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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
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Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:01982

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:01982

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text

PAGE 1

Opinion ................ 4APeople.................. 2AObituaries .............. 5A Advice & Comics ......... 3B Puzzles ................. 4B TODAY IN PEOPLE Time’s ‘Person of the Year.’ COMING FRIDAY Local news roundup. 79 42 T-Storm Chance WEATHER, 2A Lake City ReporterTHURSDAY, DECEMBER 20, 2012 | YOUR COMMUNIT Y NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | 75¢ LAKECITYREPORTER.COM CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 138, No. 232 1 Last gavel Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterRetiring Third Judicial Circuit Judge E. Vernon Douglas will be on the bench until Dec. 31. Douglas has served 36 years as a a judge. ‘The most productive part of my professional life is over,’ Douglas said. ‘I have to acknowledge that time has passe d. I don’t look back with regret, but with thankfulness. It’s an awesome responsib ility.’ Judge hanging up his robe after 36 yearsBy DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comC hief Judge of the Third Judicial Circuit E. Vernon Douglas has served as an elected judge for 36 years. Soon, he will hang up the robe and retire, but don’t expect retirement to keep him out of the courtroom for long. The Florida Supreme Court has approved his appointment as a senior judge, meaning he will fill in when needed. Douglas will be back in the courtroom for at least three cases in January. During Vietnam he was a Green Beret and trained Army Special Forces troops in America before the they went overseas. He has a twin brother who served in Vietnam.He made jokes while in the courtroom when appropriate, and knew when the situation called for seriousness. He can also fly a plane.In 1982 and in 1984, Douglas lobbied successfully to have Johnny Cash play concerts in Lake City to help raise money for a Civil War museum. He was a scoutmaster with the Boy Scouts. Third Judicial Circuit Judge E. Vernon Douglas shakes hands with Leah Vail, a forensic program director with Meridian Behavioral Hea lthcare, on Tuesday as he is awarded with a plaque in appreciation for the dedica tion to the recovery of persons with mental illness in the criminal justice system. Tracy Lawrencecoming to FGCFrom staff reportsHe has three dozen Billboard hits and 18 No. 1 singles. After 20 years in the industry, Tracy Lawrence remains one of country music’s most popular acts, and will perform this February at Florida Gateway College. The show begins at 7:30 p.m. on February 8, 2013, at the Howard Conference Center. The show is spon-sored by Shands Lake Shore Regional Medical Center and CMS Professional Staffing, Inc. The Arkansas native burst on the scene with 1991’s Platinum-selling Sticks and Stones. The album contained four massive radio hits, including its title tune. His second album, Alibis, issued in 1993, sold more than two million copies and spawned four FGC continued on 3A COURTESYTracy Lawrence Huntingaccidentleaves 1injured Fort White man suffersa life-threatening rifle wound hunting coyotes. By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comFORT WHITE — A Fort White man suffered life-threatening injuries when he acci-dentally shot himself in the abdomen while hunting in Fort White, FWC officials said. Norberto Mondilio Quinones-Caseres, 61, was reportedly climbing a fence Tuesday evening when his .30-30 lever-action Marlin rifle discharged and he was struck in the abdomen, according to Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission inves-tigators. The incident occurred at Bethany Farms on State Road 47 just north of Fort White. Quinones-Caseres was airlifted to Shands Hospital in Gainesville for treatment. HUNTER continued on 3A Circuit judge Paul Bryan hurt in crashBy TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comThird Judicial Circuit Judge Paul Bryan is recovering at home after a car accident Tuesday. The two-vehicle crash occurred at the intersection of Main Boulevard and Knox Street around 11:30 a.m. Tuesday when Bryan’s car was apparently struck in the driver’s side door by another vehicle. Further details are unknown. An accident report was not available from the Lake City Police Department as of Wednesday, and LCPD personnel declined to release any information regarding the crash, including who was driving the other vehicle. Following the accident, Bryan was taken to Shands Lake Shore Regional Medical Center for observation, treated and released. BRYAN continued on 3A DOUGLAS continued on 3A



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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Thursday, December 20, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS 156 N. Marion Avenue • Downtown Lake City • 752.547 0 • wardsjewelryandgifts.com50% off All Jewelry Boxes 25% off All Chamilia(compatible with Pandora™) 25% off All Watches (Seiko • Citizen • Pulsar) 40% off Gentlemen's Jewelry (select case) 25% off All Tree Ornaments nnr rn All of us at Food Stores 8JTIZPVBWFSZ .FSSZ$ISJTUNBT BRIEFS SIGNINGS continued on 6B Ivery, Legree lead signees during 2012. GAMES Today Q Columbia High boys soccer vs. Eastside High, 6 p.m. Friday Q Columbia High wrestling in Beast of the Beach at Fort Walton Beach High, 3 p.m. CST Q Fort White High girls basketball vs. Williston High, 6 p.m. Q Columbia High girls soccer vs. Suwannee High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Q Columbia High boys basketball at St. Augustine High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Saturday Q Columbia High wrestling in Beast of the Beach at Fort Walton Beach High, 9 a.m. CST Q Columbia High basketball vs. Hamilton County High, 7:30 p.m. (girls-6) CHS SOFTBALL Lady Tigers tryouts Jan. 8 Columbia High softball tryouts are 2:45 p.m. Jan. 8 at the CHS field. Participants must meet academic requirements and have completed paperwork. For details, call Jimmy Williams at 303-1192. ADULT BASKETBALL Charity games for USSSA youth Richardson Community Center/Annie Mattox North, Inc., is sponsoring the third annual charity basketball games at the Lake City Middle School gym on Jan. 5. The games feature adult women and men teams — Live Oak vs. Lake City. Game times are 6 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Admission is $5, with all proceeds going to the USSSA youth basketball program. For details, call Nicole Smith at 754-7095. ZUMBA Beginner, weight loss classes A Zumba beginner class and weight loss contest will be offered at Teen Town on Jan. 6. The Zumba beginner class is 3-4 p.m., with the weight loss contest starting at 4 p.m. For details, call Sarah Sandlin at 758-0009. BOYS CLUB Registration for basketball league The Boys Club of Columbia County is taking registration for its basketball program. Three leagues are offered. Cost is $45. For details, call the club at 752-4184.Q From staff reports A year full of signings JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High defensive tackle Dequan Ivery signed to p lay football with the University of Miami on Feb. 1. By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comIt was a year full of signings for Columbia and Fort White high schools as 12 players committed to play sports at the next level. Leading the way were Dequan Ivery and A.J. Legree who signed football scholarships to play at the University of Miami and Kentucky, respectively. “It was a tough decision,” Ivery said at his signing on Feb. 1. “I liked both schools (Lousville as well), but I’m choosing the University of Miami. I want to thank all the coaches that helped me by staying by my side and helping to make this decision.”



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CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Actress Audrey Totter is 95. Rock musician Peter Criss is 67. Psychic/illusionist Uri Geller is 66. Producer Dick Wolf (Law & Order) is 66. Rock musician Alan Parsons is 64. Actress Jenny Agutter is 60. Actor Michael Badalucco is 58. Actress Blanche Baker is 56. AROUND FLORIDA School threats spread in Tampa TAMPA Tampa Bayarea authorities said the Connecticut school mas sacre and doomsday sce narios based on the Mayan calendar have prompted a string of school threats that have overwhelmed deputies. The Hillsborough County Sheriffs Office said none of the threats about shootings or other acts of violence on Friday has proven to be viable. Cpl. Jason Napoli told The Tampa Tribune that deputies are extremely overwhelmed as they investigate each one. Napoli said most of the threats were made through social media. About 10 middle and high schools were named. Two teens were arrested in separate incidents of mak ing threats toward their schools. The county sent depu ties to elementary schools this week because of the Connecticut shooting. Ancient Mayans suppos edly predicted that the end of the world will occur on Friday. Poll says Scotts popularity slips TALLAHASSEE A new poll says Florida Gov. Rick Scotts chances for reelection are in jeopardy. A poll of registered vot ers in Florida found that 52 percent say he does not deserve a second term. Scott, who narrowly beat Democrat Alex Sink in 2010, has already said he plans to run in 2014. The poll also found that 53 percent of Republicans think another Republican should run against Scott in a GOP primary. Scott has been battling low approval ratings since he took office. The new poll shows that only 36 percent approve of the job hes doing. The Quinnipiac University poll also shows that former Gov. Charlie Crist has a 47 percent favorable rating. Crist, who was elected as a Republican and then turned independent, became a registered Democrat last week. Layaway accounts paid off secretly CLEARWATER More than 200 layaway orders at Toys R Us stores in Florida have been paid off by some anonymous holi day helpers. The company said Wednesday that these anonymous Good Samaritans paid the out standing layaway balances for people in Orlando, Tallahassee, Clearwater, Naples and Palm Beach Gardens. Several hundred other layaway accounts at Toys R Us across the country also have been paid. Toys R Us spokeswom an Katie Reczek says the average value of a layaway order is about $200. For each layaway bal ance paid off, Toys R Us is donating $200 worth of toys to the Marine Toys for Tots Foundation, up to $1 million worth of mer chandise. Endangered whale washes ashore ORLANDO One of the most endangered whales in the world has washed up dead on a beach in northeast Florida. Marine officials said Wednesday that the 26foot-long North Atlantic right whale washed up overnight on a beach near Palm Coast. Federal marine offi cial Barb Zoodsma says biologists arent sure what caused the death. A necropsy will be con ducted on the beach since the 1-year-old whale is too large to move. The whale will then be buried on the beach. There are fewer than 400 North Atlantic right whales left in the world. The whales are found from Cape Code to Nova Scotia. Pregnant females travel to waters off the southeast coast to give birth. Zoodsma says the dead whale wasnt old enough to reproduce. City commissioner returns to office TAMARAC A Tamarac city commis sioner who had been sus pended for more than two years has been reinstated after being acquitted of corruption charges. Gov. Rick Scott signed an executive order on Tuesday that returned 66-year-old Patricia AtkinsGrad to office. Her term ends in November 2014. The South Florida Sun Sentinel reported that Atkins-Grad will be able to claim back pay and other benefits. She can now also ask the city commission to vote to have taxpayers reimburse her for the legal costs of her defense. A Broward County jury found Atkins-Grad not guilty last week of eight felony charges, including bribery and unlawful com pensation, She was suspended in June 2010, after prosecu tors claimed Atkins-Grad allowed developers to pay for her car and election victory party in exchange for her support. Obama is Times Person of the Year NEW YORK P resident Barack Obama has been named Time magazines Person of the Year for 2012. We are in the midst of historic cultural and demographic changes, and Obama is both the symbol and in some ways the archi tect of this new America, Time Editor Rick Stengel told NBCs Today show, where he announced the selection on Wednesday. The short list for the honor includ ed Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani teenager who was shot in the head for advocating for girls education, as well as Egyptian president Mohamed Morsi, Apple CEO Tim Cook and Italian physicist Fabiola Giannati. Obama also received the honor in 2008, when he was president-elect. In an interview with Time, Obama said his re-election may have been more satisfying a win than 2008. Weve gone through a very dif ficult time, he said. The American people have rightly been frustrated at the pace of change, and the economy is still struggling, and this president we elected is imperfect, and yet, despite all that, this is who we want to be. Thats a good thing. Times Person of the Year is the person or thing that has most influ enced the culture and the news dur ing the past year for good or for ill. Arbitrator: Beauty queen defamed pageant NEW YORK A beauty queen who claimed this years Miss USA contest was fixed has been ordered to pay the pageant organization $5 million for defamation. In a decision signed last week, an arbitrator found that the comments from Miss Pennsylvania USA Sheena Monnin were false, harmful and malicious. Monnin had alleged that the five finalists had been selected in advance of the pageants live telecast. The arbitrator, Theodore Katz, said Monnin had two motives: She was a disgruntled contestant who failed to make it past the preliminary competition and she objected to the pageants decision to allow transgender contestants. He wrote that the way the contest is judged precludes any reasonable possibility that the judg ing was rigged. Monnin, of Cranberry, Pa., resigned her state title after the pag eant. Her allegations on Facebook and NBCs Today show cost the pageant a $5 million fee from a potential 2013 sponsor, Katz said. Monnins lawyer, Richard Klineburger III, had no comment on the decision, his office said. Katz said Monnin agreed to arbi trate any disputes when she became a Miss USA contestant, but she and her lawyer didnt participate in the process. Michael Douglas watches sons appeal NEW YORK Michael Douglas has been watching from a New York courtroom audience as federal appeals judges consider the validity of his sons nearly 10-year prison sentence for drug crimes. A three-judge panel of the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals listened to lawyers in Cameron Douglas case Wednesday. The judges didnt imme diately say whether they thought the sentence was legally justified. Cameron Douglas initially made a cooperation deal with the govern ment and was sentenced to five years in prison for selling drugs. He was sentenced to another 4 1/2 years after he was caught using drugs in prison. Wednes day: Afternoon: 7-1-8 Evening: N/A Wednes day: Afternoon: 7-9-2-3 Evening: N/A Tues day: 2-5-15-19-23 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAIL Y BRIEFING THURSDAY, DECEMBER 20, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 2AWEATHER Daily Scripture And you, my child, will be called a prophet of the Most High; for you will go on before the Lord to prepare the way for him, to give his people the knowledge of salvation through the forgiveness of their sins, because of the tender mercy of our God, by which the rising sun will come to us from heaven Luke 1:76-78 HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter ASSOCIATED PRESS President Barack Obama talks to news reporters in the briefing room of the White House on Wednesday in Washington. The president was selected as Time maga zines Person of the Year, the second time he was so honored. Associated Press Associated Press Monnin Douglas



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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today COLLEGE FOOTBALL 8 p.m. ESPN — Poinsettia Bowl, BYU at San Diego St. NBA BASKETBALL 7 p.m. TNT — Oklahoma City at Minnesota 9:30 p.m. TNT — Miami at DallasFOOTBALLNFL games Saturday’s Game Atlanta at Detroit, 8:30 p.m. Sunday’s Games Tennessee at Green Bay, 1 p.m.Indianapolis at Kansas City, 1 p.m.New Orleans at Dallas, 1 p.m.Minnesota at Houston, 1 p.m.Oakland at Carolina, 1 p.m.Buffalo at Miami, 1 p.m.Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.New England at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.Washington at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.St. Louis at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.San Diego at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m.Cleveland at Denver, 4:05 p.m.Chicago at Arizona, 4:25 p.m.N.Y. Giants at Baltimore, 4:25 p.m.San Francisco at Seattle, 8:20 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 30 Jacksonville at Tennessee, 1 p.m.Green Bay at Minnesota, 1 p.m.Carolina at New Orleans, 1 p.m.N.Y. Jets at Buffalo, 1 p.m.Miami at New England, 1 p.m.Baltimore at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.Cleveland at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.Houston at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.Philadelphia at N.Y. Giants, 1 p.m.Dallas at Washington, 1 p.m.Chicago at Detroit, 1 p.m.Tampa Bay at Atlanta, 1 p.m.Oakland at San Diego, 4:25 p.m.Arizona at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.St. Louis at Seattle, 4:25 p.m.Kansas City at Denver, 4:25 p.m. NFL playoff scenarios AFC CLINCHED: New England, AFC East; Houston, AFC South; Denver, AFC West; Baltimore, playoff spot HOUSTON (vs. Minnesota)Clinches first-round bye with:— Win or tie, or— New England loss or tie, or— Denver lossClinches home-field advantage throughout AFC playoffs with: — Win, or— Tie AND Denver loss or tie, or— New England loss or tie AND Denver loss DENVER (vs. Cleveland)Clinches first-round bye with:— Win AND New England loss or tie, or — Tie AND New England lossBALTIMORE (vs. N.Y. Giants)Clinches AFC North with:— Win, or— Tie AND Cincinnati loss or tieINDIANAPOLIS (at Kansas City)Clinches playoff spot with:— Win or tie, or— Clinches strength of victory tiebreaker over Cincinnati, or — Pittsburgh loss or tieCINCINNATI (at Pittsburgh)Clinches playoff spot with:— Win NFC CLINCHED: Green Bay, NFC North; Atlanta, NFC South; San Francisco, playoff spot ATLANTA (at Detroit)Clinches first-round bye with:— Win or tie, or— Green Bay loss or tie, or— San Francisco lossClinches home-field advantage throughout NFC playoffs with: — Win, or— Tie AND San Francisco loss or tie, or — Green Bay loss or tie AND San Francisco loss SAN FRANCISCO (at Seattle)Clinches NFC West with:— Win or tieClinches first-round bye with:— Win AND Green Bay loss or tie, or — Tie AND Green Bay lossWASHINGTON (at Philadelphia)Clinches a playoff spot with:— Win AND N.Y. Giants loss AND Chicago loss AND Minnesota loss SEATTLE (vs. San Francisco)Clinches playoff spot with:— win, or— Tie AND N.Y. Giants loss AND Chicago loss or tie, or — Tie AND N.Y. Giants loss AND Minnesota loss or tie, or — Tie AND Chicago loss or tie AND Minnesota loss or tie, or — Tie AND Dallas loss AND Washington loss AND Chicago loss or tie, or — Tie AND Dallas loss AND Washington loss AND Minnesota loss or tie, or — Chicago loss AND Minnesota loss AND Washington loss, or — Chicago loss AND Minnesota loss AND Dallas loss or tie AND Washington tie NEW YORK GIANTS (at Baltimore)Clinches playoff spot with:— Win AND Chicago loss AND Minnesota loss AND Dallas loss AND Washington loss or tie, or — Win AND Chicago loss AND Minnesota loss AND Washington loss AND Dallas tieCollege bowl games Today Poinsettia Bowl At San DiegoSan Diego State (9-3) vs. BYU (7-5), 8 p.m. (ESPN) Friday Beef ’O’ Brady’s Bowl At St. PetersburgBall State (9-3) vs. UCF (9-4), 7:30 p.m. (ESPN) Saturday New Orleans Bowl East Carolina (8-4) vs. LouisianaLafayette (7-4), Noon (ESPN) Las Vegas Bowl Boise State (10-2) vs. Washington (7-5), 3:30 p.m. (ESPN) Monday Hawaii Bowl At HonoluluSMU (6-6) vs. Fresno State (9-3), 8 p.m. (ESPN) Wednesday Little Caesars Pizza Bowl At DetroitCentral Michigan (6-6) vs. Western Kentucky (7-5), 7:30 p.m. (ESPN) Thursday, Dec. 27 Military Bowl At WashingtonBowling Green (8-4) vs. San Jose State (10-2), 3 p.m. (ESPN) Belk Bowl At Charlotte, N.C.Duke (6-6) vs. Cincinnati (9-3), 6:30 p.m. (ESPN) Holiday Bowl At San DiegoBaylor (7-5) vs. UCLA (9-4), 9:45 p.m. (ESPN) Friday, Dec. 28 Independence Bowl At Shreveport, La.Louisiana-Monroe (8-4) vs. Ohio (8-4), 2 p.m. (ESPN) Russell Athletic Bowl At OrlandoVirginia Tech (6-6) vs. Rutgers (9-3), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN) Meineke Car Care Bowl At HoustonMinnesota (6-6) vs. Texas Tech (7-5), 9 p.m. (ESPN) Saturday, Dec. 29 Armed Forces Bowl At Fort Worth, TexasRice (6-6) vs. Air Force (6-6), 11:45 a.m. (ESPN) Fight Hunger Bowl At San FranciscoArizona State (7-5) vs. Navy (7-4), 3:15 p.m. (ESPN2) Pinstripe Bowl At New YorkSyracuse (7-5) vs. West Virginia (7-5), 3:15 p.m. (ESPN) Alamo Bowl At San AntonioTexas (8-4) vs. Orgeon State (9-3), 6:45 p.m. (ESPN) Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl At Tempe, Ariz.Michigan State (6-6) vs. TCU (7-5), 10:15 p.m. (ESPN) Monday, Dec. 31 Music City Bowl At Nashville, Tenn.Vanderbilt (8-4) vs. N.C. State (7-5), Noon (ESPN) Sun Bowl At El Paso, TexasGeorgia Tech (6-7) vs. Southern Cal (7-5), 2 p.m. (CBS) Liberty Bowl At Memphis, Tenn.Iowa State (6-6) vs. Tulsa (10-3), 3:30 p.m. (ESPN) Chick-fil-A Bowl At AtlantaLSU (10-2) vs. Clemson (10-2), 7:30 p.m. (ESPN)BASKETBALLNBA schedule Today’s Games Oklahoma City at Minnesota, 7 p.m.Miami at Dallas, 9:30 p.m.Denver at Portland, 10 p.m. Friday’s Games Atlanta at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.Orlando at Toronto, 7 p.m.Milwaukee at Boston, 7:30 p.m.Chicago at New York, 7:30 p.m.Indiana at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.Washington at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.Dallas at Memphis, 8 p.m.New Orleans at San Antonio 8:30 p.m.Charlotte at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.Sacramento at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.AP Top 25 schedule Today’s Games No. 1 Duke vs. Elon, 7 p.m.No. 2 Michigan vs. Eastern Michigan, 8:30 p.m. Friday’s Games No. 6 Indiana vs. Florida Atlantic, 7 p.m. No. 22 Notre Dame vs. Niagara, 7 p.m. Saturday’s Games No. 3 Syracuse vs. Temple at Madison Square Garden, Noon No. 4 Arizona vs. East Tennessee State at the Stan Sheriff Center, Honolulu, 10:30 p.m. No. 5 Louisville vs. Western Kentucky at Bridgestone Arena, Nashville, Tenn., 8:30 p.m. No. 7 Ohio State vs. No. 9 Kansas, 4 p.m. No. 8 Florida vs. Kansas State at the Sprint Center, Kansas City, Mo., 8 p.m. No. 10 Illinois vs. No. 12 Missouri at Scottrade Center, St. Louis, 6 p.m. No. 11 Cincinnati vs. Wright State, 4 p.m. No. 13 Minnesota vs. Lafayette, 7 p.m.No. 15 Georgetown vs. American, Noon No. 16 New Mexico vs. South Dakota State, 2:30 p.m. No. 18 San Diego State vs. San Francisco at the Stan Sheriff Center, Honolulu, 6 p.m. No. 19 Butler vs. Evansville, 2 p.m.No. 20 Michigan State vs. Texas, 2 p.m.No. 21 UNLV vs. Canisius, 10 p.m.No. 23 North Carolina vs. McNeese State, Noon No. 24 Oklahoma State vs. Tennessee Tech, 1 p.m. No. 25 N.C. State vs. St. Bonaventure, 3 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 20, 2012 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04202BAGATE THURSDAY EVENING DECEMBER 20, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) I Want a Dog for ChristmasCMA Country Christmas Country stars share holiday traditions. (N) News at 11(:35) Nightline (N) 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) The Insider 5-PBS 5 -Journal Nightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) The This Old House Hour (N) 15th Annual Holiday Traditions ConcertMI-5 The team must nd a mole. BBC World NewsTavis Smiley 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge Judy Two and Half MenBig Bang TheoryTwo and Half Men(:01) Person of Interest (:01) Elementary “Child Predator” Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneThe Vampire Diaries “Memorial” Beauty and the Beast “All In” TMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ce The Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family Guy Family Guy The SimpsonsThe X Factor “Season Finale, Part Two” Khlo and Mario announce the winner. NewsAction News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) A White House ChristmasThe Of ceParks/Recreat(:01) Rock Center With Brian WilliamsNewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(5:00) Public Affairs Capitol Hill Hearings WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H The Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279I (Almost) Got Away With It I (Almost) Got Away With It 48 Hours: Hard Evidence 48 Hours: Hard Evidence 48 Hours: Hard Evidence 48 Hours: Hard Evidence A&E 19 118 265The First 48 The First 48 The First 48 The First 48 (N) Beyond Scared Straight “Richland County, S.C.” (N) (:31) The First 48 HALL 20 185 312“A Bride for Christmas” (2012, Romance) Arielle Kebbel, Andrew Walker. “Christmas With Holly” (2012, Drama) Sean Faris, Eloise Mumford. “The Christmas Heart” (2012, Drama) Teri Polo, Paul Essiembre, Ty Wood. FX 22 136 248How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherTwo and Half MenTwo and Half Men “Christmas With the Kranks” (2004, Comedy) Tim Allen, Jamie Lee Curtis. It’s Always SunnyThe League (N) The LeagueUnsupervised CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245The Mentalist “Always Bet on Red”d NBA Basketball Oklahoma City Thunder at Minnesota Timberwolves. (N) d NBA Basketball Miami Heat at Dallas Mavericks. From American Airlines Center in Dallas. (N) NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobDrake & JoshDrake & JoshiCarly “iChristmas” Victorious Full House Full House The Nanny The Nanny Friends (:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241Jail Jail Jail Jail (N) iMPACT Wrestling Ink Master Athletes choose their artists. Ink Master “Ink Master Live” MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*H M*A*S*H White Collar “Company Man” White Collar “Point Blank” Seinfeld Frasier The Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Phineas and FerbGood Luck CharlieShake It Up! Austin & Ally “The Nightmare Before Christmas” (1993) Good Luck CharlieGood Luck CharliePhineas and FerbA.N.T. Farm Jessie LIFE 32 108 252To Be AnnouncedTo Be AnnouncedProject Runway All Stars Project Runway All Stars (N) Project Runway(:31) Project Runway All Stars Project Runway USA 33 105 242NCIS “Reveille” NCIS “Rule Fifty-One” NCIS Investigating a suspected suicide. Burn Notice “You Can Run; Game Change” Michael tries to leave the country. Burn Notice “No Good Deed” BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Top 10 Countdown” (N) Apollo Live Musical guest Eric Benet. Apollo Live Musical guest Eric Benet. “Torque” (2004) Martin Henderson. A drug dealer frames a biker for murder. ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) Coll. Football Livee College Football San Diego County Credit Union Poinsettia Bowl -BYU vs. San Diego State. From San Diego. (N) SportsCenter (N) ESPN2 36 144 209SportsNation (N) Audibles (N) (Live) ProFILE: 60 (N) ProFILE: 60 (N) ProFILE: 60 (N) NFL’s Greatest Games From Feb. 1, 2009. SportsCenter (N) Sport Science (N) SUNSP 37 -how to Do oridaAlong the WayAlong the WayPrep Zone SpoLightning Classics From April 7, 2012. XTERRA USA ChampionshipXTERRA World Championship DISCV 38 182 278Amish Ma a Amish Ma a “Fire From the Lord” Amish Ma a “Devil Comes Calling” Moonshiners Ghost Town Gold “The Big Gamble” Moonshiners TBS 39 139 247King of QueensKing of QueensSeinfeld Seinfeld Family Guy “Road to the North Pole” Big Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryConan (N) HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) What Would You Do?What Would You Do?Showbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236Ice Loves CocoIce Loves CocoE! News (N) The SoupLove You, Mean ItMiss Universe Chelsea Lately (N) E! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Carribean Beaches Overboard Boats Extreme houseboats. Mysteries at the Museum Mysteries at the Museum Mysteries at the Museum Mysteries at the Museum HGTV 47 112 229Selling New YorkSelling New YorkHunters Int’lHouse HuntersBuying and Selling Extreme Homes (N) House HuntersHunters Int’lExtreme Homes TLC 48 183 280Island MediumIsland MediumTop 10 Weddings of 2012 Sin City Rules “Whine Tasting” Four Weddings (N) Say Yes to the Dress: The Big Day (N) Four Weddings HIST 49 120 269Brad Meltzer’s Decoded Brad Meltzer’s Decoded “2012” Pawn Stars Pawn Stars 2012 The End Is Now Decoding the real threats to humanity. (N) (:02) Brad Meltzer’s Decoded ANPL 50 184 282Monsters Inside Me Rattlesnake Republic Rattlesnake Republic Rattlesnake Republic Rattlesnake RepublicRattlesnake Republic FOOD 51 110 231Sweet Genius “Holiday Genius” Sugar DomeRestaurant: Impossible “Frankie’s” Restaurant Stakeout “Oh, Brother” Sweet Genius (N) The Next Iron Chef: Redemption TBN 52 260 372(4:30) “The Ten Commandments” (1956) The Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesJoel Osteen Joseph PrinceHillsong TV “King of Kings” (1961, Historical Drama) Jeffrey Hunter, Siobhan McKenna. FSN-FL 56 -Football PrevUFC Insider Tennis Champions Series: Chicago. McEnroe vs. Sampras. World Poker Tour: Season 10Football PrevUFC InsiderThe Best of Pride SYFY 58 122 244Haven “Last Goodbyes” Haven Audrey searches for a killer. “The 12 Disasters of Christmas” (2012) Ed Quinn, Magda Apanowicz. “Ice Quake” (2010, Science Fiction) Brendan Fehr, Holly Dignard. AMC 60 130 254CSI: Miami “Down to the Wire” CSI: Miami “Going Ballistic” “Miracle on 34th Street” (1947) Maureen O’Hara, John Payne. (:15) “Miracle on 34th Street” (1947) Maureen O’Hara, John Payne. COM 62 107 249(5:56) South Park(:26) Tosh.0 The Colbert ReportDaily Show(7:58) Futurama(:28) Tosh.0 (8:59) Tosh.0 (:29) The Comedy Central Roast Comedian Bob Saget. Daily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327Reba Reba “The Rings” Reba Reba Reba Reba “The Feud” “Pure Country” (1992) George Strait. A country singer struggles with the burden of stardom. (:45) Fireproof NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer “Shadow Dogs” Desert SeasIcy Killers: Alaska’s Salmon SharkSecret Brazil “Jaguar Rising” Secret Brazil “Cannibal Caimans” Icy Killers: Alaska’s Salmon Shark NGC 109 186 276Am. ChainsawAm. ChainsawThe Truth Behind...Wicked Tuna: Hooked Up (N) Rocket CityRocket CityAm. ChainsawAm. ChainsawRocket CityRocket City SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s Made (N) How It’s MadeThey Do It?They Do It?How It’s MadeHow It’s Made ID 111 192 285The Will: Family Secrets Revealed48 Hours on ID “Murder at the Manor” Fatal Vows “The Last Seduction” The Will: Family Secrets Revealed (N) Very Bad Men (N) Very Bad MenFatal Vows “The Last Seduction” HBO 302 300 501(5:00) Contagion(:45) “Johnny English Reborn” (2011, Comedy) Rowan Atkinson. ‘PG’ Fight Game “Project Nim” (2011) Premiere. ‘PG-13’ Les MiserablesAtlantic City Hookers: Being a Ho MAX 320 310 515(4:00) Pulp Fiction(:35) “The Sitter” (2011, Comedy) Jonah Hill. ‘R’ “The Brave One” (2007, Suspense) Jodie Foster, Nicky Katt. ‘R’ “End of Days” (1999, Horror) Arnold Schwarzenegger. ‘R’ SHOW 340 318 545 “Fightville” (2011, Documentary) ‘NR’ (:25) “Source Code” (2011) Jake Gyllenhaal. ‘PG-13’ “Drive Angry” (2011, Action) Nicolas Cage, Amber Heard. ‘R’ Dave’s Old PornReality Show (N) J A C K S O N V I L L E L o c a l physicians at a new medicalclinic in suburban Jacksonville are so sure their medicationwill help men with erectiledysfunction, they are offering the first 37 callers a free in-office medication dose. Erectile dysfunction and premature ejaculation have long been a problem for millions of men, in spite of the popularity of Viagra, Cialis and Levitra. Many men aren't helped by these pills or cannot take them due to adverse side effects. Florida Men's Medical Clinic custom blends over 180 combinations of medications for each patient. 'That's why our success rate is so /0./B:(@:9,=05 695:)@',/,374,5as old as ninety-four, with diabetes, prostate surgery and heart conditions. Regardless of t heir age or medical history our results everyday are (4(A05.B 334,+0*(;065:(9, approved, andn os u r g e r yis i n v o l v e d ',(+1<:; t h e p r e s c r i p t i o nf o raman's performance to 45-minutes, an hour, 90-minutes or 365.,9B(**69+05.;69 695:)@(5+ patients see results right in our office.After climax the patient stays erect the entire period of time. This allows them to achieve a second climax and adequately satisfyt h e i rp a r t n e r N oo t h e rmedication can do;/0:',6--,9(:0473,.<(9antee: If you don't respond to the medication on the first =0:0;;/,6--0*,=0:0;0:-9,,B '0;/;/(;.<(9(5;,,36*(3 patients have nothing to lose. Openings are filling quickl y for the free in-office medication dose, after that the normal feesw i llbe charged. P a t i e n t sa rea s s u r edo fu t m o s tprivacy and professionalism with private waiting rooms and an all-male staff. Further information is available by calling (904) 600-0560. Florida Men's Medical Clinic, 4651 Salisbury Rd., Suite 151 in the lobby,Jacksonville, FL, at I-95 & Butler/Rt. 202. For patients more than 60 miles away the doctor will pay your gas. www.FloridaMensClinic.comA d v e r t o r i a lF R E EM E D I C A T I O ND O S EErecti l eD y s f u n ction Cl i n i cOpensinJ a c k s onvi l l e BY STEVE MUELLER s Health Consultant (904) 600-0940 Patients are assured of utmost Seminoles to open 2014 with Okla. StateAssocaited PressSTILLWATER, Okla. — Oklahoma State will open the 2014 college foot-ball season with a neutral site game against Florida State. OSU, FSU, the Dallas Cowboys and ESPN announced Wednesday that the Cowboys and Seminoles will play at Cowboys Stadium in Arlington, Texas, in a game to be televised by ESPN. The game will be the fifth time OSU and FSU have played with Florida State winning three of the previous four. Record-setting prep QB Will Grier chooses FloridaAssociated PressDAVIDSON, N.C. — Junior quarterback Will Grier, who threw for a national record 837 yards and had 10 TD passes in a 104-80 North Carolina state playoff win last month, will be a Florida Gator. Chad Grier, Will’s father and Davidson Day football coach, said Wednesday his son “feels so strong about it that he is ready to com-mit now so he can focus on his schoolwork, improving his game and helping his team prepare for a third consecutive state champi-onship.” The 6-foot-3, 190-pound QB trimmed his choice to five schools before choos-ing the Gators over North Carolina, Tennessee, North Carolina State and Oregon. A 2012 AP All-State selection, Grier threw for 5,785 yards and 69 touchdowns with six interceptions this season. He also carried 95 times for 813 yards and eight TDs. Tebow ‘disappointed’ by Ryan choosing McElroyBy DENNIS WASZAK Jr.Associated PressFLORHAM PARK, N.J. — It all began as an intrigu-ing idea, the thought of Tim Tebow running around as an exciting spark for the New York Jets’ offense. Then it all fizzled — before it really even start-ed. Rex Ryan acknowledged Wednesday that he had higher expectations for the seldom-used Tebow in the Jets’ wildcat-style offense. And, so did the NFL’s most popular and maligned back-up quarterback. “For some reason, it hasn’t panned out to my expectations and maybe Tim’s, either,” Ryan said. “Defenses have attacked us a little differently. Maybe that’s a contributing factor to it.” Ryan would not go into detail about why he chose Greg McElroy over Tebow to replace the struggling Mark Sanchez as the team’s starting quarterback with two games left in a lost sea-son. He reiterated his com-ments from Tuesday that it was his decision — and his alone — saying it was a “gut” call. It was one that, predictably, didn’t sit well with Tebow. “Obviously, I’m a little disappointed,” he said. “You try to handle it the best you can.” Tebow paused for a second when asked if he felt passed over by Ryan choosing McElroy instead of him. “All you can ask for and all you want is a chance,” he said. “A chance to go out there and play the game you love, and help this team win football games. That’s all I wanted.” Ryan didn’t consult with any players before making the call — other than to tell Sanchez after the Jets’ 14-10 loss to Tennessee on Monday night that he was out as the starter.



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Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, DECEMBER 20, 2012 3A 3A plus all the ( jingle ) bells & whistles! tis the time to buy! 2 26 % APR 1 for up to 60 months As low as No payments until 2 0 1 3 2 Shop the dealership with a CAMPUS Pre-Approved Loan Draft and negotiate as a cash buyer! Have a loan with another lender? Lower your payment by bringing it to CAMPUS! M M Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Columbia and Suwannee counties! 3 Accelerate your approval, apply today! Call 754-2219 Click campuscu.com Visit your local service center OFFER NOT AVAILABLE ON EXISTING CAMPUS LOANS. OFFER IS FOR NEW LOANS ONLY. MAY NOT BE COMBINED WITH ANY OTHER OFFER. 1. Credit approval required. Your rate may be higher based on creditworthiness, vehicle and term of loan. For example, a $39,000.00 loan with no money down at 2.14% for 48 months would require 47 monthly payments of $854.12 and a final payment of $833.58, finance charge o f $1,839.67, for a total of payments of $40,977.22. The amount financed is $39,237.55, the APR is 2.26%. APR = Annual Percentag e Rate. 2. Interest will accrue from date of purchase. Choosing this option will increase the total amount of interest you pay. 3. Credit approval and initial $5 deposit required. Mention this ad and well waive the $15 new membership fee. This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration. Lake City 183 SW Bascom Norris Dr. Gville E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunters Walk 5115 NW 43rd St. Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St. Shands at UF Room H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Alachua 14759 NW 157th Ln. Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E. Silver Springs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. Summer eld 17950 US Hwy. 441 Tallahassee 1511 Killearn Center Blvd. BRYAN: Injured in crash Continued From Page 1A HUNTER: Critically wounded Continued From Page 1A FGC: Concert Continued From Page 1A DOUGLAS: Third Circuit chief judge is retiring after 36 years on the bench Continued From Page 1A Call his cell phone and Folsom Prison Blues plays in place of the regular ring tone. In retirement, the judge plans on trav eling to places hes always wanted to see, playing the guitar more and spending time with his grandchild. With every decision Douglas attempted to do whats right for the community -while still remembering that every judg ment affected not just those judged, but their families too. Every year it grows on you more and more the responsibility of what youre asked to do, because daily youre affect ing the lives of people which will affect the lives of those to come, he said. ... Every judge I know begins the day with a prayer in their heart. Douglas spoke about how retirement is something that happens to everybody. he came to terms with his retirement by looking back at the impact he had in the community. One could look on it with sadness of the passing of a passage in life... There are necessary losses in our lives that have to happen, he said. We can look at it and not understand it, or we can look at it with thankfulness and gratitude. As a judge, Douglas has been forced to take children from parents, has listened to the family members of murder victims looking for closure and heard any num ber of terrible cases that appeared on his docket. How does a judge go home to their children and hide the awful things away? Is a judge ever not on duty? The short answer is no. Youre always judge, Douglas said. He said hes tried to fool himself that the when he takes off the robe, he leaves his work in the office. He said it doesnt work that way. You see families destroyed, you see lives destroyed, Douglas said. ... When you see the loss of just the whole human condition. Can you turn (it off). You have to turn it off at 5 oclock, but you cannot. It will affect you all the days of your life. Ive had horrific murder cases and its overwhelming to reflect back on the dam age on human lives and families. Douglas said he believes that the sys tem of government we practice in the United States was inspired by God. My greatest prayer is that I contrib uted to that inspired system, he said. He said that people have the right to protest whatever they want, but that he believes its politically correct to say Merry Christmas during the holidays. Very frankly my friends, its politi cally correct and most accurate to say Merry Christmas, because without this inspired document people wouldnt have the right to dissent and disrespect the very Christianity that produced that docu ment, he said. Douglas has three children. He said he has never pushed them to follow in his footsteps. Both his two sons are attorneys and his daughter is a social worker in Alexandria, Virginia. Douglass retirement ceremony is set for Dec. 31 in courtroom Number One at the Columbia County Courthouse. At the ceremony he will swear in his son Wes Douglas to serve as a judge of the Third Circuit. Theres no greater honor then for my last words as Judge to be Son, raise your right hand, Douglas said. Deputies said while he was being airlifted he was alert, said Karen Parker, FWC public information coordinator. The last update I had on him is that he was in critical condition. It was a life-threatening injury. Parker said Columbia County sheriffs deputies arrived at the scene around 6 p.m. and the victim was airlifted shortly afterward. Columbia County Sheriffs Office deputies responded to the scene initially and then they called the FWC to take over (the investigation) because it was a hunting accident, Parker said. Parker said reports did not give any specific details regarding the fence. When the deputies arrived on scene Quinones-Caseres was in a van being treated by EMS personnel, who determined he needed to be air lifted, she said. Parker said when the incident occurred, Quinones-Caseres called some one on the property requesting assistance, and the person picked him up in a van and called emergency medical services and first responders. The FWC continues to investigate the incident. Parker said she is uncer tain how long the investigation will continue. The investigators were interviewing witnesses and gathering evidence Wednesday, she said. Any investigation will take as long as it takes. Quinones-Caseres told authorities he was hunting coyotes. He is now at home. They had to extract me from the car, a Honda Insight, Bryan said. Bryan said first responders used a mechanical device to open the car door, pulled him out and put him on a backboard before taking him to the hospital. Both vehicles had to be towed from the crash scene, he said. Bryan is now resting at home. Im a very fortunate guy because my car is very little and that vehicle was large, he said. Bryan said has no broken bones and plans to return to work after Christmas. The rescue people and emergency medical techni cians did an excellent job taking care of me and get ting me the help I needed, he said. They were very professional, courteous as well as the people at the hospital. Bryan is serving in his 20th year as a third circuit judge. As a Third Circuit judge Bryan hears cases in Columbia, Dixie and Lafayette counties. consecutive No. 1 hits: Alibis, Cant Break it to My Heart, My Second Home, and If the Good Die Young. Lawrences most recent No. 1, the 2006 hit Find Out Who Your Friends Are, holds the record for the slowestclimbing No. 1 single in the history of the Billboard country music charts. Lawrence is scheduled to release a new album in January, titled Headlights, Taillights and Radios. Tickets for the event are now avail able and can be purchased by call (386) 754-4340 or by visiting www. fgcentertainment.com. Tickets are $15 for FGC students, faculty, and staff, $25 for general admission, and $40 for VIP seating. For more information, contact Troy Roberts at Troy.Roberts@fgc.edu or by calling (386) 754-4247. JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City Reporter Douglas cuts a slice of cake during a retirement party on Wednesday. Pictured are Lake City Police Chief Argatha Gilmore (from left), outgoing State Attorney Skip Jarvis, judge Leandra Johnson, incoming judge Wes Douglas, Meridian Behavioral Healthcare forensic program director Leah Vail, outgoing judge Douglas, Columbia County Sheriff Mark Hunter and judge Julius Collins.



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DEAR ABBY: I confess, I can be a procrastinator. Last year, my holiday cards sat on my desk, blank and unaddressed until almost Easter, when it was far too late to send them. This year, I figured brevity was better than not getting them sent, so I had photo cards made and wrote short notes on each before mailing them. Several of my relatives have now told me they felt “snubbed and offended” by my short notes. One aunt is particularly upset and said (via my mother) that my cards “clearly showed I don’t care about people, and I should have written proper letters or sent noth-ing.” Was I wrong to think “some” card was better than no card at all? -HOLIDAY CARD WRITER, AKRON, OHIO DEAR HOLIDAY CARD WRITER: I don’t think you were wrong. As for your aunt, who appears to be one of those individuals who hang onto imagined slights and delivers her messages via other people, perhaps you should con-sider leaving her off your Christmas card list from now on for fear of offend-ing her further. Some peo-ple are just not “pleasable,” and your aunt may be one of them. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: My 20year-old son, “P.J.,” dresses in Army fatigues when he goes out. His clothes and boots -including name patches -make him look like a soldier. Because he seems so fascinated with the outfit, I asked him if he wants to consider joining the military. He said he’s not interested, he just likes “the look.” I’m embarrassed when we’re out together. Friends have commented, “I didn’t know P.J. enlisted.” My response is, “He’s not in the military. He just likes to dress the part.” When strangers have approached him and thanked him for his service and for protect-ing our country, he actual-ly says, “You’re welcome!” How am I supposed to respond when people ask me obvious questions? Isn’t it illegal to dress in Army attire when you’re not affiliated with the military? -MOM OF A CIVILIAN IN WEST VIRGINIA DEAR MOM: I can see why you are embarrassed. You should be. What your son is doing may not be illegal, but it IS dishonest. When you are asked if he is in the military, you should continue to tell the truth. What your son is doing is disrespectful, unethical and unfair to anyone who actually HAS served. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: I live in a small rural town with lots of nice neighbors. During the holidays, I receive a variety of delicious home-made gifts -jams, cookies, breads and other special-ties. I am careful about my diet and consume no white flour or sugar. This means I must thank the person for the gifts, then figure out what to do with them. What’s the best way to handle this annual dilem-ma? -UNSURE IN NEW ENGLAND DEAR UNSURE: If you work, consider bringing the goodies with you and sharing them with your co-workers. Or, donate them to a shelter or senior cen-ter where they might be enjoyed and appreciated. DILBERT BABY BLUES HOROSCOPES DEAR ABBY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Don’t jump to conclu-sions. Put the past behind you and look to the future with optimism. You’ll learn from a personal experience you encounter with some-one of interest. A financial gain will help you invest in your skills and endeavors. +++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Don’t look at your failures -enjoy your suc-cesses. A serious outlook is fine, but not when you should be enjoying the lighter side of life with people who normally only get to see you at work. Get year-end paperwork out of the way. +++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Relationships are key to your future. Ask for favors or offer something that will secure a relation-ship with someone special. A problem with deception must be brought out into the open before you can move on. Moderation will be required. ++++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Don’t let change cause emotional upset. Do your best to finish what you start and to take care of any responsibilities you’ve been given. You will reap the rewards and be given the time you need to devote to home and family. ++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Personal responsibilities must be dealt with before you can relax and enjoy the end-of-the-year festivi-ties. A close relationship with someone will be enhanced. Travel plans or spending time doing some-thing out of the ordinary will bring you pleasure. +++++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Face domestic and family challenges in a prac-tical manner. Judging oth-ers will cause resentment. A social event or shopping will cost you more than you anticipate. Don’t count on a contract unless you have it signed, sealed and delivered. +++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Please those around you and you will open up new opportunities pre-sented to you by a friend, relative or someone who is looking for a partnership. Traveling will lead to con-versations with extraordi-nary people. Love is in the stars. +++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Getting back to your roots may be interesting, but don’t believe every-thing an old friend tells you. Rely on your intuition to guide you when deal-ing with family and to lead you in a direction that will secure your position. +++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Create change if you are bored or unhappy in your current situation. A new year is about to begin and preparing to wipe your slate clean and start anew will bring you greater vitality and a chance to do things differently. +++++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): You may want to help those less fortunate, but do so for the right reason. Offering time, a service or suggestions will make a difference. An impulsive decision or move will cause emotional stress and can hurt your reputa-tion. ++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Spend time preparing for the upcom-ing year. Strategize and figure out your best move. Focusing on what you can do to improve your chance of getting ahead person-ally or professionally will lead to a plan that will help build your confidence. ++++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Too much of every-thing will be your downfall. Keep things simple and stick close to home. Don’t be fooled by what others say. Avoid a fast-talking sales pitch, suggestions or offers that are too good to be true. Self-deception is apparent. +++ CELEBRITY CIPHER Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com BLONDIE BEETLE BAILEY B.C. FRANK & ERNEST FOR BETTER OR WORSE ZITS HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH GARFIELD THE LAST WORD Eugenia Last Holiday greetings get humbug response from offended aunt Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. CLASSIC PEANUTS Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 20, 2012 3B



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HIGHLIGHTS IN HISTORY On this date:In 1790, the first successful cotton mill in the United States began operating at Pawtucket, R.I. In 1803, the Louisiana Purchase was completed as ownership of the territory was formally transferred from France to the United States. In 1812, German authors Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm published the first volume of the first edition of their col-lection of folk stories, titled “Children’s and Household Tales.” OPINION Thursday, December 20, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A4AOPINIONN ow, suddenly, the Tea Party is every-body’s whip-ping boy. Liberals, in the wake of the election, gloat about what they see as liberalism’s return to the mainstream and good rid-dance to the Republican “extremists.” And, despite the spin, it is not accidental that four prominent Tea Party congressmen have been purged from key com-mittee posts by House Speaker John Boehner. So as the Washington “establishment” cozies up to the mindset that a bloat-ed, debt-ridden America can go on just fine as long as there is political compro-mise in Washington, here are a few things to think about. The Economist Intelligence Unit, a sister company of The Economist magazine, publishes each year a “quality of life” index. It ranks 50 countries around the world accord-ing to which has the best prospects for the highest quality of life in the upcom-ing year. It looks at 11 factors, including economic and socio-political consider-ations. When the Index was first published in 1988, the United States was No. 1 in the world. This year, the United States has dropped to No. 16. Or consider the Economic Freedom of the World Index, published annually by a consortium of free-market think tanks from around the world. According to this year’s report: “The United States, long considered the standard bearer for economic freedom among large industrial nations, has experienced a sub-stantial decline in eco-nomic freedom during the past decade. From 1980 to 2000, the United States was generally rated the third freest economy in the world, ranked behind only Hong Kong and Singapore.” In the latest rankings, the United States has dropped to number 19 in the world in economic freedom. Why does this matter? There is a direct correlation between how a nation ranks in economic freedom and its per capita GDP, income, and general measures of quality of life, such as life expectancy and civil liberties. More economic freedom means more prosperity and a higher quality of life. According to data just published by the United Nations, in 2011 China surpassed, for the first time, the United States as the world’s leading manu-facturer. Walter Isaacson relates, in his 2011 biography of the late founder of Apple Steve Jobs, how Jobs lec-tured President Barack Obama about how “regu-lations and unnecessary costs” in the United States drive firms to open plants in China. We’ve got bad news and good news in our country today. The bad news is that the country is unquestion-ably in decline. The good news is that we remain sufficiently free to turn things around. The compromisers tell us that we have no choice but to resign ourselves to a bloated, second-class America. They point out the obvious -Obama won the election -and con-clude we should run up the white flag. They also point to current polling that says the majority of Americans want compromise. Raise taxes, cut spending here and there and move on. Disappearing from the discussion is what is really needed -real unilateral spending cuts, real tax reform and a real over-haul of entitlements. We should conclude from this how deep-seated our problem is and how badly America needs cou-rageous leadership. If the founders of America, upstarts against the British Empire, caved in the face of early defeats, the American miracle would never have occurred. Let’s recall two of Benjamin Franklin’s quotes: “Those who would give up essential liberty to pur-chase a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.” “We must all hang together, or assuredly we shall all hang separately.” Tea Partiers must hang together, hang tough, and continue the winnable fight to restore American freedom. Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com T he reaction of local school and law enforcement officials to last week’s tragedy in Newtown, Conn., has been measured, rational – and swift. Supt. Terry Huddleston is sizing up the situation at county schools and sending out a team to help determine just what changes need to be made. Some seem fairly easy, such as the possible repositioning of an entrance gate at Melrose Park Elementary. Others may take some doing.For example, should we place armed school resource officers, now just at sec-ondary institutions in Columbia County, at elementary schools as well? As of now it appears to be a matter of funding. Sheriff Mark Hunter and LCPD Chief Argatha Gilmore both seem enthusiastic about the idea, but up to eight (one for each public elementary school) additional deputies or police officers would add con-siderably to county or city payroll costs. It’s just not clear at this point what’s possible. Huddleston says federal funding could become available to cover or at least defray the costs of added personnel. And if the federal funding doesn’t materialize? We’ll have to take a step back and analyze the situation anew. While our schools can never be made completely safe, we must do all within our power to ensure nothing even remotely approaching the magnitude of Newtown ever happens here. On that we’re all agreed.Meanwhile, some tough choices may lie ahead for us in the coming months. Newtown in the long run OUR OPINION Tea Partiers need to hang tough North Korea’s latest provocationT he successful launch on Dec. 12 of a space satellite by North Korea is cause for concern, but no sign of a basic strategic shift -yet. Nonetheless, a tough response with teeth is required by the world community. For almost two decades, Pyongyang has oscil-lated between apparent accommodation and bom-bastic hard line. In late February, North Korea’s official news agency and the U.S. State Department jointly announced that Pyongyang would cease uranium enrichment and nuclear weapons tests and permit inspection of nucle-ar facilities. In return, the U.S. would resume shipments of substantial amounts of humanitarian food relief. This was followed in April by a test of a long-range missile. That mis-sile launch led to immedi-ate cessation of U.S. aid. Even in closed North Korea, news leaked out to the undernourished popu-lation that anticipated pro-visions had been stopped. The past several years have seen some unrest amid the apparently total discipline imposed from the top. Space shot publicity will not change this. A report in September by the Rand Corp., a defense policy think tank, argued North Korea’s long-term but erratic efforts to develop long-range missiles do not represent a major threat to the global balance of power. Markus Schiller, author of the study, emphasized that obsolete Russian engines were used, with both range and payload too small to sup-port a credible interconti-nental ballistic missile. There remains the basic question of the communist regime’s true goals, given that its actions increase North Korea’s isolation. Dictatorships encourage suspicion among their own populations and also outside analysts, leading to the bias of assuming coordinated planning. Much media commen-tary on both missile and nuclear weapons tests over nearly two decades assumes that North Korean leaders are operat-ing in concert. In fact, there are signs of bureaucratic conflict and a power struggle in Pyongyang, encouraged by the ineffectiveness of Kim Jong-un, the young recently installed leader. Cracks in the rigid face of the regime provide open-ings for diplomacy. The United Nations Security Council strongly condemned the North Korea test. The test vio-lates U.N. resolutions that prohibit missile and nuclear-related tests by the North. This should be accompanied by tough action. As an example, the Bush administration declared Banco Delta Asia (BDA), based in Macau, a renegade institution assisting illegal activi-ties by Pyongyang in the global black market. U.S. businesses were banned from dealing with BDA, and others followed suit. Macau government authorities froze $25 mil-lion in North Korean funds. The money was released following North Korean concessions. The high stakes involved are self-evident. The Korean War of 1950-53 took an estimated 1 million lives, brought direct combat between American and Chinese forces, and devastated the Korean peninsula. In U.S. politics, the conflict destroyed public support for the Truman adminis-tration and fed anti-com-munist hysteria. Another war could devastate the Koreas once again. Approaching U.S. defense budget cuts will leave even fewer forces for a possible war in Korea. Over the years, Pyongyang has been effective at creating cri-ses, sometimes approach-ing the brink of war, only to step back, usually in return for substantial eco-nomic aid. For Washington and its allies, negotiation has been frustrating, at times agonizing, but war has been averted and stability maintained. China’s role in restraining an ideologi-cal ally will become even more important. Most important of all is South Korea, where remarkable economic and political success provides a profound rebuttal to the communist North. Arthur I. Cyr Q Arthur I. Cyr is Clausen Distinguished Professor at Carthage College. Email him at acyr@carthage.edu Q Associated Press Star Parkerparker@urbancure.org Q Star Parker is president of CURE, Coalition on Urban Renewal and Education (www.urbancure.org) and author of three books.



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DeadlinesBe Sure to Call Early You can call us at 755-5440 Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.Some people prefer to place their classified ads in person, and some ad categories will require prepay-ment. Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street.You can also fax or email your ad copy to the Reporter.FAX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the Classified Department.EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreporter.comAd is to Appear:TuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday Call by:Mon., 10:00 a.m.Mon., 10:00 a.m.Wed., 10:00 a.m.Thurs., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fax/Email by:Mon., 9:00 a.m.Mon., 9:00 a.m.Wed., 9:00 a.m.Thurs., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.These deadlines are subject to change without notice. Cancellations, Changes & Billing Questions Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject, or classify all advertisements under appropriate headings. Copy should be checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day of pub-lication. Credit for published errors will be allowed for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement which was incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be published, nor for any general, special or consequential damages. Advertising language must comply with Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition of discrimi-nation in employment, housing and public accommodations. Standard abbreviations are acceptable; how-ever, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated. Ad Errors-Please read your ad on the first day of publication. Weaccept responsibility for only the first incorrect insertion, and only the charge for the ad space in error. Please call 755-5440 immediately for prompt correc-tion and billing adjustments.CancellationsNormal advertising deadlines apply for cancellation.Billing InquiriesCall 755-5440. Should further information be required regarding payments or credit limits, your call will be trans-ferred to the accounting depart-ment. General Information In Print and Onlinewww.lakecityreporter.com Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$2504 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $.25One item per ad Under $100 Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 ServicesDISPLAY4 White's Trucking Services You call & We Haul! Fill Dirt, Lime Rock. AsphaltMillings, Granite, Road Rock.386-362-8763 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACase No. 1200504CABank of America, NAPlaintiffVs.ESTATE OF HEIDI HELENE KAMPAKAHEIDI KAMPAKAHEIDI H. KAMP, C/O SUSAN H. MARANGONI, PERSONALREP-RESENTATIVE, ALAN W. MCEL-ROY, PENNYC. ALLESANDRIAN/K/APENNYCATHERINE MCELROY, et alDefendantsNOTICE OF ACTIONTo the following Defendant:UNKNOWN HEIRS, SUCCES-SORS, ASSIGNS AND ALLPER-SONS, FIRMS OR ASSOCIA-TIONS CLAIMING RIGHT, TITLE OR INTERESTFROM OR UNDER HEIDI HELENE KAMPAKAHEI-DI KAMPAKAHEIDI H. KAMP, DECEASED232 SE BECKYTERRACELAKE CITY, FL32055UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ALAN WMCELROY232 SE BECKYTERRACELAKE CITY, FL32055UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ALAN WMCELROY5339 NE 58TH TERRACELAKE CITY, FL32543ALAN W. MCELROY232 SE BECKYTERRACELAKE CITY, FL32055ALAN WMCELROY5339 NE 58TH TERRACEHIGH SPRINGS, FL32543YOUR ARE NOTIFIED that an ac-tion for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property:LOT42 OF EASTSIDE VILLAGE, ASUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TOTHE PLATTHEREOF AS RE-CORDED IN PLATBOOK 5, PAGE(S) 115, OF PUBLIC RE-CORDS OF COLUMBIACOUN-TY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH AT1986 COUN DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME, ID NOS. CF284820258AAND CF284820258B, WHICH SAID MOBILE HOME IS ATTACHED TOAND IS APARTOF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PROPERTYA/K/A232 SE BECKYTERR, LAKE CITY, FL32055Has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Udren Law Offices, P.C., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 4651 Sheridan Street, Suite 460, Holly-wood, FL33021 on or before 1/3/13, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in the Lake City Reporter and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plain-tiff’s attorney or immediately there-after; otherwise a default will be en-tered against you for the relief de-manded in the complaint.You have 30 calendar days after the first publication of this Notice to file a written response to the attached complaint with the clerk of this court. Aphone call will not protect you. Your written response, includ-ing the case number given above and the names of the parties, must be filed if you want the court to hear your side of the case. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case, and your wages, mon-ey, and property may thereafter be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal re-quirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may call an attorney referral service or a legal aid office (listed in the phone book).This notice if provided pursuant to Administrative Order No. 2.065.If you are a person with a disability who requires accommodations in or-der to participate in a court proceed-ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of certain assis-tance. Individuals with a disability who require special accommodations in order to participate in a court pro-ceeding should contact the ADACo-ordinator, 173 NE Hernando Ave-nue, Room 408, Lake City, FL32055, (386) 719-7428, at least 7 days before your scheduled court ap-pearance, or immediately upon re-ceiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711.WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court this 3rd day of Dec., 2012.CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURTAs Clerk of the Court by:BY: /s/ B. ScippioAs Deputy ClerkSEAL05536196December 20, 27, 2012 BOARD OF COUNTYCOMMISSIONERS, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAINVITATION TO BIDCOLUMBIACOUNTYFIRE ASSESMENTPROGRAM UPDATEBID NO. 2012 – PThis is to advise that Columbia County is accepting bids to study and prepare an update to its fire assess-ment program. Bids will be accepted through 11:00 A. M. on January 15, 2013 in the Board of County Com-missioners Columbia County located at 135 NE Hernando Ave. Suite 203, Lake City, Florida or P. O. Box 1529, Lake City, Florida 32056Legal1529. Bid packages may be down-loaded from the County’s website: http://www.columbiacountyfla.com/PurchasingBids.aspColumbia County Board of County CommissionersStephen Bailey, Chairman05536421December 20, 27, 2012 IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUN-TY, FLORIDACASE NO.: 12-2010-CA-000806WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.,Plaintiff,vs.JOHN W. KEEN A/K/AJOHN WAYNE KEEN, et al, Defendant(s).NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANTTO CHAPTER 45NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN Pur-suant to a Final Judgment of Foreclo-sure dated August 9, 2012, and en-tered in Case No. 12-2010-CA-000806 of the Circuit Court of the Third Judicial Circuit in and for Co-lumbia County, Florida in which Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., is Plaintiff and John W. Keen a/k/a John Wayne Keen, Rita Jones Keen, are defend-ants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the third floor of the Columbia County Court-house at 173 N.E. Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055, Columbia County, Florida at 11:00 AM on the 9th day of January, 2013, the follow-ing described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure:LOT7, BLOCK WEST, COLUM-BIAEAST-WESTSUBDIVISION, ASUBDIVISION ACCORDING TOPLATTHEREOF RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 5, PAGE 53 AND 53A, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CO-LUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH AMOBILE HOME LOCATED THEREON AS APERMANENTFIXTURE AS AP-PURTENANCE THERETO, DE-SCRIBED AS 1997 HOMES OF MERITDOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME, MODEL28-15576 AND VIN. NUMBERS FLHMLCB118515612AAND FLHMLCB118515612BA/K/A4062 S.W. OLD WIRE RD., FT. WHITE, FL32038-6014Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-er than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.Dated in the Columbia county, Flori-da this 15th day of Nov., 2012.Clerk of the Circuit CourtColumbia County, FloridaBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkSEALIf you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceed-ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assis-tance. Persons with a disability who need any accommodation in order to participate should call Jacquetta Bradley, ADACoordinator, Third Judicial Circuit, P.O. Box 1569, Lake City, Florida, at (386) 719-7428 within two (2) working days of your receipt of this notice; if you are hearing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if your voice impaired, call (800) 955-8770. To file response please contact Columbia County Clerk of Court, 173 N.E. Hernando Ave., Lake City, FL32056-2069; Fax (386) 758-1337.05536185December 20, 27, 2012 STATE OFFLORIDADEPARTMENTOF ENVIRON-MENTALPROTECTIONNOTICE OF PROPOSED AGENCYACTIONThe Florida Department of Environ-mental Protection (FDEP) gives no-tice that it proposes to approve a No Further Action Proposal with Institu-tional Controls or with Engineering and Institutional Controls and issue a Site Rehabilitation Completion Or-der with controls for a contaminated site. G.W. Hunter, Inc. is seeking this order in reference to FDEPSite ID # 128842202, Chevron-G.W. Hunter #299, 4008 US Highway 90 West, Lake City, FL32055, and in-tends to restrict exposure to contami-nation in the follow manner: Are-strictive covenant that will impose the following controls on the restrict-ed property:1. Digging Restriction2. An Engineering Control Manage-ment Plan which requires the area of soil contamination to be permanently covered and maintained with an im-permeable material that prevents hu-man exposure and water infiltration.Complete copies of the No Further Action Proposal, the draft restrictive covenant, and the FDEP’s prelimina-ry evaluation are available for public inspection during normal business hours 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday, except legal holidays at FDEPNortheast District, 8800 Baymeadows Way West, Suite 100, Jacksonville, FL32256.Local governments with jurisdiction over the property subject to the Insti-tutional Control, real property own-er(s) of any property subject to the Institutional Control, and residents of any property subject to the Institu-tional Control have 30 days from publication of this notice to provide comments to the FDEP. Such com-ments must be sent to Lynal DeFal-co, FDEPNortheast District, 880 Baymeadows Way West, Suite 100, Jacksonville, FL32256 Email: Lynal.defalco@dep.state.fl.us05536412December 20, 2012 LegalSTATE OFFLORIDADEPARTMENTOF ENVIRON-MENTALPROTECTIONNOTICE OF PROPOSED AGENCYACTIONThe Florida Department of Environ-mental Protection (FDEP) gives no-tice that it proposes to approve a No Further Action Proposal with Institu-tional Controls or with Engineering and Institutional Controls and issue a Site Rehabilitation Completion Or-der with controls for a contaminated site. G.W. Hunter, Inc. is seeking this order in reference to FDEPSite ID # 128842202, Chevron-G.W. Hunter #299, 4008 US Highway 90 West, Lake City, FL32055, and in-tends to restrict exposure to contami-nation in the follow manner: Are-strictive covenant that will impose the following controls on the restrict-ed property:1. Digging Restriction2. An Engineering Control Manage-ment Plan which requires the area of soil contamination to be permanently covered and maintained with an im-permeable material that prevents hu-man exposure and water infiltration.Complete copies of the No Further Action Proposal, the draft restrictive covenant, and the FDEP’s prelimina-ry evaluation are available for public inspection during normal business hours 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday, except legal holidays at FDEPNortheast District, 8800 Baymeadows Way West, Suite 100, Jacksonville, FL32256.Local governments with jurisdiction over the property subject to the Insti-tutional Control, real property own-er(s) of any property subject to the Institutional Control, and residents of any property subject to the Institu-tional Control have 30 days from publication of this notice to provide comments to the FDEP. Such com-ments must be sent to Lynal DeFal-co, FDEPNortheast District, 880 Baymeadows Way West, Suite 100, Jacksonville, FL32256 Email: Lynal.defalco@dep.state.fl.us05536412December 20, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILACTIONCASE NO.: 12-2012-CA-000057JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NA-TIONALASSOCIATION,Plaintiff,vs.DELLAM. GILMORE, et al,Defendant(s).NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANTTO CHAPTER 45NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN Pur-suant to a Final Judgment of Foreclo-sure dated 12/5/2012, and entered in Case No. 12-2012-CA-000057 of the Circuit Court of the Third Judicial Circuit in and for Columbia County, Florida in which JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, is the Plaintiff and Della M. Gillmore, Jack D. Taylor, Jackie E. Taylor, Tenant #1 n/k/a Jonathan Nesbit, Tenant #2 n/k/a Carrie Nesbit, are defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bid-der for cash in/on the third floor of the Columbia County Courthouse at 173 N.E Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055, Columbia County, Florida at 11:00 AM on the 9th day of Jan., 2013, the following described property as set forth in Legalsaid Final Judgment of Foreclosure:APARCELOF LAND IN SEC-TION 12, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 15 EAST, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRI-BED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE ATTHE SE CORNER OF THE SW1/4 OF SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 15 EAST, CO-LUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN THENCE N. 00 DE-GREES 41 MINUTES 05 SEC-ONDS W., ALONG THE EASTLINE, OF SW1/4 OF SAID SEC-TION 12, 1323.97 FEET; THENCE CONTINUE N. 00 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 05 SECONDS W., STILLALONG SAID EASTLINE 662.00 FEET; THENCE S. 88 DE-GREES 49 MINUTES 53 SEC-ONDS W., 1324.32 FEET; THENCE CONTINUE S. 88 DE-GREES 49 MINUTES 53 SEC-ONDS W., 994.49 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE S. 88 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 53 SECONDS W., 330.30 FEET; THENCE N 00 DE-GREES 39 MINUTES 24 SEC-ONDS W., 661.49 FEET; THENCE N. 88 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 56 SECONDS E., 331.30 FEET; THENCE S. 00 DEGREES 34 MI-NUTES 13 SECONDS E., 661.40 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGIN-NING.TOGETHER WITH AN EASE-MENTFOR INGRESS AND EGRESS MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE ATTHE SE COR-NER OF THE SW1/4 OF SEC-TION 12, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 15 EAST, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN THENCE N. 00 DEGREES 41 MI-NUTES 05 SECONDS W., ALONG THE EASTLINE OF THE SW1/4 LegalOF SAID SECTION 12, 1323.97 FEET; THENCE CONTINUE N. 00 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 05 SEC-ONDS W., STILLALONG SAID EASTLINE, 632.00 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE N. 00 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 05 SECONDS W., 60 FEETTHENCE S. 88 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 53 SECONDS W., 2318.78 FEET; THENCE S. 00 DE-GREES 39 MINUTES 24 SEC-ONDS E., 60 FEET; THENCE N. 88 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 53 SEC-ONDS E., 2318.81 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING.TOGETHER WITH AMOBILE HOME AS APERMANENTFIX-TURE AND APPURTENANCE THERETO, DESCRIBED AS: A1996 SHOR TRIPLE-WIDE MO-BILE HOME BEARING IDENTIFI-CATION NUMBER(S) 6H6305501A, 6H6305501B, AND 6H6305501C AND TITLE NUM-BER(S) 0071955115, 0071955116 AND 0071955117,A/K/A579 SWGALLANTLAN, LAKE CITY, FL32024-3945Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-er than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.Dated in Columbia County, Florida this 6th day of Dec., 2012.Clerk of the Circuit CourtColumbia County, FloridaBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkSEALIf you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceed-ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assis-tance. Persons with a disability who need any accommodation in order to participate should call Jacquetta



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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE THURSDAY, DECEMBER 20, 2012 5A Dec. 21 Quilt raffleColumbia County Senior Services will raffle a sam-pler quilt to support the center. Tickets are $1 and the drawing will be today. See Carol for tickets. Dec. 22Filipino society dinnerThe Filipino American Cultural Society of Lake City will have a “Christmas Celebration Dinner and Dance” from 6 to 11 p.m. at the Epiphany Catholic Church Social Hall in Lake City. There will be holi-day entertainment, music, dancing and a cultural food buffet. Please bring a covered dish to share. Arrival, setup of buffet and social time will be from 6 to 6:30 p.m., dinner will be at 6:30. The event is free for FACS members. For non-members, cost is $10 per person. For more informa-tion contact, Bob Gavette at 965-5905.Toy drive, concertResurrection Praise Team will hold a toy drive and Christmas Praise Extravaganza from 4 to 6 p.m. at Niblack Elementary School. Bring unwrapped toys and enjoy praise danc-ing, singing and spoken words. Door prizes and raffles will be held.Praise breakfastNew Mount Zion AME Church, of Watertown, will have a Christmas Praise and Prayer Breakfast from 10 a.m. to noon. the meal will include grits, scram-bled eggs, sausage, salmon patties, toast, buscuit, juice and coffee. Cost is $7 per person. The Rev. Leroy Young, of Jacksonville, will speak on “The Real Meaning of Christmas.” For tickets or additional information, call The Rev. Charles young at (904) 713-7877, Curtis Jones at (386) 752-8179 or Evette Harris at (386) 752-4306. SHINE trainingSHINE (Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders) is seeking volunteers in Columbia, Suwannee, Hamilton and Lafayette counties. Free volunteer training is scheduled as fol-lows: orientation, Jan. 11, 1 to 3 p.m,; basic train-ing, Feb. 13-15, 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.; and mentoring, six sessions scheduled at volunteer’s convenience. All training will take place at Elder Options, 100 SW 75ht St. (Tower Road) in Gainesville. Registration is required by Dec. 28. Meals will be provided and mileage and, if need-ed, hotel accommoda-tions will be reimbursed. SHINE is a statewide volunteer-based program of the Florida Department of Elder Affairs, offering counseling and assistance to older residents with Medicare, Medicaid, long-term care planning, pre-scription drug assistance, supplemental insurance and Medicare fraud. For more information or to request a SHINE volun-teer application packet, call (352) 692-5264 or toll-free at (800) 963-5337.Dec. 23Puppet performanceFirst Presbyterian Church, 697 SW Baya Drive, invites the community to see Peter the Presbyterian and his family of puppets perform a skit during its worship service at 1030 a.m. For more information, call the church office at 752-0670.Candlelight serviceElim Baptist Church, 3435 SW Elim Church Road in Fort White, will hold a Christmas Candlelight Service at 6 p.m. The com-munity is invited. For more information, call (386) 497-1972.Youth Day eventBethesda Outreach Ministries of Alachua, 13205 NW 157th Ave. in Alachua, will hold a Youth Day to rally around the youth of our community. Services will be at 11 a.m. and 4 p.m. at the Civic Center in High Springs. A dinner will be served in between the ser-vices. For more informa-tion, call Elders Nyron or LaShandra Jenkins at (352) 339-4466.Dec. 24Christmas Eve serviceFirst Presbyterian Church, 697 SW Baya Drive, will hold its Christmas Eve candlelight service at 6:30 p.m. Special music, the Christmas message and the puppet ministry will be shared. For more informa-tion, call the church office at 752-0670.Chirstmas Eve serviceSt. James’ Episcopal Church, 2423 SW Bascom Norris Drive, will hold its Christmas Eve family ser-vice at 7 p.m. and a candle-light service at 11 p.m.Christmas Eve serviceSpirit of Christ Lutheran Church, 145 SW Sweetbreeze Drive (U.S. 90 1.5 miles west of Interstate 75), will hold its Christmas Eve service at 5 p.m. For more information, call 344-3364.Dec. 25Free dinnerSuwannee Valey Rescue Mission and Lad Soup Kitchen, 127 Escambia St. in Lake City, will serve its sixth annual Free Christmas Day Dinner. The menue includes turkey, ham, rice and gravy, col-lard greens, string beans, candied yams, dressing, desserts and iced tea. To donate food, money or time to the meal, call Timothy at (386) 758-2217.Dec. 31Retirement, investitureA retirement ceremony for Judge E. Vernon Davis and an investiture ceremo-ny for his son, Judge-elect Wesley R. Davis, will be at 1:30 p.m. in the Columbia County Courthouse, 173 NW Hernando Ave. A reception will follow. Jan. 2Olustee battle meetingThe Blue-Grey Army will meet at 5:30 p.m. to plan the Olustee Battle Festival. The meeting will be at the school district central building, room 153, 409 SW St. Johns St.Jan. 6Zuumba introductionA free introduction to Zumba class will be held from 3 to 4 p.m. at the Teen Town Recreation Building, 533 NW DeSoto St. For more information, contact Sarah Sandlin as (386) 758-0009 or visit “Lake City Zumba” on Facebook.Zumba weight lossThe Lake City Zumba Loser weight-loss contest will begin at 4 p.m. at the Teen Town Recreation Building, 533 NW DeSoto St. For more information, contact Sarah Sandlin as (386) 758-0009 or visit “Lake City Zumba” on Facebook.Jan. 8Medicare seminarLifestyle Enrichment Center is sponsoring a free Medicare seminar from 5 to 6 p.m. The semi-nar will be moderated by Irv Crowetz of C/C & Associates. Subjects to be covered include: what you need to know about Medicare, when to enroll, what’s covered and when a supplement is needed. Call 755-3476 ext. 107 to reserve a seat.Jan. 12Chili cook-offThe fourth annual Branford Chili Cook-off will be from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hatch Park on Craven Street in Branford. The evend will include a silent auction for adults and kids, door prizes, live music, an antique car show, moon walk, Home Depot Kids Workshop and a variety of homemade chili. Admission is $5 and includes all the chili you can eat. Proceeds will benefit Herry’s Kids Pediatric Services, a pro-gram of Hospice of the Nature Coast. To register to compete in the chili cook-off, call the hospice at (386) 755-7714 or vist online at www.hospiceofcit-rus.org.Jan. 15Pageant entriesToday is the deadline for contestants to enter the 2013 Olustee Festival Pageant. The pageant is open to girls ages 3 months to 20 years who live in or attend school in Baker, Columbia, Gilcrist, Hamilton, Union and Suwannee counties. Age divisions are 3 to 12 months, 13 to 23 months, 2 to 3 years, 4 to 6 years, 7 to 9 years, 10 to 12 years, 13 to 15 years and 16 to 20 years. Contestants may compete in beauty, sportswear, tal-ent and photogenic catego-ries. The pageand awards include educational schol-arships, trophies, crowns and banners. Each pageant contestant will receive a tiara. First-place winners will ride in the Olustee Festival parade. The pag-eant will be held Jan. 26 at the Columbia County Schools Administrative Complex. Applications may be obtained at the Cloumbia County Library, the Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of Commerce, Emily Taber Library, Suwannee Regional Library, Hamilton County Library or by contacting Elaine Owens at (386) 965-2787.OngoingFestival vendorsThe Blue-Grey Army is accepting applications from vendors wanting to take part in the 2013 Battle of Olustee Festival on Feb. 15 and 16 in Lake City. For more information, phone Phil Adler at (386) 438-3131, visit the festival web-site, www.olusteefestival.com, or email vendorinfo@olusteefestival.com. The deadline to apply is Feb. 8 and spaces are limited.Winter programThe Boys and Girls Club of Columbia County, on Jones Way in Lake City, is now accepting registra-tions for its winter pro-gram, which runs through March 1. The fee is $200, which includes transporta-tion from all elementary, middle and high schools. The club offers a variety of activities, including sports, arts and crafts, game room, livrary and special events. It also offers a homework program with tutorial help for children. A computer lab also is available. For more information, call the club at 752-4184.Woodturners ClubBell Woodturners Club meets the second Thursday of the month in the Bell com-munity Center, Bell Florida at 7 p.m.. Every meeting features a show and tell of members current projects. There is also a full demon-stration of a woodturning project by a club member. There are opportunities to take home project wood, tools and receive help from other turners. All experi-ence levels are welcome. For additional info contact Kent Harris at 365-7086.Photo clubLake City Photo Club meets every second Tuesday of each month from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Lifestyle Enrichment Center at Baya Ave. Share your photos and ideas with the group. Newcomers are welcome.Volunteers neededShands LakeShore Regional Medical Center Auxiliary is looking for volunteers to work a vari-ety of positions around the hospital. Volunteers are asked to work a four-hour shift once per week, but are welcome to work more often. Volunteers are need-ed to drive the shuttle car and help with jobs in the hospital. If you have some time to donate, come to the gift shop and pick up an application or call (386)292-8000, ext. 21216.Volunteers soughtUnited Way of Suwannee Valley is recruiting volun-teers who are willing to be called upon to staff the Columbia County Emergency Operations Center’s Information Center during disasters. These volunteers serve as the link between the coun-ty emergency management offices and the public when the EOC is activated. Call Jenn Sawyer, United Way of Suwannee Valley long-term recovery coordinator, at 752-5604, ext. 101. Rosa Mae Sheppard “A blooming bud, a blossom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yrone Anthony Cooper7\URQH$QWKRQ\&RRSHU)LHOG([HFXWLYH6XSHUYLVRUIRU$'3,QFDJHSDVVHGDZD\RQ0RQGD\'HFHPEHUDW6W/XNH7KHWoodlands +RVSLWDOWoodland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erome Brown Funeral Home +LJK6SULQJV)/Obituaries are paid advertise-ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporter’s classified department at 752-1293.5A White’s Trucking Services For more information or a quote please call 386-362-8763 or e-mail us at whitestruckingservice@gmail.com or visit our website at www.whitestruckingservice.weebly.comNeed somelthing hauled call us:Fill DirtLime RockAsphaltMillingsGraniteRoad RockMisc. Hauling to meet your needsSemi Services also availableYou Call & We Haul! OBITUARIES COMMUNITY CALENDAR Q To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr@lakecityreporter.com.



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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTHURSDAY, DECEMBER 20, 2012 5B Classified Department: 755-5440 2000 Lincoln TowncarMed. blue, leather, power seats & more. 147,400 miles. Excellent condition.$3,490 386-623-2848 LegalBradley, ADACoordinator, Third Judicial Circuit, P.O. Box 1569, Lake City, Florida, at (386) 719-7428 within two (2) working days of your receipt of this notice; if you are hearing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if your voice impaired, call (800) 955-8770. To file response please contact Columbia County Clerk of Court, 173 NE Hernando Ave., Lake City, FL32056-2069; Fax (386) 758-1337.05536387December 20, 27, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO. 12 177 CASUNSTATE FEDERALCREDITUNION,Plaintiff,vs.JAMES M. ODATO A/K/AJAMES M. ODATO, SR. AND DAWN R. ODATO,Defendants.NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALENotice is hereby given that the un-dersigned, Clerk of Circuit Court, Columbia County, Florida, will on the 1/9/2013, at 11:00 a.m., at the front door of the Columbia County Courthouse, 173 NE Hernando Ave-nue, Lake City, Florida, offer for sale and sell at public outcry, one by one, to the highest bidder for cash, the property located in Columbia Coun-ty, Florida, as follows: PARCELAApart of the S 1/2 of SW1/4 of Sec-tion 22, Township 6 south, Range 17 East, more particularly described as follows: Commence at the SWcor-ner of said Section 22 and run N 8806’30” E, along the south line thereof, 1,564.25 feet; thence N 141’58” W, 11.70 feet to the North right-of-way line of an existing County Graded Road; thence N 8732’44” E, along said North right-of-way line 85.25 feet; thence N 338’54” W, 333.34 feet for a POINTOF BEGINNING; thence S 8732’44” W, 646.40 feet to a point on the Easterly right-of-way line of U.S. No. 441; thence N 839’58” E, along said Easterly right-of-way line 386.90 feet to the intersection of the South right-of-way line of Club House Road; thence N 8838’51” E along said South right-of-way line 402.12 feet; thence N 8643’23” E, still along said South right-of-way line 100.75 feet; thence S 141’58” E, 56.57 feet; thence N 8812’58” E, 63.54 feet; thence S 338’54” E, 316.11 feet to the POINTOF BE-GINNING, Columbia County, Flori-da.PARCELBApart of the S 1/2 of SW1/4 of Sec-tion 22, Township 6 South, Range 17 East, more particularly described as follows: Commence at the SWcor-ner of said Section 22 and run N 8806'30” E, along the South line thereof 1,564.25 feet; thence N 141'58” W, 11.70 feet to the North right-of-way line of an existing County Graded Road; thence N 8732’44” E, along said North right-of-way line 85.25 feet; thence N 338'54” W, 649.45 feet for the POINTOF BEGINNING; thence S 8812’58” W, 63.54 feet, thence N 141’58” W, 56.57 feet to a Point on the South right-of-way line of Club House Road; thence N 7529’17” E, along said South right-of-way line 62.31 feet; thence S 338’54” E, 70.33 feet to the POINTOF BEGIN-NING Columbia County, Florida. Subject to Power Line Easements.pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on December 4, 2012, in the above-styled cause, pending in said Court.Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-er than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.P.DeWitt Cason, ClerkClerk of Circuit CourtBy:/s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkSEAL05536416December 20, 27, 2012 020Lost & Found 11/28/12 Horse found Mason City area. Call to identify. 727-686-7156 13 lbs gray, white & blk, Pappilin w/ big ears, & one blue eye. Last seen 12/14 in Fort white no collar, microchpped. Reward 497-1949 Cash Reward if returned w/ items inside. Lost Blk Brief zip case, Medical, Military, & Misc records inside. FOUND 100Job Opportunities05536269H&RBLOCK in Branford and Starke has immediate openings for experienced tax professionals. For more information please email a resume to bkoon@Hughes.net or fax a resume to our District Office at (352)493-7422. 05536389FANTASTIC OPPORTUNITY Guest Services Position Part/Full time with opportunity for advancement. MUST be a people person with great customer service skills, strong work ethic, DEPENDABLE good communication, sales skills, computer skills, and willingness to learn. MUST be a team player and able to work a flexible schedule including weekends & holidays. We offer Competitive Pay and Health Benefits. Hotel Experience Preferred but not required. Only those seeking long term employment apply in person at Comfort Suites 3690 WUS HWY90. Please do not call the hotel regarding your application. Mechanic needed at Fla.Rock & Tank Lines In White Springs. Diesel exprnc reqr'd in maintenance & repair of tractor trailers. 45-50hrs/wk Class A CDLlicense preferred. Excellent Benefits! email: mcomer@patriottrans.com or fax 904-858-9008 100Job Opportunities60 Temp Farm Workers needed 1/15/13 – 10/31/13. Wrkrs will perform a variety of duties associated with growing peaches and other vegetables. 3 months verifiable experience pruning commercial fruit bearing trees. Wrkrs may perform support duties such as operate farm equipment, packing and general field/ orchard maintenance. Pre-employment & random drug testing at the employer’s expense. Guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours. All tools, supplies, & equip provided at no cost. Free housing provided for non-commuting workers. Transportation & subsistence reimbursed to worker upon completion of 50% of contract, or earlier if appropriate. Pay rate is $9.39/hr or applicable piece rates depending on crop activity. Worksites in Chesterfield Co. SC. Applicants should report or send a resume to the nearest FLAgency of Workforce Innovation office or call (386) 755-9026 & reference job # 545418. McLeod Farms – McBee, SC Must have a minimum of 5 yrs Exp. selling HVAC Equipment. Excellent benefits &Great pay. Call Allen 386-628-1093 SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 Seeking a Phone Salesperson for a local mortgage company. Inbound & outbound calls. No experience is necessary. Must have happy, energetic personality. Email resume to: lakecityresume@yahoo.com Service Techs & Installers Must be EPA& NATE certified. Excellent benefits & great pay. Call Allen (386) 628-1093 120Medical EmploymentBusy Family Practice Office Seeks FTNursing Personnel Medical Office Exp Preferred Fax Resumes to 719-9494 GIEBEIG FAMILYMEDICINE P/THousekeeper Needed Occasional Nights And Weekends. Fax Resume to 386-487-1232 240Schools & Education05535484Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class12/24/2012• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-11/05/12• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies CKC American Bulldogs both a 1 yr old brother & sister, spayed and nuetered, shots, free to the right home. 386-935-4473 Free to the right home. Male approx 8 weeks old. Marble tabby. 386-466-7662 PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 430Garage Sales PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 440Miscellaneous M&M Fitness Closing Sale Cybex, Nautilus, and free weight Equipment, Treadmills, Elliptical, Stairmasters, and bikes. Aerobic Steps, mats, hand weights, etc. Office furniture, copiers, & more. Great for business or home. Must sell quick. Call for prices 752-1652 450Good Things to EatThe Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans 2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024 Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville 386-963-4138 or 961-1420 630Mobile Homes forRent2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $700. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 2 BR/1BA $475/mth. Located in center of Lake City Close to Everything !!! 305-984-5511 or 386-344-0830 3Br/2Ba Mod 1/2acre (nice subd) concrete drive, wrap around deck appl's,energysaver, &thermo's ready (386) 984-5341 $800 mo Mobile Homes for rent in White Springs & Ft. White. Contact 386-623-3404 Quiet Country Park 3br/2ba $525. Very clean NO PETS! References & Deposit required 386-758-2280 640Mobile Homes forSale1600 SQFT, 3/2 DWMH, close to town, country setting on 2 ac. Reduced to $49,000 (short sale) Poole Realty 362-4539. MLS 82068 2 MFG HOMES on 5 ACRES! Great for 2 families in Godbold Acres west of Lake City $79,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCY INC. 755-5110 #81421 2013 DOUBLEWIDE $33,995 inc. set-up, trim-out & A/C Call 386-288-8379. 3BR/2BA28X64 in a great location, a lot of upgrades, fireplace. Only $2,500 down $399 a month. Call Paula at 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com 4br 2b open/split floor plan MH w/wood flooring, newly painted, large stone fireplace. MLS 82326 Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $74,000 5 LIKENew Mobile Homes!!! For under $30,000. MUSTSEE Call John T. 386-752-1452 Bank owned, Cozy 1/1 home in Lake C community $55,000. MLS 81365 Poole Realty 362-4539. $55,000 BANK REPO 3BR/2BADoublewide ’09 Excellent condition. Only $999 down $377 a month. Call Paula 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com Breathtaking 80 ac horse ranch w/ 7700 sqft home, heated pool, stocked pond, workout facility MLS 82156 Poole Realty 362-4539. short sale $950,000 CLOSE TO VAMED CTR! 3BR/2BAw/beautiful interior, new CH&A$59,900 DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #81428 EASTSIDE VILLAGE 2BR/2BAw/lg kitchen, open floor plan $79,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #80972 Hardwood floors, formal dining room, great rm, f/p, double car garage. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 MLS 82374 $243,900 LIVE OAK! Cute home in city limits; 3BR/1BA& 1,294 SqFt $49,500 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #81410 MUSTSEE 2013 2x6 walls, R30 insulation, OSB wrap, house wrap, real wood cabinets, and thermal pain windows. Payment $399 per month call John T386-752-1452. Results Realty Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 4/2 on 10 Ac home features 2200 heated sqft. 10x20 frame shed. MLS# 76582 $67,500 WANTED…CASH PAID for your Mobile Home, Singlewide or Doublewide flood homes welcome. Call 386-288-8379 Palm Harbor Homes 4/2 From 499 Mo Loaded3/2 From 399 Mo Loaded Homes on Your Lot 0 Down 800-622-2832 WOODGATE VILLAGE Move-in ready! Open 3BR/2BA floor plan on nice shaded lot $49,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC 755-5110 #82259 WOODGATE VILLAGE Nice 3BR/2BADWMH w/fenced yd, workshop; $39,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCY, INC 755-5110 #79078 650Mobile Home & Land2/1 MH, completely remodeled. Custom Floors on 5 ac. w/ 2 stall horse barn. MLS # 79025 $49,900 Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Results Realty 2br/2ba on 3.51 ac, 1512 sqft DW perfect Rental, Lg deck, MLS # 82216 Results Realty Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 $49,900 FSBO 5 ac lot w/ 1995 refurb. MH. 66ft long w/ new roof & wheel chair ramp. $5,000 down Owner Fin. on Balance Approx 5 miles N. of LC. 386-752-4597 Great Value 24 acres, 3/2 DWMH, front porch, full length of MH, open floor plan. MLS 79000. Poole Realty Nelda Hatcher. 688-8067 Hallmark Real Estate $34,400. 3/2 MH in O’Brien. On 4 Ac. Case#091-374923 www.hudhomestore.com Robin Williams (386)365-2135 MLS 81700 Hallmark Real Estate Beautiful 4.38 Ac with 4/2 MH. Master has separate office/den area. Large living room with fireplace. Janet Creel (386)719-0382 MLS#82465 Hallmark Real Estate Beautiful Pasture, fenced for horses, well kept 3/2 M/H Great front & back porch to enjoy nature. Robin Williams (386)365-5146 MLS#80899 Hallmark Real Estate Just Reduced! Home & office over 1900sqft with glassed porch centrally located in town. Janet Creel (386)719-0382 MLS#81207 Hallmark Real Estate Live better for less! 3/2.5 Brick home on an acre. Inground Pool. F/p. Lrg oak trees. S. Columbia County. Ginger Parker(386)365-2135 MLS#81183 Hallmark Real Estate This is it! This 3/2 Home on a corner lot. Close to all amenities. Private fenced backyard. Paula Lawrence (386)623-1973 MLS#79943 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05536252$100 off December's rentMust be presented at the time of application. $89 Deposit Windsong Apts. 386-758-8455 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent2 bedroom / 1 Bath Apts for rent in Live Oak. Call for price. Contact 386-623-3404 & 386-362-9806 2br/1ba duplex NWGeorgia Ave. Renovated & energy efficient. Tile floors, W/D, $475/Mo. $300 Dep. 386-755-1937 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Amberwood Hills Apts. Private Patio area. Beautiful yard. Washer/dryer hkup. Free water & sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special. 386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com Brandywine & Branford Apartments Now Renting 1, 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-752-3033 W. Grandview Ave. Equal Housing Opportunity TDD Number 1-800-955-8771 BRANFORD VILLAS 386-935-2319 2br/1ba Apts. Now available.$570. mo. TDD number 1-800-955-8771 Equal Housing Opportunity Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2 mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet Friendly. Pool laundry & balcony. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A$530 month $530 deposit garbage included. No pets. 386-344-2170 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Greentree Townhouse Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free water & sewer. Balcony & patio. Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com Redwine Apartments Pets welcome. with 5 complexes, we have a home for you. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com Studio Cottage -$500 month $200 Security Deposit, Utilities included, in town, Near Post Office. Call Chris 386-365-2515 UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 Wayne ManorApts. Spacious 2bedroom washer/dryer. Behind Kens off Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 www .myflapts.com WindsorArms Apartments. Move in! 2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free 200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent3/2 in woodcrest lrg fenced yrd, beautiful neighborhood, 1st, last & deposit, references & credit check. 386-984-6796 3bdrm very spacious, 2ba, garage, CH/AFenced in backyard. $1,400 mth & $1,400 dep. Contact 386-344-1914 3br/1.5ba. Very clean, Brick great area w/bonus room. Carport, shed & Fenced (privacy) back yard. $825. mo $825. dep. Ref’s req’d. (941)920-4535 NICE 3/2 brick home w/garage in quiet neighborhood. 489 SWBrandy. $900 plus sec. dep. 386-438-4600 750Business & Office RentalsMedical, Retail and Professional Office space on East Baya near Old Country Club Rd. Call 386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622 (cell) Office or Retail Space. Many to choose from. Tom Eagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor 805Lots forSale 2 Ac lot in Timberlake S/D. $135,000 MLS # 79025 Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Results Realty 3 Acres in White Springs, Commercial usage, city sewer. Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS $175,000 MLS 82358 Beautiful log home located on 5 ac, well maintained, wrap around porch. MLS 75550 $189,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #80401 $60,000. Must be 55+ 130x750 right on Suwannee, Beautiful lot, minutes from Royal Springs, Denise Bose 752-5290 805Lots forSale Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #76668 $32,000 Must be 55+, Buildable lot for site built homes only. In Forest Country. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Great home, Emerald Lakes, well kept, split floor plan, oversized family room, MLS# 79733 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Missy Zecher 623-0237 $169,900 Great starter, corner lot, needs some TLC, close to town MLS 81784 $90,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 810Home forSale 3br/2ba plus office, 2103 heated sqft, wood floors, large patio MLS # 81984 Swift Creek Realty $229,900 (386) 496-0499 58 Ac, Suwannee County, 3br/2ba newly remodeled horse barns & tack.MLS 81002 Swift Creek Realty $650,000 (386) 496-0499 Access Realty Gorgeous views 3bd/3ba on Lake Montgomery. Elevator, fishing dock & jacuzzi. MLS 81438 $249,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access RealtySpacious 4 bd/3ba Cypress Lake w/ 3643 sqft 1.25 acres on lake. Vaulted ceilings. MLS 81314 $279,900. Patti Taylor386-623-6896 Access RealtyTwo story 1895 Victorian house w/ electrical upgrades throughout. double -deck porches, MLS 71594 $149,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Beautiful 2 story w/ upgrades, open kitchen, granite counter tops, great room w/ stone f/p. MLS 81994 Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $435,000 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Country Home, 3br 3 bath, spacious, close to Suwannee & Santa Fe River MLS 81775, $169,900 Elaine Tolar 755-6488 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty MLS 80175, 4br 3ba & 2.5 ba colonial, 3 fireplaces $315,000 Mary Brown Whitehurst. 965-0887 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty 3br 3ba home with a two story duplex. Owner Financing MLS 80915, Elaine Tolar 365-1548 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Building lots: May-Fair, Cannon Creek, Creek Run & Meadow View. Elaine Tolar 386-365-1548 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Home with 5+ ac 3b 2.5 ba, large kitchen covered deck MLS 81630 Elaine Tolar 365-1548 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty 230 Acres, Col. Co. Paved Rd. 752-4211 MLS 70453 Country home, wood burning f/p, granite counter tops, vaulted ceilings in living room. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 MLS 82022, $240,000 Custom home, located on 6.05 ac. Pecan grove w/ rolling hills in Equestrian Comm. Remax Professionals Missy Zecher 623-0237 $269,000 MLS 81075 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81959 Must be 55+, 2br/2ba, $79,900. Site Built Home w/eat in kitchen, laundry rm, scrn porch. Denise Bose @ 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81958-, $115,000. Must be 55+, 3br/2ba, Site Built w/ lots of room, split plan mstr suite, FL. Rm. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Hallmark Real Estate Brick Home on 6.3 acres 4bd 2.5ba with large 32X20 Deck & Gazebo. Solid wood cabinets Kay Priest(386)365-8888 MLS#82488 Hallmark Real Estate Short Sale Brick home corner lot 2600 SQFT, fenced back yard. Located minutes from town. Paula Lawrence (386)623-1973 MLS 82491 Spectacular 3br/2b home, great room French doors, 10 aces, w/ barn MLS 79593. Jo Lytte Remax 386-365-2821 $349,800 810Home forSale Ichetucknee River 3br/2ba + loft, 1350 sqft. Hardwood floors, f/p, granite counters Swift Creek Realty $399,000 (386) 496-0499 Just listed unique home with 2800 sqft of living space, located on 1.37 acres in Live Oak, MLS 82214, Poole Realty $67,500. 362-4539 Lake Front property w/ 137 ft frontage, eat-in kitchen, screened deck w/ view quality furnishings. MLS 81850 Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $119,000 Open floor plan, covered back patio. Lots of big windows, new carpet & paint, beautiful ceramic tile Century 21 Darby Rogers MLS 82078, 752-6575 Remax Jo Lytte 386-365-2821 Ichetucknee River front 4b/3.5b 2 fireplaces, 2 story home. MLS 81777 $559,000 Ultimate River Experience. Santa Fe River home 2br/2b, granite tops, wood burning heater & open great room. Too many extras to mention. Jo Lytte Remax MLS 81537 $339,000 820Farms & Acreage4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com Access Realty10 acre square tract, High & Dry, OF Avail. w/ 25% down. Convenient Location MLS 81258$39,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access Realty43.64 acres wooded acreage in N.Columbia County. Scenic & Private. MLS 74429 $89,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Owner financed land 1/2 to 10 acre lots. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 830Commercial Property260 S. Marion Ave. 2641 s.f of Office Space. Can be subdivided. $5-$7/sf. No CAM. Prorata for utilities. Call Mika (352) 359-604 Industrial warehouse7+ acres fenced 17,000 sq ft Barn $1,500 mo. TomEagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 950Cars forSale 2000 Lincoln Town Car; Med blue, leather, power seats & more. 147,400 miles, Exc condition. $3,490. 386-623-2848 755-5440Toplace your classified ad call



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By CURT ANDERSONAP Legal Affairs WriterMIAMI — The former caretaker of miss-ing Florida foster child Rilya Wilson confessed to smothering the girl with a pillow because the woman said the child was “evil” and had mental problems that would never be cured, a jailhouse informant testi-fied Wednesday. Robin Lunceford said 66year-old Geralyn Graham admitted to the killing while the two were in a holding cell alone together on Aug. 18, 2004. That was nearly four years after 4-year-old Rilya disappeared from the home Graham shared with her live-in female lover. Lunceford, who is testifying under a plea deal that spares her a life pris-on sentence, said Graham referred to Rilya as “it” and claimed that the girl did unusual or strange things such as smearing feces on the floor and rubbing her hand on men’s genitals. Lunceford said she and Graham became friends because they had adjoin-ing jail cells and traveled back and forth to court appearances together. “She said that Rilya was evil and a demon,” Lunceford testified. Graham reportedly told Lunceford, 50, she became increasingly frustrated by an inability to control Rilya and that the last straw came on Halloween 2000, when the girl refused to wear an angel costume in favor of a Cleopatra mask an older child had brought. “She was enraged. She said at that point she knew what she had to do. She couldn’t allow it to suf-fer like that. And that Cleopatra was evil and a slut,” Lunceford quoted Graham as saying. “Then she kind of whispered to me that she killed it, and I asked her how, and she said she smothered it with a pillow. I asked her twice. She said it was suffering and she couldn’t allow it to grow up and suf-fer like that,” Lunceford testified. Later, Lunceford said Graham told her the body was buried near a canal or lake because “water represented peace.” Rilya’s body has never been found. Lunceford’s testimony is critical to the state’s case because pros-ecutors have little physical evidence and no witness-es to any killing. Graham faces life in prison if con-victed of first-degree mur-der, kidnapping and child abuse charges. Rilya’s disappearance was not noticed by the state Department of Children and Families for some 15 months, trig-gering a statewide scan-dal that led to high-level resignations and reforms including improved moni-toring of foster children. Defense attorneys have also suggested that Rilya may have been sold and could be alive. Graham has insisted that Rilya was taken from her home by a DCF worker for a mental evalu-ation and never returned. Investigators, however, found nothing to sub-stantiate that story and Graham’s former com-panion Pamela Graham — they are not related — testified earlier that the tale was false. Pamela Graham and other witnesses have testi-fied that Geralyn Graham abused Rilya because she was disobedient, including tying her to her bed at night with plastic restraints and forcing her into dayslong timeouts in a laundry room. Those witnesses said they never saw the so-called evil and strange behavior that Graham dis-cussed. The defendant’s alleged confession came the same day homicide detectives met with Graham to tell her she was being charged with kidnapping and child abuse. Miami-Dade police Det. Chris Stroze said he urged Graham to come clean. “I told her that basically at this point we’re all look-ing for some closure on this. That this spirit, this child, needs a proper place to rest. I told her about proper burial, a ceremony, so that people could put this, part of this, to some kind of rest,” Stroze said. 6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE THURSDAY, DECEMBER 20, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04246A First Presbyterian Church, 497 SW Baya Dr., Lake City, Fla. • (386) 752-0670 HI, I AM PETER THE PRESBYTERIAN PUPPET!MY FRIENDS AND I WOULD SURE LIKE TO MEET YOU,WE WILL BE SHARING IN WORSHIP AT THE…FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Sunday, December 23rd at 10:30AM and Monday, December 24th at 6:30PM WE WILL BE LOOKING FOR YOU! BRING A FRIEND! Falling Creek Chapel will be having its annual Christmas Eve Service at 6:30PM. All are welcome. Commissioners to consider soccer group’s grant requestBy DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comColumbia County commissioners will choose committee members for the coming year at the last meet-ing of 2012 tonight at the Columbia County School Board Administration Complex at 7 p.m. There are two action items up for discussion at the meeting. The Columbia Youth Soccer Association is ask-ing for a grant of $13,000 to start a program for children with special needs. The TOP Soccer program is affiliated with Florida Youth Soccer and U.S. youth soccer. Scott Everett, president of the Columbia Youth Soccer Association, sent an email to the county commission that said there will be no registration fee for special needs children. The grant money would be used for special equip-ment, coaching, advertise-ments, administrative costs and accommodations to facilities that will be needed to enhance accessibility. In the consent agenda, a receipt for a previous audit of Columbia Youth Soccer Association is men-tioned, but in the docu-ment, completed by Powell & Jones, the accountants said an audit was impos-sible because Columbia Youth Soccer Association said their records were destroyed by vandalism. Powell and Jones also found multiple instances of improper filings of tax records with the Internal Revenue Service. Everett emailed County Manager Dale Williams detailing the steps the organization will take to fix the problems noted in the report. Also on the agenda is the revised job description for the assistant county man-ager. The other discussion item that the commission could act on is a safety code enforcement request to sell surplus property located at 188 SE Faye Lane. Also, Brian Kepner will conduct the public hearing for a zoning amendment to the land development regu-lations.From staff reportsLIVE OAK — A Live Oak teenager suffered serious injuries Wednesday morning when the sports utility vehi-cle he was driving struck a Suwannee County School District school bus carrying 48 children. Some of the children suffered minor injuries in the crash, reports said. The bus driver, Monica G. Pitts, 33, suffered minor injuries in the crash. The driver of the SUV, Brandon J. Cunningham, 18, Live Oak, was taken by helicopter to a Gainesville-area hospital for treatment of his injuries. The 48 students on the bus were taken to Shands Live Oak for precautionary measures. The children attended various schools and ranged in age from elementary to high school students. The wreck occurred 7:35 a.m. Wednesday on U.S. 90 at the inter-section of 74th Street in Suwannee County. According to Florida Highway Patrol reports, Cunningham was trav-eling in the eastbound lane of US 90 in a 2002 Chevrolet SUV as Pitts, who was driving a 2000 Blue Bird Suwannee County school bus, was stopped at the intersection of US 90 and 74th Street in the eastbound lane. Warning lights on the bus were activated as children were boarding. The children were all seated as Cunningham failed to slow and struck the rear of the bus with the front of the SUV. The children were carried to Shands Live Oak for precautionary measures and Pitts was taken to the same hospital with minor injuries. Cunningham was flown to Shands Gainesville with serious injuries. Cunningham was wearing a seatbelt at the time of the crash and his vehicle sustained an estimated $10,000 damage. The school bus sus-tained an estimated $25,000 damage. Charges in connection with the wreck are pending further investiga-tion, FHP reports said. ASSOCIATED PRESS FILEA wood stork prepares to land in a tree at Big Cypress National Preserve. Federal officials say the population o f wood storks has rebounded to the point where they can now be classified as ‘threatened,’ rather than ‘endangere d.’ Some environmentalists object to the proposed upgraded status, though, saying significant threats remain for the birds, particularly in the Everglades.Government says wood storks no longer endangeredBy MATT SEDENSKYAssociated PressWEST PALM BEACH — Federal officials say the population of wood storks has rebounded to the point that they can be classi-fied as threatened instead of endangered, but some environmentalists object to the proposed new status. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service plans to list its proposal for wood storks in the federal reg-istry next week, pointing to marked improvement since the species was listed as endangered in 1984. “This is a good day for the wood stork, and a good day for conservation,” Dan Ashe, director of the Fish and Wildlife Service, said in a written statement. “Thanks to great efforts from our conservation part-ners, the species is mak-ing real progress toward recovery.” Changing the storks’ status to threatened is largely a symbolic move. No con-servation or protection measures for the species would be removed. But opponents of the change, who will be able to offer comments and data to sup-port their case, say it is a step toward a full delist-ing. No one doubts that biologists’ counts of wood storks mean there has been a resurgence of the birds, which have white feathers and a long bill. In 1984, an estimated 4,742 pairs of the birds were counted; today the popula-tion range is believed to be 7,086 to 8,996 pairs. But much of the return of the birds has come outside South Florida, where they once thrived. “We’re not diminishing the gains that are made in north Florida, Georgia and South Carolina. Storks are nesting there in greater numbers than in the past,” said Jason Lauritsen, director of Audubon’s Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary. “But there is a reverse side to the coin, that they’re not mating in South Florida like they were in the past.” In 1984, more than 90 percent of the wood storks believed to be in the southeastern U.S. were in South Florida. That ratio has decreased as the birds migrated elsewhere. In the Corkscrew sanctuary out-side Naples, for example, Lauritsen said there were estimates that a colony of wood storks in the 1910s numbered 100,000 and that in the 1960s, there were believed to be around 12,000 of the birds. In five of the past six years, though, none have been recorded there. “The threats are still there. They’re not recover-ing in their historic range, they’re going somewhere else because they haven’t fixed it,” said Lauritsen, an animal ecologist. Teen hurt when SUV hits school bus Jail informant: Woman admitted killing her 4-year-old foster child ASSOCIATED PRESS Robin Lunceford testifies at the murder trial of Geralyn Gr aham on Wednesday in Miami. Robin Lunceford said Graham admitted to killing her foste r child while the two were in a holding cell alone together in Aug. 18, 2004. That was nearly four years after 4-year-old Rilya disappeared from the home Graham shared with her livein female lover.



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6B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 20, 2012 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 6BSports Jump G. W. HUNTER, INC. 1130 US Hwy 90 W (386) 752-5890 WE NOW HAVE ETHANOL FREE PLUS GASOLINE ONLY AT INTENDED USES: BOATS & WATERCRAFTS COLLECTABLE VEHICLES OFF-ROAD VEHICLES MOTORCYCLES SMALL ENGINES Lake City Reporter Located at SHANDS Lake City, Live Oak & Starke Womens Center of Florida ALL MAJOR INSURANCES ACCEPTED INCLUDING MEDICAID & MEDICARE FREE Pregnancy Ultrasound WITH THIS AD* *Insurance billing may occur if necessary. Some Restrictions apply. OBSTRETRICS & GYNECOLOGY PRENATAL CARE & ULTRASOUNDS STDS & HPV TESTING BIRTH CONTROL & INFERTILITY MENOPAUSE & INCONTINENCE WEIGHT LOSS & 4D ULTRASOUNDS BOTOX & LASER HAIR REMOVAL NO INSURANCE VISITS ASK ABOUT OUR $ 50 CHANDLER MOHAN, MD EMAD ATTA, MD NOW HIRING MID-LEVEL PROVIDERS 386-466-1106 SERVICES: OB-GYN www.myobcare.com NEW LOCATION Branford Crossing Across from the fairgrounds Patel 386-755-5571 T IMELESS M EMORIES 386-466-1888 Gator Jewelry Has Arrived Large Selection To Choose From GO GATORS Everything on Absolutely SW Deputy J. Davis Lane, Lake City 386.752.3910 or 800.597.3526 www.Morrells.com No Interest Financing up to Mo. 24 $ 1795 $ 499 $ 335 $ 410 $ 420 $ 1625 $ 565 $ 525 Plus Take an additional 20 % OFF All Clearance Merchandise SIGNINGS: 11 sign in 2012 Continued From Page 1B Legrees decision didnt come down to signing day as he committed to Kentucky during December, but signed on Feb. 1. It was one of those deci sions that came down to my gut, Legree said. But they werent the only signings of 2012. In all, 10 other players decided to play sports at the next level on scholarship. Jessica Keene began the signings on Jan. 31 by com mitting to play at St. Johns River State College. Keene said it was the way the Lady Tigers softball team worked that helped her move to the next level. We work harder every day, Keene said. It is tough, but it will be better for us in the long run. Three more signings would come before March as Jonathan Dupree, Xavier Wyche and JR Dixon all signed to play football at the next level. Dupree signed with Glenville State College in West Virginia while Wyche and Dixon made a package deal of former Indians to sign at Union College in Kentucky. Kellen Bailey signed a scholarship to pitch for Florida State College of Jacksonville as the only baseball scholarship to come out of Columbia on April 10. Nine days later, Michaela Burton joined Keene as a teammate at St. Johns River State College by signing with the Vikings on April 19. Columbia swimmer Heather Burns signed the only swimming scholarship in the county on April 29 when Burns committed to Florida Southern. Its a rarity for a swim ming scholarship to come out of the county, but assistant swimming coach Sabrina Sibbernsen offered up a reason Burns was able. It is said that the road to success is traveled by those who believe and Heather is headed to great things, Sibbernsen said. She is a determined, dedicated young lady and a joy to teach. Heather is a shin ing example of a Christian athlete. But Burns was far from the last player to come out of the county. Robby Howell, who pitched a no-hitter for the Indians baseball team in 2012, signed a scholarship to play for the University of Central Florida on Nov. 16. This is a very special moment for Fort White and our baseball program, head coach Mike Rizzi said at Howells signing. Actually, it is historical. Robby is our first D-1 signee and that is a pretty big deal. The number of players who go to D-1 is pretty small. Robby worked hard for this. It is a proud moment for his family and for me and for the entire community. Howell wasnt the only player to commit on Nov. 16, however, as Columbia quarterback Jayce Barber signed with Jacksonville State University as an early enrollee. I fell in love with them immediately, Barber said. I met their coach Jack Crow and he told me that I was their No. 1 target. I was told that theyre going to make the offense fit around my strengths. They want me to throw first, but still be able to run. And the future for sign ees looks just as bright in 2013. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Fort White High wide receiver AJ Legree smiles with family and friends after signing his letter of intent to play football for the University of Kentucky earlier this year.



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By MARIA CHENGAP Medical WriterLONDON — The fight against malaria is slowing down amid a dra-matic drop in efforts to reverse the epidemic, even as health officials insist they will try to meet their ide-alistic target of virtually eliminating deaths from the parasitic illness by the end of 2015. Malaria causes symptoms including fever, chills, and vomiting and can kill if not treated early. It mainly strikes children under 5, mostly in Africa. In 2010, about 145 million bed nets were given out across Africa to protect people against the mosquitoes that spread the killer disease. Last year, that fell to about 66 million. The num-ber of homes in Africa sprayed with pesticides has also stalled, as have attempts to treat pregnant women, one of the high-risk groups. While the malaria death rate has fallen by a quarter since 2000, offi-cials say further improvements are in jeopardy. “We must act with urgency and determination to keep this tremen-dous progress from slipping out of our grasp,” Dr. Margaret Chan, WHO’s director-general, wrote in a report released Monday. WHO blamed fall-ing donations and said the $2.3 bil-lion invested in malaria programs in 2011 was less than half of what was needed. The agency estimated there were about 219 million malaria cases and 660,000 deaths in 2010. But there were only solid data from countries representing just 15 percent of cases worldwide; the remaining cases and deaths were largely based on esti-mates and modeling. There was no solid information on countries with the biggest outbreaks, including the Democratic Republic of Congo and Nigeria, which account for about 40 percent of global malaria deaths. WHO acknowledged there was “a large degree of uncertainty” about its figures. “There are a lot of blind spots in surveillance,” said Jorgen Stassijns, a malaria adviser at Doctors Without Borders who was not connected to the report. He thought efforts against malaria might be sluggish because of the financial crisis or donors prioritiz-ing other health campaigns. “In a lot of our work in the field, we don’t see malaria going down,” Stassijns said, citing clinics in Congo, Niger and Sierra Leone. Some said the stalled progress wasn’t unexpected. “A disease is always more difficult to control at lower levels,” said Richard Tren, director of the non-profit Africa Fighting Malaria. He said past initiatives to reduce malaria rebounded after a few years and advised officials to use their funds more wisely. He said a $460 million program led by the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria should have been scrapped since there was no proof the initia-tive — which flooded private mar-kets with malaria drugs — actu-ally worked to reduce cases since there were no controls on who got the medicines. The program, the Affordable Medicines Facility for malaria, was renewed by the Global Fund last month. Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, DECEMBER 20, 2012 7A7AHEALTH FDA pushes for specialty pharmacy rulesBy MATTHEW PERRONEAP Health WriterSILVER SPRING, Md. — The head of the Food and Drug Administration renewed her push Wednesday for new laws to help police pharmacies like the one that triggered a deadly meningitis out-break, even as members of Congress expressed little interest in cooperating with the agency. FDA Commissioner Margaret Hamburg met with state pharmacy reg-ulators at a meeting to discuss the oversight of compounding pharma-cies like the New England Compounding Center, the company which triggered a now 3-month-old outbreak of rare fungal meningitis. Contaminated injections from the Framingham, Mass.-based company have been blamed for 39 deaths and 620 illnesses, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. About 370 of the cases were caused by a rare form of fungal menin-gitis, which causes inflam-mation on the lining of the brain and spinal cord. Hamburg said federal and state health inspec-tors need to work together more closely to oversee compounding pharmacies, which fall into a legal gray area between various state and federal laws. “We can do the most effective work when we do it in partnership,” Hamburg told the heads of 50 state pharmacy boards, gathered at the FDA’s headquarters. “This is a shared respon-sibility and the states are obviously on the front line of this issue.” Compounding pharmacies, which mix customized medications based on doc-tors’ prescriptions, have traditionally been overseen by state pharmacy boards, many which date back to the 19th century. The FDA mainly oversees multina-tional pharmaceutical man-ufacturing companies like Pfizer Inc. and Merck & Co. In the last two decades, the agency has begun scru-tinizing larger compound-ers like the NECC, which mass-produce thousands of vials of drugs that can be shipped nationwide. The FDA says new laws are needed to regulate these so-called “nontraditional” compounding pharmacies. Hamburg has proposed a new system under which nontraditional pharmacies would have to register with the FDA and undergo regular inspections, similar to pharmaceutical manufac-turers. Small compounding pharmacies would contin-ue to be regulated by state pharmacy boards. Hamburg told reporters at the meeting she was “guardedly optimistic” that Congress would pass the requested legislation. But House Republicans on Wednesday signaled little interest in moving ahead on the issue, accus-ing the agency of dragging its feet in cooperating with their investigation into FDA’s oversight of NECC. At a congressional hear-ing on the outbreak last month, many Republicans said the FDA had multiple chances to shut down the pharmacy and requested internal agency memos on the matter. “More than a month later, the FDA still has not pro-duced its internal commu-nications and documents related to NECC,” said Rep. Fred Upton, R-Mich., who chairs the House Energy and Commerce Committee. “Without this information, we are unable to identify any possible weaknesses and as a result, the neces-sary corrections.” An agency spokeswoman said the FDA is working to respond to the committee, and has turned over nearly 4,000 pages of documents to congressional lawmak-ers. While the FDA’s proposal has idled in Congress it has also attracted criti-cism from consumer safety advocates — who typically favor more regulation. The health safety group Public Citizen argued that the FDA already has the authority to shut down operations like the NECC, since the pharmacy had clearly crossed the line from mixing prescriptions to manufacturing drugs. In a letter released Tuesday, the group said that the new laws sought by the FDA would actually do more harm by legitimizing the activities of rogue pharma-cies like the NECC. “This proposal, if implemented, would validate the FDA’s current lax enforcement practices for drug manufacturing con-ducted under the guise of pharmacy compound-ing,” the group states in a letter to Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius. Also on Wednesday, health officials released new details about the out-break investigation. In an article published by the New England Journal of Medicine, officials dis-cussed how illnesses were tied to three lots of the ste-roid — methylprednisolone acetate — made at New England Compounding. The first lot was made in May and included about 6,500 vials. A second, of nearly 6,300 was, produced in June. The third, of 4,900 vials, was made in August. Well over half of the cases of meningitis and other fun-gal infections were tied to the June lot, investigators said in the article. The same finding applied to deaths, according to addi-tional information released this week by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Nearly two-thirds of the deaths were in people who received shots from the June lot. It’s not clear why deaths and illnesses were so much more common in patients ASSOCIATED PRESSDennis O’Brien, of Nashville, Tenn., rubs his head while he and his wife, Kaye O’Brien, contemplate both the medical and legal fallout of the nation wide fungal meningitis outbreak. Dennis O’Brien contracted fungal meningitis after receivi ng a series of steroid injections made by a Massachusetts pharmacy that has been linked to the o utbreak. Congress shows little interest despite outbreak. WHO: Malaria progress falters By HOPE YENAssociated PressWASHINGTON — Teenagers’ perception of the dangers of marijuana has fallen to the lowest level in more than 20 years, a new study says, prompting federal researchers to warn that already high use of the drug could increase as more states move to legal-ize it. The annual survey released Wednesday by the National Institutes of Health found that only 41.7 percent of eighth graders believe that occasional use of marijuana is harmful, while 66.9 percent regard it as dangerous when used regularly. Both rates are the lowest since 1991, when the government first began tracking this age group. Teens’ perception of marijuana risks diminished even more as they got older. About 20.6 percent of 12th graders said that occa-sional use of pot is harm-ful. Roughly 44.1 percent believed that its regular use was detrimental, the lowest rate since 1979. The government-sponsored study said teens’ dwindling concerns about the dangers of marijuana, despite the risks, “can signal future increases in use.” “We are increasingly concerned that regular or daily use of marijuana is robbing many young people of their potential to achieve and excel in school or other aspects of life,” said Dr. Nora D. Volkow, director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, which is part of NIH. She said teens are influenced by whether a drug is legal in some form when deciding to try it recreationally, so in states where marijuana is sanc-tioned, “the deterrent is no longer present.” Volkow cited recently published research show-ing that people who used marijuana heavily before age 18 had impaired men-tal abilities even after they quit using the drug. Those who used cannabis heavily in their teens and into their adulthood showed a signifi-cant drop in IQ between the ages of 13 and 38, accord-ing to the studies. “Marijuana use that begins in adolescence increases the risk they will become addicted to the drug,” she said. The findings come after Washington state and Colorado voted last month to legalize marijuana and regulate its recreational use, boosted by the strong support of younger voters. While the new laws apply only to adults over 21, the broader effort by states to decriminalize pot use and push the drug toward pub-lic legitimacy could confuse the picture for teens. President Barack Obama said last week that the fed-eral government won’t go after pot users in Colorado and Washington state who are legal under their state laws, even though federal law officially bans mari-juana possession. Eighteen states and the District of Columbia also have laws in place to regulate the medi-cal use of marijuana. “Now more than ever we need parents and other adult influencers to step up and have direct conversa-tions with young people about the importance of making healthy decisions,” said White House drug czar Gil Kerlikowske on Wednesday. According to the federal survey, marijuana use among teenagers remained ASSOCIATED PRESSA teenager relights a partially smoked marijuana cigarette. Teens’ views on dangers of pot fall to 20-year lowASSOCIATED PRESSA municipal employee in Delhi, India, fumigates a neighb orhood to kill malariacarrying mosquitoes. The fight against malaria is slowing down with a dramatic drop in the number of protective bednets distributed last y ear, even as health officials insist they will try to meet their ambitious target of eliminating deaths from the parasitic disease by the end of 2015. POT continued on 8A FDA continued on 8A



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8A LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, DECEMBER 20, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 8AHealth Accepting New Patients Medicare, Blue Cross and most insurance plans accepted, worker compensation Specializing in adult medical care including: Primary Care High Blood Pressure Heart Disease Lung Disease Gastrointestinal High Cholesterol Diabetes Headache Evaluation and Treatment Arthritis Low Back Problems Evaluation and Treatment Optifast Weight Loss System Full Dizziness, vertigo and balance diagnosis and treatment Womens Health Allergy Testing & Treatment Accepting New Patients SOUTHERN INTERNAL MEDICINE Located in the Lake City Mediplex Building 404 N.W. Hall of Fame Drive, Lake City, FL Visit our website at www.SouthernInternalMedicineLC.com 386-719-2540 Allison B. Baris, ARNP Stephanie K. Finnell, ARNP Stefanie Jackson, ARNP New Patients New Patients INTERNAL MEDICINE Dr. Guy S. Strauss, D.O.,F.A.C.O.I 9/11 cancer study wont settle debate By LINDSEY TANNER AP Medical Writer CHICAGO The most com prehensive study of potential World Trade Center-related can cers raises more questions than it answers and wont end a debate over whether the attacks were really a cause. The study suggests possible links with prostate, thyroid and a type of blood cancer among rescue and recovery workers exposed to toxic debris from the terrorist attacks. But there were few total cancers and even the study leaders say the results should be interpreted with cau tion. The study involved nearly 56,000 people enrolled in a reg istry set up to monitor health effects from those exposed to the aftermath of the trade center attacks. Most participants vol unteered for enrollment, which could skew the results if people who already had symptoms were more likely to enroll than health ier people. Cancers diagnosed through 2008 were included in the study, but thats just seven years after the 2001 attacks, and cancer often takes longer to develop. People diagnosed with cancer before the attacks were excluded from the study. Cancer rates were compared with those in the general New York state population. But the researchers had no data on wheth er people in the study had risk fac tors for getting cancer, including a strong family history, or if they had existing cancer that wasnt detected until after the disaster. Participants are being monitored for health issues and may have gotten more cancer screening than other people, which also could skew the results. The increased risks were seen only in rescue and recovery work ers, who likely had more direct, sustained contact with potential cancer-causing substances in the dust, smoke and debris from the attacks. But cancers werent more common in workers who had the most exposure a find ing that would seem to contradict the theory that contact was the cause. The study comes just a few months after the federal govern ment added dozens of types of cancer to a list of illnesses related to the trade center attacks that will be covered by a program to pay for health coverage. The study results wont settle the question because its still too early, said Dr. Thomas Farley, New York Citys health commis sioner. People are very, very interested in this topic and we thought it was important to get the data out that we have even though it is early. Marijo Russell OGrady, dean of students at Pace Universitys New York City campus, was at her office near the trade cen ter during the attacks. She also lives nearby, and said she worries about how exposure to choking dust, ash and an overwhelming burnt plastic smell might affect her family, including her then 1 1/2 year-old son. They are all enrolled in the health registry. Cancer is her greatest con cern and its always present in the back of my mind, she said. Researchers from the citys health department led the study, which was partly paid for by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. NIOSH spokesman Fred Blosser said the agency welcomes the results and that longer follow-up is needed to examine risks for cancers with that take a long time to develop. The study appears in Wednesdays Journal of the American Medical Association. ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE Rescue workers examine the site of the Sept. 11, 2001, World Trade Center terrorist attacks in New York just days after the attacks. The most comprehensive study of potential World Trade Center-related cancers raises more questions than it answers and wont end a debate over whether the attacks were really a cause. stuck at high levels in 2012. Roughly 6.5 percent of 12th graders smoked mari juana daily, up from 5.1 percent in 2007. Nearly 23 percent of the high-school seniors said they smoked the drug in the month prior to the sur vey, while 36.4 percent used it in the past year. About 45.2 percent reported they had tried marijuana at least once in their lifetime. Daily marijuana use by 10th graders climbed from 2.8 percent to 3.5 percent, and for eighth-grade stu dents it edged up from 0.8 percent to 1.1 percent. On other topics the sur vey found: Use of illicit drugs other than marijuana was at a low for eighth-, 10thand 12th-grade students. In the past year, about 1.3 percent of 12th graders used bath salts, a new synthetic drug which mim ics the effect of cocaine. In terms of prescrip tion drug abuse, about 7.6 percent of 12th grad ers in the past year used Adderall, a stimulant pre scribed to treat ADHD. Thats up from 5.4 percent in 2009, coinciding with a decline in teens percep tions of the harm in using the drug. Teen abuse of over-the-counter cough and cold medicines con taining dextromethorphan held steady. Reported alcohol use continued to steadily decline, falling to the low est level on record. The survey, conduct ed by the University of Michigan for NIH, covered more than 45,000 students in the eighth, 10th and 12th grades in 395 schools. POT: Teens more receptive to drug Continued From Page 7A who got the June doses, said Dr. Benjamin Park, head of the CDC team that investi gates fungal diseases. The CDC said the first death from the outbreak occurred in Florida in July. The 38 other known deaths occurred in September or afterward, including two this month. Things could have been much worse. In some earlier fungal meningitis outbreaks, as many as 40 percent of the people who grew sick ultimately died. In this outbreak, 6 percent died. CDC officials believe some lives were probably saved because nearly every one who got the tainted were notified quickly. FDA: Still waiting prevention power Continued From Page 7A