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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
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Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:01983

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:01983

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text

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10B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT FRIDAY & SATURDAY, DECEMBER 21-22, 2012 10BSPORTS FRI. 12-21 SEC B 1-10.indd 10 12/20/12 10:04:43 AM



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By DAVID ESPO AP Special Correspondent WASHINGTON Confronted with a revolt among the rank and file, House Republicans abruptly put off a vote Thursday night on legislation allowing tax rates to rise for households earning $1 million and up, complicating attempts to avoid a year-end fiscal cliff that threatens to send the economy into recession. In a brief statement, House Speaker John Boehner said the bill did not have sufficient support from our members to pass. At the same time he challenged President Barack Obama and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., to work on legislation to avert the fiscal cliff. The Senate must now act, Boehner, R-Ohio, said. Emerging from a hurriedly called evening meeting of House Lake City Reporter FRIDAY & SATURDAY, DECEMBER 21 & 22, 2012 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | 75 LAKECITYREPORTER.COM WEEKEND EDITION Opinion ................ 4A People .................. 2A Obituaries .............. 5A Advice & Comics ........ 6-7B Puzzles ................ 6-7B TODAY IN PEOPLE Miss Universe hails from U.S. COMING SUNDAY Recharging the Florida Aquifer. 56 26 Sunny WEATHER, 2A CALL US: (386) 752-1293 SUBSCRIBE TO THE REPORTER: Voice: 755-5445 Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 138, No. 232 1A LAST CHANCE FOR 2012 SAVINGS! 1-800-650-2199 www.RountreeMooreToyota.com Friday Quilt raffle Columbia County Senior Services will raffle a sam pler quilt to support the center. Tickets are $1 and the drawing will be held today. See Carol for tickets. Saturday Filipino society dinner The Filipino American Cultural Society of Lake City will have a Christmas Celebration Dinner and Dance from 6 to 11 p.m. at the Epiphany Catholic Church Social Hall in Lake City. There will be holiday entertainment, music, danc ing and a cultural food buf fet. Please bring a covered dish to share. Arrival, setup of buffet and social time will be from 6 to 6:30 p.m., din ner will be at 6:30. The event is free for FACS members. For nonmembers, cost is $10 per person. For more information contact, Bob Gavette at 965-5905. Toy drive, concert Resurrection Praise Team will hold a toy drive and Christmas Praise Extravaganza from 4 to 6 p.m. at Niblack Elementary School. Bring unwrapped toys and enjoy praise danc ing, singing and spoken words. Door prizes and raffles will be held. Praise, prayer breakfast New Mount Zion AME Church, of Watertown, will have a Christmas Praise and Prayer Breakfast from 10 a.m. to noon. the meal will include grits, scrambled eggs, sausage, salmon pat ties, toast, buscuit, juice and coffee. Cost is $7 per per son. The Rev. Leroy Young, of Jacksonville, will speak on The Real Meaning of Christmas. For tickets or additional information, call The Rev. Charles young at (904) 713-7877, Curtis Jones at (386) 752-8179 or Evette Harris at (386) 752-4306. Tickets will be available at the door. Sunday Puppet performance First Presbyterian Church, 697 SW Baya Drive, invites the community to see Peter the Presbyterian and his family of puppets perform a skit during its worship service at 1030 a.m. For more information, call the church office at 752-0670. Candlelight service Elim Baptist Church, 3435 SW Elim Church Road in Fort White, will hold a Christmas Candlelight Service at 6 p.m. The com munity is invited. For more information, call (386) 497-1972. Boehner pulls Plan B Is the world ending today? Locals on Mayan prophecy: Dont hold your breath. By DEREK GILLIAM dgilliam@lakecityreporter.com The Lake City Reporter polled shoppers at the Lake City Mall Thursday about the predicted Mayan apoc alypse thats supposed to strike today. The general consensus was that tomor row will come, and the next day will follow. George Villalta, 23 of Lake City, said he sees a major flaw in the Mayan calendar. It seems kinda ridiculous that peo ple believe (that the world will end today). The Mayan calendar doesnt even account for leap years. Charlie Davis, a Lake City resident since 1982, also thinks the hype the impend ing destruc tion of the world has received is ridicu lous. I think its a crock of bull, he said. Is that going to be in the paper if the world doesnt end tomorrow? Destiny Hill, also a Lake City resident, said she doesnt have time to comp template whether the world will end today. Not even going to give it a second thought, going to continue on like Im doing today, she said. Tammy Harris said she doesnt believe the world will end, but that she has advice to those that do. To all those that believe, send me your stuff. PO Box 1624 Lake City, Florida, Harris said. And I will be sure all (your) possessions are well taken care of. No pets. Christy Welborn, of Glen St. Mary, said she doesnt Hill Davis Harris Villalta Welborn From staff reports Candlelight for the homeless will shine at Olustee Park in downtown Lake City tonight at 6:30 p.m. The Homeless Services Network of Suwannee Valley holds its annu al Homeless Persons Awareness Candlelight Vigil on the first day of winter, which is today. Dec. 21 is the longest night of the year, and Jennifer Lee, homeless coordinator for the United Way of Suwannee Valley, said this vigil helps bring awareness to homelessness in the area. Our goal is to get them off the streets, she said. She said last year there were 929 homeless in Columbia County. Last year, 1,813 homeless indi viduals were identified in Columbia, Hamilton, Lafayette and Suwannee counties. This number includes children in school who may not know where they will be staying or from where they will get their next meal. United Way of Suwannee Valley serves as the lead agency for the homeless Services Network of Suwannee Valley. That group serves the counties of Columbia, Hamilton, Lafayette and Suwannee. WORLD continued on 3A HOUSE continued on 3A SHOPPERS continued on 3A VIGIL continued on 3A Speaker delays House vote on cliff proposal due to lack of support. Good listener JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City Reporter Santa Claus cradles 6-week-old Emma Button as he asks her sister Natalie, 5, what she wants for Christmas at the Lake City Mall on Thursday. Button said that she wanted a Doc McStuffins doll and she wanted to learn how to fly. Candelight vigil for homeless JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Last-minute shoppers pass through the Lake City Mall as they search for the best deals on Thursday. Shoppers set for big weekend By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com Toys, clothes and gift cards and gift certificates will be hot items as the final weekend to shop before Christmas 2012 approaches and residents hit local stores. Janice Dorminey, Lake City Mall operations and marketing manag er, said the final days of shopping leading up to Christmas have been excellent with lots of mall patrons



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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Friday & Saturday, December 21-22, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B CHEAP SEATS Tim KirbyPhone: (386) 754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTSTime to declare intentT he deadline for non-traditional students to declare their intentions to try out for public school spring sports teams is approaching. Non-traditional students are those who are home-educated, attend charter or non-member private schools or are enrolled in special and Florida virtual school programs. Fort White athletic director John Wilson said students who want to participate in spring sports must register at the school in the zone where they live. The deadline to declare intent for softball, and track and field in Classes 1A and 2A (Fort White) is Jan. 7. The deadline to declare for baseball, and track and field in Classes 3A and 4A (Columbia High) is Jan. 14. The deadline to declare for boys weightlifting is Jan. 21. The Christmas holidays start Monday and continue to Jan. 9. For details on the FHSAA requirements, call Wilson at (352) 317-5865. Q The FHSAA recently released student population numbers for ninth through 12th grades. Fort White’s dream of qualifying for the Class 1A rural division in football is unlikely, though the FHSAA noted that decisions on all sports would be issued at a later date. Fort White reported 641 students for the fall of 2012. Columbia reported 1,759. The 2011-12 Class 1A football status of a couple of schools appears to be in jeopardy. Union County reported 525 enrollment, while Newberry was at 589 and Baldwin was up to 637. Other area teams with near Fort White numbers that could be potential district opponents are Williston (593), Madison County (672), Taylor County (639), Florida High (642) and The Villages (673). Trinity Catholic reports 501 enrollment. Among other nearby 1A schools from 2011-12 are Dixie County (534), Chiefland (471), Hamilton County (375), Branford (326), Lafayette (323) and Jefferson County (197). Q The winter results for the Floyd E. Lay Sunshine Cup all-sports awards are posted. Columbia is eighth overall in Class 6A. Q Tim Kirby is sports editor of the Lake City Reporter Penn State voted AP sports story of year againBy RACHEL COHENAssociated PressNEW YORK — The Penn State child sex abuse scandal was selected as the sports story of the year by U.S. editors and news direc-tors in an annual vote con-ducted by The Associated Press The news broke in November 2011, with a grand jury report outlin-ing charges against Jerry Sandusky, and the outrage that followed led to the fir-ing of Hall of Fame coach Joe Paterno. But the after-shocks were felt long into 2012: Sandusky was con-victed in June of assault-ing 10 boys, and the NCAA handed down brutal sanc-tions in July. In both years, the scandal was picked as the top sports story, the first time since the AP began conducting its annual vote in 1990 that the same story was selected twice in a row. The results of this year’s tally were announced Wednesday. Even before the Sandusky trial, the State College com-munity had absorbed anoth-er huge blow as Paterno died Jan. 22 at age 85 of lung cancer. The year ended with a small step to normalcy — joy on the football field. Under new coach Bill O’Brien, the Nittany Lions won eight of their last 10 games to finish 8-4, capped by an overtime victory at home over Wisconsin. There were 157 ballots submitted from U.S. news organizations. The voters were asked to rank the top 10 sports stories of the year, with the first-place story getting 10 points, the sec-ond-place story receiving nine points, and so on. The Penn State saga received 1,420 points and 109 first-place votes. The No. 2 sports story, Lance Armstrong stripped of his seven Tour de France titles, had 10 first-place votes and 1,008 points. Football’s popularity, college and pro, was unmistak-able with seven of the top 10 stories. But only two of them involved the action on the field. Here are 2012’s top 10 stories : 1. Penn State: Sandusky, the former defensive coor-dinator whose crimes led to such devastation for his victims and for his for-mer employer, was found guilty on 45 of 48 counts. In October, the 68-year-old was sentenced to 30 to 60 years in prison. His conviction pro-vided some closure, but a messy aftermath remained. Former FBI Director Louis Freeh released the results of his investigation July 12, saying Paterno and other top school officials cov-ered up allegations against Sandusky. The NCAA used that report as a basis for its sanctions announced later that month, which included a $60 million fine, a four-year bowl ban and scholar-ship reductions. 2. Lance Armstrong: In February, federal prosecu-tors closed an investigation into whether the star cyclist doped. That turned out to be only a temporary reprieve for a once-revered figure. In June, the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency accused him of using performance-enhanc-ing drugs, and in August, when he dropped his fight against the charges, USADA ordered his record seven Tour titles wiped out. A report released in October laid out vivid details of the evidence. The year ends with Armstrong dropped by many of the companies he endorsed and no longer formally involved with the cancer charity he founded, Livestrong. 3. NFL bounties: This much is clear: Saints coach Sean Payton was suspend-ed for the entire season and New Orleans started 0-4 to quickly fall out of playoff contention. Much else about the bounty scandal remains in dispute. Players deny the NFL’s assertions of a pay-for-injury program. On Dec. 11, former Commissioner Paul Tagliabue overturned his successor’s suspensions of four players but endorsed Lance Armstrong comes in as year’s No. 2 story. ASSOCIATED PRESSIn this Oct. 9 file photo, former Penn State University assista nt football coach Jerry Sandusky (center) is taken from the Centre County Courthouse by Cen tre County Sheriff Denny Nau, (left) and a deputy, after being sentenced in Bellefonte, Pa. Sandusky was sentenced to at least 30 years in prison, effectively a life sentence, in the child sexual abuse scandal that brought shame to Penn State and led to coach Joe Paterno’ s downfall. YEAR continued on 3B ASSOCIATED PRESSIn this April 21 file photo, Notre Dame coach Brian Kelly leads his team onto the field for their spring NCAA college football game in South Bend, Ind. For leading the Fighting Irish to the BCS championship game for the first time, Kelly was voted Associated Press college football coach of the year. Notre Dame’s Kelly wins AP coach of the yearBy RALPH D. RUSSOAssociated PressSOUTH BEND, Ind. — After two seasons as Notre Dame coach, Brian Kelly decided he wasn’t spending enough time doing the best part of his job: coaching players. Kelly changed that in 2012, and he shuffled his staff. Then, with Kelly more in tune to his team and the assistants in sync with the head coach, Notre Dame went from unranked to top-ranked. For leading the Fighting Irish to the BCS champion-ship for the first time, Kelly Second-year coach has Irish playing for title. COACH continued on 3B Tigers fall to Eastside JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Dakota Waters (18) gets possession of th e ball while playing against Eastside High on Thursday. Columbia comes out on losing in during stormBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comFor a half, it looked like the weather conditions would keep Columbia and Eastside high schools from putting a score on the board. However, Eastside broke the tie with two goals in the second half to take a 2-0 lead and eventually went on to win 2-1. Tiger Stadium’s field filled with puddles causing play to stop on more than one occasion due to players losing footing on the field’s slippery surface. Eastside scored the game’s first goal in the 65th minute of the contest and another goal just minutes later. It looked like the Tigers would go down in a 2-0 game, but in the final min-ute of play Columbia came up with a goal from Dylan Sessions with an assist from Cody Beadles. “We played hard and I’m proud of them for sticking with it in these conditions,” Columbia head coach Trevor Tyler said. “We had a lot of rain in these last two games when a lot of people were cancelling. We want to play good teams, however, and Eastside is a good team. This will help us prepare for the district tournament.” The Tigers enter the Christmas break at 8-6-3, (1-4-3, district).



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CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Daily Scripture Celebrity Birthdays Talk show host Phil Donahue is 77. Actress Jane Fonda is 75. Actor Samuel L. Jackson is 64. Movie producer Jeffrey Katzenberg is 62. AROUND FLORIDA Court seeking 63 more judgeships TALLAHASSEE The Florida Supreme Court is asking the Legislature to create 63 more trial-level judgeships. The justices on Thursday cited high work loads due to prior budget cuts that have reduced staffing. They acknowledged that a falling crime rate has taken some of the pressure off the courts but wrote that judges still are dealing with a backlog of mortgage foreclosure cases. The high court has made similar requests in each of the past six years, but lawmakers have autho rized no additional judge ships in that span. The request is for 47 new county judges, whose duties include misdemean or and traffic cases, includ ing 11 in Miami-Dade County and six in Broward County. The justices are seek ing 16 additional circuit judges, who handle felony cases as well as foreclo sures and large lawsuits. Senator wants law revised TALLAHASSEE The state Senates Democratic leader has filed a bill that would revise Floridas stand your ground law following the Trayvon Martin shooting. Sen. Chris Smith of Fort Lauderdale said on Wednesday said his bill (SB 136) was inspired by the unarmed 17-year-old boys death in Sanford. Martin was shot by neigh borhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman who is claiming self-defense under the law. One key change would eliminate protection from prosecution for someone who provokes violence or pursues a victim. The bill also would remove automatic immunity from arrest or detention and clarify that a suspect can be arrested following a questionable death. It is likely to face opposi tion from Republicans who control the Legislature and backed the current law. A panel created by Gov. Rick Scott has recommended no major changes. Father charged with child abuse SARASOTA, A Sarasota County father has been charged with aggravated child abuse in the death of his 11-year-old daughter. Jail records show 35year-old Kenneth Stoddard was arrested Wednesday night. Hes being held without bond. His arraign ment is scheduled for Jan. 18. A sheriffs office report 11-year-old Melissa Stoddard died Monday of oxygen deprivation that caused brain damage. The report also says doctors found ligature marks on her upper arms, wrists, ankles and thighs. Her parents told authori ties they sometimes had to restrain her because of behavioral problems. The mother has not been charged. Authorities said more charges are possible. Five other children at the home are now with child welfare officials. 15-year-old takes gun to school TALLAHASSEE A 15-year-old high school student was arrested for taking a semi-automatic handgun to school. The Leon County Sheriffs Office said that the ninth-grader at Leon High School took the weapon to school on Thursday morning. He was spotted by another student who informed school authorities. In those days Caesar Augustus issued a decree that a census should be taken of the entire Roman world. So Joseph also went up from the town of Nazareth in Galilee to Judea, to Bethlehem the town of David, because he belonged to the house and line of David. He went there to register with Mary, who was pledged to be married to him and was expecting a child. Luke 2:1, 4-5 Miss Universe crown back in USA LAS VEGAS T he 20-year-old Rhode Islander who brought the Miss Universe crown back to the U.S. for the first time in 15 years is hoping that her quick rise through the beauty pageant ranks and an onstage stumble will show women that anything is possible. Perched high above the Las Vegas Strip in the Planet Hollywood win ners suite Thursday, Olivia Culpo told The Associated Press that her yearlong transformation from Boston University sophomore to pageant winner proves that women can accomplish anything to which they set their minds. My first pageant was a year ago, she said. She pointed to the fact that she stumbled on her red velvet evening dress on Wednesday night before beating out 88 beauty queens from six continents as proof that confi dence and poise matter more than perfect performance. I think the fact that I tripped is cool, she said. The former Miss USA spent the first day of her reign surrounded by stylists and handlers, wearing a scarlet mini-dress with cutout cap sleeves and sky-high silver heels. Plates of cupcakes and fruit sat untouched as she sipped from a water bottle with a straw. Her coronation ended a long los ing spell for the U.S. in the competi tion co-owned by Donald Trump and NBC. An American had not won the Miss Universe title since Miss Hawaii Brook Lee took the crown in 1997. Ex-ABC News veteran charged with DUI LEWES, Del. ABC News vet eran and former correspondent Sam Donaldson is facing a drunken driv ing charge in Delaware. Police in the southern coastal town of Lewes said the 78-year-old Donaldson was stopped Dec. 1 for a traffic violation. Police said the officer determined Donaldson had been drinking and gave him field sobriety tests. Donaldson was arrested and later released. An arraignment is set for today. A phone call to Donaldsons home in McLean, Va., on Wednesday was not immediately returned. McLean is about 110 miles west of Lewes. Donaldson was twice chief White House correspondent for ABC News, covering Presidents Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan and Bill Clinton. He also co-hosted PrimeTime Live with Diane Sawyer and the ABC News Sunday morning broadcast This Week with Sam Donaldson and Cokie Roberts. Lady Gaga takes youth foundation on the road NEW YORK Lady Gaga is tak ing her Born This Way Foundation on the road. The singer announced Thursday that the Born Brave Bus Tour will tailgate outside her upcom ing U.S. concerts and provide a space for 13to 25-yearolds to learn more about local resources on anti-bullying, sui cide prevention and mental health services. Her foundation focuses on youth empowerment and developing selfconfidence. Organizations like The Trevor Project, Campus Pride and the National Association of School Psychologists will assist on the bus. Thurs day: Afternoon: 2-2-0 Evening: N/A Thurs day: Afternoon: 2-5-3-6 Evening: N/A Wednes day: 1-16-19-20-28 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAIL Y BRIEFING FRIDAY & SATURDAY, DECEMBER 21-22, 2012 2A HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter ASSOCIATED PRESS Miss USA, Olivia Culpo is congratulated by other contestants after being crowned as Miss Universe during the Miss Universe competition Wednesday in Las Vegas. Associated Press Associated Press Gaga Donaldson ASSOCIATED PRESS Scuba Santa Spencer Slate, garbed as a scuba-diving Santa Claus, eyes a moray eel in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. During the holiday season, Slate dresses as Santa to enter tain his dive shop customers and to help raise funds for a local childrens charity.



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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today COLLEGE FOOTBALL 7:30 p.m. ESPN — Beef ’O’ Brady’s Bowl, UCF vs. Ball St., at St. Petersburg MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN2 — FAU at Indiana 9 p.m. ESPN2 — BYU at Baylor ——— Saturday BOXING 4 p.m. NBC — Cruiserweights, Tor Hamer (19-1-0) vs. Vyacheslav Glazkov (13-0-0); heavyweights, Steve Cunningham (25-4-0) vs. Tomasz Adamek (47-2-0), at Bethlehem, Pa. COLLEGE FOOTBALL Noon ESPN — New Orleans Bowl, East Carolina vs. Louisiana-Lafayette 3:30 p.m. ESPN — Las Vegas Bowl, Washington vs. Boise St. MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL Noon ESPN2 — Syracuse vs. Temple, at New York 2 p.m. ESPN2 — Texas at Michigan St. 3 p.m. NBCSN — George Mason vs. Richmond, at Richmond Coliseum 4 p.m. CBS — Kansas at Ohio St.ESPN2 — Marshall at Kentucky 5:30 p.m. NBCSN — Virginia vs. Old Dominion, at Richmond, Va. 6 p.m. ESPN2 — Missouri vs. Illinois, at St. Louis 8 p.m. ESPN2 — Florida vs. Kansas St., at Kansas City, Mo. NBCSN — Davidson at Drexel NBA BASKETBALL 7 p.m. WGN — Chicago at Atlanta NFL FOOTBALL 8:30 p.m. ESPN — Atlanta at Detroit SOCCER 7:30 a.m. ESPN2 — Premier League, Arsenal at WiganFOOTBALLNFL standings AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAy-New England 10 4 0 .714 506 315N.Y. Jets 6 8 0 .429 255 320Miami 6 8 0 .429 264 279 Buffalo 5 9 0 .357 306 402 South W L T Pct PF PAy-Houston 12 2 0 .857 394 280Indianapolis 9 5 0 .643 309 358Tennessee 5 9 0 .357 285 396 Jacksonville 2 12 0 .143 219 383 North W L T Pct PF PAx-Baltimore 9 5 0 .643 348 307Cincinnati 8 6 0 .571 355 293Pittsburgh 7 7 0 .500 302 291 Cleveland 5 9 0 .357 280 310 West W L T Pct PF PAy-Denver 11 3 0 .786 409 274San Diego 5 9 0 .357 299 312 Oakland 4 10 0 .286 263 402 Kansas City 2 12 0 .143 195 367 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAWashington 8 6 0 .571 381 350 Dallas 8 6 0 .571 327 338N.Y. Giants 8 6 0 .571 373 304Philadelphia 4 10 0 .286 253 375 South W L T Pct PF PAy-Atlanta 12 2 0 .857 371 259New Orleans 6 8 0 .429 389 379 Tampa Bay 6 8 0 .429 354 349Carolina 5 9 0 .357 296 319 North W L T Pct PF PAy-Green Bay 10 4 0 .714 344 292 Minnesota 8 6 0 .571 319 308Chicago 8 6 0 .571 321 240 Detroit 4 10 0 .286 330 380 West W L T Pct PF PAx-San Francisco 10 3 1 750 357 218Seattle 9 5 0 .643 350 219St. Louis 6 7 1 .464 258 315Arizona 5 9 0 .357 224 302 x-clinched playoff spoty-clinched division Saturday’sGame Atlanta at Detroit, 8:30 p.m. Sunday’s Games Tennessee at Green Bay, 1 p.m.Indianapolis at Kansas City, 1 p.m.New Orleans at Dallas, 1 p.m.Minnesota at Houston, 1 p.m.Oakland at Carolina, 1 p.m.Buffalo at Miami, 1 p.m.Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.New England at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.Washington at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.St. Louis at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.San Diego at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m.Cleveland at Denver, 4:05 p.m.Chicago at Arizona, 4:25 p.m.N.Y. Giants at Baltimore, 4:25 p.m.San Francisco at Seattle, 8:20 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 30 Jacksonville at Tennessee, 1 p.m.Green Bay at Minnesota, 1 p.m.Carolina at New Orleans, 1 p.m.N.Y. Jets at Buffalo, 1 p.m.Miami at New England, 1 p.m.Baltimore at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.Cleveland at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.Houston at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.Philadelphia at N.Y. Giants, 1 p.m.Dallas at Washington, 1 p.m.Chicago at Detroit, 1 p.m.Tampa Bay at Atlanta, 1 p.m.Oakland at San Diego, 4:25 p.m.Arizona at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.St. Louis at Seattle, 4:25 p.m.Kansas City at Denver, 4:25 p.m. End regular season College bowl games Thursday Poinsettia Bowl San Diego State vs. BYU (n) Today Beef ’O’ Brady’s Bowl At St. PetersburgBall State (9-3) vs. UCF (9-4), 7:30 p.m. (ESPN) Saturday New Orleans Bowl East Carolina (8-4) vs. LouisianaLafayette (7-4), Noon (ESPN) Las Vegas Bowl Boise State (10-2) vs. Washington (7-5), 3:30 p.m. (ESPN) Monday Hawaii Bowl At HonoluluSMU (6-6) vs. Fresno State (9-3), 8 p.m. (ESPN) Wednesday Little Caesars Pizza Bowl At DetroitCentral Michigan (6-6) vs. Western Kentucky (7-5), 7:30 p.m. (ESPN) Thursday, Dec. 27 Military Bowl At WashingtonBowling Green (8-4) vs. San Jose State (10-2), 3 p.m. (ESPN) Belk Bowl At Charlotte, N.C.Duke (6-6) vs. Cincinnati (9-3), 6:30 p.m. (ESPN) Holiday Bowl At San DiegoBaylor (7-5) vs. UCLA (9-4), 9:45 p.m. (ESPN) Friday, Dec. 28 Independence Bowl At Shreveport, La.Louisiana-Monroe (8-4) vs. Ohio (8-4), 2 p.m. (ESPN) Russell Athletic Bowl At OrlandoVirginia Tech (6-6) vs. Rutgers (9-3), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN) Meineke Car Care Bowl At HoustonMinnesota (6-6) vs. Texas Tech (7-5), 9 p.m. (ESPN)BASKETBALLNBA schedule (Through Wednesday) EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct GB New York 19 6 .760 — Boston 13 12 .520 6 Brooklyn 13 12 .520 6Philadelphia 12 14 .462 7 12 Toronto 8 19 .296 12 Southeast Division W L Pct GB Miami 16 6 .727 — Atlanta 15 8 .652 1 12 Orlando 12 13 .480 5 12 Charlotte 7 18 .280 10 12 Washington 3 20 .130 13 12 Central Division W L Pct GB Chicago 14 10 .583 —Milwaukee 13 11 .542 1Indiana 14 12 .538 1 Detroit 7 21 .250 9 Cleveland 5 22 .185 10 12 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct GB Memphis 17 6 .739 — San Antonio 19 8 .704 — Houston 13 12 .520 5 Dallas 12 13 .480 6 New Orleans 5 20 .200 13 Northwest Division W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 21 4 .840 — Denver 14 12 .538 7 12 Minnesota 12 11 .522 8 Utah 14 13 .519 8 Portland 11 12 .478 9 Pacific Division W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 19 6 .760 — Golden State 17 9 .654 2 12 L.A. Lakers 12 14 .462 7 12 Phoenix 11 15 .423 8 12 Sacramento 8 17 .320 11 Today’s Games Atlanta at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.Orlando at Toronto, 7 p.m.Milwaukee at Boston, 7:30 p.m.Chicago at New York, 7:30 p.m.Indiana at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.Washington at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.Dallas at Memphis, 8 p.m.New Orleans at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m. Charlotte at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.Sacramento at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. Saturday’s Games Chicago at Atlanta, 7 p.m.Detroit at Washington, 7 p.m.Utah at Miami, 7:30 p.m.Memphis at Houston, 8 p.m.Indiana at New Orleans, 8 p.m.Cleveland at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.Charlotte at Denver, 9 p.m.Phoenix at Portland, 10 p.m.L.A. Lakers at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.AP Top 25 schedule Today’s Games No. 6 Indiana vs. Florida Atlantic, 7 p.m. No. 22 Notre Dame vs. Niagara, 7 p.m. Saturday’s Games No. 3 Syracuse vs. Temple at Madison Square Garden, Noon No. 4 Arizona vs. East Tennessee State at the Stan Sheriff Center, Honolulu, 10:30 p.m. No. 5 Louisville vs. Western Kentucky at Bridgestone Arena, Nashville, Tenn., 8:30 p.m. No. 7 Ohio State vs. No. 9 Kansas, 4 p.m. No. 8 Florida vs. Kansas State at the Sprint Center, Kansas City, Mo., 8 p.m. No. 10 Illinois vs. No. 12 Missouri at Scottrade Center, St. Louis, 6 p.m. No. 11 Cincinnati vs. Wright State, 4 p.m. No. 13 Minnesota vs. Lafayette, 7 p.m.No. 15 Georgetown vs. American, Noon No. 16 New Mexico vs. South Dakota State, 2:30 p.m. No. 18 San Diego State vs. San Francisco at the Stan Sheriff Center, Honolulu, 6 p.m. No. 19 Butler vs. Evansville, 2 p.m.No. 20 Michigan State vs. Texas, 2 p.m.No. 21 UNLV vs. Canisius, 10 p.m.No. 23 North Carolina vs. McNeese State, Noon No. 24 Oklahoma State vs. Tennessee Tech, 1 p.m. No. 25 N.C. State vs. St. Bonaventure, 3 p.m.Florida 82, Southeastern Louisiana 43 At Gainesville SE LOUISIANA (1-8) Benton 2-6 0-0 4, James 0-2 2-2 2, Evans 3-7 0-0 6, Fortenberry 5-13 4-4 15, Ricard 1-9 2-2 4, Woods 1-1 0-0 2, Campbell 0-1 0-0 0, Nelson 2-7 0-0 6, Petrovcic 0-2 0-2 0, Ochie 2-7 0-0 4. Totals 16-55 8-10 43.FLORIDA (8-1) Yeguete 1-2 6-6 8, Murphy 3-7 0-0 6, Young 5-7 0-2 10, Boynton 1-7 4-4 7, Rosario 8-13 0-0 20, Kurtz 0-0 0-0 0, Wilbekin 3-6 0-0 9, Ogbueze 0-1 0-0 0, Graham 1-1 0-0 2, Frazier II 3-7 4-4 12, Prather 3-4 2-2 8, Walker 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 28-57 16-18 82. Halftime—Florida 43-26. 3-Point Goals—SE Louisiana 3-21 (Nelson 2-6, Fortenberry 1-5, Benton 0-2, Ochie 0-2, Evans 0-3, Ricard 0-3), Florida 10-32 (Rosario 4-8, Wilbekin 3-6, Frazier II 2-6, Boynton 1-7, Ogbueze 0-1, Prather 0-1, Murphy 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—SE Louisiana 30 (Fortenberry, Ricard, Woods 5), Florida 40 (Frazier II, Rosario, Wilbekin 6). Assists—SE Louisiana 4 (Benton, Evans, Fortenberry, Ricard 1), Florida 20 (Boynton 5). Total Fouls—SE Louisiana 12, Florida 12. A—8,057. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, DECEMBER 21-22, 20122BSPORTS BOWLING BRIEFS CHS SOFTBALL Lady Tiger tryouts set for Jan. 8 Columbia High softball tryouts are 2:45 p.m. Jan. 8 at the CHS field. For details, call Jimmy Williams at 303-1192. ADULT BASKETBALL Charity games for USSSA youth Richardson Community Center/Annie Mattox North, Inc., is sponsoring their third annual charity basketball games at the Lake City Middle School gym on Jan. 5. The games feature adult women and men teams — Live Oak vs. Lake City. Game times are 6 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Admission is $5. Proceeds go to USSSA basketball. For details, call Nicole Smith at 754-7095. WOLVES BASKETBALL Breakfast at Richardson CC The Columbia County Recreation Department and Richardson Middle School has a pancake breakfast at Richardson Community Center from 7-11:30 a.m. Jan. 12. Tickets are $5 and may be purchased at Richardson Middle School or the Columbia County Recreation Department. All proceeds benefit the boys basketball programs. For details, call Mario Coppock at 754-7095. YOUTH BASEBALL Lake City Babe Ruth registration Lake City Babe Ruth Baseball has online registration for its spring league at lcccyb.com For details, call Jessica Langley at 867-1897. ZUMBA Beginner, weight loss classes There is a Zumba beginner class and weight loss contest at Teen Town on Jan. 6. The class is 3-4 p.m.; with the weight loss contest at 4 p.m. For details, call Sarah Sandlin at 758-0009.Q From staff reports League resultsLake City Bowl league play: HIT & MISS Team standings: 1. All Mrs’s (43-25); 2. Legal Ladies (41.5-26.5); 3. Spare Us (41-27). Team high handicap game: 1. All Mrs’s 823; 2. (tie) High Five, Oddballs 770. Team high handicap series: 1. Legal Ladies 2,324; 2. Silver Ladies 2,304; 3. Sandbaggers 2,239. High handicap game: 1. (tie) Linda Herndon, Susan Mears 224; 3. (tie) Joan Carman, Vicki Baker 221. High handicap series: 1. Judy Daniels 643; 2. Rose Brown 618; 3. (tie) Angie Meek, Sharon Tuning 605.(results from Dec. 11) SEXY SENIORS Team standings: 1. Handicappers (83-53, 40,106 pins); 2. Jo’s Crew (83-53, 39,936 pins); 3. Perky Pals (83-53, 39,486 pins). Team high handicap game: 1. Pin Busters 885; 2. Keglers 803. Team high handicap series: 1. Jo’s Crew 2,446; 2. Perky Pals 2,396; 3. Pin Droppers 2,221. High scratch game: 1. Betty Carmichael 202; 2. Diane Madsen 148; 3. Sandra Johns 144. 1. (tie) Earl Hayward, Ross Meyers 180; 3. (tie) Johnnie Croft, Morrell Atwood 165. High scratch series: 1. Joanne Denton 506; 2. Yvonne Finley 424; 3. Sjaan Tensen 381. 1. Michael Murrey 603; 2. Ric Yates 505; 3. Edward Smith 463. High handicap game: 1. Joyce Crandall 255; 2. Vy Ritter 245; 3. Janet Nash 214. 1. (tie) Mike Helvey, Wayne Johns 224; 3. Jim Hawkins 221. High handicap series: 1. Aggie Mumbauer 663; 2. Janie Posey 625; 3. Pat Hale 602. 1. Dan Ritter 668; 2. Jerry Crandall 612; 3. Ron Grey 608.(results from Dec. 4) WATERGUARD LEAGUE Team high handicap game: 1. O 2 Cool 868; 2. Canam 864; 3. All In 825. Team high handicap series: 1. Who Gives A Split 2,511; 2. Wolf Pack 2,442; 3. All In The Family 2,422. High scratch game: 1. (tie) Carla Nyssen, Chrissy Fancy 184; 3. Mary Lobaugh 174; 4. Joyce Hooper 167. 1. James Price 244; 2. (tie) Bill Dolly, Bill Price 221; 4. Dess Fennell 220. High scratch series: 1. Chrissy Fancy 502; 2. Carla Nyssen 475; 3. Mary Lobaugh 467. 1. James Price 641; 2. Bill Dolly 614; 3. Dess Fennell 578. High handicap game: 1. Rachel McInally 231; 2. Linda Oliver 229; 3. Chrissy Fancy 220. 1. Bill Price 256; 2. Tony Harper 253; 3. Steven Hayes 241. High handicap series: 1. Carla Nyssen 667; 2. Samantha Lovell 632; 3. Pat Fennell 627 1. James Price 677; 2. Bob Wheeler 672; 3. Dess Fennell 671. High average: Mary Lobaugh 180; James Price 196.(results from Dec. 11) GOLDEN ROLLERS Team standings: 1. Knock em Down; 2. 2 Plus 2; 3. Gamblers. Team high handicap game: 1. You’re Up 677; 2. Quirky Quad 623; 3. 4 S’s 505. Team high handicap series: 1. Knock em Down 2,571; 2. Bubba & His Bubetts 2,392; 3. Wild Things 2,304. High scratch game: 1. (tie) Joanne Denton, Betty Carmichael 178; 3. Elaine Nemeth 171. 1. Lee McKinney 200; 2. George Walters 197; 3. Ric Yates 180. High scratch series: 1. Susan Mears 494; 2. Louise Atwood 472; 3. Judy Johnson 464. 1. George Mulligan 578; 2. Bill Dolly 516; 3. Earl Hayward 509. High handicap game: 1. (tie) Yvonne Finley, Pat Hale 238; 3. Jeanne Sireci 229; 4. Diane Madsen 221. 1. (tie) Dan Ritter, David Duncan 264; 2. Gerald Hale 245; 4. Ray Denton 238. High handicap series: 1. DeDe Young 706; 2. Amy Musselwhite 643; 3. Vy Ritter 613. 1. Tom Young 712; 2. Jim Burnett 652; 3. Sal Annello 605. High average: 1. Judy Johnson 153.88; 2. Elaine Nemeth 151.12; 3. DeDe Young 150.76. 1. David Duncan 191.53; 2. Bill Dolly 187.24; 3. Wayne Johns 180.13.(results from Dec. 13) COURTESY PHOTOSouth Carolina competitorsSepulveda ATA Black Belt Academy students Joy Geiger ( from left), Brody Green, Robert Cook and Alice Geiger recently participated in c hampionship competition at The Citadel in the South Carolina. FSU hires ’Bama assistant as defensive coordinatorAssociated PressTALLAHASSEE — Alabama secondary coach Jeremy Pruitt is Florida State’s new defensive coor-dinator. Seminoles coach Jimbo Fisher announced Thursday that Pruitt will replace Mark Stoops, who took the Kentucky job. Pruitt has been on Nick Saban’s Alabama staff for three years. Fisher was Saban’s offensive coordina-tor at LSU. The 38-year-old Pruitt has built a reputation as an effective recruiter in addition to coaching a defensive backfield that’s ranked in the top 15 in pass defense the last three seasons. He will be only the third defensive coordinator at Florida State in the last 28 years, following Stoops and Mickey Andrews. The release did not say when Pruitt’s FSU duties begin. Alabama plays Notre Dame on Jan. 7 for the BCS title; Florida State plays Northern Illinois in the Jan. 1 Orange Bowl. Barring setback, Redskins’ Griffin III looks good to goAssociated PressASHBURN, Va. — Robert Griffin III looks good to go. The Washington Redskins rookie had a full practice Thursday for the second straight day as the team prepares for this week’s game against the Philadelphia Eagles. “I like what I see,” coach Mike Shanahan said. “If there is no setback, he should be ready to go.” Griffin missed Sunday’s win over the Cleveland Browns with a sprained right knee. On Wednesday, he had his first full prac-tice since the injury, and coaches and doctors were eager to see how the knee would respond. “There wasn’t a setback today, so that’s a good sign,” Shanahan said. Also Thursday, right tackle Tyler Polumbus remained unable to prac-tice as he recovers from a concussion. Linebacker London Fletcher (sprained left ankle), linebacker Lorenzo Alexander (right shoulder) and defensive end Stephen Bowen (torn biceps) were limited, and linebacker Rob Jackson returned to practice after the birth of his baby girl. Falcons determined to avoid letdown against Lions By CHARLES ODUMAssociated PressFLOWERY BRANCH, Ga. — Thursday was an ugly, rainy day at Atlanta’s practice facility — a per-fect setting for the Falcons to be reminded they can make sure they don’t play another game outdoors this season. That’s added motivation to avoid a letdown in Saturday night’s game at Detroit’s Ford Field. The Falcons can secure home-field advantage through the NFC playoffs by beating the Lions. They play their final regular-sea-son game against Tampa Bay next week in the Georgia Dome. The Super Bowl in New Orleans also will be played in a dome. The Falcons have painful memories of their last road game, a Dec. 9 loss at Carolina that followed a home win over the Saints. Tight end Tony Gonzalez says players must respond better to last week’s impressive win over the Giants.



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shopping for gifts in local establishments. We are having an awe some season, she said. All the merchants in the mall are reporting positive sales. The mall has extended its hours of operation for the final days leading to the holiday and will be opened from 8 a.m. 11 p.m. today and Saturday, from 8 a.m. 10 p.m. on Sunday and from 8 a.m. 6 p.m. on Christmas Eve. Dorminey said its impor tant for area residents to shop locally because it ben efits the entire community. It helps our dollars stay at home so that they get recirculated and it sup ports our local families, she said. Dennille Decker, execu tive director of the Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of Commerce, said shes gotten lots of positive feedback from local merchants going into the final weekend of Christmas shopping. Throughout my person al shopping locally I always ask the merchants how the season is going and Ive received nothing by posi tive feedback, she said. Decker said she thinks this will be the busiest shopping weekend of the year locally, not only for people buying gifts, but for people who are trying to purchase last minute gift certificates and gift cards. She said shes heard a lot of people are pur chasing gift cards, even moreso for services rath er than products. Decker also stressed the importance of shop ping locally as the final hours of holiday season begin to wane. Its important because all of the local revenue that people spend locally gets put back in our local economy, Decker said. Its better to help your friends and neighbors rather than strangers in another town and other areas. LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, DECEMBER 21-22, 2012 3A 3A Knives Sunglasses...30% off Sandals...20-30% off Open Saturdays until Christmas! WILSONS OUTFITTERS 1291 SE Baya Dr, Lake City (386) 755-7060 WilsonsOutfitters@comcast.net Camo Wear Delicious Gift Ideas Custom Gift Baskets Gift Cards Available Tasty Stocking Stuers & More! 3739 WEST HWY. 90, LAKE CITY, FL (386) 243-8335 Hours of operation: Mon.-Fri. 8am-7pm Sat. 8am-6pm. Sun. Closed www.WhyNotFresh.com Why Not Fresh? Local & Fresh Foods Market Offering Meat, Produce & More! WORLD: Few believe here Continued From Page 1A believe the end of the world will happen tomorrow. There aint no end of the world, she said. Sam Sumpter, of Baltimore Md., and Terrell Simons, of Macon, Georgia, were passing through Lake City, but decided to stop in at the mall. They both said they also dont believe the world wasnt in danger of destruction by some cos mic conspiracy predicted by the Mayans. Sumpter had never heard of the theory, but said that theres only one force he would truly believe. If I would have heard about it, I wouldnt have paid any attention to it, he said. If God didnt tell me that the world is end ing tomorrow, nothing else matters. Simons said the world has been around for a long time, and has seen other civilizations disappear. Great civilizations come and go, yet the world still survives, he said. SHOPPERS: Time rapidly running out Continued From Page 1A HOUSE: Vote delayed Continued From Page 1A VIGIL: Set for tonight Continued From Page 1A Republicans, Ohio Rep. Steve LaTourette said Boehner had told lawmak ers hes going to call the president and hes going to go down and talk to him and maybe they can ham mer something out. There was no immedi ate response from either the White House or Reids office. The legislation was craft ed to prevent tax increases set to kick in on Jan. 1, 2013, on tens of millions of Americans. But another provision that would have let rates rise for those at the upper income range a violation of long-stand ing Republican orthodoxy triggered the opposi tion of anti-tax lawmakers inside the party. The abrupt turn of events left precious little time for divided govern ment to prevent acrossthe-board tax increases and deep spending cuts from taking effect with the new year. Economists say the combination threat ened a return to recession for an economy that has been recovering slowly from the last one. The House will not meet again until after Christmas, if then, and the Senate is expected to meet briefly on Friday, then not reconvene until next Thursday. The fiscal cliff issue has dominated the postelec tion session of Congress. More broadly, it marks the end of a tumultuous two-year period that began when tea party-backed Republicans roared into the House demanding lower taxes, only to be asked by their leadership to bless higher tax rates at upper incomes. Boehner said Thursday nights legislation hed dubbed it Plan B marked a move to protect as many American fami lies and small businesses as possible from the tax hikes that are already scheduled to occur with the new year. Referring to one of the core themes of Obamas re-election campaign, he said the president has called for legislation to protect 98 percent of the American people from a tax hike. Well, today were going to do better than that, he said of the measure that raises total taxes by slightly more than $300 billion over a decade. Our bill would protect 99.81 percent of the American people from an increase in taxes. Democrats said that by keeping tax rates unchanged below $1 mil lion Obama wants the level to be $400,000 Republicans had turned the bill into a tax break for the wealthy. They also accused Republicans of crafting their measure to impose a tax increase on 11 million middle class families. This is a ploy, not a plan, said Rep. Sander Levin, D-Mich. He accused Republicans of being deeply cynical, saying the legislation would scale back some education and child tax credits. A companion bill on the evenings House agenda, meant to build GOP sup port for the tax bill, called for elimination of an esti mated $97 billion in cuts to the Pentagon and certain domestic programs over a decade. It cleared the House on a partisan vote of 215-209 and is an updated version of legislation that passed a little more than six months ago. Those cuts would be replaced with savings total ing $314 billion, achieved through increases in the amount federal employees contribute toward their pensions and through cuts in social programs such as food stamps and the health care law that Obama signed earlier in his term. Ironically, the votes were set in motion earlier in the week, after Boehner and Obama had significantly narrowed their differences on a compromise to avoid the fiscal cliff. Republican officials said that members of the GOP leadership had balked at the terms that were emerging. Democrats said Boehners abrupt decision to shift to his Plan B leg islation drafted unilaterally by Republicans reflected a calculation that he lacked support from his own rank and file to win the votes needed for the type of agreement he was negoti ating with the president. The network includes agencies and individuals interested in the services available to those who are homeless or threatened with homelessness. United Way of Suwannee Valley is a community impact and fundraising organization, which utilizing volunteers on all levels. The organization iden tifies unmet community needs and seeks to find ways to meet those needs. For more information on the annual Homeless Awareness Day candle light vigil, contact Lee at 752-5604 or Dana Huggins, homeless liaison, Columbia County School System. Commission holds final 2012 meeting; appointments made By DEREK GILLIAM dgilliam@lakecityreporter.com The last meeting of the year for the Columbia County Commission saw the approval of a new description of the job duties of assistant county manager as well as the appointment of the commissioners to the various committees. Also, the county commission tabled the funding of the proposed TOP Program from the Columbia Youth Soccer Association that would require a grant of $13,000. Chairman and District 4 Commissioner Stephen Bailey will meet with the board of the Columbia Youth Soccer Association and talk about some of the actions that will be taken to ensure proper accounting procedures are being followed. The discussion of the TOP Program will be held at a later meeting. District 1 Commissioner Ronald Williams was appointed to: Tourist Development Council Board, Suwannee Valley Transit Authority, Small County Coalition, Florida Leaders Organized for Water and Non Ad Valorem Assessments Adjustment Committee. District 2 Commissioner Rusty Depratter was appointed to: Florida Crown Workforce Development Board Consortium, North Central Florida Regional Planning Council, SHIP-Affordable Housing Advisory Committee, County Utility Committee and 2013 Value Adjustment Board. District 3 Commissioner Bucky Nash was appointed to the Suwannee Valley Transit Authority, Transportation Disadvantaged Coordinating Board and 2013 Value Adjustment Board. Bailey was appointed to: Economic Development Authority Board, North Central Florida Economic Development Partnership, North Central Florida Regional Planning Council, County Utility Committee and 911 Combined Communications Center Executive Committee. District 5 Commissioner Scarlet Frisina was appointed to: Tourist Development Council Board, Small County Coalition, County Utility Committee, Sports Advisory Council, Non Ad Valorem Assessments Adjustment Committee and Florida Association of Counties Trust Board. County Manager Dale Williams said the description for the assis tant county manager was copied from the description of his position, other than that the assistant county manger would report to the county manger and not the board. That was done so that when Williams does decide to retire, the county will be left with a person quali fied to complete the business of the county. Williams contract doesnt expire until 2015. DEREK GILLIAM/ Lake City Reporter Columbia County Commission Chairman and District 4 Commissioner Stephen Bailey presents District 5 Commissioner Scarlet Frisina with a gavel for her service as the chairperson of the commission. Justices limit private doctor-lawyer talks By BILL KACZOR Associated Press TALLAHASSEE Malpractice defendants must not try to circumvent a Florida law that bars them from obtaining confidential medical information about plaintiffs from other doc tors or dentists who are treating them, the state Supreme Court said in a ruling Thursday. The 5-2 ruling prohib its private meetings about cases between lawyers and plaintiffs other doc tors even if they intend to discuss only non-privileged matters. The decision came in the case of Dr. Lanny Garvar, a Tamarac dentist, who was sued by former patient Ramsey Hasan. Hasan alleged that Garvar failed to diagnose and treat his dental condi tion, making it worse and resulting in a bone infection that left Hasan with perma nent and severe physical and emotional damage. Garvars insurer, OMS National Insurance Co., also covers Dr. Jennifer Schaumberg, an oral sur geon who later treated Hasan. The majority quashed two lower court decisions that would have permitted Schaumbergs lawyer, who was selected and hired by the insurance company, to discuss nonprivileged aspects of the Garvar case with her. That could lead to inad vertent disclosures of confi dential information, Justice R. Fred Lewis wrote for the majority. Garvars attempt to skirt the protections afforded by the patient confidential ity statute are to no avail, Lewis wrote. The 1988 law says the medical condition of a patient may not be discussed with any person other than the patient or the patients legal representative.



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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, DECEMBER 21-22, 2012 3B3BSports COACH: Kelly led Notre Dame to undefeated regular season, title game Continued From Page 1B YEAR: Provides many storylines in the world of sports inc luding Olympics Continued From Page 1Bthe findings of the investiga-tion under Roger Goodell. 4. Football concussions: The deaths of NFL greats Alex Karras — who suf-fered from dementia — and Junior Seau — who com-mitted suicide — were grim reminders of the angst over head injuries in the sport and their possible conse-quences. Thousands of retired players have sued the league, alleging the NFL failed to protect them from the dangers of concus-sions. 5. London Olympics: Michael Phelps retired from swimming after setting an Olympic record with his 22nd medal at a Summer Games bursting with mem-orable performances. Usain Bolt became the first man to successfully defend both the 100and 200-meter dash titles. And the host country racked up 65 medals in an Olympics so successful for Britain that it barely even rained. 6. College football playoffs: Instead of complaining about the BCS, soon we can moan about the selec-tion committee. After years of carping, fans finally got a playoff system, which will debut after the 2014 season. The four-team bracket will feature semi-finals and a title game to determine a national champion. 7. Replacement officials: Fans and pundits predicted a blown call would decide a critical game when the NFL started the season with replacement officials. Sure enough, in Week 3, on the national stage of “Monday Night Football,” a missed offensive pass interference penalty and a questionable touchdown catch handed the Seattle Seahawks a win over the Green Bay Packers. Two days later, the league resolved its labor dispute with the regular refs. 8. Super Giants: A team that had been 7-7 upset the top-seeded Green Bay Packers on the road in the playoffs, needed overtime to beat the San Francisco 49ers in the NFC title game, then came from behind to defeat the New England Patriots in the Super Bowl, 21-17, an out-come strangely similar to their matchup four years earlier. Eli Manning won his second Super Bowl MVP award. 9. Summitt retires: Pat Summitt, the winningest coach in NCAA basketball history, retired from the Tennessee bench in April at age 59, less than eight months after revealing she had early-onset dementia. Longtime assistant Holly Warlick took over the Lady Vols. Summitt was 1,098-208 with eight national titles in 38 seasons. 10. Manning’s resurgance: Peyton Manning was released from the Indianapolis Colts in March after missing last season because of neck surgery, the future uncertain for the four-time MVP. John Elway and the Broncos gambled that he still had some cham-pionship play left in that right arm, and so far it’s looking like a brilliant move as Denver won the AFC West. nrnnrnrnrnnnrnnnn nnnnrn r !nrnnn nnnnnn"#$n nrrnrrnrnnrn nnn%rr"nrnnrn&'n('n)'nnn nr*! nnnn rnrnr+nrnrrnn ,n rnn r-nnn nnn('%n .rr% n-//n nnrn n rr % nrrnrrnr n r n!" (904) 600-0940 ASSOCIATED PRESSIn this July 31 file photo, (from left) Conor Dwyer, Michael Phelps, Ryan Lochte and Ricky Berens, all of the United States, pose with their gold medals after their win in the men’s 4x200-meter freestyle swimming relay at the Aquatics Centr e in the Olympic Park during the 2012 Summer Olympics in Lond on.ASSOCIATED PRESSIn this Nov. 25 file photo Denver Broncos quarterback Pey ton Manning (18) callis a play during agame against the Kansas City Chiefs in Kansas C ity, Mo. was voted Associated Press college football coach of the year. “When you’re talking about the coach of the year, there’s so many things that go into it,” Kelly said. “I know it’s an individual award and it goes to one guy, but the feelings that I get from it is you’re build-ing the right staff, that you’ve got the right players and to me that is a valida-tion of the program. That you put together the right business plan.” Kelly received 25 votes from the AP college football poll panel. Penn State’s Bill O’Brien was second with 14 votes. Stanford’s David Shaw (four), Texas A&M’s Kevin Sumlin (three), Kansas State’s Bill Snyder (two) and Alabama’s Nick Saban (one) also received votes. Kelly is the first Notre Dame coach to win the AP award, which started in 1998. Of course, the Irish haven’t played for a nation-al championship since 1988 and spent much of the past two decades trying to find a coach who could restore a program that was becoming a relic of its proud past. It turns out Kelly was the answer. He arrived in 2010 after two decades spent climb-ing the coaching ladder and winning big everywhere he worked. But in the world of college football, Notre Dame is a long way from Grand Valley State — where Kelly won Division II nation-al titles — and Cincinnati, his previous stop, for that matter. “I think the job tends to distract you,” Kelly said earlier this week. “There are a lot of things that pull you away from the prima-ry reason why you want to be head coach of Notre Dame, and that is graduate your players and play for a national championship. “Now, to do that you have to have the pulse of your football team and you’ve got to have relationships with your players. If you’re already going around the country doing other things other than working with your football team, it’s hard to have the pulse of your team.” Kelly said he made a point of spending more time with the team this year. “That’s why I got into this. I want to develop 18 to 21 year olds. My develop-ment as the head coach at Notre Dame this year has been about getting back to why you would want to coach college players. You want to learn about them; you want to know their strengths and weaknesses; you want to help them with leadership skills; you want to help them when they’re not feeling confident in their ability. “For me, that is why it’s been the most enjoyable year as the head coach at Notre Dame, is that I got a chance to spend more time with my team.” The first step, though, toward a successful 2012 season for Notre Dame can be traced to Feb. 10. On that day Kelly announced his coaching staff. The most notable change was moving Chuck Martin from defensive backs coach to offensive coordinator to fill the hole left when Charley Molnar became the coach of Massachusetts. Martin was defensive coordinator for Kelly at Grand Valley State, then replaced his boss as head coach of the Division II power when Kelly was hired by Central Michigan after the 2003 season. The move might have seemed odd to some, but Kelly, who built his reputa-tion on offensive acumen, wanted a right-hand man who understood exactly what he wanted. To replace Martin on the defensive side, Bob Elliot was hired from Iowa State to coach safeties. Harry Hiestand was hired away from Tennessee to replace offensive line coach Ed Warinner, and co-defensive coordinator Bob Diaco, who had been with Kelly at Central Michigan and Cincinnati, was promoted to assistant head coach. “The voice of your coordinators has got to be in lock step with the head coach,” Kelly said. “Now both of these guys have been with me a long time. “Chuck Martin on offense, I wanted a voice that went back with me to Grand Valley State. And with Bob Diaco someone that goes back to Central Michigan with me. So yeah, it was important to get that voice right.” ASSOCIATED PRESSIn this Oct. 20 file photo, Notre Dame coach Brian Kelly checking the replay screen during the first half of an NC AA college football game against Brigham Young in South Be nd, Ind. For leading the Fighting Irish to the BCS championship game for the first time, Kelly was voted Associated Press college football coach of the year on Wednesday.



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F ar more over-sight is needed at Citizens Property Insurance Corp., the state-backed property insurer, so Gov. Rick Scott’s proposal to create an inspector general position has merit. But it is premature. The governor’s own inspector general is inves-tigating reports of misbe-havior at the agency and has yet to file reports that reveal what exactly hap-pened and what is needed to restore credibility. The operation is now very suspect. When inter-nal auditors with Citizens’ Office of Corporate Integrity detailed a series of troubling incidents, including improper rela-tionships, favoritism and lavish spending and travel, they were fired. Citizens chief Barry Gilway blandly concedes the timing of the firings was “dumb,” but explains he was trying to make the operation more efficient, including hiring more forensic auditors. Perhaps, but from the outside, this looks to be a blatant attempt to silence whistleblowers. ... (I)t is obvious reforms are needed. Pinellas Sen. Jack Latvala, who chairs the Senate’s Ethics and Elections Committee, is on target when he says safeguards are needed to prevent hijinks. He likes Scott’s plan, as do we, but it’s best to wait until the investigation is complete before deciding on specific remedies. Dan Krassner, head of Integrity Florida, a non-partisan, nonprofit govern-ment watchdog, puts it well: “Just adding another seat on the bus may not solve all the problems.” ... Scott and legislative leaders want Citizens to increase premiums to market rates, to encourage private insurers to return to Florida and cut the risk to policyholders. The public, already resistant to higher rates, is cer-tainly not going to accept hikes from an agency known for mismanagement and wild spending. An inspector general might be just what’s need-ed at Citizens. Q The Tampa Tribune OPINION Friday & Saturday, December 21-22, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A4AOPINION HIGHLIGHTS IN HISTORY On this date:In 1620, Pilgrims aboard the Mayflower went ashore for the first time at present-day Plymouth, Mass. In 1861, President Abraham Lincoln signed a congressional act authorizing the Navy Medal of Honor. In 1879, the Henrik Ibsen play “A Doll’s House” premiered at the Royal Theater in Copenhagen. In 1910, 344 coal miners were killed in Britain’s Pretoria Pit Disaster. in 1937, Walt Disney’s first feature-length animated cartoon, “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs,” had its world premiere in Los Angeles. In 1942, the U.S. Supreme Court, in Williams v. North Carolina, ruled 6-2 that all states had to recognize divorc-es granted in Nevada. In 1945, Gen. George S. Patton died in Heidelberg, Germany, of injuries from a car accident. In 1948, the state of Eire, or Ireland, passed an act declaring itself a republic. In 1958, Charles de Gaulle was elected to a sevenyear term as the first president of the Fifth Republic of France. In 1971, the U.N. Security Council chose Kurt Waldheim to succeed U Thant as Secretary-General. W hy is Sandy Hook School in Newtown, Conn., so vital to all of us? The most important part of the story isn’t “how” children died, or even “how many.” The loss of any child is the most trag-ic thing that can happen to us, and to their families. Too many children die every day. Every one of them is wonderful, inno-cent and precious. So why is Sandy Hook so significant to us? It has allowed all of us — the whole country, even the whole world — to acknowledge and feel the pain and loss, together — of the senseless loss of the most important part of our lives, wonderful, inno-cent children. There were services in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and Sidney, Australia. Condolences are being received from all over the planet. Let’s do what we can to not let this important moment in time slip away. What can we do? Grieving folks in Newtown gave a note to CNN’s reporter Don Malloy, expressing their thanks for his sensitive handling of his interview and the story. They asked that we do all we can to make their school, all of our schools, as safe as possible. Our children need to be provided with safety and protection. They asked specifically that a school resource officer be always on the school grounds during school days. What can the rest of us do? Feel their loss as our own. All children are precious and wonderful. Acknowledge them. Show your respect, appreciation, and love for every child you know or meet. Be kind to all. Show everyone you care. Appreciate the meaning of this event, and allow it to make a differ-ence in our lives and our world. Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com T oday marks the start of what local retailers say could be the busiest shopping weekend of the year in Lake City. Let’s all do our part to make it so. It’s important for several reasons.First we need to keep the local economy strong, and what better way to do that than by keeping money earned here, cir-culating here? We live in Columbia County, not Gainesville. Our efforts ought to be spent supporting the businesses which, through their sup-port of us, keep our community thriving. But there’s another, equally compelling reason to shop at home during the holi-days and beyond. Buying your Christmas gifts in Lake City saves time, money and incalculable hassle. Even if you don’t factor in gas prices, the deals are often better here than in Gainesville or Jacksonville. As for selection, you’ll have at least as good a shot at finding a nice range of spe-cialty items here as you would elsewhere. (You might be surprised.) Don’t dismiss your hometown out of hand this weekend. Give it a shot.Staying home might even become a habit. Spend it here OUR OPINION What Sandy Hook School can mean Were the Mayans right or wrong? S o far, so good. The sun came up. You received your Lake City Reporter and you’re reading it. The day is headed in the right direction. In case you haven’t heard, today is Mayan Doomsday — the pre-dicted end of the world — according to the ancient (and, for that matter, extinct) Mayan civilization of Mexico. December 21, 2012, is the day where the Mayan calendar abruptly ends. As best I could gather from multiple on-line media reports, the calendar was scratched in stone. After something called a “Long Count,” scentists deci-phered the last stick fig-ure represented Dec. 21 with the proclamation of revenge for a catastrophic battle loss sometime dur-ing the 600s or 700s. That battle defeated a promi-nent local Mayan king. The description called for the return from Mayan heaven of nine gods, called the Bolon Yokte, who would descend to the earth on Dec. 21 and ... You guessed it. The tablet is broken off and ends right there. So, book scientists conferred, I’m assuming without the input of Indiana Jones, and decid-ed this dangling outcome could only mean one thing from the Mayans: the prediction of the end of the world. I debated writing this for Thursday’s paper, not sure at all if the dooms-day prediction meant midnight Thursday, at the beginning of Dec. 21, or if we would get the opportunity to skip through a Friday. The more I considered it, I knew that even if heck was breaking loose in the pre-dawn darkness, our all-star newspaper carri-ers would still make sure your paper was delivered. So, here I am. Common sense says the world won’t end on a Friday. It would complete-ly disrupt the weekend. It feels more like a Monday event, but who am I to predict. Messages were traded among many of my wiseacre friends across the country on Thursday. My favorite came from a high school friend who now lives in Washington, D.C. “Just in case the Mayans were right, live it up today ... Wine, not whine!” I am curious about the end of the Mayan story. What was the next glyph that was chipped away, destroyed or just acciden-tally broken off? Was it so shocking it was intention-ally removed? Personally, I think the nine Bolon Yokte were coming to this planet to introduce baseball in the Western Hemisphere. Nine guys, super-human abilities ... Sounds like a starting lineup to me. What if the guy on the calendar chisel was look-ing outside his hut, it was a beautiful day, and he went outside with his friends to play dodge ball and just forgot to finish the artwork? What if he had to attend a ceremo-nial beheading on the temple mound in order to appease the corn god and he got distracted? Maybe the guy’s wife was nagging him to help her unload the groceries from the ox cart and one of the bags was too heavy for that corner of the tablet? Boom. Just like that, the world crumbles. I also read the Mayan calendar in question lists creation day as Aug. 11, 3114 B.C. Why, I don’t know. And, how that was figured, I also can’t explain. That’s just some worthless knowledge on the final day of civiliza-tion. Maybe. I’m hanging in there today, holding out until at least lunch time. I’m counting on Chasteen’s downtown to have squash casserole on the menu today. One last time. Since this might be it. And one last clich for eternity: Live today like it’s your last. I’ve checked in with those significant others in my life who need to know how I feel about them. Leave it to the Mayans to make us slow down and put things in perspective. That may be the best gift of this entire hoax ... In the back of our minds, we’re all aware that time keeps ticking and there are no guarantees. So, I’ll see you in Heaven ... or I’ll see you when we hit the streets on Sunday. Either way, make the most of today! Q Associated Press Todd Wilsontwilson@lakecityreporter.com Q Todd Wilson is publisher of the Lake City Reporter. Robert DennyBob.Denny8@gmail.com Q Contact Robert Denny at (386) 454-4950. Restoring credibility at Citizens Property Insuranc e



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4B LAKE CITY REPORTER NASCAR FRIDAY & SATURDAY, DECEMBER 21-22, 20124BNASCAR When it comes to Camping World Truck Series resumes,there are few that stand asstrong as Todd Bodine’s.The youngest of theracing Bodine brothers from Chemung,N.Y.,has22 career victories,92 top-five finishes and twochampionships,in 2006 and 2010.He’s only fin-ished out of the top four in points on two occa-sions. He’s been successful in NASCAR’s Nationwide Series as well,winning 15 races andposting 90 top-five finishes.In his full-time sea-sons in Nationwide,he had a runner-up finishin 1997,was third twice and fourth twice.Hisworst finish there was a seventh in 1991,hisfirst full season. Along the way he also made 241 Sprint Cup starts,mostly in inferior equipment,but he stillmanaged seven top-five finishes and five poles. But with the 2013 season just around the corner,the 48-year-old brother of retired Cup driv-ers Geoffrey and Brett Bodine finds himselfwithout a ride.As Bodine explains,driving tal-ent alone is no longer enough to ensure employ-ment.In today’s NASCAR a driver also has tobe able to bring along the funding to supportthe race team. “The days of getting a job on your skills are over,”Bodine said.“If you’ve got the money,teams will take you.” Indeed,the Red Horse Racing team that fielded trucks for Bodine in 2012 has idled his crewbut has assigned one of its trucks to John WesTownley,who has the backing of his family’sZaxby’s restaurant team. But Bodine isn’t sitting idly by,hoping the current culture of Truck Series racing willchange.He and his wife Janet,especially Janet,are working full-time trying to secure sponsor-ship. “She’s been working on it every day for a year,”Bodine said,adding that interest frompotential sponsors has picked up in recentweeks,but there’s no contract yet signed.“Thereare some really good companies that we’re talk-ing to.We’re taking steps,but it takes time.Bigcorporations don’t work in the same time framethat race teams do.There are budgets to consid-er,and things like that.” In one respect,time is still on Bodine’s side. The Truck Series opens its season on Feb.22 atDaytona,then is idle for six weeks.He figuresthat if no sponsor is on board by Daytona,he’llmake the season opener some way or another,then have another break to focus on securingsponsorship before the Kroger 250 atMartinsville Speedway on April 6. Bodine said it takes about $60,000 per race to field a truck,not counting the overhead at theshop,salaries and other costs.Sponsors general-ly would have to kick in between $80,000-$130,000 per race to have a competitive team,he said. Bodine would like to return with the Red Horse team,and he’d like to stay with Toyota,but he said he’s open to any offers,including aride in the Nationwide Series. “But so far,all we’ve pitched to sponsors is trucks,”he said. Despite the situation,Bodine sounds upbeat about the future. “I’ve been through this kind of thing before,” he said.“But it’s the first time my wife’s had togo through it.She’s struggling with it some,butshe’s also working from 8 to 8 on sponsorship.” NOTEBOOK Shortened tests still revealingRain cut short the second and final day of testing of the 2013 Sprint Cup cars at CharlotteMotor Speedway last week,but Kasey Kahne inthe No.5 Chevrolet from Hendrick Motorsportsdid manage to turn a lap at 193.771 miles perhour.That was a tick faster than the trackrecord of 193.708 mph set by Greg Biffle inOctober. “It felt fast,and I knew where my throttle was,so I knew it was as fast as I have everbeen around this track,”Kahne said.“I justthink this car goes around the corner quicker.” The speeds have many in the sport speculating that NASCAR officials will make changes toslow the cars before the start of the season. Bobby Labonte said his single-car No.47 Toyota team,led by crew chief Brian Burns,made progress at the test. “There are a lot of little things we are trying to figure out on the new car,”he said.“There aredifferent nuisances we didn’t have with theother car.The rear camber issue;we’re just try-ing to get it all figured out. “This is the only car we have.So,we will go to the wind tunnel with it when we leave here andlearn as much as we can.The biggest differenceis the back of the car with the camber.With morecamber in it,it’s more secure back to the throttlethan what I was used to having last year.” Aric Almirola,driver of the No.43 for Richard Petty Motorsports,said he made some laps dur-ing the test,and focused on things like fuelmileage instead of pure speed.And he said itstill was helpful to get some laps in the new car. Additional testing of the redesigned car is set for Jan.10-12 at Daytona InternationalSpeedway and at Charlotte on Jan.17-18.Drivers return from USO tour Sprint Cup driver Joey Logano and two-time and reigning Nationwide Series championRicky Stenhouse Jr.are back from a USO-backed trip to visit troops stationed in theMiddle East and in Germany. The two visited six installations in the second such trip for Logano and the first for Stenhouse. “We had the chance to meet some amazing men and women on our USO tour,”Logano toldreporters.“I have so much respect for our troops;they do their jobs day in and day out withoutcomplaint and are always giving it their all. “We are lucky to have these men and women serving and protecting our country,and I can’tthank them enough for all that they do.” Said Stenhouse:“My first USO tour was an amazing experience.It was an honor to meetour troops and see them in action. “The service and sacrifice of these men and women and their families are inspiring,and Ihave nothing but admiration and gratitude forwhat they do for our country.”Scott to helm Childress’No. 2After a rather lackluster year drivingthe No.11 Toyota inthe NationwideSeries for Joe GibbsRacing,Brian Scott ismoving to RichardChildress Racing todrive the No.2Chevrolet that wasvacated by ElliottSadler,who is mov-ing to Gibbs’ team. Scott,a 24-year-old driver from Boise,Idaho,had two top-five and11 top-10 finishes in 2012,but did not finishseven races en route to a ninth-place points fin-ish. His bright spot for the season was a win in the season-ending Camping World Truck Seriesrace at Homestead-Miami Speedway drivingthe No.18 Toyota fielded by his then-Gibbsteammate Kyle Busch. Phil Gould,the car chief for the No.2 Chevy this past season,has been promoted to the crewchief position. NUMERICALLYSPEAKING Drivers who ran all22 Camping World Truck Series races in 2012 Drivers who finished inthe top 10 in Camping World Truck Series points butdid not win a race (MattCrafton in sixth and MiguelPaludo in 10th) Drivers who ran atleast one Truck Series race in 2012 Drivers who ran all 35points-paying Sprint Cup races in 2012 but had lessthan $4 million in race win-nings (David Gilliland,CaseyMears and David Ragan) 2 17 3 109 Todd Bodine (NASCAR photo)By RICK MINTER / Universal Uclick By RICK MINTER / Universal Uclick Brad Keselowski unofficially began thedefense of his Sprint Cup champi-onship last week during a test session at Charlotte Motor Speedway. The reigning champion is in a rather unique position,as he’s starting out with anew manufacturer,Ford,replacing the Dodgehe drove to the 2012 title,and he has a newteammate in Joey Logano. Dodge dropped out of NASCAR after Keselowski’s Penske Racing teamannounced in mid-season that it was switch-ing to Ford.Logano left his longtimeemployer,Joe Gibbs Racing,to take over theNo.22 at Penske from temporary driverSam Hornish Jr. A.J.Allmendinger started the 2012 season in the No.22,but lost the ride after failing adrug test. Keselowski told reporters at Charlotte that it’s a little too soon to say how the newFord Fusion will compare to the DodgeCharger he drove to the title. “It’s hard to get a great read on the whole manufacturer change because,obviously,it’sa different car,but I think all the signs arethere that we have the potential to be just asstrong,if not stronger,than we were lastyear,which is very,very encouraging,”hesaid.“We still have to work for it and makeit happen,but the signs are there.” He also sounded positive about Logano.“It’s been a lot of fun having the first day today working with Joey,which I think hasbeen probably more of an adjusting processthan the actual car itself,and a good adjust-ing process.I’m curious to see over time howwe can work together and push each other tobe the best we can be. “I’ve had a lot of fun with that so far. We’ve got a lot of work to do.” Keselowski said the early signs indicate that the affiliation with Ford will pay divi-dends. “I think the level of engagement from the Ford camp is very,very high,which isextremely encouraging and that’s from thetop on down,”he said.“That makes me feelmore confident than anything else becauseat the end of the day,this is a people sport.You look at the cars and you look at the aeroor whatever it might take to be the best youcan be,and those things tend to work them-selves out when you have the best people,and when you have people that are engagedand all are sharing a common goal and workethic.” Keselowski also said he believes that he can learn from Logano,even though he hasjust two Sprint Cup wins to Keselowski’s nine and has never finished better than 16thin the points standings. “I feel like there are a lot of areas that I can improve and be better,and I think thereare things Joey does right out of the gatethat are better than what I do,”Keselowskisaid.“I think he has the ability to unload ata place like [Charlotte Motor Speedway] andjust instantly be fast,and that’s not mystyle. “It’s something that I would like to add to my arsenal because there are times wherethat’s really,really helpful,so those are someof the things I look at.” The reigning champ went on to say that he plans to put teamwork and hard workahead of wearing his champion’s hat nextseason. “I think that Joey is an elite talent in this sport,and if we can work together that wewill both be better,”he said.“I would ratherfinish second to him next year in every raceand even the championship,than to rest onmy laurels,not get any better and the wholefield does,and run fifth,10th,15th,17th –whatever it might be – and beat him.Ithink it’s that spirit that is going to drive usto be the best we can.” Keselowski also said he hopes to keep his crew motivated in 2013,not letting themrest on their championship accomplish-ments.He said the switch to a new manufac-turer can help with that. “One of the best advantages of switching to Ford is it gives us something to prove allover again,that we can continue to be suc-cessful no matter what the manufacturer orno matter what the circumstance is and Ithink that’s very healthy,”he said. Brad Keselowski on the track during testing of his new Ford Fusion No.2 at Charlotte Motor Speedway.(N ASCAR photo)Fusion powerBodine, wife team to find new Truck Series sponsor Brad Keselowski (left) with new Penske Racing teammate Joey Logano during last week’s testing at Charlotte Motor Speedway.(NASCAR photo) Brian Scott(NASCAR photo) With new elements, Keselowski preps for 2013



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Dec. 21 Quilt raffleColumbia County Senior Services will raffle a sam-pler quilt to support the center. Tickets are $1 and the drawing will be held today. See Carol for tick-ets. Dec. 22Toy give-awayDr. Lorenzo L. Dixon, a Lake City native, is return-ing to his hometown to make Christmas a little merrier for all children. He will be giving away toys to children age 12 months to 12 years old from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Young’s Park on Lake Jeffrey Road.Filipino society dinnerThe Filipino American Cultural Society of Lake City will have a “Christmas Celebration Dinner and Dance” from 6 to 11 p.m. at the Epiphany Catholic Church Social Hall in Lake City. There will be holi-day entertainment, music, dancing and a cultural food buffet. Please bring a covered dish to share. Arrival, setup of buffet and social time will be from 6 to 6:30 p.m., dinner will be at 6:30. The event is free for FACS members. For non-members, cost is $10 per person. For more informa-tion contact, Bob Gavette at 965-5905.Toy drive, concertResurrection Praise Team will hold a toy drive and Christmas Praise Extravaganza from 4 to 6 p.m. at Niblack Elementary School. Bring unwrapped toys and enjoy praise danc-ing, singing and spoken words. Door prizes and raffles will be held.Praise breakfastNew Mount Zion AME Church, of Watertown, will have a Christmas Praise and Prayer Breakfast from 10 a.m. to noon. the meal will include grits, scrambled eggs, sausage, salmon pat-ties, toast, biscuit, juice and coffee. Cost is $7 per per-son. The Rev. Leroy Young, of Jacksonville, will speak on “The Real Meaning of Christmas.” For tickets or additional information, call The Rev. Charles Young at (904) 713-7877, Curtis Jones at (386) 752-8179 or Evette Harris at (386) 752-4306. Tickets will be avail-able at the door. SHINE trainingSHINE (Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders) is seeking volunteers in Columbia, Suwannee, Hamilton and Lafayette counties. Free volunteer training is scheduled as fol-lows: orientation, Jan. 11, 1 to 3 p.m,; basic train-ing, Feb. 13-15, 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.; and mentoring, six sessions scheduled at volunteer’s convenience. All training will take place at Elder Options, 100 SW 75ht St. (Tower Road) in Gainesville. Registration is required by Dec. 28. Meals will be provided and mile-age and, if needed, hotel accommodations will be reimbursed. SHINE is a statewide volunteer-based program of the Florida Department of Elder Affairs, offering counseling and assistance with Medicare, Medicaid, long-term care planning, prescription drug assistance, supplemental insurance and Medicare fraud. Meals are provided and mileage reimbursed. SHINE is dedicated to pro-viding free and unbiased information and counseling through a dedicated net-work of volunteers, empow-ering Florida seniors, their families and caregivers, to make informed healthcare choices. For more informa-tion or to request a SHINE volunteer application pack-et, call (352) 692-5264 or toll-free at (800) 963-5337. Dec. 23Puppet performanceFirst Presbyterian Church, 697 SW Baya Drive, invites the community to see Peter the Presbyterian and his family of puppets perform a skit during its worship service at 1030 a.m. For more information, call the church office at 752-0670.Candlelight serviceElim Baptist Church, 3435 SW Elim Church Road in Fort White, will hold a Christmas Candlelight Service at 6 p.m. The com-munity is invited. For more information, call (386) 497-1972.Youth Day eventBethesda Outreach Ministries of Alachua, 13205 NW 157th Ave. in Alachua, will hold a Youth Day to rally around the youth of our community. Services will be at 11 a.m. and 4 p.m. at the Civic Center in High Springs. A dinner will be served in between the ser-vices. For more informa-tion, call Elders Nyron or LaShandra Jenkins at (352) 339-4466.Dec. 24Christmas Eve serviceFirst Presbyterian Church, 697 SW Baya Drive, will hold its Christmas Eve candlelight service at 6:30 p.m. Special music, the Christmas message and the puppet ministry will be shared. For more informa-tion, call the church office at 752-0670.Chirstmas Eve serviceSt. James’ Episcopal Church, 2423 SW Bascom Norris Drive, will hold its Christmas Eve family ser-vice at 7 p.m. and a candle-light service at 11 p.m.Christmas Eve serviceSpirit of Christ Lutheran Church, 145 SW Sweetbreeze Drive (U.S. 90 1.5 miles west of Interstate 75), will hold its Christmas Eve service at 5 p.m. For more information, call 344-3364.Dec. 25Free dinnerSuwannee Valey Rescue Mission and Lad Soup Kitchen, 127 Escambia St. in Lake City, will serve its sixth annual Free Christmas Day Dinner. The menu includes turkey, ham, rice and gravy, col-lard greens, string beans, candied yams, dressing, desserts and iced tea. To donate food, money or time to the meal, call Timothy at (386) 758-2217.Dec. 31Retirement, investitureA retirement ceremony for Judge E. Vernon Davis and an investiture ceremo-ny for his son, Judge-elect Wesley R. Davis, will be at 1:30 p.m. in the Columbia County Courthouse, 173 NW Hernando Ave. A reception will follow.Jan. 2Olustee battle meetingThe Blue-Grey Army will meet at 5:30 p.m. to plan the Olustee Battle Festival. The meeting will be at the school district central building, room 153, 409 SW St. Johns St.Jan. 6Zuumba introductionA free introduction to Zumba class will be held from 3 to 4 p.m. at the Teen Town Recreation Building, 533 NW DeSoto St. For more information, contact Sarah Sandlin as (386) 758-0009 or visit “Lake City Zumba” on Facebook.Zumba weight lossThe Lake City Zumba Loser weight-loss contest will begin at 4 p.m. at the Teen Town Recreation Building, 533 NW DeSoto St. For more information, contact Sarah Sandlin as (386) 758-0009 or visit “Lake City Zumba” on Facebook.Jan. 8Medicare seminarLifeStyle Enrichment Center is sponsoring a free Medicare seminar from 5 to 6 p.m. The semi-nar will be moderated by Irv Crowetz of C/C & Associates. Subjects to be covered include: what you need to know about Medicare, when to enroll, what’s covered and when a supplement is needed. Call 755-3476 ext. 107 to reserve a seat.Jan. 12Chili cook-offThe fourth annual Branford Chili Cook-off will be from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hatch Park on Craven Street in Branford. The evend will include a silent auction for adults and kids, door prizes, live music, an antique car show, moon walk, Home Depot Kids Workshop and a variety of homemade chili. Admission is $5 and includes all the chili you can eat. Proceeds will benefit Herry’s Kids Pediatric Services, a pro-gram of Hospice of the Nature Coast. To register to compete in the chili cook-off, call the hospice at (386) 755-7714 or vist online at www.hospiceof citrus.org.Jan. 15Pageant entriesToday is the deadline for contestants to enter the 2013 Olustee Festival Pageant. The pageant is open to girls ages 3 months to 20 years who live in or attend school in Baker, Columbia, Gilcrist, Hamilton, Union and Suwannee counties. Age divisions are 3 to 12 months, 13 to 23 months, 2 to 3 years, 4 to 6 years, 7 to 9 years, 10 to 12 years, 13 to 15 years and 16 to 20 years. Contestants may compete in beauty, sportswear, tal-ent and photogenic catego-ries. The pageant awards include educational schol-arships, trophies, crowns and banners. Each pageant contestant will receive a tiara. First-place winners will ride in the Olustee Festival parade. The pag-eant will be held Jan. 26 at the Columbia County Schools Administrative Complex. Applications may be obtained at the Columbia County Library, the Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of Commerce, Emily Taber Library, Suwannee Regional Library, Hamilton County Library or by contacting Elaine Owens at (386) 965-2787.Jan. 19Chili cook-offThe Lake DeSoto Farmers Market will have its second annual chili cook-off during market hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Funds raised from the sale of chili sam-ples will benefit Church of the Way. Registration is $10, and there will be a cash prize for the win-ner. For registration infor-mation and contest rules, visit online at market.lcfla.com. The farmers market is held along Lake DeSoto between the Columbia County Courthouse and Shands Lakeshore Hospital in downtown Lake City. For more information, call (386) 719-5766 or visit market.lcfla.com.Jan. 26Olustee pageantThe 2013 Olustee Festival pageant will be held in the Columbia County Schools Administrative Complex on West Duval Street (U.S. 90) in Lake City. Competition for girl age 3 months to 9 years will be at 4 p.m. Competition for girls 10 to 20 will begin at 7 p.m. Contestants will be judged in beauty, sportswear, tal-ent and photogenic cat-egories. For more infor-mation, contace Elaine Owens at (386) 965-2787. Winners will ride in the Olustee Festival parade on Feb. 16. OngoingFestival vendorsThe Blue-Grey Army is accepting applications from vendors wanting to take part in the 2013 Battle of Olustee Festival on Feb. 15 and 16 in Lake City. For more information, phone Phil Adler at (386) 438-3131, visit the festival web-site, www.olusteefestival.com, or email vendorinfo@olusteefestival.com. The deadline to apply is Feb. 8 and spaces are limited.Winter programThe Boys and Girls Club of Columbia County, on Jones Way in Lake City, is now accepting registra-tions for its winter pro-gram, which will run Dec. 1 through March 1. The fee is $200, which includes transportation from all ele-mentary, middle and high schools. The club offers a variety of activities, includ-ing sports, arts and crafts, game room, library and special events. It also offers a homework program with tutorial help for children. A computer lab also is avail-able. For more information, call the club at 752-4184.Woodturners ClubBell Woodturners Club meets the second Thursday of the month in the Bell community Center, Bell Florida at 7 p.m.. Every meeting features a show and tell of members cur-rent projects. There is also a full demonstration of a woodturning project by a club member. There are opportunities to take home project wood, tools and receive help from other turners. All experi-ence levels are welcome. For additional info contact Kent Harris at 365-7086.Volunteers neededThe Shands LakeShore Regional Medical Center Auxiliary is looking for volunteers to work a vari-ety of positions around the hospital. Volunteers are asked to work a four-hour shift once per week, but are welcome to work more often. Volunteers are needed to drive the shuttle car and help with other jobs in the hospital. If you have some time to donate and areinterested, come to the gift shop and pick up an application or call (386)292-8000, ext. 21216 for more information. LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY & SATURDAY, DECEMBER 21-22, 2012 5A5A Falling Creek Chapel will be having its annual Christmas Eve Service at 6:30PM. All are welcome. COMMUNITY CALENDAR Q To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr@lakecityreporter.com. JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterFinal preparationsDamien and Jenna Edwards watch as Sabine Marcks, the g arden department supervisor at the Lake City Home Depot, tr ims the bottom of at Fraser fir Christmas tree on Wednesday.



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By PAUL NEWBERRYAssociated Press Now that he’s away from the pool, Michael Phelps can reflect — really reflect — on what he accomplished. Pretty amazing stuff.“It’s kind of nuts to think about everything I’ve gone through,” Phelps said. “I’ve finally had time to myself, to sit back and say, ‘... that really happened?’ It’s kind of shocking at times.” Not that his career needed a capper, but Phelps added one more honor to his staggering list of accom-plishments Thursday — The Associated Press male athlete of the year. Phelps edged out LeBron James to win the award for the second time, not only a fitting payoff for another brilliant Olympics (four gold medals and two silvers in swimming at the London Games) but recognition for one of the greatest careers in any sport. Phelps finished with 40 votes in balloting by U.S. editors and broadcasters, while James was next with 37. Track star Usain Bolt, who won three gold med-als in London, was third with 23. Carl Lewis is the only other Olympic-related star to be named AP male athlete of the year more than once, taking the award for his track and field exploits in 1983 and ‘84. The only men honored more than twice are golf’s Tiger Woods and cyclist Lance Armstrong (four times each), and bas-ketball’s Michael Jordan (three times). “Obviously, it’s a big accomplishment,” Phelps said. “There’s so many amazing male athletes all over the world and all over our country. To be able to win this is something that just sort of tops off my career.” Phelps retired at age 27 as soon as he finished his final race in London, having won more gold medals (18) and overall medals (22) than any other Olympian. No one else is even close.“That’s what I wanted to do,” Phelps said. “Now that it’s over, it’s something I can look back on and say, ‘That was a pretty amazing ride.’” The current ride isn’t so bad either. Set for life financially, he has turned his fierce competitive drive to golf, working on his links game with renowned coach Hank Haney as part of a television series on the Golf Channel. “I can’t really complain,” Phelps quipped over the phone. Certainly, he has no complaints about his swimming career, which helped turn a sport that most Americans only paid attention to every four years into more of a mainstream pursuit. More kids took up swimming. More advertisers jumped on board. More viewers tuned in to watch. Just the fact that he won over James shows just how much pull Phelps still has. James had an amazing year by any measure: The league MVP won his first NBA title with the Miami Heat, pick-ing up finals MVP honors along the way, and then starred on the gold medal-winning U.S. basketball team in London. Phelps already had won the AP award in 2008 after his eight gold medals in Beijing, which broke Mark Spitz’s record. Phelps got it again with a performance that didn’t quite match up to the Great Haul of China, but was amazing in its own right. Never mind that he was already the winningest Olympian ever. Never mind that he could’ve eclipsed the record for overall med-als just by swimming on the relays. He wanted to be one of those rare athletes who went out on top. “That’s just who he is,” said Bob Bowman, his long-time coach. “He just couldn’t live with himself if knew he didn’t go out there and give it good shot and real-ly know he’s competitive. He doesn’t know anything else but to give that kind of effort and have those kind of expectations.” Phelps got off to a rocky start in London, finishing fourth in the 400-meter individual medley. Phelps rebounded to become the biggest star at the pool, winning the 200 IM, contributing to a pair of relay victories, and winning his final individual race, the 100 butterfly. There were two silvers, as well, leaving Phelps with 22 medals. LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, DECEMBER 21-22, 2012 5B5B FRIDAY EVENING DECEMBER 21, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Last Man StandingMalibu CountryBack to the Beginning With Christiane Amanpour (N) (Part 1 of 2) News at 11(:35) Nightline (N) 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) The Insider 5-PBS 5 -Journal Nightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Washington WeekNeed to Know (N) Christmas With Mormon TabernacleChristmas at Belmont BBC World NewsTavis Smiley 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge Judy Two and Half MenAction News ReportsThe Good Wife “The Art of War” The Good Wife Friday Night BlitzLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneThe Happy Elf Eubie spreads joy. Grandma Got Run Over by a ReindeerTMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ce The Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family Guy Family Guy The SimpsonsKitchen Nightmares (DVS) Fringe “Anomaly XB-6783746” (N) (PA) NewsAction News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) Michael Bubl: Home for the HolidaysA White House ChristmasDateline NBC (N) NewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(2:00) Politics & Public Policy Today Politics & Public Policy Today Politics & Public Policy Today WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304(5:11) Bonanza(:22) M*A*S*HM*A*S*H The Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Police Women of Broward CountyPolice Women of Broward CountyPolice Women of Broward CountyPolice Women of Broward CountyPolice Women of Broward CountyPolice Women of Broward County A&E 19 118 265Parking WarsParking WarsDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck Dynasty Storage WarsStorage Wars(:01) Storage Wars(:31) Storage Wars HALL 20 185 312“Help for the Holidays” (2012, Fantasy) Summer Glau, Eva La Rue. “Come Dance With Me” (2012) Andrew McCarthy, Michelle Nolden. “Baby’s First Christmas” (2012) Casper Van Dien, Rachel Wilson. FX 22 136 248(5:00) “Armageddon” (1998) Bruce Willis, Billy Bob Thornton, Liv Tyler. “2012” (2009, Action) John Cusack, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Amanda Peet. A global cataclysm nearly wipes out humanity. 2012 (2009) CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245The Mentalist “My Bloody Valentine” The Mentalist “Red Is the New Black” Christmas in Washington 2012 (N) “Four Christmases” (2008) Vince Vaughn, Reese Witherspoon. (DVS) Christmas in Washington 2012 NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobDrake & JoshDrake & Josh“Merry Christmas, Drake & Josh” (2008, Comedy) Drake Bell, Josh Peck. See Dad RunThe Nanny Friends Friends SPIKE 28 168 241(5:30) Gangland “Coming to America” (1988, Comedy) Eddie Murphy, Arsenio Hall, John Amos. Eddie Murphy: One Night Only A tribute to comedy icon Eddie Murphy. “Coming to America” (1988) MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*H M*A*S*H “O.R.” Monk Monk A man who is dressed as Santa. Seinfeld Frasier The Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Phineas and FerbGood Luck CharlieShake It Up! Jessie Phineas and FerbPhineas and FerbGood Luck CharlieDog With a BlogA.N.T. Farm Good Luck CharlieGood Luck CharlieAustin & Ally LIFE 32 108 252 “The Perfect Holiday” (2007) Gabrielle Union, Morris Chestnut. “Finding Mrs. Claus” (2012, Comedy) Mira Sorvino, Will Sasso. “Christmas Crash” (2008, Drama) Michael Madsen, Alexandra Paul. USA 33 105 242Law & Order: SVULaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims Unit “The Game Plan” (2007, Comedy) Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, Madison Pettis. Burn Notice BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Freestyle Friday” Getting ready for Christmas. Roots Kunta Kinte is captured. (Part 1 of 6) Roots Kunta Kinte arrives in America. (Part 2 of 6) ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) Coll. Football Livee College Football Beef ’O’ Brady’s Bowl St. Petersburg -Ball State vs. Central Florida. From St. Petersburg, Fla. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209SportsNation Special: Year in Reviewd College Basketball Florida Atlantic at Indiana. (N)d College Basketball BYU at Baylor. (N) NFL Kickoff (N) SUNSP 37 -Game TimeThe Game 365d College Basketball Western Carolina at Tennessee. (N) Fight Sports: In 60Fight Sports: In 60 Boat Racing DISCV 38 182 278Zombie Apocalypse Gold Rush Dave pushes his crew. Gold Rush “Up Smith Creek” Gold Rush “Behind the Scenes 1” (N) Bering Sea Gold “The Bitter End” Gold Rush “Behind the Scenes 1” TBS 39 139 247King of QueensKing of QueensSeinfeld Seinfeld House of PayneHouse of PayneBetter WorseBetter Worse “Hitch” (2005, Romance-Comedy) Will Smith, Eva Mendes. (DVS) HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace MysteriesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesNancy Grace Mysteries FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236Love You, Mean ItThe SoupE! News (N) Ice Loves CocoIce Loves CocoCelebrity Oops: They Did It AgainFashion Police (N) Chelsea LatelyE! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures “Cripple Creek” Ghost Adventures “Clinically Dead” Ghost Adventures “Killer Nightlife” (N) The Dead Files (N) The Dead Files HGTV 47 112 229Hunters Int’lHunters Int’lHunters Int’lHunters Int’lCountry Stars at Home (N) White House Christmas 2012 House HuntersHunters Int’lHunters Int’lHunters Int’l TLC 48 183 280Say Yes: BrideSay Yes: BrideSay Yes: BrideSay Yes: BrideSay Yes: BrideSay Yes: BrideSay Yes: BrideSay Yes: BrideBrides-HillsBrides-HillsSay Yes: BrideSay Y es: Bride HIST 49 120 269Apocalypse Island Island clue in Mayan predictions. American Pickers American Pickers “Boys’ Toys” American Pickers “Picker Man Blues” How the StatesAmerican Pickers ANPL 50 184 282Monsters Inside Me “Sleeper Cells” Infested! “Crawls From the Walls” Infested! A family battles cockroaches. Infested! “The Most Horrifying” Infested! Campers battle bedbugs. Infested! A family battles cockroaches. FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveRestaurant: ImpossibleRestaurant StakeoutMystery Diners (N) Mystery DinersDiners, DriveDiners, Drive TBN 52 260 372Christmas PageantLive-Holy LandSid Roth It’s SuThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesHal Lindsey The Harvest Perry StoneChristmas With a Capital CChristian Ebner FSN-FL 56 -Inside the MagicMagic Live! (Live)d NBA Basketball Orlando Magic at Toronto Raptors. Air Canada Centre in Toronto. Magic Live! (Live) Inside the MagicGolf Life ’12Action Sports World Tour SYFY 58 122 244“The 12 Disasters of Christmas” (2012) Ed Quinn, Magda Apanowicz. WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) Haven Duke faces off against the Killer. Haven “Silent Night” AMC 60 130 254(5:45) “Miracle on 34th Street” (1947) Maureen O’Hara, John Payne. “Miracle on 34th Street” (1994) Richard Attenborough, Elizabeth Perkins. Premiere. “Miracle on 34th Street” (1994) Richard Attenborough. COM 62 107 249(5:55) South Park(:26) Tosh.0 The Colbert ReportDaily Show(7:57) Tosh.0 (:28) Tosh.0 (8:58) “Harold & Kumar Escape From Guantanamo Bay” (2008) Kal Penn. (:15) Chris Hardwick: Mandroid CMT 63 166 327Reba Reba “The Wall” Reba Reba Reba “The Will” Reba “Fireproof” (2008) Kirk Cameron. A divorcing couple turn to God to save their marriage. Facing the Giants NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer Wolf-dog hybrids. Night Stalkers “Leopard Battleground” Night Stalkers “Hyena Gangs” Night Stalkers “Jaguar Ambush” Night Stalkers “Crocodile War” Night Stalkers “Hyena Gangs” NGC 109 186 276Access 360 World Heritage (N) Maya Underworld: The Real DoomsdayEvacuate Earth How humans would evacuate Earth. The Mayan Apocalypse 2012Evacuate Earth SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeUnearthing Ancient Secrets Unearthing Ancient Secrets Unearthing Ancient Secrets Unearthing Ancient Secrets (N) Unearthing Ancient Secrets ID 111 192 285Deadly Women “Married to Murder” Deadly Women “Matriarchs of Murder” Facing EvilFacing EvilPretty Bad Girls (N) Pretty Bad Girls (N)Wives With Knives (N) Facing EvilFacing Evil HBO 302 300 501Mel Brooks Strikes Back! “In Time” (2011, Science Fiction) Justin Timberlake. ‘PG-13’ “New Year’s Eve” (2011, Romance-Comedy) Halle Berry. ‘PG-13’ “The Change-Up” (2011) ‘R’ MAX 320 310 515(:05) “Larry Crowne” (2011) Tom Hanks. ‘PG-13’ (:45) “X-Men: First Class” (2011, Action) James McAvoy, Michael Fassbender. ‘PG-13’ “Project X” (2012, Comedy) Thomas Mann. ‘R’ Lingerie SHOW 340 318 545(5:30) “Red” (2010, Action) Bruce Willis. ‘PG-13’ “War Horse” (2011) Emily Watson. A horse sees joy and sorrow during World War I. ‘PG-13’ “Real Steel” (2011, Action) Hugh Jackman, Evangeline Lilly. ‘PG-13’ SATURDAY EVENING DECEMBER 22, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Tonight (N) Prep & LandingA ChipmunkCMA Country Christmas Country stars share holiday traditions. News at 11Crook & Chase 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsPaid Program30 Rock 30 Rock Rules/EngagementRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryNewsInside EditionChann 4 NewsFirst Baptist 5-PBS 5 -The Lawrence Welk Show “Christmas” Andy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th Show “Soldier in the Rain” (1963) Jackie Gleason. ’Allo ’Allo!Austin City Limits “Tom Waits” Front Row Center “Bachman & Turner” 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge Judy Two and Half MenMade in Jersey “Wingman” (N) Made in Jersey “Ancient History” (N) 48 Hours (N) Action Sports 360Two and Half Men 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneFantasy FootballLike, LoveDaryl’s HouseYourjax MusicYourJax MusicJacksonvilleI Know JaxLocal Haunts 10-FOX 10 30 30The First FamilyMr. Box Of ceChristm St JohLift Your VoiceCops (N) Cops (PA) Kitchen Nightmares “Zocalo” NewsAction Sports 360MasterChef “Top 6 Compete, Part 3” 12-NBC 12 12 12First Coast NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! “Mr. Magoo’s Christmas Carol” WWE Tribute to the Troops (N) Saturday Night Live NewsSat. Night Live CSPAN 14 210 350Washington This CommunicatorsWashington This Week WGN-A 16 239 307Law & Order: Criminal Intent “Pravda”d NBA Basketball Chicago Bulls at Atlanta Hawks. From Philips Arena in Atlanta. (N) America’s Funniest Home VideosWGN News at NineBones A corpse has on a Santa suit. TVLAND 17 106 304The Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Behind Mansion Walls “Fatal Dynasty” Behind Mansion Walls Six Little McGhees Six Little McGheesSix Little McGheesIyanla, Fix My Life Reloaded (N) Six Little McGheesSix Little McGhees A&E 19 118 265Storage-TexasStorage-TexasStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsParking Wars (N) Parking Wars (N) Parking Wars (N) Parking WarsExterminatorExterminator HALL 20 185 312“A Christmas Wish” (2011, Drama) Kristy Swanson, Tess Harper. “The Christmas Card” (2006, Romance) Ed Asner, John Newton. “Christmas With Holly” (2012, Drama) Sean Faris, Eloise Mumford. FX 22 136 248(5:30) “Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian” (2009, Comedy) “Alvin and the Chipmunks” (2007, Comedy) Jason Lee, David Cross. “Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Squeakquel” (2009, Comedy) Zachary Levi. CNN 24 200 202The Situation RoomCNN Newsroom (N) Fareed Zakaria GPS Four leaders. Piers Morgan TonightPiers Morgan TonightFareed Zakaria GPS Four leaders. TNT 25 138 245(5:00) “Four Christmases” (2008) “The Wizard of Oz” (1939) Judy Garland, Frank Morgan. (DVS) (:15) “The Wizard of Oz” (1939, Fantasy) Judy Garland, Frank Morgan. (DVS) Monster-in-Law NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobVictorious Marvin MarviniCarly “iChristmas” Victorious The Nanny The Nanny Friends Friends SPIKE 28 168 241Tattoo NightmaresTattoo NightmaresTattoo NightmaresTattoo NightmaresTattoo NightmaresTattoo NightmaresTattoo NightmaresTattoo NightmaresTattoo NightmaresTattoo NightmaresTattoo NightmaresTattoo Nightmares MY-TV 29 32 -Hogan’s HeroesHogan’s HeroesBatmanBatmanLost in Space Star Trek “Wink of an Eye” “Abbott and Costello Go to Mars” (1953) Bud Abbott, Lou Costello. DISN 31 172 290Austin & Ally Shake It Up! Dog With a BlogDog With a Blog “The Search for Santa Paws” (2010, Comedy) Phineas and FerbA.N.T. Farm Jessie Shake It Up! Good Luck Charlie LIFE 32 108 252 “A Nanny for Christmas” (2010) Emmanuelle Vaugier, Dean Cain. “A Boyfriend for Christmas” (2004) Kelli Williams, Patrick Muldoon. “Single Santa Seeks Mrs. Claus” (2004) Crystal Bernard. USA 33 105 242 The Game Plan “The Ugly Truth” (2009) Katherine Heigl, Gerard Butler, Eric Winter. “The Back-up Plan” (2010, Romance-Comedy) Jennifer Lopez, Alex O’Loughlin. Premiere. “The Ugly Truth” (2009) BET 34 124 329(5:30) Roots Kunta Kinte arrives in America. (Part 2 of 6) Roots Kunta is severely punished for escaping. (Part 3 of 6) Roots Kizzy is raped by her new master. (Part 4 of 6) ESPN 35 140 206e College FootballMonday Night Countdown (N) (Live) e NFL Football Atlanta Falcons at Detroit Lions. From Ford Field in Detroit. (N Subject to Blackout) SportsCenter (N) ESPN2 36 144 209d College Basketball Illinois vs. Missouri. From St. Louis. (N)d College Basketball Florida at Kansas State. (N) SEC Storied (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter SUNSP 37 -Along the WayInside the HEAT Golf South Walton Celebrity Classic. ACC Road Trip SpecialFight Sports: In 60Inside the HeatInside the HeatInside the Heat DISCV 38 182 278Moonshiners Tickle trims his tree. The Great Barrier Reef Great Barrier Reef. (N) Frozen Planet “Edge of the Earth” (N) Alaska: The Last Frontier Frozen Planet “Edge of the Earth” TBS 39 139 247King of QueensKing of QueensKing of QueensKing of QueensBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryWedding Band (N) Wedding Band HLN 40 202 204Mystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesNancy Grace Mysteries FNC 41 205 360America’s News Headquarters (N) FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Justice With Judge Jeanine (N) Geraldo at Large Journal EditorialFOX News Watch E! 45 114 236 “Sweet Home Alabama” (2002) Reese Witherspoon, Josh Lucas. “Ocean’s Thirteen” (2007) George Clooney. Danny Ocean and his gang seek to right a wrong. Love You, Mean ItFashion Police TRAVEL 46 196 277State Fair Foods Barbecue Paradise Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures “Mizpah Hotel” Ghost Adventures “Yorktown Hospital” HGTV 47 112 229High Low Proj.Hunters Int’lHouse Hunters Renovation Love It or List It “The Doudelet Family” Love It or List It John and Cecil. House HuntersHunters Int’lHouse HuntersHunters Int’l TLC 48 183 280Extreme Chea.Extreme Chea.Holiday ER Toddlers & Tiaras Four Weddings: Holiday ShowdownFour Houses: Deck the Halls Toddlers & Tiaras HIST 49 120 269Mankind The Story of All of Us “Revolutions” Mankind tames the wilderness. Mankind The Story of All of Us “New Frontiers” The end of the Civil War. Pawn Stars (:31) Pawn Stars(:02) Pawn Stars(:32) Pawn Stars ANPL 50 184 282Too Cute! “Fuzzy Polar Puppies” Too Cute! “Fluffy Puppy Party” Too Cute! (N) The Year in Pup Culture (N) Too Cute! “Cuddly Kittens” The Year in Pup Culture FOOD 51 110 231The Next Iron Chef: RedemptionUnwrappedUnwrappedUnwrapped Holiday sweet treats. Unwrapped “Holiday Favorites” Unwrapped “Holiday Helpings” Iron Chef America TBN 52 260 372Just Where I BeJacob’s GiftGaither: Precious MemoriesIn Touch With Dr. Charles StanleyHour of Power “Love’s Christmas Journey” (2011, Drama) Natalie Hall, Dylan Bruce. FSN-FL 56 -The Game 365UFC InsiderUFCe High School Football UIL Class 5A Division I, Final: Allen (TX) vs. Houston Lamar (TX). (N) SYFY 58 122 244Star Trek IV “Star Trek Generations” (1994, Science Fiction) Patrick Stewart, William Shatner. “Star Trek: First Contact” (1996, Science Fiction) Patrick Stewart, Jonathan Frakes. Star Trek II AMC 60 130 254(5:45) “Miracle on 34th Street” (1947) Maureen O’Hara, John Payne. “Miracle on 34th Street” (1994, Fantasy) Richard Attenborough, Elizabeth Perkins. “Miracle on 34th Street” (1994) Richard Attenborough. COM 62 107 249(5:56) Tosh.0 (:27) Tosh.0 (6:57) Tosh.0 (:28) Tosh.0 (7:58) South ParkBeavis, Butt-head(8:59) South ParkBeavis, Butt-headSouth Park Beavis, Butt-head(:01) South ParkBeavis, Butt-head CMT 63 166 327Redneck IslandRedneck IslandRedneck IslandRedneck Island (N) Chainsaw Gang (N) Chainsaw Gang (N) Redneck Island NGWILD 108 190 283Beast HunterDog Whisperer “Rockin’ the Boat” Dog Whisperer “Scared Straight” The Lady With 700 CatsMy Child Is a MonkeyDog Whisperer “Scared Straight” NGC 109 186 276Living in the Time of JesusDragon Wars: Fire and FuryAlaska State TroopersDoomsday PreppersDoomsday PreppersAlaska State Troopers SCIENCE 110 193 284Oddities Oddities Oddities Oddities Oddities Oddities Oddities (N) Oddities Death DealersDeath DealersOddities Oddities ID 111 192 285Final Cut “Red Carpet to Hell” Fatal Vows “The Last Seduction” Motives & Murders Motives & Murders “He Came for Me” Fatal Vows “Lies and Death” (N) Motives & Murders HBO 302 300 501 “Something Borrowed” (2011) Ginnifer Goodwin. ‘PG-13’ “Joyful Noise” (2012) Queen Latifah, Dolly Parton. Premiere. ‘PG-13’ “Johnny English Reborn” (2011) Rowan Atkinson. ‘PG’ (:45) Joyful Noise MAX 320 310 515(4:30) Antitrust(:20) “Big Stan” (2007, Action) Rob Schneider. ‘R’ (:15) “Hall Pass” (2011, Comedy) Owen Wilson, Jason Sudeikis. ‘R’ “The Revenant” (2009, Comedy) David Anders. Premiere. ‘R’ SHOW 340 318 545(5:45) Dexter (:45) Homeland “The Choice” Carrie needs to decide. “Our Idiot Brother” (2011) Paul Rudd. ‘R’ “50/50” (2011) Joseph Gordon-Levitt. ‘R’ (:10) “Blue Valentine” (2010) ‘R’ Phelps named AP Athlete of the Year ASSOCIATED PRESSMichael Phelps of the United States shows his gold medal in the men’s 4x100-meter medley swimming relay at the Aquatics Centre in the Olympic Park on Aug. 4 during the 2012 Summer Olympics in London.



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FAITH & VALUES Friday & Saturday, December 21-22, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 6A6AF&V Mary, Queen of Heaven? Thinking about self-controlI recently read an article by S. Rindlisbacher that I totally agree with and I want to share some of the thoughts. What is the Biblical stand concerning the veneration or worshiping of Mary? Is she the Queen of heaven, or an absolutely normal person? (Venerate: to honor or reverence with religious awe – to reverence to the highest degree.) From the beginning, I want to state that we have no reference to the veneration of Mary in the Bible, such as is practiced in the Roman Catholic Church. Such veneration, also called Mariolatry, must be firmly rejected. With all our hearts, however, we can join in the praise of Elisabeth, who said to Mary, “Blessed art thou among women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb” (Luke 1:42). This Biblical praise of Elisabeth expressed Mary’s attitude to God’s counsel: her submission, humility and readiness to do the will of God and to accept it in her life, despite all the negative things. Whatever goes beyond this praise, however, either in Mariolatry or in the cult around Mary, we must reject in light of the Bible, particularly in view of the words of God. “I am the Lord thy God, which have brought thee out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage. Thou shalt have no other gods before me” (Exodus 20:2-3). Let us consider briefly the virtues attributed to her by the Catholic Church and compare what the Bible has to say. Mary is said to have had an “immaculate conception,” or also the “perpetual sinless-ness.” These characteristics attributed to Mary are in clear contradiction to the words of God in Romans 3:23, “For all have sinned, and come short of the glory of God.” David the king also says in Psalm 51:5, “Behold, I was shapen in iniq-uity; and in sin did my mother conceive me.” These statements – I want to emphasize the word “all” in the text from the letter to the Romans – apply without exception. This includes Mary and invalidates any claim to the contrary. The Bible does not speak of a perpetual virginity either. Mary certainly was a virgin when she became pregnant with Jesus Christ, through the visitation of the Holy Spirit. This is expressly stated in the Bible. But after the birth of Jesus, Mary gave birth to several other children. We read in Matthew 13:55-56, “Is not this the carpenter’s son? Is not his mother called Mary? And his sisters, are they not all with us?” Through this Bible text alone it is clear that Mary lost her virginity after the birth of Jesus. Also, the term “Mother of God” is not tenable. Mary is the biological mother of Jesus, but not the “Mother of God” in the sense that the Catholic Church means. The Catholic Church attributes to Mary a similarity to God, and exalts her to “Queen of heaven,” who should be given particular veneration. We do not find this in the Bible, however. The Bible gives us a different picture of Mary. The Bible teaches that the only person deserving of rever-ence is our Heavenly Father, His Son Jesus, and the Holy Spirit. There is no short cut to commu-nicate with the Father. May God bless you in this season! T he massacre of little children is never easy to hear about. Their earthly lives gone for eternity; their lifelong dreams never realized; their potential influence never given an opportunity. As people are beginning to think about the events in that small Connecticut town, there may be some things which we need to think about as well. Everyone is asking the question, “Why?” and rightfully so. They are asking how this could have been prevented. Were there any warning signs? What about more gun control? All of these ques-tions are good and should be discussed. However, let us think about the actions of the young shooter. If the reports are accurate, in that he shot his mother first, let us think about how a person who has lived a little over two decades on this earth could have so little regard for human life? What type of person had he become so that he could actually murder his own mother? His caregiver all his life and his sole custodian since her divorce from his father. What kind of feelings are “bottled-up inside someone” that would cause them to take such action? If it is really true that the young man was full of anger, then how would the taking of the lives of those a decade-and-a-half younger than he remove the cause of the anger? How does a person become so full of rage that they are willing to take the lives of pos-sibly someone they do not even know? What could those children have possibly done to this young man that would have warranted their death? If there are to be any types of control put into place, maybe one of them should be “self-control.” However, by defini-tion, for this control to be in place it must be imposed by “self.” So how do we as a community, state or nation impose “self-control” upon ourselves? Imposing “self-control” is probably the hardest thing humans have to do. It is not my parents who are controlling me. It is not the government controlling me. It is “I” controlling me. How do “I” control me? There seems to be only two ways that “I” can control me. I must be taught that “I” have to control me. And two, “I” must control me. My actions must be controlled by my thoughts and not by my feelings. Both my posi-tive and negative feelings must be controlled by me. The apostle Paul discussed with the Roman official, Felix, among other things, self-control (Acts 24:25). Paul wrote the Galatians (5:23) and told them that “self-control” was a com-ponent of the fruit of the Spirit. Peter said that we must develop “self-control” (2 Peter 1:6). “Self-control” is a learned action that must be practiced. We need to think about the parents of those little children as well as the family of the principal and the other school workers who lost their life. But let’s not forget to think about the brother and father of the shooter. They are hurting also. They have lost family, too. What a sad time in our country, but maybe it will give us an opportunity to think about what is a real problem for our country. Maybe it will give us time to think about how we can truly prevent this type of action from happening again. Maybe the answer is that we need to change the way we “think” about certain things. A wise man said about mankind, “For as he thinks within himself, so he is.” (Proverbs 23:7). Let’s individually, as a community, state and nation think about self-control. Q Hugh Sherrill is an ordained minister and Bible teacher at Eastside Baptist Church. Hugh Sherrillems-hugh43@comcast.net BIBLE STUDIES BIBLICAL MEDITATION Carlton McPeakcarlton_mc@msn.com Q Carlton G. McPeak is an evangelist working in the Lake City area. All Scriptural quotations are from the New American Standard Bible, Holman Bible Publishers, unless otherwise noted.



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6B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & PUZZLES FRIDAY & SATURDAY, DECEMBER 21-22, 2012 DEAR ABBY: My divorce from “Vince” will be final in a few weeks. We have two sons together and we communicate well. Since our breakup, my parents have continued their relationship with him. They say, “You divorced him, we didn’t.” They have confirmed that he will be invited to all holiday events. I am so upset about it that I now want nothing to do with them. Vince has his own family who have unani-mously removed me from their lives. I’m hurt by my parents’ actions. Am I wrong? And are my feelings normal? -LOST MY PARENTS IN THE DIVORCE IN CALIFORNIA DEAR LOST: As the father of your children, Vince will always be a part of your life, so my advice is to accept it graciously. Because Vince had a good relationship with your par-ents, I can understand why they would extend an invi-tation to the father of their grandchildren. Whether he will choose to accept is the question. His family may have declared you persona non grata because in their eyes you divorced HIM. That said, your feelings are your feelings. Rather than say they are “wrong,” I would point out that they are unproductive at this point. As you move for-ward with your emotional life, I predict this will become less of an issue. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: I am a 50-year-old divorced man. I use an online dating service to meet women my age, but I’m extremely frustrated by the lack of courtesy. Why is it so hard for a woman to simply write, “Thanks, but I’m not inter-ested” after getting a note of inquiry? My photos are recent, I’m polite and I send thoughtful notes that show I have read their profiles carefully and think there’s a chance we have something in common. I admit, I’m not the hand-somest man, but I hold a master’s degree and I am financially stable. I have sent a dozen notes over the last few months, and not one woman has been polite enough to respond. Any thoughts? -DATELESS IN DAYTON DEAR DATELESS: Please don’t let the lack of response make you quit putting yourself out there, because eventually you’re going to find someone if you keep trying. You are an intelligent man, and I am sure you have much to offer some lucky woman. However, I would delicately point out to you that by not responding to your notes these women ARE sending you a message. It is possible that because the “chemistry” is wrong, they do not wish to get into a dialogue. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: I’m a 17-year-old girl and every time I meet people, they think I am 12. How do I look more my age? Please help me. -HONEY IN GEORGIA DEAR HONEY: A way to accomplish it would be to go to a department store and ask at the cos-metics counter about a demonstration makeover to achieve a more sophis-ticated look. While you’re there, I’m sure a clothing salesperson would also be happy to accommodate you in finding items that girls your age are buying. A different hairstyle could also “update” your image if you are wearing it the way you did a few years ago. P.S. While you may not think it now, later on you will regard your youthful appearance as an asset. Trust me on that! ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: My boy-friend and I are in a longdistance relationship and agreed to split our visits 50-50 between our cities. Initially, it worked great. Unfortunately, his work schedule has changed, and for the past year he has come here to visit me only once every month or so, while I frequently drive for hours to see him. He says that because he’s away from home for work, it’s only fair that I travel to see him since it’s “less trouble” for me. I understand that he puts in a lot of time with travel for work, but at what point does the ratio become unbalanced and unfair? I miss weekends in my city with my friends, and it makes me sad that he won’t make the effort to see me. What do you think is right in this matter? -UNCERTAIN IN SAN FRANCISCO DEAR UNCERTAIN: “What’s right” is the original agreement you had with your boyfriend, or something close to it. Because he is no longer willing to live up to his part in the bargain, consid-er seeing him less often. Perhaps if he has a chance to miss you, he will feel impelled to make more of an effort. And if he’s not, then you won’t have to cut off your social relationships at home -relationships you may need if this romance doesn’t work out the way you would like. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: My wife of 32 years has delusional jealousy. It is so bad that she has checked my geni-tals and questioned the neighbors’ wives. I have stayed in this marriage only because of our chil-dren, who are now adults. I am at a crisis point where I want a divorce. I detest throwing 32 years away, but I have no love for this woman. We have sought counseling three times. However, once I start describing her delu-sions, the sessions quickly stop. -WANTS OUT IN COLORADO DEAR WANTS OUT: Nowhere in your letter could I discern a question, but from my vantage point, I disagree that you would “throw 32 years away.” You used that time to make sure your children were grown and independent. I’m sorry about your wife’s delusions, but because she is unwilling to follow through with counseling, there is noth-ing you or I can do about them. If you want my permission to end this marriage, I can’t grant it; only you can do that for yourself. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: My sister is engaged to a severe alcoholic. I host the annual Christmas dinners and I feel stuck. When he was here last year, he broke a wine glass that held spe-cial meaning for my hus-band and me and generally made a fool of himself. Should I invite my sister and tell her that her fiance isn’t welcome? (They live together.) He has gotten even worse this year. He broke three bones because he was so drunk he fell, and he left rehab three times in one month. I’m a cancer survivor and do not need the stress in my life. -NERVOUS IN NEW YORK DEAR NERVOUS: I agree that you shouldn’t subject yourself to unnec-essary stress. Your health must come first. If you haven’t discussed this with your sister, do it NOW. A way to include her and her fiance would be to serve no alcohol during your Christmas cel-ebration. However, if that isn’t feasible, then tell her that until her fiance is able to stay “dry,” you regret that you will be unable to entertain them. ** ** ** Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. HOROSCOPES DEAR ABBY ARIES (March 21-April 19): You can’t please every-one, so do your best to please the people you care about most. A moneymak-ing opportunity will spark your interest. Personal changes will build confi-dence and help you ven-ture down new avenues. Love is enhanced. +++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): A financial bonus or surprise is heading your way. Put your skills to work for you and offer a service that will help put cash in your pocket. A partnership will help you develop a business plan. Travel plans should be made. +++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): A positive attitude will help you develop better relationships with people trying to reach similar goals. You may feel like celebrating, but overdoing it in any way will lead to emotional or financial loss. Stick to what and whom you know. ++++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Don’t let what oth-ers do add pressure or responsibilities that don’t belong to you. Enjoy time spent with good friends or those you know you can rely on regardless of what happens. Follow your intu-ition. It won’t let you down. ++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Get out and do some shop-ping or get involved in an event that will allow you to lend a helping hand. Strive to enhance your reputa-tion and you will meet someone who can change your life by introducing you to a different lifestyle. +++++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Refrain from being overly generous. Draw the line when asked for too much or put in a position that warrants you to do things you’d prefer not to do. A change at home is likely to leave you feeling uncertain about your finan-cial future. +++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Listen carefully or you may misinterpret what’s expected of you at home or at work as the day progresses. Do your share, but maintain equal-ity as well as moderation to avoid feeling like you’ve been taken for granted. Avoid anyone being exces-sive. +++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Money matters must be taken care of frugally. Learn from past experi-ence when it comes to making impulsive purchas-es. Focus more on what you can do or create that will help you bring in more money. Don’t let a lover or partner cost you. +++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Put your heart on the line and show your feelings. The changes at home will bring you great joy and something to look forward to in the upcom-ing year. An honest assess-ment will make the differ-ence between success and failure. +++++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Problems while traveling or dealing with foreigners, friends or relatives can be expected. Don’t make hasty deci-sions based on what others want. Stick to your game plan and think matters through. It’s your disci-pline that will win out in the end. ++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Gauge your time and don’t make a move because someone puts pressure on you. Believe in your capabilities, and set your goals based on your needs and what you want to achieve. Love is in the stars, and advancement is within reach. ++++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Don’t take on too much. Set your priorities and a strict budget. A relationship you have will be unstable. Don’t make judgments that will make you look bad. You will be missing pertinent informa-tion that will change your mind. +++ THE LAST WORD Eugenia Last Woman’s soon-to-be ex still on family’s guest list Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com Puzzle Solutions on the next page.



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W hen we were kids, mom and dad sent us to bed when we wanted to stay up. When all was ‘clear’, we would sneak and get things like marbles, baseball cards, plastic army men. Mom and dad believed in ‘communal sleeping arrangements’ three boys in one room. We had a bunk bed, I was on the top, Ed was on the bottom, and Bob had a separate bed four feet away. I remember getting rubber bands to shoot at Bob, but he was well ‘armed’ as well. The war was on, and we had a great time, until mom or dad would come in and spoil the fun. As usual, they always came in when we didn’t expect them. We had good times, there wasn’t a lot of money. Dad was making $164.00 preaching in Dallas. We got $.25 weekly allow-ance, spent wisely on 5 cent Bubble gum, and 5 baseball cards, which we collected). We chewed the gum all day and at night (when we remembered) we stuck it on the bed post, hoping that someone had not stolen it by morning. Sometimes we forgot to take it out at night, and mom had to cut it out of our hair. Dad didn’t mind giving us work around the house and yard, pulling weeds, planting rose bushes for mom, laying flagstone, pull-ing bushes, cut the grass, pick up after our selves, clean our rooms, wash the dishes, dry the dishes, wash the car, clean the garage, empty the garbage. So, we asked “How about an increase in our allow-ance?” Dad would say, “You don’t pay rent son, I’ll put it on your bill.” Mom was the “house doctor.” She had special cures for most things. If we skinned ourselves, she would get iodine and rub that yukky brick-red stuff on the cut. She would say, “This is going to hurt a bit.” (Wrong! It hurt a lot!) She would blow on it till the pain went away. Then put a Band-aid on it, and off we would go. We always went to “Dr. Mom” for everything, from skinned knees and bruises to splin-ters and burns. She always knew what to do. Her cure for almost everything was a hug and a kiss. We were amazed how that helped. Mom was also the “house defense attorney” (most of the time), when we wanted something from dad. She was our mediator and sometimes defense attor-ney. We didn’t always get what we wanted, but some-how, we always got what we needed. I was the first of three boys in the family, mom lost two other baby girls prematurely, we had three adopted sisters who were loved the same. Now, mom and dad are gone, one brother (Ed) and sister (Charlene) have passed away. This leaves Bob, Sandi, Tammy and myself. As we grow older, we reflect back when we get together on the times we had with mom and dad and laugh and cry. We remember mom and dad praying, and reading the Bible to us. They would read things like, “My son, hear the instruction of your father, and do not forsake the law of your mother; For they will be a graceful orna-ment on your head, And chains about your neck” Proverbs 1:8-9. Through the memories, and their teachings, they are still with us. LAKE CITY REPORTER FAITH & VALUES FRIDAY & SATURDAY, DECEMBER 21-22, 2012 7A7AReligion Straining toward what’s aheadI like moving forward — especially this time of year. After Christmas Day, I am ready to take down the tree, pack up the decorations and begin looking for the fresh clean pages of a New Year’s calendar. Depending on how you look at it, those pages can represent days full of dread and demands or they can shine with possibility and opportunities. The Bible records the Apostle Paul saying it best: “I press on to take hold of that for which Christ Jesus took hold of me...but one thing I do: forget-ting what is behind and straining toward what is ahead, I press on toward the goal to win the prize for which God has called me heavenward in Christ Jesus.” (Philippians 3:13-14) Understanding that God has a plan and purpose for our lives is important, but He has called us to participate with Him in bringing that purpose to real-ity. Paul says we have to “press on” or keep moving forward to fulfill that plan. Then he gives us instruction on how to do just that. Forgetting what is behind doesn’t mean that we can’t remember our past. Only God can intentionally forget anything. What it does mean is that the past shouldn’t take priority over the present and future. Too many of us live continually with the hurt and failures of the past and can’t seem to move ahead in forgiveness and success. Or maybe we live in the past because we believe they were our best days, and the rest of our years will pale in comparison — and they absolutely will as long as we choose to stay behind. God’s plan here is for us to give the present and future our energy, our hope and our faith that God’s plan for us will be “immeasurably more than all we ask or imagine, according to His power that is at work within us.” (Ephesians 3:20) The abundant life that Christ offers us is not a destination but a journey, and to find it, we keep moving forward until we reach that “heavenward” home. The second part of the instruction is just as critical; “straining toward what is ahead” is something we need to give special attention. Webster’s dictionary defines strain as “to struggle; to make a desperate effort.” This is our first clue that pressing on and moving forward will not be an easy thing to do. “Easy” usually means staying right in that comfortable spot-it may not even be a great spot, but at least we know what to expect! But we do have the choice: we can take the easy way and spend the rest of our lives wondering if there was more, or we can start making that desperate effort to find and live in the purpose for which God planned our whole life. I hope so much that you will grab those fresh pages of a new calendar and see them as fresh new opportunities to be every-thing that God created you to be ... because your heart really does matter! Blessings for an amazing 2013! Angie Dec. 21Fish dinnerOur Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5056 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, pre-pares fish dinners every Friday from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The dinner is $6 for two Alaskan pollock filets, corn, baked beans, hush-puppies, cole slaw and tarter sauce. Take out or eat in.Dec. 22Toy drive, concertResurrection Praise Team will hold a toy drive and Christmas Praise Extravaganza from 4 to 6 p.m. at Niblack Elementary School. Bring unwrapped toys and enjoy praise danc-ing, singing and spoken words. Door prizes and raffles will be held.Praise breakfastNew Mount Zion AME Church, of Watertown, will have a Christmas Praise and Prayer Breakfast from 10 a.m. to noon. the meal will include grits, scrambled eggs, sausage, salmon pat-ties, toast, biscuit, juice and coffee. Cost is $7 per per-son. The Rev. Leroy Young, of Jacksonville, will speak on “The Real Meaning of Christmas.” For tickets or additional information, call The Rev. Charles Young at (904) 713-7877, Curtis Jones at (386) 752-8179 or Evette Harris at (386) 752-4306. Tickets will be avail-able at the door. Dec. 23Puppet performanceFirst Presbyterian Church, 697 SW Baya Drive, invites the community to see Peter the Presbyterian and his family of puppets perform a skit during its worship service at 1030 a.m. For more information, call the church office at 752-0670.Candlelight serviceElim Baptist Church, 3435 SW Elim Church Road in Fort White, will hold a Christmas Candlelight Service at 6 p.m. The com-munity is invited. For more information, call (386) 497-1972.Youth Day eventBethesda Outreach Ministries of Alachua, 13205 NW 157th Ave. in Alachua, will hold a Youth Day to rally around the youth of our community. Services will be at 11 a.m. and 4 p.m. at the Civic Center in High Springs. A dinner will be served in between the ser-vices. For more informa-tion, call Elders Nyron or LaShandra Jenkins at (352) 339-4466.Dec. 24Christmas Eve serviceFirst Presbyterian Church, 697 SW Baya Drive, will hold its Christmas Eve candlelight service at 6:30 p.m. Special music, the Christmas message and the puppet ministry will be shared. For more informa-tion, call the church office at 752-0670.Chirstmas Eve serviceSt. James’ Episcopal Church, 2423 SW Bascom Norris Drive in Lake City, will have its Christmas Eve family service at 7 p.m. and a candlelight service at 11 p.m.Christmas Eve serviceSpirit of Christ Lutheran Church, 145 SW Sweetbreeze Drive (U.S. 90, 1.5 miles west of Interstate 75), will hold its Christmas Eve service at 5 p.m. For more information, call 344-3364.Dec. 30 The Women’s Missionary Society of Union A.M.E. Church will hold worship services at 11 a.m. The guest speaker will be mrs. Erma J. Harris-Morris. The public is invited. The church is at 357 NW Queen Road in Lake City. For more information, contact Angee Ford at 755-6314 or Shirley Harris at 755-0858.OngoingDevotional servicesThe American Legion Rider Chapter 57, South Highway 47, hosts Sunday morning devotional servic-es on the second Sunday of every month at 9 a.m. There is also a continen-tal breakfast from 8 to 9 a.m. Services are held by the Christian Motorcycle Association. Everyone is welcome to join in the fel-lowship and breakfast and participate in a spiritually uplifting morning. Christian motorcyclistsChristian Motorcyclist Association Iron Shepherds Chapter 826 meets at 6:30 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month at Ray’s Deli & Grill on Highway 247 across from the Columbia County fairgrounds, at 6:30 p.m. For more information email Ironshepherds826@gmail.com. CHURCH CALENDAR Q To submit your Church Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr@lakecityreporter.com.When we were kids Jack Exum Jr.jackexumjr@yahoo.com HEART MATTERS Angie Landangieland3@windstream.net Q Heart Matters is a weekly column written by Angie Land, direc tor of the Family Life Ministries of the Lafayette Baptist Association, where she teaches bible studies, leads marriage and family confer ences, and offers biblical counsel ing to individuals, couples and families. Q Jack Exum Jr. Is a freelance writer who lives in Lake City. To find more articles (by Jack Exum Jr. as well as Jack Exum Sr.), Exum books for sale, family pictures, Bible studies, spe cial “For Teens Only” area and more, visit Exum’s new website, www. jackexum.com. Fear keeps Egypt’s Christians away from pollsBY HAMZA HENDAWIAssociated PressASSIUT, Egypt — A campaign of intimidation by Islamists left most Christians in this south-ern Egyptian province too afraid to participate in last week’s ref-erendum on an Islamist-drafted constitution they deeply oppose, residents say. The disenfran-chisement is hiking Christians’ worries over their future under empowered Muslim conserva-tives. Around a week before the vote, some 50,000 Islamists marched through the provincial capital, Assiut, chanting that Egypt will be “Islamic, Islamic, despite the Christians.” At their head rode several bearded men on horse-back with swords in scabbards on their hips, evoking images of early Muslims conquering Christian Egypt in the 7th Century. They made sure to go through mainly Christian districts of the city, where residents, fearing attacks, shuttered down their stores and stayed in their homes, witnesses said. The day of the voting itself on Saturday, Christian voting was minimal — as low as 7 percent in some areas, according to church officials. Some of those who did try to head to polling stations in some villages were pelted by stones, forcing them to turn back without casting ballots, Christian activists and residents told The Associated Press this week. The activists now see what happened in Assiut as a barom-eter for what Christians’ sta-tus will be under a constitution that enshrines a greater role for Shariah, or Islamic law, in government and daily life. Even under the secular regime of auto-crat Hosni Mubarak, Egypt’s Christians complained of discrim-ination and government failure to protect them and their rights. They fear it will be worse with the Islamists who have dominated Egypt’s political landscape since Mubarak’s ouster in February 2011. “When all issues become religious and all the talk is about championing Islam and its proph-et, then, as a Christian, I am excluded from societal participa-tion,” said Shady Magdy Tobia, a Christian activist in Assiut. “If this does not change, things will only get worse for Christians.” But some of the Christians of Assiut are pushing back against the emboldened Islamists. In recent weeks, young Christians joined growing street protests to demand that the charter is shelved, casting aside decades of political apathy. Assiut province is significant because it is home to one of Egypt’s largest Christian com-munities — they make up about 35 percent of the population of 4.5 million, perhaps three times the nationwide percentage. At the same time, it is a major stronghold of Egypt’s Islamists, who now dominate its local government. The province was the birthplace of some of the country’s most rad-ical Islamist groups and was the main battlefield of an insurgency by Muslim militants in the 1990s. It was one of 10 provinces that voted in the first round of Egypt’s referendum. Nationwide, around 56 percent voted in favor of the draft charter, according to prelimi-nary results. Assiut had one of the strongest “yes” votes at more than 77 percent. It also had a turnout of only 28 percent ‚ one of the lowest in a round marred by a low participation of only 32 percent nationwide. The second and final round will held the coming Saturday in 17 provinces, including in Minya, which has the country’s highest proportion of Christians, at 36 percent. Rights groups reported attempts at suppression of the “no” vote in many parts of the country. But Christians say intimidation and suppression are more effec-tive in this smaller, largely rural province. Women attend a class in a church in the village of El-A ziyah in southern Egypt. After a campaign of intimidation by Islamists, most Chr istians in the province were too afraid to participate in last week’s re ferendum on an Islamist-drafted constitution they desperately oppose, reside nts say.



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FRIDAY & SATURDAY, DECEMBER 21-22, 2012 PUZZLES & COMICS LAKE CITY REPORTER 7B DILBERT BABY BLUES BLONDIE BEETLE BAILEY B.C. FRANK & ERNEST FOR BETTER OR WORSE ZITS HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH GARFIELD CELEBRITY CIPHER CLASSIC PEANUTS PUZZLE ANSWERS



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8A LAKE CITY REPORTER STATE FRIDAY & SATURDAY, DECEMBER 21-22, 2012 8A We will always remember Ann Redish 10-25-27 12-22-10 We thought of you with love today, but that is nothing new. We thought about you yesterday, and days before that too. We think of you in silence, we often speak your name. But all we have are memories & your picture in a frame. Your memory is our keepsake with which well never part. God has you in his keeping, We have you in our hearts! We miss you Edgar Redish, Peggy, Priscilla, Chloe, Alden, Frank Offers good on new and unregistered units purchased between 11/1/12-12/31/12. *On select models. See your dealer for details. **Rates as low as 2.99% for 36 months. Offers only available at participating Polaris dealers. Approval, and any rates and terms provided, are based on credit worthiness. Other nancing offers are available. Applies to the purchase of all new, quali ed ATV and RANGER models made on the Polaris Installment Program from 11/1/12-12/31/12. Fixed APR of 2.99% 6.9 9%, or 9.99% will be assigned based on credit approval criteria. An example of monthly payments required on a 36-month term at 2.99% is $29.08 per $1,000 nanced. An example of monthly payments required on a 36-month term at 9.99% APR is $32.26 per $1,000 nanced. See participating retailers for complete details and conditions. Warning: The Polaris RANGER and RANGER and RANGER RZR are not intended for on-road use. Driver must be at least 16 years old with a valid drivers license to operate. Passengers must RZR are not intended for on-road use. Driver must be at least 16 years old with a valid drivers license to operate. Passengers must RZR be at least 12 years old and tall enough to grasp the hand holds and plant feet rmly on the oor. All SxS drivers should take a safety training course. Contact ROHVA atwww.rohva.org or (949) 2552560 for additional information. Drivers and passengers should always wear helmets, eye protection, protective clothing, and seat belts. Always use cab nets. Be particularly careful on dif cult terrain. Never drive on public roads or paved surfaces. Never engage in stunt driving, and avoid excessive speeds and sharp turns. Riding and alcohol/drugs dont mix. Check local laws before riding on trails. ATVs can be hazardous to operate. Polaris adult models are for riders 16 and older. For your safety, always wear a helmet, eye protection and protective clothing, and be sure to take a safety training course. For safety and training information in the U.S., call the SVIA at (80 0) 887-2887. You may also contact your Polaris dealer or call Polaris at (800 ) 342-3764. 2012 Polaris Industries Inc. 1866 US Hwy 90 W Lake City (386) 752-2500 By MELISSA NELSON-GABRIAL Associated Press PENSACOLA Morgan and Stephen Sanger are on a mission to bring history to life by visit ing one port at time. The father and son are captains of the Pinta and Nina, replicas of the ships on which Christopher Columbus sailed on his 1492 voyage. The Sangers are traveling to ports throughout the United States as part of an education al tour. The ships pulled into Pensacola on Wednesday with dozens onlookers gathered to welcome them. You realize how tiny they are compared to todays ships. To realize that people came across that huge ocean in such tiny ships and helped to build our country, it is just an amazing thing, said Jim Taylor, a Pensacola man who was among those watching as the vessels made their approach in Pensacola Bay. These ships arent much big ger than shrimping boats we use today, Taylor said. The Nina is an exact scale rep lica, at 65 feet long by 18 feet wide. The Pinta is slightly larger than its famous namesake. The Sangers are from the British Virgin Islands and Morgan Sanger decided to reproduce the Columbus ships while working at a shipyard there in the late 1980s. The original plan was to finish the three replicas in time for the 500th anniversary of Columbus journey. It was a wooden boat shipyard where we repaired very expen sive yachts. We got this idea for the quincentennial to build the ships, all three ships from 1492. That didnt work out so well because of funding, Morgan Sanger said. Only the Nina was finished before 1992. The replica was featured in the movie 1492: Conquest of Paradise directed by Ridley Scott and starring Gerard Depardieu. The Pinta was finished in 2005 at a shipyard in Brazil. The ships were built with hand tools and using many of the same tech niques pioneered by Portuguese shipbuilders more than 500 years ago. Although the ships were state of the art for their day, they arent very comfortable for modern sailors, Stephen Sanger said. Out in the open ocean, they bob like a cork. They are very round-bottomed and they only have a seven-foot draft. It is kind of like a bathtub out in the ocean, he said. Captaining the replica Nina has given him a deep appre ciation for the skills of Columbus and his men. We have charts, we have GPS, we know where we are going. They had no idea where they were going especially on a little ship like this. They were sailing off into the unknown, a lot of them thinking they were going to fall off the edge of the Earth. They called it the sea of dark ness, but Columbus and some of the more intelligent people knew the world was round and they knew they werent going to fall off the Earth, he said. When Columbus sailed, the Nina had a crew of 20 to 30 who were an average of 16, Stephen Sanger said. They also carried 20 calves, 200 chickens and two horses, he said. Although the ship seems small to modern eyes, he said it was the space shuttle of her day because it was built using the most-advanced ship building technology of the time. The purpose of the tour is to pay tribute to the scientific accomplishments of Columbus and his men, Morgan Sanger said. We arent political and we arent making any sort of state ment about Columbus beliefs or the way he treated people, Morgan Sanger said. Sanger said research shows that Columbus was hard on his crew and in his dealings with native people. I dont defend Columbus, Sanger said. What we get into is the navi gational skills and how they used the crudest of instruments to find their way back to the same port. Sanger has no plans to recre ate the third ship in Columbus fleet, The Santa Maria. Overseeing two ships and their crews is a full-time job. Adding a third ship would be too much of an undertaking, he said. The Nina and the Pinta have spent the last year traveling the Gulf Coast, East Coast and Midwest River system. The ships will resume their circuit next year after a winter break. The ships will remain in Pensacola through Jan. 2. TALLAHASSEE Florida voters are split on gay marriage and oppose legalizing marijuana, according to a state poll released Thursday. The survey by Quinnipiac University of 1,261 registered voters found that 45 percent oppose gay marriage while 43 percent support it. Thats a change from last May when 50 percent opposed same-sex marriage. The polls margin of error was plus or minus 2.8 percent. Fifty-two percent are opposed to making marijuana legal while 42 per cent say the drug should be made legal. The states of Washington and Colorado recently legalized small amounts. On other issues: 73 percent of voters said they oppose an effort to allow colleges like the University of Florida and Florida State University raise tuition higher than the law currently makes possible. Gov. Rick Scott earlier this year vetoed a bill that would have let the states two top research schools exceed an exist ing 15 percent annual cap on tuition increases. But new House Speaker Will Weatherford has already voiced support for bringing the measure back during the 2013 session of the Florida Legislature. The poll also found that Florida voters oppose other potential chang es to college tuition. Sixty-six per cent said they opposed allowing uni versities to charge lower tuition for certain in-demand majors such as those in the science and engineering field, while charging more for those degrees that are considered less employable. A higher education task force created by Scott in November recommended making that change. In other education issues 71 per cent of those surveyed opposed hav ing the state set different achievement levels for public schools students based on race. The Florida Board of Education this year approved a fiveyear strategic plan that has lower reading and math proficiency goals for minority students. A majority of voters 53 percent support changes being proposed by House Speaker Will Weatheford to the state pension plan. Weatherford wants to eliminate guaranteed pension benefits for newly hired state employees as a way to reduce the cost of paying for them. Instead, all new hires would go into the states defined contribu tion plan, which is currently option al. Those benefits can vary depend ing how successful an employees investment choices turn out, similar to a 401k plan. Replicas Columbus ships visit Pensacola ASSOCIATED PRESS A replica of the Pinta ship from Columbus 1492 voyage moves into Pensacola on Wednesday as part of a national educational tour. The ships were built using tools and techniques developed more than 500 years ago. Poll: Floridians spilt on gay marriage Grand jury recommends election changes Associated Press MIAMI The MiamiDade County Grand Jury, responding to massive elec tion problems in the county, issued a report Thursday asking that the Legislature make several changes to the state voting laws that its members believe would shorten lines at early vot ing sites and reduce the chance for absentee ballots to be filed fraudulently. The grand jury is responding after lines of up to five hours plagued some early voting sites in the county and local media reported on possibly fraudulent absentee bal lots being cast. They said many of the recommended changes are easy to imple ment as we are only ask ing that they reinstate laws that were previously on the books. They said the recom mendations are aimed at making it more difficult for persons to commit fraud, make it easier for authori ties to detect and prosecute such fraud and increase the punishment for voting fraud. The widespread belief is that such illegal activ ity is rampant, the report said. With several con tests decided by narrow margins, can the public have confidence in the elec tion results of these close races? We are not certain they can. ASSOCIATED PRESS Swimsuits required Veterinarian Tyler Davis (left) helps guide a a 30-year old horse, as it is lifted from a backyard pool in Loxahatchee on Tuesday. Palm Beach County Fire Rescue Capt. Albert Borroto said the horse jumped a fence, landed in the pool and couldnt get out on its own. The rescue took about two hours. Agency: Health care changes will cost far more than estimated By GARY FINEOUT Associated Press TALLAHASSEE The administration of Gov. Rick Scott is now contending that the federal health care over haul will cost state taxpayers billions more than estimates from just a few months ago. Scotts health care agency has drawn up dramatic new estimates that now prices the cost of implementing the overhaul including expanding the states safety net health care program to thousands of Floridians cur rently ineligible at nearly $26 billion over a 10 year period. Thats three times higher than the nearly $8 billion figure drawn up by state economists back in August and has immediately come under suspicion by health care advocates. State economists have not yet endorsed the new numbers from the Agency for Health Care Administration nor has the Florida Legislature. But the new numbers are sure to influence the ongo ing debate about whether Florida will reject federal dollars intended to help the state expand its Medicaid program. Scott was a fierce critic of the health care overhaul, but then softened his opposition after the November election of President Barack Obama. Scott has asked to talk with federal officials and will meet Jan. 7 with Secretary Kathleen Sebelius of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. He continues to be con cerned about how we can address cost, quality and access in health care, said Melissa Sellers, a spokes woman for Scott. This report shows that a major expansion of the states Medicaid system would result in major costs for Florida families. Greg Mellowe, policy director for the health care advocacy group Florida CHAIN, blasted the new numbers as fantasy that rely on indefensible and unreasonable assump tions. He pointed out the state assumes that every one who would be eligible would sign up quickly for health care coverage from the state. These estimates are hyper-inflated and unrea sonable to the point of hav ing no real use whatsoever for planning purposes, Mellowe said in an email. They are purely intended to evoke a visceral reaction and not to assist the budget ing process.



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8B LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDFRIDAY& SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 21-225, 2012 CLASSIFIED AD vantageTake ADvantage of the Reporter Classifieds!755-5440Lake City Reporter FIND IT SELL IT BUY IT $17504 lines 3 days Includes 2 Signs Each additional line $1.65 Garage Sale Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$10104 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.10One item per ad Under $500 Personal Merchandise Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$16754 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.15One item per ad Under $1,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less. Each item must include a price. 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Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be published, nor for any general, special or consequential damages. Advertising language must comply with Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition of discrimi-nation in employment, housing and public accommodations. Standard abbreviations are acceptable; how-ever, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated. Ad Errors-Please read your ad on the first day of publication. Weaccept responsibility for only the first incorrect insertion, and only the charge for the ad space in error. Please call 755-5440 immediately for prompt correc-tion and billing adjustments.CancellationsNormal advertising deadlines apply for cancellation.Billing InquiriesCall 755-5440. Should further information be required regarding payments or credit limits, your call will be trans-ferred to the accounting depart-ment. General Information In Print and Onlinewww.lakecityreporter.com Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$2504 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $.25One item per ad Under $100 CLASSIFIED AD vantageTake ADvantage of the Reporter Classifieds!755-5440Lake City Reporter FIND IT SELL IT BUY IT $17504 lines 3 days Includes 2 Signs Each additional line $1.65 Garage Sale Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$10104 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.10One item per ad Under $500 Personal Merchandise Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$16754 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.15One item per ad Under $1,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$23704 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.45One item per ad Under $2,500 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $4,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$27404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.55One item per ad Under $4,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$30404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.65One item per ad Under $6,000 Placing An Ad Service Guide Limited to service type advertis-ing only.4 lines, one month....$92.00 $10.80 each additional lineIncludes an additional $2.00 per ad for each Wednesday insertion. DeadlinesBe Sure to Call Early You can call us at 755-5440 Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.Some people prefer to place their classified ads in person, and some ad categories will require prepay-ment. Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street.You can also fax or email your ad copy to the Reporter.FAX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the Classified Department.EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreporter.comAd is to Appear:TuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday Call by:Mon., 10:00 a.m.Mon., 10:00 a.m.Wed., 10:00 a.m.Thurs., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fax/Email by:Mon., 9:00 a.m.Mon., 9:00 a.m.Wed., 9:00 a.m.Thurs., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.These deadlines are subject to change without notice. Cancellations, Changes & Billing Questions Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject, or classify all advertisements under appropriate headings. Copy should be checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day of pub-lication. Credit for published errors will be allowed for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement which was incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be published, nor for any general, special or consequential damages. Advertising language must comply with Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition of discrimi-nation in employment, housing and public accommodations. Standard abbreviations are acceptable; how-ever, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated. Ad Errors-Please read your ad on the first day of publication. Weaccept responsibility for only the first incorrect insertion, and only the charge for the ad space in error. Please call 755-5440 immediately for prompt correc-tion and billing adjustments.CancellationsNormal advertising deadlines apply for cancellation.Billing InquiriesCall 755-5440. Should further information be required regarding payments or credit limits, your call will be trans-ferred to the accounting depart-ment. General Information In Print and Onlinewww.lakecityreporter.com Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$2504 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $.25One item per ad Under $100 Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 ServicesWhite's Trucking Services You call & We Haul! Fill Dirt, Lime Rock. AsphaltMillings, Granite, Road Rock.386-362-8763 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO: 11-CA-00015021STMORTGAGE CORPORA-TION, ADelaware corporation, au-thorized to Transact business in Flor-ida,Plaintiff,vs.EDGAR MORENO; CYNTHIAL. MORENO,His wife,Defendants.CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALENOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accord-ance with the Plaintiff’s Final Judg-ment of Foreclosure entered on Sep-tember 19, 2012 in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on 1/9/2013 at 11:00 A.M., located at Columbia County Courthouse, 173 NE Hernan-do Avenue, Lake City, FL32055, the following described property:Lot 8, GRASSLAND ACRES, ac-cording to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 5, Page 71-71A, of the Public Records of Co-lumbia County Florida,Together with that certain 2007 Sky-line Manufactured home, Oak Springs LTPmodel 76x32 and hav-ing serial number F262-0322-V-AB.Property Address: 324 SWGrassland Way, Lake City, FL32024.ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN IN-TERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.Dated: 12/4/12.P. DEWITTCASON, CLERKCOLUMBIACOUNTYCIRCUITCOURTBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy Clerk05536391December 21, 28, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE 3RD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILDIVISION CASE NO.: 12-522-CACITMORTGAGE, INC.,Plaintiff,vs.STEVEN D. PETERS A/K/ASTE-VEN D. PETERS, II, et al., Defendants.NOTICE OF ACTIONTO:ELIZABETH E. PETERS A/K/AELIZABETH LYONS PETERSLast Known Address: 7816 SOUTH-SIDE BLVD APT78, JACKSON-VILLE, FL32256Also Attempted At: 121 SWMEL-BAGLN, LAKE CITY, FL32024; 1268 S MARION AVE, LAKE CITY, FL32025; 251 SWDUN-AWAY#000003, LAKE CITY, FL32025; 2540 S MARION AVE LAKE CITY, FL32025 AND 633 NWPALM DR, LAKE CITY, FL32025Current Residence UnknownYOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property:LOT5, IN BLOCK 1, OF GWEN LAKE ESTATES UNITNO. 1, AC-CORDING TO THE PLATTHERE-OF, AS RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 2, ATPAGE 115, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF COLUM-BIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Marshall C. Watson, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 1800 NW49th STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE FL33309 on or be-fore 1/11/2013, a date which is with-in thirty (30) days after the first pub-lication of this Notice in the Lake City Reporter and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the com-plaint.AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-TIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who requires accommo-dations in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of cer-tain assistance. Individuals with a disability who require special accom-modations in order to participate in a court proceeding should contact the ADACoordinator, 173 NE Hernan-do Avenue, Room 408, Lake City FL32055, (386) 719-7428, within two (2) business days of receipt of notice to appear. Individuals who are hear-ing impaired should call (800) 955-8771. Individuals who are voice im-paired should call (800) 955-8770.WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court this 11th day of December, 2012.P. DEWITTCASONAs Clerk of the CourtBy /s/ B. ScippioAs Deputy ClerkSEAL05536434December 21, 28, 2012 Shands Lake Shore Orthopedics will be closing effective January 4, 2013. All records will be maintained by Lake Shore HMAMedical Group. Patients may make arrangements to pick up their records at Shands Lake Shore Orthopedics, 348 NE Method-ist Terrace, Suitte 101, Lake City, FL32055 or by calling 386-755-4007.05536188December 7, 14, 21, 28, 2012 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR COLUM-BIACOUNTYCIVILDIVISIONCase No. 12-2011-CA-000573WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.Plaintiff,vs.TAMMYL. ROBBINS A/K/ATAMMYLYNN ROBBINS AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS,Defendants.NOTICE OF SALENotice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on Nov. 30th, 2012, in the Circuit Court of Columbia County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Colum-bia County, Florida described as:LOT85, BLOCK G, CANOVASUBDIVISION IN THE SOUTH-ERN DIVISION OF THE CITYOF LAKE CITY, FLORIDA, AC-CORDING TO THE PLATTHERE-OF RECORDED IN PLATBOOK A, PAGE 21 OF THE PUBLIC RE-CORDS OF COLUMBIACOUN-TY, FLORIDAcommonly known as: 328 SE CAMPST, LAKE CITY, FL32025; includ-ing the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the Columbia County Courthouse Courtroom 1, 173 NE Hernando Ave, Lake City, FL32056, on 1/30/13 at 11:00 a.m.Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-er than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.Dated this 3rd day of Dec., 2012.Clerk of the Circuit CourtP. Dewitt CasonBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkSEAL05536218December 14, 21, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUN-TY, FLORIDACIVILDIVISIONCase No.: 12-2012-CA-000082BANK OF AMERICAN, N.A., SUCCESSOR BYMERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LPF/K/ACOUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LPPlaintiff,v.PEPPER L. TOMPKINS; et al.,Defendants,RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale and Final Summary Judgment dated November 6, 2012, entered in Civil Case No.: 2011-CA-000392, of the Circuit Court of the Third Judi-cial Circuit in and for Columbia County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BYMERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LPF/K/ACOUN-TRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERV-ICING, LP, is Plaintiff and PEP-PER L. TOMPKINS; BILLD. TOMPKINS; TIMBERLANDS OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN TENANT#1; UN-KNOWN TENANT#2; ALLOTH-ER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM-ING INTERESTBY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINSTANAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAYCLAIM AN INTERESTAS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIM-ANTS, are Defendants.P.DEWITTCASON, the Clerk of Court shall sell to the highest bidder for cash on the third floor of the Co-lumbia County Courthouse, located at 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, FL32055 at 11:00 a.m. on the 9th day of Jan., 2013 the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit:LOT9, TIMBERLANDS PHASE 1, ACCORDING TO MAPOR PLATTHEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 9, PAGES 26 AND 27, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLOR-IDA.This property is located at the street address of: 299 SWTIMBER RIDGE DR, LAKE CITY, FL32024.If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of re-cord as of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus.WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on 12/7/2012.P. DEWITTCASONCLERK OF THE COURTBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkSEALAMERICANS WITH DISABILI-TIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accom-modation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Persons with a disability who need any accommoda-tion to participate should call the ADAcoordinator, Jacquetta Bradley, P.O. Box 1569, Lake City, FL32056, 386-719-7428, within two (2) working days of your receipt of this notice; if you are hearing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if you are voice impaired call (800) 955-8770.05536281December 14, 21, 2012 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTFOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAPROBATE DIVISIONFile No. 12-270-CPDivision ProbateIN RE: ESTATE OF ROBERTS. BINKLEYDeceased.NOTICE TO CREDITORSThe administration of the estate of Robert S. Binkley, deceased, whose date of death was September 26, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Columbia County, Florida, Pro-bate Division, the address of which is 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055. The names and addresses of the personal representa-tive and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below.All creditors of the decedent and oth-er persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with the court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICA-TION OF THIS NOTICE.ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITH-IN THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED.NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.The date of first publication of this notice is December 14, 2012.Co-Personal Representative:/s/ Robert William Binkley1212 St. Paul RoadOwatonna, Minnesota 55060Attorney for Co-Personal Represen-tative:/s/ John J. KendronAttorney for Robert William BinkleyFlorida Bar Number; 0306850Robinson, Kennon & Kendron, P.A.582 West Duval StreetP.O. Box 1178Lake City, FL32056-1178Telephone: (386) 755-1334Fax: (386) 755-1336E-Mail: jjk@rkkattorneys.comSecondary E-Mail: mad@rkkattor-neys.comCo-Personal Representative:/s/ Kerry J. Duggan3131 Bellflower WayLakeland, Florida 33811Attorney for Co-Personal Represen-tative:/s/ Julie Landrigan BallAttorney for Kerry J. DugganFlorida Bar Number: 768731Hardin & Associates, P.A.P.O. Box 3604Lakeland, FL33802-3604Telephone: (863) 688-5200Fax: (863) 686-0777E-Mail: jball@hardinpalaw.com05536219December 14, 21, 2012 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CONCERNING ASPECIALEX-CEPTION AS PROVIDED FOR IN THE CITYOF LAKE CITYLAND DEVELOPMENTREGULATIONSBYTHE BOARD OF ADJUST-MENTS OF THE CITYOF LAKE CITY, FLORIDA, NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN that, pursuant to the City of Lake City Land Develop-ment Regulations, as amended, here-inafter referred to as the Land Devel-opment Regulations, objections, rec-ommendations, and comments con-cerning a special exception, as de-scribed below, will be heard by the Board of Adjustments of the City of Lake City, at a public hearing on Wednesday, January 2, 2013 at 6:30 P.M., or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard, in the City Council room on the second floor of City Hall located at 205 North Mari-on Avenue, Lake City, Florida.Pursuant to a petition, SE 12-03, by Florida SE, Inc. d/b/a The Olive Gar-den Italian Restaurant #4442, owner, requesting a special exception be granted as provided for in Section 4.15.2 of the Land Development Regulations to permit alcoholic bev-erages to be served in such establish-ed restaurant in Commercial High-way Interchange (CHI) zoning dis-trict, to be located on property de-scribed, as follows:3072 US Highway 90 WestColumbia County Parcel Number #02582-001The public hearing may be continued to one or more future dates. Any in-terested party shall be advised that the date, time, and place of any con-tinuation of the public hearing shall be announced during the public hear-ing and that no further notice con-cerning the matter will be published, unless said continuation exceeds six (6) calendar weeks from the date of the above referenced public hearing.At the aforementioned public hear-ing, all interested parties may appear to be heard with respect to the amendment.Copies of the special exception are available for public inspection at the Office of Growth Management, City Hall, located on the first floor at 205 North Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida, during regular business hours.All persons are advised that if they decide to appeal any decision made at the above referenced public hear-ing, they will need record of the pro-ceedings, and that, for such purpose, they may need to ensure that a verba-tim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the tes-timony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.05536398December 21, 2012 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILDIVISIONCASE NO.: 11-504 CATD BANK, NATIONALASSOCIA-TION, successor by merger to MER-CANTILE BANK,Plaintiff,vs.JAMES CONNER a/k/a JAMES M. CONNER; AMANDACONNER a/k/a AMANDAL. CONNER; and JOHN DOE and JANE DOE, un-known parties in possession,Defendants.NOTICE OF SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to the Final Judgment of Fore-closure dated December 4, 2012 (the “Judgment”), entered in Civil Case No. 12-2011-CA-000504 of the Cir-cuit Court of the Third Judicial Cir-cuit in and for Columbia County, Florida, in which TD BANK, NA-TIONALASSOCIATION, is Plain-tiff and JAMES CONNER a/k/a JAMES M. CONNER, and AMAN-DACONNER a/k/a AMANDAL. CONNER, are the Defendants.The Clerk of Court will sell the Property as defined in the Judgment and as set forth below at a public sale on 1/9/2013 at 11:00 a.m. to the “highest bidder,” for cash on the third floor of the Columbia County Courthouse, 173 N.E. Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida, in ac-cordance with Section 45.031, Flori-da Statues. The “highest bidder” for purposes of this Notice of Sale, is defined as the party who bids the largest amount of money to purchase the Property (as defined below) and who completes the sale in a timely fashion, as here-inafter set out. The one who bids the largest amount of money to purchase the Property (as defined below) shall be permitted to complete the sale by delivering to the Clerk, the balance of such bid, over and above the de-posit, by 4:30 p.m. on the day of the sale.The following property located in Columbia County, Florida, is the subject of this Notice of Sale:Lot 11, of the Gables Subdivision, as per plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 9, Page(s) 37 and 38 of the Public Records of Columbia County, Floridatogether with all existing or subse-quently erected or affixed buildings, improvements, and fixtures (the “Property”).Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-er than the property owner as of thedate of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.DATED on 12/5/12.P. DEWITTCASONClerk of Circuit CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkSEAL05536420December 21, 28, 2012 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CONCERNING ASPECIALEX-CEPTION AS PROVIDED FOR IN THE CITYOF LAKE CITYLAND DEVELOPMENTREGULATIONSBYTHE BOARD OF ADJUST-MENTS OF THE CITYOF LAKE CITY, FLORIDA, NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN that, pursuant to the City of Lake City Land Develop-ment Regulations, as amended, here-inafter referred to as the Land Devel-opment Regulations, objections, rec-ommendations, and comments con-cerning a special exception, as de-scribed below, will be heard by the Board of Adjustments of the City of Lake City, at a public hearing on Wednesday, January 2, 2013 at 6:30 P.M., or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard, in the City Council room on the second floor of City Hall located at 205 North Mari-on Avenue, Lake City, Florida.Pursuant to a petition, SE 12-04, by Florida SE, Inc. d/b/a Longhorn Steakhouse #5451, owner, requesting a special exception be granted as provided for in Section 4.15.2 of the Land Development Regulations to permit alcoholic beverages to be served in such established restaurant in Commercial Highway Interchange (CHI) zoning district, to be located on property described, as follows:3092 US Highway 90 WestColumbia County Parcel Number #02582-001The public hearing may be continued to one or more future dates. Any in-terested party shall be advised that the date, time, and place of any con-tinuation of the public hearing shall be announced during the public hear-ing and that no further notice con-cerning the matter will be published, unless said continuation exceeds six (6) calendar weeks from the date of the above referenced public hearing.At the aforementioned public hear-ing, all interested parties may appear to be heard with respect to the amendment.Copies of the special exception are available for public inspection at the Office of Growth Management, City Hall, located on the first floor at 205 North Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida, during regular business hours.All persons are advised that if they decide to appeal any decision made at the above referenced public hear-ing, they will need record of the pro-ceedings, and that, for such purpose, they may need to ensure that a verba-tim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the tes-timony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.05536399December 21, 2012 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE 3RD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILDIVISIONCASE NO.: 122011CA000326CAXXXXONEWESTBANK, FSB,Plaintiff,vs.MARIE BURBACK; EASTSIDE VILLAGE HOMEOWNERS ASSO-CIATION, INC.; SECRETARYOF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVEL-OPMENT; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MARIE BURBACK; UN-KNOWN TENANT; IN POSSES-SION OF THE SUBJECTPROPER-TY,Defendants.NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to Final Judgment of Foreclo-sure dated the 3rd day of Dec., 2012 and entered in Case No. 122011CA000326CAXXXX, of the Circuit Court of the 3RD Judicial Circuit in and for Columbia County, Florida, wherein ONEWESTBANK, FSB is the Plaintiff and MARIE BURBACK, EASTSIDE VILLAGE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., SECRETARYOF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MARIE BURBACK and UNKNOWN TEN-ANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECTPROPERTYare defend-ants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the, Columbia County Court-house, 173 N.E. HERNANDO AVE-NUE, LAKE CITY, FL32055, 11:00 AM on the 9th day of Jan., 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit:LOT10, OF EASTSIDE VILLAGE UNITIII, ASUBDIVISION AC-CORDING TO PLATTHEREOF RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 6, PAGE 65, PUBLIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN IN-TERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-TIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who requires accommo-dations in order to participate in acourt proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of cer-tain assistance. Individuals with a disability who require special accom-modations in order to participate in a court proceeding should contact the ADACoordinator, 173 NE Hernan-do Avenue, Room 408, Lake City, FL32055, (386) 719-7428, within two (2) business days of receipt of notice to appear. Individuals who are hearing impaired should call (800) 955-8771. Individuals who are voice impaired should call (800) 955-8770.P. DEWITTCASONClerk of The Circuit CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkSEAL05536331December 14, 21, 2012 INVITATION TOBIDBID NO. 2012-QONE (1) NEWTRANSPORTTRUCKPlease be advised that Columbia County desires to accept bids on the above referenced project. Bids will be accepted through 11:00 A.M. on January 7, 2013. Bids should be sub-mitted to the office of the Board of County Commissioners, Columbia County, 135 NE Hernando Ave. Room 203, Post Office Box 1529 Lake City, Florida 32056-1529. All bids submitted shall be on the form provided.Specifications and bid forms may be downloaded from the County’s web-site:http://www .columbiacountyfla.com/ PurchasingBids.asp Columbia County reserves the right to reject any and/or all bids and to accept the bid in the County’s best interest.Dated this 19th day of, December 2012.Columbia County Board ofCounty Commissioners05536448December 21, 28, 2012 020Lost & Found 11/28/12 Horse found Mason City area. Call to identify. 727-686-7156 13 lbs gray, white & blk, Pappilin w/ big ears, & one blue eye. Last seen 12/14 in Fort white no collar, microchpped. Reward 497-1949 Cash Reward if returned w/ items inside. Lost Blk Brief zip case, Medical, Military, & Misc records inside. FOUND 100Job Opportunities05536269H&RBLOCK in Branford and Starke has immediate openings for experienced tax professionals. For more information please email a resume to bkoon@Hughes.net or fax a resume to our District Office at (352)493-7422. Mechanic needed at Fla.Rock & Tank Lines In White Springs. Diesel exprnc reqr'd in maintenance & repair of tractor trailers. 45-50hrs/wk Class A CDLlicense preferred. Excellent Benefits! email: mcomer@patriottrans.com or fax 904-858-9008 PublishedMonthlybythe Lake City Reporter REPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Linewww.lakecityreporter.com



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FRIDAY& SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 21-22, 2012 CLASSIFIEDLAKE CITYREPORTER 9B 2000 Lincoln TowncarMed. blue, leather, power seats & more. 147,400 miles. Excellent condition.$3,490 386-623-2848 100Job Opportunities05536389FANTASTIC OPPORTUNITY Guest Services Position Part/Full time with opportunity for advancement. MUST be a people person with great customer service skills, strong work ethic, DEPENDABLE good communication, sales skills, computer skills, and willingness to learn. MUST be a team player and able to work a flexible schedule including weekends & holidays. We offer Competitive Pay and Health Benefits. Hotel Experience Preferred but not required. Only those seeking long term employment apply in person at Comfort Suites 3690 WUS HWY90. Please do not call the hotel regarding your application. DRIVERS: ALLMiles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-ACDLFlatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down. 866-823-0323 Must have a minimum of 5 yrs Exp. selling HVAC Equipment. Excellent benefits &Great pay. Call Allen 386-628-109305536451T eachers Join our team of over 100 professional teachers! Want to make a difference in the lives of children? Infant/T oddler Positions: 12 Mo Ft Teacher (Jennings) And 12 MO PTTeacher Child Development Associate (CDA) or equivalent credential (FCCPC or ECPC) required. Three years experience with birth to 3 preferred. High School Diploma/ GED Required. Must be able to pass DCF background screenings. Excellent Benefits, Paid Holidays, Sick/Annual Leave, Health/Dental Insurance, and more. Apply at 236 SW Columbia Ave, Lake City, FL or send resume to: employment@sv4cs.org Fax (386) 754-2220 or Call 754-2225 EOE EOE Real Estate Co. looking for Office Staff Computer knowledge required. Real Estate Exp. is a plus! Fax resume to 386-496-4309 SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 Seeking a Phone Salesperson for a local mortgage company. Inbound & outbound calls. No experience is necessary. Must have happy, energetic personality. Email resume to: lakecityresume@yahoo.com Service Techs & Installers Must be EPA& NATE certified. Excellent benefits & great pay. Call Allen (386) 628-1093 120Medical EmploymentBusy Family Practice Office Seeks FTNursing Personnel Medical Office Exp Preferred Fax Resumes to 719-9494 GIEBEIG FAMILYMEDICINE CMA experience preferred in Peds/ Family Practice. Experience injections & taking accurate vital signs. Excellent communication and documentation, organization and assessment skills. P/THousekeeper Needed Occasional Nights And Weekends. Fax Resume to 386-487-1232 240Schools & Education05535484Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class12/24/2012• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-11/05/12• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies CKC American Bulldogs both a 1 yr old brother & sister, spayed and neutered, shots, free to the right home. 386-935-4473 Free to the right home. Male approx 8 weeks old. Marble tabby. 386-466-7662 PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 430Garage Sales PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 450Good Things to EatThe Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans 2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024 Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville 386-963-4138 or 961-1420 630Mobile Homes forRent1/1 Cabin & Lots for your RVor your own Cabin for rent. Between Lake City & G’ville. Access to I-75 & 441 (352)317-1326. 2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $700. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 2 BR/1BA $475/mth. Located in center of Lake City Close to Everything !!! 305-984-5511 or 386-344-0830 3Br/2Ba Mod 1/2acre (nice subd) concrete drive, wrap around deck appl's,energysaver, &thermo's ready (386) 984-5341 $800 mo Mobile Homes for rent in White Springs & Ft. White. Contact 386-623-3404 Quiet Country Park 3br/2ba $525. Very clean NO PETS! References & Deposit required 386-758-2280 640Mobile Homes forSale1600 SQFT, 3/2 DWMH, close to town, country setting on 2 ac. Reduced to $49,000 (short sale) Poole Realty 362-4539. MLS 82068 2 MFG HOMES on 5 ACRES! Great for 2 families in Godbold Acres west of Lake City $79,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCY INC. 755-5110 #81421 2013 DOUBLEWIDE $33,995 inc. set-up, trim-out & A/C Call 386-288-8379. 3BR/2BA28X64 in a great location, a lot of upgrades, fireplace. Only $2,500 down $399 a month. Call Paula at 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com 4br 2b open/split floor plan MH w/wood flooring, newly painted, large stone fireplace. MLS 82326 Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $74,000 5 LIKENew Mobile Homes!!! For under $30,000. MUSTSEE Call John T. 386-752-1452 Bank owned, Cozy 1/1 home in Lake C community $55,000. MLS 81365 Poole Realty 362-4539. $55,000 BANK REPO 3BR/2BADoublewide ’09 Excellent condition. Only $999 down $377 a month. Call Paula 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com Breathtaking 80 ac horse ranch w/ 7700 sqft home, heated pool, stocked pond, workout facility MLS 82156 Poole Realty 362-4539. short sale $950,000 CLOSE TO VAMED CTR! 3BR/2BAw/beautiful interior, new CH&A$59,900 DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #81428 EASTSIDE VILLAGE 2BR/2BAw/lg kitchen, open floor plan $79,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #80972 Hardwood floors, formal dining room, great rm, f/p, double car garage. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 MLS 82374 $243,900 LIVE OAK! Cute home in city limits; 3BR/1BA& 1,294 SqFt $49,500 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #81410 MUSTSEE 2013 2x6 walls, R30 insulation, OSB wrap, house wrap, real wood cabinets, and thermal pain windows. Payment $399 per month call John T386-752-1452. Results Realty Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 4/2 on 10 Ac home features 2200 heated sqft. 10x20 frame shed. MLS# 76582 $67,500 WANTED…CASH PAID for your Mobile Home, Singlewide or Doublewide flood homes welcome. Call 386-288-8379 Palm Harbor Homes 4/2 From 499 Mo Loaded3/2 From 399 Mo Loaded Homes on Your Lot 0 Down 800-622-2832 WOODGATE VILLAGE Move-in ready! Open 3BR/2BA floor plan on nice shaded lot $49,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC 755-5110 #82259 WOODGATE VILLAGE Nice 3BR/2BADWMH w/fenced yd, workshop; $39,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCY, INC 755-5110 #79078 650Mobile Home & Land2/1 MH, completely remodeled. Custom Floors on 5 ac. w/ 2 stall horse barn. MLS # 79025 $49,900 Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Results Realty 2br/2ba on 3.51 ac, 1512 sqft DW perfect Rental, Lg deck, MLS # 82216 Results Realty Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 $49,900 FSBO 5 ac lot w/ 1995 refurb. MH. 66ft long w/ new roof & wheel chair ramp. $5,000 down Owner Fin. on Balance Approx 5 miles N. of LC. 386-752-4597 Great Value 24 acres, 3/2 DWMH, front porch, full length of MH, open floor plan. MLS 79000. Poole Realty Nelda Hatcher. 688-8067 Hallmark Real Estate $34,400. 3/2 MH in O’Brien. On 4 Ac. Case#091-374923 www.hudhomestore.com Robin Williams (386)365-2135 MLS 81700 650Mobile Home & LandHallmark Real Estate Beautiful 4.38 Ac with 4/2 MH. Master has separate office/den area. Large living room with fireplace. Janet Creel (386)719-0382 MLS#82465 Hallmark Real Estate Beautiful Pasture, fenced for horses, well kept 3/2 M/H Great front & back porch to enjoy nature. Robin Williams (386)365-5146 MLS#80899 Hallmark Real Estate Just Reduced! Home & office over 1900sqft with glassed porch centrally located in town. Janet Creel (386)719-0382 MLS#81207 Hallmark Real Estate Live better for less! 3/2.5 Brick home on an acre. Inground Pool. F/p. Lrg oak trees. S. Columbia County. Ginger Parker(386)365-2135 MLS#81183 Hallmark Real Estate This is it! This 3/2 Home on a corner lot. Close to all amenities. Private fenced backyard. Paula Lawrence (386)623-1973 MLS#79943 OwnerFinanced 3/22.5 ac.River Access. Small down $585 mo 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05536252$100 off December's rentMust be presented at the time of application. $89 Deposit Windsong Apts. 386-758-8455 2 bedroom / 1 Bath Apts for rent in Live Oak. Call for price. Contact 386-623-3404 & 386-362-9806 2br/1ba duplex NWGeorgia Ave. Renovated & energy efficient. Tile floors, W/D, $475/Mo. $300 Dep. 386-755-1937 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Amberwood Hills Apts. Private Patio area. Beautiful yard. Washer/dryer hkup. Free water & sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special. 386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com Brandywine & Branford Apartments Now Renting 1, 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-752-3033 W. Grandview Ave. Equal Housing Opportunity TDD Number 1-800-955-8771 BRANFORD VILLAS 386-935-2319 2br/1ba Apts. Now available.$570. mo. TDD number 1-800-955-8771 Equal Housing Opportunity Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2 mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet Friendly. Pool laundry & balcony. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A$530 month $530 deposit garbage included. No pets. 386-344-2170 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Greentree Townhouse Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free water & sewer. Balcony & patio. Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com Redwine Apartments Pets welcome. with 5 complexes, we have a home for you. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com Studio Cottage -$500 month $200 Security Deposit, Utilities included, in town, Near Post Office. Call Chris 386-365-2515 UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 Wayne ManorApts. Spacious 2bedroom washer/dryer. Behind Kens off Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 www .myflapts.com WindsorArms Apartments. Move in! 2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free 200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent3/2 $500dep. $550 /mth, water and sewer included, off Lake Jeffrey & Honeysuckle Rd. Contact 623-5410 or 623-2203 3/2 in Woodcrest lrg fenced yrd, beautiful neighborhood, 1st, last & deposit, references & credit check. 386-984-6796 3bdrm very spacious, 2ba, garage, CH/AFenced in backyard. $1,400 mth & $1,400 dep. Contact 386-344-1914 3br/1.5ba. Very clean, Brick great area w/bonus room. Carport, shed & Fenced (privacy) back yard. $825. mo $825. dep. Ref’s req’d. (941)920-4535 NICE 3/2 brick home w/garage in quiet neighborhood. 489 SWBrandy. $900 plus sec. dep. 386-438-4600 750Business & Office RentalsMedical, Retail and Professional Office space on East Baya near Old Country Club Rd. Call 386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622 (cell) Office or Retail Space. Many to choose from. Tom Eagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor 805Lots forSale 2 Ac lot in Timberlake S/D. $135,000 MLS # 79025 Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Results Realty 3 Acres in White Springs, Commercial usage, city sewer. Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS $175,000 MLS 82358 Beautiful log home located on 5 ac, well maintained, wrap around porch. MLS 75550 $189,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #80401 $60,000. Must be 55+ 130x750 right on Suwannee, Beautiful lot, minutes from Royal Springs, Denise Bose 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #76668 $32,000 Must be 55+, Buildable lot for site built homes only. In Forest Country. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Great home, Emerald Lakes, well kept, split floor plan, oversized family room, MLS# 79733 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Missy Zecher 623-0237 $169,900 Great starter, corner lot, needs some TLC, close to town MLS 81784 $90,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 810Home forSale 3br/2ba plus office, 2103 heated sqft, wood floors, large patio MLS # 81984 Swift Creek Realty $229,900 (386) 496-0499 58 Ac, Suwannee County, 3br/2ba newly remodeled horse barns & tack.MLS 81002 Swift Creek Realty $650,000 (386) 496-0499 Access Realty Gorgeous views 3bd/3ba on Lake Montgomery. Elevator, fishing dock & jacuzzi. MLS 81438 $249,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access RealtySpacious 4 bd/3ba Cypress Lake w/ 3643 sqft 1.25 acres on lake. Vaulted ceilings. MLS 81314 $279,900. Patti Taylor386-623-6896 Access RealtyTwo story 1895 Victorian house w/ electrical upgrades throughout. double -deck porches, MLS 71594 $149,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Beautiful 2 story w/ upgrades, open kitchen, granite counter tops, great room w/ stone f/p. MLS 81994 Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $435,000 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Country Home, 3br 3 bath, spacious, close to Suwannee & Santa Fe River MLS 81775, $169,900 Elaine Tolar 755-6488 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty MLS 80175, 4br 3ba & 2.5 ba colonial, 3 fireplaces $315,000 Mary Brown Whitehurst. 965-0887 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty 3br 3ba home with a two story duplex. Owner Financing MLS 80915, Elaine Tolar 365-1548 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Building lots: May-Fair, Cannon Creek, Creek Run & Meadow View. Elaine Tolar 386-365-1548 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Home with 5+ ac 3b 2.5 ba, large kitchen covered deck MLS 81630 Elaine Tolar 365-1548 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty 230 Acres, Col. Co. Paved Rd. 752-4211 MLS 70453 Country home, wood burning f/p, granite counter tops, vaulted ceilings in living room. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 MLS 82022, $240,000 Custom home, located on 6.05 ac. Pecan grove w/ rolling hills in Equestrian Comm. Remax Professionals Missy Zecher 623-0237 $269,000 MLS 81075 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81959 Must be 55+, 2br/2ba, $79,900. Site Built Home w/eat in kitchen, laundry rm, scrn porch. Denise Bose @ 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81958-, $115,000. Must be 55+, 3br/2ba, Site Built w/ lots of room, split plan mstr suite, FL. Rm. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Hallmark Real Estate Brick Home on 6.3 acres 4bd 2.5ba with large 32X20 Deck & Gazebo. Solid wood cabinets Kay Priest(386)365-8888 MLS#82488 Hallmark Real Estate Short Sale Brick home corner lot 2600 SQFT, fenced back yard. Located minutes from town. Paula Lawrence (386)623-1973 MLS 82491 Ichetucknee River 3br/2ba + loft, 1350 sqft. Hardwood floors, f/p, granite counters Swift Creek Realty $399,000 (386) 496-0499 810Home forSale Just listed unique home with 2800 sqft of living space, located on 1.37 acres in Live Oak, MLS 82214, Poole Realty $67,500. 362-4539 Lake Front property w/ 137 ft frontage, eat-in kitchen, screened deck w/ view quality furnishings. MLS 81850 Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $119,000 Open floor plan, covered back patio. Lots of big windows, new carpet & paint, beautiful ceramic tile Century 21 Darby Rogers MLS 82078, 752-6575 Remax Jo Lytte 386-365-2821 Ichetucknee River front 4b/3.5b 2 fireplaces, 2 story home. MLS 81777 $559,000 Ultimate River Experience. Santa Fe River home 2br/2b, granite tops, wood burning heater & open great room. Too many extras to mention. Jo Lytte Remax MLS 81537 $339,000 Spectacular 3br/2b home, great room French doors, 10 aces, w/ barn MLS 79593. Jo Lytte Remax 386-365-2821 $349,800 820Farms & Acreage4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com Access Realty10 acre square tract, High & Dry, OF Avail. w/ 25% down. Convenient Location MLS 81258$39,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access Realty43.64 acres wooded acreage in N.Columbia County. Scenic & Private. MLS 74429 $89,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Owner financed land 1/2 to 10 acre lots. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 830Commercial Property260 S. Marion Ave. 2641 s.f of Office Space. Can be subdivided. $5-$7/sf. No CAM. Prorata for utilities. Call Mika (352) 359-604 Industrial warehouse7+ acres fenced 17,000 sq ft Barn $1,500 mo. TomEagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 950Cars forSale 2000 Lincoln Town Car; Med blue, leather, power seats & more. 147,400 miles, Exc condition. $3,490. 386-623-2848REPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Linewww.lakecityreporter.com 180 East Duval St. Lake City, FLorida 32055Contact us at the paper.Mon.-Fri.: 8 a.m.5:00 p.m.CLASSIFIED ADS 386-755-5440 SUBSCRIPTION 386-755-5445 ALL OTHER DEPARTMENTS 386-752-1293 ELECTRONIC ADS SEND TOads@lakecityreporter.com THIS REPORTER WORKS FOR YOU! Lake City Reporter We’re on target! days a weekSubscribe Today 386-755-5445 LAKE CITY REPORTER This Reporter Works For You! 755-5440Classifieds 755-5445 Circulation