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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
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Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:01977

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:01977

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text

PAGE 1

By DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comThe North Florida Broadband Authority was thrown a potential lifeline, although one with barbs, by the federal govern-ment, NFBA General Manager Richelle Sucara told board members Wednesday. The National Telecommunications Information Administration offered to extend the amount of time the NFBA will be a grant project from February to September, Sucara said. Although Columbia County isn’t part of the NFBA, Lake City is still a member of the By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comThirty-one people died in Columbia County car crashes in 2011 while only nine people have lost their lives to crashes in the county this year. Local law enforcement agencies and first responders want the trend of lower traffic deaths to continue, and Wednesday morning, they held a news con-ference to promote safe driving during the Christmas and New Years holiday period. The Columbia Community Traffic Safety Team held its annu-al “Celebrate Safely” press con-ference Wednesday morning at the Shands LakeShore Regional Medical Center pavilion. The Traffic Safety Team is comprised of traffic safety professionals and community leaders whose mis-sion is to reduce the number of traffic crashes and in the area. The group hosts the annual news conference prior to the Christmas holiday period because statistics show it’s one of the most dangerous times to drive. During the news conference, the group also provided tips for motorists to stay safe during the holiday period and promoted a booklet with non-alcoholic drink From staff reportsAttorney General Pam Bondi has filed an emergency rule out-lawing 22 additional synthetic drugs, commonly called “bath salts,” “K2” or “Spice.” “The ban on synthetic drugs is a tool that will enable law enforce-ment to better enforce the law that’s going to be coming to get this off the street,” Columbia County Sheriff Mark Hunter said in response Wednesday. “My understanding is there is no research on the effects these drugs are having on the human body, so they are a danger. I’ve had numerous parents call me and their children and differ-ent people that are taking these things over the counter in a nega-tive way. This is a way for us to get ahead of this.” The emergency rule, issued Tuesday, designates new synthet-ic drugs as Schedule I controlled substances. That means it’s a third-degree felony for anyone to sell, make or deliver those types of drugs. Bondi said the drugs “have been linked to thousands of emer-gency department visits across the country, and a majority of those visits are by patients ages 12 to 29.” Synthetic drugs can cause psychotic episodes, hallucinations, Opinion ................ 4APeople.................. 2AObituaries .............. 5A Advice & Comics ......... 3B Puzzles ................. 4B TODAY IN PEOPLE Whitney most Googled in ‘12. COMING FRIDAY Local news roundup. 63 42 Isolated showers WEATHER, 2A Lake City ReporterTHURSDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2012 | YOUR COMMUNIT Y NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | 75¢ LAKECITYREPORTER.COM CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 138, No. 227 1 JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterDeeDee Johnson, state Department of Transportation community traffic safety program assistant, pours a cup of Tropical Storm, one of a number of non-alcoholic beverages and snacks featured in Jiffy L ube’s 15th annual Recipes 4 the Road recipe book. Pictu red (from left) are Columbia County Emergency Management Director Shane Morgan, Lake City P olice Chief Argatha Gilmore, Florida Highway Patrol Maj. Gene Spaulding, Johnson and Columbia County Sheriff Mark Hunter. Order bans designer drugs State AG Bondi acts in response to pleas from law enforcement. Here’s to a safe holiday By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comTwo Columbia County women, both of whom want to be the next president of the local branch of the NAACP, went to court over an alleged assault this week. Bernice Presley and Debra White are both seeking to become the president of the Columbia County branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, but Tuesday morn-ing both were in court after Presley sought a temporary restraining order against White. The Columbia County NAACP branch election of offi-cers will take place at 10 a.m. Saturday at the Richardson Community Center, 255 NE Coach Anders Lane. The two women took part in an injunction hear-ing before Circuit Judge E. Vernon Douglas around 11:20 a.m. Tuesday. Presley sought the restraining order against White after the two were involved in an argument on Nov. 19 at the Richardson Community NFBA gets more time– if it likes As election nears, request for restrainingorder is denied.Traffic Safety Team: ‘Celebrate safely’ Agencies offer tips for safe driving, non-alcoholic drink recipes. Johnson White Springs mankilled in crash hereUp a treeJASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterA duck is seen resting atop a tree branch aboutt 20 feet i n the air at Lake DeSoto on Wednesday. DisputesendsNAACPhopefulsto court NAACP continued on 3A TRAFFIC continued on 3A BAN continued on 3AFrom staff reportsA White Springs man was killed in a single vehicle crash Wednesday morning when his car failed to make a curve, ran off the roadway and struck a tree. Charles Ray Tidwell Jr., 52, White Springs, was killed in the wreck, which occurred around 12:30 a.m. Wednesday on Northwest White Springs Avenue. According to Florida Highway Patrol reports, Tidwell was driving a 1999 Nissan Sentra and traveling north-bound on Northwest White Springs Avenue just south of Northwest Stephen Foster Drive. Tidwell failed to negotiate a curve to the right in the roadway and his vehicle traveled across the south-bound lane and off the west edge of the road. The car continued traveling in a northerly direction on the west grass shoulder until its left front struck a tree. Reports indicate Tidwell was not wearing a seat-belt. Tidwell was pronounced dead at the scene by personnel from LifeGuard Ambulance Service. NFBA continued on 3A



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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Thursday, December 13, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS BRIEFS BURNS continued on 6B Burns gets nation to take a look at Lake City. GAMES Today Q Columbia High girls weightlifting vs. Union County High, 3:30 p.m. Q Columbia High boys soccer at Leon High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Q Columbia High girls basketball vs. Wolfson High, 7:45 p.m. (JV-6:30) Friday Q Fort White High girls basketball at Interlachen High, 6 p.m. Q Columbia High boys basketball at Atlantic Coast High, 7 p.m. (JV-5:30) Q Fort White High boys basketball vs. Interlachen High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Saturday Q Columbia High wrestling at Bradford High duals, 10 a.m. Q Columbia High girls soccer vs. Lincoln High, 2 p.m. (JV-noon) YOUTH SOCCER CYSA extends registration The Columbia Youth Soccer Association has make-up registration for the 2013 winter season from 6-7 p.m. today and 1-2:30 p.m. Saturday at Southside Sports Complex. Fee is $65 per child. For details, call Scott Everett at 288-2504 or Melody Everett 288-4481. ADULT FLAG FOOTBALL Registration for 7 on 7 league Lake City Recreation Department is taking registration for its Adult 7 on 7 Flag Football League. Entry fee is $600 for a minimum of 10 games. Deadline for fee is Friday. For details, call Hayward Christie at 754-3607. RUNNING Chomp Cancer Foundation 5K Chomp Cancer Foundation’s Chomp Cancer 5K Run/Walk is 8 a.m. Saturday in Fort White. Registration begins at 7 a.m. UF Shands Cancer Center is the beneficiary. There will be music, post-race snacks, an awards ceremony and a silent auction/raffle. For details, call Lauren Valentine at (321) 501-9526. ZUMBA Free Zumba for toy drive A free Zumba class is being offered at the Lake City Mall from 9-10 a.m. Saturday before the stores open. Participants are asked to bring a new or gently used toy to be donated to Children’s Medical Services. For details, call Sarah Sandlin at 758-0009. YOUTH BASEBALL River Rats U11 team tryouts North Florida River Rats U11 travel baseball team has open tryouts at 1 p.m. Saturday at the Southside Recreation Complex. For details, call Jamie Albritton at 209-0166.Q From staff reports On the map COURTESY PHOTO COURTESY PHOTO JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High goal keeper Ty Williams saves the ball during a game against Mosley High on Nov. 28. Tigers soccer splits gamesBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High split results against Hamilton County and Lincoln high schools on the soccer field. The Tigers started the week off with an 8-0 win against the Trojans in Hamilton, but fell against Lincoln in Tallahassee, 2-1. Columbia picked up the mercy rule in the sec-ond minute of the second half making short work of Hamilton. Tucker Stanton scored two goals to lead the Tigers in the contest while Alex Rhea, Tim Bagley, Ty Williams, Dalton Parker and Cody Beadles all had goals for Columbia. On the assists end, Beadles and Williams each added an assist to go along with their goals. Kyle Richardson, Travis Berry and Josh Wacha also had assists in the game. “It was a whole-team effort,” Columbia head coach Trevor Tyler said. “Everyone played and con-tributed. Tucker played very well for us in the midfield.” The Tigers didn’t come out as energized against Lincoln and ultimately it cost Columbia the game. “We came out flat and without energy,” Tyler said. “We played better in the second half, but giving up two goals in the first 20 minutes hurt us.” Braden Lehman scored the Tigers’ only goal off an assist from Beadles. Columbia (8-4-2) plays at Leon High today. Columbia High beats Hamilton, falls to Lincoln. By TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comWith consecutive state championships, Hannah Burns has put Columbia High swimming on the map. Now, she is getting the nation to take a look at Lake City. Burns competed over the weekend in the Speedo Winter Junior National Championships at the Allan Jones Aquatic Center on the campus of the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. Burns, who turned 16 on the Saturday of the Championships, placed 17th overall in the competition that is open to qualifying swimmers under age 18. Burns swims year-round as a member of the Gator Swim Club. She is coached by Jaime Lewis. Swimmers must meet time standards set by USA Swimming to qualify for junior nationals and nation-als. The FHSAA state meet, where Burns won the 200 Individual Medley this year, is a qualifying meet. Burns placed second at state in the 100 Breaststroke, the event she won in 2011. The Winter Junior Nationals is a short course event (distances in yards) in non-Olympic years and brings in qualifiers from all over the United States. Burns qualified in three events for Winter Nationals open, but opted to swim Junior Nationals where she qualified in six events. Burns’ best finish was fourth place in the 400 IM, an event that she qualified to swim in the Olympic Trials. There were 77 entries in the event and Burns swam a 4:16.24. “It felt great to represent everyone,” Burns said. “It was a great experience to compete at that level and for my first meet at national, ABOVE : Hannah Burns competes in the freestyle event at the Speedo Winter Junior National Championship at Allan Jones Aquatic Center on the campus of the University of Tennessee in Knoxville on Saturday.LEFT : Burns makes her way through the lane at the Speedo Winer Junior National Championships.



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CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Former Secretary of State George P. Shultz is 92. Actor-comedian Dick Van Dyke is 87. Actor Christopher Plummer is 83. Singer Ted Nugent is 64. Rock musician Jeff Skunk Baxter is 64. Country singer-musician Randy Owen is 63. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack is 62. Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke is 59. Country singer John Anderson is 58. Singer-songwriter Steve Forbert is 58. Actor Steve Buscemi is 55. Actor Johnny Whitaker is 53. Actress-reality TV star NeNe Leakes is 46. Actor-comedian Jamie Foxx is 45. TV personality Debbie Matenopoulos is 38. AROUND FLORIDA Police: Argument led to shooting HOLLY HILL Police in central Florida say a man fatally shot his room mate during an argument over how to prepare pork chops. Holly Hill Police Chief Mark Barker told the Daytona Beach NewsJournal the shooting hap pened about 10:30 p.m. Tuesday. Barker says another roommate called 911 and 55-year-old Thomas Matthew Hahn confessed to responding officers. Barker says the room mate was shot twice in the head. His name has not been released. Hahn told officers that his roommate had come home drunk and the two began arguing about din ner. He said they had argued in the past, with the argu ments often becoming physical. Hahn was charged with second-degree murder and is being held without bond at the jail. Health care worker killed DADE CITY Authorities say a 25-yearold health care worker was chased down a street and fatally stabbed by one of her clients. The Ledger of Lakeland reported Steffanie Ross was stabbed multiple times with a butcher knife as wit ness watched on Monday. On Wednesday, 53-year-old Lucious Smith remained in the Pasco County Jail on a first-degree murder charge. The Ledger reported Smith has a history of vio lent and erratic behavior. Ross had worked as a service coordinator for Maryland-based Integra Health Management since September. She went to Smiths home on Monday morning. Police said something upset Smith, and neigh bors heard screams as he chased Ross from the apartment. They said he stabbed her as they ran into the street. Officials said Ross likely was not aware of Smiths criminal history. Disease exposure warnings issued DANIA BEACH Broward School District officials say children at a Dania Beach middle school may have been exposed to someone diag nosed with Legionnaires disease. The South Florida SunSentinel reported auto mated robo-calls were made Tuesday to parents of children who attend Olsen Middle School. Officials said the person with the disease is not a student. District officials said they are working with the Broward County Department of Health and school staff to keep stu dents safe. Legionnaires Disease is spread when someone inhales vapors contami nated with the bacteria. Symptoms include high fever, chills, coughing, muscle aches and head aches. School officials said Olsen Middle School par ents are advised to take children to the doctor if they exhibit any of these symptoms. Right whales spotted off coast AMELIA ISLAND Florida wildlife officials say theyve spotted the first mothers and calves of the right whale calving season. Right whales are an endangered species. Conservationists are hop ing for a rebound in births after the number of new born whales hit a 10-year low last winter. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission said the first mother-and-calf pairs were spotted Dec. 4 in the Atlantic Ocean off north east Florida. One pair was spotted near the entrance to the St. Johns River. The other was seen about a dozen miles off Amelia Island. Experts estimate as few as 400 North Atlantic right whales remain. Female right whales migrate each winter to the warmer waters along the Georgia and Florida coasts to give birth. Man convicted in fiery death TAVARES A central Florida man has been con victed of killing an elderly man after setting his house on fire. The Orlando Sentinel reported 43-year-old Christopher Goodall expressed little emotion after being found guilty Tuesday of first-degree murder and arson. His mother and daughter wept. His sentencing is sched uled for a later date. Prosecutors claimed Goodall set Salvatore Giumarras mobile home in Eustis on fire in 2010. Fire officials said the fire was set using gasoline. Giumarra was trapped and died in a bedroom closet. An autopsy reveleaed he died of carbon monoxide poisoning. Houston most Googled in 2012 LOS ANGELES T he worlds attention wavered between the tragic and the silly in 2012, and along the way, millions of people searched the Web to find out about a royal princess, the latest iPad, and a record-breaking skydiver. Whitney Houston was the top trending search of the year, accord ing to Google Inc.s year-end zeit geist report. Googles 12th annual roundup is an in-depth look at the spirit of the times as seen through the billions of searches on Google over the past year, the company said in a blog post Wednesday. People around the globe searched en masse for news about Houstons accidental drowning in a bathtub just before she was to perform at a preGrammy Awards party in February. Google defines topics as trend ing when they garner a high amount of traffic over a sustained period of time. Korean rapper PSYs Gangnam Style music video trotted into sec ond spot, a testament to his self-dep recating giddy-up dance move. The video is approaching a billion views on YouTube. Superstorm Sandy, the damaging storm that knocked out power and flooded parts of the East Coast dur ing the presidential campaign, was third. Judge revokes Lohans probation, sets hearing LOS ANGELES A judge revoked Lindsay Lohans probation on Wednesday and scheduled a hearing that could result in more jail time for the closely watched Liz and Dick star. The ruling in Los Angeles came as the 26-year-old actress who did not appear in court faces misde meanor counts of reckless driving, lying to a police officer and obstruct ing an officer from performing duties after an accident in which her Porsche slammed into the back of a dump truck in June. Lohan told police in Santa Monica that her assistant was driving, but detec tives now believe the actress was behind the wheel as she headed to a movie set. Lohan was on probation at the time after previously being convicted of the misdemeanor theft of a neck lace and two DUI charges. A probation violation hearing was set for Jan. 15. A judge could sentence the actress up to 245 days in jail after the Santa Monica case is resolved. Indian sitar virtuoso Ravi Shankar dies at 92 NEW DELHI Ravi Shankar helped connect the world through music. The sitar virtuoso hobnobbed with the Beatles, became a hippie musical icon and spearheaded the first rock benefit concert as he introduced tra ditional Indian ragas to Western audiences over nearly a century. Shankar died Tuesday at age 92. A statement on his website said he died in San Diego, near his Southern California home. The musicians foundation issued a statement saying that he had undergone heart-valve replacement surgery last week. Wednes day: Afternoon: 2-7-8 Evening: N/A Wednes day: Afternoon: 5-6-5-9 Evening: N/A Tues day: 1-2-20-32-35 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAIL Y BRIEFING THURSDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 2AWEATHER Daily Scripture But when the set time had fully come, God sent his Son, born of a woman, born under the law, to redeem those under the law, that we might receive adoption to sonship. Galatians 4:4-5 HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter ASSOCIATED PRESS Singer Whitney Houston, who died in February, was the top trending search of 2012 according to Google Inc.s year-end report. Associated Press Associated Press Lohan Shankar



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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today EXTREME SPORTS 7:30 p.m. NBCSN — Dew Tour, iON Mountain Championships, at Breckenridge, Colo. (same-day tape) GOLF 6:30 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Alfred Dunhill Championship, first round, at Mpumalanga, South Africa 9 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour Australasia, Australian PGA Championship, second round, at Coolum Beach, Australia 2 a.m. TGC — Asian Tour, Johor Open, second round, at Johor Bahru, Malaysia (delayed tape) NBA BASKETBALL 8 p.m. TNT — L.A. Lakers at New York 10:30 p.m. TNT — San Antonio at Portland NFL FOOTBALL 8 p.m. NFL — Cincinnati at Philadelphia WOMEN’S COLLEGE VOLLEYBALL 7 p.m. ESPN2 — NCAA, Division I, playoffs, semifinal, Texas vs. Michigan, at Louisville, Ky. 9 p.m. ESPN2 — NCAA, Division I, playoffs, semifinal, Penn St. vs. Oregon, at Louisville, Ky.FOOTBALLNFL standings AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAy-New England 10 3 0 .769 472 274N.Y. Jets 6 7 0 .462 245 306Buffalo 5 8 0 .385 289 352Miami 5 8 0 .385 240 276 South W L T Pct PF PAx-Houston 11 2 0 .846 365 263 Indianapolis 9 4 0 .692 292 329Tennessee 4 9 0 .308 271 386Jacksonville 2 11 0 .154 216 359 North W L T Pct PF PABaltimore 9 4 0 .692 331 273 Pittsburgh 7 6 0 .538 278 264 Cincinnati 7 6 0 .538 321 280 Cleveland 5 8 0 .385 259 272 West W L T Pct PF PAy-Denver 10 3 0 .769 375 257 San Diego 5 8 0 .385 292 281 Oakland 3 10 0 .231 248 402 Kansas City 2 11 0 .154 195 352 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAN.Y. Giants 8 5 0 .615 373 270Washington 7 6 0 .538 343 329Dallas 7 6 0 .538 300 314 Philadelphia 4 9 0 .308 240 341 South W L T Pct PF PAy-Atlanta 11 2 0 .846 337 259Tampa Bay 6 7 0 .462 354 308New Orleans 5 8 0 .385 348 379Carolina 4 9 0 .308 265 312 North W L T Pct PF PAGreen Bay 9 4 0 .692 323 279 Chicago 8 5 0 .615 308 219 Minnesota 7 6 0 .538 283 286 Detroit 4 9 0 .308 320 342 West W L T Pct PF PASan Francisco 9 3 1 .731 316 184Seattle 8 5 0 .615 300 202St. Louis 6 6 1 .500 236 279 Arizona 4 9 0 .308 186 292 x-clinched playoff spoty-clinched division Today’s Game Cincinnati at Philadelphia, 8:20 p.m. Sunday’s Games Green Bay at Chicago, 1 p.m. Tampa Bay at New Orleans, 1 p.m.Minnesota at St. Louis, 1 p.m.Indianapolis at Houston, 1 p.m.N.Y. Giants at Atlanta, 1 p.m.Washington at Cleveland, 1 p.m.Jacksonville at Miami, 1 p.m.Denver at Baltimore, 1 p.m.Carolina at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.Detroit at Arizona, 4:05 p.m.Seattle vs. Buffalo at Toronto, 4:05 p.m.Kansas City at Oakland, 4:25 p.m.Pittsburgh at Dallas, 4:25 p.m.San Francisco at New England, 8:20 p.m. Monday’s Game N.Y. Jets at Tennessee, 8:30 p.m. NFL playoff scenarios AFC CLINCHED — New England, AFC East; Denver, AFC West; Houston, playoff spot HOUSTON Clinches AFC South with— WinClinches first-round bye with— Win AND New England loss or tie AND Denver loss BALTIMORE Clinches AFC North with— Win, or— Tie AND Pittsburgh loss or tie AND Cincinnati loss or tie, or — Loss AND Cincinnati lossClinches playoff spot with— Tie, or— Cincinnati loss or tie, or— Pittsburgh loss or tie INDIANAPOLIS Clinches playoff spot with— Win, or— Tie AND Cincinnati loss or tie, or— Tie AND Pittsburgh loss or tie, or— Tie AND Baltimore win, or— N.Y. Jets loss or tie AND Cincinnati loss, or — N.Y. Jets loss or tie AND Baltimore win AND Cincinnati tie AND Pittsburgh tie ——— NFC CLINCHED — Atlanta, NFC South. ATLANTA Clinches first-round bye with— Win AND Green Bay loss or tie, or — Win AND San Francisco loss, or— Tie AND Green Bay lossClinches home-field advantage throughout NFC playoffs with — Win AND Green Bay loss or tie AND San Francisco loss SAN FRANCISCO Clinches NFC West with— Win AND Seattle lossClinches a playoff spot with— Win, or— Tie AND Dallas loss or tie AND Washington loss or tie AND Minnesota loss or tie, or — Tie AND Dallas loss or tie AND Washington loss or tie AND Green Bay-Chicago does not end in tie, or — Tie AND Dallas loss or tie AND Minnesota loss or tie AND Chicago loss, or — Tie AND N.Y. Giants loss AND Minnesota loss or tie AND Chicago loss, or — Minnesota loss AND Dallas loss AND Washington loss AND Seattle loss or tie GREEN BAY Clinches NFC North with— WinClinches playoff spot with— Tie AND Dallas loss AND Washington loss AND St. Louis-Minnesota tie, or — Tie AND Dallas loss AND Washington loss AND Minnesota loss AND San Francisco win or tie, or — Tie AND Dallas loss AND Washington loss AND Minnesota loss AND Seattle does not tieFCS playoffs Semifinals Friday Georgia Southern (10-3) at North Dakota State (12-1), 8 p.m. Saturday Sam Houston State (10-3) at Eastern Washington (11-2), 4:05 p.m.NCAA Div. II playoffs Championship Saturday At Braly Municipal StadiumFlorence, Ala.Valdosta State (11-2) vs. WinstonSalem (14-0), 1 p.m.NCAA Div. III playoffs Amos Alonzo Stagg Bowl Friday At Salem (Va.) StadiumMount Union (14-0) vs. St. Thomas (Minn.) (14-0), 7 p.m.NAIA playoffs Championship Today At Barron StadiumRome, Ga.Morningside (Iowa) (13-0) vs. Marian (Ind.) (11-1), 6:30 p.m.College bowl games Saturday New Mexico Bowl At AlbuquerqueNevada (7-5) vs. Arizona (7-5), 1 p.m. (ESPN) Famous Idaho Potato Bowl At Boise, IdahoToledo (9-3) vs. Utah State (10-2), 4:30 p.m. (ESPN)BASKETBALLNBA schedule Today’s Games Charlotte at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.L.A. Lakers at New York, 8 p.m.San Antonio at Portland, 10:30 p.m. Friday’sGames Dallas at Toronto, 7 p.m.Philadelphia at Indiana, 7 p.m.Golden State at Orlando, 7 p.m.L.A. Lakers at Washington, 7 p.m.Milwaukee at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.Detroit at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.Boston at Houston, 8 p.m.Minnesota at New Orleans, 8 p.m.Sacramento at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.Utah at Phoenix, 9 p.m.Memphis at Denver, 10:30 p.m. AP Top 25 schedule Today’s Games No. 20 UNLV vs. La Verne at Orleans Arena, Las Vegas, 10 p.m. No. 23 Wichita State at Tennessee, 7 p.m. Saturday’s Games No. 1 Indiana vs. Butler at Bankers Life Fieldhouse, 2 p.m. No. 3 Michigan vs. West Virginia at the Barclays Center, 8 p.m. No. 4 Syracuse vs. Canisius, 7 p.m.No. 5 Florida at No. 8 Arizona, 10 p.m. No. 6 Louisville at Memphis, 2:30 p.m.No. 7 Ohio State vs. UNC Asheville, Noon No. 9 Kansas vs. Belmont, 7 p.m.No. 11 Cincinnati at Marshall, 2 p.m.No. 14 Gonzaga vs. Kansas State at KeyArena, Seattle, 9 p.m. No. 15 Georgetown vs. Western Carolina, Noon No. 16 Creighton at California, 11 p.m. No. 17 New Mexico vs. New Mexico State, 6 p.m. No. 18 San Diego State vs. San Diego, 10 p.m. No. 19 Michigan State vs. Tuskegee, 9 p.m. No. 21 North Carolina vs. East Carolina, Noon No. 22 Notre Dame vs. Purdue at Bankers Life Fieldhouse, 4:30 p.m. No. 25 N.C. State vs. Norfolk State, 7 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2012 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04202BAGATE THURSDAY EVENING DECEMBER 13, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Last Resort “Blue Water” (N) Grey’s Anatomy “Run, Baby, Run” (N) (:02) Scandal “Blown Away” (N) News at 11(:35) Nightline (N) 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) The Insider 5-PBS 5 -Journal Nightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Live From Lincoln Center Soprano Ailyn Prez. 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The First 48 “Fatal Call” The First 48 (N) Panic 9-1-1 (N) (:01) Panic 9-1-1 HALL 20 185 312“Gift of the Magi” (2010, Drama) Marla Sokoloff, Mark Webber. “Help for the Holidays” (2012, Fantasy) Summer Glau, Eva La Rue. “The Town Christmas Forgot” (2010) Lauren Holly, Rick Roberts. FX 22 136 248How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherTwo and Half MenTwo and Half Men “Deck the Halls” (2006, Comedy) Danny DeVito, Matthew Broderick. It’s Always SunnyThe League (N) The League (N) Unsupervised (N) CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245The Mentalist The Mentalist “Rhapsody in Red”d NBA Basketball Los Angeles Lakers at New York Knicks. (N) d NBA Basketball: Spurs at Trail Blazers NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobDrake & JoshDrake & JoshBig Time Rush “Big Time Christmas” Full House Full House The Nanny The Nanny Friends (:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241Jail Jail Jail Jail (N) iMPACT Wrestling (N) Ink Master “Better Than Words?” MMA Uncensored1,000 Ways to Die MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*H M*A*S*H White Collar “In the Red” White Collar “Prisoner’s Dilemma” Seinfeld Frasier The Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Phineas and FerbGood Luck CharlieA.N.T. FarmGravity Falls “The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause” (2006) (:35) A.N.T. FarmGravity Falls Phineas and FerbJessie A.N.T. Farm LIFE 32 108 252Trading Spouses: Meet New MommyTrading Spouses: Meet New MommyProject Runway All Stars Project Runway All Stars (N) Abby’s Ultimate Dance Competition Three dancers compete for a scholarship. USA 33 105 242NCIS “Marine Down” NCIS “Patriot Down” NCIS “A Desperate Man” (DVS) NCIS “Secrets” (DVS) Burn Notice Michael is caught. (N) (:01) NCIS “Left for Dead” BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Top 10 Countdown” (N) Apollo Live Guest Doug E. Fresh. (N) “We the Party” (2012, Comedy-Drama) Mandela Van Peebles, Simone Battle. Vindicated ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) Audibles (N) (Live) High School Basketball Teams TBA. (N) High School Basketball Teams TBA. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209SportsNation (N) Women’s College Volleyball NCAA Tournament, First Semi nal: Teams TBA. (N) Women’s College Volleyball NCAA Tournament, Second Semi nal: Teams TBA. From Louisville, Ky. Coll. Football Live SUNSP 37 -how to Do oridaInside Israeli Bask.2011 American Ski ClassicLightning Classics (Subject to Blackout) Prep Zone SpoFuture Phenoms College Basketball DISCV 38 182 278Jungle Gold “Armed Robbery” Amish Ma a Amish Ma a “Fire From the Lord” Moonshiners “Prophecy Ful lled” Ghost Town Gold (N) Moonshiners “Prophecy Ful lled” TBS 39 139 247King of QueensKing of QueensSeinfeld Seinfeld Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryConan (N) HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) What Would You Do?What Would You Do?Showbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236(5:00) “Sweet Home Alabama”E! News (N) The Soup “Knocked Up” (2007) Seth Rogen. A one-night stand has an unforeseen consequence. Chelsea Lately (N) Chelsea Lately TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. Food Man v. Food Mysteries at the Museum Mysteries at the Museum (N) Mysteries at the Museum Dangerous Grounds “Bolivia” HGTV 47 112 229Property Brothers “Dan & Brittany” Hunters Int’lHouse HuntersHotel Impossible “Triangle T Ranch” Extreme Homes (N) House HuntersHunters Int’lExtreme Homes French bubble palace. TLC 48 183 280Island MediumIsland MediumAlong for the BrideAlong for the BrideSin City Rules Top 10 Weddings of 2012 (N) Say Yes, DressSay Yes, DressTop 10 Weddings of 2012 HIST 49 120 269The Universe “Mars: The Red Planet” Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Bamazon The group arrives in Guyana. (:02) Ax Men “All or Nothing” ANPL 50 184 282Monsters Inside Me “Feeding Frenzy” Swamp Wars “A Python Ate My Pet” Call-WildmanCall-WildmanCall-WildmanCall-WildmanCall-WildmanCall-WildmanCall-WildmanCall-Wildman FOOD 51 110 231Chopped “On the Line” Cupcake Wars “Cupcakes On Parade” Sugar Dome “Rock Star Concert” Sweet Genius “Electrifying Genius” Sweet Genius A southern candy treat. The Next Iron Chef: Redemption TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the Lord Always Good NewThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesJoel Osteen Joseph PrinceHillsong TVPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -Football PrevUFC Insider Tennis Champions Series: Philadelphia. Rafter vs. McEnroe. World Poker Tour: Season 10Football PrevGame TimeUFC Unleashed SYFY 58 122 244Star Trek: The Next Generation Star Trek: The Next Generation Star Trek: The Next Generation Star Trek: The Next Generation Star Trek: The Next Generation Star Trek: The Next Generation AMC 60 130 254CSI: Miami “Miami Con dential” CSI: Miami “Miracle on 34th Street” (1947) Maureen O’Hara, John Payne. (:15) “Miracle on 34th Street” (1947) Maureen O’Hara, John Payne. COM 62 107 249(5:58) South Park(:29) Tosh.0 The Colbert ReportDaily Show(7:59) FuturamaTosh.0 Tosh.0 The Comedy Central Roast Actor David Hasselhoff. Daily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327Reba Reba Reba Reba Reba Reba Redneck IslandRedneck IslandRedneck Island NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer “Caged Heat” American CougarThe Unlikely LeopardCheetah: Fatal Instinct (N) Lion Battle ZoneThe Unlikely Leopard NGC 109 186 276Am. ChainsawAm. ChainsawUltimate Factories (N) Wicked Tuna: Hooked Up (N) Rocket CityRocket CityAm. ChainsawAm. ChainsawRocket CityRocket City SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s Made (N) How It’s MadeThey Do It?They Do It?How It’s MadeHow It’s Made ID 111 192 285The Will: Family Secrets RevealedThe Will: Family Secrets RevealedFatal Vows “Secrets of a Dying Man” The Will: Family Secrets Revealed (N) Nightmare Christmas (N) Fatal Vows “Secrets of a Dying Man” HBO 302 300 501 “Welcome to Mooseport” (2004, Comedy) Gene Hackman. ‘PG-13’ Mel Brooks Strikes Back! “What’s Your Number?” (2011, Romance-Comedy) Anna Faris. ‘R’ Katie Does M.Cathouse: Wel. MAX 320 310 515(4:30) Hanna(:20) “The Whole Nine Yards” (2000) Bruce Willis. ‘R’ “What’s Love Got to Do With It” (1993) Angela Bassett. ‘R’ “Big Mommas: Like Father, Like Son” (2011) Martin Lawrence. ‘PG-13’ SHOW 340 318 545(5:30) “Paper Man” (2009) Jeff Daniels. ‘R’ “Red” (2010, Action) Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman. ‘PG-13’ “Sexy Baby” (2012) A cultural shift in the sexual landscape. Dave’s Old PornReality Show (N) ASSOCIATED PRESSIn this July 20 file photo, Tom Watson reacts on the 18th gr een after his second round of the British Open Golf Championship at Royal Lytham & St Anne s golf club in Lytham St Annes, England. Golf Digest reported on its website that the PGA of America plans to p ick Watson as the 2014 Ryder Cup captain.Watson to be named Ryder Cup captainBy DOUG FERGUSONAP Golf WriterIn the two months since a stunning loss in the Ryder Cup, the PGA of America talked about doing things differently when selecting its next captain. Tom Watson certainly would break the mold. Golf Digest reported on its website that the PGA of America plans to pick Watson, celebrated world-wide as an eight-time major champion and revered in Scotland where he won four of his five British Open titles. “We look forward to sharing the news of the 2014 Ryder Cup captain on Thursday,” PGA spokes-man Julius Mason said when asked for comment. The PGA of America spares no expense or amount of glitz when it comes to the Ryder Cup, and that much hasn’t changed. Instead of a stan-dard news conference, it will introduce its next captain Thursday morning during a segment on the “Today” show on NBC, the longtime broadcast partner at the Ryder Cup. Later, it will have a news conference in the Empire State Building. Watson will be 65 when the Ryder Cup is played at Gleneagles, Scotland, mak-ing him by oldest captain in U.S. history. Sam Snead was 57 when he was cap-tain in 1969. Watson has not played a full PGA Tour schedule in 14 years, though he is still capable of show-ing the young kids a thing or two as one of the cleanest ball-strikers in history. Remember, it was only three years ago that Watson stood 8 feet away from capturing the British Open at Turnberry at age 59. Stranger still, he says he has not been to a Ryder Cup since he last was captain in 1993 at The Belfry, which also was the last time the Americans won in Europe. And his relationship with Tiger Woods is much like how the weather can be in Scotland in the early fall — cold and damp. He would be the first repeat captain since Jack Nicklaus in 1987 on his home course of Muirfield Village. Watson said over the weekend at the Australian Open that it would be a “great honor if I got tapped on the shoulder,” though he said he had not spoken to the PGA. The organization risks some fallout. By taking a veteran of Watson’s age would be to overlook Larry Nelson for the second time. Nelson is a three-time major cham-pion — twice at the PGA Championship — who did not take up golf serious-ly until he returned from the Vietnam War. He had 9-3-1 record in the Ryder Cup and won all five of his matches in 1979, beating Seve Ballesteros in four of those matches. At least two former captains lobbied the PGA on behalf of Nelson, who was in line to be a cap-tain in the 1990s. Nelson is scheduled to play in the Father-Son Challenge pro-am today and Friday in Orlando.



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By BILL KACZORAssociated Press TAMPA — State Board of Education members on Wednesday bemoaned an embarrassing and cred-ibility damaging glitch that occurred when the state Department of Education released the first results from its new teacher evalu-ation system. The panel, meeting in Tampa, also endorsed a proposal to eliminate state textbook adoption and called for celebrating the achievement of Florida’s 2011 fourth-graders who came in a close second on an international reading test. The Department of Education last week posted results showing 97 per-cent of Florida’s teachers were rated as “effective” or “highly effective” on a Web page only to take it down hours later because of errors. It was restored the next day after being corrected with the percentage virtu-ally unchanged, but board members said the episode cost the state credibility. The evaluations have been contentious with many teachers and their unions opposed to a heavy reliance on student test scores. “Before we put anything on our website or before we release, there must be a thorough review of the data and multiple eyeballs looking at it,” said board member A.K. Desai. “It takes everything away and distracts the students, par-ents, others and makes us look incompetent.” Board member Kathleen Shanahan said people sometimes are afraid to let others review their work “because we feel like it’s going to make us look weak and that’s not the case.” Interim Education Commissioner Pam Stewart said the problem occurred because some school dis-tricts submitted duplicate reports, which are required for salary information in certain cases but not for the evaluations. Stewart noted the results for the last school year were the first using what’s called a value-added model. “We’ll get better at it every single year,” she said. Board members also urged staffers to do more to call more attention to international reading scores released Tuesday by the National Center for Education Statistics. Florida’s overall fourthgrade reading score was 569, just two points behind Hong Kong and ahead of 54 other school systems including the United States overall, Canada, Germany, Israel, Sweden, Denmark, Chinese Taipei, Great Britain and France. Board member Roberto “Bobby” Martinez won the panel’s support for his leg-islative proposal that would repeal a law requiring the state to decide which text-books school districts can purchase. Martinez said it’s an outmoded requirement in the electronic age. He said schools and teachers should be given the flexibil-ity to choose from a wider array of materials whether in book form or digital. It was his final act as a board member as his term expires at the end of the year. The board also passed a rule change to implement a new law allowing active duty service personnel and vet-erans to earn college credit for military training. Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2012 3A3A Alabama man arrested after tussle with deputiesBy TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comAn Alabama man was arrested Tuesday and faces multiple charges after he allegedly struck a Department of Children and Families investiga-tor’s vehicle, causing it to hit the investigator, then tried to run over two deputies. Shiloh Durant Champion, 35, 615 Roulain Road, Odenville, Ala., was charged with aggravated assault with a deadly weapon, aggravat-ed battery, resisting arrest, criminal mischief and two arrest warrants from Alabama. He was booked into the Columbia County Detention Facility without bond. According to Columbia County Sheriff’s Office reports, about 7 p.m. Tuesday, deputies were called to the Players Club Restaurant on U.S. 90 to assist a DCF inves-tigator who had a court order to take a male infant. Deputies learned that the child, his mother and father, were sitting in a vehicle in the restaurant’s parking lot. Deputies assist-ed the DCF investigator in explaining the court order. Champion, was holding the infant and handed the child over to the mother instead of the DCF investigator. Deputies asked Champion for his identi-fication as he sat in the driver’s seat of a Honda Accord, and Champion told deputies that he did not have any ID with him and proceeded to give them a name that they knew was false. Deputies asked Champion to exit the vehi-cle so they could continue their investigation into his identity. Champion initially opened the driver’s door and appeared as though he was going to exit the vehi-cle. Instead, he slammed the driver’s door shut and put the car in reverse, reports said. Deputy Paul Hebb attempted to keep Champion from leaving, but Champion accelerated in reverse and struck the DCF investigator’s vehi-cle. The collision caused the DCF investigator to be struck by her vehicle, resulting in minor injury, reports said. Sgt. Todd Lussier arrived on the scene to assist Hebb and they both gave Champion commands to stop the vehicle. Champion ignored the deputies’ orders, turned the wheels of the vehicle towards the deputies and reportedly attempted to put the car in a forward gear. While Champion struggled to place the vehicle in gear, Lussier seized the opportunity to deploy a Taser, and Hebb then removed Champion from the vehicle. Reports said Champion continued to resist arrest and struggled with both deputies on the ground. Deputies were able to gain control of Champion and placed him in restraints. LifeGuard Ambulance Service personnel evaluat-ed Champion at the scene for scrapes and lacera-tions to his arms from the struggle to get him to the ground. He refused treat-ment, reports said. Champion was taken from the scene and booked into jail. Champion TRAFFIC: A safe holiday Continued From Page 1Arecipes. Keynote speakers for the event, Florida Highway Patrol Maj. Gene Spaulding, Lake City Police Department Chief Argatha Gilmore, Shands LakeShore Emergency department Dr. Edward Lucas and Columbia County Sheriff Mark Hunter, spoke about experiences they’ve had with impaired drivers. Spaulding said there was 5,068 alcohol-related crash-es statewide last year with 39 of those crashes occurring in Columbia County. “That’s entirely too many,” he said, as he promoted the Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over impaired driving holi-day enforcement campaign which begins Thursday and concludes in 2013. Gilmore said there will be a sobriety check in Lake City on Friday night as local law enforcement officers work to get impaired driv-ers off the roadways. “We can’t tolerate the drunk drivers on the road-ways,” she said. BAN: Trying to get ahead of the problem Continued From Page 1Aseizures, paranoia, trem-ors and more. “These dangerous drugs are widely available in smoke shops, truck stops, convenience stores and through the Internet,” said Florida Department of Law Enforcement Commissioner Gerald Bailey. “Retailers who stock these products have two options: surrender their inventory or face enforce-ment action.” Bondi says she’ll work with the Legislature to ban the 22 additional drugs per-manently. Bondi signed an emergency rule in 2011 mak-ing MDPV, commonly known as “bath salts,” illegal. Bondi has worked closely with the Legislature for the past two sessions to add synthetic drugs to the schedule of controlled substances. The Columbia County Sheriff’s Office said it will be communicating with local business owners to make them aware of the emergency rule and ensure they are in compliance. “The problem I have with these synthetic drugs is that this is nothing more than legalized drug deal-ers,” Hunter said. “They’re putting profit ahead of the people’s health. I have a problem with that. They’re selling these things over the counter and there is no research on these synthetic drugs. I’m very much in favor of a ban on this until we can find out what the harmful effects are on the human body.” NAACP: Leadership dispute ends up in court Continued From Page 1ACenter parking lot. Presley was not accompanied by an attorney as she gave her testi-mony to the judge, but White was represented by Andrea V. Nelson. Nelson told Douglas she was rep-resenting White on behalf of the NAACP national office. “I was hired by the NAACP’s national office to come and repre-sent the interest of its local branch,” Nelson said. According to Lake City Police Department reports and testi-mony from Presley, around 7:30 p.m. on Nov. 19, Presley was at the Richardson Community Center, standing with her husband, Glynnell Presley, and three other people talk-ing when an unknown vehicle sped into the parking lot and nearly struck Glynnell Presley. Presley had to quickly move out of the car’s path to avoid being struck and when the vehicle came to a stop, reports said, White exited the vehicle in an aggressive manner and imme-diately approached Bernice Presley, allegedly yelling and cursing. Bernice Presley said she was in fear for her life, the report said, which is what she also told Douglas. The report said that prior to the incident, White was at Richardson Community Center for an NAACP meeting that was to be held to elect a new Columbia County chapter president. White reportedly left the meeting prior to it closing, but allegedly came back to confront Bernice Presley about something that she heard during the meeting. The elec-tion was suspended by state level NAACP officials “to protect the vot-ing rights” of local NAACP mem-bers, according to state-level docu-ments, and will be held Saturday. Police reports said Presley told the officer she believes White was upset about is her becoming presi-dent of the NAACP. White disputed the claim.“That can’t be true, She hasn’t been officially nominated,” White said. “The nominations will come from the floor.” Following the hearing on Tuesday, White said Presley had sought the injunction in order to keep her from running for the organization’s presidency. White said a person seeking an office within the NAACP cannot run if they have a criminal charge or injunction filed against them. “I wouldn’t have been able to run or be nominated because I had an injunction against me at Richardson (Community Center), which she (Presley) was trying to do to keep me away from the school,” she said. “It’s not so much that she was afraid of me, it was just to keep me from the school.” Nelson said part of Presley’s petition to the court indicated she wanted White kept away from the Richardson Community Center, which is where the county branch holds its monthly meetings. “By getting her (White) banned from the community center, she couldn’t participate in any NAACP meetings,” Nelson said. Presley said she did not seek the restraining order to keep White from running for the NAACP presidency. “I was encouraged and nominated to be the nominee for the president of the Columbia County NAACP by the 2012 nominating committee because many in the community felt the branch needed a facelift,” Presley said. “The actions that I took was at the advice of my attorney because I felt threatened by White who was acting uncontrollable, using profan-ity and bullying tactics.” Presley told police she wanted to file an official report and pursue charges against White. However, Presley did not seek charges until two days later, on Nov. 21, according to police reports. “Due to the seriousness of the altercation, as well as Presley’s level of fear and age, I am filing an affida-vit with the State Attorney’s Office for final review,” Officer Tammy Cox wrote in the police report. “Presley was instructed to seek an injunction against White for her protection.” Douglas ruled that Presley failed to meet the legal standards required by law in order for him to issue a restraining order against White, and denied her request. NFBA: More time Continued From Page 1Aauthority. The NTIA watches how the authority spends grant money. On Feb. 1, federal oversight and funding ends. The NFBA is required to send any money left from the $30 million grant back to the federal government. The grant was designed to help build the infrastruc-ture to bring high-speed Internet to rural areas in North Central Florida. Sucara said the NFBA will spend all grant funds before Jan. 31. “It comes with time, but no money,” she said of the extension. Project Manager Donnie Lort said the NFBA has about $3 million left of the grant. While the NFBA uses federal grant money, the authority has to follow guidelines and require-ments from the federal gov-ernment. Also, any revenue generated by the authority goes back to the federal government. “We’re not 100 percent sure the right thing to do is to extend the grant, because we’re under their scrutiny (and) we can’t use the income the way we would like to use it,” Lort said. City Manager Wendell Johnson said time is of the essence but time is running out. He said he doesn’t see any positives if the NFBA has spent all the grant money and would have to give any revenues to the federal government. Johnson said he’s not being critical of the job staff or board members have done over the past three years. He said the system is built, but the federal gov-ernment had a flaw in the grant. There isn’t transition money for when the author-ity’s grant period ends, he said. “I see the edge of the cliff coming, and I don’t want to see us go over that cliff,” Johnson said. Board unhappy about teacher evaluation snafu Proposal to letdistricts pick textbooks OK’d.



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DEAR ABBY: I must respond to “Always His Mom” (Sept. 26), who asked what to do with her grown son’s baby teeth. She can contact the college of dentistry close to her and ask if the school would like to have the baby teeth the Tooth Fairy collected. When I was in dental school, we used deciduous teeth (baby teeth) to study the dental anatomy of children. It’s rare to have a complete set from one person, which would make these a good learning aid for students. When I was in school, the deciduous teeth were nearly smooth because of the number of students who had handled them, making them very difficult to identify. -DOUG FROM SOLON, IOWA DEAR DOUG: Your suggestion to contact a dental school and ask if they would be interested in using the baby teeth as learning aids is sensible. Other readers offered some “unique” ideas on the subject: DEAR ABBY: I’d like to comment about what to do with those baby teeth. The original reasoning behind the tooth under the pillow custom was to keep witch-es from getting hold of them and casting a spell on the child. The traditional disposition of those teeth was straight into the fire! -LADAWN IN WISCONSIN DEAR ABBY: I had a neighbor with five children. She also kept their baby teeth and was inspired to use them to make a present for her father. At the time, we were into casting things in plastic, so she bought a mold for a toilet seat and embedded all the teeth neatly into it. Her father refused to use it because he said it would be like sitting in a shark’s mouth. -CAROLE IN GILFORD, N.H. DEAR ABBY: My son passed away. His girlfriend was pregnant and had the baby four months later. We had a DNA test done using his baby teeth, which I had saved. It proved he was the father, and the baby, our grandson, is now 10 years old. Also, with this information, the boy was able to get Social Security ben-efits for survivors. It was a bit of a struggle, but well worth it. How’s that for a good use for baby teeth? -GRANDMA IN NEWBURGH, N.Y. DEAR ABBY: As I was cleaning out my father’s dresser, I found an enve-lope with a drawing that I had done in kindergarten and another envelope con-taining a tooth and a note to the Tooth Fairy written in my childish hand. Imagine how touched I was when I found it -knowing he had kept these things for nearly a half a century. I think putting the teeth in an envelope for “Always’” son to find later on would be a lovely thing to do. -SISSY IN LAUSANNE, SWITZERLAND DEAR ABBY: My favorite Tooth Fairy memory is when my 6-year-old daugh-ter asked if she would hear the “Tooth Fairy’s wings flapping” when she came to collect the tooth that had been placed under her pillow. Kids do say the darnedest things, and yes, I still have her teeth and the notes she wrote to the Tooth Fairy. -KARIE’S MOM IN ENCINO, CALIF. DILBERT BABY BLUES HOROSCOPES DEAR ABBY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Plan a get-together with old friends or take a moment to re-evalu-ate your strategy for the upcoming year. This is a great day to talk about your plans or share what you have to offer with people in influential or knowledgeable positions. +++++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Your partnerships must be looked at care-fully. Size up who has done what and make an effort to equalize your position one way or another. Taking a creative idea and turning it into a useful solution will bring you applause and maneuverability. +++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Respond graciously. Love and compassion will help you avoid discord. Not everyone will agree with your choices, and some may be dishonest to avoid involvement, but at the end of the day, you are the one who has to live with your decisions. +++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Look at your past and present before you decide on future prospects. You must ensure that you will be victorious before you tell everyone your plans. Love is in the stars, and discussing your feelings and commitment will change your life. +++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Don’t allow anyone to weigh you down with responsibilities that don’t belong to you. Put your priorities in order and make sure everyone knows your schedule. It’s important that you mingle with people who can con-tribute to a brighter future. +++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Shopping, socializing and sharing with friends will be a pick-me-up as long as you don’t take on too much or overspend in the process. Set your budget and you will ensure that everything you do will be accessible and afford-able. +++++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Listen to what elders in your family and work-place have to say. You will find out valuable informa-tion that will help and encourage you to make the right choice personally and professionally. Don’t get angry when what’s needed is making a difference. ++++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Don’t question your desires -make them hap-pen. Shying away from something you’ve wanted to do for a long time will leave you depressed. Follow through with your ideas and broaden your spectrum. It’s up to you to do what’s required to advance. +++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Your enthusi-asm will motivate others to pitch in and help. Focus on what you can do for those in need and you will boost your image and attract hefty support. Getting together with someone from your past will lead to deception. +++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Uncertainty will kick in, causing you self-doubt and the possibility of making a costly mistake. Rethink your plans. You will see that compromise is required in order to make things work personally and professionally. +++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Listen carefully and respond slowly. Ask questions and look at what’s being offered and the type of results you can expect to get. Keep your festivities simple and thrifty. Someone showing interest may not have good intentions. ++++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Focus on travel, love and learning about dif-ferent lifestyles and tradi-tions. Don’t be too quick to judge others or to concur with a decision you feel iffy about. Promises must be kept, so don’t commit to anything that will be hard to honor. ++ CELEBRITY CIPHER Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com BLONDIE BEETLE BAILEY B.C. FRANK & ERNEST FOR BETTER OR WORSE ZITS HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH GARFIELD THE LAST WORD Eugenia Last Dental school would welcome Tooth Fairy’s treasure trove Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. CLASSIC PEANUTS Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2012 3B



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OPINION Thursday, December 13, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A4AOPINION Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com T he number of highway fatalities in Columbia County, that is. Thirty-one people died in automobile accidents within our borders in 2011, according to local authorities. Nearly halfway through December, the 2012 total is just nine. Remarkable.While the reason for the decline isn’t clear – and might be nothing more than a statistical anomaly – there’s another pos-sible explanation as well. Could be that folks who’ve stubbornly refused to buckle up are finally getting the message. Let’s hope.Meanwhile, there’s a good way to find out. If we all start, or keep, wearing our seat belts, and if traffic death totals here stay low, we might well have our answer. Regardless, that’s an experiment we feel certain will yield some pretty amazing – and life-saving – results. Let’s keep it down OUR OPINION On this date:In 1642, Dutch navigator Abel Tasman sighted present-day New Zealand. In 1769, Dartmouth College in New Hampshire received its charter. In1862, Union forces led by Maj. Gen. Ambrose Burnside launched futile attacks against entrenched Confederate soldiers during the Civil War Battle of Fredericksburg; the soundly defeated Northern troops withdrew two days later. (It was during this battle that Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee is said to have remarked: “It is well that war is so terrible, or we should grow too fond of it.”) In 1918, President Woodrow Wilson arrived in France, becoming the first chief executive to visit Europe while in office. In 1928, George Gershwin’s “An American in Paris” had its premiere at Carnegie Hall in New York. In 1937, the Chinese city of Nanjing fell to Japanese forces; what followed was a massacre of war prison-ers, soldiers and citizens. (China maintains as many as 300,000 people died; Japan says the toll was far less.) In 1944, during World War II, the U.S. cruiser Nashville was badly damaged in a Japanese kamikaze attack that claimed more than 130 lives. In 1962, the United States launched Relay 1, a communications satellite which retransmitted television, telephone and digital signals. In 1978, the Philadelphia Mint began stamping the Susan B. Anthony dollar, which went into circulation in July 1979. In 1981, authorities in Poland imposed martial law in a crackdown on the Solidarity labor movement. HIGHLIGHTS IN HISTORY T he think tank I head organizes an annual poli-cy conference that has to be planned many months in advance so we always worry that the theme we choose will be embar-rassingly outdated by the time hundreds of govern-ment officials, wonks and reporters settle in their seats. This year we got lucky: The Foundation for Defense of Democracies’ 2012 Washington Forum was titled “Dictators and Dissidents: Should the West Choose Sides?” As the panelists took to the podium, Egyptian dissidents in Ismailia and Cairo were torching Muslim Brotherhood headquarters to protest President Mohamed Morsi’s attempt to award himself dictatorial powers and the Syrian opposition was battling the Assad dic-tatorship. There was edifying debate about how the United States and its allies ought to respond. Robert S. Ford, American ambas-sador to Syria — from which he was forced to flee at risk of his life more than a year ago — insisted that Bashar al-Assad must and will go. Nevertheless, the U.S. continues to pro-vide only minimal assis-tance to the pro-Western factions in the opposition. Lacking such support, those factions have been increasingly overshad-owed by the Nusra Front, a band of mostly foreign, al-Qaida-linked jihadists. The liveliest disagreement at the conference was over this resolution: “If democracy is to triumph in the Middle East, Islamist victories at the ballot box are unavoidable and essential.” Bret Stephens of The Wall Street Journal and Rob Satloff of the Washington Institute for Near East Policy argued that it requires stunning naivete to believe there are “moderate” Islamists prepared to establish lib-eral democracies. Foundation senior fellow Reuel Marc Gerecht, a former CIA operative, and Brian Katulis, senior fellow at the Center for American Progress, coun-tered that after genera-tions of failed secular dic-tatorship, it is inevitable — not to be confused with desirable —that free elections bring Islamists to power. What happens after that? Not a new era of Middle Eastern prosperity or freedom — the experi-ences of Islamist-ruled Iran, Sudan and Gaza demonstrate that clearly. This question then arises: If most people in countries such as Egypt and Tunisia become disenchanted with Islamist governments will they be able to choose a different direction? I’m doubtful. Iran’s revolutionary rulers hold elections — and rig them. Hamas came to power in 2006 through a not-quite-free election and, surprise, Gaza’s ballot boxes have been in mothballs ever since. Gerecht argued that in Egypt the Muslim Brotherhood will continue to encounter resistance not just from secularists, but also from fundamen-talists dissatisfied with Morsi’s more pragmatic (not to be confused with moderate) policies. Gerecht adds: “Right now, I would be content with democratic values that are far from ideal but at least offer space for differences to be voiced freely.” I see no reason to believe that Islamist regimes will mellow over time or allow themselves to be voted out of power. At the conclusion of the Washington Forum, one thing was clear: Those of us committed to what that old neo-conservative John F. Kennedy called the “survival and the success of liberty” have few good policy options to choose among. Instead, we face bad options — and worse options. As that old reli-gious conservative Woody Allen said, “Let us pray that we have the wisdom to choose correctly.” Few good policies for Islamic regimes A s a profession-al registered nurse, I am deeply dis-turbed by the recent news that one of my colleagues took her own life, according to news accounts, because of her unsuspecting participation in a publicity prank just to boost radio station ratings. I did not personally know Jacintha Saldanha, the nurse that was on duty at King Edward VII’s hos-pital in the UK, when so called radio personalities from Australia, Mel Greg and Michael Christian posed as Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Charles of the Royal Family, called to get personal information on Kate Middleton, wife of Prince William. However, I feel a professional bond and understand the responsibility she was faced with every day. The hospital had supported her and said she acted in a professional and car-ing manner as she really thought she was speak-ing to the Royal Family. I am deeply saddened that she felt she had no other alternative than to end her life. Condolences go to her family in this time of tragic loss. What many people do not know, or even try to understand, is that nurses are challenged every day with the decision as to who should know what about patients they are caring for. In the United States, HIPPA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) privacy laws are very strict. HIPPA states that a patient’s information can be shared when required by police, when it is nec-essary for public health, or if permission is given for family or friends to view the information. I am employed by the Lake City VA Medical Center and following those rules and regula-tions are on the forefront every day. I am positive that Lake Shore Hospital and Lake City Medical Center have similar poli-cies for release of informa-tion. At the VA we are required to sign privacy agreements of under-standing several times a year and must complete annual training on privacy. We ARE held accountable for proper dissemination of patient information. Now that being said, the nurse still has to make a decision as to what information is disclosed, either over the phone, other electronic media, or in person. The medical record has those listed that the information can be shared with and 99 per-cent of the time (excep-tions below), if the person making the inquiry cannot be properly identified as a documented point of contact, the informa-tion is not released or discussed. Please note, nurses have been cursed at, threatened, and rarely, but sometimes, physi-cally attacked, if we do not tell an inquiring person what they want to know. Nurses try to be patient advocates. We also must take into account family and friends when making these decisions, as well as the wishes of the patient during each hospital stay. The patient sometimes wants some people to know about their hospital status, while excluding others; it is called Opting Out. There are few exceptions such as when phone calls are received from other medical facilities where a patient is being treated and sharing infor-mation in a timely manner is necessary for the safety and welfare of the patient. Information is also shared with law enforce-ment in a time of emer-gency. There are protocols in place for releasing this information. Bottom line while caring for a patient, privacy is important, but is just one of the many legal, moral, psychological, safety and medical decisions that nurses have to make every day. Take what you have to do for one patient and multiply this by as many as 50 or more patients that you may interact with during the day, depend-ing on where you work, it is a daunting task. I truly believe that nurse Saldanha believed she was speaking with the Royal Family and acted in the patient’s best interest. Pranks have their place, for some people, but this is a prank that went entirely too far. The radio person-alities need to be fired for their unprofessional and egregious behavior. This is just one more example how our public airways, worldwide, are turning into the media of trash. Some call it enlightenment, others entertain-ment, many progress; call it what you may but I feel it is a sad sign of the times. Richard Poole, R.N. Q Richard Poole is a registered nurse in Lake City. Cliff May Q Clifford D. May is president of the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies, a policy insti-tute focusing on terrorism.A prank that went too far GUEST COLUMN



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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTHURSDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2012 Classified Department: 755-5440 4B CLASSIFIED AD vantageTake ADvantage of the Reporter Classifieds!755-5440Lake City Reporter FIND IT SELL IT BUY IT $17504 lines 3 days Includes 2 Signs Each additional line $1.65 Garage Sale Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$10104 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.10One item per ad Under $500 Personal Merchandise Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$16754 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.15One item per ad Under $1,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less. Each item must include a price. 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General Information In Print and Onlinewww.lakecityreporter.com Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$2504 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $.25One item per ad Under $100 CLASSIFIED AD vantageTake ADvantage of the Reporter Classifieds!755-5440Lake City Reporter FIND IT SELL IT BUY IT $17504 lines 3 days Includes 2 Signs Each additional line $1.65 Garage Sale Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$10104 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.10One item per ad Under $500 Personal Merchandise Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$16754 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.15One item per ad Under $1,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$23704 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.45One item per ad Under $2,500 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $4,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$27404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.55One item per ad Under $4,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$30404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.65One item per ad Under $6,000 Placing An Ad Service Guide Limited to service type advertis-ing only.4 lines, one month....$92.00 $10.80 each additional lineIncludes an additional $2.00 per ad for each Wednesday insertion. DeadlinesBe Sure to Call Early You can call us at 755-5440 Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.Some people prefer to place their classified ads in person, and some ad categories will require prepay-ment. Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street.You can also fax or email your ad copy to the Reporter.FAX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the Classified Department.EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreporter.comAd is to Appear:TuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday Call by:Mon., 10:00 a.m.Mon., 10:00 a.m.Wed., 10:00 a.m.Thurs., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fax/Email by:Mon., 9:00 a.m.Mon., 9:00 a.m.Wed., 9:00 a.m.Thurs., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.These deadlines are subject to change without notice. Cancellations, Changes & Billing Questions Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject, or classify all advertisements under appropriate headings. Copy should be checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day of pub-lication. Credit for published errors will be allowed for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement which was incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be published, nor for any general, special or consequential damages. Advertising language must comply with Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition of discrimi-nation in employment, housing and public accommodations. Standard abbreviations are acceptable; how-ever, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated. Ad Errors-Please read your ad on the first day of publication. Weaccept responsibility for only the first incorrect insertion, and only the charge for the ad space in error. Please call 755-5440 immediately for prompt correc-tion and billing adjustments.CancellationsNormal advertising deadlines apply for cancellation.Billing InquiriesCall 755-5440. Should further information be required regarding payments or credit limits, your call will be trans-ferred to the accounting depart-ment. General Information In Print and Onlinewww.lakecityreporter.com Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$2504 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $.25One item per ad Under $100 Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 ServicesFLCert. Teacher with 10 yrs exp. Offering a homeshooling group in Jan. Reasonably priced. Interested parents 386-288-0954. LegalTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE 3RD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILDIVISIONCASE NO.: 12-2009-CA-000434BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,Plaintiff,vs.SHAWN VAUGHN; BLUE WORLD POOLS, INC.; JOAN M. PIERCE; UNKNOWN TENANT(S); TRACYVAUGHN; IN POSSES-SION OF THE SUBJECTPROPER-TY,Defendants.RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to an Order Resetting Foreclo-sure Sale dated the 28th day ofNov., 2012, and entered in Case No. 12-2009-CA-000434, of the Circuit Court of the 3RD Judicial Circuit in and for Columbia County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is Plaintiff and SHAWN VAUGHN, BLUE WORLD POOLS, INC., JOAN M. PIERCE, UNKNOWN TENANT(S) and TRACYVAUGHN IN POSSES-SION OF THE SUBJECTPROPER-TYare defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the, Columbia County Courthouse, 173 N.E. HER-NANDO AVENUE, LAKE CITY, FL32055, 11:00 AM on the 30th day of Jan., 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit:LOTNO. 14, SPRING RUN, AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION BEING APARTOF THE W1/2 OF SECTION 16, AND ALLOF THE W1/2 OF THE NE 1/4 OF SEC-TION 16, TOWNSHIP6 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRI-BED AS FOLLOWS:COMMENCE ATTHE NWCOR-NER OF SAID SECTION 16 AND RUN N 8811’19E 25.00 FEETTO THE EASTRIGHTOF WAYLINE OF LAZYOAK ROAD (A50 FOOTCOUNTYMANINTAINED DIRTROAD AS NOWESTAB-LISHED); THENCE CONTINUE ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SECTION 16, N 8811’19E ADISTANCE OF 815.61 FEET; THENCE S 0028’58”E, 3792.45 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGIN-NING; THENCE N 8811’19E, 761.35 FEETTO ITS INTERSEC-TION WITH THE WESTERLYRIGHTOF WAYLINE OF 60 FOOTROAD RIGHTOF WAYTO APOINTON ACURVE, SAID CURVE CONCOVE TO THE RIGHTHAVING ARADIUS OF 880.80 FEETAND ACHORD BEARING AND DISTANCE OF S 1706’44”WAND 292.68 FEET; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTHER-LYALONG SAID ARCE OF CURVE 294.04 FEETTO THE PONTOF TANGENCE OF SAID CURVE; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID WESTERLYRIGHTOF WAYLINE S 2640’34”W, 205.49 FEET; THENCE N 6319’26”W, 650.60 FEET, 650.60 FEET; THENCE N 0028’58”W, 147.20 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING.TOGETHER WITH A2003 MERITDOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME WITH VIN #’S FLHML3B121326780AAND FLHML3B121326780BANYPERSON CLAIMING AN IN-TERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.AMERICAN WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disa-bility who requires accommodations in order to participate in a court pro-ceeding, yo uare entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of certain assis-tance. Individiuals with a disability who require special accommodations in order to participate in a court pro-ceeding should contact the ADACo-ordinator, 173 NE Hernando Ave-nue, Room 408, Lake City, FL32055 (386) 719-7428, within two (2) business days of receipt of notice to appear. Individuals who are hear-ing impaired should call (800) 955-8771. Individuals who are voice im-paired should call (800) 955-8770.Dated thi 28th day of Nov., 2012P. DEWITTCASONClerk of the Circuit CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkSEAL05536112December 6, 13, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO.: 12-2012-CA-000053BANK OF AMERICA, NA, SUC-CESSOR BYMERGER TO BACK HOME LOANS SERVICING, LPFKACOUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LPPlaintiff,v.ASHLEYR. WHITELYAKAASH-LEYWHITELY, et alDefendant(s)NOTICE OF ACTION FOR FORE-CLOSURE PROCEEDING-PROP-ERTYTO: ASHLEYR. WHITELYAKAASHLEYWHITELY, ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUTWHOSE LASTKNOWN ADDRESS IS: 8672 NORTHWESTLAKE JEFFERYROAD, LAKE CITY, FL32055-0000 LegalResidence unknown, if living, in-cluding any unknown spouse of the said Defendants, if either has remar-ried and if either or both of said De-fendant(s) are dead, their respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all other persons claim-ing by, through, under or against the named Defendant(s); and the afore-mentioned named Defendant(s) and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendants and such of the afore-mentioned unknown Defendant(s) as may be infants, incompetents or oth-erwise no sui juris.YOU ARE HEREBYNOTIFIED that an action has been commenced to foreclose a mortgage on the fol-lowing real property, lying and being situated in COLUMBIACounty, Florida, more particularly described as follows:COMMENCE ATTHE SOUTH-WESTCORNER OF THE NORTH 1/2 OF THE SOUTHEAST1/4 OF SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP3, RANGE 16 EAST, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND RUN NORTH 8814'58” EASTALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID NORTH 1/2 OF THE SOUTHEAST1/4 OF SECTION 6, ADISTANCE OF 517.40 FEET; THENCE NORTH 0105’00” WESTALONG THE WESTLINE OF APARCELOF LAND RECORDED IN O.R. BOOK 543, PAGES 453-454 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CO-LUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAADISTANCE OF 151.34 FEET; THENCE NORTH 6744’22” WESTADISTANCE OF 229.92 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 6744’22” WESTADISTANCE OF 109.64 FEET; THENCE NORTH 0157’06” WESTADISTANCE OF 305.50 FEET; THENCE NORTH 8711’46” EASTADISTANCE OF 358.36 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 0157’06” EASTADISTANCE OF 210.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 8711’46” WESTADISTANCE OF 258.35 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 0157’06” EASTADISTANCE OF 141.95 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING.TOGETHER WITH AN EASE-MENT, 30.00 FEETIN WIDTH, FOR THE PURPOSE OF INGRESS AND EGRESS, LYING 15.00 FEETEACH SIDE OF THE FOLLOW-ING DESCRIBED CENTERLINE: COMMENCE ATTHE NORTH-WESTCORNER OF APARCELOF LAND RECORDED IN OFFI-CIALRECORD BOOK 543, PAGE 453 AND 454 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND RUN SOUTH 0105’00” EASTALONG THE WESTLINE OF SAID PAR-CELOF LAND ADISTANCE OF 75.00 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING OF SAID CENTER-LINE, THENCE NORTH 6744’22” WESTADISTANCE OF 75.00 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGIN-NING OF SAID CENTERLINE, THENCE NORTH 6744’22” WESTADISTANCE OF 569.55 FEETTO APOINTON THE WESTLINE OF THE NORTH 1/2 OF THE SOUTH-EAST1/4 OF SECTION 6, TOWN-SHIP3 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, (SAID POINTLYING ON THE CENTERLINE OF ACOUNTYGRADED ROAD) AND THE TER-MINALPOINTOF SAID CEN-TERLINE.TOGETHER WITH A2009, SOUTHERN OAK, 28X48, DOU-BLE WIDE MOBILE HOME, ID #’S TBD.THESE MOBILE HOME TITLES WILLBE RETIRED WITH THE FLORIDADEPARTMENTOF MOTOR VEHICLES ACCORDING TOFLORIDASTATUE SECTION 319.261 AND HEREAFTER AL-WAYS APARTOF THIS REALPROPERTY.COMMONLYKNOWN AS: 8672 NORTHWESTLAKE JEFFERYROAD, LAKE CITY, FL32055-0000this action has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, such Morris Hardwick Schneider, LLC, Attorneys for Plaintiff, whose ad-dress is 5110 Eisenhower Blvd, Suite 120, Tampa, FL33634 on or before 12/27/12, and file the original with the clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or im-mediately there after; otherwise a de-fault will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Com-plaint.WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 27th day of Nov., 2012.P. Dewitt CasonClerk of the Circuit CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkIn accordance with the American with Disabilities Act, persons need-ing a special accommodation to par-ticipate in this hearing, should con-tact ADACoordinator no later than 1 (one ) day prior to the proceeding at Three Rivers Legal Services, Inc. (Columbia), 853 SWSisters Welcome Road, Lake City, FL32056 386-752-5960 and for the hearing and voice impaired 800-955-8770.05536096December 6, 13, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE 3RD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILDIVISIONCase No. 12-2009-000801-CATHE BANK OF NEWYORK MEL-LON F/K/ATHE BANK OF NEWYORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATE HOLDERS OF THE CWABS, INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-22,Plaintiffvs.JOELA. MANZANARES, ETAL.,DefendantsNOTICE OF SALENotice if hereby given pursuant to the final judgment/order entered in the above noted case, that I will sell the following property situated in Columbia County, Florida described as:COMMENCE ATTHE NWCOR-NER OF THE NE 1/4 OF THE SE Legal1/4 OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP6 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, CO-LUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN N 8803’E 315.00 FEETTOTHE POINTOF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE N 8803’E 210.00 FEET; THENCE S 0157’E 254.00 FEET; THENCE S 8803’W210.00 FEET; THENCE N 0157’W254.00 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING.COMMENCE ATTHE NWCOR-NER OF THE NE 1/4 OF THE SE 1/4 OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP6 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, CO-LUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE N 8803’E 315.00 FEET; THENCE RUN S 0157’E 254.00 FEET; THENCE RUN N 8803’W315.00 FEET; THENCE N 0157’W254.00 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING.at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash, on the 3rd Floor of the Columbia County Courthouse 173 N.E. Hernando Ave., Lake City, Florida, at 11:00 A.M. on 1/2/2013. The highest bidder shall immediately post with the Clerk, a deposit equal to five percent (5%) of the final bid. The deposit must be cash or cash-ier’s check payable to the Clerk of the Court. Final payment must be made on or before 4:30 p.m. on the date of the sale by cash or cashier’s check.ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN IN-TERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.CLERK OF THE COURTBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkSEALDated 11/27/1205536091December 6, 13, 2012 020Lost & Found Lost Cell phone in ladies restroom at TJMaxx. If found please return to front desk or Verizon if found. Reward 386-755-0398 100Job Opportunities05536167Local insurance agency seeks Licensed CSR Experience preferred. Send reply to Box 05099, C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056 05536269H&RBLOCK in Branford and Starke has immediate openings for experienced tax professionals. For more information please email a resume to bkoon@Hughes.net or fax a resume to our District Office at (352)493-7422. HVAC SALES Excellent benefits & Great pay. Call Allen 386-628-1093 100Job OpportunitiesMechanic needed with tools and experience. Southern Specialize Truck & Trailer. 386-752-9754 Part-time employee janitorial duties hours 7am-12noon ONLY! Apply in person at 3631 E. Hwy 90 across from Airport to fill out application. Attn. Cheryl Real Estate Co. looking for Office Staff Computer knowledge required. Real Estate Exp. is a plus! Fax resume to 386-496-4309 Seeking a Phone Salesperson for a local mortgage company. Inbound & outbound calls. No experience is necessary. Must have happy, energetic personality. Email resume to: lakecityresume@yahoo.com Service Techs & Installers Must be EPA& NATE certified. Excellent benefits & great pay. Call Allen (386) 628-1093 120Medical EmploymentP/THousekeeper Needed Occasional Nights And Weekends. Fax Resume to 386-487-1232 DIET AR Y MANAGER Needed CDM, Chef, LTC, 2 years experience preferred Must be able to manage large staff and oversee daily food preparation for a 180 bed SNF. Full time with excellent benefits. E-mail resume to Greg Roberts: groberts@gulfcoasthealthcare.com or fax to: (386)362-4417. Live Oak, FLEOE/V/D/M/F 120Medical EmploymentPosition Avail M-F for F/TLPN at busy medical practice in Lake City. LPN license REQ’D! 1 page resumes accepted ONLY! If you are not a licensed LPN your resume will be trashed! If you send more than a 1 page resume it will be trashed. Do NOTsend references or copies of licenses or certificates with resume or it will be trashed! Fax resume to 386-487-1232. GREATOPPORTUNITY•Full Time Experienced RN’s, LPN’s 7a-7p & 7p-7a•Full Time Experienced C.N.A’s All Shifts Apply in person at Suwannee Health Care & Rehab. 1620 Helevenston Street S.E. Live Oak, FL32064 EOE/m/f/d/v Busy Family Practice Office Seeks FTNursing Personnel Medical Office Exp Preferred Fax Resumes to 719-9494 GIEBEIG FAMILYMEDICINE LAKE CITY REPORTER This Reporter Works For You! 755-5440Classifieds 755-5445 Circulation



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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2012 5A 5A plus all the ( jingle ) bells & whistles! tis the time to buy! 2 26 % APR 1 for up to 60 months As low as No payments until 2 0 1 3 2 Shop the dealership with a CAMPUS Pre-Approved Loan Draft and negotiate as a cash buyer! Have a loan with another lender? Lower your payment by bringing it to CAMPUS! M M Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Columbia and Suwannee counties! 3 Accelerate your approval, apply today! Call 754-2219 Click campuscu.com Visit your local service center OFFER NOT AVAILABLE ON EXISTING CAMPUS LOANS. OFFER IS FOR NEW LOANS ONLY. MAY NOT BE COMBINED WITH ANY OTHER OFFER. 1. Credit approval required. Your rate may be higher based on creditworthiness, vehicle and term of loan. For example, a $39,000.00 loan with no money down at 2.14% for 48 months would require 47 monthly payments of $854.12 and a final payment of $833.58, finance charge o f $1,839.67, for a total of payments of $40,977.22. The amount financed is $39,237.55, the APR is 2.26%. APR = Annual Percentag e Rate. 2. Interest will accrue from date of purchase. Choosing this option will increase the total amount of interest you pay. 3. Credit approval and initial $5 deposit required. Mention this ad and well waive the $15 new membership fee. This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration. Lake City 183 SW Bascom Norris Dr. Gville E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunters Walk 5115 NW 43rd St. Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St. Shands at UF Room H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Alachua 14759 NW 157th Ln. Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E. Silver Springs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. Summer eld 17950 US Hwy. 441 Tallahassee 1511 Killearn Center Blvd. Marshall Alridge Marshall Alridge, 84, of Olustee departed this life on December 9, 2012 at home after an ex tended illness. Marshall was born January 4, 1928 to the late Grant and Susie Alridge. He received his education in the public school in Ellaville, Georgia. Marshall worked in Pulpwood for over 35 years, varieties of rest areas, and 25 years with the U.S. Forestry in Olustee under the Older American Program. He was a member of The Body of Assembly Church of God In Christ under the leader ship of Elder Alvin B. Jones. Preceded him in death: his par ents, Grant and Susie Alridge; one sister, Alma Alridge; one brother, Haver Alridge; two daughters, Marshalene Al ridge, Norma Jean Alridge; one grandson, Daniel Thomas. Left to cherish his memories: a devoted wife, Nancy Alridge; six daughters, Evang. Linda (Rev. Joe) Thomas, Johnnie Mae (Julius) Dinkens, Kimberly (West) Dryden, Nichole Brown, Nettie (Reginald) Tisdale, Cath erine Harris; four sons, Travis (Samantha) Alridge, Marshall Jr. Alridge, Jerome (Lisa) Al ridge, Jeffrey Alridge; godchil dren, Wesley Jackson, Clifford Scott, William & Tajuana Gen try, and Kelsie Stewart; special and Brenda Jackson; numerous brother-in-laws and sister-inlaws; a host of nieces, nephews, cousins and sorrowing friends. Funeral services will be 11:00 a.m. Saturday, December 15, 2012 at New Day Spring Missionary Baptist Church, 709 NW Long St., Lake City, FL, Rev. Lantz G. Mills, Sr., Pastor. Elder Alvin will be in Quitman Cemetery. Viewing and visitation will be Friday, December 14, 2012 from 6-8pm at Jerusalem Bap tist Church in Olustee. Arrange ments entrusted to: MIZELLS FUNERAL HOME 365 NW Washington St, Lake City, FL 32055. (386) 752-3166, Rudolph Mizell, FLD ~ Our success is measured by satisfying those we serve, www.mizellfuneral home.com/rudolmize@att.netEssie D. Mosley As the sun rose on December 9, 2012, the Lord was preparing a resting place for Miss Essie D. Mosley. Miss Mosley was born October 9, 1911 in Fort White, Florida to Jack C. and An nie Mae Frances Mosley. Both parents preceded her in death. She received her education in the Columbia County School System. Later she received a Miss Mosley was employed as a CNA and Food Service Aide at Lake Shore Hospital in Lake City, and a member of the Saint Anthony Hospital Team in St. Petersburg, FL. After returning cant contributions to her com munity harvesting locally grown food crops. Other precedents in death: sisters, Cassie B. Mos ley, Bessie Legree (Garnell), Thelma C. McKinnon (Curtis); brother, Jesse E. Mosley (Essie Mae); nephews, David Johnson, Jack Mosley, Curtis G. McKin non; niece, Annie Mae Frances. Left to cherish the fruits that she imparted in them over the years as an aunt and in later years as a mother, as she was ing on both sides (Father and Mother) of the family: neph ews, Edward J. Mosley (Do ris), Henry R. Mosley (Cora), Albert Mosley (Donnie), Fred E. Mosley (Dorothy), Glenice Legree (Emma), John Henry Legree; nieces, Joann Shemwell (Wayne), Jeanette McKinnon, Mable Johnson, Willie Mosley; hosts of greatnieces, neph ews; other relatives and friends. Funeral services for Miss Essie Mosley will be 1:00 p.m. Satur day, December 15, 2012 at An tioch Missionary Baptist Church, 174 Sky Avenue, Fort White, FL., Rev. Donald Sanders, Pas tor. Rev. Jerry Mosley, Eulogist. The family will receive friends from 6:00 8:00 p.m. Fri day, December 14, 2012 at Antioch M.B. Church. Arrangements entrusted to COMBS FUNERAL HOME 292 NE Washington Street. Lake City, FL. (386) 752-4366. The Caring Professionals Louise Norris Louise Norris, 79, of Branford, Florida passed away Friday, December 7, 2012 at her home after an extended illness. She was a loving mother, grandmoth er and wife. Louise was preced ed in death by her parents John Vance Bullard and Pinky Louise Bullard, AJ Bullard, ML Bul lard, Albert Bullard, Bill Bullard and one sister, May Bohannan; all of Douglas, Georgia. Louise is survived by her husband of 63 years Norman Norris, Jr.; three daughters, Gayla McDonough (Mike) of Branford, Florida, Jer rell Lowry of Branford, Florida, Christine Agers of Lake City, Florida; three sons, Jonnie Nor ris (Genny) of Lake City, Flor ida, Kenney Norris (Beth) of Bell, Florida and Norman Norris (Casey) of Lake City, Florida; she is also survived by 10 grand children and 11 great grandchil dren, and one sister Rose Par tin of Cartersville, Georgia. A memorial service will be held at Bell Baptist Church, 1029 S Main Street, Bell, Florida on Saturday, December 15, 2012 at Noon with Brother Henry with the family will follow at the Reception Hall until 3:00pm. donations to Haven Hospice.Charles Ray Tidwell Mr. Charles Ray Tidwell, 52, of White Springs died Wednesday, December 12, 2012 from inju ries sustained in an automobile accident. A native of Miami, Mr. Tidwell had been a resident of White Springs since 1980, and was a loving son, brother, and outdoors, NASCAR Racing, go ing to the Dog Track in Jasper, and was a talented mechanic. Mr. Tidwell was of the Baptist faith and was preceded in death by his father Charles R. Tidwell, Sr. and his stepfather, Owen Pritchard. Mr. Tidwell is survived by his mother, Aline Noegel Pritchard of White Springs; maternal grandmother, Mozell Hunter Her old; brothers, Kenneth Tidwell (Rhonda), Owen Pritchard, II (Diane), Lee Pritchard, Barry Pritchard (Tina), Doug Pritchard, and David Pritchard (Heather); sisters, Karen Tidwell Brown (Jim), and Pam Tidwell Fox (Tim); numerous aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, great nieces and great nephews also survive. Memorial services for Mr. Tidwell will be conducted at 4:00 P.M. Saturday, Decem ber 15, 2012 at Mt. Pleasant Church in Wellborn, FL with rangements are under the direc tion of GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN FUNERAL HOME 3596 S. HWY 441, Lake City. (386) 752-1954. Please leave words of comfort for the family on Charles page at www.gatewayforestlawn.com Obituaries are paid advertise ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporters classified depart ment at 752-1293. OBITUARIES COMMUNITY CALENDAR To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr@lakecityreporter.com. Dec. 13 Woodturners Club Bell Woodturners Club meets the second Thursday of the month in the Bell community Center at 7 p.m. Every meeting features a show and tell of members current projects. There is also a full demon stration of a woodturning project by a club member. There are opportunities to take home project wood, tools and receive help from other turners. All experi ence levels are welcome. For additional info contact Kent Harriss at 365-7086. Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon at the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane, to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. This will be the last clinic until Jan. 13. Tea party meeting North Central Florida Tea Party will meet at 7 p.m. at the Taylor Building, 128 SW Birley Ave. in Lake City. KrisAnne Hall will speak about nullification what it is, how it works, etc. There also will be a report on what the Columbia County Commission is doing and information on upcoming meetings and events. For more informa tion, call Sharon Higgins at (386) 935-0821 or go online at www.northcentral floridateaparty.org. Dec. 14 The annual Lake City Holiday Crafts Bazaar and Festival will be today through Sunday at the Lake City Mall, 2469 W U.S. Highway 90. Craft ven dors will be available from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. today and Saturday and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. Organizers also will accept donations of new or gently used toys and nonperishable foods on center court at the mall, in cooperation with Childrens Medical Center, all three days. Activities for children Saturday and Sunday will include train rides, a pet ting zoo, face painting, sand art, bounce houses and visits with Santa. Vendors and entertainment acts are being sought. For informa tion, call Genovese Terry at (386) 623-3502 or visit online at www.lakecityba zaar.com. Community theater High Springs Commnity Theater will present the comedy Christmas Belles, tonight through Sunday. Tickets are available for purchase at The Framery of Lake City (386) 754-2780, Pampered Paws in High Springs (386) 454-4464 or online at highspringscom munitytheater.com. Friday and Saturday shows will be at at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m. Doors open a halfhour before show time. Tickets are $11 for adults, $8 for children 12 and younger and $9 for seniors on Sundays. The theater is at 130 N. First Ave. in High Springs. Fish dinner Our Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5056 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, pre pares fish dinners every Friday from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The dinner is $6 for two Alaskan pollock filets, corn, baked beans, hush puppies, cole slaw and tart er sauce. Class reunion Columbia High School classes of 1949 through 1953 will have a reunion luncheon at 11:30 a.m. at Mason City Community Center. All former CHS stu dents are welcome. Bring a covered dish to share. For more information, con tact Julia Osburn at 7527544 or Morris Williams at 752-4710. Dec. 15 Charity Extravaganza North Florida Animal Rescue will host a Holiday Charity Extravaganza from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. at 16800 County Road 137 in Wellborn, one mile south of Pinemount Road. Many vol unteer and charitable orga nizations from the area that help those in need around the holidays be partiipat ing. Planned attractions include live music, food and a gift exchange for kids 10 and younger. Service groups or charities want ing to participate should contact Kami at (386) 9631295 or email kami@north floridaanimalrescue.org. The public is encouraged to join us in the spirit of holiday generosity and sup port these organizations.



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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTHURSDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2012 5B Classified Department: 755-5440 2007 Signature Lincoln Town Car28,200 miles$15,500 386-397-3568 120Medical Employment05536110Advent Christian VillageCurrent JOBS Line Advertisement call 658-5627 orvisit www.acvillage.net 24 hrs/day, 7 days/week Be your BEST, Among the BEST! RN Quality of Care Leader Unrestricted Florida RN license, excellent clinical nursing / assessment skills, current CPR certification, verifiable IVskill (start, regulate, maintain, discontinue IVs) required. Good communication, organizational, and computer skills required; must work as part of interdisciplinary team to assure outstanding quality of life / quality of care for LTC residents. On-call rotation required. Management / supervisory experience and knowledge of LTC regs desired. CNA& LPN FT/PT/ long-term care setting. Florida certification (CNA) or unrestricted license (LPN) required. FTpositions include health, dental, life, disability, AFLAC; 403b; paid time off, access to on site day care and fitness facilities. Apply in person at Personnel Office, Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m., or fax resume/credentials to (386) 658-5160. EOE / Drug Free Workplace/Criminal background checks required. 240Schools & Education05535484Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class12/24/2012• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-11/05/12• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies Free puppy to good home. Miniature Jack Russell & Chihuahua mix, puppy shots have already been started. 386-623-9371 PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 403Auctions 05536210PMC LIQUIDATORS AB3212 On Site Estate Action 21043 25th Road Lake City, FL32024 Saturday, Dec. 15th Preview 8AM-Auction 10AMPropertymanagement714.webs.com407-416-4063 407Computers DELLCOMPUTER $75.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 430Garage Sales ESTATE SALE Fri 1pm ? & Sat 8am -? 494 SE Oak St. LC, Forest Hill Sbdv. Tv’s,Furniture &much more Huge Multi Family-Furn., NickNacks, etc.. Sat.12/15 8am2pm. 457 NWBlackberry Cir., Blackberry Farms off Nash Rd. LC PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. Sat&Sun 12/15 & 16, 8am-? 189 SWCharlie Ln. Follow Blue signs from 90W. Handicap items, lawn tools, misc. Must See 440Miscellaneous 4-WHEELER HONDA TRX 300 EX Exc. Cond., Fast $2900 Neg (386) 344-3836 450Good Things to EatThe Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans 2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024 Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville 386-963-4138 or 961-1420 630Mobile Homes forRent2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $450. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 2 BR/1BA $475/mth. Located in center of Lake City Close to Everything !!! 305-984-5511 or 386-344-0830 2 BR/2BASW, Completly furnished, carport, shed, located on 41st Dr., $600 mo.,+ Util. $300 Dep. 935-2461 630Mobile Homes forRent2/2 SWMH $500 deposit & $500 month 386-623-5410 or 386-623-2203 2BR/1BA Located onCountyRoad 133C, $450 mo. plus $450 dep. 954-258-8841 Efficency Apt and Rv Lots for Rent. Between Lake City & G’ville. Access to I-75 & 441 (352)317-1326. Call for terms. Mobile Homes for rent in White Springs & Ft. White. Contact 386-623-3404 Quiet Country Park 3br/2ba $525. Very clean NO PETS! References & Deposit required 386-758-2280 WATERTOWN AREA 3br/2ba DW, Handicap accessible, $650 mth, $500 dep. Call 386-344-0144, 386-344-5791 640Mobile Homes forSale1600 SQFT, 3/2 DWMH, close to town, country setting on 2 ac. Reduced to $49,000 (short sale) Poole Realty 362-4539. MLS 82068 2 MFG HOMES on 5 ACRES! Great for 2 families in Godbold Acres west of Lake City $79,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCY INC. 755-5110 #81421 2013 DOUBLEWIDE $33,995 inc. set-up, trim-out & A/C Call 386-288-8379. 3BR/2BA28X64 in a great location, a lot of upgrades, fireplace. Only $2,500 down $399 a month. Call Paula at 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com 5 LIKENew Mobile Homes!!! For under $30,000. MUSTSEE Call John T. 386-752-1452 Bank owned, Cozy 1/1 home in Lake C community $55,000. MLS 81365 Poole Realty 362-4539. $55,000 BANK REPO 3BR/2BADoublewide ’09 Excellent condition. Only $999 down $377 a month. Call Paula 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com Breathtaking 80 ac horse ranch w/ 7700 sqft home, heated pool, stocked pond, workout facility MLS 82156 Poole Realty 362-4539. short sale $950,000 CLOSE TO VAMED CTR! 3BR/2BAw/beautiful interior, new CH&A$59,900 DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #81428 EASTSIDE VILLAGE 2BR/2BAw/lg kitchen, open floor plan $79,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #80972 HALLMARK REALESTATE What a Deal! 2003 3/2 MH over 1600 sqft,in Trenton, .92 ac ONLY case # 091-379757 MLS# 82117 Robin Williams 386-365-5146 LIVE OAK! Cute home in city limits; 3BR/1BA& 1,294 SqFt $49,500 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #81410 MUSTSEE 2013 2x6 walls, R30 insulation, OSB wrap, house wrap, real wood cabinets, and thermal pain windows. Payment $399 per month call John T386-752-1452. WANTED…CASH PAID for your Mobile Home, Singlewide or Doublewide flood homes welcome. Call 386-288-8379 Palm Harbor Homes Stilt Homes 34 Years Experience Go directly to the factory & Save 800-622-2832 WOODGATE VILLAGE Move-in ready! Open 3BR/2BA floor plan on nice shaded lot $49,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC 755-5110 #82259 WOODGATE VILLAGE Nice 3BR/2BADWMH w/fenced yd, workshop; $39,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCY, INC 755-5110 #79078 650Mobile Home & LandGreat Value 24 acres, 3/2 DWMH, front porch, full length of MH, open floor plan. MLS 79000. Poole Realty Nelda Hatcher. 688-8067 Hallmark Real Estate Deer & turkey roam, 3000 sqft brick home, detached garagesworkshops on 18 ac. MLS #81005 Ginger Parker 386-365-2135 OwnerFinanced 3/22.5 ac.River Access. Small down $585 mo 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05536252$100 off December's rentMust be presented at the time of application. $89 Deposit Windsong Apts. 386-758-8455 1/1 APT @ $750 per month Util included. No pets. $500 sec 386-546-4424 1BR APT. Downtown Location, Clean. New Carpet $450 mo, plus Security. NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456 2 bedroom / 1 Bath Apts for rent in Live Oak. Call for price. Contact 386-623-3404 & 386-362-9806 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Amberwood Hills Apts. Private Patio area. Beautiful yard. Washer/dryer hkup. Free water & sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special. 386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRentBrandywine & Branford Apartments Now Renting 1, 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-752-3033 W. Grandview Ave. Equal Housing Opportunity TDD Number 1-800-955-8771 BRANFORD VILLAS 386-935-2319 2br/1ba Apts. Now available.$570. mo. TDD number 1-800-955-8771 Equal Housing Opportunity Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2 mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet Friendly. Pool laundry & balcony. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A$530 month $530 deposit garbage included. No pets. 386-344-2170 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Greentree Townhouse Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free water & sewer. Balcony & patio. Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com Redwine Apartments Pets welcome. with 5 complexes, we have a home for you. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com Studio Cottage -$500 month $200 Security Deposit, Utilities included, in town, Near Post Office. Call Chris 386-365-2515 UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 Wayne ManorApts. Spacious 2bedroom washer/dryer. Behind Kens off Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 www .myflapts.com WindsorArms Apartments. Move in! 2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free 200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 STUDIO APT. FOR RENT All utilities included & Cable, $500 month + $300 sec. deposit. Call 386-697-9950 730Unfurnished Home ForRent2BR, 1/2 acre, Fenced, Close-in, Huge Den, Carport, Smoke Free, $800 mo. App & Ref Req’d Short Term Avail 386-758-9824 2br/1ba $548 mo. + sec., 4mi S. Lake City. Clean & Quiet 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 3bdrm very spacious, 2ba, garage, CH/AFenced in backyard. $1,400 mth & $1,400 dep. Contact 386-344-1914 3br/1.5ba. Very clean, Brick great area w/bonus room. Carport, shed & Fenced (privacy) back yard. $825. mo $825. dep. Ref’s req’d. (941)920-4535 ALandlord You Can Love! 3br/1.5ba, Eat in Kitchen, CH/A, 2 car carport $750 mth + dep 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Avail. for Rent 1206 McFarlane Ave. 3 BR/2 BAhouse. Smoke Free and No Pets allowed. $850 a mo. $500 dep. Call for appt. 904-813-8864. House For Rent 3Br 1.5 bath $750 mo. Plus Security No Pets 386-623-7379 750Business & Office RentalsMedical, Retail and Professional Office space on East Baya near Old Country Club Rd. Call 386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622 (cell) Office or Retail Space. Many to choose from. Tom Eagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor 805Lots forSale 3 Acres in White Springs, Commercial usage, city sewer. Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS $175,000 MLS 82358 Beautiful log home located on 5 ac, well maintained, wrap around porch. MLS 75550 $189,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #80401 $60,000. Must be 55+ 130x750 right on Suwannee, Beautiful lot, minutes from Royal Springs, Denise Bose 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #76668 $32,000 Must be 55+, Buildable lot for site built homes only. In Forest Country. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Great home, Emerald Lakes, well kept, split floor plan, oversized family room, MLS# 79733 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Missy Zecher 623-0237 $169,900 Great starter, corner lot, needs some TLC, close to town MLS 81784 $90,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237 REMAX PROFESSIONALS HALLMARK REAL Estate 2.68 acres homes only. Gorgeous neighborhood, Deed restricted. $34,000. Owner Fin. MLS# 80588. Tanya Shaffer 386-397-4766 805Lots forSale PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 810Home forSale Access Realty Gorgeous views 3bd/3ba on Lake Montgomery. Elevator, fishing dock & jacuzzi. MLS 81438 $249,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access RealtySpacious 4 bd/3ba Cypress Lake w/ 3643 sqft 1.25 acres on lake. Vaulted ceilings. MLS 81314 $279,900. Patti Taylor386-623-6896 Access RealtyTwo story 1895 Victorian house w/ electrical upgrades throughout. double -deck porches, MLS 71594 $149,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Country Home, 3br 3 bath, spacious, close to Suwannee & Santa Fe River MLS 81775, $169,900 Elaine Tolar 755-6488 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty MLS 80175, 4br 3ba & 2.5 ba colonial, 3 fireplaces $315,000 Mary Brown Whitehurst. 965-0887 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty 3br 3ba home with a two story duplex. Owner Financing MLS 80915, Elaine Tolar 365-1548 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Building lots: May-Fair, Cannon Creek, Creek Run & Meadow View. Elaine Tolar 386-365-1548 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Home with 5+ ac 3b 2.5 ba, large kitchen covered deck MLS 81630 Elaine Tolar 365-1548 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty 230 Acres, Col. Co. Paved Rd. 752-4211 MLS 70453 Custom home, located on 6.05 ac. Pecan grove w/ rolling hills in Equestrian Comm. Remax Professionals Missy Zecher 623-0237 $269,000 MLS 81075 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81959 Must be 55+, 2br/2ba, $79,900. Site Built Home w/eat in kitchen, laundry rm, scrn porch. Denise Bose @ 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81958-, $115,000. Must be 55+, 3br/2ba, Site Built w/ lots of room, split plan mstr suite, FL. Rm. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Hallmark Real Estate 4.3 acres on the Santa Fe River. Wooded. Natures lover’s paradise. Paved Rd frontage, septic. MLS 81946. Ron Feagle 386-288-2901 Just listed unique home with 2800 sqft of living space, located on 1.37 acres in Live Oak, MLS 82214, Poole Realty $67,500. 362-4539 820Farms & Acreage4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com Access Realty10 acre square tract, High & Dry, OF Avail. w/ 25% down. Convenient Location MLS 81258$39,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access Realty43.64 acres wooded acreage in N.Columbia County. Scenic & Private. MLS 74429 $89,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Hallmark Real Estate Hunters Paradise! 3/2 brick, over 1700 sqft on 10 acres, 24x24 barn, fruit trees. MLS #80851 Ginger Parker 386-365-2135 830Commercial Property05536046Receivership Sale Soneet R. Kapila, Receiver Corbitt Manufacturing Company, Inc. Lake City, FL3 parcels Approx. 55 acres Vacant Industrial & Residential Site Zoned Industrial and Residential Rural Lake City 2 Parcels Approx. 3 acres Vacant Commercial Property Zoned Commercial Intensive Email: blombardo@kapilaco.com or call: 954/712-3185 260 S. Marion Ave. 2641 s.f of Office Space. Can be subdivided. $5-$7/sf. No CAM. Prorata for utilities. Call Mika (352) 359-604 Industrial warehouse7+ acres fenced 17,000 sq ft Barn $1,500 mo. TomEagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 950Cars forSale 2003 ACURA TL3.2, midnight blue, 192k hwy miles, fully loaded, leather int. bose sterio system $7,800 obo 386-590-1206 PublishedMonthlybythe Lake City Reporter



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6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE THURSDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04246A Thursday-Saturday, December 13-15 3 Days Only!Door Busters RED DOT: *Limited exclusions in Brighton, St. John, Eileen Fisher, Lilly Pulitzer, Resort, Bridge Collection, Levi’s, Coach, designer handbags and junior denim. Juniors total savings are 70-80% off. Fashion Accessories, Handbags, Small Leather Goods, Hosiery, Home Store and Men’s Tailored Clothing total savings are 60-75%. COUPONS NOT VALID ON RED DOT **Throughout the entire store, Sat., Dec. 15. Excludes all gift cards, non-merchandise and leased departments. Starts Thursday December 13 While quantities last. Coupons excluded. BELK.COM EXTENDED STORE HOURS THURS. 8 AM -11 PM FRI. 8 AM MIDNIGHT SAT. 6AM-MIDNIGHT 20OFF DECEMBER 13-18 Coupon can only be used once and must be presented to your sales associate at the time of purchase. Qualifying purchase must be before tax. *Only excludes Red Dot, Clearance, Earlybirds, Night Owls, Doorbusters, Bonus Buys, Everyday Values, Alegria, Ben Sherman, Brighton, b.tempt’d; Designer, Bridge and Contemporary Sportswear and Dresses; Casio, Coach, Cosmetics/Fragrances, Da nsko; Fine Jewelry watches, trunk shows and service plans; Gameday, Gear For Sports, Hanky Panky, Herend, Keen, Lacoste, Levi’s, Lilly Pulitzer, Lucchese, Minnetonka Moccasin, Miss Me, Munro, Original Penguin, Roberto Coin, Spanx, Stuart Weitzman, Thomas Dean, Ugg, Under Armour, Vineyard Vines, Wacoal, non-merchandise depts., lease depts. and Belk gift cards. Frye and Brahmin excluded online. Not valid on prior purchases or special orders. Cannot be redeemed for cash, credit or refund, used in combination with any other discount or coupon offer. Valid December 13-18, 2012 your first $100 or moreregular or sale priced purchase* storewide 30OFF DECEMBER 13-18 Coupon can only be used once and must be presented to your sales associate at the time of purchase. Qualifying purchase must be before tax. *Only excludes Red Dot, Clearance, Earlybirds, Night Owls, Doorbusters, Bonus Buys, Everyday Values, Alegria, Ben Sherman, Brighton, b.tempt’d; Designer, Bridge and Contemporary Sportswear and Dresses; Casio, Coach, Cosmetics/Fragrances, Da nsko; Fine Jewelry watches, trunk shows and service plans; Gameday, Gear For Sports, Hanky Panky, Herend, Keen, Lacoste, Levi’s, Lilly Pulitzer, Lucchese, Minnetonka Moccasin, Miss Me, Munro, Original Penguin, Roberto Coin, Spanx, Stuart Weitzman, Thomas Dean, Ugg, Under Armour, Vineyard Vines, Wacoal, non-merchandise depts., lease depts. and Belk gift cards. Frye and Brahmin excluded online. Not valid on prior purchases or special orders. Cannot be redeemed for cash, credit or refund, used in combination with any other discount or coupon offer. Valid December 13-18, 2012 LIMITED EXCLUSIONS LIMITED EXCLUSIONS LIMITED EXCLUSIONS 10OFFDECEMBER 13-18 your first $150 or moreregular or sale priced purchase* storewide Coupon can only be used once and must be presented to your sales associate at the time of purchase. Qualifying purchase must be before tax. *Only excludes Red Dot, Clearance, Earlybirds, Night Owls, Doorbusters, Bonus Buys, Everyday Values, Alegria, Ben Sherman, Brighton, b.tempt’d; Designer, Bridge and Contemporary Sportswear and Dresses; Casio, Coach, Cosmetics/Fragrances, Da nsko; Fine Jewelry watches, trunk shows and service plans; Gameday, Gear For Sports, Hanky Panky, Herend, Keen, Lacoste, Levi’s, Lilly Pulitzer, Lucchese, Minnetonka Moccasin, Miss Me, Munro, Original Penguin, Roberto Coin, Spanx, Stuart Weitzman, Thomas Dean, Ugg, Under Armour, Vineyard Vines, Wacoal, non-merchandise depts., lease depts. and Belk gift cards. Frye and Brahmin excluded online. Not valid on prior purchases or special orders. Cannot be redeemed for cash, credit or refund, used in combination with any other discount or coupon offer. Valid December 13-18, 2012 your first $50 or moreregular or sale priced purchase* storewide 25028359 41980971 88411652 50% off ENTIRE STOCK* Sleepwear and robes from ND Intimates, Character, Ellen Tracy, HUE, Kim Rogers Intimates, Aria and Miss ElaineOrig. 24.00-78.00 Sale 12.00-39.00Shown, Kim Rogers 2-pc pajamas Orig. 46.00Sale 23.00*Excludes Designer Collections, Miss Elaine classics, Romancewear, Jockey & Honeydew Intimates. Imported buy1, get 2 free*ENTIRE STOCK Mens pants by Izod, Haggar and SavaneDress and casual styles in classic, straight and slim t. Orig. 59.50-69.50Imported*Free item must be of equal or lesser valueLife Khaki from Haggar excluded 1999 Ladies’ Rampage bootsOrig. 59.00-69.0050% off ENTIRE STOCK handbags from ND NewDirections Kim Rogers Bueno, Rosetti and Del Mano Orig. 50.00108.00 Sale 25.0054.00extra 10% off Already on sale kitchen electrics from Cuisinart, Mr. Coffee, Oster, Sunbeam, Bella and moreA. Mr. Coffee 12 cup programmable coffeemaker Orig. 49.99, Sale 34.99 After 10% off 31.49 B. Cuisinart 11 Cup Food ProcessorOrig. 229.99, Sale 149.99 After 10% off 134.99 C. Oster Toaster Oven Orig. 54.99, Sale 39.99 After 10% off 35.99 60% off ENTIRE STOCK Chaps SportswearOrig. 15.80-39.20 Sale 39.50-98.00Imported55% off Better sportswear from Madison, Rafaella, Jones New York Sport, Sunny Leigh and moreOrig. 24.00-119.00 Sale 10.80-53.55Imported 60% off ENTIRE STOCK ND New Directions, Erica Lyons™ & Kim Rogers jewelry Reg. 8.00-68.00Sale 3.20-27.20 FREE SHIPPINGBELK.COMON ALL ORDERS through December 21ELITE FREE SHIPPING All the time. No Minimum. SATURDAY onlyearn5X Points** with your Belk Rewards Card A B C red dotclearance75%& more50%offthe current ticketed price* when you take an extra $ $ $ Organizations partner to provide food for kidsCOURTESY PHOTOColumbia County Farm Bureau worked with Fort White Commun ity Thirft store to raise $2,500 for the Backpack Ministries program, which helps feed hu ngry children. Shown at the check presentation are (from left) Charlotte Collins, Sherry Keen Wyndel Bailey, Mike Tice, Lamar Moseley, Harriet Presscot and Charley Crawford.COURTESY PHOTOFlorida Gateway College’s cosmetology students gathered fo r a group photo after treating 40 local girls to makeovers during a “Princess Party” recently.From staff reportsColumbia County Farm Bureau partnered recent-ly with the Fort White Community Thrift Store to raise money to support the Backpack Ministries Project. Backpack Ministries is a program that helps to pro-vide food for those students in the Columbia County area who are in need of assistance. The two organizations rallied together to prepare and distribute chicken and rice dinners. The fundrais-er brought in $2,500. Fort White Community Thrift Store spokesperson Connie Moseley said, “It is very encouraging to see the community turn out and show support of such a worthwhile cause.” Moseley went on to say that she would like to “thank everyone for mak-ing the event a huge suc-cess.” Each year Columbia County Farm Bureau sponsors a Farm City Celebration. This year’s event also included a lun-cheon with the Lake City Kiwanis where the local County Farm Bureau joined with the Columbia County Extension Office to present to guests that agriculture plays a major role in the economic success of our county. Columbia County Farm Bureau President Charlie Crawford, said, “It is very important to get the word out to everyone on where our food comes from, and the opportunity to help strengthen our communi-ties, aligns with our organi-zation’s mission.” Since 1955, the National Farm-City Council has supported educational pro-gramming to build inter-dependence between rural and urban citizens. If you would like to learn more about Farm City Week or the local Backpack Ministries please contact your local County Farm Bureau Office at (386) 752-4003. ‘Princess Party’ at FGC a big hitwith local girlsFrom staff reportsMore than 40 local girls’ dreams of becoming a prin-cess came true — at least for a day — thanks to the Cosmetology students at Florida Gateway College. FGC’s Cosmetology department held a Princess Party on November 17, host-ing more than three-dozen girls between the ages of 3-10. Girls were able to come in, choose a hairstyle and makeup, get their finger-nails and toenails painted, as well as receive various prizes throughout the day – including a tiara and wand. They also had their photo taken with a princess at the end of the day. Turnout was better than expected, said Summer Witt, Cosmetology Club president, thanks to Facebook promotion and word-of-mouth advertising. Funds from the event will go toward allowing the stu-dents in the class to attend the Premiere Hair Show this June in Orlando. Due to the popularity of the event, the Cosmetology department will host another Princess Party this Spring. In addition, they planning on doing something special for moms, hosting a Mother’s Day Princess Party this May. New commissioner selected by boardBy BILL KACZORAssociated PressIndiana’s recently ousted state school superintendent was named to a new job Wednesday as Florida’s education commissioner, a choice that drew applause from Gov. Rick Scott and criticism from the leader of Florida’s statewide teach-ers union. The State Board of Education unanimously selected Tony Bennett, a Republican who lost a bid for re-election in Indiana last month, from a slate of three finalists at its regular meeting in Tampa. “Tony’s experience in being a teacher, a super-intendent, a coach and a statewide elected leader brought a lot more real time, real recent experience in terms of where we need to get to,” board member Kathleen Shanahan said. She also cited Bennett’s leadership in the imple-mentation of Common Core State Standards and a related battery of tests. Florida is among 45 states, the District of Columbia and three territories that have agreed to adopt the national standards. In a statement, Scott said, “Tony has a great record of achievement in Indiana and I am confident he will be a tireless advocate for Florida’s students.” Scott added that he would hold Bennett responsible for driving the Republican governor’s agenda that emphasizes preparing students for college and careers. The commissioner is hired by the board, whose members are appointees of Scott and prior GOP gov-ernors. After Scott was elected governor in 2010, he pres-sured Eric Smith, who had strong support in the Republican-controlled Legislature, to resign as commissioner. Scott was a proponent of Smith’s suc-cessor, Gerard Robinson, who resigned in August after about a year on the job. In Indiana, Bennett led efforts to adopt account-ability changes, including letter grades for schools, pioneered by Florida and former Gov. Jeb Bush, who has close ties to several board members. Many of the GOP initiatives in the state have drawn opposition from the Florida Education Association. The union’s president, Andy Ford, said the FEA “is disap-pointed and disheartened” by Bennett’s selection.



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6B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2012 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 6BSports Jump US 90 E to Sanderson, left on Hwy 127 go 8 miles, left on Hwy 125 at caution light. Go 6/10 mile, turn right at Noah Raulerson Rd., 3 miles to farm. For more info call (904) 259-7703 To participate, simply leave a bag of non-perishable foods at your Reporter paper tube or the end of your driveway Thursday night. No glass containers. Your Lake City Reporter carrier will pick it up while delivering your Friday paper. located at 180 E. Duval Street, Lake City Mondays through Fridays, from 8 a.m. 5 p.m. Place a collection box in your place of business for donation and you will be recognized with other business donors in the Lake City Reporter. For additional information and to participate, please call 752-1293 Supporting the Florida Gateway Food Bank Lets Fill It Up! For all Cash Donations make checks payable to: Florida Gateway Food Bank BURNS: Solid showing Continued From Page 1B I think it was a great meet. She placed sixth out of 50 swimmers in the 1650 Freestyle (mile) with a time of 16:29.10. Burns other events were: 200 Breaststroke, 12th out of 76 with a time of 2:16.75; 500 Freestyle, 14th out of 98 with a time of 4:49.39; 200 IM, 19th out of 152 with a time of 2:02.62; 100 Breaststroke, 41st out of 87 with a time of 1:04.71. COURTESY PHOTO Hannah Burns competes in the freestyle event at the Speedo Winter Junior National Championship at Allan Jones Aquatic Center on the campus of the University of Tennessee in Knoxville on Saturday. Playoffs, draft picks all play part of Week 15 By BARRY WILNER Associated Press The Philadelphia Eagles havent completely given up on the season. They damaged Tampa Bays playoff chances last week end and get an opportu nity Thursday night to do the same to the Cincinnati Bengals. Its a critical game for the Bengals (No. 16 in the AP Pro32). At 7-6, they are in the midst of the AFC wild-card race, tied with the Steelers and a game in front of the Jets for the final spot. After blowing a ninepoint lead in the fourth quarter against Dallas, at home no less, they cant afford to flop in Philly, where the Bengals are a 3-point favorite. Had the Eagles (No. 27, AP Pro32) not rallied to win at Tampa on the final play last Sunday, this wouldnt seem much of a hurdle. To the credit of coach Andy Reid and the young play ers hes using in this lost season, the Eagles still are trying. I think the big thing is, its a great thing for the team sticking together, rookie quarterback Nick Foles said. We can build off of this. Perhaps. But at 4-9 and with an eight-game slide just concluded, Philadelphia isnt going anywhere this season. For Cincinnati, a loss to the lowly Eagles is unthinkable. Bengals, 19-13 No. 3 San Francisco (plus 3) at No. 1 New England If Patriots do to Niners what they did to Texans, there might be no stopping them. Patriots, 24-17 No. 6 (tie) New York Giants (plus 1) at No. 5 Atlanta Falcons look like firstplace team chasing those behind them. Giants, 26-20 No. 10 Indianapolis (plus 8 1 2 ) at No. 4 Houston Texans look like firstplace team chasing those behind them, too. Texans, 23-21 No. 13 Pittsburgh (plus 1) at No. 14 Dallas Picking road underdogs is dangerous business. But Dallas isnt imposing at home. Steelers, 23-17 No. 6 (tie) Green Bay (minus 3) at No. 12 Chicago Packers wrap up NFC North, keep archrivals skidding. Packers, 27-17 No. 2 Denver (minus 2 1 2 ) at No. 8 (tie) Baltimore Ravens need to straight en themselves out. This is not the best game to do so. Broncos, 28-27 No. 8 (tie) Seattle (minus 3) vs. No. 26 Buffalo at Toronto Win here and Seahawks can make playoff plans. Seahawks, 24-20 No. 15 Minnesota (plus 3) at No. 17 St. Louis Jeff Fisher should be in Coach of Year conversa tion. Rams, 21-20 No. 18 Tampa Bay (plus 3 1 2 ) at No. 19 New Orleans Bucs will kick them selves for loss to Eagles when season concludes. Buccaneers, 30-27 No. 32 Jacksonville (plus 7) at No. 23 Miami Jaguars have No. 1 overall draft pick in their sights. Dolphins, 17-9 No. 25 Carolina (plus 3) at No. 21 San Diego Both teams pulled off upsets a week ago. Chargers avoid one. Chargers, 30-28 No. 24 Detroit (minus 6 1 2 ) at No. 29 Arizona Cardinals will show up this time. They just wont win. Lions, 24-13 No. 30 (tie) Kansas City (plus 3) at No. 30 (tie) Oakland AP Pro 32 rankings say it all about these teams. Chiefs, 19-17 No. 20 New York Jets (plus 1) at No. 28 Tennessee Now Jets fans are talking playoffs? Fuhgeddaboudit! Titans, 14-13 No. 11 Washington (OFF) at No. 22 Cleveland With or without RG3, Redskins have come too far to stumble here. Redskins, 17-13 ASSOCIATED PRESS Miami Dolphins quarterback Ryan Tannehill looks to throw the ball during the fourth quarter against the San Francisco 49ers in San Francisco on Sunday.



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By LAURAN NEERGAARDAssociated PressWASHINGTON — New tests that promise to speed up diagnosis of food poi-soning pose an unexpected problem: They could make it more difficult to iden-tify dangerous outbreaks like the one that sickened people who ate a variety of Trader Joe’s peanut butter this fall. The new tests could reach medical laboratories as early as next year, an exciting development for patients. They could shave a few days off the time needed to tell whether E. coli, salmonella or other foodborne bacteria caused a patient’s illness, allowing faster treatment of some-times deadly diseases. The problem: These new tests can’t detect crucial differences between differ-ent subtypes of bacteria, as today’s tests can. And that fingerprint is what states and the federal government use to match sick people to a contaminated food. “It’s like a forensics lab. If somebody says a shot was fired, without the bul-let you don’t know where it came from,” explained E. coli expert Dr. Phillip Tarr of Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention expects private labs to rapidly adopt these next-generation tests ‚ and warns that what is prog-ress for individual patients could hamper the nation’s efforts to keep food safe. Already, 1 in 6 Americans gets sick from foodborne illness each year, and 3,000 die. So even before these tests hit the market, the agency is searching for solutions. Unless one is found, the CDC’s Dr. John Besser said the tests’ unin-tended consequence could be that ultimately, more people become sick. “In the past 20 years, there’s been a fantastic ability to fingerprint bugs: Is this an organism that’s causing multiple infections and we can interdict it? Or is this a once-only event?” added Tarr, the E. coli spe-cialist. “Without that organ-ism in hand, the state can’t do it. The government can’t do it. You lose the ability to get the evidence.” It all comes down to what’s called a bacte-rial culture — whether labs grow a sample of a patient’s bacteria in an old-fashioned petri dish, or skip that step because the new tests don’t require it. Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2012 7A7AHEALTH HOLIDAY CRAFT BAZAAR Lake City Mall Friday Saturday December 14th & 15th 10:00 am 5:00 pm Sunday December 16th 11:00 am 5:00 pm 8PPE8PSLt#BLFE(PPETt $BOEMFTt5PZTt+FXFMSZt )PNF%FDPSt$IJMESFOT4FDUJPOt "OE.PSF STILL ACCEPTING VENDOR APPLICATIONS www.lakecitybazaar.com Black women unite to battle obesityBy STACY A. ANDERSONAssociated PressWASHINGTON — Nicole Ari Parker was motivated by frustra-tion. For Star Jones, it was a mat-ter of life or death. Toni Carey wanted a fresh start after a bad breakup. All three have launched individual campaigns that reflect an emerging priority for African-American women: finding cre-ative ways to combat the obesity epidemic that threatens their lon-gevity. African-American women have the highest obesity rate of any group of Americans. Four out of five black women have a body mass index above 25 percent, the threshold for being over-weight or obese, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. By comparison, nearly two-thirds of Americans overall are in this category, the CDC said. Many black women seem to not be be bothered that they are generally heavier than other Americans. Calorie-rich, traditional soul food is a staple in the diets of many African-Americans, and curvy black women are embraced positively through slang prais-ing them as “thick” with a “little meat on their bones,” or through songs like the Commodore’s “Brick House” or “Bootylicious” by Destiny’s Child. A study by the Kaiser Family Foundation and The Washington Post earlier this year found that 66 percent of overweight black women had high self-esteem, while 41 per-cent of average-sized or thin white women had high self-esteem. Still, that doesn’t mean black women reject the need to become healthier. Historically black, all-female Spelman College in Atlanta is disbanding its NCAA teams and devoting those resources to a campus-wide wellness program. In an open letter announcing Spelman’s “wellness revolution,” president Beverly Daniel Tatum cited a campus analysis that found many of Spelman’s 2,100 students already have high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes or other chronic ailments. “Spelman has an opportunity to change the health trajectory of our students and, through their influence, the communities from which they come,” Tatum’s letter said. Jones, who underwent open heart surgery in 2010 at age 47 and now urges awareness about heart disease among black women, was met by an over-flow crowd earlier this year when she convened a Congressional Black Caucus Foundation panel on black women and obesity. “We have to get ourselves out of being conditioned to think that using soft words so we don’t hurt peoples’ feelings is doing them any favor,” Jones said. “Curvy, big-boned, hefty, full-figured, fluffy, chubby. Those are all words designed to make people feel bet-ter about themselves. That wasn’t helpful to me.” Jones once embraced being large and fabulous, at 5 feet 5 inches tall and 300 pounds. But under that exterior, she said, she was morbidly obese, suffering from extreme fatigue, nausea, lightheadedness, heart palpita-tions and blurred vision. The attorney and TV personality also had gastric bypass surgery in 2003. Now, she advises women to make simple changes such as reducing salt intake, exercising 30 minutes a day, quitting smoking, controlling portion sizes and mak-ing nutritious dietary choices. Nutritionist and author Rovenia M. Brock, known professionally as Dr. Ro, agrees with Jones. She said getting active is only about 20 percent of the fight against obesity. The rest revolves around how much people eat. “Our plates are killing us,” she said. Brock said “food deserts,” or urban areas that lack quality supermarkets, are a real obstacle. She suggested getting around that by carpooling with neighbors to stores in areas with higher-quality grocery options or buying food in bulk. She also suggested growing herbs and vegetables in window-box gardens. “Stop focusing on what’s not there, or what you think is not there,” Brock said. “We have to get out of this wimpy, ‘woe is me’ mentality.” While first lady Michelle Obama has encouraged exercise through her “Let’s Move” campaign target-ing childhood obesity, the spark for this current interest among black women may have been comments last year by Surgeon General Regina Benjamin, who observed publicly that women must stop allowing concern about their hair to prevent them from exercising. ASSOCIATED PRESSRegina Benjamin, surgeon general of the United States,talks about health disparities in Washington earlier this month. African-American women have the highest rate of obe sity of any group of Americans. Benjamin sparked controversy last year when she said publicly that women must stop allowing concern about their hair prevent them from exercising. Multiple campaigns started to combat serious health issue. ASSOCIATED PRESSThe Sunland Inc. peanut butter and nut processing plant in New Mexico has been shuttered since late September due to a salmonella outbreak that si ckened dozens. It’s about to get faster and easier to diagnose food poisoning but that prog ress for individual patients comes with a downside: It could hurt the nation’s ability to spot a nd solve dangerous outbreaks. New tests could hamper food outbreak detection Surprise: New insurance fee in health overhaul lawBy RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVARAssociated PressWASHINGTON — Your medical plan is facing an unexpected expense, so you probably are, too. It’s a new, $63-per-head fee to cushion the cost of covering people with pre-existing conditions under President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul. The charge, buried in a recent regulation, works out to tens of millions of dollars for the largest companies, employers say. Most of that is likely to be passed on to workers. Employee benefits lawyer Chantel Sheaks calls it a “sleeper issue” with significant financial conse-quences, particularly for large employers. “Especially at a time when we are facing eco-nomic uncertainty, (com-panies will) be hit with a multi-million dollar assessment without get-ting anything back for it,” said Sheaks, a principal at Buck Consultants, a Xerox subsidiary. Based on figures provided in the regulation, employer and individual health plans covering an estimated 190 million Americans could owe the per-person fee. The Obama administration says it is a tempo-rary assessment levied for three years starting in 2014, designed to raise $25 billion. It starts at $63 and then declines. Most of the money will go into a fund administered by the Health and Human Services Department. It will be used to cushion health insurance compa-nies from the initial hard-to-predict costs of cover-ing uninsured people with medical problems. Under the law, insurers will be forbidden from turn-ing away the sick as of Jan. 1, 2014. The program “is intended to help millions of Americans purchase affordable health insur-ance, reduce unreim-bursed usage of hospital and other medical facili-ties by the uninsured and thereby lower medical expenses and premiums for all,” the Obama admin-istration says in the regu-lation. An accompanying media fact sheet issued Nov. 30 referred to “contribu-tions” without detailing the total cost and scope of the program. Of the total pot, $5 billion will go directly to the U.S. Treasury, apparently to offset the cost of shor-ing up employer-spon-sored coverage for early retirees. The $25 billion fee is part of a bigger package of taxes and fees to finance Obama’s expansion of cov-erage to the uninsured. It all comes to about $700 billion over 10 years, and includes higher Medicare taxes effective this Jan. 1 on individuals making more than $200,000 per year or couples making more than $250,000. People above those threshold amounts also face an additional 3.8 per-cent tax on their invest-ment income. But the insurance fee had been overlooked as employers focused on other costs in the law, including fines for medi-um and large firms that don’t provide coverage. “This kind of came out of the blue and was a sur-prisingly large amount,” said Gretchen Young, senior vice president for health policy at the ERISA Industry Committee, a group that represents large employers on ben-efits issues.



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