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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
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Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:01981

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:01981

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text

PAGE 1

By DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comS ometimes all it takes is a little dis-traction, and then the healing can start. A local nonprofit organization, Gentle Carousel Miniature Therapy Horses, plans to take its horses on the road, in hopes of putting smiles on the faces of the broken-hearted survivors of the tragedy in Newtown, Conn. Debbie Garcia-Bengochea, owner of Gentle Carousel with her husband Jorge, said a family of one of the victims contacted her about taking their horses there. She said she plans to go. “You can’t take some of the conversations we’ve had with these families and not go,” she said. “We were surprised to get the call, but some things you just don’t say no to.” Before the school shooting, a private school in Connecticut had sent a donation to the organization. She said those funds will go toward the cost of the trip. Her goal is to leave at the end of next week after all the media attention dies down and the funerals are over. Gentle Carousel has an all-volunteer staff, and they plan on taking five volunteers. Garcia-Bengochea will be one of the five. She said that Magic, the most famous therapy horse on the farm, will go. Aladdin and Hamlet, two of the other horses, also will travel to Connecticut. The organization doesn’t have the equipment or the funds to make the trip. Although Gentle Carousel has horse trailers for short trips, the long trip, combined with the frigid temperatures, has Garcia-Bengochea looking for a van and some gas cards to transport three or four of the little horses. On Monday, the Lake City City Council donated $500 to the organization. Magic the Miniature Mare was named one of the top 10 heroic animals by Time magazine in 2011. She seems to always know where she’s needed, Garcia-Bengochea said. One time, Magic went to visit an assistedliving facility. One of the patients who lived there hadn’t spoken in three years. Opinion ................ 4APeople.................. 2AObituaries .............. 5A Advice & Comics ......... 4B Puzzles ................. 2B TODAY IN PEOPLE NBC crew escapes. 75 46 Sunny WEATHER, 2A Lake City ReporterWEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2012 | YOUR COMMUNI TY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | 75¢ LAKECITYREPORTER.COM CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 138, No. 231 1A COMING THURSDAY Local news roundup. We’ll have a role in the healing SANDY HOOK TRAGEDY FILEDebbie Garcia-Bengochea watches as Travis Jaffe plants a kiss on Magic, of Gentle Carousel Miniature Horses. Local therapy horses invited to Newtown, Conn. Miniature animals will comfort the survivors ofDec. 14 school shooting.COURTESY CCSOLake City Firefighters clean debris and check a Columbi a County sheriff’s cruiser Tuesday morning after the vehicle was involved in a cr ash at the intersection of Marion Street and Baya Avenue. HORSES continued on 3A Deputy hurt in crashFrom staff reportsA Columbia County sheriff’s deputy suffered minor injuries Tuesday morning when his patrol car was struck by another vehicle as he trav-eled through an intersection after the light had changed. Deputy David W. Milligan, 55, of Lake City, was hurt when his patrol cruiser was struck by a vehicle driv-en by Mariam M. Darwiche, also of Lake City. The crash occurred about 11:30 a.m. at the intersection of Marion Street and Baya Avenue.According to Florida Highway Patrol reports, Milligan was in a 2007 Crown Victoria, a marked Columbia County sheriff’s unit, traveling east on Baya Avenue in the inside lane. Darwiche, 30, was driving a 2008 DEPUTY continued on 3A CRIME Students return toclass inNewtown By DAVID KLEPPER and MICHAEL MELIAAssociated PressNEWTOWN, Conn. — Newtown returned its stu-dents to their classrooms Tuesday for the first time since last week’s massacre and faced the agonizing task of laying others to rest, as this grieving town wrestled with the same issues gripping the country: violence, gun control and finding a way forward. Funerals were held for two more of the tiny fallen, a 6-year-old boy and a 6-year-old girl, the latest in a long, almost unbearable procession of grief. A total of 26 people were gunned down at Sandy Hook Elementary School in one of the worst mass shoot-ings in U.S history. The gun-man also killed his mother in her home, before committing suicide. The resumption of classes at all Newtown’s schools except Sandy Hook brought a return of familiar routines, something students seemed to welcome as they arrived aboard buses festooned with large green-and-white ribbons — the colors of the stricken elementary school. “We’re going to be able to comfort each other and try and help each other get through this, because that’s the only way we’re going to do it,” said 17-year-old P.J. Hickey, a senior at Newtown High School. “Nobody can do this alone.” Still, he noted: “There’s going to be no joy in school. It really doesn’t feel like Christmas anymore.” At St. Rose of Lima Catholic Church in Newtown, back-to-back funerals were held for first-graders James Mattioli and Jessica Rekos, the first of eight to be held in the coming days at the church. As mourners gathered outside, a motorcade led by police motorcycles arrived for the funeral of little James, who especially loved recess and math, and who was described by his family as a “numbers guy” who couldn’t wait until he was old enough to order a foot-long Subway sandwich. Traffic in front of the church slowed to a crawl as police directed vehicles into the church parking lot. At one point, a school bus carrying elementary students got stuck in traffic, and the children, pressing their faces into the windows, sadly watched as the mourners assembled. Inside the church, James’ mother stood and remem-bered her son. “It was very somber, it was very sad, it was very mov-ing,” said Clare Savarese, who taught the boy in pre-school and recalled him as “a lovely little boy. A sweet little angel.” The service had not yet concluded when mourners began arriving for the funeral of Jessica, who loved horses and was counting the years until she turned 10, when her fam-ily had promised her a horse of her own. For Christmas, she had asked Santa for new cowgirl boots and hat. Except at Sandy Hook Elementary, site of melee. NEWTOWN continued on 3AMan tosses desk, threatens deputyBy DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comA drunk man threw a desk off the balcony of the Budget Inn and threatened Columbia County deputies with a ham-mer when they were called to the scene, according to an arrest report from the sheriff’s office. Jason Martin Strickland, 36, faces charges of criminal mischief (damage to property valued between $200 to $1,000) and felony charges of aggravated assault with a weapon with-out intent to kill and resist-ing an officer with violence. Deputy Will Porter responded to a call on Sunday that Strickland was drunk and throwing furniture off the balcony. The caller said this an ongoing problem, according to the arrest report. When Porter arrived at the Budget Inn, Daniel Murrill told Porter that Strickland had just thrown a desk that belongs to the hotel off of the balcony, and that Strickland was in room 235, according to the arrest report. As Porter approached the door of room 235, he looked into the window and could see Strickland sitting on the bed. Porter knocked and announced himself as a deputy sheriff, according to the report. Porter saw Strickland go to the back of the room and “arm himself with a ham-mer.” Porter told bystanders to get back. According to the report, Strickland walked out of the room with the hammer in THREAT continued on 3A Strickland



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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Wednesday, December 19, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS BRIEFS GAMES Thursday Q Columbia High boys soccer vs. Eastside High, 6 p.m. Friday Q Columbia High wrestling in Beast of the Beach at Fort Walton Beach High, 3 p.m. CST Q Fort White High girls basketball vs. Williston High, 6 p.m. Q Columbia High girls soccer vs. Suwannee High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Q Columbia High boys basketball at St. Augustine High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Saturday Q Columbia High wrestling in Beast of the Beach at Fort Walton Beach High, 9 a.m. CST Q Columbia High basketball vs. Hamilton County High, 7:30 p.m. (girls-6) BOYS CLUB Registration for basketball league The Boys Club of Columbia County is taking registration for its basketball program. Three leagues are offered: Training for ages 6-7-8; Jr. Varsity for ages 8-9-10; Varsity for ages 11-12-13-14. Practices are twice weekly and games are played on Saturday, with the exception of the Training League. Cost is $45. For details, call the club at 752-4184. WOLVES BASKETBALL Breakfast at Richardson CC The Columbia County Recreation Department and Richardson Middle School is sponsoring a pancake breakfast at the Richardson Community Center cafeteria from 7-11:30 a.m. Jan. 12. The menu will consist of pancakes, Nettles sausage, eggs and orange juice. Tickets are $5 and may be purchased at Richardson Middle School or the Columbia County Recreation Department. Proceeds benefit the boys basketball programs. For details, call Mario Coppock at 754-7095. ADULT SOFTBALL Winter league planned in 2013 An adult softball winter league is planned to begin January 21. Women, men and co-ed leagues will be offered. Registration deadline is Jan. 11. For details, call Casandra Wheeler at 365-2168. ADULT BASKETBALL Charity games for USSSA youth Richardson Community Center/Annie Mattox North, Inc., is sponsoring charity basketball games at Lake City Middle School gym Jan. 5. The games feature adult women and men teams — Live Oak vs. Lake City. Game times are 6 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Admission is $5, with proceeds going to USSSA youth basketball. For details, call Nicole Smith at 754-7095.Q From staff reports A magic number JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Dana Roberts, 17, does the clean and je rk during a weightlifting meet against Baker County on Thu rsday. Lady Tigers defeat Union CountyFrom staff reportsColumbia High’s weightlifting team found the magic number in recent home wins over Suwannee High and Union County High. The Lady Tigers beat Suwannee, 49-39, on Monday, after beat-ing Union County, 49-21, on Thursday. The meets ended the 2012 portion of the season. Next up is the sub-sectional meet at Godby High on Jan. 9. Columbia’s points come from seven weight class winners: Q 110 pounds — Kayla Carman, 95 bench press-110 clean and jerk-205 total vs. Union County; 100-105-205 vs. Suwannee; Q 129 pounds — Charlie Watson, 105-115-220 vs. Union County; 110-115-225 vs. Suwannee; Q 139 pounds — Lindsay Lee, 100-110-210 vs. Union County; 100-110-210 vs. Suwannee; Q 169 pounds — Jordan Parks, 100-115-215 vs. Union County; 105-125-230 vs. Suwannee; Q 183 pounds — Briana Pope, 105-105-210 vs. Union County; 105-110-225 vs. Suwannee; Q 199 pounds — Glendasha Johnson, 105-120-225 vs. Union County; 110-125-235 vs. Suwannee; Q Unlimited — Dana Roberts, 160-150-310 vs. Union County; 170-150-320 vs. Suwannee. Suwannee’s winners were Kierra Cherry (95-95-190 at 119 pounds) and Logan Boss (95-135-230 at 154 pounds). Union County’s winners were Brittany Garylord (70-55-125 at 101 pounds), Marcia Fletcher (160-115-285 at 119 pounds) and Jessica Brown (150-125-275 at 154 pounds). Final stretch before breakFrom staff reportsColumbia High’s girls basketball team snapped a three-game slide with a 38-36 home win over Union County High on Monday. It wasn’t easy. The Lady Tigers trailed 26-15 at the half. “I’m proud of the girls,” coach David Tompkins said. “They could have eas-ily given up at halftime. We finally played good team defense and held Union County to two points in the fourth quarter.” Justice Campbell led Columbia with 10 points, followed by Marnae Gaskins with nine points, Lona Wilson with eight points, Stephanie Silva and Pashen Williams with four points apiece, and Antyria Caldwell with three points. Columbia (4-7, 0-3) wraps up pre-Christmas play against Hamilton County High at home on Saturday. The boys and girls varsities and junior varsities will play four games, beginning with the girls JV at 3 p.m.Lady Indians basketballKasha Cook scored 13 points and pulled down 21 rebounds to lead Fort White High’s girls basketball team to its first District 5-4A win. The Lady Indians blasted host Interlachen High 65-33 on Friday. Shatasha Robinson poured in 28 points that included three treys. Cenise Armstrong scored 15 points and had 14 rebounds. Khadijah Ingram scored four points, with two points apiece from Rykia Jackson and Desma Blake and a free throw from Hailey Shook. Fort White (5-5, 14) completes its first trip through the district compe-tition when Williston High visits for a 6 p.m. game on Friday.Columbia soccerColumbia’s boys soccer team ran into The Bolles School buzzsaw, losing 5-0 at the Jacksonville school on Monday. “They are a very formidable opponent,” coach Trevor Tyler said. “I am proud of the way we han-dled ourselves.” Columbia (8-5-3, 1-4-3) hosts Eastside High at 6 p.m. Thursday in the final match before Christmas break.Fort White soccerFort White’s boys soccer team lost 8-0 at Gainesville High on Dec. 11. It was the final match for the boys before Christmas break. The Indians lost 6-1 at Keystone Heights High on Dec. 6. Anthony Gonzalez scored the goal with an assist by Matt Otto. Lady Tigers knock off Union County on Monday JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Akiria Richburg (33) win a rebound against Wolfson High’s Courtney Crawford (23) during a game on Thursday.



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CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, pleas e call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Q Country singer Little Jimmy Dickens is 92.Q Actress Cicely Tyson is 79. Q Rhythm-and-blues singermusician Maurice White (Earth, Wind and Fire) is 71. Q South Korean President Lee Myung-bak is 71. Q Actress Elaine Joyce is 69. Actor Tim Reid is 68. Q Paleontologist Richard E. Leakey is 68. Q Rock singer Alvin Lee (Ten Years After) is 68. Q Musician John McEuen is 67. Q Singer Janie Fricke is 65. Jazz musician Lenny White is 63. Q Actor Mike Lookinland is 52.Q Actress Jennifer Beals is 49. Q Actor Scott Cohen is 48. AROUND FLORIDA New license plate design revealed TALLAHASSEE — Floridians who voted in an online poll favor a new license plate design that features an orange forming the “O” in Florida. State motor vehicle officials announced the win-ning design on Tuesday. The body of the flat tag is white with black num-bers. The word “Florida” is in white lettering on a green stripe across the top. Another green stripe at the bottom has the words “Sunshine State.” The design, however, still needs approval from Gov. Rick Scott and the Florida Cabinet before it can go into production. The department wants to replace existing plates that are difficult for red light and toll booth camer-as to read. That’s because they have raised numbers and an image of oranges and orange blossoms in the middle of each tag.Man pleads not guilty in shooting JACKSONVILLE — A Florida man charged with first-degree murder in the death of a teenager follow-ing an argument over loud music coming from the teen’s car has pleaded not guilty. News outlets reported that 46-year-old Michael David Dunn entered his plea Monday. A grand jury indicted Dunn last week, but the state attorney’s office said it won’t be seek-ing the death penalty. Dunn initially was charged with second-degree murder in the Nov. 23 shooting death of 17-year-old Jordan Davis. Officials said Dunn parked at a Jacksonville gas station next to the vehicle where Davis was sitting with three other teens. Dunn complained about the loud music and they started arguing. Dunn told police he thought he saw a gun and fired eight or nine shots into the vehicle. Grand jurors also added three counts of attempted murder.State universities may expand online DAVIE — The board that oversees Florida’s public universities is examining ways to expand online learning. The Board of Governors Strategic Planning Committee focused on four options during a meeting Monday in Davie. The panel directed State University System staffers to do further research on combining two options. Those are collaboration among multiple universi-ties and letting one school take the lead in develop-ing online courses for the system. The committee also plans to continue discus-sion of creating a new online university. The fourth option is for each school to continue developing its own online programs. State University System Chancellor Frank Brogan said Florida already is a major contributor to online learning but needs to organize its efforts to get a maximum return on that investment in the future.County works to be ‘tsunami ready’ MELBOURNE — Central Florida isn’t likely to be hit by a tsunami, but officials there want to be ready, just in case. Brevard County’s emergency managers are working with the National Weather Service to be one of the first “tsunami-ready” counties in Florida. Emergency Management Director Kimberly Prosser tells Florida Today that Brevard County wants to be as ready for tsunamis as it is for hurricanes and wild-fires. Officials will estab-lish protocols to follow when tsunami warnings are issued and designate evacuation routes. NBC crew escapes from captorsBEIRUT N BC’s chief foreign corre-spondent Richard Engel said Tuesday he and members of his network crew escaped unharmed after five days of captivity in Syria, where more than a dozen pro-regime gunmen dragged them from their car, killed one of their rebel escorts and subjected them to mock execu-tions. Appearing on NBC’s “Today” show, an unshaven Engel said he and his team escaped during a firefight Monday night between their captors and rebels at a check-point. They crossed into Turkey on Tuesday. NBC did not say how many people were kidnapped with Engel, although two other men, producer Ghazi Balkiz and photographer John Kooistra, appeared with him on the “Today” show. It was not confirmed whether everyone was accounted for. Engel said he believes the kidnappers were a Shiite militia group loyal to the Syrian government, which has lost control over swaths of the country’s north and is increasingly on the defensive in a civil war that has killed 40,000 people since March 2011. “They kept us blindfolded, bound,” said the 39-year-old Engel, who speaks and reads Arabic. “We weren’t physically beaten or tor-tured. A lot of psychological torture, threats of being killed,” he added.Hollywood hacker gets 10 years in prison LOS ANGELES — A federal judge sentenced a hacker to 10 years in prison on Monday after he broke into the personal online accounts of Scarlett Johansson, Christina Aguilera and other women and post-ed revealing photos and other material on the Internet. U.S. District Judge S. James Otero sen-tenced Christopher Chaney after hear-ing from a tearful Johansson in a video-taped statement. The case included the revelation that nude photos taken by Johansson of herself and meant for her then-husband Ryan Reynolds were leaked online. “I have been truly humiliated and embarrassed,” Johansson said. “I find Christopher Chaney’s actions to be perverted and reprehensible.” Prosecutors said Chaney, 35, of Jacksonville, Fla., also targeted two women he knew, sending nude pic-tures of one former co-worker to her father. The judge noted the damage to the women was in some ways worse than what Chaney’s celebrity victims endured.‘Scarface’ actor arrested on suspended license MIAMI — “Scarface” actor Steven Bauer has been arrested in the Miami area, accused of driving with a sus-pended license. The 52-year-old Bauer’s real name is Steven Ernest Echevarria and he was booked into the Miami-Dade County Jail early Tuesday morning. His arrest report shows Bauer was stopped in Sweetwater for an improp-er left turn late Monday night. He was given a warning, but the officer ran his driver’s license and found an open 12-year-old warrant. Bauer played Manny Ribera in the 1983 movie “Scarface.” Tuesday: Afternoon: 8-5-5 Evening: N/A Tuesday: Afternoon: 6-7-1-0 Evening: N/A Monday: 7-11-19-28-33 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 HOW TO REACH USMain number ........(386) 752-1293 Fax number ..............752-9400Circulation ...............755-5445Online... www.lakecityreporter.comThe Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis-sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)NEWSEditor Robert Bridges.....754-0428(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)ADVERTISING.........752-1293 (ads@lakecityreporter.com)CLASSIFIEDTo place a classified ad, call 755-5440BUSINESSController Sue Brannon....754-0419(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)CIRCULATIONHome delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday.Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service.In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-vice related credits will be issued.In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser-vice related credits will be issued.Circulation...............755-5445(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)Home delivery rates(Tuesday -Friday and Sunday)12 Weeks.................. $26.3224 Weeks...................$48.7952 Weeks...................$83.46Rates include 7% sales tax.Mail rates12 Weeks.................. $41.4024 Weeks...................$82.8052 Weeks..................$179.40 Lake City Reporter 2AWEATHER Daily Scripture “‘Praise be to the Lord, the God of Israel, because he has come to his people and redeemed them. He has raised up a horn of salvation for us in the house of his servant David (as he said through his holy prophets of long ago).’” — Luke 1:68-70 Q Associated Press Q Associated PressASSOCIATED PRESSNBC chief foreign correspondent Richard Engel (center), NBC Turkey reporter Aziz Akyavas (left) and NBC photographer John Kooistra talk about their abduction by and escape from gunmen in Syria. ASSOCIATED PRESSMonroe County Sheriff’s Office Bureau Chief Lou Caputo, costumed as the “Grinch,” operates a radar gun in the sc hool zone of Stanley Switlik Elementary in Marathon on Monday Drivers exceeding the speed limit by not more than 5 mp h had the option of choosing between receiving a traffic ci tation or an onion for the infraction. Chaney Bauer



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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN2 — Xavier at CincinnatiNBCSN — W. Michigan at Duquesne 9 p.m. ESPN2 — North Carolina at Texas NBA BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN — Brooklyn at New York 9:30 p.m. ESPN — Milwaukee at MemphisFOOTBALLNFL standings AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAy-New England 10 4 0 .714 506 315N.Y. Jets 6 8 0 .429 255 320Miami 6 8 0 .429 264 279 Buffalo 5 9 0 .357 306 402 South W L T Pct PF PAy-Houston 12 2 0 .857 394 280Indianapolis 9 5 0 .643 309 358Tennessee 5 9 0 .357 285 396 Jacksonville 2 12 0 .143 219 383 North W L T Pct PF PAx-Baltimore 9 5 0 .643 348 307Cincinnati 8 6 0 .571 355 293Pittsburgh 7 7 0 .500 302 291 Cleveland 5 9 0 .357 280 310 West W L T Pct PF PAy-Denver 11 3 0 .786 409 274San Diego 5 9 0 .357 299 312 Oakland 4 10 0 .286 263 402 Kansas City 2 12 0 .143 195 367 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAWashington 8 6 0 .571 381 350 Dallas 8 6 0 .571 327 338N.Y. Giants 8 6 0 .571 373 304Philadelphia 4 10 0 .286 253 375 South W L T Pct PF PAy-Atlanta 12 2 0 .857 371 259New Orleans 6 8 0 .429 389 379 Tampa Bay 6 8 0 .429 354 349Carolina 5 9 0 .357 296 319 North W L T Pct PF PAy-Green Bay 10 4 0 .714 344 292 Minnesota 8 6 0 .571 319 308Chicago 8 6 0 .571 321 240 Detroit 4 10 0 .286 330 380 West W L T Pct PF PAx-San Francisco 10 3 1 750 357 218Seattle 9 5 0 .643 350 219St. Louis 6 7 1 .464 258 315Arizona 5 9 0 .357 224 302 x-clinched playoff spoty-clinched division Monday’s Game Tennessee 14, N.Y. Jets 10 Saturday’sGame Atlanta at Detroit, 8:30 p.m. Sunday’s Games Tennessee at Green Bay, 1 p.m.Indianapolis at Kansas City, 1 p.m.New Orleans at Dallas, 1 p.m.Minnesota at Houston, 1 p.m.Oakland at Carolina, 1 p.m.Buffalo at Miami, 1 p.m.Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.New England at Jacksonville, 1 p.m. Washington at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.St. Louis at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.San Diego at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m.Cleveland at Denver, 4:05 p.m.Chicago at Arizona, 4:25 p.m.N.Y. Giants at Baltimore, 4:25 p.m.San Francisco at Seattle, 8:20 p.m. NFL calendar Jan. 5-6 — Wild-card playoff games.Jan. 12-13 — Divisional playoff games.Jan. 20 — AFC and NFC championship games. Jan. 27 — Pro Bowl, Aloha Stadium, Honolulu. Feb. 3 — Super Bowl, Superdome, New OrleansCollege bowl games New Mexico Bowl Arizona 49, Nevada 48Famous Idaho Potato BowlUtah State 41, Toledo 15 Thursday Poinsettia Bowl At San DiegoSan Diego State (9-3) vs. BYU (7-5), 8 p.m. (ESPN) Friday Beef ’O’ Brady’s Bowl At St. PetersburgBall State (9-3) vs. UCF (9-4), 7:30 p.m. (ESPN) Saturday New Orleans Bowl East Carolina (8-4) vs. LouisianaLafayette (7-4), Noon (ESPN) Las Vegas Bowl Boise State (10-2) vs. Washington (7-5), 3:30 p.m. (ESPN) Monday Hawaii Bowl At HonoluluSMU (6-6) vs. Fresno State (9-3), 8 p.m. (ESPN)BASKETBALLNBA schedule Today’s Games Brooklyn at New York, 7 p.m.Detroit at Toronto, 7 p.m.Utah at Indiana, 7 p.m.Washington at Orlando, 7 p.m.Cleveland at Boston, 7:30 p.m.Oklahoma City at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.Philadelphia at Houston, 8 p.m.Charlotte at Phoenix, 9 p.m.Milwaukee at Memphis, 9:30 p.m.Golden State at Sacramento, 10 p.m.New Orleans at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. Thursday’s Games Oklahoma City at Minnesota, 7 p.m.Miami at Dallas, 9:30 p.m.Denver at Portland, 10 p.m. AP Top 25 schedule Today’s Games No. 1 Duke vs. Cornell, 7 p.m.No. 5 Louisville vs. Florida International, 7 p.m. No. 6 Indiana vs. Mount St. Mary’s, 7 p.m. No. 8 Florida vs. Southeastern Louisiana, 7 p.m. No. 11 Cincinnati vs. Xavier at U.S. Bank Arena, Cincinnati, 7 p.m. No. 14 Gonzaga vs. Campbell, 9 p.m.No. 16 New Mexico at New Mexico State, 9 p.m. No. 17 Creighton vs. Tulsa, 8:05 p.m. No. 21 UNLV vs. Northern Iowa, 10 p.m. No. 22 Notre Dame vs. Kennesaw State, 7 p.m. No. 23 North Carolina at Texas, 9 p.m. No. 24 Oklahoma State vs. TexasArlington, 8 p.m. Thursday’s Games No. 1 Duke vs. Elon, 7 p.m.No. 2 Michigan vs. Eastern Michigan, 8:30 p.m. Friday’s Games No. 6 Indiana vs. Florida Atlantic, 7 p.m. No. 22 Notre Dame vs. Niagara, 7 p.m. Saturday’s Games No. 3 Syracuse vs. Temple at Madison Square Garden, Noon No. 4 Arizona vs. East Tennessee State at the Stan Sheriff Center, Honolulu, 10:30 p.m. No. 5 Louisville vs. Western Kentucky at Bridgestone Arena, Nashville, Tenn., 8:30 p.m. No. 7 Ohio State vs. No. 9 Kansas, 4 p.m. No. 8 Florida vs. Kansas State at the Sprint Center, Kansas City, Mo., 8 p.m. No. 10 Illinois vs. No. 12 Missouri at Scottrade Center, St. Louis, 6 p.m. No. 11 Cincinnati vs. Wright State, 4 p.m. No. 13 Minnesota vs. Lafayette, 7 p.m.No. 15 Georgetown vs. American, Noon No. 16 New Mexico vs. South Dakota State, 2:30 p.m. No. 18 San Diego State vs. San Francisco at the Stan Sheriff Center, Honolulu, 6 p.m. No. 19 Butler vs. Evansville, 2 p.m.No. 20 Michigan State vs. Texas, 2 p.m.No. 21 UNLV vs. Canisius, 10 p.m.No. 23 North Carolina vs. McNeese State, Noon No. 24 Oklahoma State vs. Tennessee Tech, 1 p.m. No. 25 N.C. State vs. St. Bonaventure, 3 p.m. Sunday’s Games No. 4 Arizona vs. Hawaii or Miami at the Stan Sheriff Center, Honolulu, 9 or 11:30 p.m. No. 18 San Diego State vs. Mississippi or Indiana State at the Stan Sheriff Center, Honolulu, 3 or 5:30 p.m.Florida St. 63, Louisiana-Monroe 48 At Tallahassee LOUISIANA-MONROE (1-6) James 2-6 2-2 6, Brown 3-9 1-2 7, Hansberry 1-4 0-0 2, McCray 3-7 0-0 6, Mackey 8-18 0-0 22, Eke 0-0 0-0 0, Koszuta 0-1 0-0 0, Lindsey 2-5 0-2 5. Totals 19-50 3-6 48.FLORIDA ST. (6-4) White 3-9 12-13 19, Turpin 1-2 2-2 4, Brandon 3-4 0-2 7, Thomas 6-12 5-5 17, Whisnant II 1-6 0-0 3, Bookert 4-7 0-0 10, Shannon 1-5 1-2 3, Bojanovsky 0-1 0-0 0, Ojo 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 19-47 20-24 63. Halftime—Florida St. 30-25. 3-Point Goals—Louisiana-Monroe 7-21 (Mackey 6-12, Lindsey 1-3, Hansberry 0-2, James 0-2, McCray 0-2), Florida St. 5-15 (Bookert 2-3, Brandon 1-1, White 1-4, Whisnant II 1-5, Thomas 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Louisiana-Monroe 25 (James 12), Florida St. 37 (White 11). Assists—Louisiana-Monroe 15 (James 5), Florida St. 7 (Bookert 4). Total Fouls—Louisiana-Monroe 17, Florida St. 10. A—5,484. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2012 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04202BSPORTS AGATE ASSOCIATED PRESSMinnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson (28) r uns with the ball during the fourth quarter of an NFL football game against the St. Louis Rams S unday in St. Louis. Peterson remains focused while chasing DickersonBy JON KRAWCZYNSKIAssociated PressEDEN PRAIRIE, Minn. — The record many thought would never be broken is right there in front of him, and Adrian Peterson can smell it. His powerful legs have been chewing up the yards at a staggering pace over these last two months, chas-ing down Eric Dickerson’s single-season rushing mark with the relentlessness that helped him come back from a devastating knee injury in less than nine months. As Peterson continues that pursuit, Minnesota Vikings coach Leslie Frazier is comfortable in knowing that while the record is important to his star running back, making the playoffs trumps every-thing. Actually, the two may go hand in hand. Heading into the final two games of the season, Peterson is 294 yards away from eclipsing Dickerson’s record 2,105 yards set in 1984 and the Vikings (8-6) almost surely need wins over Houston and Green Bay to get into the playoffs. With all that in mind, Frazier had a chat with Peterson on Monday just to make sure that the focus remains where it needs to be. “The record would be great,” Frazier said the day after the Vikings won in St. Louis to stay alive in the playoff race. “But the most important thing is to get a win in Houston. And the fact that he feels that way, that will permeate through the rest of our team. He wants to really concentrate on winning this game, more so than the record.” Peterson was unavailable for comment on Monday after racking up 212 yards and a touchdown in the 36-24 victory over the Rams, but he said after the game that he knows how to pri-oritize the two pursuits. “It’s something that I’m not focusing on, it’s in the back of my mind, but I want to accomplish that,” Peterson said of the record. “I want to let the chips fall where they may. I look at today’s game, I could have had 300 (yards), but it wasn’t meant to happen. We got the ‘W,’ we got clos-er. Let’s move on.” To say that Peterson is “only” 294 yards away from Dickerson’s record with two games to go is remark-able in its own right. The game has evolved from Dickerson’s day to a quar-terback-centric universe, one where running backs are lucky to get a dozen carries in a game just to keep the defense off bal-ance. Perhaps that’s why Dickerson felt relatively comfortable that his mark would stand. In five of Dickerson’s first six sea-sons, he had at least 379 carries for the Los Angeles Rams and Indianapolis Colts. Peterson’s career high for carries is 363 in 2008, and he enters the game against the Texans with just 289 on the sea-son. “He’s a phenomenal player and seems like a good dude,” Dickerson told CBSsports.com last week. “If a player was to break it, I’d probably want it to be Adrian, but I like having the record. I don’t think it’s going to be broken.” The Vikings are a throwback to the days when run-ning backs ruled. They rely on Peterson as their first, second and third option to move the ball down the field, and he has deliv-ered even with opposing defenses crowding the line of scrimmage in an all-out effort to stop him. He’s topped 200 yards twice in the last three weeks, is averaging more than 164 yards per game over the last eight and is averaging more yards per carry (6.3) than Christian Ponder is per pass attempt (5.95). Tebow passed over for McElroy as Jets starterBy DENNIS WASZAK Jr.Associated PressNEW YORK — Mark Sanchez blew the second chance Rex Ryan gave him. Now, it’s Greg McElroy’s turn to be the New York Jets’ starting quarterback. And, Tim Tebow? Well, he was leapfrogged by the third-stringer, fueling spec-ulation that the team has little confidence in him as a quarterback. Ryan decided to bench Sanchez on Tuesday after the fourth-year quarter-back had another misera-ble performance, throwing four interceptions Monday night. He also mishandled a low snap with the game on the line as the Jets were eliminated from playoff contention with a 14-10 loss at Tennessee. Ryan said after the game that he wasn’t ready to decide who would start against the Chargers, but chose McElroy over Sanchez and Tebow after talking with his staff and others in the orga-nization Tuesday. McElroy, a seventh-round pick last year out of Alabama, helped lead the Jets to a 7-6 win over Arizona on Dec. 2 when Ryan pulled Sanchez from that game late in the third quarter. Ryan decided to stick with Sanchez after that game, saying that the one-time face of the fran-chise gave the Jets their best chance at winning as they remained in the playoff hunt. But Sanchez struggled in a 17-10 win over Jacksonville and again even more in the loss to Tennessee. McElroy, who gave the Jets a huge spark in his first NFL action, was inactive for both games. That hurt New York Monday night when Ryan was unable to turn to McElroy, but instead went to Tebow for one unpro-ductive series before putting Sanchez back in. Sanchez leads the league with 24 turnovers, includ-ing 17 interceptions, and has turned the ball over 50 times since the start of last season. His future with the team is uncertain because he signed a con-tract extension with New York in March that included $8.25 million in guaranteed money for next season. Tebow, acquired from Denver in March, has had a minor role in the offense after being expected to play a major part. He is recover-ing from two broken ribs that sidelined him for three games, but he returned Monday night and had lit-tle impact. It would seem unlikely that Tebow, who helped lead the Broncos to the playoffs last season, will be back with New York next season.



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his hand. Porter drew his service weapon and point ed it at Strickland while yelling commands for him to drop the hammer. Strickland looked at Porter and drew the ham mer back in an aggressive manor, according to the arrest report. At that point, Porter told Strickland that he would be forced to use deadly force if he did not drop the hammer. Strickland did not com ply. After about one minute, Strickland walked back into his room and locked the door. Porter radioed for backup units, according to the report. When backup arrived, Porter told Strickland to come back outside the room. When he came out side this time, he didnt have the hammer and the deputies ordered him to put his hands on the wall so they could secure him. Again, he did not comply. According to the arrest report, Porter grabbed Strickland by the arm and kicked his legs out from under him, taking him to the ground. Once on the ground, Strickland continued to struggle with deputies, but the deputies were able to put get handcuffs on Strickland, according to the report. Once deputies were able to get Strickland down the stairs he refused to walk, causing Deputy Josh Joyner to carry him to the patrol car, according to the arrest report. Strickland was told to lean against the car so he could be searched. He refused, according to the report. Joyner pushed Strickland into the side of the car and held him down so that he could be searched. According to the report, this resulted in Strickland hitting his head on the trunk of the patrol car, resulting in a cut above his eye. Stirckland was transport ed to Lake City Medical Center, where he recieved some staples to close the cut above his eye. Once he was medi cally cleared by the doc tor, Strickland was taken to Columbia County Detention Facility in lieu Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 19, 2012 3A 3A NOTICE Attention Humana Wal-mart and CVS Caremark Medicare Part D patients: We accept these plans and all other Part D plans. Baya East 755-6677 Baya West 755-2233 Medical 755-2277 Call one of our pharmacies to see which plan is best for you. HORSES: Headed north to help heal Continued From Page 1A Isnt she beautiful? the woman said. Those words caused the staff to break out in tears, according to the article in Time in March 2011. Shes talked ever since that day, Garcia-Bengochea said. Another time, the horse singled out a child in a group and walked up to him. The horse pushed its nose into his face and the two stood locked head to head. The child had just found out that day his cancer had returned. The volunteers for Gentle Carousel reminded him that the magic show was about to start. He said, Im having my magic show right here, Garcia-Bengochea said. Cheryll Walker, executive director of Happy House, said Gentle Carousel has visited the day care center in the past. She said two horses were dressed up in costumes. While one of the volunteers read a story, the horses pranced around and acted out the scenes. It was very, very sweet, Walker said. She said it was especially moving for one of the children at the day care to see the miniature horses. That child had dwarfism. Walker said the horses have a special effect on the shy children and the chil dren with special needs. They light up the most, she said. While the therapy horses sometimes visit healthy children at libraries and day care centers, the real reason for the two years of training for each horse is to help the terminally ill and dying make one last happy memory. Weve met so many children who arent alive today, but for that moment they were happy, she said. When you see the faces and you see the differ ences, to be able to give someone that makes it worth it. THREAT: Resisting arrest charges filed Continued From Page 1A DEPUTY: Cars collide at intersection Continued From Page 1A Honda Element that was stopped for a red light in the northbound lane of Marion Street. According to witness statements, Darwiches traffic signal turned green and she proceeded north across the intersection. Milligans vehicle entered the intersection at the same time, and Darwiches vehicle struck the right front of Milligans car. Both vehicles came to rest on the east side of the intersection. Reports indicate that both drivers were wearing seat belts at the time of the crash, and even though Milligan suffered minor injuries, he was not taken to the hospital. Darwiche was not injured in the crash, reports said. The patrol cruiser sus tained approximately $4,000 worth of damage, and Darwiches vehicle sustained approximately $5,000 damage. Charges in connection with the crash are pending further investigation, FHP reports said. NEWTOWN: Classes resume after tragedy Continued From Page 1A We are devastated, and our hearts are with the other families who are grieving as we are, her parents, Rich and Krista Rekos, said in a statement. Tensions in the shattered communi ty ran high as the grief of parents and townspeople collided with the crush of media reporting on the shootings and the funerals. Police walked children to parents waiting in cars to protect them from the cameras. Many parents yelled at reporters to leave their children and the town alone. Go away! a man in a tow truck paint ed with an American flag screamed at media across from Hawley Elementary School. At Newtown High School, students in sweat shirts and jackets, many wear ing headphones, had mixed reactions. Some waved at or snapped photos of the assembled media horde, while others appeared visibly shaken. Students said they didnt get much work done Tuesday and spent much of the day talking about the terrible events of last Friday, when 20-year-old gunman Adam Lanza, clad all in black, broke into Sandy Hook Elementary and opened fire on students and staff. Its definitely better than just sit ting at home watching the news, said sophomore Tate Schwab. It really hasnt sunk in yet. It feels to me like it hasnt happened. As for concerns about safety, some students were defiant. This is where I feel the most at home, said Hickey. I feel safer here than anywhere else in the world. Still, some parents were apprehen sive. Priscilla and Randy Bock, arriving with their 15-year-old special needs son, James, expressed misgivings. I was not sure we wanted him going, Priscilla Bock said. Im a mom. Im anxious. Is there ever a right day? I mean, you just do it, you know, just get them back to school, said Peter Muckell as he brought his 8-year-old daughter Shannon, a third-grader, to Hawley Elementary. At one Newtown school, students found some comfort from Ronan, an Australian shepherd therapy dog from Good Dog Foundation in New York. Owner Lucian Lipinsky took the dog to a fifth-grade science and math class where students were having dif ficulty coping with the tragedy. Most started smiling immediately. Lipinsky told the students they could whisper their secrets into Ronans ear. Its pretty amazing how a lot of kids will just go whisper in his ear and tell them their secret and of course he doesnt tell any one, Lipinsky said. Hes a very good dog. Authorities say the horrific events of Friday began when Lanza shot his mother, Nancy, at their home, then took her car and some of her guns to nearby Sandy Hook Elementary, where he broke in and opened fire, killing 20 children and six adults before turning the gun on himself. A Connecticut official said the mother, a gun enthusiast who prac ticed at shooting ranges, was found dead in her pajamas in bed, shot four times in the head with a .22-caliber rifle. As investigators worked to figure out what drove him to lash out with such fury and why he singled out the school federal agents said that he had fired guns at shooting ranges over the past several years, though there was no evidence he had done so recently. Debora Seifert, a spokeswoman for the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, said both Lanza and his mother fired at shooting ranges, sometimes visit ing them together. We do not have any indication at this time that the shooter engaged in shooting activities in the past six months, Seifert said. Investigators have found no let ters or diaries that could explain the attack. Lanza is believed to have used a Bushmaster AR-15-style rifle, a civil ian version of the militarys M-16. It is similar to the weapon used in a recent shopping mall shooting in Oregon and other deadly attacks around the U.S. Versions of the AR-15 were out lawed in this country under the 1994 assault weapons ban, but the law expired in 2004. Private equity firm Cerberus Capital Management announced Tuesday it plans to sell its stake in Freedom Group, maker of the Bushmaster rifle, following the school shootings. Cerberus said in a statement that it was deeply saddened by Fridays events, and that it will hire a financial adviser to help with the process of selling its Freedom Group interests. In Pittsburgh, Dicks Sporting Goods said it is suspending sales of modern rifles nationwide because of the shooting. The company also said its removing all guns from display at its store closest to Newtown. Meanwhile, the outlines of a national debate on gun control began to take shape. At the White House, spokesman Jay Carney said curbing gun violence is a complex problem that will require a comprehensive solution. Carney did not offer specific proposals or a timeline. He said President Barack Obama will meet with law enforcement officials and mental health professionals in com ing weeks. Cliff talks hit a lull with Boehners Plan B ANDREW TAYLOR Associated Press WASHINGTON Just two weeks from an economy-threat ening deadline, fiscal cliff talks hit a lull Tuesday as House Speaker John Boehner announced that Republicans would also march ahead with their own tax plan on a separate track from the one hes been pursuing with President Barack Obama. The White House and leading congressional Democrats imme diately rejected Boehners Plan B, which would extend soonto-expire Bush-era tax cuts for everyone making less than $1 million but would not address huge across-the-board spending cuts that are set to strike the Pentagon and domestic programs next year. Everyone should understand Boehners proposal will not pass the Senate, said Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev. Boehners surprise move came after significant progress over the past several days in talks with Obama talks that produced movement on tax rate hikes that have proven deeply unsettling to GOP conservatives and on cuts to Social Security benefits that have incensed liberal Democrats. Just Monday, Obama offered concessions, including a plan to raise top tax rates on households earning more than $400,000 instead of the $250,000 thresh old he had campaigned on. And the two sides had inched closer on the total amount of tax rev enue required to seal the agree ment. Obama now would settle for $1.2 trillion over the coming decade while Boehner is offering $1 trillion. By contrast, protecting income below $1 million from a hike in the top tax rate from 35 per cent to 39.6 percent would raise only $269 billion over the coming decade. But the outlines of a possi ble Obama-Boehner agreement appeared to have shaky support at best from Boehners leader ship team and outright opposi tion from key Republicans such asvice presidential nominee Paul Ryan, R-Wis., a House GOP aide said. Stylists: Lanza never spoke, made no eye contact By DAVID KLEPPER Associated Press NEWTOWN, Conn. As a teenager, Adam Lanza would come in for a haircut about every six weeks without speaking or looking at anyone and always accompanied by his mother, said stylists at a salon in the town where Lanza gunned down 27 people last week, including his mother, before killing himself. He stopped coming in a few years ago, and the employees at the salon thought he had moved away, said stylist Bob Skuba. The comments from him and his colleagues were among the first describing how the Lanzas interacted with each other. Investigators have found no letters or diaries that could explain the attack, one of the deadliest mass shootings in U.S. history. Cutting Adam Lanzas hair was a very long half an hour. It was a very uncomfortable situation, stylist Diane Harty said. She said that she never heard his voice and that Nancy Lanza also hardly spoke. Another stylist, Jessica Phillips, echoed their descriptions of the Lanzas and added that Nancy Lanza would give her son directions about what to do and where to go. Adam would move only when his mother told him to, Skuba said. I would say, Adam, come on. He wouldnt move, Skuba said. And his mother would have to say, Adam, come on, hes ready. It was like I was invisible. He said Adam also wouldnt move from his chair after his hair was cut until his mother told him to. If a stylist would ask Adam a question, Skuba said, his mother would answer. He would just be look ing down at the tiles ... the whole time, Skuba said. Former classmates have previously described Adam Lanza as intelligent but remote, and former high school adviser described him as anxious and shy. Several people who knew his mother have described her as a devoted parent. Divorce paperwork released this week showed that Nancy Lanza had the authority to make decisions regarding Adams upbring ing. The divorce was final ized in September 2009, when Adam Lanza was 17.



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Sunday’s final round of the MGA Championship proved to be an exciting one with two of the three divisions coming down to the final holes to determine the winners. In the Championship flight, the winner seemed to be locked up after round one as Garrett Odom turned in a +10 perfor-mance to lead Chet Carter at +4 and Phillip Russell at +1. No other golfer had a plus score. However, as round two progressed, Odom started to feel the heat as both Carter and Russell began to make up ground on the leader. With four holes to go, Russell caught fire and finished birdie-eagle-par-par with the final putt for birdie finishing less than an inch short. The surge gave Russell a final total of +11, tying him with Odom’s after the leader’s +1 total for the day. A playoff was required to determine the MGA champion. The momentum seemed to be in Russell’s favor, but as all golfers know momen-tum can be a fleeting thing as Odom rolled in a 30-foot putt from the front to the back of the green to capture the title. Congratulations to Odom, as he now holds both the MGA Championship title and the club Match Play title. In the first flight, Tony Johnson finished birdie-par for +8 to Codey Blackwell’s par-bogey finish (+7) to give Johnson the come-from-behind victory. Jack Tuggle was close behind, finishing third at +6. In second flight action, Tim Blackwell (+4) held on after a solid first-day lead to outdistance Wallace Christie at +1. Randy Scovill beat out a host of finishers at -1 in a match of cards to take third place. Skin winners in the tournament were; Q Day 1 — Christie, Kevin Odom, Garrett Odom, Chet Carter and Todd Carter; Q Day 2 — Russell, Jason Self, Mike Kahlich, Todd Carter and Chet Carter. Sunday’s game also included a closest to the pin competition on the par 3’s. Winners were Pete Sapienza, No. 3, Russell, No. 5, Chet Carter, No. 11, Todd Carter No. 15, and Codey Blackwell, No. 17. The Quail Heights Men’s Golf Association would like to thank all members for a great turnout and are looking forward to an even greater level of participa-tion at the next event to be scheduled shortly. In Wednesday Blitz action, Ronnie Ash and Brandon Goss handled the tough conditions to finish in a tie at +1 for first place. There was a four-way tie for third at even with Frog Niewish, Mike Kahlich, Jim Munns and Buddy Simpkins. Skin winners were Barney Hart, Jim Munns and Tony Kent (3). Closest to pin win-ners were Munns, No. 3, Kent, No. 5, Phillip Russell, No. 11, Barney Hart, No. 15, and Munns, No. 17. Friday’s Dogfight results: first-Tony Johnson +5; sec-ond-Gerald Smithy; third-Ronnie Ash. Skin winners were Smithy, Ash and Brandon Goss. Closest to pin win-ners were Ash, No. 5, Randy Heavrin, No. 11, Ash, No. 15, and Smithy, No. 17. Sunday’s Scramble winner was the team of Mike Kahlich, Keith Hudson and Jerry Connell in a chip-off over the team of Phillip Russell, Tony Johnson and Pete Sapienza. Hank Rone used one of his two eagles this week to post a winning +12 in B flight of Saturday’s blitz. Brian Snead (+7) and David Pope (+6) took the other two money spots. Eddy Brown had a lot bigger battle in winning the A flight. His birdie on No. 16 was just enough to slide by Steve Patterson (+6). Steve Thomas rolled in a handful of birdies, but offset them with a few “others” to finish in a tie with Joe Paul for third at +2. Two of Thomas’ birdies held up for skins. Dennis Crawford, Paul and Rone shared the rest of the skins pot. Tom Wade (+10) had enough game to overcome two birdies by Dave Mehl (+8) in the Sunday blitz. Hank Rone eagled No. 11 to forge a tie for third with Steve Patterson and John Brewer at +6. Mehl and Rone had the only skins. Closest to the pin winners were Don Howard on No. 5, Brewer on No. 7, Timmy Rogers on No. 15 and Mehl on No. 17. The ladies had a contest with their flat sticks in the LGA “low putts” format. Cathy Steen and Caroline Stevens toured the course with a very respectable total of 28 shots on the greens to tie for first place. Shirley Edelstein used one more putt than the winners for third place. Natalie Bryant and Ann Bormolini shared fourth with 31 strokes. Suzi Davis and Dottie Rogers split the chip-in pot with their shots on No. 17. The Good Old Boys played two close matches and one runaway in their outing. Match one was the first close encounter with the team of Jerry West, Eli Witt, Bobby Simmons and Jim McGriff edging the team of Marc Risk, Dennis Hendershot and Tom Elmore by a count of 2-1. A three-way match also ended in a one-point win, this time by a score of 4-3 for the team of Monty Montgomery, Emerson Darst, Jim Stevens and Hugh Sherrill over the four-some of Don Howard, Joe Persons, Mike Spencer and Dan Stephens. The third place team of Rhea Hart, Rob Brown, Bill Rogers and Paul Davis was another point back. The one-sided win came when Ed Snow, Stan Woolbert, Tony Branch and Nick Whitehurst pounded the team of Barney Hart, Larry Ward, Jim Bell and Merle Hibbard by a count of 9-3. Montgomery recorded the week’s best score with a 36-38-74. Woolbert was two stokes back with a round of 40-36-76. Other good scores came from Risk (38-39-77), and Snow, Brown, Barney Hart and West, all with 78. The four-man MGA one gross score/two net score tournament is Saturday. Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2012 3B3BSPORTS QUAIL HEIGHTS COUNTRY CLUB Chet Carter COUNTRY CLUB at LAKE CITY Ed Goff GOLF REPORTS Two-eagle week for Rone Odom is MGA champion ASSOCIATED PRESSIn this Oct. 6 file photo, Texas A&M quarterback Johnny Man ziel throws a pass in the first quarter o against Mississippi in Oxford, Miss. Manziel h as become the first freshman to be voted The Associated Press Player of the Year in college football on Tuesday.A&M’s Johnny Football is AP’s Player of the YearBy KRISTIE RIEKENAssociated PressJohnny Manziel ran for almost 1,700 yards and 30 touchdowns as a dual-threat quarterback his senior year of high school at Kerrville Tivy. Who would have thought he’d be even more impres-sive at Texas A&M when pitted against the defens-es of the Southeastern Conference? On Tuesday, Manziel picked up another major award for his spectacular debut season. He was voted The Associated Press Player of the Year. As with the Heisman Trophy and Davey O’Brien Award that Manziel already won, the QB nick-named Johnny Football is the first freshman to collect the AP award. Manziel’s 31 votes were more than twice that of second place finisher Manti Te’o, Notre Dame’s start linebacker. He is the third straight Heisman-winning quarterback to receive the honor, follow-ing Robert Griffin III and Cam Newton. Manziel erased initial doubts about his ability when he ran for 60 yards and a score in his first game against Florida. “I knew I could run the ball, I did it a lot in high school,” Manziel said in an interview with the AP “It is just something that you don’t get a chance to see in the spring. Quarterbacks aren’t live in the spring. You don’t get to tackle. You don’t get to evade some of the sacks that you would in normal game situations. So I feel like when I was able to avoid getting tackled, it opened some people’s eyes a little bit more.” The 6-foot-1 Manziel threw for 3,419 yards and 24 touchdowns and ran for 1,181 yards and 19 more scores to help the Aggies win 10 games for the first time since 1998 — and in their inaugural SEC year, too. Ryan Tannehill, Manziel’s predecessor now with the Dolphins after being drafted eighth over-all this season, saw prom-ise from the young quarter-back last year when he was redshirted. But even he is surprised at how quickly things came together for Manziel. “It’s pretty wild. I always thought he had that play-making ability, that some-thing special where if somebody came free, he can make something excit-ing happen,” Tannehill said. “I wasn’t really sure if, I don’t think anyone was sure if he was going to be able to carry that through-out an SEC season, and he’s shocked the world and he did it.” After Manziel sat out as a redshirt in 2011, Texas A&M’s scheduled season-opener against Louisiana Tech this year was postponed because of Hurricane Isaac. That left him to get his first taste of live defense in almost two years against Florida. He responded well, helping the Aggies race to a 17-7 lead early using both his arm and his feet. The Gators shut down Manziel and A&M’s offense in the second half and Texas A&M lost 20-17. But Manziel’s performance was enough for Texas A&M’s coaching staff to realize that his scrambling ability was going to be a big part of what the Aggies could do this season. “The first half really showed that I was a little bit more mobile than we had seen throughout the spring,” Manziel said. “Me and (then-offensive coordi-nator) Kliff Kingsbury sat down and really said: ‘Hey we can do some things with my feet as well as throwing the ball.’ And it added a little bit of a new dimension.” Manziel knew that the biggest adjustment from playing in high school to college would be the speed of the game. Exactly how quick players in the SEC were was still a jolt to the quarterback. “The whole first drive I was just seeing how fast they really flew to the ball and I felt like they just moved a whole lot faster,” he said of the Florida game. “It was different than what I was used to, different than what I was used to in high school. So it was just having to learn quick and adjust on the fly.” He did just that and started piling up highlight reel material by deftly avoiding would-be tacklers to help the Aggies run off five con-secutive wins after that. His storybook ride hit a roadblock when he threw a season-high three intercep-tions in a 24-19 loss to LSU. “He just told me to have a plan every time, before every snap,” Manziel said. “Make sure you have a plan on what you want to do and where you want to go with the ball.”



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D emocracy hangs by a thread in Egypt. Violence and charges of ballot irregu-larities that accompanied Saturday’s referendum on President Mohammed Morsi’s power grab raise doubt whether Egyptians can find a path to free-dom. Should the tally seal a victory for Mr. Morsi and his Muslim Brotherhood support-ers, the long trek will detour into heavy-handed Islamism. The opposition National Salvation Front charged that the weekend’s pattern of unmonitored polling places, coercion of voters and failure to seal com-pleted paper ballots “points to a clear desire for vote rigging by the Muslim Brotherhood,” according to Agence France-Presse. Clashes between rival factions that left eight dead in Cairo last week persisted during ballot-ing, and the offices of an opposition party newspa-per were firebombed. The Shariah-based Muslim Brotherhood claimed a slight lead with 56.5 per-cent, Reuters reported, but the winning side won’t be decided until ballots are counted from a sec-ond round of voting next Saturday. The Arab Spring uprising of 2010 that ended strongman Hosni Mubarak’s 30-year reign set in motion a face-off between Islamic and secular factions vying for dominance in charting Egypt’s future. Mr. Morsi, elected in June with a slim 51 percent majority, suddenly issued decrees in late November grant-ing himself near absolute authority. His backers were jubilant, but hun-dreds of thousands fearing oppression of women and religious minorities took to the streets in protest. In response, a judicial panel hastily drafted a new con-stitution that would tone down some of Mr. Morsi’s self-appointed author-ity while still recognizing Islamic law as the founda-tion for legislation. The vote over whether to accept the constitu-tion was meant originally to occur on a single day, but Mr. Morsi ordered it broken into two sessions because of a shortage of judges to monitor all 13,000 polling places at once. Pro-democracy organizations considered boy-cotting the referendum, charging the move allows the Muslim Brotherhood more time to gather momentum in favor of passage. Ultimately, they urged supporters to vote no. During his administration, President Obama has refused the role of human rights advocate as Islamist movements have swept quickly to power in Egypt, Libya, Tunisia and Yemen. Western liberals contend Shariah-based “democ-racy” is better than none and place their hopes in the notion that the flow of information through cyber-space will somehow soften the impulses of these fundamentalist Islamic states. Unfortunately, the digital age has produced few examples of this in the Middle East. Instead of democrats, the region spawns leaders in the vein of Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who once compared democracy to “catching a train. When you get to your station, you get off.” Even if Mr. Obama has few words of support for freedom in Egypt, money talks. Congress should send a message of its own to Cairo’s theocrats that is certain to catch their atten-tion: A decline in liberty will result in a reduction in the $2 billion the United States supplies the country in annual foreign aid. If Egypt turns its back on its people, freedom-lov-ing Americans shouldn’t be forced to pay for it. ANOTHER VIEW Q The Washington Times OPINION Wednesday, December 19, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A4AOPINION Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com T eachers unions and educa-tors statewide, glum over the appointment of Tony Bennett as Florida’s new commissioner of education, have all but given up on the prospect of meaningful educa-tion reform in the Sunshine State. Bennett, who lost his bid for re-election as schools chief in Indiana last month, is seen as a test-happy technocrat who cares not a whit for real reform, but thinks everything educators do can –– and should –– be quantified and measured. It’s just a matter of finding the right diagnostic tool –– that is, exam. So what did Bennett do in Indiana that so roiled voters they tossed him out after just one term? Pretty much what we’ve been doing in Florida all along: introduced a grading system for schools, renewed the empha-sis on school choice, placed greater focus on teacher accountability, and, of course, instituted a heavy regimen of standardized testing. Just what educators here say has been plaguing their profession since the days of Jeb Bush – a close Bennett ally. As for the testing, some thought that storm had passed. Back in July, Gov. Rick Scott said the current regimen of standardized exams might have gone too far. Folks now think Bennett will undo that agenda. Possibly.But if Scott wasn’t serious about cutting back on testing, Bennett’s own views might not matter. Unlike Indiana, this is an appointed post, and while the board of education picked Bennett unanimously, nobody suspects he’ll stay here long should he run afoul of Scott. As for Scott, that’s an issue voters can address, should they wish, two years from now. Bottom line is, let’s give Bennett a chance. After all, the bar’s been set pretty low by his predecessors. Remember the teacher evaluation fiasco?If he can just convince Tallahassee to take local officials’ word for it when they tell them how many teachers we have, that will be seen as a fine start. Simple competence, for starters OUR OPINION Democracy is in peril in Egypt How to stop mass murdersL et’s perform a thought experi-ment. You want to kill as many people as possible with very little chance of being stopped. Do you go to (a) a gun range; (b) a police station; (c) a hunting camp; (d) a place where people are forbidden to carry weap-ons? One of the common denominators of recent mass murders is that the killer has gone to a place where weapons are forbidden. This suggests one preventive measure that is relatively easy to take to reduce these types of crimes. Have highly visible armed guards at weapons-free locations. We don’t really need more gun-control laws. Stringent gun control laws are like Prohibition. They may make the selfrighteous feel better, but they do nothing to stop the illegal traffic in the prohibited item. Many factors contribute to the tragedy of mass murder, and I’m not smart enough name them all or know what to do about them if I could. I do, how-ever, think I see two large-ly overlooked contributing factors to the enabling of such tragedies. One contributing factor can be solved relatively easily. The second contributing factor is built into the case law interpreting our Constitution.Contributing Factor 1: It may sound counterintuitive, and it certainly isn’t politically correct to say this, but gun control laws actually enable mass murders. If the law says “don’t have a gun,” then most people won’t. But people who want to kill people will arm them-selves despite the law. Gun control laws simply produce large gun-free zones where a mass murderer can run amok and kill large numbers of people before law enforce-ment can respond. If we are going to disarm people and make them vulnerable, then we must do something proactive to protect them. We can counteract this contribut-ing factor easily. Place highly visible armed guards in these gun-free zones, and we will reduce the number of mass mur-ders. Don’t arm them with Uzis, M-16s or AK-47s. Arm them with pump shotguns. These mass murders appear to me to be committed at close range, usually by people who couldn’t hit the broad side of a barn at any dis-tance. Shotguns have the range to deal with such people, and they don’t have the distant lethality of a high-powered rifle. You’re not going to miss and accidentally kill some-one 300 yards away with a shotgun.Contributing Factor 2: Now for another politically incorrect statement. Mass murders are facili-tated by a Supreme Court decision: O’Connor v. Donaldson, 422 U.S. 563, 95 S.Ct. 2486 (U.S.Fla. 1975). O’Connor severely limited the states’ ability to involuntarily commit the mentally ill. The gist of this opinion was that mentally ill people cannot be locked up unless they are shown to be danger-ous. To put it crudely, just acting weird is not enough for involuntary hospitaliza-tion. The Supreme Court put it more delicately, but they were saying the same thing: “May the State fence in the harmless mentally ill solely to save its citizens from exposure to those whose ways are different?” Before 1975, we regularly locked up people who were acting weird but who had never harmed anyone. And I believe at that time we had fewer mass murders. Most of the mass killers of recent vintage (I’m thinking par-ticularly about the man who ran amok at Virginia Tech) acted weird long before they killed any-one. Under O’Connor, they couldn’t be locked up because they hadn’t harmed anyone, or if they had harmed someone, there was a mental health professional who testified that they were all better now and weren’t danger-ous anymore. I vividly remember one case we had where a man kept committing arsons. He’d get arrested, the doctors would say he was mentally ill but he didn’t need hospitalization, and under O’Connor, he’d get put back on the street where — you guessed it — he set something else on fire. He finally “burned out” on his hobby of set-ting fires, and thankfully he never hurt anyone. Now, I’m not in favor of locking people up merely because they act weird. Most people who act weird don’t commit mass murders. Just as most people who own guns don’t commit mass murders. Bob Dekle Q Bob Dekle is a retired Third Judicial Circuit Assistant State’s Attorney who worked for 30 years as a prosecutor. He is a pub-lished author who lives in Lake City and is a professor at the Levin College of Law at the University of Florida



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Randall Blake Branham Randall Blake Branham, 60, of Lake City, passed away on Saturday, December 15, 2012. He was born in Detroit, Michi gan where he attended Chad sey High School then enlisted in the U.S. Army. RB moved to the Lake Butler area and began his career with the Florida De partment of Corrections in 1978, Colonel in 2008, after 30 years of dedicated service. RB enjoyed spending time with family and friends and was an avid Florida Gator fan. He believed in liv ing life to its fullest and loved to make people laugh with his sto ries. RB is preceded in death by his father, Walter Branham. He is survived by his loving wife, Amanda Branham; his son, Robert Branham; his daugh ter, Belinda Amber Carter; his step-daughter, Alyssa Mon temayor; and his grandchil dren, Rebecca Branham, Em ily Tanner and Kolby Carter. Memorial services will be held at 10:00 a.m. on Friday, December 21, 2012 in the chapel of Gate way-Forest Lawn Funeral Home. that donations in RBs memory be made to the Christmas Dream Machine, 109 SE Price Creek Loop, Lake City, FL, 32025. GATEWAY-FO R EST LAWN FUNERAL HOME 3596 South U.S. Hwy 441, Lake City, Florida, 32025. (386) 752-1954 is in charge of arrangements. Please leave words of comfort for the family at www.gatewayforestlawn.com 44, passed away suddenly on December 17, 2012. She was born to John Jack and Caro on April 23, 1968. In her spare time, Barbie enjoyed cooking, ing. She was preceded in death by two sisters, Karen Fern and is survived by her daughter, Jacksonville, FL; parents, Jack Vedra Beach, FL; brother, lumbus, GA, along with several loving aunts, uncles, nieces and nephews. A visitation will be on Wednesday, December 19, from 5 to 7 pm at Ponte Vedra Valley Funeral Home. A grave side service will be held the fol lowing day at 11 am, Thursday, December 20, at Memorial Cemetery in Lake City, FL, with Please sign the online guestbook at www.pontevedravalley.com.Myrtle Sue Norris 8/4/1911 12/16/2012 Myrtle Sue Norris, age 101, of Pensacola, Florida, died Sun day, Dec. 16, 2012, where she resided at Bayside Manor. She is survived by her children: Ja net Boggs Kuykendall (John) of Lake City, Florida, Clifford Norris (Ida) of Live Oak, Flor ida, Carol Burkman ( Bob) of Miamisburg, Ohio, Jerry Norris (Diane) of Pensacola, Florida, Don Norris (Melody) of Pensac ola, Florida. Myrtle is also sur vived by grandchildren in Lake City: Jennifer Boggs Robinson (Ryan), Joni Boggs Middleton (Jay), Jaime Boggs Plecenik (Paul), and great-granchildren: Gage Robinson, Miley Middle ton, Mia Middleton, and Petra Plecenik, as well as many other grands that live throughout the U.S. Myrtle was preceded in death by her husband, Oliver Norris in 1979. Her career as a Kindergarten Teacher allowed her to teach, love, and nurture hundreds of children through the years at Brent Baptist Church School and later at the First Bap tist Church of Ensley School. Visitation will be at Faith Cha pel North, 1000 South Highway 29, Cantonment, FL, from 10:00 till 11:00 a.m. on Wednesday, December 19th, with the funeral services following at 11:00 a.m. Dr. Barry Howard, Senior Pas tor of First Baptist Church of family will have a graveside service that afternoon at 2:00 p.m. at the McCullough Cem etery, McCullough, Alabama. to Ensley First Baptist Church, 50 West Johnson Avenue, Pen sacola, FL 32534, or First Bap tist Church of Pensacola, 500 North Palafox Street, FL 32051. F AITH CHAPEL FUNER AL HOME NOR TH 1000 Hwy 29S, Cantonment, FL is in charge of arrangements. You may express your condo lences online at www.fcfhs.com You may also place your con dolences at www.legacy.com/ obituaries/lakecityreporter /Novice M. Parrish Mrs. Novice M. Parrish, 87, a lifelong resident of Lake City, passed away Monday evening, December 17, 2012 in The Health Center of Lake City following an extended illness. She was the daughter of the late Lewis and Rachel Melton Brady and was educated in and graduated from the Columbia County School System. Mrs. Parrish had been a homemak er. She loved working in her yard, listening to gospel music and playing Bingo. She was a longtime faithful member of the Pine Grove Baptist Church. Mrs. Parrish was preceded in death by her husband, William Bill Parrish and three of her sons, Kenneth Parrish, Billy Joe Parrish and Phillip Parrish. Mrs. Parrish is survived by a son, Bobby Parrish (Marilyn) of Fort White; and two daugh ters, Linda Morrell and Shirley Mirra both of Lake City. Fifteen grandchildren and twenty-four great-grandchildren also survive. Funeral services for Mrs. Parrish will be conducted at 2:00 PM on Thursday, December 20, 2012 in the Pine Grove Baptist Church with Pastor Ron Thompson of in Memorial Cemetery. The family will receive friends at the funeral home from 5:00-7:00 Wednesday evening. Arrange ments are under the direction of the DEES-P ARRISH F AMIL Y FUNERAL HOME 458 S. Marion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025 752-1234 Please share your thoughts and wishes for the family at our on-line family guestbook at parrishfamilyfuneralhome.com Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 19, 2012 5A 5A On Friday, December 21st Santa will be in Lake City to talk to boys and girls. The calls will be made between 6-8 p.m. and carried live on Power Country 102.1 FM If you would like for Santa to call your child, just ll out the form below. Additional forms may be picked up at the Lake City Reporter, Lake City Police Department, the Florida Highway Patrol or Power Country 102.1 FM. Mail or bring the completed forms to Lake City Reporter, 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, FL 32055 Childs Name:______________________________________ Age:______ Address: ________________________________ Phone:_______________ Parents Name: _______________________________________________ Brothers & Sisters:____________________________________________ Ages:______________________________________________________ Seen Santa this year? Yes No (check one) Where? _____________________________________________________ Pets? Yes No (check one) Type: ______________ Name:________________________________ Gifts he or she requested? _______________________________________ Goods things the child has done through the year:____________________ ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ Santa Calls from Santa Sponsored by: Florida Highway Patrol, Power Country 102.1 FM, Lake City Police Department, and Lake City Reporter. Lake City Reporter www.boatangel.com 800 1 CAR L ANGE Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE C all 888-203-3179 www. C enturaOnline.com Obituaries are paid advertise ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporters classified depart ment at 752-1293. OBITUARIES Dec. 19 Night of worship Orchard Community Church will present Glory ... A night of Worship at Skating Place on Hall of Fame Drive in Lake City. At 6 p.m., there will be a Christmas block party in the parking lot, with Santa Claus, a Christmas train, bounce house and a live praise band. At 7 p.m., the church praise team will present A Night of Worship concert in the skating rink. The praise team is under the direction of Pastor Michael Federico. For information, call (386) 758-3400 or go online at www.theorchardcc.org. Dec. 21 Quilt raffle Columbia County Senior Services will raffle a sam pler quilt to support the center. Tickets are $1 and the drawing will be held Dec. 21. See Carol for tickets. Dec. 22 Filipino society dinner The Filipino American Cultural Society of Lake City will have a Christmas Celebration Dinner and Dance from 6 to 11 p.m. at the Epiphany Catholic Church Social Hall in Lake City. There will be holi day entertainment, music, dancing and a cultural food buffet. Please bring a covered dish to share. Arrival, setup of buffet and social time will be from 6 to 6:30 p.m., dinner will be at 6:30. The event is free for FACS members. For non members, cost is $10 per person. For more informa tion contact, Bob Gavette at 965-5905. Toy drive, concert Resurrection Praise Team will hold a toy drive and Christmas Praise Extravaganza from 4 to 6 p.m. at Niblack Elementary School. Bring unwrapped toys and enjoy praise danc ing, singing and spoken words. Door prizes and raffles will be held. Praise breakfast New Mount Zion AME Church, of Watertown, will have a Christmas Praise and Prayer Breakfast from 10 a.m. to noon. the meal will include grits, scram bled eggs, sausage, salmon patties, toast, buscuit, juice and coffee. Cost is $7 per person. The Rev. Leroy Young, of Jacksonville, will speak on The Real Meaning of Christmas. For tickets or additional information, call The Rev. Charles young at (904) 7137877, Curtis Jones at (386) 752-8179 or Evette Harris at (386) 752-4306. Tickets will be available at the door. SHINE training SHINE (Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders) is seeking volunteers in Columbia, Suwannee, Hamilton and Lafayette counties. Free volunteer training is scheduled as fol lows: orientation, Jan. 11, 1 to 3 p.m,; basic train ing, Feb. 13-15, 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.; and mentoring, six sessions scheduled at volunteers convenience. All training will take place at Elder Options, 100 SW 75ht St. (Tower Road) in Gainesville. Registration is required by Dec. 28. Meals will be provided and mileage and, if need ed, hotel accommoda tions will be reimbursed. SHINE is a statewide vol unteer-based program of the Florida Department of Elder Affairs, offering counseling and assistance with Medicare, Medicaid, long-term care planning, prescription drug assis tance, supplemental insur ance and Medicare fraud. For more information or to request a SHINE volun teer application packet, call (352) 692-5264 or toll-free at (800) 963-5337. Dec. 23 Puppet performance First Presbyterian Church, 697 SW Baya Drive, invites the community to see Peter the Presbyterian and his family of puppets perform a skit during its worship service at 1030 a.m. For more information, call the church office at 752-0670. Dec. 24 Christmas Eve service First Presbyterian Church, 697 SW Baya Drive, will hold its Christmas Eve candlelight service at 6:30 p.m. Special music, the Christmas message and the puppet ministry will be shared. For more informa tion, call the church office at 752-0670. Chirstmas Eve service St. James Episcopal Church, 2423 SW Bascom Norris Drive, will hold its Christmas Eve family ser vice at 7 p.m. and a candle light service at 11 p.m. Christmas Eve service Spirit of Christ Lutheran Church, 145 SW Sweetbreeze Drive (U.S. 90 1.5 miles west of Interstate 75), will hold its Christmas Eve service at 5 p.m. For more information, call 3443364. Dec. 25 Free dinner Suwannee Valey Rescue Mission and Lad Soup Kitchen, 127 Escambia St. in Lake City, will serve its sixth annual Free Christmas Day Dinner. The menue includes turkey, ham, rice and gravy, col lard greens, string beans, candied yams, dressing, desserts and iced tea. To donate food, money or time to the meal, call Timothy at (386) 758-2217. Jan. 2 Olustee battle meeting The Blue-Grey Army will meet at 5:30 p.m. to plan the Olustee Battle Festival. The meeting will be at the school district central building, room 153, 409 SW St. Johns St. Jan. 6 Zuumba introduction A free introduction to Zumba class will be held from 3 to 4 p.m. at the Teen Town Recreation Building, 533 NW DeSoto St. For more information, contact Sarah Sandlin as (386) 758-0009 or visit Lake City Zumba on Facebook. Zumba weight loss The Lake City Zumba Loser weight-loss contest will begin at 4 p.m. at the Teen Town Recreation Building, 533 NW DeSoto St. For more information, contact Sarah Sandlin as (386) 758-0009 or visit Lake City Zumba on Facebook. Jan. 8 Medicare seminar LifeStyle Enrichment Center will have a free Medicare seminar from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. The semi nar will be moderated by Irv Crowetz of C/C & Associates. Call 755-3476, extension 107, to reserve a seat. COMMUNITY CALENDAR To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr @lakecityreporter.com. COURTESY PHOTO Ken Hohmann, seen here portraying Santa Claus outside of Walmart, is a staple around Lake City this time of year. For more than 20 years, he has portrayed Santa for the Salvation Army, ringing bells at the old Kmart and now Walmart. He said he has many memories of his time ringing the bell for the Salvation Army, but one sticks out the most a 4-year-old girl gave him a kiss a candy kiss and told him it was for him, not for his wife. Longtime volunteer



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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDWEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2012 5B Classified Department: 755-5440 CLASSIFIED AD vantageTake ADvantage of the Reporter Classifieds!755-5440Lake City Reporter FIND IT SELL IT BUY IT $17504 lines 3 days Includes 2 Signs Each additional line $1.65 Garage Sale Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$10104 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.10One item per ad Under $500 Personal Merchandise Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$16754 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.15One item per ad Under $1,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less. Each item must include a price. 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General Information In Print and Onlinewww.lakecityreporter.com Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$2504 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $.25One item per ad Under $100 Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 ServicesWhite's Trucking Services You call & We Haul! Fill Dirt, Lime Rock. AsphaltMillings, Granite, Road Rock.386-362-8763 Legal2000 Lincoln Town Car; Med blue, leather, power seats & more. 147,400 miles, Exc condition. $3,490. 386-623-2848 COLUMBIACOUNTYBOARD OF COUNTYCOMMISSIONERSPROJECTNUMBER 2012-13Annual Guardrail ServicesNOTICE TOCONTRACTORSNotice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received in the Columbia County Manager’s office until 11:00 A.M. on December 20, 2012, for Co-lumbia County Project No. 2012-13. This office is located on the second floor of the Courthouse Annex at 135 Hernando Avenue, Room 203 Lake City FL32055.This project consists of installing guardrail at various locations throughout Columbia County.The scope of services consists of re-moving existing guardrail, repairing existing guardrail, and construction of new guardrail at various locations throughout Columbia County. This contract will be utilized on an "as needed" basis during Fiscal Year 2012/2013, which begins October 1, 2012, and ends September 30, 2013.The Bid Forms and Construction specifications may be obtained from the County’s web site at http://www.columbiacountyfla.com/PurchasingBids.asp. Deadline for questions regarding specifications and/or bid documents must be received before 11:00 P.M. on December 19, 2012.The successful bidder will be required to furnish the County Man-ager with proof of liability insurance prior to commencing work.The Columbia County Commission reserves the right to reject any or all bids and to add to the contract or delete from the contract to stay with-in their funding capabilities.Columbia County Board of County CommissionersStephen E. Bailey, Chair05536225December 12, 19, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO.: 12-2012-CA000519WELLS FARGO BANK, NA,Plaintiff,VS.BRANDON L. PHINNEYA/K/ABRANDON LANE PHINNEY; AR-RI A. PHINNEYA/K/AARRI PHINNEYN/K/AARRI ANN SIM-QUE; et al.,Defedant(s).NOTICE OF ACTIONTO: Unknown Spouse of Brandon L. Phinney A/K/ABrandon Lane Phin-ney and Arri A. Phinney A/K/AArri Phinney N/K/AArri Ann SimqueLast Known Residence: 167 SWCates St, Lake City, FL32024Brandon L. Phinney A/K./ABrandon Lane Phinney, Last Known Residence: Lot 9 Cates Road, Lake City, FL32024Current Residence unknownand all persons claiming by, through, under or against the named Defend-ants.YOU ARE HEREBYNOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mort-gage on the following property in COLUMBIACounty, Florida:LOT9, TIMBERLANE, ASUBDI-VISION ACCORDING TO THE MAPOR PLATTHEREOF AS RE-CORDED IN PLATBOOK 5, PAGE 126, PUBLIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on AL-DRIDGE / CONNORS, LLP, Plain-tiff’s attorney, at 7000 West Palmet-to Park Road, Suite 307, Boca Raton, FL33433 (Phone Number: (561) 392-6391), within 30 days of the first date of publication of this notice, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before 1/4/2013 on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief de-manded in the complaint or petition.Dated on 12/4/2012.P. DEWITTCASONAs Clerk of the CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioAs Deputy ClerkSEAL05536335December 19, 26, 2012 REGISTRATION OFFICTITIOUS NAMESWethe undersigned, being duly sworn, do hereby declare under oath that the names of all persons interest-ed in the business or profession carried on under the name of BELLALUNAKNITS, 18387 SWHIGHWAY47, FORTWHITE, FL32038.Contact Phone Number: (352) 514-4360 and the extent of the interest of each, is as follows:Name: KIM SHEFFIELDExtent of Interest: 100%by:/s/ KIM SHEFFIELDSTATE OF FLORIDACOUNTYOF COLUMBIASworn to and subscribed before me this 17TH day of DECEMBER, A.D. 2012.By:/s/ DOROTHYL. SPENCER05536403DECEMBER 19, 2012 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE 3RD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.CASE No.: 11-472CAWELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR THE REGIS-TERED HOLDERS OF STRUC-TURED ASSETSECURITIES CORPORATION MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFI-CATES, SERIES 2007-OSI,Plaintiff,vs.Diane R. Zwick and Wesley ZwickDefendants.NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANTTO CHAPTER 45NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated December 5th, 2012 and entered in Case No. 11-472CAof the Circuit Court of the 3rd Judicial Circuit in and for Co-lumbia County, Florida, wherein, WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR THE REGIS-TERED HOLDERS OF STRUC-TURED ASSETSECURITIES CORPORATION MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFI-CATES, SERIES 2007-OSI, is Plaintiff and Diane R. Zwick and Wesley Zwick, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the 3rd Floor of the Colum-bia County Courthouse located at 173 N.E. Hernando Street, Lake City, FLat 11:00 o’clock A.M. on the 9th day of Jan., 2013 the follow-ing described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to wit:PARCEL1:Apart of Northeast 1/4 of Section 3, Township 7 South, Range 16 East, Columbia County, Florida, more par-ticularly described as follows:Commence at the Northwest corner of said Northeast 1/4 and run N 87 deg. 30’16” E, along the North line thereof, 659.33 feet for a Point of Beginning; thence continue N 87 deg. 30’16” E, 659.34 feet to the Northeast corner of the Northwest 1/4 of said Northeast 1/4; thence s 1 deg. 48’26” e 662.00 feet; thence s 87 deg. 30’16”W658.10 feet; thence N 1 deg. 54’51” W, 661.98 feet to the Point of BeginningAND PARCEL2:Section 3, Township 7 South, Range 16 East: Begin at the Northwest cor-ner of the Northeast 1/4 of the North-east 1/4 for Point of Beginning; run S. 87 deg. 30’27” W, 772.32 feet; thence run N 1 deg. 37’02” W, 56.4 feet; thence run N 87 deg. 30’27” E, 772.32 feet; thence run S 1 deg. 37'02” E, 56.4 feet to the Point of Beginning, being in Section 34, Township 6 South, Range 16 East, Columbia County, Florida.Together with the Right of Ingress and Egress over and across the fol-lowing described parcel: Commence at the Northwest corner of said Northeast 1/4, Section 3, Township 7 South, Range 16 East, Columbia County, Florida, and run N 87 deg. 30’16” E, along the North linethereof, 659.33 feet; thence S 1 deg. 54’51” E, 661.98 feet for a Point of Beginning of said easement; thence N 87 deg. 30’16” E, 326.82 feet; thence S 1 deg. 48’26” E 60.00 feet; thence N 87 deg. 30’16” E, 331.28 feet; thence S 1 deg. 8’26” E 60.00 feet; thence S 87 deg. 30’16” W, 343.96 feet; thence N 2 deg. 01’18” W,60.00 feet; thence N 87 deg. 30’16” E, 77.35 feet to the Point of Beginning, Columbia County, Flori-da.Street Address: 307 SWMelville Glen, Fort White FL32038and all fixtures and personal property located therein or thereon, which are included as security in Plaintiff’s mortgage.Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the list pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.Dated at Lake City, Columbia Coun-ty, Florida, this 6th day of Dec., 2012.Dewitt CasonClerk of said Circuit CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioAs Deputy ClerkSEAL05536364December 19, 26, 2012 NOTICE OF SALEGateway Mini–Warehouses will of-fer for sale the contents of the fol-lowing units which contain:person-al, household goods, and business items:Unit# Name8Cicarra Sharnea Denitra Gibson37Christopher John Boucher72Erical Lynn Shaw78Marquite Leuwance Odom82Rachel Merrick103Bobby Cagle106Debra Griffis139Danamarie Works149Phyllis J. Boswell156Glenda Milton Buckner170Mary MacDonald204Elizabeth Ann Lott 240Samantha Jean Griffin275Amy Alicia Sherell Smith277Frank Costello284Ashley & Robert Hargrove291Curtis Marshall426Sitel439Robin Johnson440Robin JohnsonThe sale will be held on Tuesday, January 8, 2013 at 9:00 AM at:Gateway Mini-Warehouses4158 West US Highway 90Lake City, Florida32055(Some units located at NWChristian Court) The contents of the units may be viewed at this time and bids submit-ted.Upon notification of acceptance of bid, payment must be made in full, cash only, and the contents re-moved.Sale is subject to cancella-tion in the event of settlement be-tween the owner and the obligated party.Gateway Mini-Warehouses reserves the right to bid.05536401December 19, 26, 2012 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITOF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, I NAND FOR COLUMBIACOUN-TYCIVILDIVISIONCASE NO. 11-000628-CAFIRSTFEDERALBANK OF FLORIDA,Plaintiff,vs.COLIN P. WILLIAMSON; UN-KNOWN SPOUSE OF COLIN P. WILLIAMSON; IF LIVING, IN-CLUDING ANYUNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RE-SPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGN-EES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALLOTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTTHE NAMED DE-FENDANT(S); UNKNOWN TEN-ANT#1; UNKNOWN TENANT#2;Defendant(s)NOTICE OF SALENotice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Columbia County, Florida, I will sell to property situate in Columbia County, Florida, described as:Northwest 1/4 of Southeast 1/4 of Northeast 1/4, LESS AND EXCEPTthe 25 feet off the North side for road, in Section 5, Township 4 South, Range 16 East, lying and be-ing in Columbia County, Florida. Al-so known as the North 1/2 of Lot 21 of Cason Tract, and unrecorded sub-division.A/K/A434 SWRiddle LnLake City, FL32024at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, in Courtroom 1 lo-cated at the Columbia County Court-house, 173 NE Hernando Street, Lake City, FL32056 at 11:00, on 1/16/13.Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-er than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the e sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 30th day of Nov., 2012.CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURTBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkSEALAMERICAN WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a dis-ability who requires accommoda-tions in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of cer-tain assistance. Individuals with a disability who require special accom-modations in order to participate in a court proceeding should contact the ADACoordinator, 173 NE Hernan-do Avenue, Room 408, Lake City, FL32055, (386) 719-7428, within two (2) business days of receipt of notice to appear.Individuals who are hearing impaired should call (800) 955-8771. Individ-uals who are voice impaired should call (800) 955-8770.05536217December 12, 19, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NUMBER: 12-193-CAJ.L. DICKSPlaintiff,vs.ROBERTK. DIETRICH AND BRENDAL. DIETRICH,Defendants.CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE UN-DER F.S. CHAPTER 45NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accord-ance with the Summary Final Judg-ment of Foreclosure dated December 5th, 2012, in the above styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bid-der for cash in Courtroom 1, Colum-bia County Courthouse in Lake City, Florida, at 11:00 A.M. on 1/9/2013, the following described property:Parcel 3 NorthCommence at the NE corner of the S 1/2 of the NE 1/4 of the NW1/4 of Section 4, Township 7 South, Range 17 East and run S 8804’30” Walong the North line of the S 1/2 of the N 1/2 of said NW1/4 725.80 feet to the POINTOF BEGINNING; thence continue S 8804’30” W, 406.0 feet; thence S 216’53” E, 591.46 feet; thence S. 7538’21” E 421.76 feet; thence N 0216’53” W709.76 feet to the POINTOF BE-GINNING. Columbia County, Flori-da.TOGETHER WITH AND SUB-JECTto an easement for ingress and egress 30.00 feet to the right and 30.00 feet to the left of the following described centerline: Commence at the NE corner of the S 1/2 of the NE 1/4 of the NW1/4 of Section 4, Township 7 South, Range 17 East, and run thence S 8804’30” Walong the North line of the S 1/2 of the N 1/2 of said NW1/4, 725.80 feet; thence S 0216’53” E 679.76 feet to the POINTOF BEGINNING; thence continue S 0216’53” E 700.00 feet to the existing right-of-way of Old Bellamy Road and the Termination Point.ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN IN-TERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS FILED HEREIN MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITH THIS COURTWITHIN SIXTY(60) LegalDAYS AFTER THE DATE OF THE SALE.Dated this 6th day of December, 2012.P. DeWITTCASONClerk of CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy Clerk05536390December 19, 26, 2012 020Lost & Found 11/28/12 Horse found Mason City area. Call to identify. 727-686-7156 Cash Reward if returned w/ items inside. Lost Blk Brief zip case, Medical, Military, & Misc records inside. FOUND 100Job Opportunities05536167Local insurance agency seeks Licensed CSR Experience preferred. Send reply to Box 05099, C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056 05536269H&RBLOCK in Branford and Starke has immediate openings for experienced tax professionals. For more information please email a resume to bkoon@Hughes.net or fax a resume to our District Office at (352)493-7422. DRIVERS: ALLMiles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-ACDLFlatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down. 866-823-0323 Mechanic needed at Fla.Rock & Tank Lines In White Springs. Diesel exprnc reqr'd in maintenance & repair of tractor trailers. 45-50hrs/wk Class A CDLlicense preferred. Excellent Benefits! email: mcomer@patriottrans.com or fax 904-858-9008 Must have a minimum of 5 yrs Exp. selling HVAC Equipment. Excellent benefits &Great pay. Call Allen 386-628-1093 SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 Seeking a Phone Salesperson for a local mortgage company. Inbound & outbound calls. No experience is necessary. Must have happy, energetic personality. Email resume to: lakecityresume@yahoo.com Service Techs & Installers Must be EPA& NATE certified. Excellent benefits & great pay. Call Allen (386) 628-1093 120Medical EmploymentBusy Family Practice Office Seeks FTNursing Personnel Medical Office Exp Preferred Fax Resumes to 719-9494 GIEBEIG FAMILYMEDICINE P/THousekeeper Needed Occasional Nights And Weekends. Fax Resume to 386-487-1232 240Schools & Education05535484Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class12/24/2012• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-11/05/12• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 409Jewelry 14 K gold Diamond Ring, sz 6 14 Flawless Diamonds 1.5k. Sold gold. Very little wear. 365-3895 $6,000 430Garage Sales PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 440Miscellaneous 4-WHEELER HONDA TRX 300 EX Exc. Cond., Fast $2900 Neg (386) 344-3836 M&M Fitness Closing Sale Cybex, Nautilus, and free weight Equipment, Treadmills, Elliptical, Stairmasters, and bikes. Aerobic Steps, mats, hand weights, etc. Office furniture, copiers, & more. Great for business or home. Must sell quick. Call for prices 752-1652 450Good Things to EatThe Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans 2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024 Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville 386-963-4138 or 961-1420 630Mobile Homes forRent2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $450. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 2 BR/1BA $475/mth. Located in center of Lake City Close to Everything !!! 305-984-5511 or 386-344-0830 Mobile Homes for rent in White Springs & Ft. White. Contact 386-623-3404 Quiet Country Park 3br/2ba $525. Very clean NO PETS! References & Deposit required 386-758-2280 640Mobile Homes forSale1600 SQFT, 3/2 DWMH, close to town, country setting on 2 ac. Reduced to $49,000 (short sale) Poole Realty 362-4539. MLS 82068 2 MFG HOMES on 5 ACRES! Great for 2 families in Godbold Acres west of Lake City $79,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCY INC. 755-5110 #81421 2013 DOUBLEWIDE $33,995 inc. set-up, trim-out & A/C Call 386-288-8379. 3BR/2BA28X64 in a great location, a lot of upgrades, fireplace. Only $2,500 down $399 a month. Call Paula at 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com 4br 2b open/split floor plan MH w/wood flooring, newly painted, large stone fireplace. MLS 82326 Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $74,000 5 LIKENew Mobile Homes!!! For under $30,000. MUSTSEE Call John T. 386-752-1452 Bank owned, Cozy 1/1 home in Lake C community $55,000. MLS 81365 Poole Realty 362-4539. $55,000 BANK REPO 3BR/2BADoublewide ’09 Excellent condition. Only $999 down $377 a month. Call Paula 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com Breathtaking 80 ac horse ranch w/ 7700 sqft home, heated pool, stocked pond, workout facility MLS 82156 Poole Realty 362-4539. short sale $950,000 CLOSE TO VAMED CTR! 3BR/2BAw/beautiful interior, new CH&A$59,900 DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #81428 EASTSIDE VILLAGE 2BR/2BAw/lg kitchen, open floor plan $79,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #80972 Hardwood floors, formal dining room, great rm, f/p, double car garage. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 MLS 82374 $243,900 LIVE OAK! Cute home in city limits; 3BR/1BA& 1,294 SqFt $49,500 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #81410 MUSTSEE 2013 2x6 walls, R30 insulation, OSB wrap, house wrap, real wood cabinets, and thermal pain windows. Payment $399 per month call John T386-752-1452.REPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Linewww.lakecityreporter.com



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By JESSICA GRESKO Associated Press WASHINGTON It happens every week at meetings in towns, coun ties and cities nationwide. A lawmaker or religious leader leads a prayer before officials begin the business of zoning changes, con tract approvals and trash pickup. But citizens are increas ingly taking issue with these prayers, some of which have been in place for decades. At least five lawsuits around the coun try in California, Florida, Missouri, New York, and Tennessee are actively challenging pre-meeting prayers. Lawyers on both sides say there is a new com plaint almost weekly, though they dont always end up in court. When they do, it seems even courts are struggling to draw the line over the acceptable ways to pray. Some lawyers and lawmakers believe its only a matter of time before the Supreme Court will weigh in to resolve the differences. The court has previously declined to take on the issue, but lawyers in a New York case asked the justices to revisit it in a petition filed in early December. And even if the court doesnt take that par ticular case, it could accept a similar one in the future. Lawmakers who defend the prayers cite the nations founders and say theyre following a long tradition of prayer before public meet ings. They say residents dont have to participate and having a prayer adds solemnity to meetings and serves as a reminder to do good work. Its a reassuring feeling, said Lakeland, Fla., Mayor Gow Fields of his citys prayers, which have led to an ongoing legal clash with an atheist group. The City Commissions meeting agenda now begins with a disclaimer that any prayer offered before the meeting is the voluntary offering of a private citizen and not being endorsed by the commission. Citizens and groups made uncomfortable by the prayers say theyre fighting an inappropriate mix of reli gion and politics. It makes me feel unwelcome, said Tommy Coleman, the son of a church pianist and a selfdescribed secular human ist who is challenging pre-meeting prayers in Tennessees Hamilton County. Coleman, 28, and Brandon Jones, 25, are urg ing the county to adopt a moment of silence at its weekly meeting rather than beginning with a prayer. A number of groups are willing to help with com plaints like those filed by Coleman and Jones. Annie Laurie Gaylor, the co-found er of the Wisconsin-based Freedom From Religion Foundation, says com plaints about the prayers are among the most frequent her organization gets. Gaylors organization sends out letters when it is contacted by citizens, urging lawmakers to dis continue the prayers. Other groups including the American Civil Liberties Union and the Washingtonbased Americans United for Separation of Church and State send out similar letters. Ian Smith, a lawyer with Americans United for Separation of Church and State, says his organization has gotten more complaints in recent years. That could be because people are more comfortable standing up for themselves or more aware of their options, but Smith also said groups on the right have also promoted the adoption of prayers. Brett Harvey, a lawyer at the Arizona-based Alliance Defending Freedom, a Christian group that often helps towns defend their practices, sees it the other way. He says liberal groups have made a coordinated attempt to bully local gov ernments into abandoning prayers, resulting in more cases. Its really kind of a cam paign of fear and disinfor mation, Harvey said. Harvey has talked with hundreds of towns about their policies and been involved in about 10 court cases in the past three years. Right now, his advice differs for different parts of the country because the law is in flux. Courts around the coun try dont agree on whats acceptable or havent con sidered the issue. In 1983 the U.S. Supreme Court approved prayer before legislative meetings, say ing prayers dont violate the First Amendments so-called Establishment Clause, which prohib its the government from favoring one religion over another. But the case didnt set any boundaries on those prayers, and today courts disagree on what is permissible. 6A LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 19, 2012 Page Editor: JIm Barr, 754-0424 6A and soreness aches THG-12902 COURTESY PHOTO Soup for Seniors collection SunCrest Omni homecare members pose with some of the food they collected to be donated to the Community Food Bank. The staff and our referral sources donated just over 230 pounds of food in Suncrests Soup for Seniors food drive.The staff welcomed the opportunity to give back and share with others in the community that may not be so fortunate. COURTESY PHOTO Toys for abused, neglected children Toys, bicycles and other gifts collected by Columbia County Corrections Institution staff fill an office at the corrections facility on Dec. 10. The gifts later were delivered for the local Guardian Ad Litem program to be distributed to 53 local children who were sponsored by the correctional institution and the Region II Business Office. The toy collection has been an annual activity of the institution for the past several years. COURTESY PHOTO Epiphany Catholic School Angel Project For the second year in a row, Epiphany Catholic School and Church collaborated to collect gifts and necessities for Catholic Charities to distribute to children in need. Approximately 400 gifts were collected this year. Pictured are eighth-grade-students from Epiphany and representatives from Catholic Charities: (from left) Brandon Gaylord, Camille Florez, Dakota Stitsinger, Suzanne Edwards of Catholic Charities, Steven Jones, Sarah Mehalko, Pam Knighton Catholic Charities, Ryan Kasak and Jared Ordinario. COURTESY PHOTO Epiphany students participate in 12-12-12 Epiphany students assisted Catholic Charities with the recent 12-12-12 project. On Dec. 12, eighth-grade students helped bag and distribute food to those in need in Jennings. One of the bilingual students assisted with translations throughout the event.The students also helped clean up the distribution site, Jennings Public Library, when the event was over. SEASON OF GIVING Some of the many ways Lake City area people and organizations are working to make Christmas merrier for those less fortunate. At public meetings, fights over prayer drag on



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Call 888-203-3179 www.CenturaOnline.com _____________________________ AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualied Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 _____________________________ ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualied.SCHEV authorized. Call www.CenturaOnline.com 888-203-3179 _____________________________ OTR Drivers Wanted Drivers Class A Flatbed, HOME EVERY WEEKEND! Pay 37¢/mi, Both ways, FULL BENEFITS, Requires 1 year OTR Flatbed experience. (800)572-5489 x227, SunBelt Transport, Jacksonville, FL _____________________________ TIRED OF LIVING PAYCHECK TO PAYCHECK? There’s great earning potential as a Professional Truck Driver! The average Professional Truck Driver earns over $700/wk*! 16-Day CDL Training @ NFCC/Roadmaster! Approved for Veterans Training. CALL TODAY! (866)467-0060 *DOL/BLS 2012 _____________________________ Real Estate/ Land for Sale _____________________________ 20 ACRES FREE! Own 60 acres for 40 acre price/payment. $0 Down, $168/mo. Money Back Guarantee, NO CREDIT CHECKS. Beautiful Views, West Texas. (800)843-7537 www.sunsetranches.com _____________________________ Skilled Trades/ Crafts _____________________________ Experienced Telephone Lineman Must have Class “A” CDL Current medical certication Ability to travel Benets, vacation, holidays Contact Jeannette @ 814-474-1174 Or email resume to Jeannettebrown@thayerpc.com Week of December 17, 2012 2007 Signature Lincoln Town Car28,200 miles$15,500 386-397-3568 640Mobile Homes forSaleResults Realty Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 4/2 on 10 Ac home features 2200 heated sqft. 10x20 frame shed. MLS# 76582 $67,500 WANTED…CASH PAID for your Mobile Home, Singlewide or Doublewide flood homes welcome. Call 386-288-8379 Palm Harbor Homes 4/2 From 499 Mo Loaded3/2 From 399 Mo Loaded Homes on Your Lot 0 Down 800-622-2832 WOODGATE VILLAGE Move-in ready! Open 3BR/2BA floor plan on nice shaded lot $49,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC 755-5110 #82259 WOODGATE VILLAGE Nice 3BR/2BADWMH w/fenced yd, workshop; $39,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCY, INC 755-5110 #79078 650Mobile Home & Land2/1 MH, completely remodeled. Custom Floors on 5 ac. w/ 2 stall horse barn. MLS # 79025 $49,900 Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Results Realty 2br/2ba on 3.51 ac, 1512 sqft DW perfect Rental, Lg deck, MLS # 82216 Results Realty Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 $49,900 FSBO 5 ac lot w/ 1995 refurb. MH. 66ft long w/ new roof & wheel chair ramp. $5,000 down Owner Fin. on Balance Approx 5 miles N. of LC. 386-752-4597 Great Value 24 acres, 3/2 DWMH, front porch, full length of MH, open floor plan. MLS 79000. Poole Realty Nelda Hatcher. 688-8067 Hallmark Real Estate $34,400. 3/2 MH in O’Brien. On 4 Ac. Case#091-374923 www.hudhomestore.com Robin Williams (386)365-2135 MLS 81700 Hallmark Real Estate Beautiful 4.38 Ac with 4/2 MH. Master has separate office/den area. Large living room with fireplace. Janet Creel (386)719-0382 MLS#82465 Hallmark Real Estate Beautiful Pasture, fenced for horses, well kept 3/2 M/H Great front & back porch to enjoy nature. Robin Williams (386)365-5146 MLS#80899 Hallmark Real Estate Just Reduced! Home & office over 1900sqft with glassed porch centrally located in town. Janet Creel (386)719-0382 MLS#81207 Hallmark Real Estate Live better for less! 3/2.5 Brick home on an acre. Inground Pool. F/p. Lrg oak trees. S. Columbia County. Ginger Parker(386)365-2135 MLS#81183 Hallmark Real Estate This is it! This 3/2 Home on a corner lot. Close to all amenities. Private fenced backyard. Paula Lawrence (386)623-1973 MLS#79943 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05536252$100 off December's rentMust be presented at the time of application. $89 Deposit Windsong Apts. 386-758-8455 2 bedroom / 1 Bath Apts for rent in Live Oak. Call for price. Contact 386-623-3404 & 386-362-9806 Amberwood Hills Apts. Private Patio area. Beautiful yard. Washer/dryer hkup. Free water & sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special. 386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com Brandywine & Branford Apartments Now Renting 1, 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-752-3033 W. Grandview Ave. Equal Housing Opportunity TDD Number 1-800-955-8771 BRANFORD VILLAS 386-935-2319 2br/1ba Apts. Now available.$570. mo. TDD number 1-800-955-8771 Equal Housing Opportunity Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2 mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet Friendly. Pool laundry & balcony. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A$530 month $530 deposit garbage included. No pets. 386-344-2170 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Greentree Townhouse Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free water & sewer. Balcony & patio. Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com Redwine Apartments Pets welcome. with 5 complexes, we have a home for you. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRentWayne ManorApts. Spacious 2bedroom washer/dryer. Behind Kens off Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 www .myflapts.com WindsorArms Apartments. Move in! 2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free 200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent3bdrm very spacious, 2ba, garage, CH/AFenced in backyard. $1,400 mth & $1,400 dep. Contact 386-344-1914 3br/1.5ba. Very clean, Brick great area w/bonus room. Carport, shed & Fenced (privacy) back yard. $825. mo $825. dep. Ref’s req’d. (941)920-4535 NICE 3/2 brick home w/garage in quiet neighborhood. 489 SWBrandy. $900 plus sec. dep. 386-438-4600 750Business & Office RentalsMedical, Retail and Professional Office space on East Baya near Old Country Club Rd. Call 386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622 (cell) Office or Retail Space. Many to choose from. Tom Eagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor 805Lots forSale 2 Ac lot in Timberlake S/D. $135,000 MLS # 79025 Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Results Realty 3 Acres in White Springs, Commercial usage, city sewer. Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS $175,000 MLS 82358 Beautiful log home located on 5 ac, well maintained, wrap around porch. MLS 75550 $189,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #80401 $60,000. Must be 55+ 130x750 right on Suwannee, Beautiful lot, minutes from Royal Springs, Denise Bose 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #76668 $32,000 Must be 55+, Buildable lot for site built homes only. In Forest Country. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Great home, Emerald Lakes, well kept, split floor plan, oversized family room, MLS# 79733 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Missy Zecher 623-0237 $169,900 Great starter, corner lot, needs some TLC, close to town MLS 81784 $90,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Owner financed land 1/2 to 10 acre lots. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 810Home forSale 3br/2ba plus office, 2103 heated sqft, wood floors, large patio MLS # 81984 Swift Creek Realty $229,900 (386) 496-0499 58 Ac, Suwannee County, 3br/2ba newly remodeled horse barns & tack.MLS 81002 Swift Creek Realty $650,000 (386) 496-0499 Access Realty Gorgeous views 3bd/3ba on Lake Montgomery. Elevator, fishing dock & jacuzzi. MLS 81438 $249,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 810Home forSale Access RealtySpacious 4 bd/3ba Cypress Lake w/ 3643 sqft 1.25 acres on lake. Vaulted ceilings. MLS 81314 $279,900. Patti Taylor386-623-6896 Access RealtyTwo story 1895 Victorian house w/ electrical upgrades throughout. double -deck porches, MLS 71594 $149,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Beautiful 2 story w/ upgrades, open kitchen, granite counter tops, great room w/ stone f/p. MLS 81994 Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $435,000 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Country Home, 3br 3 bath, spacious, close to Suwannee & Santa Fe River MLS 81775, $169,900 Elaine Tolar 755-6488 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty MLS 80175, 4br 3ba & 2.5 ba colonial, 3 fireplaces $315,000 Mary Brown Whitehurst. 965-0887 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty 3br 3ba home with a two story duplex. Owner Financing MLS 80915, Elaine Tolar 365-1548 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Building lots: May-Fair, Cannon Creek, Creek Run & Meadow View. Elaine Tolar 386-365-1548 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Home with 5+ ac 3b 2.5 ba, large kitchen covered deck MLS 81630 Elaine Tolar 365-1548 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty 230 Acres, Col. Co. Paved Rd. 752-4211 MLS 70453 Country home, wood burning f/p, granite counter tops, vaulted ceilings in living room. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 MLS 82022, $240,000 Custom home, located on 6.05 ac. Pecan grove w/ rolling hills in Equestrian Comm. Remax Professionals Missy Zecher 623-0237 $269,000 MLS 81075 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81959 Must be 55+, 2br/2ba, $79,900. Site Built Home w/eat in kitchen, laundry rm, scrn porch. Denise Bose @ 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81958-, $115,000. Must be 55+, 3br/2ba, Site Built w/ lots of room, split plan mstr suite, FL. Rm. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Hallmark Real Estate Brick Home on 6.3 acres 4bd 2.5ba with large 32X20 Deck & Gazebo. Solid wood cabinets Kay Priest(386)365-8888 MLS#82488 Hallmark Real Estate Short Sale Brick home corner lot 2600 SQFT, fenced back yard. Located minutes from town. Paula Lawrence (386)623-1973 MLS 82491 Ichetucknee River 3br/2ba + loft, 1350 sqft. Hardwood floors, f/p, granite counters Swift Creek Realty $399,000 (386) 496-0499 Just listed unique home with 2800 sqft of living space, located on 1.37 acres in Live Oak, MLS 82214, Poole Realty $67,500. 362-4539 Lake Front property w/ 137 ft frontage, eat-in kitchen, screened deck w/ view quality furnishings. MLS 81850 Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 $119,000 Open floor plan, covered back patio. Lots of big windows, new carpet & paint, beautiful ceramic tile Century 21 Darby Rogers MLS 82078, 752-6575 810Home forSale Remax Jo Lytte 386-365-2821 Ichetucknee River front 4b/3.5b 2 fireplaces, 2 story home. MLS 81777 $559,000 Ultimate River Experience. Santa Fe River home 2br/2b, granite tops, wood burning heater & open great room. Too many extras to mention. Jo Lytte Remax MLS 81537 $339,000 Spectacular 3br/2b home, great room French doors, 10 aces, w/ barn MLS 79593. Jo Lytte Remax 386-365-2821 $349,800 820Farms & AcreageAccess Realty10 acre square tract, High & Dry, OF Avail. w/ 25% down. Convenient Location MLS 81258$39,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access Realty43.64 acres wooded acreage in N.Columbia County. Scenic & Private. MLS 74429 $89,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 830Commercial Property260 S. Marion Ave. 2641 s.f of Office Space. Can be subdivided. $5-$7/sf. No CAM. Prorata for utilities. Call Mika (352) 359-604 Industrial warehouse7+ acres fenced 17,000 sq ft Barn $1,500 mo. TomEagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 nr 5 a week days Lake City Reporter



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By JENNIFER KAY Associated Press CORAL GABLES Almost three years after an earthquake toppled the Roman Catholic and Episcopal cathedrals in Haitis capital, visions for their resurrection have started to take shape as officials from both church es begin considering pro posals to rebuild them. A six-member panel led by the dean of the University of Miamis School of Architecture met this week in South Florida to choose the winner of a design competition that sought ideas for rebuild ing the Notre Dame de lAssomption Cathedral. Meanwhile, Episcopal Church officials have selected a Virginiabased architectural firm to design a new Holy Trinity Cathedral. Both cathedrals col lapsed in the Jan. 12, 2010, earthquake that leveled much of Port-auPrince. Their destruc tion left people yearn ing for the comfort of public monuments, said Haitian-American writer Edwidge Danticat, one member of the jury that met in Coral Gables to select the winner from 134 designs submitted as part of the Notre Dame com petition. When so much is cha otic and so much is not in an ideal state, its wonder ful to have beautiful things around us, spiritual things that connect our human ity. I think a cathedral is one of those things, said Danticat. Kings, presi dents have walked in it, but so have the poorest people in the neighborhood. The jurys other mem bers are Haitian architect and former government minister Patrick Delatour, the editor-in-chief of Faith & Form magazine, a litur gical consultant and a structural engineer spe cializing in disaster recon struction. Haitis recovery from the quake has been slow, and Catholic Church offi cials hope their project will encourage more recon struction. We really feel the cathe dral had to be a flagship for this effort, not only for the church but also for the entire capital, said Yves Savain, a consultant to the Archdiocese of Portau-Prince and the competi tions coordinator. Page Editor: JIm Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 19, 2012 7A 7A Be c ome a v olu n t eer with Florida s LongT erm Ca r e Ombudsman P r og r am. The Ombudsman P r og r am is a s t a t ewide ad v o c acy o r g ani z a on seeking t o ensu r e the health, s a f e t y w el f a r e and rig h ts of Florida s elde r s who r eside in nu r sing homes, assi s t ed living f acili es and adult f amily c a r e homes. Bene ts of v olu n t eering with us include: Me e t and i n t e r act with othe r s who sha r e a passion f or v olu n t eerin g pe r sonal ful llme n t and g r owth. Gi v e back t o the c ommunity and seek t o ma k e a posi v e di e r ence in the li v es of longt erm c a r e f acility r eside n ts. R ecei v e milea g e r eimbu r seme n t as w ell as support f r om s t a t e and lo c al s t a Apply t od a y! T o learn mo r e c all 1-888-831-0404 or visit ombudsman. m orida.com online. 866-314-3769 AIRLINES ARE HIRING Falling Creek Chapel will be having its annual Christmas Eve Service at 6:30PM. All are welcome. Two escape from high-rise jail JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City Reporter Award-winning work Volunteers and staff members of the Catholic Charities Lake City Regional Office pose for a photograph after Catholic Charities Chief Operating Officer Suzanne Edwards awarded the group with the organizations annual Grace Award on Friday. The group was recognized for their outstanding service shown throughout multiple programs as well as the response seen during Tropical Storm Debby. The grace you do in everyday work cannot be thanked enough, Edwards said. Without you, this organization doesnt work. COURTESY PHOTO Tailer raffle winner Cody Witt (second from left) was the winner of a trailer raffle at Florida Gateway College. The trailer, which was designed and built by the FGC Welding Club students, was raffled to students, faculty, staff, and community members. More than $2,500 was raised. New Millennium, Co2 Gas, Fastenal, Metal Masters and Advance Auto Parts contributed to the project. Pictured are (from left) John Piersol, executive director of Industrial and Agricultural Programs at the college; Witt; Joe Ganser, welding instructor; and Carl Romano, coordinator of Industrial Technology. COURTESY PHOTO Corrections officers complete training Columbia County Corrections Institution Warden Wellhausen and the administration congratu lated four officers for graduating from the 12-week Basic Corrections Recruit Academy on Dec. 10. They are (from left) R. Rodriquez, R. Edwards, J. Lee, J. Rice, and C. Cowling. The officers are scheduled to take the Florida Department of Law Enforcement exam next week. Associated Press CHICAGO Two bank robbers pulled off a dar ing escape from downtown Chicagos high-rise jail Tuesday by apparently scal ing down about 20 stories using a makeshift rope tied to the bars in a cell window. Police helicopters and canine units swarmed the area, but not until more than three hours after Joseph Jose Banks and Kenneth Conley went unac counted for during a 5 a.m. headcount, U.S. Marshals Service spokeswoman Belkis Cantor said. Both men were still at large late Tuesday night. Investigators found a bro ken window in the mens cell, where window bars were found inside a mat tress, according to an FBI affidavit filed late Tuesday. Fake metal bars also were found in the mens cell, a rope was tied to a window bar, and each mans bed was stuffed with clothing and sheets to resemble a body, the affidavit said. It appeared to illustrate a meticulously planned escape from the 27-story facility that came a week after Banks made a court room vow of retribution. Both men face hefty prison sentences, and the FBI said they should be considered armed and dangerous. By GARY FINEOUT Associated Press TALLAHASSEE Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi is jumping into the twisting criminal case against a former aide to Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll, asking that an appeals court force a newspaper reporter to testify for the prosecution. Her offices filing on Friday with the 1st District Court of Appeal contends that the case against Carletha Cole could fall apart if prosecutors cant interview Matt Dixon, a reporter with The Florida Times-Union. Local pros ecutors asked for Bondis help. Cole was arrested in 2011 and accused of giving Dixon a secret recording containing a conversation between Cole and John Konkus, Carrolls chief of staff. The case has yet to go to trial, but has led to a swirl of allegations, including one in which Cole said she found Carroll in a com promising position with another female aide in the office. Carroll has called the allegations false and absurd. Prosecutors first tried to subpoena Dixon in October, but The Florida Times-Union fought the request. A circuit judge in November ruled against prosecutors, saying they did not show that there was a compelling reason for Dixon to testify. But Bondis office appealed that decision even though the criminal case is still pending. The appeal states that prose cutors want to ask Dixon if Cole ever told him she recorded Konkus without his knowledge. Assistant Attorney General Thomas Duffy argues that without Dixons testimony the criminal case could become no more than a swearing contest between workplace rivals if the defendant denies mak ing the recording without Mr. Konkus permission. Jenn Meale, a spokes woman for Bondi, said the attorney generals office pursued the appeal at the request of State Attorney Willie Meggs. Meale said that prosecutors wanted a higher court to review a ruling that they believe was handled incorrectly by Judge Frank Sheffield. Under Florida law, jour nalists have limited pro tection from testifying in cases they are involved with professionally. The Florida TimesUnion said it will fight the appeal. We dont think jour nalists belong on witness stands and giving deposi tions, said Times-Union editor Frank Denton. Surely there are other ways the state can make its case. The newspaper in 2011 placed on its website the recording between Cole and Konkus. Konkus can be heard saying that Gov. Rick Scotts then-chief of staff, Steve MacNamara, is afraid of Carroll. Konkus also complained that Scott is not leading. Cole, who was fired last year, is charged with the third-degree felony of dis closure of intercepted oral or electronic communica tion and could face up to five years in prison. It is illegal in Florida to record someone without the per sons consent, although there have been legal ques tions about whether the law applies in public buildings. This summer Coles law yers filed court documents that included numerous allegations about Carroll and others in her office. Cole alleged that Konkus recorded conversations routinely at the direction of those working for Scott. That court filing also alleged that Cole was ordered by travel aide Beatriz Ramos to find adjoining hotel rooms for Carroll and Ramos when they traveled and that she witnessed Ramos and Carroll together. Cole served as a spokeswoman among other duties. Carroll, a former Navy officer who is also married and a mother of three, has blasted the allegations and said they were an attempt by Cole to get her crimi nal charges dropped. A spokesman for Scott has previously denied that the governors office directed people to secretly record conversations. Lawyers for Cole last week filed a new request to question Carroll, Ramos and MacNamara. The Scott administration tried earli er this year to get Judge Sheffield to shield Ramos and Carroll from answer ing questions, but Sheffield has said Carroll could be forced to testify if he decides that she is relevant to Coles defense. Attorney general wants news reporter to testify Case involves former aide of lieutenant gov. Plans to rebuild Haitis cathedral begin to form



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8A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2012 Page Editor: JIm Barr, 754-04248A Celebrate the Rockin’ New Year at Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park & Campground 3 BIG NIGHTS OF GREAT MUSIC FRIDAYDEC 28SATURDAYDEC 29SUNDAYDEC 30 386-364-1683 3076 95TH DRIVE, LIVE OAK, FLORIDA 32060WWW.MusicLivesHere.COM HONKYTONK HITMEN JAMIE DAVIS BAND PETE HUNT & THE SOUTHERN BRANDED BAND r r r n • EBT • SNAP • Debit • All Major Credit Cards • No Rain Checks • While Supplies Last NettlesSmoked Turkeys $24.99each IBP CleanedPork Chitterlings5Lb. Bag $4.99each Nettles Sugar Cured SmokedWhole Hams $1.19Lb. Nettles Sugar CuredSmoked Picnics 99¢ Lb. NettlesPork Chops6Lb. Box $10.00 Boston ButtPork Roast2 Pack $1.29Lb. BonelessSirloin Tip RoastWhole In Bag $2.99Lb. BonelessTop Sirloin SteaksFamily Pack $3.99Lb. Boneless New YorkStrip SteaksWhole or Half Loin $4.99Lb. Bone-In RibeyeSteaks or RoastWhole or Half Loin $5.99Lb. Whole BonelessPork Loins $1.99Lb. Sanderson Farms FryerThighs or DrumsticksFamily Pack 99¢ Lb. Sanderson Farms Cryovac WholeFrying Chicken 99¢ Lb. Peeled BeefButt Tenderloin3 Lb. Avg. Wt. $6.99Lb. FreshGround ChuckFamily Pack $2.69Lb. Ad Good 12-17-12 through 12-24-12 Store Hours: Monday – Saturday 8am – 6pm Nettles Sausage190 SW CR 240 Lake City, FL 32025 (386) 752-2510 “Country Made By Country Folks” NettlesSmoked Hog Jowl $1.69Lb. Pre-CutOx Tails $3.99 Lb. JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterTerry Baker, PotashCorp White Springs general manage r, presents a check for $35,000 to Suzanne Edwards, chief operating officer of the Catholic C harities Lake City Regional Office, on Tuesday. The money will go to operating the charities’ Feed-A-Family Mobile Outreach program, which serves Columbia, Union, Hamilton, Suwanne e and Lafayette counties. JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterSiTEL team supervisor Tina Sharpe (left) and site directo r Steven Tye join Suzanne Edwards, chief operating officer of the Catholic Charities Lake City Regional Office, on Tuesday to show off food SiTEL donated to the agency. SiTEL donated about $1,1 00 worth of food, ncluding cereal, macaroni and cheese, peanut butter and canned tun a and canned vegetables. Helping Catholic Charities



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By KELLI KENNEDY Associated Press A highly touted new tech nology system designed to stop fraudulent Medicare payments before they are paid has saved about $115 million and spurred more than 500 investigations since it was launched in the summer of 2011, according to a report released Friday. Federal health officials said the projected sav ings are much higher. The savings so far, how ever, are minuscule com pared with the estimated $60 billion lost each year to Medicare fraud. With the Obama administration and Congress desperately looking for savings to avoid a budget meltdown, dent ing Medicare fraud has the potential to save billions of dollars annually. However, the Department of Health and Human Services inspector general noted the report had some inconsistencies in its data and questioned the meth odology for calculating some of the figures. In these cases, we could not determine the accuracy of the departments infor mation, which impeded our ability to quantify the amount of the inaccura cies noted in this report, the inspector generals office said in a review of the report. Officials in the office said regardless of the glitches, they believe the new fraud system is a use ful anti-fraud, too. The $77 million technol ogy system fights fraud in much the way credit card companies scan charges and can freeze accounts. It saved $32 million by kicking providers out of the program or refusing to pay suspicious claims. The report from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, obtained by The Associated Press, was unclear on how many actual providers were suspended or revoked from Medicare. The rest of the money, about $84 million, is pro jected savings flowing from those actions. For example, if a fraudulent provider has been billing Medicare for roughly $100 million a year for wheelchairs that patients never receive and they are kicked out of the program, officials estimat ed the program would save $100 million the next year. Medicare has been a highly sensitive political issue for the Obama admin istration since Democrats lost the House in 2010, partly due to a backlash from seniors over pro gram cuts to help finance the presidents health care overhaul. Since then, top officials have empha sized the administrations stewardship of Medicare, pointing to better benefits and an all-out campaign against fraud. Lawmakers from both parties, including Sen. Tom Carper, D-Del., and Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, have pressed health officials for months to release results on the system, complaining that without data, theres no accountability for the money spent and the prom ises made. Todays report shows that Medicare officials are clearly moving in the right direction when it comes to curbing waste and fraud, said Carper. Hatch spokeswoman Julia Lawless said the report seems promising at first glance but said Hatch will closely review it to see if the numbers still hold up under scrutiny. The systems projected savings are only for one year, but anti-fraud admin istrator Peter Budetti noted the actual savings could be much more because a provider that has been banished from the program could have stayed in the system for years, racking up hundreds of millions of dollars in bad claims. The bulk of the projected savings came in referrals to law enforcement that remain under investiga tion but will likely result in payment suspensions or kicking providers out of the program. Federal health officials did not say how many cases were pending but estimated about $68 million in potential savings in that category. Federal health officials have struggled with how to measure the success of the Fraud Prevention System. In the past, it was mea sured by how much money law enforcement officials recovered. Now, its based on how much money is saved before its paid. Data from the new sys tem also launched 536 investigations and provided information for 511 others already in progress, but its unclear what actions had been taken based on those investigations. We have shown this technology can work in fighting health care fraud, and we have seen encour aging results. The system is designed to grow in sophistication and complex ity, helping the government stay one step ahead of fraud sters, Budetti said. The new screening tech nology, which was mandat ed by Congress, is housed in the Baltimore area in a $3.6 million command center. In the past, investigators individually screened each claim as it came in, determin ing on face value whether it looked suspicious. Under the new system, claims are run through a series of sophisticated computer models that can spot suspi cious billing patterns and put that claim in the context of all the claims from that provider and claims from other providers in a particu lar industry. Wednesday, December 19, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 1C Travel hotspots in 2013 C2 1CACT2 1CACT2 1CACT2 1CACT2 1CACT2 Photos by Tony Brit/t Lake City Reporter Claudette Mears, a Columbia County Senior Services LifeStyles Enrichment Center senior ambassador, shows off some crafts she made in Claudette and Sheryls Happy Hands Crafts Class, which is held at the center. The red tree is made from a folded and painted magazine, and the green one is made from canning jar lids. New Medicare fraud detection system works About $115M saved since start of project in 2011 ACTIVE SENIORS Creative with crafts Women teach how to make art out of common materials By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com F rom forming Christmas trees and angel center pieces out of magazines to creating tissue-paper flowers, it takes imagina tion, time and creativity to make crafts come to life. Over the past two years Claudette Mears, a Columbia County Senior Services LifeStyles Enrichment Center senior ambassa dor, has proven she has all the tools it takes to create such craftwork. The door to her home offers proof of her talent with a miniature Christmas tree out of Mason jar tops and several other craft items she fashioned over the ages. Mears, 77, partners with Sheryl Marshall and the two volunteer their time to teach seniors how to make crafts through Claudette and Sheryls Happy Hands Crafts Class. The class is offered at LifeStyle Enrichment Center. Weve been doing this for a couple of years now, making vari ous items out of magazines, tissue paper and all kinds of artificial flowers, she said. I dont do it for glory. I do it because I enjoy doing it and letting the people take home something pretty that they enjoy. A lot of them have made doubles of our centerpieces that were made out of paper cone drinking cups. Mears moved to Columbia County in the summer of 2002 from the Fort Lauderdale area. I was always involved in organi zations that called for activities like Cub Scouts and other organizations and I enjoyed it, Mears said. At the LifeStyle Enrichment Center where Mears and Marshall teach their crafts classes, up to eight clients at a time can partici pate in a project. The projects nor mally last a month. The projects are done the entire year and the class is opened from 10 to 11:30 a.m. each Monday. I like making the paper cone ball centerpieces because we can go into springtime with that again and make either half ones or whole ones, Mears said. Mears is not a retired arts teacher or artist and she said her interests in making crafts is much more modest. Ive just always been interested in craftwork and doing craftwork in the past, she said. Mears said Marshall came up with the idea to fold the maga zines to make the centerpieces, but Hillary Yeager, LifeStyle Enrichment Center activities director, said the two often work together and feed off one another as they develop projects for the class. The thing that I love about she and Sheryls class is that its inexpensive, anybody can do it and thats a good thing, Yeager said. A lot of people cant afford to buy all the products it would take to make these items. They are very inexpen sive and very creative. An angel on a pedestal also made from a folded and decorated magazine, is another of the decorative items people make in the crafts class at the LifeStyle Enrichment Center.