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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
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Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:01979

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:01979

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text

PAGE 1

From staff reportsJASPER — A Lake City firefighter has been arrested in Hamilton County on a charge of lewd/lascivious behavior. Donald Carl Wilson Jr., 47, of 14458 SE 87th Terrace, White Springs, faces a charge of lewd/lascivious behavior (victim 12 16 years old and offender 18 years of age or older). He was booked into the Hamilton County Jail on Wednesday without bond. Lake City Fire Department assistant chief Frank Armijo only released limited information about Wilson’s arrest during a tele-phone inter-view Friday afternoon. “He (Wilson) is incarcerated in the Hamilton County Jail,” Armijo said. “Per the city policy, he will no longer be employed with the City of Lake City.” Wilson had been employed with the Lake City Fire By DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comSuperintendent Terry Huddleston told all Columbia County principals to review and emphasize the county’s crisis response plan after Friday’s school shooting in Connecticut. Asst. Supt. Lex Carswell sent an email to all Columbia County District principals look over the plan on Friday, Huddleston said. “Every school has had one since Columbine,” he said. “Unfortunately it’s incidents like this that remind us to always be diligent with efforts to protect the children, teachers and staff.” Huddleston said he doesn’t know if the tragic event in Connecticut could have been prevented. “No school, no public place is immune to what we witnessed yesterday,” he said Saturday. What Huddleston said he does know is that to prevent other school shootings, which often involve students at the school, require creating an atmosphere where students trust school employees. He said that some-times the only way to stop the loss of life at schools is to be tipped off by students who may have overheard plans or rumors of an impending attack. “That’s why relationships are so important,” Huddleston said. Huddleston said that every public school here has a school resource officer. “They are law enforcement, and they are armed at all times,” he said. Sheriff Mark Hunter said the sheriff’s office has worked with school officials to ensure that every school in the county has a comprehensive plan in place. By DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comThe day after a school shooting stole the futures of 20 elementary school chil-dren in Connecticut, shop-pers at the Lake City Mall on Saturday expressed their grief and asked the impos-sible question of why. Shemeka Jefferson of Lake City said her heart hurt when she heard the news, but said a prayer for those that lost loved ones. “When I heard about it yesterday, my heart went out because I’m a mother of four,” Jefferson said. “At that moment I felt that America should go to praying for all those that lost loved ones.” Jose Morales, father of a 15-year-old daughter, spoke about the need for armed officers or deputies at schools across the country. Marales is originally from Massachusetts but lives in Lake City. “It’s a sad day in this country when your kids aren’t even safe in school,” Morales said. “If they would have had an (armed) officer present a lot less kids would have been killed. We’re 1,500 miles By JOHN CHRISTOFFERSEN andMATT APUZZOAssociated PressNEWTOWN, Conn. — Investigators tried to figure out what led a bright but painfully awkward 20-year-old to slaugh-ter 26 children and adults at a Connecticut elementary school, while townspeople sadly took down some of their Christmas decorations and struggled Saturday with how to go on. The tragedy brought forth soul-searching and grief around the globe. Families as far away as Puerto Rico began to plan funerals for victims who still had their baby teeth, world leaders extended condolences, and vigils were held around the U.S. Amid the sorrow, stories of heroism emerged, including an account of the Sandy Hook Elementary School principal who lost her life lunging at the gunman, Adam Lanza, in an attempt to overpower him. Police shed no light on what triggered the second-deadliest school shooting in U.S. history, though state police Lt. Paul Vance said investigators had found “very good evidence ... that our CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Opinion ................ 4ABusiness ................ 5AObituaries .............. 6A Advice & Comics ......... 8B Puzzles ................. 2B TODAY IN PEOPLE Bynes settles hit-run case. COMING TUESDAY City council coverage. 91 64 T-Storm Chance WEATHER, 2A Opinion ................ 4ABusiness ................ 1CObituaries .............. 5AAdvice.................. 5DPuzzles ................. 5B 76 56 Morning fog WEATHER, 8A Lake City ReporterSUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2012 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | $1.00 LAKECITYREPORTER.COM Local retailerslooking aheadto a bright ’13 Parents stayingbusy filling theirkids’ wish lists. SUNDAYEDITION Vol. 138, No. 229 1D 1C 1A AMERICA MOURNS Lake City firefighter jailed on sex charge COUNTY continued on 6A SAFETY continued on 6A MOURNING continued on 6A Wilson 911 manager quits after 8 weeksBy TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comBennie Coleman, who was hired as the Columbia County 911 Communication’s Center manager roughly eight weeks ago, has tendered his resignation to county officials. Dale Williams, county manager, said he was advised Thursday of Coleman’s resig-nation by David Kraus, the county safety manager. “I have not seen the resignation letter,” Williams said. “I have called to speak to him (Coleman), but I haven’t talked to him. I believe he and David Kraus have a follow-up (exit) meeting Monday.” Coleman was hired for the position about TONY BRITT /Lake City ReporterBennie Coleman at work at the Columbia County Emergency Operations Center in early November, about a week after b eing named 911 Communications Center manager. COLEMAN continued on 3A JAILED continued on 3A County’s anguish mirrors nation’s Greater focuson emergencyprocedures atlocal schools Police look for motive in massacre that left 20 children, 6 adults dead Huddleston Johnson Jefferson Mcgaughey ASSOCIATED PRESSThousands attend a vigil service for the victims of the sch ool shooting at Saint Rose of Lima Church on Friday in Newtown, Conn. Authorities report ‘very good evidence’ASSOCIATED PRESSA sign on a post shows support for the victims of a gunma n who opened fire inside Sandy Hook Elementary School a day earlie r as police officers stand at a roadblock Saturday in Sandy Hook village of Newtown, Conn. Morales Hunter



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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Sunday, December 16, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS GAMES Monday Q Columbia High girls weightlifting vs. Suwannee High, 4:30 p.m. Q Fort White High girls soccer at Bradford High, 6 p.m. Q Columbia High boys soccer at Bolles School, 7:30 p.m. (JV-5:30) Q Fort White High boys basketball vs. Columbia High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Q Columbia High girls basketball vs. Union County High, TBA Thursday Q Columbia High boys soccer vs. Eastside High, 6 p.m. Friday Q Columbia High wrestling in Beast of the Beach at Fort Walton Beach High, TBA Q Fort White High girls basketball vs. Williston High, 6 p.m. Q Columbia High girls soccer vs. Suwannee High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Q Columbia High boys basketball at St. Augustine High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Saturday Q Columbia High wrestling in Beast of the Beach at Fort Walton Beach High, TBA Q Columbia High basketball vs. Hamilton County High, 7:30 p.m. (girls-6) BRIEFS Columbia battles back to beat Atlantic Coast. Fort White downs Interlachen High on Friday, 73-47. CHS continued on 2B CHS FOOTBALL Q-back Club meeting Monday The Columbia County Quarterback Club will meet at 7 p.m. Monday in the Jones Fieldhouse. For details, call Joe Martino at 984-0452. CHS SOFTBALL Tryouts set for Jan. 8 at school Columbia High softball tryouts are 2:45 p.m. Jan. 8 at the CHS field. Participants must meet academic requirements and have completed paperwork. For details, call Jimmy Williams at 303-1192. ADULT BASKETBALL Charity games for USSSA youth Richardson Community Center/Annie Mattox North, Inc., is sponsoring the third annual charity basketball games at the Lake City Middle School gym on Jan. 5. The games feature adult women and men teams — Live Oak vs. Lake City. Game times are 6 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Admission is $5, with all proceeds going to the USSSA youth basketball program. For details, call Nicole Smith at 754-7095. WOLVES BASKETBALL Breakfast at Richardson CC The Columbia County Recreation Department and Richardson Middle School are sponsoring a pancake breakfast at the Richardson Community Center cafeteria from 7-11:30 a.m. Jan. 12. Tickets are $5 and may be purchased at RMS or the Columbia County Recreation Department. For details, call Mario Coppock at 754-7095.Q From staff reportsShowdown coming BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Javonta Foster drives to the hoop again st Atlantic Coast High in Jacksonville on Friday.JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Michael Mulberry looks for an open de fender against Santa Fe High earlier this season. From staff reportsFort White High remained undefeated on the season with a 73-47 home win against visiting Interlachen High on Friday. The Indians jumped out to a 38-24 win at the half as Trey Phillips and Chris Cottrell each had eight points to help Fort White out to a 13 point lead head-ing into the locker room. Josh McGruber had nine points for Interlachen in the opening half. Cottrell led the Indians for the game with 17 points on eight baskets from the field. Melton Sanders had a strong second half to end up with 16 points off eight field goals and Jalen Wyche finished with 16 points that included two three-point shots. Phillips ended with 12 points including three three-points shots. The Indians moved to 7-0 on the season and is 4-0 in district play. “We were focused on tonight’s district game against Interlachen,” Fort White head coach Isiah Phillips said. Fort White’s next opponent will be a county collis-sion against Columbia High at 7:30 p.m. on Monday before taking a break before the Fort White Country Christmas Classic on Dec. 27. Although it’s not a district game, the Indians look to pick up a home win against the Tigers for a second year in a row. “We haven’t had a chance to really look at CHS yet,” Phillips said. “Our players know that Columbia has a really good team and they know their tradition. Columbia is built on history and our guys have respect for that. It should be a good game with a good crowd. We want to give a good showing.” Phillips have a simple strategy for keeping the Indians focused on the con-test and not the emotion that could come with facing off against a rival. “We tell our guys to focus on the game and not the opponent,” Phillips said. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Wayne Broom is surrounded by a grou p of Lee High defenders during the Tigers win against the Generals earlier this year. Jefferson looks forward to Tigers’ test By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comJACKSONVILLE — Columbia High picked up its third district win of the year to stay undefeated in District 4-6A play against Atlantic Coast High, 57-47, on Friday. The Tigers fell behind by as many as seven points in the first quarter before closing the score to 14-13 with three seconds left on the clock. Atlantic Coast hit a shot at the buzzer to take a 17-13 first period lead. Javonta Foster hit a three-point shot with 4:32 remaining in the second quarter to give the Tigers their first lead at 20-19, but Columbia went into the half down 26-25. Wayne Broom scored the first basket of the second half and Columbia resumed control of the lead at 27-26. The Tigers began to take control of the game when Morris Marshall had a layup and one to give Columbia a 32-28 lead. The Tigers took a 37-30 lead with 2:30 to go in the third quarter, but again the Stringrays bounced back to tie the game 39-39 heading into the fourth quarter. With Columbia trailing 46-44, Robert Dace came in off the bench to hit a three-point shot in what head coach Horace Jefferson called the turning point of the contest. “I don’t think we win that game without him hitting that shot,” Jefferson said. “That shot allowed us to go on a tear for the final 6:02 of the game.” After a rebound by Dace, the ball was transitioned up court and Dekarry Rossin gave the Tigers a three-point lead after a basket put back in after a rebound. Foster gave Columbia a 51-46 lead with 4:17 remain-ing in the game off a transition basket and the Stingrays would only score a free throw throughout the remainder of the contest. “We played the final six minutes pretty darn good,” Jefferson said. “Rossin, without a doubt played By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High will take on its toughest foe so far this season on Monday and it won’t have to go far to do it. The Tigers travel down the county to take on Fort White High in a clash at 7:30 p.m. The annual rivalry game pits the undefeated Indians (7-0, 4-0 district) with the Tigers looking to give Fort White its first loss. Columbia comes into the contest with a 4-2 record, although the Tigers’ remain undefeated in District 4-6A play with a 3-0 record. For Columbia coach Horace Jefferson, this will be the Tigers toughest matchup so far. It will also be an emotional game. “Anytime it’s big brother and little brother, it’s going to be emotional,” Jefferson said. “They come in undefeated and we’ve lost two games. They’ve been playing pretty good.” Jefferson is very familiar with one of the Indians’ CHS travels to undefeated Fort White Monday. CLASH continued on 2B



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ByANNE D’NNOCENZIOAP Retail WriterNEW YORK — If shoppers don’t show up in stores soon, more 70 percent off sale signs will. After a promising start to the holiday shopping season over the four-day Thanksgiving weekend, sales have slowed as wor-ries about weak U.S. job growth and other concerns have caused Americans to spend less. That puts pressure on J.C. Penney, Macy’s and other stores, which had been offering fewer dis-counts this season than they did last year, to step up promotions to lure shop-pers like Ron Antonette from Long Beach, Calif. Antonette so far has spent about $1,000 on Legos, a Wii U game con-sole and Apple’s iPad Mini tablet computer for his two young children. Even though that’s just half of what he planned to spend for the season, Antonette has stopped shopping over fears that Congress and the White House won’t reach a budget deal by January. A stalemate would trigger tax increases and spending cuts known as the “fiscal cliff.” “I basically stopped moving forward in buying,” said Antonette, 44, who runs a small public rela-tions business and worries that he might not be able to take mortgage deductions on his house next year. “I feel like we’re in financial limbo.” Antonette isn’t the only shopper who feels that way. Mike Duke, CEO of Wal-Mart, the world’s largest retailer, said that in a poll last month of the chain’s low-to-middle income shop-pers, an overwhelming majority was aware of the threat of higher taxes. And some said it would lead them to cut back their holi-day buying, he said. Overall, holiday sales are up 2.2 percent to $659 bil-lion from Nov. 1 through last Saturday, according to an analysis of sales data done for The Associated Press by ShopperTrak, a Chicago-based firm that tracks spending at 40,000 stores across the country. That’s slightly below the 2.7 percent increase over the Thanksgiving weekend when shoppers spent $22 billion. The modest increase means sales for rest of the season will be crucial for stores, which get as much as 40 percent of their annu-al sales in November and December. With only about a week and a half left until Christmas, stores have a ways to go in order to reach ShopperTrak’s fore-cast of a 3.3 percent rise in sales during the two-month stretch compared with the same period last year. It’s like the ghost of Christmas past has returned for stores. In order to salvage the sea-son, they may be forced to offer the kind of heavy discounts that helped boost sales last year, but that also ate away at their profits. That’s something stores have tried to resist all sea-son: Promotions are down 5 percent so far this season compared with last year, according to BMO Capital, which tracks promotions at about two-thirds of mall stores. To be sure, there still are plenty of 30, 40 and 50 percent off sale signs in store windows. But stores also have been doing more creative things with pricing to get shoppers to think they’re getting a better deal than they really are. Think: Offering jeans for $9 instead of $9.99, hop-ing round numbers will appeal more to shoppers, or selling two shirts for $20 instead of giving shoppers 20 percent off. “The retailing nation is trying to get off the dis-counting habit,” said Paco Underhill, founder of Envirosell, which studies consumer behavior. “It’s just like heroin — the more you do it the more you need to do it.” The fact that stores are struggling to find the right balance between pricing and profits during the holi-day season is no surprise. They’ve been doing that since the dawn of depart-ment stores in the 1800s. Perhaps the biggest change occurred in 1975, when the Consumer Goods Pricing Act repealed state fair trade laws, allowing stores to sell items at whatever price they want instead of what manufacturers dictate. Prices like “$19.99” instead of “$20” sprang up because as Baba Shiv, Lake City Reporter Week of December 16-22, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section C Columbia, Inc. Your marketplace source for Lake City and Columbia County1CColumbia Inc.Season makes retailers optimisticBy TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comA lthough consumers are in the midst of making Christmas purchases and giving a financial boost to the remainder of the 2012 econ-omy, several local merchants are encouraged that December’s financial boost may carry over into 2013. Several local business owners have an optimistic outlook for 2013 with the recent increased activity in the economy. Bob and Andrea Smith, of Smitty’s Western Store, said they think 2013 is going to be a tremendous year for local busi-nesses. “It’s really neat to see people come in and shop right now and it not be 100 percent on a credit card,” Bob Smith said. “We’ve had more cash business this year than we’ve had in four years. To me that’s a positive thing. People are spending their money after they make it instead of spending it before they make it. After the holidays you can go on with your life, support your children and do things you normally do in January and February rather than waiting on the credit card bill to come in.” He said he’s noticed that consumers are spending their dol-lars wisely and they want more of a value for their dollar. “They’re spending as much money or more money than they spent last year, they’re just being a little bit smarter about what they are buying,” he said. “They’re looking for quality. Buy nice or buy twice.” Bob Smith said in 2012 there was lots of talk about politics, health care, unemployment and the uncertainty of where the country is going and he said it’s been a tremendous burden on small business owners. The Smiths also stressed the importance of shopping locally next year as a way of supporting the community. “We need to support the local community and the small busi-nesses that are trying to keep the people in Lake City and Live Oak working with jobs,” Andrea Smith said. “You’re supporting yourself when you support your small business. Every small busi-ness needs the support of their community so the business can give back to the community.” Brad Lefkowitz, owner of Chastain Jewelers, said he’s looking forward to a strong 2013. “We’re encouraged by the traffic in the mall and we’re encour-aged by the local optimism,” he said. Lefkowitz said he’s seen some things during the Christmas holiday shopping season which lead him to believe 2013 may be a good year for business. “I haven’t seen the indicators necessarily in traffic at the mall, but with the optimism of people who are in the mall who are shopping,” he said. “Where as it was more dooms day last year, people are definitely encouraged this year and hopeful.” In 2013 Lefkowitz said he’s looking forward to having more customers. “We’ll possibly have some new tenants coming in the mall and that will increase traffic,” he said. “We have a new neighbor, Kay’s (Jewelry), and we’re glad there’s more jewelry business being done in the mall, so that’s good for us. It’s also nice to see people who we haven’t seen in the last couple of years in the store lately, so we’re encour-aged. We’re looking for a good year next year.” Chris Pottle, Furniture Showplace owner, is also hopeful that 2013 will prove to be more Photos by TONY BRITT/ Lake City ReporterDarryl Register, of Macclenny, gets help from Emma Noll, a sales associate at Chastain Jewelers in the Lake City M all, as he looks at jewelry. Lisa Croft (left) listens to Andrea Smith while shopping for accessories at Smitty’s Western Store on U.S. 90 west of Lake City. Business people expect economy to improve in 2013. Holiday shoppers may see big discounts soonASSOCIATED PRESSS hoppers wait on a check-out line in the Times Square T oys-R-Us store in New York. U.S. shoppers hit stores and websites at record numbers over the four-day Thanksgiving weekend, according to a survey by the National Retail Federation, b ut have cooled off since then. Nationwide, retailers fret as holiday sales lag. OPTIMISM continued on 2C SALES continued on 2C



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LIFE Sunday, December 16, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section D Story ideas?ContactRobert BridgesEditor754-0428rbridges@lakecityreporter.com Lake City Reporter1DLIFEBy DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comS anta isn’t the only one who makes a list for Christmas time. Children across Columbia County make out their lists with hopes that the their favorite toys will appear under the tree on Dec. 25. On Friday, the Walmart Supercenter’s parking lot squeaked with the sound of loaded-down carts full of Christmas toys. Parents were making the last push to find the toys that will put smiles on faces when the wrap-ping paper comes off. Lore Owens had two Spider-Man bicycles stuffed in her cart. She was there with her daughter Kelly Presnell looking for anything Spider-Man. Owens’ grandchildren love the Spider-Man movies but want something they can take out-side and pretend to be the friendly neighbor-hood web-slinger. “I bought them nothing but Spider-Man,” she said. Inside the store, they had a variety to pick from. “Spider-Man (web) shooters, Spider-Man race tracks, Spider-Man bikes — even the Spider-Man mask that talks,” Presnell said. For the other children they got Bay Blades, a new take on the spinning tops. There’s an plastic arena that you shoot a top into, and the toys fight. The winner is the last top to stop spinning. “Everybody wants Bay Blades,” Owens said. David Brace also was at Walmart, but had already done most of his shopping. Still, he picked up some extra wrapping paper, along with the groceries. Brace has three children all under the age of 10. He said around this time of year, his children watch the commercials on TV and T is the season to give or get a popular poinsettia plant. Therefore, many of us have one or more of these festive plants at home right now, providing us with some colorful holiday cheer. Plain red poinsettias used to be the norm. With new introductions and increasing color choices rang-ing in shades of orange, mauve, cream, pink and purple, nearly everyone’s indoor color scheme can be complimented with poinsettias. Not too many years ago, a holiday poinsettia’s colorful display was expected to last through the holidays and not much longer. New cultivars have been intro-duced with greatly extended bloom periods, so this plant is truly a gift that keeps on giving. Last year my holiday plants were still healthy and colorful in late March, when I finally discard-ed them for some long-awaited spring annuals. Each year about now, I start getting questions about poinset-tia care in the home. Because the plants last so long, people are interested in giving them the right care to keep them looking their best. The first step, of course, is making sure you start off with the healthiest plants from the store. Here are a few don’ts: Q Don’t purchase plants that are on display in a hot, sunny loca-tion, in a windy area or packed together tightly with no air around them. Q Don’t purchase plants that are on display with the protective shipping sleeve still up around them. Q And don’t choose plants that have excess water in the bottom of the wrapping or that have soil that is obviously dried out. Any of these conditions will cause the lower leaves to prema-turely drop and leave a scraggly-looking plant. Take your carefully chosen plant home and put some thought into where you’ll keep it for view-ing. Poinsettias are tropical desert plants and should be placed in a warm location out of drafts. Bright light is good, but hot, direct sunlight is too strong. Water only when the top inch of soil is dry to the touch, and don’t allow drained water to remain in the saucer. Fertilizer is not recom-mended. It is possible to get another season of bloom from your poinsettia, although it takes some dedication and adherence to details. Avid gardeners can get some long-term care tips at http://ohio line.osu.edu/hyg-fact/1000/1248.html. If you haven’t had indoor poinsettias in the past few years, give them a try. These traditional col-orful holiday plants now have the added value of longevity. W hen Austin, my 15-year-old nephew, suggested the Jersey Shore for his summer vaca-tion earlier this year, I was a little surprised. His goal was to visit Seaside Heights, the site of the hit MTV show. I mapped it on the coast and realized it was only an hour north of Atlantic City. Well, that sold me on the trip. I could cross Atlantic City off of my bucket list and make Austin happy too. So off we went, just the two of us spending some quality time and exploring the Jersey Shore. We stayed in Atlantic City — we have a time share I could use and cut the costs down — then made Seaside Heights a day trip. Atlantic City was not exactly what I expected. I’m thinking Vegas on the beach. That’s not the case. We did see several of the casino hotels that were rem-iniscent of Las Vegas, but most of them are a lot older. The only newer one was the Borgata. We also shopped the outlets, but ultimately spent most of our time on the boardwalk. The boardwalk was everything I expected. I had recently been to Ocean City, Md., and enjoyed the food experiences there. The Atlantic City boardwalk offered just as much food, lots of souvenir shops and some gaming. We arrived on the shoulder season (May) and most of the amusement parks on the piers were not open yet. Austin and I were able to find an arcade where we played some games, and I beat him on the go kart track. Yes, I did! Our first stop in Seaside Heights was the house where the cast members live during the filming of the MTV show, “Jersey Shore.” They were setting up to begin filming in a couple of weeks. Austin had a few questions for the security detail. Next, we walked to the Shore Store on the boardwalk. I had fun watching him work deals on his “Jersey Shore” T-shirts — he really enjoyed himself. The beaches were not yet filled with people, but the boardwalks were filled with tourists and locals alike — in both towns. I enjoyed hanging out with Austin. We loved people watching as we made our way up and down the boardwalk, taking in all of the sights, lights, smells and sounds. I am so happy now to have these memories. I could never have imagined then, the damage and devastation that Hurricane Sandy caused. When I saw the aerial photos of the roller coaster in the ocean, I couldn’t believe it. We were just there a few months ago. It was also shocking to see the wood planks, where we had just walked, piled Jersey Shore, then and now Some pointers on caring for poinsettias GARDEN TALK Nichelle Demorestdndemorest@ufl.edu Parents fill wish lists Area residents rush to buy gifts requested by child ren Q D. Nichelle Demorest is a horticulture agent with the Columbia County Extension of the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.PHOTOS BY DEREK GILLIAM/ Lake City ReporterLore Owens (left) and her daughter, Kelly Presnell, look through the toys they bought at the Walmart Supercenter on U.S. 90 West on Friday. Spider-Man themed toys were high on the wish lists of Owens’ grandc hildren for this Christmas. Michelle Hammett loads two Remington Model 770 rifles wi th scopes into the back of her SUV at the Walmart Supercenter on Friday. The hunting rifles will go under the Christmas tree for her 15and 17-year-old sons, she said. TRAVEL TALES Sandy Kishton TRAVEL continued on 3D RUSH continued on 3D



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PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Daily Scripture Celebrity Birthdays Actress Liv Ullman is 74. Journalist Lesley Stahl ( Minutes) is 71. Actor Ben Cross is 65. Singer-guitarist Billy Gibbons of ZZ Top is 63. CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. AROUND FLORIDA Friday: 32-34-38-41 8 Friday: 9-17-20-22-25 Saturday: Afternoon: 8-9-4 Evening: N/A Saturday: Afternoon: -9-5-6 Evening: N/A Wednesday: 17-33-34-41-49-53 x4 State economists predict continued growth TALLAHASSEE Floridas economy contin ues to show signs of slow, steady growth as the state continues to pull out of the depth of the recession. State economists on Friday drew up new fore casts for the coming year that project that the states tax collections one sign of Floridas economic health will grow about 5 percent for the next two years. But Amy Baker, the head of the states Office of Economic and Demographic Research, cautioned that the econ omy could be harmed by outside factors, including the ongoing stalemate in Washington D.C., over how to avoid looming tax hikes and budget cuts due to take effect in January. She said there were already signs that the ongoing discussion of the fiscal cliff was beginning to have a dampening effect on the economy. Were not trying to guess what will happen in the future, Baker said. We are just trying to rec ognize the little bit of con cern in the economy were seeing right now. What the latest numbers do show, however, is that there should be less pres sure on Gov. Rick Scott and the GOP-controlled Legislature to enact spending cuts in order to balance the state budget. Scott will rely on these estimates to draw up the budget recommendations he will unveil early next year. Scott, in fact, could have a budget surplus of more than $800 million to work with, according to the lat est estimates although the money is primarily a one-time windfall. Child abuse hotline updated FORT LAUDERDALE Child welfare officials have overhauled the state abuse hotline, saying theyve added new technol ogy so they can provide investigators with more updated information about alleged abuse and a fami lys background before a home visit. The Department of Children and Families hotline receives more than 400,000 calls a year, yet staff were relying on the same outdated procedures and antiquated technology for the past 30 years. And operators were focusing more on speed more than accuracy, Secretary David Wilkins said Thursday. In February 2011, the call center received multiple calls worrying about the safety of Nubia Barahona, a 10-year-old former foster child whose partially decomposing body was later found doused in toxic chemicals in the back of her adoptive fathers pickup truck along a busy highway. Cop charged with illegal gun sales MIAMI A South Florida police officer and his wife are facing charges of illegally selling hun dreds of weapons over the Internet and at gun shows. Prosecutors said Friday that 42-year-old Hialeah police officer Rafael Oscar Valdes and 45-year-old Tammy Lynn Valdes were charged with deal ing firearms without a federal license. That car ries a maximum five-year prison sentence. Rafael Valdes also is charged with making a false statement regarding a firearm. That carries a maximum 10-year sentence. Authorities say the couple sold at least 100 firearms over the Internet to people in 44 states since 2005. They also allegedly sold more than 500 weap ons at gun shows. The indictment says nine weap ons were sold to under cover agents. Prosecutor aide guilty in drug case FORT LAUDERDALE An employee of the U.S. attorneys office in South Florida has pleaded guilty to providing assistance to her convicted drug-dealer husband. Tamika Jasper-Barbary pleaded guilty Friday in federal court to conspir ing to use a cell phone to provide her husband with law enforcement informa tion that might impact his cocaine and pain pill business. Jasper-Barbary had a $57,000-a-year job in the grand jury suite for Miamis federal prosecu tor. Andre Barbary was con victed in November of two drug-related crimes and awaits sentencing. Court documents say Barbary has been involved in the illegal drug trade for 10 years. Jasper-Barbarys agree ment with prosecutors calls for a sentence of a year in prison, proba tion and a fine of $5,000. She will be sentenced in February and has agreed to resign from the prose cutors office. FPL settlement may be reviewed TALLAHASSEE The Public Service Commissions unprec edented decision to approve a rate settlement for Floridas biggest elec tric utility over opposition from the states consumer advocate is likely to draw scrutiny in the courts and from the Legislature. Public Counsel J.R. Kelly says the agreement approved Thursday is a bad deal for most of Florida Power & Light Co.s 4.6 million custom ers. It also undercut Kellys role as the legal representative of all con sumers because FPL negotiated the deal with three groups representing only industrial, health care and federal government customers. LOS ANGELES A ctress Amanda Bynes has resolved a misdemeanor hit-and-run case after entering into a civil settle ment with other drivers. Court records show Bynes entered a civil compromise to end the case and her attorney informed a Los Angeles court on Thursday. Bynes was charged with leaving the scene of accidents in April and August without providing the proper information. Defendants in certain California misdemeanor cases are allowed to enter civil settlements to resolve criminal cases. City Attorneys spokesman Frank Mateljan (mah-tell-JIN) says prose cutors objected to the dismissal, not ing other instances in which Bynes has been cited for driving without a license and her pending driving under the influence case. Bynes rose to fame starring in Nickelodeons All That and has also starred in several films, includ ing 2010s Easy A. Laura Ingraham back on the air next month NEW YORK Radio talk show host Laura Ingraham will soon be back on the air after taking a short break. Courtside Entertainment Group says it will distribute The Laura Ingraham Show starting Jan. 2. Meanwhile, she will boost her audience through a deal with Lauchpad Digital Media, which will stream the threehour daily program and make it available for download on podcast. Talkers magazine says the con servative Ingraham is the most-lis tened-to woman on radio, with an estimated 5.75 million listeners a week. Her show, launched in 2001, is now heard on more than 300 radio stations nationally. She is also a Fox News contribu tor and principal guest host of The OReilly Factor. Ingraham began a brief hiatus from her show last month after end ing a deal with its former distributor. Final celebrity burglary defendant enters plea LOS ANGELES The final defen dant in a group charged with bur glarizing celebrities homes pleaded no contest Friday to receiving a jacket stolen from Paris Hilton. Courtney Leigh Ames entered the plea and is expected to be sentenced on Feb. 1 to three years of super vised probation and 60 days of com munity service. Prosecutors dropped felony resi dential burglary, conspiracy to com mit burglary charges and another count of receiving stolen property in exchange for the plea. Ames, who had been charged with breaking into Hiltons home, had also been accused of wearing a neck lace stolen from Lindsay Lohans home to court. Authorities arrested most of the group in October 2009 and accused them of a months-long crime spree that netted more than $3 million in clothes, jewelry and art from the homes of stars such as Lohan, Hilton, Orlando Bloom and Megan Fox and Brian Austin Green. All the stars have agreed not to seek restitution for their losses. Sally Struthers enters not guilty plea for DUI YORK, Maine Sally Struthers has entered a not guilty plea on charges she drove drunk in Maine, where she was performing in a musical. The Portland Press Herald reported the 65-year-old Struthers did not appear in York District Court on Thursday, and entered the plea through her lawyer. Police arrested Struthers on Sept. 12 on U.S. Route 1 in the resort town Ogunquit (ohGUHNG-kwit). She was charged with criminal operating under the influence. Struthers is best known for her role as Gloria Stivic in the 1970s TV sitcom All in the Family. She had been performing at the Ogunquit Playhouse in the musical to 5. Struthers is scheduled to appear in court on Feb. 13 for a bench trial. Man arrested at home tied to Taylor Swift NASHVILLE, Tenn. A man took a bus from Wisconsin to Nashville, climbed a fence at a home linked to singer Taylor Swift on Friday and told police he was there to surprise a woman on her birthday, authorities said. He is jailed on a trespassing charge. The singer, who is overseas, turned 23 Thursday. Court docu ments show 24-year-old Jacob Nicholas Kulke, of Marshfield, Wis., was arrested early Friday after climbing a fence and secured gate. The affidavit did not identify the property owner, and Swifts spokes woman declined comment on wheth er the home was linked to the family. But online celebrity news websites indicate Swift had a connection to the home. The City Paper previously reported that the $2.5 million house in Belle Meade, a Nashville suburb, was bought last year by a trustee who has previously handled property deals for Swift. The affidavit said Kulke claimed he was in contact with a person at the home through social media and it was her birthday and he want ed to surprise her and that he was also dating her. Amanda Bynes settles hit-run case Wednesday: 8-10-25-36-44 PB 28 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter 2A But the angel said to her, Do not be afraid, Mary; you have found favor with God. You will conceive and give birth to a son, and you are to call him Jesus. He will be great and will be called the Son of the Most High. The Lord God will give him the throne of his father David, and he will reign over Jacobs descendants forever; his kingdom will never end. Luke 1:30-33 ASSOCIATED PRESS Dan Cornell (left), of South Lyon, Mich., and Joe Muscato, of Grass Lake, Mich., ride their bicycles in Key West on Friday to complete an Alaska-to-Key West cycling journey that Cornells father, Pete Cornell, began in 2011. Pete Cornell died July 26 when he, Muscato and another rider were hit by a tractor-trailer in Dawson, Ga. Muscato also was hurt. Associated Press Associated Press Struthers Bynes Ingraham



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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today EXTREME SPORTS 1 p.m. NBC — Dew Tour, iON Mountain Championships, at Breckenridge, Colo. (same-day tape) GOLF 5:30 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Alfred Dunhill Championship, final round, at Mpumalanga, South Africa 9:30 a.m. TGC — The Royal Trophy, final round, at Negara, Brunei (same-day tape) 3 p.m. NBC — Father-Son Challenge, final round, at Orlando NFL FOOTBALL 1 p.m. CBS — Regional coverageFOX — Regional coverage 4 p.m. FOX — Regional coverage 4:25 p.m. CBS — Doubleheader game 8:20 p.m. NBC —San Francisco at New England WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 2 p.m. FSN — Tennessee at Texas ——— Monday MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN2 — Detroit at Syracuse NFL FOOTBALL 8:30 p.m. ESPN — N.Y. Jets at Tennessee SOCCER 2:55 p.m. ESPN2 — Premier League, Arsenal at ReadingFOOTBALLNFL standings AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAy-New England 10 3 0 .769 472 274N.Y. Jets 6 7 0 .462 245 306Buffalo 5 8 0 .385 289 352Miami 5 8 0 .385 240 276 South W L T Pct PF PAx-Houston 11 2 0 .846 365 263 Indianapolis 9 4 0 .692 292 329Tennessee 4 9 0 .308 271 386Jacksonville 2 11 0 .154 216 359 North W L T Pct PF PABaltimore 9 4 0 .692 331 273 Cincinnati 8 6 0 .571 355 293 Pittsburgh 7 6 0 .538 278 264 Cleveland 5 8 0 .385 259 272 West W L T Pct PF PAy-Denver 10 3 0 .769 375 257 San Diego 5 8 0 .385 292 281 Oakland 3 10 0 .231 248 402 Kansas City 2 11 0 .154 195 352 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAN.Y. Giants 8 5 0 .615 373 270Washington 7 6 0 .538 343 329Dallas 7 6 0 .538 300 314 Philadelphia 4 10 0 .286 253 375 South W L T Pct PF PAy-Atlanta 11 2 0 .846 337 259Tampa Bay 6 7 0 .462 354 308New Orleans 5 8 0 .385 348 379Carolina 4 9 0 .308 265 312 North W L T Pct PF PAGreen Bay 9 4 0 .692 323 279 Chicago 8 5 0 .615 308 219 Minnesota 7 6 0 .538 283 286 Detroit 4 9 0 .308 320 342 West W L T Pct PF PASan Francisco 9 3 1 .731 316 184Seattle 8 5 0 .615 300 202St. Louis 6 6 1 .500 236 279 Arizona 4 9 0 .308 186 292 x-clinched playoff spoty-clinched division Thursday’s Game Cincinnati 34, Philadelphia 13 Today’s Games Green Bay at Chicago, 1 p.m.Tampa Bay at New Orleans, 1 p.m.Minnesota at St. Louis, 1 p.m.Indianapolis at Houston, 1 p.m.N.Y. Giants at Atlanta, 1 p.m.Washington at Cleveland, 1 p.m.Jacksonville at Miami, 1 p.m.Denver at Baltimore, 1 p.m.Carolina at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.Detroit at Arizona, 4:05 p.m.Seattle vs. Buffalo at Toronto, 4:05 p.m.Kansas City at Oakland, 4:25 p.m.Pittsburgh at Dallas, 4:25 p.m.San Francisco at New England, 8:20 p.m. Monday’s Game N.Y. Jets at Tennessee, 8:30 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 22 Atlanta at Detroit, 8:30 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 23 Tennessee at Green Bay, 1 p.m.Indianapolis at Kansas City, 1 p.m.New Orleans at Dallas, 1 p.m.Minnesota at Houston, 1 p.m.Oakland at Carolina, 1 p.m.Buffalo at Miami, 1 p.m.Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.New England at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.Washington at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.St. Louis at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.San Diego at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m.Cleveland at Denver, 4:05 p.m.Chicago at Arizona, 4:25 p.m.N.Y. Giants at Baltimore, 4:25 p.m.San Francisco at Seattle, 8:20 p.m. FCS playoffs Semifinals Friday North Dakota State 23, Georgia Southern 20 Saturday Sam Houston State at Eastern Washington (n)NCAA Div. II playoffs Championship Saturday Valdosta State 35, Winston-Salem 7 NCAA Div. III playoffs Amos Alonzo Stagg Bowl Friday Mount Union 28, St. Thomas (Minn.) 10 NAIA championship Marian (Ind.) 30, Morningside (Iowa) 27, OTCollege bowl games Saturday New Mexico Bowl Arizona 49, Nevada 48Famous Idaho Potato BowlToledo vs. Utah State (n) Thursday Poinsettia Bowl At San DiegoSan Diego State (9-3) vs. BYU (7-5), 8 p.m. (ESPN) Friday Beef ’O’ Brady’s Bowl At St. PetersburgBall State (9-3) vs. UCF (9-4), 7:30 p.m. (ESPN) Saturday New Orleans Bowl East Carolina (8-4) vs. LouisianaLafayette (7-4), Noon (ESPN) Las Vegas Bowl Boise State (10-2) vs. Washington (7-5), 3:30 p.m. (ESPN) Monday, Dec. 24 Hawaii Bowl At HonoluluSMU (6-6) vs. Fresno State (9-3), 8 p.m. (ESPN) Wednesday, Dec. 26 Little Caesars Pizza Bowl At DetroitCentral Michigan (6-6) vs. Western Kentucky (7-5), 7:30 p.m. (ESPN) Thursday, Dec. 27 Military Bowl At WashingtonBowling Green (8-4) vs. San Jose State (10-2), 3 p.m. (ESPN) Belk Bowl At Charlotte, N.C.Duke (6-6) vs. Cincinnati (9-3), 6:30 p.m. (ESPN) Holiday Bowl At San DiegoBaylor (7-5) vs. UCLA (9-4), 9:45 p.m. (ESPN) Friday, Dec. 28 Independence Bowl At Shreveport, La.Louisiana-Monroe (8-4) vs. Ohio (8-4), 2 p.m. (ESPN) Russell Athletic Bowl At OrlandoVirginia Tech (6-6) vs. Rutgers (9-3), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN) Meineke Car Care Bowl At HoustonMinnesota (6-6) vs. Texas Tech (7-5), 9 p.m. (ESPN) Saturday, Dec. 29 Armed Forces Bowl At Fort Worth, TexasRice (6-6) vs. Air Force (6-6), 11:45 a.m. (ESPN) Fight Hunger Bowl At San FranciscoArizona State (7-5) vs. Navy (7-4), 3:15 p.m. (ESPN2) Pinstripe Bowl At New YorkSyracuse (7-5) vs. West Virginia (7-5), 3:15 p.m. (ESPN) Alamo Bowl At San AntonioTexas (8-4) vs. Orgeon State (9-3), 6:45 p.m. (ESPN) Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl At Tempe, Ariz.Michigan State (6-6) vs. TCU (7-5), 10:15 p.m. (ESPN)BASKETBALLNBA schedule Today’s Games Houston at Toronto, 1 p.m.Denver at Sacramento, 6 p.m.L.A. Lakers at Philadelphia, 6 p.m.New Orleans at Portland, 9 p.m. Monday’s Games Minnesota at Orlando, 7 p.m.Houston at New York, 7:30 p.m.L.A.Clippers at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.Chicago at Memphis, 8 p.m.San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.Sacramento at Phoenix, 9 p.m. AP Top 25 schedule Today’s Games No. 10 Illinois vs. Eastern Kentucky, 6 p.m. No. 24 Oklahoma State vs. Central Arkansas, 4 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2012 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04202BSPORTS CHS: Tigers beat Atlantic Coast Continued From Page 1B some big minutes for us. He sprained his ankle after being in the starting lineup for us during the preseason and that’s the first game he’s been able to play with-out favoring it. He’s our workhorse inside. I’ll put him up against anyone and his improvement has been tremendous. Him and broom gave us some good quality baskets tonight.” But the Tigers’ leading scorer was again Morris Marshall who had 15 points on the night. Foster finished with 12 points and Rossin had 11 points to round out the Tigers in double figures.Broom had eight points, Akeem Williams had six points and Dace rounded out the Tigers’ scor-ing with three. Kriston Laster led the Stringrays with 13 points in the game. Columbia is 4-2 (3-0, district) heading into a match-up against Fort White High at 7:30 p.m. on Monday in Fort White. BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Dekarry Rossin goes up for a shot aga inst Atlantic Coast High on Friday in Jacksonville. stars this season after having coached transfer Jalen Wyche last season at Columbia. “Transfers have played a major role in their success, and that’s not to take anything away from what they already had there,” Jefferson said. “Wyche has played extremely well, however, and they’ve taken it to another level.” Jefferson noted the Indians as already having a couple of big wins. “They’ve beat Williston and Starke (Bradford County),” Jefferson said. “So those are some good wins. They’re just down the county road, so we’re looking for a good match.” The Indians will play an up-tempo style and try to force Columbia into turnover situations to come away with easy baskets. “They’re going to press us out of multiple sets from a 1-2-2 to a 2-1-2,” Jefferson said. For Jefferson, the final outcome is going to come down to one pivotal thing. “It’s going to come down to who plays harder,” Jefferson said. “We’re going to try to play harder than them.” But basketball IQ will also play a role. “We have to break their press,” Jefferson said. “We have to come out and play our best game of the year. We’ve played some good minutes, but we haven’t played an entire game. We have to play our best to make good.” Jefferson noted that the Tigers are playing some of their best ball after a comeback win against Atlantic Coast High in Jacksonville on Friday. After trailing 17-13 in the first quarter and down by one at the half, the Tigers came back to pick up a 10point win, 57-47, against their district foe. “I’m so proud of my guys right now, because they’re doing what we’ve been trying to teach in practice,” Jefferson said. “They attempted to take five charges in the game and they were all called blocking fouls, but they were questionable calls. I’m proud of them for trying though, because it showed effort.” And it will take effort for the Tigers to hand Fort White its first loss. CLASH: Tigers, Indians set to face off Continued From Page 1B



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2C LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF DECEMBER 16, 2012 2CBIZ/MOTLEY Sometimes the market reacts poorly to world events, but just be-cause the market reacts doesn’t mean you should. Still, if current events are making you feel uncertain about your nances, you should schedule a complimentary portfolio review. That way, you can make sure you’re in control of where you want to go and how you get there. YOU CAN’T CONTROL THE WORLD,BUT YOU CAN CONTROL YOUR DECISIONS. BUISINESS BRIEFFrom staff reports Rockford Realty Group, 496 SW Ring Court, Lake City, is excited to announce not one, but two additions to its team. Josh Silvis is a newly licensed Realtor. He previously worked as a short-sale con-sultant helping homeowners avoid foreclosures. He is well versed in the world of short-sale mediation and will be a great asset to the Rockford team. Charles Sparks Jr., a Florida licensed Realtor since 2005, has been successful in meeting the needs of many buyers and sellers in their real estate transactions. Following in his father’s footsteps, Charles Jr., abides by the same ethical and moral values as his father, and brings an addi-tional level of professional-ism to the Rockford Realty team. Silvis Sparks Rockford Realty Group adds agents a marketing professor at Stanford University who focuses on neuroeconom-ics, puts it: “When you see something for $9.99, the brain categorizes that as being $9 rather than $10,” he said. “Those things are still effective.” But at a time when shoppers are more price sensi-tive, some stores have got-ten rid of the ubiquitous “99 cents” in prices in favor of flat prices. In fact, Kmart played up flat prices in its advertising and in-store deals on Black Friday with signs that read: “Experience our $5, $10, $20 Freak Out Pricing.” “The effort was around being able to communicate clearly to our customer in gift denominations they commonly think within,” said Tom Aiello, Kmart’s spokesman. “Nothing against the “.99.” Last weekend, tables at Forever 21 in New York’s Times Square had clothes with prices that ended with “50 cents” -for example, “$10.50 and up” or “$17.50 and up.” Steve Martin, a 27-year-old resident of Scranton, Pa. who was shopping there, said people aren’t fooled by fractional prices. “I think most people are rounder-uppers,” said Martin. But if the price is right, shoppers will scoop up items. Twenty-somethings Malia and Kyra Bennett were out at Lloyd Center Mall in Portland, Ore., recently when they spot-ted workout shirts at H&M for $5 that they had to buy. “We didn’t come to buy those, but they are only $5,” Bennett said. SALES: Shoppers slow after record start Continued From Page 1Cfinancially stable than 2012. “I think 2013 is going to be good,” he said. “They’re starting to build some homes and of course that relates directly to furniture sales. Mobile home sales are also getting better and that will help quite a bit.” Pottle also noted he’s seen indicators which lead him to believe the econo-my is improving. “December is always our best month, so it’s always hard to say, but we’re only halfway through it,” he said. “A lot of the business in December comes right after Christmas. We’re waiting for that. People get money at Christmas from their parents and such and sometimes they buy furni-ture.” As a business owner Pottle is also looking for-ward to increased sales and profits in 2013. “I’m pulling very much for the improvement in the construction industry — that’s what we have to have as far as furniture sales are concerned,” he said. “I hope everybody does well.” OPTIMISM: Locals happy Continued From Page 1C EPA to tighten standards for sootBy MATTHEW DALYAssociated PressWASHINGTON — In its first major regulation since the election, the Obama administration on Friday imposed a new air quality standard that reduces by 20 percent the maximum amount of soot released into the air from smoke-stacks, diesel trucks and other sources of pollution. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Lisa Jackson said the new standard will save thousands of lives each year and reduce the burden of illness in com-munities across the coun-try, as people “benefit from the simple fact of being able to breathe cleaner air.” As a mother of two sons who have battled asthma, Jackson said she was pleased that “more moth-ers like me will be able to rest a little easier know-ing their children, and their children’s children, will have cleaner air to breathe for decades to come.” Announcement of the new standard met a court deadline in a lawsuit by 11 states and public health groups. The new annual standard is 12 micrograms per cubic meter of air, down from the current 15 micro-grams per cubic meter. The new soot standard has been highly anticipat-ed by environmental and business groups, who have battled over whether it will protect public health or cause job losses. Soot, or fine particulate matter, is made up of microscopic particles released from smokestacks, die-sel trucks, wood-burning stoves and other sources and contributes to haze. Breathing in soot can cause lung and heart prob-lems, contributing to heart attacks, strokes and asthma attacks. Environmental groups and public health advocates welcomed the new stan-dard, saying it will protect millions of Americans at risk for soot-related asthma attacks, lung cancer, heart disease and premature death. Dr. Norman H. Edelman, chief medical officer for the American Lung Association, said a new standard will force the industry to clean up what he called a “lethal pollutant.” Reducing soot pollution “will prevent heart attacks and asthma attacks and will keep children out of the emergency room and hospitals,” Edelman said in a statement. “It will save lives.” But congressional Republicans and industry officials called the new standard overly strict and said it could hurt economic growth and cause job loss-es in areas where pollution levels are determined to be too high. Ross Eisenberg, vice president of the National Association of Manufacturers, said the new rule is “yet another costly, overly burdensome” regulation that is “out of sync” with President Barack Obama’s executive order last year to stream-line federal regulations.



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2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04242DLIFE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILEFlourless chocolate cake is decadent enough for a f estive celebration, but doesn’t require hours to make. Nutcrackers expand their ranks By SAMANTHA CRITCHELLAssociated PressNEW CANAAN, Conn. — The gang’s all here: the football fan, the chef, the teacher and the skier. And there’s the Nutcracker prince from E.T.A. Hoffmann’s clas-sic Christmas story, who inspired them all. The quaint Whitney Shop here is just one of so many home-goods stores filled with this granddaddy and all his offspring that people are collecting and turning into family tradi-tions of their own. Some become an annual gift — Whitney Shop owner Karen Stinchfield and her grown children make sure there is a new version of the Nutcracker under the tree each year for her husband to enjoy — while other people come in to the store between Thanksgiving and New Year’s to see which new characters have joined the pack. They start calling before Halloween to find out when the display is going up. The wooden dolls, many of which will really crack your walnuts and maca-damias, are increasingly popular in holiday decor, although they are hardly new. The classic Nutcracker soldier, with sword in hand and a prominent moustache, comes from Hoffmann’s early 19th-cen-tury tale “The Nutcracker and the Mouse King.” Soon there were kings and policemen as carvers sought to embrace nor-mally stern authority fig-ures, according to Wade Bassett, director of opera-tions for Yankee Candle’s flagship store. Legend has it those tough-guy exteriors were intended to ward off evil, while deep down, as in Hoffmann’s story, the Nutcracker is most inter-ested in his owner’s hap-piness. In 1892, at the request of the Moscow Imperial Theatres, Peter Illyich Tchaikovsky set the story to music and Marius Petipa choreographed the dances to create one of the world’s most famous and beloved ballets, “The Nutcracker.” But beyond the ballet, decorative nutcracker char-acters, often with high-top hats and square jawlines, have become a sign of the season. And there’s a little more room to have fun with them than with, say, Santa Claus, who is always expected to have on his red suit and rosy cheeks, says Rebecca Proctor, creative director of upscale home-goods retailer Mackenzie-Childs. Stinchfield sees all types of holiday nutcrackers, from kitschy to elegant, and all types of fans. There are the customers drawn in because their daughter once wore a sugarplum tutu on the school stage; the Civil War buff looking for the Union soldier; the Disney aficionado in search of the Geppetto/Pinocchio-themed nutcracker; and the biker come for the Harley-Davidson dude. Someone once bought three beekeeper nutcrack-ers without batting an eye, and there’s a baker one holding a cupcake, to keep up with the cupcake trend. Bari Murdock has a baker, but hers holds a miniature gingerbread house. She also has a skier nutcracker, purchased two decades ago in Austria, which has moved around the world with her. Murdock, an interior stylist, is having her first Christmas in Chile after living in Connecticut for years. She was happy to unpack the nutcrackers. “It’s not quite like an orna-ment, some inanimate object. It’s like a little man. You open the box and say, ‘Oh hi, I’m glad you made the move and I’m glad you made it in one piece,’” Murdock says. She wants her children to remember them as part of their holiday celebra-tion. Mackenzie-Childs wants to make a new holiday nutcracker an annual tradi-tion, offering a limited-edi-tion one each year. Proctor went this season with a royal-court jester theme. The mismatched prints and patterns of his outfit also run through stockings and a tree skirt. Elsewhere, the Nutcracker has inspired ornaments, paper goods and dish tow-els. At Yankee Candle’s flagship store in South Deerfield, Mass., in its Bavarian-castle room, there’s a nutcracker sec-tion complemented by beer steins and cuckoo clocks. “Nutcrackers are for someone who has spirit,” Proctor says. Next year, she’s already considering a Scottish bagpiper nut-cracker. “I’m sure a lot of people who collect nutcrack-ers have no idea where they come from, where they’re made or where the tradition started, but we’ve studied them!” says Proctor. Many of the most traditional ones are made in Germany in the type of snowy mountain towns you’d imagine, she says. “We are convinced the people working on them are descendants of Santa Claus. They pay incredible attention to detail and qual-ity.” Sales, however, are just as strong in warm-weather places, says Proctor who, for this phone interview, happened to be in Texas advising Neiman Marcus customers on how to deck their air-conditioned halls. Some decorative nutcrackers are gifts, but she suspects just as many go right into personal collec-tions. “Some people have dozens of their own. They love them to death for a few weeks and then tuck them away,” Proctor says. “It’s the best of both worlds.” The Stinchfield family collection, however, stays up year-round. “They just make you smile,” Stinchfield says. Decadent dessert with a minimum of muss and fussBy ALISON LADMANAssociated PressYou want something rich and decadent for the holidays. Something choc-olate. Something that will impress. Something that really screams celebration. But you don’t want to spend hours making it. The answer? A flourless choco-late cake. It’s like a baked truffle — simple, yet sen-sational enough to impress your guests. All you have to do is dress it up with whipped cream and fresh berries. Be sure to cut small slices from this; it really is amazingly rich.Flourless chocolate cake Start to finish: 1 hour, plus cooling Servings: 16Ingredients1 1/2 cups (3 sticks) unsalted butter 12 ounces bittersweet chocolate bits 3/4 cup strong brewed coffee 6 eggs3/4 cup packed brown sugar 1/2 cup unsweetened cocoa powder, sifted Pinch of salt2 tablespoons brandy or rum Whipped cream, to serve Fresh berries or shaved chocolate, to serveInstructionsHeat the oven to 350 F. Coat an 8-inch cake pan with cooking spray. Line the bottom of the pan with a piece of parchment paper cut to fit. Set the cake pan in a larger baking dish, such as a 9-by-13-inch bak-ing pan. In a medium saucepan over medium-high heat, melt the butter. Remove the pan from the heat and stir in the chocolate bits until completely melted and smooth. Stir in the coffee. In a medium bowl, use an electric mixer to beat together the eggs, brown sugar, cocoa powder, salt and brandy for 2 to 3 min-utes, or until slightly thick-ened. Beat in the chocolate-butter mixture. The batter should resemble a thick pudding. Pour the batter into the cake pan, jiggling the pan to settle the batter so that it’s level. Place the larger pan with the cake pan in it into the oven. Pour hot water into the larger pan, being care-ful not to get any water on the cake batter. Add enough water to bring it halfway up the sides of the cake pan. Bake for 35 to 40 minutes, or until the cake is slightly puffed and set in the middle. Carefully remove the pan from the oven; be careful not to splash the hot water. Remove the cake pan from the water bath and allow the cake to cool fully in the pan. Place a serving plate over the cake pan and invert the two so that the pan is on top of the serving plate. Gently lift the cake pan off, then peel away the parchment paper. Serve topped with whipped cream and fresh berries or chocolate shavings. Nutrition information per serving: 340 calories; 250 calories from fat (74 percent of total calories); 28 g fat (16 g saturated; 0.5 g trans fats); 115 mg cho-lesterol; 23 g carbohydrate; 2 g fiber; 18 g sugar; 5 g protein; 40 mg sodium. Wooden nutcracker dolls, many of which will really crack your walnuts and macadamias, are increasingly popular in holiday decor. The classic, a soldier with his sword in hand and prominent moustache, has had to move over to make room for (above, from left) prince, scholar, musician, horseman and (at right) a skier. HOLIDAY DECORATING FOODASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS Modern versions include variety of characters. Party dress codes hard to decipher By SAMANTHA CRITCHELLAP Fashion WriterNEW YORK — The holidays are often a highly social season that pro-vide a good reason to wear the things you might not often have the occasion to pull out of your closet: sequins, a fancy red dress, the sexy black one. But should you? Or will everyone else be wearing their cozy cashmere sweater and favorite riding boots? “People don’t know how to dress anymore — it’s anything goes, which is a huge problem,” says Marie France Van Damme, a fash-ion designer and author of the new book, “RSVP: Simple Sophistication, Effortless Entertaining.” ‘’People are either overdressed or not dressed at all. They should be looking for the happy medium.” The invite — or make that the more likely Evite — probably won’t give you the guidance you’re seeking. Hosts want to kick off the party with cute conversation, not an edict about what to wear. And even if dress code is addressed, it’s probably “cocktail casual” or “holiday glam,” which can mean a whole lot of things to different people. Even the formal “black-tie” directive seems to be open to inter-pretation. “As soon as you get an invitation, the first question is, ‘What do I wear?’ Or at least that’s what I think,” says Lisa Axelson, head designer at Ann Taylor. Style expert Amy Tara Koch goes straight to the fine print to see what the venue is. She says that gives the biggest clue; a party at someone’s home will dictate a different dress than one at a restaurant. A house party gives permission to be a little more daring, whether it’s a plunging neckline or a fashion-for-ward combination, mostly because there’s an assumption that you know the hosts well enough to be invited into their inner circle and you could very well know the other people there, Koch says. A restaurant party could still be a gathering of your more inti-mate friends, but it also could be with work colleagues or extended family — you know, the relatives you only see in December. Axelson, however, sees a big difference in the appropriate attire if the party is at the country club or the neighborhood bistro. She also lets the day and time guide her: probably nice trousers or a pencil skirt and embellished-neck sweater with flats for a Sunday brunch, maybe some-thing with some glitter for Saturday night. An afternoon open house is practically an invitation for something col-orful, says Koch. Her plan this season is to break out a bright shirt, fur vest, leggings and tall boots. There are very few dress-code mistakes that can’t be fixed with a great shoe, says Colleen Sherin, senior fashion director at Saks Fifth Avenue. The other option is a lovely necklace or earrings to draw people immedi-ately to your face. Both Axelson and Koch encourage easily removable accessories that dress up or down an outfit. It could be the statement necklace that tucks under your collar if it’s a more relaxed crowd, or a beaded wrap or tailored jacket — maybe one with sparkle, Axelson suggests — that can be hung with the coats. FASHIONMichelangelo statue on yearlong US tourBy BRETT ZONGKERAssociated PressWASHINGTON— Michelangelo’s “David-Apollo” has been show-cased publicly since Thursday at the National Gallery of Art to open a yearlong celebration of Italian culture in more than 30 U.S. cities. The sculpture from 1530 was unveiled Wednesday by Italy’s foreign minis-ter to launch “2013: The Year of Italian Culture,” which will showcase Italy’s art, science, music, design and innovations. Events and exhibits are planned in Los Angeles, Houston, Cleveland, New York, Boston and points in between, involving about 70 cultural institutions. The masterpiece by Michelangelo will be fea-tured as a centerpiece in Washington until March as a symbol of friend-ship between the United States and Italy, said Italian Foreign Minister Giulio Terzi di Sant’Agata. “It represents innovation and some revolutionary concepts, which were developed by Michelangelo and by the Renaissance artists,” he said, “but it rep-resents also the bilateral relations between Italy and the United States.” The sculpture was last shown in the U.S. capital in 1949 when it drew nearly 800,000 visitors. It was a centerpiece for those who attended President Harry Truman’s inaugural recep-tion at the museum, he said. This time, it will be on view for crowds attend-ing the inauguration of President Barack Obama. “David-Apollo” is special, in part, because it’s myste-rious and engages a view-er’s imagination. It was left unfinished and unresolved, said Alison Luchs, curator of early European sculpture at the National Gallery. “It seems on the way to becoming something, but we’re not sure what,” she said. “That’s why it goes by a double name, the ‘David-Apollo.’” The statue is on loan from the Museo Nazionale del Bargello in Florence.



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Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2012 3A 3A SPECIALIZING IN: Non-Invasive Laparoscopic Gynecological Surgery Adolescent Gynecology High and Low Risk Obstetrics Contraception Delivering at Shands Lake Shore In-Ofce ultrasounds for our patients 3D/4D Entertainment Scans offering DaVinci Robotic Surgeries. New Patients Welcome Call today for a personal appointment: 386-755-0500 449 SE Baya Drive Lake City, Floraida 32025 www.dainagreenemd.com WE ARE WOMEN, WE ARE M OTHERS, WE UNDERST A ND RIDE R S WITH CA R ING HEA R TS 1ST ANNUAL C H R ISTMAS TOY R UN benetting e Christian Service Center of Columbia County ank you for a totally successful ride on Dec. 1 to: C O R PO R ATE SPONSO R S Roundtree Moore Auto Group Columbia County Cycles HOSTS Registration Site: Roundtree Moore After Party: American Legion 57 SAFETY, SECU R ITY AND T R AFFIC CONT R OL Florida Highway Patrol Troop B, e Columbia County Sheris Department, Columbia County Sheris Department Citizens Service Unit, Columbia County Fire Department, Lifeguard Ambulance Service and Suwannee County Sheris Department COLO R GUA R D Rolling under District 4 VOLUNTEE R S Christian Motorcycle Association, Volunteers from the Christian Service Center, Matt Baroni of Empire Tattoos and Art Gallery for logo design, Cindy Gaylord for yer design and Vonda Murray the designated gopher and all around help in every area. F INANCIAL SPONSO R S Alphabetically Anita Eason (COO Rountree Moore), Bill Garber (Reynolds & Reynolds), Jacobs Casting LLC, Joyes Gems, Steve Dowling (Southeast Toyota), Showcase Mobile Homes and Tim Murphy (Kilgore Welding) FOOD DONATION SPONSO R S Alphabetically C.W. Boone, Hardees, Harveys, Jackson Drywall, Kens Bar B Que, Merita Bread, Nettles Sausage, Ole Times Country Buet, Pepsi, Players Club and Publix A DVE R TISING SPONSO R S Lake City Advertiser, Lake City Journal, Lake City Reporter, Suwannee Democrat, Hunter Printing and Rapid Press Printing (yers), Kickin Kevin and Power Country, Terry Rauch and the 107.5 Conservative Countdown, 94.3 and 96.5 e Jet Advance Auto American Pawn AutoZone Als Motorcycle Shop Beef oBradys Bruce Rossmeyers Destination Daytona Budweiser Car-X Chaney Brothers Cracker Barrel Ellianos Freds Leather Gainesville Harley Davidson Hairs Western Auto High Performance Cycles Interstate Cycles Larry Krull Little Caesars Mikells Power Equipment Morrells Mustang Seats NAPA Phish Heads Performance Tint Pepsi Pete Olin Premier Paper & Janitorial Ronsonet Buick Smittys Western Wear Street FX Streits Motorsports of Gainesville Sunbelt Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge Sunbelt Honda Timeless Memories Tucker Rockey Unicorn Editions, ltd. Wilsons Outtters Wellborn Pawn DONATIONS FO R R AFFLES AND AUCTIONS Alphabetically AND ESPECIALLY TO ALL THE R IDE R S WHO CAME OUT IN SUPPO R T AND MADE THE R IDE A HUGE SUCCESS NOTICE Attention Humana Wal-mart and CVS Caremark Medicare Part D patients: We accept these plans and all other Part D plans. Baya East 755-6677 Baya West 755-2233 Medical 755-2277 Call one of our pharmacies to see which plan is best for you. JAILED: City firefighter faces charges Continued From Page 1A COLEMAN: Resigns after 8 weeks on the job Continued From Page 1A Presley elected local NAACP president By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com Bernice Presley was voted in as the new Columbia County Branch NAACP presi dent Saturday during the organizations bi-annual election. The election was held at the Richardson Community Center with several local National Association for the Advancement of Colored People members in attendance as well as with five officials from the NAACP state office who conducted the election. The Columbia County Branch of the NAACP holds its elections every other year, and officers serve two-year terms. State NAACP officials conducted the election because a complaint was filed with the state branch centering around a violation of process regarding the local branchs nominating process. Although it was the bi-annual election for the organization there was only one contested race the race for president, in which Presley and Debra White were the candidates. Presley garnered 16 votes to win the position, while White collected 13 votes. The election process began just after 10 a.m. Saturday with state NAACP officials explaining why they were conducting the election. After fielding questions from the floor, Dale R. Landry, president of the Tallahassee branch NAACP and fourth vice president of the Florida State Conference NAACP, opened the floor to nominations. There were three initial nominations for the presidents post with Presley, Debra White and John Mayo all being nomi nated to the post. However, Mayo declined the nomination setting up competition between Presley and White. Landry then took nominations for the organizations other administrative posi tions as well its executive committee. After the floor was closed to the nomina tions, state NAACP officials used the local branchs roster to verify that members seeking office met election guidelines. When the process was concluded ballots were created. Voting began around 1:15 p.m. with five people voting at a time. There were observers present in the voting area to preserve the integrity of the election. Voting concluded around 1:54 p.m. and Landry read the election results. Election returns for Columbia County NAACP Branch officers were: Bernice Presley president; Linda Thomas first vice president; Patricia Brady second vice presi dent; Glynnell Presley secretary; Georgia Muldrow assistant secre tary; Martha Harris treasurer; and Delerria Rentz and Gaynell Lee executive committee members. (Additional executive committee members will be appointed at a later date.) Shortly after the election concluded, the organizations officers were sworn in by Juvais Harrington, assistant secretary for the Florida State Conference of the NAACP. Election results will be forwarded to the state and national offices. From staff reports FORT WHITE Two Fort White teens, one a Fort White High School student, were arrested Tuesday and face felony charges stemming from an alleged burglary of a Fort White home. John Andrew Burke, 18, 234 Shelbyville Court, Fort White, was charged with burglary while armed and grand theft in connec tion with the case. He was booked into the Columbia County Detention Facility in lieu of $60,000 bond. Shawn Paul Pearson, 16, address withheld, also was charged with burglary while armed and grand theft in the case. Authorities did not give a bond amount for Pearson or list where he was being incarcerated. According to Columbia County Sheriffs Office reports, the sheriffs office launched an investi gation into a burglary on Cumberland Street in Fort White, where several fire arms and computer equip ment were stolen. On Thursday, Columbia County Sheriffs Office school resource deputies got information that a Fort White High School student may have been involved in the burglary. Through their joint inves tigation, school resource deputies and detectives were able to locate the sto len property at a residence on Nantucket Street in Fort White. The stolen firearms and the majority of the computer equipment were recovered for the victim. Detectives arrested the two suspects and took them to the Columbia County Detention Center. Both suspects were booked on multiple charges, reports said. Burke Department for more than 17 years, Armijo said. According to Hamilton County Sheriffs reports, the victims father received word through an anonymous call alleging that his daughter was having an inappropriate relationship with Wilson, and that the two had been talking for months. The girl was reported to have Wilsons cellphone number programed into her phone under the name Ashley, and the childs mother told authorities when she took the phone, she saw more than 500 texts to and from the number the girl allegedly used to contact Wilson. The woman told authorities the content of the texts made it clear to her that Wilson was texting her daughter. When authorities interviewed the victim she said she and Wilson began texting for a while and their communication con tinued and escalated to she and Wilson kissing and having physical contact dur ing an incident the Sunday before the White Springs Christmas parade. The vic tim reportedly told her friends about what happened. Authorities then confiscated the cell phone, reports said. Authorities reportedly spoke to Wilson at his White Springs home and he was detained for questioning. After he was read his Miranda rights, Wilson reportedly told authorities that he and the victim had been texting and talk ing daily for some time and she confided in him abuse that occurred to her at age 9 by a family member and of another incident with a 24-year-old. Wilson said they developed feelings for one another and that they kissed on sever al occasions, but they were never intimate, the report said. Wilson told authorities that the phone with which he and the girl communicated was a prepaid phone that he had purchased solely for that purpose and he threw the phone away before he was interviewed by authorities. Wilson was then arrested and taken to the Hamilton County Jail. the last week of October after work ing for the Columbia County Sheriffs Office for the previous five and a half years. The last four years, he was the jail administrator at the Columbia County Detention Facility. The Columbia County 911 Communications Center dispatches all of the emergency service first responders in Columbia County with the exception of the Lake City Police Department. Williams said he was told that Coleman resigned Thursday with the intention of his resignation taking effect immediately, even though he agreed to follow up with Kraus on Monday. Williams said he was not given a reason for Colemans resignation. The impression I got was the job was more than Bennie anticipated, he said. The specifics I do not know. Thats something I would like to know. Williams said the county has imple mented a contingency plan for the time being. Patricia Coker is serving as the departments interim director. Its a position shes held before, Williams said. No interviews have been scheduled yet to fill the newly created vacancy, and Williams said he is uncertain how long it may take to fill the vacan cy. However, he noted there is not a deadline facing the county. The process hasnt started yet for a replacement, but it soon will, he said. Williams said he called county commissioners to give them a headsup that Coleman had resigned late in the week. Two charged in Fort White burglary Get your community news online with The Lake City Reporter digital edition. Free to all subscribers. Call the Circulation Department at (386) 755-5445



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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2012 3B3BSPORTS • EBT • SNAP • Debit • All Major Credit Cards • No Rain Checks • While Supplies Last NettlesSmoked Turkeys $24.99each IBP CleanedPork Chitterlings5Lb. Bag $4.99each Nettles Sugar Cured SmokedWhole Hams $1.19Lb. Nettles Sugar CuredSmoked Picnics 99¢ Lb. NettlesPork Chops6Lb. Box $10.00 Boston ButtPork Roast2 Pack $1.29Lb. BonelessSirloin Tip RoastWhole In Bag $2.99Lb. BonelessTop Sirloin SteaksFamily Pack $3.99Lb. Boneless New YorkStrip SteaksWhole or Half Loin $4.99Lb. Bone-In RibeyeSteaks or RoastWhole or Half Loin $5.99Lb. Whole BonelessPork Loins $1.99Lb. Sanderson Farms FryerThighs or DrumsticksFamily Pack 99¢ Lb. Sanderson Farms Cryovac WholeFrying Chicken 99¢ Lb. Peeled BeefButt Tenderloin3 Lb. Avg. Wt. $6.99Lb. FreshGround ChuckFamily Pack $2.69Lb. Ad Good 12-17-12 through 12-24-12 Store Hours: Monday – Saturday 8am – 6pm Nettles Sausage190 SW CR 240 Lake City, FL 32025 (386) 752-2510 “Country Made By Country Folks” NettlesSmoked Hog Jowl $1.69Lb. Pre-CutOx Tails $3.99 Lb. Lady Tigers taking court JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterWolfson High’s Breona Pelham (25) attempts to block a sh ot made by Columbia High’s Alkeidra Lewis (1). JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Cinnamon Davis (3) attempts to move aro und Wolfson High’s Nia Peoples (33) on Thursday.



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LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF DECEMBER 16, 2012 3C US manufacturing rises By MARTIN CRUTSINGERAP Economics WriterWASHINGTON — U.S. factories rebounded in November from Superstorm Sandy, boosting production of cars, equipment and appliances. But after factor-ing out the impact from the storm, the broader trend in manufacturing remained weak. The Federal Reserve said Friday that factory output increased 1.1 per-cent in November from October. That offset a 1 percent decline in the pre-vious, which was blamed on the storm. Auto production jumped 4.5 percent last month, the first increase since July. Production of primary met-als, wood products, electri-cal equipment and appli-ances all showed gains. Total industrial output at factories, mines and utili-ties rose also rose 1.1 per-cent last month, after a 0.7 percent decline in October. Still, economists cautioned that the rebound in manufacturing was almost entirely related to Sandy. Sal Guatieri, senior economist at BMO Capital Markets, noted that when averaging data over October and November, industrial output and manu-facturing both were up just 2.1 percent over the past year — less than half the growth rate from the start of the year. “Looking beyond Sandy’s impact, U.S. manufacturers continue to plod ahead,” Guatieri said. Many companies have delayed purchases of machinery and equipment this year because of uncer-tainty surrounding taxes and government spend-ing. They are also worried about a slowdown in global growth that has weighed on U.S. exports. “The global slowdown will prevent a strong recovery” in manufactur-ing, predicted Paul Dales, senior economist at Capital Economics. U.S. manufacturing activity shrank in November to the slowest pace since July 2009, according to a closely watched index of manufac-turing activity compiled by the Institute for Supply Management. China’s manufacturing activity rose to a 14-month high in December, adding to signs the world’s second-largest economy is recov-ering, a survey showed Friday. But export orders weakened. Economists say the U.S. economy is growing in the current October-December quarter at an annual rate below 2 percent. That would be slower than the 2.7 percent growth rate in the July-September quarter and too weak to rapidly lower the unemployment rate. The job market is making steady gains. Employers added 146,000 jobs in November. That’s about the same as the average monthly gain of 150,000 in the past year. The unemployment rate fell to 7.7 percent — a four-year low — from 7.9 percent in October. But the decline occurred mostly because more people without jobs gave up looking for work. The government counts people without jobs as unemployed only if they’re actively seeking one. ASSOCIATED PRESSSherle Mir works on an assembly line at Generac Powe r Systems, Inc., one of the largest makers of residential generators in the country, in Whitew ater, Wis. U.S. factories rebounded in November from Superstorm Sandy, boosting production o f cars, equipment and appliances. ASSOCIATED PRESSA Georgia Port Authority electric, rubber-tire gant ry crane works off a new electric grid system at the Savanna h Port in Savannah, Ga. The cranes can switch from shore-b ased power on the grid, to on-board diesel generators wh en moving between stacks. The new technology reduces fuel consumption by an estimated 95 percent, the authority said. US refuses to sign telecomm treaty By RUSS BYNUMAssociated PressSAVANNAH, Ga. — The Port of Savannah on Friday rolled out tower-ing mobile cranes that run mostly on electricity, technology that port offi-cials said would slash die-sel fuel consumption by nearly 6 million gallons a year once the entire fleet is upgraded over the next decade. The 80-foot gantry cranes, which span six truck lanes, load and unload cargo contain-ers from trucks carry-ing goods to and from the nation’s fourth-busi-est container port. The manufacturer of the elec-tric cranes, Finnish com-pany Konecranes, said Savannah was the first U.S. seaport to use them. “What you are seeing here is going to set a new benchmark for electrify-ing this type of equipment in the U.S.,” said Curtis Foltz, executive direc-tor of the Georgia Ports Authority. The cranes cost $1.8 million apiece and the Savannah port is start-ing out with just four in its total fleet of 116. Foltz said could take 10 years to replace all the port’s die-sel-powered cranes. Once that’s done, port officials said, the switch would not only slash emissions but also save about $10 mil-lion a year. It’s not the first move aimed at cutting die-sel consumption at the Savannah port, which moved just shy of 3 mil-lion cargo containers in 2012. The port installed giant ship-to-shore cranes that run entirely on elec-tricity more than a decade ago, and later switched to electric refrigeration racks that keep cool poultry and other perishable products being shipped in contain-ers. The port authority says those changes already have reduced diesel fuel use by 5.4 million gallons a year. The problem with electrifying mobile cranes is that they need move about the port terminal on rub-ber tires, so they can’t stay plugged in. Konecranes ended up producing a model that runs back-and-forth along a 500-foot electrified rail while it’s moving cargo. When the cranes need to cruise to another stack of contain-ers, they switch to diesel power for the trip. Richard Cox, general manager of equipment and facilities engineer-ing for the Georgia Ports Authority, said the new cranes would run on elec-tric power 95 percent of the time. Konecranes expects it won’t be long until other U.S. ports start using the company’s electric mobile cranes as well. Tuomas Saastamoinen, the company’s sales and marketing director, said seaports in China, Honk Kong and Turkey are already using the cranes and other American ports are talking with the com-pany about upgrading their equipment. He said he expects even more interest in the U.S. now that the electric cranes are being used in Savannah. “Basically it tells the other facilities that it can be done, it’s proven and it works,” Saastamoinen said. Economic stresses easing in EuropeBy DAVID McHUGHAP Business WriterFRANKFURT, Germany — European Central Bank officials say there is “no room for complacency” even though stresses from the debt crisis have eased on banks and financial mar-kets. The central bank for the 333 million people in the 17-country eurozone on Friday warned that failure by governments to reduce deficits and improve growth risked worsening the situa-tion again. And European leaders need to press on with build-ing new rules and institutions to safeguard the euro, the bank added in its twice-yearly financial stability report. “Key financial stability risks remain and there is no room for complacency,” the bank said. Europe is struggling with high levels of government debt in some countries, financially weak banks, and sluggish economic growth. Greece, Ireland and Portugal have needed government rescue loans, although Spain and Italy are now breathing easier after struggling to finance themselves over the sum-mer. The bank noted “a tangible easing of euro area financial stability strains since the summer.” Bond markets have improved dramatically since ECB President Mario Draghi vowed in July to do “whatever it takes” to save the euro. The ECB then outlined a plan under which it would buy unlim-ited amounts of a country’s government bonds, reduc-ing its borrowing rates, on condition it tapped a European aid program. But ECB Vice President Vitor Constancio was cau-tious when asked Friday at a news briefing about the eurozone’s progress out of its financial and economic troubles. “I have learned with ancient Greece, not to be hubristic,” he said, using the Greek word for excessive pride and self-confidence. “There is an improvement.” The ECB report said there was a risk that the improvement in market conditions might reduce the pressure on govern-ments to cut debt and defi-cits and improve growth. Banks also remain a potential weak spot as they repair their finances, Constancio said. The bank-ing system also remains fragmented. By BRIAN MURPHYAssociated PressDUBAI, United Arab Emirates — Envoys from nearly 90 nations signed Friday the first new U.N. telecommunications treaty since the Internet age, but the U.S. and other Western nations refused to join after claiming it endorses greater government con-trol over cyberspace. The head of the U.N. telecoms group pushed back against the American assertions, defending the accord as necessary to help expand online ser-vices to poorer nations and add more voices to shape the direction of modern communications technol-ogy. Hamadoun Toure’s remarks highlighted the wide gaps and hard-fought positions during the past 10 days of global talks in Dubai. The negotiations essentially pitted the West’s desire to preserve the unregulated nature of the Net against developing countries yearning for better Web access and strong-arm states such as Iran and China that closely fil-ter cyberspace. The final break late Thursday was not over specific regulations in the U.N. group’s first telecoms review since before the Internet was a global force. Instead, it came down to an ideological split over the nature of the Internet and who is responsible for its growth and governance. More than 20 countries joined the U.S. on Friday in refusing to sign the protocols by the U.N.’s International Telecommunications Union, or ITU, claiming it opens the door to greater government controls of the Net and could be used by authoritarian states to justify further crackdowns on cyberspace. Rival countries — including Iran, China and African states — insist the governments should have a greater sway over Internet affairs and seek to break a perceived Western grip on informa-tion technology. Cheaper gas lowers consumer pricesBy CHRISTOPHER S. RUGABERAP Economics WriterWASHINGTON — A steep fall in gas costs pushed down a measure of U.S. consumer prices last month, keeping inflation mild. The seasonally adjusted consumer price index dropped 0.3 percent in November from October, the Labor Department said Friday. Gas prices fell 7.4 percent, the biggest drop in nearly four years. That offset a 0.2 percent rise in food prices. In the past year, consumer prices have risen 1.8 per-cent, down from October’s 12-month increase of 2.2 percent. Excluding the volatile food and gas categories, prices ticked up 0.1 percent in November. Core prices have risen 1.9 percent in the past year — below the Federal Reserve’s annual target of 2 percent. Higher rents, airline fares and new cars pushed up core prices last month. The cost of clothing and used cars fell. “In simplest terms, inflation is not a problem,” Jim Baird, chief investment strategist at Plante Moran Financial Advisors, said. Lower inflation “is a real positive that should provide modest relief for house-holds dealing with limited income growth.” High unemployment and slow wage growth have made businesses reluctant to raise prices. Many worry higher prices could drive away customers. That’s helped keep inflation tame. Modest inflation leaves consumers with more money to spend, which can boost economic growth. Lower inflation also makes it easier for the Fed to continue with its efforts to rekindle the economy. If the Fed were worried that prices are rising too fast, it might have to raise interest rates. Gas prices have fallen sharply in the past two months after spiking in the late summer. A gallon of gas cost an average of $3.29 nationwide Friday. That’s 15 cents less than a month ago and 50 cents less than in mid-October. The increase in food prices was smaller than many economists expected. This summer’s drought in the Midwest, which scorched corn and soybean crops, has pushed up food pric-es. But the increase hasn’t been dramatic so far. Food costs have risen 1.8 percent in the past 12 months. Some items have seen big increases. The cost of milk, cheese and other dairy products have risen 0.8 percent in each of the past two months. That could reflect the higher cost of animal feed, which usu-ally includes corn and soy-beans. Cereals and baked goods rose 0.3 percent last month. But prices for the broad category of meat, chicken, fish and eggs fell in November, after a big gain the previous month. Shoppers may face further increases soon. Wholesale food costs jumped 1.3 percent last month, according to a sepa-rate report Thursday, the most in nearly two years. Beef prices jumped the most in 4 1 years, and vegetable costs also rose sharply. Grocery stores may pass on some of those costs to consumers in the coming months.Savannah port upgrades toelectric cranes ASSOCIATED PRESSGas prices are dropping just in time for holiday travel By Monday the national average should fall below $3.2775 a gallon, the low for the year set on J an. 1.



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up, covered in sand and in shambles. This goes to show you that timing, sometimes, is everything. I believe that these towns and cit-ies along the Jersey Shore will rebuild, but I doubt they’ll ever really be the same. There will be some nostalgia lost along the way. I firmly believe that if an opportunity presents itself, you should grab it! You just never know what tomorrow will bring. I am thankful to have had the opportunity to visit these cities along the Jersey Shore with my nephew, who will also one day, grow up and may not want to hang out with his Aunt Sandy. Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2012 3D3DLIFE Stop by the Lake City Reporter for your complimentary engagement package. Aisle Style Complimentary Engagement Package • Sweetwater Branch Inn 800-595-7760• Wards Jewelry & Gifts 752-5470• Camp Weed Cerveny Conference Center 386-364-5250• GeGee’s Studio 758-2088• Holiday Inn 754-1411, ext. 106 By SUE MANNINGAssociated PressLOS ANGELES — A holiday present for Fido or Fluffy used to be an extra table scrap or a new squeeze toy. But as with gifts for their human coun-terparts, pet presents are becoming increasingly high-tech. Like presents for young children who lack the dex-terity to enjoy their new playthings, pet gifts are usually for the human who owns the pet. Allie Robino of Austin, Texas, bought a dog treat maker for her 8-year-old rescue mutt Bentley, but it’ll be her baking the biscuits — not Bentley. She bought PetSmart’s Sunbeam Holiday Dog Treat Maker, essentially a waffle-maker with dog-bone molds, for Bentley when she took him to see Santa Claus at a Fort Worth pet store. Even though he and her other dog, Shiner, will be the primary beneficia-ries of the purchase, it’s mostly a gift for Robino, who admits to having prob-lems making things at home from scratch. “A lot of these kinds of things end up being more complicated than the com-pany promises, but this was super easy to use and the finished product looked great. Believe me, if it were possible to mess up, I would have messed up. I’m batting zero on Pinterest,” she said, referring to the photo-sharing website beloved by amateur chefs and DIY-crafters. Robino said it was the only time she has bought a gift for a pet that requires electricity, figuring that would put Bentley in a rar-efied group of animals with high-tech presents. But there are actually plenty of gadgets in stores for animals, from the predict-able (dog barking control, electronic self-cleaning cat litter boxes) to the surpris-ing (exercise equipment, air conditioners for dog-houses, pet air purifiers for human houses). Technology is having an impact in every area of the pet world, including food, toys and care products, said Bob Vetere, president of the American Pet Products Association. He believes health care advances are moving the fastest. “There are many advances on the pet rehabilita-tion side of health care that weren’t even heard of a few years ago. There are also new advances in medica-tion, treatments, and even testing and diagnostic areas. For example, you can send off your pet’s DNA to find out their breed and even give at-home tests to determine if certain diseas-es are present,” he said. Rehab equipment for pets, such as a dog-size treadmill, are no longer just for veterinarian clin-ics. Pet owners can buy the DogPacer’s Minipacer treadmill ($479), which is made for dogs under 55 pounds. The original DogPacer treadmill will accommodate dogs up to 179 pounds and sells for $499 — about the same price as human-size gym equipment. For owners who exercise with their pets, the Sharper Image Pet-O-Meter Pet Pedometer ($19.99) counts steps, calculates distance and tracks the calorie intake of the human partner. Meanwhile, the proliferation of apps for mobile devices offers clutter-free options for urban pet own-ers with little living space. There are apps that track pets’ whereabouts, like the GPS-based monthly service Tagg Pet Tracker, which can alert owners if a dog leaves a designated area or monitor a pet’s physi-cal activity. For a simpler option, PetHub dog tags and collars make owners’ contact information acces-sible through a scanning app on a mobile device, and animal shelter and GPS tracking services can be added. Vetere believes the best high-tech pet product is the microchip, which can be implanted in dogs, cats, birds, horses and other ani-mals and will help reunite owners with lost pets. “They are also widely used by industry profes-sionals to track vaccina-tions, test results and other records. With GPS micro-chips now available as well, your missing pet can not only be tracked back to you, but you can now track them down and prove own-ership if need be,” he said. Vetere predicts hot hightech gifts this year will be microchip pet doors, which open using a chip implant-ed in the animal. He said the most popular products will always be those that make life easier for pet owners — “like automatic feeders and water delivery systems, automatic litter boxes, grooming tools that comb and also vacuum up the pet hair.” On Vetere’s personal wishlist is “an automatic yard cleaner that would pick up after my dog, but I don’t see how that would work without a robot,” he said. For pets and owners who do volunteer work — yes, there’s an app for that, too. For example, the $149.99 TouchChat alternative com-munication app lets people who have difficulty speak-ing play with a dog using voice commands.Gifts for pets following high-tech trend ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOSA holiday present for Fido or Fluffy used to be an extra ta ble scrap or a new squeeze toy. But as with gifts for their human counterparts, pet presents are becoming increasingly high-tech. ABOVE LEFT: Sunbeam appliance company has a Holiday Dog Treat M aker, available at PetSmart Inc. stores. ABOVE RIGHT: Sharper Image is selling the Motion Activated Pet Bowl, w hich has with a built-in sensor that detects when a pet is near and automatically slides the doors open so the pet can eat. The doors close five secon ds after the pet walks away. New squeeze toy not good enough for today’s pooch. New arrival A daughter, Adalyn Olevia, was born to Chuck and Lyndsie Peeler, of Lake City, on Nov. 29, 2012, at North Florida Regional Hospital, Gainesville. The baby weighed 7 pounds and measured 19.5 inches. The grandparents are Charles and Dianna Peeler, Rhonda and Alan House and Brad and Tracy Roberts. TRAVEL: Jersey Shore Continued From Page 1D HAPPENINGS Q Sandy Kishton is a freelance travel writer who lives in Lake City. Contact her at skishton@comcast.net Couple water skis together for more than 50 yearsThe Daytona Beach News-JournalDAYTONA BEACH, — Love of water has been a common bond in Harry and Artis Price’s lives from the day they first met on a diving board more than 50 years ago. The Prices of DeLeon Springs — Harry, 85, and Artis, 82 — have compet-ed in more national water ski competitions than any other man or woman, according to USA Water Ski. That’s 53 national competitions for Harry and 52 for Artis. They both again broke records and won titles recently in various events in their age division at the national championships in West Palm Beach. Their love story began when he was giving div-ing instructions in Illinois and was asked to give les-sons to an English teacher. She wanted to teach high school swimming because she had been on the swim team at Purdue University when in college but didn’t know how to dive. “Don’t saddle me with some old English teacher,” Price recalls saying. The young teacher was assigned to another coach. Then, one day while Harry Price was on the diving board, “climbing up the back was my future wife.” “He tried not to meet me,” she joked. “I didn’t tell her for years that ‘I’m the guy who refused to teach you,’ “ he laughed. But before they married 54 years ago, Price, now a retired physician, taught his wife to water ski, and it has been a combined pas-sion ever since. Together, they have won more than 130 nation-al gold medals since the 1960s. At their home in DeLeon Springs, a glass cabinet dis-plays more than 50 of their trophies and plaques. By SCOTT MAYEROWITZAP Business WriterNEW YORK — This Christmas travel season could be the busiest in six years, with AAA predicting that 93.3 million Americans will hit the road. That’s 1.6 percent more than last year and just 400,000 people shy of the 2006 record. More cars will crowd the highways than ever before, largely because finding a seat on a plane at a desir-able price has gotten more difficult. AAA says a record 84.4 million people will drive at least 50 miles between Dec. 22 and Jan. 1. That’s 90.5 percent of allholiday travelers, a slight increase from 89.3 percent six years ago. Put another way: one in four Americans will be driving long distances for Christmas and New Year’s. So expect plenty of traf-fic jams, crowded highway rest stops and overflowing toll plazas. The price of gas could be close to the average of $3.23 a gallon that drivers paid last Christmas Day. The price has dropped about 50 cents since September. AAA estimates the average price will range between $3.20 and $3.40 per gallon by New Year’s Day. That’s pricey, but hardly a deterrent to holiday travel for most people. “The year-end holiday season remains the least volatile of all travel holi-days as Americans will not let economic conditions or high gas prices dictate if they go home for the holi-days or kick off the New Year with a vacation,” AAA president and CEO Robert Darbelnet said. Travel forecast to surge RUSH: Shoppers rush as clock ticks Continued From Page 1Dmake up lists of toys. Commercials are key for children this time of year. Children wouldn’t know what they wanted without the commercials. They’re a part of Christmas just as much as holiday eggnog or the jolly old elf himself. “They grab a piece of paper and write it all down,” Brace said. “They make a list, and you know what they want because they talk about those things the most.” He said he can’t keep track of everything he’s bought, but he knows they wanted the iPod shuffle, and he remembers buying the baby that walks and talks, Baby Alive, he said. Stormy Waldron also was walking out of the Walmart with gifts for Christmas. She has three children aged 9 years to 15 years. Her daughter wanted a Furby. Her oldest wanted the new Halo Xbox game, and her youngest wanted the Skylander toys. “All he asked for Christmas is Skylanders,” she said. “They’re actually kinda cool.” She had the Skylander Giants in her buggy, and Skylander cupcakes, too. Her 9-year-old’s birthday is today. “I try to never come to Walmart, but over the past few weeks I’ve been here seven or eight times,” Waldron said. While the other parents were buying kiddy toys for younger children, Michelle Hammett was buying for kids on the border of becoming adults. She has a 15-, 17and 18-year-old. This Christmas, the 15and-17-year-olds are getting Remington Model 770s hunting rifles with scopes. Her oldest already has a rifle and has mounted on his walls mementos of his hunting successes. “When they are little, you can buy little toys, and they’re fine with it,” she said. AAA expects car trips to increase to near record.



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OPINION Sunday, December 16, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A4AEDIT Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com H earts were broken from Connecticut to California and everywhere in between on Friday. Columbia County included. Even at a safe distance from the carnage, we are sick with grief. The suffering of those at the center of the Newtown tragedy is hard for the rest of us to comprehend, however great we like to imagine our capacity for empathy. For what it’s worth, Newtown is said to be a close-knit community whose resi-dents will pull together to ease, as best they can, the pain of those who’ve suffered immeasurable loss. That will be of some comfort.As for us, we’ll take comfort in the dedication of those sworn to protect us and our children from the horrors we saw in countless cable TV recaps over the week-end. There are no guarantees. As Supt. Terry Huddleston rightly observed, no public place can ever be made completely safe. It isn’t possible.Still, we know that Huddleston and his staff – with considerable help from Mark Hunter and the Columbia County Sheriff’s Office – will do everything in their power to shield us from the terrors visited upon so many in recent years. Meanwhile, God bless the people of Newtown, Conn. And God bless every one of us as well. Suffer the children OUR OPINION On this date:In 1431, Henry VI of England was crowned king of France. In 1653, Oliver Cromwell took on dictatorial powers in England with the title of “Lord Protector.” In 1773, to protest the tax on tea from England, a group of young Americans, disguised as Indians, threw chests of tea from British ships in Boston Harbor. In 1835, a fire in New York City destroyed property estimated to be worth $20 million. It lasted two days, ravaged 17 blocks and destroyed 674 buildings, includ-ing the Stock Exchange, Merchants’ Exchange, Post Office and the South Dutch Church. In 1863, Confederate Gen. Joseph Johnston took command of the Army of Tennessee. In 1864, Union forces under Gen. George H. Thomas won the battle at Nashville, smashing an entire Confederate army. HIGHLIGHTS IN HISTORY Q Historynet.com ( Editor’s note: This column is reprinted from Dec. 30, 2006.)W hen I was in fifth grade, I was in a school play called “The ‘C’ in Christmas”. I got stage fright and forgot my lines but got help from an unexpected source. Here is the story. Mrs. Lucille Inman, our teacher, told our class that we would be putting on a school play called “The ‘C’ in Christmas”. It would be a simple play with a cus-tomary Christian theme, and we would be present-ing it in front of the other elementary classes. She selected nine students to be in the play—one student for each letter in the word Christmas—and each student was assigned one of the letters that spells Christmas. For example, one kid would be the “C” in Christmas, another would be the “H”, another the “R”, and so on. The idea was that we kids would line up across the stage holding a large cut-out of their letter and the letters seen all together would spell “Christmas.” Then each kid would recite his assigned part, beginning with a Christmas word that start-ed with the letter they were holding. Parts in the play were assigned. Friend Cleveland Brock would be the “C”, I would be the “H”, another friend, Beanie Bryant, would be the “R”, etc. Cleve was a large, outgoing boy but Beanie was the smallest girl in our class and the quiet-est. She had had polio and wore a heavy metal brace on her left leg. Her brace made a soft, clink-ing sound as she limped along. Everybody liked Beanie and helped her when she needed help. We loved play rehearsal and practiced our parts so much that some of us came to know each other’s lines as well as our own. Time passed fast and soon there we were stand-ing on the stage in front of all the other kids, holding our letters. Our narrator stepped forward and said, “We are Mrs. Inman’s fifth grade class and our play is called “The ‘C’ in Christmas.” Then Cleve stepped forward holding a big “C” and said confidently, “I am the ‘C’ in Christmas. ‘C’ stands for Christ. We cel-ebrate Christmas because of the birth of Christ.” Then I stepped forward holding my ‘H’, but as soon as I looked out into the sea of faces, I froze in my tracks. My mind went completely blank and I just stood there not knowing what to do. But, after a minute of utter hopelessness, I heard the familiar, soft clink of metal and out of the corner of my eye, I saw little Beanie limping out to stand beside me. She leaned toward me and whispered, “Say ‘I am the ‘H’ in Christmas’ ” and I did. She knew my part and was going to help me! Then, line-by-line, she slowly whispered my part and line-by-line I repeat-ed what she said. “ ‘H’ Stands for Holy. Christ is holy. Holy means Christ is pure, per-fect, free from sin.” I was done. My nightmare was over. Beanie stayed out front and said her part perfect-ly. So did all the other stu-dents and the short play was over. Then we all held our letters high over our heads for the final spelling of “Christmas” and shouted, “Merry Christmas, everybody!” The students clapped and we marched off stage and back to our class-room. Mrs. Inman gave us all a big hug and told us how proud she was of us. Then she went to Beanie and thanked her for helping me, and Beanie said, ‘Mrs. Inman, you told us to always help others when they need help. Everybody here helps me every day and I try to help them when I can.” With that, we all bounded out of the room and ran home for two weeks of glorious Christmas vaca-tion. Cleve and Beanie, both now long gone from this earth, can still remind us of the two essential lessons to remember at Christmas and throughout the year. From Cleve: “The ‘C’ in Christmas stands for Christ. We celebrate Christmas because of the birth of Christ.” And from Beanie: “Help others when they need help.” Christmas is just as simple and eloquent as that. I am the ‘C’ in Christmas Morris WilliamsPhone: (386) 755-8183williams_h2@firn.edu372 W. Duval St.Lake City, FL 32055 Q Morris Williams is a local historian and long-time Columbia County resident. Spectacular birthday celebration coming M y 80th birthday is Dec. 21, and according to the doomsday “experts” who are com-bining the abrupt end of the Mayan Calendar, the Nostradamus prophecies and some choice Biblical revelations, they predict it will be a spectacular cel-ebration! Catastrophes galore are said to be looming, and depending on your information source, either a rogue planet will slam into the earth, killing all its inhabitants, or a gigantic solar flare will reach the earth, completely inciner-ating everything on it, or the north and south poles will suddenly reverse, catapulting all of us into outer space, or much more appropriately, God will decide He’s had enough of our foolishness and smite us with His almighty fist. While I appreciate all this commotion in honor of my birthday, it’s really not at all necessary, and a little less stimulation might be preferable. I am just another “OOPS” child, born in 1932, the height of the Great Depression, to a 52-year-old widower with six children and a 39-year-old widow with four, who combined in 1925 to form the dirty dozen. As if they didn’t have enough prob-lems, they accidentally conceived me a few years later when they threw all caution to the wind, creat-ing a perfect storm, which blew me into their lives just nine months later. So, how do we get so old so fast? Just as a pas-senger on an enormous roller coaster struggling ever so slowly up that first hill, then plunging into what seems a bottomless pit. And like a bloodhound hanging ecstatically out of a speeding car with jaws flapping and eyes water-ing, unaffected by the pos-sibility of a collision with an immovable object, we rejoice in the simple joy of rapid movement, even while feeling our bodies being harshly compressed and our heads driven downward into our chests at each and every dip. But like a stubborn straphanger on a rush hour subway, we continue to endure the unmerciful battering at every turn, trying mightily not to be flung off and smashed into the ground. Desperately hanging on, white-knuck-led and determined to the very end, we are pro-foundly dismayed that it was over so quickly, boldly pretending we were never afraid. Not one of us knows what’s going to happen on Dec. 21, but hopefully it will pass quietly and the sun will rise without inci-dent on Dec. 22. Even with the wear and tear of 80 years on this earth, the unwelcome thought of its destruction, however much deserved, does not carry any great appeal. Merry Christmas to all, I hope! GUEST COLUMN Marian LewisLake City



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4B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2012 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04204BSports Winter sports in full swing JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Jordan Parks, 17, competes in a weightl ifting competition against Baker County on Dec. 6. COURTESY PHOTOColumbia High’s ColeSchreiber works on a first-round pin against an opponent from Orange Park High at the Tiger Invitational. COURTESY PHOTOColumbia High’s Kaleb Warner is on the way to a win i n his match against a Gainesville High wrestler at the Tiger Invitational. COURTESY PHOTOColumbia High’s Marcus Zeigler squares off against a w restler from Tampa Jesuit High at the Capital City Classic in Tallahassee.JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Dre Brown (33) goes up for a rebound against Santa Fe High. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Wayne Broom applies defensive pressu re against Lee High.



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4D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2012 4DLIFE SUNDAY EVENING DECEMBER 16, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosWipeoutThe Bachelorette: Ashley and J.P.’s Wedding The couple get married. (N) News at 11Inside Edition 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsThe Insider (N) Love-RaymondBig Bang TheoryCSI: Miami “In Plane Sight” Criminal Minds “Epilogue” NewsSports ZoneChann 4 NewsBig Bang Theory 5-PBS 5 -(5:00) Superstars of Seventies Soul Live (My Music)Downton Abbey Revisited Behind-the-scenes footage. Masterpiece Classic “Downton Abbey” Masterpiece Classic “Downton Abbey” Doc Martin Martin’s rst patient. 7-CBS 7 47 47e(4:00) NFL Football Pittsburgh Steelers at Dallas Cowboys. 60 Minutes (N) Survivor: Philippines (Season Finale) (N) Survivor: Philippines “Reunion” (N) Action Sports 360 9-CW 9 17 17(4:00) Vera DrakeAccording to JimYourJax MusicVoid TVLaw & Order A woman kills her sister. Local HauntsLocal HauntsTMZ (N) The Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30e NFL Football: Bills vs. Seahawks Cleveland ShowCleveland ShowThe Simpsons (N) Bob’s Burgers (N) Family Guy (N) American Dad (N) NewsAction Sports 360Leverage “The Miracle Job” 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsFootball Night in America (N) (Live) e(:20) NFL Football San Francisco 49ers at New England Patriots. (N) News CSPAN 14 210 350NewsmakersWashington This Week Q & APrime MinisterRoad to the White House Q & A WGN-A 16 239 307Funny VideosBloopers!Bloopers!How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine(:40) Instant Replay30 Rock30 Rock TVLAND 17 106 304RoseanneRoseanneRoseanneRoseanneRoseanneRoseanneLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Oprah’s Next ChapterOprah’s Next Chapter Rapper 50 Cent. Oprah’s Next ChapterOprah’s Next Chapter “Jamie Foxx” Golden SistersGolden Sisters (N) Oprah’s Next Chapter A&E 19 118 265Storage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage Wars(:01) Be the Boss “Auntie Anne’s” (N) HALL 20 185 312“November Christmas” (2010, Drama) Sam Elliott, John Corbett. “Christmas With Holly” (2012) Sean Faris, Eloise Mumford. Premiere. “A Dog Named Christmas” (2009, Drama) Bruce Greenwood, Noel Fisher. FX 22 136 248“Salt” (2010, Action) Angelina Jolie, Liev Schreiber, Chiwetel Ejiofor.“Taken” (2008, Action) Liam Neeson, Maggie Grace, Famke Janssen.“Taken” (2008, Action) Liam Neeson, Maggie Grace, Famke Janssen. CNN 24 200 202CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) Fareed Zakaria GPS Four leaders. (N) Piers Morgan TonightCNN Newsroom (N) Fareed Zakaria GPS Four leaders. TNT 25 138 245“A Christmas Story” (1983) Peter Billingsley, Darren McGavin. (DVS)“Four Christmases” (2008) Vince Vaughn, Reese Witherspoon. (DVS)“Four Christmases” (2008) Vince Vaughn, Reese Witherspoon. (DVS) NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobSee Dad Run“Rugrats in Paris: The Movie” (2000, Adventure) The NannyThe NannyFriends(:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241(4:00)“GoodFellas” (1990, Crime Drama) Robert De Niro, Ray Liotta.“The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift” (2006, Action) Lucas Black, Zachery Ty Bryan. (:45)“The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift” (2006) MY-TV 29 32 -LassieLassieM*A*S*HM*A*S*HColumbo “A Case of Immunity” M*A*S*HThriller “Kill My Love” The Twilight ZoneThe Twilight Zone DISN 31 172 290Austin & AllyDog With a BlogDog With a BlogGood Luck CharlieShake It Up!JessieA.N.T. FarmJessieGood Luck CharlieAustin & AllyDog With a BlogJessie LIFE 32 108 252(5:00) “All About Christmas Eve”“The Christmas Hope” (2009) Madeleine Stowe, James Remar. “The Merry In-Laws” (2012) Shelley Long, George Wendt, Lucas Bryant. (:02)“The Christmas Hope” (2009) USA 33 105 242NCIS “Thirst” (DVS) NCIS “Engaged, Part 1” (DVS) NCIS Searching for a missing Marine. Royal Pains “Off-Season Greetings” The nuptials of Evan and Paige. (N) (:02) Royal Pains BET 34 124 329Friday After Next“Obsessed” (2009, Suspense) Idris Elba, Beyonc Knowles, Ali Larter. “Meet the Browns” (2008, Comedy-Drama) Tyler Perry, Angela Bassett, David Mann. B. College TourDon’t Sleep! ESPN 35 140 206(3:30) World Series of Poker Europe Final Table. (Taped) SportsCenter (N) (Live) 30 for 30 30 for 30SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209CrossFit GamesCrossFit GamesCrossFit GamesCrossFit GamesCrossFit GamesCrossFit Games2012 CrossFit GamesCrossFit GamesCrossFit Games2012 CrossFit Games SUNSP 37 -Ship Shape TVFlorida SportsmanFishing the FlatsSport FishingSportsman’s Adv.2012 TEVA Mountain GamesAlong the WayAlong the WayO’Neill OutsideSaltwater Exp.Into the Blue DISCV 38 182 278Moonshiners Tickle builds a new still. Amish Ma aAmish Ma a “Fire From the Lord” What Destroyed the Hindenburg? (N) Gold Rush “Up Smith Creek” Amish Ma a “Fire From the Lord” TBS 39 139 247(5:30)“Bad Boys II” (2003, Action) Martin Lawrence, Will Smith. “Killers” (2010, Action) Ashton Kutcher, Katherine Heigl. (DVS)“Killers” (2010, Action) Ashton Kutcher, Katherine Heigl. (DVS) HLN 40 202 204Murder by the BookDominick Dunne: Power, PrivilegeDominick Dunne: Power, PrivilegeWhat Would You Do?What Would You Do?Dominick Dunne: Power, Privilege FNC 41 205 360FOX News Sunday With Chris WallaceFOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) FOX News Sunday With Chris WallaceGeraldo at Large (N) Huckabee E! 45 114 236LeAnn RimesIce Loves CocoIce Loves CocoIce Loves Coco“She’s Out of My League” (2010) Jay Baruchel, Alice Eve, T.J. Miller. Ice Loves CocoTrue HollywoodLove You, Mean ItThe Soup TRAVEL 46 196 277Airport 24/7: MiamiAirport 24/7: MiamiAirport 24/7: MiamiAirport 24/7: MiamiSturgis: Metal ManiaSturgis: Wild and Free (N) Sturgis: Wild RideMud People HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lMillion Dollar RoomsExtreme Homes Human nests. Property Brothers “Amber” House Hunters RenovationHouse HuntersHunters Int’l TLC 48 183 280Dateline: Real Life MysteriesSin City RulesWilliam and Kate: A Royal Baby StorySister Wives (N) Sister Wives (N) Sin City Rules “Whine Tasting” (N) Sister WivesSister Wives HIST 49 120 269Ancient AliensAncient AliensAx Men “All or Nothing” Ax Men “We’re Not Alone” (N) Bamazon “Heart of Darkness” (N) (:02) Outback Hunters (N) ANPL 50 184 282Call of WildmanCall of WildmanFinding Bigfoot “Dances With Bigfoot” Rattlesnake Republic (N) Call of WildmanCall-WildmanFinding Bigfoot (N) Call of WildmanCall-Wildman FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveThe Next Iron Chef: RedemptionSugar Dome (N) The Next Iron Chef: Redemption (N) Sweet Genius “Holiday Genius” Iron Chef America TBN 52 260 372T.D. JakesJoyce MeyerLeading the WayThe Blessed LifeJoel OsteenKerry ShookBelieverVoiceCre o DollarJesus of Nazareth Robert Powell stars; 1977 miniseries. FSN-FL 56 Tennis Champions Series: Chicago. World Poker Tour: Season 10World Poker Tour: Season 10The Best of Pride (N) UFC InsiderFootball PrevWorld Poker Tour: Season 10 SYFY 58 122 244(5:00)“Stake Land” (2010) “Underworld: Rise of the Lycans” (2009) Michael Sheen, Bill Nighy. “Blade II” (2002) Wesley Snipes. A vampire hunter unites with his prey against a new threat. Syfy Anniversary AMC 60 130 254(5:30)“Prancer” (1989, Fantasy) Sam Elliott, Rebecca Harrell. “A Christmas Carol” (1984, Fantasy) George C. Scott, Angela Pleasence. “A Christmas Carol” (1984) George C. Scott. COM 62 107 249(5:30)“Grandma’s Boy” (2006) Doris Roberts. (:32)“Get Him to the Greek” (2010, Comedy) Jonah Hill, Russell Brand, Elisabeth Moss. (:04)“Zack and Miri Make a Porno” (2008) Seth Rogen, Traci Lords. CMT 63 166 327(4:30)“Facing the Giants” (2006)“Fireproof” (2008) Kirk Cameron. A divorcing couple turn to God to save their marriage. “Grumpier Old Men” (1995, Comedy) Jack Lemmon, Walter Matthau. (:45)Fireproof NGWILD 108 190 283Swamp LionsWorld’s Deadliest “Underwater Killers” Predators of the Sea Icy Killers: Alaska’s Salmon SharkPredators of the Sea NGC 109 186 276Outlaw Bikers “Masters of Mayhem” World’s Toughest PrisonsRussia’s Toughest PrisonsDrugs, Inc. “Hollywood High” (N) Alaska State Troopers (N) Drugs, Inc. “Hollywood High” SCIENCE 110 193 284Factory MadeFactory MadeWonders of the Solar SystemWonders of the Solar System “Aliens” How Big Is the Universe?How Small Is the Universe? (N) Wonders of the Solar System “Aliens” ID 111 192 285Nightmare Next DoorDisappeared “Dark Voyage” On the Case With Paula ZahnFatal Encounters “Death Undercover” On the Case With Paula ZahnOn the Case With Paula Zahn HBO 302 300 501“New Year’s Eve” (2011, Romance-Comedy) Halle Berry. ‘PG-13’ “In Time” (2011, Science Fiction) Justin Timberlake. ‘PG-13’ GirlsGirlsEnlightenedEnlightened MAX 320 310 515(4:50)Alien 3(:45) “Alien Resurrection” (1997) Sigourney Weaver. ‘R’ (:35)“The Sitter” (2011, Comedy) Jonah Hill. ‘R’ “Bridesmaids” (2011, Comedy) Kristen Wiig, Maya Rudolph. ‘NR’ SHOW 340 318 545Untold History of the United StatesDexter Dexter tries to balance his life. Homeland “In Memoriam” Dexter Dexter must protect himself. (N) Homeland Carrie needs to decide. (N) (:10) Dexter “Surprise, Mother...” MONDAY EVENING DECEMBER 17, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Extreme Makeover: Home Edition (N) Extreme Makeover: Home Edition (N) Castle “Secret’s Safe With Me” News at 11(:35) Nightline (N) 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) The Insider 5-PBS 5 -JournalNightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Use Your Brain to Change Your Age With Dr. Daniel AmenSuper Brain With Dr. Rudy TanziTavis Smiley 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJaguars AccessTwo and Half MenHow I Met Your Mother (N) 2 Broke Girls (N) Mike & Molly (N) Hawaii Five-0 “Kahu” (N) Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneGossip Girl “New York, I Love You XOXO” Gossip Girl’s identity is revealed. TMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family GuyFamily GuyThe SimpsonsDragons: GiftIce Age: Christmas“Happiness Is a Warm Blanket”NewsAction News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) The Voice The nal two vocalists perform. (N) (Live) (:31) 1600 Penn (N) (:01) Take It All (Season Finale) (N) NewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(5:00) Public Affairs Politics & Public Policy Today WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosWGN News at Nine (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304M*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279The Will: Outrageous Final Wishes 2The Will: Outrageous Final Wishes 3Dateline on OWNDateline on OWN Internet con artists. Dateline on OWN “Bitter Pill” (N) Dateline on OWN A&E 19 118 265The First 48Hoarders “Manuel & Carla” Hoarders “Terry; Adelle” Hoarders “Jan; Bebe” (N) Intervention “Sarah P.” (N) (:01) Intervention “Sandi” HALL 20 185 312“A Season for Miracles” (1999, Drama) Carla Gugino, David Conrad. “A Christmas Wish” (2011, Drama) Kristy Swanson, Tess Harper. “A Town Without Christmas” (2001) Patricia Heaton, Rick Roberts. FX 22 136 248Two and Half MenTwo and Half Men“The Karate Kid” (2010, Drama) Jaden Smith, Jackie Chan. A Chinese master schools an American boy in the martial arts.“The Karate Kid” (2010) Jaden Smith, Jackie Chan. CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245The Mentalist “Scarlet Ribbons” The Mentalist “Little Red Book” The Mentalist “Blood Money” The Mentalist “Red All Over” The Mentalist “18-5-4” CSI: NY The team must save the lab. NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobDrake & JoshDrake & JoshNews W/LindaFull HouseFull HouseFull HouseThe NannyThe NannyFriends(:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241Ink Master “Ink Master Revealed” Tattoo NightmaresTattoo NightmaresTattoo NightmaresTattoo NightmaresTattoo NightmaresTattoo NightmaresTattoo NightmaresTattoo NightmaresTattoo NightmaresTattoo Nightmares MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*HM*A*S*H “Crisis” Law & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitSeinfeldFrasierThe Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Phineas and FerbGood Luck CharlieShake It Up!Austin & Ally“Beethoven’s Christmas Adventure” (2011) Kyle Massey. Dog With a BlogGood Luck CharliePhineas and FerbGood Luck CharlieJessie LIFE 32 108 252“Holiday Switch” (2007, Comedy) Nicole Eggert, Patricia Mayen-Salazar. “All About Christmas Eve” (2012, Comedy) Haylie Duff. “Holiday Wishes” (2006, Drama) Amber Benson. USA 33 105 242NCIS Naval of cers targeted. NCIS: Los Angeles “Overwatch” WWE Monday Night RAW WWE TLC: Tables, Ladders & Chairs PPV results. (N) (:05) CSI: Crime Scene Investigation BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Top 10 Countdown” (N) D’Jango Unc.“He Got Game” (1998) Denzel Washington, Ray Allen. A high-school basketball star faces his estranged father. Apollo Live Guest Doug E. Fresh. ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) Monday Night Countdown (N) (Live) e NFL Football New York Jets at Tennessee Titans. (N Subject to Blackout) SportsCenter (N) ESPN2 36 144 209SportsNation (N) SportsCenter (N) Around the HornInterruption 2012 World Series of Poker 2012 World Series of Poker 2012 World Series of PokerSportsCenter (N) Coll. Football Live SUNSP 37 -Billy DonovanThe Game 365d College Basketball Alabama State at Georgia Tech. (N)d College Basketball2011 American Ski Classic College Basketball DISCV 38 182 278American Chopper “Impasse” American Chopper “The Last Build” American Chopper (N) American Chopper “The End” (N) Amish Ma a “Fire From the Lord” American Chopper “The End” TBS 39 139 247King of QueensKing of QueensSeinfeldSeinfeldFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyConan Amanda Seyfried; Adam Pally. HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) Dr. Drew on Call (N) Nancy GraceShowbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236The Voice Vocalists face elimination. E! News (N) Studio E! (N) Ice Loves Coco“Sweet Home Alabama” (2002) Reese Witherspoon, Josh Lucas. Chelsea Lately (N) E! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernBizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernThe Layover with Anthony BourdainThe Layover with Anthony BourdainHotel Impossible (N) Hotel Impossible “Triangle T Ranch” HGTV 47 112 229My First PlaceMy First PlaceLove It or List It “The Douglas Family” Love It or List It Holly and Peter. Love It or List It The Jaswal family. (N) House HuntersHunters Int’lLove It or List It “Michael & Jeffery” TLC 48 183 280Island MediumIsland MediumCake Boss: Next Great BakerCake Boss: Next Great BakerCake Boss: Next Great Baker (N) Cake Boss (N) Cake Boss (N) Cake Boss: Next Great Baker HIST 49 120 269American Pickers “Substitute Picker” American Pickers “Dial F for Fritz” Pawn StarsPawn StarsAmerican Pickers (N) Pawn Stars (N) (:31) Pawn StarsI Love the 1880’s(:32) Pawn Stars ANPL 50 184 282Monsters Inside Me “Shape Shifters” Gator Boys “Horse-Devouring Gator” Rattlesnake RepublicFinding BigfootFinding Bigfoot: Further EvidenceRattlesnake Republic FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveRestaurant: ImpossibleRestaurant StakeoutDiners, DriveDiners, DriveMystery DinersHealth Inspectors TBN 52 260 372Mary and Joseph: A Story of FaithTrinity Music City The Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesLiving EdgeKingdom Conn.Jesse Duplantis“A Christmas Snow” (2010, Drama) Catherine Mary Stewart, Muse Watson. FSN-FL 56 -Inside the MagicMagic Live! (Live)d NBA Basketball Minnesota Timberwolves at Orlando Magic. From Amway Center in Orlando, Fla. Magic Live! (Live) World Poker Tour: Season 10World Poker Tour: Season 10 SYFY 58 122 244(5:30)“Blade II” (2002, Horror) Wesley Snipes, Kris Kristofferson.“Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End” (2007) Johnny Depp, Orlando Bloom. Jack Sparrow’s friends join forces to save him. Riverworld AMC 60 130 254“Yours, Mine & Ours” (2005, Comedy) Dennis Quaid, Rene Russo. “A Christmas Carol” (1984, Fantasy) George C. Scott, Angela Pleasence. “A Christmas Carol” (1984) George C. Scott. COM 62 107 249It’s Always Sunny(:26) Tosh.0The Colbert ReportDaily Show(7:58) Futurama(:28) Futurama(8:59) South Park(:29) South ParkDenis Leary’s Merry F... ChristmasDaily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327RebaRebaRebaRebaRebaReba“Deliverance” (1972) Jon Voight. An Appalachian canoe trip turns bad for four businessmen. Smokey-Bandit NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer A wheaten terrier mix. Ultimate Predators “Jaws of Death” Ultimate Predators “Animal Assassins” Ultimate Predators “Chimp Attack” Ultimate Predators “Death by Dragon” Ultimate Predators “Animal Assassins” NGC 109 186 276Taboo “Changing Gender” Border Wars “Special Ops” Hell on the HighwayTaboo “Booze” Taboo “Nudity” Shedding clothes. Hell on the Highway SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeJourney to the Center of the EarthPredicting Monster EarthquakesCuriosity (N) When Earth Erupts “Asia” Predicting Monster Earthquakes ID 111 192 285Sins & Secrets “Hilo” 48 Hours on ID “Family Affair” The Great Pretender (N) Devil-KnowDisappeared A woman goes missing. The Great Pretender HBO 302 300 501(5:30) Namath“New Year’s Eve” (2011, Romance-Comedy) Halle Berry. ‘PG-13’ Picture Paris(:45)“Red Tails” (2012, Historical Drama) Cuba Gooding Jr., Terrence Howard. ‘PG-13’ MAX 320 310 515“X-Men: First Class” (2011, Action) James McAvoy. ‘PG-13’ (:15)“Something to Talk About” (1995) Julia Roberts. ‘R’ “Hanna” (2011, Action) Saoirse Ronan, Eric Bana. ‘PG-13’ SHOW 340 318 545(5:55) A Game of HonorUntold History of the United States (N) Homeland Carrie needs to decide. (:10) Dexter “Surprise, Mother...” (:10) Homeland Carrie needs to decide. WEEKDAY AFTERNOON Comcast Dish DirecTV 12 PM12:301 PM1:302 PM2:303 PM3:304 PM4:305 PM5:30 3-ABC 3 -NewsBe a MillionaireThe ChewGeneral HospitalMauryDr. PhilBe a MillionaireNews 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsVaried ProgramsPaid ProgramAndy Grif th ShowThe Jeff Probst ShowSteve HarveyThe Dr. Oz ShowChann 4 NewsChann 4 News 5-PBS 5 -WordWorldBarney & FriendsCaillouDaniel TigerSuper Why!Dinosaur TrainCat in the HatCurious GeorgeWild KrattsElectric Comp.R. Steves’ EuropeWorld News 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxThe Young and the RestlessBold/BeautifulThe TalkLet’s Make a DealJudge Joe BrownJudge JudyAction News JaxAction News Jax 9-CW 9 17 17The Trisha Goddard ShowLaw & Order: Criminal IntentJudge MathisThe Bill Cunningham ShowMauryThe People’s Court 10-FOX 10 30 30Jerry SpringerThe Jeremy Kyle ShowJudge Joe BrownWe the PeopleThe DoctorsDr. PhilFamily FeudFamily Feud 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsBe a MillionaireDays of our LivesFirst Coast LivingKatie The Ellen DeGeneres ShowNewsNews CSPAN 14 210 350(9:00) Public AffairsPublic AffairsVaried Programs Public Affairs WGN-A 16 239 307In the Heat of the NightWGN Midday NewsWalker, Texas RangerWalker, Texas RangerWalker, Texas RangerLaw & Order: Criminal Intent TVLAND 17 106 304Andy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowGunsmokeVaried ProgramsGunsmokeVaried ProgramsBonanzaBonanzaBonanza OWN 18 189 279Dr. PhilDr. PhilVaried Programs A&E 19 118 265CSI: MiamiCriminal MindsCriminal MindsVaried ProgramsThe First 48The First 48The First 48 HALL 20 185 312Marie Marie Movie Movie FX 22 136 248MovieVaried Programs How I Met/MotherHow I Met/Mother CNN 24 200 202CNN Newsroom CNN Newsroom The Situation Room TNT 25 138 245Varied Programs NIK 26 170 299Team UmizoomiVaried ProgramsDora the ExplorerVaried ProgramsTeenage Mut.SpongeBobOdd ParentsOdd ParentsOdd ParentsSpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBob SPIKE 28 168 241Varied Programs MY-TV 29 32 -Hawaii Five-0GunsmokeBonanzaThe Big ValleyThe Wild, Wild WestEmergency! DISN 31 172 290Phineas and FerbMovieVaried ProgramsA.N.T. FarmVaried Programs Good Luck CharlieVaried Programs LIFE 32 108 252Old ChristineOld ChristineHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherFrasierFrasierFrasierFrasierMovieVaried Programs USA 33 105 242Varied Programs BET 34 124 329The ParkersThe ParkersMy Wife and KidsMy Wife and KidsJamie FoxxJamie FoxxThe ParkersMovieVaried Programs ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenterSportsCenterSportsCenterOutside the LinesColl. Football LiveNFL LiveAround the HornInterruption ESPN2 36 144 209First Take Numbers Never LieBest of First TakeVaried ProgramsNumbers Never LieDan Le BatardNFL32Varied Programs SUNSP 37 -College BasketballVaried Programs DISCV 38 182 278FBI: Criminal PursuitAuction KingsAuction KingsMythBustersVaried Programs TBS 39 139 247Fresh PrinceAmerican DadAmerican DadLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondSeinfeldFriendsFriendsFriendsFriends HLN 40 202 204News Now Making It in AmericaEvening Express FNC 41 205 360(11:00) Happening NowAmerica Live Studio B With Shepard SmithYour World With Neil CavutoThe Five E! 45 114 236E! NewsSex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CityVaried Programs TRAVEL 46 196 277Varied Programs HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lVaried Programs TLC 48 183 280What Not to WearA Baby StoryA Baby StoryCake BossCake BossWhat Not to WearVaried ProgramsSay Yes: BlissSay Yes: BlissI Found the GownI Found the Gown HIST 49 120 269Varied Programs ANPL 50 184 282Animal Cops DetroitAnimal Cops DetroitAnimal Cops DetroitPit Bulls and ParoleesPit Bulls and ParoleesThe Haunted FOOD 51 110 231Varied Programs Secrets/Restaurant30-Minute MealsGiada at HomeGiada at HomeBarefoot ContessaBarefoot ContessaVaried Programs TBN 52 260 372Varied Programs James RobisonTodayThe 700 ClubJohn Hagee TodayMovieVaried Programs FSN-FL 56 -Varied Programs SYFY 58 122 244Varied Programs AMC 60 130 254(11:30) MovieVaried Programs COM 62 107 249MovieVaried Programs Movie Comedy Central(:40) Futurama(:10) FuturamaIt’s Always Sunny CMT 63 166 327Varied ProgramsExtreme MakeoverVaried Programs RoseanneRoseanne(4:50) Roseanne(:25) Roseanne NGWILD 108 190 283Dog WhispererVaried Programs NGC 109 186 276Alaska State TroopersBorder WarsTabooVaried Programs SCIENCE 110 193 284Varied Programs Factory MadeFactory MadeMythBustersVaried ProgramsThey Do It?They Do It? ID 111 192 285Dateline on IDDeadly WomenVaried ProgramsDeadly WomenVaried ProgramsSins & SecretsVaried ProgramsSins & SecretsVaried Programs48 Hours on ID HBO 302 300 501(11:45) MovieVaried Programs (:15) MovieVaried Programs MAX 320 310 515Movie(:45) MovieVaried Programs (:15) MovieVaried ProgramsMovieVaried Programs SHOW 340 318 545(10:30) MovieMovieVaried ProgramsMovieVaried Programs(:05) MovieVaried Programs



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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2012 5A 5A On Friday, December 21st Santa will be in Lake City to talk to boys and girls. The calls will be made between 6-8 p.m. and carried live on Power Country 102.1 FM If you would like for Santa to call your child, just ll out the form below. Additional forms may be picked up at the Lake City Reporter, Lake City Police Department, the Florida Highway Patrol or Power Country 102.1 FM. Mail or bring the completed forms to Lake City Reporter, 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, FL 32055 Childs Name:______________________________________ Age:______ Address: ________________________________ Phone:_______________ Parents Name: _______________________________________________ Brothers & Sisters:____________________________________________ Ages:______________________________________________________ Seen Santa this year? Yes No (check one) Where? _____________________________________________________ Pets? Yes No (check one) Type: ______________ Name:________________________________ Gifts he or she requested? _______________________________________ Goods things the child has done through the year:____________________ ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ Santa Calls from Santa Sponsored by: Florida Highway Patrol, Power Country 102.1 FM, Lake City Police Department, and Lake City Reporter. Lake City Reporter Jana Elizabeth Oxendine & Ronald Wayne Frost II will be married on Saturday, December 29, 2012 at 4 p.m. at the Calvary Baptist Church in Jasper, FL. All friends and family are invited to attend. Lake City 352-374-4534 426 S.W. Commerce Dr., Suite 130 John Robert Grund John Robert Grund, 79, passed away Wednesday, December 12, 2012 at the VA Medical Cen ter following a lengthy illness. He was pre ceded in death by his parents, Henry Grund and Rosa Mae Davis Grund, brother Rudy Grund and sisters Marga ret Jenkins and Betty Taylor. Mr. Grund was retired from the US Navy. He was a Navy Diver and Explosive Ordinance Dis posal Technician for 15 years. He then worked for the Department of Defense as a Security Supervi sor from which he retired in 1989. Mr. Grund was a member of Lantern Park Baptist Church where he served as Deacon and Bible Teacher. He was as sociated with AWANA Youth International for 29 years trav eling to South Florida, NE Flor ida and South Georgia teaching and training churches to start AWANA clubs. This minis try of teaching young peo ple Christian living from the Bible was very dear to him. He is survived by his wife of 54 years, Faye McClendon Gr und, sons Tony Carter and Jeff Grund, daughters-in-laws Kar en Carter and Sandra Grund, granddaughters Theresa Brock (Michael), Michelle Staf ford (Kevin), Emily Whatley (Rod), and grandson Clayton Grund, great-grandchildren Na than Brock, Nicholas Brock, Keira Stafford, Aaron Staf ford, Will Whatley and Katie Whatley, his constant pet com panions Bear and Ginger, his Lantern Park Church family and many other special friends. Viewing will be at GatewayForest Lawn Funeral Home, Friday, December 14 from 5-7 p.m. A memorial service con ducted by Rev. Neal Howard, Lantern Park Baptist Church, were held on Saturday, Decem ber 15 at 11 a.m. at the chapel of GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN 3596 S. US Hwy 441, Lake City, FL 32025. (386) 752-1954.Ellis Julian Stephens Sr. Mr. Ellis Julian Stephens, Sr., lovingly known to his children, grandchildren and great grand children as Daddy, Papa, Big Papa and Papadolphilus. Mr. Stephens was born on August 28, 1925 in Adel, Georgia to James iett Stephens. He lived in Valdo sta, Georgia before moving to Florida in 1966. He worked for Occidental Chemical Company (PCS) for 24 years, retiring in 1989. Mr. Stephens was proud of his country and served in the United States Army as Sergeant, 168th Infantry, 34th Division. He was preceded in death by his parents, his wife, Essie Virginia Conine Stephens and one son, Ellis Julian Stephens, Jr. Also preceding him in death were siblings, Ethridge, Roy, James, Floyd, Ethel Giddens and Myrtle Sims; brothers-in-law, Carson Giddens and Joe Sims; sis ters-in-law, Ora, Maybelle and Sadie Stephens, Catherine Conine Simpson and Gail Lightsey Poole. He leaves behind daughters, Bar bara Stephens and Mary Stephens Wynn (Gene), of Jasper, Florida and a son Grady Harris Mixon (Joyce) of Fargo, Georgia; Nine Grandchildren, Kelsey Beck (Maryann), Sabrina Beck Howell (Eric), Brandon Blair (Heather), Jessica Wynn Clinard (Barry), Amanda Wynn Brady (Billy), Deanna Makuch (Phillip), Ste phen Paul Stephens, Melissa Mixon Davis (Mike) and Vir ginia Mixon; twenty three great grandchildren. Also surviving is his brother, Carlis Snooks Ste phens and brother-in-law, David Lightsey. Sisters-in-law, Marga ret Stephens Brooks and Sarah Ernestine Conine Spector and many beloved family and friends. Funeral services will be held at 1:00 P.M. Monday, De cember 17, 2012 at Jennings Missionary Baptist Church in Jennings, Florida. Inter ment will follow in Greenville, Florida at Evergreen Cemetery. The family will receive friends on Sunday, Decem ber 16, 2012 at Harry T Reid Funeral Home between the hours of 3:00-5:00 P.M. tions may be made to: American Cancer Society (800)227-2345 cancer.org or 2119 SW 16th St. Gainesville, Florida 32608. Harry T. Reid Funeral Home, Jasper, Florida is in charge of arrangements. Obituaries are paid advertise ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporters classified depart ment at 752-1293. OBITUARIES Water management board adopts budget The Suwannee River Water Management District Governing Board on Wednesday approved a preliminary budget of $14.9 million and a pro posed millage rate of 0.4143, the same as last year. In accordance with a new statutory require ment, the district must present a preliminary bud get to the Legislature by January 15. The prelimi nary budget provides the Legislature with additional oversight of the districts budget. The preliminary budget with the assistance of pro jected state funding sup ports the Districts core mission, including springs protection, and maintains reserve funding for costshare programs. Among the strategic pri orities and program high lights include continuation of: Heartland Springs Initiative; North Florida Regional Water Supply Partnership; Aquifer recharge fea sibility study; Land management and surplus lands pro grams; Agricultural costshare program; Santa Fe and Suwannee River Basins Nutrient Reduction and Irrigation Retrofit pro gram. COURTESY PHOTO Columbia County Sheriff Mark Hunter (center) poses with Deputies State Attorney General Pam Bondi recently recognized two Columbia County Sheriffs Office Deputies Steven Khachigan (left) and Don Meyer. The deputies show off their letters of Attorney General Pam Bondi recently recognized Khachigan and Meyer for completing 130 hours of training in juve nile issues through the Florida Crime Prevention Institute. COURTESY PHOTO Columbia County Resources presented a check in the amount of $3,500 to Catholic Charities from proceeds the fourth annual Smokin Pig BBQ Fest along with a donation from Sonnys BBQ in Lake City. Pictured are: (front row, from left) Linda Dowling, Columbia County Resources manager; Steve Briscoe, president; Wanda Jones, director; Suzanne Edwards, Catholic Charities; Jimmy Sparks, director; and Trey Dixon of Sonnys BBQ.; and (back row) Gator Moore, director; Rob Summerall, director; Dale Peeler, vice president; Mike Nelson, secretary-treasure; and Lamar Boozer, director. COURTESY PHOTO Dorothy Spradley, district volunteer/education marketing coordinator, presented $335 from the Columbia County School System raised during the schools Wear Pink Day to Columbia County Resources Tough Enough To Wear Pink Crisis Fund. Pictured are (front row, from left) Steve Briscoe, Columbia County Resources president; Wanda Jones, director; Dorothy Spradley; Jimmy Sparks, director; and Linda Dowling, manager; and (back row) directors Gator Moore, Rob Summerall, Dale Peeler, Mike Nelson and Lamar Boozer. Deputies recognized Community involvement Panther deaths report issued Associated Press TALLAHASSEE State wildlife officials said vehi cle strikes are responsible for most of the 25 Florida panther deaths that were recorded this year. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission officials said 17 panthers were killed by vehicles. In 2011, nine of 24 panther deaths that were inves tigated were attributed to vehicle strikes. The Florida panther once roamed across the Southeastern United States. Now, scientist estimate that just 100 to 160 remain. Theyre found only in South Florida. Environmentalists blame the panther deaths on shrinking habitat. The Naples-based Conservancy of Southwest Florida said the death toll is likely to increase unless steps are taken to keep development in check. The Center for Biological Diversity said the federal government has twice rejected its proposals to attempt to establish a sec ond panther population in the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge on the Georgia-Florida border.



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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2012 5B 5BSports *See Players Club for complete details. Must be at least 21 years old and a Seminole Players Club member to participate. Valid ID required. Management reserves all rights. Offers are non-negotiable, non-transferable and must be redeemed in person at the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel and Casino Tampa. Offer is for the slot and gaming machine of your choice, not valid for live Poker or Table Games. No cash value. Persons who have been trespassed or banned by the Seminole Tribe of Florida or those who have opted into the self-exclusion program are not eligible. If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, please call 1-888-ADMIT-IT. 2011 Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino. All rights reserved. 4 813.627 SEMINOLE HARD ROCK HOTEL & CASINO TAMPA YOU PAY: $ 40 00 PACKAGE INCLUDES: $ 35 00 FREE PLAY Plus $ 5 Meal Voucher & Roundtrip Transportation OVER 4,100 OF THE HOTTEST SLOT MACHINES, 90 TABLE GAMES AND 50 LIVE POKER TABLES. MORE WAYS TO WIN. Service from Valdosta/Lake City/Gainesville PICK-UP LOCATIONS & TIMES NEW SERVICE! For group charter information, please call the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino 877.529.7653 For more information call FABULOUS COACH LINES at 1.866.352.7295 or visit their website at fabulouscoach.com HOP ON THE BUS GUS YOU PAY: $ 35 00 From Valdosta From Lake City & Gainesville TUESDAYS & SATURDAYS VALDOSTA MALL VALDOSTA, GA 1700 Norman Drive LAKE CITY MALL LAKE CITY 2469 West US Hwy. 90 OAKS MALL GAINESVILLE 6419 Newberry Road 8:15 AM 7:00 AM 9:00 AM Miami Central knocks off GHS for state title Associated Press ORLANDO Joseph Yearby and Dalvin Cook rushed for two touchdowns apiece as Miami Central defeated Gainesville 37-14 in the Florida Class 6A state championship game on Saturday. Miami Central (122) won its second state championship in the last three seasons behind the legs of Yearby, who rushed for 125 yards, and Cook, who added 79 yards and 47 yards receiving. Emilio Nadelman added three field goals. Yearbys first touch down came on Centrals second possession in the first quarter a 35-yard run on the first play of the drive to give Central a 10-0 lead. Cook found the end zone for the first time early in the second quarter and Yearby closed out the first half with a 19-yard touchdown to give Central a commanding 27-7 lead. Gainesville (14-1) entered the game hoping to match Centrals rushing attack but outside of an 80-yard touchdown run by Ralpheal Webb in the first quarter there wasnt much room on the ground for the Hurricanes. Webb finished the game with 146 yards on 16 carries but Gainesville quarterback Marquis Cato struggled, going 3of-17 for 70 yards and an interception. St. Thomas Aquinas 41, Lincoln 25 ORLANDO John OKorn threw for 339 yards and two touchdowns and ran for two more scores to lead Fort Lauderdale St. Thomas Aquinas to a 41-25 victory over Tallahassee Lincoln in the Florida Class 7A state champion ship game Friday night. OKorn threw an 80-yard strike to Corey Holmes and a 71-yarder to Mark Barr in the first quarter. He also rushed for a 51-yard touch down in the second as St. Thomas Aquinas stormed out to a 21-6 lead. Lincoln (12-2) came back with a short touchdown run from quarterback Cameron Joseph and a 50yard pass to Taj Williams to make it 21-19. St. Thomas Aquinas (13-2), however, got anoth er touchdown run from OKorn, who had 95 yards rushing, and a 40-yard scoring run from Fred Coppet to extend its lead to 41-19. St. Thomas Aquinas outgained Lincoln 605-225. Lincolns John Burt took the opening kickoff 95 yards for a touchdown. Tallahassee Godby 21, Immokalee 20 ORLANDO Tallahassee Godby held on to defeat Immokalee 21-20 in the Florida Class 5A state championship game Friday after Immokalee botched an extra-point attempt with no time remaining. Godby (14-1) took a 21-7 lead with 5:54 remaining in the game after Khalid Thomas scored on a 28yard run. Immokalee (114) stormed right back with a short touchdown run from quarterback Tshumbi Johnson. After both defenses held for a series, Immokalee received the ball at its 18-yard-line with 1:08 remaining and no time outs. Johnson drove the Indians down to the 1-yard line after a 19-yard pass to Mackensie Alexander with less than one second remaining. Immokalee tried for a quick snap and QB sneak but the officials called a false start and moved the ball back to the six. On the next play Johnson threw an incomplete pass in the end zone but Godby was whis tled for pass interference and the ball was moved to the 3. On the third untimed down Johnson completed the touchdown pass to Xavier Richardson in the corner of the end zone. On the extra point play Johnson struggled to grab a low snap and scrambled before throwing the ball into a crowd short of the goal line. Johnson finished with 301 yards passing but three interceptions. J.T. Bradwell threw for 108 yards and rushed for 67 yards and a touchdown. ASSOCIATED PRESS Mount Unions Charlie Avila (92) celebrates after the conclusion of the NCAA Division III football championship between Mount Union and St. Thomas in Salem, Va., Friday. Mount Union won 28-10. Mount Union wins Stagg Bowl 28-10 over St. Thomas By HANK KURZ Jr. Associated Press SALEM, Va. Mount Union is back on top of Division III football, and failure was the inspiration. Kevin Burke led two sec ond-half touchdown drives and the Purple Raiders ended a three-year losing streak in the Amos Alonzo Stagg Bowl with a 28-10 victory over St. Thomas of Minnesota on Friday night. Those three straight losses, coach Larry Kehres said, gave him a sense of urgency to win again, and keep his seniors from being his first class in 20 years to leave without a title. It was a difficult three years to see the seniors experience loss in the final game, Kehres said. I felt for them. This group inspired me to do every thing I could coaching to make sure we got every chance to win the champi onship this year. The victory gave Kehres his 11th national title in 16 appearances in the Stagg Bowl, all in the past 20 years. Hes staggering 332-24-3 in 27 seasons, and those seniors did a lot of the heavy lifting. Linerbacker Charles Dieuseul blocked a punt and returned it for a touch down as the Purple Raiders (15-0) took an early 140 lead, and wide receiver Chris Denton rebounded form fumbling a punt away with a 17-yard TD catch on a fourth down play. Its the best feeling in the world, Dieuseul gushed after also having six tackles and a sack. We worked all summer to get to this point right here. All the hard work 6 a.m. lifting, practicing in the snow and it paid off tonight. Burke, the games most outstanding player, threw the scoring pass to Denton on fourth down late in the third quarter to give the Purple Raiders a 21-10 lead, then directed a 14-play, 87yard drive for the clinching score with 4:28 to play. I think it was these guys kind of buckling down, Burke said. You looked at where you are and kind of realized that this is it. This is our last second quarter, third quarter, fourth quar ter. That hits you hard and youve got to step up at that point.



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DEAR ABBY: I have been separated for three years and am now going through a divorce. I have started a new relationship, and, for the first time, I know what being in love feels like. “Mason” is a remarkable man with many great qualities. However, when we go to my friends’ par-ties, they often make com-ments and belittle him because he didn’t graduate from college. Mason is a security guard. It doesn’t bother me, but I feel bad when people ask him why he didn’t become a police officer “instead.” My friends are all professionals who mar-ried other professionals. They don’t realize that they can sometimes be snobs. I don’t know how to approach this subject without getting into an awkward confrontation. Mason’s feelings were hurt before by a prior girl-friend whose family and friends thought he was a loser because of his job. I love him and want this to work. Why do I let other people’s comments affect me? And how can I approach them about this matter? -UNHAPPY IN NEW YORK DEAR UNHAPPY: If your friends persist in making comments to Mason about his job, you should ask them to please stop because they are mak-ing BOTH of you uncom-fortable. However, I would be remiss if I didn’t caution you: After someone has experienced a divorce, it is not unusual to experi-ence a rush of adrenaline -a kind of “high” -dur-ing the next relationship. While it seems idyllic, the problem is that it usually doesn’t last, which is why rebound relationships often don’t work out. This is not to imply that there is anything wrong with Mason, only that you would be wise to take your time before rushing into another marriage. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: I want to be at home on Christmas! Am I so bad? Every year, my mother-in-law pushes us to be at her house on Christmas. My husband and I have even discussed this issue with a marriage counselor. Together, we agreed to always be in our home on Christmas Day. I am happy to have my in-laws over, but not bothered if they choose not to come. My husband talked to his mother, and everything was worked out last year. However, when I told him she was starting up again, he got mad at ME! He seems more worried about pacifying her than making memories with me. I want to fix dinner and do special things in my home because I didn’t have that when I was a child. She had her time. Now I want MY time. -WANTS MY TURN IN NORTH CAROLINA DEAR WANTS YOUR TURN: While I sympa-thize with your desire to establish traditions of your own, you will encounter less resistance and resent-ment if you do it gradually. A way to do that would be to alternate Christmas holidays between your home and your in-laws’ -a suggestion I hope you will take to heart. DEAR ABBY HOROSCOPES ARIES (March 21-April 19): Don’t let impulsive-ness get you into trouble. Think before you act, or you may find out you have jeopardized a relationship with someone who can influence your position. Make personal, financial and emotional changes that will raise your living standard. ++++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Be careful what you share with others. Keep your personal thoughts a secret and fixate more on what others are doing and thinking. ++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Search the job market, even if you aren’t look-ing to make a change. An interesting prospect will give you an idea for a way to make extra cash. A part-nership opportunity can make a difference regard-ing personal and profes-sional success. +++++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): You’ll have a good handle on money matters and be able to wheel and deal in order to get every-thing you want one way or another. Your ability to use your creative skills to mus-ter up unusual offerings will result in compliments. +++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Don’t let emotions come between you and someone you need to get along with. Get together with someone you can share your ideas with and you will come up with a game plan that will help you. +++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Problems on the home front will escalate if you aren’t diplomatic. Steer clear of any form of indul-gence, or you may end up in a precarious position or have to apologize. +++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The more you move about, travel and communi-cate, the better off you will be. Idle time is the enemy, and negative encounters with someone trying to control you will not lead to a resolution. +++++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Don’t fold under emo-tional pressure. Set the stage for change instead of being forced to accept something you may not want to do. ++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Getting together with old friends will boost your confidence and help you find other outlets to bring in a new year. Change is required, but how you go about enforc-ing what you want will determine what you end up with. ++++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Size up your situa-tion and prepare to make a move that will help you uti-lize your skills fully. Power and recognition can be yours if you show compas-sion as well as stability to those looking for answers. Charm will sway opinions. +++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): You’ve got the edge and can make your claim. Feeling good about who you are and what you can accomplish will help you end the year on a high note and head into next year with determination to be victorious. +++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Listen carefully and follow through with your promises. You will face opposition that can dam-age your reputation if you aren’t careful how you handle emotional matters. Find common ground and strive for equality. +++ Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com THE LAST WORD Eugenia Word SUNDAY CROSSWORD Across 1 Striped pet6 Befuddled11 Mr. ___ (old softdrink name) 15 Variety-show overseers 18 Antipasto tidbit19 Simulate2OGSKRWRVWRQH21 Loop locale, informally 22 Entry in a PHWDOZRUNHUVpersonal planner? 24 Roast a red-breasted bird? 26 Gall27 Like movies and bonds 28 Pounds and pence?29 Exercised caution32 Copies from CD to PC 33 Distresses34 What misbehaving kids must haveinherited from theirparents? 37 Funnywoman Boosler 40 Nose wrinkler42 They might not be on the charts 43 Holds up44 Napoleon, e.g., prior to exile? 48 Stuff49 Suffix with fatal52 W. Hemisphere alliance 6RSUDQRUROHLQ,O 7URYDWRUH 54 Fishing spear?56 Verizon forerunner57 Where many last names start with2 58 Shirt front clip-on60 Like superfans61 Has a capacity of63 Timid swearword65 Bit of news6SRNHWRRQHV flock? 68 Small sandwichBBBWKDW71 Undergo73 1975 TVdebut, briefly 0RRFKHUVPRVW valuableacquaintance? 78 Sent texts to, in bygone days 80 Hard water81 Meaning reverser82 Claim findings83 The Salt, in Arizona? 85 Forum wear86 ___ Cassidy, 1970s teen heartthrob 87 High-flown poetry88 Furnace worker90 Coffee from Big Sky Country? &R[VZDLQV teammates ,WVVXLWDEOHIRU framing 96 No.1 priority?100 Smarmy preprandialblessing? &DOLIRUQLDV6DQ ___ County 106 Filmmaker Lee107 Official seal on a Havana cigar? 108 Beverage made by squeezing fruit-filled cookies? 111 Partook of112 Wind-chime location 113 Lagoon encloser114 Benevolent Narnia denizen 115 ___ judicata116 Oklahoma city117 Looked bad in comparison 7KH&KULVWPDV 7KDW$OPRVWBBB(1966 holiday film)Down 1 Specifically2 Last Oldsmobile to be made 3 Conniving sergeant of 1950s TV 4 Hanes competitor5 Up to now6 Frightened, in dialect3URFWRUVFKDUJH8 Debating choice+RO\FDWV10 More than none11 Low class 12 Device with a click wheel 13 Soweto uprising figure 14 Stock holder15 Ed who wrote the 87th Precinctnovels 16 Chewing-gum ingredient 17 Goes under20 Checks (out),WIORZVWKURXJK Orsk /RYH7UDLQJURXS ZLWKWKH 28 Passenger ship30 Tae ___ do31 Venn diagram sets, usually 32 Trade magazines?35 ___ law (acronymic 1970 measure) 36 Minor suit?37 Timeline divisions38 Plenty39 Early fratricide victim 40 Sacred piece41 Click again, maybe44 Turn signal?+DYH


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investigators will be able to use in painting the com plete picture, the how and, more importantly, the why. He would not elaborate. Another law enforce ment official, speaking on condition of anonym ity, said investigators have found no note or manifesto from Lanza of the sort they have come to expect after murderous rampages such as the Virginia Tech blood bath in 2007 that left 33 people dead. The mystery deepened as Newtown education offi cials said they had found no link between Lanzas moth er and the school, contrary to news reports that said she was a teacher there. Investigators said they believe Adam Lanza attend ed Sandy Hook Elementary many years ago, but they had no explanation for why he went there on Friday. Lanza shot and killed his mother, Nancy Lanza, at the home they shared, then drove to the school in her car with at least three of her guns, forced his way inside and opened fire in two classrooms, authori ties said. Within minutes, he killed 20 children, six adults and himself. On Saturday, Chief Medical Examiner Dr. H. Wayne Carver said all the victims at the school were shot with a rifle, at least some of them up close, and all of them were appar ently shot more than once. All six adults killed at the school were women. Of the 20 children, eight were boys and 12 were girls. All the children were 6 or 7 years old. Asked how many bullets were fired, Carver said, Im lucky if I can tell you how many I found. Asked if the children suf fered, he paused. If so, he said, not for very long. The tragedy plunged Newtown into mourning and added the picturesque New England community of handsome colonial homes, red-brick sidewalks and 27,000 people to the grim map of towns where mass shootings in recent years have periodically reignited the national debate over gun control but led to little change. Signs around town read, Hug a teacher today, Please pray for Newtown and Love will get us through. People in my neigh borhood are feeling guilty about it being Christmas. They are taking down decorations, said Jeannie Pasacreta, a psychologist who was advising parents struggling with how to talk to their children. The list of the dead was released Saturday, but in the tightly knit town, nearly everyone already seemed to know someone who died. Among the dead: wellliked Principal Dawn Hochsprung, 47, who town officials say tried to stop the rampage; school psycholo gist Mary Sherlach, 56, who probably would have helped survivors grapple with the tragedy; a teacher thrilled to have been hired this year; and a 6-year-old girl who had just moved to Newtown from Canada. Next week is going to be horrible, said the towns legislative coun cil chairman, Jeff Capeci, thinking about the string of funerals the town will face. Horrible, and the week leading into Christmas. School board chair woman Debbie Leidlein spent Friday night meet ing with parents who lost children and shivered as she recalled those conver sations. They were asking why. They cant wrap their minds around it. Why? Whats going on? she said. And we just dont have any answers for them. Authorities said Lanza had no criminal history, and it was not clear wheth er he had a job. Lanza was believed to have suffered from a personality disor der, said a law enforcement official who spoke on con dition of anonymity. Another law enforce ment official, also speaking on condition of anonymity, said Lanza had been diag nosed with Aspergers, a mild form of autism often characterized by social awkwardness. People with the disorder are often highly intelligent. While they can become frustrat ed more easily, there is no evidence of a link between Aspergers and violent behavior, experts say. The law enforcement officials insisted on ano nymity because they were not authorized to discuss the unfolding investiga tion. Acquaintances describe the former honor student as smart but odd and remote. Olivia DeVivo, now a student at the University of Connecticut, recalled that Lanza always came to school toting a briefcase and wearing his shirt but toned all the way up. He was very different and very shy and didnt make an effort to interact with anybody in his 10th-grade English class, she said. You had yourself a very scared young boy who was very nervous around peo ple, said Richard Novia, who was the school dis tricts head of security and adviser to the high schools Tech Club, of which Lanza was a member. He added: He was a loner. Novia said Lanza had extreme difficulties relat ing to fellow students and teachers, as well as a strange bodily condi tion: If that boy wouldve burned himself, he would not have known it or felt it physically. Lanza would also go through crises that would require his mother to come to school to deal with. Such episodes might involve total withdrawal from whatever he was sup posed to be doing, be it a class, be it sitting and read a book, Novia said. When people would approach Lanza in the hall, he would press himself against the wall or walk in a different direction, clutch ing his black case like an 8-year-old who refuses to give up his teddy bear, said Novia, who now lives in Tennessee. Even so, Novia said his main concern about Lanza was that he might become a target for teasing or abuse by other students, not that he might become a threat. Somewhere along in the last four years there were significant changes that led to what has happened Friday morning, Novia said. I could never have foreseen him doing that. Sandy Hook Elementary will be closed next week some parents cant even conceive of sending their children back, Leidlein said and officials are decid ing what to do about the towns other schools. Asked whether the town would recover, Maryann Jacob, a clerk in the school library who took cover in a storage room with 18 fourth-graders during the shooting rampage, said: We have to. We have a lot of children left. Contributing to this report were Associated Press writ ers Jim Fitzgerald, Bridget Murphy, Pat Eaton-Robb and Michael Melia in Newtown; Adam Geller in Southbury, Conn.; and Stephen Singer in Hartford, Conn. 6A LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SUNDAY DECEMBER 16, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 6A NEW LOCATION Virginia Tiner BOOKKEEPING AND TAX SERVICE Corner of Baya & S.E. Llewellyn Ave. Lake City, FL (across from East Side School ) (386) 758-9808 Over Years WILSONS O UTFITTERS 1291 SE Baya Dr, Lake City (386) 755-7060 WilsonsOutfitters@comcast.net Knives Camo Wear Open Saturdays until Christmas! Sunglasses...30% off Sandals...20-30% off N O T I C E O F M E E T I N G A D V I S O R Y U T I L I T Y C O M M I T T E E C I T Y O F L A K E C I T Y N O T I C E I S H E R E B Y G I V E N t ha t t he A dvi s or y U t i l i t y C om m i t t e e f or t he C i t y of L a ke C i t y F l or i da w i l l hol d a m e e t i ng on M onda y, D e c e m be r 17, 2012 a t 6: 00 P M i n t he C ounc i l C ha m be r s l o c a t e d on t he s e c ond f l oor of C i t y H a l l a t 205 N or t h M a r i on A ve nue L a ke C i t y F l or i da T H E P U R P O S E O F T H E M E E T I N G I S A S F O L L O WS : S t or m w a t e r U t i l i t y & F e e S t r uc t ur e A l l i nt e r e s t e d pe r s ons a r e i nvi t e d t o a t t e nd A U D R E Y E S I K E S M M C C i t y C l e r k C I T Y C O U N C I L M E E T I N G T H E C I T Y C O U N C I L O F T H E C I T Y O F L A K E C I T Y F L O R I D A WI L L M E E T O N M O N D A Y D E C E M B E R 17, 2012, A T 7 : 00 P M I N T H E C O U N C I L C H A M B E R S L O C A T E D O N T H E S E C O N D F L O O R O F C I T Y H A L L A T 205 N O R T H M A R I O N A V E N U E L A K E C I T Y F L O R I D A A l l i nt e r e s t e d pe r s ons a r e i nvi t e d t o a t t e nd S P E C I A L R E Q U I R E M E N T S : I f you r e qui r e s pe c i a l a i d or s e r vi c e s f or a ny of t he m e e t i ngs i de nt i f i e d a bove a s a ddr e s s e d i n t he A m e r i c a n D i s a bi l i t i e s A c t pl e a s e c ont a c t t he C i t y M a na ge r s O f f i c e a t ( 38 6 ) 719 5768. A U D R E Y E S I K E S M M C C i t y C l e r k MOURNING: A town and a nation struggle to cope with unspeakable tragedy Continued From Page 1A away, and it hurts my heart to watch the news. Columbia County does have armed school resource officers at every school supplied by the Columbia County Sheriffs Office. Al Williams, former Suwannee County sher iff, was in the Lake City Mall on Saturday buying presents for his 14 grandchildren. Its sad, very sad, he said. You wonder what makes these people tick... All those children didnt hurt anybody. I just dont understand. Debra Johnson, a mother of three, said she started crying when she heard the news. It just sickened my heart, she said. I just started bawling. Robert Mcgaughey, 22, doesnt have children, but he does have niece and nephew. Anybody that does that should be locked up and killed, Mcgaughey said at the Lake City Mall Saturday. A man who lives along the border between Florida and Georgia said he thinks people who murder chil dren should be publicly executed to hopefully prevent others from com mitting similar heinous crimes. Hang (them) up by (their) toes and skin (them) alive, John Holbrook said. Maybe then people will think before they act. Tiger Scroggins of Madison said he has a fiveyear-old daughter. This shooting rein forces why I want to home school, he said. Tim Pipkin, a father of five from McAlpin, said his heart broke. Sadness. It was ter rible, he said. My heart broke for the children that was killed. Trying to under stand why someone would do that is beyond me. Shelley Snyder, who has one daughter, said she cant watch anymore of the news coverage. Horror at first, I cant believe that people would do that to other people, she said. I just turn it off. I cant watch it anymore. Ray Hancock said he felt sad when he first heard the news about the children, but that his Facebook page was assaulted with gun and anti-gun political rants. I hate that its become so political and that thats everybodys first reaction, he said. COUNTY: Mourns Conn. victims Continued From Page 1A Hunter said sheriffs deputies have been trained in active shooter scenari os and that the training is ongoing. Our School Resource Deputy program is staffed to the best of our current abilities with well trained, capable deputy sheriffs, Hunter said in an email. Two years ago at the Florida Association of School Resource Officers, senior members of the Columbia County School District attended the annual conference with Columbia County Sheriffs Office School Resource Deputy, Hunter said. Hunter said school members received a better understanding of the per spective of law enforcement at that conference and that one of the items on the agenda was active shooter cases. The incident in Connecticut was a tragedy of unimaginable horror for the families and commu nity of Newtown, Hunter said in an email. Our hearts are heavy as we grieve for and with them. We are keeping their fami lies and the first respond ers, who had to witness such a tragic scene, in our thoughts and prayers. SAFETY: Local schools Continued From Page 1A MILTON The states Department of Juvenile Justice is sending staff to monitor employees at a Florida Panhandle facility where surveillance video showed a guard battering a teenage inmate. The guard has pleaded not guilty to a misdemean or charge but continues to work at the privately managed Milton Girls Juvenile Residential Facility. Juvenile justice officials said the 15-yearold girl seen in the video recorded Aug. 9 was moved to another facility. State officials say that case and a Nov. 2 com plaint made by another inmate against the facilitys director reveal a pattern of improper conduct. Associated Press State staff to monitor juvenile facility



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6D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 6DLIFE Seasons Greetings to our patients, their families and the North Florida community that we are privileged to serve. Hope. Bharat Gummadi, M.D. Division of Cardiology University of FloridaJacksonville For more information about Dr. Gummadi and our staff of expert physicians, go to ShandsLakeShore.com UF CARDIOVASC U LAR EXCELLENCE MEETS IN-TOWN CONVENIENCE. 368 NE Franklin Street Lake City, Florida 32055 386-292-8100 W ELCOME, D R. G U MMADI. Nobody knows hearts like a cardiologist. As an assistant professor in the University of Florida Division of Cardiology, Dr. Gummadi ranks among the very best. He has a natural way of making complicated ideas understandable, so his patients always have a clear picture of their situation. Dr. Gummadi is an interventional cardiologist specializing in congestive heart failure, peripheral vascular disease and other acute cardiovascular conditions. He will be joining Lyndon Box, M.D., FACAI, at the University of Florida Cardiovascular Center in Lake City. By BETH J. HARPAZ AP Travel Editor NEW YORK Its a meet up, its a party, its a spectacle: SantaCon is coming to town in fact, to nearly 300 towns and cit ies around the world. Maybe youve seen them in your neighborhood: Dozens, sometimes hundreds of Santas ho, ho, ho-ing in and out of bars, stopping traffic and pos ing for photos. The red-suited, white-bearded revelers have gathered in Trafalgar Square in London and Tiananmen Square in Beijing. Theyve walked across the Brooklyn Bridge. And this past weekend in Los Angeles, they visited the space shuttle en masse at the California Science Center. Its innocent fun, said Tim Mambort, 27, whos been taking part in SantaCon in New York City for five years with friends from college. You end up standing in a bar singing Jingle Bells with people you just met, all dressed like Santa, or walking with hun dreds of Santas to Central Park, or filling up an entire subway car with Santas. But whether SantaCon is naughty or nice depends on whom you ask. The website for the New York City event, planned for Dec. 15, says SantaCon is not a bar crawl. Every time you call it that, a sug arplum fairy dies. But the fact is, most SantaCons involve stops at bars along a prescribed route, and over the years, there have been isolated reports of misbehavior. In New York, police have issued sum monses for violations of open container laws, and some bars refuse entry to anyone dressed in red. Last year, residents of Lower Manhattan complained of drunken Santas vomiting and uri nating in the streets. There was one Santa lying on the ground and I saw a father go by with two young children and the little girl said, Daddy, what is wrong with Santa? said Community Board 1 member Paul Hovitz, who worries that the event encourages binge drinking and underage drinking. Ian Sibley, who organizes the SantaCon.info webpage, acknowl edges that a dark shadow seems to haunt the event. So we take the extra step of emphasizing not drinking too much and perhaps supporting a good cause. Indeed, many SantaCons require participants to bring donations for food banks or Toys for Tots, or raise money for childrens charities or no-kill pet shelters. Sibley started SantaCon.info five years ago with a half-dozen listings after encountering this crazy thing with all these peo ple dressed up like Santa in Asheville, N.C. The website now lists nearly 275 events in 37 coun tries between November and January. Sibley says SantaCons have been held on every continent from Uganda to Katmandu to Sydney and even Antarctica but he dates the first events to the 1990s in Copenhagen and San Francisco. He says New York is one of the biggest, drawing 20,000 Santas. Anna Sandler, a mom from Maplewood, N.J., thinks most participants take seriously the notion that SantaCon must not hurt Santas image. Two years ago while pushing her toddler in a stroller in Manhattan, Sandler encountered tons of Santas crossing the street and had no idea why. It was the most amaz ing spectacle. She stopped a few Santas to chat, then went home and looked the event up online. The Santas were completely hammered, but also complete ly polite, she said. They were definitely following the SantaCon creed of being super-respectful. Like zombie walks at Halloween, SantaCon is a grass roots phenomenon, organized locally and mostly through digital media, from email blasts and web sites to Twitter and FourSquare. The term SantaCon may bring to mind Comic-Con, the pop culture convention, but theres no indus try behind SantaCon, though a growth in sales of Santa suits led Party City to start advertising on SantaCon.info in 2011. Our Santa suits have always sold to the Santa who dresses up at the mall or dad dressing up at home, said Melissa Sprich, Party Citys vice president of costumes and accessories. But we started to see an increase in sales and were hearing that local events were occurring with peo ple dressing up for this SantaCon thing. Demographics for the events also led Party City to add Santa styles for women including some sexy looks as well as accessories like antlers. Dana Humphrey, 29, who dressed like Mrs. Claus last year and is going as an elf this year, has made SantaCon in Manhattan a tradition with friends, start ing with brunch, then joining SantaCon crowds for the routes first stop at a bar in the Wall Street area. Along the way, theyve posed for photos at the famous Wall Street bull sculpture and done an Ace of Bass sing along with 80 Santas. Youll find groups of Santas doing all kinds of ridiculous things, she said. Nigel Parry is organizing the fifth annual SantaCon in Lowertown, an artsy historic neighborhood in St. Paul, Minn. The gathering drew 200 Santas last year and is accompanied by a brass band that leads revel ers in and out of bars. One of the first stops is billed as an all ages event at the Black Dog Cafe where parents can bring kids. But how do you explain to a wide-eyed 5-year-old why there are 50 Santas, not just one? Thats up to the parents to get creative, Parry said. Some just say, These are not real Santas theyre just dressed up as Santa. Some customers come in early and stake out their seats just to watch, said Sara Remke, co-owner of the Black Dog Cafe. Its very much a spectator event. But most SantaCons stress that they are not for kids, and Sibley says thats part of the appeal. The holidays tend to be family oriented and adults get squat, Sibley said. They work hard all year and extra hard over the holi days. So when you get a costume on like Santa, the pressures of the real world are lifted. You have this strange camaraderie because everyone is dressed like you. Better watch out: SantaCon is coming Claus a cause to party in more than 300 cities and towns. ASSOCIATED PRESS Hundreds of people dressed in Santa Claus suits gather at Union Square during the Santacon pub crawl in downtown San Francisco last year. SantaCon is coming to town in fact, to nearly 300 towns and cities around the world. Dozens, sometimes hundreds of red-suited revelers gather, bar hop, stop traffic and pose for photos.



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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2012 7A7A FREE SHIPPINGBELK.COMON ALL ORDERS through December 21ELITE FREE SHIPPING All the time. No Minimum. With Elite Card. See belk.com for details. Connect with us for special offers and promotions at Belk.com/getconnected LAST 3 DAYS 20$OFF DECEMBER 16-18 Coupon can only be used once and must be presented to your sales associate at the time of purchase. Qualifying purchase must be before tax. *Only excludes Red Dot, Clearance, Earlybirds, Night Owls, Doorbusters, Bonus Buys, Everyday Values, Alegria, Ben Sherman, Brighton, b.tempt’d; Designer, Bridge and Contemporary Sportswear and Dresses; Casio, Coach, Cosmetics/Fragrances, Dansko; Fine Jewelry watches, trunk shows and service plans; Gear For Sports, Hanky Panky, Herend, Keen, Lacoste, Levi’s, Lilly Pulitzer, Minnetonka Moccasin, Miss Me, Munro, Original Penguin, Roberto Coin, Spanx, Stuart Weitzman, Thomas Dean, Ugg, Under Armour, Vineyard Vines, Wacoal, non-merchandise depts., lease depts. and Belk gift cards. Frye and Brahmin excluded online. Not valid on prior purchases or special orders. Cannot be redeemed for cash, credit or refund, used in combination with any other discount or coupon offer. Valid December 16-18, 2012 LIMITED EXCLUSIONSyour first $100 or moreregular or sale priced purchase* storewide 30$OFF DECEMBER 16-18 Coupon can only be used once and must be presented to your sales associate at the time of purchase. Qualifying purchase must be before tax. *Only excludes Red Dot, Clearance, Earlybirds, Night Owls, Doorbusters, Bonus Buys, Everyday Values, Alegria, Ben Sherman, Brighton, b.tempt’d; Designer, Bridge and Contemporary Sportswear and Dresses; Casio, Coach, Cosmetics/Fragrances, Da nsko; Fine Jewelry watches, trunk shows and service plans; Gear For Sports, Hanky Panky, Herend, Keen, Lacoste, Levi’s, Lilly Pulitzer, Minnetonka Moccasin, Miss Me, Munro, Original Penguin, Roberto Coin, Spanx, Stuart Weitzman, Thomas Dean, Ugg, Under Armour, Vineyard Vines, Wacoal, non-merchandise depts., lease depts. and Belk gift cards. Frye and Brahmin excluded online. Not valid on prior purchases or special orders. Cannot be redeemed for cash, credit or refund, used in combination with any other discount or coup on offer. Valid December 16-18, 2012 LIMITED EXCLUSIONS 10$OFFDECEMBER 16-18 your first $150 or moreregular or sale priced purchase* storewide Coupon can only be used once and must be presented to your sales associate at the time of purchase. Qualifying purchase must be before tax. *Only excludes Red Dot, Clearance, Earlybirds, Night Owls, Doorbusters, Bonus Buys, Everyday Values, Alegria, Ben Sherman, Brighton, b.tempt’d; Designer, Bridge and Contemporary Sportswear and Dresses; Casio, Coach, Cosmetics/Fragrances, Dansko; Fine Jewelry watches, trunk shows and service plans ; Gear For Sports, Hanky Panky, Herend, Keen, Lacoste, Levi’s, Lilly Pulitzer, Minnetonka Moccasin, Miss Me, Munro, Original Penguin, Roberto Coin, Spanx, Stuart Weitzman, Thomas Dean, Ugg, Under Armour, Vineyard Vines, Wacoal, non-merchandise depts., lease depts. and Belk gift cards. Frye and Brahmin excluded online. Not valid on prior purchases or special orders. Cannot be redeemed for cash, credit or refund, used in combination with any other discount or coupon offer. Valid December 16-18, 2012 LIMITED EXCLUSIONS your first $50 or moreregular or sale priced purchase* storewide 25028359 41980971 88411652 RED DOT: *Limited exclusions in Brighton, St. John, Eileen Fisher, Lilly Pulitzer, Resort, Bridge Collection, Levi’s, Coach, designer handbags and junior denim. Juniors total savings are 70-80% off. Fashion Accessories, Handbags, Small Leather Goods, Hosiery, Home Store and Men’s Tailored Clothing total savings are 60-75%. COUPONS NOT VALID ON RED DOT 75%& moresavered dotclearancethe current ticketed price*50%OFFextrawhen you take an 50% off Kim Rogers Cinch back cardiganOrig. 52.00 Sale 26.00Imported and Made in USA 1999 Kim Rogers eece robesOrig. 54.00 60% off Boots from ND New Directions and Kim RogersOrig. 59.00-79.00Sale 23.60-47.40 40% off Nautica sweaters, eece, wovens and outerwearOrig. 69.50-168.00 Sale 41.70-100.80Merchandise notin all stores 50% off ENTIRE STOCKBelk Silverworks Orig. 26.00-180.00 Sale 13.00-90.00 30% offENTIRE STOCK coffeemakers from Cuisinart, Bunn, Mr. Coffee & moreA. Bunn 10-cup coffeemaker Orig. 174.99, Sale 109.99 99.99 after $10 mail-in rebate thru 12/20 B. Cuisinart Brew Central 12-cup coffeemaker Orig. 129.99, Sale 89.99 C. Mr. Coffee 12-cup programmable coffeemaker, orig. 64.99, Sale 44.99Bonus: free Cuisinart coffee grinder with any 89.99 or more Cuisinart coffeemaker purchaseA B C 50% off Kim Rogers Cinch back cardiganOrig. 52.00 Sale 26.00Imported and Made in USA 1999 Kim Rogers eece robesOrig. 54.00 EXTENDED STORE HOURS SUN.* 9AM-11PM MON. & TUES. 8AM-11PM*Except where prohibited by state law or local ordinance BELK.COM 40% off ENTIRE STOCK handbags from Anne Klein, Nine West, Franco Sarto and The Sak Orig. 48.00-175.00 Sale 28.80-105.0030% off Belts and wallets from Columbia, Nautica, Geoffrey Beene, Saddlebred and more. Assorted styles. Orig. 25.00-45.00, Sale 17.50-31.50 Plus, 30% off jewelry from Izod, Saddlebred and Geoffrey Beene. Orig. 20.00-45.00, Sale 14.00-31.50Belts also in Big & Tall sizes at slightly higher prices



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8A LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04248AWEATHER ATTN: EILEEN BENNETT LAKE CITY REPORTER plus all the( jingle )bells& whistles! ’tis the time to buy! 2.26% APR1 for up to 60 months As low as No payments until 2013!2 Shop the dealership with a CAMPUS Pre-Approved Loan Draft and negotiate as a cash buyer!Have a loan with another lender? Lower your paymen t by bringing it to CAMPUS! MM Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Columbia and Suwannee counties!3 Accelerate your approval, apply today! Call 754-2219 Click campuscu.com Visit your local service center OFFER NOT AVAILABLE ON EXISTING CAMPUS LOANS. OFFER IS FOR NEW LOANS ONLY. MAY NOT BE COMBINED WITH AN Y OTHER OFFER. 1. Credit approval required. Your r ate may be higher based on creditworthiness, vehicl e and term of loan. For example, a $39,000.00 loan with no money down at 2.14% for 48 months would require 47 monthly payments of $854.12 and a final payment of $833.58, finance charge of $1,839.67, for a total o f payments of $40,977.22. The amount financed is $3 9,237.55, the APR is 2.26%. APR = Annual Percentage Rate. 2. Interest will accrue from date of purchase. Choosing this option will in crease the total amount of interest you pay. 3. Cr edit approval and initial $5 deposit required. Ment ion this ad and we’ll waive the $15 new membership fee. This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration. Lake City 183 SW Bascom Norris Dr.G’ville E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunter’s Walk 5115 NW 43rd St. Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St. Shands at UF Room H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Alachua 14759 NW 157th Ln. Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E. Silver Springs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. Summer eld 17950 US Hwy. 441 Tallahassee 1511 Killearn Center Blvd.