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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
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Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:01986

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:01986

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text

PAGE 1

From staff reporsHAMILTON COUNTY — Two area men were killed and two others critically hurt when their car left the road and struck a tree in a Christmas Eve crash on U.S. 41. Tony Brady Ogburn, 24, White Springs, and Stephen Michael Cordle, 22, Lake City, were pronounced dead at the scene of the 11:45 p.m. accident just north of Collins Street in Hamilton County, the Florida Highway Patrol reported. Two back-seat passengers, Virginia Kay Wagoner, 22, Jasper, and Katlyn Paige Cribbs, 14, also of Jasper, suffered critical injuries and were lifeflighted to Shands at the University of Florida, according to FHP. Ogburn, traveling south, failed to negotiate a right curve and left the roadway, FHP reported. His 2010 Camaro struck a road sign on the east shoulder then continued south until it hit a tree. The car spun clockwise and struck a second tree with its rear. The vehicle came to rest facing east in a wooded area east of U.S. 41. The bodies of Ogburn and Cordle, the right-front passenger, were taken to the office of the medical examiner in Jacksonville, an FHP report showed. No one in the car was wearing a seat belt, FHP said. Opinion ................ 4APeople.................. 2AObituaries .............. 5A Advice & Comics ......... 4B Puzzles ................. 2B TODAY IN PEOPLE Jack Klugman dies at 90. 66 35 T-Storm Chance WEATHER, 2A Lake City ReporterWEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2012 | YOUR COMMUNI TY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | 75¢ LAKECITYREPORTER.COM CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 138, No. 236 1A COMING THURSDAY Local news roundup. 2 dead in Christmas Eve crash Lake City, White Springs men killed; two otherpassengers critically hurt. By CANDICE CHOI andMAE ANDERSONAP Retail WritersNEW YORK — Shoppers who waited until the final days before Christmas were rewarded with big bargains and lighter crowds. But their last-minute deal hunting may hurt stores. Although fresh data on the holiday shopping season won’t be available until Christmas, analysts expect growth from last year to be modest. Several factors have dampened shoppers’ spirits, including fears that the economy could fall off the “fis-cal cliff,” triggering tax increases and spending cuts early next year. On Christmas Eve, Taubman Centers, which operates 28 malls across the country, reported a “very strong weekend.” But many last-minute shoppers in cities including New York, Atlanta and Indianapolis were spending less than they did last year, and taking advantage of big discounts of up to 70 percent that hurt stores’ profits.ASSOCIATED PRESSFedEx courier Andrew Standeven makes last-minute delive ries to businesses at the CambridgeSide Galleria mall in Cambridge, Mass., on Monday. By BROCK VERGAKIS andSTEPHEN SINGERAssociated Press NEWTOWN, Conn. N ewtown observed Christmas amid snow-covered teddy bears, stockings, flowers and candles left in memorial to the 20 children and six educators gunned down at an elementary school just 11 days before the holiday. The outpouring of support for this community continued through Christmas Eve, with visitors arriving at town hall with offerings of cards, handmade snowflakes and sympathy. “We know that they’ll feel loved. They’ll feel that somebody actually cares,” said Treyvon Smalls, a 15-year-old from a few towns away who arrived bearing hundreds of cards and paper snowflakes collected from around the state. And on Christmas Day, out-of-town police officers were on duty to give police here a break. “It’s a nice thing that they can use us this way,” Ted Latiak, a police detective from Greenwich, Conn., said Christmas morning, as he and a fellow detective, each working a half-day shift, came out of a store with bagels and coffee for other officers. At St. Rose of Lima Roman Catholic Church, which eight of the child victims of the massacre attended, the pastor told parishioners Tuesday at the second of four Masses that “today is the day we begin everything all over again.” Recalling the events at Sandy Hook Elementary School on Dec. 14, the Rev. Robert Weiss said: “The moment the first responder broke through the doors we knew good always overcomes evil.” “We know Christmas in a way we never ever thought we would know it,” he said. “We need a little Christmas and we’ve been Christmas amid tears Motive amystery in ambush of firemen By JOHN KEKISAssociated PressWEBSTER, N.Y. — A man who set his house on fire, then lured firefighters to their deaths in a blaze of flames and bullets, had attracted little attention since he got out of prison in the 1990s for killing his grandmother, authori-ties said. But two months ago, William Spengler’s mother died, leaving the 62-year-old ex-convict in a Lake Ontario house with his sis-ter, who he “couldn’t stand,” a friend said. Spengler set a car and a house in his neighborhood ablaze early Monday, and then killed two responding firefighters, wounded two others and injured a police officer while several homes burned around him, police said. Spengler then killed himself. His sister, Cheryl, was missing. Authorities did not offer a possible motive. About 100 people attended an impromptu memorial vigil Monday evening in Webster, a suburb of Rochester. Dozens of bouquets were left at the fire station, along with a handwritten sign that said, “Thanks for pro-tecting us. RIP.” Spengler had been living in the home in Webster with his moth-er and sister since his parole in 1998. He had served 17 years in prison in the beating death of his 92-year-old grandmother in 1980, for which he had originally been charged with murder but pleaded guilty to a reduced charge of manslaughter. His mother, Arline, died in October. On Monday, Spengler fired at the four firefighters when they arrived shortly after 5:30 a.m. at the blaze, town police Chief Gerald Pickering said. The first police officer who arrived chased the gunman and exchanged shots. Spengler lay in wait outdoors for the firefighters’ arrival, then opened fire probably with a rifle and from atop an earthen berm, Pickering said. “It does appear it was a trap,” he said. Authorities used an armored vehicle to help residents flee doz-ens of homes on the shore of Lake Ontario a day before Christmas. Police restricted access to the neighborhood, and officials said it was unclear whether there were other bodies in the seven houses left to burn. Authorities said Spengler hadn’t done anything to bring himself to their attention since his parole. As a convicted felon, he wasn’t allowed to possess weapons. Monroe County District Attorney Sandra Doorley said Spengler led a very quiet life after he got out Man set house ablaze, lured two firefighters to their deaths. AMBUSH continued on 3AASSOCIATED PRESSKerry O’Mahony, of Danbury, Conn., takes a bouquet of flower s to a memorial for the Sandy Hook Elementary School sh ooting victims down the street from the school’s entrance in Newtown, Conn. Newtown observes a somber holiday ‘Today is the day we begineverything all over again,’worshippers are told. NEWTOWN continued on 3A Shoppers found bigger sales, smaller crowds SHOPPERS continued on 3A



PAGE 1

By TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comWhile high school sports stresses the team concept, it helps to have individual stars to set the pace. Columbia High and Fort White High had several athletes that excelled in sports during 2012. Columbia High swimmer Hannah Burns won a second state champion-ship, this time in the 200 Individual Medley. Burns was state runner-up in the 100 Breaststroke. It was a flip-flop from her results in the two events as a freshman last year. Burns was district champion in both events. She qualified for the Olympic Trials in the 400 IM and recently swam in the Speedo Winter Junior National Championships. Lindsay Lee qualified for state in the 50 Freestyle and 100 Backstroke. She was district runner-up in both events. It was the third year Lee has advanced to the state meet. Micheala Polhamus and Stephanie Silva joined Burns and Lee in the 400 freestyle and 200 medley relays, and both qualified for region. Joseph Piccioni qualified for region in the 50 Freestyle. Fort White’s Sitia Martinez was track and field district champion in the 100 meters, 200 meters and 300-meter hurdles, and was district runner-up in the long jump. Martinez qualified for the Lake City Reporter SPORTS Wednesday, December 26, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS FEATS continued on 3B Individual featsHigh school’s top performers in ’12 FILEColumbia High swim team had five region qualifiers: Jos eph Piccioni (from left), Micheala Polhamus, alternate Syd ney Morse, Lindsay Lee, Hannah Burns, Stephanie Silva and alternate Courtney Britt. Burns advanced to state in the 200 IM and 1 00 Breaststroke, where she was state champion and state runne r-up, respectively. Lee qualified for state in the 50 and 1 00 free. FILEFort White High’s Sitia Martinez was district champion in the 100 meters, 200 meters and 300-meter hurdles and was runner-up in the long jump. Martinez qualified for state in the 100 meters and 300-meter hurdles and placed fourth in th e hurdles.FILEColumbia High tennis player Chrissie Reichert was dis trict champion in No. 1 singles. Reichert advanced to state competition for the third straight year COURTESY PHOTOColumbia High wrestling state qualifiers were Joe Fields (from left), Isaac Henderson, Cole Schreiber and Monteran ce Allen. Schreiber was district and region champion and placed third at state. Allen was district champion and placed thi rd at state. Fields was district champion and placed sixth at state. Dan iel Devers and Ethan Treverrow also were district cham pions.J ASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Laremy Tunsil was all-state in football and voted to the All-USA Today first team in a nationwide poll Tunsil, one of the most highly sought college recruits, is playing in the U.S. Army All-American Bowl on Jan. 5.



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Dennis Crawford lived up to his +3 handicap, and then some, in the Wednesday blitz. His round of 65 included seven bird-ies and no bogies for +6 and a first-place finish in A flight. Scott Kishton took second place with a fine round of +5. Joe Paul was in third with +2. Jerry West also posted +6 to top B flight. Ed Higgs was a stroke back with +5, followed by Lynn Smith at +4. Crawford almost shut out the field with three skins, but Jordan Hale spoiled the sweep with a winner. Both pot holes carried over. Shelton Keen and Bob Wheary set the pace in Sunday’s blitz, finally settling for a first-place tie at +7. Terry Hunter rolled in four birdies to take third place with +4. Bob Randall (+3) and A.J. Lavin (+2) rounded out the top four. Skins weren’t worth much with seven players sharing the pot. Hunter’s three keepers led the way. Randall had two skins. Steve Patterson, John Brewer, Keith Shaw, Wheary and Keen each had one. Closest to the pin winners were Lavin on No. 5, Steve Thomas on Nos. 7 and 15 and Patterson on No. 17. A nice field of players waited out a frost delay to compete in the MGA sham-ble. The delay didn’t bother Tom Sheldon and Brian Snead, who teamed for the top spot with a net 61. Dennis Crawford and George Bowlin took second with 63. Steve Patterson and Bud Johnson claimed third with 65. The day’s low gross score winner was Scott Kishton with a 75. The net score prize went to Jonathan Allen for his round of 74. The LGA had the ladies going head-to-head an a low net format. Cathy Steen shot a net 71 to edge Sally Rivers by a stoke for first place. Natalie Bryant and Faye Warren tied for third at 73. Dottie Rogers chipped in on No. 4 to share the skill shot pot with Bryant, who scored on No. 9. The team of Ed Snow, Jim Bell and Dan Stephens had an easy win in match one of Good Old Boys play. They topped the threesome of Jerry West, Eli Witt and Emerson Darst by a score of 6-2. Match two was almost as easy for the team of Shelton Keen, Terry Mick, Howard Whitaker and Dennis Hendershot. They overcame the team of Monty Montgomery, Tom Elmore, Joe Persons and Hugh Sherrill by a count of 6-3. The three-team finale went to the team of Rob Brown, Dave Cannon, Mike Spencer and Merle Hibbard, 8-6, over the team of Marc Risk, Bobby Simmons, Jim McGriff and Stan Woolbert. The team of Rhea Hart, Don Howard, Steve Peters and Bill Rogers was another stroke back. Risk shot 37 on both nines to take medalist honors. Montgomery (39-38-77) and Snow (40-37-77) tied for the runner-up spot. Hart (78) and Howard (79) had the other scores of note. SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today COLLEGE FOOTBALL 7:30 p.m. ESPN — Little Caesars Pizza Bowl at Detroit, Western Kentucky vs. Central Michigan SOCCER 9:55 a.m. ESPN2 — Premier League, Newcastle at Manchester UnitedFOOTBALLNFL standings AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAy-New England 11 4 0 .733 529 331 Miami 7 8 0 .467 288 289 N.Y. Jets 6 9 0 .400 272 347 Buffalo 5 10 0 .333 316 426 South W L T Pct PF PAy-Houston 12 3 0 .800 400 303x-Indianapolis 10 5 0 .667 329 371 Tennessee 5 10 0 .333 292 451Jacksonville 2 13 0 .133 235 406 North W L T Pct PF PAy-Baltimore 10 5 0 .667 381 321x-Cincinnati 9 6 0 .600 368 303 Pittsburgh 7 8 0 .467 312 304 Cleveland 5 10 0 .333 292 344 West W L T Pct PF PAy-Denver 12 3 0 .800 443 286San Diego 6 9 0 .400 326 329Oakland 4 11 0 .267 269 419Kansas City 2 13 0 .133 208 387 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAWashington 9 6 0 .600 408 370Dallas 8 7 0 .533 358 372 N.Y. Giants 8 7 0 .533 387 337 Philadelphia 4 11 0 .267 273 402 South W L T Pct PF PAy-Atlanta 13 2 0 .867 402 277New Orleans 7 8 0 .467 423 410 Tampa Bay 6 9 0 .400 367 377Carolina 6 9 0 .400 313 325 North W L T Pct PF PAy-Green Bay 11 4 0 .733 399 299Minnesota 9 6 0 .600 342 314Chicago 9 6 0 .600 349 253Detroit 4 11 0 .267 348 411 West W L T Pct PF PAx-San Francisco 10 4 1 .700 370 260x-Seattle 10 5 0 .667 392 232 St. Louis 7 7 1 .500 286 328 Arizona 5 10 0 .333 237 330 x-clinched playoff spoty-clinched division Sunday’s Games Jacksonville at Tennessee, 1 p.m.Carolina at New Orleans, 1 p.m.N.Y. Jets at Buffalo, 1 p.m.Baltimore at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.Cleveland at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.Houston at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.Philadelphia at N.Y. Giants, 1 p.m.Chicago at Detroit, 1 p.m.Tampa Bay at Atlanta, 1 p.m.Oakland at San Diego, 4:25 p.m.Arizona at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.St. Louis at Seattle, 4:25 p.m.Kansas City at Denver, 4:25 p.m.Green Bay at Minnesota, 4:25 p.m.Miami at New England, 4:25 p.m.Dallas at Washington, 8:20 p.m. End regular season Playoff scenarios AFC CLINCHED: Houston, AFC South; Denver, AFC West; New England, AFC East; Baltimore, AFC North; Indianapolis, No. 5 playoff spot; Cincinnati, No. 6 playoff spot. HOUSTON (at Indianapolis)Clinches first-round bye with:— Win or tie, or— New England loss or tie, or— Denver lossClinches home-field advantage throughout AFC playoffs with: — Win, or— Tie AND Denver loss or tie, or— New England loss or tie AND Denver loss DENVER (vs. Kansas City)Clinches first-round bye with:— Win or tie, or— New England loss or tieClinches home-field advantage throughout AFC playoffs with: — Win AND Houston loss or tie, or— Tie AND Houston lossNEW ENGLAND (vs. Miami)Clinches first-round bye with:— Win AND Denver or Houston loss Clinches home-field advantage throughout AFC playoffs with: — Win AND Denver and Houston loss NFC CLINCHED: Atlanta, NFC South and home-field advantage; Green Bay, NFC North; San Francisco, playoff spot; Seattle, playoff spot GREEN BAY (at Minnesota)Clinches first-round bye with:— Win, or— Tie AND San Francisco loss or tie, or — San Francisco loss AND Seattle loss or tie SAN FRANCISCO (vs. Arizona)Clinches NFC West with:— Win or tie, or— Seattle loss or tieClinches first-round bye with:— Win AND Green Bay loss or tie, or — Tie AND Green Bay lossSEATTLE (vs. St. Louis)Clinches NFC West with:— Win AND San Francisco lossClinches first-round bye with:— Win AND San Francisco loss AND Green Bay loss WASHINGTON (vs. Dallas)Clinches NFC East with:— Win or tieClinches playoff spot with:— Chicago loss AND Minnesota loss DALLAS (at Washington)Clinches NFC East with: — WinNEW YORK GIANTS (vs. Philadelphia) Clinches playoff spot with:— Win AND Dallas loss or tie AND Chicago loss AND Minnesota loss MINNESOTA (vs. Green Bay)Clinches playoff spot with:— Win, or— Tie AND Chicago loss or tie, or— Dallas loss or tie AND N.Y. Giants loss or tie AND Chicago loss CHICAGO (at Detroit)Clinches playoff spot with:— Win AND Minnesota loss or tie, or — Tie AND Minnesota loss NFL calendar Jan. 5-6 — Wild-card playoff games.Jan. 12-13 — Divisional playoff games.Jan. 20 — AFC and NFC championship games. Feb. 3 — Super Bowl, Superdome, New OrleansCollege bowl games New Mexico Bowl Arizona 49, Nevada 48Famous Idaho Potato BowlUtah State 41, Toledo 15 Poinsettia Bowl BYU 23, San Diego State 6 Beef ’O’ Brady’s Bowl UCF 38, Ball State 17 New Orleans Bowl Louisiana-Lafayette 43, E. Carolina 34 Las Vegas Bowl Boise State 28, Washington 26 Monday Hawaii Bowl SMU 43, Fresno State 10 Today Little Caesars Pizza Bowl At DetroitCentral Michigan (6-6) vs. Western Kentucky (7-5), 7:30 p.m. (ESPN) Thursday Military Bowl At WashingtonBowling Green (8-4) vs. San Jose State (10-2), 3 p.m. (ESPN) Belk Bowl At Charlotte, N.C.Duke (6-6) vs. Cincinnati (9-3), 6:30 p.m. (ESPN) Holiday Bowl At San DiegoBaylor (7-5) vs. UCLA (9-4), 9:45 p.m. (ESPN) Friday Independence Bowl At Shreveport, La.Louisiana-Monroe (8-4) vs. Ohio (8-4), 2 p.m. (ESPN) Russell Athletic Bowl At OrlandoVirginia Tech (6-6) vs. Rutgers (9-3), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN) Meineke Car Care Bowl At HoustonMinnesota (6-6) vs. Texas Tech (7-5), 9 p.m. (ESPN) Saturday Armed Forces Bowl At Fort Worth, TexasRice (6-6) vs. Air Force (6-6), 11:45 a.m. (ESPN) Fight Hunger Bowl At San FranciscoArizona State (7-5) vs. Navy (7-4), 3:15 p.m. (ESPN2) Pinstripe Bowl At New YorkSyracuse (7-5) vs. West Virginia (7-5), 3:15 p.m. (ESPN) Alamo Bowl At San AntonioTexas (8-4) vs. Orgeon State (9-3), 6:45 p.m. (ESPN) Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl At Tempe, Ariz.Michigan State (6-6) vs. TCU (7-5), 10:15 p.m. (ESPN) Monday, Dec. 31 Music City Bowl At Nashville, Tenn.Vanderbilt (8-4) vs. N.C. State (7-5), Noon (ESPN) Sun Bowl At El Paso, TexasGeorgia Tech (6-7) vs. Southern Cal (7-5), 2 p.m. (CBS) Liberty Bowl At Memphis, Tenn.Iowa State (6-6) vs. Tulsa (10-3), 3:30 p.m. (ESPN) Chick-fil-A Bowl At AtlantaLSU (10-2) vs. Clemson (10-2), 7:30 p.m. (ESPN) Tuesday, Jan. 1 Heart of Dallas Bowl At DallasPurdue (6-6) vs. Oklahoma State (7-5), Noon (ESPNU) Gator Bowl At JacksonvilleMississippi State (8-4) vs. Northwestern (9-3), Noon (ESPN2) Capital One Bowl At OrlandoGeorgia (11-2) vs. Nebraska (10-3), 1 p.m. (ABC) Outback Bowl At TampaSouth Carolina (10-2) vs. Michigan (8-4), 1 p.m. (ESPN) Rose Bowl At Pasadena, Calif.Stanford (11-2) vs. Wisconsin (8-5), 5 p.m. (ESPN) Orange Bowl At MiamiNorthern Illinois (12-1) vs. Florida State (11-2), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN) Wednesday, Jan. 2 Sugar Bowl At New OrleansFlorida (11-1) vs. Louisville (10-2), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN) Thursday, Jan. 3 Fiesta Bowl At Glendale, Ariz.Kansas State (11-1) vs. Oregon (11-1), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN) Friday, Jan. 4 Cotton Bowl At Arlington, TexasTexas A&M (10-2) vs. Oklahoma (10-2), 8 p.m. (FOX) Saturday, Jan. 5 BBVA Compass Bowl At Birmingham, Ala.Pittsburgh (6-6) vs. Mississippi (6-6), 1 p.m. (ESPN) Sunday, Jan. 6 GoDaddy.com Bowl At Mobile, Ala.Kent State (11-2) vs. Arkansas State (9-3), 9 p.m. (ESPN) Monday, Jan. 7 BCS National Championship At MiamiNotre Dame (12-0) vs. Alabama (12-1), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN)FCS Championship Saturday, Jan. 5 At FC Dallas StadiumFrisco, TexasNorth Dakota State (13-1) vs. Sam Houston State (11-3), 1 p.m.BASKETBALLNBA schedule Today’s Games Miami at Charlotte, 7 p.m.Chicago at Indiana, 7 p.m.New Orleans at Orlando, 7 p.m.Cleveland at Washington, 7 p.m.Detroit at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.Houston at Minnesota, 8 p.m.Philadelphia at Memphis, 8 p.m.Brooklyn at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.Toronto at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.L.A. Lakers at Denver, 9 p.m.New York at Phoenix, 9 p.m.Golden State at Utah, 9 p.m.Sacramento at Portland, 10 p.m. Thursday’s Games Dallas at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.Boston at L.A.Clippers, 10:30 p.m. USA Today/ESPN Top 25 The top 25 teams in the USA Today ESPN men’s college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Dec. 23, points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and last week’s ranking: Record Pts Pvs 1. Duke (30) 11-0 774 1 2. Michigan (1) 12-0 745 2 3. Louisville 11-1 682 4 3. Arizona 11-0 682 5 5. Indiana 11-1 648 6 6. Kansas 10-1 642 8 7. Syracuse 10-1 559 3 8. Cincinnati 12-0 543 11 9. Missouri 10-1 537 1210. Ohio State 9-2 480 711. Florida 8-2 406 912. Creighton 11-1 395 1313. Gonzaga 11-1 391 1414. Minnesota 12-1 345 1615. Illinois 12-1 330 1016. San Diego State 11-1 327 1517. UNLV 11-1 240 1818. Georgetown 10-1 217 2119. Michigan State 11-2 207 1920. Notre Dame 12-1 181 2221. Butler 9-2 136 2522. Oklahoma State 10-1 129 2423. Kentucky 8-3 108 2324. Pittsburgh 12-1 97 —25. N.C. State 9-2 87 — Others receiving votes: New Mexico 62, North Carolina 34, Kansas State 22, VCU 22, Wyoming 20, UConn 6, Oregon 6, Temple 5, Colorado 3, Maryland 3, Wichita State 3, Colorado State 1.AP Top 25 schedule Thursday’s Game No. 8 Cincinnati vs. New Mexico, 9 p.m. Friday’s Games No. 5 Indiana vs. Jacksonville, 8 p.m.No. 7 Missouri at UCLA, 10 p.m.No. 13 Gonzaga vs. Baylor, 8 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2012 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-04212BSPORTS AGATE COUNTRY CLUB at LAKE CITY Ed Goff BRIEFS GOLF REPORTS Crawford fires 7-under 65 ADULT BASKETBALL Charity games for USSSA youth Richardson Community Center/Annie Mattox North, Inc., is sponsoring the third annual charity basketball games at the Lake City Middle School gym on Jan. 5. The games feature adult women and men teams — Live Oak vs. Lake City. Game times are 6 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Admission is $5, with all proceeds going to USSSA youth basketball program. For details, call Nicole Smith at 754-7095. YOUTH BASEBALL North Florida Rays 11U tryouts The North Florida Rays 11U travel team has tryouts at 1 p.m. Jan. 5 at the Southside Baseball Complex red fields. For details, call Andy Miles at 867-0678 or Todd Green at 365-5161. ZUMBA Beginner, weight loss classes A Zumba beginner class and weight loss contest will be offered at Teen Town on Jan. 6. The beginner class is 3-4 p.m., with the weight loss contest starting at 4 p.m. For details, call Sarah Sandlin at 758-0009. PREP SPORTS Deadlines for non-traditionals Non-traditional students (home-school, charter schools, FHSAA non-member private schools, special schools, Florida virtual schools) must declare to try out for public school sports. The deadline for softball and Classes 1A-2A track and field is Jan. 7. Students who want to participate in public prep sports must register at the school in the zone where they live. For details, call John Wilson at (352) 317-5865. CHS SOFTBALL Lady Tigers tryouts Jan. 8 Columbia High softball tryouts are 2:45 p.m. Jan. 8 at the CHS field. For details, call Jimmy Williams at 303-1192.Q From staff reports



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of prison. A friend said Spengler hated his sis ter. Roger Vercruysse lived next door to Spengler and recalled a man who doted on his mother, whose obituary suggested contributions to the West Webster Fire Department. He loved his mama to death, said Vercruysse, who last saw his friend about six months ago. Vercruysse also said Spengler couldnt stand his sister and stayed on one side of the house and she stayed on the other. The West Webster Fire District learned of the fire early Monday after a report of a car and house on fire on Lake Road, on a narrow peninsula where Irondequoit Bay meets Lake Ontario, Monroe County Sheriff Patrick OFlynn said. The fire appeared from a distance as a pulsating ball of flame glowing against the early morning sky, flames licking into treetops and reflecting on the water, with huge bursts of smoke billowing away in a brisk wind. Emergency radio communications cap ture someone saying he could see the muzzle flash coming at me as Spengler carried out his ambush. The audio posted on the website RadioReference.com has someone reporting firefighters are down and saying got to be rifle or shotgun high powered ... semi or fully auto. Two of the firefighters arrived on a fire engine and two in their own vehicles, Pickering said. After Spengler fired, one of the wounded men fled, but the other three couldnt because of flying gunfire. The police officer who exchanged gun fire with Spengler in all likelihood saved many lives, Pickering said. A police armored vehicle was used to recover two men, and eventually it removed 33 people from nearby homes, the police chief said. The gunfire initially kept firefighters from battling the blazes. The dead men were identified as police Lt. Michael Chiapperini, 43, the Webster Police Departments public information officer; and 19-year-old Tomasz Kaczowka, also a 911 dispatcher. Pickering described Chiapperini as a lifetime firefighter with nearly 20 years in the department, and he called Kaczowka a tremendous young man. Kaczowkas brother, reached at the fam ily home Monday night, said he didnt want to talk. The two wounded firefighters, Joseph Hofstetter and Theodore Scardino, remained in guarded condition Tuesday at Strong Memorial Hospital, authorities said. Both were awake and alert and are expected to recover. Hofstetter, also a full-timer with the Rochester Fire Department, was hit once in the pelvis, and the bullet lodged in his spine, authorities said. Scardino was hit in the chest and knee. given it. At the Trinity Episcopal Church, an overflow crowd of several hundred people attended Christmas Eve services. They were greeted by the sounds of a chil drens choir echoing throughout a sanctu ary hall that had its walls decorated with green wreaths adorned with red bows. The church program said flowers were donated in honor of Sandy Hook shoot ing victims, identified by name or as the school angels and Sandy Hook fami lies. The service, which generally took on a celebratory tone, made only a few vague references to the shooting. Pastor Kathie Adams-Shepherd led the congregation in praying that the joy and consolation of the wonderful counselor might enliven all who are touched by illness, danger, or grief, especially all those families affected by the shootings in Sandy Hook. Police say the gunman, Adam Lanza, killed his mother in her bed before his rampage and committed suicide as he heard officers arriving. Authorities have yet to give a theory about his motive. While the grief is still fresh, some residents are urging political activism. A group called Newtown United has been meeting at the library to talk about issues ranging from gun control, to increasing mental health services to the types of memorials that could be erected for the victims. Some clergy members have said they also intend to push for change. We seek not to be the town of tragedy, said Rabbi Shaul Praver of Congregation Adath Israel. But, we seek to be the town where all the great chang es started. Since the shooting, messages similar to the ones delivered Monday have arrived from around the world. People have donated toys, books, money and more. A United Way fund, one of many, has collected $3 million. People have given nearly $500,000 to a memorial scholarship fund at the University of Connecticut. In the center of Newtowns Sandy Hook section Monday, a steady stream of residents and out-of-towners snapped pictures, lit candles and dropped off childrens gifts at an expansive memorial filled with stuffed animals, poems, flow ers, posters and cards. All the families who lost those little kids, Christmas will never be the same, said Philippe Poncet, a Newtown resi dent originally from France. Everybody across the world is trying to share the tragedy with our community here. Richard Scinto, a deacon at St. Rose of Lima, said Weiss had used several eulo gies to tell his congregation to get angry and take action against what some con sider is a culture of gun violence in the country. Praver and Scinto said they are not opposed to hunting or to having police in schools, but both said something must be done to change what has become a cul ture of violence in the United States. These were his mothers guns, Scinto said. Why would anyone want an assault rifle as part of a private citizen collec tion? A mediator who worked with Lanzas parents during their divorce has said Lanza, 20, was diagnosed with Aspergers syndrome, an autism-like disorder that is not associated with violence. It is not known whether he had other mental health issues. The guns used in the shoot ing had been purchased legally by his mother, Nancy Lanza, a gun enthusiast. Associated Press writers Pat Eaton-Robb, John Christoffersen and Katie Zezima con tributed to this report. Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 26, 2012 3A 3A Call today to RSVP! 386.269.4973 www.HearingSolutionInc.com THE E AR E XPER T S Lake City Live Oak Dowling Park 10820 Marvin Jones Blvd Our Services $ 500 off hearing system. Expires 1/3 1 /1 3 NEWTOWN Continued From Page 1A AMBUSH: Man set trap for firefighters, say police; assailants motive unknown Continued From Page 1A SHOPPERS: Bigger bargains this year Continued From Page 1A ASSOCIATED PRESS Former tennis star Andrea Jeager, of Hesperus, Colo., says a prayer as she places flowers and a candle at a makeshift memorial at a sign for the Sandy Hook school in Sandy Hook village of Newtown, Conn. Kris Betzold, 40, of Carmel, Ind., was out at the Fashion Mall at Keystone in Indianapolis on Monday looking for deals on toys, and said shes noticed the sales are even better now than they were at Thanksgiving. She said the economy has prompted her and her husband to be more frugal this year. We under-budgeted ourselves by $400 for Christmas because we just wanted to put that money back in savings, she said. Dianne Ashford, 40, was at the Lenox Square Mall in Atlanta on Monday, said she was spending $500 on gifts this year, down from the $1,000 she normally spends. Times are hard, said Ashford, who works for a film production company. The best deal she found this year was a guitar for her mother, half off at $79. Other last-minute shoppers said they were holding off as much as possible for even bigger post-holiday sales. Chris Ailes, a 37-year-old TV producer, also was at the Lenox Square on Monday to pick up last-minute gifts for his mom and grandmother. With the economy so shaky, he and his family are trying to cut back on spend ing. So he said hes looking forward to discounts after Christmas. Thats when the sales are going on, he said. At Macys in New York, shopper Maureen Whyte had a similar game plan in mind. Whyte, a 33-year-old who works for an insurance company, was picking up last-minute stocking stuffers for her kids. For some toys, however, she was holding off for the post-Christmas sales and her kids understood why. I told them, Whatever Mommy didnt get you, youll get after this week, she said.



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Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2012 3B3BSPORTS WEDNESDAY EVENING DECEMBER 26, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) The MiddleThe NeighborsModern Family(:31) SuburgatoryNashville (DVS) News at 11(:35) Nightline (N) 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) The Insider 5-PBS 5 -Journal Nightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Nature “Wild Balkans” (DVS) NOVA Gothic cathedrals. (DVS) NOVA “Quest for Solomon’s Mines” BBC World NewsTavis Smiley 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge Judy Two and Half MenElementary A man is shot and killed. The 35th Annual Kennedy Center Honors Entertainers receive recognition. 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Inside the HeatInside the HEATInside the Heat3 Wide Life DISCV 38 182 278Fast N’ Loud “Ramshackle Rambler” Fast N’ Loud “One of a Kind Woodill” Moonshiners Amish Ma a Moonshiners Amish Ma a TBS 39 139 247King of QueensKing of QueensSeinfeld Family Guy Family Guy Family Guy Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryConan Lisa Kudrow; Vince Gilligan. HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) Dr. Drew on Call (N) Nancy GraceShowbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236Celebrity Oops: They Did It AgainE! News (N) LeAnn RimesIce Loves CocoIce Loves CocoThe Soup (N) Love You, Mean ItChelsea Lately (N) E! 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Tanked “Midwest Zest” Tanked Money BarnMoney Barn (N) FOOD 51 110 231Restaurant: ImpossibleRestaurant: Impossible “Valley View” Restaurant: ImpossibleRestaurant: ImpossibleWedding: ImpossibleRestaurant: Impossible TBN 52 260 372Mary and Joseph: A Story of FaithBilly Graham CrusadeBehind the ScenesTurning PointJoseph PrinceEnd of the AgeLeft Behind Peter and Paul Lalonde. FSN-FL 56 -ACC All-AccessMagic Live! (Live)d NBA Basketball New Orleans Hornets at Orlando Magic. From Amway Center in Orlando, Fla. Magic Live! (Live) Inside the MagicFootball PrevWorld Poker Tour: Season 10 SYFY 58 122 244(4:00) “Starship Troopers” (1997) Ghost Hunters “Harvesting Murder” Ghost Hunters “Well of Horror” Ghost Hunters “Roasts and Ghosts” Ghost Hunters “Stage Fright” Ghost Hunters “Murdered Matron” AMC 60 130 254(5:30) “Appaloosa” (2008, Western) Ed Harris, Viggo Mortensen. “Four Brothers” (2005, Crime Drama) Mark Wahlberg, Tyrese Gibson, Andr Benjamin. “Casino” (1995) Robert De Niro, Sharon Stone. COM 62 107 249It’s Always Sunny(:29) Tosh.0 Chappelle’s ShowChappelle’s ShowChappelle’s ShowChappelle’s ShowSouth Park South Park Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 CMT 63 166 327Reba Reba Reba Reba Reba Reba Redneck IslandRedneck IslandRedneck Island NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer “Grizzly Dogs” Kingdom of the Blue WhaleGalapagos Sites and creatures of the islands. Kingdom of the Blue Whale NGC 109 186 276Hell on the Highway “Do or Die” Border Wars “War on the Streets” Border Wars “The War Comes Home” Border Wars “24-Hour Watch” (N) Hell on the HighwayBorder Wars “24-Hour Watch” SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeDark Matters: Twisted but True Dark Matters: Twisted but True Dark Matters: Twisted but True (N) Dark Matters: Twisted but True Dark Matters: Twisted but True ID 111 192 285Motives & Murders “In Harm’s Way” Unusual Suspects Dateline on ID Final Cut A teacher is found dead. (N) Someone WatchingSomeone WatchingDateline on ID HBO 302 300 501 “New Year’s Eve” (2011, Romance-Comedy) Halle Berry. ‘PG-13’ Game of Thrones Game of Thrones “The Night Lands” Game of Thrones Boxing’s Best of 2012 (N) MAX 320 310 515(4:40) “The Contender” (2000) ‘R’ (6:50) “This Means War” (2012) Reese Witherspoon. “Project X” (2012, Comedy) Thomas Mann. ‘R’ “The Revenant” (2009, Comedy) David Anders, Chris Wylde. ‘R’ SHOW 340 318 545A Game of Honor “Fightville” (2011, Documentary) ‘NR’ Untold History of the United StatesInside the NFL (N) Jim Rome on Showtime (N) Inside the NFL Education _____________________________ MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED! 7UDLQWREHFRPHD0HGLFDO2IFH Assistant. NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training gets you Job ready ASAP. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)374-7294 _____________________________ Employment _____________________________ $1000 Bonus (1st 30 Hired) Up to 47 cpm. New Equipment. Need CDL Class A Driving Exp. 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Cole Schreiber was district and region cham-pion for Columbia wrestling and placed third in the state meet. Monterance Allen and Joe Fields were district champions and placed third and sixth, respectively, at state. Isaac Henderson also qualified for state. Ethan Treverrow and Daniel Devers were district champions. Chrissie Reichert played No. 1 singles for the Lady Tigers tennis team and won the district champi-onship, beating the topseeded player in the pro-cess. Reichert’s victory allowed her to qualify for the state meet for the third consecutive year. Fort White football players A.J. Legree (first team) and Jonathan Dupree (second team) were named all-state in Class 3A. Dupree also qualified for state in weightlifting. Columbia’s Laremy Tunsil was first-team all-state in Class A football, while Darius Williams was honorable menton. Columbia’s Dana Roberts won sectional weightlifting and qualified for the state meet. She was joined by Jasmayne Davis and Kayla Carman at state. Columbia’s Antonio Pelham won his weight-lifting sectional to qualify for state. Drew Clark and Javere Smith also made the state field. Lady Tigers golfer Gillian Norris was district runner-up to advance to region. Brooke Russell also made region by placing sixth in the district tournament. Columbia’s Dean Soucinek advanced to the boys golf region. Columbia freshman Emma Tucker was runner-up in district cross country. Tucker won state in the 800 meters in the spring as an eighth-grader. Columbia’s track and field 4x100 relay team of Rakeem Battle, Cornelius Montgomery, Zedrick Woods and Trey Marshall was district runner-up and eventually made the state field. Montgomery ran with Speed City Athletics in Gainesville over the sum-mer and was a Junior Olympic qualifier in the 100 meters and 4x100 and 4x400 relay teams. LEFT: Columbia High golfers Gillian Norris (left) and Brooke Russell take a close look at a putt during a practice round. Norris was runner-up in the district meet and Russell placed sixth. Both advanced to the region tournament.RIGHT: Fort White High’s Jonathan Dupree competes in the bench press at a home weightlifting meet in February. Dupree, an all-state football player, also qualified for the state meet in weightlifting.FILEColumbia High weightlifters Dana Roberts (from left), Jasmy ne Davis and Kayla Carmen qualified for the FHSAA Finals state meet.



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OPINION Wednesday, December 26, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A4AOPINIONM y dad was a mailman with a high school edu-cation, not a constitutional scholar. And although he was a deeply religious man, led by a Christian faith that informed every facet of his life, he was no theologian. But back in the days when, here in South Texas, high school foot-ball games always began with an unashamedly institutionally sanctioned Christian prayer over the public address system, he was smart enough to note the irony involved in praying for victory and the safety of the players, on the one hand, and exhort-ing them to beat hell out of their opponents, on the other. His homespun wisdom came to mind when I con-sidered this fall’s dust-up in Kountze, Texas, where high school cheerleaders hoisted huge paper ban-ners inscribed with Bible verses for their football team to burst through onto the field. For example, one banner somewhat presumptuously proclaimed Romans 8:31: “If God is for us, who can be against us?” Most citizens of Kountze, a town of 2,100 near Houston, had no problem with the banners. But some unidentified “nonbeliever” complained to the Freedom From Religion Foundation in Madison, Wis., whose officials contacted the Kountze district superin-tendent, Kevin Weldon, who banned the banners, based on the advice of his lawyers. In October, a state district judge ruled that the cheerleaders could con-tinue to use the banners until the case goes to trial next summer. But if the Kountze cheerleaders are allowed to post religious banners next season, more creativity is called for. For example, for the team that thrashed them last year, how about Romans 12:19: “Vengeance is mine; I will repay, saith the Lord.” Or maybe Leviticus 26:7: “And ye shall chase your enemies, and they shall fall before you by the sword.” Or given that most football players are 16and 17-year-old boys, maybe Genesis 38:10 would be appropriate: “And the thing which he did dis-pleased the Lord: where-fore he slew him also.” I share my father’s skepticism about our efforts to mingle religion with public institutions, which are meant to be available to and suitable for people of all faiths or of no faith at all. As a rule, the state isn’t well served by reli-gion. Look at Iran. The religious right can say what it likes about our nation’s Christian origins, but whatever the beliefs of the Founding Fathers, clearly government and law were meant to depend on principles derived from rationality and reason, not revelation. And that’s why the founders were intent on keeping the state and religion separated. Religion, on the other hand, isn’t particularly well served by overex-posure to the state and its secular institutions. Institutionally sanctioned Christian prayer in public schools and before foot-ball games was always more or less at odds with Christ’s injunction in Matthew 6:6 to go into your closet and pray in secret. Furthermore, not only was it sometimes offensive to practitio-ners of other religions, it always ran the risk of tipping down the slope toward empty, meaning-less ritual. The Kountze cheerleaders aren’t to be faulted for their earnestness and faith, but surely it’s a distortion of some of the essential principles of Christianity to apply them to something as trivial, exploitative and violent as a football game. Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com Y ou can’t always tell who’s really responsible for the twists and turns of the American econo-my. During any given era, the groundwork for good times or bad may have been laid by politicians and policy makers who have long since left the scene. For example, in the 1990s Bill Clinton presided over an economic resurgence the likes of which hadn’t been seen in ages. Yet there are those who credit, in part, the policies of Climton’s predecessor, George H.W. Bush, with the great fiscal renaissance of the late 20th century. (Of course, the Internet boom and post-Cold War cuts in defense spending helped con-siderably, as well.) And if it isn’t always easy to tell who gets the credit, it’s not always clear who’s to blame, either. The markets crashed less than a year after Herbert Hoover took office in 1929. While no one really thinks he really caused the Great Depression, he presided over it for three-plus years, and that’s as good as the same thing in the popular mind. The crisis that may be coming is different. To whatever degree the dangers of the “fiscal cliff” may have been exaggerated by cable-TV talk shows, it seems a genu-ine threat to an already fragile recovery – and one which, should it be visited upon us, will have a simple, obvious cause. If we go over the edge, it will be because the White House and Congress failed to prevent it. The economic theory underly-ing each side’s positions may be complex, but the bottom line is simple. Last year, in a stop-gap effort to end the debt ceiling debate, both sides cre-ated a mechanism of automatic tax hikes and entitlement cuts so monstrous that Democrats and Republicans would some-how have to come to terms to avoid it. Back then Jan. 1, 2013 seemed far away. Surely our leaders would find common ground by then. As they stumble around in the dark nigh upon the 11th hour, all we can say to them is this: You bear the burden for just what-ever it is that’s headed our way. Whatever the consequences of your collective inaction, we’ll know just where to lay the blame Novembers hence. We’ll know just who to blame Bible verses for football gamesColleges failing at history OUR OPINION I t’s the holidays, col-lege and university students are mostly back at home, and here’s a thought: There’s a great movie out about Abraham Lincoln, and with no classes to interfere, they ought to go to it and learn some American history. Many students, you may not realize, don’t know beans about their own country’s past. Back some years ago, the American Council of Trustees and Alumni commissioned a study of how much seniors at 55 elite universities knew about fundamental, high school-level historical matters, and guess what. A startling 81 percent got either a “D” or an “F” on a test. This year, the group commissioned another study, this one of college graduates, and found just a sliver knew James Madison was the father of the Constitution or George Washington the victorious general at Yorktown. Only 17 percent could identify the source of the phrase “government of the people, by the people and for the people.” The issue is not one of student stupidity, but of institutional neglect. The council has conducted another study showing you can get out of most institutions of higher learning without taking the kinds of courses that turn on the lights for you as a human being and a citizen, giving you a broad understand-ing of this world. By the reckoning of the council, schools ought to be requir-ing courses in U.S. history or government, science, math, literature, econom-ics a foreign language and composition, and most are sloppy about it. Only 2 percent of 1,070 surveyed schools get an “A” for mandating study in at least six of these knowledge areas, and I am proud to say I have taught at one of them, Colorado Christian University. By contrast, one university that received a “D” is sup-posedly one of the best in America, a place that is unbelievably tough to get into and proffers a degree that opens career doors hither, yon and in between. I mean Harvard, whose failings are the subject of “Privilege,” a splendidly written 2005 book by Ross Gregory Douthat. Douthat, a conservative columnist at the ultra-lib-eral New York Times, says being a student at Harvard is more nearly about suc-cess than learning, even though, yes, there are lots of brilliant people around, including professors who inflate your grades even as too few offer up terrific classes. One problem is that there’s no guidance about what to take, and the choices available in core curriculum subject areas can be leaps and bounds from anything central and substantive. All of which brings us to the “Lincoln” movie. Let’s first get the criticism out of the way, namely that there are some false moments lessening instead of focusing the drama. But the movie as a whole is an intense experience of a great man pulling off the great accomplish-ment of winning a House of Representatives vote furthering the 13th Amendment that ended slavery in the United States. I am a fan of Lincoln and books about him and found the depic-tion of him incredibly convincing, as did some historians who have also commented that the movie is basically sound in its wondrously moving por-trayal of events. The short of it is that someone could go to this movie and learn more about a crucial episode in American history than during a four-year stay at one of hundreds of col-leges, including the fact that Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address was the source of the phrase about govern-ment of, by and for all of us. They would not have to spend a ton on tuition, either, or end up owing enough to the federal gov-ernment’s ultra-inflationary student loan program to be in debt for years. Our universities need reform, serious, tuition-reducing, curriculum-improving reform that also sees professors putting teaching above publish-ing as the way to keep from perishing. Here and there are hints of steps in hopeful directions, such as Texas and Florida developing online degree programs costing a total of $10,000. Minus some experiments that work, the hurt will be grievous to a whole slew of people, and to something else as well: our American future. Q Jay Ambrose, formerly Washington director of editorial policy for Scripps Howard newspapers and the editor of dailies in El Paso, Texas, and Denver, is a col-umnist living in Colorado. Jay AmbroseSpeaktoJay@aol.com Q John M. Crisp teaches in the English Department at Del Mar College in Corpus Christi, Texas. John Crispjcrisp@delmar.edu



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DEAR ABBY: Please help save my marriage. My wife of five years dis-covered an Internet brows-er history of 13 Web pages I had clicked on the previ-ous day. The pages were of women’s sexy lips. My wife is calling it “porn” and a “gateway to porn.” I feel guilty about it, but I told her it isn’t pornography. I think it’s a fetish. Will you please tell her that this probably is a fetish? Our sex life has not been the same since she discovered the images on the computer. -NOT GUILTY AS CHARGED DEAR NOT GUILTY: It’s a shame you and your wife hadn’t discussed what turns you on before she checked your browser his-tory. A fetish is any object that turns someone on, and it can range from large breasts, to stiletto heels, to leather or rubber items of clothing, to full red lips. It is NOT pornography. A way to strengthen your marriage would be for you to buy her a tube of bright red lipstick. And a way for her to improve your sex life would be to put it on. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: I’m a 13-year-old girl with a sister and a brother. I was recently told by my dad that I have to teach my brother how to read, but the problem is he has a learning disability and a behavior disorder. On top of that, my dad got mad at my sister and me and said that when we were younger we were just like my brother, only worse. He said he was close to giving up on us. Sometimes Dad says we’re worthless, stupid and asks why we’re even in this world. He says we’re not good for anything. I have a slight form of autism, so I’m sort of slow doing certain things other kids do at my age. I feel like I’ll never be as smart as anyone else, and I have no clue how I’m going to teach my disabled brother to read. Help! -LOST, ALONE AND WORRIED IN URBANA, ILL. DEAR LOST: It would be wonderful if you could teach your learning dis-abled brother how to read, but you are not equipped to do that. Your brother should be in a special edu-cation class with a teacher who has the specialized training -and, possibly, a tutor. Sometimes, when parents are extremely stressed or angry they can say things they don’t mean without thinking of the lasting effect their words can have on a child. You are neither worthless nor stupid. You are an intel-ligent girl. Frankly, your father appears to be in need of some help, and I hope you will share with a counselor at your school what you have told me. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: My 13year-old son is refusing to wear a bicycle helmet because he has decided it’s “uncool.” I know how devastating the effects of a head injury can be and I want to pre-vent my son from getting one. My son insists I am ... AN OVERPROTECTIVE MOM DEAR OVERPROTECTIVE MOM: Contact your son’s pediatrician and ask if he or she can facilitate a tour of a rehabilitation facility that treats people with traumatic brain injuries. If that doesn’t convince your son, nothing will. DILBERT BABY BLUES HOROSCOPES DEAR ABBY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Don’t stick around if someone is being criti-cal. Short trips or getting together with friends will turn your day into an adventure with plenty of opportunity to mingle with people who appreciate your humor and expertise. A little pampering will go a long way. ++++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Check out an interest you have or start making plans for your next win-ter getaway. Refuse to let future prospects or what someone has done to com-plicate your life get to you. Once you take charge, all will be forgotten. +++++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Don’t get too far ahead, or you may have to backtrack. Finding out the possibilities that exist along with the favors you are owed and personal con-tributions you can make will be sufficient enough to raise interest in your plans for the future. +++ CANCER (June 21July 22): Memories are brought to mind by those you miss and those who reminisce with you. Cling to the thoughts that make you feel happy and which encourage you to add cre-ate more precious memo-ries to look back on in the future. +++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Enjoy the end-of-year festivities. Getting together with friends will brighten your day as well as bring about some very interest-ing ideas about how you will be able to improve your future. A change of scenery will do you good. ++++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Relax, engage in a little pampering, and most of all don’t feel obligated to take care of domestic responsibilities if you have already done your fair share. Focus on doing what makes you happiest, not what others want you to do. ++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Travel about or get together with someone you can share your experi-ence and expertise with. Love and romance are highlighted and can turn a dull day into something spectacular. Share your feelings as well as your personal plans. +++++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Stick close to home and make some personal alterations that will make your life more comfortable or a project you want to pursue easier. Don’t limit the possibilities when all that’s required is a little discipline and hard work. +++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): You’ll certainly draw a lot of attention if you make personal chang-es. Open up emotionally and you will receive the help you need to move for-ward. Love and romance are in the stars and pros-pects for a brighter future are present. +++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): A change of plans may disrupt your day. Don’t let what oth-ers choose to do have an impact on you. Follow your own path and you will discover something that will make everyone take a second look at the way you handle situations. +++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Spend time devel-oping a skill or taking a suggestion someone made and turning it into a viable means to advance finan-cially, emotionally or physi-cally. Love is on the rise and a romantic evening should be on your agenda. +++++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Not everyone will see things your way. Don’t get into a dispute over trivial matters. You are best to put more thought, research and development into prospects you want to pursue in the New Year. Don’t give in to someone acting unreasonable. ++ CELEBRITY CIPHER Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com BLONDIE BEETLE BAILEY B.C. FRANK & ERNEST FOR BETTER OR WORSE ZITS HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH GARFIELD THE LAST WORD Eugenia Last Wife has a few choice words on man’s love for sexy lips Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. CLASSIC PEANUTS Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2012 4B



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Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & ST A TE WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 26, 2012 5A 5A Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE C all 888-203-3179 www. C enturaOnline.com 866-314-3769 AIRLINES ARE HIRING www.boatangel.com 800 1 CAR L ANGE Dec. 28 SHINE training SHINE (Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders) is seeking volunteers in Columbia, Suwannee, Hamilton and Lafayette counties. Free volunteer training is scheduled as fol lows: orientation, Jan. 11, 1 to 3 p.m,; basic train ing, Feb. 13-15, 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.; and mentoring, six sessions scheduled at volunteers convenience. All training will take place at Elder Options, 100 SW 75th St. (Tower Road) in Gainesville. Registration is required by Dec. 28. Meals will be provided and mileage and, if need ed, hotel accommoda tions will be reimbursed. SHINE is a statewide vol unteer-based program of the Florida Department of Elder Affairs, offering counseling and assistance with Medicare, Medicaid, long-term care planning, prescription drug assis tance, supplemental insur ance and Medicare fraud. SHINE is dedicated to pro viding free and unbiased information and counseling through a dedicated net work of volunteers, empow ering Florida seniors, their families and caregivers to make informed health care choices. For more informa tion or to request a SHINE volunteer application pack et, call (352) 692-5264 or toll-free at (800) 963-5337. Dec. 31 Retirement, investiture A retirement ceremony for Judge E. Vernon Douglas and an investiture ceremo ny for his son, Judge-elect Wesley R. Douglas, will be at 1:30 p.m. in the Columbia County Courthouse, 173 NW Hernando Ave. A reception will follow. Watch Night service New Bethel Missionary Baptist Church will have its annual Watch Night service at 9:30 p.m. The church is at 550 NE Martin Luther King St. Jan. 2 Olustee battle meeting The Blue-Grey Army will meet at 5:30 p.m. to plan the Olustee Battle Festival. The meeting will be at the school district central building, room 153, 409 SW St. Johns St. Jan. 6 Zumba introduction A free introduction to Zumba class will be held from 3 to 4 p.m. at the Teen Town Recreation Building, 533 NW DeSoto St. For more information, contact Sarah Sandlin as (386) 7580009 or visit Lake City Zumba on Facebook. Zumba weight loss The Lake City Zumba Loser weight-loss contest will begin at 4 p.m. at the Teen Town Recreation Building, 533 NW DeSoto St. For more information, contact Sarah Sandlin as (386) 758-0009 or visit Lake City Zumba on Facebook. Jan. 8 Medicare seminar LifeStyle Enrichment Center is sponsoring a free Medicare seminar from 5 to 6 p.m. The semi nar will be moderated by Irv Crowetz of C/C & Associates. Subjects to be covered include: what you need to know about Medicare, when to enroll, whats covered and when a supplement is needed. Call 755-3476 ext. 107 to reserve a seat. Jan. 12 Chili cook-off The fourth annual Branford Chili Cook-off will be from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hatch Park on Craven Street in Branford. The event will include a silent auction for adults and kids, door prizes, live music, an antique car show, moon walk, Home Depot Kids Workshop and a variety of homemade chili. Admission is $5 and includes all the chili you can eat. Proceeds will benefit Herrys Kids Pediatric Services, a pro gram of Hospice of the Nature Coast. To register to compete in the chili cook-off, call the hospice at (386) 755-7714 or vist online at www.hospiceof citrus.org. Jan. 15 Pageant entries Today is the deadline for contestants to enter the 2013 Olustee Festival Pageant. The pageant is open to girls ages 3 months to 20 years who live in or attend school in Baker, Columbia, Gilcrist, Hamilton, Union and Suwannee counties. Age divisions are 3 to 12 months, 13 to 23 months, 2 to 3 years, 4 to 6 years, 7 to 9 years, 10 to 12 years, 13 to 15 years and 16 to 20 years. Contestants may compete in beauty, sportswear, tal ent and photogenic catego ries. The pageant awards include educational schol arships, trophies, crowns and banners. Each pageant contestant will receive a tiara. First-place winners will ride in the Olustee Festival parade. The pag eant will be held Jan. 26 at the Columbia County Schools Administrative Complex. Applications may be obtained at the Columbia County Library, the Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of Commerce, Emily Taber Library, Suwannee Regional Library, Hamilton County Library or by contacting Elaine Owens at (386) 965-2787. Jan. 16 Olustee planning The Blue-Grey Army will meet at 5:30 p.m. to plan the Olustee Battle Festival. The meeting will be at the school district central building, room 153, 409 SW St. Johns St. Jan. 19 Chili cook-off The Lake DeSoto Farmers Market will have its second annual chili cookoff during market hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Funds raised from the sale of chili sam ples will benefit Church of the Way. Registration is $10, and there will be a cash prize for the win ner. For registration infor mation and contest rules, visit online at market.lcfla. com. The farmers market is held along Lake DeSoto between the Columbia County Courthouse and Shands Lakeshore Hospital in downtown Lake City. For more information, call (386) 719-5766 or visit market.lcfla.com. MLK Jr. proram The Columbia County Branch of NAACP will hold its 30th annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. pro gram at 4 p.m. at Mount Pisgah AME Church, 529 NE Washington St. Judge Julian Collins will be key note speaker. The NAACP choir, directed by Dr. Tony Buzzella, will perform. Jan. 26 Olustee pageant The 2013 Olustee Festival pageant will be held in the Columbia County Schools Administrative Complex on West Duval Street (U.S. 90) in Lake City. Competition for girls age 3 months to 9 years old will be at 4 p.m. Competition for girls 10 to 20 old will begin at 7 p.m. Contestants will be judged in beauty, sports wear, talent and photoge nic categories. For more information, contact Elaine Owens at (386) 965-2787. Winners will ride in the Olustee Festival parade on Feb. 16. Ongoing Festival vendors The Blue-Grey Army is accepting applications from vendors wanting to take part in the 2013 Battle of Olustee Festival on Feb. 15 and 16 in Lake City. For more information, phone Phil Adler at (386) 4383131, visit the festival web site, www.olusteefestival. com, or email vendorinfo@ olusteefestival.com. The deadline to apply is Feb. 8 and spaces are limited. Winter program The Boys and Girls Club of Columbia County, on Jones Way in Lake City, is now accepting registra tions for its winter pro gram, which will run Dec. 1 through March 1. The fee is $200, which includes transportation from all ele mentary, middle and high schools. The club offers a variety of activities, includ ing sports, arts and crafts, game room, library and special events. It also offers a homework program with tutorial help for children. A computer lab also is avail able. For more information, call the club at 752-4184. Woodturners Club Bell Woodturners Club meets the second Thursday of the month in the Bell community Center, Bell Florida at 7 p.m.. Every meeting features a show and tell of members cur rent projects. There is also a full demonstration of a wood turning project by a club member. There are opportunities to take home project wood, tools and receive help from other turners. All experience lev els are welcome. For addi tional information, contact Kent Harris at 365-7086. Photo club Lake City Photo Club meets every second Tuesday of each month from 2 to 4 p.m. at the LifeStyle Enrichment Center on Baya Avenue. Share your photos and ideas with the group. Newcomers are welcome. Volunteers sought Shands LakeShore Regional Medical Center Auxiliary is looking for volunteers to work a vari ety of positions around the hospital. Volunteers are asked to work a four-hour shift once per week, but are welcome to work more often. Volunteers are need ed to drive the shuttle car and help with jobs in the hospital. If you have some time to donate, come to the gift shop and pick up an application or call (386)2928000, ext. 21216. Volunteers needed United Way of Suwannee Valley is recruiting vol unteers who are willing to be called upon to staff the Columbia County Emergency Operations Centers Information Center during disasters. These volunteers serve as the link between the county emergency man agement offices and the public when the EOC is activated for disasters. Anyone willing to serve in this capacity when needed should call Jenn Sawyer, United Way of Suwannee Vallety long-term recovery coordinator, at 752-5604, ext. 101. Grief support The Grief Share Support Group, a minis try of Orchard Community Church, meets every Saturday from 2 to 4 p.m. in room D at the Willowbrook Assisted Living center, 1580 S. Marion Ave. The group offers caring sup port for those who have lost a loved one, through videos, discussion time, and prayer. There are fees. For information, call 288-7429. Volunteer opportunity Hospice of the Nature Coast is seeking volunteers in Columbia, Suwannee Hamilton and Lafayette counties. Volunteers are needed to provide general office support and nonmedical assistance to patients. Specialized training will be provid ed. Contact Volunteer Manager Drake Varvorines at (386) 755-7714 or email dvarvorines@hospiceofthe naturecoast.org. COMMUNITY CALENDAR To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr @lakecityreporter.com. By GARY FINEOUT Associated Press TALLAHASSEE For the third year in a row, Florida is giving up on collecting more than $100 million in taxes, fees and fines owed the state. But the amount of money the state is walk ing away from continues to grow. Data released this past month shows that the state forgave $124.2 mil lion in the fiscal year that ended June 30. Florida in 2011 wrote off $110.5 million as uncollect able, while the number was more than $109 million the year before. The overall amount of money that Florida is los ing is small compared with the size of the states annu al $70 billion budget. But the failure to collect the money comes amid year after year of state budget cuts. State Sen. Joe Negron, R-Stuart and the new Senate budget chief, said even though the amount is small he still wants the Legislature to re-examine whether the state is doing enough to collect money it is owed. We want to be circum spect and prudent with every dollar we have avail able to us in the state bud get, Negron said. Well take a fresh look at that number and see if there is any possibility of reducing that amount. A large portion nearly $37 million that was written off by state offi cials was unpaid taxes, including sales taxes, cor porate income taxes and unemployment taxes. A breakdown provided by the Department of Revenue shows that $15.4 million that was forgiven was sales taxes owed by businesses. Stores and other businesses are required to collect and then hand over the states 6 percent sales tax. The agency also forgave $13.4 million in unpaid income taxes from corpo rations. This year the state also closed the books on trying to collect back nearly $30.7 million that was overpaid to people receiving unem ployment compensation checks. These overpay ments were made when the states jobless rate was rising between the years of 2006 and 2009. James Miller, a spokes man with the Department of Economic Opportunity, pointed out that the amount of money written off represents just 1.3 per cent of the unemployment compensation benefits the state was paying annually. The names of business es and residents that owed money to the Department of Revenue and had their tax bills waived are kept confidential under state law. The names of people who received too much in jobless benefits is also exempt from the states public records law. The Agency for Health Care Administration reported that it waived col lection of nearly $14 mil lion that the state paid too much to more than 100 health care providers treat ing patients in the states Medicaid program. Shelisha Coleman, a spokeswoman for the agen cy, however, said that even though the debt has been forgiven that the agency will continue to try to recoup taxpayer dollars. Coleman said if the pro vider files for reimburse ment of a new claim then the agency can place a lien on that claim in order to recover the overpayment. Coleman, however, said in most cases collections are unsuccessful because either someone is dead or in jail, or the company is dissolved or has filed for bankruptcy. This years total amount that is being waived also includes nearly $800,000 in fines owed to the Florida Commission on Ethics by public officials and others. Republican legislative lead ers have already said they may enact new measures in the coming year that make it harder for elected officials to refuse to pay the fines. State forgives $124.2M in taxes, fines ASSOCIATED PRESS Surfing Santas Approximately 150 people dressed as Santas, elves, snowmen and other Christmas charac ters showed up at George Trossets Surfing Santa event Monday in Cocoa Beach. The event raised money for Grind for Life, which helps people with cancer.



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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDWEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2012 5B Classified Department: 755-5440 CLASSIFIED AD vantageTake ADvantage of the Reporter Classifieds!755-5440Lake City Reporter FIND IT SELL IT BUY IT Open House Your community call centerJoin us for Open House Thursday, January 3, from 10-12Brunch will be providedPerfect time to view our facility, meet the staff and discuss job opportunities with recruiters onsite.1152 S.W. Business Point Dr. • Lake City (386)754-8562 www.sitel.com Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 ServicesWhite's Trucking Services You call & We Haul! Fill Dirt, Lime Rock. AsphaltMillings, Granite, Road Rock.386-362-8763 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO.: 12-2012-CA000519WELLS FARGO BANK, NA,Plaintiff,VS.BRANDON L. PHINNEYA/K/ABRANDON LANE PHINNEY; AR-RI A. PHINNEYA/K/AARRI PHINNEYN/K/AARRI ANN SIM-QUE; et al.,Defedant(s).NOTICE OF ACTIONTO: Unknown Spouse of Brandon L. Phinney A/K/ABrandon Lane Phin-ney and Arri A. Phinney A/K/AArri Phinney N/K/AArri Ann SimqueLast Known Residence: 167 SWCates St, Lake City, FL32024Brandon L. Phinney A/K./ABrandon Lane Phinney, Last Known Residence: Lot 9 Cates Road, Lake City, FL32024Current Residence unknownand all persons claiming by, through, under or against the named Defend-ants.YOU ARE HEREBYNOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mort-gage on the following property in COLUMBIACounty, Florida:LOT9, TIMBERLANE, ASUBDI-VISION ACCORDING TO THE MAPOR PLATTHEREOF AS RE-CORDED IN PLATBOOK 5, PAGE 126, PUBLIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on AL-DRIDGE / CONNORS, LLP, Plain-tiff’s attorney, at 7000 West Palmet-to Park Road, Suite 307, Boca Raton, FL33433 (Phone Number: (561) 392-6391), within 30 days of the first date of publication of this notice, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before 1/4/2013 on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief de-manded in the complaint or petition.Dated on 12/4/2012.P. DEWITTCASONAs Clerk of the CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioAs Deputy ClerkSEAL05536335December 19, 26, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NUMBER: 12-193-CAJ.L. DICKSPlaintiff,vs.ROBERTK. DIETRICH AND BRENDAL. DIETRICH,Defendants.CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE UN-DER F.S. CHAPTER 45NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accord-ance with the Summary Final Judg-ment of Foreclosure dated December 5th, 2012, in the above styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bid-der for cash in Courtroom 1, Colum-bia County Courthouse in Lake City, Florida, at 11:00 A.M. on 1/9/2013, the following described property:Parcel 3 NorthCommence at the NE corner of the S 1/2 of the NE 1/4 of the NW1/4 of Section 4, Township 7 South, Range 17 East and run S 8804’30” Walong the North line of the S 1/2 of the N 1/2 of said NW1/4 725.80 feet to the POINTOF BEGINNING; thence continue S 8804’30” W, 406.0 feet; thence S 216’53” E, 591.46 feet; thence S. 7538’21” E 421.76 feet; thence N 0216’53” W709.76 feet to the POINTOF BE-GINNING. Columbia County, Flori-da.TOGETHER WITH AND SUB-JECTto an easement for ingress and egress 30.00 feet to the right and 30.00 feet to the left of the following described centerline: Commence at the NE corner of the S 1/2 of the NE 1/4 of the NW1/4 of Section 4, Township 7 South, Range 17 East, and run thence S 8804’30” Walong the North line of the S 1/2 of the N 1/2 of said NW1/4, 725.80 feet; thence S 0216’53” E 679.76 feet to the POINTOF BEGINNING; thence continue S 0216’53” E 700.00 feet to the existing right-of-way of Old Bellamy Road and the Termination Point.ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN IN-TERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS FILED HEREIN MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITH THIS COURTWITHIN SIXTY(60) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF THE SALE.Dated this 6th day of December, 2012.P. DeWITTCASONClerk of CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy Clerk05536390December 19, 26, 2012 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE 3RD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.CASE No.: 11-472CAWELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR THE REGIS-TERED HOLDERS OF STRUC-TURED ASSETSECURITIES CORPORATION MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFI-CATES, SERIES 2007-OSI,Plaintiff,vs.Diane R. Zwick and Wesley ZwickDefendants.NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANTTO CHAPTER 45NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated December 5th, 2012 and entered in Case No. 11-472CAof the Circuit Court of the 3rd Judicial Circuit in and for Co-lumbia County, Florida, wherein, WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR THE REGIS-TERED HOLDERS OF STRUC-TURED ASSETSECURITIES CORPORATION MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFI-CATES, SERIES 2007-OSI, is Plaintiff and Diane R. Zwick and Wesley Zwick, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the 3rd Floor of the Colum-bia County Courthouse located at 173 N.E. Hernando Street, Lake City, FLat 11:00 o’clock A.M. on the 9th day of Jan., 2013 the follow-ing described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to wit:PARCEL1:Apart of Northeast 1/4 of Section 3, Township 7 South, Range 16 East, Columbia County, Florida, more par-ticularly described as follows:Commence at the Northwest corner of said Northeast 1/4 and run N 87 deg. 30’16” E, along the North line thereof, 659.33 feet for a Point of Beginning; thence continue N 87 deg. 30’16” E, 659.34 feet to the Northeast corner of the Northwest 1/4 of said Northeast 1/4; thence s 1 deg. 48’26” e 662.00 feet; thence s 87 deg. 30’16”W658.10 feet; thence N 1 deg. 54’51” W, 661.98 feet to the Point of BeginningAND PARCEL2:Section 3, Township 7 South, Range 16 East: Begin at the Northwest cor-ner of the Northeast 1/4 of the North-east 1/4 for Point of Beginning; run S. 87 deg. 30’27” W, 772.32 feet; thence run N 1 deg. 37’02” W, 56.4 feet; thence run N 87 deg. 30’27” E, 772.32 feet; thence run S 1 deg. 37'02” E, 56.4 feet to the Point of Beginning, being in Section 34, Township 6 South, Range 16 East, Columbia County, Florida.Together with the Right of Ingress and Egress over and across the fol-lowing described parcel: Commence at the Northwest corner of said Northeast 1/4, Section 3, Township 7 South, Range 16 East, Columbia County, Florida, and run N 87 deg. 30’16” E, along the North linethereof, 659.33 feet; thence S 1 deg. 54’51” E, 661.98 feet for a Point of Beginning of said easement; thence N 87 deg. 30’16” E, 326.82 feet; thence S 1 deg. 48’26” E 60.00 feet; thence N 87 deg. 30’16” E, 331.28 feet; thence S 1 deg. 8’26” E 60.00 feet; thence S 87 deg. 30’16” W, 343.96 feet; thence N 2 deg. 01’18” W,60.00 feet; thence N 87 deg. 30’16” E, 77.35 feet to the Point of Beginning, Columbia County, Flori-da.Street Address: 307 SWMelville Glen, Fort White FL32038and all fixtures and personal property located therein or thereon, which are included as security in Plaintiff’s mortgage.Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the list pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.Dated at Lake City, Columbia Coun-ty, Florida, this 6th day of Dec., 2012.Dewitt CasonClerk of said Circuit CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioAs Deputy ClerkSEAL05536364December 19, 26, 2012 NOTICE OF SALEGateway Mini–Warehouses will of-fer for sale the contents of the fol-lowing units which contain:person-al, household goods, and business items:Unit# Name8Cicarra Sharnea Denitra Gibson37Christopher John Boucher72Erical Lynn Shaw78Marquite Leuwance Odom82Rachel Merrick103Bobby Cagle106Debra Griffis139Danamarie Works149Phyllis J. Boswell156Glenda Milton Buckner170Mary MacDonald204Elizabeth Ann Lott 240Samantha Jean Griffin275Amy Alicia Sherell Smith277Frank Costello284Ashley & Robert Hargrove291Curtis Marshall426Sitel439Robin Johnson440Robin JohnsonThe sale will be held on Tuesday, January 8, 2013 at 9:00 AM at:Gateway Mini-Warehouses4158 West US Highway 90Lake City, Florida32055(Some units located at NWChristian Court) The contents of the units may be viewed at this time and bids submit-ted.Upon notification of acceptance of bid, payment must be made in full, cash only, and the contents re-moved.Sale is subject to cancella-tion in the event of settlement be-tween the owner and the obligated party.Gateway Mini-Warehouses reserves the right to bid.05536401December 19, 26, 2012 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDAGENERALCIVILDIVISIONCase No. 2011-CA-000274WELLS FARGO FINANCIALSYSTEM FLORIDA, INC.Plaintiff,vs.SANDRAL. SMITH; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SANDRALSMITH; and UNKNOWN OCCUPANTS, TENANTS, OWNERS, AND OTH-ER UNKNOWN PARTIES, includ-ing, if a named defendant is de-ceased, the personal representatives, the surviving spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and all other par-ties claiming by, through, under or against that defendant, and all claim-ants, persons or parties, natural or corporate, or whose exact legal status is unknown, claiming under any of the above named or described de-fendants,Defendants.NOTICE OF SALENotice is hereby given that pursuant to the Order or Final Judgment en-tered in this cause, in the Circuit Court of Columbia County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Co-lumbia County, Florida, described as:Begin at the NE corner of Lot 1, of a subdivision of a part of Block 309 in the Western Division of the City of Lake City, Columbia County, Florida as shown in Plat Book 2, Page 103 and run N 8907’East along the South right of way line of Hillsboro Street 210 feet, more or less to the old West right of way line of First Street; thence run South along the old West right of way line of First Street 209.5 feet, more or less to the North right of way line of Hamilton Street; thence run S 8907’West 210 feet, more or less, to the SWcorner of Lot 12 in the aforesaid Subdivi-sion; thence run N 053’West 209.5 feet, more or less to the POINTOF BEGINNING.LESS AND EXCEPTright of way for State Road 25, deeded to State of Florida in Official Records Book 22, page 253 described as follows: Be-ginning at the SE corner of Block 309 of the Western Division of the City of Lake City, Florida, according to the Official plat thereof in the Of-fice of the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Columbia County, Florida, same being the intersection of the North boundary of Hamilton Street and the West boundary of First Street; thence run S 8932’30” W47.57 feet; thence N 4545’E 14.45 feet; thence N 200’30” E, 187.75 feet; thence N 4427' W13.78 feet to the North boundary of said Block 309; thence N 8904’30” E 33.73 feet along the North boundary of said Bock 309 ( South boundary of Hillsboro Street) to the East boundary of said Block 309, thence S 148’30” Walong boundary 207.81 feet to the point of beginning, lying in and being a part of the East 1 acre of Block 309 of the Western Division of the City of Lake City, Florida.Property Address: 314 Main Boule-vard NWLake City, FL32056Parcel I.D.: R12233-000at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, on the third floor of the Columbia County Courthouse, 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32056 at 11:00 a.m. on 1/16/13.ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN IN-TERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS, MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITH THE CLERK OF COURTWITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.DATED this 6th day of Dec., 2012.P. DEWITTCASONClerk of Circuit CourtBy /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkIn accordance with the American With Disabilities Act, persons need-ing a special accommodation to par-ticipate in this proceeding should contact the A.D.A. Coordinator not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding via the Florida Relay Service at 1-800-955-8771.05536433December 26, 2012January 2, 2013 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO: 12-276-CPIN RE: ESTATE OF THOMAS DENNIS ANDERSON, deceased.NOTICE TO CREDITORSTOALLPERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINSTTHE ABOVE ESTATE:You are hereby notified that the ad-ministration of the estate of Thomas Dennis Anderson, deceased, File Number 12-276-CP,is pending in the Circuit Court for Columbia County, Florida, Probate Division, the ad-dress of which is P.O. Box 2069; Lake City, FL32056. Then names and addresses of the personal repre-sentative and the personal represen-tative’s attorney are set forth below.ALLINTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:All creditors of the decedent and oth-er persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATTER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTYDAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or de-mands against the decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AF-TER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.ALLCLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOTSO FILED WILLBE FOREVER BARRED.The date of first publication of this Notice is: December 26, 2012 LegalPersonal Representative:Ms. Crystal D. Rehm1936 SWHerlong StreetFort White, FL32038Attorney for Personal Representa-tive:Hugh Cotney, P.A.905 Blackston BuildingJacksonville, FL3220205536436December 26, 2012January 2, 2013 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO.: 12-2012-CA-000479DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONALTRUSTCOMPANY, AS TRUSTEE OF INDYMAC RESIDENTIALMORTGAGE-BACKED TRUST, SERIES 2006-L2, RESIDENTIALMORTGAGE-BACKED CERTIFI-CATES, SERIES 2006-L2Plaintiff,v.REVANORD PIERRE LOUIS, et alDefendant(s).NOTICE OF ACTION FOR FORE-CLOSURE PROCEEDING-PROP-ERTYTO:NANNOTTEE OBBEY, LASTKNOWN ADDRESS IS:5367 NW116TH AVENUE, COR-ALSPRINGS, FL33076Residence unknown, if living, in-cluding any unknown spouses of the said Defendants, if either has remar-ried and if either or both of said De-fendant(s) are dead, their respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all other persons claim-ing by, through under or against the named Defendant(s); and the afore-mentioned named Defendant(s) and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendants and such of the afore-mentioned unknown Defendant(s) as may be infants, incompetents or oth-erwise not sui juris.YOU ARE HEREBYNOTIFIED that an has been commenced to fore-close a mortgage on the following re-al property, lying and being and situ-ated in COLUMBIACounty, Flori-da, more particularly described as follows:LOT18, SOUTHERN EXPO-SURES (UNRECORDED)COMMENCE ATTHE NWCOR-NER OF THE SOUTH 1/2 OF SEC-TION 25, TOWNSHIP5 SOUTH, RANGE 15 EAST, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE N 8833’56” E, ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SOUTH 1/2 OF SAID SECTION 25 ADISTANCE OF 1968.15 FEET; THENCE S 0035’31” E, ADISTANCE OF 2045.43 FEETTO THE POINTOF CURVATURE OF ACURVE TO THE RIGHT, HAVING ARADIUS OF 300.00 FEET, ACENTRALANGLE OF 1720’29”, ACHORD BEARING OF S 0804’44” WAND ACHORD LENGTH OF 90.45 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE, AN ARC LENGTH OF 90.80 FEETTO THE POINTOF REVERSE CURVA-TURE OF ACURVE TO THE LEFT, HAVING ARADIUS OF 360.00 FEET, ACENTRALAN-GLE OF 3425’28”, ACHORD BEARING S 0027’46” E AND ACHORD LENGTH OF 213.06; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE, AND ARC LENGTH OF 216.29 FEETTO THE POINTOF REVERSE CURVA-TURE OF ACURVE TO THE RIGHT, HAVING ARADIUS OF 330.00 FEET, ACENTRALAN-GLE OF 1023’48”, ACHORD BEARING OF S 1228’36” E AND ACHORD LENGTH OF 59.80 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE, AN ARC LENGTH OF 59.88 FEETTO THE END OF SAID CURVE AND THE POINTOF BEGINNING OF THE HEREIN DESCRIBED LANDS; THENCE N 8833’18” E, ADIS-TANCE OF 778.72 FEETTO THE POINTON THE EASTLINE OF LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFI-CIALRECORDS BOOK 943, PAGE 1192 OF THE OFFICIALRECORDS OF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE S 0532’32” W, ALONG SAID EASTLINE ADISTANCE OF 276.75 FEETTO APOINTON THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SECTION 25; THENCE S 0532’32” W, STILLALONG SAID EASTLINE ADISTANCE OF 435.46 FEETTO THE SE CORNER OF SAID LANDS; THENCE N 7707’10” W, LegalALONG THE NORTH LINE OF “FERNWOOD ESTATES” ASUB-DIVISION AS PER PLATTHERE-OF RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 4, PAGES 104 THROUGH 104AOF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, ADISTANCE OF 713.94 FEETTO APOINTON THE CENTERLINE OF A60 FOOTWIDE ROAD EASEMENT; THENCE N 0117’15” W, ALONG SAID CEN-TERLINE ADISTANCE OF 249.65 FEETTO APOINTON THE AFOREMENTIONED SOUTH LINE OF SECTION 25; THENCE N 0117’15” W, STILLALONG SAID CENTERLINE, ADISTANCE OF 246.17 FEETTO THE POINTOF CURVATURE OF ACURVE TO THE LEFT, HAVING ARADIUS OF 330.00 FEET; ACENTRALANGLE OF 059’27”, ACHORD BEARING OF N 0416’58” WAND ACHORD LENGTH OF 349.49 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE, AN ARC LENGTH OF 34.50 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING. SUBJECTTO AN EASEMENTFOR AGAS LINE OVER AND ACROSS THE SOUTHERLY47 FEETOF THE ABOVE DESCRI-BED LANDS.THE ABOVE DESCRIBED LANDS BEING APARTOF THE SOUTH 1/2 OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP5 SOUTH, RANGE 15 EASTAND PARTOF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP5 SOUTH, RANGE 15 EAST, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.SUBJECTTO AND TOGETHER WITH AN EASEMENTFOR IN-GRESS AND EGRESS AND PUB-LIC UTILITIES DESCRIBED AS “ROAD EASEMENT” AND SHOWN HEREON.“ROAD EASEMENT”COMMENCE ATTHE NWCOR-NER OF THE SOUTH 1/2 OF SEC-TION 25, TOWNSHIP5 SOUTH, RANGE 15 EAST, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE S 0035’31” E, ALONG THE WESTLINE OF SAID SECTION 25 ADISTANCE OF 1107.80 FEETTO APOINTON THE WESTERLYEXTENSION OF THE CENTER-LINE OF A60 FOOTWIDE ROAD EASEMENT; THENCE N 8833’18” E, ALONG SAID EX-TENSION ADISTANCE OF 19.96 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGIN-NING OF THE HEREIN DESCRI-BED ROAD EASEMENT; THENCE N 0057’09” W, ALONG THE EASTRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE OF COUNTYMAINTAINED PUB-LIC ROAD ADISTANCE OF 60.26 FEETTO THE POINTOF CURVA-TURE OF ACURVE TO THE LEFTHAVING ARADIUS OF 30.00 FEET, ACENTRALANGLE OF 9029’33”, ACHORD BEAR-ING OF S 4611’56” E AND ACHORD LENGTH OF 42.61 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE, AN ARC LENGTH OF 47.38 FEETTO THE POINTOF TANGENCYOF SAID CURVE; THENCE N 8833’18” E, ADIS-TANCE OF 1858.56 FEETTO THE POINTOF CURVATURE OF ACURVE TO THE LEFT, HAVING ARADIUS OF 30.00 FEETACEN-TRALANGLE OF 8908’49”, ACHORD BEARING OF N 4358’54” E AND ACHORD LENGTH OF 42.11 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE, AN ARC LENGTH OF 46.68 FEETTO THE POINTOF TANGENCYOF SAID CURVE; THENCE N 0035’31” W, ADIS-TANCE OF 564.72 FEETTO THE POINTOF CURVATURE OF ACURVE TO THE LEFT, HAVING ARADIUS OF 30.00 FEET, ACENTRALANGLE OF 4124’35”, ACHORD BEARING OF N 2117’48” WAND CHORD LENGTH OF 21.21 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE, AN ARC LENGTH OF 21.68 FEETTO THE POINTOF COMPOUND CURVATURE OF ACURVE TO THE LEFT, HAVING ARADIUS OF N 8924’29” E AND ACHORD LENGTH OF 75.00 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE AN ARC LENGTH OF 229.35 FEETTO THE POINTOF COMPOUND CURVA-TURE OF ACURVE TO THE LEFT, HAVING ARADIUS OF 30.00 FEET, ACENTRALANGLE OF 4124’35”, ACHORD BEAR-ING OF S 2006’46” WAND CHORD LENGTH OF 21.21 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE, AN ARC LENGTH LegalOF 21.68 FEETTO THE PONTOF TANGENCYOF SAID CURVE; THENCE S 0035’31” E, ADIS-TANCE OF 1561.82 FEETTO THE POINTOF CURVATURE OF ACURVE TO THE RIGHT, HAVING ARADIUS OF 330.00 FEET, ACENTRALANGLE OF 1720’29”, ACHORD BEARING OF S 0804’44” WAND ACHORD LENGTH OF 99.50 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE, AN ARC LENGTH OF 99.88 FEETTO THE POINTOF REVERSE CURVATURE OF ACURVE TO THE LEFT, HAVING ARADIUS OF 330.00 FEET, ACENTRALANGLE OF 3425’28”, ACHORD BEARING OF S 0027'46” E AND CHORD LENGTH OF 195.30 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE, AN ARC LENGTH OF 198.27 FEETTO THE POINTOF REVERSE CURVATURE OF ACURVE TO THE RIGHT, HAVING ARADIUS OF 360.00 FEET, ACENTRALANGLE OF 1623’15”, ACHORD BEARING OF S 0928'52” E AND ACHORD LENGTH OF 102.61 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE, AN ARC LENGTH OF 102.97 FEETTO THE POINTOF TANGENCYOF SAID CURVE; THENCE S 0117’15” E, ADISTANCE OF 245.85 FEETTO APOINTON THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SECTION 25; THENCE S 0117'15” E, ADISTANCE OF 257.55 FEETTO APOINTON THE NORTH LINE OF “FERN-WOOD ESTATES’ASUBDIVI-SION AS PER PLATTHEREOF RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 4, PAGES 104 THROUGH 104AOF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CO-LUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE N 7707’10” W, ADIS-TANCE OF 241.76 FEETTO APOINTON THE AFOREMEN-TIONED SOUTH LINE OF SEC-TION 25; THENCE N 0117’15” W, ADISTANCE OF 246.49 FEETTO THE POINTOF CURVATURE OF ACURVE TO THE LEFT, HAV-ING ARADIUS OF 300.00 FEET, ACENTRALANGLE OF 1623'15”, ACHORD BEARING O F N 0928’52” WAND CHORD LENGTH OF 85.51 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE, AN ARC LENGTH OF 85.80 FEETTO THE POINTOF REVERSE CURVATURE OF ACURVE TO THE RIGHT, HAVING ARADIUS OF 390.00 FEET, ACENTRALANGLE OF 3425’28”, ACHORD BEARING OF N 0027'46” WAND ACHORD LENGTH OF 230.81 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE, AN ARC LENGTH OF 234.32 FEETTO THE POINTOF REVERSE CURVATURE OF ACURVE TO THE LEFT, HAVING ARADIUS OF 270.00 FEET, ACENTRALANGLE OF 1720’29”, ACHORD BEARING OF N 0804'44” E AND ACHORD LENGTH OF 81.41 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE, AN ARC LENGTH OF 81.72 FEETTO THE POINTOF TANGENCYOF SAID CURVE; THENCE N 0035’31” W, ADIS-TANCE OF 877.08 FEETTO THE POINTOF CURVATURE OF ACURVE TO THE LEFT, HAVING ARADIUS OF 30.00 FEET, ACENTRALANGLE OF 9051’11”, ACHORD BEARING OF N 4601'07” WAND CHORD LENGTH OF 42.74 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE, AN ARC LENGTH OF 47.57 FEETTO THE POINTOF TANGENCYOF SAID CURVE; THENCE S 8833’18” W, ADIS-TANCE OF 1857.80 FEETTO THE POINTOF CURVATURE OF ACURVE OF THE LEFT, HAVING ARADIUS OF 30.00 FEET, ACENTRALANGLE OF 8930’27”, ACHORD BEARING OF S 4348'04” WAND ACHORD LENGTH OF 42.24 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE, AN ARC LENGTH OF 46.87 FEETTO THE POINTOF TANGENCYOF SAID CURVE; THENCE N 0057’09” W, ALONG THE AFOREMENTIONED WESTRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE OF THE COUNTYMAINTAINED PUBLIC ROAD ADISTANCE OF 59.74 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGIN-NING.THE ABOVE DESCRIBED LANDS ARE PARTOF THE SOUTH 1/2 OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP5 SOUTH, RANGE 15 LAKE CITY REPORTER This Reporter Works For You! 755-5440Classifieds 755-5445 Circulation



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6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 20126A Celebrate the Rockin’ New Year at Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park & Campground 386-364-1683 3076 95TH DRIVE, LIVE OAK, FLORIDA 32060WWW.MusicLivesHere.COM JUSTIN CASE rnn $ 50 Couples ‡ $ 30 Singles rn INCLUDES: AUCE FINGER FOOD BUFFET, CHAMPAGNE TOAST & NOISE MAKERS COURTESY PHOTOSABOVE: Lake City Masonic Lodge and Cherry Hill Lodge of Fort White held their first combined annual Christmas party for families and friends. Good food, fellowship and Christmas carols were enjoyed by all. LEFT: A surprise visit by Santa and his elf who gave out presents and gift bags to all the children ended the festive occasion. Masonic Christmas State quietly adopts national school standardsBy BILL KACZORAssociated PressTALLAHASSEE — Florida’s schools are adopt-ing uniform academic stan-dards shared with most other states, but the move is not creating the kind of uproar that’s surrounded some other major changes in public education. Common Core State Standards, which are designed to help American children compete with their peers around the world, are getting mostly high marks from Florida’s teachers, administrators and politi-cians alike. Forty-five states, the District of Columbia and three territories are adopting the standards, which cover kindergarten through high school. Supporters say the standards are designed to align with college and work expectations in a global economy. To be sure, there is some angst, but it’s mostly over how to meet the state’s goal of getting them fully phased in over the next 20 months. “It’s the implementation, it’s the structure, it’s the timing,” Pinellas County School Superintendent Mike Grego recently told the State Board of Education. “There’s no resistance.” Florida and its new education commissioner, Indiana’s outgoing state schools chief Tony Bennett, have been leaders in the ini-tiative. While serving as a measuring stick, they’ll give schools and teachers wider latitude for developing cur-riculum to help students learn what’s required than currently allowed by the Sunshine State standards. “My first thought was, ‘Gee, that’s the way I was taught to teach back in the ‘70s,’” said Andy Ford, president of the Florida Education Association. The statewide teachers union has been at odds with Republican governors and the GOP-controlled Legislature over such issues as private school vouchers, class size limits and the use of student test scores to determine everything from school grades and teacher evaluation, but the FEA is supportive of the common core approach. “It tells you what you need to teach but not how to teach it, so it gives me back the power to say ‘OK, this is where I want my kids to go,’” said Margaret Goodwin, who teaches third-graders at Westgate Elementary School in St. Petersburg. Melissa Stokes, a fourth grade teacher at Yulee Elementary School in northeast Florida, also is looking forward to the new standards. “It’s better for not just the teacher, but it’s even more crucial for the stu-dents,” Stokes said. The standards will be particularly helpful in military communities such as Yulee that have a rapid turnover of students. Stokes said children transferring from out of state often haven’t learned the skills required in Florida. That’s just a bonus, said state Public Schools Chancellor Pam Stewart, who’s also serving as interim commissioner until Bennett arrives in mid-January. The new standards in math and language arts aren’t as broad as the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards they are replacing, but are deeper. Medial of Honor nominee, 89, still waiting for awardBy R. NORMAN MOODYFlorida TodayPALM BAY — Arcadio Santiago-Rodriguez spent 20 years quietly driving school buses in Brevard County and proudly flying the American flag on a tall pole in his front yard. Rarely did he say anything about a remarkable military career that includ-ed multiple commenda-tions and a promise from his commander that he would recommend him for a Medal of Honor for hero-ics in Korea. It has taken a neighbor and his youngest son to encourage him to talk about his military service that spanned World War II, Korea and Vietnam, for which he earned him two Silver Stars, two Bronze Stars and the Purple Heart. Santiago-Rodriguez, who turned 89 on Saturday, served with the Army’s 65th Infantry Regiment ‚ nick-named The Borinqueneers, a Puerto Rican regiment of the United States Army. Segregated from other American troops, the unit saw action in Germany during World War II and distinguished themselves in Korea. “They told us we were not allowed on the front lines,” he said smiling. “We fought as much as the people on the front lines. Later we went to the front lines.” Santiago-Rodriguez thinks he was discrimi-nated against and was not awarded the Medal of Honor because he is Puerto Rican, the same attitude that kept his unit from joining the rest of the infantrymen on the front line. World War II was the beginning of his combat duty that spanned decades. By 1951, Santiago-Rodriguez and the 65th Infantry were in the middle of the conflict in Korea. Santiago-Rodriguez and his company were near Hongbok, Korea, when they got into a firefight with an enemy battalion. When his squad leader was killed, Private Santiago-Rodriguez assumed command of the squad. During a later assault to drive the enemy from a ridge, he volunteered to carry a wounded comrade to safety. In doing so, he encountered five enemy soldiers. He placed his wounded comrade on the ground, and opened fire on the enemy, killing four of them and capturing the fifth. He forced his pris-oner to carry the wounded man to the battalion aid station, according to a cita-tion for the medal. He later visited the soldier and his grateful family in Guaynilla, Puerto Rico. Santiago-Rodriguez said there was no explanation as to why he received the Silver Star instead of the Medal of Honor. “My commander told me I will recommend you for the the Medal of Honor,” Santiago-Rodriguez said. “A few months later I got the Silver Star.” Richard Santiago, 43, of Palm Bay said his father had spoken little about his service until recent years. And even then, the stories were slow in coming. “I sit down and listen,” he said. Santiago-Rodriguez’s neighbor, John Hardesty, lives in Dallas but spends at least one weekend a month in Palm Bay. “I feel very fortunate he opened up to me,” Hardesty said. “One thing that both-ers me, and I know our country has changed since then, is that his command-er nominated him for the Medal of Honor and he didn’t get it.” It is not known how many people have been nominated for the Medal of Honor. The first Puerto Rican awarded the Medal of Honor was Marine Pfc. Fernando L. Garcia, who when an enemy grenade landed nearby, endanger-ing another Marine and himself, chose to sacrifice himself, throwing him-self on the grenade in the Korean War. Four other Puerto Ricans have been awarded the Medal of Honor, the highest military decoration award-ed by the United States, for heroics in Vietnam. A total of 135 Medals of Honor were awarded for action in the Korean War. Doug Sterner, military historian and curator for Military Times Hall of Valor, said Santiago-Rodriguez’ nomination may have been downgraded. “It’s not uncommon that they downgrade,” Sterner said. “That happens with frequency.” Sterner said that there is no list of people simply nominated for the Medal of Honor. Hardesty, 61, said he met Santiago-Rodriguez about three years ago and thought his story should be told. “He is just a great man who served his country long,” he said. “He’s a humble man.”



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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDWEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2012 Classified Department: 755-5440 6B 2000 Lincoln TowncarMed. blue, leather, power seats & more. 147,400 miles. Excellent condition.$3,490 386-623-2848 LegalEASTAND SECTION 36, TOWN-SHIP5 SOUTH, RANGE 15 EAST, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.COMMONLYKNOWN AS: XXX SOUTHWESTSPRUCE ROAD, LAKE CITY, FL32024This action has been filed against you and your are required to serve acopy of your written defense, if any, such Morris Hardwick Schneider, LLC, Attorneys for Plaintiff whose address is 5110 Eisenhower Blvd, Suite 120, Tampa, FL33634 on or before 1/7/2013, and file the original with the clerk of this Court either be-fore service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Com-plaint.WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 6th day of Dec./s/ P. DeWitt CasonClerk of the Circuit CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkSEAL“In accordance with the American with Disabilities Act, persons need-ing a special accommodation to par-ticipate in this hearing, should con-tact ADACoordinator no later than 1 (one) day prior to the proceeding at International Revenue Service (FL-Northern), 400 West Bay Street, Stop 5710, Jacksonville, FL32202 904-665-0832 and for the hearing and voice impaired 800-955-8770.”05536336December 26, 2012January 2, 2013 100Job Opportunities05536389FANTASTIC OPPORTUNITY Guest Services Position Part/Full time with opportunity for advancement. MUST be a people person with great customer service skills, strong work ethic, DEPENDABLE good communication, sales skills, computer skills, and willingness to learn. MUST be a team player and able to work a flexible schedule including weekends & holidays. We offer Competitive Pay and Health Benefits. Hotel Experience Preferred but not required. Only those seeking long term employment apply in person at Comfort Suites 3690 WUS HWY90. Please do not call the hotel regarding your application. Case managers are needed for long-term recovery efforts to assist Columbia County households affected by Tropical Storm Debby. Applicants should have good communication skills and be able to work with minimum supervision. This position requires travel in the county; a dependable vehicle is required. These are grant-funded full-time positions. Submit a resume to United Way of Suwannee Valley, 325 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, FL32055 or fax to 386-752-0105. Construction Salesman Needed. Excellent Pay. Experience Required. 866-959-7663 ConsumerLender-SunState FCUFull-Time Position in Lake City. Experience selling financial products, proven customer relations expertise, and lending experience REQUIRED. Great pay and benefits! Application Required and available at www.sunstatefcu.org. Fax to 386-462-4686. DFWP, EOE 32 Temp Farmworkers 2/4/13 – 12/3/13. Workers will plant, cultivate, thin, harvest, grade & pack fruit & vegetables. 3 months verifiable experience as a farm worker. Subject to random drug testing at employer’s expense. Guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours. Work tools, supplies and equipment provided at no cost. Free housing provided for non-commuting workers. Transportation & subsistence reimbursed to worker upon completion of 50% of contract, or earlier, if appropriate. Worksite in George CO, MS. $9.30/hr. Applicants report or send a resume to the nearest FLAgency of Workforce Innovation Office & ref. job #64973 or call (386) 755-9026. Courtney Farms – Lucedale, MS Mechanic needed at Fla.Rock & Tank Lines In White Springs. Diesel exprnc reqr'd in maintenance & repair of tractor trailers. 45-50hrs/wk Class A CDLlicense preferred. Excellent Benefits! email: mcomer@patriottrans.com or fax 904-858-9008 Must have a minimum of 5 yrs Exp. selling HVAC Equipment. Excellent benefits &Great pay. Call Allen 386-628-1093 4 TEMPNursery Workers needed 2/4/13-10/15/13. Workers will plant, cultivate, harvest, propagate, grade, store, ship container & field grown horticultural products. Workers will handle a variety of bare root products. 3 months verifiable exp. working in a greenhouse or nursery Guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours. Work tools, supplies, equip. provided at no cost. Free housing provided for noncommuting workers. Transportation & subsistence reimbursed to worker upon completion of 50% of contract, or earlier if appropriate. $10.34/hr. Random drug testing at employer’s expense. Worksite location in Mount Airy, MD. Report or send a resume to the nearest FL Agency of Workforce Innovation office & ref. job order # 262687 or call (386)-755-9026. Snell’s Greenhouses – Mount Airy, MD SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 Service Techs & Installers Must be EPA& NATE certified. Excellent benefits & great pay. Call Allen (386) 628-1093 100Job OpportunitiesOverdevest Nurseries, LP Bridgeton, NJ 55 Order Pullers Needed Individuals with at least three months of recent, verifiable, and positive nursery experience, familiar with a range of proper plant names, and sufficiently familiar with plant identification so as to accurately and timely pull orders for delivery trucks. Must be capable of frequent lifting of plants up to 50 lbs. (occasionally heavier with assistance) and willing to do other assignments. Employment is temporary from February 11 to November 30, 2013 with pay rate of $10.34 per hour (subject to increase as may be required by law). Must provide a verifiable, positive, reference from a recent nursery employer showing the required experience. Hours: M-F 7:30 to 5:00 pm, Sat 7:30 to 12:00 noon with extra hours during busy periods. All work in the Bridgeton, NJ area. All required tools provided at no cost. For non-commuting workers, company provided housing is available. In bound travel and subsistence expenses reimbursed upon completion of 50% of the contract period. Guarantee offer of 3/4 of contract hours to those who complete season. Additional benefits may be available after continued employment. Interested applicants should contact: Florida Agency of Workforce Innovation Office of Workforce Services Alien Labor Certification Program Caldwell Building, MSCG 300 107 East Madison Street Tallahassee, Florida 32399-4140 (850) 921-3466 Attn:H-2ACoordinator Job Order # NJ0839400 or the One-Stop Career Center in Vineland, New Jersey (856) 6966600. StarTech Computer Center Now hiring Exp Techs. Send resume to: bdj@startech.cc 10 Temp Nursery Workers needed 1/28/13 – 11/28/13. Workers will perform duties concerned with preparing soil & growth media, cultivation, & participating in horticultural activities. Random drug testing at employer’s expense. Guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours. All tools, supplies & equipment provided at no cost. Free housing provided for non-commuting workers. Transportation & subsistence reimbursed to worker upon completion of 50% of contract, or earlier if appropriate. $9.30/hr. Worksites in George County, MS. Applicants should report or send a resume to the nearest FLAgency of Workforce Innovations Office or call 386755-9026 & reference job order #64712.Thompson Farms – Lucedale, MS United Way of Suwannee Valley is seeking a Construction Coordinator for long-term recovery efforts to assist Columbia County households affected by Tropical Storm Debby. The Long Term Recovery Construction Coordinator will assist the disaster survivors in their home repair project, conduct project inspections, and provide estimates for needed materials and labor. Licensed contractor preferred. This position requires in county travel; dependable transportation is required. This is a grant-funded, full-time contractual position. Send resume to United Way of Suwannee Valley, 325 NE Hernando Ave., Lake City, FL 32055, or fax to 386-752-0105 120Medical EmploymentDIET AR Y MANAGER Needed CDM, Chef, LTC, 2 years experience preferred Must be able to manage large staff and oversee daily food preparation for a 180 bed SNF. Full time with excellent benefits. E-mail resume to Greg Roberts: groberts@gulfcoasthealthcare.com or fax to: (386)362-4417. Live Oak, FLEOE/V/D/M/F GREATOPPORTUNITY•Full Time Experienced C.N.A’s All Shifts Apply in person at Suwannee Health Care & Rehab. 1620 Helevenston Street S.E. Live Oak, FL32064 EOE/m/f/d/v P/THousekeeper Needed Occasional Nights And Weekends. Fax Resume to 386-487-1232 240Schools & Education05535484Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class12/24/2012• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-11/05/12• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies CKC American Bulldogs both a 1 yr old brother & sister, spayed and neutered, shots, free to the right home. 386-935-4473 Free to the right home. Male approx 8 weeks old. Marble tabby. 386-466-7662 310Pets & Supplies PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 430Garage Sales PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 450Good Things to EatThe Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans 2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024 Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville 386-963-4138 or 961-1420 630Mobile Homes forRent1/1 Cabin & Lots for your RVor your own Cabin for rent. Between Lake City & G’ville. Access to I-75 & 441 (352)317-1326. 2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $700. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 3Br/2Ba Mod 1/2acre (nice subd) concrete drive, wrap around deck appl's,energysaver, &thermo's ready (386) 984-5341 $800 mo Mobile Homes for rent in White Springs & Ft. White. Contact 386-623-3404 Quiet Country Park 3br/2ba $525. Very clean NO PETS! References & Deposit required 386-758-2280 640Mobile Homes forSale1600 SQFT, 3/2 DWMH, close to town, country setting on 2 ac. Reduced to $49,000 (short sale) Poole Realty 362-4539. MLS 82068 2 MFG HOMES on 5 ACRES! Great for 2 families in Godbold Acres west of Lake City $79,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCY INC. 755-5110 #81421 2013 DOUBLEWIDE $33,995 inc. set-up, trim-out & A/C Call 386-288-8379. 3BR/2BA28X64 in a great location, a lot of upgrades, fireplace. Only $2,500 down $399 a month. Call Paula at 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com 4br 2b open/split floor plan MH w/wood flooring, newly painted, large stone fireplace. MLS 82326 Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $74,000 5 LIKENew Mobile Homes!!! For under $30,000. MUSTSEE Call John T. 386-752-1452 Bank owned, Cozy 1/1 home in Lake C community $55,000. MLS 81365 Poole Realty 362-4539. $55,000 BANK REPO 3BR/2BADoublewide ’09 Excellent condition. Only $999 down $377 a month. Call Paula 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com Breathtaking 80 ac horse ranch w/ 7700 sqft home, heated pool, stocked pond, workout facility MLS 82156 Poole Realty 362-4539. short sale $950,000 CLOSE TO VAMED CTR! 3BR/2BAw/beautiful interior, new CH&A$59,900 DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #81428 EASTSIDE VILLAGE 2BR/2BAw/lg kitchen, open floor plan $79,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #80972 Hardwood floors, formal dining room, great rm, f/p, double car garage. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 MLS 82374 $243,900 LIVE OAK! Cute home in city limits; 3BR/1BA& 1,294 SqFt $49,500 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #81410 MUSTSEE 2013 2x6 walls, R30 insulation, OSB wrap, house wrap, real wood cabinets, and thermal pain windows. Payment $399 per month call John T386-752-1452. Results Realty Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 4/2 on 10 Ac home features 2200 heated sqft. 10x20 frame shed. MLS# 76582 $67,500 WANTED…CASH PAID for your Mobile Home, Singlewide or Doublewide flood homes welcome. Call 386-288-8379 Palm Harbor Homes New Home Stimulus 5K For Your Used Mobile Home Any Condition 800-622-2832 ext 210 WOODGATE VILLAGE Move-in ready! Open 3BR/2BA floor plan on nice shaded lot $49,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC 755-5110 #82259 WOODGATE VILLAGE Nice 3BR/2BADWMH w/fenced yd, workshop; $39,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCY, INC 755-5110 #79078 650Mobile Home & Land2/1 MH, completely remodeled. Custom Floors on 5 ac. w/ 2 stall horse barn. MLS # 79025 $49,900 Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Results Realty 650Mobile Home & Land2br/2ba on 3.51 ac, 1512 sqft DW perfect Rental, Lg deck, MLS # 82216 Results Realty Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 $49,900 FSBO 5 ac lot w/ 1995 refurb. MH. 66ft long w/ new roof & wheel chair ramp. $5,000 down Owner Fin. on Balance Approx 5 miles N. of LC. 386-752-4597 Great Value 24 acres, 3/2 DWMH, front porch, full length of MH, open floor plan. MLS 79000. Poole Realty Nelda Hatcher. 688-8067 Hallmark Real Estate $34,400. 3/2 MH in O’Brien. On 4 Ac. Case#091-374923 www.hudhomestore.com Robin Williams (386)365-2135 MLS 81700 Hallmark Real Estate Beautiful 4.38 Ac with 4/2 MH. Master has separate office/den area. Large living room with fireplace. Janet Creel (386)719-0382 MLS#82465 Hallmark Real Estate Beautiful Pasture, fenced for horses, well kept 3/2 M/H Great front & back porch to enjoy nature. Robin Williams (386)365-5146 MLS#80899 Hallmark Real Estate Just Reduced! Home & office over 1900sqft with glassed porch centrally located in town. Janet Creel (386)719-0382 MLS#81207 Hallmark Real Estate Live better for less! 3/2.5 Brick home on an acre. Inground Pool. F/p. Lrg oak trees. S. Columbia County. Ginger Parker(386)365-2135 MLS#81183 Hallmark Real Estate This is it! This 3/2 Home on a corner lot. Close to all amenities. Private fenced backyard. Paula Lawrence (386)623-1973 MLS#79943 OwnerFinanced 3/22.5 ac.River Access. Small down $585 mo 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05535481We’ve got it all!$89 Deposit Limited Avail. Call Today! Windsong Apts. *Free afterschool program386-758-8455 2 bedroom / 1 Bath Apts for rent in Live Oak. Call for price. Contact 386-623-3404 & 386-362-9806 2br/1ba duplex NWGeorgia Ave. Renovated & energy efficient. Tile floors, W/D, $475/Mo. $300 Dep. 386-755-1937 2br/1ba. Close to town. $580.mo plus deposit. Includes water & sewer. 386-965-2922 Amberwood Hills Apts. Private Patio area. Beautiful yard. Washer/dryer hkup. Free water & sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special. 386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com Brandywine & Branford Apartments Now Renting 1, 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-752-3033 W. Grandview Ave. Equal Housing Opportunity TDD Number 1-800-955-8771 BRANFORD VILLAS 386-935-2319 2br/1ba Apts. Now available.$570. mo. TDD number 1-800-955-8771 Equal Housing Opportunity Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2 mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet Friendly. Pool laundry & balcony. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A$530 month $530 deposit garbage included. No pets. 386-344-2170 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Greentree Townhouse Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free water & sewer. Balcony & patio. Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com Redwine Apartments Pets welcome. with 5 complexes, we have a home for you. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 Wayne ManorApts. Spacious 2bedroom washer/dryer. Behind Kens off Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 www .myflapts.com WindsorArms Apartments. Move in! 2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free 200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 White Springs upstairs Large 1 or 2 bedroom apt. $350 per month includes DSL& Free T.V. 397-1410 730Unfurnished Home ForRent3/2 $500dep. $550 /mth, water and sewer included, off Lake Jeffrey & Honeysuckle Rd. Contact 623-5410 or 623-2203 3B/2BA brick,Florida room, fireplace, 2 car carport, Large yard, quiet & private. Country Club Rd. South, $900 mo. 386-365-6228 3bdrm very spacious, 2ba, garage, CH/AFenced in backyard. $1,400 mth & $1,400 dep. Contact 386-344-1914 3br/1.5ba. Very clean, Brick great area w/bonus room. Carport, shed & Fenced (privacy) back yard. $825. mo $825. dep. Ref’s req’d. (941)920-4535 730Unfurnished Home ForRentNICE 3/2 brick home w/garage in quiet neighborhood. 489 SWBrandy. $900 plus sec. dep. 386-438-4600 750Business & Office RentalsMedical, Retail and Professional Office space on East Baya near Old Country Club Rd. Call 386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622 (cell) Office or Retail Space. Many to choose from. Tom Eagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor 805Lots forSale 2 Ac lot in Timberlake S/D. $135,000 MLS # 79025 Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Results Realty 3 Acres in White Springs, Commercial usage, city sewer. Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS $175,000 MLS 82358 Beautiful log home located on 5 ac, well maintained, wrap around porch. MLS 75550 $189,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #80401 $60,000. Must be 55+ 130x750 right on Suwannee, Beautiful lot, minutes from Royal Springs, Denise Bose 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #76668 $32,000 Must be 55+, Buildable lot for site built homes only. In Forest Country. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Great home, Emerald Lakes, well kept, split floor plan, oversized family room, MLS# 79733 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Missy Zecher 623-0237 $169,900 Great starter, corner lot, needs some TLC, close to town MLS 81784 $90,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 810Home forSale 3br/2ba plus office, 2103 heated sqft, wood floors, large patio MLS # 81984 Swift Creek Realty $229,900 (386) 496-0499 58 Ac, Suwannee County, 3br/2ba newly remodeled horse barns & tack.MLS 81002 Swift Creek Realty $650,000 (386) 496-0499 Access Realty Gorgeous views 3bd/3ba on Lake Montgomery. Elevator, fishing dock & jacuzzi. MLS 81438 $249,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access RealtySpacious 4 bd/3ba Cypress Lake w/ 3643 sqft 1.25 acres on lake. Vaulted ceilings. MLS 81314 $279,900. Patti Taylor386-623-6896 Access RealtyTwo story 1895 Victorian house w/ electrical upgrades throughout. double -deck porches, MLS 71594 $149,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Beautiful 2 story w/ upgrades, open kitchen, granite counter tops, great room w/ stone f/p. MLS 81994 Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $435,000 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Country Home, 3br 3 bath, spacious, close to Suwannee & Santa Fe River MLS 81775, $169,900 Elaine Tolar 755-6488 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty MLS 80175, 4br 3ba & 2.5 ba colonial, 3 fireplaces $315,000 Mary Brown Whitehurst. 965-0887 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty 3br 3ba home with a two story duplex. Owner Financing MLS 80915, Elaine Tolar 365-1548 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Building lots: May-Fair, Cannon Creek, Creek Run & Meadow View. Elaine Tolar 386-365-1548 810Home forSale Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Home with 5+ ac 3b 2.5 ba, large kitchen covered deck MLS 81630 Elaine Tolar 365-1548 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty 230 Acres, Col. Co. Paved Rd. 752-4211 MLS 70453 Country home, wood burning f/p, granite counter tops, vaulted ceilings in living room. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 MLS 82022, $240,000 Custom home, located on 6.05 ac. Pecan grove w/ rolling hills in Equestrian Comm. Remax Professionals Missy Zecher 623-0237 $269,000 MLS 81075 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81959 Must be 55+, 2br/2ba, $79,900. Site Built Home w/eat in kitchen, laundry rm, scrn porch. Denise Bose @ 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81958-, $115,000. Must be 55+, 3br/2ba, Site Built w/ lots of room, split plan mstr suite, FL. Rm. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Hallmark Real Estate Brick Home on 6.3 acres 4bd 2.5ba with large 32X20 Deck & Gazebo. Solid wood cabinets Kay Priest(386)365-8888 MLS#82488 Hallmark Real Estate Short Sale Brick home corner lot 2600 SQFT, fenced back yard. Located minutes from town. Paula Lawrence (386)623-1973 MLS 82491 Ichetucknee River 3br/2ba + loft, 1350 sqft. Hardwood floors, f/p, granite counters Swift Creek Realty $399,000 (386) 496-0499 Just listed unique home with 2800 sqft of living space, located on 1.37 acres in Live Oak, MLS 82214, Poole Realty $67,500. 362-4539 Lake Front property w/ 137 ft frontage, eat-in kitchen, screened deck w/ view quality furnishings. MLS 81850 Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $119,000 Open floor plan, covered back patio. Lots of big windows, new carpet & paint, beautiful ceramic tile Century 21 Darby Rogers MLS 82078, 752-6575 Remax Jo Lytte 386-365-2821 Ichetucknee River front 4b/3.5b 2 fireplaces, 2 story home. MLS 81777 $559,000 Ultimate River Experience. Santa Fe River home 2br/2b, granite tops, wood burning heater & open great room. Too many extras to mention. Jo Lytte Remax MLS 81537 $339,000 Spectacular 3br/2b home, great room French doors, 10 aces, w/ barn MLS 79593. Jo Lytte Remax 386-365-2821 $349,800 820Farms & Acreage4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com Access Realty10 acre square tract, High & Dry, OF Avail. w/ 25% down. Convenient Location MLS 81258$39,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access Realty43.64 acres wooded acreage in N.Columbia County. Scenic & Private. MLS 74429 $89,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Owner financed land 1/2 to 10 acre lots. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 830Commercial Property260 S. Marion Ave. 2641 s.f of Office Space. Can be subdivided. $5-$7/sf. No CAM. Prorata for utilities. Call Mika (352) 359-604 Industrial warehouse7+ acres fenced 17,000 sq ft Barn $1,500 mo. TomEagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 950Cars forSale 2000 Lincoln Town Car; Med blue, leather, power seats & more. 147,400 miles, Exc condition. $3,490. 386-623-2848 755-5440Toplace your classified ad call