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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
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Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:01984

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:01984

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text

PAGE 1

By DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comW hite Springs once saw U.S. presidents bathe in the sulfur-rich waters that gave the town its name. Where the spring used to be, now there’s nothing -not even a trickle. A new study detailing ways to put water back into the ground aims at preventing that same fate for springs throughout North Central Florida. A technical memorandum, completed by Atkins North America Inc., presents a number of aquifer recharge concepts to help decide the best ways to artificially put water back into the aquifer. The study looks at direct and indirect injection of water into the massive limestone formation that holds the drinking water of the state. One of the concepts calls for direct injection of reclaimed water from wastewa-ter treatment facilities. That option won’t be used in Suwannee River Water Management District. The SRWMD stretches from Jefferson County in the west, then snakes down the coast as far south as Levy County and as far west as Bradford County. Direct injection of reclaimed water isn’t possible here because the study recom-mends the capacity of a wastewater treat-ment facility be greater than 10 million gallons per day. Treatment facilities in the district don’t produce that much wastewater, according to the study. “Due to high cost of transmission piping installation, any potential recharge project should focus on maximizing the quantity of wastewater/reclaimed water in the closest proximity to the potential recharge area,” the study said. While direct injection of reclaimed From staff reportsFORT WHITE — Two Fort White residents were arrested and face crim-inal charges after sheriff’s deputies exe-cuted a search warrant at their Fort White home and found them process-ing metham-phetamine, according to arrest reports. Daniel Dyal, 43, and Shannon Stamper, 40, both of 1069 SW Faulkner Drive, Fort CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Opinion ................ 4ABusiness ................ 5AObituaries .............. 6A Advice & Comics ......... 8B Puzzles ................. 2B TODAY IN PEOPLE Kutcher, Moore will divorce. COMING TUESDAY Local news roundup. 91 64 T-Storm Chance WEATHER, 2A Opinion ................ 4APeople.................. 2AObituaries .............. 5AAdvice.................. 5DPuzzles ................. 5B 63 40 Mostly Sunny WEATHER, 8A Lake City ReporterSUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | $1.00 LAKECITYREPORTER.COM Local jobless rate holds steady, butstill below state. Santa may comelate for some online shoppers. SUNDAYEDITION Vol. 138, No. 234 1D 1C 1ARecharge option eyed SCHOOL GRADES CHSa ‘B,’FWHSfalls Supt.: Ever-changing standards make the target hard to hit. GRADES continued on 3A Dyal By DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comState-assigned grades were released by the Florida Department of Education for Florida schools Friday. This year Fort White High School dropped from a B to a C and Columbia High School remained a B school despite hope from school officials that CHS would do better this year. Superintendent Terry Huddleston said Columbia High scored as well or better then last year, but because of tweaks to the school grading system, including new catago-ries of 4and 5-year graduation rates, Columbia didn’t see the jump from B to A. “Very frankly, I don’t know what a 4or 5-year graduation rate has to do with last year,” he said. Huddleston said that the Florida Department of Education sent a email to coun-ty school officials saying that the grades for schools from this year weren’t comparable to last years. Huddleston is planning for how to improve the schools’ grades for next year by focusing on the students’ raw scores. “What I’m looking on focusing is how well our students per-formed in reading, math, writ-ing and science,” Huddleston said. “All I know is to continue to focus on the kids.” Huddleston said that Fort White slumped because of how Stamper BUST continued on 7A JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterA youngster swims at Ichetucknee Springs in this file pho to. SRWMD may start pumping water underground Vigil for the homeless JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterLake City residents Jayce Barber (right) and his brothe r, Shayne, pray on Friday for the homeless individuals w ho are forced to sleep outside in freezing temperatures this winter. The vigil at Olustee Park in downtown Lake City was sponsored by the Homeless Services Network of Suwa nnee Valley. FLORIDAN AQUIFER AQUIFER continued on 7A Some question whether effort will have noticeableeffect on water levels. 2 jailedin methlab bust Teen grabsextinguisher,douses fireBy DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comA Columbia High School senior grabbed a fire extinguish-er, entered his neighbor’s smoky apartment and doused a blaze, county fire officials said. The fire started in a unit of Verndale Apartments on CR 252 about 9 p.m. Wednesday. Keith Williams said he had come home from church when his nextdoor neighbor came knocking. Columbia County Fire Rescue Shift Commander Arness Thomas said he thinks the fire started from clothes thrown onto a lamp. The clothes caught fire then fell onto the carpet. Williams said he didn’t really think much before running into the smoke-filled apartment. He likes the show “Heroes” and enjoys shows about firefighters. “I just grabbed (the fire TEEN continued on 3A



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By TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comFORT WHITE — Fort White High’s Tasha Robinson filled the bucket with 41 points on Friday as the Lady Indians beat visit-ing Williston High, 67-48. It was the second District 5-4A win in a row for the Lady Indians, who improved to 6-5 overall and 2-4 in dis-trict play. The Lady Devils fell to 4-6 overall and 2-3 in district. After a two-point first quarter, as Fort White built a 9-4 lead, Robinson took off and scored in double figures in each of the next three quarters. She had 13 points in the second quar-ter, 15 in the third and 11 in the fourth. The total included four 3-pointers. Scoring 41 points requires a lot of shooting and Robinson has the green light from coach DeShay Harris. “When she’s hot, she’s hot,” Harris said. “If she can score, we ride her.” Desma Blake contributed two baskets in a 9-0 Fort White run early in the second quarter that pretty much put the game on ice. The Lady Indians led 27-15 at the break. Blake also hit two baskets to go with Robinson’s points in an 8-0 spurt late in the third quarter. Robinson added a pair of treys down the stretch and Kasha Cook hit a basket for a 50-27 lead at the end of the quarter. Robinson personally From staff reportsThe honors continue to come for Columbia High’s Laremy Tunsil. The offensive tackle for the Tigers was named to the USA Today All-USA 2012 high school football team. Tunsil made first team in the list posted in USA Today on Thursday. “It’s the same as any of the other honors he’s received in that it’s a big acknowledgement for him as well as us as a program and the community as a whole,” CHS head coach Brian Allen said. Tunsil was part of a 1-2 coup for North Florida. Yulee running back Derrick Henry also was selected to the first team in the nation-wide poll. Vernon Hargreaves III of Wharton High in Tampa was a first-team defensive back. Running backs Greg Bryant of American Heritage High in Delray Beach and Kelvin Taylor of Glades Day School in Belle Glades were named to the second team. Defensive back Leon McQuay III of Armwood High in Seffner was named to the third team. The USA Today note on Tunsil was: “Helped the team run for 275 yards a Lake City Reporter SPORTS Sunday, December 23, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS INDIANS continued on 2B Leads Fort White to 67-48 district win over Williston. TUNSIL continued on 2B Tigers’ lineman voted first-team All-USA Today. GAMES Thursday Q Fort White High girls basketball vs. Lafayette High in Country Christmas Classic, 12:30 p.m. Q Fort White High girls basketball vs. Branford High in Country Christmas Classic, 4:30 p.m. Q Columbia High boys basketball in Jarvis Williams Tournament at Palatka High, 4:30 p.m. Friday Q Fort White High Country Christmas Classic consolation, championship games, noon, 1:30 p.m. Q Columbia High boys basketball in Jarvis Williams Tournament at Palatka High, TBD Saturday Q Columbia High boys basketball in Jarvis Williams Tournament at Palatka High, TBD BRIEFS YOUTH BASEBALL North Florida Rays 11U tryout The North Florida Rays 11U travel team has tryouts at 1 p.m. Jan. 5 at the Southside Baseball Complex red fields. For details, call Andy Miles at 867-0678 or Todd Green at 365-5161. PREP SPORTS Deadlines for non-traditionals Non-traditional students (home-school, charter school, FHSAA non-member private schools, special schools, Florida virtual schools) must declare their intentions to try out for public school sports. The deadlines to declare for spring sports are: Jan. 7 for softball and Classes 1A-2A track and field; Jan. 14 for baseball and Classes 3A-4A track and field; Jan. 21 for boys weightlifting. Students who want to participate in public prep sports must register at the school in the zone where they live. For details, call Athletic Director John Wilson at (352) 317-5865. CHS SOFTBALL Tryouts planned for Jan. 8 Columbia High softball tryouts are 2:45 p.m. Jan. 8 at the CHS field. For details, call Jimmy Williams at 303-1192. ZUMBA Beginner, weight loss classes A Zumba beginner class and weight loss contest will be offered at Teen Town on Jan. 6. The Zumba class is 3-4 p.m., with the weight loss contest starting at 4 p.m. For details, call Sarah Sandlin at 758-0009. ADULT SOFTBALL Winter league planned in 2013 An adult softball winter leagues is set for January 21. Women, men and co-ed leagues will be offered. Registration deadline is Jan. 11. For details, call Pete Bonilla at 623-6561 or Casandra Wheeler at 365-2168.Q From staff reports BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterColumbia High seniors are joined by head coach Ashl ey Brown (back left) and coach Scott Busby (back right). The seniors are (front row, from left) Holly Boris, Keeley Murray, Kaitl yn Daniel and Ellie Garcia Gomez. Back row (from left) are Danielle Mathis, Sara Woodfield, Ashleigh Bridges, Ashtyn Vincent and Jaime Vincent. Senior Night for Lady TigersBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High’s Lady Tigers soccer team fell, 1-0, to rival Suwannee High at home on Friday. It was Senior Night for the Lady Tigers and nine players were honored. “This is the first senior class that I’ve had since they were freshmen,” head coach Ashley Brown said. “They’ve worked hard and shown dedication to the program. I’m proud of them and they played well tonight. I couldn’t ask for more.” Keeley Murray, a goalkeeper for the Lady Tigers, committed to play at LaGrange College earlier this week. FILE PHOTOColumbia High’s Laremy Tunsil (77) blocks against a Santa Fe High defender in a game on Aug. 24.JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s N’Mandria Reynolds steals the ball as Columbia High’s Arnereanna Bryant (25) slips on Nov. 15. Another accolade for TunsilRobinson scores 41



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Lake City Reporter Week of December 23-29, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section C Columbia, Inc. Your marketplace source for Lake City and Columbia County1CColumbia Inc.By CANDICE CHOIAP Food Industry WriterNEW YORK — Twinkies, Wonder Bread and Devil Dogs are likely to return to shelves in coming months, but probably not under the same owners. Hostess Brands Inc. said in bankruptcy court Friday that it’s narrowing down the bids it received for its brands and expects to sell off its snack cakes and bread to separate buyers. The testimony came from an investment banker for Hostess, which is in the pro-cess of liquidating. A likely suitor has emerged for the name-sake Hostess brand, which includes Twinkies, Ding Dongs and Ho Hos, along with Dolly Madison cakes, which includes Coffee Cakes and Zingers, said Joshua Scherer of Perella Weinberg Partners. He said another viable bid was made for Drake’s cakes, which includes Devil Dogs, Funny Bones and Yodels. That bid-der also wants to buy the Drake’s plant in Wayne, N.J., which Scherer said is the country’s only kosher bakery plant. Additional bids have been submitted for its bread brands, which include Wonder and Home Pride. Hostess expects to file bind-ing “stalking horse” bids for many of its brands in January. Those filings would be followed by a four-week auction process to allow competing bids. Scherer said the auctions could be very active for some of the brands, given the number of parties that have expressed interest. Sales could be completed by as early as mid-March. About 30 plants could also be sold with the brands, Scherer said, with six plants, several warehouses and a fleet of trucks likely to be closed or scrapped. Hostess has hired a firm Hilco to act as a sales agent for those additional assets; the firm will also give Hostess a $30 million loan to maintain operations dur-ing its liquidation, which is expected to take about a year. Hostess, based in Irving, Texas, has said potential buyers include major pack-aged food companies and national retailers, such as big-box retailers and super-markets. The company has stressed it needs to move quickly in the sale process to capitalize on the outpour-ing of nostalgia sparked by its bankruptcy. To begin winding down its operations late last month, Hostess had said it would retain about 3,000 workers to shutter plants and perform other tasks. On Friday, an attorney for Hostess said in court that figure was down to about 1,100 employees. The liqui-dation of Hostess ultimately means the loss of about 18,000 jobs, not including those shed in the years lead-ing to the company’s failure. CEO Greg Rayburn, who was hired as a restructuring expert earlier this year, is earning $125,000 a month. The company’s demise came after years of man-agement turmoil and turn-over, with workers saying the company failed to invest in updating its snack cakes and breads. Hostess filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in January, citing steep costs associated with its unionized workforce. UNEMPLOYMENT By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comThe Columbia County unemployment rate for November was 7.6 per-cent, holding steady at the same level from the previous month, according to information released Friday by the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity. Although the local unemployment rate did not change in November, it remains below the state unemploy-ment rate, 8.1 percent. The state unemployment rate fell 0.4 percent compared to October when it was recorded at 8.5 percent. The decrease marked the second time in 2012 that the unemployment rate fell 0.4 percent over a month. Prior to this year, the last time the state’s unemployment rate dropped by at least 0.4 percent in one month was October 1992. The national unemployment rate was 7.7 percent in November. The Columbia County labor force consists of 31,230 people. In November, 28,858 residents were employed while an estimated 2,372 people were unemployed. In November 2011 the county’s unemployment rate was 9.5 percent, when 28,670 people in the county’s workforce of 31,667 people had jobs. Back then 2,997 residents were job-less. According to state employment officials, there were 760,000 jobless Floridians out of a labor force of 9.3 million people last month. The industries gaining the most jobs in the state was the leisure and hospitality industry. Other industries gaining jobs included trade, transpor-tation and utilities. The number of jobs in the state was up 83,300 from November 2011, an increase of 1.1 percent. Nationally, the number of jobs was up 1.4 per-cent over the year. In November Monroe County had the state’s lowest unemployment rate at 4.7 percent. Hendry County had the state’s highest unemployment rate at 11.6 percent. TONY BRITT/ Lake City ReporterLilly Saxon (standing), a Florida Crown Workforce Caree r Center customer service representative, helps Leslie W hite search for a job in the facility’s resource room.Local jobless rate unchanged in Nov., but still below state. Hostess expects to split up snack cakes in sale ASSOCIATED PRESSA cashier rings up boxes of Hostess Twinkies and Cup Cakes at the Hostess Brands’ bakery in Denver. Blaming a labor dispute for ongoing financial woes, Hostess Brands decid ed to close shop this year, taking with it lunch box stapl es such as Twinkies, Ding Dongs and Wonder bread. The company sai d it would try to sell off its more storied brands, so may be there is Familiar brands may return to shelves afterward.County holding steady Consumer confidence takes plungeBy MARTIN CRUTSINGERAP Economics WriterWASHINGTON — Confidence among U.S. consumers has sunk to its lowest point since July, according to a monthly index. The University of Michigan says its con-sumer sentiment index for December fell to 72.9, a sharp drop from the November reading of 82.7. The November figure was a five-year high. Peter Newland, an economist at Barclays, says consumer confidence has dropped because of uncertainty over whether Congress and the Obama administration will reach a budget deal to avert sharp tax increases and govern-ment spending cuts. Economists said confidence could fall further if the standoff over the “fis-cal cliff” persists into 2013. And Peter Curtin, the University of Michigan’s chief economist for the survey, said confidence might be slow to recover even if a deal is reached early in the new year. “Confidence is lost much more easily than it can be regained,” Curtin said. “Blaming one side or the other for failure will only increase pessimism as it reflects a dysfunc-tional system for setting economic policy.” Chris Christopher, senior economist at IHS Global Insight, said the survey showed that “Americans have become increasingly worried over their personal finances, business conditions and the economic outlook.”ASSOCIATED PRESSA shopper makes her way through the aisles at Best Buy in Bowling Green, Ky. U.S. consumer confidence rose in November to its highest level in almost five years, but ha s slipped since, partially because of the ‘fiscal cliff.’



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By MAE ANDERSONAP Retail WriterW ill Santa’s sleigh be late? A record number of Americans took to the Web to order holiday gifts after retail-ers flooded their inboxes with offers of extra discounts, free shipping and easy returns. But a storm that brought heavy winds and snow to much of the Midwest on Thursday — the heaviest shipping day of the year — could mean that some packages might not make it under the tree in time for Christmas. That’s a headache for retailers, shippers and customers alike, who already were experiencing problems because of the surge in shipping this year. Some shoppers at the Lake City Mall said that they usually buy from retail stores, shun-ning the Internet for a number of reasons. John Kent, of Lake City, said he doesn’t like how the products are displayed online. He said that the pictures of cheese baskets and other food stuffs are taken to make them appear larger. “I like to see it and touch it (before I buy),” Kent said. Thomas Ivey, also of Lake City, said he doesn’t like buying online because if some-thing doesn’t fit it’s a hassle to ship it back. He would rather go to a store and try out his clothes. “I just enjoy shopping,” Ivey said. “(Online shopping) takes all the fun out of it if you do it online.” Stephen Jones, of Lake City, said his shopping is about 50 percent online 50 percent retail stores. “All my last-minute shopping I run to the store to buy,” Jones said. “If I plan ahead, I buy online.” Shelly Nolin, of Lake City, said she doesn’t like waiting for the things she buys. “I would rather go and get it rather then waiting,” Nolin said. “What happens when (Christmas) comes, and it’s still not here.” Meally Jenkins said she doesn’t shop online because it’s bad for local retailers. “I just find it hard to believe that you can’t find everything you need here in Lake City,” Jenkins said. “Support your local merchants.” As of Friday, no major disruptions had been reported nationwide. Wal-Mart, the No. 2 online retailer behind Amazon.com, said no orders were delayed. GSI Commerce, which handles online shipping for 70 retailers including Aeropostale and Godiva, said they are monitoring the situation hour-by-hour and so far, deliveries are being made on time. By the time the storm hits the Northeast on Friday, it should be a wintry mix of rain and snow — nothing bad enough to delay deliver-ies. Still, the storm’s timing couldn’t be worse for the world’s largest package delivery com-pany, UPS. Thursday is the Atlanta-based company’s busiest day of the year. Before the storm shut down service in some areas, it expected to move 28 million packages on Thursday, nearly double an average day. Both UPS and smaller rival FedEx Corp., which is based in Memphis, Tenn., have extensive contingency plans for blizzards and other inclement weather, including scores of meteorologists on staff to redirect planes and trucks and planes at the ready to replace oth-ers that can’t take off. The storm led UPS to halt all pickups and deliveries in some parts of Iowa and Nebraska. It had to re-route pack-ages destined for the Des Moines airport, from which many shipments are then moved by truck to their final destinations across the Plains states. Instead, it’s moving those ship-ments out of its hub in Louisville, Ky., until the skies and roads clear, and expects most of the delays to be worked out this weekend. Even before the storm hit, shipping delays were irking some. Ronni Kenoian, a 24-year-old consumer marketing manager, ordered a $150 bracelet set for her mother-in-law on Dec. 4 at Alex and Ani, a jewelry company based in Cranston, R.I. She expected it to arrive within seven to 10 business days. Her credit card was charged but Kenoian said she received no tracking number for the package. With no sign of the bracelet after a week, she phoned and emailed the company but her messages went unanswered. She tried to send a post on social media website Twitter and got a response to send her order number to the company, which she did. Still, nothing. Finally, on Monday evening, she got word that her package would arrive Tuesday, two weeks after placing her order. She also received a coupon for 15 percent off her next online purchase. But the damage had been done. “On a scale of 1 to 10 of how frustrated I am, I’m like a 12,” she said. “I will never, ever order from their website again.” Alex and Ani CEO Giovanni Feroce said the delay is a result of the growing company trying to satisfy a major surge in demand: orders more than tripled this year to $3.3 mil-lion from $672,000 last year. Alex and Ani had boosted promotions too, offering free ship-ping and 10 to 15 percent off on four key days throughout the season, compared with just one day, Cyber Monday, last year. “Although it is statistically impossible to get close to 50,000 orders perfect since Cyber Monday, we will always do our best to do just LIFE Sunday, December 23, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section D W hile there are certain-ly plenty of pizza plac-es to go to when you find you are in Tallahassee, Barnaby’s Family Inn has been a mainstay for over 40 years, and in our humble opinion, it offers the very best pizza around. Located on Apalachee Parkway, Barnaby’s isn’t a fancy place at all. We bet they have the same pizza ovens that have been there since the beginning and the same wooden booths (no padded seats here) the locals have come to love. And there aren’t any fancy wait staffs either. But that’s perfectly fine. We did say this was a simple establish-ment — one place to order your pizza, one place to order your drinks and one place to pick up your pip-ing-hot pizza. Just like years ago, you still place your order on a paper order sheet, making sure to mark your selection with a big “x” in the circle. Barnaby’s does offer a strong menu of sandwiches and dinner specials like spaghetti, fried chicken, chopped steaks, rib eye steaks, hot wings and a salad bar, but we’d be lying if we said we ever tried any of those except the salad bar. The main attraction here is their one-of-a-kind pizza with a taste of its own. Their pizza dough, made fresh daily, really makes the difference, along with the finest, freshest ingre-dients for toppers. We’re not sure what their secret recipe is for the crust, but when you pick up your pie from the window and take that first bite (and those after), it’s like noth-ing you’ve had before. The crust is thin, but not too thin, crispy but not too much and the flavor has a hint of yeast ... beer ... heck, we don’t know ... but it’s yummy delicious. They also cut their pizzas differ-ently than your standard pizza joint. The pie is cut into squares not triangles. For those who aren’t that fond of the outside crust, you are in for a treat, and for those that do, you’ve got plenty of outside slices that will make you happy too. You can opt for their fresh sausage and top quality mozzarella cheese, ground beef, pepperoni, onions, green peppers, or mushrooms. You can also add fresh tomato slices, pineapple or black olives for an additional charge. We have to warn you, if you are looking for some more exotic toppings, this isn’t the place for you. But we can promise that you will not be disappointed Very best pizza around Story ideas?ContactRobert BridgesEditor754-0428rbridges@lakecityreporter.com Lake City Reporter1DLIFEF lorida homeowners enjoy such a wide selection of ornamental plants in their land-scapes. In northern Florida, we teeter on the edge of temperate and sub-tropical climates, and some plants mistakenly sold here are just not winter hardy. Although we push some plants well beyond their northern limits, they often can be overwintered successfully. There are several methods of protection that maximize chances of successfully overwintering favorite plants. Being prepared to protect vulnerable outdoor plants is important. So, keep some type of covering on hand such as sheets or blankets. Plastic is not recommended unless the plant does not contact the plastic. Protecting plants from frost is much easier than saving them from a freeze. Frosts can happen well above 32 degrees. Keep frost from forming on leaves by mov-ing plants under a tree canopy or porch roof, or by covering the plants with sheets. Just make cer-tain that a breeze can’t blow the sheet off. If frost has settled on tender leaves in the early morning, spray the plants with a light mist of water to keep the frost melted. Freezing temperatures require more protection. Moist soil absorbs and retains heat better than dry soil. Before an expected freeze, water the soil beneath plants so the sun’s rays will warm the moist soil. Cover the plants before the ground heat escapes and make certain that the fabric extends to the ground. The slowly radiated heat from the soil will keep the night air around the plant a couple degrees warmer. You can even place a small light bulb or a string of Christmas lights beneath the cover to produce a small amount of heat. Don’t for-get to uncover your plants in the morning before the sun causes a buildup of heat. The soil in potted plants can quickly freeze and thaw, however, and kill the root systems. The best way to protect potted plants is to put them in a shed, under cover, or close to building walls for protection from rapid freezes and thaws. Group pots closely together so there will be less heat loss, and cover plants with blankets or sheets. Check pots periodically for moisture content and don’t let them dry out. ‘Right plant, right place’ means placing plants where they will natu-rally thrive. But in our own back-yard microclimates, sometimes we can push the limit of a favorite plant, even with a little protection.Tips for protecting plants from freezing GARDEN TALK Nichelle Demorestdndemorest@ufl.eduSanta may be delayed Storm could snarl delivery of gifts purchased onlin e Q D. Nichelle Demorest is a horticulture agent with the Columbia County Extension of the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.ASSOCIATED PRESSFedEx workers sort packages at the Oakland Regional Sor t Facility in Oakland, Calif. A storm that brought heavy wind s and snow to much of the Midwest on Thursday — the heaviest shipping day of the year — co uld mean that some gifts bought online might not make it un der the tree in time for Christmas. Genie Norman and Mary Kay HollingsworthTasteBuddiesLakeCity@gmail.com TASTE BUDDIES TASTE continued on 3D LATE continued on 3D Area shoppers say they avoid problems by filling their lists at local stores.



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PEOPLE IN THE NEWS CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. AROUND FLORIDA Friday: 3-6-7-44 13 Friday: 4-11-14-23-25 Saturday: Afternoon: 7-1-8 Evening: N/A Saturday: Afternoon: 7-9-8-0 Evening: N/A Wednes day: 25-29-37-38-44-45 x3 South Fla. man acquitted in 94 triple murder FORT LAUDERDALE A South Florida man once sentenced to die for a 1994 triple murder has been acquitted following a new trial that was ordered by the state Supreme Court. Jurors deliberated about 10 days before finding Seth Penalver not guilty Friday. The South Florida SunSentine l reported that Penalver wept and knelt as if in prayer after the ver dict was read. Penalvers first trial ended in a mistrial. In 1999 he was convicted and sen tenced to die. That verdict was tossed in 2006 by the Supreme Court, which found problems with evi dence. Marie Rogers, Sharon Anderson, and nightclub owner Casmir Sucharski were fatally shot during a robbery at Sucharskis home in Miramar. A videotape captured the crime but one man wore a hat and sunglasses. Penalver insisted he wasnt involved. Judge dismisses Obama challenge TALLAHASSEE A judge has borrowed a famous line from the clas sic Christmas movie A Miracle on 34th Street in dismissing a challenge to President Barack Obamas eligibility to hold the nations highest office. Circuit Judge Kevin Carroll noted that Obama lives in the White House, flies on Air Force One, has delivered State of the Union Addresses to Congress and was re-elect ed as president. In the opinion signed Thursday, Carroll then said it therefore was appro priate during the holiday season to paraphrase the movies fictional judge, who ruled the government had declared the films leading character, Kris Kringle, to be Santa Claus by delivering Santas mail to him. Carroll wrote: Since the United States government declares this man to be president, this court will not dispute it. Case dis missed. Carlton Fisks home burglarized BRADENTON Manatee County Sheriffs detectives are investigat ing a break-in at the home of baseball Hall of Fame catcher Carlton Pudge Fisk. Officials say thousands of dollars in collectible sil ver coins were stolen. The Sarasota HeraldTribune reports that its unclear exactly when Fisks home was burglar ized. Detectives say Fiske was out of town when a pool serviceman arrived Thursday and noticed the break-in. Investigators say it doesnt appear anything else was stolen. Fisk was a catcher for the Boston Red Sox and the Chicago White Sox for years, and was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2000. His dramatic, often-replayed home run clinched Game 6 of the 1975 World Series for the Boston Red Sox against the Cincinnati Reds, although the Reds ulti mately won the Series. Zimmerman sued over security fees ORLANDO A secu rity company claims in a lawsuit that Trayvon Martin shooter George Zimmerman, his wife and attorney owe more than $27,000 for protection ser vices. The Orlando Sentinel reportede that Associated Investigative Services filed the lawsuit Friday in Orange County Circuit Court. The company says it was hired in June to provide security for the Zimmerman family but promised payments stopped after an indepen dent trustee took over Zimmermans defense fund. Zimmerman attorney Mark OMara says the lawsuit was a surprise and that the company was paid some $40,000. Zimmerman is await ing trial on second-degree murder charges in the shooting of Martin. Zimmerman contends the unarmed teen ager attacked him and is claiming self-defense in the February killing. Zimmerman is free on $1 million bail and is in hiding. Woman charged with child porn PENSACOLA Federal authorities have arrested a Florida Panhandle woman on producing child por nography charges. The U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcements Homeland Security Investigations said Friday that 25-year-old Corine Danielle Motley was apprehended follow ing a nationwide public appeal for help. ICE received an arrest warrant Tuesday in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia for Motley. Officials said she is believed to have produced at least one video with her engaging in explicit sexual conduct with a 4 to 5-yearold victim. The video was brought to authorities attention by law enforcement in Denmark, who download ed the video during a child pornography investigation in that country. The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children says the victim has not been identified. Motley is being held in the Escambia County Jail without bond. LOS ANGELES A shton Kutcher filed court papers Friday to end his seven-year marriage to actress Demi Moore. The actors divorce peti tion cites irreconcilable differences and does not list a date that the cou ple separated. Moore announced last year that she was ending her mar riage to the actor 15 years her junior, but she never filed a petition. Kutchers filing does not indicate that the couple has a prenuptial agreement. The filing states Kutcher signed the document Friday, hours before it was filed in Los Angeles Superior Court. Kutcher and Moore married in September 2005 and until recently kept their relationship very public, communicating with each other and fans on the social networking site Twitter. After their breakup, Moore changed her name on the site from (at)mrskutcher to (at)justdemi. Kutcher currently stars on CBS Two and a Half Men. Messages sent to Kutchers and Moores publicists were not immedi ately returned Friday. Moore, 50, and Kutcher, 34, creat ed the DNA Foundation, also known as the Demi and Ashton Foundation, in 2010 to combat the organized sex ual exploitation of girls around the globe. They later lent their support to the United Nations efforts to fight human trafficking, a scourge the international organization estimates affects about 2.5 million people worldwide. Moore was previously married to actor Bruce Willis for 13 years. They had three daughters together Rumer, Scout and Tallulah Belle before divorcing in 2000. Willis later married model-actress Emma Heming in an intimate 2009 cer emony at his home in Parrot Cay in the Turks and Caicos Islands that attended by their children, as well as Moore and Kutcher. Kutcher has been dating former That s Show co-star Mila Kunis. The divorce filing was first report ed Friday by People magazine. Gangnam Style reaches 1B views on YouTube NEW YORK Viral star PSY has reached a new milestone on YouTube. The South Korean rappers video for Gangnam Style has reached 1 billion views, according to YouTubes own counter. Its the first time any clip has sur passed that mark on the streaming service owned by Google Inc. It shows the enduring popularity of the self-deprecating video that fea tures Park Jae-sangs giddy up-style dance moves. The video has been available on YouTube since July 15, averaging more than 200 million views per month. Justin Biebers video for Baby held the previous YouTube record at more than 800 million views. PSY wasnt just popular on YouTube, either. Earlier this month Google announced Gangnam Style was the second highest trending search of 2012 behind Whitney Houston, who passed away in February. Reports: Rolling Stones guitarist Wood ties knot LONDON Two British news papers say Rolling Stones guitarist Ronnie Wood has married his fiancee Sally Humphreys at a ceremony at Londons Dorchester Hotel. The Sun and the Daily Mirror carried photographs of the 65-year-old rocker wearing a pale boutonniere and a dark blue suit, and his 34-year-old bride in a traditional white gown and a clutch of matching white flowers. The Sun quoted Wood as say ing Im feeling great as he and his bride kissed and posed for pic tures outside the exclusive hotel in Londons upscale Mayfair district. Kutcher files for divorce from Moore Wednes day: 5-8-20-23-30 PB 3 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter 2A Daily Scripture And there were shepherds living out in the fields nearby, keeping watch over their flocks at night. An angel of the Lord appeared to them, and the glory of the Lord shone around them, and they were terrified. But the angel said to them, Do not be afraid. I bring you good news that will cause great joy for all the people. Today in the town of David a Savior has been born to you; he is the Messiah, the Lord. Luke 2:8-11 ASSOCIATED PRESS Actors Ashton Kutcher (left) filed for divorce from actress Demi Moore (right) on Frida, citing irreconcilable differences. The two have been married for seven years. Associated Press Associated Press PSY ASSOCIATED PRESS Golfing Santa Carina Ballard, 6, left and her brother, Blake, 3, play golf with Santa Claus and his elves dur ing the Macys National Santa Tour visit at The Ritz Carlton Golf Resort in Naples on Friday. Woods



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By NANCY ARMOURAssociated PressWhen Gabby Douglas allowed herself to dream of being the Olympic cham-pion, she imagined having a nice little dinner with family and friends to cel-ebrate. Maybe she’d make an appearance here and there. “I didn’t think it was going to be crazy,” Douglas said, laughing. “I love it. But I realized my perspec-tive was going to have to change.” Just a bit. The teenager has become a worldwide star since win-ning the Olympic all-around title in London, the first African-American gymnast to claim gymnastics’ big-gest prize. And now she has earned another honor. Douglas was selected The Associated Press ’ female athlete of the year, edging out swimmer Missy Franklin in a vote by U.S. editors and news directors that was announced Friday. “I didn’t realize how much of an impact I made,” said Douglas, who turns 17 on Dec. 31. “My mom and everyone said, ‘You really won’t know the full impact until you’re 30 or 40 years old.’ But it’s starting to sink in.” In a year filled with standout performances by female athletes, those of the pint-sized gymnast shined brightest. Douglas received 48 of 157 votes, seven more than Franklin, who won four gold medals and a bronze in London. Serena Williams, who won Wimbledon and the U.S. Open two years after her career was nearly derailed by a series of health prob-lems, was third (24). Britney Griner, who led Baylor to a 40-0 record and the NCAA title, and skier Lindsey Vonn each got 18 votes. Sprinter Allyson Felix, who won three gold medals in London, and Carli Lloyd, who scored both U.S. goals in the Americans’ 2-1 victory over Japan in the gold-medal game, also received votes. “One of the few years the women’s (Athlete of the Year) choices are more compelling than the men’s,” said Julie Jag, sports editor of the Santa Cruz Sentinel Douglas wasn’t even in the conversation for the Olympic title at the begin-ning of the year. That all changed in March when she upstaged reigning world champion and team-mate Jordyn Wieber at the American Cup in New York, showing off a new vault, an ungraded uneven bars routine and a dazzling personality. She finished a close second to Wieber at the U.S. championships, then beat her two weeks later at the Olympic trials. game en route to the Class 6A state quarterfinals.” “I believe that he’s the first to be selected as a first-team member,” Allen said. “It’s a big honor and my hat is off to him. (Timmy) Jernigan was a member, but as far as I know Laremy is the only first-team player. “He’s got the main stage and that takes the cake.” Tunsil is the only firstteam offensive lineman selected that has not com-mitted to a college. The others are signing with big names: Evan Lisle of Centerville, Ohio, with Ohio State; Ethan Pacic of Lemont, Ill., with LSU; Grant Hill of Huntsville, Ala., with Alabama; Kent Perkins of Dallas with Texas. Quarterback Max Browne of Sammamish, Wash. was Offensive Player of the Year. Defensive back Su’a Cravens of Murrieta, Calif., was Defensive Player of the Year. Both have com-mitted to Southern Cal. J.T.Curtis of John Curtis Christian High in River Ridge, La., was Coach of the Year. Tunsil will share his national stage with Allen when the two travel to the U.S. Army All-American Bowl on Jan. 3. The game is at the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas, on Jan. 5. SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 11:30 p.m. ESPN2 — Diamond Head Classic, semifinal, at Honolulu NFL FOOTBALL 1 p.m. CBS — Regional coverageFOX — Regional coverage 4 p.m. CBS — Regional coverage 4:25 p.m. FOX — Doubleheader game 8:20 p.m. NBC — San Francisco at Seattle ——— Monday COLLEGE FOOTBALL 8 p.m. ESPN — Hawaii Bowl at Honolulu, Fresno St. vs. SMUFOOTBALLNFL standings AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAy-New England 10 4 0 .714 506 315N.Y. Jets 6 8 0 .429 255 320Miami 6 8 0 .429 264 279 Buffalo 5 9 0 .357 306 402 South W L T Pct PF PAy-Houston 12 2 0 .857 394 280Indianapolis 9 5 0 .643 309 358Tennessee 5 9 0 .357 285 396 Jacksonville 2 12 0 .143 219 383 North W L T Pct PF PAx-Baltimore 9 5 0 .643 348 307Cincinnati 8 6 0 .571 355 293Pittsburgh 7 7 0 .500 302 291 Cleveland 5 9 0 .357 280 310 West W L T Pct PF PAy-Denver 11 3 0 .786 409 274San Diego 5 9 0 .357 299 312 Oakland 4 10 0 .286 263 402 Kansas City 2 12 0 .143 195 367 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAWashington 8 6 0 .571 381 350 Dallas 8 6 0 .571 327 338N.Y. Giants 8 6 0 .571 373 304Philadelphia 4 10 0 .286 253 375 South W L T Pct PF PAy-Atlanta 12 2 0 .857 371 259New Orleans 6 8 0 .429 389 379 Tampa Bay 6 8 0 .429 354 349Carolina 5 9 0 .357 296 319 North W L T Pct PF PAy-Green Bay 10 4 0 .714 344 292 Minnesota 8 6 0 .571 319 308Chicago 8 6 0 .571 321 240 Detroit 4 10 0 .286 330 380 West W L T Pct PF PAx-San Francisco 10 3 1 750 357 218Seattle 9 5 0 .643 350 219St. Louis 6 7 1 .464 258 315Arizona 5 9 0 .357 224 302 x-clinched playoff spoty-clinched division Saturday’s Game Atlanta at Detroit (n) Today’s Games Tennessee at Green Bay, 1 p.m.Indianapolis at Kansas City, 1 p.m.New Orleans at Dallas, 1 p.m.Minnesota at Houston, 1 p.m.Oakland at Carolina, 1 p.m.Buffalo at Miami, 1 p.m.Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.New England at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.Washington at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.St. Louis at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.San Diego at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m.Cleveland at Denver, 4:05 p.m.Chicago at Arizona, 4:25 p.m.N.Y. Giants at Baltimore, 4:25 p.m.San Francisco at Seattle, 8:20 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 30 Jacksonville at Tennessee, 1 p.m.Green Bay at Minnesota, 1 p.m.Carolina at New Orleans, 1 p.m.N.Y. Jets at Buffalo, 1 p.m.Miami at New England, 1 p.m.Baltimore at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.Cleveland at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.Houston at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.Philadelphia at N.Y. Giants, 1 p.m. Dallas at Washington, 1 p.m.Chicago at Detroit, 1 p.m.Tampa Bay at Atlanta, 1 p.m.Oakland at San Diego, 4:25 p.m.Arizona at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.St. Louis at Seattle, 4:25 p.m.Kansas City at Denver, 4:25 p.m. End regular season NFL calendar Jan. 5-6 — Wild-card playoff games.Jan. 12-13 — Divisional playoff games.Jan. 20 — AFC and NFC championship games.College bowl games New Mexico Bowl Arizona 49, Nevada 48Famous Idaho Potato BowlUtah State 41, Toledo 15 Thursday Poinsettia Bowl BYU 23, San Diego State 6 Friday Beef ’O’ Brady’s Bowl UCF 38, Ball State 17 Saturday New Orleans Bowl Louisiana-Lafayette 43, E. Carolina 34 Las Vegas Bowl Boise State 28, Washington 26 Monday Hawaii Bowl At HonoluluSMU (6-6) vs. Fresno State (9-3), 8 p.m. (ESPN) Wednesday Little Caesars Pizza Bowl At DetroitCentral Michigan (6-6) vs. Western Kentucky (7-5), 7:30 p.m. (ESPN) Thursday, Dec. 27 Military Bowl At WashingtonBowling Green (8-4) vs. San Jose State (10-2), 3 p.m. (ESPN) Belk Bowl At Charlotte, N.C.Duke (6-6) vs. Cincinnati (9-3), 6:30 p.m. (ESPN) Holiday Bowl At San DiegoBaylor (7-5) vs. UCLA (9-4), 9:45 p.m. (ESPN) Friday, Dec. 28 Independence Bowl At Shreveport, La.Louisiana-Monroe (8-4) vs. Ohio (8-4), 2 p.m. (ESPN) Russell Athletic Bowl At OrlandoVirginia Tech (6-6) vs. Rutgers (9-3), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN) Meineke Car Care Bowl At HoustonMinnesota (6-6) vs. Texas Tech (7-5), 9 p.m. (ESPN) Saturday, Dec. 29 Armed Forces Bowl At Fort Worth, TexasRice (6-6) vs. Air Force (6-6), 11:45 a.m. (ESPN) Fight Hunger Bowl At San FranciscoArizona State (7-5) vs. Navy (7-4), 3:15 p.m. (ESPN2) Pinstripe Bowl At New YorkSyracuse (7-5) vs. West Virginia (7-5), 3:15 p.m. (ESPN) Alamo Bowl At San AntonioTexas (8-4) vs. Orgeon State (9-3), 6:45 p.m. (ESPN) Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl At Tempe, Ariz.Michigan State (6-6) vs. TCU (7-5), 10:15 p.m. (ESPN) Monday, Dec. 31 Music City Bowl At Nashville, Tenn.Vanderbilt (8-4) vs. N.C. State (7-5), Noon (ESPN) Sun Bowl At El Paso, TexasGeorgia Tech (6-7) vs. Southern Cal (7-5), 2 p.m. (CBS) Liberty Bowl At Memphis, Tenn.Iowa State (6-6) vs. Tulsa (10-3), 3:30 p.m. (ESPN) Chick-fil-A Bowl At AtlantaLSU (10-2) vs. Clemson (10-2), 7:30 p.m. (ESPN) Tuesday, Jan. 1 Heart of Dallas Bowl At DallasPurdue (6-6) vs. Oklahoma State (7-5), Noon (ESPNU) Gator Bowl At JacksonvilleMississippi State (8-4) vs. Northwestern (9-3), Noon (ESPN2) Capital One Bowl At OrlandoGeorgia (11-2) vs. Nebraska (10-3), 1 p.m. (ABC) Outback Bowl At TampaSouth Carolina (10-2) vs. Michigan (8-4), 1 p.m. (ESPN) Rose Bowl At Pasadena, Calif.Stanford (11-2) vs. Wisconsin (8-5), 5 p.m. (ESPN) Orange Bowl At MiamiNorthern Illinois (12-1) vs. Florida State (11-2), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN) Wednesday, Jan. 2 Sugar Bowl At New OrleansFlorida (11-1) vs. Louisville (10-2), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN) Thursday, Jan. 3 Fiesta Bowl At Glendale, Ariz.Kansas State (11-1) vs. Oregon (11-1), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN) Friday, Jan. 4 Cotton Bowl At Arlington, TexasTexas A&M (10-2) vs. Oklahoma (10-2), 8 p.m. (FOX) Saturday, Jan. 5 BBVA Compass Bowl At Birmingham, Ala.Pittsburgh (6-6) vs. Mississippi (6-6), 1 p.m. (ESPN)BASKETBALLNBA schedule Today’s Games Philadelphia at Brooklyn, 3 p.m.Minnesota at New York, 5 p.m.Utah at Orlando, 6 p.m.Dallas at San Antonio, 7 p.m.L.A. Clippers at Phoenix, 8 p.m.Portland at Sacramento, 9 p.m. Monday’s Games No games scheduled AP Top 25 schedule Today’s Games No. 4 Arizona vs. Hawaii or Miami at the Stan Sheriff Center, Honolulu, 9 or 11:30 p.m. No. 18 San Diego State vs. Mississippi or Indiana State at the Stan Sheriff Center, Honolulu, 3 or 5:30 p.m.BASEBALLCollegiate Baseball Preseason Top 40 1. Arkansas 46-22 496 2. North Carolina 46-16 495 3. Vanderbilt 35-28 494 4. Louisiana St. 47-18 487 5. UCLA 48-16 484 6. Oregon 46-19 482 7. South Carolina 49-20 481 8. Kentucky 45-18 478 9. Stanford 41-18 47610. Oregon St. 40-20 473 11. N.C. State 43-20 47012. San Diego 40-17 46713. Mississippi St. 40-24 46414. Oklahoma 42-25 46215. Texas Christian 40-22 46016. Arizona St. 36-20 45817. Georgia Tech. 38-26 45618. Arizona 48-17 45419. Florida St. 50-17 45220. Rice 41-19 45021. Texas 30-22 44822. Louisville 41-22 44623. Cal. St. Fullerton 36-21 44524. Florida 47-20 44325. Mississippi 37-26 43726. Texas A&M 43-18 43427. Clemson 35-28 42928. Miami 36-23 42729. Georgia 31-26 42330. U.C. Irvine 31-25 42031. Missouri St. 40-22 41832. Wichita St. 35-25 41533. New Mexico 37-24 41334. Kent St. 47-20 41135. Virginia 39-19-1 40836. Southern Miss 32-24 40537. East Carolina 36-24-1 40338. Coastal Carolina 42-19 40039. Dallas Baptist 41-19 39740. Pepperdine 36-23 395 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-04212BSPORTS INDIANS: Are hosting tournament Continued From Page 1B TUNSIL: Will play in U.S. Army Bowl Continued From Page 1B outscored Williston 9-1 to open the fourth quarter. Blake and Cook both finished with 10 points for Fort White. Rykia Jackson, Cenise Armstrong and Hailey Shook each hit a basket. “We played extremely well,” Harris said. “It was a good team win for us.” Hanna Coleman led the Lady Devils with 14 points. Jill Edwards (12) and Danielle Dallas (10) also hit double figures. Fort White is hosting the Country Christmas Classic on Thursday and Friday. Branford High, Lafayette High and North Florida Christian School will join the Lady Indians for the tournament. “We started it last year,” Harris said. “It is a chance to bring girls basketball to Fort White.” Thursday’s schedule, which will determine cham-pionship round seeding, is: Q 11 a.m. — North Florida Christian vs. Branford; Q 12:30 p.m. — Fort White vs. Lafayette; Q 3 p.m. — North Florida Christian vs. Lafayette; Q 4:30 p.m. — Fort White vs. Branford. There will be a 3-point shooting contest at 3 p.m. Friday’s consolation game is at noon, followed by the championship game at 1:30 p.m. The awards ceremony is at 3 p.m. and there will be a Fort White basketball alumni game at 3:30 p.m. Daily admission is $5. Douglas named AP Athlete of the Year ASSOCIATED PRESSGabrielle Douglas of the United States acknowledges the crowd after receiving her gold medal in the artistic gymnastics women’s individual all-around competition o n Aug. 2 at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London.



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2C LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF DECEMBER 23, 2012 2CBIZ/MOTLEY Associated PressNEW YORK — Oil prices fell as much as $2 a barrel Friday as doubts grew about whether politi-cal leaders in Washington could reach a deal on the budget before a package of tax hikes and spending cuts automatically kicks in with the new year. In afternoon trading benchmark crude for February delivery fell $1.62 to $88.51 per barrel in New York. It was as low as $87.96 at one point. Brent crude, used to price international varieties of oil, fell $1.22 to $108.98 per barrel in London. If Republicans and Democrats don’t work out a compromise in the next 10 days, the U.S. could go over the so-called “fiscal cliff,” a reference to hundreds of billions of dollars in tax increases and government spending cuts that take effect if a budget deal is not reached. Many econo-mists fear that would even-tually push the U.S. back into recession, a situation that would likely mean less energy demand. Late Thursday House Republicans abruptly put off a vote on an alterna-tive plan offered by House Speaker John Boehner that would prevent scheduled tax increases from tak-ing effect on Jan. 1 on all income under $1 million. President Barack Obama wants the cutoff point to be $400,000.Oil prices drop as ‘cliff’ approaches Madoff’s brother gets 10 yearsBY COLLEEN LONGAssociated PressNEW YORK — Peter Madoff was “frankly, not believable” when he claimed he was as sur-prised as anyone to learn his brother had blown $20 billion of investor money in a massive Ponzi scheme that lasted for decades, a judge said as she sen-tenced him to 10 years in prison. The disbelief was a recurring theme at the sentenc-ing proceeding Thursday for the 67-year-old former chief compliance officer before U.S. District Judge Laura Taylor Swain in Manhattan. Two investors among 40 who wrote victim impact statements for the court expressed the same disbelief and a prosecutor was skeptical as well. Investor Michael T. De Vita, 62, said he believed “it to be physically impos-sible for a single person to carry out such a gargan-tuan task all by himself.” “Four years later, Peter still has chosen to take no action and turn a blind eye, leaving us the true victims,” said Amy Luria Nissenbaum, 49, whose home is in foreclosure as wave after wave of crip-pling financial news con-tinues to hit her family. She choked back tears as she described her strug-gle to “clothe and feed my children” since Bernard Madoff four years ago revealed the Ponzi scheme that wiped out her family’s life savings. When Swain announced that Peter Madoff will not have to report to prison until Feb. 6, Nissenbaum laughed out loud bitterly. The delay will let Peter Madoff attend his grand-daughter’s Bat Mitzvah on Jan. 19. The judge noted that 10 years was the maximum sentence allowed by the charges to which Madoff had pled and repeatedly urged Madoff to relieve the pain of investors by revealing more about the Madoff business. “I challenge you to be honest about all that you have done and all that you have seen. In other words, all that you know,” she said to Madoff, who wore a well-tailored char-coal suit. The judge said Peter Madoff was “frankly not believable” when he claimed he only learned of the fraud when his brother revealed it just before his arrest. Peter Madoff had agreed when he pleaded guilty in June to conspiracy and falsifying the books and records of an investment adviser that he would not challenge a 10-year sen-tence. He follows to prison his 74-year-old brother, who is serving a 150-year sentence. Peter Madoff spoke only briefly, saying: “I am deeply ashamed of my conduct and have tried to atone by pleading guilty and have agreed to for-feit all of my present and future assets.” He added: “I am profoundly sorry that my fail-ures let many people down, including my loved ones.” Assistant U.S. Attorney Lisa Baroni said it would have been easy for Peter Madoff to blow the whistle on the fraud. Instead, she said, he even conspired with his brother to dis-tribute the remaining $300 million in the company’s accounts to family, friends and favored clients before the FBI put an end to the plan by arresting his brother. The sentencing comes four years and a week after Bernard Madoff first revealed the fraud, which occurred as the former NASDAQ chairman built a reputation for delivering unparalleled investment results, even in bad times. The revelation came only days after the business sent out statements that made investors think their investments had grown to a total of more than $65 billion. Peter Madoff said at his plea that he had no idea his brother was running a massive Ponzi scheme, paying off longtime inves-tors at times with money from newer investors. “My family was torn apart as a result of my brother’s atrocious conduct,” he said. “I was reviled by strang-ers as well as friends who assumed that I knew about the Ponzi scheme.” Peter Madoff, who joined his brother’s firm after graduating from Fordham Law School in 1970, has been free on $5 million bail after agreeing to surrender all of his assets. Prior to sentencing, his lawyer, John Wing, said in a memorandum that Peter Madoff will “almost cer-tainly live out his remain-ing days as a jobless pari-ah, in or out of prison.” He called him a victim of his loyalty to his brother, saying he had been mis-treated by the sibling who was eight years older and was viewed as “the prince” by his mother. As part of a forfeiture agreement, Madoff’s wife, Marion, and daughter Shana must forfeit near-ly all of their assets. The government said those assets and assets that will be forfeited by other family members include several homes, a Ferrari and more than $10 million in cash and securities. It said his wife will be left with $771,733. Besides the Madoff brothers, no other family members have been arrested. Though Peter Madoff had been the firm’s chief compliance officer for nearly four decades, the government marked his start in the conspiracy as 1996, when he creat-ed false and misleading compliance documents and false reports for the Securities and Exchange Commission. Since the fraud was revealed, a court-appointed trustee has reached agree-ments to recover approxi-mately $9.3 billion and is hoping to recover another $3 billion over the next 18 months. About $3 billion has been approved for redistribu-tion to victims through an ongoing claims process. Besides his brother, Peter Madoff is among six who have pleaded guilty, including the for-mer finance chief, a payroll manager, an accountant, a comptroller and a securi-ties trader. ASSOCIATED PRESSPeter Madoff was sen-tenced to 10 years in prison for participating in the $20 billion Ponzi scheme run by his brother, Bernard Madoff. IMF warns French economy vulnerable Associated PressPARIS — The International Monetary Fund warned Friday that the French economy, the eurozone’s second-largest, is vulnerable to a downturn because of its shrinking share of the export market and ossified labor market and urged the government to do more, faster to stay competitive and keep its finances under control. A day after the French parliament passed a new budget that included a 75 percent tax on those earn-ing more than 1 million ($1.32 million), the IMF’s executive board praised the country’s efforts to fix its economic problems. But the statement suggested that France’s projections of its 2013 budget deficit were too rosy and warned that the country’s companies remained at a severe dis-advantage to those in other European countries, espe-cially for investment and innovation. The statement blamed the problem in large part on labor costs, which con-tribute to low profit margins that discourage investment. It projected unemployment would continue to rise slight-ly to 10.6 percent in 2013, and economic growth would remain below 1 percent.



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2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04242DLIFE Stop by the Lake City Reporter for your complimentary engagement package. Aisle Style Complimentary Engagement Package • Sweetwater Branch Inn 800-595-7760• Wards Jewelry & Gifts 752-5470• Camp Weed Cerveny Conference Center 386-364-5250• GeGee’s Studio 758-2088• Holiday Inn 754-1411, ext. 106 By SUE MANNINGAssociated PressLOS ANGELES — The most prized holiday guests are those that eat with gusto, express their appre-ciation and lick their plates clean. So what if some of them eat off the floor, get a little sloppy and never help with the dishes? At Nancy Guberti’s house, Flower, a 6-year-old black-and-white shih tzu, will eat the same organ-ic turkey and spinach as Guberti’s own sons. “She’s part of the family and she’s such a good dog,” Guberti said. “We treat her with the utmost respect, like you’d want to be treated.” Guberti, a certified nutritionist in New York City, makes a special din-ner for the whole family to share five times a year — Christmas, New Year’s, Easter, Thanksgiving and Flower’s June 10 birthday. Plenty of people cook for their dogs year-round, but the holidays might be the easiest time because human menus can be so easily adapted to their needs, said Sarah Zorn, a New York pet columnist for the magazine Everyday with Rachael Ray. She also creates and tests most of the pet recipes the magazine runs. “Do unto your dog as you are doing to yourself,” she said. Ingredients that are good for humans are very often good for dogs, too, she said. Dogs have millions of taste buds, said Dr. Katy Nelson. But the veterinar-ian said those taste buds are not really well defined — and neither is the dog’s sense of smell. “My dog thinks the garbage can smells good, so it’s all subjective,” Zorn said. Nelson, who hosts “The Pet Show” on Saturdays on News Channel 8 in Washington, D.C., had guests who made turkey cakes she plans to make for Papi, her 70-pound Labradoodle, on Christmas morning. They look like crabcakes, with brown rice, vegetables and shredded turkey. You mix that with an egg, make patties and sear them in a pan,” she said. How would you fix a traditional holiday dinner of appetizers, turkey, mashed potatoes and gravy, can-died sweet potatoes, green bean casserole, cranberry sauce, biscuits and dessert to serve dogs and humans? No matter how spicy the human food is, the dog’s has to be bland and low-fat. “Before dinner, they can graze like everybody else, have a couple of carrot sticks and cheese cubes,” Zorn said. When it comes to preparing the turkey, go salt-less, she said. Eliminate onions and garlic, white flour, refined sugars and processed foods. That doesn’t mean you can’t put anything in the dog’s meal. “There are actually a lot of herbs that are good for dogs. Parsley is good for them — it’s a natural breath freshener. Ginger is good for diges-tion and turmeric is good. It’s hard to make biscuits without flour, Zorn said. “But try to use whole wheat, barley, rice, flax or amaranth because they should really have a low-gluten diet.” For side dishes, make the green beans with chicken stock or sauteed mushroom soup. Before you candy the sweet potatoes, take one out for the dog and steam it with a little cinnamon and ginger. White potatoes are OK, too, although not as healthy as sweet potatoes. A little cranberry sauce is good for a dog. Instead of gravy, use turkey juice or stock, Zorn said. For dessert, Zorn recommends gingerbread bis-cuits. Dogs also love peanut butter cookies with yogurt frosting, she said. Zorn tries out many of her creations on her own dog Rowdy, a hound mix. “He is the first rung of the testing process. He’s my child to be sure — obsessed with food. If this dog doesn’t eat it, the recipe needs to be scrapped,” she said. All of the dog’s food can go in one bowl, Zorn said. Every other day of the year, Rowdy gets 1 1/2 cups of food twice a day, so he’ll get the same on Christmas Day. “We are talking about making this special, but he’s not going to gain 10 pounds.” Zorn drew up a quick nice-naughty dog food list. Bad: Chocolate, coffee, alcohol, raisins and grapes, onions and garlic, milk, avo-cado, macadamia nuts and yeast. Cabbage, broccoli and cauliflower can cause gas but are OK in small doses. Tomatoes, eggplant and peppers aren’t danger-ous but add nothing posi-tive to a dog’s diet. Good: Lean meats, fish, tuna, olive oil, eggs, egg shells, yogurt, carrots, green beans, peas, sweet potatoes and pumpkin. Finally, Zorn said Santa’s reindeer would probably turn up their noses at Santa’s cookies and milk. But they would welcome a bowl of berries, acorns, a carrot, a little hay or alfalfa pellets, along with a bowl of water. Family dog is on guest list for holiday dinner ASSOCIATED PRESSNew York pet columnist for the magazine “Everyday with R achael Ray,” Sarah Zorn and her dog Rowdy admire oven-fresh gingerbread holiday dog biscuits in her home in Brooklyn, N.Y. The holidays might be the easiest time of the year to cook for dogs because human menus can be so easily adapted to their needs, said Zorn. Your Christmas feast can be one for your pet, too. By KIM COOKFor The Associated PressIt’s that time of year when texture, character and warmth define the most successful decor. The perfect time for felt. This season has seen a variety of creative, deco-rative felt items for table and tree. You’ll find it sewn, lasercut, appliqued or oth-erwise manipulated to cre-ate eye-catching fashion accessories, charming toys and sculptures, and chic items for the home. Or you can try your hand at felt-making and crafting yourself. In Portland, Ore., designer Alison Comfort offers a woodsy wonderland of little felt pumpkins, acorns, mushrooms, nests and for-est animals — small sculp-tures that might add charm to a holiday table — at her Etsy.com shop, www.etsy.com/shop/houseofmoss. “There’s something so dear and precious about starting with a natural material in its raw state, using a simple tool and my own hands, and transform-ing it,” she says. There are guides online for making felt candy canes, but if you aren’t crafty and still love the look, consider Land of Nod’s delicious-looking versions; here too, round ornaments in felt stripes or gathered layers. All would look cute on a kids’ tree. www.landofnod.com At Crate & Barrel, lasercut felt placemats with sea-sonal motifs, felt ball gar-lands, and a collection of tree ornaments including gingerbread men, Swedish style birds and owls add homespun charm. A felt pillow with appliqued par-tridge in a pear tree might make a welcome hostess gift. www.crateandbarrel.com. The nature of felt — soft, pliable and able to take on a variety of colors — makes it terrific for crafting, not only for designers but for creative amateurs. “Felt is one of my favorite materials. It’s an extremely easy material to work with because, unlike most fab-rics, it’s non-woven, so it won’t unravel and doesn’t require hemming,” says Jodi Levine, designer-at-large for Martha Stewart Living. April Tatom of Louisville, Ky., sells felting supplies on her website, www. feltorama.com. When she decided to try her hand at appliqued clothing for children and experiment-ed with various fabrics, “I found that nothing matched the lush texture of felt. It just beckons to be touched and adds a cozy dimension to any project. There’s no ‘right’ or ‘wrong’ side to it. Felt toys are wonderfully tactile for little fingers and visually stimulating for kids of all ages.” For her own kids, Tatom recently completed a felt “picnic” set complete with a lunchmeat-, cheeseand lettuce-filled baguette, and a cookie for dessert. She also recreated one of her son’s favorite book characters, Lowly Worm, from Richard Scarry’s “Busytown.” Felt products add texture, warmth, fun to winter daysEye-catching fashions, toys, among designs. Associated PressHere is a simple recipe for gingerbread biscuits that should make you a hit with your dogs during the holidays. Recipe makes 24 gingerbread biscuits. Start to finish: 30 minutesIngredients3 cups whole-wheat flour 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger 1 teaspoon cinnamon1/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon vegetable oil 1/2 cup molasses1/2 cup waterInstructionsHeat the oven to 325 F. Coat a baking sheet with cooking spray or oil. In a large bowl, sift together the flour, ginger and cinnamon. Mix in the oil, molasses and water, then let rest for 15 min-utes. On a lightly floured surface, roll out the dough until 1/4 inch thick. Using holiday-themed or bone-shaped cookie cutters, cut out cookies, rerolling the dough scraps and cut-ting out more as able. Transfer to the prepared baking sheet, then bake until firm, about 20 min-utes. Cool on the baking sheet, then store in an airtight container. Every pet is different, so please check with your vet to see if this recipe is suitable for your dog. (Recipe from Every Day with Rachael Ray maga-zine.) Gingerbread dog biscuits Pets Traditional holiday treatFather Cyprian Harrison (left) and Brother Thomas Imhoff decorate fruitcakes at Assumption Abbey, in Ava, Mo. The Trappist monks spend most of the year mak-ing more than 20,000 fruit-cakes, 125 at a time, and selling the majority of them around the holiday season as a way to support their way of life.ASSOCIATED PRESS Home Decor ASSOCIATED PRESS Acorns (top) and miniature pumpkins (above) made of wo od felt by House of Moss are examples of the eco-friendly designs that can add warmth and texture to a winter decor.



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By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com Christmas dreams became a reality for more than 800 children locally and three families who recently lost their homes and possessions to fire, thanks to the Christmas Dream Machine. The Christmas Dream Machine provides toys and clothes to disadvantaged children and their families who meet the organiza tions financial criteria. Thursday and Friday evening and Saturday afternoon volunteers with the Christmas Dream Machine distributed hun dreds of bags containing toys, clothes and other items requested by disad vantaged children. Hundreds of Belks bags were lined up in five rows in a storefront inside the Lake City Mall and fami lies brought in the paper work to claim their bags of Christmas joy. The Christmas Dream Machine has been provid ing toys, clothing and other items to disadvantaged area families for 24 years. Meally Jenkins, Christmas Dream Machine director and founder, said this year the Christmas Dream Machine provided items for 801 children. Jenkins, along with approx imately 18 volunteers and donations from the com munity, provided gifts and other items to disadvan taged area children. Jenkins said an anony mous sponsors donation and a $10,000 donation from Potash Corp. White Spring ensured that all chil dren who qualified for the service and three families that lost their homes to fire would receive gifts. The majority of money that was donated at the very end went to towards the three burned-out fami lies that we were working with, she said. Those families had no insurance. Were helping those that are less fortunate who dont have the money to pay the insurance. Jenkins said the families were given sheets, towels, blankets, clothes, personal hygiene items and even Christmas gifts. We held off on any big Christmas gift items because two of families are still in motels and the other one has just moved into another rental property, she said. Jenkins said people who were served this year by the Christmas Dream Machine have been extremely appreciative. She also con tributions have come from several people in the com munity. Everybody has contrib uted and to us as long as youre giving from your heart, a dollar means as much a $10,000 check that we received, she said. Every dollar, no matter how little or how big; its the giving that counts the most with us. If you give, youre giving for the right reason. Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012 3A 3A SPECIALIZING IN: Non-Invasive Laparoscopic Gynecological Surgery Adolescent Gynecology High and Low Risk Obstetrics Contraception Delivering at Shands Lake Shore In-Ofce ultrasounds for our patients 3D/4D Entertainment Scans offering DaVinci Robotic Surgeries. New Patients Welcome Call today for a personal appointment: 386-755-0500 449 SE Baya Drive Lake City, Floraida 32025 www.dainagreenemd.com WE ARE WOMEN, WE ARE M OTHERS, WE UNDERST A ND Outstanding Leader of Inpatient Therapy Our therapy program is designed to rehabilitate individuals back to their highest level of independence and functioning. Our therapists and nurses work closely with the physician and resident in order to create a plan of treatment that will combine comprehensive care with the patients personal goals. Take a step towards your independence. Individualized Physical Occupational & Joint Replacement (Knee, Hip. etc) Stroke Cardiac Disease Fractures (Hip, Shoulder, Pelvic, etc) Arthritis Neck/Back Pain Balance Disturbances Dif culties Walking Generalized Weakness Impaired Abilities to Perform Activities (Bathing, Ambulating, Dressing, Eating and Transferring) Wound Care OUR SPECIALTIES INCLUDE: 560 SW McFarlane Ave. Lake City, FL 32025 386-758-4777 Call to pre-register or for a tour. Lordy, Lordy Tammy is We love you, Dad & Charlotte, & family TEEN: Extinguishes fire at neighbors apartment Continued From Page 1A Dream Machine distributes gifts to 800 TONY BRITT/ Lake City Reporter Chad Brown (left) and Kelly Ahrens, Christmas Dream Machine volunteers, search through hundreds of bags of toys Friday evening as Christmas Dream Machine gifts are distributed. Photos by DEREK GILLIAM /Lake City Reporter LEFT: Keith Williams (left) poses with Columbia County Fire Rescue Shift Commander Arness Thomas. Williams put out a fire in his neighbors apartment with a fire extinguisher. RIGHT: Beyonce Carter (left front) and Mariah Jernigan pose with firefighters Steve Bedenbaugh (left rear) and Jeff Ballance. The firefighters bought the family a new microwave after theirs caught fire. extinguisher), pulled the pin, pointed and sprayed, he said. While Williamss actions saved the apartment from suffering worse damage, Thomas said he wouldnt tell other people to do the same thing. I wouldnt recommend that anyone do what he did because its dangerous, he said. Call 911 first. Thomas said that the fire could have spread to the bed, and it would have escalated from there. Columbia County Fire Rescue recognized Williams, along with anoth er local teen and her 9-yearold sister, for their quick reaction to fires this week. On Thursday, 9-year-old Beyonce Carter was mak ing popcorn for herself and other children in a home off NW Lake Jeffery Road when the fan in the back of the microwave sparked. She told her sister Mariah Jernigan, 19, that the microwave had caught fire. Jernigan called 911 while Carter rounded up the other kids and took them outside. I told (dispatch) that I need some fire people here because the microwave was going to catch the house on fire. Jernigan was frustrated and hung up the phone. She called her mom, Norma Foster, and she told her to unplug the microwave and take it outside which is what the 911 dispatcher had told her to do. When they shut the door to the microwave, the fire went out. As they were taking the melted micro wave down the steps of the house, firefighters were walking up. Im glad this house didnt burn down, and nobody was hurt, Carter said. Firefighters Steve Bedenbaugh and Jeff Ballance were first on the scene. They said they want ed to help out, and decided to buy the family a early Christmas present, a new microwave. Fire Chief David Booser said that with cold weather coming the next few days, people should be aware of proper ways to heat homes. He said dont use the oven as a way to heat a home, and dont leave a space heater on when sleeping. Also, keep space heaters away from drapes and furniture. He said after every fire, Fire Rescue personnel check to see if the smoke detector works. He said it surprises him how often the batteries have been taken out. He said the teenagers made quick decisions and helped prevent loss of prop erty and life. Thats whats awesome. Theyre young people and doing the real deal, he said. Williams, Jernigan and Carter all received framed certificates of appreciation from CCFR. GRADES: Columbia High still a B Continued From 1A certain categories in the grading system were weighted. There are certainly areas we have to work on, theres no question, Huddleston said. He said that Fort White can use some work on their math scores. Its very frustrating to develop a plan when the rules change every year, he said. Grades for other Columbia County pub lic schools, except for Lake City Middle School, were released in July. Due to a computational error at FDOE, that grade was not released at that time. Lake City Middle dropped from an A school to a B school. Nearly half of the high schools in Florida received an A grade for the 2011-12 school year.



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Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012 3B3BSPORTS County hoops clash JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Michael Mulberry (4) drives around a pair of Columbia High defenders to make a lay-up in th e Indians’ 74-53 home win on Monday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Kelvin Jonas (20) goes up for a shot while playing against Fort White High on Monday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Brendon Myers (20) guards Columbia H igh’s Kelvin Jonas (20) as he goes up for a shot. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Melton Sanders (22) takes a shot while being guarded by Columbia High’s Dillan Hall (10) during the game on Monday. LEFT: Columbia High’s DaKarry Rossin (25) is defended by Fort White High’s Chris Cottrell (15) in the matchup between the two county teams in Fort White on Monday.RIGHT: Columbia High’s Javonta Foster (5) brings the ball down the court in Monday’s game against Fort White High. Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER Lake City Reporter



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By CANDICE CHOIAP Business WritersNEW YORK — After new ad campaigns touting the quality of its food failed to spark sales, the parent company of Olive Garden and Red Lobster is retool-ing its strategy to attract diners with more promo-tional deals. The shift comes after Darden Restaurants Inc. earlier this fall moved to update the image of its flag-ship chains and appeal to younger diners in their 20s and 30s, who increasingly prize fresh, high-quality ingredients. The problem is that many of those same diners also want cheaper prices and convenience, reflecting the rise of chains such as Chipotle Mexican Grill Inc. and Panera Bread Co., which offer food that’s a step up from traditional fast-food for slightly higher prices. In addition to those shifting tastes, Darden and other casual dining chains such as Applebee’s are dealing with customers who are being more care-ful about where and how often they eat out in the weak economy. In a conference call with analysts Thursday, the company also stressed that none of its full-time employ-ees would be put on part-time status as a way to limit costs tied to new health care regulations. Darden noted a publicity backlash over its tests to use more part-timers hurt sales in the latest quarter. To address the “affordability many guests need right now,” Darden plans to dial back on its efforts to build revamp the image of its chains for now and increase the frequency of promotions that under-score value, said Drew Madsen, the company’s chief operating officer. He declined to specify the exact nature of the revamped strategy, however, noting that the ele-ment of surprise is critical in a “highly competitive” industry that is once again expected to see only mod-est growth in the year ahead. He also noted that Darden had been “pre-empted” by competitors in the past by revealing its hand too early. The remarks came in a conference call with ana-lysts to discuss Darden’s fis-cal second-quarter results, which showed a 37 percent drop in net income. For the three months ended Nov. 25, the company said it earned $33.6 million, or 26 cents per share. That’s compared with $53.7 mil-lion, or 40 cents per share, a year ago. Analysts predicted slightly higher earnings of 27 cents per share, accord-ing to FactSet. Earlier this month, the company had warned that revenue would fall 2.7 per-cent at U.S. restaurants open at least a year for its three biggest chains; it fell 3.2 percent at Olive Garden, 2.7 percent at Red Lobster and 0.8 percent at LongHorn Steakhouse during the quarter. LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF DECEMBER 23, 2012 3C Big Pharma cashes in on HGH abuseBy DAVID B. CARUSOAssociated PressA federal crackdown on illicit foreign supplies of human growth hormone has failed to stop rampant misuse, and instead has driven record sales of the drug by some of the world’s biggest pharmaceutical companies, an Associated Press investigation shows. The crackdown, which began in 2006, reduced the illegal flow of unregulated supplies from China, India and Mexico. But since then, Big Pharma has been satisfy-ing the steady desires of U.S. users and abusers, including many who take the drug in the false hope of delaying the effects of aging. From 2005 to 2011, inflation-adjusted sales of HGH were up 69 percent, according to an AP analy-sis of pharmaceutical com-pany data collected by the research firm IMS Health. Sales of the average pre-scription drug rose just 12 percent in that same peri-od.Unlike other prescrip-tion drugs, HGH may be prescribed only for specific uses. U.S. sales are lim-ited by law to treat a rare growth defect in children and a handful of uncommon conditions like short bowel syndrome or Prader-Willi syndrome, a congenital dis-ease that causes reduced muscle tone and a lack of hormones in sex glands. The AP analysis, supplemented by interviews with experts, shows too many sales and too many pre-scriptions for the number of people known to be suf-fering from those ailments. At least half of last year’s sales likely went to patients not legally allowed to get the drug. And U.S. phar-macies processed nearly double the expected num-ber of prescriptions. Peddled as an elixir of life capable of turning middle-aged bodies into lean machines, HGH — a synthesized form of the growth hormone made nat-urally by the human pitu-itary gland — winds up in the eager hands of affluent, aging users who hope to slow or even reverse the aging process. Experts say these folks don’t need the drug, and may be harmed by it. The supposed fountain-of-youth medicine can cause enlarge-ment of breast tissue, car-pal tunnel syndrome and swelling of hands and feet. Ironically, it also can con-tribute to aging ailments like heart disease and Type 2 diabetes. Others in the medical establishment also are tak-ing a fat piece of the profits — doctors who fudge pre-scriptions, as well as phar-macists and distributors who are content to look the other way. HGH also is sold directly without prescrip-tions, as new-age snake oil, to patients at anti-aging clinics that operate more like automated drug mills. Years of raids, sports scandals and media atten-tion haven’t stopped major drugmakers from selling a whopping $1.4 billion worth of HGH in the U.S. last year. That’s more than industry-wide annual gross sales for penicillin or pre-scription allergy medicine. Anti-aging HGH regimens vary greatly, with a yearly cost typically ranging from $6,000 to $12,000 for three to six self-injections per week. Across the U.S., the medication is often dis-pensed through prescrip-tions based on improper diagnoses, carefully crafted to exploit wiggle room in the law restricting use of HGH, the AP found. HGH is often promoted on the Internet with the same kind of before-and-after photos found in mir-acle diet ads, along with wildly hyped claims of rapid muscle growth, loss of fat, greater vigor, and other exaggerated benefits to adults far beyond their physical prime. Sales also are driven by the personal endorsement of celebrities such as actress Suzanne Somers. Pharmacies that once risked prosecution for using unauthorized, foreign HGH — improperly labeled as raw pharmaceutical ingredients and smuggled across the border — now simply dis-pense name brands, often for the same banned uses. And usually with impunity. Eight companies have been granted permis-sion to market HGH by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, which reviews the benefits and risks of new drug products. By contrast, three compa-nies are approved for the diabetes drug insulin. The No. 1 maker, Roche subsidiary Genentech, had nearly $400 million in HGH sales in the U.S. last year, up an inflation-adjusted two-thirds from 2005. Pfizer and Eli Lilly were second and third with $300 million and $220 million in sales, respectively, according to IMS Health. Pfizer now gets more revenue from its HGH brand, Genotropin, than from Zoloft, its well-known depression medicine that lost patent protection. On their face, the numbers make no sense to the recognized hormone doc-tors known as endocrinolo-gists who provide legitimate HGH treatment to a small number of patients. Endocrinologists estimate there are fewer than 45,000 U.S. patients who might legitimately take HGH. They would be expected to use roughly 180,000 prescriptions or refills each year, given that typical patients get three months’ worth of HGH at a time, according to doctors and distributors. Yet U.S. pharmacies last year supplied almost twice that much HGH — 340,000 orders — according to AP’s analysis of IMS Health data. While doctors say more than 90 percent of legiti-mate patients are children with stunted growth, 40 percent of 442 U.S. side-effect cases tied to HGH over the last year involved people age 18 or older, according to an AP analy-sis of FDA data. The aver-age adult’s age in those cases was 53, far beyond the prime age for sports. The oldest patients were in their 80s. Some of these medical records even give explic-it hints of use to combat aging, justifying treatment with reasons like fatigue, bone thinning and “off-label,” which means treat-ment of an unapproved condition Even Medicare, the government health program for older Americans, allowed 22,169 HGH prescriptions in 2010, a five-year increase of 78 percent, accord-ing to data released by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in response to an AP public records request. “There’s no question: a lot gets out,” said hormone specialist Dr. Mark Molitch of Northwestern University, who helped write medical standards meant to limit HGH treatment to legiti-mate patients. And those figures don’t include HGH sold directly by doctors without prescrip-tions at scores of anti-aging medical practices and clinics around the country. Those numbers could only be tal-lied by drug makers, who have declined to say how many patients they supply and for what conditions. First marketed in 1985 for children with stunted growth, HGH was soon misappropriated by adults intent on exploiting its mod-est muscleand bone-build-ing qualities. Congress lim-ited HGH distribution to the handful of rare conditions in an extraordinary 1990 law, overriding the gener-ally unrestricted right of doctors to prescribe medi-cines as they see fit. Despite the law, illicit HGH spread around the sports world in the 1990s, making deep inroads into bodybuilding, college ath-letics, and professional leagues from baseball to cycling. The even larger banned market among older adults has flourished more recently. FDA regulations ban the sale of HGH as an anti-aging drug. In fact, since 1990, prescribing it for things like weight loss and strength conditioning has been punishable by 5 to 10 years in prison. Steve Kleppe, of Scottsdale, Ariz., a res-taurant entrepreneur who has taken HGH for almost 15 years to keep feeling young, said he noticed a price jump of about 25 percent after the block on imports. He now buys HGH directly from a doctor at an annual cost of about $8,000 for himself and the same amount for his wife. Many older patients go for HGH treatment to scores of anti-aging prac-tices and clinics heavily concentrated in retirement states like Florida, Nevada, Arizona and California. These sites are affiliated with hundreds of doctors who are rarely endocri-nologists. Instead, many tout certification by the American Board of Anti-Aging and Regenerative Medicine, though the med-ical establishment does not recognize the group’s bona fides. The clinics offer personalized programs of “age management” to business executives, affluent retir-ees, and other patients of means, sometimes coupled with the amenities of a vacation resort. The opera-tions insist there are few, if any, side effects from HGH. Mainstream medical authorities say otherwise. A 2007 review of 31 medical studies showed swell-ing in half of HGH patients, with joint pain or diabe-tes in more than a fifth. A French study of about 7,000 people who took HGH as children found a 30 percent higher risk of death from causes like bone tumors and stroke, stirring a health advisory from U.S. authorities. For proof that the drug works, marketers turn to images like the memorable one of pot-bellied septuage-narian Dr. Jeffry Life, sup-posedly transformed into a ripped hulk of himself by his own program available at the upscale Las Vegas-based Cenegenics Elite Health. (He declined to be interviewed.) These promoters of HGH say there is a connec-tion between the drop-off in growth hormone levels through adulthood and the physical decline that begins in late middle age. Replace the hormone, they say, and the aging process slows. “It’s an easy ruse. People equate hormones with youth,” said Dr. Tom Perls, a leading industry critic who does aging research at Boston University. “It’s a marketing dream come true.” ASSOCIATED PRESSThis image made available by Atria Books shows the cover of Dr. Jeffry Life’s 2011 book “The Life Plan.” Life used testosterone and human growth hormone in his own bodybuilding regimen. NM peanut butter plant could reopen in wake of outbreak Darden seeing customers differently By JERI CLAUSINGAssociated PressALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — A troubled New Mexico peanut butter plant that had its licensed yanked after being linked to a widespread salmo-nella outbreak reached a deal Friday to resume some operations the day after Christmas under the watchful eye of federal regulators. A consent decree filed in federal court says Sunland Inc., the nation’s largest organic peanut butter pro-ducer, can reopen if it hires an independent expert to develop a sanitation plan, which then must be approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Conditions at the plant prompted the FDA in November to for the first time use new authority to revoke the company’s operating certificate with-out a court hearing. The action came after the plant was linked to a salmonella outbreak that sickened 42 people in 20 states this fall. Friday’s filing reinstates Sunland’s food facility reg-istration. But the company cannot process or distribute food from its peanut butter or peanut mill plants in Portales until it has complied with the consent decree’s requirements and receives written authoriza-tion from the FDA. “This consent decree prohibits Sunland from selling processed foods to consumers until it fully complies with the law,” Stuart F. Delery, prin-cipal deputy assistant attorney general for the Justice Department’s Civil Division said in a state-ment. “As this case dem-onstrates, the Department of Justice and FDA will work together to protect the health and safety of Americans by making sure that those who produce and sell the food we eat follow the law.” Sunland said the agreement came after it “pro-vided additional informa-tion to FDA to demon-strate that recommended actions have been taken and required corrective actions are being imple-mented.” Sunland spokeswoman Katalin Coburn said that after the decree was filed, the FDA gave the plant permission to reopen its peanut processing facility. ASSOCIATED PRESSAfter ad campaigns touting the quality of its food failed to spark sales, Darden Restaurants, the parent company of Olive Garden and Red Lobster, is retooling its strategy to attract diners with more promotional deals.



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Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012 3D3DLIFE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILEHomeless men waiting to receive hygiene kits in Santa A na, Calif. Even advocates for the homeless say they are confli cted at times about when and how they decide to help peopl e they encounter on the street.Party favors with flairBy KIM COOKFor The Associated PressA New Year’s bash is one of the easier parties to throw. Everyone’s already in the merry-making mood, so it’s a simple mat-ter of setting the stage. You can do that with decor, food, beverages and music, but it’s also nice to offer a party favor that guests can take home as a token of a special evening. For a clever collection of party favors that can be customized, look to creative gift maven Judy Walker of Seattle, at the website TopsMalibu.com. A sparkler in the shape of numbers and letters makes a fun way to toast that doesn’t involve drinks; simply touch your sparkler to the one next to you. If you’d like to get silly, buy some Poof Balls ‚ pack-ets of tubes and colorful paper balls like old fash-ioned peashooters. Walker’s “Surprize Balls” recall a hot item in the 1950s created by New Orleans native Charles Gregor with the tag line, “The Toy You Destroy to Enjoy.” Walker’s hand-made version consists of crepe paper-wrapped balls that you unravel to reveal a variety of little trinkets and treasures. They were a hit with retailers at this fall’s New York International Gift Fair. For New Year’s, she fills the balls with vintage-style toys, keepsakes, charms, gems, candy, bubbles, con-fetti poppers, fortunes and quotes. She’ll make custom ones with individualized notes or prizes. Buy them already decorated, or plain to embellish yourself. Shiny red poppers filled with confetti would be a fun midnight favor for guests, and Walker has little wish capsule necklaces too for record-ing resolutions. (Deluxe Surprize Balls, $16.50; set of six undecorated balls, $59; four sparklers, $16.50; six Poof Balls, $15; wish capsules, $9.50, www.tops-malibu.com) Brit Moran of San Francisco, who runs her own monthly subscription-based craft store, is offer-ing a festive LED balloon kit that includes mini LED lights, glitter, air pump, bal-loons and ribbon to make decorations or favors that glow and sparkle. ($24.99, www.brit.co) Small yet thoughtful favors can be found at the online wedding and party supplier www.beau-coup.com. Chic silver snowflake wine stoppers, jeweled snowflake votive holders and miniature, cinnamon-scented pinecone candles would all make pretty takeaways. (Wine stop-pers, $2.30 and up; votive holders, $2.42 and up; pine cones, $7.24 and up) A homemade takehome favor is always appreciated. HGTV.com has instructions for put-ting together interesting ones like custom-mixed loose tea, colorful candies packed in cork-topped vials, and mini bottles of custom-flavored liquors such as ginger anise vodka and vanilla cin-namon bourbon. Music lovers could create USB thumb-drive mixes, per-haps with the evening’s party playlist. (www.hgtv.com/entertaining ) Monica Pedersen, a designer, HGTV host and author of “Make it Beautiful: Designs and Ideas for Entertaining at Home” (Agate Midway, 2012), has a favorite fra-granced candle she likes to give. “Pretty, scented votives wrapped like a firecracker are always easy favors. Kai brand’s my favorite, and definitely soothing for New Year’s Day,” she says. Kai’s Twilight candles are a heady blend of exotic white florals. (box of four, $48, www.lifetherapy.com). Finally, as revelers head out the door, Pedersen suggests setting out an attractive cooler filled with iced bottles of coco-nut water. “Encourage your guests to take one for the road,” she says. Offering some post-festivity hydration may be the best favor of all.To give on the street: personal motives matterBy JOCELYN NOVECKAP National WriterDuring her two decades living in Houston, Caroline Oliver, like any urban dwell-er, frequently encountered people in the streets asking for money. She struggled with how to respond. She wanted to help, but in a useful way. And so when Oliver, a consultant and mother of two who recently moved to Austin, read about the New York police officer who was photographed giving a new pair of all-weather boots to a barefoot man on a cold street, she was moved. “He saw a need and he provided for that need,” she says. “He couldn’t just walk away.” And when the story, which went viral thanks to a photograph snapped by a tourist, turned out to be more complicated, as they often do, Oliver admired the officer’s gesture just as much. Sure, the man may not have actually been homeless as many had first presumed. And yes, he turned up on the streets soon after, shoe-less again, telling The New York Times he’d hidden the boots because they were “worth a lot of money.” But still, the officer, Lawrence DePrimo, “saw a need and fulfilled it,” Oliver says. “Even though from his experience, he probably knew it might not neces-sarily work out the way he hoped.” One might think that advocates for the homeless and the poor would say the complicated shoeless-man saga shows precisely why people should give money to organizations, and not randomly on the streets. But two prominent advo-cates for the homeless, interviewed for this article, felt that giving on the street is a highly personal and sometimes deeply reward-ing act — something they occasionally do themselves, and would never discour-age others from doing. “I probably am as conflicted as anyone about giv-ing people money on the streets, and I’ve been doing this for 32 years,” says Neil Donovan, a longtime advo-cate for the homeless and now executive director of the National Coalition for the Homeless. “I give as often as I don’t give, and it’s not connected to my finan-cial state at the time.” Donovan applauds the NYPD officer, regardless of the complications. “What motivates a person is impor-tant,” he says. “What we find out later is less impor-tant. And I think we can nod to the fact that if someone’s sitting without shoes on the street at night, something has gone wrong.” A snowflake votive candle (above) and mini cinnamonscented pine cone candles (right) — both by Beau-coup. com — area thoughtful, attractive and useful items to give as a party favors for a holiday celebration. HOLIDAY ENTERTAINING ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS Give your guests something nice as a memory. Dancing cop a Rhode Island landmarkBy RODRIQUE NGOWIAssociated PressPROVIDENCE, R.I. — Ah, Christmas in Rhode Island. Exquisitely decorat-ed mansions in Newport. A red nose on the giant termite that sits atop a Providence exterminator’s building. And a traffic cop, doing disco and salsa moves in the middle of rush-hour traffic. Officer Tony Lepore is as much a holiday tradi-tion as anything else in the state that issued the first jail sentence for speeding 108 years ago. Since 1984, he has entertained drivers, pedestrians and gawkers with dance moves in down-town Providence — all while directing traffic. “He is a Rhode Island landmark, more or less. He’s an icon, he’s like a little mini celebrity,” says Michelle Peterson, of Warwick. She’s an emer-gency medical technician and the mother of three boys who was introduced to the “dancing cop” years ago by her partner in their ambulance. This year, she took her boys to see Lepore, 65, per-form and got him to pose for pictures with them. “It feels good to see him out here; it definitely brings the holiday spirit. I think people come out here just to see him and I think it brings some people to shop so they can see him.” The routine, Lepore says, was born in the month of May of the boredom and aggravation that officers typically experience while directing rushing drivers and jaywalking pedestrians. He was inspired by classic “Candid Camera” television footage he saw a day earlier that showed police officers elsewhere directing traffic with flair. “I didn’t know if my bosses were going to like it, so a lot of times if I saw a boss come down, I’d be doing my fancy stuff, then I’d go back and do it the old-fash-ioned way so I don’t get caught,” Lepore says. His secret didn’t last long. City residents began calling the police station and raving about Lepore’s moves. A few days later, The Providence Journal, the state’s largest newspa-per, came out with a story on the sensation. The positive publicity encouraged officials to endorse the dancing cop, who continued to perform until he left the job in 1988, when he went into business with his brother with a food and vending service. In 1992, Lepore says, he got a call from city officials asking him to rejoin the force to dance and direct traffic around Christmastime as they pushed to redefine the city’s image and bring visi-tors downtown. He signed a $1,200, 10day contract as a reserve police officer and says he has frozen the value of the contract at the 1992 rate to encourage city officials to recall him every year. Standing in traffic, he adjusts his cap, shakes his hip, raises and twists one leg and spins. In one of the more unusual moves, he bends his knees, leans far back and quickly alter-nates support for his body by keeping one hand on the ground while motion-ing to the traffic with the free hand. In one move, he goes down on his knees in hom-age to John Travolta’s char-acter in “Saturday Night Fever.” ASSOCIATED PRESSFormer police officer Tony Lepore performs one of his famous dance moves while directing traffic at an intersec tion in Providence, R.I. LATE: Shipping snarled Continued From Page 1Dthat,” Feroce said in an interview. Almost all retailers offered more free ship-ping this year. Nine out of 10 retailers planned to offer free holiday ship-ping, according to Shop.org, which is part of trade group The National Retail Federation. And free shipping wasn’t just an incentive for early shoppers. More than 46 percent of the major online retailers emailed their sub-scribers on Monday Dec. 17, a.k.a. free shipping day, with offers to ship gifts free with no minimum purchase. Fewer than 10 percent made that offer last year, according to mar-keting software company Responsys. That spurred shoppers to spend more — online shopping is expected to have risen 17 percent this holiday season to a record $43.4 billion, according to comScore. But with that increase came logistical problems, and not just at small retailers. Karla Neville, 31, who works in national event marketing in New York, was enticed by Gap’s offer of 30 per-cent off everything. She ordered a sweater, belt and tie for her husband from Banana Republic’s website, which is owned by Gap Inc. Gap separated the order into two and sent the sweater and tie by FedEx and the belt by UPS. Neville never received the belt, discovering online that the UPS package had been returned to Gap for reasons unknown. Q Genie Norman and Mary Kay Hollingswoth are Columbia County Residents who love good food and fun. Their column on area restau-rants appears twice monthly. You can contact them at TasteBuddiesLakeCity@gmail.com. and will want to come back for more the next time you are in town. If you don’t have time to come into the restaurant or you live far away (like we do in Lake City) and want a piping hot pie in the com-fort of your own home, you can call ahead and order their “par-baked” pizzas. They travel well up to sev-eral hours and when you get home, just pop in the oven and in no time, you’ve got dinner on the table. Barnaby’s Family Inn is located at 2331 Apalachee Parkway in Tallahassee. They are open Sunday noon to 10 p.m. and Monday through Saturday 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. The phone number is (850) 878-8700. TASTE: Tallahassee’s best Continued From Page 1D



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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR OPINION Sunday, December 23, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A4AEDITTo the Editor:We are not sure where Mr. Sherrill gets his information or why he would consider himself an expert on the Roman Catholic religion or its beliefs regarding Mary. His definition of venerable is only one of many. Let me assist and offer a few other definitions. It also means regard with great respect, revere, honor, esteem, worship. Mr. Sherrill has an extremely high and unwarranted opinion of himself if he thinks he has the authority or right to tell anyone what should be believed or rejected as it applies to the Catholic Church. His comments are offensive and divisive, which has the opposite effect of what we strive to achieve. His opinions are just that and are based on erroneous information. In short, he doesn’t know what he is talking about. To label 1.2 billion Roman Catholics worldwide a cult is amusing at best. He should not be telling anyone how to interpret the Bible with regard to the Catholic religion and is totally off base in saying what the Catholic Church believes. Mr. Sherrill should not have a voice in the Faith and Values section of our newspaper. For him to write such a pompous and critical treatise of Roman Catholics — particularly at Christmas time/Advent when we celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ — is a travesty. He should apologize and retract his statements. We invite him to attend a Catholic church, where he can learn some valu-able lessons about the religion and our interpre-tation of the Bible. Bebe and Art McQuillan Lake City Many thanks to angels of mercy To the Editor:My mother-in-law, who is 84 years young, is a spunky, headstrong indi-vidual that is very slow to relinquish any of her inde-pendence. After a weekend spent in the hospital, to which she insisted there was no reason for her to be there, she rose early Monday morning to assert her independence. After her morning ritual of cof-fee and a honeybun, she decided to venture outside of her home, pushing her walker that she has been using for the past few years, to retrieve the gar-bage cans from the street. Relentlessly she tugged at each of the three cans until her mission was accomplished. When she reached her front porch, apparently she left her walker and walked down to the end of the porch, where she slipped and fell. She said that she tried to get up but was unable to do so. She tried to pull herself up using the back of the porch swing, but it kept moving. To make this story much shorter than it is, she lay waiting for fam-ily or neighbors to come to her rescue but to no avail. By God’s grace, two angels of mercy happened to be riding by and saw her lying there on the porch trying hard to get up. They had passed by then stopped to back up to the front of her house, where they graciuosly and gently picked her up and helped her to her walker. They helped her into the house and waited until she had locked her door before leaving her. My mother-in-law thanked them but said she failed to get their names. My family and I would also like to thank them for the random act of kind-ness that these two gentle-men displayed. After a long weekend of the tragic news coming out of Newtown, Conn., it is refreshing to know that there are people who show loving kindness to their fellow human beings, even ones they do not now. May God richly bless you gentlemen this Christmas season and throughout the New Year. Ronnie Tolar and the Family of Edna Markham Lake City Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com B y now we all know the story of Dawn Hochsprung, Mary Sherlach and the other brave women who died at Sandy Hook Elementary School Dec. 14. Hochsprung, the school’s principal, and Sherlach, the school psychologist, were meeting with a parent when they heard gunfire at 9:30 that morning. They rushed toward the source and met their deaths at the hands of a young man who had just set out on a path that would horrify the world. Twenty small children and four other adults would die that morning – all teachers trying to shield the little ones in their care from a murderous mad-man. In years to come, elementary schools will be named after Hochsprung and the others. It will be a fitting tribute. Each of us in the days since the shooting has likely wondered what we would have done in their place. Thankfully, the odds of any of us ever having to find out are slim to none. Still, you don’t have to give your life to be a hero. That impulse arguably dwells within us all, and can arise under circumstanc-es both great and small. Take the young man on today’s front page who extinguished a fire that could have done great damage and even taken lives. Without concern for his own safety, he entered a smoke-filled room, and carried the day. He is a hero as well, and ought not be lost or ignored in the bright glare of Newtown. The setting and stakes were different, but the impulse every bit the same. We suspect that someone who behaves heroically under relatively modest cir-cumstances would be just as heroic were everything on the line. Thank you, Keith Williams, for reminding us that spark is alive and well in all of us. Everyday heroism OUR OPINION Column about Mary was offensive to Catholics Stolen car, Christmas angelsI t came upon a midnight clear two weeks ago in Jacksonville that my car was stolen. Having your car stolen anytime is a bad deal but when it happens in a big city late on a bitterly cold night leaving you stranded and all alone, it is much worse. When it happens in a dark, unfamiliar area and you don’t have access to a telephone, that just adds to the anger and frustra-tion. I saw no ready answers to my most immediate questions that bleak night. How can I get out of this windy, freezing weather? How can I get back home to Lake City tonight? I saw lots of Christmas decorations at homes all around me but there were no good tidings of great joy that I could find that miserable, cold night. Or so I thought. Then, Lo and Behold, the first of three human angels miraculously entered my life.The first angelI knew this much for sure. If I knocked on anyone’s door that late at night, they would ignore me--or, at best, talk to me through their locked door and tell me to go some-place else for help. Who could blame them? But, no, the first human angel, a retired woman living alone, answered the door, listened to my story, and, miracle of miracles, invited me inside to get out of the cold. She then provided me with a phone and helped me call the police. Then she helped me arrange a rental car so I could drive home. She even made steaming hot coffee for me while I waited, and wouldn’t take the money I offered her for her help. An angel, indeed!The second angelRemember that rental car I mentioned? Well, there was a slight catch to that. The closest place I could rent a car that time of night was at the Jacksonville International Airport, some 45 minutes away. I was about to call a taxi---and I was plenty worried about the cost of such a long ride--when the second angel entered my life. A man living nearby had somehow heard of my predicament, gotten dressed, and offered to drive me, no charge, to the airport. Now I ask you. If you lived in Jacksonville, would you even stop and talk to a total stranger in the late night hours, much less invite him into your car for a dark ride over mostly empty roads through some pretty deso-late areas? Probably not, but this angel did. As we rode, I looked up at the stars on this clear and silent night, and marveled at my good luck. Two angels in one night! Star of Wonder, Star of Night, Star with Royal Beauty Bright! Little did I know there was a third angel just ahead.The third angelAs soon as I was dropped off at the airport, I headed for the rental car agency. It was after 2 a.m. and I was exhausted and sleepy. That’s when I met the third angel, a seem-ingly ordinary man, and we struck up a conversa-tion. I told him about my stolen car and the people who had been so helpful. Then, incredibly, my good luck continued. The man said he was at the airport to pick up a package and would be driving toward Lake City shortly and it wouldn’t be much out of his way to take me home. And so it came to pass that, Westward Leading, Still Proceeding, this third angel guided me safely to the Perfect Light of Lake City and the warmth of home. Was it Guardian Angels or just extraordinarily kind human beings who rescued me that cold, dif-ficult night? You tell me. Either way, it’s nice to think of protective angels and kind people at Christmas time. (Editor’s Note: This column is reprinted from Dec. 26, 1995) Morris WilliamsPhone: (386) 755-8183williams_h2@firn.edu372 W. Duval St.Lake City, FL 32055 Q Morris Williams is a local historian and long-time Columbia County resident.



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4B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-04214BSports MIDDLE SCHOOL ROUNDUP Photo courtesy of Snapshotz ‘n’ More PhotographyMembers of the Lake City Middle School 2012-13 boys so ccer team are (front row, from left) Emmett Mims, Collin Broo me, Josh Lewis, Grey Thompson, Tyler Pierce, Clayton Steinruc k and Cameron Widergren. Middle row (from left) are Jak e Ayers, Joseph Beach, Nick Jerome, Caleb Strickland, De’Andre J ones, Brock Edge, Trent Morrison, Chase Erickson and Lloyd ‘Tate’ Lee. Back row (from left) are coach Brandon Kuykendall, Zachary Smithy, Yoonsun ‘Sam’ Park, Josh Ku rtz, head coach Shayne Edge, Spencer Robinson, Tyson Ellis Hunter Houston and coach Trevor Hickman.Photo courtesy of Snapshotz ‘n’ More PhotographyMembers of the Lake City Middle School 2012-13 girls s occer team are (front row, from left) Ashton Lee and Kyrsten Giebeig. Middle row (from left) are Ashley Nobles, Alexandra Her rera, Jessica Birchard, Emma Sambey, Savannah Amparo, Katelynn Hickman, Lynsey Sutton, Victoria Napolitano and S arryn Davis. Back row (from left) are coach Tracy Lee, S amantha Jackson, Irene Carrillo, Alaina Perry, Rilie Rittman, Carl ie Carswell, Ally Robinson, Kersha Andr and head coa ch Bill Griffin.TIM KIRBY /Lake City ReporterMembers of the Richardson Middle School 2012-13 boys basketball team are (front row, from left) De’von Fleming, Jai’Anthony Holley, Teon Dollard, D’Angelo Perry and K elvin Jonas. Back row (from left) are Tyrese Peterson, Ro nnie Collins, Jeremiah Chatmon, Jamel Jackson, Darrell Roberson and Kenny Steele. Adio Faucher is coach.TIM KIRBY /Lake City ReporterMembers of the Richardson Middle School 2012-13 girls basketball team are (front row, from left) Robbrecia Fulton, Charisha Booker, Naterria Williams, Au’Maria Gibson an d Deona Munnerlyn. Back row (from left) are manager De’Borah Steele, Konstance Washington, Shaniyah Chatmon, Jazzlynn Williams, Maya Clark and coach Moses Parker. Kelli Morrow also is on the team. Proposed football districts released by FHSAAFrom staff reportsFort White High’s football program is moving up in class according to the tentative district realign-ment released by the FHSAA on Friday. Fort White will move out of Class 3A and the dis-trict it shared with Trinity Catholic High the last two years. Trinity Catholic remains in Class 3A. However, Madison County High also is mov-ing to Class 4A and is pro-posed to be in District 2-4A with Fort White. Fernandina Beach High, who Fort White played the last two years, also is in District 2-4A, as is Indians’ regular opponent Taylor County High and West Nassau High. Fort White spent four years from 2005-08 in the same district with Madison County. In 2007 the two teams met in the second round of the playoffs. Columbia High remained in Class 6A and will be in District 3 with Ed White, Englewood, Middleburg, Orange Park, Robert E. Lee and Terry Parker high schools. Classes are based on schools’ student popula-tion in the ninth through 12th grades. For football only, the top two-thirds of all schools are divided as equally as possible among the top four classes. The remaining one-third of the schools are divided among the bottom four classes with special rules for the rural Class 1A Class 4A has 41 schools and four playoffs rounds, while Class 6A has 84 schools and five playoff rounds. The district released Friday are tentative and subject to appeals by member schools. NCAA considering proposals to change recruitingBy MICHAEL MAROTAssociated PressINDIANAPOLIS — The NCAA released a package of proposals Friday that would change the recruit-ing calendar, lift restric-tions on how and how often coaches can contact recruits, and allow athletes to accept more money for participating in nonscholastic events. All the proposals are expected to be voted on Jan. 19 at the NCAA’s annual convention near Dallas. If approved, they could take effect Aug. 1. This is the first detailed glimpse into how the NCAA intends to rewrite its massive rulebook and Jim Barker, chair-man of the NCAA rules committee working on the plan, said the goal is “smarter rules and tough-er enforcement.” If the package is approved, the overall result would provide coaches with more leeway in recruiting. The hope is that athletes will build more meaningful relation-ships with their coaches. One key recommendation would create a uni-form recruiting calendar for all sports and allow coaches to begin contact-ing potential recruits after July 1 of their sophomore year. “The rules group believes that the uniform recruiting date will create significant ease of admin-istration on campus, make the rules more understand-able and allow for better recruiting decisions from both the coach and pro-spective student-athlete,” said Barker, the Clemson president. Those were the goals NCAA President Mark Emmert outlined more than a year ago when he backed the move to shrink the rulebook following a year of major college scan-dals that included stripping a national champion of its title, a Heisman Trophy winner giving back his tro-phy, criminal allegations and the accusation that another Heisman winner’s father was peddling his son’s services. In the wake of so much turmoil, Emmert held a presidential retreat in August 2011 to acknowl-edge that the governing body needed to focus more on enforcing the rules that go to heart of college sports — fair play, ethical behavior and tough penalties. That’s one reason another proposal would allow coaches to reach out to players through any com-munication mode with no limitation on the number of contacts. Other proposals would allow: Q Athletes to accept up to $300 per year beyond their own expenses to attend non-scholastic events, receive expenses and “reasonable benefits” associated with practices and competition; Q Schools to provide normal expenses, includ-ing travel expenses, for athletes representing the school at events such as goodwill tours and media appearances; Q Amateur teams or event sponsors to award money beyond an athlete’s expenses based on the performance of that ath-lete or team in all sports, not just tennis; Q Schools, conferences or the NCAA to pay for medical and related expenses for the athlete.Associated PressHOOVER Ala. — The Southeastern Conference has added two teams and a fifth day to the baseball tournament. Commissioner Mike Slive announced Friday that the field will expand to 12 teams in the 14-team league starting in 2013 in Hoover, Ala. The top four seeds will earn a bye in the double-elimination tournament, which starts on May 21. The rest will play that Tuesday with the winners advancing. The two division champions and other top four seeds have a chance to earn another bye in the tournament, which returns to single elimination on Saturday. The number of games remains at 17, capped by Sunday’s championship. The SEC has won national titles in three of the last four seasons and had teams advance to the National Championship Series five straight years.SEC expands baseball tourney to 12 teams



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General Information In Print and Onlinewww.lakecityreporter.com Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$2504 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $.25One item per ad Under $100 2000 Lincoln TowncarMed. blue, leather, power seats & more. 147,400 miles. Excellent condition.$3,490 386-623-2848 Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 ServicesWhite's Trucking Services You call & We Haul! Fill Dirt, Lime Rock. AsphaltMillings, Granite, Road Rock.386-362-8763 LegalPUBLIC NOTICEONINVITATION TO BIDITB-004-2013Sealed bids will be accepted by the City of Lake City, Florida, 205 N Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055 until Tuesday, January 22, 2013 at 11:00 A.M. All bids will be opened and read aloud at 11:15 A.M. in the City Council Chambers locat-ed on the 2nd floor of City Hall, 205 N Marion Avenue, Lake City, Flori-da.CONCRETE AND ASSOCIATED PRODUCTS – ANNUALCON-TRACTDocuments may be viewed on the City website at procurement.lcfla.com or at De-mandStar.com. Contact the Procure-ment Department at (386) 719-5816 or (386) 719-5818 for more informa-tion.05536464December 23, 2012 020Lost & Found 13 lbs gray, white & blk, Pappilin w/ big ears, & one blue eye. Last seen 12/14 in Fort white no collar, microchpped. Reward 497-1949 Cash Reward if returned w/ items inside. Lost Blk Brief zip case, Medical, Military, & Misc records inside. FOUND 100Job Opportunities05536389FANTASTIC OPPORTUNITY Guest Services Position Part/Full time with opportunity for advancement. MUST be a people person with great customer service skills, strong work ethic, DEPENDABLE good communication, sales skills, computer skills, and willingness to learn. MUST be a team player and able to work a flexible schedule including weekends & holidays. We offer Competitive Pay and Health Benefits. Hotel Experience Preferred but not required. Only those seeking long term employment apply in person at Comfort Suites 3690 WUS HWY90. Please do not call the hotel regarding your application. Case managers are needed for long-term recovery efforts to assist Columbia County households affected by Tropical Storm Debby. Applicants should have good communication skills and be able to work with minimum supervision. This position requires travel in the county; a dependable vehicle is required. These are grant-funded full-time positions. Submit a resume to United Way of Suwannee Valley, 325 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, FL32055 or fax to 386-752-0105. Construction Salesman Needed. Excellent Pay. Experience Required. 866-959-7663 Drivers: All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-ACDLFlatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down. 888-880-5916 Mechanic needed at Fla.Rock & Tank Lines In White Springs. Diesel exprnc reqr'd in maintenance & repair of tractor trailers. 45-50hrs/wk Class A CDLlicense preferred. Excellent Benefits! email: mcomer@patriottrans.com or fax 904-858-9008 Must have a minimum of 5 yrs Exp. selling HVAC Equipment. Excellent benefits &Great pay. Call Allen 386-628-1093 SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 Seeking a Phone Salesperson for a local mortgage company. Inbound & outbound calls. No experience is necessary. Must have happy, energetic personality. Email resume to: lakecityresume@yahoo.com 100Job Opportunities05536451T eachers Join our team of over 100 professional teachers! Want to make a difference in the lives of children? Infant/T oddler Positions: 12 Mo Ft Teacher (Jennings) And 12 MO PTTeacher Child Development Associate (CDA) or equivalent credential (FCCPC or ECPC) required. Three years experience with birth to 3 preferred. High School Diploma/ GED Required. Must be able to pass DCF background screenings. Excellent Benefits, Paid Holidays, Sick/Annual Leave, Health/Dental Insurance, and more. Apply at 236 SW Columbia Ave, Lake City, FL or send resume to: employment@sv4cs.org Fax (386) 754-2220 or Call 754-2225 EOE EOE Real Estate Co. looking for Office Staff Computer knowledge required. Real Estate Exp. is a plus! Fax resume to 386-496-4309 Service Techs & Installers Must be EPA& NATE certified. Excellent benefits & great pay. Call Allen (386) 628-1093 StarTech Computer Center Now hiring Exp Techs. Send resume to: bdj@startech.cc United Way of Suwannee Valley is seeking a Construction Coordinator for long-term recovery efforts to assist Columbia County households affected by Tropical Storm Debby. The Long Term Recovery Construction Coordinator will assist the disaster survivors in their home repair project, conduct project inspections, and provide estimates for needed materials and labor. Licensed contractor preferred. This position requires in county travel; dependable transportation is required. This is a grant-funded, full-time contractual position. Send resume to United Way of Suwannee Valley, 325 NE Hernando Ave., Lake City, FL 32055, or fax to 386-752-0105 120Medical EmploymentCMA experience preferred in Peds/ Family Practice. Experience injections & taking accurate vital signs. Excellent communication and documentation, organization and assessment skills. DIET AR Y MANAGER Needed CDM, Chef, LTC, 2 years experience preferred Must be able to manage large staff and oversee daily food preparation for a 180 bed SNF. Full time with excellent benefits. E-mail resume to Greg Roberts: groberts@gulfcoasthealthcare.com or fax to: (386)362-4417. Live Oak, FLEOE/V/D/M/F GREATOPPORTUNITY•Full Time Experienced RN’s, LPN’s 7a-7p & 7p-7a•Full Time Experienced C.N.A’s All Shifts Apply in person at Suwannee Health Care & Rehab. 1620 Helevenston Street S.E. Live Oak, FL32064 EOE/m/f/d/v P/THousekeeper Needed Occasional Nights And Weekends. Fax Resume to 386-487-1232 240Schools & Education05535484Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class12/24/2012• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-11/05/12• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies CKC American Bulldogs both a 1 yr old brother & sister, spayed and neutered, shots, free to the right home. 386-935-4473 Free to the right home. Male approx 8 weeks old. Marble tabby. 386-466-7662 310Pets & Supplies PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 430Garage Sales PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 450Good Things to EatThe Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans 2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024 Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville 386-963-4138 or 961-1420 630Mobile Homes forRent1/1 Cabin & Lots for your RVor your own Cabin for rent. Between Lake City & G’ville. Access to I-75 & 441 (352)317-1326. 2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $700. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 3Br/2Ba Mod 1/2acre (nice subd) concrete drive, wrap around deck appl's,energysaver, &thermo's ready (386) 984-5341 $800 mo Mobile Homes for rent in White Springs & Ft. White. Contact 386-623-3404 Quiet Country Park 3br/2ba $525. Very clean NO PETS! References & Deposit required 386-758-2280 640Mobile Homes forSalePalm Harbor Homes New Home Stimulus 5K For Your Used Mobile Home Any Condition 800-622-2832 ext 210 650Mobile Home & LandFSBO 5 ac lot w/ 1995 refurb. MH. 66ft long w/ new roof & wheel chair ramp. $5,000 down Owner Fin. on Balance Approx 5 miles N. of LC. 386-752-4597 OwnerFinanced 3/22.5 ac.River Access. Small down $585 mo 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05536252$100 off December's rentMust be presented at the time of application. $89 Deposit Windsong Apts. 386-758-8455 2 bedroom / 1 Bath Apts for rent in Live Oak. Call for price. Contact 386-623-3404 & 386-362-9806 2br/1ba duplex NWGeorgia Ave. Renovated & energy efficient. Tile floors, W/D, $475/Mo. $300 Dep. 386-755-1937 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Brandywine & Branford Apartments Now Renting 1, 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-752-3033 W. Grandview Ave. Equal Housing Opportunity TDD Number 1-800-955-8771 BRANFORD VILLAS 386-935-2319 2br/1ba Apts. Now available.$570. mo. TDD number 1-800-955-8771 Equal Housing Opportunity Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A$530 month $530 deposit garbage included. No pets. 386-344-2170 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Studio Cottage -$500 month $200 Security Deposit, Utilities included, in town, Near Post Office. Call Chris 386-365-2515 UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 White Springs upstairs Large 1 or 2 bedroom apt. $350 per month includes DSL& Free T.V. 397-1410 730Unfurnished Home ForRent3/2 $500dep. $550 /mth, water and sewer included, off Lake Jeffrey & Honeysuckle Rd. Contact 623-5410 or 623-2203 3/2 in Woodcrest lrg fenced yrd, beautiful neighborhood, 1st, last & deposit, references & credit check. 386-984-6796 3B/2BA brick,Florida room, fireplace, 2 car carport, Large yard, quiet & private. Country Club Rd. South, $900 mo. 386-365-6228 3bdrm very spacious, 2ba, garage, CH/AFenced in backyard. $1,400 mth & $1,400 dep. Contact 386-344-1914 3br/1.5ba. Very clean, Brick great area w/bonus room. Carport, shed & Fenced (privacy) back yard. $825. mo $825. dep. Ref’s req’d. (941)920-4535 NICE 3/2 brick home w/garage in quiet neighborhood. 489 SWBrandy. $900 plus sec. dep. 386-438-4600 750Business & Office RentalsMedical, Retail and Professional Office space on East Baya near Old Country Club Rd. Call 386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622 (cell) Office or Retail Space. Many to choose from. Tom Eagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor 805Lots forSale PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 820Farms & Acreage4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com Owner financed land 1/2 to 10 acre lots. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 830Commercial Property260 S. Marion Ave. 2641 s.f of Office Space. Can be subdivided. $5-$7/sf. No CAM. Prorata for utilities. Call Mika (352) 359-604 Industrial warehouse7+ acres fenced 17,000 sq ft Barn $1,500 mo. TomEagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 950Cars forSale 2000 Lincoln Town Car; Med blue, leather, power seats & more. 147,400 miles, Exc condition. $3,490. 386-623-2848 nr 5 a week days Lake City Reporter



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4D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012 4DLIFE MONDAY EVENING DECEMBER 24, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) PrepLandingShrek the Halls“Shrek the Third” (2007) Voices of Mike Myers, Eddie Murphy. News at 11(:35) Nightline (N) 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) The Insider 5-PBS 5 -JournalNightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Antiques Roadshow “Orlando, Florida” Christmas With Mormon TabernacleIndependent Lens (Subtitled) BBC World NewsTavis Smiley 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJaguars AccessTwo and Half MenHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/Mother2 Broke GirlsMike & MollyHawaii Five-0 “Kupale” Action News JaxXmas Story 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of Payne“Christmas Is Here Again” (2007) Voices of Ed Asner. Second Star LeftTMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family GuyFamily GuyThe SimpsonsRaising HopeRaising HopeRaising HopeRaising HopeNewsAction News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N)“It’s a Wonderful Life” (1946) James Stewart. A guardian angel strengthens a man ruined by a miser. (DVS) NewsChristmas Eve CSPAN 14 210 350(5:00) Public Affairs Politics & Public Policy Today WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304M*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Unusual SuspectsUnusual Suspects “The Killer Nearby” Dateline on OWN “As Darkness Fell” Dateline on OWNDateline on OWN “Murder by the Sea” Dateline on OWN “As Darkness Fell” A&E 19 118 265The First 48The First 48Duck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck Dynasty(:01) Duck Dynasty(:31) Duck Dynasty HALL 20 185 312“Eloise at Christmastime” (2003) Julie Andrews, So a Vassilieva. “Help for the Holidays” (2012, Fantasy) Summer Glau, Eva La Rue. “It’s Christmas, Carol!” (2012, Fantasy) Carrie Fisher, Emmanuelle Vaugier. FX 22 136 248“How to Train Your Dragon” (2010) Voices of Jay Baruchel, Gerard Butler.“How to Train Your Dragon” (2010) Voices of Jay Baruchel, Gerard Butler.“How to Train Your Dragon” (2010) Voices of Jay Baruchel, Gerard Butler. CNN 24 200 202CNN Heroes: An All-Star Tribute The top 10 heroes of 2012. Best and Worst 2012 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight Rick Warren. (N) After Jesus: The First Christians (N) TNT 25 138 245The Mentalist “At First Blush” The Mentalist “Cheap Burgundy” The Mentalist “Red Letter” “A Christmas Carol” (1999) Patrick Stewart, Richard E. Grant. (DVS) CSI: NY “Time’s Up” NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobVictoriousiCarly “iChristmas” See Dad RunFull HouseFull HouseFull HouseThe NannyThe NannyFriendsFriends SPIKE 28 168 241Deadliest WarriorDeadliest WarriorDeadliest WarriorDeadliest WarriorDeadliest WarriorDeadliest Warrior MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*HM*A*S*HLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitSeinfeldFrasierThe Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Phineas and FerbGood Luck CharlieDog With a BlogDog With a Blog“Disney’s A Christmas Carol” (2009, Fantasy) (:45) Fish HooksPhineas and FerbPhineas and FerbJessieShake It Up! LIFE 32 108 252“Holly’s Holiday” (2012, Romance-Comedy) Claire Coffee. “The March Sisters at Christmas” (2012, Drama) Julie Marie Berman. “The Road to Christmas” (2006, Comedy) Jennifer Grey, Clark Gregg. USA 33 105 242NCIS “False Witness” NCIS: Los Angeles “Archangel” WWE Monday Night RAW Special Christmas edition starring John Cena and Sheamus. (N) (:05)“The Mummy” (1999) BET 34 124 329Roots Chicken George wins his freedom. (Part 5 of 6) Roots George saves Tom’s life. (Part 6 of 6) “Roots: The Gift” (1988) Premiere. ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) Coll. Football Livee College Football Sheraton Hawaii Bowl -Fresno State vs. Southern Methodist. From Honolulu. (N) SportsCenter (N) ESPN2 36 144 209SportsNation Special: Year in ReviewNFL Live (N) SportsCenterE:60 (N) SportsCenter Special: My Wish (N) SportsCenter (N) E:60 SUNSP 37 College Football Florida at Texas A&M. College Football Florida at Tennessee. DISCV 38 182 278MoonshinersMoonshiners “Storm’s a Brewing” Moonshiners “A Shiner’s Last Stand” Moonshiners Tickle builds a new still. Moonshiners Tickle trims his tree. Moonshiners Tickle builds a new still. TBS 39 139 247King of QueensKing of QueensSeinfeldSeinfeld“A Christmas Story” (1983) Peter Billingsley, Darren McGavin. (DVS)“A Christmas Story” (1983) Peter Billingsley, Darren McGavin. (DVS) HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) Dr. Drew on Call (N) Nancy GraceShowbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236(5:30)“Pride & Prejudice” (2005) Keira Knightley, Matthew MacFadyen. E! Investigates “Stories of Survival” Celebrity Oops: They Did It AgainIce Loves CocoIce Loves CocoChelsea Lately (N) Celebrity Oops: TRAVEL 46 196 277Extreme RVsExtreme RVsThe Layover with Anthony BourdainThe Layover with Anthony BourdainThe Layover with Anthony BourdainThe Layover with Anthony Bourdain HGTV 47 112 229Celebrity Holiday HomesLightmaresLove It or List It “Renton” Love It or List It “The McLean Family” House HuntersHunters Int’lLove It or List It “The Goddard Family” TLC 48 183 280Island MediumIsland MediumIsland MediumIsland MediumLong Island Medium: On the RoadIsland MediumIsland MediumIsland MediumIsland MediumIsland MediumIsland Medium HIST 49 120 269Pawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn Stars(:31) Pawn Stars(:02) Pawn Stars(:32) Pawn Stars ANPL 50 184 282Too Cute!America’s Cutest Cat 2010America’s Cutest DogToo Cute!Too Cute! “Spotted, Pampered Pups” America’s Cutest Dog FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, Drive-Ins and DivesDiners, DriveDiners, DriveMystery DinersHealth Inspectors TBN 52 260 372(4:30)“King of Kings” (1961) Jeffrey Hunter. The Potter’s TouchLive-Holy LandLiving EdgeKingdom Conn.Jesse DuplantisMary and Joseph: A Story of Faith FSN-FL 56 -The Game 365Ship Shape TVUFC Reloaded “UFC 143: Diaz vs. Condit” Nick Diaz takes on Carlos Condit. World Poker Tour: Season 10World Poker Tour: Season 10 SYFY 58 122 244Stargate: Cont“Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country” (1991) William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy. “Starship Troopers” (1997) Casper Van Dien, Dina Meyer. Young troops battle a vicious army of gigantic insects. AMC 60 130 254(4:30)“A Christmas Carol” (1984)“Miracle on 34th Street” (1947) Maureen O’Hara, John Payne. (:15)“Miracle on 34th Street” (1947, Fantasy) Maureen O’Hara, John Payne. Prancer COM 62 107 249South Park(:31) South Park(:01) Tosh.0(:31) Tosh.0(:01) Tosh.0(:32) Tosh.0(:02) It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia(:02) “Bad Santa” (2003, Comedy) Billy Bob Thornton, Tony Cox. CMT 63 166 327RebaRebaRebaRebaRebaReba“Unlikely Angel” (1996, Drama) Dolly Parton, Brian Kerwin. (:15)“Fireproof” (2008, Drama) NGWILD 108 190 283Untamed Americas “Deserts” Untamed Americas “Mountains” Wild Wives of AfricaWild Wives of Africa “Family Feud” Wild Wives of AfricaWild Wives of Africa NGC 109 186 276Explorer The modern gold trade. Drain the Ocean Journey to the Edge of the Universe A tour of the cosmos. Drain the Ocean SCIENCE 110 193 284Fire y Saffron steals a valuable gun. Fire y “The Message” Fire y “Heart of Gold” Fire y “Objects in Space” Fire y 10th Anniversary: Browncoats Fire y “Heart of Gold” ID 111 192 285Disappeared “Footprints in the Sand” Disappeared “Too Young For Love” Disappeared “The Soldiers’s Wife” Disappeared A man goes missing. Disappeared “City of Angels” (N) Disappeared “The Soldiers’s Wife” HBO 302 300 501What to Watch“Gulliver’s Travels” (2010) Jack Black. ‘PG’ “Journey 2: The Mysterious Island” (2012) ‘PG’ Fight Game(:15) “In Time” (2011, Science Fiction) Justin Timberlake. ‘PG-13’ MAX 320 310 515(:15)“Fast Times at Ridgemont High” (1982) ‘R’ (:45)“Love Actually” (2003) Hugh Grant. Various people deal with relationships in London. ‘R’“The Sitter” (2011, Comedy) Jonah Hill. ‘R’ Sin Diaries 3 SHOW 340 318 545Eternal Sunshine(:25) “Source Code” (2011) Jake Gyllenhaal. ‘PG-13’ Untold History of the United States (N)“The Help” (2011) Viola Davis. An aspiring writer captures the experiences of black women. The King’s Speech SUNDAY EVENING DECEMBER 23, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World News“The Sound of Music” (1965, Musical) Julie Andrews, Christopher Plummer. A governess weds an Austrian widower with seven children. News at 11Inside Edition 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsThe Insider (N) Love-RaymondBig Bang TheoryCSI: MiamiCriminal Minds “Hope” (DVS) NewsSports ZoneChann 4 NewsBig Bang Theory 5-PBS 5 -Doc Martin Martin’s rst patient. 15th Annual Holiday Traditions ConcertChristmas at Luther: TidingsMasterpiece Classic “Downton Abbey” Spanish u disrupts Downton Abbey. Doc Martin Martin’s rst patient. 7-CBS 7 47 47CBS Evening NewsAction News Jax60 Minutes (N) Blue Bloods “Reagan V. Reagan” The Good Wife “I Fought the Law” The MentalistAction Sports 360Two and Half Men 9-CW 9 17 17(4:00) ChicagoAccording to JimYourJax MusicVoid TVLaw & Order “Survivor” Local HauntsLocal HauntsTMZ (N) The Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30e(4:00) NFL Football Regional Coverage. (N) The OT (N) The SimpsonsBob’s Burgers (PA) Family GuyAmerican DadNewsAction Sports 360Leverage “The Bank Shot Job” 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsFootball Night in America (N) (Live) e(:20) NFL Football San Francisco 49ers at Seattle Seahawks. (N) News CSPAN 14 210 350NewsmakersWashington This Week Q & APrime MinisterRoad to the White House Q & A WGN-A 16 239 307Funny VideosBloopers!Bloopers!How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine(:40) Instant Replay30 Rock30 Rock TVLAND 17 106 304RoseanneRoseanneRoseanneRoseanneRoseanneRoseanneLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Oprah: Where Are They Now?Oprah’s Next ChapterOprah’s Next Chapter “Jamie Foxx” Oprah’s Next Chapter “Jamie Foxx” Oprah’s Next Chapter Usher Raymond. Oprah’s Next Chapter “Jamie Foxx” A&E 19 118 265Storage-TexasStorage-TexasStorage WarsStorage-TexasStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage Wars Storage Wars(:01) Be the Boss “Molly Maid” (N) HALL 20 185 312“Debbie Macomber’s Trading Christmas” (2011) Tom Cavanagh. “The Most Wonderful Time of the Year” (2008) Henry Winkler. “The Case for Christmas” (2011, Fantasy) Dean Cain, Rachel Blanchard. FX 22 136 248“Deck the Halls” (2006, Comedy) Danny DeVito, Matthew Broderick.“Christmas With the Kranks” (2004, Comedy) Tim Allen, Jamie Lee Curtis.“Christmas With the Kranks” (2004, Comedy) Tim Allen, Jamie Lee Curtis. CNN 24 200 202CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN PresentsPiers Morgan TonightCNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents TNT 25 138 245“Lord of the Rings”“The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King” (2003) Elijah Wood, Ian McKellen. Humans and creatures unite to battle Sauron and his army. “Lord of the Rings” NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobSee Dad Run“A Fairly Odd Christmas” (2012) Drake Bell. The NannyThe NannyFriendsFriends SPIKE 28 168 241Ink Master “Holy Ink” Ink Master “Buck Off” Ink Master “Blowing Chunks” Ink Master “Better Than Words?” Ink Master Athletes choose their artists. Ink Master “Ink Master Live” MY-TV 29 32 -Cricket on the HearthM*A*S*HM*A*S*HColumbo “A Matter of Honor” A retired bull ghter is a hero. M*A*S*HThriller “The Innocent Bystanders” The Twilight ZoneThe Twilight Zone DISN 31 172 290Austin & AllyShake It Up!Dog With a BlogGood Luck Charlie“The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause” (2006) Good Luck Charlie(:05) Shake It Up!Austin & AllyA.N.T. FarmJessie LIFE 32 108 252(5:00) “Christmas on Chestnut Street”“Crazy for Christmas” (2005) Andrea Roth, Howard Hesseman. “The Christmas Blessing” (2005, Drama) Neil Patrick Harris. (:02)“Crazy for Christmas” (2005) USA 33 105 242Law & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims Unit BET 34 124 329(4:00) RootsRoots George saves Tom’s life. (Part 6 of 6) The Soul ManThe Soul ManThe Soul ManThe Soul ManDjango UnchainedVindicated ESPN 35 140 20630 for 30 SportsCenter (N) (Live) SEC Storied (N) 30 for 30 SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209 World/Poker 2012 World Series of Poker 2012 World Series of Poker 2012 World Series of Poker 2012 World Series of Poker 2012 World Series of Pokerd College Basketball SUNSP 37 -Ship Shape TVFlorida SportsmanFishing the FlatsSport FishingSportsman’s Adv.Halls of FameThe Best of Pride2011 XTERRA USA ChampionshipSaltwater Exp.Into the Blue DISCV 38 182 278Amish Ma aAmish Ma a “Fire From the Lord” Amish Ma a Secret MMA barn ght. X-Ray: Yellowstone (N) Zombie ApocalypseAmish Ma a Secret MMA barn ght. TBS 39 139 247“Fun With Dick and Jane” (1977) Jane Fonda, George Segal. “Evan Almighty” (2007, Comedy) Steve Carell, Morgan Freeman. (DVS)“Evan Almighty” (2007, Comedy) Steve Carell, Morgan Freeman. (DVS) HLN 40 202 204Murder by the BookDominick Dunne: Power, PrivilegeDominick Dunne: Power, PrivilegeWhat Would You Do?What Would You Do?Dominick Dunne: Power, Privilege FNC 41 205 360FOX News Sunday With Chris WallaceFOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) FOX News Sunday With Chris WallaceGeraldo at Large (N) Huckabee E! 45 114 236(5:30)“Ocean’s Thirteen” (2007) George Clooney, Brad Pitt, Matt Damon. The Bachelorette: Ashley and J.P.’s Wedding The couple get married. (N) Ice Loves Coco (N) Celebrity Oops: They Did It AgainLove You, Mean It TRAVEL 46 196 277Anthony Bourdain: No ReservationsAnthony Bourdain’s Holiday SpecialDavid Blaine: Beautiful StruggleMagic ManMagic Man (N) David Blaine: Discover MagicToy Hunter: Hunt for Mis t Toys HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lMillion Dollar RoomsExtreme HomesProperty BrothersHouse Hunters RenovationHouse HuntersHunters Int’l TLC 48 183 280Toddlers & TiarasSin City Rules “Whine Tasting” Sister WivesSister WivesSister Wives (N) Sin City Rules “She Said, She Said” Sister Wives HIST 49 120 269Bamazon “Heart of Darkness” American Pickers “Driving Miss Dani” Ax Men “We’re Not Alone” Ax Men “Sabotage” (N) Bamazon “One Way Out” (N) (:02) Outback Hunters (N) ANPL 50 184 282Rattlesnake RepublicFinding BigfootRattlesnake Republic (N) Gator Boys: Xtra Bites (N) Finding Bigfoot “Bobo Marks His Turf” Lost Treasure Hunters (N) FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveThe Next Iron Chef: RedemptionSugar Dome (N) The Next Iron Chef: RedemptionAll-Star Family Cook-offIron Chef America “Flay vs Knibb” TBN 52 260 372T.D. JakesJoyce MeyerLeading the WayThe Blessed LifeJoel OsteenKerry ShookBelieverVoiceCre o Dollar“The Greatest Story Ever Told” (1965) Max von Sydow, Charlton Heston. FSN-FL 56 -d NBA Basketball Utah Jazz at Orlando Magic. From Amway Center in Orlando, Fla. Magic Live! (Live) Inside the MagicInside the MagicUFC InsiderFootball PrevWorld Poker Tour: Season 10 SYFY 58 122 244Star Trek Gen“Star Trek: First Contact” (1996, Science Fiction) Patrick Stewart, Jonathan Frakes.“Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country” (1991) William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy. Star Trek-Insur. AMC 60 130 254(5:45)“Miracle on 34th Street” (1947) Maureen O’Hara, John Payne. “Miracle on 34th Street” (1994, Fantasy) Richard Attenborough, Elizabeth Perkins. “Miracle on 34th Street” (1994) Richard Attenborough. COM 62 107 249“Harold & Kumar Escape”Jeff Dunham Christmas SpecialJeff Dunham: Arguing With MyselfJeff Dunham Christmas SpecialJeff Dunham: Arguing With Myself“National Lampoon’s Van Wilder” CMT 63 166 327(4:45)“Unlikely Angel” (1996)“Fireproof” (2008) Kirk Cameron. A divorcing couple turn to God to save their marriage. (:45) Angels Among Us(:45) Angels Among UsAngels Among Us NGWILD 108 190 283Wild AlaskaIce BearAmerica’s Greatest Animals The search for America’s iconic animals. ThunderbeastAmerica’s Greatest Animals NGC 109 186 276Cocaine Wars “Airport Sting” Cocaine Wars “Drug Speedboats” Inside Underground PokerDrugs, Inc. “Zombie Island” (N) Alaska State Troopers (N) Drugs, Inc. “Zombie Island” SCIENCE 110 193 284What the Ancients KnewJesus ConspiraciesBiblical Mysteries Explained “Exodus” Biblical Mysteries ExplainedBiblical Mysteries ExplainedBiblical Mysteries Explained “Exodus” ID 111 192 285On the Case With Paula ZahnFatal Encounters “Death Undercover” Fatal Encounters “Stuck in the Middle” Fatal Encounters (N) On the Case With Paula Zahn (N) Fatal Encounters “Stuck in the Middle” HBO 302 300 501“Joyful Noise” (2012, Comedy-Drama) Queen Latifah. ‘PG-13’ “Cowboys & Aliens” (2011, Science Fiction) Daniel Craig. ‘PG-13’ GirlsGirls “The Return” EnlightenedEnlightened MAX 320 310 515Dream House“Garden State” (2004, Comedy) Zach Braff. ‘R’ (:15)“The Thing” (2011, Horror) Mary Elizabeth Winstead. ‘R’ “Wanderlust” (2012, Comedy) Paul Rudd. ‘R’ Zane’s Sex SHOW 340 318 545Untold History of the United StatesDexter Dexter must protect himself. Homeland Carrie needs to decide. (:05)“Traf c” (2000, Crime Drama) Michael Douglas, Don Cheadle, Benicio Del Toro. ‘R’ (:35) Sexy Baby WEEKDAY AFTERNOON Comcast Dish DirecTV 12 PM12:301 PM1:302 PM2:303 PM3:304 PM4:305 PM5:30 3-ABC 3 -NewsBe a MillionaireThe ChewGeneral HospitalVaried ProgramsMauryDr. PhilBe a MillionaireNews 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsPaid ProgramVaried ProgramsAndy Grif th ShowThe Jeff Probst ShowSteve HarveyThe Dr. Oz ShowChann 4 NewsChann 4 News 5-PBS 5 -WordWorldBarney & FriendsCaillouDaniel TigerSuper Why!Dinosaur TrainCat in the HatCurious GeorgeWild KrattsElectric Comp.R. Steves’ EuropeWorld News 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxThe Young and the RestlessBold/BeautifulThe TalkLet’s Make a DealJudge Joe BrownJudge JudyAction News JaxAction News Jax 9-CW 9 17 17The Trisha Goddard ShowLaw & Order: Criminal IntentJudge MathisThe Bill Cunningham ShowMauryThe People’s Court 10-FOX 10 30 30Jerry SpringerThe Jeremy Kyle ShowJudge Joe BrownWe the PeopleThe DoctorsDr. PhilFamily FeudFamily Feud 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsBe a MillionaireDays of our LivesFirst Coast LivingKatie The Ellen DeGeneres ShowNewsNews CSPAN 14 210 350(9:00) Public AffairsPublic AffairsVaried Programs Public Affairs WGN-A 16 239 307In the Heat of the NightWGN Midday NewsWalker, Texas RangerWalker, Texas RangerWalker, Texas RangerLaw & Order: Criminal Intent TVLAND 17 106 304Andy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowGunsmokeVaried ProgramsGunsmokeVaried ProgramsBonanzaVaried ProgramsBonanzaVaried Programs(:11) BonanzaVaried Programs OWN 18 189 279Dr. PhilDr. PhilVaried Programs A&E 19 118 265CSI: MiamiVaried ProgramsCriminal MindsVaried ProgramsCriminal MindsVaried ProgramsThe First 48Varied ProgramsThe First 48Varied ProgramsThe First 48Varied Programs HALL 20 185 312Marie MarieVaried ProgramsMovieVaried ProgramsMovieVaried Programs FX 22 136 248(11:00) MovieVaried ProgramsMovieVaried Programs CNN 24 200 202CNN NewsroomVaried ProgramsCNN NewsroomVaried ProgramsThe Situation RoomVaried Programs TNT 25 138 245Varied Programs NIK 26 170 299Odd ParentsOdd ParentsOdd ParentsOdd ParentsVaried Programs SpongeBobSpongeBob SPIKE 28 168 241Varied Programs MY-TV 29 32 -Hawaii Five-0GunsmokeBonanzaThe Big ValleyThe Wild, Wild WestEmergency! DISN 31 172 290Phineas and FerbVaried Programs A.N.T. FarmVaried Programs Good Luck CharlieVaried Programs LIFE 32 108 252Varied ProgramsHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherMovieVaried Programs MovieVaried Programs USA 33 105 242Varied Programs BET 34 124 329Varied Programs ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenterSportsCenterSportsCenterVaried Programs NFL LiveVaried Programs ESPN2 36 144 209First TakeVaried ProgramsNumbers Never LieBest of First TakeVaried ProgramsNumbers Never LieDan Le BatardNFL32 SUNSP 37 -Varied Programs DISCV 38 182 278Varied Programs TBS 39 139 247Fresh PrinceAmerican DadAmerican DadLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondSeinfeldFriendsFriendsFriendsFriends HLN 40 202 204News Now Making It in AmericaEvening Express FNC 41 205 360(11:00) Happening NowAmerica Live Studio B With Shepard SmithYour World With Neil CavutoThe Five E! 45 114 236Varied ProgramsSex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CityVaried Programs TRAVEL 46 196 277Varied Programs HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lVaried Programs TLC 48 183 280Varied Programs HIST 49 120 269Varied Programs ANPL 50 184 282Varied Programs FOOD 51 110 231Best DishesBarefoot ContessaVaried Programs10 Dollar DinnersSecrets/Restaurant30-Minute MealsGiada at HomeGiada at HomeBarefoot ContessaBarefoot ContessaBest DishesPaula’s Cooking TBN 52 260 372Varied Programs James RobisonTodayThe 700 ClubJohn Hagee TodayVaried Programs FSN-FL 56 -Varied Programs SYFY 58 122 244MovieVaried Programs AMC 60 130 254(9:45) MovieVaried Programs (:45) Movie COM 62 107 249MovieVaried Programs Movie Varied Programs(:25) Futurama(4:54) FuturamaIt’s Always Sunny CMT 63 166 327Extreme Makeover: Home EditionVaried Programs(:05) World’s Strictest Parents(:10) World’s Strictest Parents(:15) RoseanneRoseanne(4:50) Roseanne(:25) Roseanne NGWILD 108 190 283Dog WhispererVaried Programs NGC 109 186 276Alaska State TroopersBorder WarsTabooVaried Programs SCIENCE 110 193 284Varied Programs Factory MadeFactory MadeMythBustersThey Do It?They Do It? ID 111 192 285Varied Programs HBO 302 300 501(11:30) MovieVaried Programs MovieVaried Programs MAX 320 310 515(11:00) Movie(12:50) MovieVaried Programs(:20) MovieVaried Programs (:20) MovieVaried Programs SHOW 340 318 545(11:30) MovieVaried Programs



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Dec. 23Puppet performanceFirst Presbyterian Church, 697 SW Baya Drive, invites the community to see Peter the Presbyterian and his family of puppets perform a skit during its worship service at 1030 a.m. For more information, call the church office at 752-0670.Candlelight serviceElim Baptist Church, 3435 SW Elim Church Road in Fort White, will hold a Christmas Candlelight Service at 6 p.m. The com-munity is invited. For more information, call (386) 497-1972.Youth Day eventBethesda Outreach Ministries of Alachua, 13205 NW 157th Ave. in Alachua, will hold a Youth Day to rally around the youth of our community. Services will be at 11 a.m. and 4 p.m. at the Civic Center in High Springs. A dinner will be served in between the ser-vices. For more informa-tion, call Elders Nyron or LaShandra Jenkins at (352) 339-4466.Dec. 24Christmas Eve serviceFirst Presbyterian Church, 697 SW Baya Drive, will hold its Christmas Eve candlelight service at 6:30 p.m. Special music, the Christmas message and the puppet ministry will be shared. For more informa-tion, call the church office at 752-0670.Chirstmas Eve serviceSt. James’ Episcopal Church, 2423 SW Bascom Norris Drive, will hold its Christmas Eve family ser-vice at 7 p.m. and a candle-light service at 11 p.m.Christmas Eve serviceSpirit of Christ Lutheran Church, 145 SW Sweetbreeze Drive (U.S. 90 1.5 miles west of Interstate 75), will hold its Christmas Eve service at 5 p.m. For more information, call 344-3364.Dec. 25Free dinnerSuwannee Valey Rescue Mission and Lad Soup Kitchen, 127 Escambia St. in Lake City, will serve its sixth annual Free Christmas Day Dinner. The menu includes turkey, ham, rice and gravy, col-lard greens, string beans, candied yams, dressing, desserts and iced tea. To donate food, money or time to the meal, call Timothy at (386) 758-2217.Dec. 31Retirement, investitureA retirement ceremony for Judge E. Vernon Douglas and an investiture ceremo-ny for his son, Judge-elect Wesley R. Douglas, will be at 1:30 p.m. in the Columbia County Courthouse, 173 NW Hernando Ave. A reception will follow.Jan. 2Festival meetingThe Blue-Grey Army will meet at 5:30 p.m. to plan the Olustee Battle Festival. The meeting will be at the school district central building, room 153, 409 SW St. Johns St.Jan. 6Zumba introductionA free introduction to Zumba class will be held from 3 to 4 p.m. at the Teen Town Recreation Building, 533 NW DeSoto St. For more information, contact Sarah Sandlin as (386) 758-0009 or visit “Lake City Zumba” on Facebook.Zumba weight lossThe Lake City Zumba Loser weight-loss contest will begin at 4 p.m. at the Teen Town Recreation Building, 533 NW DeSoto St. For more information, contact Sarah Sandlin as (386) 758-0009 or visit “Lake City Zumba” on Facebook.Jan. 8Medicare seminarLifeStyle Enrichment Center is sponsoring a free Medicare seminar from 5 to 6 p.m. The semi-nar will be moderated by Irv Crowetz of C/C & Associates. Subjects to be covered include: what you need to know about Medicare, when to enroll, what’s covered and when a supplement is needed. Call 755-3476 ext. 107 to reserve a seat.Jan. 12Chili cook-offThe fourth annual Branford Chili Cook-off will be from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hatch Park on Craven Street in Branford. The event will include a silent auction for adults and kids, door prizes, live music, an antique car show, moon walk, Home Depot Kids Workshop and a variety of homemade chili. Admission is $5 and includes all the chili you can eat. Proceeds will benefit Herry’s Kids Pediatric Services, a pro-gram of Hospice of the Nature Coast. To register to compete in the chili cook-off, call the hospice at (386) 755-7714 or vist online at www.hospiceof citrus.org.Jan. 15Pageant entriesToday is the deadline for contestants to enter the 2013 Olustee Festival Pageant. The pageant is open to girls ages 3 months to 20 years who live in or attend school in Baker, Columbia, Gilcrist, Hamilton, Union and Suwannee counties. Age divisions are 3 to 12 months, 13 to 23 months, 2 to 3 years, 4 to 6 years, 7 to 9 years, 10 to 12 years, 13 to 15 years and 16 to 20 years. Contestants may compete in beauty, sportswear, tal-ent and photogenic catego-ries. The pageant awards include educational schol-arships, trophies, crowns and banners. Each pageant contestant will receive a tiara. First-place winners will ride in the Olustee Festival parade. The pag-eant will be held Jan. 26 at the Columbia County Schools Administrative Complex. Applications may be obtained at the Columbia County Library, the Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of Commerce, Emily Taber Library, Suwannee Regional Library, Hamilton County Library or by contacting Elaine Owens at (386) 965-2787.Jan. 16Festival planningThe Blue-Grey Army will meet at 5:30 p.m. to plan the Olustee Battle Festival. The meeting will be at the school district central building, room 153, 409 SW St. Johns St.Jan. 19Chili cook-offThe Lake DeSoto Farmers Market will have its second annual chili cook-off during market hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Funds raised from the sale of chili sam-ples will benefit Church of the Way. Registration is $10, and there will be a cash prize for the win-ner. For registration infor-mation and contest rules, visit online at market.lcfla.com. The farmers market is held along Lake DeSoto between the Columbia County Courthouse and Shands Lakeshore Hospital in downtown Lake City. For more information, call (386) 719-5766 or visit mar-ket.lcfla.com.Jan. 26Olustee pageantThe 2013 Olustee Festival pageant will be held in the Columbia County Schools Administrative Complex on West Duval Street (U.S. 90) in Lake City. Competition for girls age 3 months to 9 years old will be at 4 p.m. Competition for girls 10 to 20 years old will begin at 7 p.m. Contestants will be judged in beauty, sports-wear, talent and photoge-nic categories. For more information, contact Elaine Owens at (386) 965-2787. Winners will ride in the Olustee Festival parade on Feb. 16.OngoingFestival vendorsThe Blue-Grey Army is accepting applications from vendors wanting to take part in the 2013 Battle of Olustee Festival on Feb. 15 and 16 in Lake City. For more information, phone Phil Adler at (386) 438-3131, visit the festival web-site, www.olusteefestival.com, or email vendorinfo@olusteefestival.com. The deadline to apply is Feb. 8 and spaces are limited.Winter programThe Boys and Girls Club of Columbia County, on Jones Way in Lake City, is now accepting registra-tions for its winter pro-gram, which will run Dec. 1 through March 1. The fee is $200, which includes transportation from all ele-mentary, middle and high schools. The club offers a variety of activities, includ-ing sports, arts and crafts, game room, library and special events. It also offers a homework program with tutorial help for children. A computer lab also is avail-able. For more information, call the club at 752-4184.Woodturners ClubBell Woodturners Club meets the second Thursday of the month in the Bell community Center, Bell Florida at 7 p.m.. Every meeting features a show and tell of members cur-rent projects. There is also a full demonstration of a woodturning project by a club member. There are opportunities to take home project wood, tools and receive help from other turners. All experience lev-els are welcome. For addi-tional information, contact Kent Harris at 365-7086.Photo clubLake City Photo Club meets every second Tuesday of each month from 2 to 4 p.m. at the LifeStyle Enrichment Center on Baya Avenue. Share your photos and ideas with the group. Newcomers are welcome.Volunteers neededShands LakeShore Regional Medical Center Auxiliary is looking for volunteers to work a vari-ety of positions around the hospital. Volunteers are asked to work a four-hour shift once per week, but are welcome to work more often. Volunteers are need-ed to drive the shuttle car and help with jobs in the hospital. If you have some time to donate, come to the gift shop and pick up an application or call (386)292-8000, ext. 21216.Volunteers soughtUnited Way of Suwannee Valley is recruiting vol-unteers who are willing to be called upon to staff the Columbia County Emergency Operations Center’s Information Center during disasters. These vol-unteers serve as the link between the county emer-gency management offices and the public when the EOC is activated for disas-ters. Anyone willing to serve in this capacity when needed or can recruit volun-teers through your church or civic organization should call Jenn Sawyer, United Way of Suwannee Vallety long-term recovery coordi-nator, at 752-5604, ext. 101.Grief supportThe Grief Share Support Group, a ministry of Orchard Community Church, meets every Saturday from 2 to 4 p.m. in room D at the Willowbrook Assisted Living center, 1580 S. Marion Ave. The group offers caring support for those who have lost a loved one, through videos, dis-cussion time, and prayer. There are fees. For infor-mation call 288-7429. Volunteer opportunityHospice of the Nature Coast is searching for individuals who are inter-ested in volunteering in the, Columbia, Suwannee Hamilton and Lafayette areas. Volunteers are need-ed to provide general office support and non-medical assistance to patients and their families. Hospice vol-unteers can provide servic-es such as: telephone calls, socialization, light meal preparation, shopping or errands and staffing infor-mation booths at seasonal festivals. Specialized train-ing will be provided. To volunteer contact Volunteer Manager Drake Varvorines at 386-755-7714 or email: dvarvorines@hospiceofthe naturecoast.orgAddiction recoveryA 12-step addiction recovery group meets every Friday evening at 6 p.m. at the Community Revival Center, 244 NE Patterson Ave. in Lake City. For infor-mation call 867-6288. SHINE trainingSHINE (Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders) is seeking volunteers in Columbia, Suwannee, Hamilton and Lafayette counties. Free volunteer training is scheduled as fol-lows: orientation, Jan. 11, 1 to 3 p.m,; basic train-ing, Feb. 13-15, 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.; and mentoring, six sessions scheduled at volunteer’s convenience. All training will take place at Elder Options, 100 SW 75th St. (Tower Road) in Gainesville. Registration is required by Dec. 28. For more information or to request a SHINE volun-teer application packet, call (352) 692-5264 or toll-free at (800) 963-5337. LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012 5A5A Carl Ashley WoodsCarl Ashley Woods, 69, passed away on Saturday, December 15, 2012 after a long hard battle with cancer. He now rests in peace with the Lord. He was born in Tam-pa, Florida to the late Richmond and Lourine (Page) Woods. He served his coun-try faithfully in the United Staes Navy. He is survived by his devoted wife, Reba Woods, three daughters, Pamela, Sandra, and Sheryl; sev-en grandchildren and four great grandchildren. Carl’s wishes were to be cremated and his ash-es spread over Lake Okeechobee where he enjoyed many years RIVKLQJDQGDLUERDWLQJGATEWAY-FOREST LAWN FUNERAL HOME & CREMATORY 3596 South U.S. Hwy 441, Lake City, Florida 32025, (386) 752-1954 is in charge of arrange-ments. Please leave words of comfort for the family at www.gatewayforestlawn.com.Claire E. FisherMrs. Claire E. Fisher, 93, of &KLHDQGDQGIRUPHUO\RI/DNHCity, died late Friday evening, December 21, 2012 in Shands at the University of Florida fol-lowing an extended illness. A na-tive of Nashua, New Hampshire, Mrs. Fisher had been a resident of Lake City since moving here in 1965 from Massachusetts. Mrs. Fisher had worked for many years as a child care pro-vider. She had retired after sever-al years of service as a “Nanny” for Robert & Emmie Chasteen. She was very proud to have as-sisted in the care giving for Mary Ann and Abbie. In her spare time Mrs. Fisher enjoyed play-ing Bingo, card games; cooking and crocheting. Mrs. Fisher was a member of the D.A.R.; First United Methodist Church of Lake City and most recently the First United Methodist Church in Trenton. She was preceded in death by her husband, Clifton Fisher and a daughter, Gerilyn Niemela.Mrs. Fisher is survived by three daughters, Michelle Bar-URQRI&KLHDQG)ORULGD-R\FHMitchell of Harvey, Louisiana and Donna Thomas of Baton Rouge, Louisiana and a brother, Bradford Howlett of Worcester, Massachusetts. Thirteen grand-children and numerous great-grandchildren also survive.Funeral services for Mrs. Fisher will be conducted at NOON on Saturday, December 29, 2012 in the First United Methodist Church in Trenton with Pastor 'DOH(O]LHRIFLDWLQJ3ULYDWHfamily interment services will be held in the Huntsville United Methodist Church Cemetery. The family will receive friends for ONE HOUR prior to the funeral service at the church on Saturday. Arrangements are un-der the direction of the DEESPARRISH FAMILY FUNERAL HOME, 458 S. Marion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025 752-1234 Please share your thoughts and wishes for the family at our on-line family guestbook at parrish-familyfuneralhome.com.Dewell DryfusMr. Dewell Dryfus Lewis, 90, of Lake City, died late Friday eve-ning, December 21, 2012 in the Haven Hospice of the Suwan-nee Valley Care Center. He was ERUQRQ-XQHLQ5RZHOOArkansas (Cleveland County) to the late Lucias and Francis Faye -LPPLH6PLWK/HZLV0ULewis had lived the majority of his life in Montpelier, Louisiana where he was a member of the First Baptist Church and had worked for and retired from Paul David Lumber Inc. in Amite, Louisiana. He relocated to Lake City in 2001 to be close to his daughter. Mr. Lewis was pre-ceded in death by his wife, Mary Ella Lewis and his brothers, -DPHV+HQU\/HZLV+REHUW+Lewis and Thomas David Lewis.Mr. Lewis is survived by his daughters, Betty Ann Brehm of Lake City, Florida and Georgie Sue Lewis of Hammond, Loui-siana and his grandchildren, De-sire McDaniel, Sean McDaniel, Andrea McDaniel, Philip Brehm, Eric Robertson and Grant Black-mon. Four great-grandchildren also survive. Funeral services for Mr. Lewis will be held later this week at the Buie Funeral Home in Rison, Arkansas. Local servic-es and arrangements were under the direction of the DEES-PARRISH FAMILY FUNERAL HOME, 458 S. Marion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025 752-1234 Please share your thoughts and wishes for the family at our on-line family guestbook at parrish-familyfuneralhome.comObituaries are paid advertise-ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporter’s classified department at 752-1293. OBITUARIES COMMUNITY CALENDAR Q To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr@lakecityreporter.com.



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By FRED GOODALLAssociated PressST. PETERSBURG — UCF will head into the new-look Big East off an impressive showing in the Beef ‘O’ Brady’s Bowl. The Knights dominated Ball State 38-17 on Friday night in their final game as a member of Conference USA, amassing 494 yards total offense while holding the high-scoring Cardinals to their lowest point total of the season. “Offensively, this is one of the best games we had all year,” quarterback Blake Bortles said. “Everyone just really picked up and went, and that’s why we won the way we did.” Bortles threw for 271 yards and three touch-downs. The red-shirt soph-omore also rushed for a career-high 80 yards and scored on a 6-yard run that helped UCF (10-4) build a 21-point halftime lead. “I’m really impressed with (Bortles) and what he did and can do,” Ball State coach Pete Lembo said. “He moved the ball down-field very easily, and I’m sure they’re excited to have him back for another two years.” Bortles tossed firsthalf TD passes to Latavius Murray, who also scored on a 2-yard run. J.J. Worton’s 7-yard scoring reception made 35-10 in the third quarter. Ball State (9-4) was hoping to finish with at least 10 wins for the third time in school history, however its high-powered offense sput-tered while being held 18 points below its season aver-age. Keith Wenning threw a 7-yard TD pass to Willie Snead early in the second quarter, but the Cardinals didn’t get into end zone again until Snead scored on a 16-yard reception with 5 minutes remaining. Bortles completed 22 of 33 passes without a pick. Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012 5B5BSports ASSOCIATED PRESSFlorida State’s Aaron Thomas (25) and Charlotte’s Willie Clayton (21) battles for a rebound during their basketball game in Charlotte, N.C., on Saturday. FSU tops 49ersAssociated PressCHARLOTTE, N.C. — Michael Snaer scored 30 points in his first game back from a one-game absence, and Aaron Thomas scored 17 as Florida State beat Charlotte 79-76 Saturday. Snaer, a senior guard who sat out a win over Louisiana-Monroe on Monday for disciplinary reasons, had 17 points at halftime and hit two free throws with 11.8 seconds remaining to help seal the win. Thomas, a freshman guard, came off the bench and scored 15 of his points in the second half and hit one of two free throws with 3.4 seconds left to give the Seminoles (7-4) their final margin. The Seminoles trailed 40-35 at halftime but went on a 10-0 spurt early in the second half and took the lead for good at 47-45. They went on to lead by as many as nine points and held off several surges by Charlotte (11-2). The 49ers cut the margin to two at 78-76 on E. Victor Nickerson’s 3-pointer with 6 seconds left, but couldn’t force overtime. ASSOCIATED PRESSBoise State’s Geraldo Boldewijn (17) reaches over the goal line to score a touchdown despite a hit from Washin gton’s John Timu (10) during the MAACO Bowl in Las Vegas on Saturday.Boise State adds to Las Vegas Bowl win streak Knights bring the ‘Beef’ ASSOCIATED PRESSUCF quarterback Blake Bortles throws a pass against Ball State during Friday’s Beef ‘O’ Brady’s Bowl in St. Petersb urg.Associated PressLAS VEGAS — The last two times Boise State played in the Las Vegas Bowl, there were other places the Broncos wanted to be. Not so on Saturday, when the smallest player on the team came up big in a 28-26 victory over Washington. After two straight blowouts in the Las Vegas Bowl, the Broncos had to work hard for a win sealed by a 27-yard field goal by 5-foot-5 Michael Frisina with 1:16 left. It left them feeling good about a game and a season when, unlike the last two years, there was hardly any talk about Boise State being in a BCS game. “The most satisfying thing about this season was each week you’d see us get just a little bit better,” Boise State coach Chris Petersen said. “These guys, they don’t go through the motions. They have a chip on their shoulder.” The win capped another strong year for the No. 20 Broncos (11-2), who had to overcome a 205-yard rush-ing game by Bishop Sankey against their normally stin-gy defense. Sankey also had 74 yards receiving, giving him 279 of Washington’s 447 yards from scrimmage. But it was Frisina who came up with the biggest game of his career in his final game. He kicked three field goals, including the first game winner he could ever recall booting. “It’s every kicker’s dream to win a big game with a field goal,” Frisina said. “For this one to come on the last game of my career, you couldn’t ask for any-thing more.’ Washington (7-6) had taken the lead for the first time on a 38-yard field goal by Travis Coons with 4:09 left when No. 20 Boise State got a big kickoff return by freshman Shane Williams-Rhodes to the Washington 42. Joe Southwick guided the team to the 12 before Frisina hit the winning kick. “I was just focused on what I had to do,” Frisina said. “I’m there as the insur-ance guy, I guess you’d say.” Boise State sealed the win when Jeremy Ioane intercepted Keith Price’s pass as the Huskies neared midfield. “To their credit they found a way to win the game in the end,” said Washington coach Steve Sarkisian. “Our inability to finish is pretty blaring.” Sankey, who was third on the depth list when fall prac-tice began, rushed 30 times and caught six passes in the biggest game of his career. He scored one touchdown and was the MVP of the game, despite being on the losing side. “There’s a lot of mixed emotions going on,” Sankey said. “The MVP doesn’t mean so much when you come out a loser.” Frisina was only 12 for 17 on field goals, but kicked three of them. Southwick had another efficient game, complet-ing 26 of 38 passes for 264 yards and two touchdowns.Louisiana-Lafayette 43, East Carolina 34NEW ORLEANS — Terrance Broadway passed for 316 yards and ran for 108, helping Louisiana-Lafayette repeat as winners of the New Orleans Bowl with a 43-34 victory against East Carolina on Saturday. Alonzo Harris rushed for 120 yards and two touchdowns for the Ragin’ Cajuns (9-4), who briefly squandered a three-touch-down lead before moving back in front for good on Broadway’s 14-yard scoring pass to Javone Lawson late in the third quarter. Brett Baer added two field goals in the fourth quarter to seal the win. Broadway also ran for a 12-yard score. Shane Carden passed for 278 yards and two touch-downs for East Carolina (8-5) but was intercepted in Cajuns territory by Jemarlous Moten in the fourth quarter as ECU drove for a potential go-ahead score.



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DEAR ABBY: While searching for two of my husband’s childhood friends, with his knowl-edge, I believe I may have found a child he doesn’t know is his. I’m not posi-tive that the child is his, but the time frame and location indicate that he could be, and there’s a strong resemblance to my husband’s brother. (I have seen photos on the Internet.) I am curious whether my hunch is correct, but I’m afraid of asking the questions, not know-ing how they would be received. My husband is a kind and caring person, a great husband and father. The child could have been conceived during a casual, one-night stand before we started dating. I now wish I had never found this information because by not asking, I feel like I’m in denial, and by not saying anything to him, I feel like a terrible person. If the child is his, the mother has kept this from him for more than 10 years. I’d really appreciate some input. What’s the right thing to do? -WONDERING IN THE SOUTHWEST DEAR WONDERING: I see nothing to be gained by withholding this from your spouse. Tell your hus-band about your research, and what you think you may have turned up. Then ask if he is acquainted with the child’s mother. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: One of my fond memories of my father when I was grow-ing up was that he would always order my mom’s meal when we were out for dinner. Of course, she decided what she wanted to eat, but when the waiter came, my dad would always say, “My wife would like the....” Now that I’m older and married, my husband does the same for me. One couple we dine out with regularly gives me a difficult time about this “tradition.” They make comments like, “Oh, Susan’s not allowed to speak in a restaurant.” The wife has also told me she thinks it’s disrespectful to me when my husband orders my food. I have explained that it was a cherished memory of mine and not something forced on me. I try to respect opinions that differ from my own, and I don’t expect everyone to do as I do. Do you think I’m living in the Stone Age? -SUSAN IN VIRGINIA DEAR SUSAN: No, I do not; you appear to be living quite happily in the pres-ent. While the tradition you and your husband are observing is “antiquated,” you are hurting no one. Please allow me to make an observation: When couples dine out together socially, they are supposed to relax, entertain each other and have a good time. Giving you “heart-burn” regarding who orders your dinner is rude, particularly since this couple has done it more than once and has been given an explanation. From my perspective, you might enjoy your evenings out more if you shared them with this particular couple less often. DEAR ABBY HOROSCOPES ARIES (March 21-April 19): Make a personal change that builds your confidence. Romance is on the rise and reuniting with someone or meeting some-one who shares common interests is apparent. +++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Picking up last-minute items or getting together with friends you may not see for a while will bright-en you day. Travel plans or attending an event that allows you to share your ideas and make plans for the upcoming year will be enlightening. +++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Size up your situation, especially where partner-ships are concerned. You have to decipher what’s actually happening if you don’t want to make a mis-take. Change can be good, but it has to be done at the right time and for the right reason. +++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Socialize, be creative or pull together what you need in order to plan a surprise for someone you love. ++++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Take care of responsi-bilities quickly so you can spend time with the people you enjoy being with most. A festive party or working alongside someone special in order to plan a wonder-ful surprise for another will enhance your closest relationships. ++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Share your thoughts and plans. Getting involved in a group endeavor will help you advance in an area you hope to have greater professional deal-ings with in the future. +++++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Personal problems will develop if you aren’t willing to compromise. A change is likely to alter the way or where you live. Focus on love, getting along and doing what’s best for everyone includ-ing you. New beginnings are apparent. +++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Spend time with the ones you love. Good for-tune is within reach if you adapt to the changes going on around you. +++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Decorate and make your place inviting to all those you want to share with this festive season. Offering honest suggestions and worth-while opportunities will help form a closer bond with the people best suited to be by your side in the future. +++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Strategize and put your plans on paper. Once you know where you are heading, it will be easier for you to enjoy the people around you who deserve a little time and tender lov-ing care. +++++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): A bright cheery attitude will captivate your audience. Plan to have some fun and to enjoy the festivities happening in your community. Being a participant will lead to greater personal oppor-tunities and friendships. Love and romance are highlighted. ++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Go over personal papers and your profes-sional game plan. Make sure you have not forgot-ten to do something that may cost you financially next year. Keep a clear head and be honest. ++++ Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com THE LAST WORD Eugenia Word SUNDAY CROSSWORD Across 1 Food that jiggles$ORQJBBBVSLGHU *RQHEXWQRW IRUJRWWHQ +RUL]RQWDO$EEU7LFNHGE\)LUVW86VFUHHQ SRUWUD\HURI'U)X0DQFKX 'DQJHURXV RXWSRXULQJ 2YHUO\6RXYHQLUIURPWKH Petrified Forest? 3ULHVWVDWWLPHV7ZRILIWKVRI1 6\QF" $FWRU(GZDUG-DPHV BBB :KDWUDQG\EXFNV do? $JUHHPHQWIURPWKH *LSSHUVFRDFK" /XWKRU3UHVE35 Force&URZQLQJWRXFK":KDWPD\RLVSDUW of 7RONLHQWULORJ\WR IDQV 0HDVXUHRISXULW\.QREE\3OXFN\ KRXVHNHHSHU" 'UDPDVHWDWWKH 6WHUOLQJ&RRSHU'UDSHU3U\FHDGDJHQF\ 1DXWLFDOGLUHFWLRQ3DVWDVXIIL[,QTXLUHUV:RUGVEHIRUH FRPLQJRUPDGH ,QFOLQHG6RPHVDOPRQ:HOOGRQH6LU /DQFHORWLQ)UDQJODLV" 3\WKRQLQ7KH -XQJOH%RRN +DQGHOEDUV":LQJV/DW/LJKWQLQJBBB6RRWKVD\HUV VKRHODFHSUREOHP" /LQNXSZLWK3OHDVXUHERDWV73 Affair of the heart&KXFNOHKHDGBBB-LPD6WDJHDVVLVWDQW2XWSRXULQJV6KRUWHQDEDU PLW]YDKE\" 'HFRUDWLYHSLQ4DWDULELJZLJ9DU2QHVZLWKDORWRI SXOO" /RQGRQFDQ$OSLQHZLQG/LWHUDOO\LWVHOI0HPRRSHQHU3RODUH[SORUHUDIWHU JHWWLQJUHOLJLRQ" 7DJOLQHIRUWKH ELRSLF'XGOH\VWDUULQJEDQGOHDGHU%URZQ" 2XWDWWKHGHQWLVWV")UHGG\.UXHJHUV street 7HQ &RPPDQGPHQWVQRQR :KHUH0DF\V NHHSVWKHZHGGLQJdresses? :LPSOHZHDUHU+RPHWRWKH 'RZQRQFH 1DVW\ORRNBBBLW3RSXODU VPDUWSKRQHDSS 'RJFRPPDQG*XLWDULVW'XDQH DQGRWKHUV 0DNHVDVRQHV ZD\'RZQ :KDWRQHPD\EUHDN GXULQJH[HUFLVH $QGUp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however hard heWULHV*URZVWXEE\ZLWKRXWH[HUFLVH %LJWUXFNPDNHU+DYHBBBEDWKH:LOOLQJUHFLSLHQWV"8UJHQWO\3V\FKRORJ\SLRQHHU Alfred 7ULFNWDNLQJFDUG JDPH $EGLFDWHG" 3KRWRVKRSFRPPDQG57 Locale of a DWWDFN )XQQ\)LHOGV-XVWEHJXQ)UHFNOHVHJ6DODGEDUVXSSO\&DVWOHFRPSRQHQWBBBWRJR'URS2QHRIILYH 1LFKRODVHV 6WDUWRIDEDVNHWEDOO JDPH :RUGVIURP6JW )ULGD\ 8.PLOGHFRUDWLRQ)HPLQLVW*HUPDLQH5DLQLQJKDUG"7RWDOO\MD]]HG6RPHVFULSWXUDO SDVVDJHV 'RZQUHFLSLHQW HJ )HUJLHIRURQH%\JRQHERRNVWRUH FKDLQ %XOOVHVVLRQ",QVSHFWRULQ (OL]DEHWK*HRUJHP\VWHULHV 2EH\HGDVHQWU\VD\6HH$FURVVBBB2QO\2QH 0HOLVVD(WKHULGJHKLW 93 Cleared the dishes$QWLJRQDH FRPSRVHU&DUO 0LVV$PHULFD LGHQWLILHU $OOD\1HLWKHU'HPQRU 5HS .QRFNRYHU&KDUOHPDJQHV UHDOP$EEU 1R 5(/($6('$7( +($5,1*'28%/(%\0DWW*LQVEHUJ(GLWHGE\:LOO6K RUW] )RUDQ\WKUHHDQVZHUVFDOOIURPDWRXFKWRQHSKRQHHDFKPLQXWHRUZLWKDFUHGLWFDUG 123456789101112131415161718192021222324 2526 27282930313233 3435 36373839 4041424344 4546 4748 49 5051525354 555657 58 5960 616263 6465666768697071 72 7374 7576 77 787980818283848586878889909192939495969798 99 100 101102103104 105106107108109110111 112 Hunt for childhood friends yields surprising discovery TABBYATSEAPIBBMCS OLIVEFEIGNSEPIACHI WELDTUESDAYCOOKROBIN IRKRATEDLONDONJACK TOOKCARERIPSAILS WILDERGENEELAYNE ODORISLESROBS FRENCHVICTORSATEISM OASLEONORABASSLANCEGTEERINIDTAGAVID HOLDSDARNITEMBAAED OREOROGERHAVESNL RICHBUDDYTELEXEDICENOTORESPHOENIXRIVER TOGASHAUNODES STOKERMONTANAJOE OARSPANEEGOMANIA SLICKGRACEMATEOANG CUBANMARKNEWTONJUICE ATEEAVESATOLLASLAN RESENIDPALEDWASNT Answers to last Sunday’s Crossword. Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. CELEBRITY CIPHER Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012 5D



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6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04246A COURTESY PHOTOColumbia County Sheriff Mark Hunter (second from right) announced the promotion of three members of the sheriff’s office staff. Deputy Randy Harris on (left) was promoted to corporal; Detective Sgt. Katina Kicks (second from left) was promoted to lieutenant and Detective Jennifer Wolf was promoted to corporal. All three were as signed to the patrol division.COURTESY PHOTOFive Points Elementary School kindergartners and their te achers pose for a group photo after successful effort to co llect pet food to donate to North Florida Animal Rescue. The children collected more than 160 cans of cat and dog food. Kindergarte n teachers are Kim Fortner (left), Ashley Feagle (second fr om left), Somer Jenkins (right) and Jennifer Holme (seco nd from right). Food for rescued animals Sheriff’s office promotions COURTESY PHOTOSStonebranch Band (above) and Willow Creek Band (belo w) will provide the entertainment for the first weekend of 2013 at Spirit of the Suwannee Music P ark in Live Oak. Willow Creek, which hails from Mayo, will take the stage Friday, Jan. 4, i n the park’s Music Hall, The group plays a mix of old and new country, Southern rock and b lues, along with some classic rock. Stonebranch will perform Saturday, Jan. 5. Its music also i s a mix of country, classic rock, blues and Southern rock. Doors open at 6 p.m. both Friday and Saturday; shows start at 8. Music at SoSMP Mental disability at issue with state’s death penaltyBy BILL KACZORAssociated PressTALLAHASSEE — The Florida Supreme Court will be asked to take another look at how judges should determine if a death row inmate is mentally dis-abled. The issue divided the high court this week in a 4-2 opinion upholding Freddie Lee Hall’s death sentence for murdering Karol Hurst, a 21-year-old, pregnant woman who was abducted leaving a Leesburg grocery store in 1978. A co-defen-dant is serving a life sen-tence. Defense lawyer Eric Pinkard, who works for a state office that represents death row inmates, said Friday that he will ask for a rehearing and if that fails may take the case to the U.S. Supreme Court. “That is one of our options,” Pinkard said. “There are many cases where the issue is in play.” The federal high court has prohibited the execution of mentally disabled inmates as unconstitutional cruel and unusual punishment, but it has allowed states to determine what constitutes mental disability. The majority of Florida justices ruled Thursday in Hall’s case that they are bound by precedent set in earlier decisions prohibit-ing anyone with an IQ of 70 or higher from being declared mentally disabled, regardless of other evi-dence to the contrary. The Florida Supreme Court in 1989 vacated Hall’s original death penalty and ordered a new sentenc-ing hearing. A judge then resentenced Hall to death but declared he was men-tally disabled. That, how-ever, was before the U.S. Supreme Court had ruled mentally disabled inmates could not be executed and before Florida passed a law setting the IQ limit. When Hall later filed another appeal, the same judge ruled he was not mentally disabled because his scores on three IQ test ranged from 71 to 80. Justice Barbara Pariente sided with the majority in upholding that decision, but she wrote a concurring opinion saying there’s no clear national consensus on how to determine mental disability and noting most states do not set a limit based on IQ test scores. “It is certainly of concern that in some states Hall would be mentally (disabled) by those states’ definitions, while in others, like Florida, the bright-line cutoff requires a contrary finding,” Pariente wrote. She added that in the future the U.S. Supreme Court may determine such a cutoff is unconsti-tutional or the Legislature may change the law. Until then, though, the Florida law must be followed, she concluded. Justices Jorge Labarga and James Perry dissented. Justice Peggy Quince did not participate in the case. Labarga wrote that he believes the law is uncon-stitutional, but he also urged the Legislature to re-examine it. Perry noted that Hall’s teachers repeatedly described him as men-tally disabled and in two prior rulings the Supreme Court noted that testimony reflected Hall had an IQ of 60 and suffered from organic brain damage. “Hall is a poster child for mental (disability) claims,” Perry wrote. The state law also permits the execution of inmates with IQs below 70 if other evidence indicates they are not mentally disabled. As a result, the Supreme Court has upheld death sentences of inmates with lower scores because in one case the condemned man was able to obtain a GED diploma and live inde-pendently and in another the prisoner could copy let-ters written by others, sign his own name and work as a cook, garbage collec-tor and dish washer. In a third case, less credibility was given to an expert who testified that an inmate had an IQ of 69 than those who said he had scored higher. “If the proscription against executing the men-tally (disabled) is to mean anything, it cannot be wield-ed as this double-edged sword,” Perry wrote. Juvenile facility contractor quits TALLAHASSEE — A private juvenile justice facility in the Florida Panhandle has terminated its residential contract with the state after a staff mem-ber was charged with bat-tering a 15-year-old inmate. Department of Juvenile Justice officials on Friday said many other children also have expressed con-cerns about their safety at the Milton Girls Academy. Milton is northeast of Pensacola. The department on Dec. 12 released a surveillance video showing Shannon Abbott pushing the teen-ager into a wall, throwing her on the floor and laying on top of her for nearly 20 minutes in August. Abbott has pleaded not guilty to a misdemeanor battery charge. The contract will terminate at midnight Monday, and the department is in the process of moving the juveniles to other residen-tial programs. The agency previously had frozen admissions.Inmate dies at Polk County jail FROSTPROOF — Authorities are investigat-ing the death of an inmate in a central Florida jail. Polk County Sheriff’s Office spokeswoman Carrie Eleazer said other inmates yelled out to depu-ties Friday evening that Stephen Harry Grimm was not breathing. Eleazer said deputies and then paramed-ics attempted to revive Grimm. The 53-year-old Eaton Park man was pronounced dead at the Frostproof jail. An autopsy will be conducted. Eleazer said no foul play is suspected and there was no trauma to Grimm’s body. Grimm was sentenced in October to 180 days in jail for violating probation. He had been arrested on DUI charges in July 2011 and in April 2012. Eleazer said that when Grimm was booked into the jail, he said he suffered from a heart condition and previously had a heart attack.Man gets more time for hoax WEST PALM BEACH — A Florida prison inmate has been sentenced to more than six additional years behind bars for sending a threatening hoax letter to prosecutors. The sentence was imposed by a federal judge Friday on 28-year-old Justin Burton Lane. The federal sentence won’t begin until Lane finishes the eight years he has remaining on burglary, robbery and theft convictions.“If the proscription against executing the mentally (disabled) is to mean anything, it cannot be wielded as this double-edged sword.”— Justice James Perry, state Supreme Court AROUND FLORIDA Q Associated Press



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6B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421 6BSPORTS If you have an orthopedic injury, its good to know that quality care is available right here in Lake City. Lake City Bone and Joint offers treatment for a wide range of orthopedic issues. From sports injuries to carpel tunnel syndrome to rotator cuff injuries to arthroscopic hip, knee and shoulder surgery, Lake City Bone and Joint is ready for you. To schedule an appointment, call 386-755-9720 3140 NW Medical Center Lane, Suite 130, Lake City, FL 32055 Dr. Jeffrey Glenn is Lake Citys only board-certied Orthopedic Surgeon who is fellowship-trained in joint replacement surgery. www.LCBoneandJoint.com Excellence. I B... J. Excellence. I B... J. LCM-3109 Physician Ads 5.25x10_L7.indd 1 8/15/12 11:53:29 AM www.sb.com R OXANNE M AXSON 755-0600 ext. 3945 NMLS ID# 457358 W ILLETTE S IST R UNK 755-0600 ext. 3520 NMLS ID# 457315 2571 W US Hwy 90 4705 W US Hwy 90 707 SW Main Blvd M ITCH B R O W N 755-0600 ext. 3905 NMLS ID# 457328 R O BB B U R NS 755-0600 ext. 3540 NMLS ID# 457332 N ED R A H O R TON 755-0600 ext. 3301 NMLS ID# 613834 DEDICATED TO M AKING YOU R D R EA M S A R EALITY A CTUAL F I R ST F EDE R AL M O R TGAGE C USTO M E R CO MM ENTS EQUA L HOU SIN G L E ND ER JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Mugged in Manhattan Floridas Patric Young (4) makes a slam dunk in the Gators 82-43 win over Southeastern Louisiana in Gainesville on Wednesday. The No. 8 Gators were upset, 67-61, by Kansas State in Manhattan, Kan., on Saturday, despite 19 points from Young. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Columbia Highs Bernisha Clark (15) fights for possession of the ball against Wolfson Highs Tierra Cooper (12) and Breona Pelham (25) in a game on Dec. 13. Trojan sweep By TIM KIRBY tkirby@lakecityreporter.com It was a packed house at Columbia High on Saturday for the matchup with Hamilton County High. The Tigers went home with the lumps of coal. The Trojans (8-1) won, 57-51, completing the sweep after a 56-52 win over the Lady Tigers. In both games Hamilton County played better down the stretch. Columbia led by three points at the end of the first quarter and by six at halftime. The Tigers pushed the lead to eight points midway through the third quarter, then the Trojans took over. Hamilton County closed the quarter on a 12-2 run to take a two-point lead, 38-36. Columbia went up by four points early in the fourth quarter, before Anteferance Smith stoked the Trojans to a 17-8 finish. Smith scored 13 points in the quarter including a couple of alleyoops to put exclamation points on the win. Morris Marshall led CHS with 22 points and Tr Simmons scored 14. Javont Foster, Akeem Williams and Wayne Broom each scored four points, while Dillan Hall had a bas ket and DaKarry Rossin hit a free throw. Smith finished with 23 points. Kevin McClain scored 16 and Jeremiah Lee hit double figures with 10. The Lady Tigers came back from a six-point deficit to tie the game, but five missed free throws in the closing minutes allowed Hamilton County to win it with a 6-2 run at the end of the game. Marnae Gaskins scored 17 points and Lona Wilson scored 12. Tia Ingram scored 23 for Hamilton County. Columbias boys proved they can play late in games. The Tigers (5-3, 4-0) out scored host St. Augustine High 26-11 in the fourth quarter on Friday to pull out a 63-61 win and stay undefeated in district play. Columbia scorers were: Marshall, 18, Simmons, 15, Rossin, 11, Foster, 7, Broom, 6, Hall, 4, and Andrew Moemeka, 2.



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6D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04246DLIFEBy BETH J. HARPAZAP Travel EditorNEW YORK — For more than 20 years, state park officials in Massachusetts have encouraged locals to get off the couch Jan. 1 and take a hike — nothing too strenuous, but a healthy way to start the new year. Last year, a group called America’s State Parks expanded the effort, called First Day Hikes, to all 50 states. The group hoped for 50 events but had no idea how many Americans would willingly skip New Year’s Eve revelry in order to get up early Jan. 1 and hit the woods. They ended up with 400 outings that drew 14,000 people, hik-ing a total of more than 30,000 miles. This year will be even big-ger, with more than 600 events from a cross-country ski outing in Alaska to a sunrise hike in Hawaii. “It’s a way to promote a naturally healthy way of life but also to promote state parks as a year-round recreation option,” said Priscilla Geigis, state parks director in Massachusetts and organizer of the national effort. “The park managers got people on hikes who live right there but who had never been to the parks during the winter.” Most First Day Hikes are moderate in difficulty, ranging from one to three miles. Some are on paved roads accessible to stroll-ers and wheelchairs. All are free, though some parks have parking fees. Some hikes combine out-door interests with history, such as a hike in Castlewood Canyon State Park in Colorado where hik-ers were greeted by volunteers dressed as 19th century homesteaders. In Massachusetts, hik-ers included Gov. Patrick Deval and his dog Tobey at Mount Greylock. All First Day Hikes are guided by rangers who talk about wildlife, trees, nests and other natural phenomena in winter landscapes. “People were blown away by the quality of the park rang-ers and the details they gave us,” said Chris Saunders of Chesterfield, Va. With his wife, father-in-law and dog, he joined a group of more than 50 hik-ers in Pocahontas State Park in Virginia last January. “Every little thing — a rock, a tree — the rangers can tell a story about it.” More than 3,700 people took part in Virginia’s First Day Hikes, which were offered in all 35 state parks. Officials promot-ed the outings on Facebook and Twitter, and offered prizes for photos. Saunders sent in a photo and won a free parking pass to Pocahontas. “We go back there all the time,” said Saunders, who plans to go this Jan. 1, too. “It was so much fun, we’d go back even if we hadn’t won the pass.” In Alaska, more than 30 hardy souls turned out last Jan. 1 for a hike at the Eagle River Nature Center in Chugach State Park that lasted an hour and a half despite temperatures well below zero. This coming Jan. 1, a crosscountry ski outing is planned out of Independence Mine State Historical Park, a former gold mining site, according to Bill Kiger, interpretation and educa-tion manager for Alaska State Parks. “We want to start the year off right to help people with their New Year’s resolutions,” Kiger said. “This is the first step to doing that physical activity we all pledge to do.” In Maine last Jan. 1, hikes took place in four different types of terrain — at Popham Beach, Sebago Lake, Aroostook State Park in the northern interior and at Wolfe’s Neck Woods State Park in Freeport, a coastal wood-land. “We were so happy when the First Day Hikes came along because we have been develop-ing programs to get people into the state parks in winter,” said Will Harris, director of Maine’s Division of Parks and Public Lands. “This way, on Jan. 1, you can have people thinking about being outside from the first of the year.” State park officials are not the only ones organizing outdoor activities to start the new year off right. Many communities and athletic clubs organize races in local parks. Life Time Fitness, which operates fitness centers and programs, expects 100,000 people at 5-kilometer walks and runs in 28 cities Jan. 1. There are also polar bear plunges, where participants immerse themselves in chilly lakes and oceans on New Year’s Day, held around the country from Seattle to Coney Island in Brooklyn, N.Y. Organizations like the Appalachian Mountain Club, the Sierra Club and local groups like Nevada’s Friends of Gold Butte also organize Jan. 1 hikes and events in many places. Even in New York City, outdoor clubs are offering New Year’s Day out-ings to explore the north end of Manhattan and the shores of Staten Island. Many individuals simply create their own outings to kick off the new year. Lincoln Fuller of Yarmouth, Maine, has been hiking up Mount Washington in New Hampshire each Jan. 1 with two friends for more than 10 years. He says they usually encounter dozens of others on the cold, windy mountain. “It’s always surprising to me how many people go up on New Year’s Day to say, ‘This would be a good way to start the year,’” he said. Fuller says he’s often asked by people why he would do such a thing in the middle of winter. His standard reply: “Well, there’s no bugs.”Guided hikes Jan. 1 in parks in all 50 statesFirst Day hikes becoming tradition across the country. ASSOCIATED PRESSHikers pose for a chilly photo at Eagle River Nature Ce nter in Alaska on a First Day Hike on Jan. 1, 2012. The hike was one of 400 First Day Hikes held at parks in al l 50 states. More than 600 are planned for this Jan. 1. Hasbro to makeEasy-Bake Ovento appeal to boys By MICHELLE R. SMITHAssociated PressPROVIDENCE, R.I. — Hasbro says it will soon reveal a gender-neutral Easy-Bake Oven after meeting with a New Jersey girl who started a campaign calling on the toy maker to make one that appeals to all kids. McKenna Pope, 13, of Garfield, N.J., got more than 40,000 signatures on her online petition at Change.org and the sup-port of celebrity chefs including Bobby Flay, who backed her call for Hasbro to make a gender-neutral oven and to include boys in the ads. She was prompted to start the petition after shopping for an Easy-Bake as a Christmas present for her 4-year-old brother, Gavyn Boscio, and finding them only in purple and pink. Hasbro invited McKenna and her fam-ily to its Pawtucket, R.I., headquarters to meet with its Easy-Bake team, and on Monday, they drove to Rhode Island from New Jersey. During the meet-ing, Hasbro executives showed off a prototype of their newest Easy-Bake: one that’s black, silver and blue. Hasbro has been working on the new color scheme and design for about 18 months, and decided to invite McKenna to see it and offer her thoughts, said John Frascotti, Hasbro’s chief marketing officer. McKenna said the company is doing everything she asked, including put-ting boys in the ads. “I think that they really met most or even all of what I wanted them to do, and they really amazed me,” she said, adding that Gavyn thought the new design was “awesome.” Frascotti pointed out that the classic toy has had about a dozen different color schemes, from yel-low to green to teal to sil-ver, since first being intro-duced in 1963. The most recent iteration, introduced in 2011, is mostly purple with pink accents. By DEAN FOSDICKAssociated PressIn many of the seed catalogs arriving soon in mailboxes, the headlin-ers will be grafted veg-etables, in which one or more different varieties grow from a single root-stock. Tomatoes seem to be the grafted transplants most frequently offered, providing greater disease tolerance, bigger harvests, increased vigor and better taste. Side-by-side tests done by Ball Horticultural Co. in Chicago have shown at least 50 percent higher yields from grafted toma-toes than from non-grafted varieties. That total varies from garden to garden and gardener to gardener, but it means more fruit or larger fruit. Grafted plants are also pricier, in part because grafting is labor intensive. “You’re also paying for disease insurance and a greatly improved yield,” said Scott Mozingo, prod-uct manager for Burpee Home Gardens, a Ball Horticultural subsidiary. “You’re paying more but what you’re getting is so much more.” Grafting is an ancient horticultural practice that fuses tissues from one genetically different plant to those from another, combining, for example, disease management with heirloom flavors. Think apple trees, grapevines and roses. Vegetables have been late entries in large-scale grafting programs intend-ed for home gardeners, particularly in the United States. But that is about to change. “It’s been primarily because the (horticultural) industry here hasn’t been set up for it,” Mozingo said. “Grafted vegetables have been big in Asia for 70 years. In Europe, for about a decade. It’s been largely a supply problem, but I think they’re going to be a very big thing in seed catalogs next season. A very big thing in retail, too.” Grafted plants aren’t any more difficult to work with than non-grafted ones, but do require slightly differ-ent management. That includes Q Planting them deeper. “They’re tall tomato plants so they need a deeper base,” Mozingo said. “But don’t bury the grafts. Those should be above the soil line or you cancel out the benefits.” Q Pruning. “The plants are so vigorous that they produce a lot of vegeta-tive material,” said Josh Kirschenbaum, product development coordina-tor and spokesman for Territorial Seed Co. in Cottage Grove, Ore. “There won’t be as much fruit production if they don’t get pruned.” Q Adding trellises. “Towers or cages are pretty close to being mandatory,” Kirschenbaum said. “These plants are so energetic and grow so tall that it’s impor-tant you give them some kind of support.” Q Easing off on the chemicals. Grafted vege-tables have better natural defenses against ground-borne diseases and insects. Fewer pesticides and her-bicides are needed. The potted plants will be offered with single or double grafts. Grafted pep-pers and eggplant will be offered along with toma-toes in many catalogs. Grafted cucumbers and watermelons may be added to the inventory once nurs-eries solve the logistics. “Both vine out pretty quickly,” Kirschenbaum said. “We aren’t ruling them out, but we will have to come up with a clever way to get those plants shipped to our custom-ers.” At least one additional benefit can be derived from gardening with graft-ed plants: their entertain-ment value. “It’s fun to say you can grow red cherry toma-toes and orange cherry tomatoes on one plant,” Kirschenbaum said. “Or Beefsteaks with a Roma.” Grafted veggies are next trend Higher yields, better taste are big attractions. ASSOCIATED PRESSGrafted tomato transplants (left) produced better t han 50 percent higher yields than non-grafted varieties, as seen here at Log House Plants Nursery in Cottage Grove, Ore. Grafted vegetables are expected to be a big hit in seed catalogs and r etail stores next season. TRAVEL Online: Q America’s State Parks: http://www.americasstate parks.org/first-day-hikes Gardening Online: Q http://www.grafted veg.com. ASSOCIATED PRESSMcKenna Pope, 13, (right) and her brother Gavyn Bos cio, 4, pose for a photo at their home in Garfield, N.J. Po pe started a petition demanding the toy company Hasbro make it s Easy-Bake Oven more boy friendly. The petition garn ered more than 30,000 signatures in a little more than a week.



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water isnt an option for SRWMD, the St. Johns River Water Management District does have large enough facilities. Any water that enters into the aquifer will spread to the other water districts. The Floridan aquifer allows farms to flourish, cities to grow and industry to thrive. Its life itself. The human body is made mostly of water. Robert L. Knight is the director of the Howard T. Odum Florida Springs Institute, and someone who has studied the springs and water treat ment systems for 30 years. He has a doctorate in systems ecology from the University of Florida, department of environ mental engineering and center for wetlands. He founded and is presi dent of Wetland Solutions, and has professional expe rience with more than 200 projects assessing environ mental impacts of human activities and designing solutions, and has written more than 100 technical reports on wetland permit ting, design and operation, according to an online resume. He said the recharge concepts now under con sideration by the districts are expensive and dont deal with nearly enough water to have a noticeable effect. Thats like trying to use a rocket ship to carry toys to Orlando ..., he said of the cost effectiveness of the project. Theres a wet land alternative thats bet ter than all the concepts (studied in the memo). Knight develops wetlands to be used as recharge areas for waste water for municipalities. He said the direct and indirect injection meth ods studied in the memo do not remove enough nitrates from the water, either. He said his method of indirectly putting water back into the Floridan does. Wetlands act as a filter for all types of pollut ants, he said. But even that method, while better, doesnt address the real problem -more water is leaving than returning to the system. The cheapest way to recharge the aquifer is to stop pumping so much, Knight said. Suwannee River Water Management District per mits 300 million gallons a day to be pumped out and used by farms, cities and industry, Knight said. An additional 100 mil lions gallons a day has been redirected into the St. Johns River Water Management District by over-pumping and permit ting by that districts man agement, Knight said. With the recent bad press the water man agement districts have received over declining ground water levels, algae-clogged rivers and a 155 million gallon a day consumptive use permit, Knight said the aquifer recharge concepts stud ied in the Atkins memo amount to a public rela tions campaign. Thats trying to put a Band-Aid on (the prob lem), he said. While calling for a halt to pumping more water may seem like an easy answer to some, the prob lem with that is water fuels the economy. From cooling turbines in a power plant to grow ing green beans on a farm, a healthy supply of water allows communities to thrive. The number one use of water in the SRWMD is for agriculture, Knight said. District 1 County Commissioner and Chairman of Florida Leaders Organized for Water Ron Williams said he understands that theres a balance between growth and conservation. You have to find that happy medium, he said. Carlos Herd, SRWMD water supply division director, said the Atkins memo was just one of more than 40 concepts and projects water manage ment is either implement ing or studying to help improve the water supply. We dont have all our eggs in one basket..., he said. Theres a lot of other options out there. Herd said the public has a perception that reclaimed waste water goes from toilet to tap. He pointed out that all water on the planet has been reused. Plus, he said the state requires that water injected into the aquifer be of the same quality as whats already there. Besides, the ideas pre sented in the Atkins memo are far from ready to be implemented, he said. Minimum flow rates for the Suwannee river need to be completed, and a cost estimate for the con cepts will have to be com pleted. Theres a finite amount of water and there isnt any more being produced, he said. Every drop of water we take out of the ground has been used (at some point in the past)..., Herd said. People do not like to think they are drinking reused water. Merrillee MalwitzJipson, president of Our Santa Fe River, said she has issues with the injec tion of reclaimed wastewa ter into the aquifer. They cannot remove all the chemicals well enough to be putting (water back) into our aquifer, she said. Thats my biggest concern that they can not remove the pharmaceuti cals. She said nitrates, caf feine, sucrose and endo crine disrupters arent removed. She also worries about the effect the water would have on the limestone. At the most basic level, the Floridan Aquifer is an underground limestone formation that holds fresh water. Limestone can be dis solved by water with high concentrations of dis solved oxygen. When the limestone is eaten away by the dissolved oxygen, it releases radioactive ele ments and arsenic, which would be carried into the drinking water, she said. At the last SRWMD governing board meeting, Malwitz-Jipson mentioned her worries about the effects of dissolved oxygen on limestone. Water management told her that dissolved oxygen wasnt as much of a prob lem as she believed. I didnt feel satisfied with that answer, MalwitzJipson said, because everything that Ive read says its very hard to (remove the dissolved oxy gen from the water). Malwitz-Jipson said she would like to see fewer permits issued and the aquifer recharge itself. Employee Name Yrs Job Title Vernon M. Parsons 40 Maintenance Planner Scheduler Rudy D. Nyssen 30 Manager, Materials Management Willard Cribbs, Jr. 25 Area Foreman Bruce D. Ford 25 Utility Operator Darryl L. Franklin 25 Chief Operator James C. Hughes 25 Heavy Equipment Operator Bernard K. McCullers 25 Utility Operator William D. Newell 25 Comb A/C Man Elec Tech III Jamie L. Bowen 10 Shift Foreman Production Jonathan H. Carver 10 Comb/Elect Inst Man Tech III Allen V. Corbin 10 Comb/Elect Inst Man Tech III John A. Creech, Jr. 10 Mechanic First Class Alfred A. Deas 10 Radio Tech/Ins/Man/Tech III Monroe N. Dunaway 10 Chief Operator Phillip D. Franklin 10 Heavy Equipment Operator Jackie C. Gaylard 10 Supervisor, Accounts Payable Mona D. Gillen 10 Sr. Maintenance Assistant William G. Godwin 10 General Foreman Clayton J. Goolsby 10 Maintenance Planner Scheduler Nathan A. Griffin 10 Computer Network Specialist Jerald C. Harrell, Jr. 10 Dragline Operator Samuel E. Hawkins 10 Tank Farm Operator Zemillar Laura Hayes 10 Flotation Operator Darrin C. Howard 10 Mobile Mechanic First Class Keith L. Howell 10 B Operator Employee Name Yrs Job Title Vernon M. Parsons 40 Maintenance Planner Scheduler Rudy D. Nyssen 30 Manager, Materials Management Willard Cribbs, Jr. 25 Area Foreman Bruce D. Ford 25 Utility Operator Darryl L. Franklin 25 Chief Operator James C. Hughes 25 Heavy Equipment Operator Bernard K. McCullers 25 Utility Operator William D. Newell 25 Comb A/C Man Elec Tech III Jamie L. Bowen 10 Shift Foreman Production Jonathan H. Carver 10 Comb/Elect Inst Man Tech III Allen V. Corbin 10 Comb/Elect Inst Man Tech III John A. Creech, Jr. 10 Mechanic First Class Alfred A. Deas 10 Radio Tech/Ins/Man/Tech III Monroe N. Dunaway 10 Chief Operator Phillip D. Franklin 10 Heavy Equipment Operator Jackie C. Gaylard 10 Supervisor, Accounts Payable Mona D. Gillen 10 Sr. Maintenance Assistant William G. Godwin 10 General Foreman Clayton J. Goolsby 10 Maintenance Planner Scheduler Nathan A. Griffin 10 Computer Network Specialist Jerald C. Harrell, Jr. 10 Dragline Operator Samuel E. Hawkins 10 Tank Farm Operator Zemillar Laura Hayes 10 Flotation Operator Darrin C. Howard 10 Mobile Mechanic First Class Keith L. Howell 10 B Operator White Springs 2012 3 rd & 4th Quarter Service Awards At PotashCorp-White Springs, we celebrate with our of service. It is the experience, strong work ethic and leadership of these men and women that allow us to excel in all that we strive to accomplish. Their commitment to safely mining and manufacturing products that supply plant nutrients to help feed a hungry world ensures that we meet one of the PotashCorp Goals of No Harm to People or the Environment. As General Manager, I know that our employees are our greatest resource. I would like to take this opportunity to thank these employees for their dedication, strong work ethic and years of service. Sincerely, Terry L. Baker, General Manager Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY DECEMBER 23, 2012 7A 7A BUST: Fort White pair jailed after meth lab bust Continued From 1A AQUIFER: Water management districts consider aquifer recharge methods Continued From 1A White, were charged with posses sion of methamphetamine, posses sion of listed chemicals, manufacture of methamphetamine, possession of drug paraphernalia and grand theft auto in connection with the case. Each suspect was booked into the Columbia County Detention Center in lieu of $76,000 bond. According to Columbia County sheriffs reports, around 1 p.m. Thursday deputies found the two suspects actively processing meth amphetamine when the warrant was served. Detectives with the Multi Jurisdictional Task Force discov ered materials and chemicals consis tent with the illegal manufacture of methamphetamine. Both suspects were taken into custody without inci dent and booked into the Columbia County Detention Center. Approximately 500 grams of methamphetamine were seized at the scene. In addition to the narcot ics, a stolen scooter was seized by authorities. JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City Reporter Canoeists make their way down the Ichetucknee River in this file photo.



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