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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
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Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:01976

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:01976

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text

PAGE 1

From staff reportsTwo brothers were arrested Friday and face a variety of felony charges stem-ming from an unsolved busi-ness break-in from earlier in the month where more than $5,000 worth of computer equipment was stolen and a sexual harassment case at the mall. A younger brother in the family was later arrested and faces felony charges for alleg-edly making threats against police officers after his two older brothers were arrest-ed, police reports released Tuesday said. Sean L. Lewis, 21, 211 SW Knox St., was charged with damage to property, burglary, larceny, dealing in stolen property, assault and By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comSharon Higgins is concerned about rising state health care costs. Tuesday afternoon she ventured out to the Florida Gateway College Wilson S. Rivers Library and Media Center where she voiced her concerns to State Rep. Elizabeth Porter (R-Lake City) and State Senator Charles Dean (R-Inverness) during the annual legislative delegation hearing. “I’ve been doing some research on state health care and Florida’s got to make a decision before Dec. 14 whether they are going to set up their own state health exchange, where they would have their own batch of insurers were we would be able to go and pick from if we needed healthcare,” she said. “It’s going to involve a lot of money from the tax-payers. If we don’t do it as a state, the federal government may come in and do it. There’s been a lot of back and forth in Tallahassee about what’s the best way to go.” Higgins wasn’t the only person to take advantage of the opportunity to speak to state elected officials at the meeting, as 12 other local elected and appointed officials addressed the legislators. The annual Columbia County Legislative Delegation is a pub-lic session where residents and local officials can speak to state level politicians about the upcoming legislative ses-sion. This year’s session drew around 30 people who spoke about various topics and con-cerns. While no funding requests were made at the meeting, many local officials thanked legislators for all their help and requested that legislators not adopt any unfunded mandates. Some other people requested continued support for the North Florida Intermodal Park. Opinion ................ 4APeople.................. 2AObituaries .............. 5A Advice & Comics ......... 4B Puzzles ................. 2B TODAY IN PEOPLE Spice Girls on stage. 62 45 Showers WEATHER, 2A Lake City ReporterWEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2012 | YOUR COMMUNI TY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | 75¢ LAKECITYREPORTER.COM CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 138, No. 226 1A COMING THURSDAY Local news roundup. Administrative shuffle at schoolsBy DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comColumbia County administrators were transferred, promoted and placed in charge of multiple schools at the school board meeting Tuesday night. Todd Widergren replaced Superintendent Terry Huddleston as principal of Columbia High School. Widergren was principal at Eastside Elementary School before the transfer. Angela Coppock replaced Bessie Whitfield as principal at Richardson Middle School. Lex Carswell Jr., assistant superin-tendent, had been acting principal at Richardson since Whitfield wasn’t reappointed in June. Coppock was an administrative trainee at Richardson Middle School prior to her promotion to principal. Thomas “Trey” Hosford, formerly an administrative trainee at Richardson Middle School, was promoted to assistant principal. He will be the acting principal at Eastside Elementary School. Joseph Adkins, who was principal at Melrose Park Elementary School, will now be the admin-istrator of federal projects. He replaced Yvette Hooper. The Melrose Park Elementary School’s principal position will be advertised today, Huddleston said. Adkins takes over federal projects effective Jan. 8. Hooper moved from an administrative trainee of federal projects to administrative trainee of special services and exceptional student education. Michael Christie transferred from assistant principal at Columbia High School to assis-tant principal at Richardson Middle School. Terri Thomas was transferred to administrative trainee at Widegren goes toColumbia High, Coppock to RMS. On the job JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterLake City Police Chief Argatha Gilmore congratulates the department’s newest hires during a swearing in ceremon y in council chambers at City Hall on Tuesday. Pictured are Gilmore (from left), and Officers Ry an Gutshall, Nikki Gunter and Peter Michaels. The officers were hired on Sept. 7 and have already successfully completed the necessary training a nd testing as part of the Field Training and Evaluation Pr ogram. Porter,Deantakefloor Lawmakers field questions from local residents. LEGISLATIVE DELEGATION DELEGATION continued on 3A Jeffrey J. Lewis JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterRep. Porter, left, and Sen. Dean. SCHOOLS continued on 3A Education chief choices down to 3 TAMPA — Three finalists for Florida Education Commissioner have made their pitches to the State Board of Education. The panel interviewed them on Tuesday in Tampa and is scheduled to make its choice Wednesday. The finalists are Indiana School Superintendent Tony Bennett, Murray State University President Randy Dunn and Arlington, Va., education consultant Charles Hokanson. Bennett, a Republican, was defeated in a bid for re-election last month. Dunn is a former Illinois state school superintendent. Hokanson was a deputy assistant U.S. sec-retary of education in President George W. Bush’s administration. Former Commissioner Gerard Robinson resigned in August after only about a year on the job. He cited separation from his family in Virginia where he previously had been secre-tary of education.Q Associated Press Kids’ Night at the AtticJASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterChloe Tidwell (left), 5, helps volunteer Maddie Moore wr ap a present she picked out for her 6-year-old sister, Lilian, while shopping at the fifth annu al Kids’ Night at the Attic, at Haven Hospice in Lake City Tuesday. See more photos of Kids’ Night, Page 8A. Sean L. Lewis 3 brothers face felony charges BROTHERS continued on 3A



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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Wednesday, December 12, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS BRIEFS GAMES Today Q Columbia High girls soccer at Leon High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Thursday Q Columbia High girls weightlifting vs. Union County High, 3:30 p.m. Q Columbia High boys soccer at Leon High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Q Columbia High girls basketball vs. Wolfson High, 7:45 p.m. (JV-6:30) Friday Q Fort White High girls basketball at Interlachen High, 6 p.m. Q Columbia High boys basketball at Atlantic Coast High, 7 p.m. (JV-5:30) Q Fort White High boys basketball vs. Interlachen High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Saturday Q Columbia High wrestling at Bradford High duals, 10 a.m. Q Columbia High girls soccer vs. Lincoln High, 2 p.m. (JV-noon) ZUMBA Free Zumba for toy drive class A free Zumba class is being offered at the Lake City Mall from 9-10 a.m. Saturday. Participants are asked to bring a new or gently used toy to be donated to Children’s Medical Services. For details, call Sarah Sandlin at 758-0009. RUNNING Chomp Cancer Foundation 5K Chomp Cancer Foundation has its second Chomp Cancer 5K Run/Walk planned for 8 a.m. Saturday at the Fort White Community Center. Saturday registration begins at 7 a.m. UF Shands Cancer Center is the beneficiary. For details, call Lauren Valentine at (321) 501-9526. ADULT FLAG FOOTBALL Registration for 7 on 7 league Lake City Recreation Department is taking registration for its Adult 7 on 7 Flag Football League. Entry fee is $600. Deadline is Friday. For details, call Hayward Christie at 754-3607. YOUTH SOCCER CYSA extends registration The Columbia Youth Soccer Association has make-up registration for the 2013 winter season from 6-7 p.m. Thursday and 1-2:30 p.m. Saturday at Southside Sports Complex. Fee is $65 per child. For details, call Scott Everett at 288-2504. YOUTH BASEBALL River Rats U11 team tryouts North Florida River Rats U11 travel baseball team has open tryouts at 1 p.m. Saturday at the Southside Recreation Complex. For details, call Josh Wehinger at 623-3628 or Jamie Albritton at 209-0166.Q From staff reports COURTESY PHOTOCole Schreiber pins an opponent from Fort Walton Beach H igh in the second round at the Capital City Classic in Tallahassee. Devers, Schreiber have big finishes in Capital CityFrom staff reportsColumbia High’s wrestling team placed 10th out of 27 teams at the Capital City Classic in Tallahassee last week. The Tigers scored 96.5 points. Tampa Jesuit High was first with 272 points, followed by St. Paul’s (La.) School with 196, Lowndes (Ga.) High with 173.5 and Gainesville High with 144. Columbia’s Daniel Devers won the 170-pound weight class, posting a 4-0 mark during the tournament. Cole Schreiber placed second, going 3-1 at 113 pounds, and Marcus Ziegler placed third, going 5-1 at 285 pounds. Other CHS wrestlers were: Josh Wine, 1-1 at 106 pounds; Kaleb Warner, 3-2 at 126 pounds; Crishtian Little, 1-2 at 132 pounds; Dustin Regar, 1-2 at 138 pounds; Austin Chapman, 0-2 at 152 pounds. In junior varsity action, Kody Waldron (4-0), Cole Horton (3-0) and Little (4-0) won first place. Wine was 2-1, while Steven McCarty, Robert Martin and Chapman were 1-1. The Tigers are wrestling Columbia places 10th in wrestling Invitational. PREP continued on 3B Tunsil honored CHS lineman wins state’s Class 6A top player honorJASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Laremy Tunsil (77) was chosen the 20 12 Florida Dairy Farmer’s Mr. Football for Class 6A. By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High offensive lineman Laremy Tunsil picked up a rare honor for an offensive lineman on Tuesday. The left tackle of the Tigers was chosen by Florida Dairy Farmers as the Class 6A Mr. Football for the 2012 season. He was the only player chosen in the state’s eight classifica-tions that did not play a skill position. Tunsil led the way for an offensive line that helped the Tigers produce more than 5,100 yards of offense and average 37 points per game this season. As an individual, Tunsil allowed no sacks and grad-ed out at 93 percent for the year. He also had 91 pan-cake blocks. “It’s a major accomplishment for him and the pro-gram,” Columbia High head coach Brian Allen said. “He plays at a high level and I’m proud for him and the com-munity.” Allen said what made the award even more impres-sive for Tunsil is he was able to do it without scoring a touchdown. “For a kid of his ability that doesn’t pass, catch, run, intercept or make tackles, it says a lot that he was able to standout in the trenches,” Allen said. “It was a heck of an accom-plishment for him. It’s not just for him as an individual, but he helped the offense have a spectacular year.” Doug Peeler is the offensive line coach for the Tigers and was not sur-prised to hear that Tunsil won the award. “He’s a great kid that deserves everything that he’s got,” Peeler said. “Good things happen to good people.” Peeler also said that Tunsil was one of the most impor-tant pieces to the Tigers’ offensive puzzle this year. “He was important to us as a program,” Peeler said. “From day one we’re taught as offensive linemen that we won’t get the same type of exposure as a quar-terback will, but he’s the No. 1 tackle in the country for a reason. He helped us rush for over 3,500 yards by opening those holes.” Alabama leads nation in All-AmericansBy RALPH D. RUSSOAssociated PressNEW YORK — Alabama is No. 1 when it comes to All-Americans. The second-ranked Crimson Tide placed four players on The Associated Press All-America team released Tuesday. Among them was center Barrett Jones, who became a twotime first-team selection. No other team had more than two players selected to the first team. The Tide also led with six players chosen to all three teams. Notre Dame, Texas A&M, Stanford and Florida were second with three players on the four teams, though linebacker Manti Te’o was the only Fighting Irish player to make the first team. Matt Elam, Caleb Sturgis and Kyle Christy were cho-sen for the Gators. Elam was a first-team selection while Sturgis and Christy were named to the third team. Alabama faces top-ranked Notre Dame in the BCS championship game Jan. 7. Texas A&M Heisman Trophy winner Johnny Manziel was the first-team quarterback. Wisconsin running back Montee Ball and Georgia linebacker Jarvis Jones also became two-time All-Americans. Nine Southeastern Conference players made the first team, more than any other conference. The Pac-12 was second with six players on the first team. No other conference had more than two. The team was voted on by a panel of 16 AP college football poll voters. Barrett Jones, a senior who made the All-America team as a tackle last season, was joined on the first team by Alabama teammates guard Chance Warmack, linebacker C.J. Mosley and cornerback Dee Milliner. Offensive tackle D.J. Fluker was picked to the second team and quarterback AJ McCarron was selected to the third team. Te’o, the Heisman finalists and winner of seven other awards — including the Maxwell, Nagurski and Butkus — is the first Notre Dame defensive player to be an AP All-American since defensive back Shane Walton in 2002. Manziel is the first freshman to make the first team at quarterback. On Saturday, the redshirt freshman know Florida Gators have three players named to team. FOOTBALL continued on 2B



PAGE 1

Therefore the Lord himself will give you a sign: The virgin will conceive and give birth to a son, and will call him Immanuel. Isaiah 7:14 CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Former TV host Bob Barker is 89. Former New York City Mayor Edward Koch s 88. Basketball Hall of Famer Bob Pettit is 80. Singer Connie Francis is 75. AROUND FLORIDA FAMUs standing in jeopardy TALLAHASSEE Florida A&M University is being placed on a year-long probation in the wake of a series of scandals at the school, including the haz ing death of a drum major. FAMU officials were informed Tuesday by the Southern Association of College and Schools that its accreditation is in jeopardy. If FAMUs accreditation is revoked then students wont be eligible for federal financial aid. Interim President Larry Robinson stressed that the probation does not affect the current accreditation of academic programs. SACS took the steps because of several prob lems, including the revela tion that audits were not finished and false sum maries were distributed. Robinson also said that SACS raised questions about student safety in the wake of the death of Robert Champion as well as ques tions about the finances of the Marching 100. Eatery inspection changes in works TALLAHASSEE The restaurant industry is applauding businessfriendly changes in Floridas inspection process. Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association presi dent and CEO Carol Dover said the changes going into effect on Jan. 1 will improve regulatory compliance. The state Department of Business and Professional Regulation included Dovers comment Tuesday in a news release announc ing the revisions that it is making in the states Food Code. The agency said the most business-friendly change will divide safety and sanitation violations into three categories: high priority, immediate and basic. High priority violations are those that would con tribute directly to a food borne illness or injury such as deficiencies in cooking, reheating, cooling and hand-washing. The new system is expected to be easier for restaurant managers as well as customers to under stand. Slot machines seized in raid OCALA Central Florida authorities have seized illegal slot machines from 12 gas stations. Authorities with the Orange County Sheriffs Office and Metropolitan Investigation Bureau took part in a raid Tuesday morning. The gas stations were located in Orange, Osceola and Marion counties. Larry Zweig is the head of the MIB. He told the Orlando Sentinel each machine likely collected $1,000 to $2,000 a week. Several arrests were also made during the raid. Records show arrest war rants were also issued for two store owners. The investigation began about four months ago when a tipster called authorities about illegal gambling going on at the stations. Agency asked about graves TALLAHASSEE Floridas law enforcement agency chief is being asked to explain why university researchers found evidence of more deaths and more graves than previously identified at a now-closed state reform school. An interim report released by the University of South Florida in Tampa says the researchers found at least 50 gravesites at the former Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, about 60 miles west of Tallahassee. Thats 19 more than had been identified by the Florida Department of Law Enforcement in 2010. Thought for Today I have never known a man who died from overwork, but many who died from doubt. Charles Horace Mayo, American surgeon and co-founder of the Mayo Clinic (1865-1939) Spice Girls musical opens LONDON I ts time to find out whether Girl Power is still going strong, with Tuesdays premiere of Viva Forever, a new stage musical based on the songs of the Spice Girls. Four of the Spice Girls arrived together on the red carpet ahead of the premiere, to cheers and chants of spice up your life from scores of die-hard fans. Melanie Chisholm Sporty Spice said she was not afraid of critics verdict on the show. If people criticize it, we dont care because we love it, she said. Chisholm turned up at Londons Piccadilly Theatre with Emma Bunton, Geri Halliwell and Melanie Brown also known as Baby, Ginger and Scary Spice, respectively. Victoria Posh Spice Beckham arrived later with her husband, soc cer star David Beckham, and their children. The musical uses Spice Girls songs including Wannabe, Spice Up Your Life and the title track in a tale of four friends whose bond becomes strained when their band enters a TV talent show. The Spice Girls shot to fame in 1996 and sold 75 million records around the world. Halliwell left the group acrimoniously in 1998 and the group effectively split a decade ago. The five members appeared on stage together for the first time in five years at the London Olympics closing ceremony in August and have reunited to promote Viva Forever. Luke Bryan cleans up at ACAs with 9 awards Luke Bryan didnt want the American Country Awards to end. He cleaned up during the fanvoted show, earning nine awards, including artist and album of the year. His smash hit I Dont Want This Night To End was named single and music video of the year. Miranda Lambert took home the second most guitar trophies with three. Jason Aldean was named touring artist of the year. Carrie Underwood won female art ist of the year, and a tearful Lauren Alaina won new artist of the year. Bryan, Aldean, Keith Urban, Lady Antebellum and Trace Adkins with Lynyrd Skynrd were among the high-energy performances. Rock Hall of Fame inductees announced The Rock and Roll Hall of Fames 2013 class will be remembered for its variety. The eclectic group of rockers Rush and Heart, rap pers Public Enemy, songwriter Randy Newman, Queen of Disco Donna Summer and blues man Albert King will be inducted into the hall of fame next April in Los Angeles. The ceremony will mark the end of a long wait for fans of five of the six acts, whove been eligible for entry for some time. Public Enemy was inducted on its first ballot appearance, swelling the ranks of hip-hop entries to four. Quincy Jones and Lou Adler will receive the Ahmet Ertegun Award given for contributions beyond per formance. The inductees were announced Tuesday at a news conference in Los Angeles. T ues day: Afternoon: 2-8-1 Evening: N/A Tues day: Afternoon: 1-4-8-6 Evening: N/A Mon day: 2-12-24-28-34 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAIL Y BRIEFING WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 12, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter 2AWEATHER Daily Scripture Associated Press ASSOCIATED PRESS Four of the five former Spice Girls (from left) Melanie Brown, Geri Halliwell, Emma Bunton and Melanie Chisholm pose for photographs before the press showing of Viva Forever!, a musical based on the Spice Girls music, in London on Tuesday. Associated Press Newman Bryan ASSOCIATED PRESS Former neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman sits in Seminole County court in Sanford during a hearing Tuesday. A judge denied defense requests to end 24-hour GPS monitor ing of Zimmerman while he is out on bond in the fatal shooting of teenager Trayvon Martin.



PAGE 1

Steve Thomas blistered the front nine with four bird-ies and hung on down the stretch for +11 and a two-shot win over Bob Randal in the Saturday blitz. Eddy Brown checked in at +7 for third place. Thomas swept the skins game with the day’s only three winners. Joe Paul (+8) emerged from a three-man shootout with a one-stroke win in Sunday’s blitz. Mike Gough and Shelton Keen kept the pressure on Paul before settling into a tie for second place at +7. Bob Wheary took fourth at +4. Buddy Slay picked up decent side bets with clos-est to the pin shots on Nos. 15 and 17 and three skins. Paul had a closest to the pin shot on No. 7 and a skin. Steve Patterson added a skin to his closest to the pin shot on No. 5. Gough had two skins. Cory DePratter padded his two-point victory in A flight of the Wednesday blitz with a small pot hole win. Jonathan Allen took second place with +4. Keith Shaw and Joe Paul shared third at +3. Shelton Keen (+9) dodged a late run by Don Howard (+7) for first place in B flight. Tom Wade fin-ished in third with +6. Mike Jacobs, Steve Patterson and Mike Gough joined Paul, Shaw, Howard and DePratter with a skin apiece. One stroke separated the top five finishers in the LGA “Pick Nine” format. Jan Davis picked up three strokes with a late charge to finish in a first-place tie at 35.5 with front runner Nicole Ste-Marie. Cathy Steen and Faye Warren shared second place with 36, a half stoke ahead of Natalie Bryant. In match one of Good Old Boys play, Ed Snow, Don Christensen, Rhea Hart and Paul Davis eas-ily knocked off the team of Rob Brown, Jim Stevens, Dave Cannon and Emerson Darst by a 4-1 count. Match 2 was a bit closer as the team of Shelton Keen, Bob Wheary, Merle Hibbard and Stan Woolbert took a 5-3 win over the team of Jerry West, Eli Witt, Larry Ward and Dennis Hendershot. In the three-team finale, the team of Barney Hart, Don Howard, Nick Whitehurst, Bill Rogers and Dan Stephens took a three-point win over the second place team of Monty Montgomery, Tom Elmore, Jerry Snowberger and Hugh Sherrill. The team of Marc Risk, Bob McGraw, Bobby Simmons and Jim Bell was another two points back. Montgomery stayed in the medalist seat with a round of 37-36-73. Risk (38-38-76) and Snow (37-39-76) were the other top finish-ers. Don Howard checked in with (77), a stroke ahead of Rhea Hart, Barney Hart, Elmore and Stephens. The Titleist demonstration and club fitting is Saturday. Call 752-2266 for a reservation. Coming up are a mixed event at 1 p.m. Sunday and the MGA tournament on Dec. 22. Garrett Odom was crowned Quail Heights Country Club Match Play Champion for 2012. In Sunday’s final match Odom bested Phillip Russell 3 and 2 to capture the rubber match between the two competitors. After over three months of matches between 16 contestants, it was fitting the finals had two evenly matched players. There was only one shot differ-ence in their handicaps, which made for very com-petitive matches. Finishing in third and fourth place, respectively, were Joe Herring and Chet Carter. In Wednesday Blitz action, Gerald Smithy bested the field with a solid +8 performance. Second place went to Jack Tuggle at +7, and Brandon Goss and Barney Hart tied for third at +6. Skin winners were Randy Heavrin, Tony Johnson, Todd Carter (2) and Tony Kent (3). The Friday Dogfight winner was Ronnie Ash at +5. Larry Boone was second at +4. Skin winners were Joe Herring, Randy Heavrin (2) and Tony Johnson (2). Closest to pin winners were Tim Tortorice, No. 3, Heavrin, No. 5, Ash, No. 11, Brian “Cowboy” Shead, No. 15, and Ralph Minster, No. 17. Due to the popularity of the Dogfight format with closest to the pins, the same format will be used start-ing today in the Wednesday Blitz. The pot will continue on Wednesdays until it is won, as there is a large roll-over in play. The Sunday Scramble was won by the team of Brooke Russell, Richard Simmons and Chet Carter at 3 under. To play in the scramble sign-up by 2:30 p.m. in the pro shop. Teams will be picked at 3 p.m. The MGA Championship is Saturday and Sunday. SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today GOLF 9 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour Australasia, Australian PGA Championship, first round, at Coolum Beach, Australia 2 a.m. TGC — Asian Tour, Johor Open, first round, at Johor Bahru, Malaysia (delayed tape) NBA BASKETBALL 8 p.m. ESPN — Dallas at Boston 10:30 p.m. ESPN — San Antonio at UtahFOOTBALLNFL standings AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAy-New England 10 3 0 .769 472 274N.Y. Jets 6 7 0 .462 245 306Buffalo 5 8 0 .385 289 352Miami 5 8 0 .385 240 276 South W L T Pct PF PAx-Houston 11 2 0 .846 365 263 Indianapolis 9 4 0 .692 292 329Tennessee 4 9 0 .308 271 386Jacksonville 2 11 0 .154 216 359 North W L T Pct PF PABaltimore 9 4 0 .692 331 273 Pittsburgh 7 6 0 .538 278 264 Cincinnati 7 6 0 .538 321 280 Cleveland 5 8 0 .385 259 272 West W L T Pct PF PAy-Denver 10 3 0 .769 375 257 San Diego 5 8 0 .385 292 281 Oakland 3 10 0 .231 248 402 Kansas City 2 11 0 .154 195 352 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAN.Y. Giants 8 5 0 .615 373 270Washington 7 6 0 .538 343 329Dallas 7 6 0 .538 300 314 Philadelphia 4 9 0 .308 240 341 South W L T Pct PF PAy-Atlanta 11 2 0 .846 337 259Tampa Bay 6 7 0 .462 354 308New Orleans 5 8 0 .385 348 379Carolina 4 9 0 .308 265 312 North W L T Pct PF PAGreen Bay 9 4 0 .692 323 279 Chicago 8 5 0 .615 308 219 Minnesota 7 6 0 .538 283 286 Detroit 4 9 0 .308 320 342 West W L T Pct PF PASan Francisco 9 3 1 .731 316 184Seattle 8 5 0 .615 300 202St. Louis 6 6 1 .500 236 279 Arizona 4 9 0 .308 186 292 x-clinched playoff spoty-clinched division Monday’s Game New England 42, Houston 14 Thursday’s Game Cincinnati at Philadelphia, 8:20 p.m. Sunday’s Games Green Bay at Chicago, 1 p.m.Tampa Bay at New Orleans, 1 p.m.Minnesota at St. Louis, 1 p.m.Indianapolis at Houston, 1 p.m.N.Y. Giants at Atlanta, 1 p.m.Washington at Cleveland, 1 p.m.Jacksonville at Miami, 1 p.m.Denver at Baltimore, 1 p.m.Carolina at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.Detroit at Arizona, 4:05 p.m.Seattle vs. Buffalo at Toronto, 4:05 p.m.Kansas City at Oakland, 4:25 p.m.Pittsburgh at Dallas, 4:25 p.m.San Francisco at New England, 8:20 p.m. Monday, Dec. 17 N.Y. Jets at Tennessee, 8:30 p.m. FCS playoffs Semifinals Friday Georgia Southern (10-3) at North Dakota State (12-1), 8 p.m. Saturday Sam Houston State (10-3) at Eastern Washington (11-2), 4:05 p.m. Championship Saturday, Jan. 5 At FC Dallas StadiumFrisco, TexasSemifinal winners, 1 p.m. NCAA Div. II playoffs Championship Saturday At Braly Municipal StadiumFlorence, Ala.Valdosta State (11-2) vs. WinstonSalem (14-0), 1 p.m.NCAA Div. III playoffs Amos Alonzo Stagg Bowl Friday At Salem StadiumSalem, Va.Mount Union (14-0) vs. St. Thomas (Minn.) (14-0), 7 p.m.NAIA playoffs Championship Thursday At Barron StadiumRome, Ga.Morningside (Iowa) (13-0) vs. Marian (Ind.) (11-1), 6:30 p.m.College bowl games Saturday New Mexico Bowl At AlbuquerqueNevada (7-5) vs. Arizona (7-5), 1 p.m. (ESPN) Famous Idaho Potato Bowl At Boise, IdahoToledo (9-3) vs. Utah State (10-2), 4:30 p.m. (ESPN)BASKETBALLNBA schedule Today’s Games Brooklyn at Toronto, 7 p.m.Cleveland at Indiana, 7 p.m.Atlanta at Orlando, 7 p.m.L.A. Clippers at Charlotte, 7:30 p.m.Chicago at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.Golden State at Miami, 7:30 p.m.Washington at Houston, 8 p.m.Denver at Minnesota, 8 p.m.New Orleans at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. Sacramento at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.Dallas at Boston, 8 p.m.Memphis at Phoenix, 9 p.m.San Antonio at Utah, 10:30 p.m. Thursday’s Games Charlotte at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.L.A. Lakers at New York, 8 p.m.San Antonio at Portland, 10:30 p.m. AP Top 25 schedule Today’s Game No. 7 Ohio State vs. Savannah State, 7 p.m. Thursday’s Games No. 20 UNLV vs. La Verne at Orleans Arena, Las Vegas, 10 p.m. No. 23 Wichita State at Tennessee, 7 p.m. Saturday’s Games No. 1 Indiana vs. Butler at Bankers Life Fieldhouse, 2 p.m. No. 3 Michigan vs. West Virginia at the Barclays Center, 8 p.m. No. 4 Syracuse vs. Canisius, 7 p.m.No. 5 Florida at No. 8 Arizona, 10 p.m. No. 6 Louisville at Memphis, 2:30 p.m.No. 7 Ohio State vs. UNC Asheville, Noon No. 9 Kansas vs. Belmont, 7 p.m.No. 11 Cincinnati at Marshall, 2 p.m.No. 14 Gonzaga vs. Kansas State at KeyArena, Seattle, 9 p.m. No. 15 Georgetown vs. Western Carolina, Noon No. 16 Creighton at Cal, 11 p.m.No. 17 New Mexico vs. New Mexico State, 6 p.m. No. 18 San Diego State vs. San Diego, 10 p.m. No. 19 Michigan State vs. Tuskegee, 9 p.m. No. 21 North Carolina vs. East Carolina, Noon No. 22 Notre Dame vs. Purdue at Bankers Life Fieldhouse, 4:30 p.m. No. 25 N.C. State vs. Norfolk State, 7 p.m. Sunday’s Games No. 10 Illinois vs. Eastern Kentucky, 6 p.m. No. 24 Oklahoma State vs. Central Arkansas, 4 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2012 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04202BSPORTS AGATE QUAIL HEIGHTS COUNTRY CLUB Chet Carter COUNTRY CLUB at LAKE CITY Ed Goff GOLF REPORTS FOOTBALL: Manziel 1st team QB Continued From Page 1B Odom wins Match Play Saturday sweep for Thomas as Johnny Football became the first freshman to win the Heisman Trophy. Manziel set an SEC record with 4,600 total yards to rank second in the nation. Heisman finalist Collin Klein of Kansas State was the second-team quarter-back. Ball repeated as an AllAmerican, despite a slow start to the season and some early injuries. The senior is seventh in the nation in rushing at 133 yards per game, scored 21 touch-downs, and set the major college football record for career touchdowns. He has 82 going into the Rose Bowl. Arizona’s Ka’Deem Carey, the nation’s leading rusher at 146 yards per game, was the other first-team running back. The receivers were Southern California’s Marqise Lee, who leads the nation in catches (112) and was second in yards receiv-ing (1,680), and Baylor’s Terrance Williams, who leads in yards with 1,764. Stanford’s Zach Ertz was the tight end. Joining Jones and Warmack on the offensive line were two junior tack-les projected to be high first-round NFL draft picks: Texas A&M’s Luke Joeckel and Michigan’s Taylor Lewan. “Team goals are bigger than individual goals, but one of my personal goals was to be an All-American and it’s an unbelievable feeling to reach that goal,” Lewan said Tuesday. North Carolina’s Jonathan Cooper was the other first-team guard. West Virginia’s Tavon Austin was selected as the all-purpose player, a perfect description of the do-it-all speedster. Austin was primarily a receiver and racked up 1,259 yards through the air. Late in the season, coach Dana Holgorsen used Austin as a running back and against Oklahoma he the senior set a school-record with 344 yards rushing. He finished second in the nation in all-purpose yards with 230 per game, and returned a punt and a kickoff for touch-downs. Tulane’s Cairo Santos was the All-American kick-er after making all 21 of his field goal attempts. On the defensive side, Te’o and Mosley were joined at linebacker by the other two-time All-American. Jones followed-up his sen-sational sophomore season with 12.5 sacks and 22.5 tackles for loss. South Carolina defensive end Jadeveon Clowney had 13.5 sacks, tied for the most in the nation, play-ing in only 11 games. He’ll matchup against Lewan in the Outback Bowl on Jan. 1. “He’s very explosive player who plays every play to the whistle and never takes a snap off,” Lewan said. “It’s a great oppor-tunity to see where I’m at and where he’s at and I’m excited about it. But it’s not about me or him, it’s about the University of Michigan playing South Carolina at the Outback Bowl.” Florida State Bjoern Werner was the other end. He also had 13 sacks. At defensive tackle was a pair of Pac-12 players: Utah’s Star Lotulelei and Arizona State’s Will Sutton, who was the conference defensive player of the year. In the secondary, Jordan Poyer of Oregon State, who had seven interceptions, was the cornerback oppo-site Milliner. Fresno State safety Phillip Thomas was voted to the first team after lead-ing the nation with eight interceptions, including three returned for touch-down. Florida’s Matt Elam was the other safety.



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The meetings agenda contained 19 slots for repre sentatives from local elect ed and appointed offices to address the delegation, but many agency represen tatives did not attend the meeting. Only three private citizens, including Higgins, addressed the delegation. The most concerns to the board were made by Dale Williams, county manager, who brought a list containing eight topics ranging from local housing program funding to contin ued support for the North Florida Intermodal Park. Following the meeting, Dean noted that he and Porter were headed to another delegation meet ing in Baker County. Were pretty much find ing the same issues again that people are concerned about expenditures in government, how we are going to meet our budget and how are we going to continue the services with the cutbacks in funding that we have, he said. All of these are issues that were prepared to meet in Tallahassee when we go to committee. Porter described the meeting as being very good and informative with repre sentatives from several lev els of local government and agencies in attendance. They voiced their con cerns and pleasure at some things, she said, noting most concerns dealt with unfunded mandates from the legislature and suffi cient education funds. Its pretty much the standard concerns that we hear about every year. There were no big surprises. resisting an officer without violence in connection with the cases. Jeffrey J. Lewis, 19, 211 SW Knox St., was charged with damage to property, burglary, larceny and deal ing in stolen property. James D. Lewis, 16, no address provided, was charged with assault on a police officer, felony cor ruption by threat to police officer and resisting an offi cer without violence. According to Lake City Police Department reports, on Dec. 4, some one burglarized Morse Chiropractic offices and the sub-rented units at the establishments. Sometime between 9:30 p.m. Monday Dec. 3 and 7:45 a.m. Dec. 4, Morse Chiropractic, 444 SW Alachua Ave., was burglar ized. When the officer man ager arrived at work on Dec. 4, it was discovered that the establishments interior had been van dalized, as well as three other locked office units sub-leased to other private business owners. Sgt. Larry Shallar and Officer Nikki Gunter responded to the office to investigate and found that numerous pieces of com puter equipment, valued at more than $5,000, had been stolen during the burglary. The office had also been vandalized by the suspects who allegedly discharged fire extinguishers around the office, kicked in several locked doors and smashed several computer moni tors. Around 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 6, officers were called to a distur bance at the Lake City Mall by employees of The Shoe Dept. While working their evening shift, two women clerks were allegedly sexu ally harassed by two men, later identified as Jeffrey J. Lewis and Sean L. Lewis. The women employees informed the store man ager about the sexually suggestive remarks and of being fearful with the two men in the store. The store manager reportedly approached the Lewis brothers and asked them about their remarks and then asked them to leave the store. The manag er told officers, upon ask ing the two to leave, Jeffrey Lewis began cussing at him and threatened to Kick his butt... and punch him right in the face. The store man ager then called authori ties. Officer Garrett Register and Sergeant Marshall Sova responded to the mall and spoke with the employ ees and got a description of the two suspects. While patrolling the area, a Florida Highway Patrol Trooper identified only as Smith was scan ning the local police chan nels in his marked patrol unit and began to search the area for the two men. Trooper Smith reportedly found the pair at the car wash just west of the mall parking lot. As he approached the two suspects, Lewis looked at him, turned, threw down a backpack he was carry ing and fled the scene on foot, according to reports. Jeffrey Lewis made no attempt to flee and was detained by Smith and Sova. Register pursued Sean Lewis, yelling Stop, police, but Sean Lewis refused to stop and Register deployed his Taser, striking Lewis in the back and ending the chase, reports said. Charges were filled with the State Attorneys Office on Jeffrey Lewis and he was released at the scene. Sean Lewis was arrested and charged with assault and resisting without vio lence and booked into the Columbia County Detention Facility on $2,000 bond. Authorities inventoried the backpack and several laptop, an iPad and other miscellaneous property was seized and logged into evidence. On Friday, Dec. 7, Officer Nikki Gunter was meeting with the Property and Evidence Technician on other unrelated matters and saw the items he was processing were similar to the items stolen during the Morse Chiropractic bur glary three days earlier. The serial numbers pro vided by the victims were compared to the seized property and they matched the stolen items. Tammy Cox, the investi gator assigned to the case, received the new informa tion from Gunter and began gathering more details on the case. Based on her investiga tion, it was determined both Jeffrey Lewis and his brother Sean Lewis, unlawfully entered Morse Chiropractic, vandalized the interior, damaged parts of the building and stole several computers, a Garmin running watch and an iPad. One of the desk top computers was given to authorities by the mens sister, who said it was given to her as a birthday present by her brothers. As a result of this, both Sean Lewis and Jeffrey Lewis were arrested and face burglary to a dwell ing, criminal mischief, dealing in stolen property and larceny charges, with a $30,000 bond. While being transported to the jail by Sgt. Sova, their younger brother, James D. Lewis, 16, became out raged about the arrest of his brothers and turned and ran after Sovas patrol car. While Sovas vehicle was stopped at the intersection of Main Boulevard and Duval Street, James Lewis came running up to the car and began yelling and cuss ing at Sova. Sova exited the car and ordered James Lewis out of the middle of the street because he was obstruct ing traffic. Reports said James Lewis refused to fol low Sovas instructions and removed his shirt and took a fighting stance, challeng ing Sova. Prior to back-up offi cers arriving, James Lewis told Sova, you have one coming and that I will kill you so watch your back, reports said. James Lewis reportedly then turned and fled from the area on foot. An officer responding to the scene found James Lewis hiding behind Biellings Tire, two blocks away, and he was arrested for assault on an officer, threatening a law enforcement officer and resisting without violence. I applaud all the officers and investigators involved in this case, said LCPD chief Argatha Gilmore in a prepared statement. The assistance given in locat ing the two suspects by Trooper Smith provided the officers investigating a call for service at the mall the ability to catch two sus pects, recover stolen prop erty and solve a previous crime. The attentiveness of Officer Gunter in linking the property to a previous burglary, showcased our departments goal of going beyond the call. Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 12, 2012 3A 3A NOTICE Attention Humana Wal-mart and CVS Caremark Medicare Part D patients: We accept these plans and all other Part D plans. Baya East 755-6677 Baya West 755-2233 Medical 755-2277 Call one of our pharmacies to see which plan is best for you. H OLIDAY C RAFT B AZAAR HOLIDAY CRAFT BAZAAR Lake City Mall Friday Saturday December 14th & 15th 10:00 am 5:00 pm Sunday December 16th 11:00 am 5:00 pm STILL ACCEPTING VENDOR APPLICATIONS www.lakecitybazaar.com SCHOOLS Continued From 1A BROTHERS: Three face a range of felony charges, police records show Continued From Page 1A DELEGATION: Lawmakers visit Lake City, field questions from constituents Continued From Page 1A JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Sharon Higgins addressing lawmakers at FGC Tuesday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City Reporter Columbia County School Board Chairman Steve Nelson ges tures as he speaks at the legislative delegation meeting on Tuesday. Columbia High School. Thomas was an admin istrative trainee at Westside and Summers elementary schools. At the end of the meeting, Chairman Nelson said he wel comed the new admin istrators, but reminded them that the hon eymoon period was short. We expect you to do a good job, we expect you to get there to get there and tell your teachers you expect them to do a good job, and expect your teach ers (to) tell your stu dents that same thing, he said. The regularly sched uled meeting of Dec. 25 had been canceled at a previous meeting. The next scheduled meet ing will be Jan. 8. Obama, Boehner trade cliff proposals By BEN FELLER and DAVID ESPO Associated Press WASHINGTON In a test of divided gov ernment, President Barack Obama and House Speaker John Boehner sought an elusive com promise Tuesday to prevent economy-damag ing tax increases on the middle class at years end, conferring by phone after a secretive exchange of proposals. Details were sparse and evidence of sig nificant progress scarcer still, although officials said the president had offered to reduce his initial demand for $1.6 trillion in higher tax rev enue over a decade to $1.4 trillion. There was no indication he was relenting on his insistence strongly opposed by most Republicans that tax rates rise at upper incomes. Boehner sounded unimpressed in remarks on the House floor at midday. The longer the White House slow-walks this process, the closer our economy gets to the fis cal cliff, he said, declaring that Obama had yet to identify specific cuts to government benefit programs that as part of an agreement that also would raise federal tax revenue. The Ohio Republican made his comments well before he and the president talked by phone about attempts to avert a fiscal cliff, acrossthe-board tax increases and cuts in defense and domestic programs that economists say could send the economy into recession. In rebuttal, the White House swiftly detailed numerous proposals Obama has made to cut spending, including recommendations to cull $340 billion from Medicare over a decade and an additional $250 billion from other govern ment benefit programs. The House Democratic leader, Rep. Nancy Pelosi of California, challenged Boehner to allow a vote on the presidents proposal to extend most expiring tax cuts while letting them lapse at higher incomes. She predicted it would gain overwhelming approval, even in the GOP-controlled House. Two weeks before the year-end holidays, time to find agreement was short, but not pro hibitively so. I think its going to be extremely difficult to get it done before Christmas but it could be done, said Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid. Boehners office took the step unusu al in secretive talks of announcing that Republicans sent the White House a counter offer that would achieve tax and entitlement reform to solve our looming debt crisis and create more American jobs. Obama dispatched a top aide, Rob Nabors, to the Capitol for talks afterwards. Both sides say they want a deal to prevent damage to the economy, but that stated commit ment has been accompanied by a fierce battle to gain the political high ground in negotiations and the occasional comment that one side or the other would be willing to let the deadline pass without a deal unless it got acceptable terms. Republicans acknowledge that Obama has an advantage in one respect, citing his re-elec tion last month after a race in which he made higher taxes on the wealthy a centerpiece of his campaign. At the same time, Republicans hold power ful leverage of their own, the certainty that by spring the president will be forced to ask Congress to raise the governments borrowing authority. It was just such a threat that previous ly allowed them to extract $1 trillion in spend ing cuts from the White House and Democratic lawmakers, a situation that Obama has vowed he wont let happen again.



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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2012 3B3BSPORTS WEDNESDAY EVENING DECEMBER 12, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) The Middle (N) The Neighbors (N) Modern Family (N) Barbara Walters 10 Most Fascinating PeopleNews at 11(:35) Nightline (N) 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) The Insider 5-PBS 5 -Journal Nightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Nature “Revealing the Leopard” NOVA “Secrets of Stonehenge” Secrets of the Dead (DVS) BBC World NewsTavis Smiley (N) 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge Judy Two and Half MenSurvivor: Philippines (N) Criminal Minds “Perennials” (N) CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (N) Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneArrow “Year’s End” (N) The Victoria’s Secret Fashion ShowTMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ce The Of ce “Diwali” 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family Guy Family Guy The SimpsonsThe X Factor “Top Finalists Perform” The nalists perform. (N) (Live) NewsAction News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) Whitney (N) Guys With KidsTake It All (N) Chicago Fire “It Ain’t Easy” (N) NewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(5:00) Public Affairs Capitol Hill Hearings WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosRules/EngagementRules/EngagementRules/EngagementRules/EngagementWGN News at Nine (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H The Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondHot in ClevelandHappily DivorcedKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Stolen VoicesStolen VoicesStolen VoicesStolen VoicesUndercover Boss “Yankee Candle” Undercover Boss Undercover Boss “MasTec” Undercover Boss “Yankee Candle” A&E 19 118 265Storage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage-TexasStorage-TexasShipping Wars (N) Shipping Wars (N) Shipping WarsShipping Wars HALL 20 185 312“The Wishing Tree” (2012, Drama) Jason Gedrick, Richard Harmon. “The Christmas Heart” (2012, Drama) Teri Polo, Paul Essiembre. “The Christmas Card” (2006, Romance) Ed Asner, John Newton. FX 22 136 248Two and Half MenTwo and Half MenTwo and Half MenTwo and Half Men “Taken” (2008, Action) Liam Neeson, Maggie Grace, Famke Janssen. American Horror Story: Asylum (N) American Horror Story: Asylum CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245Castle Death of a teenage boy. Castle City councilman dies. Castle “Den of Thieves” Castle A chef is found frozen to death. Castle “Overkill” CSI: NY Painful memories haunt Stella. NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobDrake & JoshDrake & JoshFull House Full House Full House Full House The Nanny The Nanny Friends (:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241(4:13) “On Deadly Ground” (1994) “The Keeper” (2009) Steven Seagal, Luce Rains. A former cop must save a kidnapped girl. (:18) “Fire Down Below” (1997, Action) Steven Seagal, Marg Helgenberger, Harry Dean Stanton. MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*H M*A*S*H NUMB3RS “Chinese Box” NUMB3RS “Breaking Point” Seinfeld Frasier The Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Austin & Jessie & Ally All StarShake It Up!A.N.T. FarmJessieGood Luck CharlieDog With a BlogShake It Up!Good Luck CharliePhineas and FerbAustin & Ally Shake It Up! LIFE 32 108 252“Christmas on Chestnut Street” (2006) Kristen Dalton, Robert Moloney. “The Perfect Holiday” (2007) Gabrielle Union, Morris Chestnut. “Nothing Like the Holidays” (2008) John Leguizamo, Elizabeth Pea. USA 33 105 242NCIS “Cloak” NCIS “Dagger” NCIS Death of a petty of cer. NCIS “Caged” Women’s prison riot. NCIS “Broken Bird” NCIS Investigating a sergeant’s murder. BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Top 10 Countdown” Wild Out Wednesday. (N) “Gridiron Gang” (2006) The Rock, Xzibit. Premiere. A counselor turns juvenile criminals into football players. Don’t Sleep! Hosted by T.J. Holmes (N) ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) 2012 Pre-BowlNBA Countdownd NBA Basketball Dallas Mavericks at Boston Celtics. From TD Garden in Boston. (N)d NBA Basketball San Antonio Spurs at Utah Jazz. (N) ESPN2 36 144 209SportsNation (N) NFL Live (N) 30 for 30 NFL Live SportsCenter SportsCenter (N) (Live) SUNSP 37 -Inside Israeli Bask.Inside the HeatUFC Unleashed Boxing Golden Boy Live: Luis Ramos vs. Ricardo Williams. The Game 365Football PrevInside the Heat3 Wide Life DISCV 38 182 278Moonshiners “Storm’s a Brewing” Moonshiners “A Shiner’s Last Stand” American Guns Amish Ma a “Fire From the Lord” (N) Moonshiners “Prophecy Ful lled” (N) Amish Ma a TBS 39 139 247King of QueensKing of QueensSeinfeld Seinfeld Family Guy Family Guy Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryConan Michael C. Hall; Charlyne Yi. (N) HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) Dr. Drew on Call (N) Nancy GraceShowbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236Leann RimesE! News (N) “Sweet Home Alabama” (2002) Reese Witherspoon, Josh Lucas. The Soup (N) Love You, Mean ItChelsea Lately (N) Chelsea Lately TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. Food Man v. Food Baggage BattlesBaggage BattlesToy Hunter: Hunt for Mis t Toys (N) Toy Hunter Toy Hunter Man v. Food Man v. Food HGTV 47 112 229Holmes Inspection “Bigger Not Better” House Hunters Renovation Property Brothers Buying and Selling (N) House HuntersHunters Int’lProperty Brothers TLC 48 183 280Toddlers & Tiaras Toddlers & Tiaras Most Memorable MomentsToddlers & Tiaras (N) Jersey on Ice (N) Toddlers & Tiaras HIST 49 120 269RestorationRestorationRestorationRestorationRestorationRestorationRestorationRestorationInvention USA (N)(:31) Invention USACajun Pawn StarsCajun Pawn Stars ANPL 50 184 282Monsters Inside Me A sick toddler. Finding Bigfoot: Further EvidenceFinding Bigfoot River Monsters: Unhooked Gator Boys “Gators Gone Wild” Finding Bigfoot FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveRestaurant: Impossible “County Fare” Restaurant: Impossible “The Trails” Restaurant: ImpossibleRestaurant Stakeout (N) Restaurant: Impossible TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the Lord Billy Graham CrusadeBehind the ScenesTurning PointJoseph PrinceEnd of the AgePraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -ACC All-AccessMagic Live! (Live)d NBA Basketball Atlanta Hawks at Orlando Magic. From Amway Center in Orlando, Fla. Magic Live! (Live) Inside the MagicFootball PrevWorld Poker Tour: Season 10 SYFY 58 122 244(5:30) “Quantum of Solace” (2008) Daniel Craig, Olga Kurylenko. Ghost Hunters Ghost Hunters “A Soldier’s Story” Deal-Dark SideDeal-Dark SideDeal-Dark SideGhost Hunters AMC 60 130 254(5:30) CSI: MiamiCSI: Miami “Stand Your Ground” 12.12.12: The Concert for Sandy Relief Musicians perform. COM 62 107 249(5:58) South Park(:29) Tosh.0 The Colbert ReportDaily ShowChappelle’s ShowChappelle’s ShowSouth Park South Park South Park South Park Daily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327Reba Reba Reba Reba Reba Reba “Fireproof” (2008) Kirk Cameron. A divorcing couple turn to God to save their marriage. Fireproof (2008) NGWILD 108 190 283Dog WhispererHunt for the Shadow CatStalking the Mountain LionBorn Predator (N) Built for the Kill “Lions” Stalking the Mountain Lion NGC 109 186 276Hell on the HighwayBorder Wars “Traf c” Border Wars “Special Ops” Border Wars “Rio Grande Rookies” (N) Hell on the Highway “The Dead Zone” Border Wars “Rio Grande Rookies” SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeUnearthing Ancient Secrets Unearthing Ancient Secrets Dark Matters: Twisted but True (N) Dark Matters: Twisted but True Unearthing Ancient Secrets ID 111 192 285Someone WatchingSomeone WatchingSomeone WatchingSomeone WatchingDateline on ID Final Cut “Cost of Fame” (N) Someone WatchingSomeone WatchingDateline on ID HBO 302 300 501(5:15) “Red Tails” (2012) Cuba Gooding Jr. ‘PG-13’ 12.12.12: The Concert for Sandy Relief Musicians perform. (N) (Live) MAX 320 310 515Hunted Sam and Stephen grow closer. Hunted “Khyber” Hunted Sam is exposed as a spy. “X-Men: First Class” (2011, Action) James McAvoy. ‘PG-13’ (:15) Zane’s Sex Chronicles SHOW 340 318 545(5:00) “Valkyrie” (2008) ‘PG-13’ Untold History of the United StatesHomeland Inside the NFL (N) Jim Rome on Showtime (N) Inside the NFL PREP: Lady Tigers, Indians fall Continued From Page 1Bin the Bradford Duals at 10 a.m. Saturday in Starke.Lady Tigers basketballColumbia’s girls basketball team lost to Newberry High, 57-38, at home on Monday. The Lady Tigers trailed by two at halftime, 27-25, but went cold in the second half. Marnae Gaskins scored 13 for the Lady Tigers and Justice Campbell scored 12. Stephanie Silva scored five points, with four from Arnereanna Bryant, three from Adrienna Young and one from Lona Wilson. Columbia (3-6, 0-2) hosts Wolfson High at 7:45 p.m. Thursday in a District 4-6A game.Lady Indians basketballFort White High’s girls basketball team lost 51-44 at Keystone Heights High on Monday in a District 5-4A game. The Lady Indians led 2018 at the half. Tasha Robinson scored 25 points for Fort White. Cenise Armstrong scored 10 points. Kasha Cook added seven points and TaBresha Cannon scored two. Fort White (4-5, 0-4) plays at Interlachen High at 6 p.m. Friday.Lady Indians soccerFort White’s girls soccer team lost 1-0 at Santa Fe High on Monday in a District 5-2A match. The Lady Indians (4-8-1) play at Bradford High at 6 p.m. this Monday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Stephanie Silva (20) attempts to move ar ound Fort White’s Daisha Rossin (32) during a game on Nov. 15. ASSOCIATED PRESSIn this Oct. 21 file photo, New Orleans Saints linebacker J onathan Vilma (51) leaving the field after this team defeated the Tampa Bay Buc caneers 35-28 in Tampa. Former NFL Commissioner Paul Tagliabue has overturned the suspensions of four current and former New Orleans Saints players in the le ague’s bounty investigation of the club. Vilma initially had been suspended the whole sea son, while Saints defensive end Will Smith, Cleveland linebacker Scott Fujita and free age nt defensive lineman Anthony Hargrove received shorter suspensions.Tagliabue overturns Goodell on Saints suspensionsBy BRETT MARTELAssociated PressNEW ORLEANS — In a sharp rebuke to his suc-cessor’s handling of the NFL’s bounty investiga-tion, former Commissioner Paul Tagliabue overturned the suspensions of four current and former New Orleans Saints players in a case that has preoccu-pied the league for almost a year. Tagliabue, who was appointed by Commissioner Roger Goodell to handle the appeals, still found that three of the players engaged in conduct detri-mental to the league. He said they participated in a performance pool that rewarded key plays — including bone-jarring hits — that could merit fines. But he stressed that the team’s coaches were very much involved. The entire case, he said, “has been contaminated by the coaches and others in the Saints’ organization.” The team’s “coaches and managers led a deliberate, unprecedented and effec-tive effort to obstruct the NFL’s investigation,” the ruling said. Tagliabue oversaw a second round of player appeals to the league in connec-tion with the cash-for-hits program run by former defensive coordinator Gregg Williams from 2009-2011. The players initially opposed his appointment. Saints linebacker Jonathan Vilma had been given a full-season sus-pension, while defensive end Will Smith, Cleveland linebacker Scott Fujita and free agent defensive line-man Anthony Hargrove each received shorter sus-pensions. Tagliabue cleared Fujita of conduct detrimental to the league. “I affirm Commissioner Goodell’s factual findings as to the four players. I conclude that Hargrove, Smith and Vilma — but not Fujita — engaged in ‘conduct detrimental to the integrity of, and public confidence in, the game of professional football,”’ the ruling said. “However, for the reasons set forth in this decision, I now vacate all discipline to be imposed upon these play-ers. Although I vacate all suspensions, I fully consid-ered but ultimately rejected reducing the suspensions to fines of varying degrees for Hargrove, Smith and Vilma. My affirmation of Commissioner Goodell’s findings could certainly jus-tify the issuance of fines. However ... this entire case has been contaminated by the coaches and others in the Saints organization,” it said. Saints quarterback Drew Brees offered his thoughts on Twitter: “Congratulations to our players for having the suspensions vacated. Unfortunately, there are some things that can never be taken back.”



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H ave you considered capital pun-ishment lately? Most of us don’t spend much time thinking about state-sanctioned executions, even though their employ-ment in the United States is thoroughly out of step with all advanced Western countries, keeping us in company with repressive nations like China, Saudi Arabia and Iran. Even here in my home state of Texas, which is closing in on the execu-tion, since 1982, of its 500th criminal — well, I’m sure that nearly all of them were guilty — an ordinary lethal injection is never front-page news. It takes an unusual case, like Robert Post’s, to catch our attention. As reported by the Associated Press, Post is an Ohio death row inmate whose lawyers claim that, at 450 pounds, he is too fat to be executed in a humane way. They argue that Post is so heavy he might even collapse the death chamber gurney. The problem is finding, amid the fat, a suitable vein for injecting the deadly chemicals. In 2007, Ohio executioners took two hours to find a vein of a condemned 265-pound killer. Post’s lawyers contend that he has no veins acces-sible for injection and that they will resist any effort to “cut down” into his body to find one. A story like this provides a field day for online commentators, who wonder why Post’s execu-tioners can’t just shoot a bullet into his brain, at a cost of less than a dollar. Why not hang him? That would probably take his head off. Hit him in the head with a hammer. One hilarious wit suggests a cyanide-laced chocolate cake. This episode — and these ignorant, mean-spir-ited comments — exem-plify what a grisly and unseemly business killing human beings is, whether or not they deserve it. All the old arguments against capital punishment still stand up: It works fine for revenge, but it really doesn’t serve as much of a deterrent. We’ve never managed to administer it impartially. And we’ve never figured out how to avoid mistakes when put-ting people to death. But the real problem with capital punishment is that it looks backward rather than forward. The ascending arc of civiliza-tion moves slowly and erratically and its prog-ress is fragile. We’ve stopped executing people for trivial offenses, and we’ve done away with decapitation, drawing and quartering, burning at the stake, the electric chair and, for the most part, hanging. At the same time, we’ve made executions more palatable by moving them out of the public view — the last public hang-ing was in 1936 — and by using less dramatic methods of execution like lethal injection. But we’ve never understood that capital punish-ment isn’t about what the criminal deserves as much as it’s about what kind of society we want. Everyone’s freedom became more secure when we did away with slavery, and our culture’s integrity advanced when men gave in to women’s demands for the right to vote. Abolishing capital punishment — a fallible, ineffective practice that brings out the worst in us — would be one more step in the right direction. OPINION Wednesday, December 12, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A4AOPINION Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com J ust two days remain in the Lake City Reporter ’s annual Community Food Drive. The Reporter staff, independent contractors — and, especially, readers — have been working to collect non-perishable food items that will be donated to the Florida Gateway Food Bank and Catholic Charities. We’ll be col-lecting through Friday. As much as we appreciate everyone who’s pitched in to date, we could use more help. Folks, please bring canned and dry goods to the Reporter office where a collection basket is located. Any canned or boxed non-perishable item is needed. (Please, no glass containers.) Besides the food items dropped off at the Lake City Reporter office downtown, at 180 E. Duval St., the Reporter ’s independent newspaper carriers will be picking up food on Thursday night, Dec. 13, as they deliver the Friday newspaper. Home delivery customers of the newspaper are asked to leave a bag of non-perish-able food items at their delivery tube or at the end of their driveway on the night of Thursday, Dec. 13, and their newspaper carrier will pick up the food and deliver it to the Reporter office for the food drive. Once all food is collected, Reporter staff will “fill the truck” and deliver the donated food items to the Food Bank. We know well how generous this community is. We realize how much you give throughout the year and how much you’ve likely already given this holiday season. Still, whatever help you can give would be greatly appreciated – not only by us, but by the many hundreds we’re out to help. 2 days and counting OUR OPINION Capital punishment should be ended — for civilization’s good On this date:In 1787, Pennsylvania became the second state to ratify the U.S. Constitution. In 1870, Joseph H. Rainey of South Carolina became the first black lawmaker sworn in to the U.S. House of Representatives. In 1897, “The Katzenjammer Kids,” the pioneering comic strip created by Rudolph Dirks, made its debut in the New York Journal. In 1906, President Theodore Roosevelt nominated Oscar Straus to be Secretary of Commerce and Labor; Straus became the first Jewish Cabinet member. HIGHLIGHTS IN HISTORY I n his new book, “Black & Blue: The Origins and Consequences of Medical Racism,” John Hoberman shows how racial bias among doctors negatively affects diagnosis and treatment for black patients. The book comes at a perfect time, during the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, President Barack Obama’s biggest domestic accom-plishment. In an email message, Hoberman, professor of Germanic studies at the University of Texas at Austin, wrote that the legislation “serves the medical needs of count-less African-Americans by making medical care avail-able to millions of people who have not been able to afford it. It is well known that poverty and lack of access to care do more to cause illness and prema-ture death than any other factors.” While access to care for African-Americans is important, quality of care is crucial. But all too often and in too many medical offices and facilities, the quality of care patients receive depends on their skin color. This moral shortcoming should be discussed at the highest levels of medicine, but rarely is, Hoberman writes. It definitely is not part of medical schools’ curricula. Many studies have documented racial discrimi-nation in U.S. medicine. As far back as 1979, for example, a team of medi-cal authors wrote in the Journal of the American Medical Association, “It is an open secret that physicians dislike cer-tain patients.” The open secret was that African-Americans sat at the top of the list of disliked patients. Hoberman’s book goes where previous studies have not. It is an unapolo-getic and systematic analysis of how American doctors perceive racial differences and how their opinions determine diag-noses and treatment of black patients. Like others who have written about medical rac-ism, Hoberman traces the history of medical abuses of black people. But unlike others, he explores the racially driven thinking and behaviors of today’s physicians, revealing their private world, where racial biases and misinforma-tion distort diagnoses and treatments. Although many believe that doctors are paragons of reason and are mem-bers of a unique moral community, Hoberman writes that doctors have the same racial stereotypes and hold the same beliefs about racial differences as the general population. Racial folklore is part of all “medical sub-disci-plines,” from cardiology to gynecology to psychia-try, Hoberman argues. And doctors have placed racial identities on “every organ system of the human body, along with racial interpretations of black children, the black elderly, the black athlete, black musicality, black pain thresholds and other aspects of black minds and bodies.” He writes that blacks are fully aware of their diminished value and mis-treatment, learning long ago to distrust the white medical establishment. And they know something else: The medical profes-sion refuses to examine itself seriously. The relationship between blacks and the mostly white medical pro-fession is dysfunctional, and that dysfunction has caused great medical harm to blacks, Hoberman writes. Studies regularly show that blacks in gen-eral are not as healthy as whites, but these same studies fail to reveal underlying causes of the dis-parities. We read about the large numbers of blacks who lack insurance, and we know that few primary care doctors practice in black communities. We rarely read, however, about the negative impact of the bias, prejudice and stereotyping by health care providers that may directly contribute to the poor health of blacks. Many blacks hesitate to enter offices where they know their skin color alone will mark them as being unworthy of the best care. African-American patients are not the only victims of racism, Hoberman writes. Many black doctors face the same discrimination and slights that blacks seeking treatment face. The cure for medical racism, Hoberman argues, will come only when medi-cal schools abandon their “race-aversive curricula” and start including “real race-relations training.” He also argues that black leaders outside what he refers to as the “vulner-able black medical com-munity” should demand changes in medical schools. The ugly truth, he wrote in an email message, is that “most white people are not interested in black people’s problems.”Medical racism’s terrible cost Bill Maxwellmaxwell@sptimes.com Q Bill Maxwell is a columnist and editorial writer for the St. Petersburg Times. Q John M. Crisp teaches in the English Department at Del Mar College in Corpus Christi, Texas. John Crispjcrisp@delmar.edu



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DEAR ABBY: I have been married for 14 years to a man who had two failed marriages. I never felt insecure in my married life until I read his answers to a Yahoo Answers poll that asked, “Do you dream about the one that got away?” and, “Have you found the love of your life?” My husband responded that he thinks about her very often, espe-cially on her birthday and Valentine’s Day. To the other question he replied he had found the love of his life, but the relation-ship had ended in divorce, which he admitted was his fault. I know he was talking about his first wife. I feel so sad and insecure. Now I must deal with the fact that on Valentine’s Day his thoughts are with someone else. How can I get over this? I no longer believe him when he says he loves me because I have proof that he hasn’t moved on yet. I can’t believe he said that even now he still thinks about her. Please help. -SAD HEART IN SAN JOSE DEAR SAD HEART: Your husband posted those thoughts on a public forum? Rather than feel hurt and insecure, you should be furious. How would he feel if the person answering that poll had been you? (Of course, you would have had better judgment.) By now it should be clear to you that you did not marry a rocket scientist. You have my sympathy because his first marriage has been over for nearly two decades and he -along with his obvi-ous shortcomings -are no longer her problem, but yours. However, your pain may lessen if you look at the bright side: He treats you well 363 days a year, and many of the women who write to me are not so lucky. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: I have been involved with a man in a long-distance relation-ship for two years. I care about him very much and I believe he cares for me. Things were going great until he was devastated by a downturn in his busi-ness. He had planned to move here, but was unable to sell his home. We used to see each other every two weeks, but no longer. It has been almost two months. He calls once a week, but nothing else. We have been close and he has shared his life, his worries and personal infor-mation with me. I haven’t pressured him and I don’t need a commitment now, although I would like one someday. Abby, he seems to be drifting away. I have offered to travel the 1,000 miles, but he has evaded my offer. I’m not ready to walk away. We have been great together and this is difficult for me. Advice? -HOLDING ON IN COASTAL CALIFORNIA DEAR HOLDING ON: It’s fine to be supportive, but don’t overwhelm him right now. He may be lick-ing his wounds or he may have met someone, which is why he discouraged your visit. That he still calls you is encouraging. Because you have known him for two years, I recommend you simply ASK him if he’s met some-one else. If the answer is no, it will put your mind at ease. But if the answer is yes, at least you’ll be clear about what happened. DILBERT BABY BLUES HOROSCOPES DEAR ABBY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Get out and do your thing. Traveling, network-ing and meeting new people will all play in your favor. Don’t let work drag you down or cause you to miss out on an entertain-ing time that can improve your life and your future plans. +++++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Offer your assistance and you will build a closer bond to someone who has your best interests at heart. Looking at your present employment situ-ation and considering new possibilities will help you end the year on a high note. +++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Don’t feel trapped by the changes going on around you. Regardless of what others are doing or saying, make a move. You have to trust in your own instincts and let your skills and dreams guide you to a better position or partner-ship. +++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Consider your past, present and your future. Line up the changes you want to make and set your strategy to accomplish your goals. A serious attitude regarding your personal, emotional and physical wellness will lead to good long-term choices. +++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Don’t be fooled by compli-ments. Ulterior motives are apparent and must be considered when making a choice. Put greater empha-sis on the things you like to do and the skills you have to offer, and you will make the right decision. +++++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Don’t let a disap-pointment ruin your day. Put more effort into your goals and finishing what you start. Taking a time-out from an emotional situation will help you gain clarity regarding how you should handle the situa-tion. Be true to you. ++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Follow an adventure-some path that will inspire ideas and plans for the future, which can take you to unfamiliar locations in search of unique and rewarding choices. Don’t let personal demands hold you back. ++++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Don’t guess when you have the facts and figures available. Decisions must be made and certainly won’t please everyone. In the end, it’s you who has to feel comfortable about your past, present and future. An unusual living arrangement will develop. +++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You’ll be fired up and ready to take on anyone who crosses your path. Underhandedness or misrepresentation is appar-ent and should be nipped before it leads you in a direction that you can’t live up to or complete. +++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Recognize what you need to do to keep the peace. Someone needs your attention, approval and assistance in order to contribute more to your needs. Nurture partner-ships and make sugges-tions that will divvy up the responsibilities evenly. Put love first. +++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Stick close to home, and make amends with anyone you have let down or disappointed. Working toward a brighter future will help you raise your self-esteem and set your strategy for a more active and prosperous year ahead. Take control. ++++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Secure your posi-tion and your love life, but don’t overreact or do something unorthodox to ensure you win. Play a fair game or your reputation may be damaged. Do what-ever you can to help those in need without expecting anything in return. ++ CELEBRITY CIPHER Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com BLONDIE BEETLE BAILEY B.C. FRANK & ERNEST FOR BETTER OR WORSE ZITS HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH GARFIELD THE LAST WORD Eugenia Last Wife of 14 years learns man still carries torch for another Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. CLASSIC PEANUTS Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2012 4B



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Dec. 12 United Way luncheon United Way of Suwannee Valley will conduct its December community fundraising campaign report luncheon at noon at the Columbia County Senior Services LifeStyle Enrichment Center, 928 SE Allison Court, Lake City. Bill Caley, executive director of Boys Club of Columbia County, one of the 21 United Way affiliated agen cies, will utilize the theme for this years campaign, Imagine Me, to enable guests to identify with the needs addressed through United Way affiliated agen cies. Dana Huggins, chair of the Homeless Services Network of Suwannee Valley, will utilize the theme to speak about the work of the homeless coalition in Columbia, Hamilton, Lafayette and Suwannee counties. The cost is $12 per person. Water panel meeting The stakeholder adviso ry committee of the North Florida Regional Water Supply Partnership will meet at 1 p.m. at Florida Gateway College, 149 SE College Place, Lake City. The meeting will be in the Wilson S. Rivers Library and Media Center, Building 200, Room 102. The agenda includes discussion and possible committee rec ommendation of the north Florida regional water sup ply boundary area. The meeting is open to the public, and there will be an opportunity for pub lic comment. For more information about the Partnership, visit north floridawater.com. Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Wednesday from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Fort White Public Library on Route 47to answer ques tions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. Newcomers meeting Lake City Newcomers will meet at 11 a.m. at the Eastside Village Clubhouse. Sale of 50-50 tickets will end at 11:25. Lunch is $11. Those who want to partici pate in a gift exchange are asked to bring a wrapped or bagged gift valued at at least $10. There will be games, singing and a special guest. Directions to clubhouse: Turn into Eastside Village from East Baya Avenue onto Pearl Terrace; turn left onto Sable and follow signs to the clubhouse, which is on Claudia. For more informa tion, call Barbara Test at 754-7227 or Rose Taylor at 755-2175. Poinsettia sale The Fort White FFA is selling Red Velvet poin settias for $10 per plant. They will be delivered to the Fort White High School agriscience department on this date. Sale proceeds will be used to help the Fort White FFA members attend leadership semi nars, participate in career development events and build the school land labo ratory. To order, contact Jill Huesman at 288-6102. Dec. 13 Woodturners Club Bell Woodturners Club meets the second Thursday of the month in the Bell community Center at 7 p.m. Every meeting features a show and tell of members current projects. There is also a full demon stration of a woodturning project by a club member. There are opportunities to take home project wood, tools and receive help from other turners. All experi ence levels are welcome. For additional info contact Kent Harris at 365-7086. Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon at the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane, to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. This will be the last clinic until Jan. 13. Tea party meeting North Central Florida Tea Party will meet at 7 p.m. at the Taylor Building, 128 SW Birley Ave. in Lake City. KrisAnne Hall will speak about nullification what it is, how it works, etc. There also will be a report on what the Columbia County Commission is doing and information on upcoming meetings and events. For more informa tion, call Sharon Higgins at (386) 935-0821 or go online at www.northcentral floridateaparty.org. Dec. 14 Crafts bazaar, festival The annual Lake City Holiday Crafts Bazaar and Festival will be today through Sunday at the Lake City Mall, 2469 W U.S. Highway 90. Craft ven dors will be available from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. today and Saturday and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. Organizers also will accept donations of new or gently used toys and nonperishable foods on center court at the mall, in cooperation with Childrens Medical Center, all three days. Activities for chil dren Saturday and Sunday will include train rides, a petting zoo, face painting, sand art, bounce hous es and visits with Santa. Vendors and entertainment acts are being sought. For information, call Genovese Terry at (386) 623-3502 or visit online at www.lakecity bazaar.com. Community theater High Springs Commnity Theater will present the comedy Christmas Belles, tonight through Sunday. Tickets are avail able at The Framery of Lake City (386) 754-2780, Pampered Paws in High Springs (386) 454-4464 or online at highsprings communitytheater.com. Friday and Saturday shows will be at at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m. Doors open a half-hour before show time. Tickets are $11 for adults, $8 for children 12 and younger and $9 for seniors on Sundays. The theater is at 130 N. First Ave. in High Springs. Fish dinner Our Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5056 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, pre pares fish dinners every Friday from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The dinner is $6 for two Alaskan pollock filets, corn, baked beans, hush puppies, cole slaw and tarter sauce. Take out or eat in. Class reunion Columbia High School classes of 1949 through 1953 will have a reunion luncheon at 11:30 a.m. at Mason City Community Center. All former CHS stu dents are welcome. Bring a covered dish to share. For more information, con tact Julia Osburn at 7527544 or Morris Williams at 752-4710. Dec. 15 Charity Extravaganza North Florida Animal Rescue will host a Holiday Charity Extravaganza from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. at 16800 County Road 137 in Wellborn, one mile south of Pinemount Road. Many volunteer and charitable groups from the area that help those in need around the holidays will be parti ipating. Planned attractions include bands, food and a gift exchange for kids 10 and younger. Service groups or charities want ing to participate should contact Kami at (386) 9631295 or email kami@north floridaanimalrescue.org. The public is encouraged to join us in the spirit of holiday generosity. Groups planning to attend include Love Inc., American Red Cross, LifeSouth blood mobile, Pregnancy Crisis Center, various churches, local military family sup port groups, shelters and Cell Phones For Soldiers. Clothing give-away Mount Tabor AME Church, 519 SW L.M. Aaron Drive in Lake City, will have a clothing giveaway beginning at 9 a.m. in the parking lot of Cooper Funeral Home, 251 NE Washington St. Clothing for all ages will be given away. For more informa tion, call (386) 758-8022 or (386) 438-4803. Fish fry The Columbia County Chapter of the Bethune Cookman University Alumni will have a fish fry scholarship fundraiser beginning at 11 a.m. at the old Amtrak station on the corner of Lake Jeffrey Road and Kimberly Drive. Dinners will be $7.50 and include fish, grits, baked beans, bread and dessert. Sandwiches will be $6, and drinks will be 50 cents. For phone orders or more information, call (386) 752-7054. Dec. 16 Christmas concert Elim Baptist Church, 3435 SW Elim Church Road in Fort White, will pres ent a Christmas concert, Emmanuel! Celebrating Heavens Child, at its 11 a.m. service. Food and fellowship will follow. For more information, call (386) 497-1972. Christmas cantata The combined choirs of Tustenugee United Methodist Church will pres ent a Christmas cantata, The Heart of Christmas by Mike Speck, at 6 p.m. at the church. A reception will follow in the Fellowship Hall. The church is on County Road 131, one mile south of County Road 18 in Fort White. Toy donations Fifth Generation Farms store on U.S. 90 West is now a location for the Dream Machine toy col lection. Drop in the store and obtain the name of a needy child who is hoping for Christmas gifts. Dream Machine also has a location in the Lake City Mall. Candlelight service Pastor Alvin J. Baker and the members of New Bethel Missionary Baptist Church invite the Lake City/Columbia County community to join its annu al candlelight service at 5:30 p.m. The church is at 550 NE Martin Luther King St. School fundraiser New Generation Christian School is hold ing a fundraiser to support its building fund. An Apple iPad mini will be raffled and a Tim Tebow University of Florida football jersey, signed by Tebow, will be sold through silent auc tion. The silent auction will be held during the Holiday Crafts Bazaar and Festival at the Lake City Mall on Sunday. Bids may be placed in person, by calling the school at (386) 758-4710 or by email at pgorman@ newgenerationschool. org. Minimum bid is $600. Raffle tickets are $5, and tickets may be purchased at the crafts bazaar, from any New Generation parent or staff member, by calling the school or by emailing jhiggins@newgeneration school.org. The raffle and silent auction winners will be announced at 3:30 p.m. Sunday on Center Court at the mall. For more infor mation, visit the school website at www.new generationschool.org or contact Dr. Paula Gorman at (386) 758-4710. Dec. 19 Night of worship Orchard Community Church will present Glory ... A Night of Worship at Skating Place on Hall of Fame Drive in Lake City. At 6 p.m., there will be a Christmas block party in the parking lot, with Santa Claus, a Christmas train, bounce house and a live praise band. At 7 p.m., the church praise team will present A Night of Worship concert in the skating rink. The praise team is under the direction of Pastor Michael Federico. For information, call (386) 758-3400 or go online at www.theorchardcc.org. Dec. 21 Quilt raffle Columbia County Senior Services will raffle a sam pler quilt to support the center. Tickets are $1 and the drawing will be held Dec. 21. See Carol for tickets. Dec. 22 Filipino society dinner The Filipino American Cultural Society of Lake City will have a Christmas Celebration Dinner and Dance from 6 to 11 p.m. at the Epiphany Catholic Church Social Hall in Lake City. There will be holi day entertainment, music, dancing and a cultural food buffet. Please bring a covered dish to share. Arrival, setup of buffet and social time will be from 6 to 6:30 p.m., dinner will be at 6:30. The event is free for FACS members. For nonmembers, cost is $10 per person. For more information contact about the event, Bob Gavette at 965-5905. Toy drive, concert Resurrection Praise Team will hold a toy drive and Christmas Praise Extravaganza from 4 to 6 p.m. at Niblack Elementary School. Bring unwrapped toys to donate for needy children and enjoy praise dancing, singing and spo ken words. Door prizes and raffles will be held. Praise breakfast New Mount Zion AME Church, of Watertown, will have a Christmas Praise and Prayer Breakfast from 10 a.m. to noon. the meal will include grits, scram bled eggs, sausage, salm on patties, toast, buscuit, juice and coffee. Cost is $7 per person. The Rev. Leroy Young, of Jacksonville, will speak on The Real Meaning of Christmas. For tickets or additional information, call The Rev. Charles young at (904) 713-7877, Curtis Jones at (386) 752-8179 or Evette Harris at (386) 752-4306. Tickets will be available at the door. Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 12, 2012 5A 5A Call today to RSVP! 386.269.4973 www.HearingSolutionInc.com THE E AR E XPER T S Lake City Live Oak Dowling Park 10820 Marvin Jones Blvd Our Services $ 500 off hearing system. Expires 1/3 1 /1 3 www.boatangel.com 800 1 CAR L ANGE Harlow Broughton Land Harlow Broughton Land, 35, of Lake City, FL passed away on Sunday, December 2, 2012. A na tive of Mayo, FL., he gradu ated from Dar lington School in Rome, GA and the Uni versity of Mis sissippi. He was employed by the Suwannee River Water Management District in Live Oak; FL. Broughton loved life and his family. He was a coach for the Lake City Pop Warner football team and also active for ten (10) years with the Hannahs Buddies Charity. Broughton is survived by his beloved life companion & partner: Annie Winnett; parents: Judge Harlow Hank & Nelle Land of Mayo, FL; one son: Garrison Brough ton Land and daughter, Keating Blair Land of Lake City, FL; one sister: Laura Keating Land DaConceicao of St. Augustine, FL. and countless friends all over Florida and the country. He was the grandson of the late Mr. and Mrs. Harlow Land of Mayo, Fl. and the late Senator W. Brough ton Johnston and Louise John ston of Princeton, West Virginia. There will be a celebration of Broughton Land and his life on Saturday, December 15 at 2:00pm at the home of Judge and Mrs. Land in Mayo, FL. Please no formal attire, Broughton would want everyone to be comfortable. There will be a private cer emony the following day, Sun day. We ask that you please respect the familys wishes for this to be a private event. The family requests that in lieu made to Hannahs Buddies Char ity that supports research and care of victims of Spinal Muscu lar Atrophy (SMA) at Hannahs Buddies c/o The Elliots, 719 S Orleans Ave., Tampa, FL 33606 or Paddle Florida, Inc., P. O. Box 5953, Gainesville, FL 32627. The Land and Winnett fami lies would like to thank every one for the wonderful support. Broughton had a dynamic soul who touched so many and it is comforting to us to talk with those he cherished so dearly. DANIELS FUNERAL HOMES & CREMATORY, INC., of Live Oak and Branford, Fl was in charge of arrangements. Obituaries are paid advertise ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporters classified depart ment at 752-1293. OBITUARIES COMMUNITY CALENDAR To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0427 or by email at jbarr @lakecityreporter.com.



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5B Classified Department: 755-5440 LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDWEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2012 CLASSIFIED AD vantageTake ADvantage of the Reporter Classifieds!755-5440Lake City Reporter FIND IT SELL IT BUY IT $17504 lines 3 days Includes 2 Signs Each additional line $1.65 Garage Sale Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$10104 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.10One item per ad Under $500 Personal Merchandise Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$16754 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.15One item per ad Under $1,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$23704 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.45One item per ad Under $2,500 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $4,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$27404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.55One item per ad Under $4,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$30404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.65One item per ad Under $6,000 Placing An Ad Service Guide Limited to service type advertis-ing only.4 lines, one month....$92.00 $10.80 each additional lineIncludes an additional $2.00 per ad for each Wednesday insertion. DeadlinesBe Sure to Call Early You can call us at 755-5440 Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.Some people prefer to place their classified ads in person, and some ad categories will require prepay-ment. Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street.You can also fax or email your ad copy to the Reporter.FAX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the Classified Department.EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreporter.comAd is to Appear:TuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday Call by:Mon., 10:00 a.m.Mon., 10:00 a.m.Wed., 10:00 a.m.Thurs., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fax/Email by:Mon., 9:00 a.m.Mon., 9:00 a.m.Wed., 9:00 a.m.Thurs., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.These deadlines are subject to change without notice. Cancellations, Changes & Billing Questions Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject, or classify all advertisements under appropriate headings. Copy should be checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day of pub-lication. Credit for published errors will be allowed for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement which was incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be published, nor for any general, special or consequential damages. Advertising language must comply with Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition of discrimi-nation in employment, housing and public accommodations. Standard abbreviations are acceptable; how-ever, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated. Ad Errors-Please read your ad on the first day of publication. Weaccept responsibility for only the first incorrect insertion, and only the charge for the ad space in error. Please call 755-5440 immediately for prompt correc-tion and billing adjustments.CancellationsNormal advertising deadlines apply for cancellation.Billing InquiriesCall 755-5440. Should further information be required regarding payments or credit limits, your call will be trans-ferred to the accounting depart-ment. General Information In Print and Onlinewww.lakecityreporter.com Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$2504 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $.25One item per ad Under $100 Education _____________________________ MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED! Train to become a Medical Ofce Assistant. NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training gets you Job ready ASAP. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)374-7294 _____________________________ Employment _____________________________ Apply Now, 12 Drivers Needed. Top 5% Pay & Late Model Equip. Guaranteed Home for Xmas. Need CDL Class A Driving Exp. (877)258-8782 www.ad-drivers.com _____________________________ Help Wanted _____________________________ Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm l oaded. $1000 sign on to qualied drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.com. EOE _____________________________ DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for Stevens Transport! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 _____________________________ Miscellaneous _____________________________ AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualiedHousing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 _____________________________ ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualied. SCHEV authorized. Call www.CenturaOnline.com 888-203-3179 _____________________________ AIRLINE CAREERS Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualied Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 _____________________________ NURSING CAREERS begin here – Train in months, not years. Financial aid if qualied. Housing available. Job Placement assistance. Call Centura Institute Orlando (877) 206-6559 _____________________________ MEDICAL CAREERS begin here – Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualied. SCHEV authorized. Call 888-203-3179 www.CenturaOnline.com _____________________________ OTR Drivers Wanted _____________________________ Drivers Class A Flatbed, HOME EVERY WEEKEND! Pay 37¢/mi, Both ways, FULL BENEFITS, Requires 1 year OTR Flatbed experience. (800)572-5489 x227, SunBelt Transport, Jacksonville, FL _____________________________ TIRED OF LIVING PAYCHECK TO PAYCHECK? There’s great earning potential as a Professional Truck Driver! The average Professional Truck Driver earns over $700/wk*! 16-Day CDL Training @ NFCC/Roadmaster! Approved for Veterans Training. CALL TODAY! (866)467-0060 *DOL/BLS 2012 _____________________________ Real Estate/ Land for Sale _____________________________ 20 ACRES FREE! Own 60 acres for 40 acre price/ payment. $0 Down, $168/mo. Money Back Guarantee, NO CREDIT CHECKS. Beautiful Views, West Texas. (800)843-7537 www.sunsetranches.com _____________________________ Schools & Instruction _____________________________ “Can You Dig It?” Heavy Equipment School. 3wk Training Program. Backhoes, Bulldozers, Excavators. Local Job Placement Asst. VA Benets Approved. 2 National Certications. (866)362-6497 Week of December 10, 2012 Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 ServicesFLCert. Teacher with 10 yrs exp. Offering a homeshooling group in Jan. Reasonably priced. Interested parents 386-288-0954. LegalCOLUMBIACOUNTYBOARD OF COUNTYCOMMISSIONERSPROJECTNUMBER 2012-13Annual Guardrail ServicesNOTICE TOCONTRACTORSNotice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received in the Columbia County Manager’s office until 11:00 A.M. on December 20, 2012, for Co-lumbia County Project No. 2012-13. This office is located on the second floor of the Courthouse Annex at 135 Hernando Avenue, Room 203 Lake City FL32055.This project consists of installing guardrail at various locations throughout Columbia County.The scope of services consists of re-moving existing guardrail, repairing existing guardrail, and construction of new guardrail at various locations throughout Columbia County. This contract will be utilized on an "as needed" basis during Fiscal Year 2012/2013, which begins October 1, 2012, and ends September 30, 2013.The Bid Forms and Construction specifications may be obtained from the County’s web site at http://www.columbiacountyfla.com/PurchasingBids.asp. Deadline for questions regarding specifications and/or bid documents must be received before 11:00 P.M. on December 19, 2012.The successful bidder will be required to furnish the County Man-ager with proof of liability insurance prior to commencing work.The Columbia County Commission reserves the right to reject any or all bids and to add to the contract or delete from the contract to stay with-in their funding capabilities.Columbia County Board of County CommissionersStephen E. Bailey, Chair05536225December 12, 19, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURTIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAPROBATE DIVISIONIN RE: THE ESTATE OF:File Number: 12-2012-CP-000206Aline Emily Manship f/k/a Aline Emily HallDeceasedNOTICE TO CREDITORSThe administration of the estate of Aline Emily Manship f/k/a Aline Emily Hall, deceased, whose date of death was April 27, 2012, File Num-ber 12-2012-CP-000206, is pending in the Circuit Court for Columbia County, Probate Division, the ad-dress of which is P.O. Box 2069, Lake City, Florida 32056. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal rep-resentative’s attorney are set forth below.All creditors of the decedent and oth-er persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICA-TION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIR-TY(30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AF-TER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITH-IN THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED.NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.THE DATE OF FIRSTPUBLICA-TION OF THIS NOTICE IS DECEMBER 4, 2012.Personal Representative:Rebecca Lee Cason659 SWBussey GlenFt. White, FL32038Attorney for Personal Representa-tive:Gary D. Grunder23349 Northwest CR 236, Suite 10High Springs, Florida 32643(386) 454-1298Florida Bar I.D. 199486Primary email: garygrunder@hotmail.com Secondary email: amykenner@windstream.net 05536106December 5, 12, 2012 REGISTRATION OFFICTITIOUS NAMESWethe undersigned, being duly sworn, do hereby declare under oath that the names of all persons interest-ed in the business or profession carried on under the name of LIGHTOF TRUTH PHOTOGRA-PHY, 2275 SWPRECISION LOOP, LAKE CITY, FL32024Contact Phone Number: (386) 755-9951 and the extent of the interest of each, is as follows:Name: TAMMYG. HARRINGTONExtent of Interest: 100%by:/s/ TAMMYG. HARRINGTONSTATE OF FLORIDACOUNTYOF COLUMBIASworn to and subscribed before me this 10th day of December, A.D. 2012.By:/s/ KATHLEEN A. RIOTTO05536245DECEMBER 12, 2012 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITOF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, I NAND FOR COLUMBIACOUN-TYCIVILDIVISIONCASE NO. 11-000628-CAFIRSTFEDERALBANK OF FLORIDA,Plaintiff,vs.COLIN P. WILLIAMSON; UN-KNOWN SPOUSE OF COLIN P. WILLIAMSON; IF LIVING, IN-CLUDING ANYUNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RE-SPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGN-EES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALLOTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTTHE NAMED DE-FENDANT(S); UNKNOWN TEN-ANT#1; UNKNOWN TENANT#2;Defendant(s)NOTICE OF SALENotice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Columbia County, Florida, I will sell to property situate in Columbia County, Florida, described as:Northwest 1/4 of Southeast 1/4 of Northeast 1/4, LESS AND EXCEPTthe 25 feet off the North side for road, in Section 5, Township 4 South, Range 16 East, lying and be-ing in Columbia County, Florida. Al-so known as the North 1/2 of Lot 21 of Cason Tract, and unrecorded sub-division.A/K/A434 SWRiddle LnLake City, FL32024at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, in Courtroom 1 lo-cated at the Columbia County Court-house, 173 NE Hernando Street, Lake City, FL32056 at 11:00, on 1/16/13.Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-er than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the e sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 30th day of Nov., 2012.CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURTBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkSEALAMERICAN WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a dis-ability who requires accommoda-tions in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of cer-tain assistance. Individuals with a disability who require special accom-modations in order to participate in a court proceeding should contact the ADACoordinator, 173 NE Hernan-do Avenue, Room 408, Lake City, FL32055, (386) 719-7428, within two (2) business days of receipt of notice to appear.Individuals who are hearing impaired should call (800) 955-8771. Individ-uals who are voice impaired should call (800) 955-8770.05536217December 12, 19, 2012 020Lost & Found Lost Cell phone in ladies restroom at TJMaxx. If found please return to front desk or Verizon if found. Reward 386-755-0398 100Job Opportunities05536100EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COLUMBIACOUNTY Columbia County is accepting applications for Landfill Spotter. Primary responsibility is performing manual labor in the sorting of wood & yard waste, metal, liquids, & tires from Class I disposal area. Variety of maintenance work; removes litter from roadsides, rakes & cleans, cuts grass & weeds with hand tools & mowers. Minimum Experience: High School diploma/G.E.D. preferred & one-year experience in maintenance work; or an equivalent combination of training & experience. Valid Florida Driver’s License preferred. Salary is $8.67 per hr. plus benefits. Successful applicant must pass a pre-employment physical & drug screening. Applications may be obtained at the Human Resources Office, Board of County Commissioners, 135 NE Hernando, #203, Lake City, FL 32056, or online at www.columbiacountyfla.com (386)7192025, TDD (386)758-2139. Deadline: 12/21/12. AA/EEO/ADA/VPEmployer. 05536192Large Construciton Company has an immediate opening for an experienced Account Payable Clerk. Qualified candidate(s) may apply in person at Anderson Columbia, Co., Inc., 871 NWGuerdon Street, Lake City, Florida 32056, fax your resume to 386-755-9132 or visit website at www.andersoncolumbia.com. EOE & Drug Free Workplace Mechanic needed at Fla.Rock & Tank Lines In White Springs. Diesel exprnc reqr'd in maintenance & repair of tractor trailers. 45-50hrs/wk Class A CDLlicense preferred. Excellent Benefits! email: mcomer@patriottrans.com or fax 904-858-9008 100Job Opportunities05536101EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COLUMBIACOUNTY Columbia County is accepting applications for the position of part-time (20 hrs/wk) Library Assistant I. Position is advanced clerical library work; performs moderately complex clerical tasks; & may work in public services, children’s, circulation, technical or other areas of the library. Minimum requirements: High school diploma/GED, two years office work or clerical experience preferably in library setting. FL driver’s license preferred. Mandatory library screening test must be submitted with application. Call Main Library 386758-2101. Salary is $9.10 per hr. plus limited benefits (no health/life insurance). Nights & weekend work will be required. Successful applicant must pass a pre-employment physical, criminal history check & drug screen. Applications available at the Human Resources Office Board of County Commissioners, 135 NE Hernando Ave., Suite 203, Lake City, FL32055 or online at www.columbiacountyfla.com, (386)719-2025, TDD (386)7582139. Application deadline: 12/21/12. AA/EEO/ADA/VP Employer. 05536167Local insurance agency seeks Licensed CSR Experience preferred. Send reply to Box 05099, C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056 HVAC SALES Excellent benefits & Great pay. Call Allen 386-628-1093 100Job OpportunitiesMechanic needed with tools and experience. Southern Specialize Truck & Trailer. 386-752-9754 Part-time employee janitorial duties hours 7am-12noon ONLY! Apply in person at 3631 E. Hwy 90 across from Airport to fill out application. Attn. Cheryl Real Estate Co. looking for Office Staff Computer knowledge required. Real Estate Exp. is a plus! Fax resume to 386-496-4309 Seeking a Phone Salesperson for a local mortgage company. Inbound & outbound calls. No experience is necessary. Must have happy, energetic personality. Email resume to: lakecityresume@yahoo.com Service Techs & Installers Must be EPA& NATE certified. Excellent benefits & great pay. Call Allen (386) 628-1093 120Medical EmploymentP/THousekeeper Needed Occasional Nights And Weekends. Fax Resume to 386-487-1232 Position Avail M-F for F/TLPN at busy medical practice in Lake City. LPN license REQ’D! 1 page resumes accepted ONLY! If you are not a licensed LPN your resume will be trashed! If you send more than a 1 page resume it will be trashed. Do NOTsend references or copies of licenses or certificates with resume or it will be trashed! Fax resume to 386-487-1232. 120Medical Employment05536110Advent Christian VillageCurrent JOBS Line Advertisement call 658-5627 orvisit www.acvillage.net 24 hrs/day, 7 days/week Be your BEST, Among the BEST! RN Quality of Care Leader Unrestricted Florida RN license, excellent clinical nursing / assessment skills, current CPR certification, verifiable IVskill (start, regulate, maintain, discontinue IVs) required. Good communication, organizational, and computer skills required; must work as part of interdisciplinary team to assure outstanding quality of life / quality of care for LTC residents. On-call rotation required. Management / supervisory experience and knowledge of LTC regs desired. CNA& LPN FT/PT/ long-term care setting. Florida certification (CNA) or unrestricted license (LPN) required. FTpositions include health, dental, life, disability, AFLAC; 403b; paid time off, access to on site day care and fitness facilities. Apply in person at Personnel Office, Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m., or fax resume/credentials to (386) 658-5160. EOE / Drug Free Workplace/Criminal background checks required. REPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Linewww.lakecityreporter.com



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By CURT ANDERSON AP Legal Affairs Writer MIAM A nationwide dragnet launched in 2002 for a missing Florida foster child turned up no trace and also nothing to back up her caretakers claims that a state worker had taken the girl for mental tests months earlier, a police detective testified Tuesday in the caretakers murder trial. Every lead, every information that I was provided came to a dead end. Nothing panned out, said Det. Giancarlo Milito of the Miami-Dade Police Department. All rocks were turned. The investigation began as a missing persons case once the Department of Children and Families dis covered in April 2002 that 4-year-old Rilya Wilson had been missing for some 15 months. Her caretaker, 66year-old Geralyn Graham, told Milito that an unknown DCF worker had taken Rilya for psychological test ing and never returned the girl. Milito said Graham was precise about the date Jan. 18, 2001 and that the supposed worker was a dark-skinned black woman who was unusually tall, somewhere around 6 feet, and spoke with an unspeci fied accent. Graham said the woman asked for some clothes and toys for Rilya as well, Milito said. Graham had no contact information or a name for this person but told Milito she thought she could identify a photo graph. Authorities provided Graham with a pair of 6inch-thick binders of DCF worker photographs, but she never responded, Milito said. After using law enforcement databases and resources of the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, Milito said the decision was made to turn Rilyas case over to homicide detectives. Graham was eventually charged with Rilyas slay ing even though no body or crime scene has ever been found. She faces life in pris on if convicted but insists she is innocent. A key to the prosecutions case is testimony from jailhouse snitches who claim Graham confessed to smothering the girl with a pillow. Rilyas disappearance, and DCFs long delay in discovering it, led to a highlevel shake-up at the agency and numerous changes in the way foster children in Florida are tracked and monitored. Investigators decided to contact Rilyas biologi cal mother, Gloria Wilson, to see if she knew any thing about the girl. Gloria Wilson did not, but she did provide a DNA sample that was later used to determine that the body of a child known as Precious Doe found in Kansas City, Mo., was not that of Rilya. Graham attorney Scott Sakin questioned whether police might have focused too much on finding match es for Rilyas name in vari ous databases and sources. Part of Grahams defense is the suggestion that without a body, Rilya might be alive somewhere under another name. If its not that name, its going to be a problem? Sakin asked. Potentially, yes. Milito replied. Graham and her compan ion, Pamela Graham, were also caretakers of Rilyas younger sister Rodericka. By GARY FINEOUT Associated Press TALLAHASSEE Florida Gov. Rick Scott, parting ways with his fel low Republicans, asserted Tuesday that students who get financial help from the state to attend private schools should take the same standardized tests as public school students. Scott made his com ments a day before he is scheduled to speak to supporters of the states biggest and most success ful private school voucher program. The governor, who has been a supporter of increasing the size of voucher programs, said he believes parents should have a choice of schools for their children. But he said those schools should be treated the same. I believe anybody who gets state dollars ought to be under the same stan dards, Scott said. More than 50,000 stu dents from low-income families currently get state help to attend private schools. The state provides tax credits to companies that provide the money for the vouchers. The pro gram started out small, but has steadily grown with the help of the GOPcontrolled Legislature. Some Democrats have criticized the states efforts and consistently demanded that students who receive vouchers be required to follow the same edicts as those in public schools. These include requiring students to take the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test, which is used to grade public schools on an A to F scale. But Republicans have steadily rejected the idea as an administrative bur den since the majority of students at many private schools do not receive vouchers. Supporters of the current program also point out that students at these schools do take some form of standardized test but not the FCAT. Doug Tuthill, president of Step Up for Students, said many private schools may incorporate new Common Core standards that public schools are adopting over the next two years. Step Up for Students hands out the private school vouch ers to eligible low-income families. 6A LAKE CITY REPORTER STATE WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 12, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 6A Friday, December 21st 8:00 p.m. Ask About Our Cabin Rentals or Stay the Night In Our Famous Tree House! (386) 364-1683 MusicLivesHere.com Featuring Southern Rock & Country! Featuring Southern Rock & Country! 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Job placement assistance. Computer available. MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE C all 888-203-3179 www. C enturaOnline.com Scott: Test students who receive vouchers Detective testifies in foster care workers murder trial ASSOCIATED PRESS Gov. Rick Scott Ex-cop executed By TAMARA LUSH Associated Press STARKE A former police officer who mur dered nine people during a 1986 crime spree was executed Tuesday after his attorneys last-minute appeals were rejected. Manuel Pardo, 56, was pronounced dead at Florida State Prison at 7:47 p.m., about 16 minutes after the lethal injection process began. His attorneys had tried to block the execution by arguing that he was men tally ill, but federal courts declined to intercede. Reporters could not hear his final statement because of an apparent malfunction in the death chambers sound system. A white sheet had been pulled up to his chin and IV lines ran into his left arm. He blinked several times, his eyes moved back and forth and he took several deep breaths. Over the next several minutes the color drained from his face before he was pronounced dead. Prison officials said his final words were, Airborne forever. I love you, Michi baby, referring to his daughter. Pardo also wrote a final statement that was distrib uted to the media, in which he claimed that he never killed any women, but accepted full responsibil ity for killing six men. I never harmed those 3 women or any female. I took the blame as I knew I was doomed and it made no difference to me, at this time, having 6 or 9 death sentences, he wrote on Dec. 11, hours before his execution. I dont want this hanging over my head, especially these last few minutes of life, because my war was against men who were trafficing (sic) in nar cotics and no one else! Officials said most of Pardos victims were involved with drugs. Pardo contended that he was doing the world a favor by kill ing them over three-month period in early 1986. I am a soldier, I accom plished my mission and I humbly ask you to give me the glory of ending my life and not send me to spend the rest of my days in state prison, Pardo told jurors at his 1988 trial. Frank Judd, the nephew of victim Fara Quintero read a statement following the execution, which was witnessed by fewer than 10 family members of the victims. Judd thanked the state of Florida for bringing closure to his family and said the pain he and his relatives feel about the murder of Quintero continues to this day. Personally, I dont feel that what happened today was enough justice, he said, adding that Pardo was a disturbed soul. Pardos final letter apolo gized to his family for the pain and grief he caused. You all are so loving and wonderful, not deserv ing of this nightmare, he wrote. He asked his family to please not suffer and to be strong. He mentioned his daughter Michi in the written statement. Remember Michi you are Airborne and hard core...No tears! he wrote. Pardo also touched on his love of sports, devoting one of three paragraphs in his letter to baseball, soc cer and bullfighting. On a lighter note, as a New Yorker and loyal fan, I was happy to see my Yankees and Giants win so many championships dur ing my lifetime, Pardo wrote. He said it was a lifelong dream to see Spain win the World Cup and urged the Spanish government to never stop bullfights because they are a part of our culture and heritage. And if they do, Im glad I wont be alive to see such a travesty! Ann Howard, a spokes woman for Floridas Department of Corrections, said that Pardo visited with eight people Tuesday. He also met with the prison chaplain and a Roman Catholic bishop. Pardo ate a last meal of rice, red beans, roasted pork, plantains, avocado, tomatoes and olive oil. For dessert, he ate pump kin pie and drank egg nog and Cuban Coffee. Under Department of Corrections rules, the meals ingredi ents have to cost $40 or less, be available locally and made in the prison kitchen. Pardo was dubbed the Death Row Romeo after he corresponded with dozens of women and per suaded many to send him money. The former Boy Scout and Navy veteran began his law enforcement career in the 1970s with the Florida Highway Patrol, graduating at the top of his class. ASSOCIATED PRESS Manuel Pardo Pardo receives lethal injection for 9 murders. State 4th-graders global leaders in reading scores By BILL KACZOR Associated Press TALLAHASSEE Floridas on top of the world when it comes to reading. The states fourth-grade reading scores last year were slightly behind Hong Kongs, but an internation al study released Tuesday concluded their results were not measurably dif ferent. No education sys tem scored higher than Florida, it states. Floridas 2011 fourthand eighth-graders also scored above the global average in math and science and on par with the rest of the United States. The National Center for Education Statistics released both studies. They show U.S. students as a whole performed bet ter than the global average in all three subjects but still lagged behind many other Asian and European countries. For families to benefit from the expanding global economy, Florida students must compete and succeed with students internation ally, Gov. Rick Scott said in a statement. This report is great news for Florida. Interim Education Commissioner Pam Stewart said the results show Florida is on the right path as it moves toward imple menting new Common Core State Standards over the next couple years along with 44 other states, the District of Columbia and three U.S. territories. Former Gov. Jeb Bush said, Sunshine State stu dents are once again bust ing all the myths and prov ing that all kids can and will learn when education is organized around their achievement.



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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2012 Classified Department: 755-5440 6B 2007 Signature Lincoln Town Car 28,200 miles $15,500 386-397-3568 120 Medical Employment DIET AR Y MANAGER Needed CDM, Chef, LTC, 2 years experience preferred Must be able to manage large staff and oversee daily food preparation for a 180 bed SNF. Full time with excellent benefits. E-mail resume to Greg Roberts: groberts@gulfcoasthealthcare.com or fax to: (386)362-4417. Live Oak, FLEOE/V/D/M/F GREATOPPORTUNITY Full Time Experienced RNs, LPNs 7a-7p & 7p-7a Full Time Experienced C.N.As All Shifts Apply in person at Suwannee Health Care & Rehab. 1620 Helevenston Street S.E. Live Oak, FL32064 EOE/m/f/d/v 240 Schools & Education 05535484 Interested in a Medical Career? Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp Nursing Assistant, $479 next class12/24/2012 Phlebotomy national certification, $800 next class-11/05/12 LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310 Pets & Supplies Free puppy to good home. Miniature Jack Russell & Chihuahua mix, puppy shots have already been started. 386-623-9371 PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 403 Auctions 05536210 PMC LIQUIDATORS AB3212 On Site Estate Action 21043 25th Road Lake City, FL32024 Saturday, Dec. 15th Preview 8AM-Auction 10AM Propertymanagement714.webs.com 407-416-4063 407 Computers DELLCOMPUTER $75.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 430 Garage Sales ESTATE SALE Fri 1pm ? & Sat 8am -? 494 SE Oak St. LC, Forest Hill Sbdv. Tvs,Furniture &much more Huge Multi Family-Furn., NickNacks, etc.. Sat.12/15 8am2pm. 457 NWBlackberry Cir., Blackberry Farms off Nash Rd. LC PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. Sat&Sun 12/15 & 16, 8am-? 189 SWCharlie Ln. Follow Blue signs from 90W. Handicap items, lawn tools, misc. Must See 440 Miscellaneous 4-WHEELER HONDA TRX 300 EX Exc. Cond., Fast $2900 Neg (386) 344-3836 450 Good Things to Eat The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans 2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024 Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville 386-963-4138 or 961-1420 630 Mobile Homes forRent 2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $450. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 2 BR/1BA $475/mth. Located in center of Lake City Close to Everything !!! 305-984-5511 or 386-344-0830 2 BR/2BASW, Completly furnished, carport, shed, located on 41st Dr., $600 mo.,+ Util. $300 Dep. 935-2461 2/2 SWMH $500 deposit & $500 month 386-623-5410 or 386-623-2203 630 Mobile Homes forRent 2BR/1BA Located onCountyRoad 133C, $450 mo. plus $450 dep. 954-258-8841 Efficency Apt and Rv Lots for Rent. Between Lake City & Gville. Access to I-75 & 441 (352)317-1326. Call for terms. Mobile Homes for rent in White Springs & Ft. White. Contact 386-623-3404 Quiet Country Park 3br/2ba $525. Very clean NO PETS! References & Deposit required 386-758-2280 WA TERTOWN AREA 3br/2ba DW, Handicap accessible, $650 mth, $500 dep. Call 386-344-0144, 386-344-5791 640 Mobile Homes forSale Palm Harbor Homes Stilt Homes 34 Years Experience Go directly to the factory & Save 800-622-2832 650 Mobile Home & Land OwnerFinanced 3/22.5 ac River Access. Small down $585 mo 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833 www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 710 Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05536252 $100 off December's rent Must be presented at the time of application. $89 Deposit W indsong Apts. 386-758-8455 1BR APT. Downtown Location, Clean. New Carpet $450 mo, plus Security. NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456 2 bedroom / 1 Bath Apts for rent in Live Oak. Call for price. Contact 386-623-3404 & 386-362-9806 Brandywine & Branford Apartments Now Renting 1, 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-752-3033 W. Grandview Ave. Equal Housing Opportunity TDD Number 1-800-955-8771 BRANFORD VILLAS 386-935-2319 2br/1ba Apts. Now available.$570. mo. TDD number 1-800-955-8771 Equal Housing Opportunity Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A$530 month $530 deposit garbage included. No pets. 386-344-2170 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 720 Furnished Apts. ForRent ROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. W eekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730 Unfurnished Home ForRent 2BR, 1/2 acre, Fenced, Close-in, Huge Den, Carport, Smoke Free, $800 mo. App & Ref Reqd Short Term Avail 386-758-9824 2br/1ba $548 mo. + sec., 4mi S. Lake City. Clean & Quiet 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833 www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 3bdrm very spacious, 2ba, garage, CH/AFenced in backyard. $1,400 mth & $1,400 dep. Contact 386-344-1914 3br/1.5ba. Very clean, Brick great area w/bonus room. Carport, shed & Fenced (privacy) back yard. $825. mo $825. dep. Refs reqd. (941)920-4535 Avail. for Rent 1206 McFarlane A ve. 3 BR/2 BAhouse. Smoke Free and No Pets allowed. $850 a mo. $500 dep. Call for appt. 904-813-8864. 750 Business & Office Rentals Medical, Retail and Professional Office space on East Baya near Old Country Club Rd. Call 386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622 (cell) Office or Retail Space. Many to choose from. T om Eagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 805 Lots forSale PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 820 Farms & Acreage 4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com 830 Commercial Property 05536046 Receivership Sale Soneet R. Kapila, Receiver Corbitt Manufacturing Company, Inc. Lake City, FL3 parcels Approx. 55 acres V acant Industrial & Residential Site Zoned Industrial and Residential Rural Lake City 2 Parcels Approx. 3 acres V acant Commercial Property Zoned Commercial Intensive Email: blombardo@kapilaco.com or call: 954/712-3185 Industrial warehouse 7+ acres fenced 17,000 sq ft Barn $1,500 mo. Tom Eagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor 860 Investment Property 2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870 Real Estate W anted I Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 RECYCLE YOUR Lake City Reporter



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By MARCIA DUNN AP Aerospace Writer CAPE CANAVERAL The militarys small, topsecret version of the space shuttle rocketed into orbit Tuesday for a repeat mys tery mission, two years after making the first flight of its kind. The Air Force launched the unmanned spacecraft Tuesday hidden on top of an Atlas V rocket. As if on cue, clouds quickly swal lowed up the rocket as it disappeared out over the ocean. It is the second flight for this original X-37B space plane. The craft circled the planet for seven months in 2010. A second X-37B spacecraft spent more than a year in orbit. These high-tech mys tery machines 29 feet long are about onequarter the size of NASAs old space shuttles and can land automatically on a runway. The two previous touchdowns occurred in Southern California; this one might end on NASAs three-mile-long runway once reserved for the space agencys shuttles. The military isnt saying much if anything about this new secret mission known as OTV-3, or Orbital Test Vehicle, flight No. 3. In fact, launch commentary ended 17 minutes into the flight and a news blackout followed. But one scientific observ er, Jonathan McDowell of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, speculates the space plane is carrying sensors designed for spying and likely is serving as a tes tbed for future satellites. He dismisses rumors of exotic ideas for the X37B as weaponry or shad owing a Chinese satellite. While acknowledging he does not know what the spaceplane is carrying, McDowell said on-board sensors could be capable of imaging or intercept ing transmissions of elec tronic emissions from terrorist training sites in Afghanistan or other hot spots. All the sorts of things that spy satellites generally do, he said. The beauty of a reusable spaceplane is that it can be launched on short notice based on need, McDowell said. Whats important about this flight is that it is the first reflight. That is pretty cool, McDowell said, reus ing your spacecraft after a runway landing. Thats something that has only really been done with the shuttle. Now retired museum pieces, NASAs space shut tles stretch 122 feet long, and have 78-foot wing spans and weights of more than 170,000 pounds. They were launched, from 1981 to 2011, with two strapon booster rockets and an external fuel tank feeding three main engines. The X37B wingspan is 15 feet, and the 11,000-pound, Boeingbuilt vessel requires the United Launch Alliances hefty Atlas V for hoisting. It is solar powered. The two previous secret X-37B flights were in 200plus-mile-high orbits, cir cling at roughly 40-degree angles to the equator, as calculated by amateur satellite trackers. That means the craft flew over the swatch between 40 degrees or so north lati tude and 40 degrees or so south latitude. That puts Russias far north out of the space planes observing realm, McDowell noted. It might be studying Middle Eastern latitudes or it might just be being used for sensor tests over the United States, he said. McDowell speculates that this newest flight will follow suit. The International Space Station, by comparison, orbits about 250 miles high but at a much steeper 51.6-degree inclination, or angle to the equator, that covers more territory. The X-37B program, which dates back to 1999, is operated by the Air Force Rapid Capabilities Office and geared toward space experimentation. Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 12, 2012 7A 7A Be c ome a v olu n t eer with Florida s LongT erm Ca r e Ombudsman P r og r am. The Ombudsman P r og r am is a s t a t ewide ad v o c acy o r g ani z a on seeking t o ensu r e the health, s a f e t y w el f a r e and rig h ts of Florida s elde r s who r eside in nu r sing homes, assi s t ed living f acili es and adult f amily c a r e homes. Bene ts of v olu n t eering with us include: Me e t and i n t e r act with othe r s who sha r e a passion f or v olu n t eerin g pe r sonal ful llme n t and g r owth. Gi v e back t o the c ommunity and seek t o ma k e a posi v e di e r ence in the li v es of longt erm c a r e f acility r eside n ts. R ecei v e milea g e r eimbu r seme n t as w ell as support f r om s t a t e and lo c al s t a Apply t od a y! T o learn mo r e c all 1-888-831-0404 or visit ombudsman. m orida.com online. ASSOCIATED PRESS Workers prepare Madison Square Garden for the -12-12 concert whose proceeds will aid the victims of Superstorm Sandy on Tuesday in New York. Dozens of ways being found to mark 12-12-12 By BRIDGET MURPHY Associated Press A Michigan sixth-grader will put aside her nerves and get her ears pierced on her 12th birthday. Two lawenforcement officials will exchange wedding vows at 12:12 p.m. in Pittsburghs federal courthouse. And gamblers can take advan tage of promotions some casinos are using to lure in patrons who want to test their luck. With a once-a-century date arriving today, some people across the United Stated are betting on good fortune for 12-12-12. In New England, Foxwoods Resort Casino in Connecticut will offer $12 in free slots play to rewards cards members who sink $12 into the slots. A southwestern Michigan casino is also betting that 12-12-12 is going to be a lucky day for opening its new hotel. A ribbon-cut ting is planned for 12:12 p.m. today for the eightstory, 242-room hotel at FireKeepers Casino near Battle Creek. Hours later, Anna Gandy, of Battle Creek, Mich., will head to the Lakeview Square Mall after school lets out. She realized last year that she would turn 12 on 12-12-12, her father, Bryan Gandy, said Tuesday. But between her sports team commitments and nerves, Anna decided to wait until today to get her ears pierced. Shes been looking forward to it for a year, her dad said of the special birthday. She obviously likes the number 12. Fans of some of musics biggest names will feel lucky to see them share a stage today in New Yorks Madison Square Garden. The charity show for Superstorm Sandy vic tims has been dubbed the -12-12 concert and will include Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band, Paul McCartney, the Rolling Stones, the Who, Eric Clapton, Billy Joel, Kanye West, Alicia Keys and Bon Jovi. For pro football fans, todays date also will carry special meaning. Green Bay Packers quar terback Aaron Rodgers wears No. 12, and the Wisconsin state Legislature has designated the day Aaron Rodgers Day in honor of the Super Bowl winner and last years MVP. Some businesses are encouraging employees to wear Rodgers jerseys and make $12 donations to a charity fund. And in honor of New England Patriots quarter back Tom Brady, who also wears No. 12, his team is planning a series of events, offering free admittance to its interactive museum in the 12 oclock hour and discounts at its shop 12 percent off, naturally. The teams Facebook post had more than 12,000 likes in its first hour. According to Vicki MacKinnon, who practices numerology, the study of the occult significance of numbers, todays date rep resents two energies merg ing, including masculine and feminine energies. Air Force sends mystery mini-shuttle back to space ASSOCIATED PRESS ABOVE: A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket, carrying an X-37B experimental robotic space plane, lifts off from launch complex 41 at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station on Tuesday. BELOW: The X-37B Orbital Test Vehicle dur ing testing at the Astrotech facility in Titusville in 2010. Parents fight for release of jailed son By KELLI KENNEDY Associated Press MIAMI A South Florida family is fighting to get their son, a Marine veteran, released from a prison in a dangerous area in Mexico while fac ing charges that he carried across the border a shotgun with a barrel thats an inch too short. Jon Hammar and his friend were on their way to Costa Rica in August and planned to drive across the Mexican border near Matamoros in a Winnebago filled with surfboards and camping gear. Hammar, 27, asked U.S. border agents what to do with the unloaded shotgun, which his fam ily said belonged to his great-grand father. They examined it, they weighed it, they said you have to fill out this form, his father, Jon Hammar, told The Associated Press in a phone interview Tuesday from his home near Miami. But when the pair crossed the bor der and handed the paperwork to Mexican officials, they impounded the RV and jailed the men, saying it was illegal to carry that type of gun. Hammars friend was later released. The familys attorney said Mexican law prohibits civilians from carrying certain types of guns, like sawedoff shotguns, which can be more easily concealed. Mexican law pro hibits shotguns with a barrel of less than 25 inches (63.5 centimeters). Family attorney Eddie Varon-Levy said Mexican officials measured the barrel on Hammars shotgun as 24 inches (61 centimeters). It has not been sawed off. Family members said the gun was purchased at Sears and blamed U.S. officials for telling Hammar he could bring it across the border in the first place. Varon-Levy also questioned the way Mexican officials measured the gun, because the measurements can differ depending on where they are taken on the barrel. He said dealing with Mexican authorities has also been difficult. He said Hammar was brought to court a few weeks ago, where officials tried to convince him to plead guilty with out a lawyer present. Varon-Levy said he didnt show up because he was told there was a continuance. I am fuming, he said. Hammar could face 12 years in prison, but Varon-Levy said thats unlikely. He wants to get the charges downgraded, hoping Hammar can plead guilty to a lesser charge of car rying an unregistered weapon, which only carries a fine. Hammar served in Iraq and Afghanistan before being honorably discharged from the Marines in 2007. His mother said surfing helped him cope after he was diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder. Mexican authorities have fully guaranteed his right to Consular assistance; therefore Mr. Hammar has been in contact with U.S. Consular officers in Mexico who have regularly visited him, Ricardo Alday, spokesman for the Mexican Embassy, said in a statement. The possession of any weapon restricted for the use of the Army in Mexico is a Federal crime, regardless of whether you declare it or not upon entering the country, and must be automatically prosecuted. Gunman, 2 others dead in Oregon mall shooting Associated Press PORTLAND, Ore. A gunman opened fire in a suburban Portland shop ping mall Tuesday, killing two people and wounding another as people were doing their Christmas shop ping, authorities said. Witnesses described a scene of chaos and disbe lief as a gunman wearing some sort of camouflage outfit and a white mask shot an initial burst of fire and then more rounds at Clackamas Town Center. Shoppers tried to find safe areas as teams of police officers began entering the mall to find the shooter. Clackamas County sher iffs Lt. James Rhodes said later that the gunman was dead, but he wouldnt say how he died or provide any details about him. Authorities were going store-to-store to secure the scene and to escort hid ing shoppers outside, but Rhodes said there was no indication that there was more than one shooter. Austin Patty, 20, who works at Macys, said he saw a man in a white mask carrying a rifle and wearing a bulletproof vest. He heard the gunman say I am the shooter.



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8A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & ST A TE WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 12, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 8A Flex Plan Remember, your Flex Plan Insurance covers Eye Care... Use it or lose it... come in before the end of the year Lake City Lake City Commons Center (Publix Shopping) 752-3733 CONTA C TS EY E EXAM S by Independent O ptometrist 2 Complete Pair Eyeglasses $ 119 Includes Lenses & Frames Some Restrictions Apply. COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES D EC 31, 2012 NOW FREE GL A SSES FREE P A IR OF GL A SSES Buy one complete pair of glasses at regular price & receive a Some Restrictions Apply. COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES D EC 31, 2012 $ 99 1 Pair Eyeglasses I ncludes lenses & frames. Some Restrictions Apply. COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES D EC 31, 2012 NOW Where you get the Best for Less Ask about Care Credit Same Day Service Includes Saturday To participate, simply leave a bag of non-perishable foods at your Reporter paper tube or the end of your driveway Friday night. No glass containers. Your Lake City Reporter carrier will pick it up while delivering your Thursday paper. located at 180 E. Duval Street, Lake City Mondays through Fridays, from 8 a.m. 5 p.m. Place a collection box in your place of business for donation and you will be recognized with other business donors in the Lake City Reporter. For additional information and to participate, please call 752-1293 Supporting the Florida Gateway Food Bank Lets Fill It Up! For all Cash Donations make checks payable to: Florida Gateway Food Bank Miami-Dade schools win competition Associated Press MIAMI Miami-Dade County Public Schools has been named a winner in the U.S. Department of Educations Race to the Top District competition. The county will receive a $30 million grant for its efforts. The money will go toward a new math initiative in the districts middle schools that offers students digital resourc es and professional sup port from two teachers in every classroom. Superintendent Alberto Carvalho said the grant will help the district move toward the goal of ensur ing every student, no mat ter their zip code, receives a world-class education. Miami-Dade schools were among 16 winners named Tuesday out of 372 applicants. Five Florida school districts were finalists. Making the season bright Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City Reporter ABOVE: Rosie Valquez, 4, plays coy while telling Santa Claus what she wants for Christmas during the fifth annual Kids Night at the Attic, at Haven Hospice in Lake City on Tuesday. BELOW: Volunteers Enza Koger (left) and Ariel Newsome help Evelyn Lansford, 3, pick out gifts for family members. This has been a rewarding experience, Koger said. Im happy I did it, and that I will continue to volunteer.