping that one so much. Shaffer said Ruppert uses a wing suit about 90 percent of the time. The United States Parachute Association has rules governing the use of wing suits. Shaffer said it takes hours of training, and sky divers start in different sized suits and work their way up to the suit Ruppert was wearing. Shaffer said Ruppert lives Lake City but spends most of his weekends in Palatka with other skydivers. He camps out here on the weekend, he said, not ing the two are part of a group of about 50 people who jump on a regular basis. Shaffer said Ruppert is a skydiving coach and is working on becoming a tandem master, qualified to carry someone else attached to his parachute. A skydiving coach jumps with someone and teaches them to skydive. West described the area were searchers are looking as a tall mountain area. She said the initial search radius was at least five square miles. Its a very common hiker area here but also known for very treacher ous terrain, she said. West said the area was not particularly known as a destination for skydivers. We have a lot of para gliders in the area, she said. Its the first Ive heard of anybody gliding out of a helicopter. She said Ruppert and the other two skydivers would jump out of the helicop ter from the other side of the peak and glide over the peak. No one saw Rupperts parachute deploy. They never saw him come over the ridge, West said. If he would have con tinued on the path he would have glided into their view, so he either glided in a different direction or had some kind of malfunction. Searchers were hoping Ruppert was stuck in a tree with his parachute or per haps lost in rugged stateowned land around 4,200foot Mount Si, West said. Searchers looked for Ruppert until darkness fell Thursday and Friday night. West said it rained most of the night Thursday with a light snow, but Friday it was sunny and the tem perature was around 42 degrees. The weather reportedly cleared up Saturday and more people were involved in the search. Rupperts activities and interests listed on his Facebook page included: wing suit flying, scuba div ing, fishing, hiking and tower climbing. Shaffer said Ruppert once owned a landscap ing business but he was branching off into other areas. Kurt Ruppert Jr. is the son of Kurt Ruppert Sr. and Mary Ruppert, who once owned Rupperts Bakery and Cafe. The Associated Press con tributed to this story. SEARCH: Lake City skydiver missing Continued From Page 1A Issues found with St. Lucie election Associated Press WEST PALM BEACH Election staff inexperi ence and inadequate pro cedures fueled vote-count ing problems in one of the countrys most-watched congressional races, a state report released Friday found. St. Lucie County was the epicenter of issues in the hard-fought race between Allen West and Patrick Murphy. The razor-thin contest ended after two weeks of recounts, court fights and allegations that the votes werent properly counted. The Department of States review found at least four incidents in which vot ing machine memory cards failed, as well as numerous ballot-scanning errors and missing logs of ballots. Despite well-inten tioned efforts, staff inex perience and inadequate procedures compounded issues, the report states, resulting in additional technical and procedural errors. Murphy ultimately was declared the winner in the race, unseating West, a first-term hero of the tea party movement. Among the recommenda tions made by the state to St. Lucie County was to coordinate with a large county to establish review procedures and methods for processing multi-card ballots.

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OPINION Sunday, January 6, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A4AEDITU.S. fiscal policy is detached from reality Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman N ewly-installed county commissioner Bucky Nash is impatient with progess on pro-posed upgrades to the Southside Recreation Complex. It’s time to quit dragging our feet, Nash says: Figure out what’s need-ed, tally up the total and see if the numbers make sense. We agree.The proposed improvements – to bathrooms, bleachers, the lighting system and more – were given a provisional OK by the county com-mission last May. Part of the tab would be paid by a 1-cent hike in the bed tax, the rest by the county. It was agreed to wait and see how much money was left over from the 2012 budget before proceeding. In the meantime, though, members of the Tourist Development Council and others had a change of heart as to just what improvements are needed, according to County Manager Dale Williams. They should come to a consensus then plead their case to the county commission. Quickly. Sports tourism is a proven money maker for hotels, restaurants and more. While the official TDC esti-mate that visiting softball and soc-cer teams injected $6 million into the local economy in 2011 may be somewhat high, even a far smaller figure represents welcome revenue. We’d like to see solid proposals, and soon, as to just what may need to be spent to keep us in good stead with tournament organizers and promoters. No more foot-dragging, please. Time to act on sports upgrades The lakes of Lake City OUR OPINION T here are six lakes inside or near Lake City. That’s why it is called Lake City. 1. DESOTO LAKE: Located just behind (east of) the courthouse. Named after Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto, who traveled near here around 1539. One of our earliest walk-in theaters was called the DeSoto Theater, and one of our prominent streets, Hernando Avenue, also honors the explorer. 2. ISABELLA LAKE: Named after the Spanish Queen Isabella, and locat-ed behind the Woman’s Club, just off South Hernando Avenue. Some of de Soto’s travels took place during the reign of Queen Isabella. 3. GWEN LAKE: Located in the northwest quadrant of town. Named after the developer’s daughter, Gwen Roberts. A nearby street is called Shelby Drive, named after Gwen’s brother, Shelby Roberts. Many years ago this lake was called Sheffield’s Pool, after the Sheffield family who lived on the southwest side of the lake. At that time, the area was so undeveloped that sportsmen hunted and fished all around the lake. 4. LAKE MONTGOMERY: Located just across Baya Drive from the First Presbyterian Church. Named after the Rev. Dr. E. F. Montgomery Sr. He served the Lake City Presbyterian Church 40 years in the active pastor-ate and 17 years as minis-ter emeritus. Previously, Lake Montgomery was named “Hamburg Lake,” presum-ably after a Lake City fam-ily named Hamburg. 5. BIG LAKE: Located just south of Lake City on U.S. 441. Variously known as Big Lake, Alligator Lake or Big Alligator Lake. An old post card called it Lake Hiawatha. An unusual feature of that lake is that it periodically goes completely dry. 6. LAKE JEFFREY: Located just off Lake Jeffrey Road. In its early days, the lake was known as a favorite place for class picnics and swim-ming parties, excellent fishing and hunting, and occasional baptizings. The origin of the lake’s name is unknown.Coach Green retiresDanny Green, Orange Park’s head football coach and former coach at Columbia High School, has announced his retire-ment after 31 years in coaching His career record was 254-106. He also coached at Baker County and Haines City. He took both CHS and Haines City to the state championship finals. He led CHS to a 109-39 record in 12 seasons, and almost certainly would have become CHS’s all time winningest coach had he been able to coach one more season here. Danny was a CHS graduate and his many, many friends here and else-where wish him a happy retirement!Congratulations, LaremyLaremy Tunsil, massive CHS lineman, has been named to the First Coast offensive first team. The First Coast area covers nearly 50 high schools. One area coach was quot-ed as saying that “Tunsil is the best lineman he had ever faced and there isn’t even a close second.” Tiger running back Ronald Timmons and linebacker Terry Calloway were named to the second team.Christmas sentimentA husband and his wife got separated while they were Christmas shopping at a large mall so she phoned him to see where he was. He said, “Honey, do you remember the jewelry store we visited when we were first married? The one where you wanted that expensive necklace we could not afford, and I promised you I would buy it for you as soon as I could afford it.” “Yes, yes,” she said excitedly. “I remember it like it was yesterday!” “Well”, he said, “I’m in the bar right next to it!” LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.comH ere are two ways to think about the “fis-cal cliff” deal that just took place in Washington. You are sitting at dinner and television is on, broad-casting the news. There is one story after another about things you don’t want to hear. Recession. Unemployment. You walk over to the TV, turn it off or switch to a sitcom or sporting event and sit back down to finish your meal in peace. Or a more personal version. You take your mail out of the mailbox and see the bills that are due. Without opening the envelopes, you throw them into a desk drawer with vague intention to open them at some point. Or you have voice mails from creditors that you erase and then head out to a show. There is an inconvenient truth called reality. There are aspects of real-ity — things involving behavior and obligations that, unlike a rock fall-ing on your head, can be denied so that, at the moment it’s like it’s not there. Our political “friends” in Washington welcomed in 2013 for us by turning off the TV, by throwing the unopened bills into the drawer, allowing Americans to enter the New Year under the illu-sion that something fis-cally meaningful has been solved or accomplished. No one can claim that the problem is lack of information. Open any newspaper or magazine and there is sure to be at least one report about the spending of our federal government, which now takes almost $1 of every $4 produced by the American economy, or about our trillion dollar budget deficits, to which no end appears in sight, or about our national debt which soon will exceed the value of all the goods and services our whole economy produces in a year, or about the short-falls of Social Security and Medicare, which together is about five times that. Doesn’t seem to matter. Turn off the TV. Throw the bills in the drawer. Everything will work out. Always does. Supposedly what we want is a growing, pros-perous nation. But symptomatic of being detached from real-ity is behaving in ways inconsistent with what you think you are trying to do. Economic growth happens when success and risk taking is rewarded and sloth and failure is not. But part of the spending spree that has been going on over recent years has involved bailing out and subsidizing failure — auto companies, banks, green energy. Yet successful small businesses are punished in this fiscal cliff bill. According to the Wall Street Journal a 2011 Treasury Department study indicated raising taxes on incomes over $500,000 would affect about 750,000 small busi-ness and that according to one survey during the fiscal cliff talks, 29 percent of small business heads indicated the result would be less hiring and 32 per-cent indicated they would invest less. Meanwhile, not working is being subsidized by further extending unem-ployment benefits, already having been extended to a mind-boggling 99 weeks. Which all goes to explain why I was and am opposed to this agree-ment, which some are celebrating. That inconvenient truth called reality is something Americans badly need to connect with. If we want all this spending, pay for it. That means everyone. Let’s get the real numbers on the table and lets get out our checkbooks. If you don’t want to pay, cut the spending. In the words of the great 19th century French politi-cal economist Frederic Bastiat, “When misguided public opinion honors what is despicable and despises what is honorable, pun-ishes virtue and rewards vice, encourages what is harmful and discourages what is useful, applauds falsehood and smothers truth under indifference or insult, a nation turns its back on progress and can be restored only by the terrible lessons of catastrophe.” Morris WilliamsPhone: (386) 755-8183williams_h2@firn.edu372 W. Duval St.Lake City, FL 32055 Q Morris Williams is a local historian and long-time Columbia County resident. Star Parkerparker@urbancure.org Q Star Parker is president of CURE, Coalition on Urban Renewal and Education (www.urbancure.org) and

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Gail Hosford AcostaGail Hosford Acosta, 69, of Fincastle, VA passed away on Thursday, January 3, 2013. She is sur-vived by her husband of 49 years, Pat Acosta; three daughters, Tif-fany Ramo and husband, J. R., Meredith Ad-ams and husband, Timothy, Shan-non Tate and husband, Brandon; YHJUDQGFKLOGUHQ=DFK6HWKEmma, Ryan, and Matthew; brother, Buddy Hosford. A memorial service will be held at 2:00PM on Sunday, January 6, 2013 at Oakey’s East Chapel ZLWK&UDLJ7DFNHWWRIFLDWLQJ Arrangements by OAKEY’S FUNERAL SERVICE, Roanoke, VA, Ph# 540-977-3909.Emma Lou Herlong WorthEmma Lou (Herlong) Worth died suddenly at her home in Lake City, FL, on the afternoon of De-cember 31, 2012. She was born September 2, 1925, in Jasper, FL, and attended public schools in Columbia County. In 1947, Mrs. Worth earned a Bachelor’s De-gree in Social Studies and Educa-tion from the Florida State Col-lege for Women (now FSU). She then returned to Lake City and became a social worker for the Department of Public Welfare, where she met Hal McMahan Worth, a native of Sevierville, TN. They wed December 4, 1948. The Worths were married for 63 years, and reared two children as well as two grandchildren. Their devotion and deep love remained palatable throughout their lives, and still serves as a model and inspiration of what a true part-nership can achieve. Once her children were in school, Mrs. Worth began her teaching career. From 1957 to 1982, she taught WKHWKLUGIRXUWKDQGIWKJUDGHVin Columbia County; the stories and success of her students re-mained an important source of pride and happiness throughout her life. Mrs. Worth was an at-tentive mother and grandmother, a member of the First United Methodist Church, and a Silver Sister of the local chapter of Alpha Delta Kappa. She loved gardening, reading, local history, and retreating to the family’s cabin on the Santa Fe River. Af-ter retirement, she and her hus-band became avid travelers, and alongside their dear friends the Colsons, MacCalebs, and others, they visited 49 states and Cana-da. She will be remembered for her deep convictions and enthu-siasm for the simple joys of life, her loyal friendship, and the sta-bility and caring home she made for her entire family. Mrs. Worth was preceded in death by her loving parents, William Vastine “Willie” Herlong and Marietta Floyd (Ellis) Herlong, husband Hal McMahan Worth, brother-in-law J.A. “Nub” Worth, and sister-in-law Nell (Fields) Worth. She is survived by her sister-in-law Georgia Nell (Worth) Runyan (James) of Sevierville, TN; son George W. “Bill” Worth (Linda) of Chesapeake, VA; daughter Betsey (Worth) Ward (Larry) of Lake City, FL; 4 grandchil-dren: Jacob Hill, Ginger Hill, Stefanie Ward-Cerny (Mark); and Kelly Rippard (Jason); and 2 great grandchildren: Alyssa Hill and Emma Hill. Visitation with the family will be held Monday evening, January 7, 2013, from 5:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. at the funeral home. Funeral services will be conducted at 2:00 p.m. on Tuesday, January 8, 2013, at the First United Methodist Church of Lake City, with Pastor Jeff Tate RIFLDWLQJ,QOLHXRIRZHUVdonations may be made to “Out-reach Ministries,” First United Methodist Church, 973 S. Mari-on Ave., Lake City, FL 32025; or the ADK Scholarship Fund, 409 1:=DFN'ULYH/DNH&LW\)/32055. Arrangements are under the direction of GATEWAYFOREST LAWN FUNERAL HOME AND CREMATORY, INC. 3596 S. US Hwy 441, Lake City, FL (386-752-1954). Please send words of comfort to the family at www.gatewayforest lawn.com. LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013 5A5A NOTICEOFMEETINGCANCELLATION FORTHEJANUARY7,2013CITYCOUNCILMEETING.THECITYCOUNCILOFTHECITYOFLAKECITY,FLORIDA WILLNOT MEETONMONDAY,JANUARY7,2013AT7:00P.M. THENEXTMEETINGWILLBEHELDONTUESDAY, JANUARY22,2013AT7:00PMINTHECITYCOUNCIL CHAMBERSLOCATEDONTHESECONDFLOOROFCITY HALL,205NORTHMARIONAVENUE,LAKECITY,FLORIDA.AUDREYESIKES,MMC.CityClerk Obituaries are paid advertise-ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporter’s classified department at 752-1293. OBITUARIES COMMUNITY CALENDAR Q To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr@lakecityreporter.com.Jan. 6Zumba introductionA free introduction to Zumba class will be held from 3 to 4 p.m. at the Teen Town Recreation Building, 533 NW DeSoto St. For more information, contact Sarah Sandlin as (386) 758-0009 or visit “Lake City Zumba” on Facebook.Zumba weight lossThe Lake City Zumba Loser weight-loss contest will begin at 4 p.m. at the Teen Town Recreation Building, 533 NW DeSoto St. For more information, contact Sarah Sandlin as (386) 758-0009 or visit “Lake City Zumba” on Facebook.Jan. 8Medicare seminarLifeStyle Enrichment Center is sponsoring a free Medicare seminar from 5 to 6 p.m. The semi-nar will be moderated by Irv Crowetz of C/C & Associates. Subjects to be covered include: what you need to know about Medicare, when to enroll, what’s covered and when a supplement is needed. Call 755-3476 ext. 107 to reserve a seat.Native plant societyThe Sparkleberry Chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society will meet at 6:30 p.m. at Hatch Park, 403 SE Craven St., Branford. Beau Willsey, an environmental scientist with the Suwannee River Management District, will give a program about exotic invasive plants and what can be done to pre-vent and/or eliminate them. The chapter mees the second Tuesday of each month, except June, July, and August, at Hatch Park. For mor information, contact chapter President Mae Brandt by email at maebrandt@bellsouth.net or phone (386) 466-0915.Jan. 9Newcomers meetingThe Lake City Newcomers will meet at 11 a.m. at Guang Dong Chinese Restaurant in the Lake City Mall. Lunch costs $11. Sale of 50-50 tickets will end at 11:25. The guest speaker will be Leandra “Lily” Johnson, the first female judge in the Third Judicial Circuit. Formore information, call Barbara Test at 754-7227 or Rose Taylor at 755-2175.Medicare informationSHINE will present a program to inform seniors about Medicare from 1:30 tpo 3:30 p.m. at the Lake City Public Library on Columbia Avenue. For more information, call (800) 262-2243.Jan. 10Builders AssociationThe Columbia County Builders Association will hold it’s first General Council lunch at 11:30 a.m. at Guang Dong res-taurant in the Lake City Mall. The meeting will start at noon.The speaker will be Columbia County Superintendent of Schools Terry Huddleston. If you are considering joining our builders association, this is a good time to join us for lunch, meet our members and learn more of what we are all about. Cost of lunch for members is $12 and non-members fee is $15. A HammerClaw jackpot is now $275. To make a reser-vation or for more informa-tion, emai colcountybuild@comcast.net or phone (386) 867-1998.Medicare informationSHINE will present a program to inform seniors about Medicare from 9 a.m. to noon at the TOPS Health Fair at First Advent Christian Church, Live Oak, and from 1:30 tp 3:30 p.m. at Live Oak City Hall. For more information, call (800) 262-2243.DAR meetingThe Edward Rutledge Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution will hold its monthly meet-ing at 10:30 a. m. at the LifeStyle Enrichment Center, 28 SE Allison Court (off Baya Avenue). Kathleen Cooper will be speaking about Lyme dis-ease. Visitors are welcome. Garden Club to meetLake City Garden Club will meet at the Clubhouse, 257 SE Hernando Ave. Social time will begin at 9:30 a.m., and the meet-ing will start at 10. Jo Carver will give a talk on landscaping.Jan. 11History programActor Chaz Mena will perform a program, “Claiming La Florida for King and Cross,” at 6:30 p.m. at the Columbia County Main Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave. Mena will portray Pedro Menendez de Aviles, the founder of St. Augustine and first Spanish gover-nor of Florida. Tickets are required, and are avail-able free of charge at any county library location. Funding for the program was provided by the Florida Humanities Council and the state Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs, as part of the 500th anniversary of the state’s founding.Jan. 12Chili cook-offThe fourth annual Branford Chili Cook-off will be from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hatch Park on Craven Street in Branford. The event will include a silent auction for adults and kids, door prizes, live music, an antique car show, moon walk, Home Depot Kids Workshop and a variety of homemade chili. Admission is $5 and includes all the chili you can eat. Proceeds will benefit Herry’s Kids Pediatric Services, a pro-gram of Hospice of the Nature Coast. To register to compete in the chili cook-off, call the hospice at (386) 755-7714 or visIt online at www.hospiceof citrus.org.Gospel sing, supperA gospel sing and potluck supper will be held to celebrate Mary Lou Flynn Lasseter’s 75th birthday, beginning at 6 p.m. at Lee Worship Center Church Fellowship Hall, 471 SE Magnolia Drive in Lee. Supper will be at 6 p.m., and the open-mic gospel sing will start at 7. To con-firm attendance or for more information, call Brenda Lasseter McCormick at (850) 869-9976.Jan. 13Music concertThe Ball Brothers will perform a free concert at 6 p.m. at Wellborn Baptist Church. The church is on U.S. 90 West between Lake City and Live Oak at the intersection of Lowe Lake Road in Wellborn. A love offering for the group will be received.Jan. 14SCORE workshopSCORE of Lake City will hold a free entrepreneurs’ interactive workshop from 6 to 8 p.m. at Columbia County Main Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave.. Participants will have an opportunity to meet other entrepreneurs, get advice and receive free educa-tional materials from the federal Small Business Administration and other sources. Participants also will be able to arrange one-on-one business coun-seling with SCORE volun-teers. To reserve a seat, call (386) 752-2000 or email scorelakecity@gmail.com.Jan. 15Pageant entriesToday is the deadline for contestants to enter the 2013 Olustee Festival Pageant. The pageant is open to girls ages 3 months to 20 years who live in or attend school in Baker, Columbia, Gilcrist, Hamilton, Union and Suwannee counties. Age divisions are 3 to 12 months, 13 to 23 months, 2 to 3 years, 4 to 6 years, 7 to 9 years, 10 to 12 years, 13 to 15 years and 16 to 20 years. Contestants may compete in beauty, sportswear, tal-ent and photogenic catego-ries. The pageant awards include educational schol-arships, trophies, crowns and banners. Each pageant contestant will receive a tiara. First-place winners will ride in the Olustee Festival parade. The pag-eant will be held Jan. 26 at the Columbia County Schools Administrative Complex. Applications may be obtained at the Columbia County Library, the Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of Commerce, Emily Taber Library, Suwannee Regional Library, Hamilton County Library or by contacting Elaine Owens at (386) 965-2787.Historical SocietyThe Columbia County Historical Society will meet at 7 p.m. at the Columbia County Main Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave. The topic will be the Heritage Park Village in Macclenny. The meeting is open to the public. For more information, contact Sean McMahon at 754-4293.Jan. 16Olustee planningThe Blue-Grey Army will meet at 5:30 p.m. to plan the Olustee Battle Festival. The meeting will be at the school district central building, room 153, 409 SW St. Johns St.Jan. 18Medicare informationSHINE will present a program to inform seniors about Medicare from 10 a.m. to noon at the Branford Public Library. For more information, call (800) 262-2243.Music concertSouthern rock band Steel Bridge will perform at the Florida Gateway College Levy Performing Arts Center, 149 SE College Place. The show will begin at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $15. Steel Bridge is a Cross City-based band that has opened for Mel Tillis and Chris Young. The band opened for Easton Corbin during the inaugural sea-son of FGC Entertainment. For more information, visit www.fgcentertainment.com.Masonic banquetGold Standard Lodge 167 will have its annual Masonic banquet at the Winfield Community Center. For tickets and more informa-tion, call Chirs Mirra at (386) 623-3611 or Mike Kelly at (386) 867-6675. Jan. 19Chili cook-offThe Lake DeSoto Farmers Market will have its second annual chili cook-off during market hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Funds raised from the sale of chili sam-ples will benefit Church of the Way. Registration is $10, and there will be a cash prize for the win-ner. For registration infor-mation and contest rules, visit online at market.lcfla.com. The farmers market is held along Lake DeSoto between the Columbia County Courthouse and Shands Lakeshore Hospital in downtown Lake City. For more information, call (386) 719-5766 or visit market.lcfla.com.MLK Jr. programThe Columbia County Branch of NAACP will hold its 30th annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. pro-gram at 4 p.m. at Mount Pisgah AME Church, 529 NE Washington St. Judge Julian Collins will be key-note speaker. The NAACP choir, directed by Dr. Tony Buzzella, will perform.Jan. 20Bridal showThe third annual Your Perfect Day Bridal Show will be from noon to 4 p.m. at the Holiday Inn and Suites, 213 SW Commerce Drive. The show will include a variety of local vendors focused on bridal fashions, weddings and related activi-ties. There also will be door prizes, complimentary food and a cash bar. Tickets are $5 in advance or $7 at the door. Tickets may be pur-chased at the Holiday Inn and Suites. For ticket sales and vendor information, all Amanda Daye at (386) 754-1411.Gospel concertGospel music singer Ken Turner and Valor III of Statesville, N.C., will perform a free concert at Glad Tiding Assembly at 10:30 A.M. Turner traveled for 25 years as the bass singer with the Blackwood Brothers Quartet and is the recipient of five Grammy and10 Dove awards. A love offering for the group will be received. The church is at 1571 E. Duval St. (U.S. 90) Turner and Valor III can be found on Facebook or at www.valoriii.com. For more information, call (386) 365-1533.OngoingFestival vendorsThe Blue-Grey Army is accepting applications from vendors wanting to take part in the 2013 Battle of Olustee Festival on Feb. 15 and 16 in Lake City. For more information, phone Phil Adler at (386) 438-3131, visit the festival web-site, www.olusteefestival.com, or email vendorinfo@olusteefestival.com. The deadline to apply is Feb. 8 and spaces are limited.Housing assistanceThe Grater Lake City Community Development Corp. Inc. provides servic-es to area resident want-ing to become homeown-ers. CDC offers financial literacy training, credit review, preand post-own-ership counseling and homeownership education by professional instructors and credit counselors. The agency office is at 363 NW Bascon Drive. For more information call (386) 752-9785, email greaterlakec-ity@hotmail.com or visit its website at greaterlake citycdc.com.Volunteers neededShands LakeShore Regional Medical Center Auxiliary is looking for volunteers to work a vari-ety of positions around the hospital. Volunteers are asked to work a four-hour shift once per week, but are welcome to work more often. Volunteers are needed to drive the shuttle car and help with jobs in the hospital. If you have some time to donate, come to the gift shop and pick up an application or call (386)292-8000, ext. 21216.Volunteers soughtUnited Way of Suwannee Valley is recruiting vol-unteers who are willing to be called upon to staff the Columbia County Emergency Operations Center’s Information Center during disasters. These volunteers serve as the link between the county emergency man-agement offices and the public when the EOC is activated for disasters. Anyone willing to serve in this capacity when needed or can recruit volunteers through your church or civic organization should call Jenn Sawyer, United Way of Suwannee Vallety long-term recovery coor-dinator, at 752-5604, ext. 101.

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6A LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04246A Sometimes “ no” makes you say Call 754-9088 and press 7 or apply online at campuscu.com today!Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Columbia a nd Suwannee counties! 21. Offer is for new loans only. Existing CAMPUS loans not eligible. Rate based on the September 15th rate sheet and is subject to change daily. Please call 800-367-6440 and press 7 for the most accurate rate information. Must mention offer at time of loan application. No closing cost offer is available only when obtaining a CAMPUS mortgage and only in the State of Florida. Offer applies only to standard buyer’s closing costs as itemized in the CAMPUS Good Faith Estimate and does not apply if seller pays buyer’s closing costs. Offer subject to credit approval, sufficient income, adequate property valuation, and maximum $417,000 loan amount. CAMPUS will pay up to $5,000 of closing costs. Owner-occupied property only. Offer excludes mobile homes, new construction, FHA and VA loans. Prepaid interest,initial escrow deposit and fees for rate buy down, if any, must be paid by borrower. Property, Flood and Mortgage insurance may be required at an additional expense to the borrower. If loan is paid in full within the first 24 months, closing costs paid by CAMPUS will be added to the loan payoff amount. For example, a $150,000 loan with a 20% down payment of $37,500 and prepaid interest of $215.70 at a 3.5% rate for 180 months would require 179 payments of $1072.33 and a final payment of $1,070.82; finance charge of $44,719.59 for a total of payments of $193,017.89. The amount financed is $148,298.30, the APR is 3.67%. APR=Annual Percentage Rate. Certain other restrictions apply. 2. Credit approval and initial $5 deposit required. Mention this ad and we’ll waive the $15 new member fee. Typical Closing Costs on a $150,000 Mortgage$3,428 CAMPUS Closing Costs on a $150,000 Mortgage No Cost! vs. NO -Closing-Cost Mortgage1from CAMPUS. “YES!” 3.6 7% APR1As low as FIXED RATE No points Purchase or refinance As little as 5% down Ask about discounted closing costs on construction loans ATTN: EILEEN BENNETT LAKE CITY REPORTER Lake City 183 SW Bascom Norris Dr.G’ville E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunter’s Walk 5115 NW 43rd St. Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St. Shands at UF Room H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Alachua 14759 NW 157th Ln. Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E. Silver Springs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. Summer eld 17950 US Hwy. 441 Tallahassee 1511 Killearn Center Blvd. This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration.

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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Sunday, January 6, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS BRIEFS GAMES Tuesday Q Fort White High girls basketball vs. Keystone Heights High, 6 p.m. Q Columbia High boys soccer at Suwannee High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Q Fort White High soccer vs. Hamilton County High, 7 p.m. (girls-5) Q Columbia High boys basketball at Wolfson High, 7 p.m. (JV-5:30) Q Fort White High boys basketball at Keystone Heights High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Wednesday Q Columbia High girls weightlifting in sub-sectional meet at Godby High, 3 p.m. Thursday Q Fort White High girls basketball vs. Interlachen High, 6 p.m. Q Fort White High girls soccer at Lafayette High, 7 p.m. Q Fort White High boys soccer at St. Johns Lutheran School, 7 p.m. Q Columbia High girls basketball vs. Lafayette High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Q Fort White High boys basketball at Interlachen High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Friday Q Columbia High boys soccer at Wolfson High, 5:30 p.m. Q Columbia High girls soccer at Oak Hill School, 6 p.m. Q Columbia High girls basketball vs. Stanton Prep, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Q Columbia High wrestling at Suwannee High meet, TBA Q Columbia High JV soccer in Tallahassee tournament, TBA Saturday Q Columbia High wrestling at Suwannee High meet, TBA Q Columbia High JV soccer in Tallahassee tournament, TBA Q Columbia High boys basketball vs. Atlantic Coast High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) CHS FOOTBALL Q-back Club meeting Monday The Columbia County Quarterback Club will meet at 6 p.m. Monday in the Jones Fieldhouse. For details, call club president Allen Masters at (352) 392-1116. YOUTH BASEBALL Kirkman camp at Impact Zone Major League player Michael Kirkman of Lake City will conduct a pitching camp at Impact Zone on Monday. Kirkman will work with each participant and give a pitching demonstration. The camps are 10 a.m. to noon for ages 6-11 and 1:30-3:30 p.m. for ages 12 and older. Cost is $60 per player. For details, call 243-8238. CHS SOFTBALL Lady Tiger tryouts Tuesday Columbia High softball tryouts are 2:45 p.m. Tuesday at the CHS field. Participants must meet academic requirements and have completed paperwork. For details, call Jimmy Williams at 303-1192.Q From staff reports Henry leads East over WestAssociated PressSAN ANTONIO — Alabama running back com-mit Derrick Henry ran for 53 yards and a touchdown on 10 carries in the U.S. Army All-America Bowl on Saturday, showcasing the form that made him a key recruit for the Crimson Tide. Henry also scored on a 2point conversion to help the East team beat the West 15-8. When the decision was made to go for 2, Henry knew he could get in. “I told coach I wanted the ball,” Henry said. “I’ve been looking forward to this game more than watch-ing Alabama play. This is the height of competition, and I wanted to show I can play.” Columbia High standout Laremy Tunsil was also a member of the East squad. He lined up at right tackle during the game despite playing left tackle for the Tigers during his four years with Columbia. Tunsil did not announce where he would play foot-ball during the game. He most likely announce where he will play college football on national signing day in Lake City. Wide receiver James Quick announced that he’d stay in his hometown and play for Louisville, which is fresh off a Sugar Bowl win over Florida. Quick scored on a 34yard touchdown pass from Jeremy Johnson for the East. The West went ahead 8-7 with just less than seven minutes to go when Max Browne, a Washington state high-school passing record-holder from Sammamish, Wash., completed a 16-yard TD pass to Derrick Griffin. Browne, a Southern Cal commit, followed with a 2-point conversion pass to tight end DeSean Smith, who has committed to LSU. Tigers’ Tunsil plays in 15-8 win in All-American game. BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Morris Marshall goes up over two Stan ton Prep defenders in the Tigers’ 48-47 win in District 4-6A play on Friday. Columbia dunks Devils in district By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High needed a final-possession stop against Stanton Prep on Friday and the Tigers’ Morris Marshall delivered with a blocked shot to help Columbia stay undefeated in District 4-6A play with a 48-47 win at home. The Tigers fell behind in the first quarter as the Devils got off to a hot shoot-ing start and Columbia didn’t take its first lead until 1:02 remaining in the first quarter after two free throws by Javonta Foster. Columbia led 13-12 after the period and went into the half with a 29-28 lead. The third quarter was a cold one for the Tigers, however, and Columbia trailed 38-35 heading into the final period. Columbia started the third quarter hot scoring the first six points of the period, but went cold allow-ing the Devils to end the third quarter on a 10-0 run. The Tigers’ biggest lead came when Dillan Hall con-nected on a three-point shot to put Columbia up 35-28 before the Tigers fell flat. Hall’s next three-point shot would tie the game back up at 42-42 with 6:02 remaining in the contest. From that point, it was a defensive struggle. Morris Marshall had a steal and dunk to give Columbia a 44-43 lead and repeated the process for a 46-43 lead with 3:13 remain-ing. Two-consecutive baskets from the Devils left the Tigers trailing 47-46 with 1:51 remaining in the contest. After exchanged possessions, Kevin Louder hit a fall-away jumper with a min-ute remaining in the game to give Columbia a 48-47 lead. Stanton Prep had a chance to win at the buzzer, but Marshall picked up his fifth block of the game and the Tigers were able to hold on for the win. Foster led all Tigers with 13 points in the contest, while Marshall finished with 10 points. Hall had eight points, Louder had seven and Dakarry Rossin finished with three points. Columbia (9-4, 5-0 district) travels to Wolfson High at 7 p.m. on Tuesday for a district showdown. Tigers hold on against Stanton Prep, 48-47. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Trey Marshall goes up for an intercep tion against Suwannee High last season. Marshall was one of two Tigers named first team a ll-state. CHS has four players on all-state teamBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High placed four Tigers on the all-state team released Friday. The team was voted upon by sports editors and writ-ers throughout the state. Laremy Tunsil was chosen as a first-team member for the offense at left tackle and Trey Marshall was cho-sen as a first-team member of the defense at safety. “For Laremy, it was a given for him,” Columbia head coach Brian Allen said. “He helped us do some things this fall. It was a well-deserved honor. He backed it up with his play.” For Allen, Marshall was one of the surprise mem-bers from the Tigers. “For me, Trey was a surprise,” he said. “He had a good season, but I don’t think it was his best season. It’s a humongous honor for him and the program. I think it solidifies Trey as our next big recruit after being named a member of the first team.” Marshall, Tunsil lead Tigers as 1st-team members. CHS continued on 6B

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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today AUTO RACING 2:30 a.m. NBCSN — Dakar Rally, stage 2, at Pisco, Peru (delayed tape) COLLEGE FOOTBALL 9 p.m. ESPN — GoDaddy.com Bowl, Kent St. vs. Arkansas St., at Mobile, Ala. GOLF 3 p.m. NBC — PGA Tour, Tournament of Champions, third round, at Kapalua, Hawaii 6 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Tournament of Champions, third round, at Kapalua, Hawaii MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 4:30 p.m. CBS — Temple at Kansas 5:30 p.m. NBCSN — Florida at Yale 8 p.m. FSN — Tulsa at SMU 10 p.m. FSN — Oregon at Oregon St. NFL 1 p.m. CBS — AFC Wild Card Game, Indianapolis at Baltimore 4:30 p.m. FOX — NFC Wild Card game, Seattle at Washington WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 5:30 p.m. FSN — Oklahoma St. at Baylor ——— Monday AUTO RACING 2 a.m. NBCSN — Dakar Rally, stage 3, Pisco to Nazca, Peru (delayed tape) COLLEGE FOOTBALL 8:30 p.m. ESPN — BCS National Championship, Notre Dame vs. Alabama, at Miami GOLF 4 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Tournament of Champions, final round, at Kapalua, Hawaii MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 6:30 p.m. ESPN2 — Notre Dame at Cincinnati NBA BASKETBALL 8 p.m. WGN — Cleveland at ChicagoFOOTBALLNFL postseason Wild-card Playoffs Saturday Cincinnati at HoustonMinnesota at Green Bay (n) Today Indianapolis at Baltimore, 1 p.m. (CBS) Seattle at Washington, 4:30 p.m. (FOX) Divisional Playoffs Saturday, Jan. 12 Baltimore, Indianapolis or Cincinnati at Denver, 4:30 p.m. (CBS) Washington, Seattle or Green Bay at San Francisco, 8 p.m. (FOX) Sunday, Jan. 13 Washington, Seattle or Minnesota at Atlanta, 1 p.m. (FOX) Baltimore, Indianapolis or Houston at New England, 4:30 p.m. (CBS) Conference Championships Sunday, Jan. 20 AFC, TBA (CBS)NFC, TBA (FOX) Pro Bowl Sunday, Jan. 27 At HonoluluAFC vs. NFC, 7 p.m. (NBC) Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 3 At New OrleansAFC champion vs. NFC champion, 6 p.m. (CBS)College bowl games New Mexico Bowl Arizona 49, Nevada 48Famous Idaho Potato BowlUtah State 41, Toledo 15 Poinsettia Bowl BYU 23, San Diego State 6 Beef ’O’ Brady’s Bowl UCF 38, Ball State 17 New Orleans Bowl Louisiana-Lafayette 43, E. Carolina 34 Las Vegas Bowl Boise State 28, Washington 26 Hawaii Bowl SMU 43, Fresno State 10 Little Caesars Pizza Bowl Central Michigan 24, W. Kentucky 21 Military Bowl San Jose State 29, Bowling Green 20 Belk Bowl Cincinnati 48, Duke 34 Holiday Bowl Baylor 49, UCLA 26 Independence Bowl Ohio 45, Louisiana-Monroe 14 Russell Athletic Bowl Virginia Tech 13, Rutgers 10, OT Meineke Car Care Bowl Texas Tech 34, Minnesota 31 Armed Forces Bowl Rice 33, Air Force 14 Fight Hunger Bowl Arizona State 62, Navy 28 Pinstripe Bowl Syracuse 38, West Virginia 14 Alamo Bowl Texas 31, Oregon State 27 Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl Michigan State 17, TCU 16 Music City Bowl Vanderbilt 38, N.C. State 24 Sun Bowl Georgia Tech 21, Southern Cal 7 Liberty Bowl Tulsa 31, Iowa State 17 Chick-fil-A Bowl Clemson 25, LSU 24 Heart of Dallas Bowl Oklahoma State 58, Purdue 14 Gator Bowl Northwestern 34, Mississippi State 20 Capital One Bowl Georgia 45, Nebraska 31 Outback Bowl South Carolina 33, Michigan 28 Rose Bowl Stanford 20, Wisconsin 14 Orange Bowl Florida State 31, N. Illinois 10 Sugar Bowl Louisville 33, Florida 23 Thursday Fiesta Bowl Oregon 35, Kansas State 17 Friday Cotton Bowl No. 10 Texas A&M 41, No. 12 Oklahoma 13 Saturday BBVA Compass Bowl Mississippi 38, Pittsburgh 17 Today GoDaddy.com Bowl At Mobile, Ala.Kent State (11-2) vs. Arkansas State (9-3), 9 p.m. (ESPN) Monday BCS National Championship At MiamiNotre Dame (12-0) vs. Alabama (12-1), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN) ——— Saturday, Jan. 19 East-West Shrine Classic At St. PetersburgEast vs. West, 4 p.m. (NFLN) Saturday, Jan. 26 Senior Bowl At Mobile, Ala.North vs. South, TBA (NFLN) FCS Championship Saturday North Dakota State 39, Sam Houston State 13BASKETBALLNBA schedule Today’s Games Oklahoma City at Toronto, 1 p.m.Washington at Miami, 6 p.m.Charlotte at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.Memphis at Phoenix, 8 p.m.Denver at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m. Monday’s Games Oklahoma City at Washington, 7 p.m.Boston at New York, 7:30 p.m.Cleveland at Chicago, 8 p.m.San Antonio at New Orleans, 8 p.m.Dallas at Utah, 9 p.m.Orlando at Portland, 10 p.m.Memphis at Sacramento, 10 p.m. AP Top 25 schedule Today’s Games No. 2 Michigan vs. Iowa, NoonNo. 6 Kansas vs. Temple, 4:30 p.m.No. 7 Syracuse at South Florida, Noon No. 9 Minnesota vs. Northwestern, 7 p.m. No. 13 Florida at Yale, 5:30 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04202BSPORTS BOWL ROUNDUP Manziel caps off Heisman year with Cotton Bowl win ASSOCIATED PRESSTexas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel celebrates with te ammates after their 41-13 win over Oklahoma in the Cotton Bowl on Friday in Arlington, Texas.Associated PressARLINGTON, Texas — At one point early in the Cotton Bowl, with “Johnny B. Goode” blaring through the stadium speakers, Heisman Trophy winner Johnny Manziel peeked up at the accompanying highlights on the huge video board hanging over the field. Texas A&M’s exciting dual-threat quarterback known as Johnny Football sure puts on a show worth watching. “Best player I’ve ever played. He does so many good things. He’s got magic,” Oklahoma defen-sive coordinator Mike Stoops said. “He’ll have a chance to win four (Heismans) if he stays healthy.” Manziel tiptoed down the sideline for a 23-yard TD on the game’s opening drive and went on to an FBS bowl record for quarterbacks with 229 yards rushing on 17 carries. He also set a Cotton Bowl record with 516 total yards as the 10th-ranked Aggies beat No. 12 Oklahoma 41-13 on Friday night to wrap up their first SEC season. With first-year coach Kevin Sumlin and their young star quarterback after leaving the Big 12 for the SEC, the Aggies (11-2) overwhelming won the only bowl game match-ing teams from those two power conferences. They won 11 games for the first time since 1998, their only Big 12 title season. The Aggies never trailed while winning their last six games and became the first SEC team with more than 7,000 total yards — 7,261 after gaining 633 in the Cotton Bowl. “It’s huge for this program, and for me especial-ly, with the kind of woes A&M has had over the past decade or however long it’s been since they had 11 wins,” Manziel said. “For us to get up tonight and watch them battle back, it’s good when we strike first. That’s what we like to do. It was good to do that and not really look back.”Mississippi 38, Pittsburgh 17BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — Bo Wallace threw three touchdown passes and Mississippi beat Pittsburgh 38-17 in the BBVA Compass Bowl on Saturday to com-plete an impressive turn-around under first-year coach Hugh Freeze. Ole Miss (7-6) took a five-win improvement over its 2-10 finish in 2011.North Dakota State 39, Sam Houston State 13FRISCO, Texas (AP) — Quarterback Brock Jensen ran for three touchdowns, Sam Ojuri scored twice and North Dakota State beat Sam Houston State 39-13 in a title-game rematch Saturday for its second straight FCS champion-ship. Jensen scored the goahead touchdown on a 1-yard sneak in the third quar-ter, and Ojuri had a 2-yard TD run on fourth-and-1 after the Bison (14-1) got the ball with a fourth-down stop. The Bearkats (11-4) had a 40-yard touchdown run by Tim Flanders brought back by a holding penalty on the first possession of the second half, and Brian Bell’s second interception on the next play led to Jensen’s go-ahead score. ASSOCIATED PRESSHouston Texans running back Arian Foster (23) is tackle d by Cincinnati Bengals defensive end Michael Johnson (93) during a NFL wild card play off game on Saturday in Houston. Texans open NFL playoffs with win over BengalsBy KRISTIE RIEKENAssociated PressHOUSTON — Arian Foster ran for 140 yards and a touchdown, and the Houston Texans used a stifling defensive effort for a 19-13 win over the Cincinnati Bengals on Saturday in an AFC wild-card playoff game. Foster became the first player in NFL history to have 100-yard games in each of his first three play-off games. The Texans (13-4) had trouble finishing drives all day and mustered only three field goals in the first half. Houston struck first after the break, with Foster scor-ing the game’s only offen-sive touchdown on a 1-yard run in the third quarter to make it 16-7.

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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013 3B3BSPORTS Alabama’s Saban returns to MiamiBy TIM REYNOLDSAssociated PressMIAMI — Nick Saban returned to his former NFL home and insisted he’s not looking for another one. The Alabama coach was back at Sun Life Stadium — where he coached the Miami Dolphins in 2005 and 2006 — for the BCS title game media day event Saturday. The sec-ond-ranked Crimson Tide (12-1) faces No. 1 Notre Dame (12-0) on Monday night there for the national title. Saban said he wasn’t feeling nostalgic by being back on the Dolphins’ turf, fur-ther adding that a return to the NFL is not tempting to him. “I don’t have any unfinished business in the NFL,” Saban said. “I have a job right now and I want to do the best job that I possibly can for this team, right now. ... That’s not something that I’m concerned about. It’s not something I’m thinking about; it’s not even some-thing that I want to do. I want to be a college coach.” Of course, Saban sometimes changes his mind. And nowhere has that been more chronicled than Miami. It was Dec. 21, 2006, when Saban spoke at the Dolphins’ facility after his team practiced and, after weeks of trying to denounce reports that Alabama intrigued him as “rumor and innuendo,” he offered his most emphatic denial of the entire process. “I guess I have to say it. I’m not going to be the Alabama coach,” Saban said that day, an oft-repeated quote. Less than two weeks later, Saban was the Alabama coach. So when he returned Saturday — the first time he was on the field at Sun Life in a working capacity since Christmas 2006 — Saban was predictably all about what’s looming for Alabama on Monday night. “I’m kind of excited for the opportunity that our team has,” Saban said. “It’s really about our team and this game. We’re always happy to come back to South Florida. We have some great relationships here and some very fond memories of being here. But right now, we’ve recruited and worked to develop this team for a long, long time, and it’s really a lot more about them being here ... than it is anything that’s hap-pened in my past.” Saban walked onto the field about 9:30 a.m. Saturday, not even seem-ing to take a look around at the facility where he went 9-7 in home games with the Dolphins. He walked down the visitors’ side-line to his assigned booth, shook a couple hands with game staff and spoke with reporters for an hour. “It’s good to be back,” said Alabama assistant coach Jeff Stoutland, a for-mer coach at the University of Miami — which also uses Sun Life as its home field. “But it’s a business trip for us. We’ve got a schedule and we’re stick-ing to that schedule.” The Dolphins went 610 in Saban’s final season in Miami, the only sub-.500 record that one of his teams has posted in his 19 seasons as a head coach. He lost 17 games in two seasons with the Dolphins; he’s lost 13 in nearly six full seasons with the Crimson Tide and is now trying for his third BCS national title in four seasons. “I’m not looking for new challenges,” Saban said. “I’m just trying to take advantage of helping the challenging situation that we have and continue to be successful.” ASSOCIATED PRESSAlabama head coach Nick Saban makes his way to a mic rophone as workers paint the field at Sun Life Stadium du ring Media Day for the BCS National Championship college football g ame Saturday in Miami. Alabama faces Notre Dame in Mond ay’s championship game. Saban will return to Miami for the ch ampionship game as the former coach of the city’s NFL Mia mi Dolphins. ASSOCIATED PRESSNotre Dame players watch from the stands during Media Da y for the BCS National Championship college football gam e Saturday in Miami. Notre Dame faces Alabama in Monday’s championship game.Nix, Tuitt a contrast in styles for Notre DameBy TIM REYNOLDSAssociated PressMIAMI — Louis Nix III is the talker. Stephon Tuitt is the thinker. Put them together, and you’ve got the start of quite a stout defensive line for top-ranked Notre Dame. Personality-wise, there would seem to be little that links the loquacious Nix and the church-quiet Tuitt. Yet both on and off the field, they find ways to click in just about every way imag-inable — and they’re gen-erally considered the two most productive defensive linemen on an Irish team that plays No. 2 Alabama on Monday night in the BCS title game. “Guys want to talk, I like to talk,” Nix said Saturday. “Tuitt, he just hits people. I think that’s the talking he does.” For the Irish, it works.Nix, Notre Dame’s stellar nose guard, leads the line with 45 tackles despite regularly seeing doubleteams, at minimum — and he was chosen as the team’s defensive lineman of the year. Tuitt had a breakout season, 42 tackles and a team-best 12 sacks from his defensive end spot, along with a fumble return for a score in the season-opening win over Navy. That seems so long ago. The Irish were unranked then, and now are not only No. 1 in the land, but one win away from maybe a most unlikely national title. “It’s exciting. I’m glad to be here,” Tuitt said. “It’s something we’ve worked for all year. We made it. We’ve worked hard for six weeks and we’re ready to come out and play.” So much about their personalities was made clear on Saturday when the Irish arrived at Sun Life Stadium for the BCS media day festivities. Tuitt took a spot inside a tent, his backpack obstruct-ing the number and name on the back of his jersey. Nix, on the other hand, stood outside the tent, sur-rounded by a half-dozen television cameras as he discussed the upcoming return of his reality show of sorts, a YouTube sen-sation he calls “Chocolate News” where he basically shows snippets of behind-the-scenes life at Notre Dame. “Chocolate News” has been on hiatus this fall, with Nix simply too busy because of football. “Hopefully I have one soon, depending on how this game goes,” Nix said, when asked when the next episode is coming. “If we win, I’ll be happy and I’ll have one out the next day.” Sitting nearby, Tuitt could hear his affable team-mate, and just grinned. “I’m just the person who’s just here,” Tuitt said. “I don’t really do that much talking.” Except on the field. That is, with his play — not even words there. “Tuitt? He doesn’t talk on the field at all,” Nix said. “No. He doesn’t talk on the field at all. Like, he’ll talk with us, talk with his team. He doesn’t talk at all.” It’s probably not a coincidence that Tuitt’s two high-est-tackle games this sea-son came in Notre Dame’s two closest escapes. He had seven tackles in a 20-13 overtime win over Stanford, and six stops in a 29-26 triple-overtime win against Pittsburgh. Between Heisman finalist Manti Te’o, Nix and Tuitt, Notre Dame’s offense gets to regularly go up against three of the toughest chal-lenges in the nation in practice. Don’t think that isn’t one of the reasons why the Irish have made it to Miami. “Going against guys like Manti and Tuitt and Louis and those guys, you have to be on your assign-ments,” offensive lineman Zack Martin said. “You have to be on your tech-nique or you’re going to get beat.”Tide players must put aside clutterAssociated PressMIAMI — Two days after team leaders held a players-only meeting, Alabama coach Nick Saban says the Crimson Tide’s performance in Monday’s BCS championship against Notre Dame will show a lot about whether his players have put aside the “clutter” that comes with their suc-cess. “You fight against human nature a little bit,” Saban said Saturday at media day for the title game. In the past, Saban has taken issue with the phrase “defending champions.” He delivered a message of moving on to his players two days after winning last season’s BCS title. He said the gist was: “You guys are not the national champions.” “Other than making you a target,” he said, “it doesn’t do anything for you.” Alabama is still the target. Tide players held the meeting because they want-ed their teammates to get more focused in practice. Two freshmen linebackers — who aren’t part of the playing rotation — were sent home Friday for cur-few violations. No. 2 Alabama is favored by more than a touch-down, which is OK with Fighting Irish coach Brian Kelly. “Somebody’s got to be an underdog,” Kelly said dur-ing his turn at the podium. “Alabama’s got the belt; they deserve to have the belt, and we’ve got to try to take it from them.” The Tide is seeking its third national title in four years. No. 1 Notre Dame has its own impressive collection but none since 1988. Kelly hopes to reach that same level Saban has achieved, ensuring that this isn’t a one-time opportunity. “Your program is defined in consistency, and Alabama is that model,” he said. “I concede to that. It’s where we want to be. We want to be back here next year. “There’s been some commentators that talk about, ‘Is Notre Dame for real?’ Well, for me, we’re for real because we’re here. We’ve won all our games.”Kelly not paying attention to NFL teamsMIAMI — Brian Kelly says leaving Notre Dame “isn’t an option.” Alabama’s Nick Saban says he has no “unfinished business” in the NFL. While Oregon coach Chip Kelly ponders which NFL job — if any — he wants, the coaches getting ready to meet in the BCS cham-pionship said during media day at Sun Life Stadium that they have no interest in jumping to the pros. Brian Kelly is in his third season with the top-ranked Fighting Irish and has led them to an undefeated sea-son. Notre Dame will try to win its first national cham-pionship since 1988 by beating No. 2 Alabama on Monday night. The 51-year-old Kelly has steadily climbed the coaching ladder, from Grand Valley State to Central Michigan to Cincinnati to Notre Dame, winning big at every stop along the way. The next logical step would be the NFL, but for now, he said he has no desire to give it a try. “Leaving is not an option. I don’t even think about it,” he said Saturday. Chip Kelly is being courted by the Cleveland Browns, Philadelphia Eagles and Buffalo Bills. There haven’t been the same type of rumors and speculation about Brian Kelly.

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4B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04204BSportsTigers hang on BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Marquise Harrell (floor) signals for a timeout during the final minute of the Tigers’ 48-47 win against Stanton Prep on Friday in Lake City. BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Javonta Foster guards an inbound pass in the Tigers’ 48-47 win over Stanton Prep. BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Wayne Broom attempts a shot against Stanto n Prep on Friday. BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Dakarry Rossin (right) puts up a shot during the final few minutes against Stanton Prep on Friday. BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Akeem Williams (11) is trapped by two Stanton Prep defenders during the Tigers’ 48-47 win on Friday.

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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013 5B5BSports BRIEFS PREP SPORTS Deadlines for non-traditionals Non-traditional students (home-school, charter schools, FHSAA non-member private schools, special schools, Florida virtual schools) must declare intentions to try out for public school sports. The deadline to declare for softball and Classes 1A-2A track and field is Monday. For details, call John Wilson at (352) 317-5865. ADULT SOFTBALL Winter league sign-up ongoing An adult softball winter league will begin on Jan. 21. Women, men and co-ed leagues will be offered. Registration deadline is Friday. For details, call Pete Bonilla at 623-6561. ZUMBA Beginner, weight loss class today A Zumba beginner class and weight loss contest will be offered at Teen Town today. The Zumba beginner class is 3-4 p.m., with the weight loss contest starting at 4 p.m. For details, call Sarah Sandlin at 758-0009. YOUTH BASEBALL North Florida Outlaws tryouts The North Florida Outlaws 8U travel machine pitch baseball team will have tryouts at 1 p.m. Saturday at the Southside Baseball Complex blue fields. For details, call Tommy Boston at 965-9311.Lake City Babe Ruth registration Lake City Babe Ruth Baseball’s online registration for its spring league is at lcccyb.com For details, call Jessica Langley at 867-1897. YOUTH SOFTBALL Spring sign-up is under way The Girls Softball Associaton of Columbia County has registration open for its spring softball season for girls ages 4-17. Sign-up is at Brian’s Sports or Impact Zone. Cost is $55 for a single player and $75 for siblings. Registration deadline is Feb. 1, but a $10 savings is offered for sign-ups before Jan. 18. For details, call 755-4271.Q From staff reports ASSOCIATED PRESSDuke’s Ryan Kelly drives past Wake Forest’s Amaud Will iam Adala Moto (45) and Travis McKie during the first h alf of an NCAA college basketball game in Durham, N.C. on Saturday .Duke remains undefeatedAssociated PressDURHAM, N.C. — Ryan Kelly scored a season-high 22 points in No. 1 Duke’s 80-62 rout of Wake Forest on Saturday. Seth Curry also had 22 points and Quinn Cook had a career-high 14 assists for the Blue Devils (14-0, 1-0), who shot 46 percent in their Atlantic Coast Conference opener and hit 11 3-pointers — including six during the 25-7 first-half run that put them up big. They pushed their lead well into the 20s with a Curry-led 18-6 run out of the break in which they scored on nine of their first 10 possessions. Travis McKie had 22 points and 11 rebounds for Wake Forest (7-6, 0-1), which had nearly as many turnovers (19) as field goals (23) and had its three-game winning streak snapped.No. 11 ILLINOIS 74, No. 8 OHIO STATE 55CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Brandon Paul scored 19 points as Illinois bounced back from a tough loss in its Big Ten opener. The Illini (14-2, 1-1 Big Ten) led 37-25 at halftime and used a 13-2 run early in the second half to build a 50-27 lead. Illinois used stingy defense to shut down the Buckeyes (11-3, 1-1), who shot just 33 percent from the field and turned the ball over 16 times. Deshaun Thomas led Ohio State with 24 points. Sophomore center Nnanna Egwu had 16 points and a game-high eight rebounds for the Illini. point guard Tracy Abrams added 13 points and five assists, while reserve Joseph Bertrand scored 12 points. Illinois came into the game off a stunning 68-61 loss at Purdue in its Big Ten opener, and had lost two of its last three. MARQUETTE 49, No. 15 GEORGETOWN 48MILWAUKEE — Davante Gardner made two free throws with 8.3 seconds left and Marquette had to hang on while Georgetown missed a deciding free throw. With Marquette leading 49-46, Greg Whittington of the Hoyas was fouled by Trent Lockett on a base-line 3-point shot with 2.3 seconds left. He made the first two free throws and after Marquette coach Buzz Williams called a timeout, hit the front of the rim on the final attempt. Lockett grabbed the rebound, but missed two free throws and the game ended without the Hoyas attempting a final shot. Lockett and Vander Blue had 12 points each for the Golden Eagles. Marquette (11-3, 2-0 Big East) has won four consec-utive games. Georgetown (10-2, 0-1) had its seven-game winning streak snapped in its first road game of the season. Markel Starks had 14 of his 18 points in the second half while Whittington and Otto Porter added 13 each for the Hoyas.No. 16 CREIGHTON 79, INDIANA STATE 66OMAHA, Neb. — Doug McDermott had 25 points and nine rebounds, and Creighton used a 19-4 run to break open a close game in the second half. The Bluejays (14-1, 3-0) have won eight straight and are off to their best start in Missouri Valley Conference play since 2003-04. The Sycamores (9-5, 2-1) lost for the 14th straight time in Omaha since 1999. Gregory Echenique had 16 points and nine rebounds to just miss his fourth dou-ble-double in eight games. He scored inside to tie it 51-51 with 10 minutes left and gave the Bluejays the lead when he dunked Grant Gibbs’ alley-oop pass. Jake Odum and Manny Arop scored 13 points apiece and Justin Gant added 12 for the Sycamores, who made just 9 of 18 free throws in the second half.No. 17 BUTLER 57, NEW ORLEANS 44INDIANAPOLIS — Kellen Dunham scored 15 points and Khyle Marshall added 13 to lead Butler. The Bulldogs (12-2) are 7-0 at home this sea-son and will take a nine-game winning streak into their Atlantic 10 debut Wednesday night at Saint Joseph’s. The Privateers (310) were led by Lovell Cook with 11 points and Traddarius McPhearson with 10. But they have lost five straight, are 0-6 in true road games this season and have dropped 15 consecu-tive road games against Division I opponents. Their last win over a Top 25 team came against No. 21 North Carolina State on Nov. 18, 2007. The Bulldogs used a 9-3 run to close the half for a 24-18 lead.No. 18 MICHIGAN ST. 84, PURDUE 61EAST LANSING, Mich. — Freshman Gary Harris scored a season-high 22 points and Michigan State used a 28-7 run in the sec-ond half to pull away. The Spartans (12-3, 1-1 Big Ten) missed their first 10 shots from the field after halftime, but it didn’t much matter in what quickly became a free throw con-test. Michigan State fin-ished 18 of 22 from the line, and the Boilermakers were 9 of 20 — including 6 of 16 in the second half. Branden Dawson had 14 points and 11 rebounds for the Spartans, who bounced back from a loss at Minnesota in their con-ference opener. A.J. Hammons scored 20 points for the Boilermakers (7-7, 1-1), who were com-ing off a win over No. 11 Illinois.No. 21 NOTRE DAME 93, SETON HALL 74SOUTH BEND, Ind. — Scott Martin had a season-high 22 points on a career-high six 3-pointers and Jack Cooley added 19 points and 13 rebounds to lead Notre Dame to its 11th straight win. The winning streak is the second-longest for the Irish (13-1, 1-0 Big East) in 13 seasons under coach Mike Brey. The loss ended a seven-game winning streak for Seton Hall (12-3, 1-1). Seton Hall, playing with only eight scholarship players available because of injuries, kept the game close until the Irish finished the first half on a 7-2 spurt, then opened the second half with a 16-4 run to move ahead 60-41. Fuquan Edwin and Aaron Cosby had 21 points each for the Pirates.No. 25 KANSAS STATE 73, No. 22 OKLAHOMA STATE 67MANHATTAN, Kan. — Rodney McGruder scored all but two of his 28 points in the second half and Kansas State turned away a game effort from fresh-man Marcus Smart and Oklahoma State. McGruder was 10 of 13 from the field and hit all five of his 3-pointers after the break, including two in the closing minutes. The first answered seven straight points by the Cowboys, and the second gave the Wildcats (12-2, 1-0 Big 12) a 70-65 lead with 1:37 left in coach Bruce Weber’s Big 12 debut. Nino Williams added a career-best 17 points for Kansas State, which beat the Cowboys for the third straight time. Smart scored on an assortment of driving layups, pull-up jumpers and free throws for a season-best 25 points. Markel Brown added 19 points for the Cowboys (10-3, 0-1).RUTGERS 67, No. 24 PITTSBURGH 62PISCATAWAY, N.J. — Eli Carter scored 23 points and Rutgers held off a second-half rally to hand Pittsburgh its second straight loss. The victory was the first for Rutgers coach Mike Rice since returning from a three-game school-imposed suspension for inappropri-ate behavior earlier this week. The Scarlet Knights (103, 1-1 Big East) led by 14 points at halftime only to see the Panthers (12-3, 0-2) twice close the gap to two points in the final 5 min-utes, the last time at 55-53 with 3:24 to play. Carter hit a 10-footer in the lane with 2:53 to go and Dane Miller added two free throws after two missed 3-pointers by Pitt to secure the game.

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6B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 6BSPORTS Same Day Service Open Saturday See Now Pay Later with financing available through Lake City Lake City Commons Center (Publix Shopping) 752-3733 BUY 1 Pair Eyeglasses I ncludes lenses & frames. Some Restrictions Apply. COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES JANUARY 31, 2013 Where you get the Best for Less Credit approval required. See store for details. GET 1 Pair FREE E YE EXAM S by Independent Optometrist CHS: Four Tigers named all-state Continued From Page 1B Running back Ronald Timmons and right tackle Deonte Crumitie were also named to the all-state team as third-team members. Timmons was a no-brain er for the coach after break ing the teams all-time sin gle-season rushing record, but it wasnt until this year that Allen knew Timmons would be a special player. It was a special season, one that Im not sure look ing back two years ago that I thought could have been possible, Allen said. This last year, I watched him grow. Before that, he made some bone-headed deci sions. Now, hes done things the right way and hes reap ing the benefits of it. Crumitie was another surprise for the coach and a player he expects even more out of next season. Crumitie played well this season, and deserves the recognition, Allen said. But despite having four players on the team, Allen believes the Tigers had a few other players deserving of the honor. Im not sure how it works as I only had one guy call me for input, Allen said. Having four guys is a lot, but I thought we should have had a few more. You have guys like our freshman corner Roger Cray that didnt even get an honorable mention. We leave off guys like Jayce (Barber), Felix (Woods), Terry (Calloway), Shaq (Johnson) and (Darren) Birch that I thought were all deserving. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Columbia Highs Trey Marshall makes an interception against St. Augustine High in the playoffs. Marshall was a first-team all-state selection. Tigers earn all-state honors JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Columbia Highs Ronald Timmons was one of four Tigers named to the Class 6A all-state team. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Columbia Highs Laremy Tunsil was named a first-team all-state selection. JASON MATTEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Columbia Highs Roger Cray was a player head coach Brian Allen said deserved all-state honors.

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By STEPHEN OHLEMACHERAssociated PressWASHINGTON — Tucked into the “fiscal cliff” tax package approved by Congress are billions of dollars in tax breaks that should make the new year a lot happier for businesses of many stripes, includ-ing film producers, race track owners and the makers of electric motorcycles. In all, more than 50 temporary tax breaks were renewed through 2013, saving businesses and indi-viduals about $76 billion. Congress routinely renews the tax package, attracting intense lobbying — and campaign donations — from busi-nesses and trade groups that say the tax breaks help them prosper and create jobs. Businesses have grown used to many of the longstanding tax breaks, but they also have had to get used to the uncertainty of whether they will be renewed each year. This time around the tax breaks were allowed to expire at the end of 2011 as lawmakers struggled to reach consensus on a wide range of tax issues. The package passed by Congress this week and signed by President Barack Obama renews the tax breaks retroactively, so taxpayers can claim them on both their 2012 and 2013 tax returns. The biggest of the bunch, a tax credit for research and develop-ment, helps U.S. manufacturers compete against foreign compe-tition, according to the National Association of Manufacturers. Another provision helps restau-rants and retailers expand by allow-ing them to more quickly write off the costs, according to the National Restaurant Association. These provisions have widespread support in Congress; oth-ers are more obscure. For example, there is a tax credit for producing electricity from wind mills, a tax credit for buying elec-tric-powered motorcycles, and tax rebates to Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands from a tax on rum imported into the United States. Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., said the package is filled with “special-interest handouts” that make it difficult for him to justify his vote in favor of it. “It’s hard to think of anything that could feed the cynicism of the American people more than lard-ing up must-pass emergency leg-islation with giveaways to special interests and campaign contribu-tors,” McCain said. Lawmakers are wary of making the tax breaks permanent because of the cost, even though they inevi-tably renew almost all of them each year. Annual angst over whether the tax breaks will be renewed also provides incentives for businesses to lobby key lawmakers. “All these provisions have a lobbying arm behind them, for the most part,” said Mark Luscombe, principal tax analyst for CCH, a con-sulting firm based in Riverwoods, Ill. “If they only extend them for a year or two then the lobbyists have to keep coming back and bestow-ing their favors on congressmen to get the thing extended again. If they made it permanent, then the lobbyists would go away.” Among the provisions in the new law are: — A tax credit for research and development, benefiting a wide range of industries, including man-ufacturers, pharmaceutical com-panies and high tech companies. Cost: $14.3 billion. — An exemption that allows banks, insurance companies and other financial firms to shield for-eign profits from being taxed by the U.S. The tax break is important to major multinational banks and financial firms. Cost: $11.2 billion. — A tax break that allows profitable companies to write off large capital expenditures immediate-ly — rather than over time — T he new 2013 Suwannee River Valley Vacation Guide has arrived. Tourist Development Department staff will be visiting area businesses in the upcoming weeks to distribute the new edition of our 52-page tri-county vacation guide, which was designed and printed by the Lake City Reporter The guides are a useful tool for real estate offices, waiting rooms at doctor offices and other medical facilities. The guides are packed 235 to a case. If you are interested in having a supply delivered to your office, please call 758-1312 or email our office at tdc@columbiacountyfla.com. In addition, the Suwannee River Valley Vacation Guide will be an insert in the Sunday, Jan. 13, edition of the Reporter Big plans for sportsAs we noted this past month, Columbia County and the Suwannee River Valley will have hosted approximately 34 tournaments during 2012. The last was both a baseball and softball tournament during the weekend of Dec. 1-2. We already have 14 events booked for 2013, and plans are under way to upgrade elements of the Southside Recreation Complex to include new bleachers, additional parking, upgraded lights, landscaping, additional rest room and concession buildings, ADA compliant sidewalks and upgrades to the turf and playing surfaces on many of the complex’s 30 baseball, softball and soccer fields.A new look for TDC vanWe are pleased to announce that a new wrap design has been installed on our county marketing van. Utilized for brochure deliveries and a tool at many of our tourism consumer shows, the new graphics were designed by marketing director Paulette Lord and produced/installed by Media Works in Jacksonville with the old wrap removed.State parks activeFlorida State Parks continue to provide big business for our area The Suwannee River Valley counts 10 state parks as part of our tri-county area. During the 2011-12 fiscal year (which ended June 30), attendance at the 10 parks totaled 464,750, with Ichetucknee Springs being the biggest draw with 148,213 visitors, followed by Stephen Good 2012,better2013 Lake City Reporter Week of January 6-12, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section C Columbia, Inc. Your marketplace source for Lake City and Columbia County1CColumbia Inc.By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comT he economy hasn’t flourished as in past years and unemploy-ment rates are only now returning to normal, but local job service provid-ers say employment opportunities are available locally. Denise Wynne, Florida Crown Workforce Career Center lead employer services representa-tive at the Lake City of fice, said recent Florida Crown Workforce Board Region VII data shows that the number of positions available in Region VII, posted on Employ Florida, was at least 138. Wynne said she has noticed an increased amount of activity by job seekers at the local workforce center since the beginning of 2013. “We have been extremely busy,” she said. “The economy has not been where we would like to see it, but there are jobs available. There are jobs out there and we can help people find them.” The Florida Crown Workforce Board Region VII office pro-vides services for residents in Columbia, Dixie, Gilchrist and Union counties who are seeking employment. Services are avail-able for people 18 years old and older, free of charge. However, cli-ents must register. Florida Crown Workforce Board Region VII has offices in Lake City, Trenton and Old Town. Wynne said statistics indicate at least 64 people apply for every position that is posted. Last month, the Region VII office was awarded fourth place in the state among the 10 workforce regions for providing job place-ments in December. According to Florida Crown Workforce Board Region VII data, the agency placed 91 people with jobs in December. “We try very hard to place our job seekers,” Wynne said. “You hear people talk a lot about how there are no jobs out there. This just goes to show there are jobs out there, and we do work very hard to place people in those jobs.” Florida Crown Workforce Board is part of the state workforce net-work. Not only does the agency work to place job seekers with employment opportunities, it also helps employers find potential job candidates. “We’re here to assist with providing services to the job seekers and employers in the state of Florida,” Wynne said. The Florida Crown Workforce Board facility in Columbia County, 1389 U.S. 90, Suite 170, is opened 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday (closed noon to 1 p.m. for lunch). The facility’s resource room closes daily at 4:30 p.m. “All of the career managers do an assessment with the custom-ers,” Wynne said. “They sit down in a one-on-one setting and assess the customer’s strengths and weak-nesses and do some planning and goal-setting with that customer. It’s not just a cookiecutter approach. Each customer is treated as an individual and given their own game plan based on their needs.” The Florida Crown Workforce Board provides a variety of ser-vices and programs designed to employ residents. The agency programs include:Q Veteran Employment Services (for incarcerated as well as non-incarcerated veterans), Q Re-Employment Assistance (assisting displaced workers in get-ting back to work quickly), Q Resource Room (assists clients in getting registered in the Employ Florida market place sys-tem on computer; jobs referrals are also available), Q Welfare Transition (helps clients with disabilities, and classes are available to teach clients inter-view and other job-preparation skills), Q Workforce Investment Act (provides training for youth, adult and dislocated workers; also pro-vides employer working training for employees needing increased certification to keep their jobs), Q Employer Service Center (assists employers with recruiting, training and hiring), Q Resume Writing classes; and Q Computer training classes. Jobs available locally TONY BRITT/Lake City ReporterQiana Robinson, of Lake City, left, talks to Denise Wynne, Flo rida Crown Workforce Career Center employer services representative, in the agency’s digital lab as Rob inson prepares to take the Career Scope Interest and Aptitu de Assessment.tests. Increased activity among job seekers as new year begins. COUNTY TOURISM Harvey Campbell386-758-1397 TOURISM continued on 3C BREAKS continued on 2C EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES Many breaks for businesses in new tax law ASSOCIATED PRESSTucked into the “fiscal cliff” tax package approved by C ongress are billions of dollars in tax breaks for businesses, including a tax c redit for the production of wind, solar and other renewable energy.

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2C LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF JANUARY 6, 2013 2CBIZ/MOTLEY By MARY CLARE JALONICKAssociated PressWASHINGTON — The Food and Drug Administration on Friday proposed the most sweep-ing food safety rules in decades, requiring farm-ers and food companies to be more vigilant in the wake of deadly outbreaks in peanuts, cantaloupe and leafy greens. The long-overdue regulations are aimed at reducing the estimated 3,000 deaths a year from foodborne ill-ness. Just since last sum-mer, outbreaks of listeria in cheese and salmonella in peanut butter, mangoes and cantaloupe have been linked to more than 400 illnesses and as many as seven deaths, according to the Centers for Disease Control. The actual num-ber of those sickened is likely much higher. The FDA’s proposed rules would require farm-ers to take new precautions against contamination, to include making sure work-ers’ hands are washed, irri-gation water is clean, and that animals stay out of fields. Food manufacturers will have to submit food safety plans to the gov-ernment to show they are keeping their operations clean. Many responsible food companies and farmers are already following the steps that the FDA would now require them to take. But officials say the require-ments could have saved lives and prevented illness-es in several of the large-scale outbreaks that have hit the country in recent years. In a 2011 outbreak of listeria in cantaloupe that claimed 33 lives, for exam-ple, FDA inspectors found pools of dirty water on the floor and old, dirty process-ing equipment at Jensen Farms in Colorado where the cantaloupes were grown. In a peanut butter outbreak this year linked to 42 salmonella illnesses, inspectors found samples of salmonella through-out Sunland Inc.’s peanut processing plant in New Mexico and multiple obvi-ous safety problems, such as birds flying over uncov-ered trailers of peanuts and employees not washing their hands. Under the new rules, companies would have to lay out plans for preventing those sorts of problems, monitor their own progress on those safety efforts and explain to the FDA how they would correct them. “The rules go very directly to preventing the types of outbreaks we have seen,” said Michael Taylor, FDA’s deputy commissioner for foods. The FDA estimates the new rules could prevent almost 2 million illnesses annually, but it could be several years before the rules are actually prevent-ing outbreaks. Taylor said it could take the agency another year to craft the rules. ASSOCIATED PRESSCantaloupes lay in a field at Jensen Farms near Hol ly, Colo., the source of a 2011 salmonella outbreak. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Friday proposed the most swe eping food safety rules in decades, requiring farmers and food companies to be more vigilant about food-borne dise ases. BREAKS: Special deductions, credits total $76B Continued From Page 1Cgiving some companies huge tax shelters. The tax break, known as bonus depreciation, benefits auto-makers, utilities and heavy equip-ment makers. Cost: $5 billion. — A tax credit for the production of wind, solar and other renewable energy. Cost: $12.2 billion. — A provision that allows restaurants and retail stores to more quickly write off the cost of improve-ments. Cost: $3.7 billion. — Increased tax rebates to Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands from a tax on rum imported into the United States. The U.S. imposes a $13.50 per proof-gallon tax on imported rum, and sends most of the proceeds to the two U.S. territories. Cost: $222 million. — A 50 percent tax credit for expenses related to railroad track maintenance through 2013. Cost $331 million. — A provision that allows motorsport race tracks to more quickly write off improvement costs. Cost: $78 million. — Enhanced deductions for companies that donate food to the needy, books to public schools or comput-ers to public libraries. Cost: $314 million. — A tax break that allows TV and movie productions to more quickly write off expenses. Sexually explic-it productions are ineligible. Cost: $248 million. — A tax credit of up to $2,500 for buying electric-powered vehicles was expanded to include electric-powered motorcycles. Golf carts, however, were excluded. Cost: $7 million. Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., took credit for this tax break, say-ing it would help Oregon-based Brammo, which manufactures elec-tric motorcycles. “The electric motorcycle industry is poised to create tens of thousands of U.S. jobs over the next five years, led by companies like Oregon’s Brammo,” Wyden said. “This amend-ment helps promote the develop-ment of a promising U.S. industry and support the transition to a low-carbon American economy.” New food safety rules proposed Google emerges from FTC probe relatively unscathedBy MICHAEL LIEDTKEAP Technology WriterSAN FRANCISCO — Google has settled a U.S. government probe into its business practices without making any major concessions on how the company runs its Internet search engine, the world’s most influential gateway to digital information and commerce. Thursday’s agreement with the Federal Trade Commission covers only some of the issues raised in a wide-ranging antitrust investigation that could have culminated in a regulatory crackdown that re-shapes Internet search, advertising and mobile computing. But the FTC didn’t find any reason to impose radi-cal changes, to the relief of Google and technology trade groups worried about overzealous regulation dis-couraging future innovation. The resolution disappointed consumer rights groups and Google rivals such as Microsoft Corp., which had lodged complaints with regulators in hopes of legal action that would split up or at least hobble the Internet’s most powerful company. Google is still trying to settle a similar antitrust probe in Europe. A resolu-tion to that case is expected to come within weeks. After a 19-month investigation, Google Inc. pla-cated the FTC by agreeing to a consent decree that will require the company to charge “fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory” prices to license hundreds of patents deemed essential to the operations of mobile phones, tablet computers, laptops and video game players. The requirement is meant to ensure that Google doesn’t use patents acquired in last year’s $12.4 billion purchase of Motorola Mobility to thwart compe-tition from mobile devices running on software other than Google’s Android sys-tem. The products vying against Android include Apple Inc.’s iPhone and iPad, Research in Motion Ltd.’s BlackBerry. ASSOCIATED PRESSGoogle is pledging to license hundreds of key paten ts to mobile computing rivals under more reasonable terms and to curb the use of snippets from other websites in Internet sea rch results in a settlement that ends a high-profile antitrust pro be.

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By MAE ANDERSONAP Retail WriterNEW YORK — A lastminute surge in spending saved the holiday shopping season. Major retailers including Costco, Gap and Nordstrom on Thursday reported bet-ter-than-expected revenue in December. That comes as a relief for stores, which can make up to 40 percent of their annual revenue in the last two months of the year. Americans spent cautiously early in the season as the Northeast recov-ered from Superstorm Sandy. Then they held back because of fears that the U.S. economy would fall off the “fiscal cliff,” triggering massive budget cuts and tax increases that would have amounted to less money in their pock-ets. But shoppers spent more freely in the final shopping days of the year. Twenty retailers reported that revenue at stores open at least a year — an indicator of a store’s health — rose an average of 4.5 percent in December com-pared with the same month a year ago, according to the International Council of Shopping Centers. That’s on the high end of the expected range of 4 per-cent to 4.5 percent. Only a small group of stores that represent about 13 percent of the $2.4 trillion U.S. retail industry report monthly revenue, but the data offers a snapshot of consumer spending. “I wouldn’t be doing cartwheels that it was a particularly great or strong holiday season, but it could have been worse given the headwinds,” said Ken Perkins, president of RetailMetrics, a research firm. “The government and Mother Nature were not as cooperative as retailers would have liked. But it was definitely not as bad as feared.” December’s results provide a brighter picture than reports last month that proclaimed that the holiday shopping season was shaping up to be the worst since 2008 when the U.S. was in a deep reces-sion. To be sure, the season had multiple fits and starts, with healthy spending dur-ing certain periods fol-lowed by stretches of tepid sales. Overall, revenue for the combined months of November and December rose 3.1 percent, roughly on par with the 3 percent rise that the ICSC had pre-dicted. Sales were weak at the beginning of November in the wake of Superstorm Sandy and the distraction of the U.S. presidential cam-paign, followed by a surge later in the month during the four-day Thanksgiving weekend. Spending fell off after that until a rush before and after Christmas when some stores began offering bigger discounts. Nordstrom, for instance, had a particularly strong December, with revenue at stores open at least a year up 8.6 percent, more than double the 3.4 per-cent analysts expected. The Seattle-based depart-ment store operator said revenue was particularly strong in the last week of the season. “That last-minute shopping, coupled with post-Christmas bargain hunting and early gift-card redemp-tion, helped propel sales at the end of the month,” said Michael P. Niemira, ICSC’s chief economist. Kelly Tenedini, 35, decided to pick up some “fill-er” gifts for her mom and her sister on the Sunday before Christmas at the Target in the Edgewood Retail District in Atlanta. Tenedini, who spent about $400 during the season, bought a sweater for her mom and gloves for her mother and sister that day. LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF JANUARY 6, 2013 3CFarm bill evidence of lost cloutBy MARY CLARE JALONICKAssociated PressWASHINGTON — A patchwork extension of federal farm programs passed as part of a larg-er “fiscal cliff” bill keeps the price of milk from rising but doesn’t include many of the goodies that farm-state lawmakers are used to getting for their rural districts. House and Senate Agriculture Committee leaders who spent more than a year working on a half-trillion-dollar, five-year farm bill that would keep subsidies flowing had to accept in the final hours a slimmed-down, nine-month extension of 2008 law with few extras for anyone. With the new Congress opening Thursday, they’ll have to start the farm bill process over again, most likely with even less money for agriculture programs this year and the recognition that farm interests have lost some of the political clout they once held. “I think there’s a lot of hurt feelings, that all of this time and energy was put into it and you’ve got nothing to show for it,” said Roger Johnson, president of the National Farmers Union. Senate Agriculture Committee Chairwoman Debbie Stabenow, D-Mich., said it even more blunt-ly on the Senate floor just after she learned that the bare-bones extension would be part of the fiscal cliff deal. “There is no way to explain this,” she said angrily as the deal came together New Year’s Eve. “None. There is absolutely no way to explain this other than agriculture is just not a priority.” After Congress failed to pass a farm bill earlier last year, the legislation became tangled in the end-of-the-year fiscal cliff talks as dairy subsidies were set to expire Jan. 1 and send the price of milk to $6 or $7 a gallon, double cur-rent prices. The White House and congressional leaders nego-tiating the fiscal cliff had agreed that the bill would somehow have to avert that “dairy cliff,” but it was uncertain how. Hoping to salvage some of their work, Stabenow and House Agriculture Committee Chairman Frank Lucas, R-Okla., crafted a last-minute extension of 2008 farm law to add to the fiscal cliff package, including help for their own state inter-ests: fruit and vegetable growers plentiful in Michigan, and more than $600 million in emergency money for livestock producers who were affected by drought, a priority for Lucas. In addi-tion to averting the milk price spike, their bill also contained an overhaul of dairy programs, a priority for House Agriculture’s top Democrat, Collin Peterson of Minnesota. The extension Stabenow and Lucas crafted cost around $1 bil-lion — an amount too high and too risky for House and Senate leaders negotiating the broader fiscal cliff deal. According to aides familiar with the talks, the White House and congressional leaders wanted a farm bill extension with no major policy changes or new spending that could subject the entire fiscal cliff bill to opposi-tion. Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky added a bare-bones version of a farm bill extension that didn’t include money for any of the agri-culture leaders’ top priorities and renewed other farm programs without any new funding. The result, the aides said, was a farm bill extension that would keep major programs going but didn’t spend any new money. Missing were dollars for some organic programs, environmental programs and several different energy programs for encourag-ing renewable fuels. Many of those programs were renewed, but without any money. The reaction from farm-state lawmakers was swift. Stabenow went to the Senate floor called the new bill “absolutely outra-geous.” Peterson said farm-state leaders had been “disrespected.” Stabenow, as well as Lucas, ended up voting for it, Peterson against. The National Farmers Union issued a statement saying it was “left out in the cold.” The long-powerful National Corn Growers Association’s statement said the group is “tired of the endless excuses and lack of accountabil-ity.” Direct payments, a subsidy that costs $5 billion annually and is paid to farmers whether they farm or not, were retained in the agreement. Both a Senate bill passed in June and a House Agriculture Committee bill passed in July had cut those pay-ments after a consensus in the farm community that those sub-sidies would be eliminated and redirected. “That is amazing to me, I have to say. That is absolutely amazing to me. I want to hear someone justify that on the Senate floor,” Stabenow said. ASSOCIATED PRESSDairy cows wait to be miled on a farm in Nashville, Ill. A patchwork extension of federal farm programs passed as part of a larger “fiscal cliff” bill keeps the price of milk from rising but doesn’t include many of the goodi es that farm-state lawmakers are used to getting for their rural di stricts. Extension of 2008 programs falls short of expectations.Foster at 108,019. According to the Florida Park Service, the 10 parks have 52 full-time employees and a payroll of $2,049,300, including part-time seasonal staff. During the 2011-12 fiscal year, total revenues for Florida’s 161 state parks was $52.5 million with an economic impact of $1.16 billion for the state’s economy. Total visitation statewide was 25 million. Florida State Parks were more than 64.3 percent self-sustaining in funding, which primarily comes from gate receipts and revenues from campgrounds and cabin rentals.Bed tax collections and occupancy rates are upAccording to the Florida Department of Revenue, Local Option Tourist Development Tax (“bed tax”) collections for the 10-month period of January through October 2012 were $529,660, compared to $505,415 in the same period of 2011, an increase of $24,660 (4.7 percent). Columbia County currently has a 3 percent bed tax rate, while Alachua County (Gainesville) and Lowndes County (Valdosta, Ga.) are both at 5 percent. According to Smith Travel Research, the room occupancy rate is up 14.5 percent for 2012, with average daily rate up 1.9 percent and total room revenues up 13.3 percent.2013 brings changes to local lodging industryOn behalf of the Columbia County Tourist Development Council and our staff, we’d like to express our hopes that all of you enjoy a safe, prosperous and healthy New Year. 2013 has already brought several changes to our local industry as Daryl Eadie, General Manager of the Cabot Lodge, has left our community and will continue in the hospitality industry in Nashville, Tenn. Daryl worked here with Mississippi Management (MMI) for nearly 30 years as restaurant manager at the Boarding House Restaurant inside the former Holiday Inn/Quality Inn property. He later was the General Manager of the motel and moved over to the Cabot Lodge when the old property was demolished. A familiar face is taking the place of Daryl at Cabot Lodge as former Holiday Inn/Quality Inn General Manager John Parker is returning to Lake City. John was in Lake City for approximately 16 years prior to moving to moving to run MMI’s Cabot Lodge in Gainesville and most recently having moved to run an MMI property in Jacksonville. The other change in our lodging industry is a change of “flags” at one of our hotels. The former Jameson Inn of Lake City officially becomes a Quality Inn property in early January. New members of TDC board announcedA warm welcome to incoming Lake City Councilman Zack Paulk who was appointed by the City Council to serve as its representative on the TDC board. In addition, we’d like to express our appreciation to former City Councilman Jake Hill for his four years of service on the board. Also, Cecil Shaw, owner of E-Z Stop Campground at Ellisville, was appointed last month to the TDC board by the Board of County Commissioners. Cecil previously served on our board, but stepped down due to health Issues. Those issues have now been resolved and we are pleased to welcome Cecil back on our board.Tourism provides a big financial boost for our areaAccording to the U.S. Travel Association, tourism generated significant economic benefit to Columbia County. Based on 2010 data, those benefits included $85.5 million in travel spending (travel is defined as activities associated with all overnight and day trips to places 50 miles away or more, one way, from the traveler’s origin and any overnight trips away from home in paid accommodations). Travel generated payroll was $18.25 million, travel generated employment totaled 1,110 jobs, travel generated state tax receipts were $4.36 million and travel generated local tax receipts were $2.61 million. These numbers were obtained by VISIT FLORIDA and distributed to Florida counties in late October of this year.TDC discontinues median island programThe Columbia County Tourist Development Council will be discontinuing the median island beautification/sponsorship program which has been in place at four locations on U.S. 90 West near the I-75 interchange since 2006. Effective January 1, 2013, the City of Lake City resumed responsibility for maintaining the median islands. The TDC would like to express our appreciation to Hampton Inn & Suites, Texas Roadhouse Restaurant and the Lake City Wal-Mart Supercenter for their sponsorship of the median islands for the past six years. In addition, we’d like to thank Earthscapes Landscaping for their efforts to maintain the median islands since late in 2006.New name and new face for tourism promotion agencyEffective immediately our office will be known as the Columbia County Tourist Development Department. Our staff will continue to serve the Columbia County Tourist Development Council which is a nine-member committee that establishes the budget and marketing priorities along with the policies and procedures for the operation of this office. In addition, our office welcomed an additional staff person in mid-November. A recent FSU graduate, Miles Kirby, will assist our office for the next six months. Mr. Kirby’s degree is in Recreation and Leisure Services Administration. After working in our office for six months, Miles will work with the Columbia County Recreation Department at the Richardson Center for an additional six months. Q Harvey Campbell is the executive director of the Columbia County Tourist Development Council. He can be reached at (386) 758-1397.TOURISM: Lots of changes, activities taking place in 2013 Continued From Page 1C Last-minute shoppers help retailers salvage season ASSOCIATED PRESSA shopper walks past a large Christmas tree at Fashion Island shopping center in Newport Beach, Calif. A last-min ute surge in spending helped many major U.S. retailers rep ort better-than-expected sales in December.

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Classified Department: 755-5440 4C LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDSUNDAY, JANUARY6, 2013 RECEIVING CLERKOperation of a mail room and stock room. Receive, verify, and distribute warehouse stock and mail items. Computer email, data entry, and work order program management. Requires High School graduate plus three years warehouse or clerical experience. AHigh School equivalency may be substituted for high school graduation. Computer literate. Good customer service skills. Good communication skills. Knowledge of spelling, grammar and basic business arithmetic. Data entry and word processing skills. Ability to keep records. Ability to interact positively in person or on the telephone. Ability to use computer financial systems, word processing and spreadsheets. Must have valid Florida driver’s license and good driving record. Ability to handle bulk material deliveries and lift 45 pounds frequently. Commercial driver’s license a plus. SALARY: $ 19,602 annually, plus benefits. APPLICATION DEADLINE: 1/18/13 Persons interested should provide College employment application. Position details and applications available o n web at: www.fgc.edu Human Resources Florida Gateway College 149 S.E. College Place Lake City Fl 32025-2007 Phone (386) 754-4314 Fax (386) 754-4814 E-Mail: humanr@fgc.eduFGC is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.VP/ ADA/EA/EO College in Education and Employment Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 ServicesWhite's Trucking Services You call & We Haul! Fill Dirt, Lime Rock. AsphaltMillings, Granite, Road Rock.386-362-8763 2001 Dodge Ram 3500V10 Magnum, extended cab, SLT, 4 WD, DRW, AT, PW, PS, red w/tan interior, 137,000 miles, good condition.$7,900386-984-6606 or 386-758-6800 LegalINVITATION TO NEGOTIATE Commercial Environmental LaboratoryITN# 13-5-01 FLORIDAGATEWAYCOLLEGEFlorida Gateway College is seeking to enter into negotiations with quali-fied entities that are interested in es-tablishing and operating a certified Commercial Environmental Labora-tory on the College campus in Lake City, Florida. PROJECTSUMMARYFlorida Gateway College is seeking a qualified vendor with whom the Col-lege can enter into a mutually benefi-cial relationship for the purpose of operating, staffing and maintaining an NELAP-certified lab on the main campus of the College to operate, staff, and maintain NELAPcertifica-tion for a commercial environmental lab. Located on its Lake City cam-pus, the new lab will provide serv-ice-oriented, competitively priced environmental lab services as well as on-the-job training for future water industry technicians. Initial testing operations shall focus on Microbio-logical analysis including Total Coli-form, Fecal Coliform, and Total Plate Count. Eventually, broad-spec-trum analysis of drinking water, wastewater, groundwater, and sur-face water may be performed at the campus facility. PROPOSER QUALIFICATIONS Proposers must be currently certified under Federal and State laws and rules to operate a commercial water testing laboratory. PROPOSALDUE TIME AND DATE Sealed Proposals must be submitted no later than 2:00 P.M. (local time) TUESDAY, FEBRUARY05, 2013. PLACE FOR RECEIVING PRO-POSALSFlorida Gateway College Purchasing Department 149 S.E. College Place Lake City, Florida 32025-8703 Hand delivered proposals are to be delivered to: Florida Gateway College Purchasing Department 198 S.E. Staff Way Room 138 Administration Building 001 Lake City, Florida 32025 All proposals must arrive and be date/time stamped by a Purchasing Department representative prior to the specified proposal opening date/time. Proposal arriving after the set Time/ Date will be rejected. The College will not be responsible for Postal or other delivery service de-lays that cause a proposal to arrive at Room 138, Building 001 after the designated proposal opening date/time. Proposals must be clearly marked on the outside of the enve-lope “ITN # 13-5-01, COMMER-CIALENVIRONMENTALLABO-RATORY, FLORIDAGATEWAYCOLLEGE, LAKE CITY, FLORI-DA, PROPOSALOPENING 2:00 P.M. TUESDAY, FEBRUARY05, 2013”. Proposals will be opened in a public meeting in the Board Room of the Administrative Building (001). PRE-PROPOSALCONFERENCE All interested parties are required to attend a MANDATORYpre-propos-al conference commencing at 10:00 A.M. local time on THURSDAY, JANUARY24, 2013 in the Board Room in the Administrative Building (001). At this time the College's rep-resentative will be available to an-swer questions related to this Invita-tion to Negotiate. THIS IS AMAN-DATORYPRE-PROPOSALMEETING. FAILURE TO AT-TEND THIS PRE-PROPOSALCONFERENCE SHALLRESULTIN THE DISQUALIFICATION OF YOUR PROPOSAL. Any suggested modifications to the ITN document may be presented in writing to or discussed with the College's Repre-sentative(s) at this meeting and may be considered by said representative(s) as possible amend-ments to the Invitation to Negotiate. During the pre-proposal conference Responders will be offered an oppor-tunity to visually inspect facilities on campus where the equipment is to be installed or services to be rendered. ONLYONE (1) VISUALINSPEC-TION OF THE SITE WILLBE MADE PRIOR TO PROPOSALSUBMITTAL. COPYOF THE INVITATION TO NEGOTIATE DOCUMENTAcopy if the ITN is available from Tonia Lawson, Coordinator of Pur-chasing and Contracting, Florida Gateway College. Acopy may be obtained as follows. By Email: tonia.lawson@fgc.eduBy USPS: Request sent certified mail to: Purchasing Department Florida Gateway College 149 S.E. College Place Lake City, Florida 32025-8703 Walk-in Pick Up: Florida Gateway College Purchasing Department 198 S.E. Staff Way Administration Building 001, Room 138Lake City, Florida 32025-8703 RIGHTTO WAIVE IRREGULARI-TIES AND TECHNICALITIES Florida Gateway College reserves the right to waive minor irregulari-ties and/or technicalities associated with this solicitation. The Director of Purchasing of Florida Gateway College shall be the final authority regarding waivers of irregularities and technicalities. For the Board of Trustees Florida Gateway College Charles W. Hall, President 05536616January 6, 2013 020Lost & Found Found Nintendo 3D In vicinity of Troy St & Elementary School. Need to Provide Birth date & Serial I.D. Info. 243-8135 Found on Ichetucknee Rd Small female short hair brown dog, No collar. Very Sweet, Sweet, Sweet. Contact 984-6796 100Job Opportunities05536524Frito Lay Route Sales $40,000+ Full Time Open House Info Session Jan. 11th Call (386) 867-1913 to RSVP Equal Opportunity Employment M/F/D/V 05536631Expending Team Fleet Priority Dispatch -Competitive Pay -Consistent Miles -Established Routes -Direct Deposit & Pd Vacations -2012/2013 Equipment -No-Touch Freight/No Hazmat -Health Ins/401k Match Class ACDLw/1yrOTR exp. Food Grade Tanker Call 800-877-2430www.indianrivertransport.com 05536646HOLIDAYINN & SUITESLake City’s only full service hotel is seeking the following : Room Attendant P/TExperience Preferred Apply in person Mon-Fri 12-5pm 213 SWCommerce Dr. EOE/DFWP. Construction Salesman Needed. Excellent Pay. Experience Required. 866-959-7663 ConsumerLender-SunState FCUFull-Time Position in Lake City. Experience selling financial products, proven customer relations expertise, and lending experience REQUIRED. Great pay and benefits! Application Required and available at www.sunstatefcu.org. Fax to 386-462-4686. DFWP, EOE Experienced Restaurant Managers Day one medical, dental and vision. Paid vacation, 401K and bonuses. EOE. email resume to: sfl_careers@steaknshake.com Needed CNC Machinist Must be familiar with Lathes and Mills, send resume to Grizzly Mfg. 174 NE Cortez Ter. Lake City FL32055, or Email: guy@qiagroup.com NO PHONE CALLS/WALK-INS Truck Repair facility Service Writer needed. Computer literate and understanding of truck repair and parts procurement. Southern Special Truck & Trailer 752-9754 100Job OpportunitiesIndustrial Structural/ Mechanical Designer-Draftsman Must have experience in design and detailing Material Handling Equipment (conveyor systems) & related structural steel support systems. Proficiency in AutoCAD is necessary. DO NOTAPPLYIN PERSON Send resume to Draftsman 3631 US Highway 90 East Lake City, Fl 32055 Mechanic needed with tools and experience. Southern Specialize Truck & Trailer. 386-752-9754 Must have a minimum of 5 yrs Exp. selling HVAC Equipment. Excellent benefits &Great pay. Call Allen 386-628-1093 Drivers: All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-ACDLFlatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down CALL: 866-823-0323 Real Estate Co. looking for Office Staff Computer knowledge required. Real Estate Exp. is a plus! Fax resume to 386-496-4309 Sales Help at Florida Visitors Center. Benefits, hourly wage plus commission. Excellent opportunity with National company. Westgate Resorts. Call Ed 904-540-2314 or email Ed_Newman@wgresorts.com SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 Service Techs & Installers Must be EPA& NATE certified. Excellent benefits & great pay. Call Allen (386) 628-1093 Web Application Engineer Develop web applications for signage industry. Customize and extend magento system. Develop and maintain online design tool with flex, develop and maintain graphic processing and other java servlet for web app. Develop and maintain desktop applications for production department. Masters degree in Computer Engineering or related required. Certification in Sun Java Programming required. 2 years experience in Software Engineering required. Send resume to: SignSite.com 162 SWSpencer Ct. Suite 106 Lake City, FL32025. 120Medical Employment05536594Medical Billing Manager Several years experience in all aspects in medical insurance billing required. Salary based on experience. Email resume in confidence to mafaisal05@yahoo.com or fax to 386-758-5987. 05536623Referral Coordinator/ Checkout Clerk Medical Office is seeking qualified candidate with Good Multi-tasking skills and professionalism. Must have exp. w/Med. Term & Ins. Referrals & Auth. Send resume by Email to jsmith@ccofnc.com. No Calls Please. Billing Specialist : Complete knowledge of insurance, Follow Up and Follow Thru of Accts Receivable, Billing, Posting and Collection, Sage Software a plus. Fax resume to 758-5628. CMA experience preferred in Peds/ Family Practice. Experience injections & taking accurate vital signs. Excellent communication & documentation, organization &assessment skills. Fax resume to 758-5628 DIET AR Y MANAGER Needed CDM, Chef, LTC, 2 years experience preferred Must be able to manage large staff and oversee daily food preparation for a 180 bed SNF. Full time with excellent benefits. E-mail resume to Greg Roberts: groberts@gulfcoasthealthcare.com or fax to: (386)362-4417. Live Oak, FLEOE/V/D/M/F GREATOPPORTUNITY•Full Time Experienced C.N.A’s All Shifts Apply in person at Suwannee Health Care & Rehab. 1620 Helevenston Street S.E. Live Oak, FL32064 EOE/m/f/d/v Massage Therapist Needed in a 180 Beds SNF Licensed, 1-2 years Experience preferred. Part-time weekend position. E-mail resume to Greg Roberts: groberts@gulfcoasthealthcare.com or fax to: (386) 362-4417 Live Oak, FLEOE/V/D/M/F 240Schools & Education05536525Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class1/7/2013• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-1/14/13• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. Puppy 8 wks old Cream Poodle Health Certificate $350.00 Contact 752-4890 408Furniture SOFABED, new decking, springs, and mattress $100. 386-754-1595 414Needlecraft & SewingSERIOUS DEAL For Serious Sewers. Too Much to List. 754-6783 416Sporting Goods TREADMILLProScan quiet, excellent condition. $250 CASH 386-755-7045 420Wanted to Buy WANTED Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans. $300 & up No title Needed Free Pickup 386-878-9260 After5pm 386752-3648 430Garage Sales PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 440Miscellaneous Falling Creek Chapel will be having a six week Bible Study on the Anti-Christ on Tuesdays at 7:00 p.m. It will run from January 8th to February 12th. Any questions call 755-0580. Fitness Center Equipment Treadmills, Ellipticals, Stair Masters & Bikes Cybex, Nautilus & Free Weight Equipment. Tanning Beds, Office Chairs, Desk, Copiers & more. Must sell quick. Call for prices (386)365-2047 or (386)752-1652 Troy-Bilt 5550 Watt Generator, 10HPOHVBriggs & Stratton, $400, 386-754-1595 630Mobile Homes forRent1/1 Cabin $475 & Lots for your RVor your own Cabin. Between Lake City & G’ville. Access to I-75 & 441 (352)317-1326. 2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $700. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 2/1 Furnished S/WMH washer/dryer, Dep & referrences Incl: cable, water, elect. & garb. For more info. 386-965-3477 3 BR/1 BA, close to town, fenced in yard, private well $800 month. & $800 deposit 386-752-7578 & 386-288-8401 3 BR/2 BA, completely refurbished, appliances furnished, $795 month. & $795 deposit 386-752-7578 3Br/2Ba Mod 1/2acre (nice subd) concrete drive, wrap around deck appl's,energysaver, &thermo's ready (386) 984-5341 $800 mo Quiet Country Park 3bd/2ba $525, 2bd/1ba $425. Very clean. NO PETS! References & Deposit required 386-758-2280 640Mobile Homes forSalePalm HarborHomes New 2013 Models $15K Off All Homes 800-622-2832 ext 210 Suwannee River Front Home Very Nice 4br/2ba, fireplace, large deck, $149,800 Owner Broker. 1.8 acres (mol) 386-935-1482 650Mobile Home & LandFSBO 5 ac lot w/ 1995 refurb. MH. 66ft long w/ new roof & wheel chair ramp. $5,000 down Owner Fin. on Balance Approx 5 miles N. of LC. 386-752-4597 OwnerFinanced 3/22.5 ac.River Access. Small down $585 mo 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com SW2BD/1.5BA, 1 acre, Updated Kitchen. $3,500 down, $350 mth Contact 305-304-4028 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05535481We’ve got it all!$89 Deposit Limited Avail. Call Today! Windsong Apts. *Free afterschool program386-758-8455 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 BRANFORD VILLAS 386-935-2319 2br/1ba Apts. Now available.$570. mo. TDD number 1-800-955-8771 Equal Housing Opportunity Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A$530 month $530 deposit garbage included. No pets. 386-344-2170 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Large & clean 1br/1ba apt. CH/Alg walk in closet. Close to town. $395. mo and $350. dep. (904)563-6208 NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled 1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living room. $450. mo plus sec. 386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951 UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent3 bedroom 1 bath $630 mth and $630 deposit. CH/A Contact 377-2170 3bdrm very spacious, 2ba, garage, CH/AFenced in backyard. $1,400 mth & $1,400 dep. Contact 386-344-1914 3br/1.5ba. Very clean, Brick great area w/bonus room. Carport, shed & Fenced (privacy) back yard. $825. mo $825. dep. Ref’s req’d. (941)920-4535 ForLease ,3Br/2bth DWon ten acres S.of Columbia City.Contact At 727-289-2172 $800.00 mo.$350.00 security. NICE 3/2 brick home w/garage in quiet neighborhood. 489 SWBrandy. $900 plus sec. dep. 386-438-4600 750Business & Office RentalsMedical, Retail and Professional Office space on East Baya near Old Country Club Rd. Call 386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622 (cell) 820Farms & Acreage4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com Owner financed land 1/2 to 10 acre lots. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 830Commercial PropertyIndustrial warehouse7+ acres fenced 17,000 sq ft Barn $1,500 mo. TomEagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605

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LIFE Sunday, January 6, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section D W hen lunch-time came on a recent trip to Valdosta, we decided to try the Smok’n Pig BBQ restau-rant that we had heard so much about. Located on North Valdosta Road or the exit after the mall exit, it is easy to find. Plus, it’s a very large log-cabin-type structure on your left, about a mile after you exit. Can’t miss it. So, we walked in and were pleasantly surprised. It must seat several hun-dred, but the layout of sev-eral rooms makes it comfy and homey. The room we ate in had a large fireplace and numerous mounted fish on the paneled walls. The barbecue smell perme-ated the atmosphere and made us quickly peruse the menu for some of their specialties. There were numerous appetizers to choose from, including all sorts of wings or tenders, such as buffalo, barbecue, Boom Boom, and sweet chili glazed. Onion tanglers ($5.99) sounded intriguing. They are thinly sliced onions breaded, deep fried and served with special dip-ping sauce. Fried pickles, shrimp, mushrooms and cheese sticks also are avail-able. For lunch we went for the barbecue. Kimberlynne tried the Smok’n Pig Special, which was a choice of pulled or sliced pork for $7.99 and included two sides. LaShel tried the Carolina Special for $7.99. It was sliced pork piled high on top of cole slaw, also with two sides. For an additional $2.99, you can add the huge salad and dessert bar. The menu had three minis, which were the Three Little Piglets ($8.49), the Three Little Chicks ($8.49) and the Three Little Bulls ($8.99). Served on a smaller, seeded roll, they were all delicious and had very generous servings. The waitress allowed us to have one of each kind so that we could sample the three different meats, and they were all delicious. But the favorite was the Three Little Piglets. Our waitress was very attentive and well informed about the menu items. She made our visit special. So, thanks, Connie. Side dishes include barbecue beans, cole slaw, potato salad, french fries, macaroni and cheese, corn on the cob, green beans, fried okra, Brunswick stew, Mama June’s sweet potato souffl, collard greens, broccoli salad and bowl of chili, just to name a few. We tried the cole slaw, Brunswick stew and the Smok’n Pig BBQ is worth the trip Story ideas?ContactRobert BridgesEditor754-0428rbridges@lakecityreporter.com Lake City Reporter1DLIFEBy JENNIFER AGIESTA andLAURAN NEERGAARDAssociated PressWASHINGTON W e know obesity is a health crisis, or every new year wouldn’t start with resolu-tions to eat better and get off the couch. But don’t try taking away our junk food. Americans blame too much screen time and cheap fast food for fueling the nation’s fat epidemic, a poll finds, but they’re split on how much the government should do to help. Most draw the line at policies that would try to force healthier eating by limiting food choices, according to the poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. A third of people say the government should be deeply involved in finding ways to curb obesity, while a similar proportion want it to play little or no role. The rest are some-where in the middle. Require more physical activity in school, or provide nutritional guidelines to help people make better choices? Sure, 8 in 10 support those steps. Make restaurants post calorie counts on their menus, as the Food and Drug Administration is poised to do? Some 70 per-cent think it’s a good idea. “That’s a start,” said Khadijah Al-Amin, 52, of Coatesville, Pa. “The fat content should be put up there in red letters, not just put up there. The same way they mark something that’s poisonous, so when you see it, you absolutely know.” But nearly 6 in 10 people surveyed oppose taxes targeting unhealthy foods, known as soda taxes or fat taxes. And when it comes to restricting what people can buy — like New York City’s recent ban of supersized sodas in restaurants — three-quarters say no way. “The outlawing of sugary drinks, that’s just silly,” said Keith Donner, 52, of Miami, who prefers teaching schoolchildren to eat better and get moving. “People should just look at a Big Gulp and say, ‘That’s not for me.’ I think it starts when they are young and at school,” he added. Indeed, while three-quarters of Americans consider obesity a serious health problem for the nation, most of those surveyed say deal-ing with it is up to individuals. Just a third consider obesity a community problem that governments, schools, health care providers and the food industry should be involved in. Twelve percent said it will take work from both individuals and the community. That finding highlights the dilemma facing public health experts: Societal changes over recent decades have helped spur growing waistlines, and now a third of U.S. children and teens and two-thirds of adults are either overweight or obese. Today, restaurants dot more street corners and malls, regular-sized portions are larger, and a fast-food meal can be cheaper than healthier fare. Not to mention electronic distractions that slightly more peo-ple surveyed blamed for obesity than fast food. In the current environment, it’s difficult to exercise that personal responsibility, said Jeff Levi of the nonprofit Trust for America’s Health, which has closely tracked the rise in obesity. “We need to create environments where the healthy choice becomes the easy choice, where it’s possible for people to bear that responsibility,” he said. The new poll suggests women, who have M any people are growing veg-etables by using some basic gardening procedures that are fundamental to preserving the environment. Organic gardeners use only naturally occurring materials to improve the soil, fertilize plants and minimize pest problems. This growing process is healthy for the environment, and the result-ing produce is healthy for us. The Florida legislative definition of “organic” excludes the use of all synthetic chemicals on veg-etables grown for sale. But the law doesn’t apply to our own home gardens. So, why should we strive to reduce or eliminate chemicals? In a growing population and a suffering environment, we can all make this contribution to conserving our natural resources. A major concept of organic gardening is the use of organic materials to build up the soil and add needed nutrients for plants. In Florida’s poor, sandy soil, organic amendments are very important for gardening success. Generally, organic matter can be defined as the remains or direct products of plants and animals. Gardeners often use bird and animal manures, cover crops, plant manures, compost and sea products. After being applied to the soil, organic material is broken down by soil organisms such as fungi, bacteria, insects and worms. Nitrogen and other needed nutri-ents are converted to forms that the plant can use during this process. Organic matter not only provides nutrients, but it also helps the soil retain water and improves the structure of the soil. In Florida, about 19 million tons of solid waste is collected annually and taken to landfills. About 15 percent of this solid waste is yard waste, including leaves and grass clippings from lawns. Learn how to keep your yard waste and turn it into gar-dening amendments at http://sarasota.ifas.ufl.edu/compost-info. Your garden will benefit from an application of up to two pounds per square foot of com-posted yard waste each year. We have many oak leaves in North Florida and these leaves make great soil amendments. The leaves break down slowly, so an additional pound of animal manure will help even out the decomposition rate. Consider using more environmentally friendly gardening practices this year. The Master Gardeners can help answer your gardening questions at 752-5384. Attend an Extension workshop, “Plant Propagation for Gardeners,” presented at the Fort White Public Library on Thursday, Jan. 17, at 5:45 p.m. This workshop will also be held in Lake City at the downtown library on Saturday, Jan. 19, at 1:30 p.m.Use organic material to fortify garden soil GARDEN TALK Nichelle Demorestdndemorest@ufl.edu Fat epidemic attitudes Poll: Americans agree obesity’s a crisis but still want junk food Q D. Nichelle Demorest is a horticulture agent with the Columbia County Extension of the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.ASSOCIATED PRESSVegetables are the majority of food discarded by students at Roosevelt High School in Los Angeles. Americans bla me too much screen time and cheap fast-food for fueling the nation’s obesity epidemic, but a po ll finds that they’re split on how the government should h elp. Many say government should guide, not regulate or ban, what people consume. Genie Norman and Mary Kay HollingsworthTasteBuddiesLakeCity@gmail.com TASTE BUDDIES TASTE continued on 2D FAT continued on 2D

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2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04242DLIFE Stop by the Lake City Reporter for your complimentary engagement package. Aisle Style Complimentary Engagement Package • Holiday Inn 754-1411, ext. 106• GeGee’s Studio 758-2088• Camp Weed Cerveny Conference Center 386-364-5250• Wards Jewelry & Gifts 752-5470• Sweetwater Branch Inn 800-595-7760 Making lasting memories ASSOCIATED PRESSSusan Spencer Wendel (center) gives her sister, Stephan ie Harwood-Parlamento (right) and her best friend, Nancy Maass Kinnally a special Christmas present of a gold necklac e in the form of an infinity sign, one loop of the sign eng raved with Susan’s name and the other with their own. The necklaces were designed by Zan Hogan. By JAN TUCKWOODThe Palm Beach PostWEST PALM BEACH — Susan Spencer-Wendel made a career covering courts and criminals, so she’s used to asking tough questions. Now that she’s the subject of national media atten-tion herself, she appreci-ates journalists who tackle the hard stuff head-on — like the question she’s been asked several times recently: “Do you think this is your last Christmas?” Her answer is direct: “Yes. So by jove we’re gonna enjoy it!” Creating lasting memories from “last” holidays and celebrating joy in every moment has been Susan’s quest since summer 2011, when she learned she had amyotrophic lateral sclero-sis (ALS) — Lou Gehrig’s disease. As the incurable disease began to wither her muscles, Susan took con-trol like the resourceful reporter she is: She decid-ed that if her time would be limited, she would squeeze every bit of fun out of it. She planned bucket-list trips with her dearest loved ones, then wrote about two of them in The Palm Beach Post, where she had been courts reporter for 11 years. Stories of her amazing trips — one to see the Northern Lights with her best friend, Nancy, and one to Budapest to celebrate her 20th wed-ding anniversary with her husband, John — got the attention of book publish-ers. HarperCollins paid approximately $2 million for Susan’s life story, and Universal paid $2 million more for movie rights. Susan typed her memoir, “Until I Say Goodbye,” in three months on an iPhone with the one finger that has not forsaken her: Her right thumb. The book will be published in March and translated into 25 lan-guages. It is now available for preorder and has its own web site — susanspen-cerwendel.com — and Facebook page. HarperCollins calls Susan’s story “a powerfully emotional, inspirational and irrepressibly joyous look at the things that matter most.’Until I Say Goodbye’ is the fulfillment of her final wish: ‘To make people laugh and cry and hug their children and joke with their friends and dwell in how wonderful it is to be alive.”’ Susan wrote an email update on her life — which has recently been full of interviews with reporters from People, the Today show, NPR and The Associated Press and more — to share with Post read-ers: “I so enjoy meeting the journalists. Seeing what they create and how talent-ed they are. People shared their stories with me for so many years, I consider it a privilege to share mine with them. “We taped a lot of media these past weeks as my voice becomes more slurred everyday. All the content is due to be aired around March 12 — the book’s release date. By then, my voice will be unin-telligible. “My decline is speeding up: each day I lose more steps and words. I now choke at most every meal, episodes which leave peo-ple around me screaming ‘Should we call 911?’ Ergo, I don’t eat much anymore. “I knew it would be this way. So for Thanksgiving we had our major holiday event. Our entire families — 40 in all — came. Was wonderful. Hectic, but won-derful. “Thus, Christmas is a time just for John and me and our children.” The family enjoyed the day at their home in Lake Clarke Shores, where Susan’s favorite writing spot is the big chickee hut in the backyard. She planned special “forever” gifts for her family: Scrapbooks for her three children — large, leather-bound books with their names embossed in gold on the front and their lives catalogued inside. She had necklaces designed for the most precious women in her life — her daughter Marina, 15, her mother, Tee, her sister, Stephanie, and her best friend, Nancy. The necklaces feature two entwined circles with their names and Susan’s name. She had personal gifts made for John and her father, Tom, too. And when they asked her what she wanted for Christmas, she asked for a ring, an heirloom that could be passed to Marina or the fiancee of one of her two sons some day. This holiday season, Susan and John gave gen-erous gifts to causes dear to their hearts: The Legal Aid Society, ALS research, and a $10,000 check to The Post’s holiday campaign for needy neighbors, Season to Share. “It was my privilege to once write ‘Season to Share’ stories and now my privilege to make this gift,” Susan wrote in the card with their check. “I thank the journalists and editors who brought such giving to fore.” Through these tangible gifts and her intangible spirit, Susan Spencer-Wendel is making sure her last chapter lasts. “Mine is a story of twinning good and bad fortunes, which I find pro-found meaning in,” she wrote. Woman with ALS wringing pleasure out of final days. Q Genie Norman and Mary Kay Hollingswoth are Columbia County Residents who love good food and fun. Their column on area restau rants appears twice monthly. You can contact them at TasteBuddiesLakeCity@gmail.com. TASTE: Continued From Page 1Dfried okra, and they were delicious, too. Other menu items included something for everyone, including steaks, catfish, shrimp, barbecue pork, chicken, brisket, ribs and pork chops. There are menu items to go, and the special sauces are available by the bottle. ($2.99) The owner’s claim that Smok’n Pig Bab-B-Q cooked with pecan wood for hours, making it crunchy on the outside and juicy on the inside certainly proved to be true for us. Speaking of owners, the Smok’n Pig is owned by the same people who own the Ole Times Country Buffet, which has locations in Lake City, Douglas, Tallahassee, Tifton, Macon, Brunswick, Warner Robins and Dublin. If you need your GPS to find this, they are located at 4228 N. Valdosta Road, Valdosta, Ga. Telephone number is (229) 245-7008. Vera Inez (Clayton) and Spencer Roland Wallace, of Lake City, will celebrate their 60th wedding anni-versary on Jan. 11. The couple were married Jan. 11, 1953, in Georgia. After living a short time in Gainesville, they moved to Lake City, where Vera was born. They owned and operated the Gateway Tile busi-ness in Lake City for more than 50 years. The couple has two children. A son, Wayne Wallace and his wife, Marsha, live in Lake City, and a daughter, Tee Bango, lives in Trinity with her husband, Jerry. HAPPENINGS Couple to celebrate 60th wedding anniversaryCOURTESY PHOTOVera Inez and Spencer Wallace were married Jan. 11, 19 53. FAT: We want junk food Continued From Page 1Dmajor input on what a family eats, recognize those societal and com-munity difficulties more than men do. More than half of women say the high cost of healthy food is a major driver of obesity, com-pared with just 37 percent of men. Women also are more likely than men to blame cheap fast food and to say that the food indus-try should bear a lot of responsibility for helping to find solutions. Patricia Wilson, 53, of rural Speedwell, Tenn., says she must drive 45 minutes to reach a gro-cery store — passing numerous burger and pizza joints, with more arriving every year. “They shouldn’t be letting all these fast-food places go up,” said Wilson, who nags her children and grandchil-dren to eat at home and watch their calories. She recalls how her own over-weight grandmother lost both her legs and then her life to diabetes. More than 80 percent of people in the AP-NORC poll said they had easy access to supermarkets, but just as many could easily get fast food. Another 68 percent said it was easy for kids to purchase junk food on their way to school, potentially foiling diet-conscious caregivers like Wilson, who doesn’t allow her grandchildren to eat unhealthy snacks at home. “If they say they’re hungry, they get regular food,” she said. Food is only part of the obesity equation; physical activity is key too. About 7 in 10 people said it was easy to find sidewalks or paths for jogging, walking or bike-riding. But 63 per-cent found it difficult to run errands or get around without a car, reinforcing a sedentary lifestyle. James Gambrell, 27, of Springfield, Ore., said he pays particular atten-tion to diet and exercise because obesity runs in his family. He makes a point of walking to stores and running errands on foot two to three times a week. But Gambrell, a fastfood cashier, said he eats out at least once a day because of the conve-nience and has changed his order at restaurants that already have begun posting calorie counts. He’s all for the govern-ment pushing those kinds of solutions. “I feel that it’s a part of the government’s respon-sibility to care for its citi-zens and as such should attempt to set regulations for restaurants that are potentially harmful to its citizens,” he said. On the other side is Pamela Dupuis, 60, of Aurora, Colo., who said she has struggled with weight and has been diag-nosed as pre-diabetic. She doesn’t want the govern-ment involved in things like calorie-counting. “They should stay out of our lives,” she said. The AP-NORC Center survey was conducted Nov. 21 through Dec. 14. It involved landline and cellphone interviews with 1,011 adults nation-wide and has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus 4.2 percentage points. Resorts to spend $60M in Atlantic CityAssociated PressATLANTIC CITY, N.J. — When the man wide-ly hailed as a marketing genius died suddenly last year, many worried that Resorts Casino Hotel, the struggling Atlantic City gambling hall he and a partner had recently bought, might also meet its demise. But since the February death of Dennis Gomes, his business partner Morris Bailey, who provid-ed most of the financing for the Resorts purchase, has remained steadfast in his support of Resorts, despite a difficult market and ever-increasing com-petition from casinos in neighboring states. Resorts plans to spend $60 million in the first half of 2013 on renovations and an expansion designed to help it become more of a player in Atlantic City. In addition to the $35 million Jimmy Buffett-themed Margaritaville entertainment complex, Resorts is also renovating hotel rooms, adding a food court and two new VIP players’ clubs.

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By AYA BATRAWYAssociated PressCAIRO — At Egypt’s Pyramids, the desperation of vendors to sell can be a little frightening for some tourists. Young men descend on any car with foreigners in it blocks before it reaches the more than 4,500 year-old Wonder of the World. They bang on car doors and hoods, some waving the sticks and whips they use for driving camels, demanding the tourists come to their shop or ride their camel or just give money. In the southern city of Aswan, tour operator Ashraf Ibrahim was recently taking a group to a histor-ic mosque when a mob of angry horse carriage drivers trapped them inside, trying to force them to take rides. The drivers told Ibrahim to steer business their way in the future or else they’d burn his tourist buses, he said. Egypt’s touts have always been aggressive — but they’re more desperate than ever after nearly two years of devastation in the tourism industry, a pillar of the economy. December, traditionally the start of Egypt’s peak season, has brought new pain. Many foreign-ers stayed away because of the televised scenes of protests and clashes on the streets of Cairo in the battle over a controversial constitution. Arrivals this month were down 40 percent from November, according to airport officials, speaking on condition of anonym-ity because they were not autho-rized to release the information. Tourism workers have little hope that things will get better now that the constitution came into effect this week after a nationwide referendum. The power struggle between Islamist President Mohammed Morsi and the opposition threatens to erupt at any time into more unrest in the streets. More long term, many in the industry worry ruling Islamists will start making changes like banning alcohol or swimsuits on beaches that they fear will drive tourists away. “Nobody can plan anything because one day you find that everything might be OK and another that everything is lost. You can’t even take a right deci-sion or plan for the next month,” said Magda Fawzi, head of Sabena Management. She’s thinking of shutting down her company, which runs two hotels in the Red Sea resort town of Sharm el-Sheikh and four luxury cruise boats on the Nile between the ancient cities of Luxor and Aswan. In one hotel, only 10 of 300 rooms are booked, and only one of her ships is oper-ating, she said. She has already downsized from 850 employees before the revolution to 500. “I don’t think there will be any stability with this kind of consti-tution. People will not accept it,” she said. Tourism, one of Egypt’s biggest foreign currency earners, was gutted by the turmoil of last year’s 18-day uprising that toppled autocrat Hosni Mubarak. Scared off by the upheaval, the number of tourists fell to 9.8 million in 2011 from 14.7 million the year before, and revenues plunged 30 percent to $8.8 bil-lion. This year, the industry struggled back. By the end of September, 8.1 million tourists had come, injecting $10 billion into the economy. The number for the full year is likely to sur-pass 2011 but is still considerably down from 2010. For the public, it has meant a drying up of income, given that tourism provided direct or indi-rect employment to one in eight Egyptians in 2010, according to government figures. Poverty swelled at the country’s fastest rate in Luxor prov-ince, highly dependent on visitors to its monumental temples and the tombs of King Tutankamun and other pharaohs. In 2011, 39 percent of its population lived on less than $1 a day, compared to 18 percent in 2009, according to government figures. For the government, the fall in tourism and foreign investment since the revolution has wors-ened a debt crisis and forced talks with the International Monetary Fund over a $4.8 bil-lion loan. Morsi has promised to expand tourism, but hotel owners and tour operators say he has yet to make clear any plans. Their biggest fear is new violence causing shocks like December’s. Ibrahim, of the Eagle Travels tourism company, said that because of this month’s protests, two German operators he works with cancelled tours. They weren’t even heading to Cairo, but to the Red Sea, Luxor and Aswan, far from the unrest. But some in the industry fear that, with the constitution’s provi-sions strengthening implemen-tation of Shariah, Islamists will ban alcohol or restrict dress on Egypt’s beaches, which rival antiquities sites as draws for tour-ism. Officials from the Muslim Brotherhood, from which Morsi hails, are vague about any plans. Ultraconservative Salafis, who are key allies of Morsi, have been more direct. Nader Bakkar, spokesman for the Salafi Nour Party, told a con-ference of tour guides in Aswan earlier this month that tourists should not be allowed to buy alcohol but could bring it with them and drink it in their rooms. Tourists should also be encour-aged to wear conservative dress, he said. Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013 3D3DLIFECrucial industry has taken beating since ‘Arab spring.’New turmoil hits Egypt’s tourism TRAVEL ASSOCIATED PRESSForeign tourists visit the historical site of the Giza Pyram ids, near Cairo, Egypt. The past month saw a drop in tourists to Egypt, scared off by scenes of protests and clas hes over the constitution, in new pain to a crucial industry gutted the past two years by turmoil. Tourism work ers worry things won’t get any better even now that the charter has been passed: Egypt’s power struggles thre aten to erupt into more unrest at any time, and some fear Islamists will eventually try to rein in alcohol and beach tourism. Stories give some jewelry its valueBy SAMANTHA CRITCHELLAP Fashion WriterNEW YORK — It’s the story, not necessarily the stone or other bells and whistles, that gives jew-elry shared between gen-erations its high value. And there is so often a good, interesting and meaningful story since many people get or give jewelry to commemorate an event or send a mes-sage: It could be a birthday or anniversary, a statement of love or gratitude. But, says Annabel Tollman, a top industry stylist, a pen-dant, earrings or bracelet “are rarely exchanged because it’s Tuesday.” Yet, she adds, they’re items that can be worn each and every day after-ward. Try that with a sweater. “We hear so often from clients their vivid memo-ries when they speak of jewelry,” says Jon King, executive vice president at Tiffany & Co. “Women immediately paint the pic-ture of the moment they received a bracelet or ring. They’ll say, ‘I was at the restaurant. It was raining outside. My husband had the pasta and I had the meat.’ They remember every detail.” And, then: “You’ll hear young women who say, ‘I remember every time my mother went out to an important occasion, she always wore THOSE ear-rings or THAT bracelet. When the next person in line can be so fortunate to have it passed along, it comes with all the memo-ries,” King says. There’s also a trend toward shoppers buying their own celebratory jew-elry, especially rings, when they achieve an accomplishment such as a pro-motion or graduation. It could make a child proud to wear such a symbolic item many years later, King says. (He says he thinks rings are popular because they can be seen by the wearer.) Jewelry can be quite timeless in appearance. Unlike a fashion-driven item such as a dress or a handbag, the likelihood of vintage jewelry fitting into a modern wardrobe is strong, so the story of the piece doesn’t ever have to end, says Sally Morrison, head of jewelry public rela-tions of the World Gold Council. There is always a potential new chapter, she says. “Jewelry is usually a part of life’s most jubilant, happy moments. There’s an aura of positive emotion.” Morrison keeps her grandmother’s simple gold wedding ring, and she has a charm that she made from her son’s toe print when he was a baby. “Hopefully, his toe charm will someday go to his wife or child. It’s comforting to know that,” she says. Engraving or personalizing a piece adds to its intrinsic value, whether it’s a luxury-brand Swiss watch or the thin little band that served as your grandmother’s placehold-er when she and grandpa were saving for an engage-ment ring. If you’re unsure of the provenance of an engraved message or whom the initials belong to, just let your imagination run wild, Morrison says. “It gives a mystery and romance to the story.” Tiffany’s King says there is a lifetime progression in one’s jewelry wardrobe. It often starts with a silver necklace and, if he were a betting man, he’d predict a heart motif. “The heart is an important symbol, an international symbol, and it’s appreciated and under-stood regardless of where one sits in the world.” Tollman, an ambassador for Gemvara, a website that sells customized jew-elry, says a tennis bracelet or diamond stud earrings are a good place to start for those looking to build an heirloom-worthy col-lection because they can be within the budget of a self-purchase, yet they’ll age gracefully. They’re also more appropriate for a younger wearer than, say, a choker necklace drip-ping in diamonds. There is a time for diamonds, though, whether you are buying for your-self, someone else or plan-ning to pass them down. “Diamonds really are a girl’s best friend,” Tollman says, “and you can’t go wrong with them.” She has been known to pair her “nana’s” 19th-century diamond earrings with jeans and a biker jacket, or a ballgown. “Jewelry is meant to be used, meant to be worn. Leaving them in the jew-elry box would be like leaving the plastic on din-ing room furniture.” Fashion ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOSJewelry, unlike other gifts, has the potential to b ecome heirlooms because it conveys meaning across generations when shared among loved ones. Some examples from Tiffany and Co. include (above left) a sterling silver heart ke y locket; (above right) a 15.04 carat oval fancy vivid yellow diamond ring with white diamonds and set in platinum and 18 -karat yellow gold; and (below) a heart tag bracelet in st erling silver. Shiny baubles are heirlooms in the making. Destin couple, 57 and 62, run first marathon By BRANDON WALKERNorthwest Florida Daily NewsDESTIN — Upon completing the first marathon of his life, it would have been understandable if 62-year-old Destin resident Galyn Moen immediately began to reflect on his long battle to the finish line. After all, 17 years ago Moen received injuries in a car accident that left his knee shattered and forced doctors to won-der if he’d ever walk again. In the face of that adver-sity, with the help of friends and family, Galyn not only walked again, but he became extremely active, leading improbably to the Space Coast Marathon in Coco Beach on Nov. 25. But Moen didn’t think of that. Instead, he stayed around the finish line and waited for his wife, the source of much of his inspiration, to finish her first mara-thon. When Wendy Moen crossed the finish line just over 50 minutes later, the couple had completed an incredible journey that few would have thought pos-sible. And they had done so together. “What got me started was my wife,” said Galyn. “My knee was basically broken in half in 1995, and doc-tors really didn’t know if I’d be able to walk again. And they certainly didn’t know how active I’d be able to be. But I picked up cycling, and eventually I was rid-ing up to 70 miles a week. During that time, Wendy was on a health kick of her own and she began run-ning. So about 15 months ago, I asked a family friend that happens to be a doctor if he thought I could handle running with her. He told me he thought I could, and we’ve been running ever since.” Neither Wendy, a Destin realtor who also leads sev-eral active running groups in the area, nor Galyn ever set out with the intention of running a marathon. But after using running regi-mens to get healthy which led to the completions of 5K runs and then 10K runs, the couple decided to test their limits. “We were running regularly together with several groups,” said Wendy. “On Sunday, we’d run with this group, then on Monday, we’d run with another. That was our week. We got to a point where I just thought about it and said to myself ‘Wow, I think I can do this.”’ Once active in the Emerald Coast running community, the Moens quickly found like-minded couples throughout the area who also enjoyed running to stay fit. But it wasn’t until they met former Olympian Jeff Galloway that their marathon goals began to come into focus. What followed was a 30week program that incre-mentally helped the Moens get ready for the 26.2-mile grind. The couple took aim at completing the Disney Marathon in January of 2013, but a few months ago realized they were ahead of schedule. That’s when the Space Coast became a pos-sibility, and the two set their sights on running their first marathon, he at age 62, she at 57, in late November. Then, on the day of the race, a nervous Wendy received the extra push she needed. “I was warming up and getting ready, and then I made eye contact with a race volunteer,” said Wendy. “She looked at me and said ‘You’re going to have a great day.’ I thought about it for a second and I knew she was right.”

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4D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013 4DLIFE SUNDAY EVENING JANUARY 6, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsOnce Upon a Time “Queen of Hearts” Once Upon a Time (N) Revenge “Power” (N) Happy Endings (N) Apartment 23News at 11Inside Edition 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsThe Insider (N) Love-RaymondBig Bang TheoryCSI: Miami “Count Me Out” Criminal Minds “Unknown Subject” NewsSports ZoneChann 4 NewsBig Bang Theory 5-PBS 5 -Doc Martin “S... Happens” NOVA “Doomsday Volcanoes” Secrets of Highclere Castle (N) Masterpiece Classic “Downton Abbey Season 3” Wedding guests arrive. Doc Martin “S... Happens” 7-CBS 7 47 47d College BasketballAction News Jax60 Minutes (N) Person of Interest “Identity Crisis” The Good Wife “Boom De Ya Da” (N) The Mentalist (N) Action Sports 360Two and Half Men 9-CW 9 17 17Yourjax MusicAccording to JimYourJax MusicVoid TVLaw & Order “Family Business” Local HauntsLocal HauntsTMZ (N) The Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30e NFL Football: NFC Wild-Card Game -Seahawks at Redskins The Simpsons (N) Bob’s Burgers (N) Family Guy (N) American Dad (N) NewsAction Sports 360Leverage “The Wedding Job” 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsDateline NBC A couple receives shocking medical news. (N) The Biggest Loser (Season Premiere) Adults and teens try to lose weight. (N) First Coast News at 11 (N) CSPAN 14 210 350NewsmakersWashington This Week Q & APrime MinisterRoad to the White House Q & A WGN-A 16 239 307Funny VideosBloopers!Bloopers!How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine(:40) Instant Replay30 Rock30 Rock TVLAND 17 106 304RoseanneRoseanneRoseanneRoseanneRoseanneRoseanneLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Oprah’s Next ChapterOprah’s Next ChapterOprah’s Next Chapter “Jamie Foxx” Oprah’s Next Chapter (N) My Life Is a Joke Female comics. Oprah’s Next Chapter “Jamie Foxx” A&E 19 118 265Shipping WarsShipping WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStora ge Wars(:01) Be the Boss “Signal 88 Security” HALL 20 185 312(5:00)“The Nanny Express” (2009)“The Wish List” (2010, Romance) Jennifer Esposito, David Sutcliffe. “The Seven Year Hitch” (2012) Natalie Hall, Darin Brooks, Ryan Doom. FrasierFrasier FX 22 136 248(5:30)“Forgetting Sarah Marshall” (2008) Jason Segel, Kristen Bell.“Grown Ups” (2010, Comedy) Adam Sandler, Kevin James, Chris Rock.“Grown Ups” (2010, Comedy) Adam Sandler, Kevin James, Chris Rock. CNN 24 200 202CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) The Coming Storm (N) Piers Morgan TonightCNN Newsroom (N) The Coming Storm TNT 25 138 245“Rush Hour 3” (2007, Action) Jackie Chan, Chris Tucker. “Shooter” (2007, Suspense) Mark Wahlberg, Michael Pea, Danny Glover. (DVS)“Shooter” (2007) Mark Wahlberg. (DVS) NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobSee Dad Run“Rugrats in Paris: The Movie” (2000, Adventure) The NannyThe NannyFriendsFriends SPIKE 28 168 241(5:00)“Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade” (1989) Harrison Ford.“Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull” (2008, Adventure) Harrison Ford, Cate Blanchett. Premiere.“Poseidon” (2006) Josh Lucas. MY-TV 29 32 -The Saint “The Old Treasure Story” M*A*S*HM*A*S*H “Payday” Columbo Museum curator stages robbery. M*A*S*HThriller “The Specialists” The Twilight ZoneThe Twilight Zone DISN 31 172 290Austin & AllyShake It Up!JessieJessieDog With a BlogDog With a BlogDog With a BlogDog With a BlogJessieGood Luck CharlieAustin & AllyAustin & Ally LIFE 32 108 252(5:00) “Fugitive at 17” (2012) “Stalked at 17” (2012, Suspense) Taylor Spreitler, Chuck Hittinger. “An Amish Murder” (2013) Neve Campbell, Christian Campbell. Premiere. (:02) “Stalked at 17” (2012) USA 33 105 242NCIS “Legend” (Part 1 of 2) NCIS “Legend” (Part 2 of 2) NCIS The death of an ICE agent. NCIS “Aliyah” Tense reunion. NCIS “Jet Lag” “Over/Under” (2013) Steven Pasquale. BET 34 124 329“The Last Fall” (2012) Lance Gross. An NFL player struggles with life after his career is over. “Four Brothers” (2005, Crime Drama) Mark Wahlberg, Tyrese Gibson, Andr Benjamin. Family FirstFamily First ESPN 35 140 206Strongest ManStrongest ManWorld’s Strongest Man CompetitionNFL PrimeTime (N) (Live) e College Football GoDaddy.com Bowl -Arkansas State vs. Kent State. From Mobile, Ala. (N) ESPN2 36 144 209 World Series of Poker Europe Final Table. From Cannes, France. SportsCenter Special (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SUNSP 37 -Reel AnimalsSaltwater Exp.Into the BlueShip Shape TVSprtsman Adv.Florida Sport.Inside the HEATShip Shape TVSprtsman Adv.Reel TimeFishing the FlatsSport Fishing DISCV 38 182 278Moonshiners “Storm’s a Brewing” Moonshiners “A Shiner’s Last Stand” Moonshiners Tickle builds a new still. Moonshiners (N) Moonshiners (N) Moonshiners TBS 39 139 247“Ghosts of Girlfriends Past” (2009) Matthew McConaughey. (DVS)“The Wedding Date” (2005) Debra Messing. (DVS)“The Wedding Date” (2005) Debra Messing. (DVS) Wedding Band “99 Problems” HLN 40 202 204Murder by the BookDominick Dunne: Power, PrivilegeDominick Dunne: Power, PrivilegeWhat Would You Do?What Would You Do?Dominick Dunne: Power, Privilege FNC 41 205 360FOX News Sunday With Chris WallaceFOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) FOX News Sunday With Chris WallaceGeraldo at Large (N) Huckabee E! 45 114 236KardashianKeeping Up With the Kardashians“You’ve Got Mail” (1998) Tom Hanks. Two bitter business rivals conduct an online love affair. Ice Loves Coco (N) The SoupChelsea LatelyLove You, Mean It TRAVEL 46 196 277RV Crazy!Killer RV UpgradesMega RV Countdown (N) Extreme RVsExtreme RVsExtreme RVs HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lHouse HuntersHunters Int’lExtreme HomesProperty Brothers “Delecia & Dwayne” House Hunters RenovationHouse HuntersHunters Int’l TLC 48 183 280Here Comes HoneyHere Comes HoneyHere Comes HoneyHere Comes HoneyHere Comes Honey Boo BooHere Comes Honey Boo Boo (N) Best Funeral Ever (N) Here Comes Honey Boo Boo HIST 49 120 269American PickersAmerican Pickers “An Indian Reunion” Ax Men DJ Jeremiah is pushed to far. Ax Men “Cage Match” (N) Bamazon “Divided We Fall” (N) (:02) Pawn Stars(:32) Pawn Stars ANPL 50 184 282Gator Boys “Warrior Gator” Gator Boys: Xtra Bites (N) Gator Boys: Xtra Bites (N) Gator Boys “Mississippi or Bust” (N) Finding Bigfoot “Squatch Spies” (N) Gator Boys “Mississippi or Bust” FOOD 51 110 231Rachael vs. Guy Celebrity Cook-OffRachael vs. Guy Celebrity Cook-OffChopped Recipes to use with leftovers. Rachael vs. Guy Celebrity Cook-OffIron Chef America “Flay vs. Pham” (N) Restaurant Stakeout TBN 52 260 372T.D. JakesJoyce MeyerLeading the WayThe Blessed LifeJoel OsteenKerry ShookBelieverVoiceCre o DollarJoseph Biblical son of Jacob rises from slave to savior. FSN-FL 56 Women’s College Basketball Oklahoma State at Baylor. (N) The Game 365d College Basketball Tulsa at Southern Methodist. (N)d College Basketball Oregon at Oregon State. (N) SYFY 58 122 244(5:00) “Stake Land” (2010, Horror)“Resident Evil: Afterlife” (2010, Horror) Milla Jovovich, Ali Larter.“The Dead” (2010, Horror) Rob Freeman, Prince David Osei, David Dontoh.Primal (2010) AMC 60 130 254(5:30)“Signs” (2002, Suspense) Mel Gibson, Joaquin Phoenix.“Bring It On” (2000, Comedy) Kirsten Dunst, Eliza Dushku. Premiere. “Bring It On” (2000, Comedy) Kirsten Dunst, Eliza Dushku. COM 62 107 249Dinner-Schm(:45) “Hot Tub Time Machine” (2010, Comedy) John Cusack, Rob Corddry. “I Love You, Man” (2009) Paul Rudd, Jason Segel. Premiere. Tosh.0Tosh.0 CMT 63 166 327Nashville Teddy tells Rayna the truth. Nashville “Where He Leads Me” RebaRebaRebaRebaRebaReba “Roll With It” Redneck Island NGWILD 108 190 283Shark Men “Tiger Escape” The Rise of Black WolfWild AlaskaBig Sur: Wild CaliforniaClimbing Redwood GiantsWild Alaska NGC 109 186 276Taboo “Freaky Remedies” Taboo “Strange Behavior” Taboo “Strange Syndromes” Drugs, Inc. “Coke Kings and Queens” Alaska State Troopers “Fatal Inferno” Drugs, Inc. “Coke Kings and Queens” SCIENCE 110 193 284They Do It?They Do It?They Do It?They Do It?They Do It?They Do It?They Do It?They Do It?They Do It?They Do It?They Do It?They Do It? ID 111 192 285Fatal Encounters “Art Imitates Death” Fatal EncountersFatal Encounters “The Ring” Fatal Encounters “A Deadly Fix” (N) On the Case With Paula Zahn (N) Fatal Encounters “The Ring” HBO 302 300 501The New World(:25) “The Three Stooges” (2012) Sean Hayes. ‘PG’“Rise of the Planet of the Apes” (2011) James Franco. ‘PG-13’ GirlsGirls “She Did” EnlightenedEnlightened MAX 320 310 515(5:45)“The Hangover Part II” (2011) Bradley Cooper.“Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban” (2004, Fantasy) Daniel Radcliffe. ‘PG’ “The Sitter” (2011, Comedy) Jonah Hill. ‘R’ (:20) Sexual Quest SHOW 340 318 545Shameless Ian ignores Lip. Shameless “Parenthood” Shameless Monica returns. Shameless “A Great Cause” Shameless Monica tries to kill herself. Shameless “Fiona Interrupted” MONDAY EVENING JANUARY 7, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) The Bachelor (Season Premiere) Sean meets the women. (N) (:01) Castle “Signi cant Others” (N) News at 11(:35) Nightline (N) 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) omg! Insider 5-PBS 5 -JournalNightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Antiques Roadshow “Corpus Christi” Market Warriors (N) POV Reporters in Tijuana, Mexico. (N) BBC World NewsTavis Smiley 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge JudyTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother2 Broke Girls2 Broke GirlsMike & MollyHawaii Five-0 “Ua Hopu” Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneHart of DixieBeauty and the BeastTMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family GuyFamily GuyThe SimpsonsBones “The Family in the Feud” (:01) The Mob Doctor “Life and Death” NewsAction News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) The Biggest Loser “Get Moving” Contestants are pushed to new limits. (N) Deception “Pilot” (Series Premiere) (N) NewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(5:00) Public Affairs Politics & Public Policy Today WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home Videosd NBA Basketball Cleveland Cavaliers at Chicago Bulls. From the United Center in Chicago. (N) WGN News at NineAmerica’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304Andy Grif th ShowM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*H “Inga” The Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Married-MobsterMarried-MobsterMarried-MobsterMarried-MobsterDateline on OWNShocking Family SecretsTrouble Next Door (N) Dateline on OWN A&E 19 118 265Celebrity Ghost StoriesCelebrity Ghost StoriesThe Haunting Of... “Eric Mabius” The Haunting Of... “Regis Philbin” The Haunting Of... “Fairuza Balk” (N) (:01) The Haunting Of... HALL 20 185 312The Brady BunchThe Brady BunchThe Brady BunchThe Brady BunchHappy DaysHappy DaysHappy DaysHappy DaysFrasierFrasierFrasierFrasier FX 22 136 248How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherTwo and Half MenTwo and Half Men“Hancock” (2008) Will Smith. A scruffy superhero carelessly wreaks havoc in Los Angeles.“Hancock” (2008, Action) Will Smith, Charlize Theron. CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245The Mentalist “Crimson Casanova” The Mentalist “Scarlett Fever” The Mentalist Jane is kidnapped. The Mentalist “Red Moon” The Mentalist A Santa is murdered. CSI: NY A re in Stella’s apartment. NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobDrake & JoshDrake & JoshFull HouseFull HouseFull HouseFull HouseThe NannyThe NannyFriends(:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241(5:00)“Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull” (2008)“Scarface” (1983, Crime Drama) Al Pacino, Michelle Pfeiffer. A Cuban immigrant ghts to the top of Miami’s drug trade. Scarface MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*HM*A*S*HLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitSeinfeldFrasierThe Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Good Luck CharlieJessieA.N.T. FarmShake It Up!“Tinker Bell and the Great Fairy Rescue” (2010) Austin & AllyGood Luck CharlieGood Luck CharlieJessie “Star Wars” A.N.T. Farm LIFE 32 108 252“The Killing Secret” (1997, Docudrama) Ari Meyers, Tess Harper. “An Amish Murder” (2013, Mystery) Neve Campbell, Christian Campbell. Movie USA 33 105 242NCIS “Untouchable” NCIS “Bloodbath” WWE Monday Night RAW (N) (:05) NCIS: Los Angeles “Tin Soldiers” BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Top 10 Countdown” (N)“Friday After Next” (2002, Comedy) Ice Cube, Mike Epps. “Big Momma’s House 2” (2006, Comedy) Martin Lawrence, Nia Long, Emily Procter. ESPN 35 140 206College GameDay (N) (Live) BCS Nat’l Champe 2013 Discover BCS National Championship Alabama vs. Notre Dame. From Sun Life Stadium in Miami. (N) ESPN2 36 144 209SportsCenter (N)d College Basketball Notre Dame at Cincinnati. (N) NFL Live (N) ProFILE: 60Pro le: 60ProFILE: 60SportsCenter (N) (Live) SUNSP 37 -Reel AnimalsSaltwater Exp.Into the BlueShip Shape TVSprtsman Adv.Reel TimeTransat Qubec-St-MaloHalls of Fame (N) Women’s College Basketball Virginia at Miami. DISCV 38 182 278Moonshiners “Troubled Waters” Amish Ma aAmish Ma a “Fire From the Lord” Amish Ma a Secret MMA barn ght. Amish Ma a “Fall From Grace” Amish Ma a Secret MMA barn ght. TBS 39 139 247King of QueensSeinfeldSeinfeldSeinfeldFamily GuyFamily GuyBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryConan (N) HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) Dr. Drew on Call (N) Nancy GraceShowbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236Ice Loves CocoIce Loves CocoE! News (N) Studio E! (N) E! SpecialIce Loves CocoIce Loves CocoIce Loves CocoIce Loves CocoChelsea Lately (N) E! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. FoodMan v. FoodThe Layover with Anthony BourdainThe Layover with Anthony BourdainHotel Impossible “The Hotel Leger” (N) Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations HGTV 47 112 229Property VirginsProperty VirginsLove It or List It “The Preston Family” Love It or List ItLove It or List It Hard to please. House HuntersHunters Int’lLove It or List It “Kasia and Patrick” TLC 48 183 280Island MediumIsland MediumCake Boss: Next Great BakerCake Boss: Next Great BakerCake Boss: Next Great Baker (N) Cake Boss (N) Cake Boss (N) Cake Boss: Next Great Baker HIST 49 120 269American Pickers “Pickers in the Attic” American PickersPawn StarsPawn StarsAmerican Pickers “Feudin’ Pickers” Pawn Stars(:31) Pawn Stars(:02) American Pickers ANPL 50 184 282Gator Boys “See You Later, Alligators” Finding Bigfoot “Squatch Spies” Finding Bigfoot “Australian Yowie” Australia’s bigfoot-like creature. Gator Boys “Mississippi or Bust” Finding Bigfoot “Australian Yowie” FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveMystery DinersMystery Diners TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the LordMax LucadoThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesLiving EdgeKingdom Conn.Jesse DuplantisPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -Halls of FameShip Shape TVWorld Poker Tour: Season 10The Game 365Inside the MagicInside the MagicMagic Live! (Live)d NBA Basketball Orlando Magic at Portland Trail Blazers. (N Subject to Blackout) SYFY 58 122 244Being Human “Don’t Fear the Scott” Being Human Josh wants to tell Julia. Being Human Sally’s mother returns.“Dawn of the Dead” (2004, Horror) Sarah Polley. Milwaukee residents ght zombies in a mall. Apocalypse AMC 60 130 254(5:30)“Behind Enemy Lines” (2001) Owen Wilson, Gene Hackman. “The Green Mile” (1999, Drama) Tom Hanks, David Morse, Michael Clarke Duncan. A guard thinks an inmate has a supernatural power to heal. COM 62 107 249It’s Always Sunny(:26) Tosh.0The Colbert ReportDaily Show(7:57) Futurama(:28) Futurama(8:58) South Park(:29) South Park(9:59) BrickleberrySouth ParkDaily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327RebaRebaRebaRebaRebaRebaRedneck IslandRedneck IslandRedneck Island NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer “Killer in the Window” America’s Wild Spaces “Death Valley” America’s Wild SpacesAmerica’s Wild SpacesAmerica’s Wild SpacesAmerica’s Wild Spaces NGC 109 186 276Locked Up AbroadDrugs, Inc. The Cannabis industry. Drugs, Inc. “Hash” Alaska State TroopersAlaska State TroopersAlaska State Troopers SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeThrough Wormhole-FreemanThrough Wormhole-FreemanThrough Wormhole-FreemanThrough Wormhole-FreemanThrough Wormhole-Freeman ID 111 192 285True Crime With Aphrodite JonesTrue Crime With Aphrodite JonesI Didn’t Do It (N) Disappeared (N) True Crime With Aphrodite JonesDisappeared “The Dutchman’s Curse” HBO 302 300 501(5:45) “Lovewrecked” (2006) ‘PG’ (:15)“The Rundown” (2003, Adventure) The Rock. ‘PG-13’ “Joyful Noise” (2012, Comedy-Drama) Queen Latifah. ‘PG-13’ “The Day After Tomorrow” MAX 320 310 515“I, Robot” (2004, Science Fiction) Will Smith. ‘PG-13’ “The Descendants” (2011, Drama) George Clooney. Premiere. ‘R’ “Varsity Blues” (1999) James Van Der Beek. ‘R’ Co-Ed Con dential SHOW 340 318 545(:15)“50/50” (2011, Comedy-Drama) Joseph Gordon-Levitt. ‘R’ Untold History of the United States (N)“Lara Croft Tomb Raider: The Cradle of Life” (2003) Angelina Jolie. ‘PG-13’“Goon” (2011, Comedy) ‘R’ WEEKDAY AFTERNOON Comcast Dish DirecTV 12 PM12:301 PM1:302 PM2:303 PM3:304 PM4:305 PM5:30 3-ABC 3 -NewsBe a MillionaireThe ChewGeneral HospitalMauryDr. PhilBe a MillionaireNews 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsVaried ProgramsPaid ProgramAndy Grif th ShowThe Jeff Probst ShowSteve HarveyThe Dr. Oz ShowChann 4 NewsChann 4 News 5-PBS 5 -WordWorldBarney & FriendsCaillouDaniel TigerSuper Why!Dinosaur TrainCat in the HatCurious GeorgeWild KrattsElectric Comp.R. Steves’ EuropeNightly Business 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxThe Young and the RestlessBold/BeautifulThe TalkLet’s Make a DealJudge Joe BrownJudge JudyAction News JaxAction News Jax 9-CW 9 17 17The Trisha Goddard ShowLaw & Order: Criminal IntentJudge MathisThe Bill Cunningham ShowMauryThe People’s Court 10-FOX 10 30 30Jerry SpringerThe Jeremy Kyle ShowJudge Joe BrownWe the PeopleThe DoctorsDr. PhilFamily FeudFamily Feud 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsBe a MillionaireDays of our LivesFirst Coast LivingKatie The Ellen DeGeneres ShowNewsNews CSPAN 14 210 350(9:00) Public AffairsPublic AffairsVaried Programs Public Affairs WGN-A 16 239 307In the Heat of the NightWGN Midday NewsWalker, Texas RangerWalker, Texas RangerWalker, Texas RangerLaw Order: CIVaried Programs TVLAND 17 106 304Andy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowGunsmokeGunsmokeBonanzaAndy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th Show OWN 18 189 279Dr. PhilDr. PhilVaried Programs A&E 19 118 265CSI: MiamiVaried ProgramsCriminal MindsVaried ProgramsCriminal MindsVaried ProgramsThe First 48Varied ProgramsThe First 48Varied ProgramsThe First 48Varied Programs HALL 20 185 312Marie MarieVaried ProgramsHappy DaysHappy DaysHappy DaysHappy DaysThe Golden GirlsThe Golden GirlsThe Golden GirlsThe Golden Girls FX 22 136 248(11:00) MovieVaried Programs How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/Mother CNN 24 200 202CNN Newsroom CNN Newsroom The Situation Room TNT 25 138 245BonesBonesBonesBonesVaried Programs NIK 26 170 299Team UmizoomiMax & RubyDora the ExplorerGo, Diego, Go!SpongeBobSpongeBobOdd ParentsOdd ParentsOdd ParentsSpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBob SPIKE 28 168 241Varied Programs MY-TV 29 32 -Hawaii Five-0GunsmokeBonanzaThe Big ValleyThe Wild, Wild WestEmergency! DISN 31 172 290Little EinsteinsMovieVaried ProgramsPhineas and FerbVaried ProgramsGood Luck CharlieGood Luck CharlieAustin & AllyVaried Programs LIFE 32 108 252Old ChristineOld ChristineHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherFrasierFrasierFrasierFrasierWife SwapVaried Programs USA 33 105 242Varied Programs NCIS BET 34 124 329The ParkersThe ParkersMy Wife and KidsMy Wife and KidsJamie Foxx ShowJamie Foxx ShowThe ParkersMovieVaried Programs ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenterSportsCenterSportsCenterOutside the LinesColl. Football LiveNFL LiveAround the HornInterruption ESPN2 36 144 209First Take Numbers Never LieBest of First TakeVaried ProgramsNumbers Never LieDan Le BatardNFL32Varied Programs SUNSP 37 -Varied Programs DISCV 38 182 278FBI: Criminal PursuitAuction KingsAuction KingsMythBustersVaried Programs TBS 39 139 247American DadAccording to JimLove-RaymondLove-RaymondRules/EngagementRules/EngagementLove-RaymondFriendsFriendsFriendsFriendsKing of Queens HLN 40 202 204News Now Making It in AmericaEvening Express FNC 41 205 360(11:00) Happening NowAmerica Live Studio B With Shepard SmithYour World With Neil CavutoThe Five E! 45 114 236E! NewsSex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CityVaried Programs TRAVEL 46 196 277Varied Programs Anthony Bourdain: No ReservationsCarnivoreCarnivoreBizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. FoodMan v. Food HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lVaried Programs TLC 48 183 280What Not to WearA Baby StoryA Baby StoryCake BossCake BossWhat Not to WearVaried ProgramsFour WeddingsVaried ProgramsFour WeddingsVaried Programs HIST 49 120 269Varied Programs ANPL 50 184 282Animal Cops HoustonAnimal Cops HoustonAnimal Cops HoustonPit Bulls and ParoleesThe HauntedConfessions: Animal Hoarding FOOD 51 110 231Best DishesBarefoot ContessaVaried Programs10 Dollar DinnersSecrets/Restaurant30-Minute MealsGiada at HomeGiada at HomeBarefoot ContessaBarefoot ContessaBest DishesVaried Programs TBN 52 260 372Varied ProgramsBehind the ScenesVaried ProgramsJames RobisonTodayThe 700 ClubJohn Hagee TodayVaried ProgramsPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -Varied Programs SYFY 58 122 244Varied Programs AMC 60 130 254MovieVaried Programs COM 62 107 249Varied Programs Movie Comedy Central(:28) Futurama(4:59) FuturamaIt’s Always Sunny CMT 63 166 327Varied Programs RoseanneRoseanneRoseanneRoseanne NGWILD 108 190 283Dog WhispererVaried Programs NGC 109 186 276Alaska State TroopersBorder WarsTabooVaried Programs SCIENCE 110 193 284Varied Programs Time WarpMythBustersThey Do It?They Do It? ID 111 192 285Dateline on IDUnusual SuspectsUnusual SuspectsFinal CutVaried Programs HBO 302 300 501(11:00) MovieVaried Programs MAX 320 310 515(10:00) MovieVaried Programs (:10) MovieVaried Programs SHOW 340 318 545(11:45) Movie(:15) MovieVaried Programs

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DEAR ABBY: I spent the afternoon running errands. As I left the shopping cen-ter, I saw a young couple with a baby and a toddler holding a sign request-ing help with food, as the husband had just been laid off. I drove past, then con-sidered the children and circled back. I had no cash with me, so I stopped and offered them our family’s dinner -a jar of premium spaghetti sauce, a pound of fresh ground beef, a box of dried spaghetti, fruit cups that my children usually take to school for treats, and some canned soups I occasion-ally have for lunch. Imagine my surprise when the couple declined my generosity. Instead, the man strongly suggested that I should go to a nearby ATM and withdraw cash to donate to them because they preferred to select their own groceries and pay their phone bills. What are your thoughts on this? -GENUINELY PUZZLED IN AUSTIN, TEXAS DEAR PUZZLED: What happened is a shame. Some families are truly in need and should be guided to a shelter so they can receive help getting back on their feet. However, in some cities you see the same people on the same streets for long periods of time. They have staked out their “turf,” and because the money they are given is tax-free, some of them are doing quite well. In your case, the couple you saw holding the sign may have been professional panhandlers, and the chil-dren may have been “bor-rowed.” ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: My hus-band and I have been sepa-rated for a year and I have filed for divorce. We have reached an agreement about everything except one thing: our tortoise. This may seem strange, but Herbert has always been our “child.” I think of him as my kid, and I believe my husband when he says he loves him that much, too. We got Herbert as a baby that fit into the palm of my hand. Herbert is now 9, very large and lives in the backyard in a “doghouse” structure. The problem is, my husband still wants to see Herbert. He agrees that he will visit only when I am not at home. I don’t dis-trust him or worry he will try to take Herbert, but I just don’t want him here. I know that if Herbert is mine legally, I won’t have to let anyone see him. Once our divorce is final, I want nothing more to do with my husband and he knows that. But it’s like telling someone he could never see his kid again. I’d really like to know your thoughts. -NICOLE IN SANFORD, FLA. DEAR NICOLE: Because you can’t split Herbert in half, why not consider shared custody? If your husband can pro-vide a safe place for the tortoise to stay while he’s with “Daddy,” you could work out an agreement so that you could exchange your “kid” at a neutral place -such as your veter-inarian’s office -and you wouldn’t have to see your husband and vice versa. DEAR ABBY HOROSCOPES ARIES (March 21-April 19): You may feel at odds about relationships, posi-tion and your overall status. Don’t let your uncertainty get you down. Plan to get out and about doing things that make you happy, and you will come across something or someone that sparks a great idea. +++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): An interest you have in someone or something will lead to an unusual opportunity. Signing up for a course or attending a conference will help you decipher exactly what you want to pursue. +++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Reconsider your direc-tion and the prospects you have that may allow you to move further ahead. Your high energy and enthusiasm will count for something when it comes to advancement. +++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): You’ll be pulled in sev-eral different directions. Choose the one that suits you best. A chance to use your creativity in a prosperous manner is appar-ent. +++++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You’ll face trouble if you neglect your chores or per-sonal responsibility. Don’t let situations develop into an unmanageable situation before you do something. Discipline and practicality will be the best way to turn a wrong into a right. ++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Step things up a notch and you won’t be sorry. You have what it takes to turn something you enjoy doing into a prosperous venture. Learning, teach-ing and experiencing new people, places and pas-times will pay off. ++++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Problems and dis-agreements will lead to personal changes. Make sure you are fully aware of the consequences you will face should you decide to do things your way. +++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Deep discussions will help you solve some of the issues pending in your per-sonal life. When it comes to home, family and your domestic future, your intu-ition will not let you down. +++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Stick to the truth and avoid taking on too much. Falling short of a commitment you made will hurt your reputation. Make alterations to your lifestyle and living situation that will help you deal with outside factors or influ-ences. +++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Your honesty and integrity will attract interesting friends. Mixing business with pleasure will help you form a closer bond with someone that can contribute to a project you want to explore and develop this year. Rely on your past experience for insight. ++++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Put your heart on the line and find out where you stand. Regardless of the outcome, you will be one step closer to building a strong home base. ++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Don’t let your heart lead you down the wrong path when there is so much opportunity around you. Stick to basics and be responsible and disciplined in all that you do and you will excel. Avoid exagger-ating, excess and overin-dulgence. +++++ Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com THE LAST WORD Eugenia Word SUNDAY CROSSWORD Across 1 Working hours7 Bit of a trickle11 Rental car add-on14 Series of rounds18 Unlikely to surprise0HJDQRI:LOO *UDFH 21 High22 Sign-off for Spanish spies? 24 Wee25 Suffix with human3H\WRQ0DQQLQJV former teammates 27 Chuck of NBC News28 Grub around29 Zero-calorie cooler31 Parched32 Scale33 Hosen material34 Two bottled liquids kept in a cabinet? 37 Language that is mostlymonosyllabic /LIHJXDUGVVNLOO for short 40 Suffix with direct41 Some red spots44 Early education 47 Champion model maker at the countyfair? 53 Know-___'UDLQFOHDQHU chemically 55 Early seventhcentury year 56 Singer Falana and others 57 Ellipsoidal+DQGHOVBBBH /HDQGUR 60 At full speed62 Blather63 Movies often with shootouts 65 Wacky exercise regimen? 68 20 cigarettes per unit and 10 unitsSHUFDUWRQHJ" :RUOGFDSLWDOWKDWV home to Zog IBoulevard 72 Volatile stuff/LRQVGLQ:HOOORRN\WKHUH6ZHHWWDONHGPD\EH+DYHRQHVFDNHDQG eat ___ 79 Hoppy pub quaff80 Covering81 Forbes competitor82 Green room breakfast item? 86 Onetime high fliers87 God holding a thunderbolt 89 Expert finish?90 From ___ Z91 Tiny chastisement93 Musical composition aboutDOXPEHUMDFNVseat? 99 Home territories 103 Division of biology 105 Paperback publisher since1941 106 Siege weapon108 Swore109 Wally of cookie fame 110 Stunner111 Its employees might have jumperFDEOHV$EEU 112 Shortstop Garciaparra 113 Try-before-youbuy opportunitiesat knickknackstores? 116 Golfer Norman and others 117 Fabricates118 Part of an applause-o-meter 119 Bront heroine120 Sonny121 El ___$QDO\]HVLQDZD\ Down 1 Straighten out2 Some baton wielders3 Like stocks4 Modern FRPPXQLFDWLRQVfor short 5 Purse item6LODV0DUQHUDXWKRU7 Mendeleev who created theperiodic table 8 Regrets9 Timeworn 10 Heavy-duty protection 11 Went smoothly12 Go laboriously7KH6RI26 $EEU 14 Eponymous Italian city 15 Like Ben-Hur and company when notracing? 16 Handy17 Jazz pianist McCoy ___ 20 Prettify3RSH$JDWKRV successor 23 Whizzed)L[WKHFRORULQJRI say 30 Cymric31 Petal pusher?32 Dragged (on)$70PDNHU36 Alternatives to FKLSVVD\ 38 One out?42 Poor43 One having a little lamb 44 Over)LJDURLQ7KH %DUEHURI6HYLOOHHJ *DQJVWDV 3DUDGLVHEX\HU" 48 Empathetic response7LPHWKHGHYRXUHU RIDOOWKLQJVwriter 50 Skewed to one side51 It juts into the Persian Gulf 52 Less58 Examine carefully,QVWVRIOHDUQLQJ61 Capone henchman63 Elusive African animal 64 Unmitigated'UBBB,PBBB\RX69 Do70 Pacifiers 73 Grilled cheese sandwich go-with 'RQW1RERG\ Bring Me No Bad1HZVPXVLFDOZLWK7KH 77 Logical start?78 ___ a limb80 Invite to the SHQWKRXVHVXLWHsay 83 Retiring84 Mail letters 85 Pro 88 Hold stuff92 Goes without nourishment 94 Detox patients*XQQHUVWRRO96 Skirt-XVWZDWFKPH98 Hops dryer100 Bantu language101 One way to deny something 102 Equilibria103 Skin disorder104 White shade107 Singer ___ Marie109 Glow110 Morse dashes0LOWHDPOHDGHU114 Panasonic competitor &HUWDLQXWLO workers 1R RELEASE DATE: 1/6/2013 PLUS TEN By Steve Savoy / Edited by Will Shortz )RUDQ\WKUHHDQVZHUVcall from a touch-toneSKRQHHDFKPLQXWHRUZLWKDFUHGLWFDUG 123456789101112131415161718 192021 2223 24 252627282930313233343536 37383940414243 44454647484950515253545556 5758 5960616263646566676869 70 71 72737475 76 77787980 818283848586878889909192 93949596979899100101102 103104 105106107 108 109110111 112113114115116117 118 119120121122 Panhandlers refuse handout from shocked good Samaritan MENDERSCUMAHMEGLAM ICEAXETHRUDAMNNANA DOWNEDRENTMONEYANDS ANYCIGARSTANDATWORK SOOTDOINAESRISES RHOANCSHILOANEW BAKESLEANTOSUSCG ORNATEDROOLLEADTO STEREOPENNERMORTARS NEWTONEEEEEDITSYAO SYSCANTFDICNSW MIOCAUSEHAGSAGEOLD BARCODEDIALUPSETFEE ANKARASISALUNWORN NAMEFORERANROUST ACDCBRIMSDYEERR ABOILBANEIAMKLEE MOSDEFKERRISTRUGIRS IDEAINESSENCESLAVES CELTRBISSCAMSENECA ISLEMANETABSYEASTY Answers to last Sunday’s Crossword. Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. CELEBRITY CIPHER Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013 5D

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By SUZETTE LABOYAssociated PressMIAMI — When Juan Ponce de Leon searched for riches in Florida, he unknowingly helped turn the Sunshine State into the first travel destination in the United States. In April 1513, the Spanish monarchy contracted the explor-er to find another island off of Cuba that was rumored to have great riches. Instead he land-ed in Florida and named it “La Florida,” after the “feast of the flowers” during Spain’s Easter celebrations. Five centuries later, the state is celebrating its Spanish her-itage with a series of events throughout 2013. “It was always seen as an exotic place,” historian Dr. J Michael Francis said of Florida. “That’s something that Florida tourism continues to market on some level.” Although Florida’s history dates back more than 12,000 years with Native Americans, the statewide campaign “Viva Florida 500” will highlight the start of a new era with de Leon’s adventurous voyage to the New World. “He was the first visitor to the United States,” said Will Seccombe, president and CEO of Visit Florida, the state’s official tourism marketing corporation. “That’s 500 years of explorers and they kept coming back.” Tourism is Florida’s No. 1 industry, responsible for wel-coming 87.3 million visitors in 2011, according to state official estimates. Many visitors may know Florida mostly for its 825 miles (about 1,330 kilometers) of beaches or as the theme park capital of the world, but the “Viva Florida” campaign is designed to broaden their outlook, Seccombe said. The state will host 150 cel-ebrations that “highlight cultural diversity and the art culture his-tory that makes up the fabric of our communities.” After de Leon’s visit, European settlers colonized in present-day St. Augustine, the nation’s oldest city. Visitors to the city can find many references to the Spanish colonial era, from the massive Castillo de San Marcos fort that protected the city from attack, to the colorful Spanish architecture and narrow streets. (Full-scale replicas of Ponce de Leon’s flag-ship will visit the city in April). De Leon probably wasn’t the first European to set foot in Florida, and there is even debate on where he landed exactly: Melbourne Beach, St. Augustine or South Ponte Vedra Beach. But all of these suggested spots are based on fairly tenuous docu-mentation. “It’s unlikely we will ever know the precise landing spot,” said Francis, Hough Family Chair of Florida Studies at the University of South Florida in St. Petersburg. “There is no archaeological footprint. No logbook. And even if found, there’s no guarantee we would even know from that.” The commemoration, he said, is not about pinpointing the Spanish legacy but about redis-covering “and maybe even dis-cover for the first time Florida’s colonial history.” Francis also wants to set the record straight about the search for eternal youth: There is no mention of the Fountain of Youth in de Leon’s contracts with Spanish crowns or in his own writings, Francis said. “Over time that story became more embellished,” Francis said. “What started as a myth ended up in the writings of later histori-ans and chroniclers as history.” But the legend lives on in Florida’s 700 natural springs and with spas, health resorts and yoga retreats. Kicking off the 2013 celebration of European discovery was “La Gran Naranja” or the “Big Orange” drop — a 35-foot LED neon orange LCD descending from the side of a downtown Miami hotel on New Year’s Eve. The word naranja comes from the sweet Valencia orange the Spanish introduced to America, later becoming Florida’s official state fruit. Throughout the year, 150 events across the state will mark the anniversary: Drive the Spanish Heritage Trail. Dive on histor-ic shipwrecks. Tour a Spanish basilica and mission village. Visit orange groves and cattle ranches. Taste the flavors of Florida. Other events will include plenty of festi-vals with re-enactments and other things to do in addition to visiting the beaches and theme parks the state is famous for. 6D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 6DLIFE State celebrates Spanish heritage in 2013Events to mark 500th anniversary of Ponce de Leon’s arrival. ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOSABOVE: Visitors explore the Castillo de San Marcos in St. Augus tine. The nation’s oldest fort, it was built by Spanish settlers between 1672 and 1695. RIGHT: A statue of Spanish explorer Ponce de Leon, who landed here in April 1513, is located at the foot of the Bridge of Lions in St. Augustine’s Plaza de La Constitucion. By LEE REICHAssociated PressThe intricacies of plant patenting came home for me this past year with a shipment of strawberry plants. Strawberry plants send out runners, thin stems on the ends of which new plants form, which them-selves take root and bear fruits and send out more runners. Those daughter plants forming at the ends of runners are useful for filling in a strawberry bed as well as for transplant-ing elsewhere to make a new bed. But these particular plants that I bought last spring were a patented variety (Chandler). So transplanting those daughter plants would constitute a crime. How about just letting the plants root by them-selves? OK, but only for fruit production to fill in my strawberry bed. Propagation of any plant produced asexually (that is, not by seed) just to make new plants is for-bidden under the Plant Patent Act of 1930. The only exceptions are plants propagated by edible tubers — white potatoes, for example. Growers of white pota-toes evidently were vocal enough back when the Act was being drafted to press for the right to save and replant their own potato tubers.The beginnings of plant protectionSome might argue that the Plant Patent Act was too long in coming. If it had been in place earlier, then Stark Brothers Nursery, which bought propagation rights to the original Red Delicious apple for $3,000 in 1894, would not have had to erect a cage around the original Red Delicious tree. That cage only stopped people from using the original tree for propagation, however; once Stark Brothers start-ed selling trees, those trees could be used by anyone to propagate new ones.Seeds, even genes now covered by lawsThe 1930 legislation was broadened, in 1970, with the Plant Variety Protection Act. It meant that seeds, which are sexually pro-duced when pollen fertil-izes eggs, could now also be protected by patents — so-called utility pat-ents. That’s the same kind of patent used for, say, a new and better stapler or dog whistle or — more recently and controver-sially — genes. To be offered patent protection, a seed variety must not have been sold in the U.S. for longer than a year, or elsewhere for longer than four years. The variety must also reproduce reliably and be distinct. Distinctiveness has always been a potential bone of contention, espe-cially since DNA finger-printing can now be used to unlock a plant’s genetic code, some of which is just “junk,” not express-ing any trait. Patents are valid for about 20 years, after which anyone can prop-agate the plant for sale or otherwise. Someone could even then produce hybrid seeds, produced by crossing specific par-ents, because patents, available for anyone to see, spell out exactly how a product is made.What’s in a name?Enter trademarks. Whether or not a plant has been patented, it could be assigned a trademark name. What’s more, that trademark is assigned to a company or individual, who could put that name on any of their plants, even a few different ones. A patented variety also could be mar-keted under more than one trademark. A patented plant is one thing and a trademark name another. Patents have a limited life; trade-marks can be renewed indefinitely, which makes them useful. If you start selling some outstanding patent-ed plant under a trade-marked name, people will continue to buy it under that trademark even after the patent expires. Other people could propagate the patented plant, but could not sell it under your trademark. A plant label stating “PPAF” (plant patent applied for) means, for plants, the same thing as “patent pending” for anything; “PVR” (Plant Variety Rights) means the plant has been patented. A plant may be patented, though, without it stating so on its label. Names of trademarked plants are followed by the symbol “(at).” I recently learned that three birch trees I planted have broken a rule about patenting and trademark-ing. They are Heritage birches. The variety name under the patent is Heritage, and the plant was later trademarked Heritage. That’s a no-no: a variety and trademark name must be different. Oh, well, I’m not the one who broke the rule, and the plant is pest-resis-tant and beautiful despite its brush with the law. My plants broke the lawPatent and trademark rules complicate life. ASSOCIATED PRESSThese Heritage birches in Bryn Mawr, Pa., are break ing the ‘law.’ The variety name under which this plant was patented is Heritage; it was later trademarked Heritage. Tha t’s a no-no: Under federal law, a plant’s variety and tr ademark names must be different. TRAVEL FLORIDA Online: Q Viva Florida 500: www. fla500.com and www.viva florida.org Gardening ASSOCIATED PRESSInterior doors and trim can be painted to create co ntrast while adding drama and architectural detail to personaliz e a room. Painting interior doors adds ‘wow’ By AMY LORENTZENAssociated PressIf you’ve got your decor looking just about right but want that extra “wow” fac-tor, consider painting inte-rior doors. “Address other main features in the room first, and then if something is still missing, painting the door provides that ‘Aha’ moment,” says Natalie Myers, prin-cipal designer with Veneer Designs in Los Angeles. “It changes everything.” Painting a doorway is easy and inexpensive, depending on your preferred paint and supplies. It’s a low-commit-ment project, since you can simply repaint if you don’t like the outcome. And you can customize the color and design to any decor. “The true trend is that homeowners are becoming much more confident in using color,” says Colleen Maiura with Lowe’s Home Improvement stores. “When combined with the desire to personalize the space, hom-eowners are experimenting with whatever color makes them happy.” What are designers seeing most on interior doors? Interesting colors, especially teal blues and nature-inspired greens, with yel-lows and pastels for a more playful look in warmer climes and vacation homes. For the less adventurous who still want a bold state-ment, it’s classic colors such as black, charcoal, chocolate and navy. Before you coat your entire door, test a small spot to make sure you like the color. Many interior design-ers will do a color consulta-tion for a small fee. Or if that’s not in your budget, Myers suggests search-ing for inspiration at sites such as Houzz.com and DesignSponge.com where designers feature their proj-ects, or at Pinterest.com, where do-it-yourselfers post their own interior door transformations. You can also find inspiration at ApartmentTherapy.com, where founder Maxwell Gillingham-Ryan and his team offer design tips. Gillingham-Ryan recommends choosing a gloss fin-ish, not matte, of whatever hue you choose for your interior door. “Think classic, European, oil-based paints,” he says, and urges investing in a qual-ity paint. “Higher amounts of pigments and more body make fewer coats needed and a smoother finish.” Home Decor