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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:01989

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:01989

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text

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CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Opinion ................ 4ABusiness ................ 5AObituaries .............. 6A Advice & Comics ......... 8B Puzzles ................. 2B TODAY IN PEOPLE Fans to join Beyonce. COMING TUESDAY Local news roundup. 91 64 T-Storm Chance WEATHER, 2A Opinion ................ 4ABusiness ................ 1CObituaries .............. 5AAdvice.................. 5DPuzzles ................. 5B 57 32 Sunny WEATHER, 8A Lake City ReporterSUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | $1.00 LAKECITYREPORTER.COM ‘Cherry’ Brown rememberedin Winfield. The fiscal cliff:Expect hard landing or soft? SUNDAYEDITION Vol. 138, No. 239 3A 3A 1ANATIONAL continued on 7A STATE continued on 7A TOP LOCAL STORIES OF 2012 I n April, North Central Florida ended the driest 12-month period since 1932, according to water manage-ment officials. The following month, Tropical Storm Beryl brought a little relief. Then came Debbie, with her 30-inch deluge — a 500-year event for the region. We are still recovering. In other headlines of 2012, corrections officer Ruben Howard Thomas III was slain by a prisoner at Columbia Correctional Institution; Mountaintop Ministries broke decades of silence with a press conference announcing a new openness, along with a bid for a new charter school; State Attorney Skip Jarvis, under threat of indictment for mis-using state law enforcement data-bases, ended his bid for re-elec-tion; the county’s proposed events center generated heated debate, both on the concept itself as well as the center’s possible place-ment; and career educator Terry Huddleston won a hard-fought race to become superintendent of schools. You’ll find these and many more top stories of 2012 recounted in the pages this edition, our last of the year. Good luck, and have a great 2013. – Editor Debbie ended drought, but took a terrible toll JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterIn this aerial shot, homes in the Calloway subdivision a re seen flooded in the wake of Tropical Storm Debbie in June. Hundreds homeless after rains Before Tropical Storm Beryl struck in May, North Central Florida was in the middle of the worst drought since 1932. Tropical Storm Beryl’s steady rain was called a blessing at the time. But that was just the beginning.One month later Tropical Storm Debby produced rainfall of biblical proportions. Thirty inches of rain fell on Columbia County destroy-ing hundreds of homes and caus-ing tens of millions of dollars in damage. The county commission declared a state of emergency and on July 3, President Barack Obama declared a major disaster area in Baker, Bradford, Columbia, Pasco and Wakulla counties, which allowed for federal money to flow into the area. During the two days that Debby sat over North Central Florida, the Suwannee River rose 32 feet, the fastest two-day rise ever recorded. As of today, the rebuilding process continues. Tropical storm led the headlines in 2012 JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterTwo people are seen standing on Old River Road on Ju ne 27 as floodwaters rush over the roadway. NATIONAL NEW YORK — The horrific massacre of 26 children and staff at a Connecticut elemen-tary school, along with other mass shootings, was the top news story of 2012, narrowly edging out the U.S. election, according to The Associated Press’ annual poll of U.S. edi-tors and news directors. The results followed a rare decision by the AP to re-con-duct the voting. The initial round of bal-loting had ended Dec. 13, a day before the shootings in Newtown, with the election ranked No. 1, followed by Superstorm Sandy. The original entry for mass shoot-ings, focused on the rampage at an Aurora, Colo., movie theater, placed sixth in that voting. In the new poll, updated to account for Newtown, the mass shootings received 68 first-place votes out of 173 bal-lots cast for the top 10 stories, compared to 65 first-place votes for the election – one of the closest results since the AP launched the poll in 1936. On a scale of points ranging STATE By MIKE SCHNEIDERAssociated PressORLANDO — Trayvon Martin’s shooting death was just a blip on the local television news when it was first report-ed on a soggy night in late February. But the questions the 17-year-old’s death raised over the following weeks about gun control, race and equal justice under the law helped make it Florida’s top story of 2012, well ahead of Florida’s election woes which finished second, according to a poll of newspaper editors conducted by The Associated Press. Martin was fatally shot by neighborhood watch volun-teer George Zimmerman dur-ing a confrontation in a gated community in the Orlando suburb, Sanford. Zimmerman has claimed self-defense under Florida’s controversial “stand-your-ground” law, which gives broad legal protection to any-one who says they used dead-ly force because they feared death or great bodily harm. Shooting of teen tops list Zimmerman Newtown,electionsare 2012’stop stories Obama



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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Sunday, December 30, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTSLady Indians take tourney title BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterLEFT : Fort White High players and coaches celebrate after winn ing the Country Christmas Classic in Fort White on Friday. It was the first tournament title in the Lady Indians’ history. RIGHT : Tasha Robinson is congratulated on winning the tournam ent MVP by athletic director John Wilson. Fort White claims Country Christmas Classic Tigers top story of 2012 BRIEFS GAMES Tuesday Q Fort White High girls basketball vs. Keystone Heights High, 6 p.m. Q Columbia High soccer at Suwannee High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Q Fort White High soccer vs. Hamilton County High, 7 p.m. (girls-5) Q Columbia High boys basketball at Wolfson High, 7 p.m. (JV-5:30) Q Fort White High boys basketball at Keystone Heights High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Wednesday Q Columbia High girls weightlifting in sub-sectional meet at Godby High, 3 p.m. Thursday Q Fort White High girls basketball vs. Interlachen High, 6 p.m. Q Fort White High girls soccer at Lafayette High, 7 p.m. Q Fort White High boys soccer at St. Johns Lutheran School, 7 p.m. Q Columbia High girls basketball vs. Lafayette High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Q Fort White High boys basketball at Interlachen High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) CHS SOFTBALL Tryouts set for Jan. 8 Columbia High softball tryouts are 2:45 p.m. Jan. 8 at the CHS field. Participants must meet academic requirements and have completed paperwork. For details, call coach Jimmy Williams at 303-1192. ADULT BASKETBALL Charity games for USSSA youth Richardson Community Center/Annie Mattox North, Inc., is sponsoring the third annual charity basketball games at the Lake City Middle School gym on Jan. 5. The games feature adult women and men teams — Live Oak vs. Lake City. Game times are 6 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Admission is $5, with all proceeds going to the USSSA youth basketball program. For details, call Nicole Smith at 754-7095. WOLVES BASKETBALL Breakfast at Richardson CC The Columbia County Recreation Department and Richardson Middle School is sponsoring a pancake breakfast at the Richardson Community Center cafeteria from 7-11:30 a.m. Jan. 12. The menu will consist of pancakes, Nettles sausage, eggs and orange juice. Tickets are $5 and may be purchased at Richardson Middle School or the Columbia County Recreation Department. All proceeds benefit the boys basketball programs. For details, call Mario Coppock at 754-7095.Q From staff reports By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comFORT WHITE — The Lady Indians of Fort White earned their first piece of hardware in Fort White High history with a 44-36 win over Lafayette High to capture the Country Christmas Classic in Fort White on Friday. Fort White used a 13-1 first quarter that limit-ed Lafayette without a point from the field to cruise to victory. Lafayette’s first basket didn’t come until the four-minute mark of the second quarter. The shot stopped an 18-1 run by the Lady Indians to open the game. “We preach defense every day,” Fort White head coach DeShay Harris said. “The girls always say we need to play LDD — lock down defense.” The Lady Indians also had pretty good offense from Tasha Robinson in the first half of the contest. Robinson — who scored 50 points in the opening two games of the tournament to help Fort White reach the championship — scored 10 points in the first half on to help the Lady Indians to a 21-11 lead. Robinson fin-ished with 13 in the game after missing much of the second half after bump-ing heads with a Lafayette player. “She can carry us,” Harris said. With Robinson down in the second half, Kasha Cook took over and scored nine points. She had 10 in the contest. “I tell her every day that nobody on the court is as tall as her and that she can dominate,” Harris said. “Today, she was playing with confidence.” But it was a total-team effort for Fort White. Cenise Armstong opened the game with back-to-back three-point shots for the Lady Indians and scored nine points in the contest. Rykia Jackson ran the point well to the tune of eight points, Desma Blake had three points and Khadijah Ingram pitched in two points. The collective effort earned Fort White High its first tournament title in school history in the sec-ond year of the Country Christmas Classic. “It’s awesome for our team,” Harris said. “This is a great tournament and we had a great weekend.” Fort White improved to 9-5 (2-4, district) on the year with the win. The Lady Indians will return to action when they host Interlachen at 6 p.m. on Tuesday in Fort White. CHS continued on 2B Columbia football dominates this year’s headlines. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Ronald Timmons breaks into the open fi eld in the Tigers’ final game of the 2012 season agains t Navarre High. By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High not only dominated on the field in 2012, but the Tigers’ foot-ball team captured the heart of Columbia to become the Lake City Reporter’s Sports Story of the Year. The Tigers were strong from the start and fin-ished with an 11-2 record. Columbia advanced to the Region 1 final against Navarre High before falling 28-21 against the Pirates. The Tigers had 17 senior starters, which helped Columbia have its most suc-cessful season since 2003. Ronald Timmons led the group by setting a new single-season record for rushing with 1,771 yards on the season. The previous record held by Don London had stood for 15 years. “He’s someone that I will always remember,” Columbia head coach Brian Allen said after the season was over. He wasn’t the only running back that produced for the Tigers, however, as a group known as the three-headed monster rushed for 3,720 yards in 2012. Braxton Stockton and Lonnie Underwood made up the rest of the rushing machine. It was a season of both high points and heartache, however, as the Tigers



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By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com M ost small, familyrun businesses never have the opportunity to celebrate more than 50 years serving their com munities. For the past year, Vann Carpet One has had the opportu nity to celebrate being a commu nity business for 65 years. In this day and time, celebrat ing being open is a success story for most small independent retail establishments, said Marc Vann, co-owner of Vann Carpet One, with his brother, Paul Vann Jr. To know that our father and grand father opened this store July 5, 1947, right on the square down town, is something we think we should be proud of. The establishment formerly known as Brown-Vann Paint Store, but today as Vann Carpet One, sells all types of floor coverings, including carpet, ceramic tiles, wood, laminates, vinyl and bam boo floors. Austin E. Brown and Samuel P. Brown, Vanns grandfather and father, respectively, began the business as a general merchan dise and hardware store. Back then their store was located on the downtown square. When they opened up they thought that was the best spot in all of Columbia County, because everybody that came to shop in Lake City, came downtown, Vann said. We were the very first store when you crossed U.S. Highway 90. Austin E. Brown sold Glidden paint during World War II and he and Samuel Vann purchased the general merchandise store so they could turn it into a hardware and paint store. In the 1950s the store began to sell vinyl and other kinds of floor ing tiles and as the business con tinued to grow, it moved more and more toward decorating products and floor coverings and less of the general merchandise items. Vann said there are several key components to the establishments longevity as an independent busi ness in a small community. 1CBIZ FRONT ON BUSINESS Jerry Osteryoung (850) 644-3372 jostery@comcast.net To disregard what the world thinks of us is not only arrogant but utterly shameless. Marcus Tullius Cicero R eputation is one of the most valuable things a business has. It is what persuades customers to either try a new business or come back to one they have worked with in the past, and at the heart of this vital component is trust. Reputation is a tenuous thing. It is so easily dam aged so you must always be on guard to ensure this does not happen. A physician was looking for a firm who could pro vide financing to help his patients with services not covered by insurance. The firm he selected agreed to offer each of his patients 0% interest for the first 12 months. However, there was much the physician did not know about this firm. One day, this physician had a patient come in and tell him that she had tried to call this lender for two Protect your firms name Lake City Reporter 1CBIZ FRONT Week of Dec. 30, 2012-Jan. 5, 2013 www.lakecityreporter.com Section C Columbia, Inc. Your marketplace source for Lake City and Columbia County 1CColumbia Inc. Heres to a healthy you in 2013. Flex Plan Remember, your Flex Plan Insurance covers Eye Care... Use it or lose it... come in before the end of the year Lake City Lake City Commons Center (Publix Shopping) 752-3733 CONTA C TS EY E EXAM S by Independent O ptometrist 2 Complete Pair Eyeglasses $ 119 Includes Lenses & Frames Some Restrictions Apply. COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES D EC 31, 2012 NOW FREE GL A SSES FREE P A IR OF GL A SSES Buy one complete pair of glasses at regular price & receive a Some Restrictions Apply. COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES D EC 31, 2012 $ 99 1 Pair Eyeglasses I ncludes lenses & frames. Some Restrictions Apply. COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES D EC 31, 2012 NOW Where you get the Best for Less Ask about Care Credit Same Day Service Includes Saturday RISK continued on 2C Reason to celebrate TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter Co-owner Marc Vann (left) stands with his nephew Matt Vann (center) and his son Marc Vann Jr. on the display floor at Vann Carpet One at 131 W. Duval St. The business has been a community staple for more than 65 years. Vann Carpet One has been serving Lake City for 65 years. Stocks prospects look good for 13 By STEVE ROTHWELL AP Business Writer NEW YORK It may be a big if, but assuming Washington lawmakers can get past the fiscal cliff, many analysts say that the outlook for stocks next year is good, as a recov ering housing market and an improving jobs outlook helps the economy main tain a slow, but steady STOCKS continued on 2C VANN continued on 2C



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LIFE Sunday, December 30, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section D A rriving in Amarillo, Texas, Sue began to sing “Amarillo by morning …” We pulled into the parking lot and Sue says, “You’ve got to be kidding me.” The Big Texan Ranch and Motel is NOT all that. I’ll follow up this statement by saying that we both had the opportunity to research the locale on line and both opted to stay for the experi-ence alone. What were we thinking? The external facade is quaint and charming, with the freshly painted bright colors resembling Main Street of an old western town and a swing next to the office. When I checked in, my first clues as to the type of establishment we were staying at should have sent up red flags — from paying in advance for the room (about $40) then getting the key. Yes, key. Not a swipe card, but a key on a ring with a dia-mond-shaped key tag with our room number on it. The interior leaves much to be desired, and entering the room was a real treat. I went in first, scanned the room and walked out shak-ing my head. I knew then why you paid in advance. I didn’t want to ruin Sue’s first impression, so let her see for herself. The room is very small, two double beds and bathroom. We have floral carpet, brown and white cow-hide print bedspreads, a mural on the wall we can’t even explain but resembles an old wagon trail, then your eyes make their way back towards the bathroom where you find wooden saloon doors — no real bathroom door — with an old, tan fiberglass tub and shower with a Texas themed shower curtain, concrete block walls, a door you can see daylight through, wooden shutters (barn style) for window coverings. Then we noticed the table and chairs under the window, which held the ... fly swatter! What? Yep, a fly swatter. I guess it was an important amenity in this part of the country… and Sue began chasing phantom bugs all over the room. Next door to the motel was the Big Texan Steak Ranch Restaurant. So after a glass of wine in our “front porch swing,” we walked over to the restaurant for dinner (steaks) and more wine. The restaurant was dark and somewhat dingy, but we found a table next to a window. The place is filled with taxidermy all along the walls. The res-taurant is famous for the free 72 oz. steak — IF you can eat it and all the sides within one hour. There were two guys attempting Texas motel missesmark Story ideas?ContactRobert BridgesEditor754-0428rbridges@lakecityreporter.com Lake City Reporter1DLIFE TRAVEL TALES Sandy KishtonBy SAMANTHA HENRYAssociated PressM ONTCLAIR, N.J.— During stressful times as a combat medic in Afghanistan, Mason Sullivan found solace in Vivaldi. New Jersey native Nairobi Cruz was comforted by country music, a genre she had never heard before joining the Army. For Jose Mercedes, it was an eclectic iPod mix that helped him cope with losing an arm during a tour of duty in Iraq. These three young veterans all say music played a crucial role in alleviating the stress-es of active duty. Now, all three are enrolled in a program that hopes to use music to ease their reintegration into civilian life. “It’s a therapy session without the ‘sit down, lay down, and write notes,’” Mercedes, 26, of Union City, said of the music program. “It’s different — it’s an alternative that’s way better.” The pilot program, called Voices of Valor, has veterans work as a group to synthesize their experiences into musical lyrics. Guided by musicians and a psychology mentor, they write and record a song, and then hold a CD release party. The program is currently under way at Montclair State University, where stu-dents participate through the school’s veteran affairs program. Developed by husband and wife team Rena Fruchter and Brian Dallow, it is open to veterans of any age and background. No musical experience is required. Both accomplished musicians, Fruchter and Dallow created the program as part of Music for All Seasons, an organization they founded which runs musical programs for audiences at places ranging from nursing homes to prisons. Based on their experiences working with children at shelters for victims of domestic violence, Fruchter and Dallow realized that young people too traumatized to talk about what they had been through were neverthe-less willing to bang on an instrument or sing — often leading to communication break-throughs. They felt the same might be true for veterans, or other populations traditionally averse to more overt forms of ‘talk therapy.’ “We’ve had situations in which veterans have been carrying their burdens deep inside for such a long time, and they come into this group and they begin to talk about things that they’ve never talked about before,” Fruchter said. “They really open up, and it translates into some music that is really amazing and incredible and powerful.” During a recent session of the eight-week program in Montclair, music facilitators Jennifer Lampert, a former Miss USO, and Julio Fernandez, a musician and member of the band Spyro Gyra, lead a small group of young veterans in brainstorming about their W e have become such a society of “use it and toss it” consumers, and it is so evident this time of year. The roadsides are lined with boxes and trash cans full of colorful holiday discards on trash collection day. I remember the days when Mother carefully smoothed and folded our happily strewn Christmas wrapping paper for use the next year. She could never throw away perfectly fine paper. And there was always a bag of used ribbons and bows for future holiday wrapping. The website www.earth911.org is all about “waste-less living” and is full of recycling and repurpos-ing ideas that keep many useable items from ending up in landfills. The live Christmas tree that you enjoyed through the holidays is bio-degradable, but it will take up room and decompose very slowly in the landfill. According to the Florida Christmas Tree Association, nearly 30 million real trees are sold annually across the country. Check out the ways you can recycle that tree before you pull it to the curb for pickup. Many of our famous trees are now being recycled. Since 2007, the 65-foot Rockefeller Center Christmas tree has been recycled in January at the end of its term as a bright symbol of holiday cheer. It is milled into lumber and becomes part of Habitat for Humanity homes. Prior to 2007, it had been mulched and donated to the Boy Scouts of America. To keep your tree from clogging the landfill, try repurposing this year when the tree comes down. Cut the branches from the trunk and lay them over perennial beds for winter insulation. The branches or the entire tree can be used as a “habitat house” for wildlife by making a pile out in the back yard for birds and small animals. Cut the trunk up for a nice little bonfire on a cool winter evening. If you have a chipper or know someone who has one, chip the tree for pathway or garden mulch. Many communities have tree collection sites and will recycle Christmas trees for you. According to www.earth911.org, there are two sites in our area, Evacheks and Suwannee County Landfill and Recycling Center, which will accept and mulch Christmas trees. The Suwannee County facility will only accept their county residents’ trees, how-ever. We can all benefit by being a little bit more like Mother.Many ways to repurpose Christmas trees GARDEN TALK Nichelle Demorestdndemorest@ufl.eduRelieving war’s stress Voices of Valor program helps vets cope with life c hanges Q D. Nichelle Demorest is a horticulture agent with the Columbia County Extension of the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOSMusician Julio Fernandez plays a guitar during a clas s session at Montclair State University in Montclair, N.J. S tudents are participating in a music class for service men and women that helps them cope with their life after the military through a program called Voices of Valor. MUSIC continued on 3D Music used as therapy for service men, women as they transition from military. TRAVEL continued on 3D Army Sgt. Thomas Springsteen stands near a window to down load music onto his phone during a Voices of Valor class session at Montclair State Univers ity in Montclair, N.J.



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PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Actor Joseph Bologna is 78. Actor Russ Tamblyn is 78. Singer Noel Paul Stookey of Peter, Paul and Mary is 75. Singer Mike Nesmith of The Monkees is 70. Singer Patti Smith is 66. TV host Meredith Vieira (Today, The View) is 59. CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading. AROUND FLORIDA Friday: 6-10-22-38 14 Friday: 3-6-16-17-28 Saturday: Afternoon: 3-6-2 Evening: N/A Saturday: Afternoon: 6-7-6-7 Evening: N/A Wednes day: 1-6-22-24-32-48 x5 Report: FAMU ignored hazing rules before death TALLAHASSEE A blistering state report released Friday con tends that Florida A&M University officials failed to follow state laws and regulations on hazing in the years leading up to the death of a FAMU drum major. A 32-page report from the Florida Board of Governors inspector gen erals office concludes that the school lacked internal controls to prevent or detect hazing, citing a lack of communication among top university officials, the police department and the office responsible for disci plining students. But investigators said there was insufficient evi dence to conclude whether university officials ignored allegations of hazing given to them by the former director of The Marching 100 band shortly before the November 2011 death of Robert Champion. Larry Robinson, FAMUs interim president, said the university would officially review the report for any inaccuracies, but noted there were no new incidents detailed in the report. Still, he said the university would use the report to make sure that it had taken appropriate steps to prevent future hazing incidents. What I want to focus on is what we are doing at the university to minimize the chances of things happen ing again, Robinson said. The report comes at a critical time for FAMU. Earlier this month a regional accrediting organization placed the school on probation for 12 months. The university has one year to prove it is turning itself around or its accreditation could be revoked. FAMU officials say they have already made sweep ing changes in the after math of Champions death, which also resulted in the retirement of the band director and the resigna tion of the university presi dent. The Marching 100 band remains suspended, but when it is reinstated band members will have to meet strict new eligibility requirements, including a minimum grade point average. Do Not Call violations top list TALLAHASSEE Do Not Call violations top the list of consumer com plaints in Florida for the fourth straight year. The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services reported Friday that it received 17,337 complaints in the 2012 calendar year from citizens who received unwanted calls despite being on the states Do Not Call list. Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam said more than 330,000 numbers have been added to Floridas Do Not Call List since it became available at no cost to Floridians as a result of a measure passed during the 2012 legisla tive session increasing subscriptions five-fold. He noted that more than $3.8 million was recovered on behalf of Florida consum ers in 2012. Albeit far below the Do Not Call violations, tele marketing calls finished second on the list with 4,159 complaints. 3 elected officials suspended SOUTH BAY Three elected officials in a small city located at the southern end of Lake Okeechobee have been suspended from office after being charged with Sunshine Law violations. The Palm Beach Post reports that Gov. Rick Scott suspended South Bay Mayor Shirley WalkerTurner, vice mayor Linda Johnson and commis sioner John Wilson earlier this month. Prosecutors say the officials made a behindthe-scenes deal to pay city manager Corey Alston $25,139 for 498 hours in unused vacation pay. Alton has been charged with grand theft and placed on administrative leave. Also, Longtime city attorney Thomas Montgomery abruptly resigned after commis sioners accused him of not providing sufficient legal advice on how to avoid Sunshine Law violations. Only two commissioners remain in office. Kid eats crack, woman arrested SPRING HILL Sheriffs officials say a north Florida woman faces child abuse charges when a 9-year-old child in her care got sick after eating a piece of crack cocaine. Hernando County Fire Rescue officials responded to Kimberly Losurdos home Thursday after the child began having convul sions. The Tampa Tribune reported the child was taken to a hospital where blood tests revealed crack cocaine in the blood stream. A report says the child ate an irregular shaped, rock-like substance on Christmas Day. The childs condition started deterio rating shortly after. The Tribune reports Losurdo told deputies the child had been at the residence for five to seven days. She said the child probably found the crack and thought it was candy. The Department of Children and Families took custody of the child. Teen takes gun into theater JACKSONVILLE A 17-year-old from Jacksonville faces sev eral charges following his arrest for taking a loaded gun into a movie theater on Christmas night. The Florida TimesUnion reported Friday that an off-duty officer working security at the AMC movie theater at the Orange Park Mall spotted the teen when he went into a theater through an exit. When the teen couldnt produce a ticket, the offi cer told him to leave and not to return. According to a sheriffs report, the teen wouldnt leave. Then he tried to get away but the office handcuffed him. The teen told the officer he had a gun in his waistband. Hes charged with car rying a concealed firearm, resisting arrest and tres passing. Hes also charged for three active warrants for failure to appear in court. Felon shot by police dies FORT PIERCE Authorities say a con victed felon who was shot by police last week dur ing a drug deal in central Florida has died. The St. Lucie County Sheriffs Office reports that 47-year-old John Donald Augstgen Jr. died at a hospital Wednesday. Authorities said a Fort Pierce police officer and a St. Lucie County deputy, who were both working undercover, interrupted a drug deal on Dec. 19. While trying to get away, authorities said, Augstgen tried to hit the officers with a pickup truck, prompting the officers to open fire. Scripps Treasure Coast Newspapers reported that Augstgen had a criminal record dating to 1984 that included drug crimes, high-speed fleeing and eluding, assault on a law enforcement officer and aggravated assault with a deadly weapon. Red tide kills thousands of fish SARASOTA Officials say red tide is responsible for thousands of dead fish that have washed up along the beaches in Sarasota and Charlotte counties. The Sarasota HeraldTribune reported the dead fish started washing ashore on Monday. Crews spent Thursday afternoon cleaning the beaches along Blind Pass, Manasota and Englewood Beach. Sarasota park and rec reation director George Tatge called the red tide outbreak significant. He said most of the dead fish are large mullet. Tatge suspected a large school of mullet likely got caught up in a red tide bloom and washed ashore thanks to strong wind from the west. Officials said the beach es are safe. But people with asthma or chronic respiratory issues should be wary of the red tide conditions. NEW YORK A ll the single ladies and fellas will have a chance to join Beyonce on the field at the Super Bowl. Pepsi announced Friday that fans will introduce the Grammy-winning diva when she takes the stage Feb. 3 at New Orleans Mercedes-Benz Superdome. A contest that kicks off Saturday will allow fans to submit photos of themselves in various poses, including head bopping, feet tapping and hip shaking. Those pic tures will be used in a TV ad to air ahead of Beyonces halftime perfor mance, and 50 of those who submit photos along with a friend will be selected to introduce the singer. Photo contest details are at www. pepsi.com/halftime. The contest ends Jan. 19, but Jan. 11 is the cutoff date for those interested in introduc ing Beyonce. FBI releases less-edited Marilyn Monroe file LOS ANGELES FBI files on Marilyn Monroe that could not be located earlier this year have been found and re-issued, reveal ing the names of some of the movie stars communistleaning friends who drew concern from government officials and her own entourage. But the records, which previously had been heavily redacted, do not contain any new information about Monroes death 50 years ago. Letters and news clippings included in the files show the bureau was aware of theories the actress had been killed, but they do not show that any effort was undertaken to investigate the claims. Los Angeles authorities con cluded Monroes death was a prob able suicide. Recently obtained by The Associated Press through the Freedom of Information Act, the updated FBI files do show the extent the agency was monitoring Monroe for ties to communism in the years before her death in August 1962. The records reveal that some in Monroes inner circle were con cerned about her association with Frederick Vanderbilt Field, who was disinherited from his wealthy family over his leftist views. A trip to Mexico earlier that year to shop for furniture brought Monroe in contact with Field, who was living in the country with his wife in self-imposed exile. Informants reported to the FBI that a mutual infatuation had developed between Field and Monroe, which caused concern among some in her inner circle, including her therapist, the files state. The AP had sought the removal of redactions from Monroes FBI files earlier this year as part of a series of stories on the 50th anniversary of Monroes death. The FBI had reported that it had transferred the files to a National Archives facility in Maryland, but archivists said the documents had not been received. A few months after requesting details on the transfer, the FBI released an updated version of the files that eliminate dozens of redactions. Ryan Seacrest: Rockin in another year on ABC NEW YORK Yes, Ryan Seacrest has a New Years resolution for 2013: improve his skill at dancing. Theres a signifi cant other in my life whos very good at it, he notes. That would be professional dancer Julianne Hough, a two-time champ on Dancing with the Stars in whose proximity I feel the pres sure to be as good as she is. It sounds like a joke, but this is a seri ous thing for me to accomplish next year. So add dancing lessons to the long list of projects that keep Seacrest famously fast on his feet. His numer ous broadcast gigs include roles on E! Entertainment and NBC, a syndi cated morning radio show for Clear Channel, as well as American Idol. Fans to join Beyonce at Super Bowl W ednes day: 11-13-23-43-54 PB 4 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter 2A Daily Scripture [Jesus said to his disciples] Do not let your hearts be troubled. You believe in God; believe also in me. My Fathers house has many rooms; if that were not so, would I have told you that I am going there to prepare a place for you? And if I go and prepare a place for you, I will come back and take you to be with me that you also may be where I am. John 14:1-3 ASSOCIATED PRESS Beyonce, seen here during a Pepsi photo shoot in New York, will have 100 fans join her onstage during the singers halftime show at the Super Bowl on Feb. 3 in New Orleans. Winners will be picked through a Pepsi photo contest. Associated Press Associated Press Monroe Seacrest



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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today NFL FOOTBALL 1 p.m. CBS — Regional coverage, doubleheader FOX — Regional coverage, doubleheader 4:25 p.m. CBS — Regional coverage, doubleheader game FOX — Regional coverage, doubleheader game 8:20 p.m. NBC — Dallas at Washington Monday COLLEGE FOOTBALL Noon ESPN — Music City Bowl, NC State vs. Vanderbilt, at Nashville, Tenn. 2 p.m. CBS — Sun Bowl, Southern Cal vs. Georgia Tech, at El Paso, Texas 3:30 p.m. ESPN — Liberty Bowl, Iowa St. vs. Tulsa, at Memphis, Tenn. 7:30 p.m. ESPN — Chick-Fil-A Bowl, LSU vs. Clemson, at Atlanta MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL Noon ESPN2 — Cincinnati at Pittsburgh 2 p.m. ESPN2 — Michigan St. at Minnesota 4 p.m. ESPN2 — Indiana at Iowa 6 p.m. ESPN2 — Gonzaga at Oklahoma St. 8 p.m. ESPN2 — Harvard at Saint Mary’s (Cal) NBA BASKETBALL 3 p.m. WGN — Charlotte at Chicago Tuesday COLLEGE FOOTBALL Noon ESPN2 — Gator Bowl, Mississippi St. vs. Northwestern, at Jacksonville, Fla. 1 p.m. ABC — Capital One Bowl, Georgia vs. Nebraska, at Orlando, Fla. ESPN — Outback Bowl, South Carolina vs. Michigan, at Tampa Bay, Fla. 5:07 p.m. ESPN — Rose Bowl, Wisconsin vs. Stanford, at Pasadena, Calif. 8:37 p.m. ESPN — Orange Bowl, N. Illinois vs. Florida St., at MiamiFOOTBALLNFL standings AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAy-New England 11 4 0 .733 529 331 Miami 7 8 0 .467 288 289 N.Y. Jets 6 9 0 .400 272 347 Buffalo 5 10 0 .333 316 426 South W L T Pct PF PAy-Houston 12 3 0 .800 400 303x-Indianapolis 10 5 0 .667 329 371 Tennessee 5 10 0 .333 292 451Jacksonville 2 13 0 .133 235 406 North W L T Pct PF PAy-Baltimore 10 5 0 .667 381 321x-Cincinnati 9 6 0 .600 368 303 Pittsburgh 7 8 0 .467 312 304 Cleveland 5 10 0 .333 292 344 West W L T Pct PF PAy-Denver 12 3 0 .800 443 286San Diego 6 9 0 .400 326 329Oakland 4 11 0 .267 269 419Kansas City 2 13 0 .133 208 387 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAWashington 9 6 0 .600 408 370Dallas 8 7 0 .533 358 372 N.Y. Giants 8 7 0 .533 387 337 Philadelphia 4 11 0 .267 273 402 South W L T Pct PF PAy-Atlanta 13 2 0 .867 402 277New Orleans 7 8 0 .467 423 410 Tampa Bay 6 9 0 .400 367 377 Carolina 6 9 0 .400 313 325 North W L T Pct PF PAy-Green Bay 11 4 0 .733 399 299Minnesota 9 6 0 .600 342 314Chicago 9 6 0 .600 349 253Detroit 4 11 0 .267 348 411 West W L T Pct PF PAx-San Francisco 10 4 1 .700 370 260x-Seattle 10 5 0 .667 392 232 St. Louis 7 7 1 .500 286 328 Arizona 5 10 0 .333 237 330 x-clinched playoff spot; y-clinched division Today’s Games Jacksonville at Tennessee, 1 p.m.Carolina at New Orleans, 1 p.m.N.Y. Jets at Buffalo, 1 p.m.Baltimore at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.Cleveland at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.Houston at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.Philadelphia at N.Y. Giants, 1 p.m.Chicago at Detroit, 1 p.m.Tampa Bay at Atlanta, 1 p.m.Oakland at San Diego, 4:25 p.m.Arizona at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.St. Louis at Seattle, 4:25 p.m.Kansas City at Denver, 4:25 p.m.Green Bay at Minnesota, 4:25 p.m.Miami at New England, 4:25 p.m.Dallas at Washington, 8:20 p.m. NFL calendar Jan. 5-6 — Wild-card playoff games.Jan. 12-13 — Divisional playoff games.Jan. 20 — AFC and NFC championship games. Jan. 27 — Pro Bowl, Aloha Stadium, Honolulu. Feb. 3 — Super Bowl, Superdome, New OrleansCollege bowl games New Mexico Bowl Arizona 49, Nevada 48Famous Idaho Potato BowlUtah State 41, Toledo 15 Poinsettia Bowl BYU 23, San Diego State 6 Beef ’O’ Brady’s Bowl UCF 38, Ball State 17 New Orleans Bowl Louisiana-Lafayette 43, E. Carolina 34 Las Vegas Bowl Boise State 28, Washington 26 Hawaii Bowl SMU 43, Fresno State 10 Little Caesars Pizza Bowl Central Michigan vs. Western Kentucky (n) Thursday Military Bowl San Jose State 29, Bowling Green 20 Belk Bowl Cincinnati 48, Duke 34 Holiday Bowl Baylor 49, UCLA 26 Friday Independence Bowl Ohio 45, Louisiana-Monroe 14 Russell Athletic Bowl Virginia Tech 13, Rutgers 10, OT Meineke Car Care Bowl Texas Tech 34, Minnesota 31 Saturday Armed Forces Bowl Rice 33, Air Force 14 Fight Hunger Bowl Arizona State 62, Navy 28 Pinstripe Bowl Syracuse 38, West Virginia 14 Alamo Bowl At San AntonioTexas vs. Orgeon State (n) Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl At Tempe, Ariz.Michigan State vs. TCU (n) Monday Music City Bowl At Nashville, Tenn.Vanderbilt (8-4) vs. N.C. State (7-5), Noon (ESPN) Sun Bowl At El Paso, TexasGeorgia Tech (6-7) vs. Southern Cal (7-5), 2 p.m. (CBS) Liberty Bowl At Memphis, Tenn.Iowa State (6-6) vs. Tulsa (10-3), 3:30 p.m. (ESPN) Chick-fil-A Bowl At AtlantaLSU (10-2) vs. Clemson (10-2), 7:30 p.m. (ESPN) Tuesday Heart of Dallas Bowl At DallasPurdue (6-6) vs. Oklahoma State (7-5), Noon (ESPNU) Gator Bowl At JacksonvilleMississippi State (8-4) vs. Northwestern (9-3), Noon (ESPN2) Capital One Bowl At OrlandoGeorgia (11-2) vs. Nebraska (10-3), 1 p.m. (ABC) Outback Bowl At TampaSouth Carolina (10-2) vs. Michigan (8-4), 1 p.m. (ESPN) Rose Bowl At Pasadena, Calif.Stanford (11-2) vs. Wisconsin (8-5), 5 p.m. (ESPN) Orange Bowl At MiamiNorthern Illinois (12-1) vs. Florida State (11-2), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN) Wednesday Sugar Bowl At New OrleansFlorida (11-1) vs. Louisville (10-2), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN) Thursday, Jan. 3 Fiesta Bowl At Glendale, Ariz.Kansas State (11-1) vs. Oregon (11-1), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN) Friday, Jan. 4 Cotton Bowl At Arlington, TexasTexas A&M (10-2) vs. Oklahoma (10-2), 8 p.m. (FOX) Saturday, Jan. 5 BBVA Compass Bowl At Birmingham, Ala.Pittsburgh (6-6) vs. Mississippi (6-6), 1 p.m. (ESPN) Sunday, Jan. 6 GoDaddy.com Bowl At Mobile, Ala.Kent State (11-2) vs. Arkansas State (9-3), 9 p.m. (ESPN) Monday, Jan. 7 BCS National Championship At MiamiNotre Dame (12-0) vs. Alabama (12-1), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN)FCS Championship Saturday, Jan. 5 At FC Dallas StadiumFrisco, TexasNorth Dakota State (13-1) vs. Sam Houston State (11-3), 1 p.m.BASKETBALLNBA schedule Friday’s Games Indiana 97, Phoenix 91Washington 105, Orlando 97Atlanta 102, Cleveland 94Brooklyn 97, Charlotte 81Detroit 109, Miami 99Toronto 104, New Orleans 97, OTDenver 106, Dallas 85San Antonio 122, Houston 116L.A. Clippers 116, Utah 114Sacramento 106, New York 105Golden State 96, Philadelphia 89L.A. Lakers 104, Portland 87 Saturday’s Games Indiana at Atlanta (n)New Orleans at Charlotte (n)Toronto at Orlando (n)Cleveland at Brooklyn (n)Washington at Chicago (n)Oklahoma City at Houston (n)Denver at Memphis (n)Phoenix at Minnesota (n)Miami at Milwaukee (n)Philadelphia at Portland (n)Boston at Golden State (n) Today’s Games San Antonio at Dallas, 7:30 p.m.Milwaukee at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.Boston at Sacramento, 9 p.m.Utah at L.A. Clippers, 9:30 p.m. Monday’s Games Charlotte at Chicago, 3 p.m.Memphis at Indiana, 3 p.m.Miami at Orlando, 5 p.m.Atlanta at Houston, 7 p.m.Brooklyn at San Antonio, 7 p.m.Phoenix at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012 2BSPORTS CHS: Football is 2012 story of year Continued From Page 1B advanced to the Region 1 final. Columbia advanced to the Region 1 final for the first time since 2003 and served up revenge against Bartram Trail and Ridgeview high schools. In 2011, those two schools cost the Tigers the district title and knocked Columbia out of the play-offs. In 2012, Columbia reversed those fortunes. But all good things must come to an end and the Tigers season ended in a heartbreaker. Columbia battled back from a 21-0 deficit before Timmons tied the game on the opening play of the second half with a 65-yard touchdown run. It wasn’t to be however as Navarre would take home the win when Jay Warren scored from eight yards away to knock Columbia out of the playoffs. “I think we set the bar really high,” senior line-backer Felix Woods said after the game. “I’m proud of the guys and I think we’re going to be ready to make another run next year.” Woods won’t be on the field next year, but he makes up one of the graduating seniors that will always be known as Tigers. Also graduating are quarterback Jayce Barber, left tackle Laremy Tunsil and defensive end Javere Smith. Each player has a chance to play college with Barber already committed to play at Jacksonville State and Tunsil as the top-rated tack-le in the nation. Smith has offers to play from a host of schools. While the Tigers are the 2012 story of the year, Columbia will look to make even bigger headlines in 2013. BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Jayce Barber avoids a sack int he Ti gers’ 34-8 win against St. Augustine High in the Class 6A regional semifinal earlier this y ear. Orange roll West VirginiaAssociated PressNEW YORK — PrinceTyson Gulley ran for 217 yards and had three touch-downs, Syracuse scored twice on safeties and the Orange bid a snow-covered farewell to the Big East with a 38-14 victory over West Virginia in the Pinstripe Bowl on Saturday. Syracuse (8-5) will enter the Atlantic Coast Conference on a roll after finishing this season with six wins in its last seven games, capped by its sec-ond postseason victory at Yankee Stadium in the last three years. In a bowl game played in a baseball stadium with weather better suited for a playoff game in Green Bay, the team that plays in a dome ended up being bet-ter equipped to handle the elements. The Orange leaned on their running game to plow through former Big East rival West Virginia (7-6) and the snow. Jerome Smith added 158 yards rushing. Geno Smith connected with Stedman Bailey for two touchdown passes, but the Mountaineers’ quarter-back also was sacked in the end zone in the first half and called for intentional grounding in the end zone in the second half as he tried to avoid another sack. Smith, an early Heisman Trophy front-runner as the Mountaineers got off to a 5-0 start, was 18 for 26 for 197 yards in the final game of his record-breaking career. Syracuse’s Ryan Nassib threw two touchdown pass-es and an interception. FIGHT HUNGER BOWL ARIZONA STATE 62, NAVY 28SAN FRANCISCO — Taylor Kelly threw four touchdown passes and ran for a fifth score to help Arizona State rout Navy in the Fight Hunger Bowl for the Sun Devils’ first bowl win in seven years. Offensive MVP Marion Grice ran for 159 yards and two touchdowns for the Sun Devils (8-5), who used their fast-paced spread offense to score touchdowns on their first nine possessions. That helped provided a bright end to a successful first season at Arizona State for coach Todd Graham, who helped the Sun Devils win their most games since 2007 and win a bowl for the first time since the 2005 Insight Bowl against Rutgers. ARMED FORCES BOWL RICE 33, AIR FORCE 14FORT WORTH, Texas — Freshman Driphus Jackson threw for 264 yards in relief injured starter Taylor McHargue, includ-ing two touchdown passes to Jordan Taylor, and Rice beat Air Force in the Armed Forces Bowl. Jackson’s first series after taking over for McHargue ended with a bad pitch for a fumble near the goal line only 2 seconds before half-time, when the Owls (7-6) trailed 14-7. But Jackson made up for it after halftime, when Rice scored 26 straight points. Taylor caught nine passes for 153 yards, with a 16-yard TD pass from McHargue in the first quarter. McHargue left because of an apparent head injury after a helmet-to-helmet collision with about 5 minutes left in the first half.



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weeks with no response. She was really upset because, while dealing with a major illness in her family, she had been just two days late on one payment and the firm raised her interest rate to 30 percent. The high interest rate was more than enough to upset this patient, but they had also made the rate retroactive to the start of the loan, which pushed her over the edge. At first, the physician was baffled about why this patient would bother him with her beef with the lender. She cleared this up very quickly by politely — or somewhat politely — telling him that she only went with this firm because of his recommen-dation and he had signifi-cant culpability because he had selected the firm in the first place. She also added that his reputation was as much at risk as the lender. The doctor finally got it and immediately selected a new financial services provider so his reputation would not be tarnished any further. What every business owner must realize is that every element of their operation has the potential to impact its reputation as it affects the customer’s experience. With each function, ask yourself what the impact would be if there was a complete failure. Take the HR department for example. What would be the impact be on the company if an employee who did nothing wrong was terminated and it hit the front page of a newspaper? The HR scenario is possible, yes, but maybe not probable. But what about a firm who has to send technicians into custom-er’s homes while they are not there? What would be the impact on the business if one of these employees stole something from a home, the police were called in and the papers caught wind of it? At one point or another, most businesses will have to deal with a bad review by a former customer. What would your response be to a negative review on a website that is very vis-ible to large numbers of potential customers? As you can see, there are a myriad of factors that can affect a business’s reputation. To safeguard yours, you need to con-stantly be on the lookout for problem areas and try to reduce the risk. If you cannot manage the risk before it negatively affects your reputation, you need to know what your next move would be. For a few examples, would you call in a PR firm, deny the concern to any reporters who call in, or issue a very positive statement? Now go out and make sure that you identify all areas of your business that could produce some reputational risk and then determine what steps you would take if they actually occurred. You can do this! 2C LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF DECEMBER 30, 2012 2CBIZ/MOTLEY Q FSU Finance Professor Dr. Jerry Osteryoung is Executive Director of the Jim Moran Institute for Global Entrepreneurship at Florida State University’s College of Business. RISK: Reputation is all Continued From Page 1C recovery. Reasonable returns in 2013 would send the S&P 500 toward, and possibly past, its record close of 1,565 reached in October 2007. A mid-year rally in 2012 pushed stocks to their highest in more than four years. Both the Standard & Poor’s 500 and the Dow Jones industrial average are on track for strong gains in 2012. Those advances came despite uncertainty about the outcome of the presi-dential election and bouts of turmoil from Europe, where policy makers finally appear to be getting a grip on the region’s debt crisis. “As you remove little bits of uncertainty, inves-tors can then once again return to focusing on the fundamentals,” says Joseph Tanious, a global market strategist at J.P. Morgan Funds. “Corporate America is actually doing quite well.” Although earnings growth of S&P 500 listed companies dipped as low as 0.8 percent in the sum-mer, analysts are predicting that it will rebound to aver-age 9.5 percent for 2013, according to data from S&P Capital IQ. Companies have also been hoarding cash. The amount of cash and cash-equivalents being held by companies listed in the S&P 500 climbed to an all-time high $1 trillion at the end of September, 65 percent more than five years ago, according to S&P Dow Jones Indices. Assuming a budget deal is reached in a reasonable amount of time, investors will be more comfortable owning stocks in 2013, allowing valuations to rise, says Tanious. Stocks in the S&P 500 index are currently trad-ing on a price-to-earnings multiple of about 13.5, com-pared with the average of 17.9 since 1988, according to S&P Capital IQ data. The ratio rises when investors are willing to pay more for a stock’s future earnings potential. The stock market will also likely face less drag from the European debt crisis this year, said Steven Bulko, the chief investment officer at Lombard Odier Investment Managers. While policy makers in Europe have yet to come up with a comprehensive solu-tion to the region’s woes, they appear to have a bet-ter handle on the region’s problems. STOCKS: Improved housing market sould lead Continued From Page 1C“You have to be service-oriented and you have to appeal to people to want to come back,” he said. “People have to recommend you to other people. You can’t be a business that hopes just to get somebody to buy something and never get concerned. We’re selling to the grandchildren and great grandchildren of people who have been customers in our busi-ness. That’s how you survive in a small town: People always refer you to other people and to their families.” The Vann Carpet One building has been located on U.S. Highway 90 since 1989 and today the fourth generation of the family works in the business. “The success to working with family was taught by our father and that was you always have to be willing to listen to new ideas,” Vann said. “You hope and want the younger generations to bring in suggestions and ideas that will make people their age want to come to your store. Listening is a key ingredi-ent for family being able to get along and work together. The opinions of your younger relatives are very important.” VANN: Fourth-generation business thrives Continued From Page 1A ASSOCIATED PRESSA recovering housing market and improving jobs outl ook make Wall Street analysts optimistic about stock markets in 2013 — assuming Washington l awmakers can get past the “fiscal cliff.”



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2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 2DLIFE Stop by the Lake City Reporter for your complimentary engagement package. Aisle Style Complimentary Engagement Package Sweetwater Branch Inn 800-595-7760 Wards Jewelry & Gifts 752-5470 Camp Weed Cerveny Conference Center 386-364-5250 GeGees Studio 758-2088 Holiday Inn 754-1411, ext. 106 Jan. 2013 Scheduled blood drives. Times and dates subject to change. Call Tony at (386)466-2822 if you cannot nd us. Date Location Time 1 Lake City Mall 12 p.m. to 7 p.m. 2 Winn Dixie 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 3 Medical Renaissance 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 4 Hardees (by Walmart) 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. 5 Lake DeSoto Farmers Market 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. 5 Lake City Internet Services 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. 6 Ole Times Country Buffet 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. 7 Florida Forestry 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. 7 Fish & Wildlife Conservation 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. 8 Hardees Downtown 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. 8 Anderson Columbia 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. 9 Walmart Lake City 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. 10 Lake City Mall 12 p.m. to 7 p.m. 11 Columbia Correctional 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. 12 Big Lots 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 13 Christ Central Lake Butler 12 p.m. to 3 p.m. 13 Lake City Mall 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. 14 Walmart Lake City 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. 15 Winn Dixie 12 p.m. to 7 p.m. 16 Columbia Bank (SR 47) 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. 16 Columbia Bank (Downtown) 1:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. 17 Moes Southwestern Grill 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. 18 Hardees (by Walmart) 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 19 Lake City Mall 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. 20 Christ Central Lake City 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. 20 Lake City Mall 3:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. 21 Winn Dixie (Martin Luther King Day) 12 p.m. to 7 p.m. 22 Health Center of Lake City 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. 22 Lake City Mall 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. 23 Shands Lake Shore Hospital 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 24 VyStar Credit Union 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 25 Lake City Correctional 12 p.m. to 6 p.m. 26 Players Club 12 p.m. to 7 p.m. 27 Hardees (by Walmart) 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 28 Walmart Lake City 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. 29 Pizza Boy Pizza 12 p.m. to 6 p.m. 30 & 31 TBA By MELISSA KOSSLER DUTTON Associated Press Regardless of their inter est in astronomy, visitors to Chris Krstanovics home want to look through his telescope. Krstanovic recently built an observatory at his house in Windham, N.H. Before he added the domed struc ture, he didnt star-gaze as often as he liked because of the time and effort involved in setting up his telescopes and other equipment. It takes you two hours to set up plus two hours to take down. It takes away from your observing time, said the business owner, who developed an inter est in astronomy as a kid. Being out there in the open sky, its kind of cold. Its miserable. Now, he can easily search the sky for exoplan ets planets outside the solar system anytime he wants to. And share his hobby with guests. Everybody that comes to our house wants to go in there and look, he said. Many of my neigh bors have young kids. This opens up a whole new field for them. It is a very good way to get young people interested in science. A growing number of amateur astronomers around the country are installing home obser vatories to indulge their passion for exploring the night sky, said John Goss of Roanoke, Va., vice presi dent of The Astronomical League, which represents more than 200 astronomi cal societies. The cost of equipment has decreased dramatically over the last 20 years, he said. Advances in technolo gy also mean amateurs can buy cameras and viewing equipment once limited to professional observatories. Today, amateurs can buy a telescope and accessory equipment that allows a more detailed look at deep space for about $4,000. A similar set-up might have cost $20,000 two decades ago and wouldnt have been as effective. Aside from telescopes and cameras, a home observatory must have a roof that opens or retracts, and a stable mount for the telescope. Do-it-yourselfers often construct observato ries out of shed-type struc tures designed so the roof rolls off the building onto support beams. Others buy prefabricated domes and mount them on their homes or other small buildings. It helps to live far from the city lights. You can set up a home observatory for about $20,000, said Suzy Gurton, education manager at the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, in San Francisco. She used to see such a project as the exception. Now, Id compare it to buy ing a new car. And the equipment for viewing and photographing the sky has advanced so much that amateurs, too, are regularly contributing to science, she said. Thats the amazing part. The equipment to do sci entific observations has become affordable, she said. Volunteers helped astron omers at Yale University discover a series of small galaxies that could offer insights on how stars are formed. An amateur in Australia is credited with alerting NASA to a spot on Jupiter that scientists believe occurred when a comet or meteor crashed into the planet. Current equipment also allows amateurs to closely study supernovas and offer data on the life cycle of stars. Krstanovic works with professional astronomers to help measure star spots, which can determine how fast a star rotates. You now can have some thing that if you know how to use it and if you have the right camera, you can do some real science, he said. He completed his obser vatory, a 10-by-10-foot structure built on a deck behind his house, about four months ago. Winter viewing is best and he is looking forward to using the new setup in the com ing months. He already often watch es the sky remotely from a computer in his house because the observatory is unheated. Telescopes function best when they are the same temperature as the air. Hobbyists often opt for a home observa tory when they acquire so much equipment that its cumbersome to set it up and take it down, said Jerry Smith, owner of Technical Innovations, a Gaithersburg, Md., com pany that produces obser vatory domes for ama teurs and professionals. For $20,000, he said, an amateur can create a setup that would have cost about $200,000 a decade ago. Many of Smiths cus tomers are retirees who have more time to pursue their interest in astrono my. Some clients design their retirement homes to include observatories, and he cites communities in Arizona, Georgia and New Mexico that are intended for amateur astronomers. The developments are in rural areas and have restric tions on outdoor lighting to make star gazing easier. Scott Jamieson doesnt live in a dedicated astrono my community but he was thinking about his obser vatory when he chose the location of his home in Eagle, Wis. The recent retiree heads out to the observatory in his back yard about once a week to photograph galaxies and star clusters. I chose this location for its darker sky, said Jamieson, who uses an observatory with a rolloff roof. You can see the whole sky. I enjoy that. Make star-gazing easier ASSOCIATED PRESS Scott Jamiesons home observatory is seen with the roof removed in Eagle, Wis. He uses his observatory to study galaxies and star clusters. He is one of many amateur astronomers building backyard observatories to pursue their hobby. Observatories in the backyard gain favor with some. PURSUITS ASSOCIATED PRESS The Grapengeter children (from left) Ava, 6; Greg, 10; and Shane, 9, pose for a photo with their dog, Abby, who is blind and went missing more than a week during heavy snow storms in Fairbanks, Alaska. After walking 10 miles to the edge of a mushers dog yard, Abby was found and returned to her owners on Sunday, just in time for Christmas. Lost, blind dog finds way home Associated Press FAIRBANKS, Alaska Blind and alone in Alaska winter temperatures that dipped 40 degrees below zero, a lost 8-year-old Fairbanks dog wasnt given much of a chance to make it home. But after walking 10 miles to the edge of a local mushers dog yard, Abby, a brown-and-white mixed breed, was found and returned to her owners, a family that includes two boys and one girl under the age of 10. The dog that the fam ily raised from an animalshelter puppy went miss ing during a snowstorm on Dec. 13, and the family never expected to see her again, The Fairbanks Daily News-Miner reported. Its a miracle. Theres no other words to describe it, said McKenzie Grapengeter, emotion choking her voice and tears coming to her eyes. We never expected to have her to be returned safe and alive. Musher and veterinar ian Mark May said he came across the dog while running his team on Dec. 19, but didnt stop to pick her up. It ran with us for about a mile on the way home before she fell off the pace, but I had a big dog team so I couldnt grab it, he said. I said, boy I hope it finds somebodys house. The next day, the dog turned up outside Mays house. Everybody just assumed it was some kind of scaredy-cat, but there it was in front of the door in our dog lot and it was blind, May said. It was sitting there, all the way from 14 mile on the winter trail down into this neigh borhood, I guess by just sniffing, so I picked it up and brought it in. To Mays surprise, the dog had no signs of frostbite. No frozen ears, no fro zen toes, shell probably go back home and itll (be) business as usual. Shes no worse for wear but quite an adventure, he said. Sandy Kishton is a free lance travel writer who lives in Lake City. TRAVEL: Continued From Page 1D this feat as we entered. Ultimately, they did not complete their task and were charged $72 each for their meals. Our night improved when we were serenaded by a musical trio (violin, guitar and bass). When they asked for our request, Sue was quick to answer, Amarillo by Morning. We toasted to Amarillo and finished up with some of their homemade fudge for dessert. Taking our last glasses of wine in togo cups, we headed back to our room to survive the night in the roach motel. Keep in mind, we really havent seen any roaches, but the place just leaves that kind of impression. Definitely a story to tell, but not someplace Ill ever need to visit again. Been there, done that!



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By CONNIE CASS Associated Press WASHINGTON Efforts to save the nation from going over a yearend fiscal cliff were still in disarray as lawmakers returned to the Capitol to confront the tax-and-spend crisis. A tone-setting quo tation was Democratic Sen. Harry Reids asser tion that the House under Republican Speaker John Boehner had been operat ing with a dictatorship. President Barack Obama flew back to Washington from Hawaii after telephon ing congressional leaders from his Christmas vaca tion perch. Once back, he set up a meeting with lead ers of both parties at the White House late Friday to make a fresh attempt to find a solution before Monday nights deadline. A look at why its so hard for Republicans and Democrats to compromise on urgent matters of taxes and spending, and what happens if they fail to meet their deadline: NEW YEARS HEADACHE Partly by fate, partly by design, some scary fis cal forces come together at the start of 2013 unless Congress and Obama act to stop them. They include: Some $536 billion in tax increases, touch ing nearly all Americans, because various federal tax cuts and breaks expire at years end. About $110 billion in spending cuts divided equally between the mili tary and most other federal departments. Thats about 8 percent of their annual budgets, 9 percent for the Pentagon. Hitting the national economy with that double whammy of tax increases and spending cuts is whats called going over the fiscal cliff. If allowed to unfold over 2013, it would lead to recession, a big jump in unemployment and finan cial market turmoil, econo mists predict. WHAT IF THEY MISS THE DEADLINE? If New Years Day arrives without a deal, the nation shouldnt plunge onto the shoals of recession imme diately. There still might be time to engineer a soft landing. So long as lawmakers and the president appear to be working toward agree ment, the tax hikes and spending cuts could mostly be held at bay for a few weeks. Then they could be repealed retroactively once a deal was reached. The big wild card is the stock market and the nations financial confi dence: Would traders start to panic if Washington appeared unable to reach accord? Would worried consumers and businesses sharply reduce their spend ing? In what could be a preview, stock prices in the U.S. and Europe dropped Friday on waning hopes that Obama and key law makers would reach an 11th-hour compromise. Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke has warned lawmak ers that the econ omy is already suffering from the uncer tainty and they shouldnt risk making it worse by blowing past their deadline. WHAT IF THEY NEVER AGREE? If negotiations between Obama and Congress col lapse completely, 2013 looks like a rocky year. Taxes would jump $2,400 on average for families with incomes of $50,000 to $75,000, according to a study by the nonpartisan Tax Policy Center. Because consumers would get less of their paychecks to spend, businesses and jobs would suffer. At the same time, Americans would feel cuts in government ser vices; some federal work ers would be furloughed or laid off and companies would lose government business. The nation would lose up to 3.4 million jobs, the Congressional Budget Office predicts. The consequences of that would be felt by every body, Bernanke says. THE TAXES Much of the disagree ment surrounds the George W. Bush-era income tax cuts, and whether those rates should be allowed to rise for the nations wealthi est taxpayers. Both politi cal parties say they want to protect the middle class from tax increases. Several tax breaks begun in 2009 to stimulate the economy by aiding lowand middle-income families are also set to expire Jan. 1. The alternative minimum tax would expand to catch 28 million more taxpayers, with an average increase of $3,700 a year. Taxes on investments would rise, too. More deaths would be covered by the federal estate tax, and the rate climbs from 35 percent to 55 percent. Some corporate tax breaks would end. The temporary Social Security payroll tax cut also is due to expire. That tax break for most Americans seems likely to end even if a fiscal cliff deal is reached, now that Obama has backed down from his call to prolong it as an eco nomic stimulus. THE SPENDING If the nation goes over the fiscal cliff, budget cuts of 8 percent or 9 percent would hit most of the feder al government, touching all sorts of things from agri culture to law enforcement and the military to weather forecasting. A few areas, such as Social Security benefits, Veterans Affairs and some programs for the poor, are exempt. THERES MORE AT STAKE All sorts of stuff could get wrapped up in the fiscal cliff deal-making. A sam pling: Some 2 million job less Americans may lose their federal unemploy ment aid. Obama wants to continue the benefits extension as part of the deal; Republicans say its too costly. Social Security recipi ents might see their checks grow more slowly. As part of a possible deal, Obama and Republican leaders want to change the way cost-of-living adjustments are calculated, which would mean smaller checks over the years for retirees who get Social Security, veter ans benefits or govern ment pensions. The price of milk could double. If Congress doesnt provide a fix for expiring dairy price supports before Jan. 1, milk-drinking fami lies could feel the pinch. One scenario is to attach a farm bill extension to the fiscal cliff legislation if a compromise is reached in time. Millions of taxpayers who want to file their 2012 returns before mid-March will be held up while they wait to see if Congress comes through with a deal to stop the alternative mini mum tax from hitting more people. CALL THE WHOLE THING OFF? In theory, Congress and Obama could just say no to the fiscal cliff, by extending all the tax cuts and overturning the automatic spending reduc tions in current law. But both Republicans and Democrats agree its time to take steps to put the nation on a path away from a future of crippling debt. Indeed, the automatic spending cuts set for January were created as a last-ditch effort to force Congress to deal with the debt problem. If Washington bypassed the fiscal cliff, the next cri sis would be just around the corner, in late February or early March, when the government reaches a $16.4 trillion ceiling on the amount of money it can borrow. Boehner says Republicans wont go along with raising the limit on gov ernment borrowing unless the increase is matched by spending cuts to help attack the long-term debt problem. Failing to raise the debt ceiling could lead to a first-ever U.S. default that would roil the financial markets and shake world wide confidence in the United States. To avoid that scenario, Obama and Boehner are trying to wrap a debt limit agreement into the fiscal cliff negotiations. SO WHATS THE HOLDUP? Theyre at loggerheads over some big questions. Obama says any deal must include higher taxes for the wealthiest Americans. Many House Republicans oppose raising anyones tax rates. Boehner tried to get the House to vote for higher taxes only on incomes above $1 mil lion but dropped the effort when it became clear he didnt have the votes. Republicans also insist on deeper spending cuts than Democrats want to make. And they want to bring the nations longterm debt under control by significantly curtailing the growth of Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security changes that many Democrats oppose. Obama, meanwhile, By DAVID B. CARUSO and SCOTT MAYEROWITZ Associated Press NEW YORK Dockworkers along the East Coast and the Gulf of Mexico agreed Friday to extend their contract for more than a month, averting a weekend strike that could have crippled major ports from Boston to Houston and bottled up billions of dollars worth of cargo. Talks aimed at reaching a new contract covering the 14,500 longshoremen will continue during the exten sion, which runs through Feb. 6. The dockworkers union and an alliance of port operators and shipping lines agreed to the exten sion after resolving one of the stickier points in their negotiations, involving royalty payments to long shoremen for each con tainer they unload. Details were not disclosed. Federal mediator George Cohen said the agreement on royalties was a major positive step forward. While some significant issues remain in conten tion, I am cautiously opti mistic that they can be resolved, he said. The contract between the International Longshoremens Association and the U.S. Maritime Alliance original ly expired in September. The two sides agreed to extend it once before, for 90 days, but it had been set to expire again at 12:01 a.m. Sunday. As recently as Dec. 19, the president of the long shoremens union, Harold Daggett, had said a strike was expected. A walkout would have crippled the loading and unloading of a vast number of products, including elec tronics and clothing, and made it more difficult for U.S. manufacturers to get parts and raw materials at a time when the econo my is in shaky condition. The ports involved handle about 40 percent of all U.S. container cargo. Business groups expressed relief that the two sides had agreed to keep the docks running. A coast-wide port shut down is not an option. It would have severe eco nomic ramifications for the local, national and even global economies and wreak havoc on the sup ply chain, said National Retail Federation President Matthew Shay. White House spokes man Matt Lehrich said: Were pleased the parties are going to continue their work at the negotiating table and continue to urge them to reach an agree ment as quickly as pos sible. Major ports that would have been frozen includ ed the massive terminals serving the New York City area and critical seaports in Savannah, Ga., Houston, and Hampton Roads, Va. Other ports that would have been affect ed are in Boston; the Philadelphia area; Baltimore; Wilmington, N.C.; Charleston, S.C.; Jacksonville, Fla.; Fort Lauderdale, Fla.; Miami; Tampa, Fla.; Mobile, Ala.; and New Orleans. Longshoremen on the West Coast have a separate contract. Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012 3A 3A SPECIALIZING IN: Non-Invasive Laparoscopic Gynecological Surgery Adolescent Gynecology High and Low Risk Obstetrics Contraception Delivering at Shands Lake Shore In-Ofce ultrasounds for our patients 3D/4D Entertainment Scans offering DaVinci Robotic Surgeries. New Patients Welcome Call today for a personal appointment: 386-755-0500 449 SE Baya Drive Lake City, Floraida 32025 www.dainagreenemd.com WE ARE WOMEN, WE ARE M OTHERS, WE UNDERST A ND Sunglasses...30% off Sandals...20-30% off Insulated Camo Bibs & Coveralls...40% off WILSONS O UTFITTERS 1291 SE Baya Dr, Lake City (386) 755-7060 WilsonsOutfitters@comcast.net Winfield remembers Cherry Brown By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com WINFIELD Most times a commu nity isnt defined by the structures that make up a neighborhood but by the peo ple and personalities that bind everyone and everything together. Keturah Bell Cherry Brown, 78, a pil lar in the Winfield Community, tragically lost her life as a result of injuries she suf fered in a fire at her home last week. The fire occurred around 6:29 a.m. Dec. 21 at 316 NE Winfield Road. Funeral services for Brown were held Saturday. Columbia County Fire Chief David Boozer said it was an accidental fire that occurred when Brown was using her stove and her clothing caught fire. Although it was ruled an accident, it is being investigated by the state fire mar shals office. At this point we dont see any wrongdoing, its just procedures we go through, Boozer said. It was an acci dent, but we need to honor her. People kind of forget about who the person was and I dont want to lose her because she was a part of the community, she matters and we need to honor that. Brown, the daughter of Harold M. and Oni Parnell Belvin, was born and raised in the Winfield area and left Columbia County when her husband entered the military, but came back to the commu nity to serve as a family caregiver to her mother and son. Celeste Belvin Bradley, Browns oldest daughter, said she will remember how loving and caring her mother was for not only her family, but for the entire com munity. She never met a stranger and anybody that dotted her door never left hungry, Bradley said. There was always a place that anyone could find some refuge for advice or just tender loving care. Bradley said her mother was also a pil lar for the Winfield community and her neighbors. She was a pillar of the community because she became the matriarch of the Belvin family, she said. Everyone could call her at anytime of night or anytime in the day and she would be there for them. Whether it was to shelter the sick and hungry or just to give legal advice to those who may not have been as fortu nate to know some things that she may have known. She was an unconditional friend. If she ever became your friend she was always your friend. While Brown was a mother to five children, Celeste Belvin Bradley, Cynthia Brown Harris, Michael Brown, Mark Brown (deceased) and Kevin Fields. Others in the community spoke of how she treated them like family with her gen erosity, understanding and love. Rentz Galloway, a neighbor, said Brown was like a mother to him and she was also a great neighbor and a spiritual advi sor to him. He described Brown as a person with the gift to motivate others and someone a person could draw inspiration from. She was one that was always con cerned about other people, he said. She would always remind me that I needed to take care of myself. I enjoyed the joy she had. Galloway said he and Brown traveled to Gainesville to see first lady Michelle Obama and they had a great time. I was so thrilled when she moved back into the family house. She was just elated with joy, he said, noting Brown was a praying woman. You could call her to the alter and she could bring it. Brown shared her love with the com munity and spoke to her best friends, Mary and Wilbert Austin, Laverne Carter, Dani Doby and Corrine Mickler almost daily on the telephone. She also routinely called to check on her 95-year-old aunt, Emma Parnell Williams and her sister and best friend, Eliza Rentz Bell. Brown Dockworkers strike averted for now Over the fiscal cliff: Soft or hard landing? The price of milk could double if no deal is reached. Reid



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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012 3B3BSPORTS ASSOCIATED PRESSFlorida’s Michael Frazier II (right) defends Air Force’s D eLovell Earls during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game on Saturday in Sunris e. Boynton helps No. 14 Florida beat Air ForceAssociated PressSUNRISE — Kenny Boynton snapped a shoot-ing slump Saturday with three 3-pointers in the second half, when No. 14 Florida pulled away to beat Air Force 78-61 in the sec-ond game of the Orange Bowl Basketball Classic. Boynton had made only 4 of 32 from 3-point range over the previous five games, but he hit three in a span of 8 minutes to break the game open. The Gators used their superior size and smothering defense to grind down the Falcons, who shot 48 percent in the first half and 33 percent in the second half. Florida (9-2) won for only the second time in the past four games. Air Force (8-3) fell to 2-77 against ranked teams. Florida State beat Tulsa 82-63 in the first game of the one-day event. Boynton, who ranks third in career 3-pointers made at Florida with 282, went 3 for 7 from long range and scored 14 points. Erik Murphy of Florida scored 21 points, had seven rebounds and added four assists while missing only two shots in 29 min-utes. He was chosen the game’s MVP. The Falcons matched the second-best start in school history in their first 10 games but hadn’t faced a team of Florida’s caliber. Air Force’s Michael Lyons was held to 11 points, nine below his average, and he shot only 3 for 14. Three-point shooting kept the Falcons in the game. They shot 9 for 20 from beyond the arc against a team ranked third in the nation in scor-ing defense. Florida scored 38 points in the paint, and had a 36-25 advantage in rebounds. The Falcons forced Florida to be creative on offense early. Scottie Wibekin, inbounding under his basket, bounced a pass off a defender’s back, stepped onto the court and caught the ball for a wide-open layup. Boynton sparked a 12-3 spurt when he made two 3-pointers and fed Casey Prather for a layup, put-ting Florida ahead 47-37. Boynton hit another 3 for a 59-47 lead.Florida State 82, Tulsa 63SUNRISE — For a holiday vacation this year, Florida State junior Terrance Shannon gave himself a workout. Feeling fitter, Shannon scored a career-high 16 points off the bench Saturday to help beat Tulsa 82-63 in the Orange Bowl Basketball Classic. “When I went home over the break, I spent more time running and getting in bet-ter condition,” the Georgia native said. “In the second half of the season, we have to step it up, and I want to be that driving force.” Florida State (8-4) extended its winning streak to four in a row and remained unbeaten in four games against Tulsa (7-6). “We’re trying to finish strong in our non-confer-ence schedule and get some momentum going into ACC play,” Shannon said. “These games are helping us know where we need to build.” Michael Snaer scored 19 points and was chosen the game’s most valuable player.No. 4 Louisville 80, Kentucky 77LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Russ Smith scored 21 points and Chane Behanan had 20 and No. 4 Louisville ended a four-game los-ing streak against rival Kentucky with an up-and-down 80-77 victory on Saturday. Peyton Siva added 19 points as the Cardinals (12-1) won a hard-fought Battle of the Bluegrass. Alabama-Notre Dame a tough call for neutral fansBy NOAH TRISTERAssociated PressANN ARBOR, Mich. — The pub is called the Blue Leprechaun — and the name pretty much says it all. Notre Dame isn’t too popular along this strip of bars and restaurants within walking distance of Michigan Stadium, and at this lively establishment, a couple leprechaun heads wearing Wolverine-colored hats smile out at the street from an exterior awning. Ryan Gardner works inside, and like almost everyone in town, he’s a Michigan fan. So it was a touch startling to hear him declare his allegiance — such as it is — for the BCS championship game. “I would like to see Notre Dame win,” he said. The 26-year-old Gardner wasn’t exactly humming the “Notre Dame Victory March” while sizing up this Jan. 7 title tilt between two teams that defeated his Wolverines this sea-son. He’s one of many fans across the country reflecting on a question with no easy answer, trying to choose between Notre Dame and Alabama, two of the most successful — and most resented — programs in college football. So who does America dislike more, the Fighting Irish or the Crimson Tide? For unattached observers from Michigan to Texas, that’s shaping up to be one tough call. “I don’t like Alabama more than I don’t like Notre Dame,” Gardner said. Notre Dame hasn’t won a national championship since 1988, and the Irish were largely irrelevant for two decades before coach Brian Kelly’s team strung together a dozen victo-ries this season to earn a spot opposite Alabama in the title game. Now, com-parisons with the Yankees, Lakers and every other polarizing sports sensation seem appropriate again. Notre Dame recently reached the top of the AP poll for the first time since 1993. Cue the usual prattle about Rockne, Rudy, the Four Horsemen et. al. “We are going to have to deal with the lore again, God help us,” Charles Pierce wrote grudgingly last month in a piece for Grantland.com. But when Notre Dame (12-0) takes the field in Miami to play for the national title — still not part of a football confer-ence, still raking in money via its one-of-a-kind TV con-tract with NBC — the Irish won’t be facing some ran-dom opponent. They’ll be up against Alabama, Nick Saban’s dynasty-in-prog-ress that’s been Rammer Jammer Yellow Hammering opponents into the ground for most of the last five years. A victory over Notre Dame would give the sec-ond-ranked Crimson Tide (12-1) a third national cham-pionship in four seasons. You can practically hear the “S-E-C!” chant already. “The question is, who are you less sick of?” said David Bazzel, who played at Arkansas during the 1980s and now hosts a radio show for KABZ of Little Rock. “The hatred of Notre Dame. ... If you don’t have that hatred of Alabama as much, it’s that we’re tired of them winning.” That’s part of Gardner’s rationale. Alabama’s BCS title last season was the sixth in a row for the Southeastern Conference. “I’m not really an SECaffiliated fan. I actually went to an SEC school (Tennessee) for my first couple years of college, but I never really got attached to SEC sports,” Gardner said. “It’s a powerful con-ference — but never rooted for them.” On Friday, Bazzel threw the question to his listen-ers with an informal poll, and in Arkansas, SEC pride still runs deep. Of the 30 or so callers who voted, about two thirds said they’d pre-fer an Alabama win. Elsewhere, SEC fatigue is a very real phenomenon — and Notre Dame’s recent floundering may have insu-lated the Irish a bit from similar envy. “Notre Dame is obnoxious for all the reasons that Notre Dame is obnoxious, but they’ve been down for so long,” said Peter Bean, a 2003 Texas graduate who runs the blog Burnt Orange Nation. “It’s been 15 years of schadenfreude with the Irish, so it kind of feels like you’re throwing them a bone.” Bean actually went to Notre Dame for law school, but he’s no Irish supporter. The question is whether Notre Dame’s return to glory — for years a sarcas-tic punch line but suddenly a legit possibility — would be as grating as another showcase of SEC domi-nance. The Irish could be double-digit underdogs at kick-off, making Notre Dame — gulp — a sentimental favorite? “It’s kind of bizarre to be honest,” said Joe Hettler, a 2005 Notre Dame grad who hopes to attend the cham-pionship game. “I’ve been a fan since I was literally 6 years old. Nobody ever roots for us.” Perhaps that’s the next step for the Irish. Does Notre Dame need to win a national championship or two to rebuild the animosity of the neutral fan? “Hopefully, we’ll be hated back to the level that we’re accustomed to,” Hettler said. Bean can certainly see that happening. “This is the one opponent that’s more hated than they are,” he said. “Give the Irish fans a chance to squander the goodwill.” It may be only a matter of time before it’s chic to loathe Notre Dame again, but for now, public scorn will have to be shared with those bullies from the South. “Somebody’s going to be sad,” Bean said. “So we all win.” ASSOCIATED PRESSNotre Dame coach Brian Kelly talks to the media during a news conference after practice on Saturday in South Bend, Ind. Notre Dame and Alabama will play for the BCS Nationa l Championship on Jan. 7 in Miami. Werner to go pro after bowl game?Associated PressFORT LAUDERDALE — Bjoern Werner and the Seminoles face Northern Illinois in the Orange Bowl on Tuesday night, and it’s widely believed that this will be his last college game. He knows if he’ll declare for the NFL draft, saying that he and his wife made a decision. That is, unless the decision gets revisited. “If her mind changes,” Werner said, “mine might change, too.” Florida State’s opponents for next season surely won’t mind if Werner decides to head to the NFL.



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LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF DECEMBER 30, 2012 3C Ordinary folks losing faith in stocks By BERNARD CONDONAP Business WriterNEW YORK—Andrew Neitlich is the last person you’d expect to be rattled by the stock market. He once worked as a financial analyst picking stocks for a mutu-al fund. He has huddled with doz-ens of CEOs in his current career as an executive coach. During the dot-com crash 12 years ago, he kept his wits and did not sell. But he’s selling now.“You have to trust your government. You have to trust other governments. You have to trust Wall Street,” says Neitlich, 47. “And I don’t trust any of these.” Defying decades of investment history, ordinary Americans are selling stocks for a fifth year in a row. The selling has not let up despite unprecedented mea-sures by the Federal Reserve to persuade people to buy and the come-hither allure of a levitat-ing market. Stock prices have doubled from March 2009, their low point during the Great Recession. It’s the first time ordinary folks have sold during a sus-tained bull market since relevant records were first kept during World War II, an examination by The Associated Press has found. The AP analyzed money flowing into and out of stock funds of all kinds, including relatively new exchange-traded funds, which investors like because of their low fees. “People don’t trust the market anymore,” says financial histo-rian Charles Geisst of Manhattan College. He says a “crisis of con-fidence” similar to one after the Crash of 1929 will keep people away from stocks for a genera-tion or more. The implications for the economy and living standards are unclear but potentially big. If the pullback continues, some experts say, it could lead to lower spend-ing by companies, slower U.S. economic growth and perhaps lower gains for those who remain in the market. Since they started selling in April 2007, eight months before the start of the Great Recession, individual investors have pulled at least $380 billion from U.S. stock funds, a category that includes both mutual funds and exchange-traded funds, accord-ing to estimates by the AP. That is the equivalent of all the money they put into the market in the previous five years. Instead of stocks, they’re putting money into bonds because those are widely perceived as safer investments. Individuals have put more than $1 trillion into bond mutual funds alone since April 2007, according to the Investment Company Institute, a trade group representing invest-ment funds. Selling stocks during either a downturn or a recovery is unusu-al. Americans almost always buy more than they sell during both periods. Since World War II, nine recessions besides the Great Recession have been followed by recoveries lasting at least three years. According to data from the Investment Company Institute, individual investors sold during and after only one of those previ-ous downturns — the one from November 1973 through March 1975. And back then a scary stock drop around the start of the recovery’s third year, 1977, gave people ample reason to get out of the market. The unusual pullback this time has spread to other big investors ‚ public and private pension funds, investment brokerages and state and local governments. These groups have sold a total of $861 billion more than they have bought since April 2007, accord-ing to the Federal Reserve. Even foreigners, big purchasers in recent years, are selling now — $16 billion in the 12 months through September. As these groups have sold, much of the stock buying has fall-en to companies. They’ve bought $656 billion more than they have sold since April 2007. Companies are mostly buying back their own stock. On Wall Street, the investor revolt has largely been dismissed as temporary. But doubts are creeping in. A Citigroup research report sent to customers concludes that the “cult of equities” that fueled buying in the past has little chance of coming back soon. Investor blogs speculate about the “death of equities,” a line from a famous BusinessWeek cover story in 1979, another time many people had seemingly given up on stocks. Financial analysts lament how the retreat by Main Street has left daily stock trading at low levels. The investor retreat may have already hurt the fragile economic recovery. The number of shares traded each day has fallen 40 percent from before the recession to a 12-year low, according to the New York Stock Exchange. That’s cut into earnings of investment banks and online brokers, which earn fees helping others trade stocks. Initial public offerings, another source of Wall Street profits, are happening at one-third the rate before the recession. And old assumptions about stocks are being tested. One investing gospel is that because stocks generally rise in price, companies don’t need to raise their quarterly cash dividends much to attract buyers. But companies are increasing them lately. Dividends in the S&P 500 rose 11 percent in the 12 months through September, and the number of companies choosing to raise them is the highest in at least 20 years, according to FactSet, a financial data provider. Stocks now throw off more cash in dividends than U.S. govern-ment bonds do in interest. Many on Wall Street think this is an unnatural state that cannot last. After all, people tend to buy stocks because they expect them to rise in price, not because of the dividend. But for much of the history of U.S. stock trading, stocks were considered too risky to be regarded as little more than vehicles for generating dividends. In every year from 1871 through 1958, stocks yield-ed more in dividends than U.S. bonds did in interest, accord-ing to data from Yale economist Robert Shiller — exactly what is happening now. So maybe that’s normal, and the past five decades were the aberration. People who think the market will snap back to normal are underestimating how much the Great Recession scared inves-tors, says Ulrike Malmendier, an economist who has studied the effect of the Great Depression on attitudes toward stocks. She says people are ignoring something called the “experience effect,” or the tendency to place great weight on what you most recently went through in deciding how much financial risk to take, even if it runs counter to logic. Extrapolating from her research on “Depression Babies,” the title of a 2010 paper she co-wrote, she says many young investors won’t fully embrace stocks again for another two decades. “The Great Recession will have a lasting impact beyond what a standard economic model would predict,” says Malmendier, who teaches at the University of California, Berkeley. She could be wrong, of course. But it’s a measure of the psy-chological blow from the Great Recession that, more than three years since it ended, big institu-tions, not just amateur investors, are still trimming stocks. Public pension funds have cut stocks from 71 percent of their holdings before the recession to 66 percent last year, breaking at least 40 years of generally rising stock allocations, according to “State and Local Pensions: What Now?,” a book by economist Alicia Munnell. They’re shifting money into bonds. Private pension funds, like those run by big companies, have cut stocks more: from 70 percent of holdings to just under 50 percent, back to the 1995 level. “People aren’t looking to swing for the fences anymore,” says Gary Goldstein, an executive recruiter on Wall Street, refer-ring to the bankers and traders he helps get jobs. “They’re get-ting less greedy.” The lack of greed is remarkable given how much official U.S. policy is designed to stoke it. When Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke launched the first of three bond-buying programs four years ago, he said one aim was to drive Treasury yields so low that frus-trated investors would feel they had no choice but to take a risk on stocks. Their buying would push stock prices up, and every-one would be wealthier and spend more. That would help revive the economy. Sure enough, yields on Treasurys and many other bonds have recently hit record lows, in many cases below the inflation rate. And stock prices have risen. Yet Americans are pulling out of stocks, so deep is their mistrust of them, and per-haps of the Fed itself. “Fed policy is trying to suck people into risky assets when they shouldn’t be there,” says Michael Harrington, 58, a for-mer investment fund manager who says he is largely out of stocks. “When this policy fails, as it will, baby boomers will pay the cost in their 401(k)s.” Ordinary Americans are souring on stocks even though stock prices appear attractive relative to earnings. But history shows they can get more attractive yet. Stocks in the S&P 500 are trading at 14 times what compa-nies earned per share in the past 12 months. Since 1990, they have rarely traded below that level ‚ that is, cheaper, according to S&P Dow Jones Indices. But that period is unusual. Looking back seven decades to the start of World War II, there were long stretches during which stocks traded below that. To estimate how much investors have sold so far, the AP considered both money flow-ing out of mutual funds, which are nearly all held by individual investors, and money flowing into low-fee exchange-traded funds, or ETFs, which bundle securities together to mimic the performance of a market index. ETFs have attracted money from hedge funds and other institu-tional investors as well as from individuals. ASSOCIATED PRESSAndrew Neitlich poses in front of one his investment home s in Venice. Neitlich once worked as a financial analyst picking stocks for a mutual fund. During the dot-com c rash 12 years ago, Neitlich didn’t sell his stocks, but like many others he is selling now. An analysis by Th e Associated Press finds that individual investors have pulled at least $380 billion from U.S. stock funds since th ey started selling in April 2007. BY MICHELLE CHAPMANAP Business ReporterNEW YORK — Looks like Shamu may soon be making a splash in the stock market. The company famous for water shows featuring killer whales, dolphins and other animals at SeaWorld said Thursday that it is planning to go public. SeaWorld Entertainment Inc. has filed for an initial public offering of stock aimed at raising $100 million. That number is likely to change as the company’s bankers gauge interest from investors. From its origins as a Busch Gardens animal park at Anheuser-Busch’s Tampa Budweiser brew-ery, the company has grown to span 11 theme parks housing 67,000 animals. Besides the three SeaWorld parks, the company owns two Busch Gardens parks and Sesame Place, an amusement park based on the children’s TV show Sesame Street. The company warns that its business is dependent on cus-tomers’ willingness to spend on leisure and entertainment — which may be a tough proposi-tion in a still-weak U.S. economy. Still, SeaWorld’s revenue has risen in the three years that it’s been owned by private equity firm Blackstone Group LP. The company has looked for ways to stay competitive in the current market, branching out this year with a Saturday morning televi-sion show, “Sea Rescue,” on the ABC network to attract young viewers. Blackstone is expected to sell some of its stock in the IPO but keep a majority stake, SeaWorld said in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission. SeaWorld plans to use money raised in the IPO to pay down debt and make a payment to the New York-based firm. Blackstone bought SeaWorld, formerly Busch Entertainment Corp., from beer brewer Anheuser-Busch InBev in 2009 for $2.3 billion. The Belgian com-pany was shedding assets to help pay for its $52 billion takeover of St. Louis-based Anheuser-Busch in 2008. Anheuser-Busch started Busch Gardens in Tampa in 1959. The beer company bought SeaWorld, whose park opened in San Diego in 1964, in 1989. SeaWorld is now based in the theme park mecca of Orlando, Fla., also home to Walt Disney Co.’s Walt Disney World resort and Universal Studios. More than half of the company’s revenue is generated in Florida. SeaWorld said about 24 million people attended its 11 parks dur-ing the 12 months ended Sept. 30. The company did not disclose how that figure has grown or shrank in the past few years, but says it has a “stable attendance base.” In the first nine months of 2012, SeaWorld’s profit jumped 73 percent to $86.2 million from $50 million a year earlier, as rev-enue rose nearly 8 percent to $1.16 billion. Some of the company’s competitors have had a difficult climb back from the recession. Amusement park operator Six Flags Entertainment Corp. filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy pro-tection in 2009, emerging in mid-2010. It has been growing revenue since then, although it posted a loss in 2011. SeaWorld, which plans to trade under the ticker “SEAS” on the Nasdaq, did not name a date for its IPO or detail how many shares will be sold, and at what price, in its filing. But SeaWorld did warn investors of the risks involved with having its animals interact with human visitors, not-ing that accidents could hurt its parks’ reputation and attendance. In 2010, a trainer at its SeaWorld Orlando park was killed by an orca, or killer, whale. Last month an 8-year-old Georgia girl said a dolphin at the same Orlando park bit her hand while she fed the ani-mal as part of an attraction. $380B pulled from markets since 2007, invested elsewhere. ASSOCIATED PRESSVisitors watch as a killer whale flips out of the water at SeaWorld Orlando’s Shamu Stadium in Orlando. SeaWorld Entertainment Inc. on Thursday filed for an initial public offering of stock that could raise $100 million. SeaWorld files to go public with $100M IPO



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Stacey Brooke Dampier, daughter of Lee Anne and Jerry Dampier of Keystone Heights, and Denton Colter “Colt” Green, son of Pam and Danny Green of Lake City, will be mar-ried on March 19 at Haile Plantation in Gainesville. Stacey is a graduate of Bradford High School and Santa Fe College. She is a nuclear medicine technolo-gist and currently works in Gainesville. Colt is a graduate of Columbia High School and the University of Florida. He is director of opera-tions fro Aldi food stores and is currently working in Michigan and Wisconsin. After their marriage, Colt and Stacey will be making their home in Houston, Texas. Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012 3D3DLIFESpice up your party with this meatball recipe By J.M. HIRSCHAP Food EditorSometimes failure can end up tasting pretty good. It certainly was the case with these meat-balls. I’d been aiming to creating a solidly delicious, all-purpose meatball suitable for tossing with marinara over spaghetti. Except it didn’t quite work out that way. The meatballs, while certainly delicious, were both too tangy and too sweet to pair with your basic pasta sauce. And they certainly didn’t agree with the mandatory grated Parmesan cheese that spaghetti calls for. So I tried them in a curry sauce. Indian food is particularly welcoming to that play of sweet and heat, tangy and savory. But that wasn’t quite right, either. I was resistant to changing the meatballs themselves. Because while they didn’t partner well with anything I’d tried, I still thought they were good. And they certainly were worth sal-vaging. Then it hit me. Embrace the tangy, sweet-and-savory side of these meatballs. Turn them into party food. And so I ended up with these cocktail meatballs, perfect for setting out with toothpicks for a holiday gathering. And it turned out the sauce couldn’t have been simpler — tomatoes and cran-berry sauce.Cocktail meatballs with cranberry marinara Start to finish: 30 minutes. Makes 50 meatballs.Ingredients3 eggs, beaten1/4 cup finely chopped cilantro 1 tablespoon finely chopped jalapeno slices 3 cloves garlic, minced2 teaspoons fennel seeds2 teaspoon dried oregano 1 teaspoon onion powder1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes Kosher salt and ground black pepper 3 pounds ground beef (93 percent lean) 14-ounce can whole berry cranberry sauce 15-ounce can diced tomatoes Splash of hot sauceInstructionsHeat the oven to 425 F. Coat a rimmed baking sheet with cook-ing spray. In a large bowl, combine the eggs, cilantro, jalapenos, garlic, fennel, oregano, onion powder, red pepper flakes, 2 teaspoons of salt and 1/2 teaspoon of pep-per. Whisk until well combined. Add the ground beef, then mix gently until completely blended. Divide the mixture into 50 balls, using about 2 tablespoons of the mixture per ball. Arrange the meatballs on the prepared bak-ing sheet. Place the baking sheet in the oven and bake the meatballs for 20 minutes. Increase heat to broil and cook for another 1 to 2 min-utes, or until lightly browned. Meanwhile, in a medium saucepan over medium heat, combine the cranberry sauce and diced tomatoes. Bring to a simmer. Season with salt and pepper, and a splash of hot sauce. When the meatballs are done, arrange on a platter, then spoon the cranberry mixture over them. Serve with toothpicks. Nutrition information (per meatball): 60 calories; 15 calo-ries from fat (25 percent of total calories); 1.5 g fat (0.5 g satu-rated; 0 g trans fats); 30 mg cho-lesterol; 4 g carbohydrate; 0 g fiber; 2 g sugar; 6 g protein; 270 mg sodium. FOOD ASSOCIATED PRESSCocktail meatballs with cranberry marinara have a comb ination of sweet and tangy flavors that will make them a hit a any New Year’s party. Sweet, tangy flavors give different twist to old standby. Projects to spark kids’ creativity By JENNIFER FORKERAssociated PressIt’s inevitable during the holiday season: Kids get bored. But the dol-drums are just the thing for unleashing children’s creativity. Give them a few ideas and supplies, and step out of the way. Here, three crafts authors offer ideas for turning the blahs into hurrahs.SocksBrenna Maloney, a Washington, D.C., mother of two, is the author of three sock-project books, including the new “Sock It To Me” (Stash Books, 2012). She turned to sewing with stretchy socks five years ago to offset job stress. Replicating a favorite sock bunny that her mother had made her when she was a girl, Maloney then turned to crafting snakes, mice, sea creatures ‚ and, more recently, evil clowns and snowman assassins. Some of her biggest fans are pre-teens, who pose new project ideas and ask for help. “I work with (the kids) and bring them in on it,” says Maloney, now an editor at “National Geographic Explorer” magazine. For kids who know how to use a sewing machine or would like to learn, Maloney suggests starting with a snake, turtle or star-fish; the snake project is posted at Maloney’s web-site, www.brennamaloney.com. “Think about the sock and how it’s shaped turn it and twist it,” Maloney says. She uses a sock’s pattern, plus stuffing and embel-lishments to turn it into a creature.StoriesEmily K. Neuburger’s crafting projects evolve around storytelling. A for-mer teacher, she offers art and writing classes for chil-dren out of her Amherst, Mass., home. The projects in her book “Show Me a Story” (Storey Publishing, 2012) and at her website, www.redbird-crafts.com encourage kids to play and experiment. She advises parents to leave out interesting, new supplies, such as pinecones and paint, for children to explore. Help them “begin that process of imagining new worlds and telling stories,” she says. For the holidays, Neuburger suggests that kids can share a person-al memory or retell the Christmas story using memory cards or story stones. Pictures from the story are glued to card-board surfaces or small stones. Neuburger uses colored paper and fabric scraps to make simple images. “Learning to know what to include in a story and what to leave out is an important storytelling skill,” Neuburger says in her book. She also recommends making a story grab bag: Allow kids to search through magazines, maps and catalogs, and cut out interesting words, numbers and pictures. Find other images online. Also, kids can draw, paint or stamp their own images. Glue these story-telling prompts to cardstock (or cereal-box cardboard). Neuburger follows with Mod Podge to seal the images, but this step can be skipped. After the images dry, place them in a bag. From there, children can pull cards to build a story together. It can feel like a game, she says. “That element of the unknown and the random-ness — kids love it,” says Neuburger. “They have to work with it. There’s humor.”Animal templatesIf they can wield a pair of scissors, children can make the cute characters in Sarah Goldschadt’s book, “Craft-A-Day” (Quirk Books, 2012). It provides a crafting motif for each week of the year, and a simple paper cut-out or small felt object each day. There’s a new iPad app for downloading templates and instructions. The animal patterns, including a penguin, dog and raccoon, are most likely to grab a child’s imagination. After tracing a template, kids can use it to make ornaments, cards, magnets, gift tags, mobiles and cake toppers. Goldschadt, a graphic designer, recently shared some of her crafts with teenagers in an after-school program at a library near her New York home, and was impressed by the kids’ dedication to finishing their owl and bird ornaments. “It was the most quiet they’d ever been,” she says, “and they stayed longer to get it done.” Goldschadt’s website: www.sah-rah.com. HAPPENINGS Stacey Dampier, Colt Green to marry in MarchCOURTESY PHOTOColt Green and Stacy Dampier. Crafts ASSOCIATED PRESSThe holiday doldrums are just the thing for unleashing children’s creativity. If they can wield a pair of scissor s, kids can make the cute characters in crafter Sarah Goldschadt’ s book, “Craft-A-Day,” such as this plush Penguin (above) made of felt and snakes made from colorful socks (below) out of Brenna Maloney’s book, “Socks Appeal.” experiences. “Tired of being angry,” ‘’Easier not to move on,” ‘’The war at home,” were phrases Lampert extracted from a discussion among the participants and she wrote each phrase in marker on large notepads fastened to a classroom blackboard. As they spoke, Fernandez strummed an acoustic guitar while Lampert sang some of the phrases the students had come up with, adjusting the beat and tempo at their suggestion. Suddenly, a musical lyric emerged: “Sometimes, I wish the past is where I stayed.” A few weeks later, the group gathered at a sound studio in Union City, where they donned headphones and clearly relished the opportunity to record their collectively written tune, “Freedom,” in a profes-sional studio. “To see music heal people in that way, it’s beauti-ful, and the real incredible part is you don’t have to do anything but give in to the music,” Lampert said. She recounted how, time and again, the facilitators of the program had watched some participants start the class with shoulders slumped, hesitant to make eye contact, and afraid to speak up. Through the pro-cess of writing music they changed, she said, into group-focused, smiling, active participants unafraid to stand up and belt out a tune. MUSIC: Healing people Continued From Page 1A ASSOCIATED PRESSMusician Julio Fernandez (left) hands a guitar to Navy Petty Officer Mike Cordes during a Voices of Valor music the rapy session at Montclair State University in Montclair, N.J.



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OPINION Sunday, December 30, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A4AEDITWarning: Watch your back! Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman W e weathered our share of storms in 2012, of both the literal and figurative variety. Debbie brought much-needed rain, but far too much of it. In the weeks that followed, we often found ourselves looking sky-ward and praying it wouldn’t rain – a sentiment no one could have anticipated last spring. We’ve seen violent, senseless crime in the streets and violent, senseless death on the highway – though on the last count, far less of it. As of this writing, nine people have lost their lives on Columbia County roads this year. That’s nine too many, of course, but a far sight better than last year’s total of 31. We learned about the effects of bullying, this time not on TV, but right here at home. Our hearts still ache for young Davion Smith and his family. We saw 2,400 friends, colleagues and family members turn out for the funeral of a slain corrections officer. The outpouring of love for Ruben Howard Thomas III was as moving a scene as we’ve encoun-tered in recent memory. We’ve seen a changing of the guard on the local political scene and have high hopes for what the newcomers can deliver. We’ve seen the local economy begin to stir back to life along with that of the region, state and nation as well. We’ve still got a ways to go, but we’re getting there. It’s been a good year, in all, and we’re glad to have shared it with you. Happy New Year.See you Tuesday. See you in 2013 12/21/12: Another false alarm OUR OPINION D ecember 21, 2012, the predicted day of the Mayan Apocalypse, came and went and we are all still here. Nobody should be surprised. After all, there have been well over 100 of these doomsday forecasts, some dating back thou-sands of years. Obviously, none came true. Some early predictors had poetic names. Hilary of Poitiers, Martin of Tours, John of Toledo, Joachim of Fiore. Other names are more familiar to us today. For example, Martin Luther, Christopher Columbus, John Wesley, Herbert W. Armstrong (founder of the Worldwide Church of God), psychic Jean Dixon, Jim Jones (The Peoples’ Temple), Charles Manson, Pat Robertson, Hal Lindsay (author of “The Late, Great Planet Earth”), Louis Farrakhan, linguist Charles Berlitz, Nostradamus, Marshall Applewhite (Heaven’s Gate cult), Jerry Falwell, Isaac Newton, Edgar Cayce, Sun Myung Moon (the Unification Church), and Rev. Jonathan Edwards. Mary Bateman is my favorite. In 1806 she claimed she had a hen that laid eggs inscribed with the exact day of Christ’s return. It turned out that Mary had taken eggs already laid, writ-ten the prediction on them, and re-inserted the eggs back into the hen’s oviduct. Nice try there, Mary. One fictional man’s prediction did come true. He forecast that the world would end on a certain Monday at 12 noon. He got up that morning and headed out to enjoy a late brunch before time ran out. On the way, a speeding car hit and killed him. So, his world did end that day. Some doomsday predictors hedge their bets just in case they’re wrong. Years ago a woman went to a local school wearing a bright red shirt that said, “The world ends in three days.” She then enrolled her kids for the next school year!Old Christmas cardsDon’t throw your used Christmas cards away. Donate them to the Columbia Association for Retarded Citizens (CARC). Drop them off at the CARC headquarters at 512 Sisters Welcome Road. There is a mail drop on the front of the adminis-tration building. The cards will provide training and employment for the agen-cy’s clients. Questions? Call (386) 752-1880, exten-sion 113. Mason School flashbackToday most people drive right through Mason City, a few miles south of town, and don’t give it a second thought. All they see is a softball field and the community center. But time was when the community had a small, thriving school there where many Columbia Countians got their early education. The Mason School started in 1924 and was a consolidation of the schools at Mount Tabor, Live Oak, Ellisville, DeSoto, and Avery. It started as a grades 1-8 school and became an accredited high school just five years later. That first graduation class, (MHS 1929), had seven members: Roy Dicks, Edith Feagle, Phillip Feagle, Mable Jones, Anna Witt, Leola Witt, and Shealy Witt. The last graduating class was in 1958 when the school closed. It had had 14 seniors. Several students at Mason City made name for themselves locally. Among them, Claude Fralick became the first principal at Summers Elementary; Marlin Feagle became county attorney; Glenn Bailey became sheriff; George Graham (a teach-er) became county school superintendent; graduate Roy Dicks’ son (also Roy) served as principal at Melrose Park Elementary for 26 years; and his grand-daughter, Cherie Dicks Hill, is now principal at Westside Elementary. Sadly, the Mason City school now exists only in memory. LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com Morris WilliamsPhone: (386) 755-8183williams_h2@firn.edu372 W. Duval St.Lake City, FL 32055 Q Morris Williams is a local historian and long-time Columbia County resident. A dangerous enemy may be sneaking up behind you; one that could hurt or even kill you. It’s probably attacked and killed people you know. It can happen without you even realizing it, until it’s too late. It even stalks people in the holiday season! This dangerous enemy is called “stress.” What is stress? The definition I use in my psychology class is from the textbook Psychology, 10th Edition, by Tavris and Wade, Prentice Hall, 2006: “Stress is the physical and psychological effects we experience as a result of the way we react to changes in the surrounding environment.” Why is stress so dangerous? When we feel threatened, hormone glands send adrenalin, cortisone, and epinephrine to prepare the body for “fight or flight.” This survival response developed over thousands of years to help us deal with attack-ing wolves or tigers. In modern times, it’s little daily threats and aggravations instead of tigers. If stress continues, we can develop problems with our physical and mental health. The immune system wears down, and won’t be there to protect us from disease. What does that mean to you? Stress is not what happens in the world, or things that happen to you. Instead, it’s how you see and inter-pret the situation, how you respond to the situation, and how you feel about the situation. So instead of being a helpless victim, you can choose to take control of the situa-tion. You can decide how you want to see or interpret the situation, and what you choose to do about the situ-ation. So, stress is a psychological and physical reaction to a perceived threat. Which means, what’s impor-tant is not what happens to us in life, but how we perceive it and what we choose to do about it. This very defi-nition of stress gives us the power to do something about it. Here are some things you can do when you recognize symptoms of stress: Q Decide to think the opposite. If you feel worried, overwhelmed, or helpless, or if you’re thinking “This is awful; why me? I’m stuck, I’m powerless,” then that’s how you will feel. Instead, think: “This is merely a situation I’m in. It’s not what hap-pens to me that’s important, it’s how I choose to think about it, and what I decide to do about it. I’m going to make a choice on how I want to feel about it, and what I want to do about it.” Q Take action. Bust a move! Nothing can instill confidence more than facing a challenge head on and taking action. When you feel pressures from a job, family situa-tion, or conflicts in your world, you can choose to see these not as “problems,” but as “challenges” and “opportunities.” Find a way to see it as an opportunity to learn and grow, develop skills like problem solving, and build strength and character. “When life gives you lemons, make lemonade!” Q Build and maintain good relationships. Support from friends or family is extremely helpful in manag-ing stress. Resolve any relationship conflicts. Show respect and apprecia-tion for all the people in your life. Drop any resentments. Resenting someone hurts you more than it hurts them. Practice forgiveness. Q Enjoy your life. Make sure you save time to do things you love doing. Pursue hobbies, sports, and interests. Make the most of your free time. Q Take care of your health. Choose healthy foods and regular meals. Get outdoors and explore ways to enjoy regular physical activ-ity. Q Relax. Try a two-minute “mind vacation” during your day. Close your eyes and focus on your breath-ing. Visualize your favorite place, doing what you like doing. Research shows us that your mind really doesn’t see much difference between imagining it and actually being there. Q Turn problems into challenges and opportunities. Decide to think and act in ways to enhance your happiness. Make your life the best it can be. Robert DennyBob.Denny8@gmail.com Q Denny is a licensed mental health therapist, and teaches at Florida Gateway College. Contact him at (386) 454-4950.



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4B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012 4BSportsLady Indians take tourney BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Kasha Cook dribbles to the basket in the Lady Indians’ 44-36 win against Lafayette High to win the Country Christmas Classic on Friday. BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Rykia Jackson (back) applies pressur e to a Lafayette High player during the Lady Indians’ win in the Country Christmas Classic on Fr iday.BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Kasha Cook (left) waits for a ball to dro p over two Lafayette High defenders in the Lady Indians’ 44-36 win on Friday.BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Cenise Armstrong goes up for a shot aga inst Lafayette High on Friday.BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Khadijah Ingram (12) passes the ball to Desma Blake (right) during the Lady Indians’ 44-36 win against Lafayette High.



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This is a non-refundable rate.$30404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.65One item per ad Under $6,000 Placing An Ad Service Guide Limited to service type advertis-ing only.4 lines, one month....$92.00 $10.80 each additional lineIncludes an additional $2.00 per ad for each Wednesday insertion. DeadlinesBe Sure to Call Early You can call us at 755-5440 Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.Some people prefer to place their classified ads in person, and some ad categories will require prepay-ment. Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street.You can also fax or email your ad copy to the Reporter.FAX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the Classified Department.EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreporter.comAd is to Appear:TuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday Call by:Mon., 10:00 a.m.Mon., 10:00 a.m.Wed., 10:00 a.m.Thurs., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fax/Email by:Mon., 9:00 a.m.Mon., 9:00 a.m.Wed., 9:00 a.m.Thurs., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.These deadlines are subject to change without notice. Cancellations, Changes & Billing Questions Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject, or classify all advertisements under appropriate headings. Copy should be checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day of pub-lication. Credit for published errors will be allowed for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement which was incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be published, nor for any general, special or consequential damages. Advertising language must comply with Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition of discrimi-nation in employment, housing and public accommodations. Standard abbreviations are acceptable; how-ever, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated. Ad Errors-Please read your ad on the first day of publication. Weaccept responsibility for only the first incorrect insertion, and only the charge for the ad space in error. Please call 755-5440 immediately for prompt correc-tion and billing adjustments.CancellationsNormal advertising deadlines apply for cancellation.Billing InquiriesCall 755-5440. Should further information be required regarding payments or credit limits, your call will be trans-ferred to the accounting depart-ment. General Information In Print and Onlinewww.lakecityreporter.com Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$2504 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $.25One item per ad Under $100 Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 ServicesBANKRUPTCY DIVORCE& CHILD ISSUES other court forms assistance Reasonable / Experienced 386-961-5896 White's Trucking Services You call & We Haul! Fill Dirt, Lime Rock. AsphaltMillings, Granite, Road Rock.386-362-8763 LegalSUWANNEE RIVERWATER MANAGEMENTDISTRICTPUBLIC NOTICE OF APPLICA-TIONNotice is hereby given that pursuant to Chapter 373, Florida Statutes, the following application for permit was received on December 21, 2012:North Central Florida Catalyst Site Intermodal Park, Plum Creek Land Company, PO Box 357700, Gaines-ville, FL32635, has submitted an application for an Environmental Re-source Permit Application Number 11-0065M3, for a total project area of 2,622 acres. The project is locat-ed in Township 3 South, Range 18 East, Sections 31, 32, 33 and 34, and Township 4 South, Range 18 East, Sections 3, 4 and 5, in Columbia County.Interested persons may comment upon the application or submit a written request for a staff report con-taining proposed agency action re-garding the application by writing to the Suwannee River Water Manage-ment District, Attn: Resource Man-agement, 9225 C.R. 49, Live Oak, Florida 32060. Such comments or requests must be received by 5:00 PM within 21 days from the date of publication.No further public notice will be pro-vided regarding this application. Acopy of the staff report must be re-quested in order to remain advised of further proceedings. Substantially affected persons are entitled to re-quest an administrative hearing, pur-suant to Title 28, Florida Administra-tive Code, regarding the proposed agency action by submitting a writ-ten request after reviewing the staff report.05536519December 30, 2012 020Lost & Found 2 lost dogs 1 Beagle, brown & white, no collar. 1 Yellow Lab 80 lbs, blk collar. Last seen 12/24 in Ebenezer High Falls Area. Please Contact James Bailey at 755-7958 100Job Opportunities05536524Frito Lay Route Sales $40,000+ Full Time Open House Info Session Jan. 11th Call (386) 867-1913 to RSVP Equal Opportunity Employment M/F/D/V Construction Salesman Needed. Excellent Pay. Experience Required. 866-959-7663 ConsumerLender-SunState FCUFull-Time Position in Lake City. Experience selling financial products, proven customer relations expertise, and lending experience REQUIRED. Great pay and benefits! Application Required and available at www.sunstatefcu.org. Fax to 386-462-4686. DFWP, EOE Needed CNC Machinist Must be familiar with Lathes and Mills, send resume to Grizzly Mfg. 174 NE Cortez Ter. Lake City FL32055, or Email: guy@qiagroup.com NO PHONE CALLS/WALK-INS Hafner’s seeking Individual to cut nylon material with electric knifes & attend gun shows. 386-755-6481 100Job OpportunitiesMechanic needed at Fla.Rock & Tank Lines In White Springs. Diesel exprnc reqr'd in maintenance & repair of tractor trailers. 45-50hrs/wk Class A CDLlicense preferred. Excellent Benefits! email: mcomer@patriottrans.com or fax 904-858-9008 Mechanic needed with tools and experience. Southern Specialize Truck & Trailer. 386-752-9754 Must have a minimum of 5 yrs Exp. selling HVAC Equipment. Excellent benefits &Great pay. Call Allen 386-628-1093 SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 Service Techs & Installers Must be EPA& NATE certified. Excellent benefits & great pay. Call Allen (386) 628-1093 StarTech Computer Center Now hiring Exp Techs. Send resume to: bdj@startech.cc 120Medical EmploymentMassage Therapist Needed in a 180 Beds SNF Licensed, 1-2 years experience preferred. Part-time weekend position. E-mail resume to Greg Roberts: groberts@gulfcoasthealthcare.com or fax to: (386) 362-4417 Live Oak, FLEOE/V/D/M/F 240Schools & Education05536525Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class1/7/2013• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-1/14/13• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 407Computers HPComputer $75.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 430Garage Sales PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 440Miscellaneous 1 blk, 1 white,1 blk/wht & 1 blue Prom/Formal dress Sizes: Small to Medium Call 758-6812 after 4:30 pm 440Miscellaneous M&M Fitness Closing Sale Cybex, Nautilus, and free weight Equipment, Treadmills, Elliptical, Stairmasters, and bikes. Aerobic Steps, mats, hand weights, etc. Office furniture, copiers, & more. Great for business or home. Must sell quick. Call for prices 752-1652 630Mobile Homes forRent1/1 Cabin $475, Efficiency Apt $350 & Lots for your RVor your own Cabin. Between Lake City & G’ville. Access to I-75 & 441 (352)317-1326. 2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $700. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 3 BR/1 BA, close to town, fenced in yard, private well $800 month. & $800 deposit 386-752-7578 & 386-288-8401 3BD/2BADW on 1 acre refurbished. $850 a month with deposit. 386-438-0599 or 386-752-2765. 3Br/2Ba Mod 1/2acre (nice subd) concrete drive, wrap around deck appl's,energysaver, &thermo's ready (386) 984-5341 $800 mo Mobile Homes for rent in White Springs & Ft. White. Contact 386-623-3404 Quiet Country Park 3br/2ba $525. Very clean NO PETS! References & Deposit required 386-758-2280 640Mobile Homes forSalePalm Harbor Homes New Home Stimulus 5K For Your Used Mobile Home Any Condition 800-622-2832 ext 210 650Mobile Home & LandFSBO 5 ac lot w/ 1995 refurb. MH. 66ft long w/ new roof & wheel chair ramp. $5,000 down Owner Fin. on Balance Approx 5 miles N. of LC. 386-752-4597 OwnerFinanced 3/22.5 ac.River Access. Small down $585 mo 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 705Rooms forRent Room for Rent. Furnished, Convenient. For more information. Contact 386-965-3477 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05535481We’ve got it all!$89 Deposit Limited Avail. Call Today! Windsong Apts. *Free afterschool program386-758-8455 2 bedroom / 1 Bath Apts for rent in Live Oak. Call for price. Contact 386-623-3404 & 386-362-9806 2br/1ba duplex NWGeorgia Ave. Renovated & energy efficient. Tile floors, W/D, $475/Mo. $300 Dep. 386-755-1937 2br/1ba. Close to town. $580.mo plus deposit. Includes water & sewer. 386-965-2922 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Brandywine & Branford Apartments Now Renting 1, 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-752-3033 W. Grandview Ave. Equal Housing Opportunity TDD Number 1-800-955-8771 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRentBRANFORD VILLAS 386-935-2319 2br/1ba Apts. Now available.$570. mo. TDD number 1-800-955-8771 Equal Housing Opportunity Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A$530 month $530 deposit garbage included. No pets. 386-344-2170 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Large & clean 1br/1ba apt. CH/Alg walk in closet. Close to town. $395. mo and $350. dep. (904)563-6208 UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent3 bedroom 1 bath $630 mth and $630 deposit. CH/A Contact 377-2170 3/2 $500dep. $550 /mth, water and sewer included, off Lake Jeffrey & Honeysuckle Rd. Contact 623-5410 or 623-2203 3/2 in Woodcrest lrg fenced yrd, beautiful neighborhood, 1st, last & deposit, references & credit check. 386-984-6796 3B/2BA brick,Florida room, fireplace, 2 car carport, Large yard, quiet & private. Country Club Rd. South, $900 mo. 386-365-6228 3bdrm very spacious, 2ba, garage, CH/AFenced in backyard. $1,400 mth & $1,400 dep. Contact 386-344-1914 3br/1.5ba. Very clean, Brick great area w/bonus room. Carport, shed & Fenced (privacy) back yard. $825. mo $825. dep. Ref’s req’d. (941)920-4535 Lease with option to purchase 3/2 Brick on 1 acre $145,000. With Owner Financing Possible 386-752-5035 Ext 3114 ABAR SALES, INC. NICE 3/2 brick home w/garage in quiet neighborhood. 489 SWBrandy. $900 plus sec. dep. 386-438-4600 750Business & Office RentalsMedical, Retail and Professional Office space on East Baya near Old Country Club Rd. Call 386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622 (cell) Office or Retail Space. Many to choose from. Tom Eagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor 805Lots forSale PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 820Farms & Acreage4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com Owner financed land 1/2 to 10 acre lots. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 830Commercial Property260 S. Marion Ave. 2641 s.f of Office Space. Can be subdivided. $5-$7/sf. No CAM. Prorata for utilities. Call Mika (352) 359-604 Industrial warehouse7+ acres fenced 17,000 sq ft Barn $1,500 mo. TomEagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 940Trucks 2001 Dodge Ram 3500, V10 Magnum, extended cab, SLT, 4 WD, DRW, AT, PW, PS, red w/ tan interior, 137,000 miles, good condition. $7,900. Call 984-6606 or 758-6800REPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Linewww.lakecityreporter.com RECYCLE YOUR Lake City Reporter PublishedMonthlybythe Lake City Reporter



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4D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012 4DLIFE SUNDAY EVENING DECEMBER 30, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsAmerica’s Funniest Home Videos“Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix” (2007, Fantasy) Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint, Emma Watson. News at 11Inside Edition 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsThe Insider (N) Love-RaymondBig Bang TheoryCSI: Miami “Point of Impact” Criminal Minds (DVS) NewsSports ZoneChann 4 NewsBig Bang Theory 5-PBS 5 -Doc Martin Social club. Downton AbbCall the Midwife Holiday Special (N) Masterpiece Classic “Downton Abbey” The family gathers for Christmas. Call the Midwife Holiday Special (N) 7-CBS 7 47 47e(4:00) NFL Football Regional Coverage. (N) 60 Minutes (N) NCIS “Housekeeping” (DVS) The Good Wife “And the Law Won” The Mentalist “Blinking Red Light” Action Sports 360 9-CW 9 17 17(4:00)Dr. NoAccording to JimYourJax MusicVoid TVLaw & Order “Double Blind” Local HauntsLocal HauntsTMZ (N) The Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30e(4:00) NFL Football Regional Coverage. (N) The OT (N) The SimpsonsBob’s Burgers (PA) Family GuyAmerican Dad (PA) NewsAction Sports 360Leverage “The Stork Job” 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsFootball Night in America (N) (Live) e(:20) NFL Football (N) News CSPAN 14 210 350NewsmakersWashington This Week Q & APrime MinisterRoad to the White House Q & A WGN-A 16 239 307(5:00) “Grow Old Along With Me”Bloopers!How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine(:40) Instant Replay30 Rock30 Rock TVLAND 17 106 304RoseanneRoseanneRoseanne “BOO!” RoseanneRoseanneRoseanneLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Oprah: Where Are They Now?Oprah: Where Are They Now?Oprah: Where Are They Now?Oprah: Where Are They Now?Oprah: Where Are They Now? Hanson. Oprah: Where Are They Now? A&E 19 118 265Shipping WarsShipping WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStora ge Wars(:01) Be the Boss “Jazzercise” (N) HALL 20 185 312“Hitched for the Holidays” (2012) Joey Lawrence, Emily Hampshire. “A Holiday Engagement” (2011) Jordan Bridges, Bonnie Somerville. “A Christmas Wish” (2011, Drama) Kristy Swanson, Tess Harper. FX 22 136 248Mr. and Mrs. Smith“The Other Guys” (2010, Comedy) Will Ferrell, Mark Wahlberg, Eva Mendes.“Step Brothers” (2008, Comedy) Will Ferrell, John C. Reilly.“Wanted” (2008) James McAvoy. CNN 24 200 202CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN PresentsPiers Morgan TonightCNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents TNT 25 138 245(5:00)“Gladiator” (2000) Russell Crowe, Joaquin Phoenix. (DVS)“Transformers” (2007, Action) Shia LaBeouf, Tyrese Gibson. Two races of robots wage war on Earth. (DVS) “Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man” NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobSee Dad RunFull HouseFull HouseFull HouseThe NannyThe NannyFriendsFriends SPIKE 28 168 241“Star Wars: Ep. III”“Star Wars IV: A New Hope” (1977) Mark Hamill, Harrison Ford. Young Luke Skywalker battles evil Darth Vader.“Star Wars V: The Empire Strikes Back” (1980) Mark Hamill. MY-TV 29 32 -Hogan’s HeroesM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*H “Images” Columbo TV detective murders producer. M*A*S*HThriller “The Lethal Ladies” The Twilight ZoneThe Twilight Zone DISN 31 172 290Austin & AllyShake It Up!Shake It Up!Shake It Up!“Another Cinderella Story” (2008) Selena Gomez. (:40) Jessie(:05) JessieShake It Up!Austin & AllyAustin & Ally LIFE 32 108 252(5:00)“The Ex” (2006) Zach Braff.“Made of Honor” (2008) Patrick Dempsey, Michelle Monaghan. “The Switch” (2010) Jennifer Aniston, Jason Bateman. Premiere. (:02)“Made of Honor” (2008) USA 33 105 242Law & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims Unit BET 34 124 329Gridiron Gang“Waist Deep” (2006) Tyrese Gibson. A man’s son is inside his hijacked car. 2012 Soul Train Awards Musical celebration and performance. Apollo Live ESPN 35 140 206Strongest ManStrongest ManStrongest ManSportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter Special (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209Roll Tide/War30 for 3030 for 30 30 for 30 30 for 30 SUNSP 37 -Ship Shape TVFlorida SportsmanFishing the FlatsSport FishingSportsman’s Adv.Winterfest Boat ParadeACC Road Trip SpecialGatorZoneSaltwater Exp.Into the Blue DISCV 38 182 278Machines of Glory “Backhoe Brawl” Machines of Glory “Dig & Destroy!” (N) Machines of Glory “Carmageddon!” (N) Sun Storm (N) Bering Sea Gold “Back to the Dredge” Machines of Glory “Carmageddon!” TBS 39 139 247“Big Daddy” (1999, Comedy) Adam Sandler, Joey Lauren Adams. “Old School” (2003, Comedy) Luke Wilson, Will Ferrell. (DVS)“Old School” (2003, Comedy) Luke Wilson, Will Ferrell. (DVS) HLN 40 202 204Murder by the BookDominick Dunne: Power, PrivilegeAmerican Journey A commune. What Would You Do?What Would You Do?Dominick Dunne: Power, Privilege FNC 41 205 360FOX News Sunday With Chris WallaceFOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) FOX News Sunday With Chris WallaceStossel “What a Wonderful World” Huckabee E! 45 114 236(4:00)“A League of Their Own”True Hollywood“The Women” (2008) Meg Ryan. Betrayal strains the bond between two high-powered women. Ice Loves Coco (N)“I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry” (2007) TRAVEL 46 196 277Tastiest Places to ChowdownDrive Thru ParadiseBurger LandBurger LandMan v. FoodMan v. FoodMan v. FoodMan v. FoodMan v. FoodMan v. Food HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lHouse HuntersHunters Int’lExtreme HomesProperty Brothers “Wyatt & Whitney” House Hunters RenovationHouse HuntersHunters Int’l TLC 48 183 280Sister Wives “Polygamist Cults” Sister WivesSister WivesSister WivesSister Wives “Hard to Say Goodbye” Sister Wives: Secrets Revealed (N) Sin City Rules “Aleins Among Us” (N) HIST 49 120 269American PickersAmerican Pickers “Knuckleheads” Ax Men “Sabotage” Ax Men DJ Jeremiah is pushed to far. Bamazon “Timber!” (N) (:02) Outback Hunters “The Big One” ANPL 50 184 282Finding Bigfoot “Dances With Bigfoot” Finding Bigfoot “Bobo Marks His Turf” Gator Boys: Xtra Bites (N) Finding Bigfoot “Australian Yowie” Australia’s bigfoot-like creature. (N) Finding Bigfoot FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveThe Next Iron Chef: RedemptionSugar Dome (N) Iron Chef America (N) Chopped “Food Network Stars!” Restaurant Stakeout TBN 52 260 372T.D. JakesJoyce MeyerLeading the WayThe Blessed LifeJoel OsteenKerry ShookBelieverVoiceCre o Dollar“The Greatest Story Ever Told” (1965) Max von Sydow, Charlton Heston. FSN-FL 56 -Action Sports World TourWorld Poker Tour: Season 10World Poker Tour: Season 10The Best of Pride (N) UFC InsiderFootball PrevWorld Poker Tour: Season 10 SYFY 58 122 244“Land of the Lost” (2009, Comedy) Will Ferrell, Anna Friel.“The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian” (2008, Fantasy) Georgie Henley, Skandar Keynes, William Moseley.“Land of the Lost” (2009) AMC 60 130 254(4:00)“The Green Mile” (1999, Drama) Tom Hanks, David Morse. “The Green Mile” (1999, Drama) Tom Hanks, David Morse, Michael Clarke Duncan. A guard thinks an inmate has a supernatural power to heal. COM 62 107 249“Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story” (2004, Comedy) Vince Vaughn. (:01)“The 40-Year-Old Virgin” (2005, Romance-Comedy) Steve Carell, Catherine Keener. (:17)“The 40-Year-Old Virgin” (2005) Steve Carell. CMT 63 166 327(5:00) Them Idiots Whirled TourBlue Collar Comedy: Ten Years of Ron White: They Call Me Tater Salad(:15) Ron White’s Comedy Salute to the Troops 2012(:45) Them Idiots Whirled Tour NGWILD 108 190 283(4:00) GalapagosAmerica the WildAmerica the WildAmerica the Wild “Wolverine King” America the WildAmerica the Wild NGC 109 186 276Drugs, Inc. “Alaska Heroin Rush” Drugs, Inc. “High Stakes Vegas” Drugged “High on Alcohol” (N) Drugs, Inc. “Motor City Rush” (N) Alaska State Troopers (N) Drugs, Inc. “Motor City Rush” SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s Made ID 111 192 285Fatal Encounters “Living on the Edge” Fatal Encounters “The Road to Hell” Fatal EncountersFatal Encounters “Art Imitates Death” On the Case With Paula Zahn (N) Fatal Encounters HBO 302 300 501“Big Miracle” (2012, Adventure) John Krasinski, Kristen Bell. ‘PG’ “Safe House” (2012, Action) Denzel Washington, Ryan Reynolds. ‘R’ GirlsGirlsEnlightenedEnlightened MAX 320 310 515“Big Mommas: Like Father, Like Son” (2011) ‘PG-13’ (:45)“X-Men: First Class” (2011, Action) James McAvoy, Michael Fassbender. ‘PG-13’ “This Means War” (2012) Reese Witherspoon. ‘PG-13’ (:40) Dark Secrets SHOW 340 318 545Untold History(:45) “Real Steel” (2011) Hugh Jackman. A boxing promoter and his son build a robot ghter.“War Horse” (2011) Emily Watson. A horse sees joy and sorrow during World War I. ‘PG-13’ Three Musk. MONDAY EVENING DECEMBER 31, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) New Year’s Rockin’ Eve Celebrates Dick Clark (N) (Live) Dick Clark’s Primetime New Year’sNews at 11Dick Clark’s 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) The Insider 5-PBS 5 -JournalNightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Live From Lincoln Center (N) (Live) Downton AbbIndependent Lens “Men Who Swim” BBC World NewsTavis Smiley 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJaguars AccessTwo and Half MenHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/Mother2 Broke GirlsMike & MollyHawaii Five-0 “I Helu Pu” Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneiHeartRadio Music Festival Performances; previously unseen footage. (N) TMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family GuyFamily GuyThe SimpsonsBones “The Prisoner in the Pipe” (PA) (:01) The Mob Doctor “Sibling Rivalry” NewsAction News JaxNew Year’s Eve Live! (N) (Live) 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N)“Enchanted” (2007, Fantasy) Amy Adams, Patrick Dempsey. NBC’s New Year’s EveNewsNew Year’s CSPAN 14 210 350(5:00) Public Affairs Politics & Public Policy Today WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosWGN News at Nine (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304(:13) M*A*S*H “Lil” (6:52) M*A*S*H(:24) M*A*S*HThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Top 25 Best Oprah Show MomentsTop 25 Best Oprah Show MomentsTop 25 Best Oprah Show MomentsTop 25 Best Oprah Show MomentsTop 25 Best Oprah Show MomentsTop 25 Best Oprah Show Moments A&E 19 118 265Storage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage Wars(:01) Storage Wars(:31) Storage Wars HALL 20 185 312“The Wishing Tree” (2012, Drama) Jason Gedrick, Richard Harmon. “Mistletoe Over Manhattan” (2011, Drama) Tricia Helfer, Greg Bryk. “Matchmaker Santa” (2012) Lacey Chabert, Florence Henderson. FX 22 136 248“Step Brothers” (2008, Comedy) Will Ferrell, John C. Reilly.“Grown Ups” (2010, Comedy) Adam Sandler, Kevin James, Chris Rock.“Grown Ups” (2010, Comedy) Adam Sandler, Kevin James, Chris Rock. CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245(4:15)“Transformers” (2007) The Mentalist “Red All Over” The Mentalist “Cackle-Bladder Blood” The MentalistThe Mentalist “Red Carpet Treatment” Leverage “The Boiler Room Job” NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobDrake & Josh Drake and Josh go to Los Angeles. Full HouseFull HouseFull HouseFull HouseFull HouseFull HouseFriends(:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241“Star Wars V: The Empire”“Star Wars VI: Return of the Jedi” (1983) Mark Hamill. Luke and his allies have a confrontation with Darth Vader.“Star Wars VI: Return of the Jedi” (1983) Mark Hamill, Harrison Ford. MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*HM*A*S*HLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitSeinfeldFrasierThe Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Phineas and FerbGood Luck CharlieJessieJessie“Despicable Me” (2010) Voices of Steve Carell. Phineas and FerbDog With a BlogDog With a BlogAustin & Jessie & Ally All Star LIFE 32 108 252Wife SwapWife Swap“Pretty Woman” (1990) Richard Gere. A corporate raider hires a hooker to act as a business escort. (:01) Dance Moms USA 33 105 242NCIS Posthumous accusation. NCIS: Los Angeles “Lockup” WWE Monday Night RAW A special New Year’s Eve edition as the WWE Superstars ring in 2013. (N) (:05)“Couples Retreat” (2009) BET 34 124 329Nota.Top 100 Videos of 2012Notarized: The Top 100 Videos of 2012 (N) Notarized: The Top 100 Videos of 2012 (N) 106 & Party (N) ESPN 35 140 206e College FootballColl. Football Livee College Football Chickl-A Bowl -Clemson vs. LSU. From Atlanta. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209d College Basketball Gonzaga at Oklahoma State. (N)d College Basketball Harvard at St. Mary’s. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsNation (N) SUNSP 37 -Fight Sports: In 60TaylorMade: Outside the Ropes3 Wide LifeFlorida TravelInto the BlueReel AnimalsSport FishingShip Shape TVFlorida SportsmanFishing the FlatsSport Fishing DISCV 38 182 278(4:00) Amish Ma a “The Book of Levi” Fast N’ Loud “48 Chevy Fleetmaster” Fast N’ Loud “Holy Grail Hot Rod” Fast N’ Loud “Amazing Impala” Fast N’ Loud “Ramshackle Rambler” Fast N’ Loud “Amazing Impala” TBS 39 139 247King of QueensSeinfeldSeinfeldSeinfeldFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyConan HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressMaking It in America (N) Nancy Grace MysteriesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesNancyMystery Detectives FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity “Special” (N) The Five “New Year’s Special” All American New Year (N) (Live) E! 45 114 236Keeping Up With the KardashiansKeeping Up With the Kardashians“Knocked Up” (2007) Seth Rogen. A one-night stand has an unforeseen consequence. True HollywoodChelsea LatelyIce Loves Coco TRAVEL 46 196 27721 Sexiest Beach Bars21 Sinful Vegas Hot SpotsVegas After HoursVegas: Adults Only 2 Adult activities. Sturgis: Wild RideSturgis: Cops HGTV 47 112 229Hunters Int’lHunters Int’lHunters Int’lHunters Int’lHouse HuntersHouse HuntersHouse HuntersHouse HuntersHouse HuntersHouse HuntersHouse HuntersHouse Hunters TLC 48 183 280Cake Boss: Next Great BakerCake Boss: Next Great BakerCake Boss: Next Great BakerCake Boss: Next Great Baker (N) Cake BossCake BossCake Boss: Next Great Baker HIST 49 120 269Pawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn Stars(:31) Pawn Stars(:02) Pawn Stars(:32) Pawn Stars ANPL 50 184 282Tanked “Roll With It” Tanked “On the Road Again” TankedTanked Working with family members. Tanked “Midwest Zest” Eating the EnemyEating the Enemy FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, Drive-Ins and Dives TBN 52 260 372(4:30)“The Ten Commandments” (1956) The Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesLiving EdgeKingdom Conn.Jesse Duplantis“One Night With the King” (2006, Drama) Tiffany Dupont, Luke Goss. FSN-FL 56 -d(5:00) NBA Basketball Miami Heat at Orlando Magic. Magic Live! (Live) Inside the MagicInside the MagicEnglish Premier League Review ShowWorld Poker Tour: Season 10World Poker Tour: Season 10 SYFY 58 122 244The Twilight ZoneThe Twilight ZoneThe Twilight ZoneThe Twilight ZoneThe Twilight ZoneThe Twilight ZoneThe Twilight ZoneThe Twilight ZoneThe Twilight ZoneThe Twilight ZoneThe Twilight ZoneThe Twilight Zone AMC 60 130 254“The Fifth Element” (1997) Bruce Willis, Gary Oldman. A New York cabby tries to save Earth in 2259. The Walking Dead “Seed” (:01) The Walking Dead “Sick” (:02) The Walking Dead COM 62 107 249“Austin Powers in Goldmember” (2002, Comedy) Mike Myers. “Wedding Crashers” (2005, Comedy) Owen Wilson, Vince Vaughn, Christopher Walken. South Park “Pee” South ParkSouth Park CMT 63 166 327RebaRebaReba “Surprise” RebaRebaRebaChainsaw GangChainsaw GangChainsaw GangChainsaw GangChainsaw GangChainsaw Gang NGWILD 108 190 283Untamed AmericasUntamed AmericasWild Wives of AfricaWild Wives of AfricaWild Wives of AfricaWild Wives of Africa NGC 109 186 276Locked Up AbroadEvacuate Earth How humans would evacuate Earth. Maya Underworld: The Real DoomsdayThe Mayan Apocalypse 2012Maya Underworld: The Real Doomsday SCIENCE 110 193 284They Do It?They Do It?They Do It?They Do It?They Do It?They Do It?They Do It?They Do It?They Do It?They Do It?They Do It?They Do It? ID 111 192 285Scorned: Love KillsScorned: Love KillsScorned: Love KillsScorned: Love KillsScorned: Love Kills “Hot and Sweet” Scorned: Love Kills HBO 302 300 501(5:30)“Elektra” (2005) ‘PG-13’ (:15)“Johnny English Reborn” (2011, Comedy) Rowan Atkinson. ‘PG’ “New Year’s Eve” (2011, Romance-Comedy) Halle Berry. ‘PG-13’ “Contraband” (2012) ‘R’ MAX 320 310 515(5:50) Strike Back(:40) Strike BackStrike Back(:20) Strike Back(:10) Strike BackStrike Back(10:50) Strike Back(:40) Strike Back SHOW 340 318 545(:15)“Fright Night” (2011, Horror) Anton Yelchin, Colin Farrell. ‘R’ Untold History of the United States (N) D.L. Hughley: ResetAndrew Dice Clay: Indestructible (N) Katt Williams: Kattpacalypse WEEKDAY AFTERNOON Comcast Dish DirecTV 12 PM12:301 PM1:302 PM2:303 PM3:304 PM4:305 PM5:30 3-ABC 3 -NewsBe a MillionaireThe ChewGeneral HospitalMauryDr. PhilVaried ProgramsBe a MillionaireNews 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsPaid ProgramPaid ProgramAndy Grif th ShowThe Jeff Probst ShowSteve HarveyThe Dr. Oz ShowChann 4 NewsChann 4 News 5-PBS 5 -WordWorldBarney & FriendsCaillouDaniel TigerSuper Why!Dinosaur TrainCat in the HatCurious GeorgeWild KrattsElectric Comp.R. Steves’ EuropeNightly Business 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxThe Young and the RestlessBold/BeautifulThe TalkLet’s Make a DealJudge Joe BrownJudge JudyAction News JaxAction News Jax 9-CW 9 17 17The Trisha Goddard ShowLaw & Order: Criminal IntentJudge MathisThe Bill Cunningham ShowMauryThe People’s Court 10-FOX 10 30 30Jerry SpringerThe Jeremy Kyle ShowJudge Joe BrownWe the PeopleThe DoctorsDr. PhilFamily FeudFamily Feud 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsBe a MillionaireDays of our LivesFirst Coast LivingKatie The Ellen DeGeneres ShowNewsNews CSPAN 14 210 350(9:00) Public AffairsPublic AffairsVaried Programs Public Affairs WGN-A 16 239 307Heat of the NightVaried ProgramsWGN Midday NewsVaried ProgramsWalker, RangerVaried ProgramsWalker, RangerVaried ProgramsWalker, RangerVaried ProgramsLaw Order: CIVaried Programs TVLAND 17 106 304Andy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowVaried ProgramsGunsmokeVaried ProgramsBonanzaVaried Programs OWN 18 189 279Dr. PhilDr. PhilVaried Programs A&E 19 118 265CSI: MiamiVaried ProgramsCriminal MindsVaried ProgramsCriminal MindsVaried ProgramsThe First 48Varied ProgramsThe First 48Varied ProgramsThe First 48Varied Programs HALL 20 185 312Marie Marie Varied Programs MovieVaried Programs FX 22 136 248MovieVaried ProgramsMovie Varied ProgramsHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/Mother CNN 24 200 202CNN Newsroom CNN Newsroom The Situation Room TNT 25 138 245Varied Programs NIK 26 170 299Varied ProgramsOdd ParentsVaried ProgramsSpongeBobSpongeBobVaried Programs SpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBob SPIKE 28 168 241Varied Programs MY-TV 29 32 -Hawaii Five-0Varied ProgramsGunsmokeVaried ProgramsBonanzaVaried ProgramsThe Big ValleyVaried ProgramsWild, Wild WestVaried ProgramsEmergency!Varied Programs DISN 31 172 290Mickey MouseLittle EinsteinsVaried Programs Wizards-PlaceVaried Programs LIFE 32 108 252Varied ProgramsHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherVaried Programs Wife SwapWife Swap USA 33 105 242Varied Programs NCIS NCIS NCIS NCIS BET 34 124 329Varied Programs ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenterSportsCenterVaried Programs ESPN2 36 144 209First Take Varied ProgramsOutside the LinesVaried Programs NFL32Varied Programs SUNSP 37 -Varied Programs DISCV 38 182 278Varied Programs TBS 39 139 247American DadVaried ProgramsLove-RaymondVaried ProgramsLove-RaymondFriendsFriendsFriendsFriendsKing of Queens HLN 40 202 204News Now Making It in AmericaEvening Express FNC 41 205 360(11:00) Happening NowAmerica LiveVaried ProgramsStudio B With Shepard SmithYour World With Neil CavutoThe Five E! 45 114 236Varied ProgramsSex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CityVaried Programs TRAVEL 46 196 277Varied Programs HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lVaried Programs TLC 48 183 280Varied Programs HIST 49 120 269Varied Programs ANPL 50 184 282Varied Programs FOOD 51 110 231Best DishesBarefoot ContessaVaried Programs10 Dollar DinnersSecrets/Restaurant30-Minute MealsGiada at HomeGiada at HomeBarefoot ContessaBarefoot ContessaBest DishesVaried Programs TBN 52 260 372Varied ProgramsBehind the ScenesVaried ProgramsJames RobisonTodayThe 700 ClubJohn Hagee TodayVaried Programs FSN-FL 56 -Varied Programs SYFY 58 122 244Varied Programs AMC 60 130 254(10:00) MovieVaried Programs Movie COM 62 107 249MovieVaried Programs Movie Varied Programs(:26) Futurama(4:57) FuturamaIt’s Always Sunny CMT 63 166 327Varied Programs (:05) World’s Strictest ParentsVaried Programs(:15) RoseanneRoseanne(4:50) Roseanne(:25) Roseanne NGWILD 108 190 283Dog WhispererVaried Programs NGC 109 186 276Alaska State TroopersBorder WarsTabooVaried Programs SCIENCE 110 193 284Varied Programs MythBustersVaried ProgramsThey Do It?They Do It? ID 111 192 285Varied Programs HBO 302 300 501(11:30) MovieVaried Programs MAX 320 310 515(11:20) MovieVaried Programs SHOW 340 318 545(11:00) MovieVaried Programs



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LAKE CITY REPORTER TOP STORIES OF 2012 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012 5A 5A BELK.COM 30-50 % off Mens sportswear by Chaps, Izod, Columbia, Saddlebred & more Orig. 24.00-50.00, Sale 13.99-24.99 30-50 % off ENTIRE STOCK sheets & towels Shown: Home Accents 350-thread count wrinkle-free sheet sets by Home Accents Orig. 70.00-90.00 Sale 39.99-59.99 Home Accents Egyptian Luxe towels Orig. 8.00-16.00, Sale 4.99-9.99 *If youre 55 or older, take an extra 20% off storewide, or 15% off in our home & shoes departments with your Belk Rewards Card; 15% off storewide, 10% off in our home & shoes departments with any other form of payment, on your sale purchases. Only excludes Red Dot, Clearance, Earlybirds, Night Owls, Doorbusters, Bonus Buys, Everyday Values, Alegria, All Clad, Austin Reed, Ben Sherman, Brighton, btemptd, Buffalo, Casio, Citizens of Humanity, Coach, Cole Haan, Columbia, cosmetics/fragrances, Dansko, designer handbags, designer sunglasses, Dockers, Donald J Pliner, Dooney & Bourke, Eileen Fisher; Fine Jewelry watches, trunk shows and service plans; Free People, Furla, Gameday, Gear For Sports, Hanky Panky, Hart Schafner Marx, Herend, Hickey Freeman, Hugo Boss, Joseph Abboud, Kate Spade, Keen, kitchen/novelty electrics/ coffee, Lacoste, ladies better swim, ladies designer & contemporary sportswear & dresses; ladies, kids & mens designer shoes; Le Creuset, Levis, Lilly Pulitzer, Lucky, Mattel, Merrell, Minnetonka Moccasin, Miss Me, Munro, Nautica, Original Penguin, Ralph Lauren/Polo, Roberto Coin, Seven for All Mankind, Spanx, Stuart Weitzman, Thomas Dean, Tommy Bahama, Tumi, Ugg, Under Armour, Vineyard Vines, Wacoal, Wusthof; non-merchandise depts., lease depts. and Belk gift cards. Not valid on prior purchases, phone or special orders. Cannot be redeemed for cash, credit or refund, used in combination with any other discount or coupon offer or on belk.com. Valid January 1, 2013 RED DOT: *Limited exclusions in Brighton, St. John, Eileen Fisher, Lilly Pulitzer, Resort, Bridge Collection, Levis, Coach, designer handbags and junior denim. Juniors total savings are 70-80% off. Fashion Accessories, Handbags, Small Leather Goods, Hosiery, Home Store and Mens Tailored Clothing total savings are 60-75%. COUPONS NOT VALID ON RED DOT 30-50 % off Better sportswear from Rafaella, Madison, Jones New York Sport, Sunny Leigh & more for misses & petites. Orig. 24.00-119.00 Sale 11.99-82.99 Also available in todays woman sizes at slightly higher prices 30 % off Be Inspired active sets Orig. 24.00-59.00, Sale 16.80-41.30 Plus, 55% off Kim Rogers and Jane Ashley activewear for misses, petites & todays woman Orig. 30.00-48.00, Sale 13.50-21.60 40-60 % off Ladies boots from Madden Girl, Rampage, LifeStride, Rock & Candy by ZiGi, Kim Rogers, ND New Directions, Naturalizer, White Mountain, Easy Spirit, b..c, Eurosft and Unlisted, a Kenneth Cole Production orig. 59.00-179.00, Sale 29.50-131.40 50 % off ENTIRE STOCK* Fall & holiday kids sportswear sets, dresses, outerwear, sleepwear from J Khaki, OshKosh, Rare Editions, Bonnie Jean & more Orig. 10.00-100.00, Sale 5.00-50.00 *Offer excludes Columbia senior Tuesday, Jan. 1 % OFF EXTRA 20 senior DAY *See below for details. In store only 1 5 % o ff r e d d o t c l ea r a n c e 7 5 % 50 % o ff the current ticketed price* when you take an e x tra save 25-50 % off ENTIRE STOCK kitchen electrics A. KitchenAid blender, 5-speeds to stir, chop, mix, puree, or liquify Orig. 149.99, Sale 99.99 B. Keurig Elite 40 brewer with three cup sizes, 6 oz., 8 oz. and 10 oz. Orig. 179.99, Sale 119.99 C. K-cup tower Orig. 39.99, Sale 24.99 K cups, 11.99-34.99 D. Cuisinart toaster With 6 settings Orig. 79.99, Sale 49.99 celebrate new beginnings 25-50 % off A B C D Special store hours: Mon. 9am-8pm Tues. close 7pm Dewey Edward Martin Dewey Edward Martin Papa Bear, 50, of High Springs, Fl passed away on December 24, 2012. Dewey was born Sep tember 4, 1962 to Dew ey and Dorothy Martin. He is survived by his wife Kathy Martin, his mother Dorothy Martin, one son Thomas Mar tin of Ft. White, three daugh ters Jennifer Deughtery of Lake City, Charlotte Hull of Ft. White, and Maranda Martin of Ft. White, one brother Steve Mar tin of High Springs, two sisters Cynthia Martin of Inverness, and Sandra Bray of Old Town, and Four Grandchildren Sarah ann and Penny Deughtery, and Michael and Colton Hull all of Ft. White. A visitation will be held from 3:00 5:00 PM Sunday Decem ber 30, 2012 at Evans-Carter Funeral Home. Funeral services will be held at 10:00 AM Monday December 31, 2012 at High Springs Church of God, High Springs, FL. Arrangements under the care of EVANS-CARTER FUNERAL HOME High Springs, FL.Stephen Micheal Cordle Stephen Micheal Cordle, age 22, of Ft. White, Florida passed away Monday, December 24, 2012 from injuries sustained in an automobile accident near White Springs. Stephen Micheal was born in Jasper, Florida on April 23, 1990 and was em ployed by Industry Services in Lake City, FL. Survivors include his wife of 8 months, Ginny W. Cordle and his daughter, Payten Kay Corbett; his father, Stephen S. Cordle and step-mother Ginger; his mother, Yvonne M. Farnell; two brothers, Keith Cordl. and Dillon Putnel; two step sisters, Traci McCormick (Rick) and Amy Steed (Aaron) ; grandparents, William T. Cordle and Susan Cordle. Stephen was so proud of his new family that included his mother-in-law, Patty Wagoner Mitchell who he called Mom, a sister-in-law, Katlyn Mitchell and grandfa ther-in-law, John Wagoner. Funeral services will be held at 1:00 P.M. on Wednesday, Janu ary 2, 2012 at the First Presbyte rian Church in Jasper, FL. Inter ment will follow in Live Oak Cemetery, Live Oak, Florida. The family will receive friends at the church on Wednesday, Dec. 2nd beginning at noon. Obituaries are paid advertise ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporters classified depart ment at 752-1293. OBITUARIES Middle-schooler commits suicide due to bullying A Lake City middle schooler committed suicide just days before the start of his eighth grade year. Relentless bullying caused Davion Markhel Smith to take his own life, his mother Charita Williams said. His death resulted in the school district to focus on anti-bullying throughout the school year, including the holding of a Unity Day at the Lake City Mall in October. The anti-bullying event served as a way to remem ber Davion and prevent others from also suffering from taunting, teasing and harassment. At the Unity Day event, Assistant School Superintendent Lex Carswell encouraged all students to report incidents of bullying. Mountaintop Ministries Worldwide, a Lake City church long viewed with skepti cism by some in the community, broke its decades-long silence in Febuary. Church leaders opened their worship center, on County Road 240, to report ers for what leaders said was their first ever news confer ence. Church leaders debunked myths sur rounding the church. Senior Pastor James Burbach said there are no animal sac rifices, no armed guards, no ammuni tion stored in a base ment, and the build ing does not tip over to become an ark. Church officials did not ban mem bers from seeking medical attention, and members arent required to drive cer tain brands of luxury vehicles, he said. The Cadillac has nothing to do with our religion. I drive a Range Rover, Burbach said. The 2012 elections saw new a number of faces elected. A new superintendent, county commissioner, state attorney, public defender, circuit judge and two new school board members were elected. Terry Huddleston was elected superintendent of schools after a hard-fought campaign against local businessman and former school board member Glenn Hunter. The Third Judicial Circuit saw Wes Douglas become the new circuit judge for group 5 and Jeff Siegmeister become the new state attor ney. Blair Payne was elect ed public defender for the Third Judicial Circuit. Dana Brady and Stephanie Finnell were elected to the school board. Bucky Nash was elected to the county commission by the voters of District 3. Local elections bring turnover in several offices Mountaintop Ministries opens up FILE Newly elected Columbia County Superintendent of Schools Terry Huddleston (right) hugs his mother on election night after learning he had won a hard-fought battle for the office. FILE Charita Williams, whose son Davion Smith committed suicide due to bullying, speaks at Unity day Oct. 10. FILE Officials of Mountaintop Ministries at a press conference in February.



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DEAR ABBY: My sister, the mother of three boys, is now unable to take care of them. My family is ask-ing me and my new hus-band to take them in. To me it’s a no-brainer -something I’d do in a heartbeat. My husband refuses! He says that if we do, we’ll never have chil-dren of our own. I feel like I’m being forced to choose between my husband and my nephews. What would you do? -PULLED IN TWO IN CINCINNATI DEAR PULLED IN TWO: I’d keep talking to my husband about it, and find out why he thinks that taking in your nephews would prevent you from having children of your own. If the reasons are financial, perhaps he’d be more open to the idea if the rest of the family is willing to chip in. If that’s not the case, then you will have some serious choices to make. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: I have been with my wonderful wife for 35 years.However, an interloper has come between us, interfering with our ability to commu-nicate. Her cellphone has taken over her life. She’s constantly playing word games with 12 different friends, texting, etc. It starts first thing in the morning and lasts into the night. I returned my cellphone after two weeks when I saw the writing on the wall. My wife and I used to sit together and have nice conversations. Now they are interrupted by weird noises when her phone announces she has anoth-er text. Is this my future? -MISSING FACE TIME IN ARIZONA DEAR MISSING: Yes, unless you are able to negotiate an agreed-upon period of time during which you are your wife’s first priority and her cell-phone is turned off. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: After two years of dating, my girl-friend, “Noelle,” and I have become engaged. I asked for her father’s blessing, and after first telling me he wanted a few weeks to think about it, he said yes. He then complained because he thought I’d ask him “somewhere with less distractions.” (We were at the house, alone. He was sitting on the couch and I was in a chair.) I think he was just looking for some-thing to gripe about. After receiving his blessing, I proposed. Her dad says he’s happy for us, but keeps acting like the wed-ding is years away. He calls Noelle and tells her who he wants her to invite, but seems surprised to find out it costs money. He’s break-ing her heart. I am buying a condo, so I don’t have much money available, but I have offered to help as much as I can. It’s killing Noelle to have her father act this way. Is there any-thing I can do to get him to realize he’s ruining this for his daughter? -STRESSED-OUT GROOM, REDWOOD CITY, CALIF. DEAR STRESSED OUT: Probably not, but you could relieve the stress on everyone by talking Noelle into a romantic elopement. DEAR ABBY HOROSCOPES ARIES (March 21-April 19): Do whatever pleases you the most. A little pam-pering or socializing will help you lose that anxious feeling. Consider attending an event or activity that is conducive to meeting someone special. +++++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You may have trouble getting along with the people you live with, so venture out and take part in activities that stimulate your imagination. Short trips or attending a semi-nar will broaden your out-look and help you consider a new direction. ++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Put some push behind whatever you decide to do. It’s important not to put things off or ignore the people you care about most. ++++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Questioning your past, present and future will help you find a better path. Look for the perfect outfit to wear or place to bring in the New Year. +++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Emotions will be hard to contain. Try not to let your feelings lead you into a battle you cannot finish. Make love, not war or you will begin the upcoming year on a sour note that will stand in the way of your plans. +++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Get out and about, offering your time and services to those in need. Make sure that you take care of year-end responsi-bilities to ease your mind. +++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Travel about, visiting friends, relatives or those you want to connect with before the year comes to a close. Touching base with others will send a message that you don’t want to lose contact. ++++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Stick to what and whom you know best. Don’t take on a responsi-bility that doesn’t belong to you. Emotional upset must be turned into affection and greater understanding, not a wedge that will come between you and someone special. ++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Touch base with all the people you want to continue to work and play with throughout the upcoming year. It’s impor-tant to let others know where you stand, where you are headed, and how everyone fits into your future plans. +++++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Hard work will pay off. Once you have your responsibilities out of the way, you can begin to enjoy and look forward to what’s to come. Lining up your itinerary for the upcoming months will make you feel prepared for what’s to come. +++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Don’t get angry because you feel stuck or limited do to the actions of others. Discuss your plans for the upcoming festivities and make sure the people you are dealing with are fully aware of the respon-sibilities that must be hon-ored. ++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): An emotional problem will arise if you or some-one you like isn’t attentive. 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Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. CELEBRITY CIPHER Page Editor: Emma Graham 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012 5D



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6A LAKE CITY REPORTER TOP STORIES OF 2012 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04246ACity police deal with controversies FILEA Lake City Police Department K-9 unit dog was found dea d in this kennel in the backyard of its handler’s house. A n investigation that indicated the dog may have died elsewh ere resulted in a written reprimand for the handler.FILEThis architect’s rendering shows the layout of a proposed event center. The plan to build an events center in Colum bia County surfaced again this year. The proposed events center is e stimated to cost $28 million. The county commission’s requ est for proposals for land to build the events center on turned u p two sites — both in Ellisville — but because of state-m andated time limits on requests for proposals, new proposals wil l eventually have to be sought. While officials say two p roposals were submitted, only one is on file at the county office. Allegations of “waste misappropriation and potential liability associated with the North Florida Broadband Authority” proved too much for county commis-sioners, who voted unani-mously in November to withdraw from the NFBA. The NFBA was tasked with building the infra-structure of a highspeed internet network in rural North Central Florida by the federal government. The federal government also funded the project with $30 million. The county commission’s decision to leave the NFBA came less than a month after the NFBA officials requested space on county communication towers. The county commission asked for more informa-tion about the equipment and the load of the equip-ment on the towers. The information didn’t materialize before the commissioners decided to withdraw from the NFBA. Jeff Siegmeister won the state attorney’s race after Robert L. “Skip” Jarvis became the target of a grand jury investigation into improper use state law enforcement databases and dropped out of the race. The investigation into Jarvis’s improper use of state law enforcement data-bases was sparked by a for-mer Assistant State Attorney Michael J. San Filippo. He filed a complaint with the Florida Department of Law Enforcement after Jarvis allegedly used the National Crime Information Center to look at legal records con-cerning San Filippo’s wife. A grand jury was convened to investigate the matter. However, Fifth Circuit State Attorney Brad King, placed in charge of the investigation by the gov-ernor, said if Jarvis ended his bid for re-election he would stop the probe. Bill Brannon was selected by leaders in the Florida Democratic Party to be the party’s nominee for the office after Jarvis dropped out. Brannon lost the election, 42,304 votes to 32,896. Rajni Patel, a local convenience store owner, was killed during a robbery in April. One of the suspects has been caught. James Leonard Johnson was arrested by Florida Department of Law Enforcement agents at a Gate service station in Jacksonville in May. The alleged shooter, Ernest Larry Grandison, is the father-in-law of Johnson, according to mar-riage records from Franklin County, Ohio. Patel’s wife said the gunman shot at her, but she was unhurt. Grandison was a regular costumer at the store and would buy scratch-off lot-tery tickets. Grandison remains at large. The Lake City Police Department faced a number of controversies in 2012. Lake City businesswoman Ruby Earline Parker, 87, died in February following a September 2011 traffic crash in which her vehicle was struck by an LCPD patrol car. The cruiser, which was not on a call and did not have emergency lights or siren activated, was travel-ing at an estimated 76 mph in a 45 mph zone, a Florida Highway Patrol report said. Officer David Broom, also injured in the crash, was fired in June. Parker remained hospitalized or in a rehabilitation center after the crash until her death. In another development, former LCPD Capt. John Blanchard resigned in February following alle-gations he took at least $195,000 and a 10 acre plot of land from a local wealthy, elderly woman he met while investigating a case. An LCPD internal investigation later found Blanchard’s conduct “unbe-coming” and in violation of department policy. In January, an investigation into the death of a K-9 unit dog revealed the death scene may have been staged, according to one veterinarian who examined the case file. A second vet-erinarian disagreed. Robert Smith, who was hand-picked after a nation-wide search to be the sec-ond in command at LCPD, filed a discrimination and harassment complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission against the department in May following his firing a month earlier. Before he filed suit, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission dismissed Smith’s claims that he was the victim of discrimination and that he was retaliated against by his superiors. A Lake City-based title company faces legal trouble over funds allegedly missing from its escrow accounts, according to court papers filed in Jacksonville. About $190,000 is missing from the accounts of Sierra Title LLC, of Lake City, the plantiff Chicago Title Insurance alleges. Money in the account was from third-party depositors for purchase of real estate or in connection with real estate closing transatctions, and may include payments for title insurance, Chicago Title says. Chicago Title was granted an emergency injuction in a Duval County Circuit Court in August to freeze all funds in Sierra’s escrow accounts. The emergency injuction was issued after an earli-er voluntary freeze on the accounts was not honored, court records show. The case is still in court. FILELaw enforcement officers and other mourners leave the fun eral of Columbia County Corrections Officer Ruben Howar d Thomas III on March 23 at Christ Central Ministries. Thomas w as killed by an inmate at the Columbia Correctional Insti tution on March 18. A lifelong resident of Lake City, Thomas was called “Little Ruben” as a child, but he shied away from attention as an adult. However, ‘when he was a little feller, oh, did he like attention,’ said his grandfather, the Rev. Howard Th omas, who presided at the service. ‘I’m sure he’d appreciate th e attention that’s going on today.’ 3 restaurants coming hereThis year Lake City saw three restaurant chains prepare to set up shop on U.S. 90 West. An Olive Garden and a LongHorn Steakhouse are under construction, and a Chick-fil-A is expected to start construction soon. The Olive Garden and LongHorn Steakhouse are owned by Darden Restaurants, Inc. The Chick-fil-A will be constructed near the Days Inn and the Burger King on US 90 where there was a BP gas station. All three restaurants expect to be open in the spring. Fallen corrections officer mournedStore owner killed in robbery; suspect remains at large Impropriety allegations cost state attorney re-election bid Internet authority’s work brought into questionFILEThis still photo made from a surveillance camera video shows the robber who allegedly shot and killed Rajni Patel. Event center at Ellisville proposed FILEEventual winner of the state attorney race, Jeff Siegmeister (seated at center), watches election returns in his law of fice. Missing money troublefor title insurance firm FILE FILESierra Title LLC’s office in Lake City.



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6D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04246DLIFEBy KAREN SCHWARTZAssociated PressSANIBEL — Visit the beaches on this Gulf Coast barrier island and you’re likely to see people doing the Sanibel Stoop. That’s the term for the bent-at-the-waist posture used to collect seashells on Sanibel Island, which bills itself as one of the best shelling locations in the world. The island also offers 15 miles of beach, 22 miles of bike paths, and the largest undeveloped man-grove ecosystem in the country. While other beach destinations in Florida might attract partying spring breakers or glamorous fashionistas, Sanibel proved to be the perfect spot for a family looking for a quiet beach retreat at the height of spring break revelry. What we didn’t find was nightlife, high rises, chain stores, fast-food burger joints, traffic lights or insects. Even travel guru Arthur Frommer, who’s seen more than a few beaches, has named it a favorite destination, calling it an “idyllic haven of white-sand beaches” with “thousands of birds of every species.” The first sign that we’d hit on something special came soon after we landed at the Fort Myers airport, where tourism kiosks handed out free pocket-sized Lonely Planet travel guides to the area. The drive from the airport west to Sanibel generally takes less than an hour, but timing is everything. A toll bridge con-nects Sanibel to the mainland, and the morning rush hour heading on-island and evening rush hour heading off-island can add another 45 minutes onto the trip during high season, which begins mid-January and peaks mid-March through mid-April. We stopped en route at one of the several Publix markets to stock up on groceries for our rented condo. But it turned out that two markets on the island, Jerry’s Foods and Bailey’s General Store, will deliver items ordered online to your rental for $25. Groceries also proved largely unnecessary once we discovered the caliber of local restaurants and opted to eat out most evenings. Traders Cafe and Mad Hatter, both innovative and outstanding, took reservations. Others had “call-ahead seating” which put our name on a waiting list ahead of the walk-ins. The rest generally had a wait of up to 30 minutes. With as many as 30,000 people on the island during high season, biking is the easiest way to get around. But here’s a tip: Friends don’t let friends ride at night with-out lights. Knowing that we’d be biking, we brought our hel-mets (required by law for children under 16), along with small head-lights and taillights for our bikes. Even so, with no streetlights on the island and plenty of pedestri-ans and cyclists on the paths after dark, the trip home proved hairy. Some hotels provide bikes for their guests and the bike rental shops on the island will deliver and pickup for a fee. It pays to shop around as prices vary. Beach equipment can also be rented. Golf, tennis and fishing are also popular options on the island, but no trip here would be complete without two things: the beach-es and the J. N. “Ding” Darling National Wildlife Refuge. Over two-thirds of Sanibel is a nature reserve, with the ref-uge making much of it wonder-fully accessible by car or bike. We opted for a 90-minute kayak tour through the mangrove, and almost immediately caught a brief glimpse of a river otter. An assort-ment of the 230 species of birds on the island from anhingas to woodpeckers kept us busy taking pictures, while our knowledge-able guide pointed out horse-shoe crabs, flying mullet and a water snake. We so enjoyed the trip through the mangrove that we returned later for a pontoon boat tour, where we saw manatees and more birds, but unfortunately, no dolphins. The beaches themselves were lovely. The one we frequented was far from crowded, with room to play Frisbee or fly a kite with-out bumping into anyone. The waves were gentle and it was shallow for a long way out, mak-ing it ideal for children. Other beaches, like Blind Pass, have stronger currents and aren’t suit-able for swimming. A small disappointment for us ironically was the shelling. The 10-mile-long island is situated east-west, making the south side the place to scoop for shells being carried on the current from the Caribbean and other southern seas. The beaches we explored had an infinite number of shells, but they were run-of-the mill cockles and clam. We didn’t find any of the whelks, conchs, tulips and ceriths that feature prominent-ly in the marketing brochures. Then again, we weren’t beach-combing at dawn like the true devotees, nor did we follow the recommendations to check the tide tables, snorkel for shells or search after dark. But there are plenty who do take the shell hunt quite seriously. Among Sanibel’s claim to fame is a Guinness World Record for the largest treasure hunt, set last February when 478 people simul-taneously did the Sanibel Stoop, searching for seashells. Sanibel Island offers quiet beaches, moreSeashells, wildlife are big draws for this idyllic getaway spot. ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOSBy TAMARA LUSHAssociated PressFORT DE SOTO PARK — Picture this: You’re sitting on a white sand beach, warm sun on your skin. Coconut-scented sunscreen wafts through the air. A splashing noise comes from the blue Gulf of Mexico. It’s your dog, happily retrieving his favor-ite ball from the water. This could be your vacation, with a bit of planning. With miles of sandy beaches, endless winter sunshine and a laid-back vibe, there’s no reason to leave your four-legged friend behind when you vacation in Florida. From lodging that offers special pet beds, to beaches with off-leash play, to theme parks with nearby kennels, many places around the state accommodate visitors with pets. Many Florida state parks also allow leashed dogs. Lodging with your dog can be as rustic as a camp-ground or as ritzy as, well, the Ritz Carlton. In places like Key West or Sanibel Island — where all beaches are open to leashed dogs — unique and funky pet-friendly accommodations are easy to find in various price ranges. Most counties have their own tourism boards and many have specific pages on their websites about pet-friendly activities, res-taurants and hotels. Visit Florida has lots of infor-mation at http://www.visit florida.com/Pet_Friendly_ Florida. Jeannette Scott, a fashion blogger from Orlando, took her shih tzu-Yorkie mix named Bella on a three-day trip in June. Together, they drove three hours to Fort Myers, boarded a ferry to Key West, stayed at a Sheraton that offered a doggie bed for Bella, and posed for photos in front of a frozen yogurt stand that carried Yoghund, a froyo for doggies. “She thought it was really fun to get away and go on adventure instead of stay-ing at home,” said Scott. If your dog might enjoy the same, here are some dog-friendly destinations around Florida, along with lodging advice and gen-eral tips for traveling here with pets.Doggy destinationsQ Dog Beach and Paw Playground at Fort De Soto State Park. In 2010, Southern Living magazine named this spot in Pinellas County on Florida’s West Coast one of the top five dog beaches in the South. You only need to set one paw onto the sugary sand to know why: It’s a gor-geous and peaceful place. The Gulf of Mexico is usu-ally warm and calm, and dogs of all sizes love to play in the soft surf. Dogs can run on the beach and swim off-leash, then enjoy a large, adjacent fenced-in grassy dog park area. There are water fountains, waste bags and a place to wash salt out of dog fur. Admission to the park area is $5. Q Dinosaur World in Plant City. Who loves dinosaurs? Dogs, that’s who. Located halfway between Tampa and Disney, Dinosaur World is a park featuring 150 giant dinosaur statues and trails winding through the lush Florida land-scape. Leashed dogs are welcome on the trails and it’s a great opportunity to snap a photo of your pooch with a giant Stegosaurus (some intrepid bloggers have gotten shots of their dogs posing inside a dino-saur’s mouth). Tickets are $14.95, dogs are free; open daily. Q Dog Wood Park, Jacksonville. This 25-acre, privately owned park is heaven for dogs. It’s all off-leash and entirely fenced in, from the pond to the grassy knoll to the trails. A separate small area nearby has chairs where owners can sip coffee and chat. There are two ponds, Lake Bow Wow for the big dogs and Lake Fifi for little ones, plus doggie sand piles, shady areas and tires for dogs to climb on. Day vis-its are $11, including tax. Additional services, like use of the park’s indoor dog wash area, are extra. Q The Fountain of Youth in St. Augustine. Spanish explorer Pedro Menendez de Aviles dis-covered this spring in 1565 and the Timucua Indians lived here for 4,000 years before that. You and your dog can sniff around and drink from the fountain. Tickets are $12. Q Downtown Naples. A great place to stroll with your pet while embracing tropical Florida, downtown Naples has lots of outdoor cafes, bars and restaurants where you can dine al fres-co with your dog. Several stores — Diva Doghouse, For Footed Friends, Pucci & Catana and Fergie’s Closet Doggie Boutique — specialize in upscale pet accessories, clothing and food. Q Lincoln Road, Miami. Located on South Beach, this pedestrian-friendly shopping area is the place to watch all of the beautiful people and their design-er dogs. Outdoor restau-rants and tropical drinks abound. Q Jonathan Dickinson State Park, Hobe Sound. This sprawling park on Florida’s East Coast, north of tony Palm Beach, offers miles of trails that showcase how Florida looked before development. Dogs must be leashed. Admission is $6 per vehicle. Q Panama City Beach dog playground. This Florida Panhandle spring break favorite offers 400 feet of beachfront for leashed dogs and the new Panama City Beach Conservation Park with 12 trails (dogs must be leashed there). Q Miccosukee Canopy Road Greenway, Tallahassee. This park in the state’s capitol is popu-lar with local dog owners because of its beautiful trails and secluded grassy areas. State is a vacation paradise for dogs, too No need to leave your best friend at home this trip. ASSOCIATED PRESSSarah Ranes, of Safety Harbor, prepares to throw a tennis ball to her dog “Strider” on a dog friendly beach at Fort DeSoto Park in St. Petersburg. From lodging that offers special pet beds, to beaches with off-leash play, to theme parks with nearby kennels, many places around the state accommodate visitors w ith pets. TRAVEL FLORIDA ABOVE: White pelicans gather along the shore of Sanibel Island, near Fort Meyers. RIGHT: A junonia shell (center) sits amid an array of colorful seashells found on the island’s beaches. The Gulf Coast barrier island is known for quiet beaches, seashells and wildlife. Its high season for tourism begins midJanuary and peaks mid-March to mid-April. If You Go... Q Sanibel Island: Located on the Gulf Coast. Nearest airport, Fort Myers. Sanibel Chamber of Commerce: http://www.sanibel-captiva.org. Q Shelling: Tips to maximize your shelling: http:// www.iloveshelling.com Q Birding: J. N. “Ding” Darling National Wildlife Refuge: http://www.fws.gov/ dingdarling/



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Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER TOP STORIES OF 2012 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2012 7A7Afrom 10 for first place to one for 10th place, the shootings tallied 1448 points, com-pared to 1417 for the election. The second balloting ran Dec. 17-19. Superstorm Sandy was third, far ahead of the next group of stories. “After we completed our poll the news agenda was reshaped, tragically, by the Newtown shootings,” said Michael Oreskes, AP’s senior managing editor for U.S. news. “To chronicle that we con-ducted the poll again before releasing both results.” The U.S.-focused slant of the top stories this year contrasted with last year’s vot-ing, when the killing of Osama bin Laden in Pakistan was No. 1, followed by Japan’s earthquake/tsunami disaster, and the Arab Spring uprisings that rocked North Africa and the Middle East. Here are 2012’s top 10 stories, in order:1. Mass shootings: Armed with a highpowered rifle, 20-year-old Adam Lanza forced his way into Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., and shot dead 20 children – all ages 6 and 7 – and six staff members in the second-worst school massacre in U.S. history. Sadly, it was only one of several mass shootings, including the killing of 12 people at a movie theater in Aurora, Colo. After the Newtown trag-edy, President Barack Obama and many others, including some staunch gun-rights supporters, said it was time to find ways to rein in gun violence. 2. U.S. Election: Mitt Romney outcampaigned an eclectic field of Republican rivals, and bested Obama in their opening head-to-head debate. But on Election Day, thanks in part to a vigorous get-out-the-vote operation, Obama won a second term with a large lead in electoral votes and a solid advantage in popular votes. The GOP hung on to its majority in the House, but lost two seats to remain a minority in the Senate despite early-campaign projections of gains there. 3. Superstorm: As a prelude, the storm named Sandy killed more than 70 people in the Caribbean. Then its high winds and high waters slammed into more than 800 miles of the eastern U.S. seaboard, kill-ing at least 125 more people, and causing damage calculated at well over $60 billion – the second-costliest storm in U.S. his-tory after 2005’s Hurricane Katrina. New York and New Jersey were the worst hit, with several hundred thousand homes and businesses damaged or destroyed. 4. Obamacare: By a 5-4 margin, the Supreme Court upheld the core elements of Obama’s much-debated health care overhaul, which even he embraced as “Obamacare.” To widespread surprise, the decisive vote came from John Roberts, the generally conservative-leaning chief jus-tice appointed by Republican George W. Bush. Romney, as GOP presidential nomi-nee, vowed to repeal the law if he won, but Obama’s victory ensured the plan would proceed, with complex ramifications for insurers, employers, health-care providers and state governments. 5. Libya: Even amid yearlong turmoil in Libya, it was a jarring incident – a Sept. 11 assault in Benghazi, widely blamed on a group with suspected links to al-Qaida, that killed U.S. Ambassador Chris Stephens and three other Americans. The U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, Susan Rice, later bowed out of consid-eration to be the next secretary of state because of her assertions in TV interviews that a spontaneous demonstration over an anti-Muslim video triggered the attack. 6. Penn State: It was a daunting year for Penn State and its storied football program. In January, longtime coach Joe Paterno died, his legacy tarnished by the sex-abuse scandal involving his former assistant, Jerry Sandusky. In June, after a wrenching trial, Sandusky was convicted of sexually abusing 10 boys, and was later sentenced to 30 to 60 years in prison. In July, the NCAA imposed severe sanctions, including $60 million in fines, a four-year postseason ban on football and a reduction in football scholarships. 7. U.S. economy: By many measures, the economy was on a welcome upswing. The unemployment rate dipped to a four-year-low of 7.7 percent, stock markets rose, builders broke ground on more homes, and November was the best sales month in nearly five years for U.S. automakers. But overshadowing the good news was deep anxiety about the economic consequences if Obama and the Democrats failed to reach a tax-and-spending deal with the Republicans. 8. Fiscal Cliff: Obama and Republican House Speaker John Boehner engaged in high-stakes negotiations over a deal to avert the so-called “fiscal cliff” that would trigger automatic tax hikes and spending cuts. The leaders narrowed some differ-ences on Social Security and tax rates for the wealthy, but faced intense pres-sure from their bases to resist certain compromises. 9. Gay marriage: For supporters of same-sex marriage, it was a year of mile-stones. Obama, after a drawn-out process of “evolving,” said in May he supported the right of gay couples to wed. On Election Day, Maine, Maryland and Washington became the first states to legalize gay mar-riage via popular vote. And on Dec. 7 the Supreme Court agreed to hear two cases that could further expand same-sex mar-riage rights. 10. Syria: What began in 2011 as an outbreak of peaceful protests escalated into full-scale civil war pitting the belea-guered regime of Bashar Assad against a disparate but increasingly potent rebel opposition. The overall death toll climbed past 40,000, as the rebels made inroads toward Assad’s bastion of Damascus. The U.S. and many other nations were supporting the opposition, albeit wary of outcomes that might help Islamic extremists gain power in the region. Falling just short of the Top 10 was the resignation of David Petraeus as CIA director because of an affair he conducted with his biographer, Paula Broadwell. The choices of the news professionals voting in the AP poll mirrored the news stories most closely followed by the pub-lic during the year, according to the Pew Research Center’s News Interest Index. The index ranked Obama’s re-election as the most intently followed story, with the Newtown shooting second and Superstorm Sandy third. Several voters in the AP poll added a comment with their ballot, including Carol Hanner, managing editor of the Winston-Salem Journal in North Carolina. “I believe climate change is being chronically underestimated by the media and by citizens,” she wrote. The AP, like many other news organizations, traditionally releases its year-end polls and rankings before the actual end of the year. In the case of 2004’s top story poll, that meant the final list did not include the cataclysmic Indian Ocean tsunami that occurred on Dec. 26. In 2009, AP’s sports department amended its top-stories ballot part way through the voting to account for revelations about golfer Tiger Woods’ marital infidelities. That ended out finishing fifth, far behind the top-ranked entry about Major League Baseball’s steroid scandal. Q Associated Press STATE: Shootng of Trayvon Martin is top Florida story in A ssociated Press poll Continued From Page 1A NATIONAL: Connecticut school shootings, US elections top AP s tory list Continued From Page 1A T he former volunteer claimed Martin tried to reach for Zimmerman’s gun during a struggle. Zimmerman is plead-ing not guilty to second-degree murder, and his trial is set for the middle of next year. The shooting death originally was covered in a routine crime-blotter manner. But as Martin’s parents grew frustrated over the lack of an arrest, they went public with their criticism of the inves-tigation by the Sanford Police Department. The story gained international attention after the Sanford Police Department released 911 calls of neighbors reporting the shooting. Cries for help could be heard on the 911 calls. Martin’s parents claimed they were from their son, prov-ing that he was being attacked. Zimmerman’s father said he had no doubts the cries were those of his son, proving that he was act-ing in self-defense. Soon, Martin’s face was everywhere: on T-shirts, on placards raised at protests around the nation demanding Zimmerman’s arrest and on television shows around the world. President Barack Obama weighed in on the shooting. Thousands of pro-testers at demonstrations wore hoodies similar to what Martin wore when he was fatally shot, and Rep. Bobby Rush donned a hoodie during a speech on the House floor to deplore his death. Martin’s death was the first shooting of 2012 to raise ques-tions about the role of guns in U.S. society in a year in which the massacre of school children in Connecticut and movie patrons in Colorado have pushed the issue to the forefront. The 44-delay in Zimmerman’s arrest also raised questions about race and equal justice under the law. Martin’s parents said Zimmerman would have been arrested on the spot if he had been black and Martin had been white. Sanford police officials said their hands were tied in arresting Zimmerman on the spot because of the “stand your ground” law. Zimmerman wasn’t charged with a crime until the investigation was transferred to the office of Jacksonville’s prosecutor. Civil rights leaders Al Sharpton, Jesse Jackson and Ben Jealous took up Martin’s cause and talked about shaping it into a movement to challenge “stand your ground” laws around the nation. These news items rounded out the top 10 stories of the year: 2. Florida’s long ballot and the shortening of early voting days were blamed for long lines at Florida’s polling places, where some voters waited as long as seven hours. Delays in counting votes also were prevalent in South Florida counties, and Florida’s 29 electoral weren’t officially given to Obama until four days after Election Day. Gov. Rick Scott has urged lawmakers to review elec-tion laws to determine if changes are needed. Critics say a 2011 law that reduced early voting days, as well as a ballot packed with 11 constitutional amendment ques-tions, contributed to Florida’s election problems. 3. Thirteen Florida A&M marching band members were charged in connection to drum major Robert Champion’s haz-ing death in 2011. Fallout from Champion’s death reverberated throughout the year. University officials enacted a long line of new policies, including new requirements for band member-ship and new requirements for all students at the school. The school’s longtime band direc-tor and university president also resigned. Champion’s parents filed a lawsuit contending univer-sity officials did not take action to stop hazing even though a school dean had proposed suspending the Marching 100 band just days before their son died. The lawsuit also alleges that school officials fell short in enforcing anti-hazing policies. 4. Tampa hosted the 2012 Republican National Convention, but unlike in other host cities, Tampa’s streets stayed eerily quiet during the weeklong convo-cation. Tampa had been gearing up for years to host the conven-tion where Mitt Romney formally received his party’s nomination. Law enforcement made plans to manage tens of thousands of protesters and local businesses added staffers to handle the influx of conventioneers. But the threat of Hurricane Isaac kept protest-ers away, and local business own-ers complained that tight security resulted in blocked off streets and fenced-off sidewalks that discour-aged delegates from patronizing their restaurants and shops. 5. It took four days of counting before the winner was declared, but President Obama won Florida’s 29 electoral votes after a hard fought campaign in the nation’s most populous swing state. Obama beat Republican challenger Mitt Romney 50 per-cent to 49.1 percent, a differ-ence of about 74,000 votes. That was over the half-percent margin where a computer recount would have been automatically ordered unless Romney had waived it. As it turned out, Florida wasn’t even needed for Obama’s re-election win after Sunshine State voters had been told for month that their votes would make the differ-ence in the race. 6. Wildfire smoke mixed with fog blanketed six-lane Interstate 75 near Gainesville in an early January morning, resulting in a massive pileup that killed 11 people. Highway officials had closed the highway after the ini-tial blanketing from smoke, but it was then reopened shortly afterward. Within a half hour, the first of six separate fatal crashes began, involving at least a dozen cars, pickup trucks and a van, six semi-trailer trucks and a motorhome. Eleven people died, and 18 others were hospitalized. An investigation by the Florida Department of Law Enforcement found errors but no criminal violations in the decisions that were made to reopen the highway. The Florida Highway Patrol defended its actions. 7. The U.S. Supreme Court upheld key parts of Obama’s health care overhaul, rejecting an appeal by Florida and other states. Florida officials must decide whether to expand its Medicaid rolls to offer coverage to more residents and whether to set up a state-run health exchange or allow the federal government to run the program. Republican Gov. Rick Scott, a former hospital chain executive, has been a vocal critic of the health care law. He softened his stance after Obama’s re-election, signaling he wants to work together with federal offi-cials, but is worried about the cost to taxpayers. 8. Florida voters rejected eight of 11 constitutional amendments on November’s ballot. The reject-ed amendments included propos-als pushed by conservatives to restrict abortion, allow taxpayer funding of religious schools, cap state revenue and put the state on record as opposed to Obama’s health care overhaul. The three amendments that won 60 percent approval, which all amendments must get to pass, were simple and easy to understand. They offered property tax breaks targeted to groups difficult to oppose: dis-abled veterans, low-income seniors and spouses of military personnel and first responders who have died while on duty. 9. Hunting Deutsch, the executive director of Florida’s jobs agency, abruptly resigned in December after eight months on the job when questions were raised about jobless benefits he received before he was hired. Gov. Rick Scott named his gen-eral counsel to take over the job, becoming the third person to lead the Department of Economic Opportunity which was created a year ago. Questions were raised about unemployment compen-sation Deutsch received from September 2009 through May 2011. That period included a time he was traveling in Europe and presumably unavailable to work in Florida as required. 10. An obscure legislative panel approved a plan to privatize medical care at Florida’s prisons. The plans were challenged by three unions representing some 2,600 state employees who stand to lose their jobs, and a judge in Tallahassee blocked plans in three of Florida’s four prison sys-tem regions. State officials say they will appeal. ASSOCIATED PRESSFormer neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman si ts in court at the Seminole County Courthouse during a hearing Dec. 11 in Sanford. A judge denied de fense requests to end 24-hour GPS monitoring of Zimmerman while he is out on bond in the fatal shooting o f 17-year-old Trayvon Martin.



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