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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
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Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:01992

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:01992

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

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By DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comUp to $3 million in proposed improvements to the Southside Recreation Complex will come before the county commission at tonight’s meeting. County Manager Dale Williams said dis-cussion of improvements was set aside until last year’s budget was final. Some of the money left over could be used for the improve-ments, he said. Tonight’s meeting will take place at 7 p.m. at the Columbia County School Board Administrative Complex. Harvey Campbell, executive director of the Tourist Development Council, said $2.5 million to $3 million in improve-ments are needed. He said the Southside Recreation Complex’s direct eco-nomic impact was $6 million dol-lars for 2011. The impact came from tournaments the complex hosts where teams from through-out the Southeast compete, often for an entire weekend. This boosts revenue at area hotels, restaurants and stores. He said the impact of the facility for 2012 hasn’t yet been deter-mined. Campbell said there may be as many as three concession stands with bathrooms that could be added to the complex. He said the bleachers need handrails and Opinion ................ 4APeople.................. 2AObituaries .............. 5A Advice & Comics ......... 4B Puzzles ................. 5B TODAY IN PEOPLE Springsteen tribute set. COMING FRIDAY Local news roundup. 58 40 Isolated showers WEATHER, 2A Lake City ReporterTHURSDAY, JANUARY 3, 2013 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | 75¢ LAKECITYREPORTER.COM CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 138, No. 242 1 Low marks for D.C. from localsBy DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comCongress may have struck a deal late Tuesday to prevent across-the-board income tax hikes for most Americans, but they were late getting it done and general-ly didn’t inspire confidence in their ability to govern in a crisis, in the view of many. The perception that Washington is broken was evident in com-ments from shoppers at the Lake City Mall Wednesday afternoon. Arthur Fleming, 62, of Lake City, said the dysfunction of Congress sends the wrong message to the rest of the world. He said Congress needs to learn the meaning of compromise, and that politics has splintered and divided the country. “Put country before party, put people before party...” Fleming said. “It seems like we would destroy our country based on ideology.” Andy Boswell, 77, of Branford, said he felt Congress handled the “fiscal cliff” poorly, saying that there’s no one behind the wheel in Washington. “They are derelict in their duties,” Boswell said. “We hired them to a job and they ain’t done it.” Boswell said he’s a registered Democrat, but votes for what he feels is right and doesn’t toe party lines. Mark Dean, 26, moved to Lake City six months ago and said the last minute deals that have become normal in Washington are unpro-fessional. “If they saw it coming, they should have Holland Boswell Fleming REACTION continued on 3A We didn’t go over the cliff, but nation’s leaders hardly inspired confidence. Despite ‘cliff’ deal, 2% payroll tax cutallowed to expire. Federal taxes to rise for most By STEPHEN OHLEMACHERAssociated PressWASHINGTON — While the tax package that Congress passed New Year’s Day will protect 99 percent of Americans from an income tax increase, most of them will still end up paying more federal taxes in 2013. That’s because the legislation did nothing to prevent a temporary reduction in the Social Security payroll tax from expiring. In 2012, that 2-percentage-point cut in the payroll tax was worth about $1,000 to a worker making $50,000 a year. The Tax Policy Center, a nonpartisan Washington research group, estimates that 77 per-cent of American households will face higher federal taxes in 2013 under the agreement negotiated between President Barack Obama and Senate Republicans. High-income families will feel the biggest tax increases, but many mid-dleand low-income families will pay higher taxes too. Households making between $40,000 and $50,000 will face an average tax increase of $579 in 2013, according to the Tax Policy Center’s analysis. Households making between $50,000 and $75,000 will face an average tax increase of $822. “For most people, it’s just the payroll tax,” said Roberton Williams, a senior fellow at the Tax Policy Center. The tax increases could be a lot higher. A huge pack-age of tax cuts first enacted under President George W. Bush was scheduled to expire Tuesday as part of the “fiscal cliff.” The Bush-era tax cuts lowered taxes for families at every income level, reduced investment taxes and the estate tax, and enhanced a number of tax credits, includ-ing a $1,000-per-child credit. The package passed Tuesday by the Senate and House extends most the Bush-era tax cuts for individu-als making less than $400,000 and married couples making less than $450,000. Obama said the deal “protects 98 percent of Americans and 97 percent of small busi-ness owners from a middle-class tax hike. While neither TAXES continued on 3A ‘FISCAL CLIFF’ DEAL Building a better ballparkJASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterIn this file photo, Harvey Campbell, executive director of th e Columbia County Tourist Development Council, stands ne ar the entrance to one of the softball fields at the Southside Recreation Complex. The cou nty commission is considering allocating $3 million fo r improvements to the complex. Upgrades could boost tourism, officials say County commissionwill consider fundsrequest tonight. UPGRADES continued on 3AJASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterWes Smith (right), 17, and Brent Howell, 21, watch as Nathan Taylor, 16, topples a tower of bricks while playing Jeng a at Florida Gateway College on Wednesday. Pick-up game ‘Fiscal cliff’ deal leaves lots of issues danglingBy CONNIE CASSAssociated PressThe “fiscal cliff” compromise on taxes leaves a big part of the nation’s budget crisis still dangling. Lawmakers bought a little time with a New Year’s agreement to hold income tax rates steady for 99 per-cent of Americans while allowing payroll taxes to go up. But they left themselves only two months to settle seemingly irreconcilable differences over how much the United States should borrow and spend and where painful budget cuts should land. Here’s a look at what’s been resolved and what’s left hanging:AUTOMATIC SPENDING CUTSThe bipartisan deal approved by the Senate and House put off dealing with the nearly $110 billion in auto-matic spending cuts set for this year. Unless Congress stops them by March 1, automatic cuts of about 8 or 9 percent are set to sweep through nearly all federal agencies, with half the money coming out of the ISSUES continued on 3A

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CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Record producer George Martin is 87. Actor Dabney Coleman is 81. Singer Stephen Stills is 68. Bassist John Paul Jones of Led Zeppelin is 67. Actress Victoria Principal is 63. Actor Mel Gibson is 57. Jazz saxophonist James Carter is 44. AROUND FLORIDA Meth found in babys shoe PORT CHARLOTTE Sheriffs deputies found 1.7 grams of crystal meth amphetamine in a babys shoe when they arrested three people during a New Years Eve traffic stop in Port Charlotte. According to a sheriffs report, a deputy stopped the vehicle Monday night after observing it veer into the center lane and then sideswipe a curb. One occupant had a plastic bag gie with $790 and white powder that tested positive for meth. The deputy spotted a baggie sticking out of the bra of a woman passenger. In the backseat, he found meth inside a 1-year-old girls shoe, which was in her mothers purse and within the babys reach. In all, 42.3 grams of meth was seized. The three occupants were taken to jail and face multiple charges. Authorities released the child to her father. Cockfight raid nets 9 arrests PLANT CITY Nine people were detained after authorities raided a cockfight in the Tampa Bay-area. The Hillsborough County Sheriffs Office says the cockfight was in progress when deputies arrived Tuesday morning at a Plant City home to investigate reports about a cockfighting ring. Deputies say several people fled the scene on foot. Nine people were caught and detained. According to the sheriffs office, there were numerous roosters in cages at the home. Several of the birds were dead. Animal services were called to the scene. Son charged with killing father HOLIDAY Authorities said a 23-year-old is sus pected of setting a house fire that killed his father on New Years Eve. According to the Pasco County Sheriffs Office, Baron Von Duke Vercruysse was arrested Tuesday. The office said 52-year-old Rene Dominique Vercruysse died of homicidal vio lence. The Tampa Bay Times reported deputies believe a dispute between the father and son led to the death. However deputies did not release further details. Authorities found the fathers body when they responded to the fire around 10:20 p.m. on Monday. The son was charged with first-degree mur der. The Times reported his prior arrest record includes charges of lar ceny and possession of controlled substances. Man shoots naked intruder MIAMI A naked intruder shot after alleg edly throttling a Miami familys dog and trying to bite its owner is refusing to cooperate with authori ties. The homeowner heard the dog barking around 5 a.m. Wednesday and went to investigate. Police say the homeowner saw the naked man trying to choke the animal and rushed to free it. Thats when police say the naked man bit the homeowner. The homeowner told police he feared for his life and shot the intruder while other family mem bers called 911. The intruder was hit once but continued to put up a fight as officers arrived. He eventually was arrested and taken to a hospital, where he refused to provide his name. Police said the intruder faces multiple charges, including animal cruelty. Man shot in face with pellet gun LAND OLAKES Tampa Bay area deputies were searching for a sus pect in what is being called a hate crime, after a man was shot in the face with a pellet gun. The Pasco County Sheriffs Office reported that a man and his girl friend were shopping at a Walmart early Wednesday when the suspect started harassing them, believ ing the man was from the Middle East. As the man and his girl friend approached their car, the suspect walked up to them and made several comments then shot the man in the face with a pel let gun. The suspect then ran off. The victim wasnt seri ously hurt. Terror finance trial to begin MIAMI Jury selection was to begin Wednesday for the trial of an elderly Muslim cleric and a son accused of fun neling tens of thousands of dollars to the Pakistani Taliban terror group. The men claim the money they sent overseas was for purely innocent purposes. Hafiz Khan and one of his sons are charged with providing material support to terror ists by allegedly funnel ing about $50,000 to the Pakistani Taliban. Thought for Today A clash of doctrines is not a disaster it is an opportunity. Alfred North Whitehead, English philosopher and mathematician (1861-1947) Springsteen tribute set LOS ANGELES C omedian Jon Stewart will host the MusiCares salute to Bruce Springsteen. The Recording Springsteen is MusiCares person of the year, an award given to a performer who is notable both artistically and phil anthropically. The sold-out concert will benefit MusiCares emergency financial assistance and addiction recovery programs. Academy also announced Wednesday that Elton John, Neil Young, Mumford & Sons, Sting, Mavis Staples and Kenny Chesney will be among more than a dozen performers who will help pay tribute to Springsteen during the Feb. 8 benefit concert, held in Los Angeles two days before the Grammy Awards. Other performers scheduled to appear include Juanes, Tim McGraw and Faith Hill, Jackson Browne and Alabama Shakes. Stewart is the host of Comedy Centrals The Daily Show With Jon Stewart. Tennessee Waltz singer Patti Page dies at 85 NASHVILLE, Tenn. Patti Page, the Singing Rage who stumbled across Tennessee Waltz and made it one of the best-sell ing recordings ever, has died. She was 85. Page died on New Years Day in Encinitas, Calif., according to publi cist Schatzi Hageman. Page was the top-selling female singer of the 1950s with more than 100 million records sold. Her most enduring songs remain Tennessee Waltz, one of two songs the state of Tennessee has officially adopted, and (How Much Is That) Doggie in the Window. She scored 15 gold records and three gold albums with 24 songs in the top 10, including four that reached No. 1. She was popular in pop music and country and became the first singer to have television programs on all three major networks, including The Patti Page Show on ABC. In 1999, after 51 years of perform ing, Page won her first Grammy for traditional pop vocal performance for Live at Carnegie Hall The 50th Anniversary Concert. Page was planning to attend a special ceremo ny on Feb. 9 in Los Angeles where she was to receive a lifetime acheive ment award from The Recording Academy. Paparazzo killed after taking shots of Bieber LOS ANGELES A paparazzo was struck and killed by a car while dart ing across a street after taking pictures of Justin Biebers Ferrari when it was pulled over along a freeway in Los Angeles, police said Wednesday. Bieber was not in the car at the time. The singer later said his prayers were with the family of the 29-year-old photographer who was pronounced dead at a hospital short ly after the accident late Tuesday afternoon. His name was withheld by police pending notification of relatives. Wednes day: Afternoon: 8-2-7 Evening: N/A Wednes day: Afternoon: 0-4-8-6 Evening: N/A Tues day: 9-19-20-22-27 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAIL Y BRIEFING THURSDAY, JANUARY 3, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 2AWEATHER Daily Scripture Teach us to number our days, that we may gain a heart of wisdom. Psalm 90:12 HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter Associated Press ASSOCIATED PRESS Bruce Springsteen, left, and Jon Bon Jovi perform atThe Concert for Sandy Relief in New York on Dec. 12. Springsteen has been named MusiCares personof the year. Associated Press Bieber Page

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Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS THURSDAY, JANUARY 3, 2013 3A3A Lake City 183 SW Bascom Norris Dr.G’ville E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunter’s Walk 5115 NW 43rd St. Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St. Shands at UF Room H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Alachua 14759 NW 157th Ln. Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E. Silver Springs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. Summer eld 17950 US Hwy. 441 Tallahassee 1511 Killearn Center Blvd. Apply online atcampuscu.comor call754-9088and press 4 today!Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Columbia a nd Suwannee counties!2APR Fixed1 1. Offer does not apply to existing CAMPUS loans. Offe r is for new loans only. Credit approval, sufficient income, adequate prope rty valuation (maximum LTV of 70%), and first mortg age position are required. Owner-occupied property only. Offer excludes mobile homes; certain other restrictions apply. Property i nsurance is required; an appraisal, flood and/or ti tle insurance may be required at an additional expe nse to the borrower. If loan is paid in full withi n the first 24 months, closing costs paid by CAMPUS will be added to the loan payoff amount. Example: a $105,000 loan at 3.25% for 120 months would require 119 monthly payments of $1,026.27 and one final payment of $1,0 22.09, total finance charge of $18,343.93; for a to tal of payments of $123,151.93. The amount financed is $104,808.00 the APR is 3.288%. APR=Annual Percentag e Rate. 2. Credit approval and initial deposit of $ 5 required. Mention this ad and we’ll waive the $15 new member fee. This credit union is federally insured by the Natio nal Credit Union Administration.% Other rates and terms also available! Bust out of your 30-year mortgage! Free ’n Clear IN10YEARS Q you have 30% or more equity in your home... Q you want to avoid high closing costs ...IFPay off your homein10 years!TOTAL CLOSING COSTS1(Loans of $200,000 or less)10-year FIXED APR1 First Mortgage(Please call for other rates & terms) Apply Now! TAXES: Most Americans will now be paying more Continued From Page 1A UPGRADES: To complex Continued From Page 1A ISSUES: Following ‘cliff’ deal, many left unresolved Continued From Page 1A REACTION: To ‘cliff’ deal Continued From Page 1Abeen able to deal with it,” he said. Alice Kenny, who made a trip from Starke to the Lake City Mall, also said the deal should have been com-pleted before the deadline. “They should have done their job a long time ago, and not let it get to the last minute,” she said. Cindy Roberts, of Union County, said Congress “handled (the fiscal cliff) pitifully.” “I don’t know how they could have handled it better, but that’s why they’re paid the big bucks and not me,” she said. Tasha Holland, 20, of Lake City, said she watched the news last night while the “fiscal cliff” was being debat-ed. Because the maximum amount of money the gov-ernment can borrow (the debt ceiling) will be reached in March, another deal will have to be reached by the Democratically controlled Senate and the Republican-dominated House of Representatives. military. Both parties talk about the need to control spending, but lawmakers don’t want the kinds of chaotic cuts now barreling toward them. Republicans worry that the Pentagon would be hamstrung; Democrats say vital federal programs would be crippled. Federal workers would face furloughs or even layoffs, Americans would see all sorts of government services curtailed, and businesses would feel the pinch of reduced gov-ernment spending.DEBT LIMIT SHOWDOWNAround the same time, the United States would lose its ability to bor-row money to pay its debts, unless Congress acts. That’s a big deal, especially since the government bor-rows about 31 cents of every dollar it spends. The U.S. bumped against its $16.4 trillion borrowing limit Monday, but the Treasury Department is using special accounting measures to avoid default for now. Private economists say those methods could probably stretch through late February or early March. After that, the United States would risk its first-ever default. Hopes of wrapping the issue into the year-end negotiations were dashed, setting up the potential for another standoff. House Speaker John Boehner says any debt increase must be paired with equal spending cuts. Obama says the debt ceiling is too important to negotiate. The last time such a showdown brought the nation close to default, in the summer of 2011, it roiled the financial markets and contributed to Standard & Poor’s decision to strip the U.S. government of its AAA bond rating.A GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN?Yet another deadline looms on March 27. The stopgap measure that funds government activities expires; congressional approval will be needed to keep the government running. It’s another chance to fight over spend-ing. In 2011, the nation came within hours of a partial government shut-down that would have furloughed an estimated 800,000 government work-ers, closed national parks and halted the work of the IRS.THE NATIONAL DEBTThe “fiscal cliff” deadline was originally designed to force lawmak-ers to confront trillion-dollar annual budget deficits that pile the nation’s debts higher each year. As larger and larger numbers of baby boomers receive retirement benefits in coming years, the strain on the budget will be unsustainable. Obama says Medicare’s climbing costs must be addressed to fix this. Republicans want to rein in Medicare, Social Security and other entitle-ment programs more sharply. Many Democratic lawmakers object. And tampering with programs so popular with voters is never easy. The “fiscal cliff” was supposed to be a way to force Washington to confront the long-term debt problem. The next two months will be another opportunity to come up with a plan or dodge the issues again. The tough, unpopular decisions are further complicated by concerns that cutting spending too quickly could damage the nation’s sluggish eco-nomic recovery.WHAT’S DONEThe year-end “fiscal cliff” deadline did inspire compromise between Republicans and Democrats on some hotly debated tax questions. Some of the issues settled: — Payroll taxes are going back up, after being trimmed for two years to help stimulate spending and boost the economy. For most workers, that means paychecks will shrink by 2 percent — another $1,000 for someone earning $50,000 a year. The wealthiest pay a lower share of their income, however, because the Social Security payroll tax applies only to the first $113,700 of earnings. — The top 1 percent are getting socked with higher income tax rates. Income over $400,000 for individuals or $450,000 for couples will be taxed at a top rate of 39.6 percent, up from 35 percent. Everyone else gets to keep their current income tax rates, which date back to the George W. Bush-era tax cuts. — The wealthiest Americans will pay higher taxes on their invest-ments. Rates for their capital gains and dividends are rising from 15 to 20 percent. And the tax on estates worth more than $5 million will go up to 40 percent, from 35 percent. — The alternative minimum tax — designed to keep the wealthy from using loopholes to avoid taxes — will be permanently indexed for inflation so it doesn’t catch millions of middleand upper-middle-income people in its net. — Tax breaks for families with children, college tuition and low-income workers will continue for five years. A diverse group of temporary busi-ness tax breaks were extended for one year. — Emergency federal unemployment benefits to help 2 million people out of work for at least six months will be extended a year. — A scheduled 27 percent cut in Medicare payments to doctors will be held off for a year in what’s become a congressional ritual. Democrats nor Republicans got everything they wanted, this agreement is the right thing to do for our country.” The income threshold covers more than 99 percent of all households, exceeding Obama’s claim, according to the Tax Policy Center. However, the increase in payroll taxes will hit nearly every wage earner. Social Security is financed by a 12.4 percent tax on wages up to $113,700, with employers paying half and workers paying the other half. Obama and Congress reduced the share paid by workers from 6.2 percent to 4.2 percent for 2011 and 2012, saving a typical family about $1,000 a year. Obama pushed hard to enact the payroll tax cut for 2011 and to extend it through 2012. sidewalks, too. Williams said some of the bleachers don’t meet standards of the Americans with Disabilities Act. Improved lighting at some of the fields has also been discussed. The funding for the improvements will most likely come from two sources because there are two kinds of improvements — improvements that will benefit tournament play and improvements that will benefit residents, Williams said. Williams said the funds for tournament improvements should come from the bed tax, while the recre-ational improvements should be paid by the county. The Tourist Development Council has recommended an increase to the bed tax to help pay for the improve-ments. While discussion of improvements to the Southside Recreation Complex is an action item and could come to a vote, Williams said the main focus of the discussion will be to review the history of the project. Also on the agenda, Suwannee Valley Transit Authority Director Gwen Pra is scheduled to speak about the creation of a regional advisory board. The county commission will also discuss $150,000 in repairs to the Columbia County Courthouse pre-cast coping, which has been failing for at least two years. County attorney Marlin Feagle’s opinion is that because precast is considered cosmetic, that limits any action of the board against the contractor. “As a result, the county needs to make the repairs,” Williams wrote to the county commission. He said the $150,000 estimate for the repairs is most likely on the high end. Repairing the precast requires a contractor take the precast off the courthouse and reattach it. “When you’re going into a wall you never know,” Williams said. “We would rather be on the high side than on the low side.” Also, the county will discuss a private road assessment program, which Williams said would standardize the requirements for the county to take responsibility for the maintenance of a private road.

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OPINION Thursday, January 3, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A4AOPINION Islamist threat is second to none Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman T he always dysfunctional 112th Congress saved the worst for last with its desperation deal to avoid the fiscal cliff. The deal will protect more than 99 percent of Americans from higher income taxes, while increasing deficits by some $4 trillion over the next decade, according to the Congressional Budget Office. For anyone who needs reminding, the reason the cliff loomed in the first place was because Congress and the president had failed to meet their own deadline to reduce deficits. Most Democrats in Congress fell in line behind the deal, while Republicans were split. In Florida, Republican Sen. Marco Rubio and 14 of 19 GOP House members voted against it. Republican Rep. Dan Webster of Winter Garden, who opposed the deal, correctly noted that it didn’t even begin to solve the nation’s fiscal problems. The deal raises income taxes on individuals making more than $400,000 a year (and house-holds making more than $450,000) and ends the 2 percent payroll tax holiday for workers. But rather than couple those revenue increases with significant spending reductions — the “balanced approach” that President Obama insisted he want-ed from a deal — it puts across-the-board cuts on hold for another couple of months. That means the table is set for yet another budget showdown in March, when the federal govern-ment will bump up against its borrowing limit. If you were frustrated, frightened or furious with Congress for holding the economy hostage while members jockeyed for partisan advantage, you ain’t seen nothing yet. The deal leaves untouched the biggest drivers of deficits — Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid. Those entitlement programs account for more than 40 percent of federal spending, and their share is growing as America ages and health care costs rise. By keeping those programs out of the deal, the president caved to Democratic absolutists who are just as unreasonable as Republicans who reject all tax hikes. The deal didn’t address the desperate need to reform the nation’s hopelessly complex, loophole-ridden and growth-inhibiting tax code. It actually made the code worse. And lawmakers couldn’t resist using the deal to extend tax breaks for their favorite special interests, including film producers, railroad companies and NASCAR. Obama came into office vowing to be a postpartisan president. That was then. On Monday, with the deal on the fiscal cliff emerging, Obama couldn’t resist needling his Republican rivals in a campaign-style event. That’ll make progress on what’s still undone — spending cuts, the debt ceil-ing, entitlement and tax reform — even more diffi-cult to achieve. Ditto for anything else on the 2013 agenda, from immigration reform to energy policy. Today members of the 113th Congress will be sworn in. They owe it to all Americans to mount a more serious and successful effort to deal with the fiscal problems that threaten the nation’s pros-perity and security. Deal fails to tackle debt Origins of the ‘fiscal cliff’ ANOTHER VIEW Y ou may have wondered how the term “fiscal cliff” came to be coined. Not surprisingly, this phrase lately much in the news was the work of a govern-ment advisory committee. Charged with making the economic situation so bleak and scary that Congress might actually be tempted to do its job, the Metaphor Utilization and Standardization Board was charged with com-ing up with some pithy description of the nation’s economic peril, the better to prompt action. Thus, the fiscal cliff was born. Unfortunately, it had problems from the start. For one thing, it is hard to imagine a fiscal cliff. What is it exactly? Understanding the cliff is not the hard part of the comprehension riddle. After all, we have all seen our share of different cliffs and some of us have fallen off them (alcohol was not involved, Your Honor). There are chalky cliffs, icy cliffs, towering cliffs, jagged cliffs, to name but a few, but until now never a fiscal cliff. What is a fiscal cliff made of? Is it bundles of cash piled to a great height? Is it copies of the IOUs on the debt we owe China, together with a few fortune cookies saying, “You are broke!” Is it a mountain of devalued stocks and bonds? Is it a stack of luxury cars and boats as seen on the Wealth Channel? Is it accountants making a human pyramid? Is it millions of bankers’ brief-cases placed one atop the other? You see the problem. No explanation is given as to the meaning of the fiscal cliff, yet we were invited to be very scared about falling off it. The only good thing about the term is that it’s better than the word “sequestration.” Now there’s a boring word fit only for govern-ment work. Sequestration is definitely not a town in the Pacific Northwest where Sasquatch goes on vacation. That at least would be exciting for the locals. Sequestration means enforced spending cuts that go into effect across the board unless Congress comes up with an alternative — this because a super committee of lawmakers previ-ously wasn’t super enough to leap over a tall building of debt in a single bound. Taken together with taxes going back up to pre-George W. Bush levels if not acted upon, that would be the falling off the fiscal cliff to the valley of mis-ery below. As for me, I would like to do my patriotic part and be scared, but the metaphor of the fiscal cliff has failed me. This is what you get when government committees write meta-phors. Next they will be taking over similes. Congress did something — for once — and the crisis has been avert-ed. But I look at the long term, because I believe in American exceptionalism. I believe that America, despite the exceptional dimwits in Congress, has an exceptional talent for muddling through. My hope is that next time the national under-wear is in a knot the Metaphor Utilization and Standardization Board will listen to private sector suggestions for frighten-ing Congress and the public. (My services are available for a modest commission.) How much more alarming would the situa-tion have been if, instead of the fiscal cliff, the metaphor had been made more potent to the ears of its intended audience? After people got their hopes up that the world was going to end, accord-ing to ancient Mayan calendar-makers, the warn-ing of a fiscal cliff seemed rather insipid. As it was, the fiscal cliff was frightening only to those afraid of heights. But American have tons of different phobias and fears — from being tickled by a feather, to being locked up in a small box with squirrels, to falling into an outhouse pit while in the act of trying to reach for an old Reader’s Digest. Instead of a fiscal cliff, how about warning of a deadline for a feather duster being placed under the armpits of the U.S. economy, or for we the people being placed in an MRI machine infested with ravenous squirrels, or simply for the prospect that the fiscal doo-doo was going to suck everybody under? Now that would have gotten America’s attention and alerted mem-bers of Congress that it was do or die. Happy New Year to all and remember that the choice going forward is either to laugh or to cry. LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com Q Orlando Sentinel R obert D. Kaplan has long been among America’s most insightful analysts of global trends. I would rather argue with him than agree with most others. Right now, I’m going to do a bit of both. In “Toxic Nationalism,” an essay published in the Wall Street Journal last week, Kaplan observes that “Western elites” regard their beliefs as “universal values.” Because they approve of “women’s liberation,” they conclude that all think-ing people from Albania to Zanzibar believe in women’s liberation. Western elites place a pri-ority on “human rights,” assuming that to be the consensus view. Western elites are convinced that international organizations are breaking down the remaining “boundaries separating humanity,” so that must be what they’re doing, and what they seek to do. These are, Kaplan understands, illusions: “In country after country, the Westerners identify like-minded, educated elites and mistake them for the population at large. They prefer not to see the regressive and exclu-sivist forces — such as nationalism and sectarian-ism — that are mightily reshaping the future.” He cites, as an example, Egypt where the hope that decades of dictatorship were giving way to liberal democracy has faded. His explanation: “Freedom, at least in its initial stages, unleashes not only indi-vidual identity but, more crucially, the freedom to identify with a blood-based solidarity group. Beyond that group, feelings of love and humanity do not apply. That is a signal les-son of the Arab Spring.” I think Kaplan is right on all points save one: The Islamists who are coming to power are not a “blood-based solidarity group.” They are a religion-based solidarity group. Egyptian Islamists feel no solidarity with Egyptian Christians despite blood ties tracing back millennia. This is a crucial distinction, one which makes “Western elites,” Kaplan included, profoundly uncomfortable, which is why they ignore or deny it. ... Islamists insist that one’s primary identity is — and must be — based on religion, not nationality, not citizenship, not race, not class. More to the point, they demand that their religion be acknowl-edged as superior to all others. They are commit-ted to making their reli-giously derived ideology the basis for revolutionary transformation not only in the so-called Muslim world but also in Africa, Asia, Europe, the United States — anywhere there are Muslims who can be enlisted into the struggle. As Hassan al-Banna, founder of the Muslim Brotherhood, famously put it: “It is the nature of Islam to dominate, not to be dominated, to impose its law on all nations and to extend its power to the entire planet.” They see the global map not as fractured into blood-based nations squabbling over “space” but divided into just two spheres: the Dar al-Islam, the realm where Muslims rule, and the Dar al-Harb, where infidels still hold power and must be fought and, in time, decisively defeated so that the Dar al-Islam can become uni-versal. That said, there may be conceptual utility in Kaplan’s vision of a global “battle between two epic forces: Those of integra-tion based on civil society and human rights, and those of exclusion based on race, blood and radical-ized faith.” ... By calling attention to a dangerous reality to which Western elites are closing their eyes, Kaplan has rendered a service. But there’s more to it than he’s acknowledged and less time than we might like to get it in focus. Reg Henryrhenry@post-gazette.com Q Reg Henry is a columnist for the Pittsburgh PostGazette. Cliff May Q Clifford D. May is president of the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies, a policy insti-tute focusing on terrorism.

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Mary King AmbrosMrs. Mary King Ambros, 91 of Lake City, passed away on Monday, December 31, 2012 at the Lake City Medical Center. She was born in Roda, Virginia to the late William Lawrence and Stella Greer King and had lived in Lake City since 2001 having moved here from Zeph-yrhills. Mrs. Ambros was a licensed cosmetologist for many years and she enjoyed oil paint-ing, geneaology and helping those in need. She is a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints and attended the Can-non Creek Ward in Lake City.Survivors include her husband, Joseph S. Ambros, Lake City; two sons, Steve Junior Veres, Detroit, MI and Joseph Vic-tor Ambros (Stephanie), Lake City; four sisters, Margaret Ivy, Little Rock, AR, Maria Sexton, Lincoln Park, MI, Jean Vallus, Gaylord, MI and Ruth Bjiorn-holn, Zephyrhills, FL; ten grandchildren, seventeen great grandchildren and eight great-great grandchildren also survive.Funeral services will be con-ducted on Friday, January 4 at 11:00 AM at the Church of Je-sus Christ of Latter Day Saints Cannon Creek Ward on Sister’s Welcome Road with Bishop Gary Hart conducting. Inter-ment will follow at Oak Grove Cemetery in Union County, FL. Visitation with the family will be Thursday evening from 6-8:00 PM at the funeral home. Arrangements are under the direction of GUERRY FUNERAL HOME Lake City. Please sign the guestbook at www. guerryfuneralhome.net.Alma Blue Mother Alma Blue (Big Mama), lifelong resident of Baker Coun-ty, passed away December 25, 2012 after a brief illness. Mrs. Blue, 85 was born December 3, 1927 in Sanderson, FL. to Lillie Givens and Greylon Jefferson. Both preceded her in death. She retired from Northeast Florida State Hospital after 24 years of employment. Mother Blue was married to the love of her life, Ozell Blue, Sr. for forty-sev-en years. He also preceded her in death. Mother blue loved quilt-ing, spreading the love of God and spending time with her grandchildren and great-grand-children. Loving memories will be kept by her children: Vasttee Blue, Ozell Blue, Jr. (Margret), Minnie Floyd, Annie Thompson (Willie), Ricky Blue (Debra), Bruce Blue, Mary Clayton (Al-vin), Gloria Jefferson (Charles), Lucy Givens, Nancy Williams, Catha Blue, Carmen Cummings ( LeLucious), Bobbie Blue, Sr., Connie Williams (Elvis), Gwen-dolyn Blue; grandsons, Darian and Bobbie Blue; (62) grand-children; (78) great-grandchil-dren; (9) great great-grandchil-dren; sisters, Fannie M. Johns, Lillie Jones, Mary Simmons, Lucille Gordon; brothers, Robert Heard, Samuel Heard, Theotis Jefferson, Amos Jefferson, Alvin Jefferson; host of nieces, neph-ews, other relatives and friends. Funeral services for Mother Alma Blue will be 12:00 noon Saturday, January 5, 2013 at Emmanuel Church of God In Christ, Macclenny, FL. El-der Joe Nathan Ruise, Pastor. The family will receive friends from 6:00 – 8:00 p.m. Friday, January 4, 2013 at The Church of God By Faith, Sanderson, FL. Elder Alvin Armstrong, Jr. Pastor. Arrangements entrusted to COMBS FUNERAL HOME 292 NE Washington Street. Lake City, FL. (386) 752-4366. Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D. “The Caring Professionals” Willie C. McGowan Willie C. McGowan passed away December 20, 2012 in Jacksonville, Florida. He was born September 4, 1988. Willie graduated from Ed White High School in Jacksonville, where he was a starting quarter back on the football team. Draw-ing was his favorite pastime. Left to share memories: mother, Sylvonia Henderson; fathers, Nathaniel Wright and Willie C. McGowan, Sr.; siblings, Nathaniel, Nagee, Jamon, Ja-von, Devontae, Ronetta, Nake-sha, Nalani, Naquadree, Ahmed, Dallas, Rakeria, Ronyea and Willie; grandparents, Johnnie M. Henderson, Willie M. Wright and Nathaniel Wright, Sr.; special friend, Daylesha; host of aunts, uncles, oth-er relatives and friends. Funeral services for Willie C. McGowan will be held January 5, 2013 in Jacksonville, Florida. Viewing and Interment will be 1:00 p.m. Saturday, January 5, 2013 at the Garden of Rest Cemetery, Lake City, FL. Local arrangements entrusted to COMBS FUNERAL HOME 292 NE Washington Street. Lake City, FL. (386) 752-4366. Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D. “The Caring Professionals” Leslie R. ProuseLeslie R. Prouse, 70, of Lee, FL passed away on Monday, December 31, 2012 after a short illness. The Ipswich, South Dakota native moved to Lee, FL in 1998 from Spring Hill, FL. Mr. Prouse was a Veteran of the United States Air Force and was of Presbyterian faith.Mr. Prouse is survived by his wife of 44 years: Ruth Prouse, Lee, FL; Three daughters: Teresa (Dean) Prouse, New Port Richie, FL, Rebecca (Keith) Ackles, Spring Hill, FL and Kimberly (Joseph) Klukowski, Brooksville, FL; Three sisters: Leona Volk, Aberdeen, South Dakota, Raye Lynn Erickson, Lisbon, North Dakota and Mar-garet DeYoung, Fon Du Lac, WI; Seven grandchildren and one great grandchild.DANIELS FUNERAL HOME & CREMATORY, INC. of Live Oak and Branford, FL is in charge of arrangements.Emma Lou (Herlong) WorthEmma Lou (Herlong) Worth died suddenly at her home in Lake City, FL, on the afternoon of December 31, 2012. She was born September 2, 1925, in Jasper, FL, and attended public schools in Columbia County. In 1947, Mrs. Worth earned a Bachelor’s Degree in Social Studies and Education from the Florida State College for Women (now FSU). She then returned to Lake City and became a social worker for the Department of Public Welfare, where she met Hal McMahan Worth, a native of Sevierville, TN. They wed December 4, 1948. The Worths were married for 63 years, and reared two children as well as two grandchildren. Their devotion and deep love re-mained palatable throughout their lives, and still serves as a model and inspiration of what a true partnership can achieve. Once her children were in school, Mrs. Worth began her teaching career. From 1957 to 1982, she taught the third, IRXUWKDQGIWKJUDGHVLQ&R lumbia County; the stories and success of her students remained an important source of pride and happiness throughout her life. Mrs. Worth was an attentive mother and grandmother, a member of the First United Methodist Church, and a Silver Sister of the local chapter of Alpha Delta Kappa. She loved gardening, reading, local history, and retreating to the family’s cabin on the Santa Fe River. After retirement, she and her husband became avid travelers, and alongside their dear friends the Colsons, MacCalebs, and others, they visited 49 states and Canada. She will be remembered for her deep convictions and en-thusiasm for the simple joys of life, her loyal friendship, and the stability and caring home she made for her entire family. Mrs. Worth was preceded in death by her loving parents, Wil-liam Vastine “Willie” Herlong and Marietta Floyd (Ellis) Her-long. She is survived by her son George W. “Bill” Worth (Linda) of Chesapeake, VA; Betsey (Worth) Ward (Larry) of Lake City, FL; 4 grandchildren: Jacob Hill, Ginger Hill, Stefanie Ward-Cerny (Mark); and Kelly Rippard (Jason); and 2 great grandchil-dren: Alyssa Hill and Emma Hill. ,QOLHXRIRZHUVGRQDWLRQVPD\be made to “Outreach Minis-tries,” First United Methodist Church, 973 S. Marion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025; or the ADK Scholarship Fund, 409 NW Zack Drive, Lake City, FL 32055. Visitation and memorial services are pending. Arrange-ments are under the direction of GATEWAY-FORESTLAWN FUNERAL HOME AND CREMATORY, INC. 3596 S. US Hwy 441, Lake City, FL (386-752-1954). LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, JANUARY 3, 2013 5A5A White’s Trucking Services For more information or a quote please call 386-362-8763 or e-mail us at whitestruckingservice@gmail.com or visit our website at www.whitestruckingservice.weebly.comNeed somelthing hauled call us:Fill DirtLime RockAsphaltMillingsGraniteRoad RockMisc. Hauling to meet your needsSemi Services also availableYou Call & We Haul! Obituaries are paid advertise-ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporter’s classified department at 752-1293. OBITUARIES COMMUNITY CALENDAR Q To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr@lakecityreporter.com.Jan 3.Medicare informationSHINE will present a program to inform seniors about Medicare from 10 a.m. to noon at the Jasper Public Library. For more information, call (800) 262-2243.Jan. 6Zumba introductionA free introduction to Zumba class will be held from 3 to 4 p.m. at the Teen Town Recreation Building, 533 NW DeSoto St. For more information, contact Sarah Sandlin as (386) 758-0009 or visit “Lake City Zumba” on Facebook.Zumba weight lossThe Lake City Zumba Loser weight-loss contest will begin at 4 p.m. at the Teen Town Recreation Building, 533 NW DeSoto St. For more information, contact Sarah Sandlin as (386) 758-0009 or visit “Lake City Zumba” on Facebook.Jan. 8Medicare seminarLifeStyle Enrichment Center is sponsoring a free Medicare seminar from 5 to 6 p.m. The semi-nar will be moderated by Irv Crowetz of C/C & Associates. Subjects to be covered include: what you need to know about Medicare, when to enroll, what’s covered and when a supplement is needed. Call 755-3476 ext. 107 to reserve a seat.Jan. 9Newcomers meetingThe Lake City Newcomers will meet at 11 a.m. at Guang Dong Chinese Restaurant in the Lake City Mall. Lunch costs $11. Sale of 50-50 tickets will end at 11:25. The guest speaker will be Leandra “Lily” Johnson, the first female judge in the Third Judicial Circuit. For more information, call Barbara Test at 754-7227 or Rose Taylor at 755-2175.Medicare informationSHINE will present a program to inform seniors about Medicare from 1:30 tpo 3:30 p.m. at the Lake City Public Library on Columbia Avenue. For more information, call (800) 262-2243.Jan. 10Builders AssociationThe Columbia County Builders Association will hold it’s first General Council lunch at 11:30 a.m. at Guang Dong res-taurant in the Lake City Mall. The meeting will start at noon.The speaker will be Columbia County Superintendent of Schools Terry Huddleston. If you are considering joining our builders association, this is a good time to join us for lunch, meet our members and learn more of what we are all about. Cost of lunch for members is $12 and non-members fee is $15. A HammerClaw jackpot is now $275. To make a reser-vation or for more informa-tion, emai colcountybuild@comcast.net or phone (386) 867-1998.Medicare informationSHINE will present a program to inform seniors about Medicare from 9 a.m. to noon at the TOPS Health Fair at First Advent Christian Church, Live Oak, and from 1:30 tp 3:30 p.m. at Live Oak City Hall. For more information, call (800) 262-2243.DAR meetingThe Edward Rutledge Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution will hold its monthly meet-ing at 10:30 a. m. at the LifeStyle Enrichment Center, 28 SE Allison Court (off Baya Avenue). Kathleen Cooper will be speaking about Lyme dis-ease. Visitors are welcome. Garden Club to meetLake City Garden Club will meet at the Clubhouse, 257 SE Hernando Ave. Social time will begin at 9:30 a.m., and the meeting will start at 10. Jo Carver will give a talk about landscaping.Jan. 11History programActor Chaz Mena will perform a program, “Claiming La Florida for King and Cross,” at 6:30 p.m. at the Columbia County Main Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave. Mena will portray Pedro Menendez de Aviles, the founder of St. Augustine and first Spanish gover-nor of Florida. Tickets are required, and are avail-able free of charge at any county library location. Funding for the program was provided by the Florida Humanities Council and the state Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs, as part of the 500th anniversary of the state’s founding.Jan. 12Chili cook-offThe fourth annual Branford Chili Cook-off will be from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hatch Park on Craven Street in Branford. The event will include a silent auction for adults and kids, door prizes, live music, an antique car show, moon walk, Home Depot Kids Workshop and a variety of homemade chili. Admission is $5 and includes all the chili you can eat. Proceeds will benefit Herry’s Kids Pediatric Services, a pro-gram of Hospice of the Nature Coast. To register to compete in the chili cook-off, call the hospice at (386) 755-7714 or vist online at www.hospiceof citrus.org.Gospel sing, supperA gospel sing and potluck supper will be held to celebrate Mary Lou Flynn Lasseter’s 75th birthday, beginning at 6 p.m. at Lee Worship Center Church Fellowship Hall, 471 SE Magnolia Drive in Lee. Supper will be at 6 p.m., and the open-mic gospel sing will start at 7. To con-firm attendance or for more information, call Brenda Lasseter McCormick at (850) 869-9976.Jan. 13Music concertThe Ball Brothers will perform a free concert at 6 p.m. at Wellborn Baptist Church. The church is on U.S. 90 West between Lake City and Live Oak at the intersection of Lowe Lake Road in Wellborn. A love offering for the group will be received.Jan. 14SCORE workshopSCORE of Lake City will hold a free entrepreneurs’ interactive workshop from 6 to 8 p.m. at Columbia County Library at 308 NW Columbia Ave.. Participants will have an opportunity to meet other entrepreneurs, get advice and receive free educational materials from the federal Small Business Administration and other sources. Participants also will be able to arrange one-on-one business coun-seling with SCORE volun-teers. To reserve a seat, call (386) 752-2000 or email scorelakecity@gmail.com.Jan. 15Pageant entriesToday is the deadline for contestants to enter the 2013 Olustee Festival Pageant. The pageant is open to girls ages 3 months to 20 years who live in or attend school in Baker, Columbia, Gilcrist, Hamilton, Union and Suwannee counties. Age divisions are 3 to 12 months, 13 to 23 months, 2 to 3 years, 4 to 6 years, 7 to 9 years, 10 to 12 years, 13 to 15 years and 16 to 20 years. The pageant awards include educational schol-arships, trophies, crowns and banners. Winners will ride in the Olustee Festival parade. The pageant will be held Jan. 26 at the Columbia County Schools Administrative Complex. Applications may be obtained at the Columbia County Library, the Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of Commerce, Emily Taber Library, Suwannee Regional Library, Hamilton County Library or by contacting Elaine Owens at (386) 965-2787.Jan. 16Olustee planningThe Blue-Grey Army will meet at 5:30 p.m. to plan the Olustee Battle Festival. The meeting will be at the school district central building, room 153, 409 SW St. Johns St.Jan. 18Medicare informationSHINE will present a program to inform seniors about Medicare from 10 a.m. to noon at the Branford Public Library. For more information, call (800) 262-2243.Jan. 19Chili cook-offThe Lake DeSoto Farmers Market will have its second annual chili cook-off during market hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Funds raised from the sale of chili sam-ples will benefit Church of the Way. Registration is $10, and there will be a cash prize for the win-ner. For registration infor-mation and contest rules, visit online at market.lcfla.com. The farmers market is held along Lake DeSoto between the Columbia County Courthouse and Shands Lakeshore Hospital in downtown Lake City. For more information, call (386) 719-5766 or visit market.lcfla.com.MLK Jr. programThe Columbia County Branch of NAACP will hold its 30th annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. pro-gram at 4 p.m. at Mount Pisgah AME Church, 529 NE Washington St. Judge Julian Collins will be key-note speaker. The NAACP choir, directed by Dr. Tony Buzzella, will perform.Jan. 20Bridal showThe third annual Your Perfect Day Bridal Show will be from noon to 4 p.m. at the Holiday Inn and Suites, 213 SW Commerce Drive. The show will include a variety of local vendors focused on bridal fashions, weddings and related activi-ties. There also will be door prizes, complimentary food and a cash bar. Tickets are $5 in advance or $7 at the door. Tickets may be pur-chased at the Holiday Inn and Suites. For ticket sales and vendor information, all Amanda Daye at (386) 754-1411.Jan. 23Medicare informationSHINE will present a program to inform seniors about Medicare from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. at theLifeStyle Enrichment Center in Lake City. For more information, call (800) 262-2243.Jan. 26Olustee pageantThe 2013 Olustee Festival pageant will be held in the Columbia County Schools Administrative Complex on West Duval Street (U.S. 90) in Lake City. Competition for girls age 3 months to 9 years old will be at 4 p.m. Competition for girls 10 to 20 old will begin at 7 p.m. Contestants will be judged in beauty, sports-wear, talent and photoge-nic categories. For more information, contact Elaine Owens at (386) 965-2787. Winners will ride in the Olustee Festival parade on Feb. 16.Jan. 27History programArchaeologist Barbara Hines, of the Florida Public Archaeology Network, will give a brief overview of the Spanish in Florida at 2 p.m. in the Columbia County Main Library at 308 NW Columbia Ave.

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6A LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS THURSDAY, JANUARY 3, 2013 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04246A Team Totals 1st Pinemount 40 pts2nd Columbia City 30 pts3rd Westside 28 pts4th Eastside 26 pts5th Summers 21 pts6th Melrose Park 16 pts 7th Five Points 11 pts 8th Niblack 7 pts Event Results 3-3-3 Relay Pinemount 1.28.00*Summers 1.39.48Columbia City 1.42.28Five Points 1.46.68Westside 1.47.13Melrose Park 1.49.75Eastside 1.57.60Niblack 2.24.47 3-6-3 Relay Pinemount 1.45.69*Columbia City 1.52.56 Westside 1.55.47Eastside 1.57.22Summers 2.12.47Five Points 2.18.68Melrose Park 2.21.15Niblack 2.23.41 6-6 Relay Pinemount 1.39.90*Eastside 1.57.18Westside 2.05.83Columbia City 2.10.46Summers 2.11.40Melrose Park 2.13.00Niblack 2.22.18Five Points 2.24.50 1-10-1 Relay Pinemount 1.48.78*Westside 2.25.47Eastside 2.31.65Columbia City 2.36.22Melrose Park 2.37.31Summers 2.41.78Five Points 3.18.00 Niblack 4.16.22 Cycle Relay Pinemount 4.11.86*Columbia City 5.09.86Eastside 5.09.97Westside 5.38.46Melrose Park 5.48.00Summers 6.12.69Five Points 7.30.52Niblack 7.43.93 Individual Results Cycle Gyro de los Trinos Summers 10.40 Grace Duncan Pinemount 10.68 Kurstan Cheek Pinemount 11.38Kyle Booher Eastside 11.66 Kaleb White Pinemount 11.90 3-6-3 Amaria Bowles Melrose Park 5.25 6-6 Kaylee Hollingsworth Pinemount 3.80 Individual Stacking Times Cycle Westside Kaylin Claycomb 12.22 Mason Gray 12.93Cadence Mirra 12.34 Grayson Martin 13.72Seth Rutledge 13.06 Caroline Lewis 14.08Wittleigh Summerlin 15.08 Zack Shaw 14.41Hunter Shoup 15.77 Jenna Burns 22.53SummersTaylor Ivery 16.61 Gyro de los Trinos 10.40 Ja’Kiel Harris 16.97 John Saucer 11.78Ja’Nairee McQueen 18.03 Lucy Geibeig 16.91Jamaceha Sheppard 18.09 Isabella Moranto 16.97 Taniya Griffin 19.00 Garrison Land 19.15EastsideGrace Duncan 10.68 Kyle Booher 11.66Kurstan Cheek 11.38 Eyona Williams 13.47Kaleb White 11.90 Britinee Battles 14.40 Cayla Chauncey 12.34 Bryar Burnham 15.43Kaylee Brock 13.16 Asherah Collins 15.93 Melrose Park Kaylin Baisden 13.46 Lorenzo AzuaraAguilera 12.52Shannon Love 14.31 Cheyenne Gilbreath 13.27Dakota Corby 17.59 Chas Hill 13.27Tahj Fennell 18.43 Autara Horne 14.38Samantha Corby 18.44 Jacob Pauells 17.52 6-6 Amaria Bowles Melrose Park 5.25Kaylee Hollingsworth Pinemount 3.80 Aaron Byrnes Columbia City5.36Simone Ellis Columbia City 4.47 Stephanie Wells Eastside 5.53Asia Wilds Niblack 4.69Kyria Paphides Summers 5.69Kaylyn Baisden Five Points 4.71Trevoreon Mitchell Niblack 5.94Kierstan Tracy Westside 4.99Gracelyn Davi Five Points 6.00Mitchell Steele Eastside 5.35Finley Tucker Pinemount 6.02 Gi Gi Rivas Summers 5.50 Gracey Rogers Westside 6.21Natalie Nelson Melrose Park 7.65 (Editor’s note: Results shown as provided. Some may be missing or incomplete.) COURTESY PHOTOSTeams from Columbia County’s eight elementary schools — about 150 students in all — took part in the annual cup stacking competition held in Florida Gateway College’s H oward Conference Center. The competition included a variety of re lays, which were scored on the basis of time and precis ion. Countywide Speed Stacking Competition Results STUDENTS STACK UPScenes from the Countywide Speed Stacking Competition held Dec 14. at Florida Gateway College.COURTESY PHOTOSABOVE LEFT: Students show a wide range of emotions as they watch one phase of the competition. ABOVE RIGHT: Members of the Pinemount Elementary School team let out a cheer as they celebrate their overall victory in the competition. Pi nemount won all five relay events on its way to a 10-poi nt margin over second-place Columbia City Elementary. On school tour, Sandy Hook parents thank teachersBy DAVE COLLINS and PAT EATON-ROBBAssociated PressMONROE, Conn. — On a tour Wednesday of his daughter’s new school, Vinny Alvarez took a moment to thank her third-grade teacher, who protected the class from a rampaging gunman by locking her classroom door and keeping the children in a corner. Alvarez was one of many Sandy Hook Elementary School parents expressing gratitude to the teach-ers during an open house at their school in the neighboring town of Monroe, where their children are resuming classes Thursday for the first time since the Dec. 14 shooting that left 20 students and six educators dead. Alvarez said each student received a gift box with a toy inside and he expressed thanks to the teacher, Courtney Martin, who kept her door locked until it was safe to leave the building. “Everybody there thanked her in their own way,” he said. Newtown Superintendent of Schools Janet Robinson announced that the Sandy Hook staff decided that the students’ new school, the former Chalk Hill Middle School in Monroe, would be renamed Sandy Hook Elementary School. “That’s who they are. They’re the Sandy Hook family,” Robinson said after a news conference at a park in Monroe a few miles from the school. She added that renaming the Chalk Hill school will allow staff and students to keep “their identity and a comfort level.” The school where the shootings occurred remains closed and guarded by police. Newtown officials haven’t decided yet on the building’s future. The gunman, Adam Lanza, also killed his mother at the home they shared in Newtown before the school shootings, which ended when Lanza fatally shot himself as police arrived. Police haven’t released any details about a motive. Numerous police officers on Wednesday guarded the outside of the Monroe school, which is about 7 miles from the old school, and told reporters to stay away. “I think right now it has to be the safest school in America,” Monroe police Lt. Keith White said. Teachers attended staff meetings at the new school on Wednesday morning and were visited by Gov. Dannel P. Malloy before the open house, White said. Robinson said Chalk Hill School has been transformed into a “cheerful” place for the surviving students to resume normal school routines. She said mental health counselors continue to be available for anyone who needs them. Donna Page, a retired Sandy Hook principal, will lead the new school. During the open house on Wednesday, Alvarez said his 8-year-old daughter also got to pick out a stuffed animal to take home from the school library. “I’m not worried about her going back,” he said of his daugh-ter Cynthia. “The fear kind of kicks back in a little bit, but we’re very excited for her and we got to see many, many kids today. The atmosphere was very cheerful.” Several signs welcoming the Sandy Hook students to their new school were posted along the road leading to the school in a rural, mostly residential neighborhood. One said “Welcome Sandy Hook Elementary Kids,” while a simi-lar sign added “You are in our prayers.” Teams of workers, many of them volunteers, prepared the Chalk Hill school with fresh paint and new furniture and even raised bathroom floors so the smaller elementary school students can reach the toilets. The students’ desks, backpacks and other belongings that were left behind following the shooting were taken to the new school to make them feel at home. Counselors say it’s important for children to get back to a nor-mal routine and for teachers and parents to offer sensitive reassur-ances. When classes start, Robinson said teachers will try to make it as normal a school day as possible for the children. “We want to get back to teaching and learning,” she said. “We will obviously take time out from the academics for any conver-sations that need to take place, and there will be a lot of support there.”

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Soul singer Bobby Womack diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease NEW YORK — Bobby Womack has been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame member told the BBC in a recent interview the diagnosis comes after he began having difficulty remem-bering his songs and the names of people he’s worked with. A spokeswoman did not immediately reply to a message left by the Associated Press. The soul singer has cut a wide path through the music business as a per-former and songwriter in his 50-year career and recently launched another act with “The Bravest Man in the Universe,” the Damon Albarn-produced comeback album that recently made several best-of lists. Alzheimer’s is a degenerative brain disease characterized by memory loss. It’s the latest health problem for the 68-year-old singer, who’s also been fighting cancer and other maladies.Indiana hospital fires eight workers who refused flu shots GOSHEN, Ind. — A northern Indiana hospital has fire d eight employees who refused to get flu shots under a new policy intended to protect patients from the potent ially deadly illness. IU Health Goshen Hospital officials told its staff in September that flu shots would no longer be optiona l for staff, affiliated physicians, volunteers and vendor s. Hospital spokeswoman Melanie McDonald told The Elkhart Truth that the new requirements came as a recommendation from the U.S. Centers for Disease Contr ol and Prevention, the American Medical Association an d other major health agencies. McDonald said patients with compromised immune systems are at a heightened risk for illness and de ath from the flu and protecting them is the hospital’s “top priority.” Kansas agency trying to make sperm donor pay child support TOPEKA, Kan. — A Kansas man who donated sperm to a lesbian couple after answering an online ad is fight-ing the state’s efforts to suddenly force him to pay child support for the now 3-year-old girl, arguing that he and the women signed an agreement waiving all of his parental rights. The case hinges on the fact that no doctors were used for the artificial insemination. The state argues that because William Marotta didn’t work through a clinic or doctor, as required by state law, he can be held respon-sible for about $6,000 that the child’s biological mother received through public assistance — as well as future child support. Angela de Rocha, spokeswoman for the Kansas Department for Children and Families, said that when a single mother seeks benefits for a child, it’s routine for the department to try to determine the child’s paternity and require the father to make support payments. Marotta, a 46-year-old Topeka resident, answered an online ad in 2009 from a local couple, Angela Bauer and Jennifer Schreiner, who said they were seeking a sperm donor. After exchanging emails and meeting, the three signed an agreement relieving Marotta of any financial or paternal responsibility. But instead of working with a doctor, Marotta agreed to drop off a container with his sperm at the couple’s home and the women successfully handled the artificial insemination themselves. By MARILYNN MARCHIONEAP Chief Medical WriterThe kind of blood clot in the skull that doctors say Hillary Rodham Clinton has is relatively uncom-mon but can occur after an injury like the fall and con-cussion the secretary of state was diagnosed with earlier this month. Doctors said Monday that an MRI scan revealed a clot in a vein in the space between the brain and the skull behind Clinton’s right ear. The clot did not lead to a stroke or neurological damage and is being treat-ed with blood thinners, and she will be released once the proper dose is worked out, her doctors said in a statement. Clinton has been at New York-Presbyterian Hospital since Sunday, when the clot was diagnosed during what the doctors called a routine follow-up exam. At the time, her spokesman would not say where the clot was located, leading to speculation it was another leg clot like the one she suffered behind her right knee in 1998. Clinton had been diagnosed with a concussion Dec. 13 after a fall in her home that was blamed on a stomach virus that left her weak and dehydrated. The type of clot she developed, a sinus venous thrombosis, “certainly isn’t the most common thing to happen after a concussion” and is one of the few types of blood clots in the skull or head that are treated with blood thinners, said neurologist Dr. Larry Goldstein. He is director of Duke University’s stroke center and has no role in Clinton’s care or personal knowledge of it. The area where Clinton’s clot developed is “a drain-age channel, the equiva-lent of a big vein inside the skull — it’s how the blood gets back to the heart,” Goldstein explained. It should have no longterm consequences if her doctors are saying she has suffered no neurological damage from it, he said. Dr. Joseph Broderick, chairman of neurology at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, also called Clinton’s problem “relatively uncommon” after a concussion. He and Goldstein said the problem often is over-diagnosed. They said scans often show these large “draining pipes” on either side of the head are different sizes, which can mean blood has pooled or can be merely an anatomi-cal difference. “I’m sure she’s got the best doctors in the world looking at her,” and if they are saying she has no neu-rological damage, “I would think it would be a pretty optimistic long-term out-come,” Broderick said. A review article in the New England Journal of Medicine in 2005 describes the condition, which more often occurs in newborns or young people but can occur after a head injury. With modern treatment, more than 80 percent have a good neurologic out-come, the report says. In the statement, Clinton’s doctors said she “is making excellent prog-ress and we are confident she will make a full recov-ery. She is in good spirits, engaging with her doctors, her family, and her staff.” By MARILYNN MARCHIONEAP Medical WritersThis is your brain on sugar — for real. Scientists have used imaging tests to show for the first time that fructose, a sugar that saturates the American diet, can trigger brain changes that may lead to overeating. After drinking a fructose beverage, the brain doesn’t register the feeling of being full as it does when simple glucose is con-sumed, researchers found. It’s a small study and does not prove that fructose or its rela-tive, high-fructose corn syrup, can cause obesity, but experts say it adds evidence they may play a role. These sugars often are added to processed foods and beverages, and consumption has risen dramatically since the 1970s along with obesity. A third of U.S. children and teens and more than two-thirds of adults are obese or overweight. All sugars are not equal — even though they contain the same amount of calories — because they are metabolized different-ly in the body. Table sugar is sucrose, which is half fructose, half glucose. High-fructose corn syrup is 55 percent fructose and 45 percent glucose. Some nutri-tion experts say this sweetener may pose special risks, but oth-ers and the industry reject that claim. And doctors say we eat too much sugar in all forms. For the study, scientists used magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, scans to track blood flow in the brain in 20 young, normal-weight people before and after they had drinks containing glu-cose or fructose in two sessions several weeks apart. Scans showed that drinking glucose “turns off or suppresses the activity of areas of the brain that are critical for reward and desire for food,” said one study leader, Yale University endocri-nologist Dr. Robert Sherwin. With fructose, “we don’t see those changes,” he said. “As a result, the desire to eat continues — it isn’t turned off.” What’s convincing, said Dr. Jonathan Purnell, an endocrinolo-gist at Oregon Health & Science University, is that the imaging results mirrored how hungry the people said they felt, as well as what earlier studies found in ani-mals. “It implies that fructose, at least with regards to promoting food intake and weight gain, is a bad actor compared to glucose,” said Purnell. He wrote a commen-tary that appears with the feder-ally funded study in Wednesday’s Journal of the American Medical Association. Researchers now are testing obese people to see if they react the same way to fructose and glu-cose as the normal-weight people in this study did. What to do? Cook more at home and limit processed foods containing fructose and high-fructose corn syrup, Purnell sug-gested. “Try to avoid the sugar-sweetened beverages. It doesn’t mean you can’t ever have them,” but control their size and how often they are consumed, he said. A second study in the journal suggests that only severe obesity carries a high death risk — and that a few extra pounds might even provide a survival advan-tage. However, independent experts say the methods are too flawed to make those claims. The study comes from a federal researcher who drew contro-versy in 2005 with a report that found thin and normal-weight people had a slightly higher risk of death than those who were overweight. Many experts criticized that work, saying the researcher — Katherine Flegal of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — painted a misleading picture by including smokers and people with health problems ranging from cancer to heart disease. Those people tend to weigh less and therefore make pudgy people look healthy by comparison. Flegal’s new analysis bolsters her original one, by assessing nearly 100 other studies covering Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, JANUARY 3, 2013 7A7AHEALTH ASSOCIATED PRESSHigh fructose corn syrup is listed as an ingredient on a can of soda. Scientists have used imaging tests to show for the first time that fructose, a sugar that saturates the Ameri can diet, can trigger brain changes that may lead to overeating. The findings, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association on Tuesday, are from a small study and do not prove that fructose or its relative, high-fructose corn syrup, can cause obesity, but experts say it adds evidence they may play a role. ASSOCIATED PRESSDoctors treating Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton for a blood clot in her head said blood thinners are b eing used to dissolve the clot and they are confident she will make a full recovery. Study: Fructose may spur overeatingScientists discover sugar may cause changes to brain. Clinton’s blood clot uncommon complication after concussion HEALTH BRIEFS STUDY continued on 8A Womack Q Associated Press

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New Patient Exam and Necessary X-rays DO150, DO330 First-time patient Reg. $136 $ 29 SAVINGS OF $107 Expires January 31, 2013 ASPEN DENTAL GROUP FDA approves new tuberculosis drug By MATTHEW PERRONE AP Health Writer WASHINGTON The Food and Drug Administration on Monday approved a Johnson & Johnson tuberculosis drug that is the first new med icine to fight the deadly infection in more than four decades. The agency approved J&Js pill, Sirturo, for use with older drugs to fight a hard-to-treat strain of tuberculosis that has not responded to other medica tions. However, the agency cautioned that the drug carries risks of potentially deadly heart problems and should be prescribed care fully by doctors. Roughly one-third of the worlds population is estimated to be infected with the bacteria causing tuberculosis. The disease is rare in the U.S., but kills about 1.4 million people a year worldwide. Of those, about 150,000 succumb to the increasingly common drug-resistant forms of the disease. About 60 percent of all cases are concentrat ed in China, India, Russia and Eastern Europe. Sirturo, known chemi cally as bedaquiline, is the first medicine specifically designed for treating multi drug-resistant tuberculosis. Thats a form of the disease that cannot be treated with at least two of the four pri mary antibiotics used for tuberculosis. The standard drugs used to fight the disease were developed in the 1950s and 1960s. The antibiotics used to treat it have been around for at least 40 years and so the bacterium has become more and more resistant to what we have, said Chrispin Kambili, global medical affairs leader for J&Js Janssen division. The drug carries a boxed warning indicating that it can interfere with the hearts electrical activity, potentially leading to fatal heart rhythms. Sirturo provides muchneeded treatment for patients who have dont have other therapeutic options available, said Edward Cox, director of the FDAs antibacterial drugs office. However, because the drug also carries some significant risks, doctors should make sure they use it appropriately and only in patients who dont have other treatment options. Nine patients taking Sirturo died in company testing compared with two patients taking a placebo. Five of the deaths in the Sirturo group seemed to be related to tuberculosis, but no explanation was appar ent for the remaining four. Despite the deaths, the FDA approved the drug under its accelerated approval program, which allows the agency to clear innovative drugs based on promising preliminary results. Last week, the consum er advocacy group Public Citizen criticized that approach, noting the drugs outstanding safety issues. The fact that bedaqui line is part of a new class of drug means that an increased level of scrutiny should be required for its approval, the group states. But the FDA had not yet answered concerns related to unexplained increases in toxicity and death in patients getting the drug. The FDA said it approved the drug based on two mid-stage studies enroll ing 440 patients taking Sirturo. Both studies were designed to measure how long it takes patients to be free of tuberculosis. ASSOCIATED PRESS The Food and Drug Administration on Monday approved a tuberculosis drug manufactured by Johnson and Johnson that is the first new medicine to fight the deadly infection in more than four decades. New medicine is first in 40 years against disease. almost 2.9 million people around the world. She again concludes that very obese people had the high est risk of death but that overweight people had a 6 percent lower mortality rate than thinner people. She also concludes that mildly obese people had a death risk similar to that of normal-weight people. Critics again have focused on her methods. This time, she included people too thin to fit what some consider to be nor mal weight, which could have taken in people ema ciated by cancer or other diseases, as well as smok ers with elevated risks of heart disease and cancer. Some portion of those thin people are actually sick, and sick people tend to die sooner, said Donald Berry, a biostatistician at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. The problems created by the studys inclusion of smokers and people with pre-existing illness cannot be ignored, said Susan Gapstur, vice presi dent of epidemiology for the American Cancer Society. A third critic, Dr. Walter Willett of the Harvard School of Public Health, was blunter: This is an even greater pile of rub bish than the 2005 study, he said. Willett and oth ers have done research since the 2005 study that found higher death risks from being overweight or obese. Flegal defended her work. She noted that she used standard categories for weight classes. She said statistical adjustments were made for smokers, who were included to give a more real-world sample. She also said study par ticipants were not in hos pitals or hospices, mak ing it unlikely that large numbers of sick people skewed the results. We still have to learn about obesity, includ ing how best to measure it, Flegals boss, CDC Director Dr. Thomas Frieden, said in a written statement. However, its clear that being obese is not healthy it increases the risk of diabetes, heart disease, cancer, and many other health problems. Small, sustainable increases in physical activity and improvements in nutri tion can lead to significant health improvements. STUDY: Fructose may change brain Continued From Page 7A New tax targets medical device firms Associated Press BOSTON A new tax on medical device makers has taken effect after an unsuccessful attempt by the industry to delay the tax as part of the fiscal cliff deal reached in Washington. The 2.3 percent excise tax is one of several taxes that are designed to help pay for President Barack Obamas federal health care overhaul. The head of the Advanced Medical Technology Association, Stephen Ubl, said in a statement that efforts to repeal the tax will continue. Medical device makers have warned the tax could cost about 43,000 jobs nationwide.

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Associated PressNEW ORLEANS — Terell Floyd returned an interception 38 yards for a touchdown on the first play, dual-threat quarterback Teddy Bridgewater directed several scor-ing drives and No. 22 Louisville surprised No. 4 Florida 33-17 Wednesday in the Sugar Bowl. Shaking off an early hit that flattened him and knocked off his helmet, Bridgewater came back to throw TD passes to DeVante Parker and Damian Copeland. The two-touchdown underdogs from the Big East took a 14-0 lead in the first quarter and were never caught. It certainly was a sweet win for Cardinals coach Charlie Strong — he was Florida’s defensive coor-dinator before leaving after the 2009 season and taking over Louisville. Louisville scored on the first play from scrimmage in both halves. In the first quarter Floyd intercepted Florida quarterback Jeff Driskell for the pick-6. The Cardinals were just getting started. After forcing a three-and-out, Louisville rolled up five first downs in a 13-play scoring drive. Florida finally got a drive going, but had to settle for a 33-yard field goal on the first play of the second quarter. Louisville matched the three points from 27 yards out at the end of a 12-play, 66-yard drive. In both of its scoring drive, the Cardinals kept possession of the ball for more than six minutes. Bridgewater connected with Parker for a 15-yard touchdown with 2:57 left in the half. Florida got a touchdown from Matt Jones on fourth-and-goal with a trick formation with :10 left. The Gators gave up all of that momentum with a botched onside kick try to open the second half. Not only did Louisville recover, Florida was assessed two personal fouls on the play. The 30 yards in penalties put the ball at the Gators 19. Bridgewater hit Walker for a touchdown from that distance on first down. By TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comThere is almost a week of vacation remaining before school is back in session, but some sports are getting an early jump on action in 2013. Fort White High’s soccer teams are scheduled to play at Newberry High today. It will wrap up District 2-5A play for both teams. The Lady Indians play at 5 p.m. with the boys to follow at 7 p.m. The teams are at home against Hamilton County High at the same kickoff times on Tuesday. It will be Senior Night for both teams. Columbia High’s boys basketball team is fresh off winning the inaugural Jarvis Williams Christmas Tournament in Palatka. Columbia won three games in the tournament to improve to 8-4. At 4-0, the Tigers are on top of District 4-6A. They host Stanton Prep in a district game at 7:30 p.m. Friday. The junior varsity game begins at 6 p.m. The game will kick off a stretch of five consecu-tive district games for the Tigers. Columbia’s wrestling team never takes a weekend off. The Tigers competed in Fort Walton Beach and Kissimmee over Christmas break. Columbia will wrestle in a tournament at Clay High in Green Cove Springs on Friday and Saturday. Lake City Reporter SPORTS Thursday, January 3, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS BRIEFS Louisville embarrasses inept Florida squad in Sugar Bowl, 33-23. Fort White soccer, CHS wrestling, hoops this week. GAMES Today Q Fort White High soccer at Newberry High, 7 p.m. (girls-5). Friday Q Columbia High wrestling at Clay High tournament in Green Cove Springs, TBA Q Columbia High boys basketball vs. Stanton Prep, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Saturday Q Columbia High wrestling at Clay High tournament in Green Cove Springs, TBA CAMPS Kirkman camp at Impact Zone Major League player Michael Kirkman of Lake City will conduct a pitching camp at Impact Zone on Monday. Kirkman will work with each participant, sign autographs, answer questions and give a pitching demonstration. The camps are 10 a.m. to noon for ages 6-11 and 1:30-3:30 p.m. for ages 12 and older. Cost is $60 per player. Valdosta State softball head coach Thomas Macera will give a presentation for coaches and players on recruiting and hitting, and answer questions at Impact Zone from 1-2:30 p.m. Saturday. Cost is $10 per person. For details, call 243-8238. YOUTH BASEBALL North Florida Rays 11U tryout The North Florida Rays 11U travel team has tryouts at 1 p.m. Saturday at the Southside Baseball Complex red fields. For details, call Andy Miles at 867-0678 or Todd Green at 365-5161.North Florida Outlaws tryout The North Florida Outlaws 8U travel machine pitch baseball team will have tryouts at 1 p.m. Jan. 12 at the Southside Baseball Complex blue fields. For details, call Tommy Boston at 965-9311 or Drew Law at 965-8447. ZUMBA Beginner, weight loss classes A Zumba beginner class and weight loss contest will be offered at Teen Town on Sunday. The Zumba beginner class is 3-4 p.m., with the weight loss contest starting at 4 p.m. For details, call Sarah Sandlin at 758-0009. PREP SPORTS Deadlines for non-traditionals Non-traditional students must declare their intentions to try out for public school sports. The deadlines to declare for softball and Classes 1A-2A track and field is Monday. Students must register at the school in the zone where they live. For details, call Athletic Director John Wilson at (352) 317-5865.Q From staff reports COURTESY PHOTOABOVE: Columbia High’s basketball team celebrates its win in the Jarvis Wiliams Christmas Tournament in Palatka. The Tigers will be at home Friday against Stanton Prep.LEFT: Fort White High’s Wyatt Kesead (14) fights for control of the ball while playing against Interlachen High on Nov. 27. Fort White’s girls and boys soccer teams are in action today in district matches at Newberry High JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterGetting back down to business U.S.Army All-AmericanColumbia High’s Laremy Tunsil (left) clowns around with a teammate at practice for the U.S. Army All-American game at the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas, on Saturday. Tunsil will play for the East squad.The selection committee quote on Tunsil: ‘Tunsil is a physical drive blocker that is strong at the point of attack. The left tackle has long arms and a great wingspan. He explodes off the ball and can get to the second level without any problems. He finishes blocks aggressively while snapping his hands when punching.’ Tunsil is one of the top offensive line college recruits in the country.Photo courtesy of All American Games Crushed by Cardinals

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By DOUG FERGUSONAssociated PressKAPALUA, Hawaii — Carl Pettersson says the proposed rule to ban the anchored stroke for long putters feels like a “witch hunt,” and that golf’s governing bodies were only reacting to three of the last five major champions using a belly putter. “It seems silly to ban something that’s been around for 40 years,” Pettersson said in his first comments since the U.S. Golf Association and Royal & Ancient Golf Club announced plans Nov. 28 to outlaw anchored strokes. “It’s unfortunate. I feel like I’m 16 years behind because I haven’t putted with anything else for 16 years.” Pettersson, who qualified for the Tournament of Champions by winning at Hilton Head, began using a broom-handle putter that he anchors to his chest between his sophomore and junior year at North Carolina State. Keegan Bradley (PGA Championship), Webb Simpson (U.S. Open) and Ernie Els (British Open) used a belly putter to win their majors. Two more months of comment period remain before the rule becomes official; then, it does not take effect until the next Rules of Golf is published Jan. 1, 2016. Even as the long putters were getting more attention, Pettersson made one of the most compelling cases to keep them. It is the only putting stroke he has used during his 10 years on the PGA Tour. Pettersson long has argued that he has spent thousands of hours practicing the stroke, which did not come naturally to him, and that to start over would put him at an unfair disadvantage. He was said to be among those who might consider a lawsuit if the rule is adopted, though the easygoing Swede said he would see how this year unfolded. Tiger Woods, Steve Stricker and Graeme McDowell are on a long list of players who use conventional putters and believe an anchored stroke should go away, saying it takes the skill out of putting because the top part of the club is anchored to the body. SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today COLLEGE FOOTBALL 8:30 p.m. ESPN — Fiesta Bowl, Oregon vs. Kansas St., at Glendale, Ariz. MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN2 — Michigan at NorthwesternNBCSN — Northeastern at George Mason 11 p.m. FSN — California at UCLAFOOTBALLNFL postseason Wild-card Playoffs Saturday Cincinnati at Houston, 4:30 p.m. (NBC) Minnesota at Green Bay, 8 p.m. (NBC) Sunday Indianapolis at Baltimore, 1 p.m. (CBS) Seattle at Washington, 4:30 p.m. (FOX) Divisional Playoffs Saturday, Jan. 12 Baltimore, Indianapolis or Cincinnati at Denver, 4:30 p.m. (CBS) Washington, Seattle or Green Bay at San Francisco, 8 p.m. (FOX) Sunday, Jan. 13 Washington, Seattle or Minnesota at Atlanta, 1 p.m. (FOX) Baltimore, Indianapolis or Houston at New England, 4:30 p.m. (CBS) Conference Championships Sunday, Jan. 20 AFC, TBA (CBS)NFC, TBA (FOX) Pro Bowl Sunday, Jan. 27 At HonoluluAFC vs. NFC, 7 p.m. (NBC) Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 3 At New OrleansAFC champion vs. NFC champion, 6 p.m. (CBS)NFL calendar Sunday — Assistant coaches under contract to playoff clubs that have byes in the wild-card weekend may be interviewed for head coaching positions through the conclusion of wild-card games. Jan. 13 — Assistant coaches under contract to playoff clubs that won wild-card games may be interviewed for head coaching positions through the conclu-sion of divisional playoff games. Jan. 15 — Deadline for underclassmen to petition for special eligibility for the 2013 NFL draft. Jan. 27 — An assistant coach, whose team is in the Super Bowl and who has previously interviewed for another club’s head coaching job, may have a second interview with the club no later than the Sunday preceding the Super Bowl.College bowl games New Mexico Bowl Arizona 49, Nevada 48Famous Idaho Potato BowlUtah State 41, Toledo 15 Poinsettia Bowl BYU 23, San Diego State 6 Beef ’O’ Brady’s Bowl UCF 38, Ball State 17 New Orleans Bowl Louisiana-Lafayette 43, E. Carolina 34 Las Vegas Bowl Boise State 28, Washington 26 Hawaii Bowl SMU 43, Fresno State 10 Little Caesars Pizza Bowl Central Michigan 24, W. Kentucky 21 Military Bowl San Jose State 29, Bowling Green 20 Belk Bowl Cincinnati 48, Duke 34 Holiday Bowl Baylor 49, UCLA 26 Independence Bowl Ohio 45, Louisiana-Monroe 14 Russell Athletic Bowl Virginia Tech 13, Rutgers 10, OT Meineke Car Care Bowl Texas Tech 34, Minnesota 31 Armed Forces Bowl Rice 33, Air Force 14 Fight Hunger Bowl Arizona State 62, Navy 28 Pinstripe Bowl Syracuse 38, West Virginia 14 Alamo Bowl Texas 31, Oregon State 27 Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl Michigan State 17, TCU 16 Music City Bowl Vanderbilt 38, N.C. State 24 Sun Bowl Georgia Tech 21, Southern Cal 7 Liberty Bowl Tulsa 31, Iowa State 17 Chick-fil-A Bowl Clemson 25, LSU 24 Tuesday Heart of Dallas Bowl Oklahoma State 58, Purdue 14 Gator Bowl Northwestern 34, Mississippi State 20 Capital One Bowl Georgia 45, Nebraska 31 Outback Bowl South Carolina 33, Michigan 28 Rose Bowl Stanford 20, Wisconsin 14 Orange Bowl Florida State 31, N. Illinois 10 ——— Wednesday Sugar Bowl Florida vs. Louisville (n) Today Fiesta Bowl At Glendale, Ariz.Kansas State (11-1) vs. Oregon (11-1), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN) Friday Cotton Bowl At Arlington, TexasTexas A&M (10-2) vs. Oklahoma (10-2), 8 p.m. (FOX) Saturday BBVA Compass Bowl At Birmingham, Ala.Pittsburgh (6-6) vs. Mississippi (6-6), 1 p.m. (ESPN) Sunday GoDaddy.com Bowl At Mobile, Ala.Kent State (11-2) vs. Arkansas State (9-3), 9 p.m. (ESPN) Monday BCS National Championship At MiamiNotre Dame (12-0) vs. Alabama (12-1), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN) ——— Saturday, Jan. 19 East-West Shrine Classic At St. PetersburgEast vs. West, 4 p.m. (NFLN) Saturday, Jan. 26 Senior Bowl At Mobile, Ala.North vs. South, TBA (NFLN) FCS Championship Saturday At FC Dallas StadiumFrisco, TexasNorth Dakota State (13-1) vs. Sam Houston State (11-3), 1 p.m.BASKETBALLNBA schedule Today’s Games San Antonio at New York, 7:30 p.m.Minnesota at Denver, 9 p.m. Friday’s Games Cleveland at Charlotte, 7 p.m.Sacramento at Toronto, 7 p.m.Brooklyn at Washington, 7 p.m.Atlanta at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.Portland at Memphis, 8 p.m.Philadelphia at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.Indiana at Boston, 8 p.m.Chicago at Miami, 8 p.m.Houston at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.Utah at Phoenix, 9 p.m.L.A. Lakers at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. NBA calendar Feb. 15-17 — NBA All-Star weekend (Houston). Feb. 21 — Trade deadline.April 20 — Playoffs begin. AP Top 25 schedule Today’s Games No. 2 Michigan at Northwestern, 7 p.m. No. 3 Arizona vs. Colorado, 8 p.m.No. 10 Gonzaga at Pepperdine, 9 p.m. Saturday’s Games No. 1 Duke vs. Wake Forest, NoonNo. 3 Arizona vs. Utah, 5 p.m.No. 8 Ohio State at No. 11 Illinois, 2:15 p.m. No. 10 Gonzaga at Santa Clara, 8 p.m.No. 12 Missouri vs. Bucknell, 7 p.m.No. 14 Cincinnati vs. St. John’s, 4 p.m.No. 15 Georgetown at Marquette, 2 p.m. No. 16 Creighton vs. Indiana State, 3:05 p.m. No. 17 Butler vs. New Orleans, 2 p.m.No. 18 Michigan State vs. Purdue, Noon No. 21 Notre Dame vs. Seton Hall, Noon No. 22 Oklahoma State at No. 25 Kansas State, 1:30 p.m. No. 23 N.C. State at Boston College, 4 p.m. No. 24 Pittsburgh at Rutgers, 11 a.m. Sunday’s Games No. 2 Michigan vs. Iowa, NoonNo. 6 Kansas vs. Temple, 4:30 p.m.No. 7 Syracuse at South Florida, Noon No. 9 Minnesota vs. Northwestern, 7 p.m. No. 13 Florida at Yale, 5:30 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, JANUARY 3, 2013 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0422BAGATE THURSDAY EVENING JANUARY 3, 2013 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Nashville “Pilot” (DVS) Scandal Scandal Olivia helps the vice president. News at 11(:35) Nightline (N) 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) The Insider 5-PBS 5 -Journal Nightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) The This Old House Hour (N) “Mr. Cao Goes to Washington” (2012) Antiques Roadshow “Orlando, Florida” BBC World NewsTavis Smiley 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge Judy Two and Half MenBig Bang TheoryTwo and Half Men(:01) Person of Interest “2 Pi R” (N) (:01) Elementary “Dirty Laundry” (N) Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneThe Vampire Diaries Beauty and the Beast TMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ce The Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family Guy Family Guy The SimpsonsMobbed A woman issues an ultimatum. Mobbed “We’re Having a Baby” (N) NewsAction News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) 30 Rock Up All NightThe Of ceParks/Recreat(:01) Rock Center With Brian WilliamsNewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(5:00) Public Affairs Capitol Hill Hearings WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H The Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Main StreetMain StreetMain StreetMain StreetDateline on OWN Dateline on OWN “Haunting Images” Lost and Found “Miraculous Reunions” Dateline on OWN A&E 19 118 265The First 48 The First 48 “The Chase; One Shot” The First 48 The First 48 “Brutal Business” Beyond Scared Straight (N) (:01) Teen Trouble “Samm” HALL 20 185 312The Brady BunchThe Brady BunchThe Brady BunchThe Brady BunchHappy Days Happy Days Happy Days Happy Days Frasier Frasier “Bad Dog” Frasier Frasier FX 22 136 248Two and Half MenTwo and Half MenTwo and Half MenTwo and Half Men “The Waterboy” (1998, Comedy) Adam Sandler, Kathy Bates. “The Waterboy” (1998, Comedy) Adam Sandler, Kathy Bates. CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245The Mentalist The Mentalist “Red Sky at Night” The Mentalist A jockey is murdered. The Mentalist “Pink Chanel Suit” The Mentalist A building explodes. CSI: NY Drowning victim. NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobDrake & JoshDrake & JoshHouse of Anubis (N) Full House Full House The Nanny The Nanny Friends Friends SPIKE 28 168 241Jail Jail Jail Jail (N) iMPACT Wrestling (N) Bellator 360 (Series Premiere) (N) Bellator 360 (N) MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*H M*A*S*H White Collar “What Happens in Burma” White Collar “Countermeasures” Seinfeld Frasier The Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Shake It Up! Good Luck CharlieSo Random! Shake It Up! Good Luck CharlieMovie So Random! Shake It Up! Good Luck CharlieMy Babysitter LIFE 32 108 252Wife Swap Wife Swap Project Runway All Stars Project Runway All Stars (N) Dance Moms Abby holds an open audition. (:31) Double Divas USA 33 105 242NCIS A petty of cer is found dead. NCIS The murder of a Marine. NCIS “SWAK” Biohazard isolation. NCIS Bored housewives. NCIS “Light Sleeper” CSI: Crime Scene Investigation BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Top 10 Countdown” (N) “Lottery Ticket” (2010, Comedy) Bow Wow. A young man wins a multimillion-dollar prize. “Torque” (2004) Martin Henderson. A drug dealer frames a biker for murder. ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) College GameDay (N) (Live) Fiesta Bowl Pree 2013 Tostitos Fiesta Bowl Kansas State vs. Oregon. From University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale, Ariz. (N) ESPN2 36 144 209SportsNation (N) d College Basketball Michigan at Northwestern. (N) Audibles (N) NFL Live (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SUNSP 37 -how to Do oridaDriven Women’s College Basketball Florida at Kentucky. (N) Women’s College Basketball Tennessee at South Carolina. (N) College Basketball DISCV 38 182 278Moonshiners “A Shiner’s Last Stand” Moonshiners Tickle builds a new still. Moonshiners “Tickle Goes Rogue” (N) Moonshiners “Troubled Waters” Property WarsProperty WarsMoonshiners “Troubled Waters” TBS 39 139 247King of QueensSeinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryConan HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) What Would You Do?What Would You Do?Showbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236KardashianE! News SpecialE! News (N) The SoupLove You, Mean It “She’s Out of My League” (2010) Jay Baruchel, Alice Eve, T.J. Miller. Chelsea Lately (N) E! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. Food Man v. Food Mysteries at the Museum Mysteries at the Museum Mysteries at the Museum Mysteries at the Museum HGTV 47 112 229Selling New YorkSelling New YorkHunters Int’lHouse HuntersSalvage DawgsSalvage DawgsRehab AddictRehab AddictHouse Hunters (N) Hunters Int’lHouse HuntersHunters Int’l TLC 48 183 280What Not to Wear “Mayim” Sister Wives “Hard to Say Goodbye” Sister Wives: Secrets Revealed Four Weddings “...and a Pilgrim” (N) What Not to Wear “Tiffany” Four Weddings “...and a Pilgrim” HIST 49 120 269Secret Access: UFOs on the RecordPawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Bamazon “Timber!” Ax Men DJ Jeremiah is pushed to far. Cajun Pawn StarsCajun Pawn Stars ANPL 50 184 282Swamp Wars “A Python Ate My Pet” North Woods Law: On the Hunt North Woods Law: On the Hunt North Woods Law: On the Hunt North Woods Law: On the Hunt North Woods Law: On the Hunt FOOD 51 110 231Chopped “Viewers’ Choice!” Cupcake WarsChopped Spaghetti in a can; tile sh. Chopped “Pigging Out” Sweet Genius “Electric Genius” (N) Chopped “Food Network Stars!” TBN 52 260 372(5:00) TBN Highlights 2012Always Good NewThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesJoel Osteen Joseph PrinceHillsong TVPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -Halls of FameHot Stove Rep Tennis Champions Series: San Jose. Agassi vs. McEnroe. Courtside JonesForrest Grif n: The Ultimate Fighter (N)d College Basketball California at UCLA. SYFY 58 122 244(5:30) Lost Girl “Outlander” (2008) James Caviezel. An alien joins forces with Vikings to hunt his enemy. “Repo Men” (2010) Jude Law. Agents repossess transplanted organs for nonpayment. Outlander AMC 60 130 254(5:30) “Footloose” (1984, Drama) Kevin Bacon, Lori Singer. “The Karate Kid” (1984, Drama) Ralph Macchio. A Japanese handyman teaches a teenager to defend himself. (:01) “The Karate Kid Part II” COM 62 107 249It’s Always SunnyTosh.0 Futurama Futurama South Park South Park South Park South Park South Park The Comedy Central Roast Actor Charlie Sheen. CMT 63 166 327Reba “Invasion” Reba Therapist. Reba Reba Reba Reba “Beer for My Horses” (2008, Action) Toby Keith, Rodney Carrington. (:15) “Starsky & Hutch” (2004) NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer “Closet Cases” America the WildAmerica the WildAmerica the Wild “Wolverine King” America the WildAmerica the Wild NGC 109 186 276Drain the Great LakesWicked Tuna: Hooked UpWicked Tuna: Hooked Up (N) Rocket CityRocket CityDiggersDiggersRocket CityRocket City SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s Made (N) How It’s Made (N) They Do It?They Do It?How It’s MadeHow It’s Made ID 111 192 285Who the BleepWho the BleepWho the BleepWho the BleepFatal Vows “Lies and Death” The Will: Family Secrets Revealed (N) Very Bad Men (N) Very Bad MenFatal Vows “Lies and Death” HBO 302 300 501(5:45) “The Day After Tomorrow” (2004) Dennis Quaid. ‘PG-13’ REAL Sports With Bryant Gumbel “New Year’s Eve” (2011, Romance-Comedy) Halle Berry. ‘PG-13’ The Best Sex: A Retrospective MAX 320 310 515(5:50) “Arthur” (2011) Russell Brand. ‘PG-13’ (:45) “The Parent Trap” (1998, Comedy) Lindsay Lohan, Dennis Quaid. Premiere. ‘PG’ “Cadillac Man” (1990) Robin Williams. ‘R’ Sexy Assassins SHOW 340 318 545(5:45) “Mallrats” (1995) Shannen Doherty. Premiere. ‘R’ “War Horse” (2011) Emily Watson. A horse sees joy and sorrow during World War I. ‘PG-13’ “The Pianist” (2002, Historical Drama) Adrien Brody. Premiere. ‘R’ COURTESY PHOTOTeam championsTiara Carter (left) and Gillian Norris of Lake City won the North Florida Junior Golf Foundation’s Holiday Team Championship at Ponte Vedra G olf & Country Club on Dec. 27-28. Lake City’s Jacob Soucinek and Luke Soucin ek placed second in Flight 2. Pettersson calls ban on long putters ‘witch hunt’ ASSOCIATED PRESSCarl Pettersson of Sweden putts during the Wyndham Championship golf tournament in Greensboro, N.C., on Aug. 12. Chiefs beat out Jags for No. 1 draft pickAssociated PressNEW YORK — The Kansas City Chiefs own the No. 1 pick in next April’s draft, with the rest of the order set for non-playoff teams. Kansas City and Jacksonville finished 2-14 each, but the Chiefs had the weaker schedule, earning them the top selection. The rest of the top 20 picks were announced Monday by the NFL. Oakland is third, followed by Philadelphia, Detroit, Cleveland, Arizona, Buffalo, the New York Jets and Tennessee. Then come San Diego, Miami, Tampa Bay, Carolina, New Orleans, St. Louis, Pittsburgh, Dallas, the New York Giants, and Chicago.

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By FRED GOODALLAssociated PressTAMPA — Despite all South Carolina has accomplished under Steve Spurrier, the winningest coach in school history couldn’t recall a finish quite like the one the Gamecocks pulled off in the Outback Bowl. Down a point with 3:29 to go, Connor Shaw launched a game-winning drive that Dylan Thompson finished with a touchdown pass in the closing seconds to beat Michigan 33-28 and give South Carolina another 11-win season and consecu-tive bowl victories for the first time in over a decade. “We haven’t won one like that since I’ve been here, in eight years, so hopefully that will sort of tell us: ‘Hey, we can do that.’ It’s pos-sible. Just hang in there,” Spurrier said Tuesday. “I keep being reminded by a lot of my buddies, ‘We used to leave at halftime before when it was going south on us. We don’t leave anymore,” the coach added. “So, that’s encouraging.” Spurrier, who is wellknown for benching strug-gling QBs, called on both of his talented passers to improve to 3-4 in bowl games with the 11th-ranked Gamecocks. No coach has led them to more postsea-son victories. Shaw opened with a 56-yard touchdown pass to Damiere Byrd on the third play of the game. Thompson closed with a 32-yard TD strike to Bruce Ellington with 11 seconds remaining. “I don’t know if I’ve ever given two quarterbacks a game ball, but today I said: ‘Hey, we’ve got to give them to both you guys,’” the Head Ball Coach said. “Both those young men are just so super teamoriented. There’s no jealou-sy, nothing. ... Those guys are just really, really good teammates. Wonderful team players,” the coach added. “We tried to tell Connor: ‘It’s your game.’ And it was his game, but Dylan was going to play. He understood that. It worked beau-tifully as it turned out.” South Carolina defensive end Jadeveon Clowney was quiet for much of the day but shifted momentum in the fourth quarter with a big hit on Vincent Smith that sent the running back’s helmet rolling several yards backward and caused a fumble that the SEC defensive player of the year recovered to set up Shaw’s TD pass to Sanders for a 27-22 lead. The TD capped a threeplay sequence that began with Michigan running its second fake punt of the game, gaining 4 yards to the Wolverines 41 for what was ruled a first down, despite not appearing be one when the officials called for a measurement. South Carolina challenged the spot, but the ruling on the field was upheld. Clowney then leveled Smith just as he was taking the handoff from quarter-back Devin Gardner, jar-ring the ball loose. Thompson replaced Shaw during the winning drive, covering the final 43 yards after Shaw began the march from his own 30 and kept it alive with a 6-yard completion to Ace Sanders on a fourth-and-3 play. Gardner’s third TD pass of the game had given Michigan a 28-27 lead. “I wasn’t nervous. I knew I had great guys around me, and I trusted them and just was confident,” Thompson said, adding that South Carolina’s twoquarterback setup func-tioned well because he and Shaw are unselfish players. “I think it’s honestly because we have a great team. We trust each other. We pull for each other, and it’s no different with the quarterback situation,” Thompson said. Shaw threw for 227 yards and two touchdowns after missing the Gamecocks’ regular-season finale with a left foot sprain. Thompson led the Gamecocks (11-2) to a victory at archrival Clemson, and threw for 117 yards and two TDs in the bowl. Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, JANUARY 3, 2013 3B3BSports Florida Statement ASSOCIATED PRESSFlorida State fullback Lonnie Pryor (24) runs 60 yards for a touchdown during the Orange Bowl game against Northern Illinois in Miami on Tuesday. By STEVEN WINEAssociated PressMIAMI — Laughing and mugging for the cameras, the Florida State Seminoles happily hoisted the Orange Bowl trophy as a consola-tion prize, their disappoint-ment about failing to reach the national championship game all but forgotten. They figure next season will be different. Smothering defense and two breakaway runs by senior fullback Lonnie Pryor helped Florida State beat Northern Illinois 31-10 Tuesday night. The victory was the first for the Seminoles (12-2) in a BCS bowl since the glory days of 2000, when they beat Virginia Tech for the national title. After the game, coach Jimbo Fisher’s players wore T-shirts that read, “Florida Statement.” “We’re knocking on the door,” Fisher said. “We feel very confident about where we’re going and what we’re doing. We’ve laid a great foundation here, and there’s a great team coming back.” While Fisher’s roster is loaded with underclassmen, two seniors shone in the season finale. Pryor, voted the game’s outstanding player, ran for a career-high 134 yards and two scores in only five carries, while classmate EJ Manuel threw for 291 yards. “We wanted to leave a legacy and change the cul-ture in what we do here,” Manuel said. “You’re reap-ing the benefits right now.” Junior defensive end Bjoern Werner — who has yet to announce whether he’ll turn pro this year — led a swarming defense that stuffed Huskies QB and all-purpose threat Jordan Lynch for most of the night. Florida State cornerback Xavier Rhodes recovered a fumble in the fourth quar-ter to help seal the win. He said he’ll forgo his senior season and join the NFL this year. The 13th-ranked Seminoles won a bowl game for the fifth season in a row, but the stakes were higher this time. It was their first BCS bowl berth in seven years. “It’s not the national championship, but right below,” Werner said. “Not a lot of teams can say that.” The 12-victory season was the first since 1999 for the Seminoles, the Atlantic Coast Conference champions. “Florida State is almost back,” safety Lamarcus Joyner said. For 16th-ranked Northern Illinois (12-2), playing in a BCS bowl for the first time, the defeat snapped a 12-game winning streak. The Huskies came in as two-touchdown underdogs and fell to 5-28 against top 25 teams. “We knew that they were going to play us tough,” Fisher said. “But our kids, it’s another step in which we handled the big plat-form, and I’m very proud of them.” Pryor scored the first touchdown on a career-long 60-yard run, then ran 37 yards for a clinching touch-down with 10 minutes left. They were the two longest rushes allowed by Northern Illinois all season. Manuel went 26 for 38, threw for one score and ran for another. Florida State totaled 534 yards and broke the school record for yards in a season with 6,591. The Huskies were widely derided as unworthy of a BCS bowl berth, and didn’t do enough to silence the doubters. Trick plays in the kicking game helped keep them close until the fourth quarter, but when it came to Lynch, not much fooled a Florida State defense ranked second in the nation. “Definitely the best defense we played all year,” Lynch said. “They were always in the right spot at the right time, it seemed like. They were hungry out there.” Lynch came into the game leading the nation in rushing and total offense, and he threw or ran on nearly every play for the Huskies. But he completed only 15 of 41 attempts for 176 yards, and carried 23 times for 44 yards. The junior became the first player in NCAA history to surpass 3,000 yards pass-ing and 1,500 rushing in a season. After the Huskies’ lone touchdown cut their deficit to 17-10 in the third quarter, they recovered an onside kick, and Lynch moved them to the Florida State 23. But he was flushed from the pocket on third down and threw an ill-advised pass that Terrence Brooks intercepted. “It probably wasn’t the smartest thing to force the ball there,” Lynch said. The loss came in Rod Carey’s debut as the Huskies’ coach. He was promoted to replace Dave Doeren, who took the North Carolina State job after the regular season. “I’m upset,” Carey said. “Florida State is a well-oiled machine. They beat us, no doubt. That doesn’t change the fact I don’t like to lose.”South Carolina program continues at high level ASSOCIATED PRESSSouth Carolina wide receiver Nick Jones pulls in a p ass against Michigan during the Outback Bowl in Tampa on Tuesday.ASSOCIATED PRESSGeorgia quarterback Aaron Murray throws a pass agains t Nebraska in the Capital One Bowl in Orlando on Tuesda y. Georgia Bulldog-ish after victoryBy KYLE HIGHTOWERAssociated PressORLANDO — For each of its previous two bowl trips, Georgia left the field shrouded in the uncomfort-able feelings of a season-ending loss. While this offseason could certainly feature some big changes to its roster, it will at least begin on a high note. A month removed from missing a berth in the BCS title game because of a nar-row loss to Alabama, the sixth-ranked Bulldogs rode junior quarterback Aaron Murray’s five touchdown passes to a 45-31 victory over No. 23 Nebraska in the Capital One Bowl on Tuesday. Murray and fellow underclassman Jarvis Jones could certainly jump to the NFL this offseason, but for one more game Bulldogs’ fans got to see a championship-caliber team intact. “Last year we went 0-2 and win 10 in a row, but we can’t finish that season out. And this year we had another really good season, win the East, and we didn’t win the SEC championship, but we certainly performed a lot better,” Bulldogs’ coach Mark Richt said. “So now we wanted to win this bowl, to just maybe prove to ourselves that we are one of the better teams in the country.” Murray’s five touchdowns, including two in the fourth quarter, set a Georgia bowl record. He shook off a pair of firsthalf interceptions, including one returned for a touch-down, and passed for 427 yards — also a Bulldogs’ bowl record — against the nation’s top-ranked passing defense. He was the game’s most valuable player on the way to earning his first bowl victory at Georgia. Georgia (12-2) also reached 12 wins for the third time in school history. “I don’t know what it’s like to head into an offsea-son with a win,” Murray said. “It’s a great feeling to get a win. It’s great for the seniors, who have meant so much to this team. They’ve done a great job of leading this team the whole season. “To get 12 wins. ... That’s something special.” Jones said any regrets about the Alabama loss are gone now. “I think it speaks for itself,” he said. “The SEC game was a couple of weeks ago. We did what we can and we lost. We came up kind of short. And it was definitely a game that we had the opportunity to win. But you can’t take away from the day. We came out here and we executed. “We gave our seniors the opportunity to leave here with a win and a bowl game, and it’s definitely something we look forward to and something we’ll remember for a long time.” Nebraska (10-4) lost its third straight bowl game.

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DEAR ABBY: I cut my father out of my life years ago, after he declared he could not support my decision to adopt three children from a Russian orphanage with my long-time companion. The adoption announcement coincided with my “coming out” to Dad, who is now married to his third wife. It must have been a lot for him to take in at one time. He told me plainly that he could not support my decision because he could not “understand” it. This year on Father’s Day, I sent him a card and he replied by email that he was glad to hear from me and he hoped for a reconciliation, but was not sure how to go about it. I responded by email that I was cautiously optimistic that we could reignite a respectful relationship. I haven’t heard back from him and I suspect it’s because he saw that I had changed my last name from his to my husband’s, a decision I made after our marriage. Please advise me on how to proceed. -PRODIGAL SON IN CALIFORNIA DEAR SON: Call your father, tell him you love him and that you would like to schedule a visit with him -but would like to send him some reading material before you do. Then contact PFLAG (Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays). The phone number is 202-467-8180 and you’ll find them on the Internet at www.pflag.org. They will be happy to provide you with literature for your dad to help him “understand.” Frankly, he has my sym-pathy because before you hit him with the “double whammy,” he didn’t have a clue about who you really are. Whether your name change overwhelmed him or not is irrelevant. The ball is now in your court, so if you want to have a hope of a relationship with your father, YOU will have to make the next move. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: Two years ago, I proposed to the woman who changed me for the better. I love her with all my heart, but after we had been engaged for only four days every-thing came to a stop. Her mother was against the marriage, and my fiancee wasn’t strong enough to follow her heart. We had been in a relationship for more than nine years, most of it long distance except for the last two years. After getting no reason for calling off the wedding, I began texting her for an answer only to be arrested for cyber-stalking. I know in my heart from letters sent back and forth that this wasn’t Claudette’s idea, but I can’t let go. I know she’s the one for me. How do I let her go? -GRIEVING IN FLORIDA DEAR GRIEVING: You may not believe this, but you’re a lucky man. It may take the help of a psychol-ogist for you to disengage emotionally and move on. Given that you wound up in trouble with the law, this would be a wise decision. It might also help to envision what it would have been like being mar-ried not only to Claudette, but also to her mother -because they appear to be joined at the hip, and the part that’s doing the thinking isn’t your former fiancee. This may be the reason that her first mar-riage failed. DILBERT BABY BLUES HOROSCOPES DEAR ABBY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Run the show instead of giving someone else the upper hand. You may face adversity, but in the end you will build confidence and make an impression that will stop anyone from messing with you again. A relationship will lead to emotional changes. +++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Share information and you will learn something new that you can apply to a project you want to accom-plish this year. Consider your position and lifestyle and the positive changes you can make to better the world in which you live. +++++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Don’t let an impulsive decision hold you hostage. Budget will be key to how far you’ll advance. Bide your time and spend wise-ly. Invest in your future. Hard work will lead to your success, not depend-ing on luck. ++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Make a statement. Step outside your inner circle and experience what’s being offered that you can utilize in your own pursuits. Partnerships will have a favorable influence regarding your success this year. Stick close to those sharing your inter-ests and concerns. ++++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Don’t feel you have to make a decision regard-ing work if you are not fully prepared. Look for alternatives that suit your background, knowledge and passion and you will find the perfect position or direction. Keep your emo-tions out of the workplace. +++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Move toward the path that you find most invit-ing. Don’t worry about what others want you to do when the bottom line is finding your own comfort zone. Show confidence and aspire to be and do your best. New friendships will bring new prospects. +++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Slow down and observe. Remembering days gone by and people and places that made you feel happy or secure will help you find peace in the choices you make now. A chance to fraternize with people sharing your concerns and interests is apparent. +++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Recognize what you have to offer and you will avoid being manipulated by someone trying to get something from you for less. Let your intuition guide you when it comes to personal and domestic matters. Creative input will save you money. ++++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Partnerships will fall short if you can-not maintain equality. Inconsistency or asking for too much will lead to hidden matters that can upset your plans or lead to double standards. Do your own thing if possible and avoid controversy. ++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Life is looking up and past pursuits can start to pay off. Your insight and ability to meld the old with the new will be your gate-way to a better standard of living as well as enhance your reputation and your current position. +++++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Taking a critical look at where you have been and where you are headed will be an eye-opener leading to new beginnings. Don’t rule out what you are capable of doing. Believing that you can reach any goal you set will lead to victory. +++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Too many options will be your downfall. Cut through your choices quickly by harnessing the options that use your resources, skills and tal-ents the most. Once you know exactly what you want, you can enlist the assistance you need. +++ CELEBRITY CIPHER Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com BLONDIE BEETLE BAILEY B.C. FRANK & ERNEST FOR BETTER OR WORSE ZITS HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH GARFIELD THE LAST WORD Eugenia Last Father and son reconciliation stalls after email exchange Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. CLASSIC PEANUTS Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, JANUARY 3, 2013 4B

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, JANUARY3, 2013 5B Classified Department: 755-5440 CLASSIFIED AD vantage T ake ADvantage of the Reporter Classifieds! 755-5440 Lake City Reporter FIND IT SELL IT BUY IT $ 17 50 4 lines 3 days Includes 2 Signs Each additional line $ 1.65 Garage Sale Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate. $ 10 10 4 lines 6 days Each additional line $1.10 One item per ad Under $500 Personal Merchandise Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate. $ 16 75 4 lines 6 days Each additional line $1.15 One item per ad Under $1,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate. $ 23 70 4 lines 6 days Each additional line $1.45 One item per ad Under $2,500 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $4,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate. $ 27 40 4 lines 6 days Each additional line $1.55 One item per ad Under $4,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate. $ 30 40 4 lines 6 days Each additional line $1.65 One item per ad Under $6,000 Placing An Ad Service Guide Limited to service type advertising only. 4 lines, one month.... $ 92.00 $10.80 each additional line Includes an additional $2.00 per ad for each Wednesday insertion. Deadlines Be Sure to Call Early Y ou can call us at 755-5440 Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Some people prefer to place their classified ads in person, and some ad categories will require prepayment. Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street. Y ou can also fax or email your ad copy to the Reporter. F AX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the Classified Department. EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreporter.com Ad is to Appear: T uesday W ednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Call by: Mon., 10:00 a.m. Mon., 10:00 a.m. We d., 10:00 a.m. Thurs., 10:00 a.m. Fri., 10:00 a.m. Fri., 10:00 a.m. F ax/Email by: Mon., 9:00 a.m. Mon., 9:00 a.m. We d., 9:00 a.m. Thurs., 9:00 a.m. Fri., 9:00 a.m. Fri., 9:00 a.m. These deadlines are subject to change without notice. Cancellations, Changes & Billing Questions Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject, or classify all advertisements under appropriate headings. Copy should be checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day of publication. Credit for published errors will be allowed for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement which was incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be published, nor for any general, special or consequential damages. Advertising language must comply with Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition of discrimination in employment, housing and public accommodations. Standard abbreviations are acceptable; however, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated. Ad ErrorsPlease read your ad on the first day of publication. We accept responsibility for only the first incorrect insertion, and only the charge for the ad space in error. Please call 755-5440 immediately for prompt correction and billing adjustments. CancellationsNormal advertising deadlines apply for cancellation. Billing InquiriesCall 755-5440. Should further information be required regarding payments or credit limits, your call will be transferred to the accounting department. General Information In Print and Online www.lakecityreporter.com Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate. $ 2 50 4 lines 6 days Each additional line $.25 One item per ad Under $100 Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service Directory To place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding Counties Highlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Artwork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 Services White's Trucking Services Y ou call & We Haul! Fill Dirt, Lime Rock. AsphaltMillings, Granite, Road Rock. 386-362-8763 Legal AGCO FINANCELLC will offer the following repossessed equipment for sale to the highest bidder for cash, plus applicable sales tax. Equipment: Valtra-N101 Tractor, S/N: U43331, Quicle-Q65 Loader, S/N: 7339940. Date of sale: Thursday-January 10, 2013. Time of Sale: 9:00 A.M.. Place of sale: Suwannee Equipment, 3869 US Hwy 129 North, Live Oak, FL. Equipment can be inspected at place of sale. The equipment will be sold AS IS, without warranty. We reserve the right to bid. For further information please contact Dick Wilson (484) 919-2169 Cell, Reference Number 1179288. 05536250 DECEMBER 27, 2012 JANUARY3, 2013 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE 3RD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA GENERALJURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.: 12-18 CA TD BANK, N.A., a national banking association, as successor by merger with CAROLINAFIRSTBANK, as successor by merger with MERCANTILE BANK, Plaintiff, v. SIERRAWAY, LLC, a dissolved Florida limited liability company, MATTHEWD. ROCCO and UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to the Agreed Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 10, 2012, entered in Civil Case No. 1218 CAof the Circuit Court of the 3rd Judicial Circuit in and for Columbia County, Florida, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Columbia County Courthouse, 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055 at 11:00 a.m. on the 16th day of January, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Agreed Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to-wit: Lot 11, OLIVIAADDITION, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 27, Public Records of Columbia County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 14th day of December, 2012. P. DeWITTCASON As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ B. Scippio Deputy Clerk SEAL If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADACoordinator at the Office of the Trial Court Administrator, Lake County Judicial Center, Post Office Box 7800/550 W. Main Street, Tavares, Florida, 32778, Telephone: (352) 253-1604, at least (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 771. 05536468 December 27, 2012 January 3, 2013 Legal IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE 3RD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA CIVILDIVISION CASE NO. 12-2010-CA-000502 BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHERS WHO MAYCLAIM AN INTERESTIN THE ESTATE OF JOHN E. RANIERI; LAURADELL RANIERI; ANGELAC. BIVENS; JOHN DOE and; JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION; Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO the following Defendant(s): THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHERS WHO MAYCLAIM AN INTERESTIN THE ESTATE OF JOHN E. RANIERI (RESIDENCE UNKNOWN) YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: LOT8, SPRINGFIELD ESTATES, PHASE II, ASUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO THE PLATTHEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGE 27 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA. a/k/a ROUTE 22 BOX 876 (JUNE GLEN), LAKE CITY, FLORIDA 32024 has been filed against you and your are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Kahane & Associates, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 8201 Peters Road, Ste. 3000, Plantation, FLORIDA33324 on or before 1/22/2013, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in the LAKE CITYREPORTER and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter, otherwise a default will be entered against you fro the relief demanded in the complaint. If you are a person with a disability who requires accommodations in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of c certain assistance. Individuals with disability who require special accommodations in order to participate in a court proceeding should contact the ADAcoordinator, 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Room 408, Lake City, FL 32055, (386) 719-7428, within two (2) business days of receipt of notice to appear. Individuals who are hearing impaired should call (800) 9558771. Individuals who are voice impaired should call (800) 955-8770. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 19th day of December, 2012. P. DEWITTCASON As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ B. Scippio As Deputy Clerk SEAL 05536470 December 27, 2012 January 3, 2013 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA CIVILACTION CASE NO.: 12-2011-CA-000101 DIVISION: MF WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. ALISSANOVAK, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated December 17, 2012, and entered in Case No. 12-2011-CA000101 of the Circuit Court of the Third Judicial Circuit in and for Columbia County, Florida in which We lls Fargo Bank, NA, is the Plaintiff and Alissa Novak, Brandon Novak, Columbia County, are defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the third floor of the Columbia County Courthouse at 173 N.E. Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055, Columbia County, Florida at 11:00 AM on the 23 day of January, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT2, BLOCK B, SOUTHWOOD Legal MEADOWS, UNITH, ACCORDING TO THE PLATTHEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 6, P AGE 84, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIA, FLORIDA. A/K/A229 SWERIN GLEN, LAKE CITY, FL32024-4950 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Columbia County, Florida this 17 day of December, 2012. Clerk of the Circuit Court Columbia County, Florida By: /s/ B. Scippio Deputy Clerk SEAL 05536458 December 27, 2012 January 3, 2013 020 Lost & Found 2 lost dogs 1 Beagle, brown & white, no collar. 1 Yellow Lab 80 lbs, blk collar. Last seen 12/24 in Ebenezer High Falls Area. Please Contact James Bailey at 755-7958 100 Job Opportunities 05536524 Frito Lay Route Sales $40,000+ Full Time Open House Info Session Jan. 11th Call (386) 867-1913 to RSVP Equal Opportunity Employment M/F/D/V 05536568 Raymond James Financial Services located at First Federal Bank of Florida is currently seeking a full-time "Paraprofessional" Assistant to the branch manager. Fast paced work environment. Minimum requirements include exceptional interpersonal and organizational skills (attention to detail is a must); excellent computer, grammar, and mathematical abilities; and advanced technology skills including Word, Excel and Web based software programs. Salary range $40,000 $48,000. Please email resume to T ammy.Hall@RaymondJames.c om or mail to NWAmerican Lane, Suite 102, Lake City, FL32055. Construction Salesman Needed. Excellent Pay. Experience Required. 866-959-7663 ConsumerLender-SunState FCU Full-Time Position in Lake City. Experience selling financial products, proven customer relations expertise, and lending experience REQUIRED. Great pay and benefits! Application Required and available at www.sunstatefcu.org. Fax to 386-462-4686. DFWP, EOE 100 Job Opportunities Experienced Restaurant Managers Day one medical, dental and vision. Paid vacation, 401K and bonuses. EOE. email resume to: sfl_careers@steaknshake.com Needed CNC Machinist Must be familiar with Lathes and Mills, send resume to Grizzly Mfg. 174 NE Cortez Ter. Lake City FL32055, or Email: guy@qiagroup.com NO PHONE CALLS/WALK-INS Mechanic needed at Fla.Rock & Tank Lines In White Springs. Diesel exprnc reqr'd in maintenance & repair of tractor trailers. 45-50hrs/wk Class A CDLlicense preferred. Excellent Benefits! email: mcomer@patriottrans.com or fax 904-858-9008 Mechanic needed with tools and experience. Southern Specialize Truck & Trailer. 386-752-9754 Must have a minimum of 5 yrs Exp. selling HVAC Equipment. Excellent benefits &Great pay. Call Allen 386-628-1093 Real Estate Co. looking for Office Staff Computer knowledge required. Real Estate Exp. is a plus! Fax resume to 386-496-4309 SALES POSITION A vailable for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 Service Techs & Installers Must be EPA& NATE certified. Excellent benefits & great pay. Call Allen (386) 628-1093 StarTech Computer Center Now hiring Exp Techs. Send resume to: bdj@startech.cc T ruck Repair facility Service W riter needed. Computer literate and understanding of truck repair and parts procurement. Southern Special Truck & Trailer 752-9754 120 Medical Employment CMA experience preferred in Peds/ Family Practice. Experience injections & taking accurate vital signs. Excellent communication & documentation, organization &assessment skills. Fax resume to 758-5628 240 Schools & Education 05536525 Interested in a Medical Career? Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp Nursing Assistant, $479 next class1/7/2013 Phlebotomy national certification, $800 next class-1/14/13 LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310 Pets & Supplies PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 407 Computers HPComputer $75.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 416 Sporting Goods TREADMILLProScan quiet, excellent condition. $250 CASH 386-755-7045 430 Garage Sales PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 440 Miscellaneous Fitness Center Equipment T readmills, Ellipticals, Stair Masters & Bikes Cybex, Nautilus & Free Weight Equipment. T anning Beds, Office Chairs, Desk, Copiers & more. Must sell quick. Call for prices (386)365-2047 or (386)752-1652 630 Mobile Homes forRent 1/1 Cabin $475, Efficiency Apt $350 & Lots for your RVor your own Cabin. Between Lake City & Gville. Access to I-75 & 441 (352)317-1326. RECYCLE YOUR Lake City Reporter P u b l i s h e d M o n t h l y b y t h e Lake City Reporter

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTHURSDAY, JANUARY3, 2013 Classified Department: 755-5440 6B 2001 Dodge Ram 3500V10 Magnum, extended cab, SLT, 4 WD, DRW, AT, PW, PS, red w/tan interior, 137,000 miles, good condition.$7,900386-984-6606 or 386-758-6800 630Mobile Homes forRent2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $700. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 3 BR/1 BA, close to town, fenced in yard, private well $800 month. & $800 deposit 386-752-7578 & 386-288-8401 3 BR/2 BA, completely refurbished, appliances furnished, $795 month. & $795 deposit 386-752-7578 3Br/2Ba Mod 1/2acre (nice subd) concrete drive, wrap around deck appl's,energysaver, &thermo's ready (386) 984-5341 $800 mo Quiet Country Park 3bd/2ba $525, 2bd/1ba $425. Very clean. NO PETS! References & Deposit required 386-758-2280 640Mobile Homes forSale1600 SQFT, 3/2 DWMH, close to town, country setting on 2 ac. Reduced to $49,000 (short sale) Poole Realty 362-4539. MLS 82068 2 MFG HOMES on 5 ACRES! Great for 2 families in Godbold Acres west of Lake City $79,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCY INC. 755-5110 #81421 2013 DOUBLEWIDE $33,995 inc. set-up, trim-out & A/C Call 386-288-8379. 3BR/2BA28X64 in a great location, a lot of upgrades, fireplace. Only $2,500 down $399 a month. Call Paula at 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com 4br 2b open/split floor plan MH w/wood flooring, newly painted, large stone fireplace. MLS 82326 Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $74,000 5 LIKENew Mobile Homes!!! For under $30,000. MUSTSEE Call John T. 386-752-1452 Bank owned, Cozy 1/1 home in Lake C community $55,000. MLS 81365 Poole Realty 362-4539. $55,000 BANK REPO 3BR/2BADoublewide ’09 Excellent condition. Only $999 down $377 a month. Call Paula 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com Breathtaking 80 ac horse ranch w/ 7700 sqft home, heated pool, stocked pond, workout facility MLS 82156 Poole Realty 362-4539. short sale $950,000 CLOSE TO VAMED CTR! 3BR/2BAw/beautiful interior, new CH&A$59,900 DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #81428 EASTSIDE VILLAGE 2BR/2BAw/lg kitchen, open floor plan $79,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #80972 Hardwood floors, formal dining room, great rm, f/p, double car garage. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 MLS 82374 $243,900 Palm HarborHomes New 2013 Models $15K Off All Homes 800-622-2832 ext 210 LIVE OAK! Cute home in city limits; 3BR/1BA& 1,294 SqFt $49,500 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #81410 MUSTSEE 2013 2x6 walls, R30 insulation, OSB wrap, house wrap, real wood cabinets, and thermal pain windows. Payment $399 per month call John T386-752-1452. Results Realty Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 4/2 on 10 Ac home features 2200 heated sqft. 10x20 frame shed. MLS# 76582 $67,500 WANTED…CASH PAID for your Mobile Home, Singlewide or Doublewide flood homes welcome. Call 386-288-8379 WOODGATE VILLAGE Move-in ready! Open 3BR/2BA floor plan on nice shaded lot $49,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC 755-5110 #82259 WOODGATE VILLAGE Nice 3BR/2BADWMH w/fenced yd, workshop; $39,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCY, INC 755-5110 #79078 650Mobile Home & Land2/1 MH, completely remodeled. Custom Floors on 5 ac. w/ 2 stall horse barn. MLS # 79025 $49,900 Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Results Realty 2br/2ba on 3.51 ac, 1512 sqft DW perfect Rental, Lg deck, MLS # 82216 Results Realty Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 $49,900 FSBO 5 ac lot w/ 1995 refurb. MH. 66ft long w/ new roof & wheel chair ramp. $5,000 down Owner Fin. on Balance Approx 5 miles N. of LC. 386-752-4597 Great Value 24 acres, 3/2 DWMH, front porch, full length of MH, open floor plan. MLS 79000. Poole Realty Nelda Hatcher. 688-8067 Hallmark Real Estate $34,400. 3/2 MH in O’Brien. On 4 Ac. Case#091-374923 www.hudhomestore.com Robin Williams (386)365-2135 MLS 81700 Hallmark Real Estate Beautiful 4.38 Ac with 4/2 MH. Master has separate office/den area. Large living room with fireplace. Janet Creel (386)719-0382 MLS#82465 Hallmark Real Estate Beautiful Pasture, fenced for horses, well kept 3/2 M/H Great front & back porch to enjoy nature. Robin Williams (386)365-5146 MLS#80899 Hallmark Real Estate Just Reduced! Home & office over 1900sqft with glassed porch centrally located in town. Janet Creel (386)719-0382 MLS#81207 650Mobile Home & LandHallmark Real Estate Live better for less! 3/2.5 Brick home on an acre. Inground Pool. F/p. Lrg oak trees. S. Columbia County. Ginger Parker(386)365-2135 MLS#81183 Hallmark Real Estate This is it! This 3/2 Home on a corner lot. Close to all amenities. Private fenced backyard. Paula Lawrence (386)623-1973 MLS#79943 OwnerFinanced 3/22.5 ac.River Access. Small down $585 mo 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com SW2BD/1.5BA, 1 acre, Updated Kitchen. $3,500 down, $350 mth Contact 305-304-4028 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05535481We’ve got it all!$89 Deposit Limited Avail. Call Today! Windsong Apts. *Free afterschool program386-758-8455 2br/1ba duplex NWGeorgia Ave. Renovated & energy efficient. Tile floors, W/D, $475/Mo. $300 Dep. 386-755-1937 2br/1ba. Close to town. $580.mo plus deposit. Includes water & sewer. 386-965-2922 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Amberwood Hills Apts. Private Patio area. Beautiful yard. Washer/dryer hkup. Free water & sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special. 386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com BRANFORD VILLAS 386-935-2319 2br/1ba Apts. Now available.$570. mo. TDD number 1-800-955-8771 Equal Housing Opportunity Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2 mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet Friendly. Pool laundry & balcony. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A$530 month $530 deposit garbage included. No pets. 386-344-2170 Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A$530 month $530 deposit garbage included. No pets. 386-344-2170 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Greentree Townhouse Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free water & sewer. Balcony & patio. Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com Large & clean 1br/1ba apt. CH/Alg walk in closet. Close to town. $395. mo and $350. dep. (904)563-6208 Redwine Apartments Pets welcome. with 5 complexes, we have a home for you. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 Wayne ManorApts. Spacious 2bedroom washer/dryer. Behind Kens off Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 www .myflapts.com WindsorArms Apartments. Move in! 2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free 200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 STUDIO APT. FOR RENT All utilities included & Cable, $500 month + $300 sec. deposit. Call 386-697-9950 730Unfurnished Home ForRent3 bedroom 1 bath $630 mth and $630 deposit. CH/A Contact 377-2170 3B/2BA brick,Florida room, fireplace, 2 car carport, Large yard, quiet & private. Country Club Rd. South, $900 mo. 386-365-6228 3bdrm very spacious, 2ba, garage, CH/AFenced in backyard. $1,400 mth & $1,400 dep. Contact 386-344-1914 3bdrm very spacious, 2ba, garage, CH/AFenced in backyard. $1,400 mth & $1,400 dep. Contact 386-344-1914 3br/1.5ba. Very clean, Brick great area w/bonus room. Carport, shed & Fenced (privacy) back yard. $825. mo $825. dep. Ref’s req’d. (941)920-4535 ForLease ,3Br/2bth DWon ten acres S.of Columbia City.Contact At 727-289-2172 $800.00 mo.$350.00 security. NICE 3/2 brick home w/garage in quiet neighborhood. 489 SWBrandy. $900 plus sec. dep. 386-438-4600 750Business & Office RentalsMedical, Retail and Professional Office space on East Baya near Old Country Club Rd. Call 386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622 (cell) 805Lots forSale 2 Ac lot in Timberlake S/D. $135,000 MLS # 79025 Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Results Realty 805Lots forSale 3 Acres in White Springs, Commercial usage, city sewer. Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS $175,000 MLS 82358 Beautiful log home located on 5 ac, well maintained, wrap around porch. MLS 75550 $189,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #80401 $60,000. Must be 55+ 130x750 right on Suwannee, Beautiful lot, minutes from Royal Springs, Denise Bose 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #76668 $32,000 Must be 55+, Buildable lot for site built homes only. In Forest Country. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Great home, Emerald Lakes, well kept, split floor plan, oversized family room, MLS# 79733 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Missy Zecher 623-0237 $169,900 Great starter, corner lot, needs some TLC, close to town MLS 81784 $90,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS 810Home forSale 3br/2ba plus office, 2103 heated sqft, wood floors, large patio MLS # 81984 Swift Creek Realty $229,900 (386) 496-0499 58 Ac, Suwannee County, 3br/2ba newly remodeled horse barns & tack.MLS 81002 Swift Creek Realty $650,000 (386) 496-0499 Access Realty Gorgeous views 3bd/3ba on Lake Montgomery. Elevator, fishing dock & jacuzzi. MLS 81438 $249,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access RealtySpacious 4 bd/3ba Cypress Lake w/ 3643 sqft 1.25 acres on lake. Vaulted ceilings. MLS 81314 $279,900. Patti Taylor386-623-6896 Access RealtyTwo story 1895 Victorian house w/ electrical upgrades throughout. double -deck porches, MLS 71594 $149,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Beautiful 2 story w/ upgrades, open kitchen, granite counter tops, great room w/ stone f/p. MLS 81994 Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $435,000 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Country Home, 3br 3 bath, spacious, close to Suwannee & Santa Fe River MLS 81775, $169,900 Elaine Tolar 755-6488 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty MLS 80175, 4br 3ba & 2.5 ba colonial, 3 fireplaces $315,000 Mary Brown Whitehurst. 965-0887 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty 3br 3ba home with a two story duplex. Owner Financing MLS 80915, Elaine Tolar 365-1548 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Building lots: May-Fair, Cannon Creek, Creek Run & Meadow View. Elaine Tolar 386-365-1548 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Home with 5+ ac 3b 2.5 ba, large kitchen covered deck MLS 81630 Elaine Tolar 365-1548 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty 230 Acres, Col. Co. Paved Rd. 752-4211 MLS 70453 Country home, wood burning f/p, granite counter tops, vaulted ceilings in living room. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 MLS 82022, $240,000 Custom home, located on 6.05 ac. Pecan grove w/ rolling hills in Equestrian Comm. Remax Professionals Missy Zecher 623-0237 $269,000 MLS 81075 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81959 Must be 55+, 2br/2ba, $79,900. Site Built Home w/eat in kitchen, laundry rm, scrn porch. Denise Bose @ 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81958-, $115,000. Must be 55+, 3br/2ba, Site Built w/ lots of room, split plan mstr suite, FL. Rm. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Hallmark Real Estate Brick Home on 6.3 acres 4bd 2.5ba with large 32X20 Deck & Gazebo. Solid wood cabinets Kay Priest(386)365-8888 MLS#82488 Hallmark Real Estate Short Sale Brick home corner lot 2600 SQFT, fenced back yard. Located minutes from town. Paula Lawrence (386)623-1973 MLS 82491 Ichetucknee River 3br/2ba + loft, 1350 sqft. Hardwood floors, f/p, granite counters Swift Creek Realty $399,000 (386) 496-0499 Just listed unique home with 2800 sqft of living space, located on 1.37 acres in Live Oak, MLS 82214, Poole Realty $67,500. 362-4539 Lake Front property w/ 137 ft frontage, eat-in kitchen, screened deck w/ view quality furnishings. MLS 81850 Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $119,000 Open floor plan, covered back patio. Lots of big windows, new carpet & paint, beautiful ceramic tile Century 21 Darby Rogers MLS 82078, 752-6575 Remax Jo Lytte 386-365-2821 Ichetucknee River front 4b/3.5b 2 fireplaces, 2 story home. MLS 81777 $559,000 Ultimate River Experience. Santa Fe River home 2br/2b, granite tops, wood burning heater & open great room. Too many extras to mention. Jo Lytte Remax MLS 81537 $339,000 Spectacular 3br/2b home, great room French doors, 10 aces, w/ barn MLS 79593. Jo Lytte Remax 386-365-2821 $349,800 820Farms & Acreage4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com Access Realty10 acre square tract, High & Dry, OF Avail. w/ 25% down. Convenient Location MLS 81258$39,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access Realty43.64 acres wooded acreage in N.Columbia County. Scenic & Private. MLS 74429 $89,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Owner financed land 1/2 to 10 acre lots. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 940Trucks 2001 Dodge Ram 3500, V10 Magnum, extended cab, SLT, 4 WD, DRW, AT, PW, PS, red w/ tan interior, 137,000 miles, good condition. $7,900. Call 984-6606 or 758-6800