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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
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Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:01974

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:01974

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text

PAGE 1

By DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comT he ice was trucked in from Gainesville, and by 5 a.m. the snow machine was spewing soft flakes in the parking lot across from the courthouse in downtown Lake City. Snow Day, with 30 tons of man-made snow, came to Lake City Saturday. The Lake CityColumbia County Chamber of Commerce along with volunteers and city employees pulled together to create a Florida snow day -complete with a predict-ed high of 81 degrees. Dennille Decker, executive director of the chamber of commerce, organized Snow Day. She also scheduled a five kilometer race that had 109 runners and the Christmas parade came later in the day. (See coverage of the race in Sports.) She had a rough night of sleep worrying nobody would show, but thousands did come for the snow slides, the bounce houses and to share in the community fun -plus, of course, the novelty of snow itself. Those weren’t the only draws, though. Santa hit town at noon wearing dark shades. He made his entrance on the top of a fire truck, and children screamed as if the round, red-suited man were Justin Bieber. Around 5:45 p.m., Decker estimated that at least 10,000 people had attended Snow Day 2012. Mayor Stephen Witt stood in line with his granddaughter Audrey Witt. He was waiting for the chance to see her play in one of two snow pits. While the snow was the main attraction of Snow Day, Witt’s six-year-old granddaughter had only a passing inter-est in the slushy snow. “She came for the bounce houses,” Witt said. Ahead of the Witts, two families plotted war. Three vs. three. Two mothers, two brothers and two friends rushed the snow pit, formed snow balls and slung the wet-white stuff back and forth. Benjamen Burnette, 8, smacked 8-year-old Vanessa Holder with a loosely packed slush ball. While he was bend-ing over to grab more snow, Holder hit him with a snowball square on the top of his head. “Stop,” he said.Then he threw another. De’Kayla Murphy, 8, wearing purple-rubber Crocs, slipped often, but still launched mul-tiple shots at Rebecca Burnette, 29. Along the edge of By DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comThe Stop N Go Food Store near the Subway on SR 47 just west of Interstate 75 was robbed by a masked gunman at 7:17 a.m. Saturday. Rush Patel, a store manager, said he was standing near the back counter when the man entered and robbed the store. Patel and one customer were inside the store at 7:17 a.m. Patel had arrived at 6:30 a.m. The customer was busy scratching off lottery tickets in front of the cash register and didn’t notice the gunman approaching behind him. The robber hit the man in the face and pushed him out of the way so he could reach the cash register. Patel said the customer is a regular in the store and more than 70 years old. Patel said he didn’t have time to do anything but what the armed man said. He made his way to the cash regis-ter, opened it and started drop-ping bills on the counter. “That’s what he said, you do what he said,” Patel said. “I stay calm because I didn’t want him to shoot me.” This is the first time he has been robbed, Patel said, and he didn’t plan to dwell on it. Still on the job at 1:30 p.m. Saturday, he said he planned to finish his shift, which ended at 3 p.m. Patel has been in Lake City for 16 years. “Still business,” he said. “Life goes on.” Patel said the robber was taller then 6 feet. He was wearing a black ski-type mask but didn’t have gloves. Also, the man was CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Opinion ................ 4ABusiness ................ 5AObituaries .............. 6A Advice & Comics ......... 8B Puzzles ................. 2B TODAY IN PEOPLE Stones to join Sandy benefit. COMING TUESDAY Local news roundup. 91 64 T-Storm Chance WEATHER, 2A Opinion ................ 4ABusiness ................ 1CObituaries .............. 5AAdvice.................. 5DPuzzles ................. 5B 78 57 Fog early WEATHER, 8A Lake City ReporterSUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012 | YOUR COMMUNITY N EWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | $1.00 LAKECITYREPORTER.COM County econ chief settinga fast pace. Olympic gold-medalist joinsthe ‘Army.’ SUNDAYEDITION Vol. 138, No. 224 1D 1C 1A Statesticksto itsguns TEACHER EVALUATIONS From staff reportsThe Florida Department of Education’s revised figures for Columbia County on teacher evaluations are wrong but the agency refuses to fix them, according to local school offi-cials. While the rankings themselves were consistent – every Columbia educator was judged “highly effective” or “effec-tive,” as the state originally reported – FDOE once again miscalculated the total num-ber of teachers in the district, according to Frank Moore, Columbia County schools’ Numbers wrong, but FDOE won’tchange them. FDOE continued on 3A ROBBERY continued on 3A SNOW continued on 6ADespite robbery, he finishes his shift Gunman hits local convenience store, assaults customer. COURTESY STOP N GOA masked gunman leaves fingerprints while taking cash placed on the coun-ter by manager Rush Patel (left) in this photo from surveillance video. Olustee Parktransformed forannual event. 30 tons of frozen fun Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterLake City resident Mia Ray, 7, takes a snowball to the hea d while making ammo for a snowball fight on Saturday.Thousands here for Snow Day, parade Santa Claus makes his way past a group of children as he arrives at Olustee Park in downtown Lake City Saturday. The Hopeful Baptist Church entry was named best float at the Christmas parade. See more photos, Pages 6-7A. Lost childgets home– with lotsof helpFrom staff reportsColumbia County Sheriff’s deputies went door to door for two hours after finding a lost toddler walking in a ditch at the corner of NW Yates Loop and NW Ash Dr. on Saturday, according to a media release from the sheriff’s office. Mary Thomas, the child’s mother, was finally located at 1764 NW Nash Road, authori-ties said. She faces possible criminal charges of neglect, according to the release. The sheriff’s office suspects the child let himself out of the home around 10:20 a.m., then walked down a long, narrow driveway to the ditch where he was seen by a concerned resident who contacted law enforcement. The Florida Department of Children and Families will assist the sheriff’s office in its investigation, the release said.



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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Sunday, December 9, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS BRIEFS GAMES Monday Q Fort White High girls basketball at Keystone Heights High, 6 p.m. Q Columbia High girls soccer vs. Hamilton County High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Q Columbia High girls basketball vs. Newberry High, 7 p.m. (JV-5:30) Q Columbia High boys soccer vs. Hamilton County High, 7 p.m. Q Fort White High soccer at Santa Fe High, 7 p.m. (girls-5) Q Fort White High boys basketball vs. Keystone Heights High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Tuesday Q Fort White High boys soccer at Gainesville High, 6 p.m. Q Columbia High boys soccer at Lincoln High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Wednesday Q Columbia High girls soccer at Leon High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Thursday Q Columbia High girls weightlifting vs. Union County High, 3:30 p.m. Q Columbia High boys soccer at Leon High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Q Columbia High girls basketball vs. Wolfson High, 7:45 p.m. (JV-6:30) Friday Q Fort White High girls basketball at Interlachen High, 6 p.m. Q Columbia High boys basketball at Atlantic Coast High, 7 p.m. (JV-5:30) Q Fort White High boys basketball vs. Interlachen High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Saturday Q Columbia High wrestling at Bradford High duals, TBA Q Columbia High girls soccer vs. Lincoln High, 2 p.m. (JV-noon) CHS FOOTBALL Q-back Club meeting Dec. 17 The next Columbia County Quarterback Club meeting is 7 p.m. Dec. 17 in the Jones Fieldhouse. For details, call club president Joe Martino at 984-0452. ADULT FLAG FOOTBALL Registration for 7 on 7 league Lake City Recreation Department is taking registration for its Adult 7 on 7 Flag Football League. Entry fee of $600 includes trophies, officials and scorekeeper/clock operator for a minimum of 10 games. Roster forms can be picked up at Teen Town Center. Deadline for fee and to return rosters is Friday. For details, call Hayward Christie at 754-3607. YOUTH BASEBALL River Rats U11 team tryouts North Florida River Rats U11 travel baseball team has open tryouts set for 1 p.m. Saturday at the Southside Recreation Complex red practice fields For details, call Josh Wehinger at 623-3628 or Jamie Albritton at 209-0166.Q From staff reports JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Jalen Wyche (10) makes a shot over Sa nta Fe High’s Diante Williams (3) during Thursday’s game. Indians reign supremeBy TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comFORT WHITE — Fort White High settled the early supremacy of District 5-4A with a 71-64 home win over Bradford High on Friday. Both teams came in undefeated, each with two district wins. It was a seesaw struggle with two points separating the teams at the end of the first quarter and a one-point the margin at half and the end of the third quarter. Leading 27-26, the Tornadoes came back after halftime with a 6-2 run. Fort White erased that lead from long range. Jalen Wyche hit three 3-pointers during the quarter and Micheal Mulberry also hit from behind the arc. Bradford regrouped with a time out at 3:19 with Fort White leading 40-36. Brian Walton, who matched Wyche’s nine points in the quarter, hit a pair of baskets down the stretch and a trey by Deantre Burch ended the quarter with Bradford’s lead back at one, 49-48. Bradford pushed the lead to four points in the fourth quarter, then the Indians took over. Wyche hit a bucket and two free throws to tie the game at 59-all with 2:57 remaining. Fort White extended its run to 10-0 to push the lead to six points. Walton scored then Chris Cottrell answered with a basket for seven points in the quarter. Melton Sanders hit two free throw and Wyche added a late basket. The Indians had five players in double figures, led by Wyche with 17. Mulberry and Cottrell each scored 14. Sanders scored 13 and Trey Phillips scored 11. Kaleel Jackson also had a basket. Walton finished with 23 points and Deantre Burch scored 14 for Bradford (5-1, 2-1). Fort White’s early wins came on the road — 74-57 over Union County High, 86-58 over Melody Christian Academy, and 87-82 over Williston High in a district game. Sanders had 61 points in the three games and Wyche scored 48. Mulberry scored 20 against Melody Christian; Cottrell scored 18 against Union County; Phillips scored 17 against Williston. Fort White’s junior varsity is 3-1 with wins over Union County (46-39), Williston (49-43) and Bradford (59-56 in overtime) and a loss to Santa Fe High (56-24). Fort White (5-0, 3-0) continues district play when Keystone Heights High visits for a 7:30 p.m. tip on Monday. Fort White stays undefeated by beating Bradford.Weekend split JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Javontae Foster (5) drives down the cou rt against Lee High on Tuesday.Tigers beat Stanton Prep, fall to PalatkaBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comIt was a bag of mixed results for Columbia High’s basketball team as the Tigers split a pair of games on Friday and Saturday. Columbia picked up the first game of the weekend series with a 63-59 win at Stanton Prep, but fell at home to Palatka High on Saturday, 71-61. The Tigers fell behind, 25-31, on the road on Friday, before a couple of steels from reserve Akeem Williams helped Columbia mount a comeback. Columbia scored 20 points in the third quarter to regain the lead and went on to win 63-59. “I forgot about Akeem sitting down at the end of the bench since it was his first game with us,” Columbia head coach Horace Jefferson said. “When he came up with the back-to-back steals, it really got us going. That and Marshall continued to play like Marshall.” Morris Marshall finished with a game high 21 points. Columbia didn’t have any other scorers in double figures, but Kevin Louder scored nine points off the bench followed by Javonta Foster and Williams with eight each. The first half got the Tigers in trouble again on Saturday, but this time they weren’t able to battle back after scoring only a single point in the second quarter to trail 25-17 at the half. Columbia cut the lead within a single point at 52-51 with 5:57 remaining in the contest, but Palatka responded with a late run to put the game away. Marshall again led the Tigers with 28 points in the contest. Wayne Broom added 15. “Marshall was on his game, but we’ve got to have guys hitting shots around him,” Jefferson said. The Tigers fell to 3-2 while Palatka is 5-1 on the season. ASSOCIATED PRESSTexas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel became the first freshman in history to win the Heisman Trophy on Saturday. Manziel makes historyBy RALPH D. RUSSOAssociated PressNEW YORK — Johnny Football just got himself a way cooler nickname: Johnny Heisman. Texas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel became the first freshman to win the Heisman Trophy, taking col-lege football’s top individual prize Saturday night after a record-breaking debut. Notre Dame linebacker Manti Te’o finished a distant second and Kansas State quar-terback Collin Klein was third in the voting. In a Heisman race with two nontraditional candidates, Manziel broke through the class barrier and kept Te’o from becoming the first purely defensive player to win the award. Manziel drew 474 first-place votes and 2,029 points from the panel of media members and former winners. “I have been dreaming about this since I was a kid, running around the backyard pretending I was Doug Flutie, throwing Hail Marys to my dad,” he said after hugging his parents and kid sister. Manziel seemed incredibly calm after his name was announced, hardly resembling the guy who dashes around the football field on Saturday. He simply bowed his head, and later gave the trophy a quick kiss. “I wish my whole team could be up here with me,” he said with a wide smile. Te’o had 321 first-place votes and 1,706 points and Klein received 60 firsts and 894 points. Just a few days after turning 20, Manziel proved times have truly changed in college foot-ball, and that experience can be really overrated. For years, seniors dominated the award named after John Heisman, the pioneering Georgia Tech coach from the early 1900s. In the 1980s, juniors started becoming common win-ners. Tim Tebow was the first sophomore to win it in 2007. Texas A&M QB is first freshman to win Heisman.



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By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com As the final days of 2012 dwin dle into 2013, Columbia County officials have an optimistic look for economic development in the county next year. Jesse Quillen, Columbia County Economic Development Department executive director, said the department worked on 12 projects in 2012. He noted that most of the project activ ity occurred in the second half of the year, with seven projects, and he hopes the current pace continues. Of those 12, there are prob ably three or four that we still have a realistic opportunity at working, he said. It sometimes takes a couple of years for a proj ect to come to fruition. It doesnt happen easy and it doesnt hap pen quick. Quillen said there is a fair amount of diversity in the type of projects them department is working on. Were seeing everything from retail to health care, he said. When speaking to companies that located here recently, Quillen said most company representa tives said they were attracted to the area because of Columbia Countys location and area trans portation systems. Its all about access to inter states, markets and proximity to markets, he said. Were in a great location at the intersection of Interstates 10 and 75 and hav ing CSX and Norfolk Southern rail here. Its gives us a real advantage over some of the other communities. Financial incentives While Quillen is predicting an increase in activity for the 1CBIZ FRONT ON BUSINESS Jerry Osteryoung (850) 644-3372 jostery@comcast.net It is with our passions as it is with fire and water, they are good servants, but bad masters. Aesop T oo often I think we do people a tremendous dis service when we say that anyone can be an entrepreneur, especially if they have passion. In my opinion, passion without knowl edge can lead to failure so quickly. When people come to me with questions about starting a business, the Passion not sole key to success Lake City Reporter 1CBIZ FRONT Week of December 9-15, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section C Columbia, Inc. Your marketplace source for Lake City and Columbia County 1CColumbia Inc. FT. WHITE 7905 S.W. Hwy 27 497-1484 LAKE CITY 5735 SW State Rd. 247 752-3111 LAKE BUTLER 280 West Main St. 496-2878 LIVE OAK 6852 Suwanee Plaza Ln. 330-0331 LAKE CITY 857 Southwest Main Blvd. 755-7050 3 SMALL PIZZAS 3 MEDIUM PIZZAS 3 LARGE PIZZAS WE DELIVER! MINIMUM ORDER MAY APPLY. Plus sales tax. Delivery Extra. Limited time offer. Three Pizzas with 2-Toppings on each & Your Choice of Any 2-Liter! Plus sales tax. Delivery extra. Limited time offer. Plus sales tax. Delivery extra. Limited time offer. $ 12 Large 2-Topping Pizza PLUS 8 Wings with Cajun Bread & Dipping Sauce PIZZA & WINGS Two Medium 2-topping Pizzas, an order of our NEW Flavored Howie Bread, one Free Dipping Sauce and a 2-Liter! Plus sales tax. Delivery extra. Limited time offer. $ 9 Large 1-Topping Pizza and 3 Cheezer Pepperoni Bread 21894_LCReporter_12/10/12 PROJECTS continued on 2C PASSION continued on 3C Interest in area picking up TONY BRITT/ Lake City Reporter Debbie Motes, Columbia County Economic Development Department office manager, and Jesse Quillen, Columbia County Economic Development Department executive director, review paperwork. County director hopes to sustain curent efforts pace. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT



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By DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comH enrietta Onodi-Haley sprinted toward the vault, hit the spring and launched into the air, flipping one and a half times while spin-ning 360 degrees — in gymnastic terms the Yurchenko layout full. After she nailed the landing, for at least that year, she was the best in the world. Onodi-Haley won the gold medal in gymnastics for vaulting at the 1992 Olympics, held in Barcelona, Spain. She also won silver for her performance on the floor exercise. Jimbo Haley, her husband, who was raised in Lake City, also performed at those Olympics, but they never saw each other. He competed in the modern pentathlon and took fourth at the Olympics in 1992. Years later, they were put together on a project for the 2002 Winter Games in Salt Lake City. They married and later settled in Lake City. Onodi-Haley said doing for others was always something her family stressed. On Dec. 12 between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., Onodi-Haley will be in front of Publix, posing for pic-tures with residents of Lake City and raising money for the Salvation Army. She’s a mem-ber of Altrusa International of Lake City and that group has a friendly competition with the Rotary Club on which organization can feed the familiar red kettle the most dollar bills. Haley is a member of the Rotary Club, and will be out front of Walmart on Dec. 13 from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. While Walmart has more traffic, OnodiHaley said she thinks Altrusa will keep it close. Around Thanksgiving, Jim Cantore, meteorologist for the Weather Channel, gave a helping hand for Altrusa while visiting his sister while on vacation. “Rotary may have more traffic,” she said. “But we have more star power.” While the training for the Olympics was a driving force for much of their youth, the cou-ple said it isn’t something that defines them. “I think there’s a lot more to me then that gold medal,” Onodi-Haley said. Haley said they barely watched the Olympics this year, and it’s something they almost never think about. Onodi-Haley likes to tinker with old things. She takes them apart and finds a new way to make them useful. Haley likes to do anything on the water. They said they are just like anybody else. Take away their status as Olympic athletes and they’re just a regular couple. They have three children, all under the age of 8. When he was growing up Haley couldn’t stand the fact that everyone knew exactly what he was doing and where he was at all times. As a parent, he said, that isn’t a bad thing at all. Haley has seen some of the largest cities in the world, and he said that a small-town com-munity would be the best place to raise their children. “It takes a whole village to raise a child” he said. By LEANNE ITALIEAssociated PressNEW YORK — It’s not possible for Katie Jackson to be any more clear about what she wants for Christmas. It’s the same thing she has asked for three years running: a dog. But not just any dog. A Leonberger, one of those gentle giant breeds that can cost up to $1,500 and would occupy a good chunk of her Long Island City apartment. The first year she asked, she got a replica fashioned from chick-en wire. The next year, Jackson tracked down a Leo breeder in Montana, where she was visiting her parents for the holidays. She printed out the directions, wrapped them in a big box and presented them to her father as a gift: “We went home without one, but it was a fun road trip.” And the year after that? Her mom shipped her a giant stuffed dog to stand in for the real thing. While her parents have good reasons for not granting her wish (cost, size), other people aren’t so sure why their numerous gift hints year after year yield a big fat noth-ing, even when their sought-after treasures aren’t out-of-this-world expensive. David Bakke, 46, said he’s not the greatest at matching his clothes and always asks for new shirt-and-pant combos. It never happens. “Time and again, I end up with a new GPS or digital camera,” he said. “People always tell me that clothes are boring to give as a Christmas gift. I’d take that boring gift any day of the week.” Bakke also hinted for an iPad last year. Didn’t get it. “I’m a little more excited about it this year LIFE Sunday, December 9, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section D Story ideas?ContactRobert BridgesEditor754-0428rbridges@lakecityreporter.com Lake City Reporter1DLIFE R ecently on an all-day shop-ping trip to Gainesville, lunch time arrived. We faced that old dilemma of where to go that is not just the usual fast-food meal. The deci-sion was let’s go to the Honey Baked Ham Caf. It is located off Newberry Road next to MacAllister’s in the same mall area that Steinmart’s is located, so this makes it a quick and easy stop. When you walk in your senses are on alert with the wonderful smell of ham. After perusing the menu, which included pic-tures of the sandwiches, you order and fix your drink, find a table and your sandwich is usually ready before you can even sit down. The atmosphere is homey, with table cover-ings of green checked cloths and wooden kitch-en-type chairs. One of our favorite sandwich choices is the Swiss Is It, served hot ($6.09). It’s made with the bone-less ham, Swiss cheese, savory sauce and sweet honey mustard on a warm ciabatta roll. A dill strip and a bag of chips accom-pany this comforting bas-ket. Another favorite is the Tavern Club ($6.59). This club has boneless ham, smoked turkey, bacon, cheddar cheese, lettuce, tomato, savory sauce and honey mustard on multi-grain bread or rye. This, too, is served hot. The majority of the sandwiches are served hot, but there are great choices if you don’t like it hot. We ran into Genie’s doctor, Dr. Frank Ellis, and his assistant, Nancy Scott, from the Orthopedic Institute, who said they frequently go there for lunch since it is close to the institute and they can have a quick lunch and get back to work without a long wait. They had the Pepper Mill Chicken ($6.59), which is grilled chicken breast, provolone cheese, lettuce, tomato, three-pepper mayo and red onions on a fresh ciabatta roll, also served hot. The other choice that day was the Southwest Turkey Ole ($6.59). A cia-batta roll is layered with smoked turkey, provolone cheese, lettuce, tomato, banana pepper rings and creamy chipotle mayo and served hot. It has a little kick, but is certainly not too spicy. Various sides are available, such as potato salad, pasta salad, fruit cocktail, macaroni and cheese salad — all for $1.59 each. Tasty mealsat ham cafe’ Twisted tales of elusive Christmas gifts Olympian helps others Gymnastics gold-medalist promotes Salvation Army LAKE CITY GOLD GIFTS continued on 3D Genie Norman and Mary Kay HollingsworthTasteBuddiesLakeCity@gmail.com TASTE BUDDIES TASTE continued on 3DASSOCIATED PRESSMargaret Smith (left) and her niece Katie Jackson show o ff a stuffed dog Jackson received for Christmas. Jackson asked for a Leo nberger, one of those gentle, giant breeds, without luck, making her one of those people whose numerous gift hints year after year yield a big fat nothing. PHOTOS BY DEREK GILLIAM/ Lake City ReporterFormer Olympic gymnast Henrietta Onodi-Haley (left rear) and her husband, Lake City native Jimbo Haley — also a former Olympian — hold their three children (front, from left) Annabella, Christian and Sebasti an. Henrietta Onodi-Haley shows off the gold medal she won at the 1992 Olympic Games. Her husband, Jimbo Haley, competed in the same games but they did not meet until some years



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Lake City Reporter TIGER FOOTBALL Sunday, December 9, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section E 1EFOOTBALL Why wait longER? Text ER to 23000 for average ER wait times. (Wait dened as arrival time until seen by qualied medical professional.) Congratulations on a great season. A season to remember JEN CHASTEEN /Special to the Reporter Columbia High football players for 2012 are (by jersey number) 1Roc Battle, 2Zedrick Woods, 3Terry Calloway, 4Felix Woods, 5Jayce Barber, 6Jake Thomas, 7J.T. Bradley, 9Roger Cray, 10Antonio Pelham, 11Ben Kuykendall, 12Austin Williams, 14Brayden Thomas, 15Alex Weber, 16Cody Beadles, 18Shaquille Johnson, 19Dugan Dotson, 20Blake Kuykendall, 21Trey Marshall, 22Braxton Stockton, 23Ronald Timmons, 24Lonnie Underwood, 25Kenny Paul, 28Bryan Williams, 30Solomon Bell, 32Allen Tremon, 34Drew Clark, 36Darren Burch, 38Alex Milton, 40Wyndell Wallace, 41Carlos Vega, 42Jessie Nolan, 44Jesse Stokes, 48Devin Burnnam, 50Joseph Chatman, 51Javere Smith, 52Jeremy Bradley, 53Malachi Jean, 54Charles Combs, 55Tyrone Sands, 56Walker Johnson, 57Deontae Crumitie, 58Marquise Harrell, 60John Sweat, 63Milla Chasteen, 64Dalton Masters, 70Nick Martino, 71Kody Mixon, 73Breland Gandy, 74Ethan Bailey, 75Thomas Holmes, 77Laremy Tunsil, 80Desmond Mayo, 81Nathaniel Ayers, 82Caleb Carswell, 89Nathan Acosta, 99Brett Newcomb. Jarrod Harris and Hunter Lord also are on the team. Brian Allen is head coach. Mitch Shoup, Dennis Dotson, Quinton Callum, Doug Peeler, Tamar Jernigan, Andy Giddens, Reinard Wilson, Tim Jernigan and Vernon Amerson are assistant coaches. Tigers finish year as district champions By BRANDON FINLEY bfinley@lakecityreporter.com Columbia High was strong from the start in 2012 and finished with an 11-2 record after advancing to the Region 1 final against Navarre High. It was a season as strong as the Tigers have had since 2003 and one that coach Brian Allen expects his next group of football players to strive for. We definitely set the standard, Allen said after the season. The standard began early. Kickoff classic Columbia 34, Santa Fe 0 The Tigers rushed for 143 yards led by Ronald Timmons 63 yards on nine carries. Columbia jumped out to a 27-0 lead in the first half and never looked back following a Jayce Barber pass to Nate Ayers from four yards out to start the season. Lineman Milla Chasteen : We have a lot more familiarity with each other and know what the guy next to us is going to do. Were pushing the run ning backs to get every thing we can. Allen : My pre-game speech was about climbing the mountain. This season, were going to be on a slip pery slope. Weve got to take baby steps and learn from our mistakes each time we take the field. Regular season Columbia 50, Baker County 0 Columbias defense con tinued to roll and Barber threw for 189 yards and three touchdowns on CHS continued on 2E



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TALLAHASSEE The Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles says it wont try to privatize its license tag services. Tax collectors, who distribute state tags, and two manufacturing groups had lobbied election offi cials and filed legal action against the department to block the changes. Highway Safety execu tive director Julie Jones on Friday told the Tampa Bay Times that the department had wanted to save money by paying private compa nies $31.4 million over two years to make tags and distribute mail and online orders. Jones says she aban doned the idea under pressure from the tax col lectors, Attorney General Pam Bondi and Chief Financial Officer Jeff Atwater. The state still plans to redesign its license plates. Residents can vote on four proposed designs at Vote4FloridaTag.com. High court asked to stop execution TALLAHASSEE A former police officer con victed of killing nine people is asking the U.S. Supreme Court to block his execution scheduled for Tuesday. Lawyers for Manuel Pardo Jr. filed an appeal and requested of a stay of execution on Friday. Theyre arguing that state courts failed to pro vide a meaningful review of his challenge to chang es in Floridas three-drug lethal injection cocktail. They also contend psy chiatric and competency information about Pardo was never forwarded to the state Executive Clemency Board. The state filed a response arguing that Pardos constitutional rights were not violated. The 56-year-old exSweetwater officer admit ted he killed the victims in 1986. He testified at his trial that they were drug dealers who have no right to live. 20-year-old guilty in gang shooting BARTOW A central Florida man faces a man datory life sentence after being convicted of a fatal gang shooting. A Polk County jury found 20-year-old Alejandro Baez-Garcia guilty Thursday of firstdegree murder and attempted second-degree murder. Because prosecu tors didnt seek the death penalty, life imprisonment is the only option at his Feb. 1 sentencing. Authorities said BaezGarcia was riding in a van with friends in January 2011 when he opened the sliding door and began firing at people in front of a Lakeland home. The Ledger reported that 19year-old Juan Castillo and his then-11-year-old broth er were both hit. Castillo died from his wounds, and the brother was left para lyzed. A defense attorney said Baez-Garcia was acting in self-defense after Castillo and others began throw ing rocks and sticks at the van. Citations issued in I-75 wreck fest BRADENTON Florida Highway Patrol issued more than a dozen traffic citations to drivers involved in a chain of col lisions that injured more than 50 people. No one died in the Oct. 5 crashes, which closed a section of Interstate 75 for six hours along Floridas Gulf Coast. Authorities said 52 people were injured, including 22 who were hospitalized. FHP officials said Friday that they had finished their investigation into the series of crashes. Investigators found that 53 vehicles were involved in 21 crashes on the highway near the Sarasota-Manatee county line. According to FHP, bad weather and driver error contributed to the crashes. FHP issued 19 traffic cita tions to drivers involved in the collisions. Students do well on word test TALLAHASSEE Florida education officials are pleased with the first vocabulary test results from the National Assessment of Education Progress. The 2011 scores released Friday show Floridas fourth graders topped the national aver age score by four points. Scores in 23 other states were not significantly dif ferent while only six were significantly higher. Floridas eighth graders were one point above the national average. Scores in 23 states were not sig nificantly different but 16 were significantly higher. Black and Hispanic students in Florida scored lower than whites but also did well compared to minority students in other states. Cold sea turtles flown to Florida DAYTONA BEACH More than two dozen cold-stressed sea turtles have been airlifted from New England to recover in balmy Florida. The Coast Guard flew the turtles to Orlando on Friday. The Daytona Beach News Journal reported that 20 turtles were taken to SeaWorld Orlando. Five loggerhead turtles were taken to the Volusia County Marine Science Center. Three other facili ties in Florida also took in turtles. A New England Aquarium spokesman says a record number of endangered and federally protected sea turtles have been treated this year for cold stress. NEW YORK T he Rolling Stones will join the artists already booked for next weeks televised Superstorm Sandy benefit show in New York City, which producers said Friday would be the most widely available live con cert ever. The Stones join a trio of 1960s British rock royalty on the bill, including Paul McCartney and the Who. Among the other artists scheduled to appear are Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band, Alicia Keys, Kanye West, Eric Clapton, Eddie Vedder, Billy Joel, Roger Waters and Chris Martin. The -12-12 concert at Madison Square Garden will be available on television or online to some 2 billion people, said James Dolan, one of the producers. A total of 34 U.S. televi sion networks have agreed to show the concert, which begins at 7:30 p.m. EST on Wednesday. Harvey Weinstein, the movie executive who is producing the show along with Cablevision chief Dolan and John Sykes, head of Clear Channel Communications Inc., said that $30 million has been raised for victims of the storm, which hit the New York City region hard on Oct. 29. The Concert for New York, a benefit run in the wake of the 2001 terrorist attacks, had raised $19 mil lion by the same point on its way to a total of $65 million. The Robin Hood Foundation will distribute proceeds of the Sandy benefit to storm vic tims in New York, New Jersey and Connecticut. Stephen King reveals what scares him most LOWELL, Mass. Stephen King loves scaring people, but one stu dent at University of Massachusetts Lowell tried to find out Friday what scares him. Spiders, snakes ... my mother-inlaw, the writer said with a grin. The author of international best selling books including Carrie and The Shining came to the college to talk with writing students. English Department professor Andre Dubus III, another bestselling author and an old friend of Kings, shared the stage for about an hour as students asked questions about their craft. King told the crowd of about 125 students that his goal is to write sto ries that sizzle with emotion. Im a confrontational writer. I want to be in your face. I want to get into your space. I want to get within kissing distance, hugging distance, choking distance, punching distance. Call it whatever you want. But I want your attention. He got that Friday, plus some laughs. Wearing jeans and a black T-shirt, the 65-year-old writer from Maine peppered his talk with profanity and promised students he was just a regular guy. He said they shouldnt be in awe like he was when he was a University of Maine freshman and heard a talk from Catch-22 author Joseph Heller. Its not like being U2, you know what Im saying? King said. Singer Toni Braxton hospitalized in LA LOS ANGELES Singer Toni Braxton has been hospitalized in Los Angeles. The R&B performer says in a Tweet on Friday that shes been hos pitalized because of minor health issues related to Lupus. A spokeswoman confirmed the hospi talization but had no other details. But no worries!, Braxton wrote to fans. I will be out any day now. The 45-year-old singer of Unbreak My Heart revealed two years ago she has Lupus. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Actor Kirk Douglas is 96. Actor Dick Van Patten is 84. Actor-writer Buck Henry is 82. Actress Dame Judi Dench is 78. Actor Beau Bridges is 71. Jazz singer-musician Dan Hicks is 71. Football Hall-of-Famer Dick Butkus is 70. Author Joe McGinniss is 70. Actor Michael Nouri is 67. Former Sen. Thomas Daschle, D-S.D., is 65. World Golf Hall of Famer Tom Kite is 63. Singer Joan Armatrading is 62. Actor Michael Dorn is 60. Actor John Malkovich is 59. Country singer Sylvia is 56. Singer Donny Osmond is 55. CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading. AROUND FLORIDA Friday: 19-32-33-44 3 Friday: 6-9-18-21-24 Saturday: Afternoon: 1-0-7 Evening: N/A Saturday: Afternoon: 9-0-4-5 Evening: N/A Wednes day: 6-20-25-36-44-52 x3 State wont try to privatize license tag services Rolling Stones to join Sandy benefit Wednes day: 13-17-19-27-38 PB 12 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter 2A Daily Scripture Jesus answered, I am the way and the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me. John 14:6 ASSOCIATED PRESS The Rolling Stones (from left) Charlie Watts, Bill Wyman, Keith Richards, Ronnie Wood and Mick Jagger are in New York to perform two 50th anniversary concerts and plan to participate in a charity concert next weekend for victims of Hurricane Sandy in the Northeast. Associated Press King Braxton ASSOCIATED PRESS Robert Hickman (left) and Keith Nelson pedal their unicycles on the Channel 5 bridge near Islamorada. The Brooklyn, N.Y., men are pedaling 106 miles, from Key Largo to Key West, on the Florida Keys Overseas Highway as part of a six-day performance art project They are expected to arrive in Key West today. Associated Press



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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today GOLF 5:30 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Nelson Mandela Championship, final round, at Durban, South Africa 3 p.m. NBC — Franklin Templeton Shootout, final round, at Naples NFL FOOTBALL 1 p.m. CBS — Regional coverageFOX — Regional coverage 4 p.m. CBS — Regional coverage 4:25 p.m. FOX — Doubleheader game 8:20 p.m. NBC — Detroit at Green Bay RUGBY 11 p.m. NBCSN — Sevens World Series, semifinals and championship match, at Port Elizabeth, South Africa ——— Monday NFL FOOTBALL 8:30 p.m. ESPN — Houston at New England SOCCER 2:55 p.m. ESPN2 — Premier League, Newcastle at FulhamFOOTBALLNFL standings AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAy-New England 9 3 0 .750 430 260N.Y. Jets 5 7 0 .417 228 296Buffalo 5 7 0 .417 277 337Miami 5 7 0 .417 227 249 South W L T Pct PF PAx-Houston 11 1 0 .917 351 221Indianapolis 8 4 0 .667 265 306Tennessee 4 8 0 .333 248 359Jacksonville 2 10 0 .167 206 342 North W L T Pct PF PABaltimore 9 3 0 .750 303 242 Pittsburgh 7 5 0 .583 254 230Cincinnati 7 5 0 .583 302 260Cleveland 4 8 0 .333 229 265 West W L T Pct PF PAy-Denver 10 3 0 .769 375 257 San Diego 4 8 0 .333 258 257Oakland 3 10 0 .231 248 402 Kansas City 2 10 0 .167 188 322 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAN.Y. Giants 7 5 0 .583 321 243 Washington 6 6 0 .500 312 301 Dallas 6 6 0 .500 280 295 Philadelphia 3 9 0 .250 217 320 South W L T Pct PF PAy-Atlanta 11 1 0 .917 317 229Tampa Bay 6 6 0 .500 333 285New Orleans 5 7 0 .417 321 327 Carolina 3 9 0 .250 235 292 North W L T Pct PF PAGreen Bay 8 4 0 .667 296 259Chicago 8 4 0 .667 294 198Minnesota 6 6 0 .500 262 272 Detroit 4 8 0 .333 300 315 West W L T Pct PF PASan Francisco 8 3 1 .708 289 171Seattle 7 5 0 .583 242 202St. Louis 5 6 1 .458 221 267Arizona 4 8 0 .333 186 234 x-clinched playoff spoty-clinched division Thursday’s Game Denver 26, Oakland 13 Today’s Games Chicago at Minnesota, 1 p.m.Baltimore at Washington, 1 p.m.Kansas City at Cleveland, 1 p.m.San Diego at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.Tennessee at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.N.Y. Jets at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.Atlanta at Carolina, 1 p.m.Philadelphia at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.St. Louis at Buffalo, 1 p.m.Dallas at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.Miami at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.Arizona at Seattle, 4:25 p.m.New Orleans at N.Y. Giants, 4:25 p.m.Detroit at Green Bay, 8:20 p.m. Monday’s Game Houston at New England, 8:30 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 13 Cincinnati at Philadelphia, 8:20 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 16 Green Bay at Chicago, 1 p.m.Tampa Bay at New Orleans, 1 p.m.Minnesota at St. Louis, 1 p.m.Indianapolis at Houston, 1 p.m.N.Y. Giants at Atlanta, 1 p.m.Washington at Cleveland, 1 p.m.Jacksonville at Miami, 1 p.m.Denver at Baltimore, 1 p.m.Carolina at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.Detroit at Arizona, 4:05 p.m.Seattle vs. Buffalo at Toronto, 4:05 p.m.Kansas City at Oakland, 4:25 p.m.Pittsburgh at Dallas, 4:25 p.m.San Francisco at New England, 8:20 p.m. Monday, Dec. 17 N.Y. Jets at Tennessee, 8:30 p.m. NFL playoff scenarios AFC Clinched: Denver, AFC West; Houston, playoff spot; New England, AFC East. HOUSTON Clinches AFC South division with:— Win AND Indianapolis loss or tie, or — Tie AND Indianapolis lossClinches first-round bye with:— Win AND Indianapolis loss or tie AND Baltimore loss or tie, or — Win AND Indianapolis loss or tie AND Denver loss or tie Clinches home-field advantage throughout AFC playoffs with: — Win AND Indianapolis loss or tie AND Baltimore loss AND Denver loss BALTIMORE Clinches AFC North division with:— Baltimore win AND Pittsburgh loss AND Cincinnati loss Clinches playoff spot with: — Win AND Pittsburgh loss or tie, or — Win AND Cincinnati loss or tie, or — Tie AND Pittsburgh loss AND Cincinnati loss ——— NFC Clinched: Atlanta, NFC South. ATLANTA Clinches first-round bye with:— Win AND Chicago loss or tie AND Green Bay loss or tie, or — Win AND San Francisco loss, or— Tie AND Chicago loss AND Green Bay loss Clinches home-field advantage throughout NFC playoffs with: — Win AND Chicago loss or tie AND Green Bay loss or tie AND San Francisco loss SAN FRANCISCO Clinches playoff spot with:— Win AND Dallas loss AND Minnesota loss AND Tampa Bay loss AND Washington loss AND St. Louis loss or tie, or — Win AND Dallas loss AND Minnesota loss AND Tampa Bay loss AND Washington loss AND Seattle loss or tieCollege bowl games Saturday New Mexico Bowl At AlbuquerqueNevada (7-5) vs. Arizona (7-5), 1 p.m. (ESPN) Famous Idaho Potato Bowl At Boise, IdahoToledo (9-3) vs. Utah State (10-2), 4:30 p.m. (ESPN) Thursday, Dec. 20 Poinsettia Bowl At San DiegoSan Diego State (9-3) vs. BYU (7-5), 8 p.m. (ESPN) Friday, Dec. 21 Beef ’O’ Brady’s Bowl At St. PetersburgBall State (9-3) vs. UCF (9-4), 7:30 p.m. (ESPN) Saturday, Dec. 22 New Orleans Bowl East Carolina (8-4) vs. LouisianaLafayette (7-4), Noon (ESPN) Las Vegas Bowl Boise State (10-2) vs. Washington (7-5), 3:30 p.m. (ESPN) Monday, Dec. 24 Hawaii Bowl At HonoluluSMU (6-6) vs. Fresno State (9-3), 8 p.m. (ESPN) Wednesday, Dec. 26 Little Caesars Pizza Bowl At DetroitCentral Michigan (6-6) vs. Western Kentucky (7-5), 7:30 p.m. (ESPN) Thursday, Dec. 27 Military Bowl At WashingtonBowling Green (8-4) vs. San Jose State (10-2), 3 p.m. (ESPN) Belk Bowl At Charlotte, N.C.Duke (6-6) vs. Cincinnati (9-3), 6:30 p.m. (ESPN) Holiday Bowl At San DiegoBaylor (7-5) vs. UCLA (9-4), 9:45 p.m. (ESPN) Friday, Dec. 28 Independence Bowl At Shreveport, La.Louisiana-Monroe (8-4) vs. Ohio (8-4), 2 p.m. (ESPN) Russell Athletic Bowl At OrlandoVirginia Tech (6-6) vs. Rutgers (9-3), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN) Meineke Car Care Bowl At HoustonMinnesota (6-6) vs. Texas Tech (7-5), 9 p.m. (ESPN) Saturday, Dec. 29 Armed Forces Bowl At Fort Worth, TexasRice (6-6) vs. Air Force (6-6), 11:45 a.m. (ESPN) Fight Hunger Bowl At San FranciscoArizona State (7-5) vs. Navy (7-4), 3:15 p.m. (ESPN2) Pinstripe Bowl At New YorkSyracuse (7-5) vs. West Virginia (7-5), 3:15 p.m. (ESPN) Alamo Bowl At San AntonioTexas (8-4) vs. Orgeon State (9-3), 6:45 p.m. (ESPN) Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl At Tempe, Ariz.Michigan State (6-6) vs. TCU (7-5), 10:15 p.m. (ESPN) Monday, Dec. 31 Music City Bowl At Nashville, Tenn.Vanderbilt (8-4) vs. N.C. State (7-5), Noon (ESPN) Sun Bowl At El Paso, TexasGeorgia Tech (6-7) vs. Southern Cal (7-5), 2 p.m. (CBS) Liberty Bowl At Memphis, Tenn.Iowa State (6-6) vs. Tulsa (10-3), 3:30 p.m. (ESPN) Chick-fil-A Bowl At AtlantaLSU (10-2) vs. Clemson (10-2), 7:30 p.m. (ESPN) Tuesday, Jan. 1 Heart of Dallas Bowl At Dallas-Purdue (6-6) vs. Oklahoma State (7-5), Noon (ESPNU) Gator Bowl At JacksonvilleMississippi State (8-4) vs. Northwestern (9-3), Noon (ESPN2) Capital One Bowl At OrlandoGeorgia (11-2) vs. Nebraska (10-3), 1 p.m. (ABC) Outback Bowl At TampaSouth Carolina (10-2) vs. Michigan (84), 1 p.m. (ESPN) Rose Bowl At Pasadena, Calif.Stanford (11-2) vs. Wisconsin (8-5), 5 p.m. (ESPN) Orange Bowl At MiamiNorthern Illinois (12-1) vs. Florida State (11-2), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN)High school playoffs State Semifinals Class 8A Apopka 38, Dr. Phillips 19Cypress Bay 33, Christopher Columbus Catholic 13 Class 7A Lincoln 24, Kissimmee Osceola 17St. Thomas Aquinas 35, Manatee 18 Class 6A Gainesville 62, Navarre 26Miami Central 48, Naples 33 Class 5A Godby 24, Robinson 20Immokalee 29, Miami Jackson 21 State Championships Class 2A University Christian 28, Dade Christian 10 Class 1A Northview 42, Trenton 21BASKETBALLNBA schedule EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct GB New York 14 4 .778 — Brooklyn 11 7 .611 3Philadelphia 11 8 .579 3 1/2 Boston 10 9 .526 4 1/2 Toronto 4 16 .200 11 Southeast Division W L Pct GB Miami 12 5 .706 — Atlanta 11 5 .688 1/2 Charlotte 7 11 .389 5 1/2 Orlando 7 12 .368 6 Washington 2 14 .125 9 1/2 Central Division W L Pct GB Chicago 10 8 .556 —Milwaukee 9 9 .500 1Indiana 10 10 .500 1 Detroit 6 15 .286 5 1/2 Cleveland 4 16 .200 7 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct GB Memphis 14 3 .824 1/2 San Antonio 16 4 .800 — Houston 9 9 .500 6 Dallas 9 10 .474 6 1/2 New Orleans 5 13 .278 10 Northwest Division W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 16 4 .800 — Utah 11 10 .524 5 1/2 Denver 10 10 .500 6Minnesota 9 9 .500 6 Portland 8 11 .421 7 1/2 Pacific Division W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 12 6 .667 — Golden State 12 7 .632 1/2 L.A. Lakers 9 11 .450 4Phoenix 7 13 .350 6 Sacramento 6 12 .333 6 Today’s Games Toronto at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m.Milwaukee at Brooklyn, 6 p.m.Indiana at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.Denver at New York, 7:30 p.m.Orlando at Phoenix, 8 p.m.Utah at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m. Monday’s Games Detroit at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.Golden State at Charlotte, 7 p.m.Atlanta at Miami, 7:30 p.m.San Antonio at Houston, 8 p.m.Sacramento at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.Toronto at Portland, 10 p.m. AP Top 25 schedule Today’s Games No. 16 Creighton vs. Akron, 2:05 p.m.No. 21 UNLV at California, 6 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-04212BSPORTS COURTESY PHOTOJonathan Ulsh (from left) and Alex Gilmer join Florida G ateway College’s Golf Ventures GLO Invitational overall winner Nathan Allen and John Piers ol. Allen wins top prize at Golf Ventures GLO InvitationalSpecial to the ReporterFlorida Gateway College’s Golf Ventures GLO Invitational, hosted by The Country Club at Lake City, took place Dec. 1. Six area high schools were represented among the 41 golfers who partici-pated in the event. Branford High student Nathan Allen was the first-place winner, and received a $3,500 scholar-ship to Florida Gateway College. The scholarship is good for the college’s three-year Golf Course Operations, two-year Landscape Technology, or one-year Turf Equipment Management programs. Columbia High student Nick Jones and Middleburg High student Kyle Dotson came in second and third and earned $2,500 and $1,500 scholarships, respectively. The money raised at the tournament will go toward the GLO scholarship fund. For the high school golf coaches and players who participated, this was an introduction to FGC’s Golf Course Operations program. The three-person teams consisted of a high school golf coach, student, and an FGC alumnus or indus-try representative, which allowed the trio to discuss the FGC golf program and careers in golf. FGC past graduates are superintendents at some of the most renowned golf courses in the nation, including the Atlanta Athletic Club, Trump International and Sawgrass Country Club. They also work maintaining athletic fields like Everbank Field in Jacksonville and the University of Florida foot-ball field. Taggart leaves Western Kentucky for South FloridaBy FRED GOODALLAssociated PressTAMPA — Willie Taggart is taking over as South Florida’s football coach after establishing himself as one of the nation’s top young prospects by turning around a losing program at Western Kentucky. USF scheduled a news conference for Saturday afternoon to introduce the 36-year-old Taggart, who grew up in the Tampa Bay area before heading off to play and later coach at Western Kentucky. He replaces Skip Holtz, who was fired following the worst season in USF’s 16-year history. Taggart led Western Kentucky to a 7-5 record this season. The Hilltoppers, who made defensive coor-dinator Lance Guidry the interim coach on Saturday, will make their first post-season appearance since joining the Football Bowl Subdivision when they face Central Michigan in the Little Caesars Bowl. A former assistant at Stanford to Jim Harbaugh, Taggart takes over a pro-gram that went 16-21 under Holtz. Western Kentucky had lost 20 consecutive games before Taggart returned to his alma mater and went 2-10 in his first season, then followed with consecutive 7-5 records to expand his resume.



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2C LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF DECEMBER 9, 2012 2CBIZ/MOTLEY Sometimes the market reacts poorly to world events, but just be-cause the market reacts doesn’t mean you should. Still, if current events are making you feel uncertain about your nances, you should schedule a complimentary portfolio review. That way, you can make sure you’re in control of where you want to go and how you get there. YOU CAN’T CONTROL THE WORLD,BUT YOU CAN CONTROL YOUR DECISIONS. PROJECTS: Interest in county increased in past six months Continued From Page 1Ccounty’s economic development department in 2013, he said many companies that may look into coming to the area will also look for some sort of financial incentives. “In today’s climate incentives are a given,” he said. “You have to have a competitive program to actually close deals. The primary drivers are probably location and transporta-tion and workforce is always going to be a key. If you can satisfy those key components then you get to talking about incentives.” Quillen said the area has a good transportation system and the number of workers avail-able regionally should satisfy a company’s workforce needs. “We have good state incentives and we have a good crew locally that will allow us to and give us the ability to hopefully put a deal over the top,” he said. “I think we have a lot of components in place to close a deal. Incentives are going to be a part of that. I wish we could close deals with out incentives, but the reality is because of the economy and the competitive nature of communities across the country, in order for us to be competitive and have a busi-ness locate here, we’re going to have to offer incentives.”2013 outlookThe local economic development department nor its board have established a set of goals for 2013, but Quillen said he’s looking forward to “great things” including the pos-sibility of development of the RACES/Catalyst Site, which was recently renamed the North Florida Intermodal Park. “The one thing I think we have on the top of the list is the North Florida Intermodal Park,” he said. “We want to see ground broke out there and we want to see some vertical construction. I think that’s a real possibility for 2013.” There will also be continued emphasis on promoting and pursing opportunities near Interstate 75 and State Road 47, as well as on the north end of the county along Bell Road and Interstate 10. “If we look at the three of those things combined, we have opportunities throughout the county that should keep us busy through 2013,” Quillen said. Over the past 12 months, the Columbia County Economic Development department has been involved 12 projects. The projects were listed under code names and included operations, average sala-ries and other details. The projects: Q Feb. 1 — Project Waterfall, health care business, capital investment of $20 million, potentially creating 30 jobs with an average wage of $45,000; Key drivers: Tax abate-ments and local incentives; Q April 19 — Project Travel, a multicultural facility, capital investment of $25.2 million, potentially creating 100 jobs with an average wage of $60,500; Key drivers: Large campus facility, large dormitories and offices for facility; Q May 11 — Project Kohl’s, department store, capital investment of $3.5 million, potentially creating 150175 jobs with an average wage of $18,000; Key drivers: One timenonrecurring; Q May 11 — Project Veggie, food distribution, capital investment, jobs and wage infor-mation not provided; Key drivers: rail access to transport fruit; Q July 18 — Project CMS, nurse staffing, capital investment of $907,532, potentially creating 284 jobs with an average wage of $40,000; Key drivers: Requires $86,000 loan, possible tax abatement and local incentives; Q Oct. 12 — Project Redwood, a distribution center, capital investment of $40 million, potentially creating 500 jobs with an average wage of $35,000; Key drivers: Needs 40-100 acres, 800,000 1.2 million square feet and easy access to interstate or turnpike; Q Nov. 1 — Site Selection, a call center survey; no capital investment, jobs and wage information provided; Key drivers: Survey from local labor recruitment; Q Nov. 2 — Project Reach, a call center, capital investment of $500,000, potentially creating 150 jobs with an average wage of $41,142; Key drivers: 30 percent bilingual; Q Nov. 5 — Project Spark, a manufacturing company, capital investment of $400 million, potentially creating 400 jobs with an average wage of $30,000; needs 40-50 acres, 300,000 square-foot building, 18-30 ft. ceiling height, sufficient power and truck and rail; Q Nov. 16 — Project Century, food manufacturing; capital investment information not provided, potentially creating 50 jobs with an average wage of $40,555; Key drivers: Access to Interstates 10 and 75, 50-75 square-foot building, 20-foot ceiling height, dock loading and natural gas; Q Nov. 30 — Project Bark, a wood pellet facility, capital investment of $45 million, potentially creating 80 jobs with an aver-age wage of $36,000; Key drivers: Needs 25 acres, 100 miles to Jaxport and rail service; and Q Dec. 21 — Project MegaSite, original equipment manufacturing, no information provided on capital investment, jobs created or average wage, Key drivers: 1,200 acres, industrial zoning, electrical, water, natural gas, waste, telephone and dual rail. On the drawing board Gov’t wants black boxes in new carsAssociated PressWASHINGTON — Many motorists don’t know it, but it’s likely that every time they get behind the wheel, there’s a snitch along for the ride. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration on Friday proposed long-delayed regulations requir-ing auto manufacturers to include event data record-ers — better known as “black boxes” — in all new cars and light trucks begin-ning Sept. 1, 2014. But the agency is behind the curve. Automakers have been qui-etly tucking the devices, which automatically record the actions of drivers and the responses of their vehi-cles, into most new cars for years. When a car is involved in a crash or when its air-bags deploy, inputs from the vehicle’s sensors during the 5 to 10 seconds before impact are automatically preserved. That’s usually enough to record things like how fast the car was traveling and whether the driver applied the brake, was steering erratically or had a seat belt on. The idea is to gather information that can help investigators determine the causes of accidents.



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2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04242DLIFE Stop by the Lake City Reporter for your complimentary engagement package. Aisle Style Complimentary Engagement Package • Sweetwater Branch Inn 800-595-7760• Wards Jewelry & Gifts 752-5470• Camp Weed Cerveny Conference Center 386-364-5250• GeGee’s Studio 758-2088• Holiday Inn 754-1411, ext. 106 By JOHN MARSHALLAssociated PressVAIL, Colo. — Rosana Faessler stops by the host-ess stand to check on res-ervations, then makes her way into the dining room to chat with a couple of the regular guests. After a few minutes, she wanders to the breakfast buffet to make sure everything’s clean and full, then straightens a pic-ture before heading back out to the dining room. These tasks could easily be delegated to the staff. But Faessler just can’t help her-self. Sonnenalp, the resort in the Colorado Rockies that Faessler owns with her husband Johannes, isn’t like a second home; it once was her home. Everything has to be just right. This type of nurturing has made Sonnenalp one of the few remaining large, family-owned resorts left in the country, a destination for travelers from around the world. “I feel like I’m going home every time I go there,” said Harvey Simpson of Old Westbury, N.Y., who’s been staying at Sonnenalp since 1965. “It’s a very warm atmo-sphere. The top personnel are there every day and it’s incredible the attention to detail they put into it.” Big, family-owned resorts are still in vogue in Europe, particularly in the mountains of Germany and Austria, where some hotels have been passed down through the genera-tions. But in the U.S., while there are still plenty of small resorts, B&Bs and inns run by families, many larger resorts that were founded by families have been sold to or taken over by corporate entities. A recent report on the global ski resort indus-try by SkiStar, a Swedish company, noted that the North American market has seen a “shift toward fewer, increasingly larger compa-nies” often owning proper-ties in a variety of locations to “decrease dependency on weather conditions” in any one place. Those places that remain family-owned say that when the owners are in the lobby or the dining room, sea-son after season, the atmo-sphere can’t help but be different from a property where the corporate owners are halfway across the coun-try or the world. And it’s why places like Sonnenalp in Vail, Trapp Family Lodge and Tyler Place Family Resort in Vermont, and The Homestead along the shores of Lake Michigan in Glen Arbor, Mich., attract many of the same custom-ers year after year. Johannes von Trapp has owned the Trapp Family Lodge since 1969, but its history goes back to 1943, when the famous singing family from “The Sound of Music” first moved to northern Vermont. The family lived on the farm during the summer and started renting rooms to skiers while they were out on the road singing. Von Trapp expanded the lodging when he took over, and again after a fire in 1980. The resort near Stowe now sits on 2,500 acres (about 1,000 hectares) with 96 rooms in the main hotel, 100 guest houses for rent and has built 21 of an expected 40 three-bedroom villas. He now runs the resort with his son, Sam, and son-in-law, Walter Frame, who are always on hand to make sure guests are comfortable and attend to details. “This place is such an extension of my family’s values and tastes, it really is important that a family member be here to explain and interpret and welcome and host our customers,” Johannes Von Trapp said. “It’s a great life, too. My house is on the property, but a mile from hotel. My son and daughter and her husband all have houses on the property, so it’s easy to go home and come back, do some work, go home again.” The Homestead in Michigan has been operat-ed by the Kuras family since Robert Kuras purchased the property in 1975. Originally a boys camp in the 1920s, the Homestead is now a 500-acre (200 hectares) resort with four distinct hotels and year-round activ-ities, from golf and water sports in the summer to skiing and snowboarding in the winter. It’s surrounded by the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore at the mouth of the Crystal River, which Kuras proudly notes was voted the most beau-tiful place in America last year in a “Good Morning America” contest. Kuras’ children now help run the business, with the youngest in charge of social media. He said what makes a family-owned resort differ-ent is “values and tradition. We try to stress that. We view our guests as family and friends, and 80 percent of our guests are repeat. We’re pretty proud of that.” A fourth-generation hotelier, Johannes Faessler grew up in a resort called Sonnenalp in the Bavarian Alps, in Germany, founded by his great-grandparents in 1919. Faessler’s parents purchased a Vail hotel in 1979 and founded the U.S. version of Sonnenalp, which means “Sun on the Mountains.” Johannes took over opera-tions in 1985 and lived at the resort with Rosana until they had kids and moved into a house nearby. But Sonnenalp will always be their home, and they treat it that way, with Rosana doing most of the decorating to make sure the 127-room resort stays true to its Bavarian feel. The Faesslers still spend most of their time at Sonnenalp and plan to move back when their youngest daughter leaves for college. “This is more than a business. This is our lives,” Rosana Faessler said. “This is where our kids grew up. This is where my son learned to swim. It has to be not just cozy or elegant. ... It has to be special.” When problems arise, there’s no calling the cor-porate office for an answer. With owners on site, deci-sions can be made on the spot. “It’s the opposite of a large, corporate situation where it takes a long time to get a decision on anything,” Johannes von Trapp said. Family-owned resorts also offer a consistent, per-sonal experience. Other resorts may change own-ers, managers, sometimes even names and themes, but here, guests know what they’re getting every time. Even the employees some-times stay on for decades, and like the owners, they get to know repeat guests, forming bonds that reach beyond the walls. Family-owned resorts offer personal touch TRAVEL ASSOCIATED PRESSABOVE: Sonnenalp, a family-owned resort in Vail, Colo., strives to provide a personal touch in an era when many resor ts are owned by large corporations. BELOW: Cross-country skiers shush past the Trapp Family Lodge in Stowe, Vt The lodge is owned by the famous singing family from “The Sound of Mus ic.” Owners take personal pride in serving guests. Carder-Rockwell engagement Larry and Dr. Sheri Carder Gunter of Lake City and Mr. and Mrs. George Carder III of Searcy, Ark., announce the engagement of their daughter, Dr. Casey Lane Carder of Little Rock, Ark., to Mr. Eric Rockwell, also of Little Rock. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Rod Rockwell of England, Ark. The couple will be married on Feb. 17, 2013, in an intimate ceremony in Savannah, Ga. The bride-elect holds both a doctorate and a law degree from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, as well a master’s degree from the (President) Clinton School of Public Service. She is currently the deputy director of the Arkansas Tobacco Enforcement Agency. She is a 2001 honors graduate of Columbia High School. She is the granddaughter of Mrs. Gene Thompson and Mrs. George Gunter of Conway, Ark., and Mrs. Frank Carder Jr. of Searcy, Ark. The future groom graduated from Ouachita Baptist University, in Arkansas, with a bachelor of arts degree in business. He is a self-employed real estate developer and small busi-ness owner. He is the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Baisel Newton of England, Ark., and Mrs. Sue King and the late Jesse Rockwell of Humnoke, Ark. COURTESYCasey Lane Carder and Eric Rockwell.HAPPENINGS



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2E LAKE CITY REPORTER 2012 COLUMBIA HIGH FOOTBALL SALUTE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012 2EFOOTBALL CHS: Finishes season at 11-2, reaches regional final, se ts rushing record Continued From Page 1E11-of-16 passing to lead the Tigers to a 50-0 victory. The Tigers added 208 rush-ing yards led by Braxton Stockton with 100 yards on 10 carries. The Columbia defense held the Wildcats without a point on the strength of three interceptions. Quarterback Jayce Barber : “The reason we didn’t play well last week is we were playing as individ-uals. This week I sat down with every receiver and we talked about playing unself-ishly and for one another.” Allen : “Anytime the yellow, purple, white or what-ever color we’re wearing is forcing turnovers, it’s going to be a good night.” Gainesville 17, Columbia 14The Tigers fell behind 14-0, but battled back to tie the game heading into halftime on the strength of a Lonnie Underwood run from 14 yards and Barber sneaking it into the end zone with 1:45 remaining in the first half. Alex Holloway kicked the game-winning field goal with 4:23 remain-ing in the contest. Linebacker Felix Woods : “We have to play hard from the beginning and one game at a time.” Allen : “We’re not flawless,” he said. “We have to look inside ourselves as players and coaches and figure out what we can do better.” Columbia 55, Buchholz 14The Tigers got back on track in a 55-14 victory against the Bobcats as the Columbia ground game got rolling. The Tigers rushed for 327 yards behind the strength of its three-headed monster. Underwood led the way with 136 yards in the contest and Timmons went over 100 yards for the first time in the season with 101 yards. Defensively, Bryan Williams made a name for himself with two intercep-tions to help the Tigers hold the playoff-bound Bobcats to only 14 points following the loss of starting safety Trey Marshall to an ankle injury. Defensive back Bryan Williams : “I knew I had to step up and make a play for my team. I was able to do just that.” Allen : “We came out and played three and a half good quarters of football and really besides about three minutes. We took our foot off after the second quarter when we should have tried to close the door. We have to be able to execute in all three phases of the game.” Columbia 19, Oakleaf 13The Tigers jumped out to a 19-7 halftime lead, but had to hang on to beat the Knights in their first dis-trict game. The road con-test came down to a goal-line stand for the Tigers after Columbia rushed its way to 19 points in the first half. Timmons went over 100 yards for the second-consecutive game with 114 in the contest. A blocked punt by Roc Battle set up Solomon Bell to score on a 30-yard punt block return a week after Allen called out the special teams. Cornerback Roc Battle : “My heart has always been at running back, but this isn’t about me. It’s all about helping the team out and that’s why I made the move.” Allen : “We identified that Zedrick Woods almost blocked the punt earlier coming off the edge, so we decided to send some-one that was just a little faster. When you get a spread-punt formation like that, you know you’ll have someone coming free off the edge.” Columbia 28, Vanguard 20Columbia fell behind 14-0 and didn’t score their first points until the third quarter. Trailing 20-7, the Tigers put up 21 fourthquarter points to defeat the Knights. Timmons account-ed for two touchdowns in the fourth quarter and Alex Weber scored on a 32-yard pass from Barber for the final edge. Left tackle Laremy Tunsil : “We knew we could wear them down. We wore them down last year. We’ve been through this before and we know that big-time players have to make plays in big-time games.” Allen : “That’s why we bust our butts. That’s why our workouts during the summer are so hard. We saw that with the success we were having running the ball in the second half.” Columbia 52, Ridgeview 17Columbia fell behind 3-0 on the Panthers’ opening drive, but that lead didn’t last long as Timmons broke free on a 70-yard run during the Tigers’ first possession. It was the breakout game for the senior as he demol-ished the Panthers’ front to the tune of 241 yards to help the Tigers step into the driver’s seat for the dis-trict championship. Running back Ronald Timmons : “It felt so good to do something like that for my team. Allen : “Their coach said this is the best team he’s ever coached. Well, this is the best team I’ve ever coached.” Columbia 58, Middleburg 0It was a Bronco blowout as the Tigers moved one step closer to the dis-trict title with a win over Middleburg. Columbia scored 34 points in the first quarter and Barber con-nected on 7-of-9 passes for 161 yards. Quarterback Jayce Barber : “I felt like that is the prettiest I’ve thrown the ball. My receivers were making big catches like Alex (Weber) and my line was blocking great.” Allen : “We’re a disciplined group that will play through pain. We earn our respect each week.” Columbia 21, Orange Park 0Columbia clinched the District 3-6A champion-ship with a shutout of for-mer coach Danny Green’s Raiders at Tiger Stadium. Roger Cray intercepted a pass, Drew Clark forced a fumble and Javere Smith recovered a fumble to help the Tigers earn their fourth shutout of the year. Linebacker Drew Clark : “It was a good night, because we won the district championship. I feel like we’re progressing every week, but we’re still not perfect.” Allen : “It’s a win, but we weren’t sharp (offensively).We have to be 100 percent by the end of the season.” Columbia 54, Leon 3The Tigers were a lastsecond field goal away from another shutout as Columbia crushed the Lions on homecoming. Stockton rushed for 120 yards as the Tigers’ ground game punished Leon for nearly 300 yards on the ground. Columbia also got a hand from the special teams with Underwood and Cray each returning punts for a touchdown. Running back Lonnie Underwood : “I waited for my blocks to set up for me. They came up. We identi-fied some weaknesses this week and we were able to take advantage.” Allen : “It was definitely an outstanding job. Those are scores that you can’t account for. Usually when a team finds a way to score on special teams, they come up with a win.” Columbia 40, Suwannee 0Columbia ended the season like it began, with a shutout victory against a neighboring county. This time, the Tigers retained the Old Oaken Bucket against the Bulldogs while playing for Stockton, who was lost for the remainder of the season with an eye injury. Timmons scored two first-half touchdowns and Ayers caught a touch-down pass for the second consecutive week. Wide receiver Nate Ayers : “I wasn’t clicking in the passing game, but coach told me he was going to get me one last week.Tonight, it was a good way to go out in a win in the Oaken Bucket.” Allen : “We’re a family. We’re only going to continue to grow in our bond.” Playoffs Columbia 35, Bartram Trail 14The Tigers waited 51 weeks for a second shot at the Bears after falling to Bartram Trail at home in last year’s playoffs. Columbia made the most of the opportunity and jumped out to a 28-0 lead before allowing the Bears to hit the board. Ayers caught a touchdown pass for the third week in a row after drop-ping a pass against the Bears in the 2011 playoffs he felt cost the team. The icing on the cake came with a 20-yard touchdown run for Timmons for the 35-14 final. Wide receiver Nate Ayers : “It felt so good. I felt like I had dropped two big passes last year and that cost us. I was focused all week on making sure that wouldn’t happen again.” Allen : “I’m smiling. We played well in all three phases.” Columbia 34, St. Augustine 8Columbia took the sting out of the Yellow Jackets in the Class 6A regional semi-final. St. Augustine came into the game undefeated and Columbia never trailed in the contest. Timmons started a strong playoff run with a 52-yard touch-down to begin the game. By the time the game was over, Timmons had rushed for 209 yards and was Columbia’s all-time single season rushing leader. Running back Ronald Timmons : “It feels really good. I just come out and work hard and I wouldn’t be where I’m at without my offensive line. Without them blocking, I wouldn’t be able to get anything done.” Allen : “I’ve never given a game ball, but tonight No. 23 (Timmons) earned it.” Navarre 28, Columbia 21Columbia’s final game of the 2012 season was the true definition of a heartbreak-er. The Tigers fell behind 21-0 in the first half before scoring two touchdowns in the ground game to cut the lead to 21-14 heading into the half. Timmons tied the game on the first play of the second half with a 65-yard touchdown run, but Navarre would win the game on a run from Jay Warren from eight yards out. Linebacker Felix Woods : “I think we set the bar really high. I’m proud of the guys and I think we’re going to be ready to make another run next year.” Allen : “Anytime you have a senior-heavy group, you expect to have a good team. They worked their butts off to be in the game. We’re going to try to do the same things next year and look for a chance to redeem ourselves.” JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Ronald Timmons became the all-time si ngle season rushing leader after compiling 1,771 yards during the 2012 season. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High head coach Brian Allen helped guide th e Tigers to an 11-2 record in 2012. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Roc Battle helped anchor a defense that pitched five shutouts in 2012.



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Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012 3A 3A SPECIALIZING IN: Non-Invasive Laparoscopic Gynecological Surgery Adolescent Gynecology High and Low Risk Obstetrics Contraception Delivering at Shands Lake Shore In-Ofce ultrasounds for our patients 3D/4D Entertainment Scans offering DaVinci Robotic Surgeries. New Patients Welcome Call today for a personal appointment: 386-755-0500 449 SE Baya Drive Lake City, Floraida 32025 www.dainagreenemd.com WE ARE WOMEN, WE ARE M OTHERS, WE UNDERST A ND NOTICE Attention Humana Wal-mart and CVS Caremark Medicare Part D patients: We accept these plans and all other Part D plans. Baya East 755-6677 Baya West 755-2233 Medical 755-2277 Call one of our pharmacies to see which plan is best for you. H OLIDAY C RAFT B AZAAR HOLIDAY CRAFT BAZAAR Lake City Mall Friday Saturday December 14th & 15th 10:00 am 5:00 pm Sunday December 16th 11:00 am 5:00 pm STILL ACCEPTING VENDOR APPLICATIONS www.lakecitybazaar.com ROBBERY: Armed man assaults customer Continued From Page 1A FDOE: Revised figures still arent right Continued From Page 1A Food drive collection set for Dec. 14 director of human resources. Moore said the district reported on 729 county educators who were evaluated under a new state law. FDOEs original report, issued Wednesday, listed the county as having 816 teachers. The problem was reported in many other districts as well, causing state officials to retract their findings later that day. In a revised report issued late Thursday, Columbia was listed as having evaluated 718 teachers 11 fewer than local offi cials say were actually rated. Moore said the district sent an email asking FDOE to provide a list of the teach ers it had so local officials could match the names to county employment rolls and see who was missing. FDOE politely declined, Moore said. In laymans terms they said we dont have time because so many other districts were asking the same thing, he said. Moore said it was a relatively minor glitch compared to past FDOE foul-ups. To us, its kinda like, Oh well, they done it again and we move onto the next project, he said. An FDOE spokesperson was not imme dately available for comment Friday after noon. According to the original report released Wednesday, 57.5 percent of Columbia County teachers were rated highly effec tive and 42.5 percent, effective. In the revised version, 57.3 percent were highly effective and 42.7 percent were effective. No local teachers in either ver sion of the report were rated unsatisfac tory or needs improvement. Statewide the numbers did change slightly, however. In the revised report, 2.1 percent of teachers statewide were rated as needs improvement and 0.3 percent were unsat isfactory. FDOE originally reported that 1.9 per cent were considered in need of improve ment and that 0.3 percent were judged unsatisfactory. wearing a baggy gray sweat shirt over a white T-shirt and was armed with a hand gun. The Columbia County Sheriffs Office said the man had on light colored Nike athletic sneakers. The man was black, according to a media release from the sheriffs office. The robber was inside the store for less than a minute, Patel said. Witnesses outside the store told Patel they saw the robber jump into the passenger side of a lightgreen minivan. The van was last seen heading south on SR 47, according to the sheriffs office. Nilesh Patel, brother of Rush Patel and also a man ager at the Stop N Go, said authorities recovered DNA and fingerprints from the crime scene. Hopefully hes on their file because if he is they will catch him easily, he said. Nilesh Patel said he wasnt sure how much money was stolen, but that it was at least $500 and could have been as much as $1,000. The customer who was hit by the robber turned over his jacket to authori ties for testing, Nilesh Patel said. The robber also touched the counter when he was picking up the money, leav ing fingerprints. No one was seriously injured, including the cust mer who was struck, and no shots were fired, police said. Rush Patel said that was the best outcome to a bad situation. Nobody was hurt, and he didnt shoot nothing, Rush Patel said. Swearing in set for new officers From staff reports The Lake City Police Department has sched uled a swearing-in cere mony to welcome three new officers to the force. The ceremony will take place 10 a.m. Tuesday in City Council Chambers at City Hall, 205 N. Marion Ave. The public is invited. Officers Nikki Gunter, Ryan Gutshall and Peter Michaels were hired in September by the depart ment. All three officers have successfully com pleted the necessary train ing and testing as part of the Field Training and Evaluation program and will be transitioning to solo police officer. Each one of these offi cers is to be commend ed for their successful completion of our Field Training Program, LCPD chief Argatha Gilmore said in a prepared statement. This program is designed to teach them the daily responsibilities and legalities of being a full-time, solo police offi cer with the City of Lake City. Our department has welcomed them as part of our family, and I encour age our community to join us Tuesday during their swearing-in and meet our fine, new officers, the chief said. Gunter Gutshall Michaels Cops: Man attacked while watching TV By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com A Lake City woman arrested Thursday night faces felony battery charges for allegedly attacking a man with a stick as he watched television. Rachel Colwell, 62, address with held, was charged with aggravated battery in connection with the case. She was booked into the Columbia County Detention Facility in lieu of $10,000 bond. According to Columbia County Sheriffs Office reports, deputy Kristopher Kosko, was dispatched to a Putnam Street address to investigate a battery. When Kosko arrived he met a man with lacerations on his arms and his face and bleeding from the back of his head. The man reportedly told Kosko that Colwell hit him with a wooden stick. The victim told Kosko he was sit ting on his recliner in the living room watching television when Colwell walked into the living room with a large stick and began hitting him. The victim told Kosko he was struck eight to 10 times before he could get away. He was struck in the face, on the back of the head and on his arms. An ambulance arrived and took the victim to the hospital. Kosko reported the victims injuries were consistent with being struck several times with a blunt object. Kosko reported that Colwell struck the victim with such force that there was a blood splatter on the wall near where the man was sitting. Kosko recovered the stick used in the attack and placed it into evidence and arrested Colwell, reports said. Colwell A note on todays Life section The front page story in todays Life section of the newspaper contains an error. Henrietta Onodi-Haley will be out front of the Lake City Publix from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. The story inaccurately says she will be there from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. From staff reports The Fifth Annual Lake City Reporter Community Food Drive is under way and continues through Friday, Dec. 14. The Reporter staff, inde pendent contractors and especially readers will be working to collect non-per ishable food items that will be donated to the Florida Gateway Food Bank and Catholic Charities. Lake City Reporter read ers are encouraged to bring canned goods and dry goods to the Reporter office where a collection basket is located. Any canned or boxed non-perishable item is needed. (Please, no glass containers.) We launched this food drive five years ago when it was brought to our attention that between Thanksgiving and Christmas the inven tory at the Food Bank is extremely low, yet the pres ence of hungry families in Lake City and Columbia County continues to be at an all-time high, said Lake City Reporter Publisher Todd Wilson. Theres a need for a food drive at this time of year and we wanted to meet the need. Besides the food items dropped off at the Lake City Reporter office down town, at 180 E. Duval St., the Reporters indepen dent newspaper carriers will be picking up food on Thursday night, Dec. 13, as they deliver the Friday newspaper. Home delivery custom ers of the newspaper are asked to leave a bag of nonperishable food items at their delivery tube or at the end of their driveway on the night of Thursday, Dec. 13, and their newspaper carrier will pick up the food and deliver it to the Reporter office for the food drive. Once all food is collect ed, Reporter staff will fill the truck and deliver the donated food items to the Food Bank. Lake City Reporter read ers stay engaged in whats going on in our commu nity and they are invested in Columbia County, Wilson said. They always answer the call to help with our Community Food Drive and I am very thankful for their assistance as we work to help those families who are less fortunate in our com munity. Elkins said the Lake City Reporters food drive has been one of the better food drives for his organization over the last five years. He said that over the past six months, Columbia County has been especially hard hit because of Tropical Storm Debby. The need is greater this year then in years past, he said. FDOT road and lane closures Florida Department of Transportation announced the following road and lane closures for area counties during the coming week: Columbia County State Road 47 in Fort White The road will be temporarily closed Saturday,, Dec. 15 from 8 to 9 a.m. for the Chomp Cancer Foundation 5K Run and Walk. Columbia County sheriffs deputies will detour traffic. Hamilton County Interstate 75 The emer gency lanes in both direc tions between the Georgia line and State Road 6 (Exit 460) may be closed to replace motorist call boxes. U.S. 41 Daytime lane closures after 8:30 a.m. from the Columbia County line to US 129 south of Jasper for resurfacing and drainage improvements. U.S. 129 Daytime lane closures after 8:30 a.m. between the western city limits of Jasper and the Georgia line for work on the shoulders and miscel laneous clean up. Madison County Interstate 10 Daytime lane closures for eastbound traffic from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. between State Road 53 (Exit 258) and the Suwannee County line for resurfacing. Interstate 10 Daytime lane closures in both direc tions at the Suwannee River bridge approximate ly six miles west of US 90 Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. for routine bridge inspection. State Road 53 Daytime lane closures Monday through Thursday from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. from State Road 14 in Madison to Interstate 10 to clean out the ditches. U.S. 90 in Ellaville Daytime lane closures at the Suwannee River bridge just past the agricultural inspec tion station Wednesday from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. for routine bridge inspection. US 90 in Greenville The road will be temporarily closed Saturday from 11 to 11:45 a.m. for the Greenville Country Christmas parade. Madison County sheriffs deputies will detour traffic. Suwannee County Interstate 10 Daytime lane closures for westbound traffic Monday and possibly Tuesday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. five miles east of US 129 (Exit 283) to repair a depression in the outside lane.



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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012 3B 3BSPORTS Entire Stock WILSONS O UTFITTERS 1291 SE Baya Dr, Lake City (386) 755-7060 WilsonsOutfitters@comcast.net Open Saturdays until Christmas Knife Youth Insulated Camo Bibs & Coveralls 40% Sandals Jackets & Shirts (Camo & Solids) 25% off Mens Womens Children off Game Cameras Sunglasses Just Arrived Indians off to fast start JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter Fort White Highs Jalen Wyche (10) and Mike Mulberry (4) double-team Santa Fe Highs Montrell Flagg (2). JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Santa Fe Highs Brandon Drost (42) fails to stop Fort White Highs Trey Phillips (5) from making a lay-up on Thursday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Members of the Fort White High School basketball team huddle up during a time-out in a game against Santa Fe on Thursday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Fort White Highs Mike Mulberry (4) is knocked back after Santa Fe Highs Swandrick Miller (11) fouls him in mid air.



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By ALAN FRAMAssociated PressWASHINGTON — In the fiscal cliff wars, a pivotal battle is raging between Democrats demanding to raise revenue by boosting tax rates on the nation’s highest earners and Republicans insisting on eliminating deductions and other tax breaks instead. Which is better for the economy? Analysts say it depends. Economists generally agree that a simpler tax code with lower rates and fewer deductions, exemptions and credits would help the economy. With fewer tax preferences, people would be more likely to seek the best investments for their money instead of the most lucrative tax breaks. And lower rates would leave them more money to spend. Both would add oomph to the economy. But ask whether the higher tax rates that President Barack Obama wants would hurt the economy more than curbing deductions, as Republicans assert, and the picture is less clear. While many economists say the economy theoretically would work more efficient-ly if the tax code provided fewer preferences, many said it would depend on which deductions lawmak-ers curb ‚ a complicated exercise in a world where one person’s wasteful loop-hole may be viewed by oth-ers as an economic lifeline. For example, one of the biggest tax breaks is the widely popular deduc-tion for interest on home mortgages below $1 mil-lion. Because of it, the government this year will take in $87 billion less than it would if the deduction didn’t exist. That deduction allows many to buy homes they otherwise couldn’t afford and is strenuously defend-ed by the housing indus-try. But critics say it does little to help lower-income people while it encourages others to go into debt for costlier homes than they need — an activity they say taxpayers should not sub-sidize. “I’d definitely go for cutting deductions first, espe-cially if I have the opportuni-ty to make the choices about which deductions go,” said Alan Auerbach, director of the Robert Burch Center for Tax Policy and Public Finance at the University of California, Berkeley. The clash is a key part of negotiations for a deal to avert big tax increases and spending cuts due to begin in January — the fis-cal cliff — unless Obama and Congress reach an accord on some other way to rein in the government’s ballooning debt. Obama wants to raise $1.6 trillion in revenue over the next 10 years, partly by letting decade-old tax cuts on the country’s highest earners expire at the end of the year. He would continue those Bush-era tax cuts for every-one except individuals earn-ing more than $200,000 and couples making above $250,000. The highest rates on top-paid Americans would rise from 33 percent and 35 percent today to 36 percent and 39.6 percent. House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, has offered $800 billion in new revenues to be raised by reducing or eliminating unspecified tax breaks on upper-income people. There are more than 100 tax breaks with a cumula-tive price tag estimated at $1.1 trillion yearly. They range from huge breaks like the deduction for char-itable contributions and the income exclusion for employer-provided health insurance to obscure tax incentives for capturing carbon dioxide emissions or maintaining railroad tracks. The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office said in a report last month that raising tax rates would dampen peo-ple’s incentive to work and reduce the nation’s labor supply. Raising the same amount of revenue by elim-inating tax breaks would probably be less nega-tive, but the impact would depend on which deduc-tions were erased, the bud-get office said. A separate study by the same agency and in the same month, however, sug-gested that the economic harm from letting tax rates rise for top earners would be relatively negligible. That report estimated that extending the George W. Bush-era tax breaks for everyone would mean the economy would grow by 1.4 percent more than if all the tax cuts are allowed to expire. Extending the tax breaks for all but the top earners as Obama wants would produce economic growth of 1.3 percent, just 0.1 percent less. In a nearly $16 trillion economy, that one-tenth of 1 percent equals $16 billion. While higher tax rates can discourage invest-ment, “whether or not we actually see significant changes in behavior from small changes in tax rates is another story,” said Joe Rosenberg, research asso-ciate at the bipartisan Tax Policy Center, which ana-lyzes tax policy. “We do see some, but the magnitude is probably fairly small.” Part of the dispute is grounded in politics. Obama made raising rates on the wealthy a keystone of his re-election cam-paign. For two decades, Republicans have made opposition to higher tax rates their party’s mantra. Neither side is eager to surrender. The present faceoff is also a tactical duel ahead of an even larger war over revamping the entire tax code that could come next year. Both sides know that if tax rates on the wealthy rise now, it will be harder to push them back down later. In addition, the battle underscores ideological differences in the two par-ties’ constituencies. Republicans say raising tax rates on high-income Americans discourages investments that would produce new jobs. “Here’s how Republicans think,” said Kenneth Kies, a former top House GOP tax aide and now a tax lob-byist. “If I’m a risk-taker and I’m getting ready to invest $1, if I’m success-ful and the top rate is 35 percent, I get to keep 65 cents.” If the top tax rate is much higher, Kies said, he would get to keep less “and my incentive to invest is significantly reduced.” For Democrats, imposing higher tax rates on peo-ple making the most money is a fair way to make them contribute to deficit reduc-tion. They say Obama would merely return rates to levels that existed under President Bill Clinton, and the economy prospered then. Because various tax breaks have such powerful defenders — for example, charities, churches and colleges — it’s politically difficult to limit them. The subsequent search for revenue could expose the middle class to higher taxes, Democrats say. During the presidential campaign, Republican nominee Mitt Romney suggested limiting item-ized deductions to a dollar cap, such as $25,000. The nonpartisan Tax Policy Center estimates that cap-ping deductions at $25,000 would raise $1.3 trillion. But 29 percent of it would come from those earning under $200,000, whose taxes both parties say they don’t want to increase. LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF DECEMBER 9, 2012 3CFrom staff reportsSunCrest OMNI Home Health announced that it has been named a Top Agency of the 2012 HomeCare Elite, a compila-tion of the top-performing home health agencies in the United States. Now in its seventh year, HomeCare Elite identi-fies the top 25 percent of Medicare-certified agen-cies and further highlights the top 100 and top 500 agencies overall. Winners are ranked by an analy-sis of publicly available performance measures in quality outcomes, process measure implementation, patient experience), quality improvement, and financial performance. “The 2012 HomeCare Elite winners demonstrate a commitment to provid-ing patient-centered care and serving as leaders in the home health commu-nity. Their success offers data-driven proof of being well-managed and high quality care providers to hospitals, managed care organizations, ACOs and other potential referral partners across the health-care continuum,” Susan L. Henricks, president and COO of National Research Corp., the parent company of OCS HomeCare, said in a news release. “Again, this year, we updated our meth-odology to reflect the rapid-ly evolving quality-focused healthcare landscape and national value-based pur-chasing trends. We con-gratulate SunCrest OMNI Home Health on being rec-ognized as a top home care agency.” SunCrest OMNI Home Health, John W. Dant III, CEO, credits dedicated staff, commitment to qual-ity and a strong custom-er service focus with the company’s ability to rank as one of the HomeCare Elite. “We are proud and honored to have so many of our agencies recognized as a Top Agency of the 2012 HomeCare Elite.” SunCrest Healthcare, Inc., based in Nashville, Tennessee, was formed in November 2005 for the purpose of developing Medicare/Medicaid-certi-fied home health agencies in the Southern United States. SunCrest operates locations across Tennessee, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Mississippi and Pennsylvania. For more information, visit www. suncresthealth.com. SunCrest Home Health nameda top agency PASSION: Control needed Continued From Page 1Cvast majority are look-ing to open a restaurant. Normally, these people are very good cooks who have worked in a few res-taurants and they really believe they have the req-uisite skills to be success-ful. Without question, these people have passion and desire — and even some experience — but I do everything I can to talk them out of starting a res-taurant. I just know the fail-ure rate in this industry is so high. Not only is a diffi-cult business, but so many people lack the business background they need to be successful. Now that I have said this, I know I am going to get a ton of notes from people saying I have completely lost my mind — which could be true — but I stand by this advice. Many of these folks believed it when their par-ents told them they could accomplish anything they put their mind to. I know I probably told my kids the same thing to give them confidence to take some risks. However, in real life, this untempered optimism is just plain untrue and so dangerous as it encourages people to take too much risk without the knowledge to go along with it. I recently met a very neat man who has an incredible passion for dogs. Ever since gradu-ating from college, his dream was to open a canine massage business. He has a business degree, so he understands that part. It is also clear that he has the passion and the knowledge, as he has had extensive training in canine massage. I would even say there is a niche for this type of business as massage therapy is already accepted for horses and is getting some attention for dogs too. However, what he and so many early-phase entrepreneurs forget is that there has to be a strong demand for your product. He is having significant financial struggles. He has not taken a cent out for a salary and has put increas-ing amounts of money into the business over the two years it has been in operation. When I asked him if he had measured or attempted to quantify his sales, he said no. He had just gone for it with a very strong desire to make his concept work. He had really believed the classic line from the movie Field of Dreams and was convinced that if he built it, they would come. But as I am always telling these folks, building it and having passion just is not enough to be successful. There is so much more to it. I try never to tell them not to follow their dreams, rather that they should only make a go of it after they have acquired the knowledge and experience they need to give them the best chances of success. Now go out and make sure that with any new venture, you have all the skills and knowledge you need to be successful. You cannot just rely on passion and enthusiasm. You can do this! ASSOCIATED PRESSHouse Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, talks about the unfin ished business of Congress, at the Capitol in Washington on Wednesday. Republicans a re drawing a line in the sand against higher tax rates for upper-income earners, seeki ng to topple the conventional wisdom that the freshly re-elected Democrat has the whip hand in upcoming negotiations. Q FSU Finance Professor Dr. Jerry Osteryoung is Executive Director of the Jim Moran Institute for Global Entrepreneurship at Florida State University’s College of Business. Judge may trim Apple’s patent verdictAssociated PressSAN JOSE, Calif. — A federal judge on Thursday appeared ready to trim millions from a $1.05 billion jury verdict Apple Inc. won over Samsung Electronics this summer as she urged the top two smartphone companies to settle their myriad legal actions around the world. U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh said she would issue a series of ruling over the next several weeks resolving the many legal issues raised at the hearing Thursday. Samsung is seeking a new trial or a reduction of the verdict that resulted from a lawsuit Apple filed in 2011. Apple, on the other hand, urged the judge to add millions more to the award and permanently ban the U.S. sales of eight Samsung smartphone models. Higher rates or fewer tax breaks — what’s worse?FISCAL CLIFF UN climate talks go into overtime By KARL RITTERAssociated PressDOHA, Qatar — Nearly 200 countries haggling over how to stop cli-mate change ‚ and how to pay for it ‚ failed to reach a deal on schedule Friday, setting the stage for the wran-gling to continue late into the night. The two-week U.N. conference in Doha was never meant to yield a global climate pact to curb emissions of greenhouse gases ‚ that has been put off until 2015. But negotiators struggled to agree even on more modest issues, includ-ing how to scale up money to help poor countries cope with global warming, and finalizing the exten-sion of an existing treaty that only covers about 15 percent of global emissions. The U.S. and other developed countries rejected a draft agreement put on the table Friday. Several develop-ing countries also said they couldn’t accept the wording of some para-graphs, highlighting the deep divide that has haunted the talks since they first started two decades ago. One of the key disagreements was over money. Poor countries want firm commitments from rich nations to scale up climate aid for them to $100 billion annually by 2020, a general pledge that was made three years ago. But rich nations are unwilling to commit to specific targets now, citing world financial turmoil and pressure on their budgets. “We underscore the need for a goal for 2013-2015 in order to avoid a gap and ensure sufficient financial support for developing countries,” Chinese delegate Su Wei told the conference. The financing issue has overshadowed the talks since they started last week in Qatar, the first Middle Eastern country to host the slow-moving annual negotiations aimed at crafting a global response to climate change. Rich nations pledged in 2009 to deliver long-term financing to help poor nations switch to clean energy and adapt to rising sea levels and other impacts of global warming. They offered $10 billion a year in 2010-2012 in “fast-start” financing, pledging that the amount would be increased to $100 billion in 2020.



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Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012 3D3DLIFE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILEEnglish sheepdog, Georgie Girl, was a ribbon winner at an Old English Sheepdog of America competition. Breeders i n are concerned about the drop in the number of purebred sheepdog puppies registered each year, as more owners choose smaller dogs like pocket pets and designer puppies. Gingerbread houses go pro By BETH J. HARPAZAP Travel EditorNEW YORK — Out of the kitchen and into the hotel lobby: Gingerbread houses have gone from being a homemade project done with mom to profes-sional exhibits designed by pastry chefs and some-times even architects. And never mind the humble miniature: Some displays are life-size, while others depict entire villages. A few extravaganzas raise money for charity, while some include contests for home bakers. Many are part of larger Christmas celebrations at luxury hotels that also showcase decorated trees, Santa vis-its and holiday menus. Susan Matheson, coauthor of the book “The Gingerbread Architect: Recipes and Blueprints for Twelve Classic American Homes,” says these types of professional gingerbread creations “are elaborately detailed, spellbinding constructions that must require an army of pastry chefs, historians, engineers and consulting experts. The results can elevate the craft to a high art form that transports the viewer into an ethereal miniature fairy world.” But Matheson doesn’t approve of glue guns or other non-edible components: “It’s 100 per-cent digestible or count me out.” For those who admire both homemade and high art gingerbread hous-es, here are details on a few extravagant displays around the country this holiday season. For the fourth year, Le Parker Meridien hotel in midtown Manhattan is hosting a lobby display of gingerbread houses designed by New York City bakeries. The houses include replicas of land-marks like the Egyptian Sphinx, the Mexican temple Chichen Itza and the Lincoln Memorial. A gingerbread creation of the hotel’s executive chef Emile Castillo was inspired by a recent real-life head-line, depicting a crane left dangling by Hurricane Sandy from atop a building on 57th Street. Customers of the hotel restaurant, Norma’s, can get a ticket to vote on their favorite house by adding $1 to their checks; the money goes to City Harvest, a local food bank. The Mohegan Sun casino and resort in Uncasville, Conn., hosts a life-size gingerbread house that’s 28 feet high (8.5 meters) and 20,000 pounds (9,000 kilos), made from 6,000 gingerbread bricks. Visitors can walk through the home to see tiny rooms decorated for Christmas with a holiday tree, chocolate stockings and cookies for Santa. In Hawaii, a Waikiki hotel has a miniature glob-al village in gingerbread. The display at the Sheraton Princess Kaiulani includes models of London’s Tower Bridge, the Eiffel Tower in Paris, a pagoda from Yakushiji Temple in the ancient Japanese capital of Nara, and Hawaii’s own Iolani Palace. Executive Chef Ralf Bauer started the tradition years ago to recreate scenery from his native Germany. At the Grove Park Inn in Asheville, N.C., a ginger-bread contest that began as a local event 20 years ago is now a national competition with more than $7,500 in cash and prizes. This year’s 182 entries — including some from teens and young children — were judged by a panel that included pastry chefs, cookbook authors and a museum curator. A prize was also awarded to the gingerbread chef from farthest away, which this year went to a cook from Massachusetts. The con-test requires all entries to be completely edible.Breeders worrysheepdogs will become scarceBy SUE MANNINGAssociated PressLOS ANGELES — There was a time when old English sheepdogs dominated tele-vision screens and newspa-per comic strips. Now it’s hard to find one beyond a dog show. Numbers of the highmaintenance longhaired breed, which can weigh close to 100 pounds, are dropping as more owners choose pocket pets and designer puppies that are smaller, travel-ready, easy to care for and cost much less to feed. “People have more to do and less time to do it, and they have lost inter-est in old English sheep-dogs,” said Doug Johnson of Colorado Springs, Colo., the president of the Old English Sheepdog Club of America. Breeders in the United States and England are con-cerned about the drop in the number of purebred sheep-dog puppies registered in the two countries each year. At the height of the breed’s popularity in 1975, when the sheepdog was named best in show at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show, nearly 16,000 puppies were registered by the American Kennel Club, said Lisa Peterson, who went through club archives for The Associated Press. But that number dropped within 10 years to fewer than 5,600 dogs and three years ago, the last time AKC numbers were avail-able, there were just over 1,000, she said. London’s Kennel Club, which put the breed on the club’s watch list, registered just 401 sheepdog puppies in 2011, said representa-tive Heidi Ancell. The list is reserved for breeds that number between 300 and 450 registrations a year. But the kennel clubs say they have never lost a breed to extinction. Johnson said it would be “There are too many of us old die-hards that will go ahead and keep this breed alive,” said Johnson, who has 22 sheepdogs under the Bugaboo kennel banner. David Frei, director of communications for the Westminster Kennel Club and co-host of Purina’s annual National Dog Show, said he wasn’t too con-cerned that the breed is in danger. “If you have a dog that can have six, eight or nine puppies, is that a hor-ribly endangered species? Endangered animals are those that have single off-spring in a litter,” he said. “We aren’t going to lose any of these breeds. But we might have to go to shows to see them,” he said. Most historians believe the dog’s origins were in Sussex, England, where they drove sheep and cattle to market. They were called Sussex sheepdogs then, Smithfields when they took ponies to Smithfield Market and bobtailed because their tails were traditionally docked or cut off, Johnson said. The tails were docked to prove their occupation and to exempt owners from taxes because of their working status, he said. The dogs are smart, adapt-able, obedient and agile, and they have a distinctive bark, like two pots clanging together, Frei said. Pittsburgh industrialist William Wade introduced the dog in the United States in the late 1880s. The breed’s club claims five of the 10 wealthiest American families owned, bred and were showing the dogs by 1900. But, Johnson pointed out, the Morgans, Vanderbilts, Goulds, Harrisons and Guggenheims all had ken-nel managers and staff to care for the dogs. Sheepdog hair can grow up to 10 inch-es, which meant grooming could take hours. Sheepdogs later entered popular culture through Hollywood, which fea-tured them in movies such as 1959’s “The Shaggy Dog,” and on TV in “My Three Sons” (1960-1972) and “Please Don’t Eat the Daisies” (1965-1967). Looney Tunes paired one — Sam Sheepdog — with a wolf (Ralph Wolf) in car-toons depicting them clock-ing in and on duty as preda-tor and guard: “Mornin’, Sam.” ‘’Mornin’, Ralph.” But by 1982, when Lynn Johnston’s newspaper comic strip “For Better or For Worse” added a sheepdog named Farley to the Patterson family, the breed’s popularity was already sliding. It still caused a hoopla though, when the real Farley died in 1995 and Johnston wrote his death into the comic strip. When Jere Marder started breeding sheepdogs 35 years ago, the Valparaiso, Ind., resident said there were 40 instantly recogniz-able sheepdog breeding kennels across the coun-try. Only about 20 remain, and specialty clubs in cities such as Dallas and Detroit have closed, she said. Marder, who keeps three show sheepdogs at home, understands the breed can be a burden. “Breeders that are really dedicated are getting older and we don’t have as many young breeders coming into the game,” she said. Her business, Lambluv OES, breeds only one litter every couple of years, but she co-owns about 100 sheepdogs around the country. “The breed is a labor of love. You have to love the breed to labor so much,” Johnson joked. “Toji Tower,” a gingerbread creation from Kyotufo restaur ant, is on display in the lobby area of Le Parker Meridien hotel in New York.The landmark-in spired creation is being exhibited with other over-the-top gingerbread houses from city resta urants in the annual display to benefit City Harvest, a food rescue organization for feeding the needy. HOLIDAY DECORATING PETS ”The Sphinx”is a gingerbread creation from North End Gr ill in New York City. Online: Q http://www.oldenglishsheepdogclubo-famerica.org Q http://www.akc.org Q http://www.thekennelclub.org.uk Another added feature is the items available to purchase and take home. Of course the famed honey-baked hams are always avail-able, as well as the honey-baked turkey breast. There is also the beef pot roast, barbecue pork roast and baby back ribs. Sides include broccoli rice casserole, sweet pota-to souffl, green bean casserole, Yukon mashed potatoes, cinnamon apple slices, macaroni and cheese and cornbread dressing, all for $8.49 each. There are side salads sold by the pound and, oh my, let’s don’t forget the pies and cakes. So, having lunch here can kill two birds with one stone, a deli-cious lunch and then take home dinner with all the trimmings. The address is 618 NW 60th St., Gainesville, Fl.a.. Phone (353) 331-1253. Q Genie Norman and Mary Kay Hollingswoth are Columbia County Residents who love good food and fun. Their column on area restaurants appears twice monthly. You can con-tact them at TasteBuddiesLakeCity@gmail.com. TASTE: Honey Baked Ham Cafe’ in Gainesville Continued From Page 1D because I’m not even asking for the newest iPad,” he said. Marissa Anwar, 29, in Waterloo, Ontario, has been left in the cold. She’s an avid snowboarder who wants a season pass to the ski club near her house. The cost? About $700. “I’m pretty sure that I’ve wanted that for the last five years or so, but my family has a really hard time get-ting the hints,” she said. She should swap parents with Bakke. “I’m not quite sure what the issue is. I have a feeling that it may be the fact that my family really likes giving ‘tangible’ gifts. Mostly electronics and clothes,” Anwar said. Anwar has been so bold as to suggest a few friends join forces to make her wintry dream come true, “but that suggestion has fallen on deaf ears.” Tiffany is lending a hand in the hint department. The luxury jeweler launched its Drop a Hint program in November, in time for one of those signature blue boxes to show up under the tree. Click any item on Tiffany.com and you’ll see a “Drop a Hint” link allow-ing you to email the details to a recipient of choice with this mes-sage: “Dear _____: We have it on good authority from our friends at the North Pole that this is on top of _____’s list and would make her very merry indeed.” The blanks are filled in upon receipt. More than 65,000 hints have been dropped so far, said a Tiffany spokesman, Carson Glover. Well played, Tiffany.Persistence worked for 62-year-old Mark Kinders of Edmond, Okla. He once spotted some wonderful neck ties in the gift shop at the Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Monona Terrace Community and Convention Center in Madison, Wis., during a conference. “My wife wouldn’t let me buy it,” he recalled. “Over the banquet later with lots of table buzz, I interrupted with, ‘Did you hear that? I can hear that tie calling to me from the gift shop.’ My wife could have killed me. Ten minutes later I interrupted with, ‘There it is again.’” The result: “I got the tie. Still have my wife.” GIFTS: Tiffany has solved how to drop hints Continued From Page 1D



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LAKE CITY REPORTER 2012 COLUMBIA HIGH FOOTBALL SALUTE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012 3E 3EFOOTBALL G O T I G ERS 386 755-0600 www.sb.com 4705 U S Hwy 90 W Lake City, FL 32055 707 S W Main Blvd Lake City, FL 32025 2571 U S Hwy 90 W Lake City, FL 32055 Why Not Fresh? 1/4 M ile West of I-75 US Hwy 90 West LAKE CITY, FL (386) 243-8335 www.whynotfresh.com Monday Friday 8am 7pm | Saturday 8am -6pm | Sunday CLOSED PRO U DLY S UPP ORT S CHS TI GER S From our family to yours... Tigers set bar in 2012, but no looking back JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Columbia Highs Terry Calloway made an impact during his first season with the Tigers and will be counted on in 2013 as a senior next year. By BRANDON FINLEY bfinley@lakecityreporter.com While the bar has been set high for the Columbia High football program after the 2012 season that saw the Tigers go 11-2, head coach Brian Allen said there is no looking back. I can guarantee you that the expectations for me will always be high, Allen said. Im a firm believer that were going to win at least eight games a year. On the special seasons, we should get to 10 or 11 wins. If you can get kids like we had this year, we can do some thing special. The Tigers will lose a lot of players, but that doesnt mean they dont have talent. Well have to find a brand new leader, Allen said. Well have a solid running back with Lonnie Underwood (over 800 rush ing yards) and fell just short of 1,000 yards as a sopho more. We have Alex Weber, who bought in this year at receiver and tied for the team lead in touchdowns. Well have Deonte Crumitie and Milla Chasteen back on the offensive line, but other than that weve got to break in a lot of new starters on that side of the ball. Defensively, the Tigers are facing most of their holes in the front seven. Weve got to replace a kid like Brett Newcomb, Allen said. The good news is we have a big league defensive end in Tyrone Sands that we should get back after injury, but Newcomb worked his tail off into being a heck of a football player. Weve got to replace a guy like Javere Smith and itll be hard to find a kid as quick as he was. Well have to replace Charles Combs. We have to replace a kid like Drew Clark who came out of nowhere and seized his moments. He led the team in sacks with eight this sea son. Its hard to replace 4.5 speed. Weve got to replace our field commandeer in Felix Woods. But Allen expects Woods replacement wont fall far from the tree. He will be replaced by his brother Zedrick Woods. Zedrick is going to be very special, Allen said. Hes got to understand our concepts and become an academic beast like his brother. The strength of the Tigers next year, however, could be the secondary where all four starters will return. Thats the good news, Allen said. Our secondary is returning. You have a four-year starter in Trey Marshall. Ben Kuykendall is going to be a three-year starter. Roc Battle is a fouryear starter even though he spent the first two on offense. Roger Cray will be a second-year starter as a sophomore. Thats one place that Im very happy about. Although the Tigers must replace 17 seniors, the one constant will be Allen and hes proven that he can accomplish a lot on the playing field with two playoff appearances in two years. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Columbia High left tackle Laremy Tunsil is regarded as one of the highest-rated college prospects in the nation. Whats next for seniors? By BRANDON FINLEY bfinley@lakecityreporter.com Now that the 2012 sea son is behind the Columbia High Tigers, its time to find out whats next for the seniors. Coach Brian Allen expects a large class to sign for the Tigers on signing day led by one of the nations top recruits Laremy Tunsil. Tunsil is a left tackle with offers from every top col lege program stretching from Florida to California. His decision is up in the air, Allen said. He can go pretty much wherever he wants to. Right now, he likes Alabama and Georgia a lot. But Tunsil is far from the only Tiger with college aspirations. Quarterback Jayce Barber has already signed to play quarterback for Jacksonville State University and a hand ful of other Tigers should sign come February. Javere Smith is a guy that a lot of people like, Allen said of the defensive end. Hes got a big list, especially at the I-AA level. Hes got looks from Middle Tennessee State, Alabama State, Georgia Southern. Its a big list. Allen also expects line backer Felix Woods to sign in this class. The Citadel has offered, Allen said. South Alabama is interested. Charleston Southern is interested. Hell have to make a decision as this winds down. A host of other Tigers have offers including tight end Shaq Johnson and full back Darren Burch. Western Kentucky has offered Shaq, Allen said. Charleston Southern and South Alabama are inter ested. Florida International thought he was the best tight end on their board. Burch has a couple of offers including Citadel and South Alabama. Coach (Craig) Howards team, Southern Oregon, has offered him and Felix. The Tigers could have another group of players sign, but Allen said they have to get test scores first. Among them are Ronald Timmons, the Tigers alltime leading rusher, and wide receiver Nate Ayers. Ayers has an academic hill to get over, Allen said. The good thing is hes tak ing the right steps to get that cleaned up. It will be major for our program if he can do that, so that he can tell guys you cant stumble out of the gate as a fresh man. It really would be a great story if he can make it so that he can let the guys know that academics are important. Timmons is in kind of the same boat as Ayers. Hes got a look from Charleston Southern and I know they like him a lot. Theres been more than two or three teams that are really impressed with him this year. Allen said another group of Tigers will also have a chance to continue their education based on what theyve done in the class room. John Sweat is an exam ple of an academic guy, Allen said. He has a chance to be 100 percent paid for. Jesse Stokes is another guy. Nick Martino is another. These guys know that foot ball isnt the only way. If you can slam academics, thats the most important thing.



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ANOTHER VIEW OPINION Sunday, December 9, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A4AEDIT Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com I t was far too warm for snow in Lake City Saturday, but right on cue – just like last year – we got 30 tons of it right downtown. Snow Day, the Christmas parade and related activites have become a holi-day mainstay. Just as we’ve come to expect, they made for a great family outing on Saturday. Our thanks to everyone involved: The Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of Commerce, which organized the event top to bottom; Snow Day title sponsor Busy Bee B & B; the Lake City Rotary Club, which sponsored the parade; Pro Motion Physical Therapy, which sponsored Dashing to the Snow, the five-kilometer race that began the morning; city work-ers who got up early for lots of prep work, then stayed late to clean up afterward; and countless volunteers who helped out in every way imaginable. Good job, all. Thanks much for making our holidays a good bit more festive. A very cool day OUR OPINION My ‘Silent Night’ parking ticket On this date:In 1608, English poet John Milton was born in London. In 1854, Alfred, Lord Tennyson’s famous poem, “The Charge of the Light Brigade,” was published in England. In 1911, an explosion inside the Cross Mountain coal mine near Briceville, Tenn., killed 84 workers. (Five were rescued.) In 1912, longtime House Speaker Thomas “Tip” O’Neill was born in Cambridge, Mass. In 1940, British troops opened their first major offensive in North Africa during World War II. In 1942, the Aram Khachaturian ballet “Gayane,” featuring the surging “Sabre Dance,” was first performed by Russia’s Kirov Ballet. In 1958, the anti-communist John Birch Society was formed in Indianapolis. In 1962, the Petrified Forest in Arizona was designated a national park. In 1971, Nobel Peace laureate Ralph Bunche died in New York. In 1982, special Watergate prosecutor Leon Jaworski died at his Wimberley, Texas, ranch at age 77. In 1984, the five-day-old hijacking of a Kuwaiti jetliner that claimed the lives of two Americans ended as Iranian security men seized control of the plane, which was parked at Tehran airport. In 1987, the first Palestinian intefadeh, or uprising, began as riots broke out in Gaza and spread to the West Bank, triggering a strong Israeli response. HIGHLIGHTS IN HISTORY [ Editor’s note: This column first ran in December 2009.]W henever I hear the Christ-mas carol “Silent Night, Holy Night,” I think of Oberndorf, Austria. Here’s why. I was visiting friends in Oberndorf in 1965, and we had agreed to meet at a downtown restaurant on Christmas Eve for supper. The town was bustling with people and lots of Christmas activities, and I had trouble finding a park-ing place. Finally I found a place to park in a nearby church parking lot but did not see the “No Parking” sign. After supper, I walked back to my car and found a parking ticket and a short note under my wind-shield wiper. The parking ticket said I had been fined five marks (about $2.50 back then) for illegal parking. The note, written by the church minister, told me that the church parking lot was not a public park-ing lot and to please not park there again. Looking around, I saw the ‘no park-ing’ sign and knew I had been wrong to park there. The next morning I drove to the police station and paid my fine, then drove to the church to apologize for my mistake. At the church I met a personable young min-ister who spoke good English and he accepted my apology. Then he told me about his church’s his-tory which included the history of the carol “Silent Night, Holy Night.” He said “Silent Night, Holy Night” (German: Stille Nacht, Heilige Nacht), one of the most popular Christmas carols anywhere, was first per-formed in the Nikolaus-Kirche (Church of Saint Nicholas) in Oberndorf on December 24, 1818. In the early 1900’s, that church was demolished by a flood and was moved up the river to a safer location. A small chapel, called the “Stille-Nacht Gedachtniskapelle” (Silent Night Memorial Chapel) was built to memorialize the demolished church. The chapel parking lot is where I got the parking ticket. So, Oberndorf, Austria, was the town where “Silent Night” was first performed, a Christmas carol so powerful that it was eventually translated into more that 40 languag-es and recorded by over 300 artists. An incredible story reportedly took place dur-ing World War I. During the 1914 Christmas truce, previously war-ring French, English, and German troops observed Christmas night by sing-ing “Silent Night” simulta-neously, each in his own language because it was the only carol that soldiers on both sides of the front line knew. So, my visit to the Memorial Chapel to apolo-gize for my illegal parking had led to a wonderful history lesson about one of the world’s best known carols and, natu-rally, that is why I think of Oberndorf, Austria, every time I hear the song “Silent Night.” James and meSome people confuse me for James Montgomery. I don’t know why. I’m a lot younger and handsomer than James (wink, wink), but the con-fusion persists. Just recently a woman came up to me and said, “I L-I-K-E low prices” which is James’ signature line on his Baya Pharmacy TV ads. I said, “Look, lady, I’m Morris Williams. You’re thinking of James Montgomery who says that on the TV ads.” She said, “Of course you’re right. I know that. That’s my mistake. It won’t happen again. See you later ... James!” James and I do have one thing in common. We both L-I-K-E low prices!Chimney humorMichael Davis, Jacksonville chimney sweep, says, tongue in cheek, “Santa Claus hates dirty chimneys and brings more presents to people with clean chimneys. “When I clean a chimney, I notify Santa and he knows to bring more toys to that chimney. So, keep your chimney clean and have a better Christmas!”Christmas humorQ There’s nothing like Christmas to put a little BOUNCE in your checks. Q In December, it’s Santa and ho, ho, ho. In January it’s bills and owe, owe, owe. Q A man goes through three stages. He believes in Santa, he doesn’t believe in Santa, he IS Santa. Morris WilliamsPhone: (386) 755-8183williams_h2@firn.edu372 W. Duval St.Lake City, FL 32055 Q Morris Williams is a local historian and long-time Columbia County resident. To the Editor:First let me say I am pro-growth. There was no room for me to say that in my last editorial letter due to size restrictions. Second, as far as I can tell, there have been no answers to my first edito-rial expressing concerns about the proposed con-vention center. The sales projections suggested that the convention cen-ter would be profitable within three years. These projections are just that: projections, estimates, speculation and guesses. Why would our conven-tion center show profits within three years when a dozen of our competitor’s convention centers, within a 90-mile radius, have to be operating at a loss each year? Third, as I recall from driving the I-75 /441 intersection after Debbie hit, the property that has been “selected” floods. So we’re about to spend $89 million on a convention center that will flood? Fourth, as I recall, the current construction esti-mate is for $33 million.Everyone knows that cost overruns happen, so you have to automatically add 20 percent to arrive at a more realistic number of $40 million. Since this project is based upon unrealistic sales projec-tions, it will run operating deficits for 30 years of approximately $500,000 per year, an additional $15 million. Now, to finance that $55 million at 3.5 percent for 30 years is $34 million in interest expense. Total so far: $89 million. Fifth, Columbia County certainly needs good jobs, and economic opportunities are always welcome. I am concerned about this convention center because it only takes two minutes of explaining this idea to someone and I always get the same result: “Why would anyone come to Lake City for a conven-tion?” Yet the county commissioners have spent years and at least $300,000 working on it already. Now, they are ready, willing, and able to spend $89 million of your money. Why? Rick Paul, Lake City Convention center — round two LETTERS TO THE EDITOR W hen people kill others ,it’s essential for communities to know what happened, understand the history of the perpetrators and respect the victims through remembrance. Recognizing the crime, the tragedy, the “why” and the “how,” is how towns and cities learn. Knowledge is the impetus for new laws and new ways of solving problems. There have been several news articles about Kansas City Chiefs linebacker Jovan Belcher, who shot and killed his girlfriend, Kasandra Perkins, before going to Arrowhead Stadium in Kansas City and killing himself with a handgun. Reporting turned up police reports from the time Belcher was a student at the University of Maine. They showed a history of incidents with women. In response, some people have defended Belcher. They have commented that looking into Belcher’s history and conducting interviews with people who knew him are simply not needed, that two peo-ple are dead, and, thus, the story is over. “Let it rest,” some said. We say: Domestic violence is one of the most significant problems this state and country faces, and it is not time to let it rest. More, not less, must be done to raise aware-ness and understand the psychology of abusers to better prevent violence. Q The Bangor (Maine) Daily News.



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4B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04204BSportsTigers basketball tips off season JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterA basketball official explains the rules to Columbia an d Lee high schools during a game on Dec. 4. Pictured fo r Columbia are players Javonta Foster (from left), Morris Marshall and head coach Horace Jefferson. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Andrew Momeka (44) fights for possessi on of the ball against a Lee High defender. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Morris Marshall (22) makes a dunk w hile playing against Lee High on Tuesday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Wayne Broom (33) and Javontae Foster ( 5) plays defense against Lee High. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Akeem Williams (11) is fouled by a L ee High defender (12) while going up for a shot.



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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDSUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012 Classified Department: 755-5440 4C 2006 Toyota Tundra SR-5Crew cab, Class 3 Tow Package, cruise, power windows, seats five. 152,000 miles.$7,800 386-365-1901 2007 Signature Lincoln Town Car28,200 miles$15,500 386-397-3568 Rentals SUWANNEE COUNTY1349 144TH Street 3/2 960 SQ FT. $750.00COLUMBIA COUNTY459 Hernando Avenue 2BR/2BA Approx. 1793 SQ. FT. $800 196 SW Quiet Court 3BR/2BA Approx. 1512 SQ. FT. $750 2685 N US Highway 441 4BR/2BA Approx. 1475 SQ. FT. $1200 253 NW Country Lake Glen 5BR/7BATHS Approx. 5148 SQ. FT. $2500 349 Harris Loop 3BR/3BA/1 HALF Approx. 3110 SQ FT $2250 881 SW Sunview Street 4BR/2BA Approx. 2280 SQ. FT. $900 498 NW Country Lake Drive 4BR/3BA Approx. 2383 SQ. FT. $1800THE DARBY-ROGERS CO.Please Call Kayla Carbono Realtor/Rental Management 386-623-9650 Sales RepSeeking an experienced advertising sales rep to join our digital media network team. Unlimited earning potential. Contact (863) 662-0883 or email resume to: imc1832@aol.com CLASSIFIED AD vantageTake ADvantage of the Reporter Classifieds!755-5440Lake City Reporter FIND IT SELL IT BUY IT $17504 lines 3 days Includes 2 Signs Each additional line $1.65 Garage Sale Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$10104 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.10One item per ad Under $500 Personal Merchandise Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$16754 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.15One item per ad Under $1,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$23704 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.45One item per ad Under $2,500 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $4,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$27404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.55One item per ad Under $4,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$30404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.65One item per ad Under $6,000 Placing An Ad Service Guide Limited to service type advertis-ing only.4 lines, one month....$92.00 $10.80 each additional lineIncludes an additional $2.00 per ad for each Wednesday insertion. DeadlinesBe Sure to Call Early You can call us at 755-5440 Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.Some people prefer to place their classified ads in person, and some ad categories will require prepay-ment. Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street.You can also fax or email your ad copy to the Reporter.FAX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the Classified Department.EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreporter.comAd is to Appear:TuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday Call by:Mon., 10:00 a.m.Mon., 10:00 a.m.Wed., 10:00 a.m.Thurs., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fax/Email by:Mon., 9:00 a.m.Mon., 9:00 a.m.Wed., 9:00 a.m.Thurs., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.These deadlines are subject to change without notice. Cancellations, Changes & Billing Questions Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject, or classify all advertisements under appropriate headings. Copy should be checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day of pub-lication. Credit for published errors will be allowed for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement which was incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be published, nor for any general, special or consequential damages. Advertising language must comply with Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition of discrimi-nation in employment, housing and public accommodations. Standard abbreviations are acceptable; how-ever, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated. Ad Errors-Please read your ad on the first day of publication. Weaccept responsibility for only the first incorrect insertion, and only the charge for the ad space in error. Please call 755-5440 immediately for prompt correc-tion and billing adjustments.CancellationsNormal advertising deadlines apply for cancellation.Billing InquiriesCall 755-5440. Should further information be required regarding payments or credit limits, your call will be trans-ferred to the accounting depart-ment. General Information In Print and Onlinewww.lakecityreporter.com Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$2504 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $.25One item per ad Under $100 Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 ServicesFLCert. Teacher with 10 yrs exp. Offering a homeshooling group in Jan. Reasonably priced. Interested parents 386-288-0954. 020Lost & Found Lost Cell phone in ladies restroom at TJMaxx. If found please return to front desk or Verizon if found. Reward 386-755-0398 100Job Opportunities05536164T eachers Join our team of over 100 professional teachers! Want to make a difference in the lives of children? Infant/Toddler 10 Mo Ft Teacher (Lake City) Child Development Associate (CDA) or equivalent credential (FCCPC or ECPC) required. Three years experience with birth to 3 preferred. High School Diploma/ GED Required. Must be able to pass DCF background screenings. Excellent Benefits, Paid Holidays, Sick/Annual Leave, Health/Dental Insurance, and more. Apply at 236 SW Columbia Ave, Lake City, FLor send resume to: employment@sv4cs.org Fax (386) 754-2220 or Call 754-2225 EOE EOE 05536167Local insurance agency seeks Licensed CSR Experience preferred. Send reply to Box 05099, C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056 05536192Large Construciton Company has an immediate opening for an experienced Account Payable Clerk. Qualified candidate(s) may apply in person at Anderson Columbia, Co., Inc., 871 NWGuerdon Street, Lake City, Florida 32056, fax your resume to 386-755-9132 or visit website at www.andersoncolumbia.com. EOE & Drug Free Workplace Desoto Home Care Now hiring for part time position of Delivery technician. Looking for person with good mechanical abilities and a positive attitude. Drop resume off at 311 N. Marion St. L.C. FL32055 HVAC SALES Excellent benefits & Great pay. Call Allen 386-628-1093 Mechanic needed at Fla.Rock & Tank Lines In White Springs. Diesel exprnc reqr'd in maintenance & repair of tractor trailers. 45-50hrs/wk Class A CDLlicense preferred. Excellent Benefits! email: mcomer@patriottrans.com or fax 904-858-9008 Mechanic needed for general semi-truck and tire repairs. Steady employment with benefits. Salary dependent on experience. Must have own hand tools. Please contact Greg @ 755-7700 Mechanic needed with tools and experience. Southern Specialize Truck & Trailer. 386-752-9754 Real Estate Co. looking for Office Staff Computer knowledge required. Real Estate Exp. is a plus! Fax resume to 386-496-4309 Seeking a full-time Office Manager for a local mortgage company. Mortgage experience is very important. Email resume to: lakecityresume@yahoo.com Service Techs & Installers Must be EPA& NATE certified. Excellent benefits & great pay. Call Allen (386) 628-1093 120Medical Employment05536110Advent Christian VillageCurrent JOBS Line Advertisement call 658-5627 orvisit www.acvillage.net 24 hrs/day, 7 days/week Be your BEST, Among the BEST! RN Quality of Care Leader Unrestricted Florida RN license, excellent clinical nursing / assessment skills, current CPR certification, verifiable IVskill (start, regulate, maintain, discontinue IVs) required. Good communication, organizational, and computer skills required; must work as part of interdisciplinary team to assure outstanding quality of life / quality of care for LTC residents. On-call rotation required. Management / supervisory experience and knowledge of LTC regs desired. CNA& LPN FT/PT/ long-term care setting. Florida certification (CNA) or unrestricted license (LPN) required. FTpositions include health, dental, life, disability, AFLAC; 403b; paid time off, access to on site day care and fitness facilities. Apply in person at Personnel Office, Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m., or fax resume/credentials to (386) 658-5160. EOE / Drug Free Workplace/Criminal background checks required. DIET AR Y MANAGER Needed CDM, Chef, LTC, 2 years experience preferred Must be able to manage large staff and oversee daily food preparation for a 180 bed SNF. Full time with excellent benefits. E-mail resume to Greg Roberts: groberts@gulfcoasthealthcare.com or fax to: (386)362-4417. Live Oak, FLEOE/V/D/M/F F/T LPN or equivalent needed for family practice office. Must have pharmacology exp. 1PAGE RESUME’S ONLYWILLBE ACCEPTEDFax resume to 386-487-1232. GREATOPPORTUNITY•Full Time Experienced RN’s, LPN’s 7a-7p & 7p-7a•Full Time Experienced C.N.A’s All Shifts Apply in person at Suwannee Health Care & Rehab. 1620 Helevenston Street S.E. Live Oak, FL32064 EOE/m/f/d/v P/THousekeeper Needed Occasional Nights And Weekends. Fax Resume to 386-487-1232 240Schools & Education05535484Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class12/24/2012• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-11/05/12• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies Free puppy to good home. Miniature Jack Russell & Chihuahua mix, puppy shots have already been started. 386-623-9371 PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 401Antiques ANTIQUE FOR SALE China Cabinets, Wicker Stroller, Dolls, and Glassware. Contact 984-5826 Antique Hutch 82”H, 52” W. 16 drawer. 4 doors: 2 doors up top, 2 larger on the bottom. Plenty of storage space $300. 365-3730 403Auctions 05536210PMC LIQUIDATORS AB3212 On Site Estate Action 21043 25th Road Lake City, FL32024 Saturday, Dec. 15th Preview 8AM-Auction 10AMPropertymanagement714.webs.com407-416-4063 407Computers DELLCOMPUTER $75.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 430Garage Sales PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 450Good Things to EatThe Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans 2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024 Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville 386-963-4138 or 961-1420 630Mobile Homes forRent2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $450. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 2 BR/1BA $475/mth. Located in center of Lake City Close to Everything !!! 305-984-5511 or 386-344-0830 2 BR/2BASW, Completly furnished, carport, shed, located on 41st Dr., $600 mo.,+ Util. $300 Dep. 935-2461 2/2 SWMH $500 deposit & $500 month 386-623-5410 or 386-623-2203 Mobile Homes for rent in White Springs & Ft. White. Contact 386-623-3404 Newer2/2. Super clean on 1 ac North by distribution center. $550. mo. Call for details. 386-867-9231 Quiet Country Park 3br/2ba $525. Very clean NO PETS! References & Deposit required 386-758-2280 WATERTOWN AREA 3br/2ba DW, Handicap accessible, $650 mth, $500 dep. Call 386-344-0144, 386-344-5791 640Mobile Homes forSalePalm Harbor Homes Stilt Homes 34 Years Experience Go directly to the factory & Save 800-622-2832 650Mobile Home & LandOwnerFinanced 3/22.5 ac.River Access. Small down $585 mo 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com Reduced Out of State owner, Anxious to sell. Nice 2br/2ba, 1996 DW, Energy Efficient, 3/4 frnshd, 3 yr old roof, 1/2 ac lot in Oak Wd subdv in Live Oak $38,900 or best resonable offer. Call 309-645-2659 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05535481We’ve got it all!$89 Deposit Limited Avail. Call Today! Windsong Apts. *Free afterschool program386-758-8455 1BR APT. Downtown Location, Clean. New Carpet $450 mo, plus Security. NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456 2 bedroom / 1 Bath Apts for rent in Live Oak. Call for price. Contact 386-623-3404 & 386-362-9806 2BR/1BA$600/MO & $575 Sec. Dep. Lovely, Private, re-done CR 242 West of RT47 386-365-7193 or 867-6319 2br/1ba. Close to town. $580.mo plus deposit. Includes water & sewer. 386-965-2922 2BR/2BAw/garage 5 minutes from VAhospital and Timco. Call for details. 386-365-5150 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A$530 month $530 deposit. No pets. 386-344-2170 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRentBrandywine & Branford Apartments Now Renting 1, 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-752-3033 W. Grandview Ave. Equal Housing Opportunity TDD Number 1-800-955-8771 BRANFORD VILLAS 386-935-2319 2br/1ba Apts. Now available.$570. mo. TDD number 1-800-955-8771 Equal Housing Opportunity Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Studio Cottage -$500 month $200 Security Deposit, Utilities included, in town, Near Post Office. Call Chris 386-365-2515 UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent2BR, 1/2 acre, Fenced, Close-in, Huge Den, Carport, Smoke Free, $800 mo. App & Ref Req’d Short Term Avail 386-758-9824 2br/1ba $548 mo. + sec., 4mi S. Lake City. Clean & Quiet 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 3bdrm very spacious, 2ba, garage, CH/AFenced in backyard. $1,400 mth & $1,400 dep. Contact 386-344-1914 3br/1.5ba. Very clean, Brick great area w/bonus room. Carport, shed & Fenced (privacy) back yard. $825. mo $825. dep. Ref’s req’d. (941)920-4535 ALandlord You Can Love! 3br/1.5ba, Eat in Kitchen, CH/A, 2 car carport $750 mth + dep 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Avail. for Rent 1206 McFarlane Ave. 3 BR/2 BAhouse. Smoke Free and No Pets allowed. $850 a mo. $500 dep. Call for appt. 904-813-8864. 750Business & Office RentalsCk out this Awesome Deal.Let’s talk Fort White, Newly Remodled. Multi use Comm Prop. Approx 850sqft. Elec & water incl. Free WFI & yard Maint. High Traffic Area $725mth 941-924-5183. Medical, Retail and Professional Office space on East Baya near Old Country Club Rd. Call 386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622 (cell) Office or Retail Space. Many to choose from. Tom Eagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 805Lots forSale PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 820Farms & Acreage10 acres with well/septic/pp (not guar); $300 dwn; $580 a mth. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 820Farms & Acreage4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com 830Commercial Property05536046Receivership Sale Soneet R. Kapila, Receiver Corbitt Manufacturing Company, Inc. Lake City, FL3 parcels Approx. 55 acres Vacant Industrial & Residential Site Zoned Industrial and Residential Rural Lake City 2 Parcels Approx. 3 acres Vacant Commercial Property Zoned Commercial Intensive Email: blombardo@kapilaco.com or call: 954/712-3185 Industrial warehouse7+ acres fenced 17,000 sq ft Barn $1,500 mo. TomEagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 950Cars forSale 2011 Honda Insight Hybrid Four door hatchback, like new. 8k miles 44 mpg, 758-7683, $15,900REPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Linewww.lakecityreporter.com



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4D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012 4DLIFE SUNDAY EVENING DECEMBER 9, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsAmerica’s Funniest Home Videos (N) PrepLandingPrep & Landing“Christmas With Holly” (2012) Sean Faris, Eloise Mumford. Premiere. News at 11Inside Edition 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsThe Insider (N) Love-RaymondBig Bang TheoryCSI: Miami “Hostile Takeover” Criminal Minds “Painless” NewsSports ZoneChann 4 NewsBig Bang Theory 5-PBS 5 -Best Of... MI-5 “Diana” 7-CBS 7 47 47CBS Evening NewsAction News Jax60 Minutes (N) The Amazing Race (Season Finale) Contestants face a terrifying roadblock. (N) The Mentalist “Panama Red” (N) Action Sports 360Two and Half Men 9-CW 9 17 17House of PayneHouse of PayneYourJax MusicVoid TVLaw & Order “Aftershock” Local HauntsLocal HauntsTMZ (N) The Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30e NFL Football New Orleans Saints at New York Giants. (N) The OT (N) The Simpsons (N) Bob’s Burgers (N) Family Guy (N) American Dad (N) NewsAction Sports 360Leverage “The Two Horse Job” 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsFootball Night in America (N) (Live) e(:20) NFL Football Detroit Lions at Green Bay Packers. (N) News CSPAN 14 210 350NewsmakersWashington This Week Q & APrime MinisterRoad to the White House Q & A WGN-A 16 239 307Funny VideosBloopers!Bloopers!How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine(:40) Instant Replay30 Rock30 Rock TVLAND 17 106 304RoseanneRoseanneRoseanneRoseanneRoseanneRoseanneLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Oprah’s Next Chapter Usher Raymond. Oprah’s Next Chapter “Fergie” Oprah’s Next Chapter Justin Bieber. Oprah’s Next Chapter (N) Oprah’s Next ChapterOprah’s Next Chapter Justin Bieber. A&E 19 118 265To Be AnnouncedStorage-TexasStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsBe the Boss “The Melting Pot” (N) (:01) Be the Boss “The Melting Pot” HALL 20 185 312“A Princess for Christmas” (2011) Katie McGrath, Roger Moore. “Help for the Holidays” (2012) Summer Glau, Eva La Rue. Premiere. “Matchmaker Santa” (2012) Lacey Chabert, Florence Henderson. FX 22 136 248“Step Brothers” (2008, Comedy) Will Ferrell, John C. Reilly.“The Other Guys” (2010, Comedy) Will Ferrell, Mark Wahlberg, Eva Mendes.“The Other Guys” (2010) Will Ferrell, Mark Wahlberg. CNN 24 200 202CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN PresentsPiers Morgan TonightCNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents TNT 25 138 245(5:30)“S.W.A.T.” (2003) Samuel L. Jackson, Colin Farrell. Premiere. “The Town” (2010) Ben Af eck. A woman doesn’t realize that her new beau is a bank robber.“The Town” (2010) Ben Af eck, Rebecca Hall. NIK 26 170 299Marvin MarvinSpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobSee Dad Run (N) “Merry Christmas, Drake & Josh” (2008, Comedy) Drake Bell, Josh Peck. The NannyFriends(:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241(5:14)“Walking Tall” (2004, Action) The Rock.“Mission: Impossible” (1996, Action) Tom Cruise. Premiere. Treachery in Prague puts an agent on the run. (:18)“Mission: Impossible” (1996) Tom Cruise. MY-TV 29 32 -Lone RangerLone RangerM*A*S*HM*A*S*HColumbo “Identity Crisis” An adman frames his ex-partner. Thriller “The Bride Who Died Twice” The Twilight ZoneThe Twilight Zone DISN 31 172 290Dog With a BlogGood Luck Charlie“Secret of the Wings” (2012) Voices of Mae Whitman. Shake It Up! (N) Dog With a BlogJessieGood Luck CharlieShake It Up!Austin & AllyJessie LIFE 32 108 252(5:00) “Holly’s Holiday” (2012) “Christmas Angel” (2009, Comedy-Drama) K.C. Clyde, Kari Hawker. “All About Christmas Eve” (2012, Comedy) Haylie Duff. Premiere. (:02) “Christmas Angel” (2009) USA 33 105 242NCIS Senator asks Gibbs for help. NCIS “Heartland” NCIS Suspect is presumed dead. NCIS “Faith” NCIS “False Witness” “Quantum of Solace” (2008) BET 34 124 329The Best Man“Beauty Shop” (2005, Comedy) Queen Latifah, Alicia Silverstone. “Love & Basketball” (2000, Romance) Sanaa Lathan, Omar Epps, Alfre Woodard. Don’t Sleep! Hosted by T.J. Holmes ESPN 35 140 20630 for 30 SportsCenter (N) (Live) College Football Bowl Mania Special (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209 2012 World Series of Poker Final Table. From Las Vegas. World Series of Poker Europe Final Table. From Cannes, France. (Taped) SUNSP 37 -Ship Shape TVFlorida SportsmanFishing the FlatsSport FishingSportsman’s Adv.Saltwater Exp.Into the BlueTaylorMade: Outside the Ropes College Basketball Jacksonville at South Carolina. DISCV 38 182 278Moonshiners “A Shiner’s Last Stand” MythBusters “Food Fables” MythBusters “Cannonball Chemistry” Volcano Time Bomb (N) BrainwashedMythBusters “Cannonball Chemistry” TBS 39 139 247(5:30)“Tyler Perry’s I Can Do Bad All By Myself” (2009) Tyler Perry.“Tyler Perry’s Why Did I Get Married Too?” (2010) Tyler Perry, Sharon Leal. (DVS)“Tyler Perry’s Why Did I Get Married Too?” (2010) HLN 40 202 204Murder by the BookDominick Dunne: Power, PrivilegeDominick Dunne: Power, PrivilegeWhat Would You Do?What Would You Do?Dominick Dunne: Power, Privilege FNC 41 205 360FOX News Sunday With Chris WallaceFOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) FOX News Sunday With Chris WallaceGeraldo at Large (N) Huckabee E! 45 114 236Giuliana & Bill “Duke of Hazzard” Giuliana & Bill “Daddy Duty” Leann Rimes (N) Keeping Up With the KardashiansIce Loves CocoLeann RimesThe Soup TRAVEL 46 196 277Toy HunterToy HunterToy HunterToy HunterSturgis: Biker MadnessSturgis: Metal Mania (N) Sturgis: CopsMan v. FoodMan v. Food HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lMillion Dollar RoomsExtreme HomesProperty BrothersHouse Hunters Renovation (N) House Hunters Renovation TLC 48 183 280Hoarding: Buried Alive Milton; Louise. Hoarding: Buried AliveSister Wives “More Sister Wives!” Sister Wives “Polygamist Cults” (N) Sin City Rules (Series Premiere) (N) Sister Wives “Polygamist Cults” HIST 49 120 269Pawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsAx Men “All or Nothing” Bamazon The group arrives in Guyana. (:02) Outback Hunters (N) ANPL 50 184 282Finding Bigfoot: Further EvidenceFinding Bigfoot “The Sierra Spy” Rattlesnake Republic (N) Gator Boys: Xtra BitesFinding Bigfoot “Dances With Bigfoot” Gator Boys: Xtra Bites FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveThe Next Iron Chef: RedemptionSugar Dome “Rock Star Concert” (N) The Next Iron Chef: Redemption (N) Restaurant: Impossible (N) Restaurant Stakeout TBN 52 260 372T.D. JakesJoyce MeyerLeading the WayThe Blessed LifeJoel OsteenKerry ShookBelieverVoiceCre o DollarMary and Joseph: A Story of Faith FSN-FL 56 -Action Sports World TourInside the MagicMagic Live! (Live)d NBA Basketball Orlando Magic at Phoenix Suns. From US Airways Center in Phoenix. Magic Live! (Live) World Poker Tour: Season 10 SYFY 58 122 244“Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade” (1989, Adventure) Harrison Ford, Sean Connery, Denholm Elliott. “Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull” (2008, Adventure) Harrison Ford, Cate Blanchett. AMC 60 130 254“Yours, Mine & Ours” (2005, Comedy) Dennis Quaid, Rene Russo. “Miracle on 34th Street” (1947) Maureen O’Hara, John Payne. (:15)“Miracle on 34th Street” (1947) Maureen O’Hara, John Payne. COM 62 107 249(4:15)Semi-Pro(:16) “Hot Tub Time Machine” (2010, Comedy) John Cusack, Rob Corddry. (:32)“Wedding Crashers” (2005, Comedy) Owen Wilson, Vince Vaughn. (:03) Tosh.0(:33) Futurama CMT 63 166 327RebaRebaRebaCMT Artists of the Year 2012“Rumor Has It...” (2005, Comedy) Jennifer Aniston, Kevin Costner. Premiere. Rumor Has It... NGWILD 108 190 283Built for the Kill “Lions” Lion Army: Battle to SurviveSnow Leopard of Afghanistan (N) Cat Wars: Lion vs. CheetahSnow Leopard of AfghanistanCat Wars: Lion vs. Cheetah NGC 109 186 276Wicked Tuna “Pirate Problems” Wicked Tuna “Good to the Last Bite” Dragon Wars: Fire and Fury (N) Drugs, Inc. The drug scene in Montana. Alaska State Troopers (N) Drugs, Inc. The drug scene in Montana. SCIENCE 110 193 284Through Wormhole-FreemanHow the Universe Works “Asteroids” How the Universe Works “Comets” How the Universe WorksHow Big Is the Universe? (N) How the Universe Works “Comets” ID 111 192 285Nightmare Next DoorDisappeared “The Dutchman’s Curse” 48 Hours on IDFatal Encounters “Shot in the Foot” Unusual Suspects A naval of ce dies. 48 Hours on ID HBO 302 300 501(:15)“Journey 2: The Mysterious Island” (2012) Dwayne Johnson. ‘PG’ “The Change-Up” (2011, Comedy) Ryan Reynolds, Jason Bateman. ‘R’ Girls “Pilot” (:35) Girls(:05) Enlightened(:35) Enlightened MAX 320 310 515“Hall Pass” (2011, Comedy) Owen Wilson. ‘R’ (:45)“L.A. Con dential” (1997, Crime Drama) Kevin Spacey, Russell Crowe. ‘R’ “A Very Harold & Kumar 3D Christmas” (2011) ‘R’ Sweet Prudence SHOW 340 318 545Untold History of the United StatesDexter Hannah’s father visits. Homeland “Broken Hearts” Dexter “Do You See What I See?” (N) Homeland (N) Dexter “Do You See What I See?” MONDAY EVENING DECEMBER 10, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Extreme Makeover: Home Edition (N) Extreme Makeover: Home Edition (N) CastleNews at 11(:35) Nightline (N) 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) The Insider 5-PBS 5 -JournalNightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Antiques Roadshow Rare photo. Market WarriorsIndependent Lens “Garbage Dreams” BBC World NewsTavis Smiley 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJaguars AccessTwo and Half MenHow I Met/MotherBig Bang Theory2 Broke Girls (N) 2 Broke Girls (N) Hawaii Five-0 “Huaka’I Kula” (N) Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of Payne90210 “The Things We Do for Love” Gossip Girl “The Revengers” (N) TMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family GuyFamily GuyThe SimpsonsAmerican Country Awards The public votes for favorites. (N) (Live) NewsAction News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) The Voice (N) (Live) (:01) Take It All (Series Premiere) (N) Michael Bubl: Home for the HolidaysNewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(5:00) Public Affairs Politics & Public Policy Today WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosWGN News at Nine (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304(5:11) Bonanza(:22) M*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Sins & Secrets “Nantucket” Sins & Secrets “Shreveport” Dateline on OWN “Lost and Found” Dateline on OWNDateline on OWN (N) Dateline on OWN “Lost and Found” A&E 19 118 265The First 48 A gun ght at a gas station. Hoarders “Carrie; James” Hoarders “Dee; Jan” Hoarders “BG & Lee; Chris” (N) Intervention “Terry; Alissa” (N) (:01) Intervention “Kelly” HALL 20 185 312The Hollywood Christmas Parade A holiday parade featuring celebrities. “Moonlight and Mistletoe” (2008, Drama) Candace Cameron Bure. “Twice Upon a Christmas” (2001, Fantasy) Kathy Ireland, John Dye. FX 22 136 248How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherTwo and Half MenTwo and Half Men“Forgetting Sarah Marshall” (2008) Jason Segel. A musician encounters his ex and her new lover in Hawaii.“Forgetting Sarah Marshall” CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245The Mentalist “Red Gold” The Mentalist “Red Queen” The Mentalist “Code Red” The Mentalist “The Red Box” The Mentalist “Aingavite Baa” CSI: NY “What Schemes May Come” NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobDrake & JoshDrake & JoshFull HouseFull HouseFull HouseFull HouseThe NannyThe NannyFriends(:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241(5:57) Repo Games(:28) Repo GamesRepo Games(:34) Repo Games(:07) Repo Games(:40) Repo Games(:13) Repo Games(9:47) Repo Games(:20) Repo GamesRepo Games(:27) Repo Games MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*HM*A*S*HLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitSeinfeldFrasierThe Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Phineas and FerbGood Luck CharlieA.N.T. FarmGravity FallsAustin & Jessie & Ally All StarPhineas and FerbDog With a BlogJessiePhineas and FerbJessieAustin & Ally LIFE 32 108 252“A Nanny for Christmas” (2010) Emmanuelle Vaugier, Dean Cain. “Crazy for Christmas” (2005) Andrea Roth, Howard Hesseman. “All She Wants for Christmas” (2006) Monica Keena, Tobias Mehler. USA 33 105 242NCIS “The Immortals” Of cer’s sword. NCIS: Los Angeles “Disorder” WWE Monday Night RAW (N) (:05) CSI: Crime Scene Investigation BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Top 10 Countdown” (N)“Coming to America” (1988, Comedy) Eddie Murphy, Arsenio Hall, John Amos. “Next Day Air” (2009, Comedy-Drama) Donald Faison, Mike Epps. ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) Monday Night Countdown (N) (Live) e NFL Football Houston Texans at New England Patriots. (N Subject to Blackout) SportsCenter (N) ESPN2 36 144 209SportsNation (N) SportsCenter (N) InterruptionSportsNationCollege Football Bowl Mania Special (N) SportsCenter (N) Coll. Football Live SUNSP 37 -Inside the HeatTo Be Announced3 Wide LifeGolf AmericaTaylorMade: Outside the Ropes Golf South Walton Celebrity Classic. To Be AnnouncedInside the HeatInside Israeli Bask. DISCV 38 182 278American Chopper “The Last Build” Fast N’ Loud Scot quits. Fast N’ Loud (N) Chopper Live: Road to Revenge (N) Chopper Live: Road to Revenge TBS 39 139 247King of QueensKing of QueensSeinfeldSeinfeldFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyConan (N) HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) Dr. Drew on Call (N) Nancy GraceShowbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236The E! True Hollywood StoryE! News (N) Studio E! (N) Love You, Mean ItFashion PoliceLeann RimesChelsea Lately (N) Chelsea Lately TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. FoodMan v. FoodThe Layover with Anthony BourdainThe Layover with Anthony BourdainHotel Impossible “Triangle T Ranch” Hotel Impossible HGTV 47 112 229Property VirginsProperty VirginsLove It or List It “The O’Hara Family” Love It or List It Robert and Kim. Love It or List It Shelley and Michael. House HuntersHunters Int’lLove It or List It “Pinnock” TLC 48 183 280Island MediumCake Boss: Next Great Baker “Game On!” Cake Boss: Next Great BakerCake Boss: Next Great Baker (N) Cake Boss (N) Cake Boss (N) Cake Boss: Next Great Baker HIST 49 120 269American PickersAmerican Pickers “Full Steam Ahead” Pawn StarsPawn StarsAmerican Pickers “Dial F for Fritz” (N) Pawn Stars (N) (:31) Pawn StarsI Love the 1880’s(:32) Pawn Stars ANPL 50 184 282Monsters Inside Me “Breeders” Gator Boys “Mud Gator Attacks” Rattlesnake RepublicFinding Bigfoot “Dances With Bigfoot” Finding Bigfoot: Further Evidence (N) Rattlesnake Republic FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveMystery DinersHealth Inspectors TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the LordMax LucadoThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesLiving EdgeKingdom Conn.Jesse DuplantisPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -Halls of FameShip Shape TVUFC Reloaded “UFC 147: Silva vs. Franklin II” Highlights of UFC 147 in Brazil. (N) World Poker Tour: Season 10World Poker Tour: Season 10 SYFY 58 122 244“Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull” (2008, Adventure) Harrison Ford, Cate Blanchett. Syfy 20th Anniversary Special Celebrating 20 years of entertainment. (N) Syfy 20th Anniversary Special AMC 60 130 254(5:00)“Miracle” (2004, Drama) Kurt Russell, Patricia Clarkson. “Miracle on 34th Street” (1947) Maureen O’Hara, John Payne. (:15)“Miracle on 34th Street” (1947) Maureen O’Hara, John Payne. COM 62 107 249It’s Always Sunny(:29) Tosh.0The Colbert ReportDaily Show(7:59) FuturamaFuturamaFuturamaSouth ParkBrickleberrySouth ParkDaily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327RebaReba “Roll With It” RebaRebaRebaRebaThe 46th Annual CMA Awards Honoring country music industry members. NGWILD 108 190 283Dog WhispererPuma Puma mother and her three cubs.“The Last Lions” (2011, Documentary) Narrated by Jeremy Irons. Attack of the Big Cats (N)“The Last Lions” (2011) NGC 109 186 276Maya Underworld: The Real DoomsdayTaboo Individuals leading double lives. Taboo “Strange Passions” Taboo Life collides with fantasy. Taboo “Changing Gender” Taboo “Strange Passions” SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeWhen Earth Erupts “Europe” When Earth Erupts “Paci c Rim” Volcano Time Bomb (N) When Earth Erupts “Americas” When Earth Erupts “Paci c Rim” ID 111 192 285Disappeared “Just a Nice Guy” Disappeared “Missing by Design” I Didn’t Do ItI Didn’t Do It (N) Disappeared “Dark Voyage” (N) I Didn’t Do It HBO 302 300 501(5:15)“Tower Heist” (2011) “In Time” (2011, Science Fiction) Justin Timberlake. ‘PG-13’ Mel Brooks Strikes Back! (N) “Die Hard” (1988, Action) Bruce Willis, Alan Rickman. ‘R’ MAX 320 310 515Wes Craven’s(:35) “The Adjustment Bureau” (2011) Matt Damon. ‘PG-13’ (:20)“Hop” (2011) Voices of James Marsden. ‘PG’ “The Birdcage” (1996, Comedy) Robin Williams, Gene Hackman. ‘R’ SHOW 340 318 545“The Crossing Guard” (1995, Drama) Jack Nicholson, David Morse. ‘R’ Untold History of the United States (N) HomelandDexter “Do You See What I See?” Homeland WEEKDAY AFTERNOON Comcast Dish DirecTV 12 PM12:301 PM1:302 PM2:303 PM3:304 PM4:305 PM5:30 3-ABC 3 -NewsBe a MillionaireThe ChewGeneral HospitalMauryDr. PhilBe a MillionaireNews 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsPaid ProgramVaried ProgramsAndy Grif th ShowThe Jeff Probst ShowSteve HarveyThe Dr. Oz ShowChann 4 NewsChann 4 News 5-PBS 5 -WordWorldBarney & FriendsCaillouDaniel TigerSuper Why!Dinosaur TrainCat in the HatCurious GeorgeWild KrattsElectric Comp.R. Steves’ EuropeWorld News 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxThe Young and the RestlessBold/BeautifulThe TalkLet’s Make a DealJudge Joe BrownJudge JudyAction News JaxAction News Jax 9-CW 9 17 17The Trisha Goddard ShowLaw & Order: Criminal IntentJudge MathisThe Bill Cunningham ShowMauryThe People’s Court 10-FOX 10 30 30Jerry SpringerThe Jeremy Kyle ShowJudge Joe BrownWe the PeopleThe DoctorsDr. PhilFamily FeudFamily Feud 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsBe a MillionaireDays of our LivesFirst Coast LivingKatie The Ellen DeGeneres ShowNewsNews CSPAN 14 210 350(9:00) Public AffairsPublic AffairsVaried Programs Public Affairs WGN-A 16 239 307In the Heat of the NightWGN Midday NewsWalker, Texas RangerWalker, Texas RangerWalker, Texas RangerLaw & Order: Criminal Intent TVLAND 17 106 304Andy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowGunsmokeGunsmokeBonanzaBonanzaBonanzaVaried Programs OWN 18 189 279Dr. PhilDr. PhilVaried Programs A&E 19 118 265CSI: MiamiCriminal MindsCriminal MindsThe First 48The First 48The First 48 HALL 20 185 312Marie Marie Movie Movie FX 22 136 248(10:30) MovieVaried Programs How I Met/MotherHow I Met/Mother CNN 24 200 202CNN Newsroom CNN Newsroom The Situation Room TNT 25 138 245Varied Programs NIK 26 170 299Team UmizoomiMax & RubyDora the ExplorerGo, Diego, Go!SpongeBobSpongeBobOdd ParentsOdd ParentsOdd ParentsSpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBob SPIKE 28 168 241Varied Programs MY-TV 29 32 -Hawaii Five-0GunsmokeBonanzaThe Big ValleyThe Wild, Wild WestEmergency! DISN 31 172 290Mickey MouseLittle EinsteinsVaried ProgramsPhineas and FerbVaried Programs Good Luck CharlieVaried Programs LIFE 32 108 252Old ChristineOld ChristineHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherFrasierFrasierFrasierFrasierMovieVaried Programs USA 33 105 242Varied Programs NCIS NCIS NCIS BET 34 124 329The ParkersThe ParkersMy Wife and KidsMy Wife and KidsJamie Foxx ShowJamie Foxx ShowThe ParkersMovie ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenterSportsCenterSportsCenterOutside the LinesColl. Football LiveNFL LiveAround the HornInterruption ESPN2 36 144 209First Take Numbers Never LieBest of First TakeVaried ProgramsNumbers Never LieDan Le BatardNFL32Varied Programs SUNSP 37 -Varied Programs DISCV 38 182 278FBI: Criminal PursuitAuction KingsAuction KingsMythBustersVaried Programs TBS 39 139 247Fresh PrinceAmerican DadAmerican DadLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondSeinfeldFriendsFriendsFriendsFriends HLN 40 202 204News Now Making It in AmericaEvening Express FNC 41 205 360(11:00) Happening NowAmerica Live Studio B With Shepard SmithYour World With Neil CavutoThe Five E! 45 114 236E! NewsSex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CityVaried Programs TRAVEL 46 196 277Varied Programs Anthony Bourdain: No ReservationsVaried ProgramsBizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. FoodMan v. Food HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lVaried Programs TLC 48 183 280What Not to WearA Baby StoryA Baby StoryCake BossVaried ProgramsWhat Not to WearFour WeddingsFour Weddings HIST 49 120 269Varied Programs ANPL 50 184 282Animal Cops San FranciscoAnimal Cops San FranciscoAnimal Cops San FranciscoPit Bulls and ParoleesPit Bulls and ParoleesThe Haunted FOOD 51 110 231Best DishesBarefoot ContessaVaried Programs10 Dollar DinnersSecrets/Restaurant30-Minute MealsGiada at HomeGiada at HomeBarefoot ContessaBarefoot ContessaBest DishesPaula’s Cooking TBN 52 260 372Varied ProgramsBehind the ScenesVaried ProgramsJames RobisonTodayThe 700 ClubJohn Hagee TodayVaried ProgramsPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -Varied Programs SYFY 58 122 244Varied Programs AMC 60 130 254(11:30) MovieVaried Programs MovieVaried Programs COM 62 107 249Varied Programs Movie Comedy Central(:26) Futurama(4:57) FuturamaIt’s Always Sunny CMT 63 166 327Extreme Makeover: Home EditionExtreme MakeoverVaried ProgramsWorld’s Strictest ParentsWorld’s Strictest ParentsRoseanneRoseanneRoseanneRoseanne NGWILD 108 190 283Dog WhispererVaried Programs NGC 109 186 276Alaska State TroopersBorder WarsTabooThe IndestructiblesThe IndestructiblesVaried Programs SCIENCE 110 193 284Varied Programs Factory MadeFactory MadeMythBustersThey Do It?They Do It? ID 111 192 285Dateline on IDEvil, IEvil, IVaried Programs HBO 302 300 501(:15) MovieVaried Programs MAX 320 310 515(10:20) Movie(:15) MovieVaried Programs MovieVaried Programs SHOW 340 318 545(:15) MovieVaried Programs



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4E LAKE CITY REPORTER 2012 COLUMBIA HIGH FOOTBALL SALUTE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012 4EfootballRemarkable year for Tigers JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High wide receiver Alex Weber brings in a touchdown catch for the Tigers during their second round playoff win against St. Augustine High on Nov. 23. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Ben Kuykendall (11) and Kenny Paul (25) make a play on the ball against Orange Park High in the Tigers’ District 3-6A champion ship clinching win. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterDonnie Harrison (left) and Isadore Williams were along with the Tigers all year long broadcasting the games. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Braxton Stockton was part of the Tigers’ three-headed monster rushing attack before missing the playoffs due to an eye injury s ustained in practice. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High running back Lonnie Underwood was par t of the Tigers’ three-headed monster rushing attack and helped Columbia rush for over 3,700 yards on the season as a team.



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Dec. 9 Holiday cantata Covenant First Presbyterian Church (for merly First Presbyterian) of Live Oak will present the Christmas cantata, God with Us Emmanuel, by Phillip Young on at 6:00 p.m. Bill Poplin will be directing. The church is off U.S. 90 on White Avenue in Live Oak. For more infor mation, contact Bill Poplin at 365-4932. Holiday music concert The combined music ministries of Pine Grove Baptist Church and Southside Baptist Church will present Season of Joy holiday music con cert at 7 p.m. at Southside Baptist, 388 SE Baya Drive. Admission is free, but seat ing is limited. Nursery will be available for children 4 and younger. For advance tickets or more informa tion, contact Pine Grove Church a (386) 752-2664 or Southside Baptist at (386) 755-5553. Church anniversary Mount Pisgah A.M.E Church will celebrate its 135th anniversary at 4 p.m. Pastor Ronald V. Walters and the Olivet Church fam ily will be in charge of the service. For more informa tion, call 752-1830 or 7585990. Toy donations Fifth Generation Farms store on U.S. 90 West is now a location for the Dream Machine toy col lection. Drop in the store and obtain the name of a needy child who is hoping for Christmas gifts. Dream Machine also has a location in the Lake City Mall. Dec. 11 Medicare seminar Lifestyle Enrichment Center is sponsoring a free Medicare seminar from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. The seminar will be moderat ed by Irv Crowetz of C/C & Associates. Subjects to be covered include: what you need to know about Medicare, when to enroll, whats covered and when a supplement is needed. Call 755-3476 ext. 107 to reserve a seat. Author to speak Gainesville policeman and author Art Adkin will be at at the Main Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave., at 7 p.m. as a guest of the Friends of the Columbia County Public Library. Adkins will talk about his book, Leadership Basics: Conquering the Seven Deadly Sins. He is also the author of the thrillers, Power Grid and The Oasis Project. Kids shopping night The Haven Hospice Suwannee Valley Care Center will hold a Kids Holiday Shopping Night from 5 to 7 p.m. at the care center, 6037 W U.S. 90 in Lake City. Children will be able to shop for gifts for family and friends. Each child will receive Santa Bucks to spend, a photo with Santa, punch and cookies and free gift wrap ping. Child must be accom panied by adults. The hos pice is seeking donations of new or lightly used holi day gift items for the event. For more information, call (386) 752-0230. Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon at the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane, to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. Dec. 12 United Way luncheon United Way of Suwannee Valley will conduct its December community fundraising campaign report luncheon at noon at the Columbia County Senior Services LifeStyle Enrichment Center, 928 SE Allison Court, Lake City. Bill Caley, executive director of Boys Club of Columbia County, one of the 21 United Way affiliated agen cies, will utilize the theme for this years campaign, Imagine Me, to enable guests to identify with the needs addressed through United Way affiliated agen cies. Dana Huggins, chair of the Homeless Services Network of Suwannee Valley, will utilize the theme to speak about the work of the homeless coali tion in Columbia, Hamilton, Lafayette and Suwannee counties. The cost is $12 per person. For more information, contacting the United Way office at (386) 752-5604 ext. 102. Water panel meeting The stakeholder adviso ry committee of the North Florida Regional Water Supply Partnership will meet at 1 p.m. at Florida Gateway College, 149 SE College Place, Lake City. The meeting will be in the Wilson S. Rivers Library and Media Center, Building 200, Room 102. The agen da includes discussion and possible committee recom mendation of the north Florida regional water sup ply boundary area. The meeting is open to the public, and there will be an opportunity for pub lic comment. For more information about the Partnership, visit www. northfloridawater.com. Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Wednesday from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Fort White Public Library on Route 47to answer ques tions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. Newcomers meeting Lake City Newcomers will meet at 11 a.m. at the Eastside Village Clubhouse. Sale of 50-50 tickets will end at 11:25. Lunch will cost $11 per person. Those who want to partici pate in a gift exchange are asked to bring a wrapped or bagged gift valued at at least $10. There will be games, singing and a special guest. Directions to clubhouse: Turn into Eastside Village from East Baya Avenue onto Pearl Terrace; turn left onto Sable and follow signs to the clubhouse, which is on Claudia. For more informa tion, call Barbara Test at 754-7227 or Rose Taylor at 755-2175. Poinsettia sale The Fort White FFA is selling Red Velvet poin settias for $10 per plant. They will be delivered to the Fort White High School agriscience department on this date. Sale proceeds will be used to help the Fort White FFA members attend leadership semi nars, participate in career development events and build the school land labo ratory. To order, contact Jill Huesman at 288-6102. Dec. 13 Woodturners Club Bell Woodturners Club meets the second Thursday of the month in the Bell community Center at 7 p.m. Every meeting features a show and tell of members current projects. There is also a full demonstration of a woodturning project by a club member. All experi ence levels are welcome. For additional info contact Kent Harriss at 365-7086. Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon at the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane. For more information, call 752-5384. LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012 5A 5A BELK.COM 40-50 % off Mens wovens, knits, thermals & sweaters from Saddlebred, Geoffrey Beene and Van Heusen. Orig. 26.00-70.00 Sale 14.99-34.99 40-60 % off ENTIRE STOCK sportcoats, suit separates & vests from Lauren, Nautica, Saddlebred, Madison, Geoffrey Beene, Oxford Republic & Madison Tuxedo. Orig. 60.00-400.00 Sale 23.99-239.99 LIMITED EXCLUSIONS: Only excludes Red Dot, Clearance, Earlybirds, Night Owls, Doorbusters, Bonus Buys, Everyday Values, Alegria, Ben Sherman, Brighton, b.temptd; Designer, Bridge and Contemporary Sportswear and Dresses; Casio, Coach, Cosmetics/Fragrances, Dansko; Fine Jewelry watches, trunk shows and service plans; Gear For Sports, Game Day, Lucchese, Hanky Panky, Herend, Keen, Lacoste, Levis, Lilly Pulitzer, Minnetonka Moccasin, Miss Me, Munro, Original Penguin, Roberto Coin, Spanx, Stuart Weitzman, Thomas Dean, Ugg, Under Armour, Vineyard Vines, Wacoal, non-merchandise depts., lease depts. and Belk gift cards. Frye and Brahmin on excluded online. Not valid on prior purchases, phone, special orders or on belk.com. Cannot be redeemed for cash, credit or refund, used in combination with any other discount or coupon offer. Valid December 11, 2012 RED DOT: *Limited exclusions in Brighton, St. John, Eileen Fisher, Lilly Pulitzer, Resort, Bridge Collection, Levis, Coach, designer handbags and junior denim. Juniors total savings are 60-80% off. Fashion Accessories, Handbags, Small Leather Goods, Hosiery, Home Store and Mens Tailored Clothing total savings are 55-70%. COUPONS NOT VALID ON RED DOT 50 % off Kim Rogers sweaters for misses and petites. Orig. 44.00-52.00 Sale 22.00-26.00. Shown, cowl neck sweater, orig. 52.00, Sale 26.00 Also available in todays woman at slightly higher prices 50 % off Ladies outerwear Orig. 180.00-360.00, Sale 89.99-179.99 Shown, Calvin Klein O rig. 240.00, Sale 119.99 60 % off Belk Silverworks jewelry Orig. 26.00-180.00 Sale 10.40-120.00 50 % off ENTIRE STOCK Fall/holiday kids sportswear, sets, denim & sleepwear from J Khaki, Red Camel, Carters, OshKosh, Belle du Jour & more Orig. 14.00-48.00, Sale 7.00-24.00 *Excludes Levis, Everyday Value, designer collections & Under Armour senior Open early 9am Tuesday, Dec. 11 % OFF EXTRA 20 senior DAY *See below for details. In store only 1 5 % o ff LIMITED EXCLUSIONS Visit belk.com/BelkBowl for more information FREE SHIPPING through December 21. ELITE FREE SHIPPING All the time. No minimum order with Elite Card. See belk.com for details. on ALL orders BELK.COM r e d d o t c l ea r a n c e 7 0 % 40 % o ff the current ticketed price* when you take an e x tra save 25-50 % off ENTIRE STOCK sheets & towels Home Accents 350-thread count cotton rich sheet sets Stripes and solids. Full-king Orig. 70.00-90.00, Sale 39.99-59.99 Home Accents Egyptian Luxe towels Wash, hand, bath and tubmat sizes Orig. 5.00-16.00 Sale 4.99-9.99 The best gifts are the ones you share Obituaries are paid advertise ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporters classified depart ment at 752-1293. OBITUARIES James Hayden Lewis, Sr. James Hayden Lewis, Sr. went home to be with the Lord on November 27, 2012. He is proceeded in death by one son Jeff; brother Allen Lann; Par ents Harvey & Lucille Altman. Survivors include wife Elaine, sons: James Jr and Tony; daugh Danille, Jeremiah, Devin, James III, and Asher. One great grandson Jared; Two sis ter: Tammy, Tina; 1 brother Harvey Jr; as well as several nieces and nephews. Jimbo loved life. He would always say I dont mean no harm to anybody. His two favorite people were Dale Earn hardt and George Jones. He loved sleeping with his pets. He would always say They keep me warm. We will miss you. God Bless you honey. Nora Land Lord Nora Land Lord, 84, of Lake City, FL, passed away on Thurs day, December 6, 2012 at Still waters West. Nora fought a cou rageous battle with alzheimers and is now resting in peace. Nora retired from the FL De partment of Transportation after 29 years. She enjoyed playing golf, traveling, gardening and was a member of the First United Methodist Church, Lake City. Nora is survived by her husband of 33 years, Elvin C. Lord; 3 children: Lynn Stiles of Lake City, FL, Phil (Ann) Stiles of Mooresville, NC, and Larry Stiles of Lake City, FL; two step children: Debbie (Garry) Lord Durham of Cross City, FL, and Dennis (Vicki) Lord of Lake great grandchildren; sister: Ot tie Nash of Mayo, FL; brothers: Buford Land of Tallahassee, FL, Jack Land of Live Oak, FL and Colon Land of Mayo, FL and numerous nieces and nephews. Funeral services will be conduct ed at 3:00 P.M. on Sunday, De cember 9, 2012 at Gateway-Forest Lawn Funeral Chapel with Rev. will follow in Forest Lawn Me morial Gardens. Visitation with the family will be on Saturday, December 8, 2012 at the funeral home from 5:00 PM to 7:00 PM. GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN FUNERAL HOME (386-7521954), 3596 S. US Hwy 441, Lake City, FL 32025 is in charge of arrangements. Please send words of comfort to the family at www.gatewayforestlawn.com. COMMUNITY CALENDAR To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr@lakecityreporter.com.



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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012 5B5BSports COURTESY PHOTOPunt, Pass & Kick winnersThree Eastside Elementary students participated in the Punt, Pass & Kick regional competition on Oct. 27. A’deon Farmer (from left) placed thir d overall in the 8-9 age group; Jacqueline Queen placed first and qualified for the cham pionships at Everbank Field in Jacksonville on Nov. 25 where she finished second, four inches behind the winner; Zoe Brantley placed second in the 12-13 age group. MIDDLE SCHOOL ROUNDUP ABOVE: Three Lake City Middle School runners participate d in the FootLocker South Region XC: Jillian Morse, 27th in the 13-14 age group bronze team south member; (from left) Cassie Pierron, 12th in the 11-12 age group silver team south member; Bridget Morse, fifth in the 11-12 age group gold te am south member.LEFT: Lake City Middle School’s Michael Perez placed seventh and received a Disney medallion in a cross c ountry meet in Orlando.COURTESY PHOTOS COURTESY PHOTOCaptains of Lake City Middle School’s conference champi on volleyball team are Kaylin Ronsonet (from left), Kamdyn Kvistad and Kyrsten Gi ebeig. ASSOCIATED PRESSNavy’s Gee Gee Greene (left) cannot hang on to a pass i n the end zone as Army’s Brandon Fusilier-Jeffires defends during the first half on Saturday in Philadelphia. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Alex Rhea (1) looks to send the ball down the field during a game against Mosley High on Nov. 28. Tigers tie Mosley 2-2From staff reportsColumbia High came away with a tie in its second game against Mosley High on Friday as the Tigers traveled to Panama City. The Tigers lost senior captain Dylan Sessions to a broken wrist earlier in the week, which contributed to the tie after beating Mosley earlier this season. “He has a broken wrist in two places,” Columbia head coach Trevor Tyler said. “I’m not sure what the extent of it will be, but he’ll go back to the doctor this week. We haven’t been given a time frame for his return.” Rogelio Sosa and Braden Lehman scored goals for the Tigers while Lehman and Dakota Waters had assists.Lady Indians basketballFort White High’s girls basketball team stormed back from a 16-8 half-time deficit to defeat host Suwannee High 39-26 on Thursday. “We started the game really slow,” coach DeShay Harris said. “Suwannee was more aggressive than us. We let them drive to the basket too easily and score however they wanted in the first half.” The Lady Indians blazed to a 13-1 third quarter and added 18 points in the final period. “We went to a zone to prevent them from driving to the basket in the second half,” Harris said. “We also switched up our offense to score more points against their zone.” Cenise Armstrong led Fort White with 13 points. Tasha Robinson scored all 11 of her points in the second half. Rykia Jackson added eight points, with four from Khadijah Ingram and three from Kasha Cook. Fort White (4-4, 0-3) will try to pick up a district win at Keystone Heights on Monday. Game time is 6 p.m.Lady Tigers basketballColumbia High’s girls basketball team lost 57-40 in a district game at Lee High on Friday. Marnae Gaskins led the Lady Tigers with 13 points. Other scorers were Lona Wilson, 7, Stephanie Silva, 7, Antyria Caldwell 4, Adrienna Young, 4, Bernisha Clark, 3, Jazmin Robinson, 1, and Akiria Richburg, 1. Columbia (3-5, 0-2) hosts Newberry High at 7 p.m. Monday. Navy tops Army 17-13, 11th straight win in series By DAN GELSTONAssociated PressPHILADELPHIA — Keenan Reynolds extended Navy’s dominance against Army, scoring the win-ning touchdown late in the fourth quarter in a 17-13 victory in the 113th rivalry game Saturday. Navy (8-4) won the Commander-in-Chief’s Trophy awarded to the team with the best record in games among the three service academies. Army and Navy each beat Air Force, putting the presti-gious trophy up for grabs in the regular-season finale for the first time since 2005. Army (2-10) hasn’t hoisted the CIC trophy since 1996. The Black Knights came close, but Navy recovered a late fumble, and Reynolds’ 8-yard rushing score made it 17-13.



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DEAR ABBY: I’m a 24year-old woman and have been in a committed rela-tionship with “Max” for six years. He proposed four years ago and I told him I wanted to marry him, except I wasn’t ready at that time. The years have gone by, and we have flourished as a couple. Most people would swear that we’re already married. However, I have been worrying late-ly that I might have blown my chance for another pro-posal. Max doesn’t men-tion marriage anymore except if I initiate conver-sation with a related topic. Some of our mutual friends are now engaged and Max has made no comment on the future of OUR relation-ship. He seems content in our current state. I feel silly for wanting to be proposed to again, but it is important to me. I don’t want to be pushy. Should I talk to him about it or wait it out and see? -HOPEFUL FUTURE BRIDE IN NEVADA DEAR HOPEFUL: Max is not a mind reader. The squeaky wheel gets the grease, so if you want a second proposal, squeak up and tell him so. He may think you are still not ready for further commitment. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: I can’t believe I’m actually writ-ing to you, but I need an answer to this question. What is the time limit for acknowledging someone’s attendance at a memorial service? My mother passed away nine months ago. She had been ill, but the end came very quickly. My youngest sister had died two years before. To make a long story short, I went into a total meltdown. Life just stopped for me. Would it be appropriate to “come clean” and tell everyone that I was grossly over-whelmed (an understate-ment) with my grieving, or should I just send a short acknowledgment, thanking them for the time they took to attend my mother’s memorial? -WONDERING IN WEST VIRGINIA DEAR WONDERING: No two people grieve exactly alike, and most of us understand that. It is never too late to say thank you, and if you include an explanation with your acknowledgment, it would be appreciated. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: I am sending out our annual Christmas cards. I do not want to include my hus-band’s name on them this year. We haven’t spoken to each other in two years. We still occupy the same house -but thank God it’s large so we don’t have to see each other often. Please tell me it is OK. -MARRIED AND NOT, ALBANY, N.Y. DEAR MARRIED AND NOT: If you follow your impulse and omit your husband’s name from the cards, it will be like announcing that he is dead or that you have separated. While I sympathize with you, do not omit his name unless you are prepared to answer the questions that will surely follow. If you’re ready to “make an announcement,” then do as you wish. DEAR ABBY HOROSCOPES ARIES (March 21-April 19): Check your stress level and consider ways to improve your situa-tion. Cutting back your overhead or revising the way you live or the things you contribute to will help you find a better and more lucrative use for the added income. +++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Be articulate and speak from the heart when dealing with personal matters. Your accomplish-ments will set the mood for a better future if you can determine the best way to move forward with the relationships you cher-ish most. +++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Consider your position and how you can make improvements that will lead to greater security. A creative look at what you have to offer and how you can adapt your skills to fill current demands will enable you to pursue other avenues. +++++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Point in a direction that will enable you to mingle with people who have something to offer. Working alongside some-one you find inspirational will allow you to see how much you have to offer. +++++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Don’t make a snap deci-sion. Just when you think you have everyone on your side, you will meet with opposition. Problems at home will lead to added responsibilities and ques-tioning what you should do next. Don’t let your per-sonal life jeopardize your job. ++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Interacting with peo-ple or visiting new places will expand your mind and help you decide where and what you want to do next. ++++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Memories will have a huge influence on the choices you make now. Past experience and the people you have worked with will reinforce the feeling you have about someone or something you wanted to pursue. +++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Believe in your skills and ideas. The more you do to display your talent, the greater response you will receive from family and friends. +++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Make positive changes. Whether you decorate for the festive season or you improve your surroundings to suit your needs and future prospects, it will benefit you one way or another. ++++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Put thought into what you want to accom-plish next year and start to prepare. Knowing what you want and lining up the people who can contribute will give you a head start and help you close off this year on a high note. ++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Word of mouth can help or hinder you depend-ing on what you have shared. Talk about your accomplishments and ideas you have and you will advance. +++++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Offer an unusual alter-native to a problem and you will receive praise and extra cash. As long as you keep your plan simple and execute it with accuracy, you will be considered a troubleshooter and a hero. +++ Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com THE LAST WORD Eugenia Word SUNDAY CROSSWORD Across >,WVJRQH@$SRSJURXSPLJKW KDYHRQHRQ)DFHERRN 3RXFK15 64 or 1,000+HDGRIDIDPLO\:RRGFXWWHURI OHJHQG 5LQJV&RQVLGHUDWLRQLQ FKRRVLQJDGHOL" :LWKRXWUK\PHRU UHDVRQ %DE\SLJHJ1DPHSDUWPHDQLQJ IURP 3DUWRIDEXWFKHUV VWDQGXSURXWLQH" &DPRXIODJH6KDUSQHVV)UHQFKZDYH3DOOLG/DXQGU\EDVNHWRI MXVWFRORUVRUMXVWZKLWHV" BBB3HLGRJEUHHG5HTPWIRUFHUWDLQ JUDGXDWHVWXGLHV *HWDQBBBHIIRUW$FWUHVV6RPPHU:LVHODZPDNHUPRVW OLNHO\WREHUHHOHFWHG" 0LQLDWXUH 3URWHVWDQWGHQRP$QWKRQ\(GHQ(DUO RIBBB 5HGEHUULHGWUHH)UHQFKVSRXVH5RFNVBBB)LJKWHUV6HHNVDVRIILFH$UWLVWLFH[SUHVVLRQ RQWKHVORSHV" /HYHOV7KUXVWXSZDUG&DXVLQJ(OHFWLRQ 'D\GHOD\V" &DUFDWHJRU\6NLQJURZWK1HJDWLYHV7LPHBBB0LGHDVWFDSLWDO'DOODVSOD\HUIRU VKRUW -XQJOHFULWWHU&KDUWLQGLFDWLQJWKH SURJUHVVLRQRIGDUNQHVVDIWHUVXQVHW" 'LVWXUE6FKHGOLVWLQJ(YHSUHFHGHUV%R\/DW3RZHULQ +ROO\ZRRG" 'RQWEHBBB&DXJKWLQBBB7KLFNVNLQ3URSIRU0U 0RQRSRO\RU0U3HDQXW 3DLQWEDOO ZHDSRQV" 9ROXPLQRXVUHI&RPHVE\6DOVDVSHFLILFDWLRQ:KHQWKHUHPLJKW EHDWZRIRURQHVSHFLDORQLFHFUHDPGULQNV" %HDWLQDSULFHZDU3URSVIRU0U 0RQRSRO\DQG0U3HDQXW 0DNH%XLOGLQJVXSSRUW6RPHSULQWHUV&XUVH0LODZDUGV 'RZQ /RDQILJV1XXDQX3DOL/RRNRXW ORFDOH *USWKDWKDVKHOG VXPPLWPHHWLQJVLQ&DUDFDVDQG5L\DGK 3DXO%XQ\DQHJ8VHGD)HG([2IILFH VHUYLFH $FWUHVV:RRGDUG$FWUHVV9DUGDORV6RXUFHRIQRUWKHUQ H[SRVXUH" %HODUXVQHLJKERU2OGPLQHOD\HUV&ULWLF&OLYH4XDUDQWLQH&RPSRVHU6DOLHUL5%KLWIRU &KXFN:LOOLV 2URUQRU$EEU /HWBBBJRRGXQWR DOOPHQ*DODWLDQV 6XIILFH6DOLQJHUJLUO/LNHVXSHUKLJKZD\V$FWUHVV/HQD&RXQWHURUGHUV7RWKHVDPHH[WHQW6HD:RUOGDWWUDFWLRQ2IIVKRUHEDQNHJ IRUWD[SXUSRVHV 1RUPDQG\FDPSDLJQ FLW\ :ULWHU)OHPLQJ:ULWHU:DOODFHWKFHQWXU\NLQJRI 'HQPDUN &LW\RQWKH/LWWOH &X\DKRJD &OHDULQDZD\,WDOLDQSRUWRQWKH 7\UUKHQLDQ6HD $WWLFVSXUSRVH6SRUWLQYROYLQJ SDGGOHV 2OLYHBBB*UD]LQJDUHD:LVHRQH3DWURQL]HGDVD UHVWDXUDQW )UWLWOH8Q\LHOGLQJ/XQDWLFVRXWEXUVWV'HQYHUWR $OEXTXHUTXHGLU BBB3DXOR4XDNHUFHUHDO&RQWHQWVRIMHZHO FDVHV 2QHVJRLQJWKURXJK FKDQQHOV" )HQFLQJXQLW"9LYHBBB.LQGRISHUVRQDOLW\8SWREULHIO\%ULDQRIDPELHQW PXVLF %LJPDNHURI 'RZQ 3HUPHDWH-HZHOU\FKDLQ 7XUQLQVLGHRXW6HSDUDWHRXW%UDYHVGLY+LJKSHUIRUPDQFH FDUV %RQGJLUO$GDPV*LYHQHQRXJKWREH KDSS\ 2XWDURXQGPLGGD\ VD\ (PSKDVL]H6RPHFDUUDGLR EXWWRQV %EDOOHU6PDOOUHQWHGIDUPV LQ%ULWDLQ .HHSRXWRIVLJKW+LJKLQDZD\3D\IRUDKDQG7HUUDBBB$ULVWRWOH &RQWHPSODWLQJBBBRI+RPHU &HUWDLQEUD VSHFLILFDWLRQ /HJDOVFKRODU *XLQLHU 4XDLQWO\DQWLTXH *HUPDQTXDII$FWUHVV/XSLQRDQG RWKHUV 8QGHUFRYHUDJHQW%LWVDQGSLHFHV HJ$EEU 7KDWVLW5RRILQJPDWHULDO 1R 5(/($6('$7( /2$1'%(+2/'%\6WHYHQ($WZRRG(GLWHGE\:LOO 6KRUW] )RUDQ\WKUHHDQVZHUVFDOOIURPDWRXFKWRQHSKRQHHDFKPLQXWHRUZLWKDFUHGLWFDUG 1234567891011121314151617181920 2122 2324 25 26 2728 293031 323334353637383940414243 4445 464748495051525354555657585960616263 646566 676869 70717273747576 77787980818283848586878889909192939495969798 99100101102 103104105106 107108109110111 112 113114115 116 117 118 119120121 122 Woman is ready to say yes to man’s four-year-old proposal TITLEAMIDCORPAGHASTOMEIMAGIABELMAINE ONIONROLLSLEGALISTIC PINSAUCERLIANASSST SAURPROSEISLETABES SETSLIPGAITPRO HAZERSMAARNAFACTOR EZEKIELSITATHORATIOEUROPEANRIPPETEROSE PROFESSORCHROMOSOME LOYYEA GENERATIONACTOKNIFE GANYMEDESUMHAVEATITORDAINSBENINTIMBALE APOLLOREMSORSABLES FAYRENISTARLEI SRASEATITHAYEDDAVE TANENTICEABSCAMNAG ENEMYLINESPOPEMOBILE PUREENOTAEVENLOCOS SPANSGLOMNEXTEXERT Answers to last Sunday’s Crossword. Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. CELEBRITY CIPHER Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012 5D



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LAKE CITY REPORTER 2012 COLUMBIA HIGH FOOTBALL SALUTE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012 5E5EFOOTBALL Allen gives thanks for 2012 seasonBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comFor a program to enjoy the success that Columbia High did in 2012, it takes more than a group of play-ers. It’s often said that it takes a community to raise a child. The same could be said for the Tigers this season as everyone had a hand in an 11-2 year, starting with the staff and down to the booster club. “I’m always high on my staff,” Columbia head coach Brian Allen said. “It’s been a pleasure to coach with them and be around them. I can say the same thing about them as I did the guys, in that they set the standard. I feel the same way about them. They’re a special group of guys. The good thing is, I don’t think it will shake up too much next season. Most of them are alumni and the rest of them have been here long enough that they breathe Tiger football. I can’t thank them enough for the hours they put in to help make this enjoyable.” Allen also said the community support this season has been something spe-cial. “The town really caught fire and I think it will stay lit,” Allen said. “Here at the end, there was tre-mendous support. We had a core group of about 1,500 all year long. At the end, people were coming out of the woodworks. The community was fired up.” Allen said he truly felt one of the special things he had seen over his career in football was before the Tigers’ Region 1 final at Navarre as the team made its way out of the city. “So many people really wanted that game,” Allen said. “The rally on the way to Navarre was really something to see. I’ll always remember that five or 10 minutes. The streets were lined from the D.O.T. building all the way to Five Points. The town was fired up for what our men and staff had accom-plished. That’s the kind of feeling that makes you want to be here for a long time.” Allen said he can’t compare the feeling, but it mea-sures up to many. “That feeling is college football at its best,” Allen said. Considering he was a member of an undefeated Florida State Seminoles championship team, that’s saying a lot. “That’s like being on Carolina when they went to the Super Bowl at its best,” Allen said. “We were jacked up and it doesn’t get much better. I’m so proud of the community for the way they jumped on board. It made us all proud.” Allen said the support from the booster club has also been remarkable. “I won’t mention any names, but there’s a love for football in that group,” Allen said. “They made it through the growing pains of the first year and learned who I was. I was truly impressed this sea-son. Everyone has been a pleasure to work with and they are doing everything they can to help me get this program to where I believe it needs to be.” In the end, Allen said everyone had a part in mak-ing this year special for the Tigers. “I am absolutely proud,” Allen said. “We’re doing a great job of coming togeth-er as a group with one job of getting it done for these kids.” JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High head coach Brian Allen said the fans we re part of what made the 2012 football season special for the Tigers. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Lonnie Underwood (24) was one of the Tigers’ running back during the 2012 season. Tigers had a group of unsung heroes By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High’s seniors left a mark on the Tigers’ program this season. With the winningest season since 2003, it’s been almost 10 years since the Tigers have had the kind of suc-cess they enjoyed this year on the gridiron. The Tigers started 17 seniors and finished with an 11-2 record and a trip to the Region 1 final of the Class 6A state playoffs. But it’s not all about the 17 starters. Columbia had a handful of other seniors that meant just as much to the Tigers’ success this season. “They definitely set the precedent,” Columbia head coach Brian Allen said. “They’re the standard to which each class will have to live up to now.” The Tigers had 23 seniors in all and, despite not all of them being start-ers, Allen said that each has contributed to the pro-gram in some way. “We’re obviously going to lose talent, but we’re also going to lose leadership qualities,” Allen said. “You look at a kid like Breland Gandy, who never missed a practice. He might not have been a leader on the field, but he was there every day trying just as hard as the guys who started.” Allen said it’s those kinds of players that will make a difference to the younger tier of Tigers as they learn what it means to be a team-mate. “I saw something that he posted after the season,” Allen said. “He said that he doesn’t know what he’s going to do without foot-ball. For him, it hurt just as much as the 17 guys that were starting. That’s what this is about. It’s big-ger than football.” Allen pointed out William Walker as another of those guys. “He didn’t get as many snaps as the other guys, but he stuck with it,” Allen said. “It would have been just as easy for a guy like that to quit, but we didn’t have any of that. He’s out there running as much as anybody.” Allen said that is one thing that can’t be measured, but something that helped this class achieve. “That’s part of losing this class,” Allen said. “They bought into our philosophy.” Helping dreams come true…one smile at a time. MartinORTHODONTICS www.martinorthodontics.com • ADULTS • TEENS • CHILDRENClear Braces & InvisalignCELIA MARTIN, D.M.D.“Creating Beautiful Smiles Since 1979”MEMBER OF AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF ORTHODONTISTFLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ORTHODONTIST755-1001701 SW SR 47 Lake City, FL 32025 Columbia High seniors set new standard in 2012By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comReplacing the class of 2012 will be hard to do for Columbia High. The Tigers compiled an 11-2 record, led by 17 senior starters. Among the class was a school-record holder in rushing yards for a season, a quarterback that passed for over 1,500 yards, a top-rated lineman with offers to play college ball from around the country and a group of defensive play-ers that helped anchor the Tigers for two seasons. “The talented ones of this group were able to take advantage,” Allen said. “They’re going to be hard to replace.” Quarterback Jayce Barber threw for over 1,500 yards as a senior, but Allen said it was more than numbers that made him special. “He set the bar high for the next guy,” Allen said. “He was a team player first and had a great work ethic both on the field and in the classroom.” The quarterback of the defense was Felix Woods. Woods finished the season with over 90 tackles and five sacks. “He’s as talented on the field as anyone,” Allen said. “If he had height, we’d hold him in the same conversa-tion as (Laremy) Tunsil with the ability to go play anywhere. He made the best out of the ability he was blessed with and was our field general. He was our team captain and got it done in the classroom as well. He was just an aca-demic giant.” Allen said the team’s fortune turned early in the sea-son after a loss to the state’s top-ranked Gainesville High Hurricanes, 17-14. “The loss helped us learn how to fight through,” Allen said. “By the time we went to Oakleaf and battled through, I knew that we knew how to scratch and claw our way to a victory. That’s when I knew that we’d be special. I think Gainesville helped up overcome that. From that moment on, we didn’t sputter.” The Tigers beat Oakleaf, 19-13, on Sept. 21 and made it back to capture the district crown for the first time in Allen’s campaign during his second year as head coach. Columbia clinched the district title on Oct. 5 with a 52-17 win against Ridgeview High at Tiger Stadium in Lake City. “It was one of our major goals,” Allen said. “We set out to win the district and we were able to capital-ize. Ridgeview had kind of been the monkey on our back and we were able to convincingly handle the district. I think that surprised a lot of people. I’m extremely proud of this group and our entire staff.” JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Darren Burch is one of 23 seniors tha t will graduate this fall. Burch was the starting fullback and helped the Tigers to an 11-2 re cord in 2012.



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6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04246Athe pit, David Gallegos, the 10-year-old brother of Benjamen Burnette, waited for the perfect moment. Although it was sup-posed to be two teams fighting to the bit-ter end, Gallegos had other ideas. “It was every man for himself,” he said after the battle was over. Benjamen Burnette said the snow was wet and it hurt. “Try getting blasted in the neck with a darn chunk of ice,” he said. Travis Murphy watched from safety outside the pit. He was recording his wife, Samantha Murphy and their 2-year-old son, Travis Jr., with his cellphone. None of the children had seen natural snow before. The last time snow fell in Lake City and stuck to the ground was 1989. Decker said even then, it was barely a dusting. With Snow Day, area residents have the opportunity to experience snow every year. “My whole goal is to provide something for the community to come out and enjoy,” she said. SNOW: A chilling experience for all Continued From Page 1ABy DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comCity Manager Wendell Johnson said the city spends between $22,000 and $25,000 a year on pro-viding materials and man-power to host community events like Snow Day and the Olustee Festival com-ing in February. Also, the city provides $25,000 of funds to the Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of Commerce to organize the community activities. “Lake City is more proactive in their community activities then anywhere I’ve ever been,” Johnson said. Joey Raulerson, assistant director of Lake City Public Works, said Snow Day cost about $5,000 in extra hours for city employees and additional materials for the event -including an esti-mated $300 to $400 in toilet paper. The preparation for Snow Day started two days ago. Raulerson said he’s been on the Blue-Gray Committee for 22 years. Planning for the Olustee Festival has already start-ed, he said “We go to a lot of meetings to get these things ironed out,” he said. Raulerson arrived at the City Hall parking lot around 5 a.m. on Saturday. There were snow pits to rope off and snow slides to build. Around 11:30 a.m., Raulerson was stand-ing with his crew of city employees waiting until 4 p.m. to clean up the melt-ing snow so the people could watch the Christmas Parade. “You look out there right now and you see our youth,” he said. He said every year the events grow larger and larger. He remembers when Snow Day was held in the smaller parking lot near the big mural on Marion Street. It’s grown a lot since then, he said. “I love my job and not a lot of people can say that anymore,” he said. “I love my job.”Lots of money, time went into Snow Day TASTE OF NORTHERN WINTERScenes from Saturday’s Snow Day, sponsored by the Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of Commerce. Wellborn resident Angel Rodriguez and his 7-year-old daughter, Anne, attempt to make snow angels in a mound of snow while playing in shaved ice on Saturday. ‘She seems l ike she’s having a blast,’ Rodriguez said. Photos byJason Matthew WalkerLake City Reporter Marjorie Brown yells out in excitement as she sleds down with her son, Logan Brooker, 4, while enjoying Snow Day in Olustee Park in downtown Lake City on Saturday. Noah Benton, 3, takes a break from the snow as he sits beside his mother, Nikki Brown. ‘He says to me “But momm y, it’s too cold,”’ Brown joked. She said it was his first tim e attending Snow Day. Renna Moore (right) takes a photograph of her daughter, S avannah Geiger, 5, on her cellphone. ‘She loves it, she definitely loves it,’ Moore said ‘This is her first time seeing snow. This gives the kids something to do where they can have fun and enjoy themselves.’ Live Oak resident Heather Holton walks with her 5-monthold daughter, Kenleigh Cheshire, and her son C.J. Hagan, 6, past a promotional Jack’s Link s truck. Columbia High School student Shelby McRae, 16, a Snow Day volunteer, braces for impact of a snow ball.



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6B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 6BSPORTS Bharat Gummadi, M.D.Division of CardiologyUniversity of Florida–JacksonvilleFor more information about Dr. Gummadi and our staf f of expert physicians, go to ShandsLakeShore.com UF CARDIOVASCULAR EXCELLENCE MEETS IN-TOWN CONVENIENCE. 368 NE Franklin Street Lake City, Florida 32055 386-292-8100 WELCOME,DR. GUMMADI.Nobody knows hearts like a cardiologist. As an assistant professor in the University of Florida Division of Cardiology, Dr. Gummadi ranks among the very best. He has a natural way of making complicated ideas understandable, so his patients always have a clear picture of their situation. Dr. Gummadi is an interventional cardiologist specializing in congestive heart failure, peripheral vascular disease and other acute cardiovascular conditions. He will be joining Lyndon Box, M.D., FACAI, at the University of Florida Cardiovascular Center in Lake City. TODD WILSON /Lake City ReporterRecord turnout for 5kA record turnout for the Lake City/Columbia County’s Dashi ng to the Snow 5k race Saturday morning saw 109 runner s in the competition through downtown Lake City and aroun d Lake DeSoto. The event was sponsored by Pro Motion Physical Th erapy and was the event that launched the Chamber’s Snow Day downtown. TODD WILSON /Lake City ReporterMany runners in the 5k race showed up in festive costumes for the season, including the “I Kissed Santa” race team, made up of Judy Tatem, (left) Tracy Kuykendall, and Michelle Wilson. University School defeats Madison County 24-17 to win state 3A titleAssociated PressORLANDO — Emmaunel Soto hauled in an 11-yard touchdown pass from Mike White with 2:34 left in the fourth quarter to lift University School of Nover Southeastern University to a 24-17 victory over Madison County in the Class 3A state championship game. Madison County (12-2) led 17-0 midway through the second quarter after Sheddrick Williams caught a 40-yard touchdown from D.J. McKnight. University rallied to close the gap to 17-10 by halftime when Dionte Taylor caught a 15-yard touchdown pass from White. Jordan Scarlett’s touchdown run midway through the third quarter trimmed the deficit to 17-16. Madison County had a chance to tie the game late in the fourth quarter but facing a fourth-and-17, McKnight’s pass to Neal Brown came up a yard short. It was the first title for University School (12-0) and the second con-secutive loss in the finals for Madison County. White was 21-for-31 for 282 yards and two touch-downs. Soto had five catch-es for 81 while Taylor had seven catches for 80 yards. Keyon Bruton rushed for 113 yards and a touchdown for Madison County.Bratt Northview 42, Trenton 21ORLANDO — LaMikal Kyles rushed for 113 yards and a touchdown and Bratt Northview scored 21 sec-ond-quarter points to roll to a 42-21 victory over Trenton in the Florida Class A state championship game Friday night. Northview (11-3) dominated the game with oppor-tunistic defense and special teams. After Cedric Stokes scored to cut Northview’s lead to 21-7, the Chiefs’ Neino Robinson took the ensuing kickoff 79 yards. Stokes rushed for 192 yards and two touchdowns on 35 carries for Trenton (13-1), but quarterback Stephen Smith went 2 of 10 for 16 yards and three interceptions.



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6D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 6DLIFE Flex Plan Remember, your Flex Plan Insurance covers Eye Care... Use it or lose it... come in before the end of the year Lake City Lake City Commons Center (Publix Shopping) 752-3733 CONTA C TS EY E EXAM S by Independent O ptometrist 2 Complete Pair Eyeglasses $ 119 Includes Lenses & Frames Some Restrictions Apply. COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES D EC 31, 2012 NOW FREE GL A SSES FREE P A IR OF GL A SSES Buy one complete pair of glasses at regular price & receive a Some Restrictions Apply. COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES D EC 31, 2012 $ 99 1 Pair Eyeglasses I ncludes lenses & frames. Some Restrictions Apply. COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES D EC 31, 2012 NOW Where you get the Best for Less Ask about Care Credit Same Day Service Includes Saturday To participate, simply leave a bag of non-perishable foods at your Reporter paper tube or the end of your driveway Friday night. No glass containers. Your Lake City Reporter carrier will pick it up while delivering your Thursday paper. located at 180 E. Duval Street, Lake City Mondays through Fridays, from 8 a.m. 5 p.m. Place a collection box in your place of business for donation and you will be recognized with other business donors in the Lake City Reporter. For additional information and to participate, please call 752-1293 Supporting the Florida Gateway Food Bank Lets Fill It Up! For all Cash Donations make checks payable to: Florida Gateway Food Bank By TRACIE CONE Associated Press FRESNO, Calif. Deep in the Sierra Nevada, the famous General Grant giant sequoia tree is suffering its loss of stature in silence. What once was the worlds No. 2 biggest tree has been supplanted thanks to the most comprehensive mea surements taken of the larg est living things on Earth. The new No. 2 is The President, a 54,000-cubicfoot gargantuan not far from the Grant in Sequoia National Park. After 3,240 years, the giant sequoia still is growing wider at a con sistent rate, which may be what most surprised the sci entists examining how the sequoias and coastal red woods will be affected by climate change and wheth er these trees have a role to play in combatting it. I consider it to be the greatest tree in all of the mountains of the world, said Stephen Sillett, a red wood researcher whose team from Humboldt State University is seeking to mathematically assess the potential of Californias iconic trees to absorb plan et-warming carbon dioxide. The researchers are a part of the 10-year Redwoods and Climate Change Initiative funded by the Save the Redwoods League in San Francisco. The measurements of The President, reported in the current National Geographic, dispelled the previous notion that the big trees grow more slowly in old age. It means, the experts say, the amount of carbon dioxide they absorb during photosynthesis continues to increase over their life times. In addition to painstak ing measurements of every branch and twig, the team took 15 half-centimeterwide core samples of The President to determine its growth rate, which they learned was stunted in the abnormally cold year of 1580 when temperatures in the Sierra hovered near freezing even in the sum mer and the trees remained dormant. But that was an anomaly, Sillett said. The President adds about one cubic meter of wood a year during its short six-month growing season, making it one of the fastest-growing trees in the world. Its 2 billion leaves are thought to be the most of any tree on the planet, which would also make it one of the most efficient at transforming carbon diox ide into nourishing sugars during photosynthesis. Giant sequoia ranked as second largest tree The President still growing after 3,200 years. Associated Press LONDON Just try finding a partridge in a pear tree in Britain these days. Britains Royal Society for Protection of Birds says the two icons of the Christmas song grey partridges and turtle doves are in alarming decline. It said authori ties should act to prevent them from becoming just distant memories within the famed Twelve Days of Christmas song. The society says the number of partridges have dropped 30 percent. Turtle doves are even worse off with a 60 percent decline in numbers. The society warns, at this rate, the dove will face extinction by the middle of the next decade. Society spokesman Grahame Madge said Friday that budget cuts by the British government threaten farm programs that support wildlife like the birds. Britain sees decline in Christmas birds ASSOCIATED PRESS The President, a giant sequoia tree in Sequoia National Park, Calif., has been ranked as the second largest plant on the planet. After 3,240 years, it is still growing wider at a consis tent rate, which surprised scientists who measured it.



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6 LAKE CITY REPORTER 2012 COLUMBIA HIGH FOOTBALL SALUTE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012 6EFOOTBALL Timmons has record yearBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comWhile Columbia High’s football team was enjoying success as a group, one Tiger stood out from the pack by whipping out a 15-year-old team record on his way to setting the single season rushing record for Columbia. Ronald Timmons finished with 1,771 yards this season including 608 yards in three playoff games. In doing so, he shattered a team record held by Don London since the 1997 season. It’s saying a lot of a senior that wasn’t even the starter until the midway point of the season, but it wasn’t just an overnight sensation. “The thing is, it didn’t just start this year,” Columbia head coach Brian Allen said. “He came in and went to work starting last year. He hit the weight room in the offseason and bought into our training program. That really benefited him this season.” Allen said that Timmons went from being just anoth-er player at the school to someone that’s name will live forever. “He’s someone that I will always remember,” Allen said. “He had a remarkable turnaround. He bought into the program and the tone for the way we do things.” Allen said although Timmons set the record, he’s looking forward to the Tigers trying to break it. “Records are meant to be broken,” Allen said. “It took 15 years for this one to fall, but hopefully we have a kid in Lonnie Underwood that can chase it next year. Usually with these guys you can identify them com-ing up, but Ronald wasn’t that guy at first. He fought his way and ended up being that guy.” Allen also gave a lot of credit to Timmons’ suc-cess to running back coach Quinton Callum. “Callum is in his eighth year and he’s coached a ton of 1,000-yard backs,” Allen said. “He’s coached three or four guys with different style systems. He’s been the one thing that has been consistent between the different styles of Wing-T, Spread and now Pro. He gets rushers to where they need to be. He’s big for our program and helped devel-op a kid who was never a starter until the varsity level.” But even a running back with the talent and coach-ing of Timmons can’t do it all on his own. “You look back a year ago and we only had one return-ing starter on our offensive line,” This year, we return five. That’s a core group. Coach (Doug) Peeler and (Mitch) Shoup have done a great job. We end up with 3,720 rushing yards in a single season. That’s mind blowing.” JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High running back Ronald Timmons broke a 1 5-year old record by rushing for 1,771 yards in a sin gle season. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Ronald Timmons breaks through a tackl e during the Tigers’ second round playoff game victory against St. Augustine High.“He’s someone that I will always remember. He had a remarkable turnaround. He bought into the program and the tone for the way we do things.”Columbia head coach Brian Allen



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Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2012 7A7A Christmas parade float winnersParade float winners are as follows: 1. Hopeful Baptist Church; 2. First Full Gospel Church;3. 1st Street Music.Judges for the event were from Jacksonville. LIGHTING UP THE NIGHTScenes from the annual Lake City Christmas parade, which moved down Marion Avenue past hundreds of enthusiasti c watchers.Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKERLake City Reporter An American flag shies colorfully as it rolls by on a Christ Central Ministries float. Members of Cub Scout Pack 85 wave to the crowd. ABOVE: Kaleb Roberts, 2, of White Springs, waves to a passing float as he watches the Christmas parade with his family in downtown Lake City. RIGHT: Rudolph the RedNosed Reindeer pulls the sleigh on the Rim Rock Equip ment float.



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8A LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY DECEMBER 9, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 8AWEATHER plus all the ( jingle ) bells & whistles! tis the time to buy! 2 26 % APR 1 for up to 60 months As low as No payments until 2 0 1 3 2 Shop the dealership with a CAMPUS Pre-Approved Loan Draft and negotiate as a cash buyer! Have a loan with another lender? Lower your payment by bringing it to CAMPUS! M M Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Columbia and Suwannee counties! 3 Accelerate your approval, apply today! Call 754-2219 Click campuscu.com Visit your local service center OFFER NOT AVAILABLE ON EXISTING CAMPUS LOANS. OFFER IS FOR NEW LOANS ONLY. MAY NOT BE COMBINED WITH ANY OTHER OFFER. 1. Credit approval required. Your rate may be higher based on creditworthiness, vehicle and term of loan. For example, a $39,000.00 loan with no money down at 2.14% for 48 months would require 47 monthly payments of $854.12 and a final payment of $833.58, finance charge o f $1,839.67, for a total of payments of $40,977.22. The amount financed is $39,237.55, the APR is 2.26%. APR = Annual Percentag e Rate. 2. Interest will accrue from date of purchase. Choosing this option will increase the total amount of interest you pay. 3. Credit approval and initial $5 deposit required. Mention this ad and well waive the $15 new membership fee. This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration. Lake City 183 SW Bascom Norris Dr. Gville E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunters Walk 5115 NW 43rd St. Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St. Shands at UF Room H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Alachua 14759 NW 157th Ln. Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E. Silver Springs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. Summer eld 17950 US Hwy. 441 Tallahassee 1511 Killearn Center Blvd.