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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
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Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:01993

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:01993

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

Opinion ............... 4A People ................. 2A Obituaries ............. 5A Advice & Comics ....... 4-5B Puzzles ............... 4-5B TODAY IN PEOPLE Williams joining Fela! cast. COMING SUNDAY 4-laning US 90: A preview. 64 41 Isolated showers WEATHER, 2A Lake City ReporterFRIDAY & SATURDAY, JANUARY 4 & 5, 2013 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | 75LAKECITYREPORTER COM WEEKEND EDITION CALL US: (386) 752-1293 SUBSCRIBE TO THE REPORTER: Voice: 755-5445 Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 138, No 243 1A Sunday Zumba introduction A free introduction to Zumba class will be held from 3 to 4 p.m. at the Teen Town Recreation Building, 533 NW DeSoto St. For more information, contact Sarah Sandlin as (386) 7580009 or visit Lake City Zumba on Facebook. Tuesday Medicare seminar LifeStyle Enrichment Center is sponsoring a free Medicare seminar from 5 to 6 p.m. The seminar will be moderated by Irv Crowetz of C/C & Associates. Subjects to be covered include: what you need to know about Medicare, when to enroll, whats covered and when a supplement is needed. Call 755-3476 ext. 107 to reserve a seat. Wednesday Newcomers meeting The Lake City Newcomers will meet at 11 a.m. at Guang Dong Chinese Restaurant in the Lake City Mall. Lunch costs $11. Sale of 50-50 tick ets will end at 11:25. The guest speaker will be Leandra Lily Johnson, the first female judge in the Third Judicial Circuit. For more information, call Barbara Test at 754-7227 or Rose Taylor at 755-2175. Medicare information SHINE will present a program to inform seniors about Medicare from 1:30 tpo 3:30 p.m. at the Lake City Public Library on Columbia Avenue. For more informa tion, call (800) 262-2243. Thursday Builders Association The Columbia County Builders Association will hold its first General Council lunch at 11:30 a.m. at Guang Dong restaurant in the Lake City Mall. The meeting will start at noon. The speaker will be Columbia County Superintendent of Schools Terry Huddleston. If you are considering joining our builders association, this is a good time to join us for lunch, meet our members and learn more of what we are all about. Cost of lunch for members is $12 and non-members fee is $15. A HammerClaw jackpot is now $275. To make a reser vation or for more informa tion, emai colcountybuild@ comcast.net or phone (386) 867-1998. DAR meeting The Edward Rutledge Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution will hold its monthly meet ing at 10:30 a. m. at the LifeStyle Enrichment Center, 28 SE Allison Court (off Baya Avenue). Kathleen Cooper will be speaking about Lyme dis ease. Visitors are welcome. Help with the healing COURTESY GENTLE CAROUSEL Therapy horses Magic (left) and Wakanda, of Gentle Carousel Miniature Therapy Horses of Lake City, are seen at a memorial at Newtown Town Hall in Newtown, Conn. The horses were invited to Newtown by family members of one of the victims of the Dec. 14 mass shooting that left 26 dead at Sandy Hook Elementary School. Debbie GarciaBengochea, who owns Gentle Carousel with her husband, Jorge, said they will remain in Newtown through next week. Stabbing sends 1 to area hospital STABBING continued on 3A CONGRESS continued on 3A Man wounded 12 times with ice pick thing, reports say. Crash stalls traffic on I-75 More fiscal clashes coming By DAVID ESPO AP Special Correspondent WASHINGTON A new Congress opened for business Thursday to confront long-festering national prob lems, deficits and immigration among them, in an intensely partisan and crisis-driven era of divided government. The American dream is in peril, said House Speaker John Boehner, re-elected to his post despite a mini-revolt in Republican ranks. Moments after grasping an oversized gavel that symbol izes his authority, Boehner implored the assembly of new comers and veterans in the 113th Congress to tackle the nations heavy burden of debt at long last. We have to be willing truly willing to make this right. Also on the two-year agenda is the first significant effort ASSOCIATED PRESS House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio, enters the House of Representatives chamber on Capitol Hill in Washington on Thursday after surviving a roll call vote in the newly convened 113th Congress. TONY BRITT/ Lake City Reporter Northbound traffic on Interstate 75 came to a halt for more than an hour Thursday after a four-vehicle crash at 2:09 p.m. near the 435 mile marker. Traffic was backed up for more than five miles a tractor trailer jackknifed across the roadway. The driver of truck, who did not give his name, said cars cut him off and caused the crash. I tried to avoid an accident, he said. I saved lives. Nash: Speed up rec complex improvements By DEREK GILLIAM dgilliam@lakecityreporter.com District 3 County Commissioner Bucky Nash said Thursday the county has been dragging its feet on improve ments at the Southside Recreation Complex, and that its time to finalize the plans, as tournaments are sched uled to start in February. Those tournaments are opportunities to showcase the city, he said. He noted that plans for the improvements were approved in May 2012. I know this is something thats been kicked down the road...its you either COUNTY continued on 3A By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com FORT WHITE A Fort White man was arrested Wednesday and faces felony battery charges after he alleg edly stabbed another man 12 times with a home made ice pick while the two were fighting about gar bage cans and dogs. Jesus Hurtado, 50, of 527 SW Grandpa Way, Fort White, was charged with aggravated battery in connection with the incident. He was booked into the Columbia County Detention on $10,000 bond. According to Columbia County sheriffs reports, deputy Don Meyer was dis patched to a battery call after Hurtado told dispatchers he was struck by his neighbor while checking an easement. While Meyer was en route, dispatch informed him that the other man involved in the fight called and said he had been stabbed, but refused emergency medical services. Meyer met Hurtado at the intersection of County Road 138 and Grandpa Way where Hurtado told him he was blocked in on the road by the other man, at which point Hurtado confronted the man and started complain ing about garbage cans and the mans dogs. Hurtado told Meyer that the man punched him in the side of the head and the two began fighting in the roadway near Grandpa Way and Nightingale Glen. Hurtado told Meyer that he kept fighting but was dazed and the other man was getting the better of him. Meyer informed Hurtado that dispatch said the other man was cut and asked Hurtado what he used and Hurtado reportedly told Meyer he used his box cutter and cut the man several times. Hurtado COUNTY COMMISSION

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CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Actress Barbara Rush (Peyton Place) is 86. Actress Dyan Cannon is 76. Country singer Kathy Forester of the Forester Sisters is 58. Guitarist Bernard Sumner of New Order (and Joy Division) is 57. Actress Ann Magnuson (Anything But Love) is 57. Country singer Patty Loveless is 56. Singer Michael Stipe of R.E.M. is 53. Actor Dave Foley (NewsRadio, Kids in the Hall) is 50. Actress Dot Jones is 49. Actress Julia Ormond is 48. Country singer Deana Carter is 47. AROUND FLORIDA Officers to patrol schools in Tampa TAMPA When classes resume Monday at Hillsborough County elementary schools, an armed police officer or deputy will be on duty at each one for security pur poses. The Tampa Tribune reported that precaution was taken in local schools following the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary in Connecticut on Dec. 14 that left 26 dead, including 20 students. Officials said Wednesday that the additional security armed officers or depu ties already are assigned to the districts middle and high schools will be extended to elementary schools the remainder of the school year. The Hillsborough County Sheriffs Office and Tampa Police Department will have uni formed officers in about 150 elementary schools countywide. Missing boaters body found OVIEDO Authorities have found the body of one of the boaters missing since the weekend on Lake Jesup. Search crews found the body of 30-year-old Jason M. Cobb floating in the water near Bird Island on Wednesday. He and 26-year-old Charles T. Jackson went missing early Saturday when they took a 15-foot boat onto the lake. Investigators from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission said the men likely were ejected from their boat shortly after 1:30 a.m. Saturday. A friend found their boat empty about 12 hours later. Medicaid fraud efforts working TALLAHASSEE State officials said they ter minated the Medicaid prescribing rights of 437 providers who were writ ing suspicious amounts of prescriptions for painkill ers and other drugs under a new system. State health officials made the announce ment Thursday along with Attorney General Pam Bondi in the annual Medicaid fraud report. The state spent nearly $17 million fighting Medicaid fraud in fiscal year 2011-12. According to the report, it recouped nearly $50 million. Floridas Medicaid program is the fourth larg est in the nation, serving more than 3.3 million lowincome recipients. Bondi said in the report that the collaboration with the Agency for Health Care Administration has resulted in tremendous financial recoveries on behalf of taxpayers and promised to ensure that Medicaid dollars go to helping the needy rather than to those who defraud the system. Boy shoots line, causes outage OCALA A 12-year-old north Florida boy shot a high-powered rifle and hit a 69,000-volt transmission line, causing almost 6,000 customers in Lynne, Silver Springs Shores, Silver Springs and Ocklawaha to lose service for several hours. The Ocala Star-Banner reports that the Clay Electric Co-op said the outage began at about 1:30 p.m. Tuesday and lasted for about five hours. The Marion County Sheriffs Office has clas sified the incident as accidental, since the boy claimed he was shoot ing the rifle at tree limbs and was not targeting the transmission line. Clay Electric serves about 165,000 members in 14 counties, including Marion. Deputies fatally shoot man ORMOND BEACH Two Volusia County Sheriffs deputies shot and killed a suicidal man who brandished a handgun as he refused their orders to stop. Sheriffs officials said the deputies fired their weapons and shot the man Wednesday night near Ormond Beach. The Daytona Beach News-Journal reported the deputies sent messages to the 52-year-old mans cell phone. He eventually responded with a suicidal text that also demanded them to leave him alone. The incident began after a 911 caller reported the man had sent text mes sages to his ex-girlfriend threatening suicide. 3 dead after SUV goes into lake DEERFIELD BEACH The Florida Highway Patrol said the body of another person has been found in a lake where a sport utility vehicle landed following a crash on Interstate 95. Troopers said the body was found Thursday morn ing after authorities real ized another person was missing from the SUV. Two of the three people pulled from the vehicle late Wednesday died and the other was in critical condition at a hospital. Williams joining tour of Fela! NEW YORK F ormer Destinys Child member Michelle Williams is joining the latest national tour of the musical Fela! Producers said Thursday the singer, who starred on the UPN sit com Half & Half, will be onstage when the tour opens at Sidney Harman Hall in Washington, D.C., on Jan. 29. Fela! a biog raphy of Nigerian musician and political activist Fela Anikulapo Kuti will then play 16 cities, including Miami, Atlanta, Cleveland, Dallas, Los Angeles, Seattle and Nashville, Tenn. Williams will play Felas African-American lover, Sandra Isadore. Williams, part of Destinys Child along with Kelly Rowland and Beyonce, is now a solo artist who has released the dance album Unexpected and the recent singles On The Run and Waiting On You. Jay-Z, Beyonces husband, is one of the producers of Fela! which won three Tony Awards in 2010. Williams has appeared on Broadway in Aida, on tour with The Color Purple, and in London starring in Chicago. Fela! had its world premiere offBroadway in the summer of 2008, and opened on Broadway a year later, playing 34 previews and 463 regular performances. It returned to Broadway last summer after an inter national tour. Madonna fan gets probation for resisting NEW YORK A former fire fighter with a crush on Madonna has been sentenced to three years probation for resisting arrest outside the singers New York City apart ment building. Robert Linhart was convicted in November after being twice arrested in September 2010. Police say the then-59-year-old Linhart was nabbed after he parked his SUV outside the Material Girls former Manhattan apartment and spray-painted love notes on poster boards. He returned a few days later and was arrested again. His attorney had argued that it was no crime to adore Madonna, the singer of pop hits including Like a Virgin who performed at last years Super Bowl halftime game. The judge on Wednesday also ordered Linhart to attend anger management sessions. Attorney Lawrence LaBrew tells the Daily News that Linhart is appealing the conviction. Depardieu, in tax fight, gets Russian citizenship MOSCOW The Kremlin has cast Gerard Depardieu in one of the most surprising roles of his life as a new Russian citizen. The announcement Thursday that President Vladimir Putin has approved Depardieus applica tion for citizenship is almost a real-life analogue to the French actors 1990 comedy Green Card, in which his character enters into a sham mar riage in order to work in the United States. But in this version, taxes appear to be at the heart of the matter. Depardieu has waged a battle against a proposed super tax on mil lionaires in his native country. French President Francois Hollande plans to raise the tax on earned income above $1.3 million to 75 percent from the current 41 percent, while Russia has a flat 13percent tax rate. As Depardieus criticism of the proposed tax roiled his country, French Prime Minister Jean-Marc Ayrault called him pathetic. Depardieu responded angrily in an open letter. I have never killed anyone, I dont think Ive been unworthy, Ive paid $190 million in taxes over 45 years, the 64-year-old actor wrote. I will neither complain nor brag, but I refuse to be called pathetic. Ex-governor leaving Current TV LANSING, Mich. Former Michigan Gov. Jennifer Granholm says she soon will leave Current TV, where she has host ed a public affairs program for the past year. Granholm made the announcement in a Facebook post late Wednesday, the same day it was revealed that Pan-Arab news channel Al-Jazeera has acquired Current TV. In the post, Granholm says her agreement with Current was for the duration of the election (and the sale). She says The War Room will air for the next few weeks through the transition ... Thursday: Afternoon: 6-4-5 Evening: N/A Thurs day: Afternoon: 2-3-5-6 Evening: N/A Wednes day: 10-11-12-25-32 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAIL Y BRIEFING FRIDAY & SATURDAY, JANUARY 4-5, 2013 HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter 2A Daily Scripture For the grace of God has appeared that offers salva tion to all people. It teaches us to say no to ungodliness and worldly passions and to live selfcontrolled, upright and godly lives in this present age. Titus 2:11-12 Associated Press Associated Press Williams Madonna Depardieu Granholm

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LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, JANUARY 4-5, 2013 3A 3A BELK.COM RED DOT: *Limited exclusions in Brighton, St. John, Eileen Fisher, Lilly Pulitzer, Resort, Bridge Collection, Levis, Coach, designer handbags and junior denim. Juniors total savings are 55-75% off. Fashion Accessories, Handbags, Small Leather Goods, Hosiery, Home Store and Mens Tailored Clothing total savings are 45-65%. COUPONS NOT VALID ON RED DOT r e d d o t c l ea r a n c e 65 % & more 30 % o ff the current ticketed price* when you take an e x tra save *see below for details. Connect with us for special offers and promotions at Belk.com/getconnected breaks price new reductions shop Fri.-Wed., Jan. 4-9 Dont miss these great savings & our storewide clearance *Only excludes Red Dot, Clearance, Earlybirds, Night Owls, Doorbusters, Bonus Buys, Everyday Values, Alegria, All Clad, Austin Reed, Ben Sherman, Brighton, btemptd, Buffalo, Casio, Citizens of Humanity, Coach, Cole Haan, Columbia, cosmetics/fragrances, Dansko, designer handbags, designer sunglasses, Dockers, Donald J Pliner, Dooney & Bourke, Eileen Fisher; Fine Jewelry watches, trunk shows and service plans; Free People, Furla, Gameday, Gear For Sports, Hanky Panky, Hart Schafner Marx, Herend, Hickey Freeman, Hugo Boss, Joseph Abboud, Kate Spade, Keen, kitchen/ novelty electrics/coffee, Lacoste, ladies better swim, ladies designer & contemporary sportswear & dresses; ladies, kids & mens designer shoes; Le Creuset, Levis, Lilly Pulitzer, Lucky, Mattel, Merrell, Minnetonka Moccasin, Miss Me, Munro, Nautica, Original Penguin, Ralph Lauren/Polo, Roberto Coin, Seven for All Mankind, Spanx, Stuart Weitzman, Thomas Dean, Tommy Bahama, Tumi, Ugg, Under Armour, Vineyard Vines, Wacoal, Wusthof; non-merchandise depts., lease depts. and Belk gift cards. Not valid on prior purchases or special orders. Cannot be redeemed for cash, credit or refund, used in combination with any other discount or coupon offer. Valid January 4-9, 2013 sale priced purchases* storewide 10% OFF home and shoes FRI.-WED., JAN. 4-9 15 EXTRA % OFF 28145953 clearance shopping pass 10 EXTRA % OFF JANUARY 4-9 *Only excludes Belk & Co. Fine Jewelers, Bridge Collections, Brighton, Coach, cosmetics/fragrances, Eileen Fisher, handbags, fashion accessories, small leather goods, hosiery, junior denim, Levis, Lilly Pulitzer, Resort, St. John and and all lease departments. Not valid on prior purchases or special orders. Cannot be redeemed for cash, credit or refund, used in combination with any other discount or coupon offer. Valid January 4-9, 2013 clearance purchases* storewide 61941121 30-50 % off Better sportswear from Madison, Rafaella, Jones New York Sport, Sunny Leigh & more Orig. 24.00-119.00 Sale 11.99-82.99 4060 % off Ladies boots from Madden Girl, Rampage, LifeStride, Rock & Candy from ZiGi, Kim Rogers, ND New Directions, Naturalizer, White Mountain, Easy Spirit, b..c, Eurosft, Unlisted, A Kenneth Cole Production Orig. 59.00179.00 Sale 29.50107.40 Kenneth & Louise Witt will celebrate 60 years of marriage on Jan. 5, 2013 at 4:00 p.m. at Hopeful Baptist Church Life Center. No gifts please. CONGRESS: More clashes to come Continued From Page 1A COUNTY: Rec improvements coming Continued From Page 1A Sitel open house TONY BRITT /Lake City Reporter Sitel representatives Deann Cruz (from left) and Aaron Arameyo explain business opera tions at the call center to Abbie Chasteen, Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of Commerce marketing director, Audre Washington; Lake City Police Department com munity liaison, and Dennille Decker, Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of Commerce Executive Director during an open house at Sitel on Thursday morning. More than 50 people attended the open house. do it or you dont, Nash said. And (the Tourist Development Council), the tourna ment people, and everybody else ... (are) tired of hearing Were going to do this and were going to do that and we never do nothing. He said that the issue of the Southside Recreation Facility was the motivating fac tor in his decision to run for the county commission. I would like to see this done..., he said. I want to make sure that everybody knows Im very passionate about this issue right here. County Manger Dale Williams said the county had agreed to take up the issue once the final budget for 2012 was com pleted and to use money left from the bud get to pay for some of the improvements to the Southside Recreation Facility. Williams said even if the bed tax isnt increased right away, work could soon begin. Williams said that the plans for the improvements were fluid, that there would be a million dollars in improvements added to the plans then a million dollars in improvements taken out. He said that as late as Wednesday, a member of the Tourist Development Council asked for $500,000 in changes to the plans. The commission did approve a motion at Thursdays meeting to have the county attorney schedule a public hearing for the increase of the bed tax, which the TDC has recommended. County Attorney Marlin Feagle said he it would take around 30 days to schedule a public hearing for an increase in the bed tax. Hurtado then took the box cutter from his pocket and Meyer placed it into evidence. Dispatch then called Meyer and told him an ambulance was headed to the scene for the victim because the victim had been stabbed a dozen times. Another deputy arrived and stayed with Hurtado while Meyer went to the victims house. The man said he had been stabbed, and when Meyer asked him how many times he had been cut, the victim said he had not been cut but stabbed with an ice pick thing. Reports said the man had stab wounds on his back, chest and both arms and Meyer reported he saw a number of small lacerations that were consistent with punc tures from a pointed object. Meyer col lected mans shirt as evidence and photo graphed his injuries. Emergency medical services personnel transported the victim to a Gainesville hospital. Reports said the paramedics told Meyer they thought the man had a punctured lung and was possible internal bleeding. Meyer returned to Hurtado and told him the man had been stabbed and Hurtado reportedly said he had all kinds of tools in his vehicle. When asked about the ice pick, Hurtado reportedly produced a homemade ice pick from the back seat of the car Hurtado was later arrested for aggra vated battery, but he also told authorities that he wanted to press battery charges against the victim, reports said. STABBING: Man suffers 12 wounds Continued From Page 1A at an overhaul of the tax code in more than a quarter century. Republicans and Democrats alike say they want to chop at a thicket of existing tax breaks and use the resulting revenue to reduce rates. There were personal milestones aplen ty as the winners of last falls races swore an oath of office as old as the republic. Sens. Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota, Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, Tammy Baldwin of Wisconsin, Mazie Hirono of Hawaii and Deb Fischer of Nebraska were among the newcomers sworn in, raising the number of women in the Senate to a record 20. Tim Scott of South Carolina became the first black Republican in the Senate in more than three decades. On the first day of a new term, one veteran made a stirring comeback. Republican Sen. Mark Kirk of Illinois returned to the Capitol for the first time since suffering a stroke a year ago, walk ing slowly up the 45 steps to the Capitol with the use of a cane. Good to see you, guys, he said. Across the Capitol, children and grand children squirmed through opening for malities that ended with Boehners elec tion as the most powerful Republican in a government where President Barack Obama will soon be sworn in to a second term and his fellow Democrats control the Senate. At $16 trillion and rising, our national debt is draining free enterprise and weak ening the ship of state, said the Ohio Republican, whose struggles to control his members persisted to the final week end of the 112th Congress when fis cal cliff legislation finally cleared. The American dream is in peril so long as its namesake is weighed down by this anchor of debt. Break its hold and we will begin to set our economy free. Jobs will come home. Confidence will come back. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., said he, too, is ready for attempts to rein in federal spending, but laid down a few conditions. Any future budget agreements must balance the need for thoughtful spending reductions with rev enue from the wealthiest among us and closing wasteful tax loopholes, he said. That was in keeping with Obamas remarks after Congress agreed on legis lation to raise taxes for the wealthy while keeping them level for the middle class. Health union alliance may fuel labor tension By SAM HANANEL Associated Press WASHINGTON Two health care unions are joining forces in a move that could threaten a powerful rivals domi nance and fuel a new round of labor tensions. The 85,000-member California Nurses Association is forging an alliance with the 10,000-member National Union of Healthcare Workers to form a new union made up entirely of health sector workers. The alliance announced Thursday renews a bitter rivalry between the nurses union and the powerful 2 million-member Service Employees International Union, the nations dominant health care union and a major force in Democratic politics. It also points to a trend that could see unions increasingly compete against each other for a dwindling pool of new members as the ranks of organized labor continue their steady decline. Health care has been one of the few areas of growth for unions in recent years. About half of the SEIUs members are in the health care industry. CNA is part of the 185,000-member National Nurses United, the largest nurses union in the country. A top priority for the new alliance is to lure 43,000 unionized workers at Kaiser Permanente in California away from the SEIU and into the new union, to be known as NUHW-CNA and based in Oakland, Calif. That would deprive SEIU of more than $40 million a year in membership dues. It increases our power and experience exponentially, said Sal Rosselli, president of NUHW. We will now have the resourc es to compete with the SEIUs millions and millions of dollars. Rosselli, a former SEIU leader, founded his upstart union in 2009 after he was ousted by the larger union in a bitter power struggle. Rosselli claimed the SEIU granted too many concessions to health care corporations at the expense of union members, while SEIU leaders alleged Rosselli was simply making a power grab. In 2010, NUHW lost an election to woo 43,000 Kaiser workers away from SEIU. But the National Labor Relations Board later ruled that the election was tainted and ordered a new vote. The do over of the nations largest private-sector union elec tion since 1941 is expected to take place later this year. SEIU spokesman Steve Trossman said hes not surprised by the agreement because the nurses union has been work ing closely with the smaller NUHW over the past few years. They are pursuing a losing strategy that is bad for the labor movement that they claim they are all about, Trossman said. We are not in a position where we can waste precious resources on internal fights instead of using those resources to organize workers who are not already in unions. The SEIU and the nurses union have operated under a noncompetition agree ment since 2009. That agreement followed months of bitter clashes over organizing workers and accusations from both sides of sabotage and interference. Under the pact, the nurses union would focus only on recruiting hospital nurses, while SEIU would target other health care workers. But the noncompetition agreement expired at the end of 2012, and the nurses union has no intention of renewing it. On Thursday, the nurses union accused SEIUs California local, United Healthcare Workers West, of collaborating with hos pital chains Kaiser and Sutter Health to reduce health coverage, pensions and workplace standards for unionized workers. Nurses in the Kaiser system are seeing the erosion of patient care standards as a result of the SEIU regime, said CNA coPresident Deborah Burger.

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OPINION Friday & Saturday, January 4-5, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A4AOPINIONFiscal cliff leaves GOP dazed, confused Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman T he Newtown, Conn. school shooting no longer domi-nates the headlines, but the issues it raised won’t soon go away. School districts and law enforcement agencies across the nation now labor over ways to make our children safer, in the wake of the horror that left 20 of them dead at Sandy Hook Elementary. One thing that many can agree on is the need to place armed school resource officers in elementary schools. Most districts in Florida already have officers at middle and high schools, but the need for an armed presence at elementary schools just wasn’t appar-ent before Newtown. It is now.Up and down the peninsula, school officials are discussing the matter, in particular, how to fund the extra offi-cers. Some are doing more than just talking. Hillsborough County authorities announced Thursday that resouce officers will be permanently stationed at the district’s 150 or so elementary schools. Also as of Thursday, officers will be placed at elementary schools in Alachua County. We may not have the wherewithal to just snap our fingers and make it hap-pen here. But we are making headway.Supt. Terry Huddleston said Thursday that he is headed to Tallahassee on Monday, Jan. 14 to meet with area lawmakers in hopes of secur-ing funding for resource officers at Columbia County’s public elementary schools. It’s part of the annual Florida Association of School Administrators Legislative Days event, in which school officials from around the state urge lawmakers to fund whatever educa-tional needs seem most pressing at the time. This one has our vote.Let’s hope our lawmakers feel the same way. Top priority Make it so, with affirmations OUR OPINION E leven-year-old David hung his head down and wouldn’t look at me. He appeared angry and resentful of authority, and less than eager to meet me, his newly assigned court counselor. In this first counseling session, his mother was coopera-tive, but expressed disap-pointment and frustration. I learned of his chronic problems with defiance of authority, vandalism, fight-ing at school, and criminal mischief. As his therapist, I met with David and his family for the court recommend-ed 10 weeks. I worked to help him overcome his resistance to counseling, and built a supportive counseling relationship with him. David main-tained his distance, and was slow to warm to the counseling sessions. We played basketball, and his mom sometimes par-ticipated and encouraged him. He actually smiled by the 10th session. When it was time for me to say goodbye, he agreed to try to follow his mother’s rules and stay out of trouble. Several months later, I was notified that he was in juvenile detention for 30 days for burglary. From the director, I learned that he had broken up the bed in his cell, stuffed towels down his toilet and flood-ed the cell and hallway. He was placed in solitary confinement because of the violent behaviors. I visited him in the juvenile detention facility, behind about 3 locked doors. He was depressed and sullen, showing signs of giving up hope. He agreed to talk to me, and I succeeded at getting him to open up and tell me all about his situation and his feelings. I was most concerned about his hopelessness. He said he thought he would always be in jail. This could be my last chance to help him turn around the direction of his life. After a minute of silence, I asked David, “If you could have anything you wanted in your life, what would it be?” David said almost immediately: “I just want my freedom, and to go home and stay out of trouble.” I asked, “What would you have to do to make that happen?” David thought for a long minute, staring off into space. “I’d have to do what my mom says, follow the rules, and stay out of trouble.” When I do counseling in the field, I typically carry a pen and a 3-by-5 card to jot any notes I might need later, for my report. As a last chance, I took the card out of my shirt pocket and wrote what he had said on it: “I want my freedom and to go home most of all. “I want to follow the rules, “Do what my mom says,“And stay out of trouble.” I handed him the card, and said, “Will you do this? Pin this card on the wall over your bed, and look at it every morning when you wake up and each evening when you go to bed. When you’ve earned your release, hang it in your room at home.” David said he would give it a try. I followed up regularly, and six months later met with him and his mother. Both of them expressed good feelings about his life and his behavior. It can be a powerful tool to decide to turn things around, write down your goals and keep them where you see them often. In counseling, we call this “affirmations.” If it works for somebody when they hit bot-tom in life, imagine the power it can have for the rest of us. I use it myself, to remind me of my goals. How about giving affirmations a try? LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.comT he “fiscal cliff” fiasco has left the Grand Old Party in tat-ters. Dazed, confused and fractured, Republican legislators very publicly have violated some of their most unshak-able principles in exchange for a tiny sack of broken marbles. Meanwhile, the party’s wobbly congressio-nal leadership makes the Maginot Line look like the Great Wall of China. With the admirable exceptions of Iowa’s Charles Grassley, Utah’s Mike Lee, Kentucky’s Rand Paul, Florida’s Marco Rubio and Alabama’s Richard Shelby, GOP senators swallowed a car-toonishly inadequate deal. Conservatives were sad-dened when our sainted Ronald Reagan, mired in the 1982 recession, traded $3 in spending cuts for every $1 in higher taxes. In 1990, we were outraged when we read Daddy Bush’s lips as he endorsed $2 in budget cuts for each $1 in tax increases. Of course, those spending cuts evaporated, since Democrats always whine loudly enough to scare away the piper before he can get paid. But those dark days are like a rainbow-sized Laffer Curve compared to the “bargain” that passed Congress on New Year’s Day: This legislation cuts spending by $1 for every $41 in higher taxes. And that $1 likely won’t get cut. Not even joints get rolled as easily as Republicans. This legislation boosts spending by $330 billion and increases the national debt by $3.9 trillion through 2022. This is how Washington defines “bipar-tisan debt reduction.” This law also contains $7 million in special tax favors for electric scooters, $59 million for biofuel-algae growers, $78 million for NASCAR, $222 million for Puerto Rican rum produc-ers, and $248 million for the motion-picture indus-try. Conversely, it offers no escape from the brand new 2.3 percent “Obamacare” tax that already is killing jobs and innovation in the life-saving medical device industry. Republicans reply that they caved today to fight another day. The looming debt-ceiling battle sup-posedly will find them as intrepid as a Marine battalion, itching to slash spending and re-limit government. Believe it when you see it. For now, free-marketeers would be lucky if Republicans donned the blue helmets of United Nations peacekeepers. The GOP also backed higher tax rates on upper-income individuals. By conceding Obama’s class-warfare argument that “the rich” must pay their “fair share” of taxes, Republicans have rendered themselves incapable of refuting this central lie. They should have respond-ed that, in 2010, the top 10 percent of filers earned 45 percent of national income and paid 71 percent of fed-eral income taxes. When Obama screams yet again for more tax “fairness,” Republicans no longer can claim that they are protect-ing their tax-hike virginity, having shared a tax-raising toss with Obama in the back seat of Cadillac One. The House passed this measure with Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, and just 84 other Republicans, and an overwhelming 172 Democrats voting aye. Meanwhile, Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va., inspired 150 Republicans to vote no, along with 16 Democrats. As if becoming untrustworthy on spending and taxes were not calami-tous enough, Boehner boneheadedly canceled a Monday night vote on $60 billion in aid for Hurricane Sandy’s victims. The Senate shamefully contam-inated this bill with such pollution as $2 million for Smithsonian roof repairs, $8 million for new Justice Department vehicles, and $150 million for Alaskan fisheries! Boehner should have purified the Senate bill of such irrelevancies, pushed it through the House, and sent it across the Capitol without the detritus that senators recklessly inserted. Instead, Boehner scotched the Sandy vote without explanation — even to such GOP allies as Rep. Peter King of New York — then endured bit-ter bipartisan criticism for his high-handed callous-ness. Boehner eventually relented and promised Sandy-relief votes early in this new Congress. But Boehner suffered deep, self-inflicted wounds that make him look simultane-ously cruel and inept. So, like Democrats, Republicans are now a free-spending, tax-hik-ing party. But, unlike Democrats, they are badly split, hopelessly unable to play hardball, and appear mean to hurricane victims. Robert DennyBob.Denny8@gmail.com Q Bob Denny is a licensed mental health counselor in Florida, and teaches psychology at Florida Gateway College. Contact him at (386) 454-4950. Q New York commentator Deroy Murdock is a columnist with the Scripps Howard News Service and a media fellow with the Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and Peace at Stanford University. Deroy Murdockderoy.murdock@gmail.com

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Wilbert Austin Mr. Willie Austin, resident of Lake City, Florida, passed away December 28, 2012 in the Su wannee Val ley Care Cen ter. Wilbert was born Au gust 2, 1945 to Willie Aus tin and Dora Mazrene Carter. He re ceived his ed ucation in the Columbia County school system. In 1980 he was united in Matrimony to Mary Brooks. Wilbert, at the age of sixteen, worked for Mr. Gardner at a local mobile home plant and later worked for both ABC Mo bile Home and Great Lakes Mo bile Home Plants. The experi ence from working with mobile home manufacturing, afforded him the knowledge to start his own business. He named his business Austin Mobile Home and continued with the business until 2006 when his health declined. Left to cherish memories: His loving wife, Mary; children, Tony, Wilbert, Jr., both of Lake City, FL, Lynwood, Tampa, FL, Kimberly, Kathy, Jody, Brittany, Ray, Glen, Alvin, all of Lake City, FL; grandchildren, greatgrandchildren; aunts, Leather and Laverne Carter; hosts of other relatives and friends. Mr. Austins care entrusted to COMBS FUNERAL HOME. 292 NE Washington Street. Lake City, FL. (386) 752-4366. Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D. The Caring Professionals Cora T. Keene Cora T. Keene, 97, of Longwood, passed away Tuesday, January 1, 2013 at Hospice of the Com forter in Altamonte Springs. A native of Carraway, she resided in Longwood since 1990 com ing from Putnam County where she lived in the Palatka and San Mateo area. Cora was a retired insurance agent with Liberty Na tional Life In surance Com pany. She was a dedicated member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints where she was active in the relief so ciety. Cora enjoyed reading and studying the scriptures. She was preceded in death by her husband, Dewey Casper Keene, her parents, Dexter Tedder and Susan Harden Tedder, 2 broth ers, Leo Tedder and Raymond Tedder, twin grandsons, Michael and Dale Keene and a greatgrandson, Shawn Lynn Ryan. She is survived by a son, Dex ter Keene (Sandra) of East Pal atka, 2 sisters, Juanita Dorlon of Longwood and Kathleen Hicks of Sanford, 6 grandchildren, Dexter Keene, Jr., Tina Hills (Will), Brandie Bidot (Shawn), Rebecca Keene, Amber Walters (Jamie) and Chris Adams (Shan non) and 4 great-grandchildren, Bradley Cullen, Haden Bidot, Hunter Keene and Katie Walters. Services will be Saturday, January 5, 2013 at 2:00 P.M. at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in Lake Mary with Bishop Clayton Chevreier conducting. The family will receive friends Saturday at the church from 1:00 P.M. till the time of services at 2:00 P.M. The burial will be at 2:00 P.M. Sunday, January 6, 2013 at Oak Grove Cemetery in Union County (near Providence). Memories and condolences may be expressed to the family at www. JohnsonOverturffunerals.com Arrangements are under the direction of J OHNSON OV ERTURF FUNERAL HOME in Palatka. LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY & SATURDAY, JANUARY 4-5, 2013 5A 5A Community Concerts of Lake City Live Arts Series 2012-2013 AT LEVY PERFORMING ARTS CENTERFLORIDA GATEWAY COLLEGE Contact: Community Concerts of Lake City, Inc for further information (386) 466-8999 www.communityconcerts.info With an extraordinarily broad vocal range, American countertenor Terry Barber in a class by himself. Once a member of the Grammy Award winning ensemble, Chanti-cleer, he performed opera, classical, gospel, folk and jazz in a dozen languages in more than 100 concerts around the globe.Terry joined the roster of the Metropolitan Opera in 2002 for their staging of Sly, starring Placido Domingo. He made his debut at Carnegie Hall in 2004, singing the role of Orlovsky in Die Fledermaus with the National Chorale under Martin Josman. Whether performing classical or popular favorites, Terry Barber breathes new life into everything he sings and crafts what the Los Angeles Times calls a performance of great vitality and verve. TERRY BARBER Counter Tenor Board of Trustees 2013 Meeting Schedule January 14, 2013 February 11, 2013 March 11, 2013 April 8, 2013 May 13, 2013 June 10, 2013 July 8, 2013 August 12, 2013 September ** 2013 October 14, 2013 November 11, 2013 December 9, 2013 ** Budget Hearings take place in the month of September and dates will be announced. Regular Board Meetings are held on the second Monday of the month at 5:15 p.m. Special Meetings may be called as necessary and will be noticed accordingly. Board Meetings are held in the Conference Room at LSHA Administrative Complex. Jack Berry Executive Director Obituaries are paid advertise ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporters classified depart ment at 752-1293. OBITUARIES COMMUNITY CALENDAR To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr@lakecityreporter.com. Jan. 6 Zumba introduction A free introduction to Zumba class will be held from 3 to 4 p.m. at the Teen Town Recreation Building, 533 NW DeSoto St. For more information, contact Sarah Sandlin as (386) 7580009 or visit Lake City Zumba on Facebook. Zumba weight loss The Lake City Zumba Loser weight-loss contest will begin at 4 p.m. at the Teen Town Recreation Building, 533 NW DeSoto St. For more information, contact Sarah Sandlin as (386) 758-0009 or visit Lake City Zumba on Facebook. Jan. 8 Medicare seminar LifeStyle Enrichment Center is sponsoring a free Medicare seminar from 5 to 6 p.m. The semi nar will be moderated by Irv Crowetz of C/C & Associates. Subjects to be covered include: what you need to know about Medicare, when to enroll, whats covered and when a supplement is needed. Call 755-3476 ext. 107 to reserve a seat. Native plant society The Sparkleberry Chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society will meet at 6:30 p.m. at Hatch Park, 403 SE Craven St., Branford. Beau Willsey, an environmental scientist with the Suwannee River Management District, will give a program about exot ic invasive plants. For mor information, contact chap ter President Mae Brandt by email at maebrandt@ bellsouth.net or phone (386) 466-0915. Jan. 9 Newcomers meeting The Lake City Newcomers will meet at 11 a.m. at Guang Dong Chinese Restaurant in the Lake City Mall. Lunch costs $11. Sale of 50-50 tickets will end at 11:25. The guest speaker will be Leandra Lily Johnson, the first female judge in the Third Judicial Circuit. Formore information, call Barbara Test at 754-7227 or Rose Taylor at 755-2175. Medicare information SHINE will present a program to inform seniors about Medicare from 1:30 tpo 3:30 p.m. at the Lake City Public Library on Columbia Avenue. For more information, call (800) 262-2243. Jan. 10 Builders Association The Columbia County Builders Association will hold its first General Council lunch at 11:30 a.m. at Guang Dong res taurant in the Lake City Mall. The meeting will start at noon.The speaker will be Columbia County Superintendent of Schools Terry Huddleston. If you are considering joining our builders association, this is a good time to join us for lunch, meet our members and learn more of what we are all about. Cost of lunch for members is $12 and non-members fee is $15. A HammerClaw jackpot is now $275. To make a reser vation or for more informa tion, email colcountybuild@ comcast.net or phone (386) 867-1998. Medicare information SHINE will present a program to inform seniors about Medicare from 9 a.m. to noon at the TOPS Health Fair at First Advent Christian Church, Live Oak, and from 1:30 tp 3:30 p.m. at Live Oak City Hall. For more information, call (800) 262-2243. DAR meeting The Edward Rutledge Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution will hold its monthly meet ing at 10:30 a. m. at the LifeStyle Enrichment Center, 28 SE Allison Court (off Baya Avenue). Kathleen Cooper will be speaking about Lyme dis ease. Visitors are welcome. Garden Club to meet Lake City Garden Club will meet at the Clubhouse, 257 SE Hernando Ave. Social time will begin at 9:30 a.m., and the meeting will start at 10. Jo Carver will give a talk on landscap ing. Jan. 11 History program Actor Chaz Mena will per form a program, Claiming La Florida for King and Cross, at 6:30 p.m. at the Columbia County Main Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave. Mena will portray Pedro Menendez de Aviles, the founder of St. Augustine and first Spanish gover nor of Florida. Tickets are required, and are available free of charge at any county library location. Jan. 12 Chili cook-off The fourth annual Branford Chili Cook-off will be from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hatch Park on Craven Street in Branford, with a variety of events for adults and kids. Admission is $5 and includes all the chili you can eat. Proceeds will benefit Herrys Kids Pediatric Services, a pro gram of Hospice of the Nature Coast. To register to compete in the chili cook-off, call the hospice at (386) 755-7714 or visit online at www.hospiceof citrus.org.

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FAITH & VALUES Friday & Saturday, January 4-5, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com 6A6AF&V Some thoughts for the new year Happy new year, forgiven by God You only play, work or live so long.Sports: football, baseball, basketball. The average career life of an NFL running back is five years. We never know how long we have to accomplish what we are to accomplish. The Bible says we have 70 years. Some do…Some don’t. Some have longer, less healthy lives. Some have short healthy lives. But no mat-ter what, we only have so long. So that makes every day important.Every day we have opportunity to accomplish things that have to be done today. We have opportunity to serve God, to witness, to spend time with those we love, to do good. The most important thing to do are those things with eternal value. We are told to lay up treasures in heaven. James says that the things we lay up earthly will be destroyed.Because when a day is gone, it is gone forever.When a day is gone and the opportunity of that day is missed, we will never have the chance to relive or revisit some opportunities. The Bible speaks much about the importance of today. The day Jesus called His disciples; that was their opportu-nity. If they had rejected the call, someone else would have taken their place. You may remember the little, short, Zacchaeus who climbed up in the sycamore tree to see Jesus as He passed by. Jesus said to him: Come down, for today I must stay at your house. If he had not come down, Jesus would have stayed somewhere else. We are told that today is the day of Salvation. Who knows? tomorrow may be too late. In Acts we have the account of Paul before Felix. Paul preached the gospel to him but Felix told Paul to go away and he would call for him when he had a more convenient season. The Bible does not indicate that he ever called.Always have a positive attitude.My attitude is mine. Yours is yours. Don’t let someone else take control of yours. One per-son in an office, store, or church can change all the peoples’ attitudes around them because people let them; too bad that most of the time it is changed for the worst. It is a sad thing when one bad attitude can change the good attitude of so many. Always Do What Is Right. For You Are Being Watched. All those around you are watching you. When you don’t do right, those under you and around you may not do what is right. It has been said that your life may be the only Bible some may read. Your testimony is the best thing you have going for you. In the letter to all seven churches in Revelation 2 and 3 God said: “I know your works.” Don’t ever underestimate the power of love.In that great love chapter, I Corinthians 13, the Holy Spirit says that someday all the gifts will pass away; and the only thing that will remain is Love. It is the most powerful thing on earth. Someone once said: Time is so valuable that God only gives us one moment at a time; and He gives that moment but once in all eternity. T he beginning of a new year is always excit-ing. It makes you feel like you have a fresh start. It has the feeling that you can put some things behind you and go a different direction. It is as if you are living with the slate wiped clean. Being forgiven by God has the same results and should bring the same feelings. It is as if we can begin a new life. It is like we are a new creature. It is like all our sins have been wiped clean. Being forgiven by God is not something that is automatic with Him. There are some things which we must do first before He will forgive us. If we are not willing to do them, then He will not forgive us even though He has the desire to extend forgiveness. One of the very first things which we must do to have God’s forgiveness is to learn that we have done something wrong towards Him. We must learn that we have transgressed His laws or sinned. We may also have to learn that we have not done some things which He wants us to do. We need to learn that He is not pleased with our actions. The next step we must take is to make a determination that we want to make a change in our life. After learning that we have transgressed His laws, it would do us no good to have this knowledge if we were not going to act upon this knowledge. Not acting upon this knowledge would have the same effect as not having the knowledge in the first place. In Biblical terms this action is called repentance. The next step in asking God to forgive us is to admit, or confess, to Him our wrong behav-ior. The Christian has the privi-lege of confessing his sins direct-ly to God. The Christian is not in the position of the children of Israel in that he must confess his sins to a man which was called the high priest. Because Jesus is the high priest for the Christian, then the Christian has Jesus asking His Father to forgive us. Usually this asking or confessing is done through what is com-monly called prayer. The next step would be to have the confidence that God has done what He said that He would do, namely forgive us. If we have this type of confidence then we will not be having sec-ond thoughts as to whether or not God has forgiven us. If we truly trust Him to forgive us then after we have said “Amen” we will go on with life having the full assurance that we have been forgiven. To do other-wise would be an indication that our faith or trust in God is not what it should be. The final step in asking God to forgive us is to live the corrected life faithfully. We must have every intention of making the necessary changes in our life so that we will not transgress God’s law. If we find ourselves commit-ting the same sin over and over, maybe we need to question our-selves by asking, “Have I truly repented of this sin?” “Have I really changed my mind about this particular action that vio-lates the will of God?” Everyone knows that making changes is hard. Everyone knows that sometimes it takes time for us to make the complete change. However, let’s not use this as an excuse for not making the changes so that we can be forgiven by God. Have a “happy new year” by obtaining God’s forgiveness. Q Hugh Sherrill is an ordained minister and Bible teacher at Eastside Baptist Church. Hugh Sherrillems-hugh43@comcast.net BIBLE STUDIES BIBLICAL MEDITATION Carlton McPeakcarlton_mc@msn.com Q Carlton G. McPeak is an evangelist working in the Lake City area. All Scriptural quotations are from the New American Standard Bible, Holman Bible Publishers, unless otherwise noted.

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By HRVOJE HRANJSKIAssociated PressMANILA, Philippines — Twenty-six years after Roman Catholic leaders helped his mother marshal millions of Filipinos in an uprising that ousted a dic-tator, President Benigno Aquino III picked a fight with the church over con-traceptives and won a vic-tory that bared the bishops’ worst nightmare: They no longer sway the masses. Aquino last month signed the Responsible Parenthood and Reproductive Health Act of 2012 quietly and without customary hand-shakes and photographs to avoid controversy. The law that provides state funding for contraceptives for the poor pitted the dominant Catholic Church in an epic battle against the popular Aquino and his followers. A couple with links to the church filed a motion Wednesday to stop imple-mentation of the law, and more petitions are expect-ed. Still, there is no denying that Aquino’s approval of the legislation has chipped away at the clout the church has held over Filipinos, and marked the passing of an era in which it was taboo to defy the church and priests. Catholic leaders consider the law an attack on the church’s core values — the sanctity of life — saying that contraceptives promote promiscuity and destroy life. Aquino and his allies see the legislation as a way to address how the poor — roughly a third of the country’s 94 mil-lion people — manage the number of children they have and provide for them. Nearly half of all pregnan-cies in the Philippines are unwanted, according to the U.N. Population Fund, and a third of those end up aborted in a country where abortion remains illegal. Rampant poverty, overcrowded slums, and rising homelessness and crime are main concerns that neither the church nor Aquino’s predecessors have successfully tackled. “If the church can provide milk, diapers and rice, then go ahead, let’s make more babies,” said Giselle Labadan, a 30-year-old roadside vendor. “But there are just too many people now, too many homeless people, and the church doesn’t help to feed them.” Labadan said she grew up in a God-fearing family but has defied the church’s position against contra-ceptives for more than a decade because her five children, age 2 to 12, were already far too many for her meager income. Her husband, a former army soldier, is jobless. She said that even though she has used most types of contraceptives, she still considers herself among the faithful. “I still go to church and pray. It’s a part of my life,” Labadan said. “I have prayed before not to have another child, but the condom worked better,” she said. The law now faces a legal challenge in the Supreme Court after the couple filed the motion, which seems to cover more ideological than legal grounds. One of the authors of the law, Rep. Edcel Lagman, said Thursday that he was not worried by the petition and expected more to follow. “We are prepared for this,” he said. “We are cer-tain that the law is com-pletely constitutional and will surmount any attack on or test of its constitu-tionality.” Over the decades, moral and political authority of the church in the Philippines is perceived to have waned with the passing of one its icons, Cardinal Jaime Sin. He shaped the role of the church during the country’s darkest hours after dictator Ferdinand Marcos imposed mar-tial law starting in 1972 by championing the cause of civil advocacy, human rights and freedoms. Sin’s action mirrored that of his strong backer, Pope John Paul II, who himself chal-lenged communist rulers in Eastern Europe. Three years after Aquino’s father, Benigno Aquino Sr., a senator oppos-ing Marcos, was gunned down on the Manila air-port tarmac in 1983, Sin persuaded Aquino’s widow, Corazon, to run for president. LAKE CITY REPORTER FAITH & VALUES FRIDAY & SATURDAY, JANUARY 4-5, 2013 7A7AReligionI am writing these few words while flying to a weekend appoint-ment. There is a pas-senger on board that did not pay for his fare. I offered to pay it for him, but they refused. He is sitting in the seat next to me. He reclines in some-what of a mystical “praying hands” position. He is so small he sits unnoticed. His mother is not here. He has never spoken a word. He does not cry. His father is alive today, some-where on earth. A friend gave him to me to care for. Lunch will be served in a few moments, yet he will not eat. He once had a very strong appetite — but no more. He didn’t lose it; it was taken from him. He will never again swim with abandoned pleasure in the fluids of his mother’s womb. She did not love him. He is in limbo. His cry was never heard. His “personal choice” to live was cast aside. He was not made a “ward of the court” but to the con-trary, all protections, by the courts, were removed from him. He was one of five million who have been wasted by a culture that places a “low self-image on life”. The doctors who took the vow to preserve life, deliberately destroyed his. He was not sucked out of the womb in small bits and pieces much like a gar-bage disposal discharges waste. He was one of the elite who was poisoned with a saline (salt) solu-tion. He did not drink it willingly. It was injected into his little world. Now he sits — quiet and still. He is preserved in chemicals, and kept inside a special container — hidden from the eyes of the living. Atrocities of any given generation hap-pen. Yet none seems to be aware of them while they are going on. We’re now making our decent into New York City. This could have been his hometown, for more of his relatives were aborted here last year than were born alive. I dare not remove him from his hid-ing place. He would strike fear in the hearts of all the passengers. His conception was a personal choice, and so was his death. He is a legal “homicide” yet never threatened anyone with harm. He may have been another Einstein or Edison. He is silent yet so eloquent. He is naked and defenseless, yet he attacks us — reminds us — shames us! We fear him for we have failed to love him. We hide from him, yet there is no place. Now everyone is departing. Look at them — hugging loved ones — sweethearts embrac-ing. It’s great to be alive. My little friend? His life stopped at 20 weeks, yet he is perfectly formed. Weight — about half a pound. Size — a handful. On his tomb is placed the saying, “Cold is my grave, but O, I love it. For colder were my friends above it.” “Personal choice?” We’ve heard from the living, perhaps now we should listen to the dead People have many “personal choices”. What to eat, wear, and where to work, who to marry, which church to attend, and on and on. We have “personal choices”. Maybe we need to re-think the “personal choice” of Abortion. What happened to dad’s friend’? Dad had him ‘laid to rest’ in a beau-tiful place, with a quiet ceremony. Jan. 11Fish dinnerOur Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5056 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, pre-pares fish dinners every Friday from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The dinner is $6 for two Alaskan pollock filets, corn, baked beans, hush-puppies, cole slaw and tarter sauce. Take out or eat in.Jan. 12Gospel sing, supperA gospel sing and potluck supper will be held to celebrate Mary Lou Flynn Lasseter’s 75th birthday, beginning at 6 p.m. at Lee Worship Center Church Fellowship Hall, 471 SE Magnolia Drive in Lee. Supper will be at 6 p.m., and the open-mic gospel sing will start at 7. To con-firm attendance or for more information, call Brenda Lasseter McCormick at (850) 869-9976.Jan. 13Music concertThe Ball Brothers will perform a free concert at 6 p.m. at Wellborn Baptist Church. The church is on U.S. 90 West between Lake City and Live Oak at the intersection of Lowe Lake Road in Wellborn. A love offering for the group will be received.Jan. 19MLK Jr. programThe Columbia County Branch of NAACP will hold its 30th annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. pro-gram at 4 p.m. at Mount Pisgah AME Church, 529 NE Washington St. Judge Julian Collins will be key-note speaker. The NAACP choir, directed by Dr. Tony Buzzella, will perform.Jan. 20Gospel concertGospel music singer Ken Turner and the group Valor III of Statesville, N.C., will perform a free concert at Glad Tiding Assembly at 10:30 A.M. Turner traveled for 25 years as the bass singer with the Blackwood Brothers Quartet and is the recipient of five Grammy and10 Dove awards. A love offering for the group will be received. The church is at 1571 E. Duval St. (U.S. 90) Turner and Valor III can be found on Facebook or at www.valoriii.com. For more information, call (386) 365-1533.Jan. 24Gospel concertSouthern gospel singer Ivan Parker will give a con-cert in Suwannee County at 7 p.m. at the Westwood Baptist Church in Live Oak. The concert is a fund-raiser for Love INC, the Suwannee County social services agency and food pantry. General admission tickets are $10 and “Artist Circle” tickets are $25. Only 750 tickets will be sold. Parker is perhaps best known as a regular artist at the Gaither Homecoming events, and is featured on most of the Gaither videos. He has been voted favor-ite male vocalist 12 times and soloist of the year nine times. The “Artist’s Circle” tickets entitle the holders to meet Parker a half-hour before the concert and reserved seating. Tickets are available by calling the Love INC office at (386) 330-2671 or the Rev. Dr. Everett L. Parker at (386) 754-8524. Tickets can be picked up at the Love INC office in Live Oak or mailed. If not sold out, tickets also will be available at the door beginning an hour before the performance.OngoingDevotional servicesThe American Legion Rider Chapter 57, South Highway 47, hosts Sunday Morning Devotional Services the second Sunday of every month at 9 a.m. There is also a con-tinental breakfast from 8 to 9 a.m. Services are held by the Christian motorcycle Association. Everyone is welcome to join in the fel-lowship, breakfast and spir-itually uplifting morning. Christian motorcyclistsChristian Motorcyclist Association Iron Shepherds Chapter 826 meets the first Thursday of the month at Ray’s Deli & Grill, Hwy 247 across from the fair-grounds, at 6:30 p.m. For more information email Ironshepherds826@gmail.com.My little friend Jack Exum Jr.jackexumjr@yahoo.com Q Jack Exum Jr. Is a freelance writer who lives in Lake City. To find more articles (by Jack Exum Jr. as well as Jack Exum Sr.), Exum books for sale, family pictures, Bible studies, spe cial “For Teens Only” area and more, visit Exum’s new website, www. jackexum.com. New law points to Philippine Catholic church’s waning sway ASSOCIATED PRESSA “Pro-Life” sign flashes on an electric signboard outs ide a Roman Catholic church in Manila, Philippines, on Thursday. Philippine President B enigno Aquino III last month signed the Responsible Parenthood and Reproductive Health Act o f 2012. The law that provides state funding for contraceptives for the poor pitted the domin ant Roman Catholic Church in an epic battle against the popular Aquino and his follow ers. Bank’s action means ‘cash only’ at Vatican CHURCH CALENDAR Q To submit your Church Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr@lakecityreporter.com.Birth control funding battle split church, state. ASSOCIATED PRESSPeople queue to enter the Vatican Museums at the Vatican. It’s ‘cash only’ now for tourists at the Vatican wanting to p ay for museum tickets, souvenirs and other services after Italy ’s central bank decided to block electronic payments, inclu ding credit cards, at the tiny city state. By FRANCES D’EMILIOAssociated PressVATICAN CITY — It’s “cash only” now for tour-ists at the Vatican wanting to pay for museum tickets, souvenirs and other servic-es after Italy’s central bank decided to block electronic payments, including credit cards, at the tiny city-state. Deutsche Bank Italia, which for some 15 years had provided the Vatican with electronic payment services, said Thursday that the Bank of Italy had pulled its authorization after Dec. 31. The Corriere della Sera newspaper reported that the Italian central bank took the action because the Holy See has not yet fully complied with European Union safeguards against money laundering. That means Italian banks are not authorized to operate within the Vatican, which is in the process of improving its mechanisms to combat laundering. The Vatican says it is scrambling to solve the problem for thousands of visitors who flock to its very popular Vatican Museums, which include highlights like the Sistine Chapel. The Holy See had no immediate comment on the Bank of Italy’s reported reasons. Tourists in the long lines Thursday that snaked around Vatican City walls were not happy about the inconvenience. “It’s certainly a disadvantage,” said Giuseppe Amoruso, an Italian. “Credit cards provide a use-ful service, which needs to be accessible to everybody, everywhere.” “A lot of tourists don’t have cash on them, so they have to get euros and don’t know where to get them,” said Fluger William Hunter, an American tourist. The central bank said a routine inspection found that Deutsche Bank Italia hadn’t sought authoriza-tion when it first started providing services at the Vatican. When it finally did, the Bank of Italy turned it down because the Vatican’s banking norms, including measures to combat money laundering, didn’t meet Italy’s more stringent crite-ria of recent years, a central bank official said, speaking on condition of anonymity because there was no offi-cial statement on the case.

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From staff reports LIVE OAK It may be cold out side, but you can get warmed up at the Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park (SOSMP) Jan. 11-12 when the Just Maybe Band and Clay Brooker and the Bandits Band heat up the Music Hall with live country, Southern rock, R&B, blues, rock, pop classics and lots more music for dancing or listen ing. The Just Maybe Band, new to this area but based out of Gainesville, will take the stage Friday, Jan. 11. The band consists of Richard Ritari on bass, guitar, vocals and song arrange ments; Steve Kattell on drums, per cussion and vocals; Ellen Donovan on lead vocals, percussion, flute and blues harp, and Joseph Breeden on lead guitar and vocals. Just Maybe, organized in 2012, plays a rich variety of soulful R&B, along with blues, rock and pop clas sics and a little country. In other words, a wide selection of songs from all styles for all tastes that will have you tapping your foot, nodding your head and just maybe, out on that dance floor showing your moves. The bands influences range from Amy Winehouse to the Allman Brothers, Atlanta Rhythm Section, Bob Seeger, Bonnie Raitt, Carole King, Charlie Daniels, Credence Clearwater Revival, Curtis Mayfield, Dwight Yoakum, Elvis Presley, Toby Keith, Tom Petty, Wilbert Harrison, Willie Nelson, Wilson Pickett and many, many other genres of music. Clay Brooker and the Bandits played numerous times at the SOSMP last year. Clay competed for the opportunity to play at the 2012 Suwannee River Jam. Now, Clay has his own band and is out every week end making music. Clay and the Bandits will rock the house Saturday, Jan. 12. Clay, of Waldo, is a new country music artist with the look, the voice, musical abil ity and that special something that makes a country star. Ive loved music since I was little, he said. I grew up listening to all types of music, mainly country, blue grass and gospel. Clays music career began at 14 upon receiving a guitar from his par ents. From then on my passion for mak ing and writing music has grown. Clay loves playing in front of crowds, especially friends and family. He feels very blessed to have this talent and thanks God for his gift. Clay and his band play for parties, weddings or for no reason at all except their love of music. Clay is a sheet metal worker by day and music man at night. Be sure to be in the house Jan. 12 when this great band will entertain you. If you would like to make reserva tions for RV parking, cabins, primitive camping or camper parking for the SOSMP, call (386) 364-1683, email spirit@musicliveshere.com or go to www.musicliveshere.com. You may also contact the SOSMP to inquire about any of the many exciting events coming up such as live band performances each Friday and Saturday night, the I Remember You Elvis Tribute Artist Contest Jan. 25-27, Aura Festival, Suwannee River Jam Auditions, SpringFest, Wanee, the 2013 Suwannee River Jam and much, much more. Call the SOSMP now for more information! The Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park is located at 3076 95th Drive 4.5 miles north of Live Oak off US 129 at the famous Suwannee River. The park is 4.5 miles south of Interstate 75 and 4.5 miles north of Interstate 10 off US 129. 8A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE FRIDAY & SATURDAY, JANUARY 4-5, 2013 8A 4316 US Highway 90 West Lake City, Florida Please join us for our GRAND R EOPENIN G CELEBRATI O N of Rountree Moore Nissan in a brand new indoor showroom Enjoy Jazz music by Wayne Levy, heavy hors devours and wine January 14, 4-7 p.m. See the all-new 2013 Nissan lineup RSVP to (386) 752-6933 or communications@RountreeMoore.com COURTESY PHOTO First Federal Bank of Florida President and CEO Keith Leibfried (right) presents a check to Debbie Freeman of the Columbia County Senior Services organization. Senior Services is one of many local nonprofit organizations that received shares of $61,400 donated by the bank and its employees in 2012. COURTESY PHOTO Lee Rimmington and Lillian Zytowski wave as they lead the Eastside Village Golf Cart Parade on Dec. 22. Annual community event First Federal Bank, employees donate to local nonprofits From staff reports Last year, First Federal Bank of Florida employ ees donated $30,500 to local community agencies through First Federals employee contribution pro gram, First Federal Way. The $30,500 donation facilitated a match of the same amount by First Federal for a total of over $61,400 contributed to community agencies. Through First Federal Way, employees elect to contribute a portion of their paychecks to one or more participating non profit agencies. At the end of each year, First Federal matches the total contribu tion and awards it to the selected agencies. First Federal Bank is proud of our generous, compassionate employees. Our employees continued to give back to their com munities this year, despite a weak economy. For some First Federal employees, like Shawn Bailey and Heather Markham, they chose to contribute to agencies that have touched their lives and the lives around them. Other employees, like Kathy Baird, are proud to be a part of First Federals commitment to the c ommunity and enroll in the First Federal Way program because it enables their contribution to be more than they are able to give alone. At a recent check pre sentation, Keith Leibfried, president and chief execu tive officer of First Federal, expressed gratitude to the different agencies for all the dedicated services they provide to our community. I am also grateful to the First Federal employees who generously shared their hard-earned income and to First Federals board of directors for authoriz ing a match of our employ ees, Leibfried said. Most importantly, I am grateful to the loyalty of our cus tomers who enable us to be such a good community partner. First Federal Bank of Florida offers a comprehen sive portfolio of products and services for personal and business customers, and is committed to helping local communities flour ish. Founded in 1962, First Federal has 18 branches in Amelia Island, Bonifay, Bradenton, Chipley, Dowling Park, Jasper, Lake City, Live Oak, Macclenny, Marianna, Mayo, Sarasota and Yulee. Welfare savings expected Associated Press TALLAHASSEE Florida officials are expecting big savings from a new contract for handling federal food and temporary cash assistance services. The Department of Children and Families said the contract signed Wednesday will save at least $8.6 million in the next budget year that starts July 1 and an estimated $21 mil lion over three years. The contract is with eFunds, a subsidiary of FIS Government Services, the worlds largest provider of banking and payment tech nologies. The firm will process Electronic Benefit Transfer services that clients receive through plastic cards simi lar to credit or debit cards. Eclectic mix of pop, R&B, country music on tap at SOSMP Jan. 11-12 COURTESY PHOTO Clay Booker and the Bandits (top) and the Just Maybe Band out of Gainesville will provide the musical entertainment Jan. 11 and 12 at Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park in Live Oak.

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By GUERRY SMITHAssociated PressNEW ORLEANS — Jeff Driskel’s first pass of the Sugar Bowl was intercepted and returned 38 yards for a touchdown. It never got much better for heavily favored Florida in what was supposed to be the crowning game in a bounce-back season. The fourth-ranked Gators, a two-touchdown favorite over No. 22 Louisville, fell behind by 14 points midway through the first quarter and trailed by double digits the rest of the way, losing 33-23 on Wednesday night. “We got outcoached and outplayed,” Florida coach Will Muschamp said. “That’s what I told the team. That’s the bottom line.” Florida looked more like the team that dropped 11 games combined in 2010 and ’11 than the one that lost only once in 2012. The Gators (11-2) were no match for the inspired Cardinals (11-2) and former Florida defensive coordina-tor Charlie Strong, who left to become Louisville head coach in 2010. “We’ve had a great year,” Muschamp said. “We’re building something here. We still did a lot of posi-tive things this season. Obviously this is a sour day and a sour note, and I apolo-gize to our fans and the university.” Florida was beaten in almost every way possible. After never trailing by more than 10 points in their first 12 games, the Gators trailed Louisville by more than that for all but the first eight minutes and the last 2:13 The Gators could not slow down Louisville quar-terback Teddy Bridgewater, who threw for 266 yards and two TDs against the nation’s No. 1 pass efficien-cy defense. In the first half By TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comFORT WHITE — Fort White High placed two foot-ball players on the Class 3A All-State Team released Thursday. Junior linebacker Kellen Snider was second-team defense and senior Michael Mulberry was honorable mention as a utility player. The teams are chosen by selected newspaper editors and writers throughout the state. Snider led Fort White with 179 tackles — 104 solo and 75 assisted. Snider had an interception against Taylor County High and recorded one sack and three caused fumbles. “It is a great honor and well-deserved for Kellen,” Fort White head coach Demetric Jackson said. “He has put in countless hours and has grown into a great linebacker and leader for us. The state is recognizing what we know he can do.” The next closest for the Indians was 120 tackles, which Jackson said empha-sizes Snider’s effort. “The physical tools have always been there,” Jackson said. “He is now under-standing the game and beat-ing people to the spot. One thing different is his effort to the ball. He runs players down from sideline to side-line and that is just want-to. He has the desire to be the player he is and that is what a linebacker should be.” As a middle man on the kickoff return team, Snider returned seven kicks for 63 yards. Mulberry transferred to Fort White for his senior season and started both ways. Mulberry caught 28 passes for 654 yards and six touchdowns. He added three more touchdowns on punt returns, where he totaled 209 yards. Mulberry Lake City Reporter SPORTS Friday & Saturday, January 4 & 5, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B CHEAP SEATS Tim KirbyPhone: (386) 754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS BLUE BELL ICE CREAM 2/$1100 Half Gallon Assorted Flavors Shop The Best! Try Our BREAKFAST COMBO!NEW! Sausage or Chicken BiscuitLarge or Medium*AVA#OASTFine Coffee FOR $2.99 Plus Tax and Fruit Crisp Bars or Pop Tarts(2 Pk) Assorted FlavorsBuy One Get One FREE! Prices in effect thru 1/31/13 Snider, Mulberry are honored in postseason vote. ALL-STATE continued on 2B GATORS continued on 2B Muschamp pulls no punches in reviewing game. Two Indians are all-state FILEFort White High linebacker Kellen Snider (7) drags dow n Daquin Edwards of Union County High.ASSOCIATED PRESSFlorida quarterback Jeff Driskel (6) fumbles after a blind-side hit from Louisville safety Calvin Pryor duri ng the Sugar Bowl in New Orleans on Wednesday. ‘Outcoached, outplayed’ Others’ all-stateF ort White High football faced some strong teams this season, as shown by the all-state players on the opposition. The Indians played against 18 all-staters among their 1A, 3A and 4A opponents. The First Academy, which beat Fort White in the opening round of the playoffs, had first-team running back Lloyd Hylton and linebacker Colton Plante. Running back Ben Deluzio was second team. In the playoff game, Deluzio had 13 carries for 85 yards; Hylton had 12 carries for 48 yards and a touchdown. Plante also scored a touchdown at fullback. Trinity Catholic’s Tristen Brown was first team on the offensive line. Jamonte Jones was second team as a defensive back and defensive tackle Gage Smith was honorable mention. Jones had a touchdown catch against the Indians. Quarterback David Heinkle and receiver Damien Strange were honorable mention for Williston. Heinkle was 8 of 12 passing for 150 yards and a touchdown in the loss to Fort White. Strange had five catches for 78 yards including the 33-yard touchdown. For 4A Taylor County, Luke Kellschmidt was second-team linebacker and Moral Stephens was honorable mention at wide receiver. Stephens had just one catch in the 21-9 loss to Fort White. Union County’s Carl Alexander was second-team defensive lineman, while running back Walter Mabrey and linemen Laris Paige and Talon Taylor were second-team offense. Linebacker Austin Dukes also was second team. Mabrey rushed for 124 yards and two TDs against the Indians. Newberry’s Ra’kheem Hoyt was second-team running back and linebacker Les Jordan was second team. Hoyt was suspended for Fort White’s 21-7 win. Honorable mention Trace Stankunas did play and carried 14 times for 104 yards. Q Tim Kirby is sports editor of the Lake City Reporter .FILEFort White High’s Michael Mulberry (4) makes a leaping catch in the game against Newberry High.

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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today BOXING 10 p.m. ESPN2 — Junior lightweights, Rances Barthelemy (17-0-0) vs. Arash Usmanee (20-0-0), at Miami COLLEGE FOOTBALL 8 p.m. FOX — Cotton Bowl, Texas A&M vs. Oklahoma, at Arlington, Texas GOLF 5:30 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Tournament of Champions, first round, at Kapalua, Hawaii MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 8 p.m. ESPN2 — Memphis at Tennessee MEN’S COLLEGE HOCKEY 7:30 p.m. NBCSN — Colorado College at Nebraska-Omaha NBA BASKETBALL 8 p.m. ESPN — Chicago at Miami 10:30 p.m. ESPN — L.A. Lakers at L.A. Clippers PREP FOOTBALL 5 p.m. ESPN — All-America Game, at St. Petersburg ——— Saturday AUTO RACING 2:30 a.m. NBCSN — Dakar Rally, stage 1, Lima to Pisco, Peru (delayed tape) COLLEGE FOOTBALL 1 p.m. ESPN — Compass Bowl, Pittsburgh vs. Mississippi, at Birmingham, Ala. ESPN2 — NCAA, FCS, playoffs, championship, North Dakota St. vs. Sam Houston St., at Frisco, Texas GOLF 5:30 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Tournament of Champions, second round, at Kapalua, Hawaii MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 11 a.m. ESPN2 — Pittsburgh at Rutgers 4 p.m. ESPN2 — NC State at Boston College 5 p.m. NBCSN — Lehigh at VCU 11 p.m. FSN — California at Southern Cal NFL FOOTBALL 4:30 p.m. NBC — Cincinnati at Houston 8 p.m. NBC — Minnesota at Green Bay PREP BASKETBALL 6 p.m. ESPN2 — Simeon (Ill.) vs. Montverde, at Wheeling, W.Va. PREP FOOTBALL 1 p.m. NBC — All-American Bowl, at San Antonio SOCCER Noon FOX — FA Cup, third round, West Ham vs. Manchester United, at London WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 1:30 p.m. FSN — Oklahoma at Texas 2 p.m. CBS — Purdue at Nebraska 4 p.m. CBS — Notre Dame at UConnFOOTBALLNFL postseason Wild-card Playoffs Saturday Cincinnati at Houston, 4:30 p.m. (NBC) Minnesota at Green Bay, 8 p.m. (NBC) Sunday Indianapolis at Baltimore, 1 p.m. (CBS) Seattle at Washington, 4:30 p.m. (FOX) Divisional Playoffs Saturday, Jan. 12 Baltimore, Indianapolis or Cincinnati at Denver, 4:30 p.m. (CBS) Washington, Seattle or Green Bay at San Francisco, 8 p.m. (FOX) Sunday, Jan. 13 Washington, Seattle or Minnesota at Atlanta, 1 p.m. (FOX) Baltimore, Indianapolis or Houston at New England, 4:30 p.m. (CBS) Conference Championships Sunday, Jan. 20 AFC, TBA (CBS); NFC, TBA (FOX) College bowl games New Mexico Bowl Arizona 49, Nevada 48Famous Idaho Potato BowlUtah State 41, Toledo 15 Poinsettia Bowl BYU 23, San Diego State 6 Beef ’O’ Brady’s Bowl UCF 38, Ball State 17 New Orleans Bowl Louisiana-Lafayette 43, E. Carolina 34 Las Vegas Bowl Boise State 28, Washington 26 Hawaii Bowl SMU 43, Fresno State 10 Little Caesars Pizza Bowl Central Michigan 24, W. Kentucky 21 Military Bowl San Jose State 29, Bowling Green 20 Belk Bowl Cincinnati 48, Duke 34 Holiday Bowl Baylor 49, UCLA 26 Independence Bowl Ohio 45, Louisiana-Monroe 14 Russell Athletic Bowl Virginia Tech 13, Rutgers 10, OT Meineke Car Care Bowl Texas Tech 34, Minnesota 31 Armed Forces Bowl Rice 33, Air Force 14 Fight Hunger Bowl Arizona State 62, Navy 28 Pinstripe Bowl Syracuse 38, West Virginia 14 Alamo Bowl Texas 31, Oregon State 27 Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl Michigan State 17, TCU 16 Music City Bowl Vanderbilt 38, N.C. State 24 Sun Bowl Georgia Tech 21, Southern Cal 7 Liberty Bowl Tulsa 31, Iowa State 17 Chick-fil-A Bowl Clemson 25, LSU 24 Heart of Dallas Bowl Oklahoma State 58, Purdue 14 Gator Bowl Northwestern 34, Mississippi State 20 Capital One Bowl Georgia 45, Nebraska 31 Outback Bowl South Carolina 33, Michigan 28 Rose Bowl Stanford 20, Wisconsin 14 Orange Bowl Florida State 31, N. Illinois 10 Wednesday Sugar Bowl Louisville 33, Florida 23 Thursday Fiesta Bowl Kansas State vs. Oregon (n) Today Cotton Bowl At Arlington, TexasTexas A&M (10-2) vs. Oklahoma (10-2), 8 p.m. (FOX) Saturday BBVA Compass Bowl At Birmingham, Ala.Pittsburgh (6-6) vs. Mississippi (6-6), 1 p.m. (ESPN) Sunday GoDaddy.com Bowl At Mobile, Ala.Kent State (11-2) vs. Arkansas State (9-3), 9 p.m. (ESPN) Monday BCS National Championship At MiamiNotre Dame (12-0) vs. Alabama (12-1), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN)FCS Championship Saturday At FC Dallas StadiumFrisco, TexasNorth Dakota State (13-1) vs. Sam Houston State (11-3), 1 p.m.BASKETBALLNBA schedule EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct GB New York 21 10 .677 — Brooklyn 17 15 .531 4 12 Philadelphia 15 18 .455 7 Boston 14 17 .452 7 Toronto 12 20 .375 9 12 Southeast Division W L Pct GB Miami 22 8 .733 — Atlanta 20 10 .667 2 Orlando 12 20 .375 11 Charlotte 8 23 .258 14 12 Washington 4 26 .133 18 Central Division W L Pct GB Indiana 19 13 .594 — Chicago 17 13 .567 1Milwaukee 16 14 .533 2Detroit 12 22 .353 8 Cleveland 7 26 .212 12 12 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct GB San Antonio 26 8 .765 — Memphis 20 9 .690 3 12 Houston 18 14 .563 7 Dallas 13 20 .394 12 12 New Orleans 7 25 .219 18 Northwest Division W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 24 7 .774 — Denver 18 15 .545 7Portland 16 15 .516 8 Minnesota 14 14 .500 8 12 Utah 16 17 .485 9 Pacific Division W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 25 8 .758 — Golden State 22 10 .688 2 12 L.A. Lakers 15 16 .484 9Sacramento 12 20 .375 12 12 Phoenix 12 21 .364 13 Thursday’s Games San Antonio at New York (n)Minnesota at Denver (n) Today’s Games Cleveland at Charlotte, 7 p.m.Sacramento at Toronto, 7 p.m.Brooklyn at Washington, 7 p.m.Atlanta at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.Portland at Memphis, 8 p.m.Philadelphia at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.Indiana at Boston, 8 p.m.Chicago at Miami, 8 p.m.Houston at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.Utah at Phoenix, 9 p.m.L.A. Lakers at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. Saturday’s Games Boston at Atlanta, 7 p.m.Milwaukee at Indiana, 7 p.m.New York at Orlando, 7 p.m.Houston at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.Sacramento at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.Portland at Minnesota, 8 p.m.New Orleans at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.Philadelphia at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.Utah at Denver, 9 p.m.Golden State at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.AP Top 25 schedule Saturday’s Games No. 1 Duke vs. Wake Forest, NoonNo. 3 Arizona vs. Utah, 5 p.m.No. 8 Ohio State at No. 11 Illinois, 2:15 p.m. No. 10 Gonzaga at Santa Clara, 8 p.m.No. 12 Missouri vs. Bucknell, 7 p.m.No. 14 Cincinnati vs. St. John’s, 4 p.m.No. 15 Georgetown at Marquette, 2 p.m. No. 16 Creighton vs. Indiana State, 3:05 p.m. No. 17 Butler vs. New Orleans, 2 p.m.No. 18 Michigan State vs. Purdue, Noon No. 21 Notre Dame vs. Seton Hall, Noon No. 22 Oklahoma State at No. 25 Kansas State, 1:30 p.m. No. 23 N.C. State at Boston College, 4 p.m. No. 24 Pittsburgh at Rutgers, 11 a.m. Sunday’s Games No. 2 Michigan vs. Iowa, NoonNo. 6 Kansas vs. Temple, 4:30 p.m.No. 7 Syracuse at South Florida, Noon No. 9 Minnesota vs. Northwestern, 7 p.m. No. 13 Florida at Yale, 5:30 p.m. Auburn 78, Florida St. 72 At Auburn, Ala. FLORIDA ST. (8-5) Brandon 3-4 0-2 6, White 3-7 2-2 8, Turpin 1-3 0-0 2, Snaer 6-13 3-4 18, Whisnant II 6-13 0-0 16, Bookert 3-8 0-0 8, Shannon 3-5 1-1 7, Gilchrist 0-0 0-4 0, Bojanovsky 0-0 0-0 0, Thomas 2-2 1-2 5, Miller 1-3 0-0 2. Totals 28-58 7-15 72.AUBURN (6-7) Payne 4-8 9-13 17, S. Johnson 3-12 1-2 8, Wallace 0-4 6-8 6, Sullivan 6-15 9-11 24, Chubb 3-5 2-4 8, Dixon-Tatum 2-3 0-1 4, Greene Jr. 1-6 0-0 2, Granger 0-0 0-0 0, N. Johnson 3-10 1-2 9. Totals 22-63 28-41 78. Halftime—Florida St. 36-35. 3-Point Goals—Florida St. 9-26 (Whisnant II 4-8, Snaer 3-7, Bookert 2-7, White 0-2, Miller 0-2), Auburn 6-20 (Sullivan 3-7, N. Johnson 2-6, S. Johnson 1-5, Greene Jr. 0-2). Fouled Out—White. Rebounds—Florida St. 40 (Snaer 12), Auburn 42 (Chubb 10). Assists—Florida St. 16 (Bookert 6), Auburn 10 (Wallace 6). Total Fouls—Florida St. 27, Auburn 17. A—6,496. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, JANUARY 4-5, 20132BSPORTS BRIEFS GATORS: Florida 5-2 in BCS games Continued From Page 1B BOWLING ALL-STATE: Snider had 179 tackles Continued From Page 1Balone, Louisville converted five of six third downs and even made first downs on second-and-16 and second-and-15. “I looked at what did and didn’t work for quar-terbacks (against Florida) during the regular season,” Bridgewater said. “They faced guys forcing throws ... and coach tells me, ‘No capes on your back or ‘S’ on your chest. Take what the defense gives you.’” Florida did not convert its first third down until the fourth quarter. Driskel, who had thrown three interceptions all year, tossed two picks, both on tipped passes. The second came in the Louisville end zone as Florida tried to rally in the fourth quarter, but he will remember the first one the longest. His pass was slightly behind receiver Andre Debose, who tipped the ball right to Louisville corner-back Terell Floyd. Floyd raced 38 yards for a shock-ing TD. “It was a flat defender read,” he said. “I threw it behind him, he tried to make a play on it and tipped it right to the guy. It’s unfor-tunate to start the game like that, but the corner made a good play.” Losing on the scoreboard, the Gators also lost their composure. At the end of a failed onside kick to start the second half, cornerback Loucheiz Purifoy and run-ning back Chris Johnson were flagged for personal fouls (Johnson was eject-ed), moving the ball to the Florida 19 before Louisville took a snap. On the next play, Bridgewater threw his second touchdown pass to give the Cardinals a 30-10 lead — more points than the Gators had allowed in any game this year. “We felt like it was there,” Muschamp said of the deci-sion to try for the onside kick. “We hit it too hard. We game-planned it and felt good about it. We wanted to steal a possession at the start of the second half. We had struggled defensively in the first half and felt you try to gain some momen-tum in the game.” Florida slipped to 5-2 in BCS bowl games. The Gators’ other loss came to Miami in the 2001 Sugar Bowl. “We did have a great year with a lot of wins,” Driskel said. “But at the end of day we didn’t come through and we didn’t make enough plays.” had 13 kickoff returns for 296 yards. “Michael was a great surprise for us and what he did was huge,” Jackson said. “When we put him on offense, it was just ‘wow.’ He was a great player for us.” On defense, Mulberry had 65 tackles (47 solo) and tied for the Fort White lead with two interceptions. “He is a lock-down corner,” Jackson said. “He would take their best receiver and lock them down. Against Taylor and Wakulla it showed what he is capable of doing. I want to see who is a better corner than him.” In the district showdown against Trinity Catholic High, Mulberry had an 85-yard punt return for a touchdown and a 96-yard catch and run for another, as the Indians came within two points of winning the district title. League resultsLake City Bowl league play: SEXY SENIORS Team standings: 1. Farmers (95-57); 2. Jo’s Crew (93-59); 3. Handicappers (89-63, 44,739 pins); 4. Perky Pals (89-63, 44,012 pins). Team high handicap game: 1. Handicappers 832; 2. Pin Busters 797; 3. Keglers 793. Team high handicap series: 1. Farmers 2,389; 2. Jo’s Crew 2,346; 3. Pin Droppers 2,278. High scratch game: 1. Sandra Johns 159; 2. Yvonne Finley 151; 3. Sjaan Tensen 107. 1. Wayne Johns 205; 2. Johnnie Croft 174; 3. Edward Smith 168. High scratch series: 1. Vy Ritter 430; 2. Joanne Denton 425; 3. Louise Atwood 381. 1. Michael Murrey 562; 2. Earl Hayward 509; 3. Jerry Crandall 456. High handicap game: 1. Betty Carmichael 225; 2. (tie) Barbara Croft, Diane Madsen 208. 1. Joe Peterson 229; 2. Ric Yates 223; 3. Jim Belgard 211. High handicap series: 1. Janet Nash 626; 2. Joyce Crandall 584; 3. Pat Hale 583. 1. Keith Herbster 623; 2. Dan Ritter 621; 3. Ray Denton 602.(results from Dec. 18) MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS Team standings: 1. BENCOR (322-188); 2. Bias Well Drilling (295-215, 55,288 pins); 3. Ronsonet Service (295-215, 55,158 pins). High scratch game: 1. Dale Coleman 257; 2. Patrick Markham 248; 3. (tie) David Adel, Bill Duncan, Josh Bisque 246. High scratch series: 1. Dale Coleman 676; 2. John Janki 675; 3. David Adel 668. High handicap game: 1. Carl McGhghy 278; 2. Patrick Markham 276; 3. (tie) Jeff Deitz, Josh Bisque 273. High handicap series: 1. John Janki 783; 2. Carl McGhghy 774; 3. Jeff Deitz 746. High average: 1. Dale Coleman 220.36; 2. Bill Duncan 215.12; 3. Wally Howard 209.85.(results from Dec. 17) Cotton Bowl matchup like old times in Big 12By STEPHEN HAWKINSAssociated PressARLINGTON, Texas — Spencer Nealy and some of his Texas A&M teammates were discussing potential bowl games even before their first SEC season began. “We were like, how funny would it be if we made the Cotton Bowl,” Nealy said. “We were looking at SEC vs. Big 12 teams. That’s what we thought about, that situation.” Well, Texas A&M’s season of firsts — coach Kevin Sumlin’s first year, quar-terback Johnny Manziel becoming the first fresh-man to win the Heisman Trophy and the SEC debut — will end with the 10th-ranked Aggies (10-2) play-ing a familiar Big 12 foe. In the only bowl matching the SEC against the Big 12, Texas A&M takes on 12th-ranked Oklahoma (10-2) in the Cotton Bowl tonight. Both teams have five-game winning streaks. “It’s a little more than a game,” Nealy said. “It’s almost like we had a great season but we have to win this one.” In their 16 Big 12 seasons, the only time the Aggies won more than nine games was when they were 11-3 their 1998 conference title season. They left the league with a winning record (7-6) last season only after a bowl win over Northwestern. Once in the SEC, which has six national titles in a row, Texas A&M lost its opener 20-17 to Florida. The other loss was 24-19 to LSU before the current winning streak that includes the Aggies’ first-ever road win against a No. 1 team — at SEC champion Alabama, which plays in the BCS title game Monday night. “The first thing we did was we didn’t talk about it very much what happened in the past. It seemed to be what everyone wanted to talk about externally, but internally we just didn’t,” Sumlin said. “Any time you have to get over a hump or clear a hurdle, you have got to win a game in a certain fashion.” Sumlin pointed to a 30-27 win at Ole Miss the first Saturday in October, when the Aggies overcame six turnovers. They lost to LSU two weeks later, but haven’t lost since. The Sooners seemed certain of a Bowl Championship Series game after clinching a share of their eighth Big 12 title, but Mid-American champion Northern Illinois qualified as a BCS buster. “For sure, yes, we were disappointed. I was pretty upset about it,” Sooners senior quarterback Landry Jones said. “But fortunate enough for us, we got put into this game, which you can rank them right up with those BCS games. ... It’s a really good matchup, so when I heard that we were going to be in the Cotton Bowl, it kind of eased over the disappointment.” Texas A&M and Oklahoma have both aver-aged more than 40 points and 500 yards of offense per game. The only losses by both were to current Top 10 teams. It is only the second Cotton Bowl appearance for the Sooners, but will be the 17th consecutive sea-son playing Texas A&M. Since Bob Stoops became Oklahoma’s coach in 1999, the Sooners have won 11 of the 13 meetings. Jones threw five TD passes as a freshman in a 65-10 win in 2009, though the Aggies won the next year before the Sooners won the final Big 12 meeting between the two last season. “This is another opportunity to put a stamp on that. We figured last year would be the last time we’d play them for a while,” Sooners defensive tackle Jamarkus McFarland said. “It does mean something.” YOUTH BASEBALL North Florida Rays 11U tryouts The North Florida Rays 11U travel team has tryouts at 1 p.m. Saturday at the Southside Baseball Complex red fields. For details, call Andy Miles at 867-0678 or Todd Green at 365-5161.North Florida Outlaws tryouts The North Florida Outlaws 8U travel machine pitch baseball team will have tryouts at 1 p.m. Jan. 12 at the Southside Baseball Complex blue fields. For details, call Tommy Boston at 965-9311 or Drew Law at 965-8447. ZUMBA Beginner, weight loss classes A Zumba beginner class and weight loss contest will be offered at Teen Town on Sunday. The Zumba beginner class is 3-4 p.m., with the weight loss contest starting at 4 p.m. For details, call Sarah Sandlin at 758-0009. YOUTH SOFTBALL Spring sign-up is under way The Girls Softball Associaton of Columbia County has registration open for its spring softball season for girls ages 4-17. Sign-up is at Brian’s Sports or Impact Zone. Cost is $55 for a single player and $75 for siblings. Registration deadline is Feb. 1, and a $10 savings is offered for players who sign up before Jan. 18. For details, call 755-4271. CAMPS Kirkman camp at Impact Zone Major League player Michael Kirkman of Lake City will conduct a pitching camp at Impact Zone on Monday. Kirkman will work with each participant, sign autographs, answer questions and give a pitching demonstration. The camps are 10 a.m. to noon for ages 6-11 and 1:30-3:30 p.m. for ages 12 and older. Cost is $60 per player. Valdosta State softball head coach Thomas Macera will give a presentation for coaches and players from 1-2:30 p.m. Saturday. Cost is $10 per person. For details, call 243-8238. CHS SOFTBALL Lady Tiger tryouts set for Tuesday Columbia High softball tryouts are 2:45 p.m. Tuesday at the CHS field. For details, call coach Jimmy Williams at 303-1192. BOYS CLUB Registration for basketball league The Boys Club of Columbia County is taking registration for its basketball program. Three leagues are offered. Cost is $45. For details, call the club at 752-4184.Q From staff reports

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LAKE CITY REPORTER FOOTBALL FRIDAY & SATURDAY, JANUARY 4-5, 2013 3B3BSports ASSOCIATED PRESSWashington Redskins quarterback Robert Griffin III looks to pass during the first half of a game against the Dallas C owboys in Landover, Md., on Sunday. The wild card winners are ...By BARRY WILNERAssociated PressSix days after Adrian Peterson blistered them for nearly 200 yards and helped lift his team to a stunning playoff berth, the Green Bay Packers get another taste of “A.D.” This time, they will deal with “All Day” Peterson at Lambeau Field. And in the playoffs.The stakes are similar to last week for the Vikings, who would have been out of the playoffs had they lost to Green Bay, which already owned the division title. The venue, obviously, is different. If that seems like a big edge for the Packers, well, they lost their last two postseason home games, both to the Giants, who went on to win the Super Bowl each time. They dropped a 31-14 verdict to Minnesota after the 2004 season, the only time in 104 matchups these NFC North rivals have met in the playoffs. So Green Bay is 1-3 in recent home playoff games on the tundra. That doesn’t diminish the challenge facing Minnesota, an 8-point underdog. “It put us in a spot that we’ve been wanting to be, wanted to get here since April 23 of last year when we started OTAs,” Vikings quarterback Christian Ponder said of the win over the Packers that got them a trip to Green Bay, where they lost 23-14 in the regular season. “It’s going to be tough going to Lambeau. Obviously it’s an environ-ment that’s tough to play in, but we’re hoping that a lot of our Vikings fans travel, just like there were some Green Bay fans at home this past week.” The shorter week won’t matter to either side con-sidering they faced off last weekend. At least it gives the Packers less time to watch video of the hor-ror show their defense put on trying to slow down Peterson. They’ll do a better job this Saturday night. BEST BET: PACKERS, 31-20 ——— Indianapolis (plus 6 12 ) at Baltimore This could be Ray Lewis’ final game; he announced Wednesday his plan to end his 17-year career that certainly should land him in the Hall of Fame. There are much better ways to finish than chasing around the Colts’ offense, which will be a difficult chore for the Ravens’ defense. With Lewis side-lined for nearly three months with a triceps inju-ry and Terrell Suggs not resembling the Defensive Player of the Year he was in 2011 as he plays while still recovering from an Achilles tendon injury, Baltimore can’t count on shutting down opponents. In previous seasons when the Ravens were a defensive power, Andrew Luck might be reduced to an overmatched rookie. Not now. UPSET SPECIAL: COLTS, 23-17 ——— Cincinnati (plus 5) at Houston The Texans stumbled into the playoffs, losing three of four and blowing home-field advantage and a bye in the AFC. Cincinnati, on the other hand, won seven of its last eight with a staunch defense. Houston made the postseason for the first time last year and promptly knocked off the Bengals in the wild-card round. Both teams are improved this season, and the key could be which side pro-tects its quarterback better. Houston has J.J. Watt and Antonio Smith providing pressure on the quarter-backs. For Cincinnati, it’s Geno Atkins and Michael Johnson. Houston will do it better.TEXANS, 24-20 ——— Seattle (minus 1 12 ) at Washington The juiciest of the weekend’s matchups fea-tures two streaking teams: Washington won its final seven games to take the NFC East, Seattle took its last five and seven of eight. Rookie quarterbacks Robert Griffin III for the Redskins and Russell Wilson for the Seahawks have been sensational, like Indy’s Luck. RG3 showed enough mobility in the win over Dallas to clinch the division, and his knee should be even stronger on Sunday to provide the double-threat potential that highlights his game. Wilson is healthy and has similar skills. Even more encouraging for him is the Seahawks have an intimidating, resourceful defense with the speed to slow down Washington’s offense. Seattle also has learned how to win on the road. SEAHAWKS, 23-16 ——— 2012 RECORD:Against spread: 7-6 (112-124-7). Straight up: 12-4 (159-92-1) Best Bet: 7-8-2 against spread, 11-6 straight up. Upset special: 11-6 against spread, 9-8 straight up. Untested QBsBy BARRY WILNERAssociated PressAaron Rodgers has won a Super Bowl and an MVP award. Joe Flacco has been to the playoffs in all five of his pro seasons. They will be the rarities this weekend when three rookie quarterbacks, two in their second NFL seasons, and one veteran who has yet to appear in the postseason will lead the other teams in the wild-card round. Seahawks coach Pete Carroll is a fan of the young-er quarterback trend. “I think it’s really exciting and the guys have done great,” Carroll said. “They really have against all of the odds and history and stuff they’ve just been amazing to take their teams into the playoffs. “It’s a very exciting time for the league know-ing there are other guys out there who are going to come up in the next couple of years, and there are stars in the making in the college ranks, and you don’t have to wait years and years for those guys to show up and be a factor. ‘’ Indeed, those days of letting young quarterbacks watch from the sideline before getting their chance has gone the way of the single wing. Rodgers was the last premier passer to undergo a lengthy appren-ticeship, under Brett Favre in Green Bay. On Saturday night, he leads the Packers against division rival Minnesota and second-year quarterback Christian Ponder. Earlier in the day, Cincinnati and its own second-year signal caller, Andy Dalton, is at Houston. The Texans’ Matt Schaub is in his ninth pro season, but this will be his first playoff game. On Sunday, the inexperience is even more pro-nounced. Three rookies who have completely belied any rawness — Andrew Luck for Indianapolis, Robert Griffin III for Washington, Russell Wilson for Carroll’s Seahawks — will guide their teams in wild-card games. “You know there’s going to be a lot of people talk-ing about playoff football and how it’s ratcheted up a notch, which may be true,” said Flacco, who will become the first quar-terback to start a playoff game in his first five NFL seasons in the Super Bowl era. He’s also won at least one postseason game each year. “But the bottom line is, my advice would be go about your business as you always would on a normal week. It’s obviously gotten you to the point that you’re in the playoffs and playing to get to another week. If it got you that far, then you’re obviously doing something right, so you should try to continue that. You shouldn’t try anything crazy just because it’s playoff time.” Getting to the playoffs with rookie QBs was a crazy idea for decades. That changed permanently when Ben Roethlisberger led Pittsburgh to the AFC title game. Carroll points to even more recent times: 2008. “I always go back to Flacco and Matt Ryan, those guys, when they jumped in and did really well as rookies, I think that was the start of the big turn,” he said. Still, there’s never been anything like this season, when Luck, Griffin and Wilson combined for 31 wins, eight more than the previous record total for all rookie QBs in one season, which happened in 2011. Some credit should go to the coaches who turned over their teams to the kids. Of course, when the Colts grabbed Luck atop the draft and the Redskins traded up to take RG3 at the second spot, it was presumed they would move directly into the lineup. It took plenty of foresight and not a little courage for Carroll to go with Wilson, particularly after Seattle signed free agent Matt Flynn to a huge deal. But he saw something special in the third-round pick from Wisconsin by way of North Carolina State. And he sees that in all the rookie QBs. “Maybe this is just the class of classes, too,” he said. “Maybe this isn’t as much of a trend, but it looks like it’s kind of turning. “ It’s not just the rookies who are making their play-off debuts, either. Schaub was injured when the Texans made their first trip to the postseason a year ago and T.J. Yates — yes, a rookie — led them to a victory over Dalton and the Bengals. Houston then lost to Flacco and the Ravens. “I’m definitely looking forward to it,” said Schaub. “But the thing that’s going to help us win the game are the same whenever you’re playing, wherever you’re playing. That’s playing smart, clean, good football.” That’s exactly what the youngsters have done in key situations, even Ponder, who at times has looked overwhelmed. But he was solid the last two weeks when the Vikings beat Houston and Green Bay to secure their place in the Super Bowl chase. No matter how they fare this weekend, it’s been a successful two years for young quarterbacks. Redskins coach Mike Shanahan expects it to con-tinue because of the empha-sis on passing in college. “They’re throwing the football a little bit more now than they have in the past,” Shanahan said. “I think that gives them a big advantage. I think they have the ability to come in and go through OTAs and really learn the system in the offseason. I know 20 years ago, you never had an opportunity like that. “Going through a system again, you have a lot of hours in the classroom as a quarterback that you never had 10 years ago, a chance to learn the system. And a lot of these guys are com-ing out ready to go.” ASSOCIATED PRESSIn this Dec. 18 file photo, Baltimore Ravens linebacker Ra y Lewis peers over the line of scrimmage during a game against the San Diego Charger s in San Diego. Ray Lewis to retireBy DAVID GINSBURGAssociated PressOWINGS MILLS, Md. — It seems almost impos-sible to imagine the Ravens without Ray Lewis, who has anchored Baltimore’s renowned defense ever since the team came into existence. For 17 years, Lewis has been stalking oppos-ing quarterbacks and run-ning backs. He inspired his teammates with emotional speeches, proudly donned his No. 52 jersey on Sunday afternoons and did every-thing in his power to help Baltimore win. Soon, all that will only be a memory. In a stunning announcement Wednesday, the two-time AP Defensive Player of the Year said he will retire after the Ravens complete their 2013 playoff run. “It caught me by surprise, because we all thought the great Ray Lewis was going to play forever,” Baltimore outside linebacker Terrell Suggs said. “I thought he was going to surpass Brett Favre and still be out there doing it well into his 40s. He let us know that the sun is setting on his career. It’s amazing and it’s sad, all at the same time.” When Lewis gathered his teammates together, no one had a clue what he was about to tell them. “Everything that starts has an end,” the 37-year-old Lewis said. “For me, today, I told my team that this will be my last ride.” The reaction was stunned silence. “I thought we were getting our ‘Let’s go on a run in the playoffs’ speech,’” Suggs said. “Not that.” Lewis has been sidelined since Oct. 14 with a torn right triceps. He intends to return Sunday to face the Indianapolis Colts in what will almost certainly be his final home game. And when he does his trademark dance after emerging from the tunnel, Lewis will receive an ovation 17 years in the making. “That moment I walk out of that tunnel Sunday, every person that was a Ravens fan — 1996 to this day — we will all enjoy that moment,” he said. “It will probably be one of the glo-rious moments in my life.” Lewis is poised to walk away from the game because he wants to spend more time with his sons. While working to return from his injury, Lewis watched two of his boys play on the same high school football team in Florida. He intends to see Ray Lewis III perform as a freshman next year for the University of Miami, where Lewis starred.

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4B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & PUZZLES FRIDAY & SATURDAY, JANUARY 4-5, 2013 DEAR ABBY: My wife and I run a restaurant in a small town. Recently, my wife came home on my day off and told me that during the lunch hour, one of our servers had come into the kitchen and announced that they’d need extra sanitizer on table 29 because a mother was changing her baby on it! What has happened in our society that people don’t understand that this is unsanitary and rude? Had I been there, I don’t know that I could have kept a civil tongue, and I feel like people today regard my disgust as unreasonable. Is there something I’m missing here? -CAFE CRAZY DEAR “CRAZY”: I don’t know who you have been talking to, but your disgust is NOT “unreasonable.” What that mother was missing was common sense and courtesy for those around her. I agree that changing a baby on a restaurant table was out of the ballpark -particularly if a changing table was available in the women’s restroom of your cafe. (I’m assuming there is one, but if there isn’t, the situation should be immediately rectified.) ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: My hus-band, “Gene,” and I were married for five years until our divorce six months ago. We still live together and are dating each other. We had so many issues, I felt there needed to be a fresh start, including fil-ing for divorce and living apart. Now that we have started over, moved away from our hometown and gotten rid of several “friends,” our issues are gone and we’re financially stable. In fact, our relationship is better than ever. Since things are now worked out, I’d like us to get remarried. I told him before our divorce that I hoped we could resolve things and marry again. Now he’s not sure, because he says if we got divorced again, he couldn’t bear the hurt. He says he still doesn’t understand why our “fresh start” included a divorce. Abby, we love each other. We want to be together forever and have children. I don’t want to be dating my ex-husband indefinitely. Do you have advice for us? -GOING NOWHERE IN WASHINGTON DEAR GOING NOWHERE: I sure do. In the interest of solidify-ing your fresh start, you and Gene should sign up for some premarital counseling. If you do, you may be able to help him understand why you felt the way you did. With counseling, you can sure that your problems are fully resolved, and it may reassure him that this time there won’t be another divorce. If you are thinking about a religious ceremo-ny, the officiant may even require it. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: My sis-ter and mother went to a movie recently. My sister became concerned that her husband and kids were locked out of the house, so she quickly took out her phone and texted her husband. It took less than 30 seconds. A minute later a large man came down the stairs of the theater, got right in her face and began berat-ing her -telling her she was rude for pulling out her phone. It was so upset-ting that she and Mom got up and left. I understand that she should have stepped out of the theater to text. However, the man caused more of a scene than her texting did. What makes people think it is OK to treat people badly? -HOLLY IN KOKOMO DEAR HOLLY: The same thing that made your sister think it was OK to use her cellphone in a darkened theater. She’s lucky that all she got was a lecture because these days many people have short fuses. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: I’m the youngest of three children and I’ll be graduating from high school in the spring. My parents always seemed happy with each other. They were obvi-ously in love, and they told my brothers and me they would never get divorced. Although they had argu-ments, they always made up, and it never seemed to be serious. For the last few months, my dad has been acting weird. He spends a lot of time talking to and texting “a friend” on the phone. The problem is, although the friend has a male name (“George”) in his contacts, the person has a female voice. I didn’t think any-thing about it until recent-ly, when I turned on Dad’s phone to play a game and it was open to a series of text messages between him and this “friend.” What I saw made it clear that something is up. Mom knows nothing about it. I don’t know what to do. I don’t want to tell anyone because I don’t want our family to fall apart. But I can’t stay quiet. What should I do? -BLINDSIDED IN JERSEY DEAR BLINDSIDED: I agree that you can’t keep quiet about this. What you saw was, of course, shock-ing -and the person you should talk to about it is your father. Sometimes when people are going through a really tough time, they do things they wouldn’t ordinarily do. Your mother may -or may not -have an inkling that something is going on. Ask your father if the text means he plans to leave the family. Then give him a deadline to come clean with your mother, and let him know that if he doesn’t, you will. You have my sympathy. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: My husband was sober for 14 years. He started drinking again two years ago. He’s on probation and drink-ing is a clear violation of his probation. His liver enzymes are elevated, and I can’t seem to find the right words to get his attention. I have thought about contacting his proba-tion officer, but then he will be incarcerated. Abby, I am watching the man I love drink himself to death and I’m afraid for him. Should I tell his probation officer or just watch him self-destruct? -SCARED AND CONFUSED IN MICHIGAN DEAR SCARED: The reason you can’t get your husband’s attention is because of the alcohol. He isn’t thinking straight. As I am sure you realize, one of the hallmarks of addiction is denial. No one helps an alcoholic by enabling the person to continue drink-ing, and your husband definitely needs help. While it may not be easy, talk to the probation officer so your husband can be incarcerated, dry out and become rational again. I know it is a painful choice, but watching him die of liver disease would be worse. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: Can you answer something for me? If the abbrevia-tion for “mister” is “Mr.,” then why is there an R in “Mrs.” when there’s no R in the word it’s short for? -INQUISITIVE IN CALIFORNIA DEAR INQUISITIVE: According to my American Heritage Dictionary (4th Edition), “’Mrs.’ is the abbreviation of the word ‘mistress’” -an antiquated term for a married or wid-owed woman. HOROSCOPES DEAR ABBY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Put more effort into you and what you have to offer. Update your image or take time out to spend with someone you think is special. Trying new hobbies, signing up for a course or traveling some-where different will lead to a new relationship. +++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You’ve got all the right moves. Get in gear and start knocking chores off your to-do list. Getting together with friends or family late in the day will result in valuable infor-mation that will help you make a difficult choice. Make travel plans. +++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You’ll be tempted to mix business with plea-sure. Make sure that you don’t step over a line that can cost you financially or professionally. Love is highlighted, but keeping your personal life private will be required. Avoid secret encounters no mat-ter how enticing. +++++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Share your creative ideas and you will gain the confidence required to reach your goals. A part-nership will be your saving grace when faced with deadlines. Greater stabil-ity will be yours if you are disciplined and finish what you start. ++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Enjoy the company of friends or engage in an event that is conducive to meeting new people or experiencing something unique. You’ll thrive on new opportunities and people who look at life differently. Love is on the rise. ++++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Make plans with friends or engage in a creative process that helps you develop one of your talents. Stay away from anyone you feel over-spends, overindulges or is unpredictable. Take care of any pending domestic problem quickly and move on. +++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Slide under the radar when dealing with person-al problems at home. Say little and spend the least amount of time at home. Make plans to do some-thing exciting, physical or creative with a friend who shares your interests. Love is highlighted. +++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23Nov. 21): Speak up and say what’s on your mind. You cannot expect anyone to back you if you don’t share your intentions. A problem at home will arise if you have been distant or uncompromising. A positive, open attitude will bring good results. +++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Unexpected alterations at home or at work will favor you. Don’t worry about what’s to come when it’s important that you focus on what you enjoy doing most and seeing where it leads you. A good opportunity will come through a partner-ship. ++++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Offer sugges-tions, services and hands-on help, but not your hard-earned cash. Don’t let someone’s emotional plea lead to loss or uncertainty and confusion regarding what you should or should not do. Don’t make an impulsive or irreversible move. ++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Get serious about your future and what you have to offer. It’s up to you to make the first move and to secure your posi-tion financially, medically or emotionally. Expect visitors or changes to your home to lead to greater peace and happiness. +++++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Keep your thoughts a secret until you are certain you know what you are doing and who you want to include in your inner circle. A chance to for-mulate an agreement that will enable you to follow a creative dream should be explored. +++ THE LAST WORD Eugenia Last Mom using restaurant table to change baby takes the cake Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com Puzzle Solutions on the next page.

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FRIDAY & SATURDAY, JANUARY 4-5, 2013 PUZZLES & COMICS LAKE CITY REPORTER 5B DILBERT BABY BLUES BLONDIE BEETLE BAILEY B.C. FRANK & ERNEST FOR BETTER OR WORSE ZITS HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH GARFIELD CELEBRITY CIPHER CLASSIC PEANUTS PUZZLE ANSWERS

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6B LAKE CITY REPORTER OUTDOORS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, JANUARY 4-5, 2013 FRIDAY EVENING JANUARY 4, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Last Man StandingMalibu Country (N) Shark Tank (N) (DVS) (:01) 20/20 (N) News at 11(:35) Nightline (N) 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) The Insider 5-PBS 5 -Journal Nightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Washington WeekNeed to KnowGreat Performances The 25th anniversary of “Graceland.” (N) BBC World NewsTavis Smiley 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge Judy Two and Half MenUndercover Boss “Mood Media” (N) CSI: NY “Command Plus P” (N) Blue Bloods “Fathers and Sons” (N) Friday Night BlitzLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneNikita “The Sword’s Edge” Arrow “Pilot” TMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ce “Broke” The Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family Guy Family Guy Football Pregamee College Football AT&T Cotton Bowl -Oklahoma vs. Texas A&M. From Arlington, Texas. (N Subject to Blackout) Action News 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) Go On Go On Dateline NBC A teen’s murder shakes a community. (N) NewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(2:00) Politics & Public Policy Today Politics & Public Policy Today Politics & Public Policy Today WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304Andy Grif th Show(:24) M*A*S*HM*A*S*H M*A*S*H The Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Police Women of Memphis Police Women of Memphis Police Women of Memphis Police Women of Memphis Police Women of Memphis Police Women of Memphis A&E 19 118 265Dog the Bounty Hunter Duck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyStorage WarsStorage Wars(:01) Storage Wars(:31) Storage Wars HALL 20 185 312The Brady BunchThe Brady BunchThe Brady BunchThe Brady Bunch “A Kiss at Midnight” (2008, Romance) Faith Ford, Cameron Daddo. Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier FX 22 136 248Two and Half MenTwo and Half MenTwo and Half MenTwo and Half Men “Country Strong” (2010, Drama) Gwyneth Paltrow, Tim McGraw, Garrett Hedlund. Premiere. “Country Strong” (2010, Drama) Gwyneth Paltrow. CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245The Mentalist The Mentalist “Law Abiding Citizen” (2009) Jamie Foxx, Gerard Butler. (DVS) “Law Abiding Citizen” (2009) Jamie Foxx, Gerard Butler. (DVS) NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobDrake & JoshDrake & JoshMarvin MarvinMarvin MarvinFull House Full House The Nanny The Nanny Friends Friends SPIKE 28 168 241(3:30) “The Guardian” (2006) “Raiders of the Lost Ark” (1981, Adventure) Harrison Ford, Karen Allen. Premiere. “Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom” (1984) Harrison Ford, Kate Capshaw. Premiere. MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*H M*A*S*H Monk “Mr Monk and the Miracle” Monk Monk’s half-brother. Seinfeld Frasier The Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Good Luck CharlieJessie “Badfellas” Austin & Jessie & Ally All Star “Tangled” (2010) Voices of Mandy Moore. Premiere. Tangled Ever AfterDog With a BlogGood Luck CharlieAustin & Ally Jessie “Badfellas” LIFE 32 108 252Hoarders “Beverly; Megan” Hoarders “Ron; Carol” Hoarders “Anna; Claire and Vance” Hoarders “Debra & Patty” Teen Trouble “Asmara” (N) (:01) Teen Trouble “Jacob” USA 33 105 242Law & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims Unit“Over/Under” (2013, Drama) Steven Pasquale, Caroline Dhavernas. Premiere. BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Top 10 Countdown” The top 10 videos. (N) One Mic StandOne Mic StandOne Mic StandOne Mic StandOne Mic StandOne Mic StandOne Mic StandOne Mic Stand ESPN 35 140 206e(5:00) High School Football Under Armour All-American Game. (N)d NBA Basketball Chicago Bulls at Miami Heat. From the AmericanAirlines Arena in Miami. (N)d NBA Basketball: Lakers at Clippers ESPN2 36 144 209SportsCenter (N) (Live) NFL Kickoff (N) (Live) d College Basketball Memphis at Tennessee. (N)s Boxing Rances Barthelemy vs. Arash Usmanee. (N) SUNSP 37 -Prep Zone SpoInside the HeatInside the HEAT3 Wide Life College Basketball Houston Baptist at Texas A&M. (Taped) Future PhenomsGatorZoneInside the HEATInside Israeli Bask. DISCV 38 182 278Gold Rush “Game Changer” Gold Rush Dave pushes his crew. Gold Rush “Pay Dirt: Up Smith Creek” Gold Rush “Leprechaun Gold” (N) Bering Sea Gold “Point of No Return” Gold Rush “Leprechaun Gold” TBS 39 139 247King of QueensSeinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld House of PayneHouse of PayneBetter WorseBetter Worse “Failure to Launch” (2006, Romance-Comedy) Matthew McConaughey. HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace MysteriesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesNancy Grace Mysteries FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236Love You, Mean ItThe SoupE! News (N) Sex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CityE! Special (N) Love You, Mean ItChelsea LatelyE! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernGhost Adventures Tombstone, Ariz. Ghost Adventures “Do Not Disturb” Ghost Adventures “Home Sweet Hell” The Dead Files “Burned Alive” (N) Ghost Adventures “Ancient Ram Inn” HGTV 47 112 229Hunters Int’lHunters Int’lHunters Int’lHunters Int’lSelling Spelling Manor Castles on Camera: Royal ResidencesHouse Hunters (N) Hunters Int’lHunters Int’lHunters Int’l TLC 48 183 280Randy KnowsRandy KnowsSay Yes, DressSay Yes, DressSay Yes, DressSay Yes, DressSay Yes, DressSay Yes, DressRandy KnowsRandy KnowsSay Yes, DressSay Y es, Dress HIST 49 120 269Modern Marvels “The World’s Fastest” American Pickers “Frank’s Dog Days” American Pickers American Pickers “Mama Knows Best” American Pickers (:02) American Pickers ANPL 50 184 282Infested! “Spreading Too Fast” Infested! Campers battle bedbugs. Infested! “The Nastiest Battles” Infested! “Houses of Horror” (N) Infested! “The Most Horrifying” Infested! “Houses of Horror” FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveRestaurant: ImpossibleDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveMystery Diners (N) Mystery DinersDiners, DriveDiners, Drive TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the Lord Sid Roth It’s SuThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesHal LindseyThe HarvestPerry StonePraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -The Game 365Halls of FameWorld Poker Tour: Season 10 Boxing Golden Boy: Jess Soto Karass vs. Euri Gonzlez. Sports UnlimitedAction Sports World Tour SYFY 58 122 244Merlin “The Sword in the Stone” Merlin “The Sword in the Stone” WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) Merlin “Arthur’s Bane” Being Human Josh wants to tell Julia. AMC 60 130 254(5:30) “The Karate Kid Part II” (1986, Drama) Ralph Macchio. “Enter the Dragon” (1973) Bruce Lee. A kung fu expert is sent to in ltrate an island fortress. “Shanghai Noon” (2000, Comedy) Jackie Chan. COM 62 107 249It’s Always SunnyTosh.0 Jeff Dunham: Controlled Chaos Jeff Dunham: Minding the MonstersJeff Dunham: Controlled Chaos Jeff Dunham: Minding the Monsters CMT 63 166 327Reba Reba Reba Reba Reba Reba “Red Alert” “Starsky & Hutch” (2004, Comedy) Ben Stiller, Owen Wilson. (:15) “Stripes” (1981) Bill Murray. NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer A pit-mix escape artist. Built for the Kill “Great White Sharks” Shark Attack ExperimentShark InvasionRed Sea Jaws Shark Attack Experiment NGC 109 186 276(4:00) Inside the Vietnam WarCocaine Sub HuntCocaine Wars “Airport Sting” Cocaine Wars “Drug Speedboats” Inside Cocaine SubmarinesCocaine Wars “Drug Speedboats” SCIENCE 110 193 284The Planets “Different Worlds” The Planets “Giants” The Planets “Sun” Curiosity “Sunstorm” (N) Unearthing Ancient Secrets (N) The Planets “Sun” ID 111 192 285Wicked Attraction “Dressed to Kill” Wicked Attraction Deadly Women “Kinky Killers” Pretty Bad Girls (N) Pretty Bad Girls (N)Deadly Women (N) Deadly Women “Kinky Killers” HBO 302 300 501Sound-ThunderLes Miserables “The Dilemma” (2011, Comedy) Vince Vaughn, Kevin James. ‘PG-13’ “Unknown” (2011, Suspense) Liam Neeson, Diane Kruger. ‘PG-13’ “3000 Miles to Graceland” (2001) MAX 320 310 515Matrix Revol.(:20) “Fast Five” (2011, Action) Vin Diesel, Paul Walker. ‘PG-13’ (:35) “Forrest Gump” (1994, Comedy-Drama) Tom Hanks, Robin Wright. ‘PG-13’ Co-Ed Con dential(:35) Erotic Karma SHOW 340 318 545(5:15) “Brake” (2012, Action) ‘R’ CalifornicationCalifornicationCalifornicationCalifornicationCalifornicationCalifornicationCalifornicationCalifornicationCalifornicationCalifornication SATURDAY EVENING JANUARY 5, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Tonight (N) Once Upon a Time “Broken” Once Upon a Time “The Crocodile” Once Upon a Time “Tallahassee” News at 11Crook & Chase 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsPaid Program30 Rock 30 Rock Rules/EngagementRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryNewsInside EditionChann 4 NewsFirst Baptist 5-PBS 5 -The Lawrence Welk ShowAndy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th Show “An Affair to Remember” (1957, Romance) Cary Grant, Deborah Kerr. Austin City Limits “Jack White” (N) Front Row Center 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsAction Sports 360 Year End ReviewThe Mentalist 48 Hours (N) 48 Hours “Ditto” (N) Action Sports 360Two and Half Men 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneDaryl’s HouseLike, LoveThe Crook and Chase Show YourJax MusicJacksonvilleI Know JaxLocal Haunts 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?The First FamilyMr. Box Of ceThe FollowingCops (N) Cops (PA) The Mob Doctor “Resurrection” (N) NewsAction Sports 360MasterChef “Top 4 Compete” 12-NBC 12 12 12e NFL Football AFC Wild-Card Game -Cincinnati Bengals at Houston Texans. (N)e NFL Football NFC Wild-Card Game -Minnesota Vikings at Green Bay Packers. (N) NewsSat. Night Live CSPAN 14 210 350Washington This CommunicatorsWashington This Week WGN-A 16 239 307Law & Order: Criminal Intent America’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home Videos WGN News at NineBones Skeleton is encased in concrete. TVLAND 17 106 304The Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Disappeared “Un nished Business” Six Little McGheesSix Little McGheesSix Little McGheesSix Little McGheesSix Little McGheesSix Little McGheesGolden SistersGolden SistersSix Little McGheesSix Little McGhees A&E 19 118 265Beyond Scared Straight Duck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck Dynasty Shipping WarsShipping WarsShipping WarsShipping Wars HALL 20 185 312(5:00) “Class” (2010) “Elevator Girl” (2010, Romance) Lacey Chabert, Ryan Merriman. “The Seven Year Hitch” (2012) Natalie Hall, Darin Brooks, Ryan Doom. “The Nanny Express” (2009) FX 22 136 248(5:30) “Death Race” (2008, Action) Jason Statham, Tyrese Gibson. “Taken” (2008, Action) Liam Neeson, Maggie Grace, Famke Janssen. “Taken” (2008, Action) Liam Neeson, Maggie Grace, Famke Janssen. CNN 24 200 202The Situation RoomCNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents Piers Morgan TonightPiers Morgan TonightCNN Presents TNT 25 138 245(4:30) “Con Air” (1997) “Lethal Weapon 4” (1998, Action) Mel Gibson, Danny Glover, Joe Pesci. (DVS) “G.I. Jane” (1997) Demi Moore. A female Navy SEALs recruit completes rigorous training. NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobVictorious (N) Marvin Marvin (N) Supah NinjasSupah NinjasThe Nanny The Nanny Friends Friends SPIKE 28 168 241(5:00) “Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom” (1984) Harrison Ford, Kate Capshaw. “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade” (1989) Harrison Ford, Sean Connery. Premiere. “Payback” (1999) Mel Gibson. MY-TV 29 32 -Hogan’s HeroesHogan’s HeroesBatmanBatmanLost in Space Star Trek “Elaan of Troyius” “Revenge of the Creature” (1955, Horror) John Agar, Lori Nelson. DISN 31 172 290Austin & Ally Shake It Up! Good Luck CharlieGood Luck Charlie “Bolt” (2008, Comedy) Voices of John Travolta. Phineas and FerbGood Luck CharlieGood Luck CharlieJessie Jessie LIFE 32 108 252“Killer Among Us” (2012, Suspense) Tess Atkins, Tom Cavanagh. “Willed to Kill” (2012) Sarah Jane Morris, Ross McCall. Premiere. “The Eleventh Victim” (2012, Suspense) Jennie Garth, Colin Cunningham. USA 33 105 242Law & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims Unit BET 34 124 329(4:30) The Wash “Barbershop 2: Back in Business” (2004, Comedy) Ice Cube, Cedric the Entertainer. “Beauty Shop” (2005, Comedy) Queen Latifah, Alicia Silverstone. “Four Brothers” (2005) ESPN 35 140 206(4:30) World Series of Poker Europe Final Table. Strongest ManStrongest ManStrongest ManStrongest ManStrongest ManStrongest ManStrongest ManSportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209d High School Basketball Montverde (Fla.) vs. Simeon (Ill.). 30 for 30 30 for 30 30 for 30 SUNSP 37 -d College BasketballTaylorMade: Outside the RopesTransat Qubec-St-MaloFight Sports: In 60 From Nov. 19, 2011. Inside the Heat College Basketball Florida State at Clemson. DISCV 38 182 278Amish Ma a Secret MMA barn ght. Amish Ma a “Fall From Grace” Gold Rush Dave pushes his crew. Gold Rush “Up Smith Creek” Gold Rush “Leprechaun Gold” Gold Rush “Up Smith Creek” TBS 39 139 247King of QueensKing of QueensKing of QueensKing of QueensBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryWedding Band “99 Problems” Wedding Band “99 Problems” HLN 40 202 204Mystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesNancy Grace Mysteries FNC 41 205 360America’s News Headquarters (N) FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Justice With Judge Jeanine (N) Geraldo at Large Journal EditorialFOX News Watch E! 45 114 236Kourtney & KhloKourtney & KhloKourtney & KhloKourtney & KhloKourtney & KhloKourtney & KhloKourtney & KhloKourtney & Khlo “You’ve Got Mail” (1998, Romance-Comedy) Tom Hanks, Meg Ryan. TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernBizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernGhost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Savannah, Ga. Ghost Adventures “Brookdale Lodge” HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lHouse Hunters Renovation Love It or List It “Maharishi” Love It or List It “The Douglas Family” House HuntersHunters Int’lHouse HuntersHunters Int’l TLC 48 183 280Dateline: Real Life Mysteries 48 Hours: Hard Evidence 48 Hours: Hard Evidence “Temptation” 48 Hours: Hard Evidence (N) 48 Hours: Hard Evidence (N) 48 Hours: Hard Evidence “Temptation” HIST 49 120 269American Pickers “Pandora’s Box” American Pickers “Train Wreck” Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars (:31) Pawn Stars(:02) Pawn Stars(:32) Pawn Stars ANPL 50 184 282Pit Boss “The Roast” Too Cute! Shar-Pei; cairn terrier; boxer. Too Cute! Animal species mingle. Pit Boss A photo shoot with a python. Pit Bulls and Parolees “Boiling Point” Pit Boss A photo shoot with a python. FOOD 51 110 231Rachael vs. Guy Celebrity Cook-OffRachael vs. Guy Celebrity Cook-OffRachael vs. Guy Celebrity Cook-OffRachael vs. Guy Celebrity Cook-OffRachael vs. Guy Celebrity Cook-OffIron Chef America TBN 52 260 372(5:00) “Where the Red Fern Grows”Gaither: Precious MemoriesIn Touch With Dr. Charles StanleyHour of Power Billy Graham Classic CrusadesNot a FanTravel the Road FSN-FL 56 -Inside the MagicMagic Live! (Live)d NBA Basketball New York Knicks at Orlando Magic. From Amway Center in Orlando, Fla. Magic Live! (Live) Inside the MagicInside the Magicd College Basketball California at USC. SYFY 58 122 244(5:00) “Daybreakers” (2009) “Resident Evil” (2002, Horror) Milla Jovovich, Michelle Rodriguez. “Resident Evil: Afterlife” (2010, Horror) Milla Jovovich, Ali Larter. “Resident Evil” (2002, Horror) AMC 60 130 254(4:30) “The Patriot” (2000, War) Mel Gibson, Heath Ledger. “Signs” (2002) Mel Gibson. Premiere. A widower investigates huge circles in his crop elds. “Hannibal” (2001, Suspense) Anthony Hopkins. COM 62 107 249(5:30) “Tommy Boy” (1995, Comedy) Chris Farley. “Dinner for Schmucks” (2010, Comedy) Steve Carell, Paul Rudd, Bruce Greenwood. “Hot Tub Time Machine” (2010, Comedy) John Cusack, Rob Corddry. CMT 63 166 327RidiculousnessRidiculousnessRidiculousnessRidiculousnessRidiculousnessRidiculousnessRedneck Island (N) Redneck Island (Season Finale) (N) Redneck Island NGWILD 108 190 283Cesar Millan: The Real StoryDog Whisperer “Hollywood Hounds” The Incredible Dr. PolThe Incredible Dr. Pol (N) Cesar Millan’s Leader of the Pack (N) Dog Whisperer “Hollywood Hounds” NGC 109 186 276American Colony: Meet the HutteritesAlaska State TroopersAlaska State TroopersDoomsday PreppersDoomsday PreppersDoomsday Preppers SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow-MadeHow It’s MadeHow-MadeHow-MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s Made ID 111 192 285Evil Twins “A Tale of Two Sisters” Evil Twins “Trust Fund Terror” Deadly Women “Lover’s Revenge” Motives & Murders (N) Fatal Vows A couple has dark secrets. Deadly Women “Lover’s Revenge” HBO 302 300 501(5:15) “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone” (2001) Daniel Radcliffe. ‘PG’ “The Three Stooges” (2012) Sean Hayes. ‘PG’ “Bridesmaids” (2011, Comedy) Kristen Wiig, Maya Rudolph. ‘R’ The Three Stooges MAX 320 310 515(5:20) “Crazy, Stupid, Love.” (2011) Steve Carell. (:20) “Life” (1999) Eddie Murphy. ‘R’ (:15) “Horrible Bosses” (2011, Comedy) Jason Bateman. ‘NR’ “Showgirls” (1995) Elizabeth Berkley. SHOW 340 318 545Untold History of the United StatesHouse of Lies(:35) House of Lies(:05) House of Lies(:35) House of Lies(:05) House of Lies(:35) House of Lies(:05) House of Lies(:35) House of Lies(:05) House of Lies(:35) House of Lies 6B Puzzles Crappie fishing mistakesBy STEVE LINDSpecial to the ReporterEvery crappie fishermen has had his good days and bad days. The trick is to avoid the common mistakes all crappie fishermen make so you can always increase your chances of a good catch. Most folks work full time jobs and when they go fish-ing, it is a release of the common stresses of life. As we are moving into crappie fishing I did some extensive research about crappie fish-ing and came up with the following common crappie mistakes. Q Patience doesn’t pay with crappie. We have all heard folks say that patience pays when fishing. Unfortunately, that is not correct when fish-ing for crappie. Crappie are a schooling fish and it is important to find these schools. Q Casting unsharpened hooks Have you ever set the hook and thought you had your crappie on for sure? The problem isn’t necessar-ily your fishing technique, it probably is your hooks. It’s important to replace your hooks frequently or spend a few moments to sharp-en them. The best way to sharpen hooks is with a flat file, first filing the outside of the hook point. Next you will need a double-edged file that can be used to sharpen both sides of the point. Q Stopping the boat while trolling. It’s best to have two people along when troll-ing for crappie. If you have multiple poles in the water when you get a fish on, you’ll want to keep as many poles trolling as you can. If you stop the boat, you lose the correct depth where the fish are and will have to go through the setup all over again. With a second per-son, one person can keep steering the boat while the other person re-baits the poles. You’d be surprised at how many people make this mistake when trolling. Q Getting too close to the fish. The first instinct is to get as close to the crappie as you can. But that is a huge mistake. What happens is if your boat makes a wake it can spook the fish if you get too close. The best thing to do is to get a long cane pole, or a telescoping rod such as a brim buster, so you can reach out about 10-15 feet. Hopefully the above information will come in handy as we roll into crap-pie season. Also, keep I mind that crappie will not typically take bait that is beneath them as they have a ten-dency to always look up. The bait of choice for specks are live minnows. In addition, they are a cold water fish. That’s not to say you won’t catch some in hotter water, but cold water is the ticket. It is a totally different challenge than fishing for blue gill or shellcrackers, however the reward is great as crappie are the best tast-ing fish in the lake.Q Steve and Donna Lind own Tracy’s Point Fishing Lodge on Lake Panasoffkee in Sumter County ‘Rule of halves’ for turkeysBy TONY YOUNGFWC media relationsWhether you oversee a large tract of land or own a smaller parcel, there are many wildlife management techniques you can use to help attract and keep wild turkeys on your property. Wild turkeys, like deer, are “edge species,” because of their need for more than one type of habitat. Most of the time, with large tracts of land, this isn’t a problem because the vast landscape is diverse enough. But in the case of smallacreage, one-habitat prop-erties, it’s up to you as the landowner to create varied, preferred habitats if you expect turkeys to use the property. For optimal turkey habitat, most experts believe a “rule of halves” should be applied to the landscape. What that means is that half of the area (and if you own a small tract, then include surrounding prop-erties) should be in mature forests and the other half in early-succession open-ings, such as fields or clear-cut and plantation-cut landscapes. To create even better and more varied habitats for tur-keys, you should offer dif-fering age classes of forests and early-succession areas — and make prescribed burning a big part of your management plan. This will enable new growth of suc-culent, woody ornamentals, native grasses and weedy-type flowers.. Hardwood lowlands provide travel corridors that turkeys and deer use extensively and feel com-fortable moving through. Most wild turkeys prefer to roost in trees over or near water, so it’s impor-tant to leave these areas undisturbed and free from timbering. Buffer strips of native grasses and woody orna-mentals should be left unmowed where clear-cut areas meet pine or hard-wood forests. Hens require this thick understory cover for nesting. Good brood habitat should hold food in the form of seeds, insects and tender, new-growth veg-etation for young poults to feed upon throughout the summer. It should con-sist of 1to 3-foot-tall grass and weeds open enough to enable the young poults to move about, yet dense enough to provide cover from predators. There is great interest nationally in the planting of food plots for wildlife, including for turkeys. Within extensive closed-canopy forested areas, food plots and/or game feeders are essential to keeping turkeys on your property. Where an open forest structure is maintained by adequate timber thinning and the use of fire, such supplemental feeding is not as necessary because there is enough natural browse vegetation on which game can feed. When thinking about good food plot sites, avoid excessively wet or dry areas, and don’t place them along heavily used roads to minimize disturbance and possible poaching. Look to create these openings along an edge where upland pines meet a hardwood drain.Q Tony Young is media relations coordinator for the FWC’s Division of Hunting and Game Management

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LAKE CITY REPORTER NASCAR FR IDAY & SATURDAY, JANUARY 4-5, 2013 7B7BPuzzles NOTEBOOK NASCAR unveils personnel movesNASCAR has announced several changes in its competi tion department.Joe Balash,who has served as the Nationw ide Series director since 2004,will become internationa l Competition Liaison,working with NASCAR circuits inMexico,Canada and Europe. Wayne Auton moves up from his post a director of th e Camping World Truck Series to take Balash’s old job with the Nationwide Series.He will be replaced by Chad Littl e,who leaves his job as director of the Whelen Modified T our. Balash now will report to Richard Buck,who has been promoted to managing director,Competition GRAND-AM andmanaging director,Touring Series NASCAR.Auton and L ittle will continue to report to John Darby,managing dire ctor,competition and Sprint Cup Series director. Brad Moran,now the Canadian Tire Series director,wi ll serve in the role of director of Touring Series,NAS CAR,and will report to Buck.Bayne announces engagement 2011 Daytona 500 winner Trevor Bayne announced by Twitter and Facebook that he’s engaged to Ashton Cl app.“Well Ladies and Gentlemen,she said yes,”Bayne said in a message accompanied by a photo of the two of them at a ski slope.Former driver ‘Crawfish’Crider diesFormer NASCAR driver Curtis “Crawfish”Crider died l ast week at his home near Daytona Beach,Fla.The Abbevil le, S.C.,native made 232 starts in the series now known as Sprint Cup from 1959-1965.He had 14 top-five and 70 top-10 finishes. NUMERICALLYSPEAKING Cup wins in 2012 byBrad Keselowski, Jimmie Johnson and DennyHamlin,tops among drivers Poles in 2012 by MarkMartin,Kasey Kahne and Jimmie Johnson,the mostamong Sprint Cup drivers Consecutive yearswith at least one Cup victory by Tony Stewart,themost of any driver Consecutive SprintCup races without a victory by Martin Truex Jr.,the most of any driver in thetop 20 in the final 2012points standings4 5 203 14 By RICK MINTER / Universal Uclick By RICK MINTER / Universal Uclick As the calendar rolls over from 2012 to 2013, and the NASCAR guys and gals get away fromthe tracks for a few weeks,it’s time to look backat the big stories of the recently completedSprint Cup season.It’s often been said that the season-openingDaytona 500,NASCAR’s biggest race,setsthe tone for the entire year. First,there was the rain that came on race day and forced the only rainout of the history ofthe 500.But the news wasn’t all bad,becausethat put NASCAR racing live on prime time TVfor the first time ever.That switch led to thehighest number of viewers ever to watch a FOXrace broadcast. Then there was the fire,when Juan Pablo Montoya lost control of his car and slammedinto a jet dryer,igniting a spectacular blaze andcausing a two-hour delay while repairs weremade to the track. Luckily for NASCAR,just as it looked like the TV audience might tune out because of thedelay,Brad Keselowski whipped out his cellphone and began Tweeting about the incident.In addition to gaining about 100,000 Twitterfollowers,he gave NASCAR’s social media ini-tiative a huge boost. Later in the season,NASCAR decided cell phones in race cars were a bad idea and finedKeselowski $25,000 for Tweeting from his carduring a red flag at Phoenix. Finally,at the end of the 500,there was Matt Kenseth winning his second Daytona 500.Thatvictory,in addition to his solid performancethroughout the season,made his mid-yearannouncement that he was leaving his Roush-Fenway Racing team for Joe Gibbs Racing evenmore startling. He’s taking over the No.20 Toyota formerly driven by Joey Logano,who is moving to theNo.22 at Penske Racing as a teammate toKeselowski. Dale Earnhardt Jr.’s strong runner-up run at Daytona was the start of a comeback season forNASCAR’s most popular driver. He broke a 143-race winless streak at Michigan in June and made the cut for theChase for the Sprint Cup. Also grabbing headlines at Daytona were the rules infractions by Jimmie Johnson’s No.48crew.NASCAR initially suspended crew chiefChad Knaus and car chief Ron Malec,dockedthe team 25 points and fined Knaus $100,000for improper modifications to their car. The team appealed,and in a stunning move, NASCAR Chief Appellate Officer JohnMiddlebrook overturned the most damagingparts of the penalties,leaving in place only thefine against Knaus. The drama that began at Daytona continued throughout the season.Both races at Bristol Motor Speedway produced interest-ing results.The Food City 500 in March,wonby Keselowski,saw seas of empty seats in thegrandstands,prompting track owner BrutonSmith to grind portions of the pavement in anattempt to bring back the “old Bristol”that often saw slam-bang racing because of the lackof multiple grooves. But when the night race in August got under way,the top of the track that had been groundin an attempt to keep drivers on the bottom,actually proved to be the preferred line. But fans were entertained as in the past, thanks in large part to Tony Stewart and MattKenseth. After the two crashed while racing for the lead,Stewart got out of his car and threw hishelmet at Kenseth’s car,bouncing it off thefront end. Denny Hamlin took the win,one of his five for the season. NASCAR’s return trip to Daytona in July produced another stunning story. Just before the start of the race,NASCAR announced that Penske Racing driver A.J.Allmendinger had been temporarily suspendedfrom NASCAR because he didn’t pass a ran-dom drug test. He was replaced by Sam Hornish Jr.Allmendinger soon completed NASCAR’s Road to Recovery program and rejoined theseries in Charlotte in October.He ran a total offour races for Phoenix Racing. The Finger Lakes 355 at Watkins Glen on Aug.12 turned out to be more significantthan most races. Kyle Busch,who put aside much of his participation in the Nationwide and CampingWorld Truck series to concentrate on winning aSprint Cup championship,was in position toessentially sew up a Chase berth before the lastlap at the Glen. But while leading on the final circuit,he spun after contact with Brad Keselowski,whofinished second in the race. Marcos Ambrose then made a daring move on Keselowski to get the victory,which helpedhis Richard Petty Motorsports team continue toreceive much-needed funding from Ford MotorCompany. As for Busch,he missed the cut for the Chase and finished the season with just one Cup winand none in either the Nationwide or TruckSeries.That’s in contrast to 2011 when he had18 combined wins,to 2010 when he had 24 andto 2009 when he had 21. Safety also was an issue in 2012. Dale Earnhardt Jr.was among those saying early onthat racing is plenty safe these days. “The cars are safe,and we are not in physical danger of injury,”he said at Watkins Glen. But just a few weeks later,on Aug.29, Earnhardt suffered a concussion in a hardcrash during a tire test at Kansas Speedway.He kept his injuries to himself until a secondcrash,at Talladega Superspeedway on Oct.7. At that point he was diagnosed with concussions and was forced to miss the next two races.He wound up 12th in the final points standings and had 10 top-five finishes for the season,butnone after the Kansas crash. The 10-race championship-deciding Chase for the Sprint Cup played out in dramatic fashion as it boiled down to a one-on-onebetween Keselowski,in his third full year ofSprint Cup racing,and the five-time champion,Johnson,in his 11th. Keselowski won the Chase opener at Chicagoland Speedway and was never lowerthan second in points throughout the final 10races.Johnson came on strong at the end,win-ning at Martinsville and Texas and holding thepoints lead after those two races. But in the next-to-last race at Phoenix, Johnson crashed hard and fell to 20 pointsbehind Keselowski entering the finale atHomestead-Miami Speedway. In the Ford 400,pit strategy had put Johnson in position to win the race and possi-bly the championship before a penalty on pitroad put him behind.Then a mechanical issuewith the rear gear on his No.48 sealed the titlefor Keselowski,who raced conservatively andfinished 15th. Johnson’s struggles opened the door for Clint Bowyer to take the runner-up spot in thestandings,capping off a remarkable three-winfirst season with Michael Waltrip Racing. Bowyer also was involved in a couple of “old-school”NASCAR moments.His risky movein the closing laps in the first Martinsville racecaused a crash that ended what would havebeen a storybook moment for team owner RickHendrick.Two of his drivers,Jeff Gordon andJimmie Johnson,were at the front of the packand in position to claim the 200th Cup win forHendrick at the track where he got his firstCup victory and where he lost family membersand friends in a plane crash. Instead,they were collected in a crash that set the stage for a win by Ryan Newman. But Bowyer didn’t get off scot-free.In the next-to-last race of the year,at Phoenix,Gordonpaid him back by intentionally wrecking him.Then,in the final race of the year,the race forthe win came down to none other than Gordonand Bowyer. Gordon won the race,the 87th victory of his Cup career.Bowyer’s second-place finish gavehim a one-point edge over Jimmie Johnson inthe race for the runner-up spot in the stand-ings. A great start at Daytona and an equally thrilling ending at Homestead made for onememorable season and raise high hopes for thenew NASCAR year. The start of the 2012 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Dayt ona 500 on February 27 in Daytona Beach,Fla.(NASCAR photo)Rearview mirror 2012 NASCAR's Ricky Stenhouse Jr. (left) and Joey Logano (right) kiss U.S.Army Specialist Katherine Kelley 28,during a December USO tour to Kuwait and Germany .(USO Photo) Dale Earnhardt Jr. (NASCAR photo) From Daytonato Homestead,it was a seasonto remember Kyle Busch,driver of the No.18 Toyota,and BradKeselowski,driver of the No.2 Dodge,in an incident during the Finger Lakes 355 at the Glen at Watkins Gle n International on August 12.(NASCAR photo)

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8B LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDFRIDAY& SATURDAY, JANUARY4 & 5, 2013 Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 ServicesWhite's Trucking Services You call & We Haul! Fill Dirt, Lime Rock. AsphaltMillings, Granite, Road Rock.386-362-8763 2001 Dodge Ram 3500V10 Magnum, extended cab, SLT, 4 WD, DRW, AT, PW, PS, red w/tan interior, 137,000 miles, good condition.$7,900386-984-6606 or 386-758-6800 020Lost & Found Found Nintendo 3D In vicinity of Troy St & Elementary School. Need to Provide Birth date & Serial I.D. Info. 243-8135 Found on Ichetucknee Rd Small female short hair brown dog, No collar. Very Sweet, Sweet, Sweet. Contact 984-6796 100Job Opportunities05536524Frito Lay Route Sales $40,000+ Full Time Open House Info Session Jan. 11th Call (386) 867-1913 to RSVP Equal Opportunity Employment M/F/D/V 05536568Raymond James Financial Services located at First Federal Bank of Florida is currently seeking a full-time "Paraprofessional" Assistant to the branch manager. Fast paced work environment. Minimum requirements include exceptional interpersonal and organizational skills (attention to detail is a must); excellent computer, grammar, and mathematical abilities; and advanced technology skills including Word, Excel and Web based software programs. Salary range $40,000 – $48,000. Please email resume to Tammy.Hall@RaymondJames.c om or mail to NWAmerican Lane, Suite 102, Lake City, FL32055. Construction Salesman Needed. Excellent Pay. Experience Required. 866-959-7663 ConsumerLender-SunState FCUFull-Time Position in Lake City. Experience selling financial products, proven customer relations expertise, and lending experience REQUIRED. Great pay and benefits! Application Required and available at www.sunstatefcu.org. Fax to 386-462-4686. DFWP, EOE Experienced Restaurant Managers Day one medical, dental and vision. Paid vacation, 401K and bonuses. EOE. email resume to: sfl_careers@steaknshake.com Needed CNC Machinist Must be familiar with Lathes and Mills, send resume to Grizzly Mfg. 174 NE Cortez Ter. Lake City FL32055, or Email: guy@qiagroup.com NO PHONE CALLS/WALK-INS Industrial Structural/ Mechanical Designer-Draftsman Must have experience in design and detailing Material Handling Equipment (conveyor systems) & related structural steel support systems. Proficiency in AutoCAD is necessary. DO NOTAPPLYIN PERSON Send resume to Draftsman 3631 US Highway 90 East Lake City, Fl 32055 Mechanic needed with tools and experience. Southern Specialize Truck & Trailer. 386-752-9754 Must have a minimum of 5 yrs Exp. selling HVAC Equipment. Excellent benefits &Great pay. Call Allen 386-628-1093 Real Estate Co. looking for Office Staff Computer knowledge required. Real Estate Exp. is a plus! Fax resume to 386-496-4309 Sales Help at Florida Visitors Center. Benefits, hourly wage plus commission. Excellent opportunity with National company. Westgate Resorts. Call Ed 904-540-2314 or email Ed_Newman@wgresorts.com SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 Service Techs & Installers Must be EPA& NATE certified. Excellent benefits & great pay. Call Allen (386) 628-1093 StarTech Computer Center Now hiring Exp Techs. Send resume to: bdj@startech.cc Truck Repair facility Service Writer needed. Computer literate and understanding of truck repair and parts procurement. Southern Special Truck & Trailer 752-9754 120Medical EmploymentCMA experience preferred in Peds/ Family Practice. Experience injections & taking accurate vital signs. Excellent communication & documentation, organization &assessment skills. Fax resume to 758-5628 120Medical Employment05536594Medical Billing Manager Several years experience in all aspects in medical insurance billing required. Salary based on experience. Email resume in confidence to mafaisal05@yahoo.com or fax to 386-758-5987. 240Schools & Education05536525Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class1/7/2013• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-1/14/13• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 407Computers HPComputer $75.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 408Furniture SOFABED, new decking, springs, and mattress $100. 386-754-1595 416Sporting Goods TREADMILLProScan quiet, excellent condition. $250 CASH 386-755-7045 430Garage Sales PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 440Miscellaneous Fitness Center Equipment Treadmills, Ellipticals, Stair Masters & Bikes Cybex, Nautilus & Free Weight Equipment. Tanning Beds, Office Chairs, Desk, Copiers & more. Must sell quick. Call for prices (386)365-2047 or (386)752-1652 Troy-Bilt 5550 Watt Generator, 10HPOHVBriggs & Stratton, $400, 386-754-1595 630Mobile Homes forRent1/1 Cabin $475 & Lots for your RVor your own Cabin. Between Lake City & G’ville. Access to I-75 & 441 (352)317-1326. 2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $700. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 3 BR/1 BA, close to town, fenced in yard, private well $800 month. & $800 deposit 386-752-7578 & 386-288-8401 3 BR/2 BA, completely refurbished, appliances furnished, $795 month. & $795 deposit 386-752-7578 3Br/2Ba Mod 1/2acre (nice subd) concrete drive, wrap around deck appl's,energysaver, &thermo's ready (386) 984-5341 $800 mo Quiet Country Park 3bd/2ba $525, 2bd/1ba $425. Very clean. NO PETS! References & Deposit required 386-758-2280 640Mobile Homes forSale1600 SQFT, 3/2 DWMH, close to town, country setting on 2 ac. Reduced to $49,000 (short sale) Poole Realty 362-4539. MLS 82068 2 MFG HOMES on 5 ACRES! Great for 2 families in Godbold Acres west of Lake City $79,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCY INC. 755-5110 #81421 2013 DOUBLEWIDE $33,995 inc. set-up, trim-out & A/C Call 386-288-8379. 5 LIKENew Mobile Homes!!! For under $30,000. MUSTSEE Call John T. 386-752-1452 640Mobile Homes forSale3BR/2BA28X64 in a great location, a lot of upgrades, fireplace. Only $2,500 down $399 a month. Call Paula at 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com 4br 2b open/split floor plan MH w/wood flooring, newly painted, large stone fireplace. MLS 82326 Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $74,000 Bank owned, Cozy 1/1 home in Lake C community $55,000. MLS 81365 Poole Realty 362-4539. $55,000 BANK REPO 3BR/2BADoublewide ’09 Excellent condition. Only $999 down $377 a month. Call Paula 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com Breathtaking 80 ac horse ranch w/ 7700 sqft home, heated pool, stocked pond, workout facility MLS 82156 Poole Realty 362-4539. short sale $950,000 CLOSE TO VAMED CTR! 3BR/2BAw/beautiful interior, new CH&A$59,900 DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #81428 EASTSIDE VILLAGE 2BR/2BAw/lg kitchen, open floor plan $79,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #80972 Hardwood floors, formal dining room, great rm, f/p, double car garage. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 MLS 82374 $243,900 Palm HarborHomes New 2013 Models $15K Off All Homes 800-622-2832 ext 210 LIVE OAK! Cute home in city limits; 3BR/1BA& 1,294 SqFt $49,500 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #81410 MUSTSEE 2013 2x6 walls, R30 insulation, OSB wrap, house wrap, real wood cabinets, and thermal pain windows. Payment $399 per month call John T386-752-1452. Results Realty Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 4/2 on 10 Ac home features 2200 heated sqft. 10x20 frame shed. MLS# 76582 $67,500 WANTED…CASH PAID for your Mobile Home, Singlewide or Doublewide flood homes welcome. Call 386-288-8379 WOODGATE VILLAGE Move-in ready! Open 3BR/2BA floor plan on nice shaded lot $49,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC 755-5110 #82259 WOODGATE VILLAGE Nice 3BR/2BADWMH w/fenced yd, workshop; $39,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCY, INC 755-5110 #79078 650Mobile Home & Land2/1 MH, completely remodeled. Custom Floors on 5 ac. w/ 2 stall horse barn. MLS # 79025 $49,900 Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Results Realty 2br/2ba on 3.51 ac, 1512 sqft DW perfect Rental, Lg deck, MLS # 82216 Results Realty Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 $49,900 FSBO 5 ac lot w/ 1995 refurb. MH. 66ft long w/ new roof & wheel chair ramp. $5,000 down Owner Fin. on Balance Approx 5 miles N. of LC. 386-752-4597 Great Value 24 acres, 3/2 DWMH, front porch, full length of MH, open floor plan. MLS 79000. Poole Realty Nelda Hatcher. 688-8067 Hallmark Real Estate $34,400. 3/2 MH in O’Brien. On 4 Ac. Case#091-374923 www.hudhomestore.com Robin Williams (386)365-2135 MLS 81700 Hallmark Real Estate Beautiful 4.38 Ac with 4/2 MH. Master has separate office/den area. Large living room with fireplace. Janet Creel (386)719-0382 MLS#82465 Hallmark Real Estate Beautiful Pasture, fenced for horses, well kept 3/2 M/H Great front & back porch to enjoy nature. Robin Williams (386)365-5146 MLS#80899 Hallmark Real Estate Just Reduced! Home & office over 1900sqft with glassed porch centrally located in town. Janet Creel (386)719-0382 MLS#81207 Hallmark Real Estate Live better for less! 3/2.5 Brick home on an acre. Inground Pool. F/p. Lrg oak trees. S. Columbia County. Ginger Parker(386)365-2135 MLS#81183 Hallmark Real Estate This is it! This 3/2 Home on a corner lot. Close to all amenities. Private fenced backyard. Paula Lawrence (386)623-1973 MLS#79943 OwnerFinanced 3/22.5 ac.River Access. Small down $585 mo 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com SW2BD/1.5BA, 1 acre, Updated Kitchen. $3,500 down, $350 mth Contact 305-304-4028 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRentALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05535481We’ve got it all!$89 Deposit Limited Avail. Call Today! Windsong Apts. *Free afterschool program386-758-8455 Amberwood Hills Apts. Private Patio area. Beautiful yard. Washer/dryer hkup. Free water & sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special. 386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com BRANFORD VILLAS 386-935-2319 2br/1ba Apts. Now available.$570. mo. TDD number 1-800-955-8771 Equal Housing Opportunity Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2 mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet Friendly. Pool laundry & balcony. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A$530 month $530 deposit garbage included. No pets. 386-344-2170 Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A$530 month $530 deposit garbage included. No pets. 386-344-2170 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Greentree Townhouse Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free water & sewer. Balcony & patio. Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com Large & clean 1br/1ba apt. CH/Alg walk in closet. Close to town. $395. mo and $350. dep. (904)563-6208 NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled 1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living room. $450. mo plus sec. 386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951 Redwine Apartments Pets welcome. with 5 complexes, we have a home for you. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 Wayne ManorApts. Spacious 2bedroom washer/dryer. Behind Kens off Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 www .myflapts.com WindsorArms Apartments. Move in! 2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free 200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 STUDIO APT. FOR RENT All utilities included & Cable, $500 month + $300 sec. deposit. Call 386-697-9950 730Unfurnished Home ForRent3 bedroom 1 bath $630 mth and $630 deposit. CH/A Contact 377-2170 3B/2BA brick,Florida room, fireplace, 2 car carport, Large yard, quiet & private. Country Club Rd. South, $900 mo. 386-365-6228 3bdrm very spacious, 2ba, garage, CH/AFenced in backyard. $1,400 mth & $1,400 dep. Contact 386-344-1914 3bdrm very spacious, 2ba, garage, CH/AFenced in backyard. $1,400 mth & $1,400 dep. Contact 386-344-1914 3br/1.5ba. Very clean, Brick great area w/bonus room. Carport, shed & Fenced (privacy) back yard. $825. mo $825. dep. Ref’s req’d. (941)920-4535 ForLease ,3Br/2bth DWon ten acres S.of Columbia City.Contact At 727-289-2172 $800.00 mo.$350.00 security. NICE 3/2 brick home w/garage in quiet neighborhood. 489 SWBrandy. $900 plus sec. dep. 386-438-4600 750Business & Office RentalsMedical, Retail and Professional Office space on East Baya near Old Country Club Rd. Call 386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622 (cell) 805Lots forSale 2 Ac lot in Timberlake S/D. $135,000 MLS # 79025 Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Results Realty 3 Acres in White Springs, Commercial usage, city sewer. Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS $175,000 MLS 82358 Beautiful log home located on 5 ac, well maintained, wrap around porch. MLS 75550 $189,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #80401 $60,000. Must be 55+ 130x750 right on Suwannee, Beautiful lot, minutes from Royal Springs, Denise Bose 752-5290 805Lots forSale Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #76668 $32,000 Must be 55+, Buildable lot for site built homes only. In Forest Country. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Great home, Emerald Lakes, well kept, split floor plan, oversized family room, MLS# 79733 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Missy Zecher 623-0237 $169,900 Great starter, corner lot, needs some TLC, close to town MLS 81784 $90,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS 810Home forSale 3br/2ba plus office, 2103 heated sqft, wood floors, large patio MLS # 81984 Swift Creek Realty $229,900 (386) 496-0499 58 Ac, Suwannee County, 3br/2ba newly remodeled horse barns & tack.MLS 81002 Swift Creek Realty $650,000 (386) 496-0499 Access Realty Gorgeous views 3bd/3ba on Lake Montgomery. Elevator, fishing dock & jacuzzi. MLS 81438 $249,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access RealtySpacious 4 bd/3ba Cypress Lake w/ 3643 sqft 1.25 acres on lake. Vaulted ceilings. MLS 81314 $279,900. Patti Taylor386-623-6896 Access RealtyTwo story 1895 Victorian house w/ electrical upgrades throughout. double -deck porches, MLS 71594 $149,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Beautiful 2 story w/ upgrades, open kitchen, granite counter tops, great room w/ stone f/p. MLS 81994 Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $435,000 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Country Home, 3br 3 bath, spacious, close to Suwannee & Santa Fe River MLS 81775, $169,900 Elaine Tolar 755-6488 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty MLS 80175, 4br 3ba & 2.5 ba colonial, 3 fireplaces $315,000 Mary Brown Whitehurst. 965-0887 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty 3br 3ba home with a two story duplex. Owner Financing MLS 80915, Elaine Tolar 365-1548 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Building lots: May-Fair, Cannon Creek, Creek Run & Meadow View. Elaine Tolar 386-365-1548 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Home with 5+ ac 3b 2.5 ba, large kitchen covered deck MLS 81630 Elaine Tolar 365-1548 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty 230 Acres, Col. Co. Paved Rd. 752-4211 MLS 70453 Country home, wood burning f/p, granite counter tops, vaulted ceilings in living room. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 MLS 82022, $240,000 Custom home, located on 6.05 ac. Pecan grove w/ rolling hills in Equestrian Comm. Remax Professionals Missy Zecher 623-0237 $269,000 MLS 81075 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81959 Must be 55+, 2br/2ba, $79,900. Site Built Home w/eat in kitchen, laundry rm, scrn porch. Denise Bose @ 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81958-, $115,000. Must be 55+, 3br/2ba, Site Built w/ lots of room, split plan mstr suite, FL. Rm. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Hallmark Real Estate Brick Home on 6.3 acres 4bd 2.5ba with large 32X20 Deck & Gazebo. Solid wood cabinets Kay Priest(386)365-8888 MLS#82488 Hallmark Real Estate Short Sale Brick home corner lot 2600 SQFT, fenced back yard. Located minutes from town. Paula Lawrence (386)623-1973 MLS 82491 Ichetucknee River 3br/2ba + loft, 1350 sqft. Hardwood floors, f/p, granite counters Swift Creek Realty $399,000 (386) 496-0499 Just listed unique home with 2800 sqft of living space, located on 1.37 acres in Live Oak, MLS 82214, Poole Realty $67,500. 362-4539 Lake Front property w/ 137 ft frontage, eat-in kitchen, screened deck w/ view quality furnishings. MLS 81850 Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $119,000 810Home forSale Open floor plan, covered back patio. Lots of big windows, new carpet & paint, beautiful ceramic tile Century 21 Darby Rogers MLS 82078, 752-6575 Remax Jo Lytte 386-365-2821 Ichetucknee River front 4b/3.5b 2 fireplaces, 2 story home. MLS 81777 $559,000 Ultimate River Experience. Santa Fe River home 2br/2b, granite tops, wood burning heater & open great room. Too many extras to mention. Jo Lytte Remax MLS 81537 $339,000 Spectacular 3br/2b home, great room French doors, 10 aces, w/ barn MLS 79593. Jo Lytte Remax 386-365-2821 $349,800 820Farms & Acreage4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com Access Realty10 acre square tract, High & Dry, OF Avail. w/ 25% down. Convenient Location MLS 81258$39,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access Realty43.64 acres wooded acreage in N.Columbia County. Scenic & Private. MLS 74429 $89,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Owner financed land 1/2 to 10 acre lots. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605