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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
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Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:01985

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:01985

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text

PAGE 1

Opinion ................ 4APeople.................. 2AObituaries .............. 5A Advice & Comics ......... 3B Puzzles ................. 4B TODAY IN PEOPLE Deport Morgan petition out. COMING WEDNESDAY Local news roundup. 73 55 Isolated showers WEATHER, 2A Lake City ReporterTUESDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2012 LAKECITYREPORTER.COM CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 138, No. 235 YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | 75¢ MerryChristmas 1My favorite ChristmasBy DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comChristmastime brings people together, forging memories that stand the test of time. Lake City residents were asked to reflect back on the good times and share the memories that put smiles on their faces way back when. Eleanor Pickren, who’s lived in Lake City since 1966, said around Christmastime she loves seeing the nativity scenes. She remembers when Epiphany Catholic Church used to have a live man-ger scene on Christmas. She said her grand-children used to sing in the choir and always said something at the performance. The church no longer stages the birth of Christ, but Pickren has never forgotten. “I thought that was so impressive at Christmas to have the live manger scene,” she said. Dottie Price said she remembers still remembers a present from when she was a Chapman Vann Pickren Post-storm miracle Shooting site draws hundredsBy JESSE WASHINGTON andPAT EATON-ROBBAssociated PressNEWTOWN, Conn. — The Sandy Hook section of Newtown was a gathering place this weekend for hundreds of people drawn to the scene of the recent massacre to share in the community’s mourning and come to terms with the shocking school tragedy. The village’s downtown was clogged with traffic Sunday, with license plates from all across New England and beyond. Residents across Newtown, meanwhile, were seeking to move forward through faith, community and a determination to seize their future. Many have taken advantage of counseling services. Both groups are trying in their own way to cope with the puzzling Dec. 14 massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School that took the lives of 20 children and six adults. Police say the gunman killed his mother before heading to the school and committed suicide afterward. People with bouquets of flowers, teddy bears and cameras walked along the closed road to the makeshift memorial near the school. Mark Burkhart brought his wife and daughter from Wingdale, N.Y., to pay their respects. “We felt we had to come here to grieve a little bit,” he said. “You find yourself not sure what to do or what to say, so this kind of helps.”ASSOCATED PRESSRichard Dale Long (left) and his mother Lisa Long-Arsenal place stuffed animals near a makeshift memorial in Newtown, Conn. Folks share someof their happiest holiday memories.Don’t fret, Virginia,Santa’s still hereEditor’s note: More than a century ago, eight-year-old Virginia O’Hanlon wrote a letter to the edi-tor of New York’s Sun. The unsigned response, printed Sept. 21, 1897, has become a mainstay of Christmas lore. Newsman Francis Pharcellus Church’s soliloquy on Santa is the most reprinted editorial in history. Virginia’s letter, and Church’s time-less reply, follow: Dear Editor: I am 8 years old.Some of my little friends say there is no Santa Claus. Papa says, ‘If you see it in The Sun it’s so.’ Please tell me the truth; is there a Santa Claus? Virginia O’Hanlon115 West 95th StreetNew York, New YorkVirginia, your little friends are wrong. They have been affected by the skepticism of a skeptical age. They do not believe except they see. They think that noth-ing can be which is not compre-hensible by their little minds. All minds, Virginia, whether they be men’s or children’s, are little. In this great universe of ours man is a mere insect, an ant, in his intellect, as compared with the boundless world about him, as measured by the intelligence capable of grasp-ing the whole of truth and knowl-edge. Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus. He exists as certainly as love and generosity and devotion exist, and you know that they abound and give to your life its highest beauty and joy. Alas! how dreary would be the world if there were no Santa Claus. It would be as dreary as if there were no Virginias. There would be no childlike faith then, no poetry, no romance to make tolera-ble this existence. We should have no enjoyment, except in sense and sight. The eternal light with which childhood fills the world would be extinguished. Not believe in Santa Claus! You might as well not believe in fairies! You might get your papa to hire men to watch in all the chimneys on Christmas Eve to catch Santa Claus, but even if they did not see Santa Claus coming down, what would that prove? Nobody sees Santa Claus, but that is no sign that there is no Santa Claus. The most real things in the world are those that neither children nor men can see. Did you ever see fairies danc-ing on the lawn? Of course not, but that’s no proof that they are not there. Nobody can conceive or imagine all the wonders there are unseen and unseeable in the world. You may tear apart the baby’s rattle and see what makes the noise inside, but there is a veil covering the unseen world which not the strongest man, nor even the united strength of all the stron-gest men that ever lived, could tear apart. Only faith, fancy, poetry, love, romance, can push aside that curtain and view and picture the supernal beauty and glory beyond. Is it all real? Ah, Virginia, in all this world there is nothing else real and abiding. No Santa Claus! Thank God! he lives, and he lives forever. A thou-sand years from now, Virginia, nay, ten times ten thousand years from now, he will continue to make glad the heart of childhood. Family gets a second chance after SandyASSOCIATED PRESSDonald Denihan (left) chats with firefighter Chris Troy (r ight) and Chris’s son Connor, 12, who suffers from a life -threatening neuromuscular disease, at the family’s partially renovated home in Long Be ach, N.Y. Denihan, who was looking to help a family after th e Superstorm Sandy, is paying to renovate the Troys’ house.By HELEN O’NEILLAP Special CorrespondentLONG BEACH, N.Y. T he text from Sister Diane at St. Ignatius Martyr church was as odd as it was urgent: “A man is going to call. You must answer the phone.” Kerry Ann Troy had just finished her daily “cry time” — that half-hour between dropping the kids off at school and driving back to her gutted house on New York’s Long Island, or to the hurricane relief center, or to wherever she was headed in those desperate days after Sandy, when life seemed an endless blur of hopelessness and worry. Cellphone reception was sporadic, so even if the stranger called, she would likely miss him. Besides, she had so many other things on her mind. After spending the first week with relatives in Connecticut, Troy, a part-time events planner for the city, and her hus-band, Chris, a firefighter, had managed to find a hotel room for a week in Garden City. The couple had no idea where they and their three children — Ryan, 13, Connor, 12, and Katie, 4 — would go next. Hotels were full. Rentals were gone. Their modest raised ranch, a few blocks from the beach, was unlivable. But the Troys faced another dilemma.The family had been looking forward to a weeklong, post-Thanksgiving trip to Disney World, which was paid for by the MIRACLE continued on 3A VISITORS continued on 3A MEMORIES continued on 3A



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By TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comContinued domination and new determination was exhibited during 2012 in high school sports at Columbia High and Fort White High. Columbia’s bowling team repeated as district cham-pion and made its third con-secutive trip to the FHSAA Finals. The Lady Tigers placed fifth for their best showing at the state meet. Columbia’s football team was ranked in the Top 10 all season and verified the voters’ choice by winning a district championship and finishing the season 11-2. The Tigers posted home playoff wins over Bartram Trail High and St. Augustine High before fall-ing on the road to Navarre High. Columbia advanced to the third round of the playoffs for the first time since 2003. The third round of the playoffs was previously uncharted territory for Columbia baseball, but the 2012 Tigers paved a new way. After qualifying for the playoffs as district runner-up, Columbia won road games at Middleburg High and Stanton Prep before losing at Pace High. Columbia’s softball team was district runner-up for its third trip to the playoffs in the last four years. The Lady Tigers lost at Oakleaf High in the first round. Columbia’s volleyball team was district runner-up and qualified for the play-offs for the first time since 1999. The Lady Tigers won in five sets at Orange Park High after trailing 0-2 in the opening round for the school’s second-ever play-off win and first since 1997. Lake City Reporter SPORTS Tuesday, December 25, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS TEAMS continued on 6B Top teams of 2012 FILEMorris Marshall represents Columbia High’s basketball team. The Tigers were district runners-up in 2011-12.FILEColumbia High’s baseball team was district runner-up i n 2012. The Tigers were the first CHS baseball team to adv ance to the third round of the state playoffs.FILEColumbia High’s district bowling contingent repeated as district champions and advanced to the state tournament for the third straight season. The Lady Tigers finsihed fifth — the best sh owing in school history. CHS football, bowling led the way as district champ ionsJEN CHASTEEN /Special to the ReporterColumbia High’s football team won the district championsh ip in 2012. The Tigers were ranked in the top five in the state in Class 6A and advanced to the third round of the playoffs for the first time since 2003.



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CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS AROUND FLORIDA Vet hospitalized after release MIAMI A Marine veteran who spent months in a Mexican prison after trying to carry an heir loom shotgun across the border had to be hospital ized on his way home to Florida. Jon Hammar of Palmetto Bay was released Friday from a prison in Matamoros, Mexico. Relatives say he was hospitalized over the weekend in Louisiana as he drove to South Florida with his father. Hammars mother said the 27-year-old had a bad chest cold and a stomach ailment before his release from the prison. Hes expected home in time for Christmas. Hammar was headed to Costa Rica in August when he drove across the Mexican border. U.S. authorities told him he could declare the unload ed shotgun at the border. Mexican officials, howev er, said it was illegal and sent Hammar to prison. Bill McBride dies; ran for governor MIAMI Bill McBride, the Democrat who came out of nowhere to defeat Janet Reno for the partys 2002 gubernato rial nomi nation but then lost to Republican Gov. Jeb Bush, has died at the age of 67, his wife said Sunday. McBride suffered a heart attack Saturday while visiting with family in Mount Airy, N.C., said Alex Sink, who was the Democratic nominee for governor in 2010, losing to now-Gov. Rick Scott. McBride had suffered from heart problems for many years but, Sink said, this was very sudden and unexpected. A Tampa attorney, McBride captured his partys gubernatorial nomination against the better-known Reno, who was U.S. attorney gen eral under President Bill Clinton. McBride had been man aging partner at the pres tigious Holland & Knight law firm before unsuc cessfully trying to deny Bush a second term. Two killed in store robbery DELRAY BEACH Authorities said two customers at a grocery store were shot and killed by two masked men with semi-automatic handguns. Delray Beach Police said two men with bandan as over their faces opened fire early Sunday inside Community Market. Two customers were hit. According to police, the men then demanded cash from the register and then fled. It wasnt immediately clear how much money they took. Police said one cus tomer died at the scene and the other died at a hospital. Neither victim had been identified. Officer Jeffrey Messer said the robbery was similar to one that took place two blocks away on Saturday. Crash sends 4 to hospital WESTON A vehicle crash that sent four bicyclists to the hospital remains under investiga tion. The Broward Sheriffs Office said the bicyclists were part of a group that was struck by a car Saturday morning on U.S. 27 in Weston. Sheriffs office spokes woman Dani Moschella said one of the injured was airlifted to a hos pital. The three others also were hospitalized. Moschella said two of the bicyclists were trauma alerts. Wading bird nesting dips again FORT LAUDERDALE South Florida officials said wading bird nesting suffered in 2012 when too much water returned to the region too fast. The South Florida Water Management District said a rainy year following two years of drought caught herons, wood storks, ibises and egrets off guard. Officials said the num ber of wading bird nests declined for the third straight year. Wading birds cant nest or abandon nests when water levels are too high and small prey fish arent available. Officials told the Sun Sentinel that 26,395 wad ing bird nests were found this year. In 2009, 77,505 nests were found. Officials said nesting totals in the Everglades also are far below the tar gets set in state and fed eral restoration plans. Wading birds typically nest during the winter-tospring dry season. Piers Morgan target of petition LONDON T ens of thousands of people have signed a petition calling for British CNN host Piers Morgan to be deported from the U.S. over his gun control views. Morgan has taken an aggressive stand for tighter U.S. gun laws in the wake of the Newtown, Connecticut, school shooting. Last week, he called a gun advocate appearing on his Piers Morgan Tonight show an unbelievably stupid man. Now, gun rights activists are fight ing back. A petition created Dec. 21 on the White House e-petition website by a user in Texas accuses Morgan of engaging in a hostile attack against the U.S. Constitution by targeting the Second Amendment. It demands he be deported immediately for exploiting his position as a national network television host to stage attacks against the rights of American citi zens. The petition has already hit the 25,000 signature threshold to get a White House response. By Monday, it had 31,813 signatures. Morgan seemed unfazed and even amused by the movement. In a series of Twitter messages, he alternately urged his followers to sign the petition and in response to one article about the petition said bring it on as he appeared to track the petitions progress. If I do get deported from America for wanting fewer gun murders, are there any other countries that will have me? he wrote. Rebel Wilson to host MTV Movie Awards LOS ANGELES Pitch Perfect star and Bridesmaids scene-stealer Rebel Wilson is taking center stage. MTV tapped the Australian actress to host its annual movie awards, set for April 14 in Culver City, Calif. The network made the announcement late Thursday during the finale of its popu lar Jersey Shore series. Wilson is an actress and writer who rose to fame with her role as Kristin Wiigs nosy roommate in Bridesmaids. Wilsons other cred its include Bachelorette and What to Expect When Youre Expecting. The MTV Movie Awards have tra ditionally been held in June, but as the summer movie season has edged into May, the network scheduled its show earlier to give film fans a peek at the seasons blockbusters. The MTV Movie Awards has often fea tured exclusive film previews. Rihanna gives $1.75M to Barbados hospital BRIDGETOWN, Barbados Pop star Rihanna has given $1.75 million to a hospital in her Caribbean home land of Barbados in memory of her late grandmother. Rihanna says the donation to buy three pieces of medical equip ment was her way giving back to Barbados. She made the comments during a Saturday ceremony with relatives at the islands Queen Elizabeth Hospital. The hospitals radiotherapy unit has been renamed the Clara Braithwaite Center for Oncology and Nuclear Medicine after Rihannas grandmother, who died in June. Rihanna recently released Unapologetic, her seventh album in seven years. Bethenny Frankel and husband separating LOS ANGELES Bethenny Frankel and husband Jason Hoppy are separating. The 42-year-old TV personality, chef, author and entre preneur told The Associated Press Sunday that the split brings her great sadness. Frankel and Hoppy were married in 2010 and have a daughter, Bryn, who was born that same year. Sunday: 1-2-3-13-17 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAIL Y BRIEFING TUESDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 Monday: Afternoon: 3-3-0-9 Evening: N/A Monday: Afternoon: 1-2-9 Evening: N/A Saturday: 18-20-35-36-37-39 x2 HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter 2AWEATHER ASSOCIATED PRESS British CNN commentator Piers Morgan said he is unfazed by a petition seeking his deportation from the U.S. beause of his gun control views. Associated Press Daily Scripture So they hurried off and found Mary and Joseph, and the baby, who was lying in the manger. When they had seen him, they spread the word concerning what had been told them about this child, and all who heard it were amazed at what the shep herds said to them. But Mary treasured up all these things and pondered them in her heart. The shepherds returned, glorifying and praising God for all the things they had heard and seen, which were just as they had been told. Luke 2:16-20 Associated Press McBride Wilson Frankel



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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7:30 p.m. ESPN2 — Diamond Head Classic, third place, Indiana State vs. Miami, at Honolulu 9:30 p.m. ESPN2 — Diamond Head Classic, championship, Arizona vs. San Diego State, at Honolulu NBA Noon ESPN — Boston at Brooklyn 3 p.m. ABC — New York at L.A. Lakers 5:30 p.m. ABC — Oklahoma City at Miami 8 p.m. ESPN — Houston at Chicago 10:30 p.m. ESPN — Denver at L.A. ClippersFOOTBALLNFL standings AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAy-New England 11 4 0 .733 529 331 Miami 7 8 0 .467 288 289 N.Y. Jets 6 9 0 .400 272 347 Buffalo 5 10 0 .333 316 426 South W L T Pct PF PAy-Houston 12 3 0 .800 400 303x-Indianapolis 10 5 0 .667 329 371 Tennessee 5 10 0 .333 292 451Jacksonville 2 13 0 .133 235 406 North W L T Pct PF PAy-Baltimore 10 5 0 .667 381 321x-Cincinnati 9 6 0 .600 368 303 Pittsburgh 7 8 0 .467 312 304 Cleveland 5 10 0 .333 292 344 West W L T Pct PF PAy-Denver 12 3 0 .800 443 286San Diego 6 9 0 .400 326 329Oakland 4 11 0 .267 269 419Kansas City 2 13 0 .133 208 387 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAWashington 9 6 0 .600 408 370Dallas 8 7 0 .533 358 372 N.Y. Giants 8 7 0 .533 387 337 Philadelphia 4 11 0 .267 273 402 South W L T Pct PF PAy-Atlanta 13 2 0 .867 402 277New Orleans 7 8 0 .467 423 410 Tampa Bay 6 9 0 .400 367 377Carolina 6 9 0 .400 313 325 North W L T Pct PF PAy-Green Bay 11 4 0 .733 399 299Minnesota 9 6 0 .600 342 314Chicago 9 6 0 .600 349 253Detroit 4 11 0 .267 348 411 West W L T Pct PF PAx-San Francisco 10 4 1 .700 370 260x-Seattle 10 5 0 .667 392 232 St. Louis 7 7 1 .500 286 328 Arizona 5 10 0 .333 237 330 x-clinched playoff spoty-clinched division Saturday’s Game Atlanta 31, Detroit 18 Sunday’s Games Green Bay 55, Tennessee 7Indianapolis 20, Kansas City 13New Orleans 34, Dallas 31, OTMinnesota 23, Houston 6Carolina 17, Oakland 6Miami 24, Buffalo 10Cincinnati 13, Pittsburgh 10New England 23, Jacksonville 16Washington 27, Philadelphia 20St. Louis 28, Tampa Bay 13San Diego 27, N.Y. Jets 17Denver 34, Cleveland 12Chicago 28, Arizona 13Baltimore 33, N.Y. Giants 14Seattle 42, San Francisco 13 Sunday, Dec. 30 Jacksonville at Tennessee, 1 p.m. Carolina at New Orleans, 1 p.m.N.Y. Jets at Buffalo, 1 p.m.Baltimore at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.Cleveland at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.Houston at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.Philadelphia at N.Y. Giants, 1 p.m.Chicago at Detroit, 1 p.m.Tampa Bay at Atlanta, 1 p.m.Oakland at San Diego, 4:25 p.m.Arizona at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.St. Louis at Seattle, 4:25 p.m.Kansas City at Denver, 4:25 p.m.Green Bay at Minnesota, 4:25 p.m.Miami at New England, 4:25 p.m.Dallas at Washington, 8:20 p.m. End regular season NFL calendar Jan. 5-6 — Wild-card playoff games.Jan. 12-13 — Divisional playoff games.Jan. 20 — AFC and NFC championship games. Jan. 27 — Pro Bowl, Aloha Stadium, Honolulu. Feb. 3 — Super Bowl, Superdome, New OrleansBASKETBALLNBA schedule EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct GB New York 20 7 .741 — Brooklyn 14 12 .538 5 1/2Boston 13 13 .500 6 1/2 Philadelphia 13 15 .464 7 1/2 Toronto 9 19 .321 11 1/2 Southeast Division W L Pct GB Miami 18 6 .750 — Atlanta 16 9 .640 2 1/2 Orlando 12 15 .444 7 1/2 Charlotte 7 20 .259 12 1/2 Washington 3 22 .120 15 1/2 Central Division W L Pct GB Chicago 15 11 .577 —Indiana 16 12 .571 — Milwaukee 14 12 .538 1Detroit 9 21 .300 8 Cleveland 6 23 .207 10 1/2 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct GB San Antonio 21 8 .724 — Memphis 18 7 .720 1 Houston 14 12 .538 5 1/2 Dallas 12 16 .429 8 1/2 New Orleans 5 22 .185 15 Northwest Division W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 21 5 .808 — Denver 15 13 .536 7Minnesota 13 12 .520 7 1/2 Utah 15 14 .517 7 1/2 Portland 13 13 .500 8 Pacific Division W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 21 6 .778 — Golden State 18 10 .643 3 1/2 L.A. Lakers 13 14 .481 8Phoenix 11 17 .393 10 1/2 Sacramento 9 18 .333 12 Today’s Games Boston at Brooklyn, 12 p.m.New York at L.A. Lakers, 3 p.m.Oklahoma City at Miami, 5:30 p.m.Houston at Chicago, 8 p.m.Denver at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Miami at Charlotte, 7 p.m.Chicago at Indiana, 7 p.m.New Orleans at Orlando, 7 p.m.Cleveland at Washington, 7 p.m.Detroit at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.Houston at Minnesota, 8 p.m.Philadelphia at Memphis, 8 p.m.Brooklyn at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.Toronto at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.L.A. Lakers at Denver, 9 p.m.New York at Phoenix, 9 p.m.Golden State at Utah, 9 p.m.Sacramento at Portland, 10 p.m. AP Top 25 The top 25 teams in The Associated Press ’ college basketball poll, with firstplace votes in parentheses, records through Dec. 23, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and last week’s ranking: Record Pts Prv 1. Duke (63) 11-0 1,623 1 2. Michigan (2) 12-0 1,551 2 3. Arizona 11-0 1,463 4 4. Louisville 11-1 1,422 5 5. Indiana 11-1 1,383 6 6. Kansas 10-1 1,309 9 7. Missouri 10-1 1,157 12 8. Cincinnati 12-0 1,144 11 9. Syracuse 10-1 1,140 310. Ohio St. 9-2 965 711. Minnesota 12-1 878 1312. Illinois 12-1 875 1013. Gonzaga 11-1 824 1414. Florida 8-2 772 815. Georgetown 10-1 674 1516. Creighton 11-1 589 1717. San Diego St. 11-1 557 1818. Butler 9-2 512 1919. Michigan St. 11-2 416 2020. UNLV 11-1 382 2121. Notre Dame 12-1 337 2222. Oklahoma St. 10-1 318 2423. NC State 9-2 264 2524. Pittsburgh 12-1 189 —25. Kansas St. 9-2 152 — Others receiving votes: New Mexico 66, Kentucky 37, Temple 36, Wyoming 28, North Carolina 16, VCU 16, Wichita St. 11, Maryland 7, Oregon 6, UConn 6.AP Top 25 schedule Today’s Game No. 3 Arizona vs. No. 17 San Diego State at the Stan Sheriff Center, Honolulu, 9:30 p.m.Kansas State 67, Florida 61 At Manhattan, Kan. FLORIDA (8-2) Murphy 3-5 0-0 8, Young 8-11 3-4 19, Boynton 4-11 2-4 11, Rosario 1-9 2-3 5, Wilbekin 5-11 1-2 11, Graham 0-0 0-0 0, Yeguete 0-3 2-2 2, Frazier II 1-3 0-0 3, Prather 1-3 0-0 2, Walker 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 23-57 10-15 61.KANSAS ST. (9-2) Gipson 2-3 3-4 7, Southwell 2-5 0-0 5, Rodriguez 1-2 1-2 4, McGruder 4-12 5-6 13, Spradling 4-12 6-8 17, Irving 3-5 0-0 8, Williams 2-6 0-0 4, Lawrence 0-0 0-0 0, Henriquez 2-3 5-9 9, Johnson 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 20-48 20-29 67. Halftime—Kansas St. 33-23. 3-Point Goals—Florida 5-19 (Murphy 2-3, Frazier II 1-2, Rosario 1-4, Boynton 1-5, Walker 0-1, Prather 0-1, Wilbekin 0-3), Kansas St. 7-17 (Spradling 3-8, Irving 2-3, Rodriguez 1-2, Southwell 1-2, McGruder 0-2). Fouled Out—Prather, Young. Rebounds—Florida 27 (Young 10), Kansas St. 36 (Williams 7). Assists—Florida 11 (Wilbekin 7), Kansas St. 16 (Spradling 5). Total Fouls—Florida 20, Kansas St. 16. A—16,303.Florida State 79, Charlotte 76 At Charlotte, N.C. FLORIDA ST. (7-4) White 4-8 1-2 10, Turpin 1-2 2-3 4, Brandon 3-5 0-0 8, Snaer 8-19 9-10 30, Whisnant II 0-0 0-0 0, Bookert 1-4 4-6 7, Shannon 0-1 3-4 3, Bojanovsky 0-0 0-0 0, Thomas 5-10 7-9 17, Ojo 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 22-49 26-34 79.CHARLOTTE (11-2) Clark 0-1 2-4 2, Clayton 5-8 0-2 10, Ingram 1-4 0-0 3, Williams 5-17 0-0 11, Henry 4-9 1-2 9, Nickerson 1-1 0-0 3, Mayfield 6-8 3-4 16, Thompson 0-1 2-2 2, Braswell 7-13 3-3 20, Benkovic 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 29-63 11-17 76. Halftime—Charlotte 40-35. 3-Point Goals—Florida St. 9-19 (Snaer 5-10, Brandon 2-3, White 1-2, Bookert 1-3, Thomas 0-1), Charlotte 7-18 (Braswell 3-4, Nickerson 1-1, Mayfield 1-2, Ingram 1-3, Williams 1-5, Benkovic 0-1, Henry 0-2). Fouled Out—Henry, White, Williams. Rebounds—Florida St. 29 (Shannon, Turpin, White 5), Charlotte 34 (Clayton 11). Assists—Florida St. 9 (Thomas 3), Charlotte 13 (Henry 7). Total Fouls—Florida St. 17, Charlotte 25. A—7,249. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2012 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-04212BAGATE TUESDAY EVENING DECEMBER 25, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -d(5:30) NBA Basketball Oklahoma City Thunder at Miami Heat. (N) Dr. Seuss’ Grinch “Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas” (2000, Fantasy) Jim Carrey, Jeffrey Tambor. News at 11(:35) Nightline (N) 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsHoliday StoriesEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryNews(:35) The InsiderWJXT News(:35) Excused 5-PBS 5 -15th Annual Holiday Traditions ConcertPBS NewsHour (N) Breakfast Special 2: RevengeDownton AbbDownton AbbFrontline Gospels; Christianity and Roman Empire. (Part 2 of 2) (DVS) 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge Judy Two and Half MenNCIS “Newborn King” (DVS) NCIS: Los Angeles “Higher Power” Vegas Mia’s father visits Savoy. Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneHart of Dixie “Blue Christmas” Emily Owens, M.D. “Pilot” TMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ce The Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family Guy Family Guy The SimpsonsNew Girl New Girl “Santa” New Girl “Control” New Girl “Bully” NewsAction News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) “Horton Hears a Who!” (2008) Voices of Jim Carrey, Steve Carell. Blake Shelton’s-ChristmasNewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(5:00) Public Affairs Capitol Hill Hearings WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN Midday NewsWGN NewsAmerica’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne The Nanny The Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Breaking Down the Bars Unfaithful: Stories of Betrayal Unfaithful: Stories of Betrayal Unfaithful: Stories of Betrayal In the Bedroom With Dr. Laura BermanUnfaithful: Stories of Betrayal A&E 19 118 265Storage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage Wars(:01) Storage Wars(:31) Storage Wars HALL 20 185 312“Matchmaker Santa” (2012, Romance) Lacey Chabert. “A Bride for Christmas” (2012) Arielle Kebbel. “Hitched for the Holidays” (2012) Joey Lawrence. “Naughty or Nice” (2012, Fantasy) Hilarie Burton. FX 22 136 248 “Kung Fu Panda” (2008, Comedy) Voices of Jack Black, Angelina Jolie. “Shrek Forever After” (2010) Voices of Mike Myers, Eddie Murphy. “Kung Fu Panda” (2008, Comedy) Voices of Jack Black, Angelina Jolie. CNN 24 200 202Best and Worst 2012Top 10 of 2012Piers Morgan Tonight Barbra Streisand. Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Piers Morgan Tonight Barbra Streisand. TNT 25 138 245(:14) Rizzoli & Isles (:07) Rizzoli & Isles “Virtual Love” Rizzoli & Isles “Over/Under” Rizzoli & Isles Dr. Hope Martin returns. Leverage “The Long Good-bye Job” Rizzoli & Isles Dr. Hope Martin returns. NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobFull House Full House Full House See Dad RunThe Nanny The Nanny Friends Friends SPIKE 28 168 241(5:30) “A Bronx Tale” (1993, Drama) Robert De Niro, Chazz Palminteri, Lillo Brancato. “GoodFellas” (1990, Crime Drama) Robert De Niro, Ray Liotta, Joe Pesci. An Irish-Italian hood joins the 1950s New York Ma a. MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*H M*A*S*H House “Merry Little Christmas” House Cuddy receives gift. Seinfeld Frasier The Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Jessie A.N.T. Farm Shake It Up! Dog With a Blog“Good Luck Charlie, It’s Christmas!” (2011, Comedy) Good Luck CharlieA.N.T. Farm Phineas and FerbJessie Shake It Up! LIFE 32 108 252“The Christmas Consultant” (2012) David Hasselhoff, Caroline Rhea. “The Merry In-Laws” (2012) Shelley Long, George Wendt, Lucas Bryant. “Holiday Spin” (2012, Drama) Ralph Macchio, Garrett Clayton. USA 33 105 242(5:21) “Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull” (2008) “G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra” (2009) Channing Tatum, Dennis Quaid. (9:52) “Raiders of the Lost Ark” (1981) Harrison Ford, Karen Allen. BET 34 124 329Roots: The Next Generations Alex Haley learns his family history. (Part 5 of 7) Roots: The Next Generations (Part 6 of 7) Roots: The Next Generations ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) d NBA Basketball Houston Rockets at Chicago Bulls. From the United Center in Chicago. (N) d NBA Basketball Denver Nuggets at Los Angeles Clippers. ESPN2 36 144 209NFL Live (N) Sport Scienced College Basketballd College Basketball Hawaiian Airlines Diamond Head Classic, Final: Teams TBA. From Honolulu. (N) SUNSP 37 College Football LSU at Florida. College Football South Carolina at Florida. DISCV 38 182 278To Be AnnouncedTo Be AnnouncedTo Be AnnouncedTo Be AnnouncedTo Be AnnouncedTo Be Announced TBS 39 139 247 “A Christmas Story” (1983) Peter Billingsley, Darren McGavin. (DVS) Big Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryConan Mark Wahlberg ; Billy Eichner. HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) Dr. Drew on Call (N) Nancy GraceShowbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236Keeping Up With the KardashiansKeeping Up With the Kardashians “Sweet Home Alabama” (2002) Reese Witherspoon, Josh Lucas. LeAnn RimesChelsea Lately (N) The Soup TRAVEL 46 196 277Man v. Food Man v. Food Man v. Food Man v. Food Toy Hunter: Hunt for Mis t Toys Toy Hunter Toy Hunter NFL Road TestedMan v. Food Baggage BattlesBaggage Battles HGTV 47 112 229Hunters Int’lHouse HuntersHouse HuntersHunters Int’lLove It or List It “The Denil Family” Property VirginsProperty VirginsHouse HuntersHunters Int’lMillion Dollar Rooms TLC 48 183 280Undercover Boss Undercover Boss “American Seafoods” Undercover Boss Undercover Boss “MGM Grand” Undercover Boss “Subway” Undercover Boss HIST 49 120 269Hat elds & McCoys A Hat eld murders a McCoy. (Part 1 of 3) Hat elds & McCoys The McCoys murder Anse’s brother. (Part 2 of 3) Hat elds & McCoys A shattering New Year’s Day battle. (Part 3 of 3) ANPL 50 184 282Call-WildmanCall-WildmanCall-WildmanCall-WildmanCall-WildmanCall-WildmanCall-WildmanCall-WildmanCall of WildmanCall-WildmanSwamp’d!Redneck Roadtrip FOOD 51 110 231Chopped Beef tendon in the appetizer. Chopped Chicken feet; dif cult protein. ChoppedChopped “All Stars: Judge Remix” Chopped “All Stars Grand Finale” Chopped “Viewers’ Choice!” TBN 52 260 372(4:30) Jesus of Nazareth Art portraying Jesus. The Potter’s TouchChristmas with the Joyce MeyerJoseph PrinceRod ParsleyJesus of Nazareth Art portraying Jesus. FSN-FL 56 -World Poker Tour: Season 10World Poker Tour: Season 10World Poker Tour: Season 10World Poker Tour: Season 10World Poker Tour: Season 10World Poker Tour: Season 10 SYFY 58 122 244K-9K-9K-9K-9K-9K-9 “Mind Snap” K-9K-9K-9K-9Warehouse 13 “The Greatest Gift” AMC 60 130 254(5:30) “High Plains Drifter” (1973) Clint Eastwood, Verna Bloom. “El Dorado” (1967) John Wayne, Robert Mitchum. A gun ghter and a drunken sheriff face an evil land baron. “Big Jake” (1971) John Wayne. COM 62 107 249 “Bad Santa” (2003, Comedy) Billy Bob Thornton, Tony Cox. Jeff Dunham Christmas Special(:02) South Park(:32) South Park(:02) South Park(:32) South Park(:02) South Park(:33) South Park CMT 63 166 327Reba Reba Reba Reba Reba “Encounters” Reba “Fireproof” (2008) Kirk Cameron. A divorcing couple turn to God to save their marriage. Facing the Giants NGWILD 108 190 283The Incredible Dr. PolThe Incredible Dr. PolThe Incredible Dr. Pol “Jingle Pols” (N) The Incredible Dr. Pol “Whoa Mama!” The Incredible Dr. Pol “Vet and Wild” The Incredible Dr. Pol “Jingle Pols” NGC 109 186 276Brain Games “Pay Attention!” Brain Games “Remember This!” Brain Games “Watch This!” Brain Games “Pay Attention!” Brain Games “Remember This!” Brain Games “Watch This!” SCIENCE 110 193 284Fringe “Unearthed” Fringe “Johari Window” Fringe “What Lies Below” Fringe “The Bishop Revival” Fringe “Jacksonville” Fringe “What Lies Below” ID 111 192 285Nightmare Next Door Nightmare Next Door Nightmare Next Door “Road to Hell” Nightmare Next Door Nightmare Next Door Nightmare Next Door “Road to Hell” HBO 302 300 501“Anchorman: Legend of Ron”(:15) “Rio” (2011, Comedy) Voices of Anne Hathaway. ‘G’ “Joyful Noise” (2012, Comedy-Drama) Queen Latifah. ‘PG-13’ Boxing’s Best of 2012 (N) MAX 320 310 515(5:45) “The Adjustment Bureau” (2011) Matt Damon. “Superman” (1978) Christopher Reeve. Superman learns of a plot to destroy the West Coast. “A Very Harold & Kumar 3D Christmas” (2011) ‘R’ Zane’s Sex Chron. SHOW 340 318 545(5:30) “Beastly” (2011) ‘PG-13’ “The Three Musketeers” (2011, Action) Matthew MacFadyen. ‘PG-13’ “War Horse” (2011) Emily Watson. A horse sees joy and sorrow during World War I. ‘PG-13’ Red (2010) COLLEGE BOWL GAMES New Mexico Bowl Arizona 49, Nevada 48Famous Idaho Potato BowlUtah State 41, Toledo 15 Poinsettia Bowl BYU 23, San Diego State 6 Beef ’O’ Brady’s Bowl UCF 38, Ball State 17 New Orleans Bowl Louisiana-Lafayette 43, E. Carolina 34 Las Vegas Bowl Boise State 28, Washington 26 Monday Hawaii Bowl SMU vs. Fresno State (n) Wednesday Little Caesars Pizza Bowl At DetroitCentral Michigan (6-6) vs. Western Kentucky (7-5), 7:30 p.m. (ESPN) Thursday Military Bowl At WashingtonBowling Green (8-4) vs. San Jose State (10-2), 3 p.m. (ESPN) Belk Bowl At Charlotte, N.C.Duke (6-6) vs. Cincinnati (9-3), 6:30 p.m. (ESPN) Holiday Bowl At San DiegoBaylor (7-5) vs. UCLA (9-4), 9:45 p.m. (ESPN) Friday Independence Bowl At Shreveport, La.Louisiana-Monroe (8-4) vs. Ohio (8-4), 2 p.m. (ESPN) Russell Athletic Bowl At OrlandoVirginia Tech (6-6) vs. Rutgers (9-3), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN) Meineke Car Care Bowl At HoustonMinnesota (6-6) vs. Texas Tech (7-5), 9 p.m. (ESPN) Saturday Armed Forces Bowl At Fort Worth, Texas Rice (6-6) vs. Air Force (6-6), 11:45 a.m. (ESPN) Fight Hunger Bowl At San FranciscoArizona State (7-5) vs. Navy (7-4), 3:15 p.m. (ESPN2) Pinstripe Bowl At New YorkSyracuse (7-5) vs. West Virginia (7-5), 3:15 p.m. (ESPN) Alamo Bowl At San AntonioTexas (8-4) vs. Orgeon State (9-3), 6:45 p.m. (ESPN) Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl At Tempe, Ariz.Michigan State (6-6) vs. TCU (7-5), 10:15 p.m. (ESPN) Monday, Dec. 31 Music City Bowl At Nashville, Tenn.Vanderbilt (8-4) vs. N.C. State (7-5), Noon (ESPN) Sun Bowl At El Paso, TexasGeorgia Tech (6-7) vs. Southern Cal (7-5), 2 p.m. (CBS) Liberty Bowl At Memphis, Tenn.Iowa State (6-6) vs. Tulsa (10-3), 3:30 p.m. (ESPN) Chick-fil-A Bowl At AtlantaLSU (10-2) vs. Clemson (10-2), 7:30 p.m. (ESPN) Tuesday, Jan. 1 Heart of Dallas Bowl At DallasPurdue (6-6) vs. Oklahoma State (7-5), Noon (ESPNU) Gator Bowl At JacksonvilleMississippi State (8-4) vs. Northwestern (9-3), Noon (ESPN2) Capital One Bowl At OrlandoGeorgia (11-2) vs. Nebraska (10-3), 1 p.m. (ABC) Outback Bowl At TampaSouth Carolina (10-2) vs. Michigan (8-4), 1 p.m. (ESPN) Rose Bowl At Pasadena, Calif.Stanford (11-2) vs. Wisconsin (8-5), 5 p.m. (ESPN) Orange Bowl At MiamiNorthern Illinois (12-1) vs. Florida State (11-2), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN) Wednesday, Jan. 2 Sugar Bowl At New OrleansFlorida (11-1) vs. Louisville (102), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN) Thursday, Jan. 3 Fiesta Bowl At Glendale, Ariz.Kansas State (11-1) vs. Oregon (11-1), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN) Friday, Jan. 4 Cotton Bowl At Arlington, TexasTexas A&M (10-2) vs. Oklahoma (10-2), 8 p.m. (FOX) Saturday, Jan. 5 BBVA Compass Bowl At Birmingham, Ala.Pittsburgh (6-6) vs. Mississippi (6-6), 1 p.m. (ESPN) Sunday, Jan. 6 GoDaddy.com Bowl At Mobile, Ala.Kent State (11-2) vs. Arkansas State (9-3), 9 p.m. (ESPN) Monday, Jan. 7 BCS National Championship At MiamiNotre Dame (12-0) vs. Alabama (12-1), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN) Saturday, Jan. 19 East-West Shrine Classic At St. PetersburgEast vs. West, 4 p.m. (NFLN) Saturday, Jan. 26 Senior Bowl At Mobile, Ala.North vs. South, TBA (NFLN) Turmoil surrounds Tebow By DENNIS WASZAK Jr.Associated PressNEW YORK — Tim Tebow would have done whatever Rex Ryan asked — if the New York Jets coach had asked him. Ryan acknowledged Monday that Tebow wasn’t happy when the coach chose Greg McElroy to start for the benched Mark Sanchez, but insisted Tebow was willing to play in any role Sunday against San Diego — including the wildcat. “He was disappointed, there’s no question,” Ryan said Monday. “He was dis-appointed that he was not named the starter, but with that being said, I’m not going to get into private conversations that I have with players, but it was my decision to use Jeremy Kerley in the wildcat, with-out question. “But I’ll say this: I believe if Tim’s number was called, he would’ve went in and played. I don’t think there’s any doubt about that.” A person familiar with the situation told The Associated Press that Tebow asked out of his wildcat offense duties last week after hearing that McElroy, the third-stringer, would get his first NFL start over Tebow, listed as the No. 2 quarterback. Another person, also familiar with the situation, said that wildcat plays involving Kerley instead of Tebow were added before practice last Wednesday. Both people spoke on condition of anonym-ity because the Jets do not disclose personnel discus-sions. ESPN New York first reported that Tebow opted out of running wildcat plays. ESPN also reported that Tebow said his rela-tionship with Ryan was “strained” for a few days, but they smoothed things over. Ryan had all three quarterbacks active for Sunday’s 27-17 loss, but Tebow never got onto the field in any capacity. Ryan did not deny that Tebow asked out of run-ning wildcat plays, but also refused to go into any details of what happened. “I’ve been transparent and all that stuff without question, but I’m not going to give you a private con-versation that I would have with a player,” Ryan reiter-ated. “That’s between him and I. If he wants to share whatever the conversation is, Tim or anybody else, then that’s up to him.” Ryan was also asked if it could be considered “insubordination” if a play-er refuses to play in a role designed for him. “You guys are assuming something’s a fact or what-ever, and that’s fine,” Ryan said. “If I would have asked Tim to play in anything, Tim would have gone into the game and done that.” After the game, Tebow would say only that “it just happened” that he didn’t play in the wildcat pack-age. He has done his best to hide his frustration throughout what he could consider a lost year on the playing field. “Well, it’s been disappointing,” Tebow said of the season. “Obviously, it didn’t go as we thought, as I had hoped, but some-times in life you have that. Sometimes you have set-backs and you just have to look at them as another opportunity for you to step back up and keep working and figure out what to do.” New York will either trade or release Tebow after the season, a disappointing and frustrating one-year stint with the Jets.



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Make-A-Wish-Foundation to benefit Connor, who suf fers from a life-threatening, neuromuscular disease. He had lost one wheelchair to the storm. His oxygen equipment and other medi cal supplies were damaged by water. He was disori ented and confused. How could they tell their sick child that the storm that had disrupted his life might also cost him his dream to meet Kermit the Frog? Yet Chris Troy felt he couldnt leave. And Kerry Ann said she wouldnt go without him. And then in the space of a few hours every thing changed. A school administrator pulled Kerry Ann aside when she went to pick up Katie. She told her of a vacant summer home a spacious, fully furnished, three-bedroom house in nearby Point Lookout, which the owners wished to donate to a displaced family. The Troys could live there indefinitely, at no cost, while they sorted out their lives. Kerry Ann could hardly believe their good fortune. The kids could stay in their schools. The family could go to Florida after all. But that was only the beginning. The stranger that Sister Diane had texted her about earlier had left a message. His name was Donald. He wanted to meet the Troys. He wanted to help. At St. Ignatius Martyr, offers of help began pour ing in as soon as the storm waters receded: spaghetti dinner fundraisers, fat checks from churches in North Carolina and Texas, smaller donations from nearby parishes. For weeks the church had no power, heat or working phones. Masses were held in the school gym. Monsignor Donald Beckmann, scrambling to help his displaced parish ioners, was a hard man to track down. But Donald Denihan, a 51-year-old businessman from Massapequa, man aged to find him. He want ed to see the devastation firsthand. And he wanted to help one family rebuild. He would pay for everything, from demolition costs to new paint. He just wanted to make sure he found the right family, perhaps some one elderly, perhaps some one with a disability. Over the phone he asked Beckmann: Will you help me choose? The priests heart sank. There were thousands of families in need, people who had lost everything. How in the world could he pick just one? A few days later Beckmann and Sister Diane Morgan gave Denihan a tour of their bat tered barrier island town off the South Shore of Long Island. They took him to the West End, a warren of narrow streets named after the states Arizona, Ohio, Michigan and crammed with small homes, many of them passed down from generation to generation. The neighborhood is staunchly working class; police officers and firefight ers and teachers live here, many of them of Irish and Italian descent. Now it was a disaster zone. Nearly every home had been flooded, their interiors kitchen stoves and sheet rock, childrens toys and mattresses spilling out of Dumpsters that lined the streets. Father Beckmann drove Denihan to a small raised ranch at 103 Minnesota Avenue with a wheelchair ramp at the side. He told him about the family who lived there, the Troys, how they had evacuated to Connecticut mainly because of their sick son, how Kerry Anns child hood home around the corner, newly rebuilt after burning to the ground six years earlier, had been lost to the flood. Then he took Denihan to another ruined house, the tiny bungalow where the churchs 74-year-old cook had climbed a 7-foot lad der into the attic to escape the rising water. All she could do was pray as she watched her disabled son nearly drown in his wheel chair below. Both families were in urgent need of help, Beckmann said. Which one would Denihan choose? Denihan listened intently. After surviving three near-death experiences a duck-shooting acci dent at 16, prostate cancer at 36, and a serious boat ing accident in 2011 he had concluded there was a reason God wanted him around. And so Denihan, who had made his money in hotel and real estate invest ments, had set up a fund. He called it God is Good. Until now, he wasnt sure how he would use it. I cant choose, Father, Denihan confessed, as they drove back to the church. Ill just have to take care of both. The priest offered up a silent prayer of thanks. The nun grabbed her cellphone and texted Kerry Ann. Nothing had prepared Chris Troy for the sight of his home when he returned two days after the storm. The basement including his beautifully finished wooden bar, Kerry Anns office space, the kids playroom, the laundry and boiler room were dank and foul-smelling and mold was already growing. The water had reached to the ceiling, seeping into the living room, kitchen and bedrooms upstairs. Troy prides himself on his stoicism, on being able to cope with anything. But a few hours passed before he could bring himself to break the news to his fam ily. The house is a mess, and Daddy will fix it, he told Katie, and the toys you lost you will get back at Christmas. In reality, he didnt know how the family was going to cope or where they would spend Christmas. Insurance wouldnt cover the basement area. He couldnt afford to pay for repairs himself. And though friends and volun teers offered to help, most could spare only a few hours because they were so busy dealing with dam age to their own homes. We were in a tough situ ation, Chris said. So they gladly agreed to meet with Denihan. Perhaps he would offer to pay for the sheet rock, or a generator, Chris thought. That would be nice. Denihan showed up with a contractor. He walked through the house. He talked to the children. He seemed kind and matter-offact and purposeful. Standing on their front porch, in the chilly morn ing sun, Denihan made a promise. He would rebuild their home. They could make any alterations they wanted, like installing a wheelchair-accessible shower and central air, something the Troys had dreamed of, because Connors disease causes him to overheat. Ill take care of every thing, Denihan said. And well start first thing tomorrow. It was a few days before Thanksgiving and the Troys,who were distracted by the move to the bor rowed house and their upcoming trip to Florida, didnt fully comprehend. What exactly did he mean by everything? It wasnt until a moving van trundled up the next morning and workers carted off their remaining belongings and started tearing down walls, and Denihan told Kerry Ann to start picking out paint col ors and tile, that the enor mity of it began to sink in. This stranger walks into our lives and offers not just to rebuild our home, but to build us a better home, said Kerry Ann. And another family lends us their home. Its absolutely a miracle. The trip to Disney World was the best of their lives. Connor had never been happier, bright and alert and grinning from ear to ear as he met the Magic Kingdom characters Mickey and Woody and the Minions and, of course, Kermit. He went on carou sel rides specially rigged for wheelchairs, splashed in the pool in his water chair and ate ice cream all day long. Back home, they marvel at their new accommoda tions: The house is bigger than their own, with sweep ing views of the Atlantic and a backyard with a swing-set that Katie calls her private park. Still, they wrestle with how to come to grips with their new reality. And how to give thanks. The Troys are used to struggle, to battling through on their own. Kerry Anns father died when she was a 19, after seven years in a coma, and she helped raise her young er siblings. They nearly lost Connor a few years ago, after spinal surgery left him in a body-cast for eight weeks and doctors didnt think he would sur vive. Kerry Anns mother, Kathy, spent a year living with them in the basement, while her burned home was rebuilt. So they find themselves agonizing over Denihans generosity, sure of their gratitude but unsure how to process it. How do you thank someone for giving you back your home and your life, Chris asks. What do I do ... give him a child? Denihan isnt looking for thanks and he has his own children. He said he just feels blessed to be in a position to help, and grate ful that others are pitching in, too. His contractors plumber, electrician and builder have offered to do the work either for free, or at cost. Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS TUESDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2012 3A 3A No Runaround -No Hassle We can help. Denied Social Security Disability? GBIS Disability, Inc. Free Consultation 1-800-782-0059 20 years of Social Security Disability Experience www.GBISOnline.com Bring your unwanted Gold, Silver & Platinum to someone you can trust Precious metals are seeing record values. Please call me for a private and con dential appointment to sell or trade your unwanted gold, silver and platinum. George R. Ward Downtown Lake City (386) 752-5470 Let us help your business SHINE! COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL Janitorial Services Tile, Grout and General Floor Maintenance Fire, Water and Storm Restoration Upholstery Cleaning Emergency Water Extraction & Dry Down Carpet & Rug Cleaning Odor Control 24 hours a day 7 days a week emergency call out (386) 362-2244 (386) 755-6142 1-888-849-8234 email: bayway1@windstream.net Fax: (386) 362-6822 636 Helvenston St. SE, Live Oak, Florida www.baywayservices.biz The Bayway Group, LLC dba Bayway Services John A. Kasak CLU CPCU State Farm Agent Lake City, FL 32025 Bus: 386-752-7521 John W. Burns III, Agent 234 SW Main Blvd. Lake City, FL 32056 Bus: 386-752-5866 Merry Christmas and Happy New Year from your good neighbor agents. John Kasak and John Burns. VISITORS Continued From Page 1A MEMORIES: Local folks share some of their happiest Christmas memories Continued From Page 1A MIRACLE: Family gets another chance after home was destroyed by Sandy Continued From Page 1A kid. Back in the 1950s, surrey pedal cars were all any child wanted, and many chil dren only got one present at Christmas time. One year when she was five, Price and her sister received that perfect present. It had two wooden seats and four wheels, Price said. It had a canopy top that was red and white and had a white a fringe around it, and you could pedal it... Thats what my sister and I got for Christmas, a surrey with a fringe on top. Price said the first few Christmases stand out in her memory, because all the magic is still real. Those were the years that were kind of magical, she said. Blake Chapman also spoke about a present she received when she was five that she still remem bers. The now 18-year-old said it was her first bike. It was pink and it had purple strings coming all down from it, Chapman said. I probably rode it all week. Lake City resident Colt Snowden said hes just thankful to be here, and that last Christmas was one of the most memo rable. I had a blood disease that was slowly killing me, Snowden said. Last Christmas was very memorable. He said last year the doctors told his parents at one point that he had 12 hours to live. After some thing like that happens, he said its good to slow down and enjoy the small moments. Mark Vann said his best Christmas was probably last year. Last year his daughter told him that she was pregnant. Vann said the best moments are when his family is together. Vann was at the Lake City Mall on Monday with his three children, two-kid-in-laws and his four grandchildren. Also, like today, were all out here together taking pictures, he said. It dont get much better then this. Sable Woods said the year after her house burnt when she was in second grade was a Christmas that sticks out in her mind. She said shell never forget it. As surprising as it sounds, she said she has fond memories of that year. When you have stuff taken away and then you get stuff again it makes you appreciate what you have, she said. That year when Christmas rolled around, her family had lost a good house and was now living in a single-wide. It didnt matter to the second grade girl. Under the tree was a Barbie horse, the one that walked. Snowden Price Connor Collier, 21, of Newtown, said visitors earlier in the week were mostly with the media. But that changed during the weekend to just regular people from as far away as Washington State and Florida. Frankly, I like this a lot better. Everybody wants to help, said Collier, who has spent the past week near the village Christmas tree selling green and white bracelets that read, Angels of Sandy Hook. He said he has raised $40,000 for a fund established for the victims. A man dressed as Santa greeted visitors Sunday while a group of saxophone players from Newtown High School serenaded the crowd with Christmas carols. Anne Spillane, 51, of Sandy Hook, drove some of the band members, includ ing her daughter. She said the brother of one band member was killed in the shooting.



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DEAR ABBY: May I comment on the letter from “Itching to Get Even in Cincinnati” (Oct. 1), the woman who was upset that the handmade wreaths she had placed on her family graves had been stolen? I volunteer at a historical cemetery. Many cemeter-ies have rules about the type and size of grave dec-orations that are allowed on the grounds, which is sometimes none at all. In fact, if decorations ARE allowed, unless they can be firmly attached to the ground, real flowers are usually preferred because they biodegrade and do not create a nightmare for groundskeepers when the plastic eventually weakens. While it’s touching that “Itching” and her sister continue to make thought-ful and beautiful arrange-ments for their deceased loved ones, they should consider speaking with the cemetery office or ground-skeeper about any regula-tions they might have in order to avoid this kind of upset again. -MAUREEN IN BROOKLYN, N.Y. DEAR MAUREEN: For the most part, readers agree that the policies of a cemetery should be checked out before plac-ing wreaths or flowers on graves. However, other readers offered some interesting solutions to the problem: DEAR ABBY: When Dad died, my mom and I returned to his grave the next day. All the flow-ers were missing, but the plastic they were attached to was still there. When we inquired we were told that deer come down at night and eat the flowers. My dad, a nature lover, would have been pleased that they provided a meal for the deer. -STILL MISSING HIM DEAR ABBY: The dead are no longer of this world. When people visit their graves, they should leave good thoughts, not mate-rial items that end up as trash or stolen. -PAMELA IN VICTORVILLE, CALIF. DEAR ABBY: After my mother died, I bought a concrete garden angel statue and put it by her headstone. I too was bitter after it was stolen. When I told my husband, he told me, “Honey, your mother WAS an angel. She didn’t need one. Someone else must have needed one.” After he said it, it put the incident into a different perspective. -ANGEL’S DAUGHTER IN MISSOURI DEAR ABBY: Years ago, the flags my mother and I had placed on Memorial Day were stolen. After that we would write, “Stolen from the grave of ...” on the sticks of the flags we left for my father’s and stepfather’s graves. It worked! -DOT IN NEW JERSEY DEAR ABBY: My sister made a Christmas tree for our mother’s grave and decorated it with functional lights. When I asked her why she went to the extra expense, she replied that she knew it would likely be stolen. She said she wanted the thief to have a tree with working lights, so the person would have a brighter Christmas. -GERRY IN HUNSTVILLE, TEXAS DEAR ABBY: I had the same problem until I started attaching small signs to my floral wreaths that read, “Thou Shalt Not Steal.” I make the signs business card-sized, cover them with clear tape, attach them to a beverage straw and insert them in the flowers or attach them to the wreaths. So far it has worked. -MARIE IN PENNSYLVANIA DILBERT BABY BLUES HOROSCOPES DEAR ABBY ARIES (March 21-April 19): A change in the way you present and promote plans will gather interest. Offer a favor and your ser-vices will be considered for a future venture. Take con-trol and initiative and you will stifle negativity. Trust in your judgment. Love is highlighted. ++++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Take care of family members requiring assis-tance. Communication that shows responsibility and initiative will lead to a plan or service you can offer in the future, allowing you to up your income. Keep your ideas a secret for now. +++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): An open heart and an open mind will bring posi-tive results. You’ll be able to please the ones you love with your ability to come up with nifty, unique offer-ings. Travel or party plans should be made. Love is in the stars. +++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): An unusual surprise awaits you. Excessive behavior can lead to trou-ble with authority figures. Abide by the rules and be honest about what you are doing and how you intend to proceed. Don’t tempt fate, gossip or get involved in secret activity. +++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): This festive season is about love and spending time with someone you consider special. Getting involved in a group endeavor that promises to help those less fortunate will lead to an interesting new connection. Love is on the rise. ++++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Let bygones be bygones. This is not the time to start a family feud or to be critical or preach to others regarding morals or traditions. Concentrate more on being a good person -compassionate, understanding and a good listener. ++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Take some time to travel, visiting friends, relatives or a destination that allows you to spend time with someone you love. Voice your opinion, and you will entice someone to make a positive change. Plans regarding a physical move will lead to new beginnings. +++++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Put that humbug atti-tude where it belongs and become the life of the party. A unique approach to an old theme will renew some-one’s faith in life, love and the future. Take the time to turn an okay event into something spectacular for others. +++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Party, but don’t let excessiveness take over and annoy others. Put love, family and trying to please others first, and you will receive a response that will lead to future opportuni-ties. Don’t wait for others to change; be first and set the standard. +++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You may feel dissatisfied by what’s hap-pening around you. Not everyone will stick to the rules set, but don’t let that bother you. As long as you have done your share and what’s expected of you, there should be no guilt or ill feelings. +++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Put love first. Enjoy the one you’re with, and don’t worry about what others think or do. Set your own rules and follow your heart. Not everyone will agree with you, but as long as you are happy, everything will be okay. +++++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Don’t dwell on the past when it’s the future that counts. Keep your plans simple, and refrain from indulgences you cannot afford. Stability and work-ing toward a better future should be the gift you offer to yourself and others. ++ CELEBRITY CIPHER Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com BLONDIE BEETLE BAILEY B.C. FRANK & ERNEST FOR BETTER OR WORSE ZITS HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH GARFIELD THE LAST WORD Eugenia Last Readers find creative ways to combat cemetery thieves Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. CLASSIC PEANUTS Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS TUESDAY, DECEMBER 25 2012 3B



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T hose bright-burning yule logs remind us of cause for modest celebration this holiday sea-son: new efforts to protect children from blistering-hot gas fireplaces. More than 2,000 children age 5 and younger were injured over a recent 10-year period after com-ing into contact with gas fireplaces, Consumer Reports magazine has noted, citing an indepen-dent safety consultant. Some suffered secondand even third-degree burns. Industry standards for gas fireplaces permit ceramic glass to reach 1,328 degrees F; other glass fronts can hit 446 degrees F. or higher. Manufacturers of fireplace equipment, feeling the heat of potential regu-latory action and more lawsuits, this fall adopted voluntary guidelines to outfit every new gas fire-place with a protective mesh screen — but not until 2015. Consumers Union and the Consumer Federation of America, both inter-est groups, in 2011 petitioned the federal Consumer Product Safety Commission to develop a mandatory safety stan-dard for gas fireplaces. With the industry’s recent measure, the safety com-mission will hold off on regulatory action, report-ed FairWarning, a non-profit news organization that serves as a public watchdog on health and safety issues. The head of the nonprofit Burn Prevention Network, Dan Dillard, told FairWarning he thought the federal estimate of 200 child burn cases a year was too low, and he reiterated the call for mandatory standards. Specifications for these new screens are due out soon from the American National Standards Institute. Meanwhile, the Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association, an industry trade group, suggests barriers such as child safety gates and attach-able screens. And we add the importance of adult vigilance and of teaching youngsters the words “hot” and “no” — before it’s too late. OPINION Tuesday, December 25, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A4AOPINION LETTERS TO THE EDITOR To the Editor:Re: Hugh Sherrill’s column of Dec. 21, 2012 — Your column was dis-gusting, vile, offensive, inaccurate and crude. And those are the nicest things I can say about it. How dare you spew your flatulent opinion of Catholics venerating the Virgin Mary. Since you label yourself a Baptist pastor, on whose or what authority do you have to decide what or whom a Catholic should wor-ship. You speak of Mary’s Virginity or lack thereof as though you were her personal physician. Her lack of virginity according to you, resulted in broth-ers and sisters of Jesus. This is going to come as a huge surprise to my fellow Catholics, as our gospels never mention any other children of Mary. You have decided that Mary is not the Mother of God — but the mother of Jesus. “We must firmly reject the worhip and veneration of Mary as practiced in the Roman Cathoic Church.” Who are you to make this statement? And I ask it again and again. You are not a Catholic scholar. The Holy Roman Catholic Church and its beliefs, Mr. Sherrill, is over 2000 years old. It has prevailed through fire and brimstone. As a Baptist pastor, you and your fel-low congregants can wor-ship according to your beliefs, whatever those may be. What you do in your services, is quite frankly none of my busi-ness, as it is not yours to determine whom or what we as Catholics chose to worship or venerate. May the Christmas season bring you the wisdom that you so desperately need to learn when to keep your opinions to yourself. Frank and Patricia Albury High Springs HIGHLIGHTS IN HISTORY On this date:In A.D. 336, the first recorded celebration of Christmas on Dec. 25 took place in Rome. In 1066, William the Conqueror was crowned king of England. In 1776, Gen. George Washington and his troops crossed the Delaware River for a surprise attack against Hessian forces at Trenton, N.J. In 1868, President Andrew Johnson granted an unconditional pardon to all persons involved in the Southern rebellion that resulted in the Civil War. In 1887, Conrad Hilton, founder of the hotel chain bearing his name, was born in San Antonio, Territory of New Mexico. In 1926, Hirohito became emperor of Japan, succeeding his father, Emperor Yoshihito. In 1931, New York’s Metropolitan Opera broadcast an entire live opera over radio for the first time: “Hansel and Gretel” by Engelbert Humperdinck. In 1937, the NBC Symphony Orchestra, led for the first time by conductor Arturo Toscanini, performed a Christmas concert featuring works by Vivaldi, Mozart and Brahms. In 1941, during World War II, Japan announced the surrender of the British-Canadian garrison at Hong Kong. In 1962, the movie version of “To Kill a Mockingbird,” adapted from the Harper Lee novel and starring Gregory Peck, opened in Los Angeles. In 1989, ousted Romanian President Nicolae Ceausescu and his wife, Elena, were executed follow-ing a popular uprising. In 1991, Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev went on television to announce his resignation as the eighth and final leader of a communist superpower that had already gone out of existence. In 2009, passengers aboard Northwest Airlines Flight 253 foiled an attempt to blow up the plane as it was landing in Detroit by seizing a man who tried to set off explosives in his underwear. Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com T hat’s our simple message for today. Have a great day and a rich and full holiday season. Stay safe – don’t forget to buckle up, especially with all the mayhem you’re apt to find on area roadways this time of year – and enjoy everything the season has to offer. Above all, thanks for reading.It’s a joy to be asked into your homes with our daily offering of local news, opin-ion and sports. Merry Christmas from all of us at the Lake City Reporter Merry Christmas Q Associated PressHugh Sherrill column was offensive, inaccurateW hen Jan Davidson talks about the place where he works, he doesn’t have to exagger-ate — although he does wax poetic. And when his staff at the John C. Campbell Folk School in Brasstown, N.C., puts together an annual catalog inviting people to come and learn, the photo-graphs are real. No need to gild the lily. This folk school — sandwiched between Murphy and Hayesville in the Smoky Mountains — is a parcel of paradise, a place where you can smell bread baking and wood fires burning and chocolate cooling. You can hear lathes turning and blacksmiths hammering and voices singing. The school teaches a version of just about everything — from autoharp to weav-ing a bulrush hat. “Brasstown has always had a magic about it,” says Davidson, school director. He should know. He’s been at the school for 20 years, and he has seen “people start careers and find soul-mates, realize life-long dreams and check off bucket-list items, every week of the year.” In the meantime, he says, they relieve stress, unleash creativity and achieve flow. The “flow” part stumped me, so I asked. Well, Davidson says, “it happens to people when they’re so engrossed in something, they forget everything else. We all do this … sometimes. People working on a craft, especially in a group — it takes hold of them. It’s one of the highest states of bliss that a human can reach.” A few minutes of flow, he says, can be more restorative than a good night’s sleep. This dispenser of flow, the folk school, is big on tradition and history. But, most of all, Davidson says, it’s big on things that are human. “The individual expression and social interac-tion that are encouraged through music, crafts, nature studies, gardening, cooking, and dance are still meaningful to people today, regardless of where they live,” he writes in the 2013 course catalog. So people from all over the nation sign up for a week or a weekend, and they come to immerse themselves in their work, surrounded by the most serene scenery in the South. It’s certainly not their regular life. It’s more like what people look for in a vacation, Davidson says, but it’s even more than that. People take vacations often to kick back and be lazy. At the folk school, people are learning; they’re concentrating on a different kind of work, something that’s challeng-ing, but also rewarding. I hope to sign up in 2013, Jan. For 20 years or more, I’ve been promising myself a week or a week-end at the folk school. I have a guitar my wife gave me that’s hardly been touched; I have two lathes that are gathering dust but no sawdust; if nothing else, I could learn to make truffles. “If you want to be universally loved and admired,” the director says, “become a choco-late-maker.” It’s comforting to know that a school like this is still thriving, keeping alive a tradition that started 87 years ago. We all need comfort in this uncomfort-able world. And a little flow would make it even better. Q Phil Hudgins is senior editor of Community Newspapers Inc. Phil Hudginsphudgins@cninewspapers.comYou might experience ‘flow’ at the folk school in Brasstown, N.C.Keep home fires burning safely ANOTHER VIEW Q Scripps Howard News Service OUR OPINION



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General Information In Print and Onlinewww.lakecityreporter.com Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$2504 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $.25One item per ad Under $100 Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 ServicesWhite's Trucking Services You call & We Haul! Fill Dirt, Lime Rock. AsphaltMillings, Granite, Road Rock.386-362-8763 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITO THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACIVILDIVISIONCASE NO. 11-527-CACOLONIALNATIONALMORT-GAGE, ADIVISION OF COLO-NIALSAVINGS, F.A.,Plaintiff,vs.DANAM. REYNOLDS A/K/ADA-NAREYNOLDS, et al.Defendant(s)NOTICE OF SALENotice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Columbia County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Columbia County, Florida, described as:Lot 26, EMERALD FOREST, a sub-division, according to the plat there-of, as recorded in Plat Book 6, Page 74, of the Public Records of Colum-bia County, Florida.A/K/A435 SWEmerald St.Lake City, FL32024at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, in Courtroom 1 lo-cated at the Columbia County Court-house, 173 NE Hernando Street, Lake City, FL32056at 11:00 AM, on 3/6/13.Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-er than the property owner as of thedate of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 30th day of Nov., 2012.CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURTBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkSEALAMERICAN WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a dis-ability who requires accommoda-tions in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of cer-tain assistance. Individuals with a disability who require special accom-modations in order to participate in a court proceeding should contact the ADACoordinator, 173 NE Hernan-do Avenue, Room 408, Lake City, FL32055, (386) 719-7428, within two (2) business days of receipt of notice to appear.Individuals who are hearing impaired should call (800) 955-8771. Individ-uals who are voice impaired should call (800) 955-8770.05536202December 18, 25, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURTIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.Probate DivisionFile No. 12-274-CPIN RE: ESTATE OF DWIGHTG. PORTER,Deceased.NOTICE TO CREDITORSThe administration of the estate of DWIGHTG. PORTER, deceased, whose date of death was December 25, 2010; is pending in the Circuit Court for Columbia County, Florida, Probate Division; File Number 12-274-CP; the address of which is 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055. The names and ad-dresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s at-torney are set forth below.All creditors of the decedent and oth-er persons, who have claims or de-mands against decedent’s estate, in-cluding unmatured, contingent or un-liquidated claims, and who have been served a copy of this notice, must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY(30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons who have claims or demands against the decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contin-gent or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICA-TION OF THIS NOTICE.ALLCLAIMS NOTSO FILED WILLBE FOREVER BARRED.NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.THE DATE OF FIRSTPUBLICA-TION OF THIS NOTICE IS DE-CEMBER 18, 2012/s/ Mary P. RuppertMARYP. RUPPERTPersonal Representative490 NWMadison StreetLake City, FL32055/s/ Terry McDavidTERRYMCDAVIDPost Office Box 1328Lake City, FL32056-1328Telephone: (386) 752-1896Florida Bar No. 052454Attorney for Personal Representative05536359December 18, 25, 2012 PUBLIC AUCTIONWill be held by Gainey Automotive, Inc, in Columbia County at 3468 S.W. CR 138, Fort White, Fl. 32038Date 01/08/2013Time: 8:00 A.M.2003 PONTIACVin #1G2JB12F93737288005536476DECEMBER 25, 2012 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILACTIONCASE NO.: 12-2012-CA-000284WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.Plaintiff,vs.ROBERTMICHAELSWANSON JR. ALSO KNOWN AS ROBERTM. SWANSON JR., ETAL,Defendant(s).NOTICE OF ACTIONTo: Robert Michael Swanson, Un-known Spouse of Robert Michael Swanson, Tenant #1, Tenant #2Last Known Address: 1180 SE Pea-cock Ter, Lake City, FL32025-8203Current Address: UnknownANYAND ALLUNKNOWN PAR-TIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINSTTHE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUALDEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN-KNOWN PARTIES MAYCLAIM AN INTERESTAS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTSLast Known Address: UnknownCurrent Address: UnknownYOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the fol-lowing property in Columbia Coun-ty, Florida:LOT11:SECTION 26, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RAND 17 EAST: COM-MENCE ATTHE NORTHWESTCORNER OF THE SE 1/4 OF THE NW1/4, AND RUN SOUTH 1 DE-GREES 11 MINUTES 15 SEC-ONDS EAST, ALONG THE WESTLINE OF THE SE 1/4 OF THE NW1/4 1003.20 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING; AND RUN THENCE NORTH 87 DEGREES 07 MINUTES EAST, 275 FEETTO THE WESTLINE OF PEACOCK ROAD; THENCE SOUTH 1 DE-GREE 11 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID ROAD, 158.40 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 87 DEGREES 07 MINUTES WEST275 FEETTO THE WESTLINE OF SAID SE 1/4 OF THE NW1/4; THENCE NORTH 1 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST, 158.40 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING, COLUMBIACOUN-TY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH AMOBILE POINTOF BEGIN-NING, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH AMOBILE HOME LOCATED THEREON AS APERMANENTFIXTURE AND APPURTENANCE THERETO, DESCRIBED AS A1999 CLAYDOUBLEWIDE MO-BILE HOME BEARING IDENTIFI-CATION NUMBERS WHC009521GAAAND WHC009521GAB AND TITLE NUMBERS 75889045 AND 75889046A/K/A1180 SE Peacock Ter, Lake City, FL32025-8203has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Alber-telli Law Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL33623, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney, or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or peti-tion.This notice shall be published once a week for two consecutive weeks in the Lake City Reporter. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on this 29th day of August, 2012.Clerk of the Circuit CourtBy: -sB. ScippioDeputy ClerkIf you are a person with a disability who requires accommodations in or-der to participate in a court proceed-ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of certain assis-tance. Individuals with a disability who require special accommodations in order to participate in a court pro-ceeding should contact the ADACoordinator, 173 NE Hernando Ave-nue, Room 408, Lake City, FL32055, (386) 719-7428, within two (2) business days of receipt of notice to appear. Individuals who are hear-ing impaired should call (800) 955-8771. Individuals who are voice im-paired should call (800) 955-8770.05534625December 18, 25, 2012 SUWANNEE RIVER WATER MANAGEMENTDISTRICTPUBLIC NOTICE OF APPLICATIONNotice is hereby given that pursuant to Chapter 373, Florida Statutes, the following application for permit was received on November 1, 2012:Norton Borrow Pit Expansion, Jack Norton, Norton Home Improvement Company, Inc., 337 South US Hwy 441, Lake City, FL32025, has sub-mitted an application for an Environ-mental Resource Permit Application Number 04-0108M, for a total proj-ect area of 80 acres.The project is located in Township 5 South, Range 16 East, Section 13, in Columbia County.Interested persons may comment upon the application or submit a written request for a staff report con-taining proposed agency action re-garding the application by writing to the Suwannee River Water Manage-ment District, Attn: Resource Man-agement, 9225 C.R. 49, Live Oak, Florida32060. Such comments or requests must be received by 5:00 PM within 21 days from the date of publication.No further public notice will be pro-vided regarding this application.Acopy of the staff report must be re-quested in order to remain advised of further proceedings.Substantially affected persons are entitled to re-quest an administrative hearing, pur-suant to Title 28, Florida Administra-tive Code, regarding the proposed agency action by submitting a writ-ten request after reviewing the staff report.05536484December 25, 2012 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTFOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAPROBATE DIVISIONFile Number 12-274-CPIN RE: ESTATE OF DWIGHTG. PORTERDeceased.NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATIONThe administration of the estate of DWIGHTG. PORTER, deceased, File Number 12-274-CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for Columbia County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 173 NE Her-nando Avenue, Lake City, FL32055. The estate is testate and the date of the decedent’s Will is September 13, 2006. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. The fiduciary law-yer-client privilege in section 90.5021, Florida Statutes, applies with respect to the personal represen-tative and any attorney employed by the personal representative.Any interested person on whom a copy of the Notice of Administration is served who challenges the validity of the will, the qualifications of the personal representative, venue, or ju-risdiction of the court must file any objections with the court in the man-ner provided in the Florida Probate Rules within the time required by law or those objections are forever barred.Any person entitled to exempt prop-erty must file a petition for determi-nation of exempt property WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED BYLAWOR THE RIGHTTO EXEMPTPROPERTYIS DEEMED WAIVED. Any person entitled to take an elective share must file an election to take elective shareWITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED BYLAWOR THE RIGHTTO CLAIM AN ELECTIVE SHARE IS DEEMED WAIVED. An election to take an elective share must be filed within the time provided by law./s/ Mary p. RuppertMARYP. RUPPERTPersonal Representative490 NWMadison St.Lake City, FL32055/s/ Terry McDavidTERRYMCDAVIDPost Office Box 1328Lake City ,FL32056-1328Telephone: (386) 752-1896Florida Bar No. 052454Attorney for Personal Representative05536358December 18, 25, 2012 NOTICE TOPATIENTS OFMADHURI SANKURATRI, MDEffective January 7, 2013, Dr. Sankuratri will no longer be practicing at:3140 NWMedical Center Lane, Ste 120 Lake City, FL32055.Current patient medical records will still be maintained at the following address:Tallahassee Primary Care Associates, P.A.1803 Miccosukee Commons Drive, Suite 202Tallahassee, FL32308Ph: (850) 402-6201, Fax: (850) 325-6019Patients please note that unless other arrangements are made or other in-structions provided, medical records will be maintained by Dr. Sankuratri at the location listed above. Dr. San-kuratri will begin practicing with LegalTPCAin the very near future. Current or new patients wishing to schedule an appointment with Dr. Sankuratri should contact the office above to request follow-up once Dr. Sankuratri arrives.05536075December 4, 11, 18, 25, 2012 Wewill sell the following tenants units on a new day and time at Com-munity Self Storage 814 SWState Road 247/Branford Hwy., Friday, January 11, 2013 at 1:00PM. WE SELLFOR CASH ONLY. 386-961-9926.CAROLTAYLORFurniture & Household GoodsTOMMYSAXONHousehold GoodsRACHELSHAW-WILSONFurniture & BoxesBRADYHAMRICFurniture & HouseholdROGER WARDPersonal PropertyWE RESERVE THE RIGHTTO REFUSE ALLBIDS.Cash only, 10% Buyers premium, Jerry Duncan #AU527.December 25, 2012January 1, 201305536229 020Lost & Found Cash Reward if returned w/ items inside. Lost Blk Brief zip case, Medical, Military, & Misc records inside. FOUND 100Job OpportunitiesCase managers are needed for long-term recovery efforts to assist Columbia County households affected by Tropical Storm Debby. Applicants should have good communication skills and be able to work with minimum supervision. This position requires travel in the county; a dependable vehicle is required. These are grant-funded full-time positions. Submit a resume to United Way of Suwannee Valley, 325 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, FL32055 or fax to 386-752-0105. Construction Salesman Needed. Excellent Pay. Experience Required. 866-959-7663 ConsumerLender-SunState FCUFull-Time Position in Lake City. Experience selling financial products, proven customer relations expertise, and lending experience REQUIRED. Great pay and benefits! Application Required and available at www.sunstatefcu.org. Fax to 386-462-4686. DFWP, EOE Mechanic needed at Fla.Rock & Tank Lines In White Springs. Diesel exprnc reqr'd in maintenance & repair of tractor trailers. 45-50hrs/wk Class A CDLlicense preferred. Excellent Benefits! email: mcomer@patriottrans.com or fax 904-858-9008 Must have a minimum of 5 yrs Exp. selling HVAC Equipment. Excellent benefits &Great pay. Call Allen 386-628-1093



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Dec. 25 Free dinner Suwannee Valey Rescue Mission and Lad Soup Kitchen, 127 Escambia St. in Lake City, will serve its sixth annual Free Christmas Day Dinner. The menu includes turkey, ham, rice and gravy, col lard greens, string beans, candied yams, dressing, desserts and iced tea. To donate food, money or time to the meal, call Timothy at (386) 758-2217. Dec. 28 SHINE training SHINE (Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders) is seeking volunteers in Columbia, Suwannee, Hamilton and Lafayette counties. Free volunteer training is scheduled as follows: orientation, Jan. 11, 1 to 3 p.m,; basic train ing, Feb. 13-15, 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.; and mentoring, six sessions scheduled at volunteers convenience. All training will take place at Elder Options, 100 SW 75th St. (Tower Road) in Gainesville. Registration is required by Dec. 28. Meals will be provided and mileage and, if need ed, hotel accommoda tions will be reimbursed. SHINE is a statewide vol unteer-based program of the Florida Department of Elder Affairs, offering counseling and assistance with Medicare, Medicaid, long-term care planning, prescription drug assis tance, supplemental insur ance and Medicare fraud. SHINE is dedicated to pro viding free and unbiased information and counsel ing to empower Florida seniors, their families and caregivers to make informed health care choic es. For more information or to request a SHINE vol unteer application packet, call (352) 692-5264 or tollfree at (800) 963-5337. Dec. 31 Retirement, investiture A retirement ceremony for Judge E. Vernon Douglas and an investiture ceremo ny for his son, Judge-elect Wesley R. Douglas, will be at 1:30 p.m. in the Columbia County Courthouse, 173 NW Hernando Ave. A reception will follow. Watch Night service New Bethel Missionary Baptist Church will have its annual Watch Night service at 9:30 p.m. The church is at 550 NE Martin Luther King St. Jan. 2 Olustee festival The Blue-Grey Army will meet at 5:30 p.m. to plan the Olustee Battle Festival. The meeting will be at the school district central building, room 153, 409 SW St. Johns St. Jan. 6 Zumba introduction A free introduction to Zumba class will be held from 3 to 4 p.m. at the Teen Town Recreation Building, 533 NW DeSoto St. For more information, contact Sarah Sandlin as (386) 7580009 or visit Lake City Zumba on Facebook. Zumba weight loss The Lake City Zumba Loser weight-loss contest will begin at 4 p.m. at the Teen Town Recreation Building, 533 NW DeSoto St. For more information, contact Sarah Sandlin as (386) 758-0009 or visit Lake City Zumba on Facebook. Jan. 8 Medicare seminar LifeStyle Enrichment Center is sponsoring a free Medicare seminar from 5 to 6 p.m. The semi nar will be moderated by Irv Crowetz of C/C & Associates. Subjects to be covered include: what you need to know about Medicare, when to enroll, whats covered and when a supplement is needed. Call 755-3476 ext. 107 to reserve a seat. Jan. 12 Chili cook-off The fourth annual Branford Chili Cook-off will be from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hatch Park on Craven Street in Branford. The event will include a silent auction for adults and kids, door prizes, live music, an antique car show, moon walk, Home Depot Kids Workshop and a variety of homemade chili. Admission is $5 and includes all the chili you can eat. Proceeds will benefit Herrys Kids Pediatric Services, a pro gram of Hospice of the Nature Coast. To register to compete in the chili cook-off, call the hospice at (386) 755-7714 or vist online at www.hospiceof citrus.org. Jan. 15 Pageant entries Today is the deadline for contestants to enter the 2013 Olustee Festival Pageant. The pageant is open to girls ages 3 months to 20 years who live in or attend school in Baker, Columbia, Gilcrist, Hamilton, Union and Suwannee counties. Age divisions are 3 to 12 months, 13 to 23 months, 2 to 3 years, 4 to 6 years, 7 to 9 years, 10 to 12 years, 13 to 15 years and 16 to 20 years. Contestants may compete in beauty, sportswear, talent and photogenic cate gories. The pageant awards include educational schol arships, trophies, crowns and banners. Each pageant contestant will receive a tiara. First-place winners will ride in the Olustee Festival parade. The pag eant will be held Jan. 26 at the Columbia County Schools Administrative Complex. Applications may be obtained at the Columbia County Library, the Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of Commerce, Emily Taber Library, Suwannee Regional Library, Hamilton County Library or by contacting Elaine Owens at (386) 965-2787. Jan. 16 Olustee festival The Blue-Grey Army will meet at 5:30 p.m. to plan the Olustee Battle Festival. The meeting will be at the school district central building, room 153, 409 SW St. Johns St. Mary Frances Amerson Mrs. Mary Frances Amerson, age 81, of Lake City, Fla. died Friday, Dec. 21, in the Baya Point Nursing & Rehab, Lake City, Fla. following a long ill ness. She was born in Oka Humpka, Fla. and resided in Lake city from 1935 to 1950 and then until 1990 she followed her husbands military career. She returned to Lake City in 1990 to enjoy retirement. She spent many years traveling, was in Germany for six years, worked at J.C. Penny in Atlanta, Ga. for 10 years and was a devoted wife, mother and grandmother who loved spending time with her family. She was a member of the First Advent Christian Church of Lake City. She was the daughter of the late Seth Samuel Nettles, the original founder of Nettles Sausage Company, and the late Mabel Beatrice Shaw Nettles. She is survived by her husband, Thomas J. Amerson of Lake City, Fla.: Two daughters, Janet K. Burdette of Jacksonville, Fla. and Melissa D (Michael Pintar) Amerson of Tucson, Ar.: One son, Samuel T. (Barbara) Amer son of Stuart, Fla.: Three broth ers, Joe Nettles, Earl Nettles and Sammy Nettles all of Lake City, Fla.: Three grandchildren, Paul Amerson, David Amer son and Sierra Amerson: One step grandchild, Tyler Staggs. Funeral services will be con ducted at 11 A.M. Wednesday, Dec. 26, in the Chapel of Guerry Funeral Home with Rev. Fred Gaylard, Pastor of the First Ad ing. Interment will be in Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens, Lake City, Fla. Visitation will be from 10 to 11 A.M. Wednesday (One hour before services) at GUERRY FUNERAL HOME 2659 S.W. Main Blvd., Lake City, Fla. www. guerryfuneralhome.net James S. Cummings Mr. James S. Cummings, 73, of Lake City, died unexpectedly Sunday morn ing, December 23, 2012 at his residence. A na tive of Purcev ille, Virginia, Mr. Cummings had been a resident of Lake City since 2003 having moved here from Catiz, Kentucky where he had lived for many years. Mr. Cummings served in the United States Army for more than twen ty years prior to retiring. While serving in Vietnam Mr. Cum mings earned a Bronze Star and a Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm for his courageous actions. Following his retirement from the Army Mr. Cummings worked in medical supply with the U.S. Civil Service prior to his second retirement. In his spare time Mr. Cummings enjoyed collecting Fast Cars especially a former pace car for NASCAR and his favorite Corvette. His favorite time was the time he spent with his beloved grandchildren, Cait lin and Thomas. Mr. Cummings was a member of the V.F. W. Post #2206 and he was a Christian. He was preceded in death in 2006 by his beloved wife, Margaret. Mr. Cummings is survived by his children, Michelle Greene (Chris) of Lake City and Shawn Barnett (Joanne) of Alexan dria, Virginia and his grand children, Caitlin and Thomas Greene both of Lake City. Numerous other family mem bers and friends also survive. Graveside funeral services with Full Military Honors will be conducted at 10:00 A.M. on Friday, December 28, 2012 in the Florida National Cem etery in Bushnell, Florida. In terment will immediately fol low. There will be no visitation. Arrangements were un der the direction of the DEES-PARRISH FAMILY FUNERAL HOME 458 S. Mar ion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025 752-1234 Please share your thoughts and wishes for the family at our on-line family guestbook at parrishfamilyfuneralhome.com Dewell Dryfus Lewis Mr. Dewell Dryfus Lewis, 90, of Lake City, died late Friday eve ning, December 21, 2012 in the Haven Hospice of the Suwan nee Valley Care Center. He was born on June 22, 1922 in Rowell Arkansas (Cleveland County) to the late Lucias and Francis Faye Jimmie Smith Lewis. Mr. Lewis had lived the majority of his life in Montpelier, Louisiana where he was a member of the First Baptist Church and had worked for and retired from Paul David Lumber Inc. in Amite, Louisiana. He relocated to Lake City in 2001 to be close to his daughter. Mr. Lewis was pre ceded in death by his wife, Mary Ella Lewis and his brothers, James Henry Lewis, Hobert H. Lewis and Thomas David Lewis. Mr. Lewis is survived by his daughters, Betty Ann Brehm of Lake City, Florida and Geor gie Sue Lewis of Hammond, Louisiana and his grandchildren, Desire McDaniel, Sean McDan iel, Andrea McDaniel, Philip Brehm, Eric Robertson and Grant Blackmon. Four greatgrandchildren also survive. Funeral services for Mr. Lewis will be held later this week at the Buie Funeral Home in Rison, Arkansas. Local services and arrangements were un der the direction of the DEES-PARRISH FAMILY FUNERAL HOME 458 S. Marion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025 752-1234 Please share your thoughts and wishes for the family at our on-line family guestbook at parrishfamilyfuneralhome.com Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL TUESDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2012 5A 5A WILSONS CONTAINERS Construction/Debris Containers Available 755-7060 Delivered to your job site today 1001306 As life changes, so do your needs. Let State Farm Bank help with a mortgage that ts your life and your budget. Let us help you make the right move. Bank with a Good Neighbor CALL ME TODAY FOR MORE INFORMATION. Shopping for a mortgage? State Farm Bank, F.S.B., Bloomington, IL We have a great selection. Some products and services not available in all areas. John Kasak, Agent State Farm Agent 904 SW SR 247 Branford Hwy Lake City, FL 32025 Bus: 386-752-7521 NMLS # 382656 234 SW Main Blvd. 752-5866 For Life Insurance Go With Someone You Know Longer you stay, Less you pay Monthly Unlimited See store for details. BABY BACK Fifth Generation Farms offers exceptional quality, down-home prices and a little southern charm, too! Monday Friday 8am 7pm | Saturday 8am -6pm | Sunday CLOSED Offering Local & Fresh Foods THE MARKE T M EA T PRODUCE and M ORE 3739 WEST HWY. 90, LAKE CITY, FL (386) 243-8335 Why Not Fresh? Prices good thru 12-29-12, while supplies last. No rainchecks. GREAT FOR GRILLIN G BONELESS SUNSHINE ACRES SMOKED P RODUCE P AN SAUSA G E FRESH $ 2 59 LB $ 2 99 LB P ORK CHO P S N. FLA NATURAL NORTH FLORIDA NATURAL BLACK AN G US P remium quality beef from our family farm. NFNB A is raised on green pastures and natural grains with N O added hormones, antibiotics or animal by-products. NFN is locally processed, U S DA certied and dry aged for tenderness and full avor. We are committed to producing beef for our family and friends that is nutritious and delicious Naturally! SPECIAL E VENT ROOM A VAILABLE CELERY W HOLE SUNSHINE ACRES $ 1 29 BUNCH FRYERS $ 1 39 LB (2.5-3.0 LB.) P ORK LOIN RIBS $ 3 59 LB $ 1 29 LB BEEF LIVER (SLICED) ORDER NO W FRUIT & VE G ETABLE T RAYS M EAT/ C HEESE TRAYS P ARTY READY! TORTILLA CHI P S $ 1 99 16 OZ. BA G OR G ANIC, 100% ALL NATURAL OR G ANIC A PP LE JUICE $ 9 99 G ALLON (UNFILTERED & P ASTERIZED) $ 2 59 LB SW EET & Y ELLO W ONIONS 99 LB G REENS $ 3 99 BA G MUSTARDS TURNI P S COLLARDS ( C UT & CLEANED) OBITUARIES COMMUNITY CALENDAR To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr@lakecityreporter.com. Obituaries are paid advertise ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporters classified depart ment at 752-1293.



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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTUESDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2012 5B Classified Department: 755-5440 2000 Lincoln TowncarMed. blue, leather, power seats & more. 147,400 miles. Excellent condition.$3,490 386-623-2848 100Job Opportunities05536451T eachers Join our team of over 100 professional teachers! Want to make a difference in the lives of children? Infant/T oddler Positions: 12 Mo Ft Teacher (Jennings) And 12 MO PTTeacher Child Development Associate (CDA) or equivalent credential (FCCPC or ECPC) required. Three years experience with birth to 3 preferred. High School Diploma/ GED Required. Must be able to pass DCF background screenings. Excellent Benefits, Paid Holidays, Sick/Annual Leave, Health/Dental Insurance, and more. Apply at 236 SW Columbia Ave, Lake City, FL or send resume to: employment@sv4cs.org Fax (386) 754-2220 or Call 754-2225 EOE EOE Real Estate Co. looking for Office Staff Computer knowledge required. Real Estate Exp. is a plus! Fax resume to 386-496-4309 SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 Service Techs & Installers Must be EPA& NATE certified. Excellent benefits & great pay. Call Allen (386) 628-1093 StarTech Computer Center Now hiring Exp Techs. Send resume to: bdj@startech.cc United Way of Suwannee Valley is seeking a Construction Coordinator for long-term recovery efforts to assist Columbia County households affected by Tropical Storm Debby. The Long Term Recovery Construction Coordinator will assist the disaster survivors in their home repair project, conduct project inspections, and provide estimates for needed materials and labor. Licensed contractor preferred. This position requires in county travel; dependable transportation is required. This is a grant-funded, full-time contractual position. Send resume to United Way of Suwannee Valley, 325 NE Hernando Ave., Lake City, FL 32055, or fax to 386-752-0105 120Medical EmploymentCMA experience preferred in Peds/ Family Practice. Experience injections & taking accurate vital signs. Excellent communication and documentation, organization and assessment skills. DIET AR Y MANAGER Needed CDM, Chef, LTC, 2 years experience preferred Must be able to manage large staff and oversee daily food preparation for a 180 bed SNF. Full time with excellent benefits. E-mail resume to Greg Roberts: groberts@gulfcoasthealthcare.com or fax to: (386)362-4417. Live Oak, FLEOE/V/D/M/F GREATOPPORTUNITY•Full Time Experienced C.N.A’s All Shifts Apply in person at Suwannee Health Care & Rehab. 1620 Helevenston Street S.E. Live Oak, FL32064 EOE/m/f/d/v Message Therapist Needed in a 180 Beds SNF Licensed, 1-2 years experience preferred. Part-time weekend position. E-mail resume to Greg Roberts: groberts@gulfcoasthealthcare.com or fax to: (386) 362-4417 Live Oak, FLEOE/V/D/M/F P/THousekeeper Needed Occasional Nights And Weekends. Fax Resume to 386-487-1232 240Schools & Education05535484Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class12/24/2012• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-11/05/12• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies CKC American Bulldogs both a 1 yr old brother & sister, spayed and neutered, shots, free to the right home. 386-935-4473 Free to the right home. Male approx 8 weeks old. Marble tabby. 386-466-7662 PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 430Garage Sales PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 450Good Things to EatThe Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans 2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024 Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville 386-963-4138 or 961-1420 630Mobile Homes forRent1/1 Cabin & Lots for your RVor your own Cabin for rent. Between Lake City & G’ville. Access to I-75 & 441 (352)317-1326. 2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $700. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 3Br/2Ba Mod 1/2acre (nice subd) concrete drive, wrap around deck appl's,energysaver, &thermo's ready (386) 984-5341 $800 mo Mobile Homes for rent in White Springs & Ft. White. Contact 386-623-3404 Quiet Country Park 3br/2ba $525. Very clean NO PETS! References & Deposit required 386-758-2280 640Mobile Homes forSale1600 SQFT, 3/2 DWMH, close to town, country setting on 2 ac. Reduced to $49,000 (short sale) Poole Realty 362-4539. MLS 82068 2 MFG HOMES on 5 ACRES! Great for 2 families in Godbold Acres west of Lake City $79,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCY INC. 755-5110 #81421 2013 DOUBLEWIDE $33,995 inc. set-up, trim-out & A/C Call 386-288-8379. 3BR/2BA28X64 in a great location, a lot of upgrades, fireplace. Only $2,500 down $399 a month. Call Paula at 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com 4br 2b open/split floor plan MH w/wood flooring, newly painted, large stone fireplace. MLS 82326 Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $74,000 5 LIKENew Mobile Homes!!! For under $30,000. MUSTSEE Call John T. 386-752-1452 Bank owned, Cozy 1/1 home in Lake C community $55,000. MLS 81365 Poole Realty 362-4539. $55,000 BANK REPO 3BR/2BADoublewide ’09 Excellent condition. Only $999 down $377 a month. Call Paula 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com Breathtaking 80 ac horse ranch w/ 7700 sqft home, heated pool, stocked pond, workout facility MLS 82156 Poole Realty 362-4539. short sale $950,000 CLOSE TO VAMED CTR! 3BR/2BAw/beautiful interior, new CH&A$59,900 DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #81428 EASTSIDE VILLAGE 2BR/2BAw/lg kitchen, open floor plan $79,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #80972 Hardwood floors, formal dining room, great rm, f/p, double car garage. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 MLS 82374 $243,900 LIVE OAK! Cute home in city limits; 3BR/1BA& 1,294 SqFt $49,500 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #81410 MUSTSEE 2013 2x6 walls, R30 insulation, OSB wrap, house wrap, real wood cabinets, and thermal pain windows. Payment $399 per month call John T386-752-1452. Results Realty Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 4/2 on 10 Ac home features 2200 heated sqft. 10x20 frame shed. MLS# 76582 $67,500 WANTED…CASH PAID for your Mobile Home, Singlewide or Doublewide flood homes welcome. Call 386-288-8379 Palm Harbor Homes New Home Stimulus 5K For Your Used Mobile Home Any Condition 800-622-2832 ext 210 WOODGATE VILLAGE Move-in ready! Open 3BR/2BA floor plan on nice shaded lot $49,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC 755-5110 #82259 WOODGATE VILLAGE Nice 3BR/2BADWMH w/fenced yd, workshop; $39,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCY, INC 755-5110 #79078 650Mobile Home & Land2/1 MH, completely remodeled. Custom Floors on 5 ac. w/ 2 stall horse barn. MLS # 79025 $49,900 Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Results Realty 2br/2ba on 3.51 ac, 1512 sqft DW perfect Rental, Lg deck, MLS # 82216 Results Realty Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 $49,900 FSBO 5 ac lot w/ 1995 refurb. MH. 66ft long w/ new roof & wheel chair ramp. $5,000 down Owner Fin. on Balance Approx 5 miles N. of LC. 386-752-4597 Great Value 24 acres, 3/2 DWMH, front porch, full length of MH, open floor plan. MLS 79000. Poole Realty Nelda Hatcher. 688-8067 650Mobile Home & LandHallmark Real Estate $34,400. 3/2 MH in O’Brien. On 4 Ac. Case#091-374923 www.hudhomestore.com Robin Williams (386)365-2135 MLS 81700 Hallmark Real Estate Beautiful 4.38 Ac with 4/2 MH. Master has separate office/den area. Large living room with fireplace. Janet Creel (386)719-0382 MLS#82465 Hallmark Real Estate Beautiful Pasture, fenced for horses, well kept 3/2 M/H Great front & back porch to enjoy nature. Robin Williams (386)365-5146 MLS#80899 Hallmark Real Estate Just Reduced! Home & office over 1900sqft with glassed porch centrally located in town. Janet Creel (386)719-0382 MLS#81207 Hallmark Real Estate Live better for less! 3/2.5 Brick home on an acre. Inground Pool. F/p. Lrg oak trees. S. Columbia County. Ginger Parker(386)365-2135 MLS#81183 Hallmark Real Estate This is it! This 3/2 Home on a corner lot. Close to all amenities. Private fenced backyard. Paula Lawrence (386)623-1973 MLS#79943 OwnerFinanced 3/22.5 ac.River Access. Small down $585 mo 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05536252$100 off December's rentMust be presented at the time of application. $89 Deposit Windsong Apts. 386-758-8455 2 bedroom / 1 Bath Apts for rent in Live Oak. Call for price. Contact 386-623-3404 & 386-362-9806 2br/1ba duplex NWGeorgia Ave. Renovated & energy efficient. Tile floors, W/D, $475/Mo. $300 Dep. 386-755-1937 Amberwood Hills Apts. Private Patio area. Beautiful yard. Washer/dryer hkup. Free water & sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special. 386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com Brandywine & Branford Apartments Now Renting 1, 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-752-3033 W. Grandview Ave. Equal Housing Opportunity TDD Number 1-800-955-8771 BRANFORD VILLAS 386-935-2319 2br/1ba Apts. Now available.$570. mo. TDD number 1-800-955-8771 Equal Housing Opportunity Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2 mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet Friendly. Pool laundry & balcony. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A$530 month $530 deposit garbage included. No pets. 386-344-2170 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Greentree Townhouse Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free water & sewer. Balcony & patio. Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com Redwine Apartments Pets welcome. with 5 complexes, we have a home for you. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 Wayne ManorApts. Spacious 2bedroom washer/dryer. Behind Kens off Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 www .myflapts.com WindsorArms Apartments. Move in! 2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free 200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 White Springs upstairs Large 1 or 2 bedroom apt. $350 per month includes DSL& Free T.V. 397-1410 730Unfurnished Home ForRent3/2 $500dep. $550 /mth, water and sewer included, off Lake Jeffrey & Honeysuckle Rd. Contact 623-5410 or 623-2203 3B/2BA brick,Florida room, fireplace, 2 car carport, Large yard, quiet & private. Country Club Rd. South, $900 mo. 386-365-6228 3bdrm very spacious, 2ba, garage, CH/AFenced in backyard. $1,400 mth & $1,400 dep. Contact 386-344-1914 3br/1.5ba. Very clean, Brick great area w/bonus room. Carport, shed & Fenced (privacy) back yard. $825. mo $825. dep. Ref’s req’d. (941)920-4535 NICE 3/2 brick home w/garage in quiet neighborhood. 489 SWBrandy. $900 plus sec. dep. 386-438-4600 750Business & Office RentalsMedical, Retail and Professional Office space on East Baya near Old Country Club Rd. Call 386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622 (cell) Office or Retail Space. Many to choose from. Tom Eagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor 805Lots forSale 2 Ac lot in Timberlake S/D. $135,000 MLS # 79025 Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Results Realty 3 Acres in White Springs, Commercial usage, city sewer. Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS $175,000 MLS 82358 Beautiful log home located on 5 ac, well maintained, wrap around porch. MLS 75550 $189,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #80401 $60,000. Must be 55+ 130x750 right on Suwannee, Beautiful lot, minutes from Royal Springs, Denise Bose 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #76668 $32,000 Must be 55+, Buildable lot for site built homes only. In Forest Country. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Great home, Emerald Lakes, well kept, split floor plan, oversized family room, MLS# 79733 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Missy Zecher 623-0237 $169,900 Great starter, corner lot, needs some TLC, close to town MLS 81784 $90,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 810Home forSale 3br/2ba plus office, 2103 heated sqft, wood floors, large patio MLS # 81984 Swift Creek Realty $229,900 (386) 496-0499 58 Ac, Suwannee County, 3br/2ba newly remodeled horse barns & tack.MLS 81002 Swift Creek Realty $650,000 (386) 496-0499 Access Realty Gorgeous views 3bd/3ba on Lake Montgomery. Elevator, fishing dock & jacuzzi. MLS 81438 $249,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access RealtySpacious 4 bd/3ba Cypress Lake w/ 3643 sqft 1.25 acres on lake. Vaulted ceilings. MLS 81314 $279,900. Patti Taylor386-623-6896 Access RealtyTwo story 1895 Victorian house w/ electrical upgrades throughout. double -deck porches, MLS 71594 $149,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Beautiful 2 story w/ upgrades, open kitchen, granite counter tops, great room w/ stone f/p. MLS 81994 Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $435,000 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Country Home, 3br 3 bath, spacious, close to Suwannee & Santa Fe River MLS 81775, $169,900 Elaine Tolar 755-6488 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty MLS 80175, 4br 3ba & 2.5 ba colonial, 3 fireplaces $315,000 Mary Brown Whitehurst. 965-0887 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty 3br 3ba home with a two story duplex. Owner Financing MLS 80915, Elaine Tolar 365-1548 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Building lots: May-Fair, Cannon Creek, Creek Run & Meadow View. Elaine Tolar 386-365-1548 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Home with 5+ ac 3b 2.5 ba, large kitchen covered deck MLS 81630 Elaine Tolar 365-1548 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty 230 Acres, Col. Co. Paved Rd. 752-4211 MLS 70453 Country home, wood burning f/p, granite counter tops, vaulted ceilings in living room. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 MLS 82022, $240,000 Custom home, located on 6.05 ac. Pecan grove w/ rolling hills in Equestrian Comm. Remax Professionals Missy Zecher 623-0237 $269,000 MLS 81075 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81959 Must be 55+, 2br/2ba, $79,900. Site Built Home w/eat in kitchen, laundry rm, scrn porch. Denise Bose @ 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81958-, $115,000. Must be 55+, 3br/2ba, Site Built w/ lots of room, split plan mstr suite, FL. Rm. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Hallmark Real Estate Brick Home on 6.3 acres 4bd 2.5ba with large 32X20 Deck & Gazebo. Solid wood cabinets Kay Priest(386)365-8888 MLS#82488 Hallmark Real Estate Short Sale Brick home corner lot 2600 SQFT, fenced back yard. Located minutes from town. Paula Lawrence (386)623-1973 MLS 82491 Ichetucknee River 3br/2ba + loft, 1350 sqft. Hardwood floors, f/p, granite counters Swift Creek Realty $399,000 (386) 496-0499 810Home forSale Just listed unique home with 2800 sqft of living space, located on 1.37 acres in Live Oak, MLS 82214, Poole Realty $67,500. 362-4539 Lake Front property w/ 137 ft frontage, eat-in kitchen, screened deck w/ view quality furnishings. MLS 81850 Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $119,000 Open floor plan, covered back patio. Lots of big windows, new carpet & paint, beautiful ceramic tile Century 21 Darby Rogers MLS 82078, 752-6575 Remax Jo Lytte 386-365-2821 Ichetucknee River front 4b/3.5b 2 fireplaces, 2 story home. MLS 81777 $559,000 Ultimate River Experience. Santa Fe River home 2br/2b, granite tops, wood burning heater & open great room. Too many extras to mention. Jo Lytte Remax MLS 81537 $339,000 Spectacular 3br/2b home, great room French doors, 10 aces, w/ barn MLS 79593. Jo Lytte Remax 386-365-2821 $349,800 820Farms & Acreage4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com Access Realty10 acre square tract, High & Dry, OF Avail. w/ 25% down. Convenient Location MLS 81258$39,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access Realty43.64 acres wooded acreage in N.Columbia County. Scenic & Private. MLS 74429 $89,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Owner financed land 1/2 to 10 acre lots. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 830Commercial Property260 S. Marion Ave. 2641 s.f of Office Space. Can be subdivided. $5-$7/sf. No CAM. Prorata for utilities. Call Mika (352) 359-604 Industrial warehouse7+ acres fenced 17,000 sq ft Barn $1,500 mo. TomEagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 950Cars forSale 2000 Lincoln Town Car; Med blue, leather, power seats & more. 147,400 miles, Exc condition. $3,490. 386-623-2848 180 East Duval St. Lake City, FLorida 32055Contact us at the paper.Mon.-Fri.: 8 a.m.5:00 p.m.CLASSIFIED ADS 386-755-5440 SUBSCRIPTION 386-755-5445 ALL OTHER DEPARTMENTS 386-752-1293 ELECTRONIC ADS SEND TOads@lakecityreporter.com THIS REPORTER WORKS FOR YOU! Lake City Reporter We’re on target! days a weekSubscribe Today 386-755-5445



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6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL TUESDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 6A Dr. Robert J. Harvey 752-2336 Open 6 Days A Week Mon. Sat. Evening Appointments Available 1788 S.W. Barnett WayHwy. 47 South www.theaspendentalgroup.com Dr. Rameek McNair We are now a Cigna PPO Dental Network Savings Provider What are Mini Dental Implants? Mini Dental Implants are titanium screws that can replace the root of missing teeth or stabilize loose dentures. Mini Dental Implants are thinner in size making the easier to t into resorbed bone. For Dentures and Partials, a housing is attached precisley inside your appliance to hold it in place securely with an O-ring and functions like a button does, snapping in and out. Mini Dental Implants may also be an excellent option for replacing missing teeth as a more aordable option than Standard Dental Implants. Missing Teeth? The Benefits of Mini Implants: Loose Dentures? Call Aspen Dental Group Today FREE Consultation TONY BRITT/ Lake City Reporter Harold Perry, American Legion Post 322 commander (from left) stands with Korean War veterans David Lofton, Glynnell Presley, Johnnie Griggers, and Horace Jones as Willie Denson, American Legion Post 322 vice commander looks on. By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com American Legion Post 322 recent ly held an awards ceremony where Korean War-era veterans from the area were recognized for their mili tary contributions. The ceremony was held 6 p.m. at the Olivet Missionary Baptist Church Fellowship Hall. Harold Perry, American Legion Post 322 commander and Willie Denson, first vice commander for Post 322 present ed the veterans with their awards. Recognition awards were given to: David Lofton (U.S. Army) who served 14 months in Korea; Glynnell Presley (Air Force), who served for two years in the Panama Canal zone; Johnnie Griggers (Army), who served two years in Fort Benning, Ga.; Horace Jones (Army), who served two years in Europe as a com bat engineer; and James Williams and Willie Merrell were also awarded, but did not attend the ceremony. These veterans are the forgotten warriors, Perry said. World War I, World War II, Vietnam, Iraq all the other war veterans got some kind of welcome, but Korean War veterans got nothing. This is an award for them to let them know how much we love them and that we appreci ate what they did for us during that time. The award certificates were pre sented in a blue folder with gold lettering commemorating the 60th Anniversary of the Korean War, which took place from 1950-1953. The certificates were signed by Secretary of Defense Leon A. Panetta. COURTESY Valerie Lotz, a 7-year-old first grader, places a candy cane on a Chirstmas tree in the memory of one of the victims of the Sandy Hook shooting at the end of a recent youth pageant at Ft. White Church of God. As pastor Fred McCray read the names of the 20 children lost, twenty children from the church placed a candy cane on the tree in their memory. Remembering a lost child Program to honor Martin Luther King, Jr. By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. started a non violent Civil Rights movement that called for equal treatment of minorities and led to sweeping changes across the county and the world. The Columbia County Branch of the NAACP will honor Kings legacy and the movement next month when it hold its annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. observa tion program. The program will take place at 4 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 20 at Mt. Pisgah African Methodist Episcopal Church, on Washington Street. The scheduled keynote speaker for the event will be Third Judicial Circuit Judge Julian E. Collins. Collins has served as a circuit judge since December 1999. His current judicial assignment includes crimi nal cases, adult drug treatment court, domestic relations cases, truancy cases, juvenile delinquency and juvenile drug treatment court and circuit civil cases. Glynnell Presley, Columbia County Branch NAACP secretary and program chairperson, said the local NAACP has held a King observation ceremony for 30 years. We hold the program to commemorate and continue the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., he said. For years the NAACP has moved the ceremony to several churches in the community as part of its annual tradition of cele brating the King legacy. We try to move the service from church to church and this year we decided it was time to go to Mt. Pisgah AME, Presley said. Presley said the importance of the observation service can be weighed in two ways. Number one, its a historical type thing and its important to know the history, thats one of the lessons that you get from the service, he said. The other thing is the course that King led. He led a nonvio lent movement and we certainly need to continue that. We also need to continue to understand that we are all brothers, black and white, yellow or red. This is for the betterment of humanity. This man started a movement that changed the entire world and hes an individual that we should emu late and continue the work he started. Collins Korean War-era veterans honored



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6B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2012 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421 6BSPORTS JMP G. W. HUNTER, INC. 1130 US Hwy 90 W (386) 752-5890 WE NOW HAVE ETHANOL FREE PLUS GASOLINE ONLY AT INTENDED USES: BOATS & WATERCRAFTS COLLECTABLE VEHICLES OFF-ROAD VEHICLES MOTORCYCLES SMALL ENGINES Lake City Reporter Located at SHANDS Lake City, Live Oak & Starke Womens Center of Florida ALL MAJOR INSURANCES ACCEPTED INCLUDING MEDICAID & MEDICARE FREE Pregnancy Ultrasound WITH THIS AD* *Insurance billing may occur if necessary. Some Restrictions apply. OBSTRETRICS & GYNECOLOGY PRENATAL CARE & ULTRASOUNDS STDS & HPV TESTING BIRTH CONTROL & INFERTILITY MENOPAUSE & INCONTINENCE WEIGHT LOSS & 4D ULTRASOUNDS BOTOX & LASER HAIR REMOVAL NO INSURANCE VISITS ASK ABOUT OUR $ 50 CHANDLER MOHAN, MD EMAD ATTA, MD NOW HIRING MID-LEVEL PROVIDERS 386-466-1106 SERVICES: OB-GYN www.myobcare.com NEW LOCATION Branford Crossing Across from the fairgrounds Patel 386-755-5571 TEAMS: Nine advance in playoffs Continued From Page 1B FILE Fort White Highs football team made the Class 3A state playoffs as district runner-up. FILE PHOTOS LEFT: Columbia Highs volleyball team made the state playoffs as district runner-up. It was volleyballs first trip to the playoffs since 1999. ABOVE: Columbia Highs softball team advanced to the state playoffs as district runner-up. FILE Fort White Highs girls track and field team was runner-up at the district tournament. FILE Columbia Highs girls cross country team advanced to region with a third-place finish in the district tournament. Columbias boys bas ketball team was district runner-up and made its first playoff appearance since 2008. The Tigers lost at Ridgeview High in the opening round. Fort Whites football team was district runner-up and returned to the play offs for fifth time in the last six years. The Indians lost to an undefeated First Academy team on the road in the opening round. Fort Whites girls track team was runner-up in a 10-team district and had nine athletes qualify for region competition. Columbias girls cross country team placed third at district and qualified for the region meet. Several teams are knock ing at the door. Fort Whites baseball, softball, girls soccer and boys basketball teams won a game in their respective district tournaments. All four teams advanced to the district semifinals. Columbias boys soccer also won a district tourna ment match. State champs Lake City Middle Schools girls cross country team, competing under the Eye of the Tiger banner, won the FLYRA Middle School Championship for the second consecutive year. COURTESY PHOTO