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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
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Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:01973

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:01973

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text

PAGE 1

10B LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDFRIDAY& SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7-8, 2012 120Medical Employment05536110 Advent Christian VillageCurrent JOBS Line Advertisement call 658-5627 orvisit www.acvillage.net 24 hrs/day, 7 days/week Be your BEST, Among the BEST! RN Quality of Care Leader Unrestricted Florida RN license, excellent clinical nursing / assessment skills, current CPR certification, verifiable IVskill (start, regulate, maintain, discontinue IVs) required. Good communication, organizational, and computer skills required; must work as part of interdisciplinary team to assure outstanding quality of life / quality of care for LTC residents. On-call rotation required. Management / supervisory experience and knowledge of LTC regs desired. CNA& LPN FT/PT/ long-term care setting. Florida certification (CNA) or unrestricted license (LPN) required. FTpositions include health, dental, life, disability, AFLAC; 403b; paid time off, access to on site day care and fitness facilities. Apply in person at Personnel Office, Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m., or fax resume/credentials to (386) 658-5160. EOE / Drug Free Workplace/Criminal background checks required. 240Schools & Education05535484Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class12/24/2012• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-11/05/12• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies American Bulldog Puppy $100 To the right home Contact 386-466-7662 Approx 7-8 mths old Red Bone Coonhound Free to the right home. 386-466-7662 Free puppy to good home. Miniature Jack Russell & Chihuahua mix, puppy shots have already been started. 386-623-9371 PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 401Antiques 1950’s dresser, 63” high, 19 deep, Lrg mirror 38x38, 2 small mirrors on base for storage. 4 drawers on bottom. $175. 365-3730 ANTIQUE FOR SALE China Cabinets, Wicker Stroller, Dolls, and Glassware. Contact 984-5826 Antique Hutch 82”H, 52” W. 16 drawer. 4 doors: 2 doors up top, 2 larger on the bottom. Plenty of storage space $300. 365-3730 407Computers DELLCOMPUTER $100.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 430Garage Sales Huge Yard Sale 8 am-5pm Fri, Sat & Sun. Dec. 7-8-9, off C-250, 9895 Adams Road, Wellborn. Hundreds of items. Details www.lakecityflorida.com PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. SAT12/8 8-?, 181 Blueberry off 242/47. Glassware, electronics, Christmas villages, household items, collectables, and more SAT8-12, 90 Wto Right on Brown, Left on Horizon, 3rd on Rt. Tools, Generator, lawn, HouseHold, Christmas & more. SAT. 12/8, 8am-2pm, 405 E Duval St. Look For signs. Clothing, Furniture, & a variety of quality items. SAT. DEC. 8TH, 7 AM-? 575 N.W. Gwen Lake Ave., Xmas items, stroller, motor stand, HH items, clothing &more. Look for signs. 450Good Things to EatThe Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans 2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024 Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville 386-963-4138 or 961-1420 630Mobile Homes forRent2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $450. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 2 BR/1BA $475/mth. Located in center of Lake City Close to Everything !!! 305-984-5511 or 386-344-0830 2 BR/2BASW, Completly furnished, carport, shed, located on 41st Dr., $600 mo.,+ Util. $300 Dep. 935-2461 2/2 SWMH $500 deposit & $500 month 386-623-5410 or 386-623-2203 Mobile Homes for rent in White Springs & Ft. White. Contact 386-623-3404 Newer2/2. Super clean on 1 ac North by distribution center. $550. mo. Call for details. 386-867-9231 Quiet Country Park 3br/2ba $525. Very clean NO PETS! References & Deposit required 386-758-2280 WATERTOWN AREA 3br/2ba DW, Handicap accessible, $650 mth, $500 dep. Call 386-344-0144, 386-344-5791 640Mobile Homes forSale2 MFG HOMES on 5 ACRES! Great for 2 families in Godbold Acres west of Lake City $79,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCY INC. 755-5110 #81421 2013 DOUBLEWIDE $33,995 inc. set-up, trim-out & A/C Call 386-288-8379. 3BR/2BA28X64 in a great location, a lot of upgrades, fireplace. Only $2,500 down $399 a month. Call Paula at 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com 5 LIKENew Mobile Homes!!! For under $30,000. MUSTSEE Call John T. 386-752-1452 BANK REPO 3BR/2BADoublewide ’09 Excellent condition. Only $999 down $377 a month. Call Paula 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com CLOSE TO VAMED CTR! 3BR/2BAw/beautiful interior, new CH&A$59,900 DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #81428 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #75661 Must be 55+, Manufacture home, 1 ac, fireplace, laundry, open & bright $79,900. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 EASTSIDE VILLAGE 2BR/2BAw/lg kitchen, open floor plan $79,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #80972 HALLMARK REALESTATE What a Deal! 2003 3/2 MH over 1600 sqft,in Trenton, .92 ac ONLY case # 091-379757 MLS# 82117 Robin Williams 386-365-5146 LIVE OAK! Cute home in city limits; 3BR/1BA& 1,294 SqFt $49,500 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #81410 MUSTSEE 2013 2x6 walls, R30 insulation, OSB wrap, house wrap, real wood cabinets, and thermal pain windows. Payment $399 per month call John T386-752-1452. Poole Realty 3/2 MH, fireplace, screened back porch, storage shed and all the amenities necessary for a relaxing lifestyle, Irvin Dees, 208-4276. MLS 82226 WANTED…CASH PAID for your Mobile Home, Singlewide or Doublewide flood homes welcome. Call 386-288-8379 WOODGATE VILLAGE Move-in ready! Open 3BR/2BA floor plan on nice shaded lot $49,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC 755-5110 #82259 WOODGATE VILLAGE Nice 3BR/2BADWMH w/fenced yd, workshop; $39,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCY, INC 755-5110 #79078 650Mobile Home & Land2br, 2ba, 3.51 acres. 1512 sqft, nice affordable DW. Perfect Rental. Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473 MLS #882216 $65,000 Great Value 24 acres, 3/2 DWMH open floor plan, in ground pool. MLS 79000. Poole Realty $115,000 Nelda Hatcher. Call 688-8067 Hallmark Real Estate Deer & turkey roam, 3000 sqft brick home, detached garagesworkshops on 18 ac. MLS #81005 Ginger Parker 386-365-2135 OwnerFinanced 3/22.5 ac.River Access. Small down $585 mo 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com Reduced Out of State owner, Anxious to sell. Nice 2br/2ba 1996 DW, Energy Efficient, 3/4 frnshd, 3 yr old roof, 1/2 ac lot in Oak Wd subdv in Live Oak $38,900 or best resonable offer. Call 309-645-2659 Reduced Out of State owner, Anxious to sell. Nice 2br/2ba, 1996 DW, Energy Efficient, 3/4 frnshd, 3 yr old roof, 1/2 ac lot in Oak Wd subdv in Live Oak $38,900 or best resonable offer. Call 309-645-2659 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05535481We’ve got it all!$89 Deposit Limited Avail. Call Today! Windsong Apts. *Free afterschool program386-758-8455 1BR APT. Downtown Location, Clean. New Carpet $450 mo, plus Security. NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent2 bedroom / 1 Bath Apts for rent in Live Oak. Call for price. Contact 386-623-3404 & 386-362-9806 2BR/1BA$600/MO & $575 Sec. Dep. Lovely, Private, re-done CR 242 West of RT47 386-365-7193 or 867-6319 2br/1ba. Close to town. $580.mo plus deposit. Includes water & sewer. 386-965-2922 2BR/2BAw/garage 5 minutes from VAhospital and Timco. Call for details. 386-365-5150 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Amberwood Hills Apts. Private Patio area. Beautiful yard. Washer/dryer hkup. Free water & sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special. 386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com Brandywine & Branford Apartments Now Renting 1, 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-752-3033 W. Grandview Ave. Equal Housing Opportunity TDD Number 1-800-955-8771 BRANFORD VILLAS 386-935-2319 2br/1ba Apts. Now available.$570. mo. TDD number 1-800-955-8771 Equal Housing Opportunity Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2 mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet Friendly. Pool laundry & balcony. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A$530 month $530 deposit. No pets. 386-344-2170 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Greentree Townhouse Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free water & sewer. Balcony & patio. Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com Redwine Apartments Pets welcome. with 5 complexes, we have a home for you. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com Studio Cottage -$500 month $200 Security Deposit, Utilities included, in town, Near Post Office. Call Chris 386-365-2515 UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 Wayne ManorApts. Spacious 2bedroom washer/dryer. Behind Kens off Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 www .myflapts.com WindsorArms Apartments. Move in! 2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free 200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent2BR, 1/2 acre, Fenced, Close-in, Huge Den, Carport, Smoke Free, $800 mo. App & Ref Req’d Short Term Avail 386-758-9824 2br/1ba $548 mo. + sec., 4mi S. Lake City. Clean & Quiet 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 3bdrm very spacious, 2ba, garage, CH/AFenced in backyard. $1,400 mth & $1,400 dep. Contact 386-344-1914 3br/1.5ba. Very clean, Brick great area w/bonus room. Carport, shed & Fenced (privacy) back yard. $825. mo $825. dep. Ref’s req’d. (941)920-4535 ALandlord You Can Love! 3br/1.5ba, Eat in Kitchen, CH/A, 2 car carport $750 mth + dep 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Avail. for Rent 1206 McFarlane Ave. 3 BR/2 BAhouse. Smoke Free and No Pets allowed. $850 a mo. $500 dep. Call for appt. 904-813-8864. 750Business & Office RentalsCk out this Awesome Deal.Let’s talk Fort White, Newly Remodled. Multi use Comm Prop. Approx 850sqft. Elec & water incl. Free WFI & yard Maint. High Traffic Area $725mth 941-924-5183. Medical, Retail and Professional Office space on East Baya near Old Country Club Rd. Call 386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622 (cell) Office or Retail Space. Many to choose from. Tom Eagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 805Lots forSale Beautiful lot on Suwannee. Property features stairway to dock, on Suwannee. MLS# 78842, $35,000 Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473 Results Realty Charming, like new, well Maintainted 3br, 2b, split floor plan, Corner lot. REMAX Missy Zecher 623-0237 MLS# 81632 $100,000 Custom genesis modular home, finest amenities, lg oaks, custom drapery, f/p, fine detail throughout. RemaxMissy Zecher 623-0237 MLS 81634 $299,000 805Lots forSale Great family home, 3/2 recently upgraded, great location. REMAX PROFESSIONALS Missy Zecher 623-0237 MLS# 81683 $75,000 HALLMARK REAL Estate 2.68 acres homes only. Gorgeous neighborhood, Deed restricted. $34,000. Owner Fin. MLS# 80588. Tanya Shaffer 386-397-4766 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #76668 $32,000 Must be 55+, Buildable lot for site built homes only. In Forest Country. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #80401 $60,000. Must be 55+ 130x750 right on Suwannee, Beautiful lot, minutes from Royal Springs, Denise Bose 752-5290 Nice 2 acre lot in Timberlake s/d. New Owner will have fishing rights. MLS #79025 Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473 $13,500 Nice vacant lot in Desirable River Community, MLS #73268 $15,000 Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert397-3473 PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. REMAX PROFESSIONALS Missy Zecher 623-0237. 25 acre parcel, Corner lot, many possibilities. MLS 77720 $175,000 Spacious 4br, split floor plan, separate Living & family rm, gas f/p, a true pleasure to view. REMAX Missy Zecher 623-0237. MLS 81472 $237,000 810Home forSale Access Realty Gorgeous views 3bd/3ba on Lake Montgomery. Elevator, fishing dock & jacuzzi. MLS 81438 $249,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access RealtySpacious 4 bd/3ba Cypress Lake w/ 3643 sqft 1.25 acres on lake. Vaulted ceilings. MLS 81314 $279,900. Patti Taylor386-623-6896 Access RealtyTwo story 1895 Victorian house w/ electrical upgrades throughout. double -deck porches, MLS 71594 $149,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Affordable 4/2 on 10 acres in Bell. Home features over 2,200 heated sqft. MLS# 76585, Results Realty $67,500. Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Eastside Village Adult community, Great location, community pool Elaine Tolar 755-6488 MLS 74823, $84,900 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Emerald Forest repaired Brick home 3b, 2ba, Lg recreation rm, fireplace, MLS 82021 $134,900 Sherry Ratliff 365-8414 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Exceptional home on 5 ac, 3200 sf 4b, 2.5ba. Lots of storage, 3 out buildings. Elaine Tolar 755-6488 MLS 80325 $287,500 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Hallmark Real Estate 4.3 acres on the Santa Fe River. Wooded. Natures lover’s paradise. Paved Rd frontage, septic. MLS 81946. Ron Feagle 386-288-2901 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81958-, $115,000. Must be 55+, 3br/2ba, Site Built w/ lots of room, split plan mstr suite, FL. Rm. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81959 Must be 55+, 2br/2ba, $79,900. Site Built Home w/eat in kitchen, laundry rm, scrn porch. Denise Bose @ 752-5290 On Suwannee River, 4 acres, Needs some elbow grease, 3br, 3058 sqft, beautiful view, Poole Realty MLS 82075. Call Glenda McCall $299,900 Private Estate on 39 + ac, city limits. 6br, 3.5ba, 3 fireplaces, much more.MLS76111 Mary Brown Whitehurst 965-0887 $994,000. Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Reduced, 6500 plus sqft home boasts of oversized rooms, 6br, 3.5ba to many amenities to mention. Call Prell Gwinn, Poole Realty MLS 80949 $280,000 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, Golfers Dream 3B,2B formal living & dining, cover back porch. MLS 81110 $189,000 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, South Oaks C/C, 3Br or 2Br & den, 2Ba over looking 9th hole, fenced backyard & more MLS 81191 $179,000 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, Beautiful Mountainside 3b,2ba, 1662sqft, .45 ac. open floor plan, so much more MLS 80447 $144,900 Terrific home on 5+ acres. 3br, 2.5ba, large kitchen, covered deck. MLS 81630 $199,000 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Elaine Tolar 755-6488 Unique home with 2800 sqft, large upstairs game room, on 1.37 acres in Live Oak, Poole Realty MLS 82214 $67,500. 362-4539 820Farms & Acreage10 acres with well/septic/pp (not guar); $300 dwn; $580 a mth. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com Access Realty10 acre square tract, High & Dry, OF Avail. w/ 25% down. Convenient Location MLS 81258$39,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access Realty43.64 acres wooded acreage in N.Columbia County. Scenic & Private. MLS 74429 $89,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Hallmark Real Estate Hunters Paradise! 3/2 brick, over 1700 sqft on 10 acres, 24x24 barn, fruit trees. MLS #80851 Ginger Parker 386-365-2135 830Commercial Property05536046Receivership Sale Soneet R. Kapila, Receiver Corbitt Manufacturing Company, Inc. Lake City, FL3 parcels Approx. 55 acres Vacant Industrial & Residential Site Zoned Industrial and Residential Rural Lake City 2 Parcels Approx. 3 acres Vacant Commercial Property Zoned Commercial Intensive Email: blombardo@kapilaco.com or call: 954/712-3185 Industrial warehouse7+ acres fenced 17,000 sq ft Barn $1,500 mo. TomEagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 930Motorcycles 2006 Honda Shadow Aero 750 cc’s $3,900 Contact 386-438-9105 950Cars forSale 2007 Signature Lincoln Town Car 28,200 mi. Extended Warranty until April 2014. Grandmother's car like new! Silver with tan leather. $15,500 386-397-3568 2011 Honda Insight Hybrid Four door hatchback, like new. 8k miles 44 mpg, 758-7683, $15,900 PublishedMonthlybythe Lake City Reporter



PAGE 1

Opinion ............... 4A People ................. 2A Obituaries ............. 5A Advice & Comics ....... 6-7B Puzzles ............... 6-7B TODAY IN PEOPLE Individuality tops at Grammys. COMING SUNDAY Snow Day, parade coverage. 77 54 Partly cloudy WEATHER, 2A Lake City ReporterFRIDAY & SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7 & 8, 2012 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | 75LAKECITYREPORTER COM WEEKEND EDITION CALL US: (386) 752-1293 SUBSCRIBE TO THE REPORTER: Voice: 755-5445 Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 138, No 223 1A Friday Walk-a-thon Fort White High School HOSA will be putting on a walk-a-thon to raise funds for cystic fibrosis research. The event will be from 4 to 8 p.m. at Fort White High School football stadium. Activities will Include a bake sale, food concession and health screenings. For more information, contact Brian Pompili at FWHS or by email at pompili_b@firn. edu. Holiday music concert The combined music min istries of Pine Grove Baptist Church and Southside Baptist Church will pres ent Season of Joy holiday music concert at 7 p.m. at Pine Grove Church, 1989 N Highway 441, and at 7 p.m. Sunday at Southside Baptist, 388 SE Baya Drive. Admission is free, but seat ing is limited. Nursery will be available for children 4 and younger. For advance tickets or more information, call Pine Grove Church at (386) 752-2664 or Southside Baptist at (386) 755-5553. Saturday Snow Day/Parade Snow Day 2012 will be held on Saturday from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. in Olustee Park in downtown Lake City. Santa will be drop in between noon and 2 p.m. The Christmas parade starts at 6 p.m. Dashing Through the Snow, a five kilometer race, starts at 8 a.m. Registration is $35 the day of the race, $30 before. For more go to www.lake citychamber.com or call 752-3690. Farmers market Local artists and crafters will be at the Lake DeSoto Farmers Market, selling original works for that per fect holiday gift. Middle Ground will provide live music, and the Chamber of Commerce will host Snow Day 2012 at neighboring Olustee Park. For more, call (386) 719-5766 or visit market.lcfla.com. Blanket collection The United Way of the Suwannee Valley will hold Blank-fest Florida Five, a blanket collection event to support the homeless, beginning at 5 p.m. in Rock Star Lounge, 723 E. Duval St. in Lake City. Admission is the donation of one blan ket. Raffle tickets for prizes will be given for each blan ket donated. Live music will be provided. Sunday Holiday cantata Covenant First Presbyterian Church (for merly First Presbyterian) of Live Oak will present the Christmas cantata, God with Us Emmanuel at 6 p.m. Bill Poplin will be directing. The church is off US 90 on White Avenue in Live Oak. For more infor mation, contact Bill Poplin at 365-4932. Ringing it up JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Gary Boettcher, of the Kiwanis Club of Lake City, thanks Lake City resident Leslie Guerry as she makes a donation to the Salvation Army outside Winn-Dixie on Thursday. For some of the people in the community, its so hard dur ing the holidays, Guerry said. I always try to give $5 or $6 each month. Teacher ranks swell by error FDOE miscounts educators in state evaluation report. From staff reports The Florida Department of Education refuses to believe there are 729 teachers in the Columbia County school system. Thats the number of local teachers that county officials say were evaluated under a new state plan, results of which were released Wednesday. In its report, however, FDOE listed the district as having 816 teachers. On Thursday, having real ized the mistake, FDOE took another shot at it and this time came up with 718. It wasnt clear as of late Thursday just when state offi cials would finally zero in on the right figure. I dont have any answers, but at least DOE is getting closer, Frank Moore, the school districts director of human resources, said Thursday after receiving FDOEs latest guess. The agencys confusion didnt just center on Columbia County. Although there are about 13,000 teachers in Hillsborough County, the state said in its report that 23,000 had been evaluated. Other districts data contained similar mistakes. According to FDOE, how ever, the districts were respon sible for the confusion. State officials told the Associated Press that some districts submitted Woman faces 19 counts of fraud By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com Charita Monique Williams, 31, was arrested Wednesday and faces 19 counts of fraud. She was booked into the Columbia County Detention Facility in lieu of $112,000 bail as part of a Florida Department of Law Enforcement investigation. Keith Kameg, FDLE public information offi cer, said the case concerns alleged identity theft. He said the investi gation is ongoing and declined to release any additional details. Kameg said additional arrests are expected. According to Columbia County jai records, Williams faces charg es under Florida Statute 817.568, subsection 10(a). Under that subsection, any one who commits an offense described in this section and for the purpose of obtaining or Williams COURTESY From left: Terry Baker, general manager of PotashCorp-White Springs; Gerald Dopson, executive board chairman, The Foundation for Florida Gateway College; Mike Lee, executive director of the Foundation. FGC gets a major gift from PCS From staff reports Potash Corp. of White Springs made a $125,000 donation to the Foundation for Florida Gateway College to support the schools focus on STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) programs. Todays business and industry has embraced new advances in technology to become more sus tainable and competitive in what has become a global marketplace. That means the skills needed by employees have become more advanced. In recent years, the state and federal governments have placed an emphasis on devel opment of STEM programs in order to provide a highly qualified workforce to meet the needs of today employers. These funds will assist FGC in providing the STEM training to both the current workforce and future workforce of our regional area. As a member of the local com munity and general manager of PotashCorp-White Springs, I am thankful that we have an edu cational facility of the caliber of Florida Gateway College, which has the leadership and vision to recognize, plan and develop STEM programs to meet the needs of our region, Terry Baker said. The donation, made during the foundations annual luncheon Nov. 7, continues a strong Restaurant cook faces drug charges PCS continued on 3A FDOE continued on 3A By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com A restaurant cook was arrested Tuesday and faces felony drug charges after police went to the restaurant investigating an anonymous tip that drugs were being sold from the estab lishments kitchen. Jermaine Lajuane Fulton, 39, 1485 SW Pinemount Road, was charged with pos session of marijuana, posses sion of drugs (delivery/distri bution), destroying evidence, resisting an officer, posses sion of drug equipment and warrant: Violation of proba tion in relation to the case. He was booked into the Columbia County Detention Facility on without bond. According to Lake City Police Department reports, officers were dispatched to Phish Heads restaurant, 1445 S. Main Blvd., in ref erence to an anonymous tip that a cook named Jermaine was selling drugs from the COOK continued on 3A Fulton FRAUD continued on 3A



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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Friday & Saturday, December 7-8, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B CHEAP SEATS Tim KirbyPhone: (386) 754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS Q Tim Kirby is sports editor of the Lake City Reporter College athletesC olumbia High and Fort White football players are scattered throughout the college ranks. A.J. Legree appeared in all 12 games for Kentucky. He caught 12 passes for 113 yards including one at The Swamp. Tiger Powell plays at New Mexico State. He scored five touchdowns including one at Auburn. Brach Bessant is playing at Troy, and got to face off against Tennessee and Mississippi State. Robert Hartley was a fifth-year redshirt senior at Florida A&M. The Rattlers played at Oklahoma this season. Jordan Dewhirst led Jacksonville University in tackles with 57 (32 solo, 25 assists). Dewhirst returned an interception 39 yards for a touchdown and had a 44-yard kickoff return for a touchdown. Jonathan Dupree appeared in nine games at Glenville State and had eight tackles. JR Dixon (Leonard on the roster) is a running back at Union College in Kentucky. Through nine games he had 296 yards on 73 carries. In the final game of the season, Dixon carried 22 times for 157 yards and scored two touchdowns. Xavier Wyche was in the package deal with Union College. Wyche played in eight games on defense and had 18 tackles. Soron Williams is set to go to Bethune-Cookman in January. Felix Woods and Darren Burch have been offered by Southern Oregon. Southern Oregon is where Craig Howard now coaches. The former CHS coach completed a turnaround in his second season. The Raiders went 9-3 and earned a spot in the NAIA playoffs. Southern Oregon beat Saint Ambrose, 45-28, before losing to Morningside 47-44 in overtime in the second round. Morningside will play for the NAIA championship against Marian in Rome, Ga., on Thursday. In basketball action, Jordan Talley is starting for Southeastern University. The Fire, sitting at 8-5, play in the Sun Conference. Talley is averaging a bit better than 10 points per game. He had a season-high 19 points against Trinity Baptist and has had games of 16, 15, 13 and 12 twice. Sharmayne Edwards is playing for Florida State College at Jacksonville. She average 12 points per game while appearing in 12 games last season. Fort White opponents oustedBy TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comFORT WHITE — Fort White High’s last two foot-ball opponents left in the playoffs lost in the semifi-nals last week. Newberry High went to overtime at home against No. 1-ranked Trenton High before losing, 36-35. The First Academy went out easier, falling 27-3 at Madison County High. Trenton made good on a two-point conversion after scoring second in the over-time. It will be the first trip to a state championship game for the Tigers (13-0). Ra’kheem Hoyt rushed for 181 yards and four touch-downs for the Panthers (9-4). He had scoring runs of 83, 35, two and four yards. An apparent touchdown as time expired on a comple-tion from Brandon Herbert to Hoyt was negated by an offensive interference pen-alty. Trace Stankunas opened the scoring for Newberry on a 35-yard run. Herbert was 7-of-12 passing for 160 yard. Four completions went to Monte Seabrook for 139 yards and three to Davonte Flagg for 21 yards. Alex Files booted the five PATs. Madison County (12-1) schooled The First Academy in Wing-T offense. The Cowboys rushed for 374 yards with 190 and two touchdowns from Keon Bruton, and 134 yards and one touchdown from Deonshay Wells. Lloyd Hylton rushed for 90 yards for the Royals (12-1). The Citrus Bowl in Orlando is hosting the FHSAA championship games. Games will be tele-vised on the Bright House Sports Network. Today Q Class 2A — Dade Christian School vs. University Christian School, 1 p.m.; Q Class 1A — Trenton High vs. Northview High, 7 p.m.; Saturday Q Class 3A — Madison County High vs. University School of Nova Southeastern University; Q Class 4A — The Bolles School vs. Miami Washington High; Today’s semifinals (on site) Q Class 8A — Apopka High vs. Dr. Phillips High and Cypress Bay High vs. Christopher Columbus Boys Catholic High; Q Class 7A — Osceola High vs. Lincoln High and St. Thomas Aquinas High vs. Manatee High; Q Class 6A — Navarre High vs. Gainesville High and Naples High vs. Miami Central Senior High; Q Class 5A — Robinson High vs. Godby High and Miami Jackson Senior High vs. Immokalee High. Newberry, First Academy fall in semifinal games. ASSOCIATED PRESSTexas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel displays his tro phy for the Davey O’Brien Award after being named the nation’ s best quarterback at the Home Depot College Football Awards in Lake Buena Vista on Thursday. Manziel wins Davey O’Brien QB awardBy KYLE HIGHTOWERAssociated PressLAKE BUENA VISTA — Texas A&M star Johnny Manziel has become the first freshman to win the Davey O’Brien National Quarterback Award. The award was presented Thursday night at the Home Depot College Football Awards show. Manziel beat out fellow finalists Collin Klein of Kansas State and Braxton Miller from Ohio State. Manziel led the Aggies to a 10-2 record and Cotton Bowl berth. Manziel passed for 3,419 yards and 24 touchdowns and posted a Southeastern Conference-record 4,600 yards of total offense on his way to his unanimous selection for Associated Press SEC offensive player of the year.Texas A&M’s Joeckel wins Outland TrophyTexas A&M junior Luke Joeckel has won the Outland Trophy, given to the nation’s outstanding interior line-man. He beat out fellow finalists Jonathan Cooper from North Carolina and Alabama’s Barrett Jones. Joeckel helped the Aggies average 235.1 yards rush-ing per game. The Aggies also had the third-ranked scoring offense in the coun-try at 44.8 points per game. Notre Dame’s Te’o wins Bednarik AwardNotre Dame linebacker Manti Te’o has won the Bednarik Award, given to the nation’s most outstand-ing defensive player. Te’o was presented with the award Thursday night at the Home Depot College Football Awards show at Disney World. He beat out finalists Jadeveon Clowney from South Carolina and Georgia’s Jarvis Jones. The leader of the nation’s top-ranked scoring defense, the senior had 103 tackles and seven interceptions this season. He is the first line-backer to win the Bednarik since 2008. It’s the fifth national award Te’o has received since the end of the regular season. He already has won the Butkus Award, Bronko Nagurski Trophy, Lombardi Award and Walter Camp national player of the year award. QB becomes 1st freshman to win nation’s top honor. Indians move to 4-0 Fort White stays unbeaten with win over Santa Fe By TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comFORT WHITE — It was a typical Fort White/Santa Fe high school struggle, this time on the basketball court in District 5-2A play. The Indians held on for a 70-65 win Thursday to stay unbeaten. Chris Cottrell and Jalen Wyche paced the Indians in the first quarter with eight points apiece. Melton Sanders hit a pair of free throws with one second left for a 20-17 Fort White lead. Sanders and Wyche scored off steals to open the second quarter. Trey Phillips chipped in four points including two on a putback at the buzzer for a 35-29 margin. Led by eight points from Marcus Archer, Santa Fe cut the lead to one, 48-47, by the end of the third quarter. Montrell Flagg added six points in the quarter for the Raiders. Phillips had five early points to help keep Santa Fe at bay. However, the Raiders broke out of the blocks in the fourth quarter with two free throws from Flagg and a 3-pointer by Demarius Harris. Joe Powers nailed a 3-pointer to cut Santa Fe’s lead to one and Michael Mulberry had a three-point play to regain the lead for the Indians. Two free throws by Flagg tied it up at 52-all, then Fort White went on a 12-6 run capped by Wyche’s 3-point-er to put the game away. The Indians got scoring from six players in the fourth quarter. “It is a team sport and our team is not based on one player,” Fort White head coach Isiah Phillips said. “We are not very big, so playing together is our key.” Wyche led the Indians with 18 points, followed by Sanders with 14, Cottrell with 13 and Phillips with 11. Mulberry chipped in seven points to go with Powers’ trey and buckets by Dre Brown and Paul Perry. Santa Fe (1-4, 1-1) got 18 points from Flagg, 16 from Harris and 14 from Archer, all in the second half. Diante Williams scored eight points and Swandrick Miller added seven. Brandon Drest had a basket. Fort White (4-0, 2-0) has another district test at 7:30 p.m. today when Bradford High visits.JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Trey Phillips (5) goes up for a shot a gainst Santa Fe High’s Darius Jackson on Thursday night. Fort White defeated Santa Fe, 70-65.



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CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, pleas e call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Q Actor Eli Wallach is 97. Q Linguist and political philosopher Noam Chomsky is 84. Q Bluegrass singer Bobby Osborne is 81. Q Actress Ellen Burstyn is 80.Q Sen. Thad Cochran, RMiss., is 75. Q Broadcast journalist Carole Simpson is 72. Q Baseball Hall of Famer Johnny Bench is 65. Q Actor-director-producer James Keach is 65. Q Country singer Gary Morris is 64.Q Singer-songwriter Tom Waits is 63.Q Sen. Susan M. Collins, RMaine, is 60. Q Basketball Hall of Famer Larry Bird is 56. Q Actress Priscilla Barnes is 55. Q NFL player Terrell Owens is 39. AROUND FLORIDA Officials hatch python contest MIAMI — Wildlife officials hope a competition will help raise awareness about Burmese pythons and get them out of public lands in South Florida. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission announced Wednesday the 2013 Python Challenge. Python permit holders and the public will compete to see who can harvest the longest and the most Burmese pythons. Wildlife officials said the goal is to help people understand why the non-native species is a threat to the Everglades ecosystem, including native wildlife. Another goal is to collect information on the python population in South Florida and enhance research and management efforts. The challenge kicks off Jan. 12. Cop shoots at fleeing thieves MIRAMAR, — Authorities say thieves stole some televisions from a South Florida Target store and then tried to run over a police officer who tried to stop them in a busy parking lot. Miramar police spokeswoman Tania Rues said the officer pulled the car over in the Chili’s restaurant parking lot Wednesday night. She said the officer thought they were going to run over him, so he fired mul-tiple shots at the fleeing vehicle. Police eventually took three people into cus-tody and were looking for another suspect late Wednesday. The two television sets the suspects took from Target were in the car when they were arrested.Ex-teacher appealing ruling TALLAHASSEE — A former Tampa teacher con-victed of having sex with a student wants the Florida Supreme Court to take her off probation. An appellate court in August reversed a trial judge’s decision to end Debra LaFave’s 10-year non-prison sentence four years early. LaFave appealed to the Supreme Court in October and Thursday she asked the justices to let her remain off probation until they rule. A three-judge panel of the 2nd District Court of Appeal also asked the high court to review its decision as a question of great pub-lic importance. The panel acknowledged the state had no right under Florida law to appeal the trial judge’s decision but cited common law to reverse it. LaFave pleaded guilty in 2005 to having sex with a 14-year old boy.Pedestrian, hit twice, killed TAMPA — Police said a woman was struck by two vehicles as she tried to cross busy Busch Boulevard in Tampa. The woman died from her injuries Wednesday night. Tampa police said 36year-old Kine C. Stegavik was first struck by a Nissan Altima about 6 p.m. The driver of a Ford Focus tried to avoid the crash but also hit Stegavik. Individuality tops at GrammysF un. helped break up the sound of dance and electronic music on Top 40 radio with its edgy pop-rock grooves. Frank Ocean made a bold statement in R&B — with an announcement about his sexuality and with his criti-cally revered, multi-genre album, “channel ORANGE.” And Mumford & Sons continued to bring its folk-rock swag and style to the Billboard charts with its sophomore album. They all were rewarded Wednesday when The Recording Academy announced the nominees for the 2013 Grammy Awards. Those acts, who scored the most nominations with six each, were joined by typical Grammy contend-ers like Jay-Z and Kanye West, who also got six nominations. The Black Keys’ drummer, Dan Auerbach, is also up for six awards, thanks to his nomination for producer of the year. His band earned five nods, along with R&B singer Miguel and jazz pia-nist Chick Corea. “It feels like alternative music is back,” said fun. guitarist Jack Antonoff. His band’s gold-selling “Some Nights” is up for album of the year, competing with Black Keys’ “El Camino,” Mumford & Sons’ “Babel,” Jack White’s “Blunderbuss” and “channel ORANGE,” the major label debut from Ocean. Fun. is nominated in all of the major categories, including best new artist, and record and song of the year for its breakthrough anthem “We Are Young.” mtvU honors Ocean, wounded Pakistani teen NEW YORK — The mtvU network is honoring a rap superstar who detailed his love for another man and a Pakistani girl shot for her educa-tion advocacy as its Man and Woman of the Year. Frank Ocean, who earned six Grammy nomina-tions Wednesday, published a letter online about his first love, a man, just as his “chan-nel ORANGE” disc was being released. MtvU on Thursday called it “an incredibly brave move for an artist on the verge of super-stardom.” Fifteen-year-old Malala Yousufzai blogged about her support of educa-tion for girls in Pakistan. For that, Taliban militants stormed her school bus and shot her in the head and neck, but she survived. The mtvU network is geared toward college students and is seen on more than 750 campuses.Actor Stephen Baldwin charged in NY tax case WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. — Actor Stephen Baldwin was charged Thursday with fail-ing to pay New York state taxes for three years, amassing a $350,000 debt. Rockland County District Attorney Thomas Zugibe said Baldwin, of Upper Grandview, skipped his taxes in 2008, 2009 and 2010. The youngest of the four acting Baldwin brothers pleaded not guilty at an arraignment and was freed without bail. Thursday: Afternoon: 7-1-6 Evening: N/A Thursday: Afternoon: 9-0-0-6 Evening: N/A Wednesday: 3-6-18-19-21 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING FRIDAY & SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7-8, 2012 HOW TO REACH USMain number ........(386) 752-1293 Fax number ..............752-9400Circulation ...............755-5445Online... www.lakecityreporter.comThe Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis-sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)NEWSEditor Robert Bridges.....754-0428(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)ADVERTISING.........752-1293 (ads@lakecityreporter.com)CLASSIFIEDTo place a classified ad, call 755-5440BUSINESSController Sue Brannon....754-0419(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)CIRCULATIONHome delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday.Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service.In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-vice related credits will be issued.In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser-vice related credits will be issued.Circulation...............755-5445(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)Home delivery rates(Tuesday -Friday and Sunday)12 Weeks.................. $26.3224 Weeks...................$48.7952 Weeks...................$83.46Rates include 7% sales tax.Mail rates12 Weeks.................. $41.4024 Weeks...................$82.8052 Weeks..................$179.40 Lake City Reporter 2A Daily Scripture “I am the good shepherd; I know my sheep and my sheep know me — just as the Father knows me and I know the Father — and I lay down my life for the sheep.” —John 10:14-15 ASSOCIATED PRESSHosts Taylor Swift (left) and LL Cool J speak onstage at th e Grammy Nominations Concert Live! at Bridgestone Arena on Wednesdayin Nashv ille, Tenn. Q Associated Press Q Associated Press Ocean Baldwin ASSOCIATED PRESSFireworks punctuate the grand opening celebration Thursda y at the Cinderella Castle for the New Fantasyland attraction a t the Walt Disney World Resort’s Magic Kingdom theme park in Lake Buena Vista. The new attraction is the largest expa nsion at the Magic Kingdom.



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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today COLLEGE FOOTBALL 8 p.m. ESPN2 — NCAA, FCS, playoffs, quarterfinals, Sam Houston State at Montana State GOLF 6:30 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Nelson Mandela Championship, second round, at Durban, South Africa 10:30 a.m. TGC — Ladies European Tour, Dubai Ladies Masters, third round, at Dubai, United Arab Emirates (same-day tape) 1 p.m. TGC — Franklin Templeton Shootout, first round, at Naples 8 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour Australasia, Australian Open, third round, at Sydney 1 a.m. TGC — Asian Tour, Thailand Championship, third round, at Bangkok MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 9:15 p.m. NBCSN — VCU at Old Dominion MEN’S COLLEGE HOCKEY 7 p.m. NBCSN — Michigan St. at Notre Dame NBA BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN — Boston at Philadelphia 9:30 p.m. ESPN — L.A. Lakers at Oklahoma City ——— Saturday BOXING 10 p.m. NBCSN — Junior lightweights, Teon Kennedy (17-2-2) vs. Jerry Belmontes (17-0-0); heavyweights, Bryant Jennings (15-0-0) vs. Bowie Tupou (22-2-0), at Philadelphia COLLEGE FOOTBALL Noon ESPN — NCAA, FCS, playoffs, quarterfinals, Georgia Southern at Old Dominion 3 p.m. CBS — Army vs. Navy, at Philadelphia 8 p.m. ESPN — Heisman Trophy Presentation, at New York GOLF 5:30 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Nelson Mandela Championship, third round, at Durban, South Africa 3:30 p.m. TGC — Ladies European Tour, Dubai Ladies Masters, final round, at Dubai, United Arab Emirates (same-day tape) 4 p.m. NBC — Franklin Templeton Shootout, second round, at Naples 8 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour Australasia, Australian Open, final round, at Sydney 1 a.m. TGC — Asian Tour, Thailand Championship, final round, at Bangkok MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL Noon CBS — Arkansas at MichiganESPN2 — Portland at Kentucky 1 p.m. FSN — TCU at Tulsa 2 p.m. ESPN2 — Colorado at Kansas 3:15 p.m. ESPN — Temple vs. Duke, at East Rutherford, N.J. 4 p.m. ESPN2 — Virginia Tech at West Virginia 5:15 p.m. ESPN — UCLA vs. Texas, at Houston 6 p.m. ESPN2 — Wisconsin at MarquetteNBCSN — N. Iowa at George Mason 8 p.m. ESPN2 — Arizona at ClemsonNBCSN — Villanova at Penn 10 p.m. ESPN2 — Illinois at Gonzaga MIXED MARTIAL ARTS 8 p.m. FOX — UFC, welterweights, Mike Swick (15-4-0) vs. Matt Brown (17-11-0); welterweights, B.J. Penn (16-8-2) vs. Rory MacDonald (13-1-0); light heavyweights, Mauricio Rua (21-6-0) vs. Alexander Gustafsson (14-1-0); champion Benson Henderson (16-2-0) vs. Nate Diaz (16-7-0), for lightweight title, at Seattle NBA BASKETBALL 8 p.m. WGN — New York at ChicagoFOOTBALLNFL standings AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAy-New England 9 3 0 .750 430 260N.Y. Jets 5 7 0 .417 228 296Buffalo 5 7 0 .417 277 337Miami 5 7 0 .417 227 249 South W L T Pct PF PAx-Houston 11 1 0 .917 351 221Indianapolis 8 4 0 .667 265 306Tennessee 4 8 0 .333 248 359Jacksonville 2 10 0 .167 206 342 North W L T Pct PF PABaltimore 9 3 0 .750 303 242 Pittsburgh 7 5 0 .583 254 230Cincinnati 7 5 0 .583 302 260Cleveland 4 8 0 .333 229 265 West W L T Pct PF PAy-Denver 9 3 0 .750 349 244 San Diego 4 8 0 .333 258 257Oakland 3 9 0 .250 235 376 Kansas City 2 10 0 .167 188 322 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAN.Y. Giants 7 5 0 .583 321 243 Washington 6 6 0 .500 312 301 Dallas 6 6 0 .500 280 295 Philadelphia 3 9 0 .250 217 320 South W L T Pct PF PAy-Atlanta 11 1 0 .917 317 229Tampa Bay 6 6 0 .500 333 285New Orleans 5 7 0 .417 321 327 Carolina 3 9 0 .250 235 292 North W L T Pct PF PAGreen Bay 8 4 0 .667 296 259Chicago 8 4 0 .667 294 198Minnesota 6 6 0 .500 262 272 Detroit 4 8 0 .333 300 315 West W L T Pct PF PASan Francisco 8 3 1 .708 289 171Seattle 7 5 0 .583 242 202St. Louis 5 6 1 .458 221 267Arizona 4 8 0 .333 186 234 x-clinched playoff spot; y-clinched division Thursday’s Game Denver at Oakland (n) Sunday’s Games Chicago at Minnesota, 1 p.m.Baltimore at Washington, 1 p.m.Kansas City at Cleveland, 1 p.m.San Diego at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.Tennessee at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.N.Y. Jets at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.Atlanta at Carolina, 1 p.m.Philadelphia at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.St. Louis at Buffalo, 1 p.m.Dallas at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.Miami at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.Arizona at Seattle, 4:25 p.m.New Orleans at N.Y. Giants, 4:25 p.m.Detroit at Green Bay, 8:20 p.m. Monday’s Game Houston at New England, 8:30 p.m. NCAA playoffs FCS Quarterfinals Today Sam Houston State (9-3) at Montana State (11-1), 8 p.m. Saturday Georgia Southern (9-3) at Old Dominion (11-1), Noon Wofford (9-3) at North Dakota State (11-1), 3 p.m. Illinois State (9-3) at Eastern Washington (10-2), 6 p.m. DIVISION II Semifinals Saturday Valdosta State (10-2) at Minnesota State Mankato (13-0), 3 p.m. West Texas A&M (12-2) at WinstonSalem (13-0), 6:30 p.m. DIVISION III Semifinals Saturday Mary Hardin-Baylor (13-0) at Mount Union (13-0), 1 p.m. Wisconsin-Oshkosh (13-0) at St. Thomas (Minn.) (13-0), 3:30 p.m.College bowl games Saturday, Dec. 15 New Mexico Bowl At AlbuquerqueNevada (7-5) vs. Arizona (7-5), 1 p.m. (ESPN) Famous Idaho Potato Bowl At Boise, IdahoToledo (9-3) vs. Utah State (10-2), 4:30 p.m. (ESPN) Thursday, Dec. 20 Poinsettia Bowl At San DiegoSan Diego State (9-3) vs. BYU (7-5), 8 p.m. (ESPN) Friday, Dec. 21 Beef ’O’ Brady’s Bowl At St. PetersburgBall State (9-3) vs. UCF (9-4), 7:30 p.m. (ESPN) Saturday, Dec. 22 New Orleans Bowl East Carolina (8-4) vs. LouisianaLafayette (7-4), Noon (ESPN) Las Vegas Bowl Boise State (10-2) vs. Washington (7-5), 3:30 p.m. (ESPN) Monday, Dec. 24 Hawaii Bowl At HonoluluSMU (6-6) vs. Fresno State (9-3), 8 p.m. (ESPN) Wednesday, Dec. 26 Little Caesars Pizza Bowl At DetroitCentral Michigan (6-6) vs. Western Kentucky (7-5), 7:30 p.m. (ESPN) Thursday, Dec. 27 Military Bowl At WashingtonBowling Green (8-4) vs. San Jose State (10-2), 3 p.m. (ESPN) Belk Bowl At Charlotte, N.C.Duke (6-6) vs. Cincinnati (9-3), 6:30 p.m. (ESPN) Holiday Bowl At San DiegoBaylor (7-5) vs. UCLA (9-4), 9:45 p.m. (ESPN) Friday, Dec. 28 Independence Bowl At Shreveport, La.Louisiana-Monroe (8-4) vs. Ohio (8-4), 2 p.m. (ESPN) Russell Athletic Bowl At OrlandoVirginia Tech (6-6) vs. Rutgers (9-3), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN) Meineke Car Care Bowl At HoustonMinnesota (6-6) vs. Texas Tech (7-5), 9 p.m. (ESPN) Saturday, Dec. 29 Armed Forces Bowl At Fort Worth, TexasRice (6-6) vs. Air Force (6-6), 11:45 a.m. (ESPN) Fight Hunger Bowl At San FranciscoArizona State (7-5) vs. Navy (7-4), 3:15 p.m. (ESPN2) Pinstripe Bowl At New YorkSyracuse (7-5) vs. West Virginia (7-5), 3:15 p.m. (ESPN) Alamo Bowl At San AntonioTexas (8-4) vs. Orgeon State (9-3), 6:45 p.m. (ESPN) Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl At Tempe, Ariz.Michigan State (6-6) vs. TCU (7-5), 10:15 p.m. (ESPN) Monday, Dec. 31 Music City Bowl At Nashville, Tenn.Vanderbilt (8-4) vs. N.C. State (7-5), Noon (ESPN) Sun Bowl At El Paso, TexasGeorgia Tech (6-7) vs. Southern Cal (7-5), 2 p.m. (CBS) Liberty Bowl At Memphis, Tenn.Iowa State (6-6) vs. Tulsa (10-3), 3:30 p.m. (ESPN) Chick-fil-A Bowl At AtlantaLSU (10-2) vs. Clemson (10-2), 7:30 p.m. (ESPN) Tuesday, Jan. 1 Heart of Dallas Bowl At Dallas-Purdue (6-6) vs. Oklahoma State (7-5), Noon (ESPNU) Gator Bowl At JacksonvilleMississippi State (8-4) vs. Northwestern (9-3), Noon (ESPN2) Capital One Bowl At OrlandoGeorgia (11-2) vs. Nebraska (10-3), 1 p.m. (ABC) Outback Bowl At TampaSouth Carolina (10-2) vs. Michigan (84), 1 p.m. (ESPN) Rose Bowl At Pasadena, Calif.Stanford (11-2) vs. Wisconsin (8-5), 5 p.m. (ESPN) Orange Bowl At MiamiNorthern Illinois (12-1) vs. Florida State (11-2), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN) Wednesday, Jan. 2 Sugar Bowl At New OrleansFlorida (11-1) vs. Louisville (10-2), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN) Thursday, Jan. 3 Fiesta Bowl At Glendale, Ariz.Kansas State (11-1) vs. Oregon (11-1), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN) Friday, Jan. 4 Cotton Bowl At Arlington, TexasTexas A&M (10-2) vs. Oklahoma (10-2), 8 p.m. (FOX) Saturday, Jan. 5 BBVA Compass Bowl At Birmingham, Ala.Pittsburgh (6-6) vs. Mississippi (6-6), 1 p.m. (ESPN) Sunday, Jan. 6 GoDaddy.com Bowl At Mobile, Ala.Kent State (11-2) vs. Arkansas State (9-3), 9 p.m. (ESPN) Monday, Jan. 7 BCS National Championship At MiamiNotre Dame (12-0) vs. Alabama (12-1), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN)BASKETBALLNBA schedule Today’s Games Boston at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.Denver at Indiana, 7 p.m.Washington at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.Golden State at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.Chicago at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.Cleveland at Minnesota, 8 p.m.Memphis at New Orleans, 8 p.m.Houston at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.Charlotte at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.Toronto at Utah, 9 p.m.L.A. Lakers at Oklahoma City, 9:30 p.m. Orlando at Sacramento, 10 p.m. Saturday’s Games Phoenix at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m.San Antonio at Charlotte, 7 p.m.Golden State at Washington, 7 p.m.Philadelphia at Boston, 7:30 p.m.Detroit at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.New Orleans at Miami, 7:30 p.m.New York at Chicago, 8 p.m.Dallas at Houston, 8 p.m.Atlanta at Memphis, 8 p.m.Sacramento at Portland, 10 p.m. AP Top 25 schedule Saturday’s Games No. 1 Indiana vs. Central Connecticut State, 6 p.m. No. 2 Duke vs. Temple at the IZOD Center, East Rutherford, N.J., 3:15 p.m. No. 3 Michigan vs. Arkansas, NoonNo. 4 Syracuse vs. Monmouth (N.J.), 7 p.m. No. 5 Louisville vs. UMKC, 2 p.m.No. 7 Ohio State vs. Long Beach State, Noon No. 8 Arizona at Clemson, 8 p.m.No. 9 Kansas vs. Colorado, 2 p.m.No. 10 Gonzaga vs. No. 13 Illinois, 10 p.m. No. 11 Cincinnati vs. Maryland-Eastern Shore, 2 p.m. No. 12 Missouri vs. Tennessee State, 3 p.m. No. 14 Minnesota at Southern Cal, 10:30 p.m. No. 15 Georgetown vs. Towson, Noon No. 18 New Mexico vs. Valparaiso, 9 p.m. No. 19 Michigan State vs. Loyola of Chicago, 2 p.m. No. 20 North Carolina vs. East Tennessee State, 7:30 p.m. No. 22 Notre Dame vs. Brown, 7 p.m.No. 23 Oklahoma State vs. Missouri State, 4 p.m. No. 24 Wichita State vs. Northern Colorado, 8 p.m. No. 25 N.C. State vs. Cleveland State, 1 p.m.Florida 72, Florida St. 47 At Tallahassee FLORIDA (7-0) Wilbekin 2-5 0-0 5, Boynton 4-12 5-5 14, Rosario 6-10 0-0 14, Young 5-7 0-3 10, Yeguete 1-3 4-5 6, Ogbueze 0-1 0-0 0, Graham 0-0 0-0 0, Kurtz 0-0 0-0 0, Frazier II 4-5 2-2 12, Prather 1-4 0-0 2, Walker 0-2 0-0 0, Murphy 4-6 0-0 9. Totals 27-55 11-15 72.FLORIDA ST. (4-4) Snaer 3-8 2-2 10, Turpin 1-1 1-2 3, Brandon 0-1 0-0 0, White 2-8 4-4 9, Whisnant II 0-2 0-0 0, Gilchrist 1-1 0-2 2, Bojanovsky 0-0 0-0 0, Bookert 4-8 0-0 9, Thomas 2-4 0-0 5, Miller 1-4 2-2 5, Shannon 2-9 0-0 4. Totals 16-46 9-12 47. Halftime—Florida 35-15. 3-Point Goals—Florida 7-23 (Frazier II 2-3, Rosario 2-4, Murphy 1-3, Wilbekin 1-3, Boynton 1-8, Prather 0-1, Walker 0-1), Florida St. 6-19 (Snaer 2-6, Thomas 1-2, Bookert 1-2, White 1-3, Miller 1-3, Brandon 0-1, Whisnant II 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Florida 34 (Young 8), Florida St. 26 (White 6). Assists—Florida 15 (Wilbekin 5), Florida St. 7 (Snaer 4). Total Fouls—Florida 17, Florida St. 15. A—10,593. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7-8, 20122BSPORTS BOWLING BRIEFS COURTESY PHOTOState bound gymnastsBard Gymnastics has a Level 4 competition team that will compete in the 2112 AAU Fall State Meet at the Manatee Convention Center in Palmetto on De c. 15-16. Team members are (front row, from left) Natalia Duarte and Hailey Busch.B ack row (from left) are Aja Lewis, Leigh Wood, Brandi Oliver and Daphne Green. League resultsLake City Bowl league play: HIT & MISS Team standings: 1. All Mrs’s (39-21); 2. Spare Us (37-23); 3. Legal Ladies (34.5-25.5). Team high handicap game: 1. Legal Ladies 826; 2. All Mrs’s 812; 3. Sandbaggers 781. Team high handicap series: 1. Spare Us 2,413; 2. Silver Ladies 2,346; 3. Git Up & Bowl 2,305. High handicap game: 1. Cythe Shiver 260; 2. Sandra Peterson 244; 3. Harriet Woods 237. High handicap series: 1. Ruth Heims 644; 2. Skeet Giffen 639; 3. Norma Campbell 626.(results from Nov. 27) MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS Team standings: 1. BENCOR (255-165, 45,840 pins); 2. Bias Well Drilling (255-165, 45,434 pins); 3. Ronsonet Service (242-178). High scratch game: 1. Steve Madsen 278; 2. Wally Howard 258; 3. (tie) Robert Stone, Bill Duncan 257. High scratch series: 1. Wally Howard 742; 2. Zech Strohl 690; 3. Bill Duncan 688. High handicap game: 1. Steve Madsen 320; 2. Keith Rouse 288; 3. Ted Wooley 278. High handicap series: 1. Keith Rouse 833; 2. Wally Howard 778; 3. Ted Wooley 756. High average: 1. Dale Coleman 218.7; 2. Bill Duncan 215.38; 3. Wally Howard 209.82.(results from Nov. 26) SEXY SENIORS Team standings: 1. Handicappers (75-45); 2. Jo’s Crew (74-46); 3. Keglers (72-48). Team high handicap game: 1. Perky Pals 837; 2. Pin Droppers 811. Team high handicap series: 1. Handicappers 2,470; 2. Keglers 2,360; 3. Pin Busters 2,264. High scratch game: 1. Barbara Croft 164; 2. Janet Nash 144; 3. Sjaan Tensen 125. 1. Dan Ritter 201; 2. Ray Denton 165; 3. Ron Grey 163. High scratch series: 1. Sandra Johns 442; 2. Diane Madsen 427; 3. Yvonne Finley 397. 1. Ric Yates 561; 2. Vernon Black 514; 3. Jerry Crandall 444. High handicap game: 1. Betty Carmichael 240; 2. Janie Posey 218; 3. Aggie Mumbauer 204. 1. Edward Smith 240; 2. Wendell Shay 226; 3. Keith Herbster 213. High handicap series: 1. Louise Atwood 667; 2. Vy Ritter 610; 3. Joyce Crandall 571. 1. Ross Meyers 657; 2. Wayne Johns 622; 3. Morrell Atwood 589.(results from Nov. 20) WATERGUARD LEAGUE Team high handicap game: 1. 10 In The Pitt 874; 2. Wolf Pack 857; 3. O 2 Cool 850. Team high handicap series: 1. Split/House 2,565; 2. All In 2,491; 3. We Don’t Care 2,424. High scratch game: 1. Mary Lobaugh 237; 2. Mary Lobaugh 212; 3. Chrissy Fancy 189. 1. James Price 234; 2. James Price 214; 3. George Mulligan 213. High scratch series: 1. Mary Lobaugh 595; 2. Chrissy Fancy 473; 3. Linda Oliver 467. 1. James Price 615; 2. George Mulligan 577; 3. Steven Hayes 547. High handicap game: 1. Linda Oliver 252; 2. Carla Nyssen 228; 3. Julie Bell 227. 1. Charles Yulee 256; 2. James Price 246; 3. Jack Stanfield 244. High handicap series: 1. Mary Lobaugh 664; 2. Susie Camacho; 3. Debbie Walters 630. 1. Chris Camacho 674; 2, Jesus Camacho 665; 3. Josh Duff 660. High average: Mary Lobaugh 182; James Price 194.(results from Nov. 27) GOLDEN ROLLERS Team standings: 1. Knock em Down; 2. Jo’s Crew; 3. 2 Plus 2. Team high handicap game: 1. 3 Plus One 835; 2. Wild Things 833; 3. Gamblers 784. Team high handicap series: 1. Jo’s Crew 2,531; 2. 2 Girls & 2 Guys 2,398; 3. Stripers 2,290. High scratch game: 1. Doreen Waters 178; 2. Joyce Hooper 173; 3. Yvonne Finley 154. 1. George Mulligan 202; 2. Tom Young 192; 3. Vernon Black 184. High scratch series: 1. Betty Carmichael 513; 2. DeDe Young 458; 3. Susan Mears 429. 1. Wayne Johns 549; 2. (tie) Lee McKinney, Dan Ritter 533; 4. Ric Yates 508. High handicap game: 1. Barbara Griner 228; 2. Aggie Mumbauer 226; 3. Diane Madsen 215. 1. Ross Meyers 241; 2. Earl Hayward 229; 3. Tom Evert 227. High handicap series: 1. Debi Evert 748; 2. Amy Musselwhite 628; 3. Susan Stanfield 596. 1. David Duncan 682; 2. Jim Burnett 643; 3. Winton Brewer 637. High average: 1. Judy Johnson 156.24; 2. Joyce Hooper 151.1; 3. Elaine Nemeth 149.85. 1. David Duncan 191.09; 2. Bill Dolly 186.51 ; 3. Wayne Johns 181.03.(results from Nov. 29) YOUTH BASEBALL River Rats U11 team tryouts set North Florida River Rats U11 travel baseball team has open tryouts set for 1 p.m. Dec.15 at the Southside Recreation Complex red practice fields For details, call Josh Wehinger at 623-3628 or Jamie Albritton at 209-0166.Lake City Babe Ruth registration Lake City Babe Ruth Baseball has opened online registration for its spring league. Go to lcccyb.com to sign up. Dates for on-site registration are pending. For details, call Jessica Langley at 867-1897. WOLVES BASKETBALL Breakfast at Richardson CC The Columbia County Recreation Department and Richardson Middle School is sponsoring a pancake breakfast at the Richardson Community Center cafeteria from 7-11:30 a.m. Jan. 12. The menu will consist of pancakes, Nettles sausage, eggs and orange juice. Tickets are $5 and may be purchased at Richardson Middle School or the Columbia County Recreation Department. All proceeds benefit the boys basketball programs. For details, call Mario Coppock at 754-7095. ADULT FLAG FOOTBALL Registration for 7 on 7 league Lake City Recreation Department is taking registration for its Adult 7 on 7 Flag Football League. Entry fee of $600 includes trophies, officials and scorekeeper/clock operator for a minimum of 10 games. Roster forms can be picked up at Teen Town Center. Deadline for fee and to return rosters is Dec. 14. For details, call Hayward Christie at 754-3607. BOYS CLUB Registration for basketball league The Boys Club of Columbia County is taking registration for its basketball program. Three leagues are offered: Training for ages 6-7-8; Jr. Varsity for ages 8-9-10; Varsity for ages 11-12-13-14. Practices are twice weekly and games are played on Saturday, with the exception of the Training League. Cost is $45. For details, call the club at 752-4184. ADULT SOFTBALL Winter league planned in 2013 An adult softball winter league is planned to begin on January 21. Women, men and co-ed leagues will be offered. Registration deadline is Jan. 11, and there will be a coaches meeting at 6 p.m. that day at Southside Sports Complex. For details, call Pete Bonilla at 623-6561 or Casandra Wheeler at 365-2168. CHS SOFTBALL Tryouts set for Jan. 8 at school Columbia High softball tryouts are 2:45 p.m. Jan. 8 at the CHS field. Participants must meet academic requirements and have completed paperwork. For details, call Jimmy Williams at 303-1192. ADULT BASKETBALL Charity games for USSSA youth Richardson Community Center/Annie Mattox North, Inc., is sponsoring the third annual charity basketball games at the Lake City Middle School gym on Jan. 5. The games feature adult women and men teams — Live Oak vs. Lake City. Game times are 6 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Admission is $5, with all proceeds going to the USSSA youth basketball program. For details, call Nicole Smith at 754-7095.Q From staff reports



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LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7-8, 2012 3A 3A NOTICE Attention Humana Wal-mart and CVS Caremark Medicare Part D patients: We accept these plans and all other Part D plans. Baya East 755-6677 Baya West 755-2233 Medical 755-2277 Call one of our pharmacies to see which plan is best for you. $350 $495 High Quality Stainless Steel with Cast Iron Grate. Contemporary Charcoal Grill" Wood Burning Stove WR 244 Gas Logs-All Kinds using personal identification information misrepresents himself or herself to be a law enforcement officer; an employee or representative of a bank, credit card com pany, credit card counseling company, or credit reporting agency; or any person who wrongfully represents that he or she is seeking to assist the victim a problem with the credit history shall have the offense reclassified. In the case of a misdemeanor, this offense has been reclas sified, in this case to a thirddegree felony. FRAUD: Continued From Page 1A duplicate information because separate salary reports are made for teach ers who are paid from more than one source. The website containing the original report, posted Wednesday, was taken down later that day. Interim FDOE commissioner Pam Stewart told the Associated Press the website will be restored once corrections are made. The Lake City Reporter ran a story Thursday detail ing results of the states findings for county teach ers, including a notation that some of the figures might be in doubt. While FDOE misreported the number of teachers in Columbia County, however, the basic facts remained unchanged. As reported, 100 percent of local teachers received rankings of highly effective or effective. No Columbia County educators were judged unsatisfactory and none were placed in the category, needs improvement. The Associated Press con tributed to this report. FDOE: Confusion reigns Continued From Page 1A establishments kitchen. When officers arrived they spoke to the restau rants owner, explained the nature of their visit, and the owner took them to the kitchen and brought Fulton to the officers. An officer spoke to Fulton about the complaint and Fulton denied he was doing anything other than working, but told authori ties he wanted to go out side to talk. When the owner opened the back door, Fulton reportedly took off run ning toward the front of the building with officers in pursuit. One of the officers ran back to the patrol car to search the area for Fulton and found him near the north end of the Farmers Furniture building. Fulton was told to get on the ground and he was handcuffed. While searching Fulton officers reportedly found cash, Goodys powders, a napkin and a plastic bag tied in a knot. When the officer untied the knot, he report edly found cocaine residue in the bag after a field test. Fulton told authorities he ran from them because he had an active warrant for his arrest. Two other officers arrived at the scene and back-tracked the area where Fulton ran and reportedly found two bag gies containing cocaine, a small yellow bag containing marijuana and three empty bags containing cocaine residue, reports said. Fulton denied having possession of the items and throwing them to the ground. However, he was arrested and taken to jail. COOK: Brief foot chase preceeds arrest Continued From Page 1A partnership between Potash Corp-White Springs and FGC. PotashCorp has spon sored the special collec tions and archives area at the Wilson S. Rivers Library and Media Center and has also recently funded a per manently endowed scholar ship. Potash Corp. of White Springs has funded annual scholarships at FGC for more than a decade, has donated several pieces of technical equipment for var ious programs and is cur rently the sponsor of FGCs Perspective program. PCS: Continued From Page 1A Lake DeSoto Drive repaving to start By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com Construction crews are scheduled to begin repav ing Lake DeSoto Circle beginning Monday. Pedestrians are asked to avoid the area, said Thomas Henry, Lake City Public Works director. The repaving project is expected to take at least two days and the roadway circle around Lake DeSoto will be reopened to the public later in the week. possibly as early asTuesday afternoon. The circle will be restriped for vehicles with a walking stripe added for pedestrians. City officials approved the project last month at a city council meeting when city manager Wendell Johnson explained the city could use funds from a sales tax bond revenue where BB&T Bank of Jacksonville refunded the citys sales tax revenue and bonds. The proceeds of $400,000 from the General Fund Capital could be used for additional street and draining projects, he explained. Anderson Columbia has provided a projected cost for Lake DeSoto Circle overlay at approximately $80,000. The distance of Lake DeSoto Circle is seventenths of a mile. The work is part of a list of projects for downtown upgrades. There will be more projects in the downtown upgrades in the very near future, Henry said. Local Rotarians recognized Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Rotarian John Wheeler (second from left) is congratulated by Perley Richardson after receiving a plaque and being named the 2011-12 Perley Richardson Rotarian of the Year at the Rotary of Lake City/Rotary of Lake City Downtown joint meeting on Thursday. At left is Rotary of Lake City president Steve Smith and at right is Rotary of Lake City Downtown president David Rountree. Wheeler has been instrumental in the Purple Pinkie Project, the Salvation Army and protecting the Ichetucknee Springs Basin. Im very surprised. Truly surprised, Wheeler said. Im caught off-guard. Its good to be recognized by friends and peers for doing the work that you love to do. Parade marshals to turn on VA lights From staff reports On Saturday parade grand marshals will simul taneously turn on more than 300,000 lights at the Lake City Veterans Affairs Medical Center during the annual holiday parade. This years parade theme will be honoring return ing veterans. The parade theme is Ill Be Home For Christmas. The annual holiday parade will begin 6 p.m. at Memorial Stadium. The parade grand marshals (who are armed services veterans from Columbia County) will stop briefly in front of the VA medical center to assist with the lighting ceremony. The medical center has been involved in the light ing ceremony since 1985. Through the years, vari ous veteran service orga nizations have donated the lights for the event. Several local Rotarians were recognized Thursday as Paul Harris Fellows, an award named after Rotary International founder Paul Harris. The award recipients are (front row, from left) Wendell Johnson, Ann Bormolini, John Norris, Steve Smith, Steve Jones; and (back row) Mike Tatem, Ron Turbeville, Carlton Jones, Guy Norris, John ONeal, Mike Lee, Chase Moses and Joe Persons. Not pictured are Bill Phillips, Wes Douglas, Tyson Johnson and John Kuykendall. County commission elects officers, OKs SVTA funding By DEREK GILLIAM dgilliam@lakecityreporter.com The county commission appointed a new chair man and vice chair, while also distributing all of the Suwannee Valley Transit Authoritys funds in one lump at its meeting on Thursday. The new chairman of was elected unanimously. The vice chair was not. District 4 Commissioner Stephen Bailey was elected chairman. District 1 Commissioner Ron Williams was nomi nated as vice chairman by District 5 Commissioner Scarlet Frisina, and Williams seconded the motion. Both District 2 Commissioner Rusty DePratter and District 3 Commissioner Bucky Nash voted against Williams, resulting in a 3-2 vote. Despite harsh words from local resident L.J. Johnson, who spoke about his difficulties with the SVTA, the commission voted to give the organi zation all of its $24,566 of funding for the year in one lump sum. Johnson said he has been cursed and screamed at by Bill Steele, director of operations for SVTA. Hes full of crap, Steele said after the meeting. Johnson had a signed letter from a witness to back up his claim, and said that two other residents of Columbia County were will ing to say they have had problems with SVTA, too. Johnson said the author ity has told him they couldnt provide transpor tation to the hospital when he had an appointment, and that he should reschedule his appointment. They are a transporta tion provider, not a health care provider, he said. Medical foster homes sought By KELLI KENNEDY Associated Press MIAMI State child welfare officials are trying to recruit more medical fos ter homes and are increas ing oversight to prevent disabled foster children from having to live in nurs ing homes. This weeks policy change from the Department of Children and Families comes as state health offi cials are fighting accusa tions that it is warehousing disabled children in adult nursing homes with little concern for their educa tional and socials needs because the state routinely slashes in-home care. DCF has about 30 dis abled children who are in state custody living in nurs ing homes. Almost another 200 disabled children not under DCF care also reside in nursing homes unneces sarily because parents say their in-home medical ser vices have been routinely cut. The allegations come from federal investigators and a federal lawsuit filed by families of more than a dozen children. Federal justice officials have threatened their own lawsuit against state health officials if the state does not comply with all Medicaid laws, but the Agency for Health Care Administration has repeatedly insisted they are in full compliance. Meanwhile, DCF sent a letter this week requir ing that Secretary David Wilkins office or another top administrator sign off on any move to place a child in a nursing home. Children placed in insti tutions will be monitored monthly and a required timeline will ensure there is an attempt to move the child back home whenever possible, according to the memo. Lets make it hard for anyone to be able to make a decision that would make a child go into a nurs ing home, Wilkins said Thursday. The agency will also beef up recruiting efforts for medical foster homes. There are now about two dozen. The biggest holdup weve had is if there is a child that could go home but doesnt have a home to go to, he said.



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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7-8, 2012 3B 3BSports LACRECIA WILLIAMS & BRENT WILLIAMS WINNERS 2012 Lake City R eporter Football Contest Congratulations! JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Muschamp co-coach of the year University of Florida football head coach Will Muschamp yells out during a game against University of South Carolina on Oct. 20. The SEC voted Muschamp the co-coach of the year, along with Texas A&M coach Kevin Sumlin. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Sturgis co-special teams player of the year University of Florida place-kicker Caleb Sturgis (19) kicks during a game against Louisiana State University on Oct. 6. The SEC voted Sturgis as co-special teams player of the year, along with South Carolina kick returner Ace Sanders. ASSOCIATED PRESS In this photo provided by NASDAQ, University of Alabama head football coach Nick Saban (left) poses with Notre Dame head football coach Brian Kelly after a news conference at the NASDAQ MarketSite in New York on Wednesday. For coaches, no sleep til BCS championship game By RALPH D. RUSSO Associated Press NEW YORK Brian Kelly and Nick Saban expect many restless nights between now and the BCS championship game on Jan. 7. Kelly and top-ranked Notre Dame play Saban and No. 2 Alabama in Miami. The coaches appeared together at a news confer ence on Wednesday at the Nasdaq stock exchange in Times Square. And in keeping with the venue where we are, you have two blue chip stocks that are going to go against each other, Kelly said. Asked what about their opponent will keep them up at night, Kelly and Saban both said there is plenty to worry about. Are you kidding me? Really? Kelly said. Everything about them. Sabans response: For me, I never sleep well, so Notre Dame is just the excuse now. The Fighting Irish will have 42 days between their last game against Southern California and the BCS title game against the Crimson Tide. Alabama played in the Southeastern Conference title game on Dec. 1, so its break is a week shorter. This is the third BCS championship appearance in four years for the Tide Alabama won its previ ous two so Saban obvi ously hasnt had a prob lem finding a routine that works. Many people have asked me how you carry the momentum of winning the SEC championship game into the next game, Saban said. And I think the answer to that is, you cant. You almost have to look at any bowl game, or any layoff like you have for this length of time, as the next game is sort of a onegame season. Both teams will go into training-camp mode this week. The players will lift weights and do condi tioning and fundamentals drills. Right now were doing two weeks of offseason con ditioning programs, which is always fun. Always popu lar with the guys, Alabama center Barrett Jones said Tuesday, with more than a hint of sarcasm in his delivery. Kelly said the worst thing a coach can do about the unusually long time between games is worry about it. First, I think its a selffulfilling prophecy if you keep talking about the long layoff, he said. We dont talk about that. We talk about whats the next step here and the next stage, or its the national champion ship. We think weve got a plan and we dont concern ourselves with the length of that time. The plan is to keep the next few weeks as produc tive as possible. We try to work our way up to a routine, Kelly said. Theres that space there, weight training, condition ing, some fundamental work and then try to get back to that routine that they are all familiar with as we lead into the game. Aside from keeping the players occupied and in shape, Kelly and Saban are also facing the possibility that members of their staffs could land head coaching jobs over the next week or so. Kellys defensive coordi nator, Bob Diaco, was a candidate for the Boston College job that was filled Tuesday when the Eagles hired Steve Addazio away from Temple. Diaco recent ly won the Broyles Award as the nations top assistant coach. There was speculation about Alabama defensive coordinator Kirby Smart being a candidate for the Auburn job, but the Tigers hired Gus Malzahn. As jobs are filled others open and there are still plenty of vacancies. There is still a possibility Notre Dame or Alabama or both could be dealing with this issue. I think those folks have every right to receive positive self-gratification professionally by taking advantage of some oppor tunity they have created for themselves by doing a good job, Saban said, without talking about any specific assistant. And I think its just a matter of professionalism where you can separate yourself for a day or two, not affect the performance of what youre trying to do at your job, evaluate the circum stance. Last year, Alabama prepared for the national championship game with its offensive coordinator, Jim McElwain, interview ing and accepting the Colorado State head coach ing job. Alabama won that BCS title game 21-0 and Saban said McElwain, put a great plan together for the Tide. And if there is staff turn over during the layoff, and a coach needs to be replaced, Kelly said there are plans in place to deal with it. We cant predict it, but we know that we are pre pared regardless of the cir cumstances, and if we were to lose somebody, weve got great coaches on board that are ready to step up, he said. Notre Dames Kelly wins coach of the year award By KYLE HIGHTOWER Associated Press LAKE BUENA VISTA Brian Kelly of Notre Dame has won coach of the year at the Home Depot College Football Awards show at Disney World. Kelly received the award Thursday night. He becomes the first two-time winner, having previously received the honor in 2009 while he was at Cincinnati. Kelly led the 12-0 Fighting Irish to the schools first undefeated regular sea son since 1988 and only the second overall. Kelly also joins Lou Holtz as the only Notre Dame coaches to post winning seasons in each of their first three sea sons at the school. Notre Dame will take on Alabama in the BCS nation al championship game on Jan. 7.



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OPINION Friday & Saturday, December 7-8, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A4AOPINIONH ere’s the lat-est irony from the nation’s capital: Having lost the election, Republicans are demanding that the White House agree to raise the age of eligibility for Medicare from 65 to 67. Even though Medicare is predicted to be solvent for the next 12 years and we don’t know if the Affordable Care Act, when fully implemented, will extend that timeframe, the secret war going on in dysfunctional Washington is about reducing the number of seniors on Medicare. When House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio speaks for Republicans to argue that there will be no tax increase on the wealthiest 2 percent of Americans without entitle-ment “reform,” that is what he means: cut the number of seniors eligible for Medicare. Yes, it is true that Medicare is growing exponentially as baby boomers retire. Yes, it is true that changes are inevitable. That’s one reason why Obamacare requires that $716 billion be squeezed from Medicare by chang-ing formulas for payments to doctors, hospitals and insurers — not beneficia-ries. Obama believes that there is too much waste in Medicare and that reduc-ing it will lower health care costs in America. The Supreme Court ruled that Obamacare is constitutional, and Obama won re-election by a wide margin. But Republicans insist they don’t want to give Obamacare a chance to work before they begin dismantling the structure of Medicare. A lot of Republican politicians don’t like Medicare. They have con-fused the issue so much that they won more votes from seniors on Medicare than Obama did because a lot of those seniors don’t realize that the secret GOP plan is to substitute Medicare as we know it with vouchers for private insurance companies. That was Mitt Romney’s plan. (You remember him: He ran for president last month and is now shop-ping at Costco, buying a new foreign-made Audi Q7 and blaming his loss on Obama’s “gifts” to minorities — gifts such as student loans.) Romney may have been all but forgotten even by his most fervent GOP supporters, but his plan to revamp Medicare lives on. Under his proposal, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation, 25 mil-lion seniors would pay sig-nificantly more if it were implemented. Among peo-ple 65 and older reporting income, the median was $18,800 in 2010, according to the U.S. government’s Administration on Aging. There are many good suggestions for improv-ing Medicare and making it more efficient and less costly. But a majority of seniors disagree that the first thing that should be done is to slam the door on seniors just becoming eligible. Republicans want these dramatic changes to Medicare done in the next couple of weeks. (Note: Despite the frantic debate over the looming fiscal cliff, Congress has taken a five-day recess.) This is the truth: The fiscal cliff, which means draconian cuts take effect and taxes rise on every-body on Jan. 1, is man-made by Congress. It is simple to resolve: Raise revenue and cut spending in a fair and honest way. The fiscal cliff has nothing to do with Medicare. C an’t we all just get along? This question lately has inspired my friend Tim Browne, a Californian who is active among free-market think tanks. Tim has helped me ponder how both politi-cal parties can escape the deteriorating “fiscal cliff” fiasco. Democrats don’t want automatic tax increas-es to hurt the middle class. Republicans don’t want tax hikes to prevent the top 2 percent from creating jobs and expanding the economy. Tim suggests: Let’s do both. The Republican-led House of Representatives should adopt this pro-posal and send it to the Democratic-led Senate for its immediate consider-ation: Cut the 10, 15, 25 and 28 percent tax rates by 10 percent each: to 9, 13.5, 22.5 and 25 percent. Those rates cover single people up to $180,800 and married couples up to $225,550. The two top income-tax rates — 33 and 35 percent — would stay the same. So, the GOP would spon-sor a middle-class tax cut and leave rates intact for top filers, many of whom own businesses. Deductions would stay untouched, avoiding a Republican-led, back-door tax hike that would siphon the tanks of those who invest in companies, hire workers and pur-chase products manufac-tured and marketed by people with more modest incomes. How much would this cost? Experienced Washington budget analysts consulted an economic model popular among Fortune 500 com-panies. The preliminary estimate is that such a tax cut would cost $332 billion between 2013 and 2022. However, it would trigger dynamic economic activity generating $88.6 billion in federal revenue. This policy’s net cost would be $243.4 billion. How would Republicans pay for this? The GOP should finance this reform by wel-coming home corporate profits stranded overseas. Even after credit for for-eign taxes, CEOs of U.S. multinationals hate paying the balance: up to 35 per-cent for America’s corpo-rate tax. Thus, Bloomberg News estimates that “U.S. companies have more than $1.6 trillion outside the country.” Every bil-lion that languishes in Brussels or Bangkok is a billion that is not hiring workers, opening facto-ries, or performing R&D in Buffalo or Birmingham. Bloomberg surveyed 70 top multinationals in March and found that they accumulated $187 billion overseas last year. Extrapolating that through 2022 would add $1.9 trillion to today’s $1.6 trillion stockpile. A long-term, 7 percent “wel-come home” tax on this $3.5 trillion would finance the GOP’s $243 billion middle-class tax cut. This naturalized money would help companies reinvest, increase payrolls or even pay dividends — all of which would propel eco-nomic growth. With this Gordian tax knot elegantly unraveled, Congress and the White House should agree to extend everything else into 2013. This would give both parties breathing room to handle entitle-ment reform without conducting such heavy maneuvers near a swiftly approaching precipice. If President Barack Obama balks at this GOP-initiated legislation, he can explain to America’s middle class why he denied them a tax cut that Republicans authored. Obama once accepted Republican thinking on this subject. As he told NBC on Aug. 5, 2009, “The last thing you want to do is to raise taxes in the middle of a recession.” When Obama expressed this economic common sense, America no longer was “in the middle of a recession.” While it may feel otherwise, the Great Recession technically ended in the third quar-ter of 2009. As Obama spoke, output expanded at 1.4 percent. But by that October, GDP advanced at 4 percent. So, if tax hikes were unwise then, they surely are ill advised with GDP growing at just 2.7 percent today. A Republican middleclass tax cut, coupled with importation of marooned corporate profits, rec-ognizes a simple fact on which every American should meditate. A rapidly rising GOP star expressed it beautifully: “The way we’re going to move ahead is not by mak-ing rich people poorer. It’s by making poor people richer,” Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., told Bill O’Reilly of Fox News. “The only way forward for us is rapid economic growth. Not new taxes. We need new taxpayers.” Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com I t would almost be funny, if folks’ live-hoods didn’t hang in the balance. The Florida Department of Education’s botched handing of teacher evaluations, released Wednesday then retracted later that day, set a new standard for ineptitude, even for an agency that’s become known for just that in recent months. Until Wednesday, FDOE’s biggest recent blunder was in miscalculating school grades throughout the state in July. This one’s arguably even more embarrassing. It didn’t involve complex mathematical formulas. Somehow, FDOE managed to simply miscount the number of teachers who were evaluated at districts across the state. In Hillsborough County, 13,000 educators became 23,000. Right here at home, 729 became 816. (Or, if you go by a later FDOE calculation, 718.) The problem recurred all up and down the peninsula, forcing the agency to say ‘oops’ and promise to try again today. (Further revised figures had not been received at press time.) For the record, FDOE says it wasn’t their fault, that the districts gave them bad data. It’s possible. That can all be sorted out later.What matters now is that we finally get it right, and get on with the business of building accountability back into public schools. Meanwhile, let’s hope those doing the accounting prove up to the task. Ludicrous OUR OPINION Passing a middle-class tax cut could help dodge ‘fiscal cliff’ Medicare still in GOP’s crosshairs On this date:In 1787, Delaware became the first state to ratify the U.S. Constitution. In 1796, electors chose John Adams to be the second president of the United States. In 1808, electors chose James Madison to be the fourth president of the United States. In 1836, Martin Van Buren was elected the eighth president of the United States. In 1842, the New York Philharmonic performed its first concert. In 1909, chemist Leo H. Baekeland received a U.S. patent for Bakelite (BAY’-kuh-lyt), the first synthetic plastic. In 1911, China abolished the requirement that men wear their hair in a queue, or ponytail. In 1941, Japan launched a surprise attack on the U.S. Navy base at Pearl Harbor. HIGHLIGHTS IN HISTORY Q New York commentator Deroy Murdock is a columnist with the Scripps Howard News Service and a media fellow with the Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and Peace at Stanford University. Deroy Murdockderoy.murdock@gmail.com Ann McFeattersamcfeatters@nationalpress.com Q Scripps Howard columnist Ann McFeatters has cov-ered the White House and national politics since 1986.



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4B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7-8, 20124BSPORTS Manziel can make historyBy KRISTIE RIEKENAssociated PressCOLLEGE STATION, Texas — Johnny Manziel certainly has the statis-tics worthy of a Heisman Trophy winner. He plays in the powerful Southeastern Conference. He has a sig-nature win — all things Heisman voters typically look for. The only question is whether the voters will give the award to a freshman for the first time. Adrian Peterson, star running back for the Vikings and the only freshman to finish second in the vot-ing, is hoping the jinx ends Saturday night. “Hopefully, they don’t rob him like they did me,” Peterson, who lost by 328 votes to junior Matt Leinart in 2004, said in an interview with The Associated Press. “I hope he wins.” Manziel may be a favorite this year, but who knows? Kansas State quarterback Collin Klein and Notre Dame linebacker Manti Te’o are the other final-ists and both can make strong cases, too. But nei-ther caught the attention of the fans quite like Johnny Football, who led the Aggies to an upset of No. 1 Alabama in Tuscaloosa. Manziel accumulated 4,600 yards of total offense in 12 games to break the Southeastern Conference record for total yards in a season. The record was previously held by 2010 Heisman winner Cam Newton, who needed 14 games to pile up 4,327 yards. The Aggies, who went 10-2 in their first season in the SEC after moving from the Big 12, certainly hope Manziel is the one to finally break the freshman curse (Manziel is a redshirt fresh-man, not a true freshman). On a website the school created to promote Manziel for the award, they point out that he’s different than many freshman. Manziel enrolled in college in January 2010 and will be a junior aca-demically this spring. He turns 20 on Thursday, mak-ing him older than Mark Ingram was when he took home the Heisman as a sophomore in 2009. He would also be just the second Aggie to win the award and the first since John David Crow in 1957. Crow got a push from his famous coach before the voting was done that sea-son. “If John David Crow doesn’t win the Heisman Trophy,” then-A&M coach Paul “Bear” Bryant said, “they ought to stop giving it.” Crow got a good laugh this week when asked if he believed the same was true of Manziel. “I don’t have near the audience that coach Bryant had,” he said, still chuck-ling. “I’m not sure how big that would go over.” Then the 77-year-old former halfback got serious. “He is very, very deserving,” Crow said. “I don’t care what age he is, wheth-er he is right-handed or left-handed, wears a 17 shoe or nine shoe, he is very, very deserving of being named the outstanding player in college this year.” Manziel’s whirlwind season had a modest beginning with him having to beat out two other quarterbacks to win the starting position in mid-August. As his numbers grew, so did the legend of Johnny Football, a nickname Aggies bestowed him with as he settled in at College Station. When the Aggies beat the defending champi-on Crimson Tide on nation-al television behind an out-standing performance by Manziel, the phrase seemed to be everywhere. It’s a name that still amuses him. “I don’t know if I really see it as a legend,” he said. “It’s more of a folk tale, I guess.” His numbers alone seem like the stuff of some exag-gerated Texas football folk tale. He has thrown for 3,419 yards and 24 touch-downs and run for 1,181 yards and 19 more scores to become the first fresh-man, first SEC player and fifth player overall to throw for 3,000 yards and run for 1,000 in a season. But his eye-popping numbers don’t tell the whole story. The improvisation is what really sets him apart. Manziel has a knack for evading defenders, staying on his feet and finishing plays that seem impossible. Kind of like Robert Griffin III, the Baylor star who won the Heisman last year. Or Fran Tarkenton, another wizard at avoiding defend-ers. “I don’t think there’s many people in this world that could do some of the things he did,” Crow said. “He was born to run around back there — at least it looks that way to me.” Manziel was so disappointed when he came out of spring practice as a backup that he enlisted the help of quarterback guru George Whitfield to refine his skills this summer. He spent a week at Whitfield Athletix in San Diego, training up to five hours a day with Whitfield, who has worked with scores of players including Newton, Vince Young and Andrew Luck. Whitfield was struck by Manziel’s competitiveness and his desire to soak up every bit of knowledge that the coach had for not just him, but all of the quarter-backs in training. Whitfield said the only other quarterback he’s seen who can improvise like Manziel is Newton. But he said the 6-foot-1 Manziel might be tougher to deal with than the 6-5 Newton. “Cam poses a lot of problems because he’s so imposing,” Whitfield said. “Johnny, on the other hand, causes as many problems and it’s more overwhelm-ing to defensive players because they think: ‘If I can just catch him, I can get him on the ground.’ But you can’t get him.” He’s enjoyed watching Manziel develop this sea-son, and saw some flashes of what he could be when the pair worked this sum-mer. “He’s got this great sense of awareness and vision. He’s so creative,” said Whitfield, who then offered a James Bond anal-ogy. “There’s always some kind of 007 escape route in mind. If Cam is Superman, I would say that Johnny is like 007.” Growing up in Kerrville, Texas, Manziel didn’t dream of football stardom. He always pictured his path leading to a baseball dia-mond. “I always thought since I was a little kid that I would play pro baseball,” said Manziel, who also starred on his high school baseball team. “My biggest dream was that I wanted to play in the MLB. I wanted to play for the Rangers and wanted to play shortstop.” But fate stepped in and altered his dream. “Then football came along and took center stage,” he said. Manziel’s success on the field seems almost too good to be true. And when he rescued a kitten from the middle of a busy, four-lane road near Kyle Field earlier this season, it only added to the mystique of Johnny Football. (The semi-daring rescue is referenced on his Heisman page.) “Just rescued a kitten from the middle of Wellborn Rd,” Manziel tweeted in September when he wasn’t allowed to talk to the media because of coach Kevin Sumlin’s ban on freshmen interviews. He added a picture of a scared-looking black cat to prove his story. Things haven’t always been rosy for Manziel. In June, he was arrested in town after police said he was involved in a fight and produced a fake ID. He was charged with disorderly conduct and two other mis-demeanors. “It was a critical mistake in my life,” Manziel said. “It was something that I learned a lot from. It had consequences with coach Sumlin and my teammates and everyone here in Aggieland. From that I’ve had to make changes in my life.” Less than six months after his arrest, Manziel has helped the Aggies to their best season since 1998, and made Texas A&M one of the top teams in the nation after last year’s disappoint-ing 7-6 finish. He’s proud to have helped put the Aggies back in the spotlight and knows win-ning the Heisman would only add to it. “To bring a Heisman Trophy back to Aggieland for all these fans since it’s been so all these years since we’ve had a Heisman Trophy winner ... to really bring the excitement and really bring something positive back to Aggieland would be something that is truly an ultimate goal,” he said. He’s got a fan in Peterson, who ran for an NCAA fresh-man record 1,925 yards at Oklahoma in 2004 and believes the only reason he didn’t win the Heisman was because he was a first-year player. “It’s sad when you think about it, because the Heisman goes to the best player in the country so the voters shouldn’t look at it and go over what they’ve done over their career,” Peterson said. “If he’s the best player that year? Then that’s what it needs to be.” ASSOCIATED PRESSIn this Nov. 10 file photo, Texas A&M quarterback Johnny M anziel (2) runs for a first down during the first half aga inst Alabama at Bryant-Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Ala. Manz iel could become the first freshman to win the Heisman Tr ophy when the award is presented on Saturday night. By TOM COYNEAssociated PressSOUTH BEND, Ind. — If Manti Te’o’s career at Notre Dame has seemed like something straight out of a Hollywood script, perhaps it is fitting the linebacker is cast as an underdog in the final two scenes of his col-legiate career. First, he will try to become the first defense-only player to win the Heisman Trophy, going up against a couple of quarterbacks Saturday night in Texas A&M’s Johnny Manziel and Kansas State’s Collin Klein. Next month, he will lead the top-ranked Fighting Irish against defending champion Alabama in the BCS championship game as Notre Dame tries to become the first team since BYU in 1984 to start a sea-son unranked and win it all. Te’o still finds it all a bit hard to believe. “It’s something that I never — I don’t think any-body could anticipate or expect. It’s always a goal to be the best, to be the best you can be, and I just — I didn’t think that it would be to this magnitude,” he said. “I’m just very grateful to be in this situation and to represent my team.” Te’o has represented the Irish amazingly well, show-ing courage in playing his best game of the season just days after both his girl-friend and grandmother died a few hours apart. He never missed practice and made a season-high 12 tack-les, two pass breakups and a fumble recovery in a 20-3 victory over then-No. 10 Michigan State. A week later, on the day his girlfriend was buried, Te’o had two interceptions, leading to a touchdown and a field goal, and had two more quarterback hurries that led to interceptions in a 13-6 win over Michigan as many Irish fans wore leis to show their support for the star who grew up in Hawaii. The biggest item missing from Te’o’s resume from the perspective of some Heisman Trophy voters might be that he’s never passed or run for a touch-down, just about a prereq-uisite for winners. He has plenty of other impressive numbers, though. His seven interceptions are the most ever by a Notre Dame linebacker and the most by any linebacker since Georgia’s Tony Taylor had that many in 2006. Te’o also has 103 tackles. It was enough to impress the country’s major col-lege football coaches, who selected him the Walter Camp national player of the year on Thursday. His coaches and teammates, though, say the numbers don’t begin to tell the story of Te’o. He has been the face and heartbeat of not only the Notre Dame defense but the entire team that kept surprising naysayers, from winning at Oklahoma to those stir-ring goal-line stands against Stanford and Southern California. “If a guy like Manti isn’t going to win the Heisman they should just make it an offensive award and just give it to the offensive play-er every year and cut to the chase,” coach Brian Kelly said. “He is the backbone of a 12-0 football team that has proven itself each and every week.” The only defensive player to win the trophy was Michigan cornerback Charles Woodson in 1997. But Woodson also played some wide receiver and returned punts. Oklahoma coach Bob Stoops said he’s never under-stood why defensive players don’t win the award and believes Te’o is deserving. “They’re noted for their defense and he’s the quar-terback of the defense,” Stoops said. “He’s been the guy all year. He’s been their guy and I don’t think there’s any question he’s a guy that should have a great oppor-tunity to win it.” Te’o showed his leadership skills before the Oklahoma game. Quarterback Everett Golson had struggled in a big game against Michigan and Te’o asked Kelly if he could talk to Golson before the game. Kelly didn’t ask Te’o what he wanted to say. “Because it’s really not important for me what Manti is talking about with the quarterback because I know what he’s going to say is all positive. But Everett got up with a big smile on his face. I think it set him at ease,” Kelly said. “I think he impacts everybody on our football team.” With seven Heisman winners, Notre Dame has had some unconventional win-ners. Paul Hornung, who played quarterback, half-back and safety, is the only Heisman winner to play for a losing team. The Irish were 2-8 when he won in 1956. Quarterback John Huarte won in 1964 while leading the Irish to a 9-1 record a season after failing to letter for a 2-7 squad. Te’o leads Irish defense, key to perfect season ASSOCIATED PRESSIn this Oct. 20, file photo, Notre Dame linebacker Manti Te’o chases the action during the second half against the BYU in South Bend, Ind. Te’o is a finalist for the Heisman Trophy.



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Dec. 7Holiday music concertThe combined music ministries of Pine Grove Baptist Church and Southside Baptist Church will present “Season of Joy” holiday music concert at 7 p.m. at Pine Grove Church, 1989 N Highway 441, and at 7 p.m. Sunday at Southside Baptist, 388 SE Baya Drive. Admission is free, but seat-ing is limited. Nursery will be available for children 4 and younger. For advance tickets or more informa-tion, contact Pine Grove Church a (386) 752-2664 or Southside Baptist at (386) 755-5553.Walk-a-thonFort White High School HOSA will be putting on a walk-a-thon to raise funds for cystic fibrosis research. The event will be from 4 to 8 p.m. at Fort White High School football stadium. Activities will Include a bake sale, food concession and health screenings. For more information, contact Brian Pompili at FWHS or by email at pompili_b@firn.edu.Community theaterHigh Springs Commnity Theater will present the comedy “Christmas Belles,” weekends through Dec.16. The play is about Christmas time in the small town of Fayro, Texas, but the Futrelle sisters are not exactly in a festive mood. A cranky Frankie is weeks overdue with her sec-ond set of twins. Twink, recently jilted, is in jail for inadvertently burning down half the town. And hot-flash-suffering Honey Raye is desperately trying to keep the Tabernacle of the Lamb’s Christmas pro-gram from spiraling into chaos. Their hilarious holi-day journey through a mis-adventure-filled Christmas Eve is guaranteed to bring joy to your world. Tickets are available for pur-chase at The Framery of Lake City (386) 754-2780, Pampered Paws in High Springs (386) 454-4464 or online at highspringscom-munitytheater.com. Friday and Saturday shows will be at at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m. Doors open a half-hour before show time. Tickets are $11 for adults, $8 for children 12 and younger and $9 for seniors on Sundays. The theater is at 130 N. First Ave. in High Springs.Fish dinnerOur Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5056 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, pre-pares fish dinners every Friday from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The dinner is $6 for two Alaskan pollock filets, corn, baked beans, hush-puppies, cole slaw and tarter sauce. Take out or eat in. Dec. 8Breakfast with SantaCome join us at Holiday Inn & Suites for breakfast with Santa from 8 to11 a.m. The event will include a breakfast buffet with scram-bled eggs, bacon, sausage, biscuits and gravy, juice, coffee, hot chocolate and a waffle station. Enjoy holi-day music, fun and fellow-ship, complete with a visit from Santa. Cost is $9.95 for adults and $4.95 for chil-dren ages 3 to 12. Proceeds will benefit the Children’s Medical Services of North Florida. A collection box for donations of unwrapped toys also will be available. For more information, call (386) 754-1411.Canned food give-awayNorth Side Church of Christ, 378 NW Gibson Lane, will have a canned food give-away from 8 a.m. to noon. Anyone in need is welcome. For more information, contact the church office at 755-0393, by email secretarynscofc@gmail.com or visit the church website, Thenorthsidecoc.org.Clothing give-awayThe A.M.E churches of Columbia County will hold a clothing give-away begin-ning at 10 a.m. at Mount Tabor A.M.E. Church, 519 SW L.M. Aaron Drive, Lake City. Clothing for all ages, including dress, casual, purses and more, will be available. For more infor-mation, call (386) 758-8022 or (386) 438-4803.Farmers marketOnce again, local artists and crafters will be at the Lake DeSoto Farmers Market, selling original works for that perfect hol-iday gift. Middle Ground will provide live music, and the Lake City Chamber of Commerce will host its Snow Day 2012 at neigh-boring Olustee Park. Thirty tons of real snow, 10 bounce houses, live entertainment and several food vendors will make all of Downtown Lake City hopping. And at 8 a.m., early risers can catch the second annual Dashing to the Snow Reindeer 5k Run/Walk around down-town. The farmers market is open every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Wilson Park, along Lake DeSoto between the Columbia County Courthouse and Shands Lakeshore Hospital in downtown Lake City. For more information, call (386) 719-5766 or visit market.lcfla.com.Beekeeping courseThe Columbia County Extension will conduct a free Intro to Beekeeping Short-Course Workshop from 8:30 a.m. to noon at the extension office at Columbia County Fairgrounds. The Lake City Beekeepers Club meets every the fourth Monday of each month at 6 p.m. at the extension office. To register or for more infor-mation, call 758-1030.Blanket collectionThe United Way of the Suwannee Valley will hold Blank-fest Florida Five, a blanket collection event to support the home-less, beginning at 5 p.m. in Rock Star Lounge, 723 E. Duval St. in Lake City. Admission is the donation of one blanket. Raffle tick-ets for prizes will be given for each blanket donated. Live music will be provided by Kyle Whittaker, Selador, Turquois Raven, Shades of Jade, Jak’t Up and Deep South All-Stars. Dec. 9Holiday cantataCovenant First Presbyterian Church (for-merly First Presbyterian) of Live Oak will present the Christmas cantata, “God with Us Emmanuel,” by Phillip Young on at 6:00 p.m. Bill Poplin will be directing. The church is off U.S. 90 on White Avenue in Live Oak. For more infor-mation, contact Bill Poplin at 365-4932.Holiday music concertThe combined music ministries of Pine Grove Baptist Church and Southside Baptist Church will present “Season of Joy” holiday music con-cert at 7 p.m. at Southside Baptist, 388 SE Baya Drive. Admission is free, but seat-ing is limited. Nursery will be available for children 4 and younger. For advance tickets or more informa-tion, contact Pine Grove Church a (386) 752-2664 or Southside Baptist at (386) 755-5553.Church anniversaryMount Pisgah A.M.E Church will celebrate its 135th anniversary at 4 p.m. Pastor Ronald V. Walters and the Olivet Church fam-ily will be in charge of the service. For more infor-mation, call 752-1830 or 758-5990.Dec. 11Medicare seminarLifestyle Enrichment Center is sponsoring a free Medicare seminar from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. The seminar will be moderat-ed by Irv Crowetz of C/C & Associates. Subjects to be covered include: what you need to know about Medicare, when to enroll, what’s covered and when a supplement is needed. Call 755-3476 ext. 107 to reserve a seat.Author to speakGainesville policeman and author Art Adkin will be at at the Main Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave., at 7 p.m. as a guest of the Friends of the Columbia County Public Library. Adkins will talk about his book, “Leadership Basics: Conquering the Seven Deadly Sins.” He is also the author of the thrillers, “Power Grid” and “The Oasis Project.”Kids’ shopping nightThe Haven Hospice Suwannee Valley Care Center will hold a Kids’ Holiday Shopping Night from 5 to 7 p.m. at the care center, 6037 W U.S. 90 in Lake City. Children will be able to shop for gifts for family and friends. Each child will receive Santa Bucks to spend, a photo with Santa, punch and cook-ies and free gift wrapping. Children must be accompa-nied by adults. The hospice is seeking donations of new or lightly used holiday gift items for the event. For more informaiton, all (386) 752-0230.Plant clinicUniversity of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon at the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane, to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. Dec. 12United Way luncheonUnited Way of Suwannee Valley will conduct its December community fundraising campaign report luncheon at noon at the Columbia County Senior Services LifeStyle Enrichment Center, 928 SE Allison Court, Lake City. Bill Caley, executive director of Boys’ Club of Columbia County, one of the 21 United Way affiliated agen-cies, will utilize the theme for this year’s campaign, “Imagine Me,” to enable guests to identify with the needs addressed through United Way affiliated agen-cies. Dana Huggins, chair of the Homeless Services Network of Suwannee Valley, will utilize the theme to speak about the work of the homeless coalition in Columbia, Hamilton, Lafayette and Suwannee counties. The cost is $12 per person. For more information, call the United Way office at (386) 752-5604 ext. 102.Water panel meetingThe stakeholder advisory committee of the North Florida Regional Water Supply Partnership will meet at 1 p.m. at Florida Gateway College, 149 SE College Place, Lake City. The meeting will be in the Wilson S. Rivers Library and Media Center, Building 200, Room 102. The agen-da includes discussion and possible committee rec-ommendation of the north Florida regional water sup-ply boundary area. The meeting is open to the public, and there will be an opportunity for public comment. For more information about the Partnership, visit northfloridawater.com.Plant clinicUniversity of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Wednesday from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Fort White Public Library on Route 47 to answer ques-tions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. This will be the last clinic at the library until January. For more information, call 752-5384.Newcomers meetingLake City Newcomers will meet at 11 a.m. at the Eastside Village Clubhouse. Sale of 50-50 tickets will end at 11:25. Lunch is $11. Those who want to partici-pate in a gift exchange are asked to bring a wrapped or bagged gift valued at at least $10. There will be games, singing and a special guest. Directions to clubhouse: Turn into Eastside Village from East Baya Avenue onto Pearl Terrace; turn left onto Sable and follow signs to the clubhouse, which is on Claudia. For more informa-tion, call Barbara Test at 754-7227 or Rose Taylor at 755-2175. Dec. 13Woodturners ClubBell Woodturners Club meets the second Thursday of the month in the Bell community Center at 7 p.m. Every meeting features a show and tell of members current projects. There is also a full demon-stration of a woodturning project by a club member. All experience levels are welcome. For additional info contact Kent Harriss at 365-7086.Plant clinicUniversity of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon at the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane, to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. This will be the last clinic until Jan. 13.Dec. 14Crafts bazaar, festivalThe annual Lake City Holiday Crafts Bazaar and Festival will be today through Sunday at the Lake City Mall, 2469 W U.S. Highway 90. Craft ven-dors will be available from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. today and Saturday and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. Organizers also will accept donations of new or gently used toys and nonperishable foods on center court at the mall, in cooperation with Children’s Medical Center, all three days. Activities for chil-dren Saturday and Sunday will include train rides, a petting zoo, face painting, sand art, bounce hous-es and visits with Santa. Vendors and entertainment acts are being sought. For information, call Genovese Terry at (386) 623-3502 or visit online at www.lakecity bazaar.com.Fish dinnerOur Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5056 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, pre-pares fish dinners every Friday from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The dinner is $6 for two Alaskan pollock filets, corn, baked beans, hush-puppies, cole slaw and tarter sauce. Take out or eat in. LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY & SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7-8, 2012 5A5A JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterKurt Reed shows what he believes to be the skin of a wate r moccasin that he found near a creek by his home on W ednesday. Pictured are (from left) Kyle Reed, 9; Reed; Jaquez Cooper 8; and Austin Acosta, 10. ‘I think this is awesome,’ Kurt Re ed said. ‘You don’t find one very often this nice. You can se e everything from its face to the tip of the tail. It’s pretty coo l. It is concerning, though. They know they are not allowed to play ar ound there.’ COMMUNITY CALENDAR Q To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr@lakecityreporter.com.



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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7-8, 2012 5B5B FRIDAY EVENING DECEMBER 7, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Last Man StandingMalibu Country (N) Shark Tank (:01) 20/20 (N) News at 11(:35) Nightline (N) 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) The Insider 5-PBS 5 -Journal Nightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Celtic Woman: A Christmas Celebration Happy Holidays: Best of Andy WilliamsWashington WeekTavis Smiley 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge Judy Two and Half MenUndercover Boss “PostNet” (N) CSI: NY “The Real McCoy” (N) Blue Bloods “Secrets and Lies” (N) Friday Night BlitzLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneNikita Alex begins to unravel. (N) Arrow “Vendetta” TMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ce The Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family Guy Family Guy The SimpsonsKitchen Nightmares “Barefoot Bob’s” Fringe “The Human Kind” (N) NewsAction News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) Saturday Night Live “SNL Christmas” Popular holiday sketches. Dateline NBC (N) NewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(2:00) Politics & Public Policy Today Politics & Public Policy Today Politics & Public Policy Today WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304(:13) M*A*S*H (6:52) M*A*S*HThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Police Women of Memphis Police Women of Memphis Police Women of Memphis Married to the Army: Alaska (N) Married to the Army: Alaska (N) Police Women of Memphis A&E 19 118 265The First 48 Drug-related murder. Duck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck Dynasty(:01) Duck Dynasty(:31) Duck Dynasty HALL 20 185 312 “A Season for Miracles” (1999, Drama) Carla Gugino, David Conrad. “The Christmas Heart” (2012, Drama) Teri Polo, Paul Essiembre. “Santa Jr” (2002, Romance-Comedy) Lauren Holly, Judd Nelson. FX 22 136 248Two and Half MenTwo and Half MenTwo and Half MenTwo and Half Men “Predators” (2010, Science Fiction) Adrien Brody, Topher Grace. The Ultimate Fighter (N) “Predators” (2010) Adrien Brody. CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245The Mentalist “Red Alert” The Mentalist A witness gets killed. “Inception” (2010) Leonardo DiCaprio, Ellen Page. A thief enters people’s dreams and steals their secrets. (:15) “U.S. Marshals” (1998, Action) NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobDrake & JoshDrake & Josh “A Fairly Odd Christmas” (2012) Drake Bell. Full House The Nanny The Nanny Friends (:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241Ink Master “Holy Ink” Ink Master “Buck Off” Ink Master “Blowing Chunks” VGA Ten Samuel L. Jackson hosts. (N) (Live) VGA Ten Samuel L. Jackson hosts. MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*H M*A*S*H Monk New lotto girl Natalie. Monk A boxer inspires Monk. Seinfeld Frasier The Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290A.N.T. Farm Jessie Dog With a BlogGood Luck CharlieAustin & Jessie & Ally All StarPhineas and FerbGravity Falls A.N.T. Farm Good Luck CharlieGood Luck CharlieShake It Up! LIFE 32 108 252 “The Christmas Blessing” (2005, Drama) Neil Patrick Harris. “Under the Mistletoe” (2006, Drama) Jaime Ray Newman, Michael Shanks. “Finding Mrs. Claus” (2012, Comedy) Mira Sorvino, Will Sasso. USA 33 105 242Law & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitBurn Notice “Best Laid Plans” BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live Trey Songz; Freestyle Friday battle. (N) One Mic StandOne Mic StandOne Mic StandOne Mic StandOne Mic StandOne Mic StandApollo Live Musical guest Angie Stone. ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) d NBA Basketball Boston Celtics at Philadelphia 76ers. From Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia. (N)d NBA Basketball Los Angeles Lakers at Oklahoma City Thunder. (N) ESPN2 36 144 209SportsNation (N) NFL Kickoff (N) (Live) e College Football NCAA FCS Division I, Quarter nal -Sam Houston State at Montana State. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SUNSP 37 Boat RacingThe Game 365d College Basketball Jacksonville at South Carolina. (N) Fight Sports: In 60Fight Sports: In 60 From April 3, 2010. College Basketball DISCV 38 182 278Gold Rush Todd’s chief investor visits. Gold Rush “The Ultimatum” Gold Rush Todd takes a delivery. (N) Gold Rush Dave pushes his crew. (N) Jungle Gold “Armed Robbery” (N) Gold Rush Dave pushes his crew. TBS 39 139 247King of QueensKing of QueensSeinfeld Seinfeld Better WorseBetter WorseBetter WorseBetter Worse “Tyler Perry’s Why Did I Get Married Too?” (2010) Tyler Perry. Premiere. HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace MysteriesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesNancy Grace Mysteries FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236Love You, Mean ItThe SoupE! News (N) “Sweet Home Alabama” (2002) Reese Witherspoon, Josh Lucas. Fashion Police (N) Chelsea LatelyE! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernGhost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures “Crazy Town” (N) The Dead Files (N) The Dead Files HGTV 47 112 229Hunters Int’lHunters Int’lHunters Int’lHunters Int’lCelebrity Holiday Homes Celebrity Holiday Homes (N) House HuntersHunters Int’lHunters Int’lHunters Int’l TLC 48 183 280Four Weddings Four Weddings Say Yes: BrideSay Yes: BrideSay Yes: BrideSay Yes: BrideBrides-HillsBrides-HillsSay Yes: BrideSay Yes: Bride HIST 49 120 269(5:00) Pearl Harbor: 24 Hours AfterPawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars WW2 From Space Ten tipping points of World War II. (N) 10 Things About10 Things About ANPL 50 184 282Monsters Inside Me Monsters Inside Me Monsters Inside Me (N) Adrift: 47 Days With Sharks Back to the Wild (N) Monsters Inside Me FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveRestaurant: ImpossibleDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveMystery Diners (N) Health InspectorsDiners, DriveDiners, Drive TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the Lord It’s SupernaturalThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesHal Lindsey The Harvest Perry StonePraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -UEFA MagazineThe Game 365Game TimeFootball PrevEnglish Premier League Review ShowInside the MagicMagic Live! (Live)d NBA Basketball Orlando Magic at Sacramento Kings. (N Subject to Blackout) SYFY 58 122 244(5:30) “Constantine” (2005, Fantasy) Keanu Reeves, Rachel Weisz. WWE Friday Night SmackDown! Main event: Randy Orton vs. Wade Barrett. (N) Haven “Last Goodbyes” (N) Deal-Dark SideDeal-Dark Side AMC 60 130 254(4:00) “Hannibal” (2001) “The Fifth Element” (1997) Bruce Willis, Gary Oldman. A New York cabby tries to save Earth in 2259. The Walking Dead “Made to Suffer” The Walking Dead “Made to Suffer” COM 62 107 249(5:58) South Park(:28) Tosh.0 The Colbert ReportDaily Show(7:59) Tosh.0 (:29) Tosh.0 Kevin Hart: I’m a Grown Little ManChris Rock: Never Scared Katt Williams: The Pimp Chronicles CMT 63 166 327Reba Reba Reba Reba Reba Reba The 46th Annual CMA Awards Honoring country music industry members. NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer “Family Feud” Anaconda: Queen of the SerpentsWorld’s Deadliest SnakesSuper SnakeMan v. Monster “Brazilian Bigfoot” (N) World’s Deadliest Snakes NGC 109 186 276(5:00) Inside the Afghanistan WarThe IndestructiblesThe IndestructiblesVegas Ma a Gambling mecca. (DVS) Tijuana Drug LordsMiami Drug CartelVegas Ma a Gambling mecca. (DVS) SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeMutant Planet Mutant Planet “Japan” Life in Hell (N) Life in Hell (N) Life in Hell (N) Life in Hell (N) Mutant Planet “Japan” ID 111 192 285Deadly Women “Baby-Faced Killers” Deadly Women “Deadly Delinquents” Facing EvilFacing EvilPretty Bad GirlsPretty Bad Girls (N)Wives With Knives (N) Facing EvilFacing Evil HBO 302 300 501Weigh-In Live24/7 Pacquiao24/7 Pacquiao24/7 Pacquiao24/7 PacquiaoWeigh-In Live “Red Tails” (2012, Historical Drama) Cuba Gooding Jr. ‘PG-13’ (:15) “Your Highness” (2011) ‘R’ MAX 320 310 515(4:30) Mr. Baseball(:20) “Alien Resurrection” (1997) Sigourney Weaver. (:15) “Wanderlust” (2012, Comedy) Paul Rudd. Premiere. ‘R’ Hunted Sam is exposed as a spy. Lingerie Hunted SHOW 340 318 545 “Real Steel” (2011, Action) Hugh Jackman, Evangeline Lilly. ‘PG-13’ War Horse(:25) “The Mechanic” (2011) Jason Statham. ‘R’ “Sexy Baby” (2012) A cultural shift in the sexual landscape. Drive Angry ‘R’ SATURDAY EVENING DECEMBER 8, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Tonight (N) “The Borrowers” (2011, Fantasy) Stephen Fry, Victoria Wood. Premiere. Castle “After the Storm” News at 11Crook & Chase 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsBest Gift Ever!30 Rock 30 Rock “Chill Factor” (1999, Action) Cuba Gooding Jr., Skeet Ulrich, Peter Firth. NewsInside EditionChann 4 NewsFirst Baptist 5-PBS 5 -To Be Announced 7-CBS 7 47 47e College FootballCBS Evening NewsTwo and Half MenTwo and Half MenFrosty SnowmanFrosty Returns“The Flight Before Christmas” (2008) 48 Hours (N) Action Sports 360Two and Half Men 9-CW 9 17 17d High School BasketballFantasy Footballd ABA Basketball South Carolina Warriors at Jacksonville Giants. (N) YourJax MusicJacksonvilleI Know JaxAccording to Jim 10-FOX 10 30 30The First FamilyMr. Box Of ceAre We There Yet?Christm St Joh UFC: Henderson vs. Diaz (N) NewsAction Sports 360MasterChef “Top 6 Compete, Part 1” 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneNBC Nightly NewsThe American Giving Awards Honoring deserving charities in the U.S. (N) Law & Order: Special Victims UnitNewsSat. Night Live CSPAN 14 210 350Washington This CommunicatorsWashington This Week WGN-A 16 239 307Law & Order: Criminal Intent “Watch” Funny VideosBullseyed NBA Basketball New York Knicks at Chicago Bulls. From the United Center in Chicago. (N) WGN News at NineBones “Bodies in the Book” TVLAND 17 106 304The Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Welcome to Sweetie Pie’s Welcome to Sweetie Pie’s Welcome to Sweetie Pie’s Welcome to Sweetie Pie’s (N) Iyanla, Fix My Life “Fix My Mistake” Welcome to Sweetie Pie’s A&E 19 118 265Gangsters: America’s Most Evil Storage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsParking Wars (N) Parking Wars (N) ExterminatorExterminatorExterminatorExterminator HALL 20 185 312“A Holiday Engagement” (2011) Jordan Bridges, Bonnie Somerville. “Come Dance With Me” (2012, Romance) Andrew McCarthy. Premiere. “A Bride for Christmas” (2012, Romance) Arielle Kebbel, Andrew Walker. FX 22 136 248(5:00) UFC: Henderson vs. Diaz Prelims (N) “Step Brothers” (2008, Comedy) Will Ferrell, John C. Reilly. “Easy A” (2010, Comedy) Emma Stone, Penn Badgley, Amanda Bynes. CNN 24 200 202The Situation RoomCNN Newsroom (N) CNN Heroes: An All-Star Tribute The top 10 heroes of 2012. CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Heroes: An All-Star Tribute TNT 25 138 245(4:45) “Inception” (2010) Leonardo DiCaprio, Joseph Gordon-Levitt. “The Town” (2010) Ben Af eck. A woman doesn’t realize that her new beau is a bank robber. “The Town” (2010) Ben Af eck, Rebecca Hall. NIK 26 170 299Victorious Victorious Victorious Victorious Victorious Marvin Marvin (N) How to Rock iCarly “iChristmas” The Nanny The Nanny Friends (:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241(:09) “Kick-Ass” (2010) Aaron Johnson, Christopher Mintz-Plasse. An ordinary teen decides to become a superhero. “Walking Tall” (2004, Action) The Rock. A sheriff and a deputy try to rid their town of thugs. (:19) Doom MY-TV 29 32 -Hogan’s HeroesHogan’s HeroesBatmanBatmanLost in Space “The Space Primevals” Star Trek “The Tholian Web” “Tarantula” (1955, Science Fiction) John Agar, Mara Corday. DISN 31 172 290Austin & Ally Shake It Up! Phineas and FerbPhineas and FerbGood Luck CharlieAustin & Jessie & Ally All StarDog With a BlogAustin & Ally A.N.T. Farm Jessie Good Luck Charlie LIFE 32 108 252“Under the Mistletoe” (2006, Drama) Jaime Ray Newman, Michael Shanks. “Holly’s Holiday” (2012, Romance-Comedy) Claire Coffee. Premiere. “Dear Santa” (2011, Drama) Amy Acker, Brooklynn Proulx, Gina Holden. USA 33 105 242 “Couples Retreat” (2009, Comedy) Vince Vaughn, Jason Bateman, Jon Favreau. “How Do You Know” (2010) Reese Witherspoon. A woman gets caught in a love triangle. (:05) “Couples Retreat” (2009) BET 34 124 329(5:00) “Getting Played” (2005) “National Security” (2003, Comedy) Martin Lawrence, Steve Zahn. “Beauty Shop” (2005, Comedy) Queen Latifah, Alicia Silverstone. “Love & Basketball” (2000) ESPN 35 140 206d College Basketball UCLA at Texas. (N)(:15) SportsCenter (N) (Live) 2012 Heisman Trophy Presentation (N) 30 for 30 (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209d College Basketball Wisconsin at Marquette. (N)d College Basketball Arizona at Clemson. (N)d College Basketball Illinois at Gonzaga. (N) SUNSP 37 -To Be AnnouncedTo Be Announced Golf South Walton Celebrity Classic. (Taped) College Basketball Cleveland State at North Carolina State. Inside the HeatInside the HeatInside Israeli Bask. DISCV 38 182 278Gold Rush “Game Changer” Gold Rush Dave pushes his crew. Alaska: The Last Frontier “Fall Feast” Alaska: The Last Frontier Alaska: The Last Frontier Alaska: The Last Frontier TBS 39 139 247King of QueensKing of QueensKing of QueensKing of QueensBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryWedding Band “Get Down on It” (N) Wedding Band “Get Down on It” HLN 40 202 204Mystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesNancy Grace Mysteries FNC 41 205 360America’s News Headquarters (N) FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Justice With Judge Jeanine (N) Geraldo at Large The Journal Editorial Report E! 45 114 236 “Sweet Home Alabama” (2002) Reese Witherspoon, Josh Lucas. “The Women” (2008) Meg Ryan. Betrayal strains the bond between two high-powered women. Fashion PoliceLove You, Mean It TRAVEL 46 196 277Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures “Remington Arms” Ghost Adventures “Stanley Hotel” Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures HGTV 47 112 229High Low Proj.Hunters Int’lWhite House Christmas: ThroughWhite House Christmas 2012 (N) Love It or List It “The Singh Family” House HuntersHunters Int’lHouse HuntersHunters Int’l TLC 48 183 280Say Yes, DressSay Yes, DressSay Yes, DressSay Yes, DressMario & Courtney’s Wedding Fiesta (N) To Be AnnouncedSecrets of a Trophy Wife (N) Mario & Courtney’s Wedding Fiesta HIST 49 120 269Ax Men “The Ax Stops Here” Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Mankind The Story of All of Us “New World” The Aztecs build a mighty empire. Pawn Stars (:31) Pawn Stars(:02) Pawn Stars(:32) Pawn Stars ANPL 50 184 282Too Cute! Too Cute! “Spotted, Pampered Pups” Too Cute! (N) Too Cute! Animal species mingle. America’s Cutest Cat 2010Too Cute! Animal species mingle. FOOD 51 110 231The Next Iron Chef: RedemptionSugar DomeGuy’s Disney HolidayDiners, Drive-Ins and DivesDiners, Drive-Ins and DivesIron Chef America “Holiday Battle” TBN 52 260 372Just Where I BeJacob’s GiftGaither: Precious MemoriesIn Touch With Dr. Charles StanleyHour of Power Billy Graham Classic CrusadesThe Christmas Child FSN-FL 56 Tennis Champions Series: Surprise. Courier vs. McEnroe. College Basketball Texas Christian at Tulsa.s Boxing Golden Boy Live: Luis Ramos vs. Ricardo Williams. (N) SYFY 58 122 244(5:00) “Ice Quake” (2010) “Snowmageddon” (2011, Science Fiction) Michael Hogan, David Cubitt. “The 12 Disasters of Christmas” (2012) Ed Quinn, Magda Apanowicz. Premiere. “Doomsday Prophecy” (2011) AMC 60 130 254(5:00) “Coach Carter” (2005) Samuel L. Jackson, Robert Ri’chard. “Miracle” (2004, Drama) Kurt Russell. Premiere. The U.S. Olympic hockey team beats the Soviet team. “Miracle” (2004) Kurt Russell. COM 62 107 249(5:58) Jeff Dunham: Spark of Insanity Gabriel Iglesias: I’m Not FatJeff Dunham: Spark of Insanity Gary Gulman: In This Economy (N) “Hot Tub Time Machine” (2010) CMT 63 166 327Grumpier Old Men(:45) “Starsky & Hutch” (2004) Ben Stiller. Two detectives investigate a cocaine dealer. Redneck Island (N) CMT Artists of the Year 2012 (N) Crossroads NGWILD 108 190 283Freaks & Creeps “Devil Island” Dog Whisperer “Shadow Dogs” Dog Whisperer “Warrior Dog” Animal InterventionAnimal Intervention “RV Monkeys” Dog Whisperer “Warrior Dog” NGC 109 186 276Wild Justice “Born to Kill” Alaska State Troopers “Ice Patrol” Alaska State Troopers “Knife Fight” Doomsday PreppersDoomsday PreppersAlaska State Troopers “Knife Fight” SCIENCE 110 193 284They Do It?They Do It?Tarantulas & Venomous RelationsMutant Bees Carnivorous Ants Insects in the City (N) Mutant Bees ID 111 192 285Fatal Encounters “The Ring” Fatal Vows “Blood and Wine” Fatal Vows “Dead Silence” Motives & Murders “Not Again” (N) Fatal Vows “The Last Seduction” (N) Fatal Vows “Dead Silence” HBO 302 300 501(4:45) “Titanic” (1997, Historical Drama) Leonardo DiCaprio. ‘PG-13’ “Journey 2: The Mysterious Island” (2012) ‘PG’ (:45) Boardwalk Empire (:45) “Contagion” (2011) Marion Cotillard. ‘PG-13’ MAX 320 310 515Whole 9 Yards(:45) “Bridesmaids” (2011, Comedy) Kristen Wiig, Maya Rudolph, Rose Byrne. ‘NR’ Hunted Sam is exposed as a spy. “Wanderlust” (2012, Comedy) Paul Rudd. ‘R’ (:40) Hunted SHOW 340 318 545(5:30) Dexter Homeland “Broken Hearts” War Horse “War Horse” (2011) Emily Watson. A horse sees joy and sorrow during World War I. ‘PG-13’ “The Three Musketeers” (2011) Matthew MacFadyen. From staff reportsThe 2nd Annual Chomp Cancer Run/Walk is Dec. 15 in Fort White. The start of the race is at the Fort White Community Center with race day registration begin-ning at 7 p.m. There is online registration at www.active.com is $25 through Friday. Following the race there will be music, food, an awards ceremony and a silent auction. Proceeds go to the UF & Shands Cancer Center and the event raised $8,000 last year. The Chomp Cancer Foundation was started by Lauren Valentine and David Koon in honor their grandmother Betty Koon. Betty Koon was diagnosed with Stage II Multiple Myeloma in January 2011. “She has undergone extensive treatment since her diagnosis and continues to face each day with a positive attitude and outlook on life,” said Valentine. “This is our way of spreading her positive energy and helping families deal-ing with incurable disease called cancer.” Valentine said close to 100 runners have registered to daye, and she expects a lot of day-of registration and hopes to have more than 200 participants. She estimated 350 people enjoyed the festivities last year. The 5K runners will be The race will be chip-timed by Half-Mile Timing. There will be awards forthe top three finishers in each age group, male and female. There also will be a prize for the participant with the best orange and blue inspired outfit.Chomp Cancer 5K coming up in Fort White COURTESY PHOTOMembers of the Fort White High cross country team lead the charge at the Chomp Cancer 5K Run/Walk in Fort White last year. This year’s event is Dec. 15.



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FAITH & VALUES Friday & Saturday, December 7-8, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 6A6AF&V Christmas: a time for spiritual warPlacing blame or repairing the damage “Put on the whole armor of God, that you may be able to stand against the wiles of the devil.” — Ephesians 6:11 A t this season of the year (Christmas), I believe that Satan has many of his greatest victories in the life of many Christians. Therefore we should be prepared for a greater battle. Remember Christmas is a pagan holiday that began in the time of Constantine, about AD 325. Christmas has no bibli-cal base. We are never told to remember His birth or to cel-ebrate it. We are told to remem-ber the death of our Savior. In Ephesians 6:11 we are told that we are doing battle in everyday life against the wiles of the devil. The “wiles” means “strat-egy” or “plans of war”, so Satan is attacking the lives and causes of Christians. He is at war with those who would defeat his plans, which is why Christians feel so much of the effect of his presence. Satan is not after those who already belong to him; he is after those who want to defeat him. That is why we need to understand his efforts, as Paul wrote to the Corinthians, so that we are not ignorant of his devices. The Bible says that Satan’s purpose is to blind sinners and beguile Christians, and to hurt and discourage those who belong to God. He will do anything to disturb the mind, deceive the heart, and defeat life. Hs is actively involved in the world today, and if you read your Bible you will find he has always been active. He led Lot into Sodom, got Peter to deny Christ, made Annanias and Sapphira lie to the church, and even dared attack Jesus Christ. If he isn’t afraid to attack the Lord of Glory, you should not be surprised to discover that he is willing to attack the most mature Christian. He wants to bring division into the church today, paralyzing its ministry and scan-dalizing its leaders. The thing most often forgotten by Christians today is that we live on Satan’s territory. We are not fighting on neutral ground, nor on God’s ground. The battle we fight is fought on the enemy’s territory. Christians today are fighting a war on foreign turf, and the world, the flesh, and the devil are our common enemies. They all maneuver in order to entice us and cause weakness and failure in our lives. So if we are going to fight in this war, we had better recognize that there really is a war going on and how it will be fought. The devil has three primary goals, and it should be evident that he is a least moderately suc-cessful in each of his attacks. First, he is after every indi-vidual Christian to destroy his life. Second, he is after every Christian home to destroy its unity, its purity, and its oneness. Third, he is after every Christian church; to erode its ministry, discredit its leaders, wipe out its financial base, and destroy it so that it no longer has a presence in the world of darkness. So in this season, let’s don’t let the rituals of the world and man’s traditions cause us to honor the Babe in the Manger more than the Christ of Calvary. T he girl said, “He did it!” “No, she did it!” shouted back the boy. And back and forth the kindergarten children go. Or are they teenagers? Could they possibly be adults? What about one government agency to another? One church member to another? Placing blame has almost been eternal. Recently, through different media, I have heard about people wanting to find out who is to blame for the recent flooding in different parts of the country caused by recent storms. Should I even mention the blame that is beginning to be placed by football fans because of their favorite team having a losing season? Fire the coach! Fire his staff! When questioned by God as to why he ate of the forbidden fruit, Adam blamed God while at the same time pointing his finger towards Eve. When Eve was questioned by God as to why she ate of the fruit, she blamed the serpent. It is understandable that we want to figure out what went wrong in a given situation. It is also understandable that we might want to figure out who is responsible for the damage that has been done. It appears that we humans want to place the blame upon someone. Maybe because we want to make sure that we are not blamed or held responsible. However, what is accomplished by placing the blame upon some-one? Have we corrected the prob-lem by placing the blame upon an individual, state or federal agency, some contractor or com-pany? What will happen if we find out whose fault it is that caused the damage? Will just finding who is at fault fix the problem? We all recognize that the answer is no. We may need to spend some time understanding what went wrong, but after that we need to spend more time seeking a plan to repair the damage and let the blaming go. Our efforts should be upon repairing the damage. We also find this same problem in our individual spiritual lives. How often are we guilty of say-ing, “So-and-so caused me to do that!” Or, “It was not my fault, it just happened!” What has happened to us as a society so that we can’t say, “I caused the problem”? What has happened to me taking responsi-bility for my actions and saying, “I am at fault”? Have we evolved into a society that thinks that we never do anything wrong? Have we convinced ourselves that we have no need to be forgiven because it was not my fault? Do we think that we have become so righteous that we have no need to repent and confess our own faults? Should not the emphasis be upon repairing the damage that has been done rather than trying to place the blame? Let’s not only fix our physical problems, but let’s work on fixing our spiritual problems so that we can repair the damage that we have done to our relationship with God. We can accuse whomever we want; God knows that we are to blame for our own actions. Let’s make sure that we work on repairing the damage. Q Hugh Sherrill is an ordained minister and Bible teacher at Eastside Baptist Church. Hugh Sherrillems-hugh43@comcast.net BIBLE STUDIES BIBLICAL MEDITATION Carlton McPeakcarlton_mc@msn.com Q Carlton G. McPeak is an evangelist working in the Lake City area. All Scriptural quotations are from the New American Standard Bible, Holman Bible Publishers, unless otherwise noted. God is not dead, nor does He sleepO n Christmas Day, 1864, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow com-posed the poem, “I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day” that later became one of our best loved Christmas carols. The poem tells of Longfellow’s experience of hearing the church bells ring out “peace on earth, good will to men” on Christmas Day, during the dark-est period of the Civil War. Still months away from Lee’s surren-der to Grant at the Appomattox Courthouse, and grieving the tragic death of his wife Fanny and the crippling war injury of his son Charles, Longfellow penned the second stanza of the poem, “And in despair I bowed my head/There is no peace on earth I said/For hate is strong and mocks the song/Of peace on earth, good will to men.” If that were the last verse in the song, it would indeed pro-nounce a bleak Christmas … not unlike how many may be feeling this year. Peace on earth and good will to men doesn’t seem the prevalent theme to many facing unemployment, economic downturns, families separated by miles, death or divorce and the uncertainty of the future. Yet, it was in his despair that Longfellow then heard the bells ring “more loud and deep” proclaiming “God is not dead, nor doth He sleep/The wrong shall fail, the right prevail/With peace on earth, good will to men.” We need to be reminded of this truth during the Christmas season and perhaps when the trimmings are stripped away, we can see more clearly. My family has joined the ranks of many this season who are “scaling back” on our Christmas shopping and giving more to those in need … and yet the simplicity of this kind of Christmas really points us back to the baby in a manger some 2000 years ago. Where angels themselves sang the carols and invited a field full of shepherds who probably smelled a tad too much like their sheep, to cel-ebrate the very first Christmas. This baby who was foretold hundreds of years before, in the greatest of detail: “For unto us a child is born, to us a son is given and the government shall be on his shoulders and he will be called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace.” Isaiah 9:6 reminds us that indeed God is not dead, nor does He sleep … as He left heaven to come to earth … all because our hearts really do matter. “For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whosoever believes in Him shall not perish, but have everlasting life.” Blessings, Angie HEART MATTERS Angie Landangieland3@windstream.net Dec. 7Holiday music concertThe combined music ministries of Pine Grove Baptist Church and Southside Baptist Church will present “Season of Joy” holiday music concert at 7 p.m. at Pine Grove Church, 1989 N Highway 441, and at 7 p.m. Sunday at Southside Baptist, 388 SE Baya Drive. Admission is free, but seat-ing is limited. Nursery will be available for children 4 and younger. For advance tickets or more informa-tion, contact Pine Grove Church a (386) 752-2664 or Southside Baptist at (386) 755-5553.Fish dinnerOur Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5056 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, pre-pares fish dinners every Friday from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The dinner is $6 for two Alaskan pollock filets, corn, baked beans, hush-puppies, cole slaw and tarter sauce. Take out or eat in.Dec. 8Canned food give-awayNorth Side Church of Christ, 378 NW Gibson Lane, will have a canned food give-away from 8 a.m. to noon. Anyone in need is welcome. For more infor-mation, contact the church office at 755-0393, by email secretarynscofc@gmail.com or visit the church website, Thenorthsidecoc.org.Clothing give-awayThe A.M.E churches of Columbia County will hold a clothing give-away begin-nint at 10 a.m. at Mount Tabor A.M.E. Church, 519 SW L.M. Aaron Drive, Lake City. Clothing for all ages, including dress, casual, purses and more, will be available. For more infor-mation, call the church at (386) 758-8022 or (386) 438-4803.Dec. 9 Holiday cantataCovenant First Presbyterian Church (for-merly First Presbyterian) of Live Oak will present the Christmas cantata, “God with Us Emmanuel,” by Phillip Young on at 6:00 p.m. Bill Poplin will be directing. The church is off U.S. 90 on White Avenue in Live Oak. For more infor-mation, contact Bill Poplin at 365-4932.Holiday music concertThe combined music ministries of Pine Grove Baptist Church and Southside Baptist Church will present “Season of Joy” holiday music con-cert at 7 p.m. at Southside Baptist, 388 SE Baya Drive. Admission is free, but seat-ing is limited. Nursery will be available for children 4 years old and younger. For advance tickets or more information, contact Pine Grove Church a (386) 752-2664 or Southside Baptist Church at (386) 755-5553.Church anniversaryMount Pisgah A.M.E Church will celebrate its 135th anniversary at 4 p.m. Pastor Ronald V. Walters and the Olivet Church fam-ily will be in charge of the service. For more infor-mation, call 752-1830 or 758-5990.Devotional servicesThe American Legion Rider Chapter 57, South Highway 47, hosts Sunday morning devotional servic-es the second Sunday of every month from 8:30 to 9 a.m. There also will be a continental breakfast from 8 to 8:30 a.m. Services are held by the Christian Motorcycle Association. Everyone is welcome to join in the fellowship, breakfast and spiritu-ally uplifting morning of activities. Dec. 16Christmas concertElim Baptist Church, 3435 SW Elim Church Road in Fort White, will pres-ent a Christmas concert, “Emmanuel! Celebrating Heaven’s Child,” at its 11 a.m. service. Food and fellowship will follow. For more information, call (386) 497-1972. Dec. 22Toy drive, concertResurrection Praise Team will hold a toy drive and Christmas Praise Extravaganza from 4 to 6 p.m. at Niblack Elementary School. Bring unwrapped toys to donate and enjoy praise dancing, singing and spoken words. Door prizes will be awarded and raffles will be held.Dec. 30Mission worship serviceThe Women’s Missionary Society of Union A.M.E. Church will hold worship services at 11 a.m. The guest speaker will be Mrs. Erma J. Harris-Morris. The public is invited. The church is at 357 NW Queen Road in Lake City. For more information, contact Angee Ford at 755-6314 or Shirley Harris at 755-0858. Q Heart Matters is a weekly column written by Angie Land, direc-tor of the Family Life Ministries of the Lafayette Baptist Association, where she teaches bible studies, leads marriage and family confer-ences, and offers biblical counsel-ing to individuals, couples and families. CHURCH CALENDAR Q To submit your Church Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr@lakecityreporter.com.



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6B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & PUZZLES FRIDAY & SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7-8, 2012 DEAR ABBY: I never had a desire to have kids. I married a man, “Harry,” who had four, and did my duty being with them on holidays, birthdays and vacations. I never enjoyed it, and I have always been honest regarding my feel-ings about baby-sitting. Now that Harry’s children are grown and have children of their own, they think my husband and I should give up our week-ends and holidays to baby-sit their children. Harry and I have had several serious arguments about this. I have told his kids I do not want to watch their children. Harry will tell me at the last minute that one of them is being dropped off because the father and his girlfriend are going out. When the grandchild arrives, Harry disappears because he doesn’t want to be bothered. I served my time when my stepchildren were small and have looked forward to the day I’d no longer have to share my down time with kids. Three months ago I was “surprised” with the 7-year-old so her dad and his honey could go to Atlantic City for a great time. I told them I had a political function to attend at 1:30 the next day; they didn’t return until 3:30 in the afternoon. My husband thought it was fine to go without me! I would never have done that. I love Harry, but this is causing me major grief. Please tell me what you think about this. Oh -and did I mention they think because I was an elementa-ry school teacher I should WANT to sit and play with their kids? It’s compar-ing apples to oranges. -NEARING WITS’ END IN NEW JERSEY DEAR NEARING WITS’ END: What I think is that you are being taken advan-tage of, and it will continue as long as you allow it, however unwillingly. The next time Harry informs you at the last minute that a grandchild is being dropped off, grab your coat and purse and tell him you are going shopping, visiting a friend, seeing a movie or anything else that will get you out of the house. If you do, perhaps the next time his kids need a baby sitter he will sug-gest that they hire one. Oh, and did I mention that when you were a teacher, you were COMPENSATED for your labor? You are being used, and I hope you draw the line before you really arrive at wits’ end. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: I am a 70-year-old man. Many people tell me I look much young-er because I have my hair colored professionally. I started dyeing my hair about 16 years ago because my children are much younger than those of most people my age. They wanted me to color my hair so that I didn’t look like their friends’ grandparents. Now friends and new acquaintances make com-ments about me not having any gray hair at my age. So, what do I say? Should I tell them that I have my hair colored? Should I just laugh? Please advise. -TO DYE OR NOT TO DYE DEAR T.D.O.N.T.D.: Many men have their hair professionally colored these days and others do it themselves at home. It is nothing to be ashamed of. You neither have to laugh nor to divulge the secret of your eternal youth. However, since you are beginning to feel self-conscious because you feel the color of your hair isn’t age-appropriate, discuss it with your colorist. It may be time to let a little bit of gray come through at the temples. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: I am a 41year-old female working on my associate’s degree in paralegal studies. Most people I know tell me I’m attractive, and I do get some second looks from men, but there is one thing I think -although I’m not sure -that scares them away. I am disabled. I dress well, am an average weight for my height, independent-minded, although not quite inde-pendent physically. I get around on crutches. I live with my parents. I enjoy and participate in physical activities. I don’t have a lot of friends, which is fine with me, but I do have a number of special ones. I try to make the best of my disability, and everyone I know, even strangers, tell me I do well and admire me for my courage and strength. I should be happy with that, but sometimes it bothers me that I haven’t found one man who can see past whatever it is that keeps them from liking me. I know a number of grumpy, unhappy, ungrate-ful women who abuse the men in their lives, and sometimes I can’t help but wonder at how “blind” their partners are. I like my alone time. But it’s a big, beautiful world out there, and I’d like to share it with someone. -AT A LOSS IN OHIO DEAR AT A LOSS: You need to widen your circle of acquaintances. Once you have completed your studies and have more time, make it your busi-ness to join local and state groups associated with your profession. While some people may be put off by your disability, not everyone will be. Many people with physical dis-abilities have romantic lives and good marriages to partners who see past their disabilities and recog-nize all of the things they CAN do. P.S. I know I have said this before, but you should also consider volunteer-ing some of your time to a cause that interests you because it’s a great way to meet people. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: Last night I received a call from my almost-5-year-old grand-daughter asking me for Santa Claus’ phone num-ber. It seems she is very angry at her daddy for call-ing her a brat because she wouldn’t give him a hug. She wants to tattle on her daddy to Santa. Her parents are not together. Her daddy’s involvement has been only within the last year. She seemed very upset about the incident, and I want to make sure “Santa” gives her a good answer. I asked her to write a letter instead of phoning Santa to give me time for an answer. Did I do the right thing? -GRANDMA T., PACIFIC GROVE, CALIF. DEAR GRAMDMA T.: Yes. Once your grand-daughter has written the letter to Santa you may find that she no longer dwells on what happened. However, if she contin-ues to look for a reply, “Santa’s” response should be that her daddy was hurt when she refused to give him a hug because daddies need love just as little girls do. But name-calling is wrong, no matter how old you are, and he shouldn’t have called her a brat -which is why he’ll be getting a lump of coal in his stocking at Christmas. ** ** ** Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Good advice for everyone is in “The Anger in All of Us and How to Deal With It.” To order, send your name and mailing address, plus check or money order for $7 to: Dear Abby, Anger Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Shipping and handling included in price.) HOROSCOPES DEAR ABBY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Closing a deal or finishing what you start will be crucial as the day progresses. Your reputa-tion will be directly linked to what you do and how well you do it. Appeal to the undecided peers and clients. Financial improve-ment is apparent. +++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Take a huge step forward and you will be respected for your actions and your self-confidence. A partnership will enable you to progress faster and position you for an employ-ment opportunity. Shoot for the stars. ++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Stick to the facts. Underestimating or over-estimating will get you into trouble. Being concise will play out in your favor when you reach your destination in good time and with finesse. Making a good impression will be your endorsement. +++++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Get out and meet new people or take on a respon-sibility that will ensure someone in need gets the help required to make the festive season bright. Anything is possible if you are diligent about making it happen. Love is in the stars. ++++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Troubleshooting will be your middle name. You must act fast and without complaint. It’s getting things back on the right track that will count, not who did what. Put your ego aside and do what’s best for everyone you love. ++++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Put your priorities in a row. Make time for friends and family. Festive cheer or getting together with colleagues will bring you closer to goals. New friendships will help you see your situation in a new light. Love is highlighted. +++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Prepare for the future. Set up an interview or answer online job post-ings that interest you. The end of the year is fast approaching and setting a direction that better suits your needs personally and professionally should be put in place. +++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You’ve got the abil-ity to capture a piece of what will be in demand. Focus on your talent and how you can turn what you have into something lucrative. A favor offered should be taken with grati-tude and a consideration for future collaboration. ++++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Keep a secret. Your future will depend on how willing and able you are to do just that. Put more into your work and completing what you’ve been asked to finish and you will prove that you are trustworthy and reliable. ++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Line up your preferences and take steps to put your plans into motion. You will command attention and attract part-nerships that will improve your life, wealth and physi-cal wellness. Love is in the stars, and a promise will be honored. +++++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Ride out the storm. Keep your thoughts a secret and stand on guard to protect your assets, reputation and future prospects. Don’t let personal relationships cause you to falter when you need to stand tall and be strong. Play to win. +++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Tie up loose ends and make the year ahead free and clear of deadweight. An agreement you make will ensure that you get to follow your heart and a dream you’ve been try-ing to live for some time. +++ THE LAST WORD Eugenia Last Family treats retired teacher like free babysitting service Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com Puzzle Solutions on the next page.



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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE FRIDAY & SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7-8, 2012 7A7AReligion HOLIDAY CRAFT BAZAAR Lake City Mall Friday Saturday December 14th & 15th 10:00 am 5:00 pm Sunday December 16th 11:00 am 5:00 pm 8PPE8PSLt#BLFE(PPETt $BOEMFTt5PZTt+FXFMSZt )PNF%FDPSt$IJMESFOT4FDUJPOt "OE.PSF STILL ACCEPTING VENDOR APPLICATIONS www.lakecitybazaar.com The DreamD ad said, “Jack, my time is over.” It seemed there was no way I could convince him otherwise. He had done so much for others, and now his legs were giving him pain, he had a pace-maker, skin cancers that were periodically being removed. Mom was in the nursing home, and we could not convince him, to move in with us. It seemed like he was just ‘tired’. Giving up was never dad’s way, and I knew this. “You still have a lot that you can do, dad.” I said to him. He just smiled, and said, “Jack, my time is done. It’s time for you and others to continue.” I sat and spoke with him about the possibility of a website. One where he could put his books, and over time, make them into e-Books. It would be a site where he could have a blog, and carry on discussions with people all over the world, and possibly do some counseling with those who needed it. Sounded like a good idea to dad. It was 2010 and we were discussing it a bit more. I didn’t want to push, but I just knew his work was not done. Besides, I told him, “Dad you are so wise, you have so much to offer to so many people. Let’s do something!” Dad finally came around to the idea, and we started talking about what to call the site. Dad said, “We have to figure what the site will be about… its purpose.” There were several ideas and thoughts that we discussed: 1.) “Amazing Grace” since over the years, dad had done so much study on the subject. Yes, he wrote about it earlier in his min-istry. Yet, time, prayer, experi-ence and study helped him to “grow in grace”. We played with this name, but it was being used quite a bit. 2.) “jackexum.com”, well, he liked that. Unfortunately, dad went into the hospital to have his leg oper-ated on to ease the pain form an artery being clogged. It was during this period that things started going down hill. He has a slight heart attack, and after a time, had another, and after a short recovery in the nursing home, had another. He passed away February 7, 2010. The dream was gone… I thought. Then after a couple of months, I went to a local web builder who had helped in the past with my computer. We talked about the possibilities, the obstacles and it started. After two years of work, www.jackexum.com was ‘born’. With hundreds of articles by myself and dad, books for free and for sale, pictures, a special teens area, Bible studies, discussions and more. The site continues to be improved, and expanded. All dedicated to the memory of my dad, Jack Exum. Dedicated to keeping his work going, and reaching out to all who want to ‘grow in grace’.Associated PressSANTA MONICA, Calif. — Less than a week after a federal judge ruled Santa Monica has a right to ban religious displays on pub-lic land, a Christian group says it will stage its tra-ditional Christmas Nativity scene on private land. The Los Angeles Times reported the much-debated and litigated display of 14 life-sized figures depicting the birth of Jesus Christ will open Sunday on Ocean Park Boulevard, between Clover Park and 28th Street. The scenes are scheduled for display until early January, said Hunter Jameson, chair-man of the Nativity Scenes Committee. “We are deeply grateful for the use of this new site to allow all of Santa Monica’s distinctive Christmas story to continue spreading the message of joy, hope and peace found in the Christ child’s birth,” he said in a statement. The atheist group opposing the scene’s display on public land praised the decision, saying the scene belongs on private land. “This move is great,” Annie Laurie Gaylor of the Freedom From Religion Foundation told the news-paper. “But it does under-cut any argument they have that they don’t have free expression. Obviously they do.” The Nativity scenes were erected for nearly six decades in Palisades Park, until debates in recent years grew more heated, resulting in atheists erect-ing their own, sometimes satirical, displays. City officials then banned all displays in the park, drawing a lawsuit from Nativity scene proponents. A lawyer for the Christian group, William Becker, was critical of Monday’s deci-sion and pledged to file an appeal. Jack ExumPhone: (386) 755-9525jhe@netzero.net Q Jack Exum is an Amy-Awardwinning religious writer and resides in Lake City. Nativity scene moving to private landASSOCIATED PRESSA woman walks past traditional Nativity displays at Palis ades Park in Santa Monica, Calif. A Los Angeles federal judge on Thursday dismissed a Christian group’s lawsuit to force Santa Monica to reopen spaces in Palisades Park to pri vate displays, including Christmas Nativity scenes. Vatican upholds closing of Pa. churchAssociated PressDONORA, Pa. — The Vatican has upheld a deci-sion by Pittsburgh Bishop David Zubik to close a 107-year-old church over the objections of parishioners who appealed, citing its historic ties to the Slavic immigrants who built it. The Pittsburgh diocese closed St. Dominic Church in Donora last year, saying it was too costly to main-tain or repair and that Our Lady of the Valley Parish — which used the building as one of two worship sites — wouldn’t be harmed by the move. Six parishioners appealed, but the diocese says the Vatican found “no canonical basis in law or in fact” to keep the church open. The diocese says that means the church about 20 miles south of Pittsburgh can now be sold but “not for any purpose contrary to the doctrinal or moral teachings of the church.”



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FRIDAY & SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7-8, 2012 PUZZLES & COMICS LAKE CITY REPORTER 7B DILBERT BABY BLUES BLONDIE BEETLE BAILEY B.C. FRANK & ERNEST FOR BETTER OR WORSE ZITS HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH GARFIELD CELEBRITY CIPHER CLASSIC PEANUTS PUZZLE ANSWERS



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8A LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT FRIDAY & SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7-8, 20128A



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8B LAKE CITY REPORTER NASCAR FRIDAY & SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7-8, 20128BNASCAR For Jeff Gordon,the winning didn’t end with the Ford EcoBoost 400 at Homestead-Miami Speedway.Last week at Las Vegas hewas named the 2012 winner of the NationalMotorsports Press Association’s MyersBrothers Award. The award is given in memory of NASCAR pioneering drivers Billy and Bobby Myers andrecognizes individuals and groups that madesignificant contributions to the sport. Gordon was chosen because of his on-track success,which includes 87 Sprint Cup victo-ries and four championships,and his off-trackwork on behalf of various charities. “Off the track,he has raised countless funds for charity through his foundation forpediatric cancer research,”said Modified racerBurt Myers,the grandson of Billy Myers,whopresented the award to Gordon along with hisbrother and fellow Modified racer JasonMyers.“He has traveled to Rwanda to aidwith health care as well as partnering withan organization to put it on the side of hisrace car as a drive to end hunger.” Gordon seemed genuinely surprised to receive the award. “I am deeply honored,proud of the work that I do on and off the track,”he said in hisacceptance remarks.“This is fantastic.” There was little surprise when the winner of the NMPA’s Most Popular Driver awardwas announced.Dale Earnhardt Jr.won forthe 10th straight year,tying him for consecu-tive years honored with Bill Elliott,who has a league-leading 16 awards for his career. Other award recipients included veteran broadcaster Ken Squier,who took the BuddyShuman Award,given annually to those whohelped build the Sprint Cup Series.It’s in memory of Louis Grier Shuman,a driver andlater racing official who died in a hotel fire inHickory,N.C.,in 1955 at age 40. The Crew Chief of the Year award went to Matt Puccia,crew chief for Greg Biffle’s No.16Ford.Engine builder honors went to ShaneParsnow from the No.48 team at HendrickMotorsports.Pit crew honors went to the No.56team of Martin Truex Jr.at Michael WaltripRacing,and Denny Hamlin won the Mobil 1Driver of the Year honors. Stephen Leicht was named the Sunoco Rookie of the Year for the Sprint Cup Series.There waslittle activity on the rookie front in 2012.Leicht started just 15 of 36 races,finishedjust five of those and had a best effort of 26that Watkins Glen. The winner of the second annual Betty Jane France Humanitarian Award earned it with-out even being at a race track.Lorri ShealyUnumb,creator of “Ryan’s Law,”received theaward for her work on behalf of children withautism. According to a NASCAR release,when Unumb’s oldest son Ryan was diagnosed withserious autism,she learned that health insur-ers wouldn’t cover his treatment.So shedrafted legislation,Ryan’s Law,that has beenenacted in more than 30 states and requiresinsurers to cover autism treatment.She alsofounded the Autism Academy of SouthCarolina,and the NASCAR Foundation’sdonation of $100,000 will fund scholarships tothe academy. NOTEBOOK Keselowski relishes new roleBrad Keselowski spent a whirlwind week of media and other public appearances followinghis championship-sealing finish at Homestead-Miami Speedway.His week in the public eyeconcluded with his officially receiving the Cupchampionship and themore than $5 millionin bonus money thatgoes with it at theannual awards cere-mony in Las Vegas. Many of those in attendance at LasVegas said Keselowskiseemed to make themost of every appear-ance,taking time tochat with the atten-dees and convincingmany of them thathe’ll be a great voicefor the sport as its reigning champion. His comments to the media indicate it’s a role he relishes. “I’ve enjoyed every second of my time in Vegas,”he said.“It was tough to really sit backand realize how special this opportunity is.Because of that,now I really want to come backnext year and do it all again. “The fans have been amazing this week.I can’t believe how many came out to celebratethis week with me.It’s special how passionateour fans are,and I’m proud to be a part of all ofit for them.” His crew chief Paul Wolfe also seemed to be appreciative of the attention and accolades hereceived. “There was a lot to take in,”he said.“It seemed like we were non-stop on the go.I triedto take it all in and enjoy itChevy reveals 2013 race model Chevrolet used the Sprint Cup Awards week in Las Vegas to unveil the car that it will cam-paign in Cup beginning next season.The SSmodel will compete along with the Ford Fusionand the Toyota Camry as NASCAR’s elite seriesmoves to a redesigned car for the 2013 season. Jeff Gordon,who drives the No.24 Chevrolet for Hendrick Motorsports,was among those pres-ent for the official unveiling, “I’m so excited to race this car,”Gordon said.“I had a chance to test it at Charlotte a coupleweeks ago.Drove great.” The new cars are designed to better represent the passenger car versions offered to the public,and there have been changes made in an effortto make the racing more competitive,especiallyon the intermediate-length tracks that dominatethe Cup schedule.Erik Jones, 16, wins Snowball The 45th annual Snowball Derby at Five Flags Speedway in Pensacola,Fla.,saw some ofNASCAR’s top drivers,as well as some otherswith considerable NASCAR experience,battlingfor the win in a race that is arguably the highestprofile short track race this side of NASCAR. In the end,it was Erik Jones,a 16-year-old driver from Byron,Mich.,prevailing in a late-race duel with Kyle Busch to take the check-ered flag.Jones and Busch raced each other forthe top spot over the final 20 laps before Buschfaded,allowing short track ace Jeff Choquetteto take the runner-up spot,with Busch third,Jeff Fultz fourth and Chase Elliott,the son of1988 NASCAR champion Bill Elliott,fifth. David Ragan,who drives in Sprint Cup for Front Row Motorsports,finished eighth afterstarting from the pole.Second-generation driv-ers John Hunter Nemechek and Ross Kensethwere 10th and 11th respectively.Camping WorldTruck Series driver Johanna Long,a formerDerby winner,finished 14th,while her fellowtruck series driver Nelson Piquet Jr.was 28th. Elliott,the defending Snowball Derby winner,won the preliminary Snowflake race onSaturday night,his second win in that event inthe past three years. NUMERICALLYSPEAKING Caution periodsduring the 2012 Cup season,compared to278 in 2011,265 in2010 and 305 in 2009 Most miles rununder caution in a Cup race in 2012 (inthe Daytona 500) Most cautions in aCup race in 2012 (in the second race atKansas Speedway) Fewest cautions in aCup race in 2012 (at Auto Club Speedway)105 216 1 14 Jeff Gordon during Friday’s Sprint Cup Series Champions Awards Ceremony in Las Vegas.(NASCAR photo) Brad Keselowski with his championship ring.(NASCAR photo) By RICK MINTER / Universal Uclick By RICK MINTER / Universal Uclick It could well be that when Tony Stewart’scareer is over,one of his biggest legacieswill be what he did for dirt racing. Since he came to NASCAR,he’s often spoken kind words about the dirt-racing worldwhere he spent many of his formative yearsand where he still races as often as possible. Then in 2004,he bought one of the most famous dirt tracks in America,EldoraSpeedway in Rossburg,Ohio.The next yearhe launched the Prelude to the Dream atEldora,a charity event in which top driversfrom NASCAR and other forms of motor-sports compete in Late Model cars. Now he’s bringing the Camping World Truck Series to his track,marking the firsttime a major NASCAR series has raced ondirt since Richard Petty won a GrandNational race on the half-mile track on theNorth Carolina State Fairgrounds inRaleigh,N.C.,in 1970. The trucks will run at Eldora on Wednesday night,July 24.That date is justbefore the Sprint Cup race at nearbyIndianapolis Motor Speedway,and it shouldresult in a good many Cup drivers in thestarting field,especially since the Prelude ison hiatus this year. “I think the race itself is going to be pretty exciting,”Stewart said on a NASCAR tele-conference.“We’ve seen what the Prelude tothe Dream has done in the past,bringing indrivers that weren’t accustomed to runningon dirt,how quickly they adapt to it. “I think with a little bit more favorable conditions we’ll be able to give the truckseries a surface that’s going to be really,really competitive,very,very wide,at the sametime going to give these guys an opportunityto learn something that’s a little bit differentto them … “It’s going to be a very historic day for NASCAR and definitely for EldoraSpeedway.” NASCAR and its safety experts have determined that SAFER barriers,usuallyrequired at any track that hosts the topthree series,won’t be needed at Eldora,butsome safety improvements are planned. “We don’t have to add SAFER barriers,but we are going to be making changes to the exitsand entrances to the pit areas,”Stewart said.“There will be some changes structural insidethe track,but all for the safety obviously.” The format for the race has yet to be determined,but NASCAR vice presidentSteve O’Donnell said it’s possible that therace will be run like a big dirt-racing event. “I think what is fair to say is we are looking at how races are competed at dirt trackshistorically with heat races or last-chanceraces,”O’Donnell said.“I think we’re veryinterested in looking at that.” After a recent test session involving Stewart and Austin Dillon,Stewart said hedoesn’t foresee any big changes to the trucksthemselves to make the transition frompavement to dirt. “Literally,all we had to do was take the splitters off the front of the trucks,”he said.“With pavement tracks,and we do it in theNationwide Series,the Cup Series and theTruck Series,determining how close you canget the nose of the vehicle to the ground is very,very important. “With it being a dirt surface,those splitters can dig into the ground.Just a simple changeof removing the splitter seemed to be enoughof a change to keep that from happening.” Stewart,who usually competes in events at his track when possible,said he’s not sureabout this one.His first priority is makingsure the race goes off without a hitch,andhe’ll likely be dealing with a much largercrowd than usual.The track capacity now isabout 20,000,but temporary seats are anoption if advance ticket sales warrant them. “Part of me definitely wants to be in a truck there and competing,”he said.“At thesame time,as a track owner I feel a lot ofresponsibility to make sure everything isgoing as planned and doing everything wecan to ensure a great show.” The race is one of 22 next season for the Truck Series.The other major change is theaddition of a race at Canadian TireMotorsports Park in Ontario on Sept.1,thesame weekend as the Nationwide and SprintCup series races at Atlanta Motor Speedway. In the past,the trucks were part of the Labor Day weekend schedule at AMS,butthis year the track will host a winged sprintcar event for the Fayetteville,Ga.-basedUnited Sprint Car Series on Friday night inaddition to pole qualifying for the Sprint Cuprace and a major fan event. Track president Ed Clark said that while the trucks put on a good show at AMS,he’sexcited about the new lineup. “It’ll be a good,compact program,and it’ll offer a lot for fans,”Clark said. Stewart brings Truck Series to Eldora’s dirt trackTony Stewart signs autographs during practice for the Sprint Cup Series Tums Fast Relief 500 at Martinsville Speedw ay on October 26 in Ridgeway,Va.(NASCAR photo)Down and dirtyGordon honored for racing, philanthropic work



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FRIDAY& SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7-8, 2012 CLASSIFIEDLAKE CITYREPORTER 9B CLASSIFIED AD vantageTake ADvantage of the Reporter Classifieds!755-5440Lake City Reporter FIND IT SELL IT BUY IT $17504 lines 3 days Includes 2 Signs Each additional line $1.65 Garage Sale Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$10104 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.10One item per ad Under $500 Personal Merchandise Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$16754 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.15One item per ad Under $1,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less. Each item must include a price. 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General Information In Print and Onlinewww.lakecityreporter.com Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$2504 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $.25One item per ad Under $100 Sales RepSeeking an experienced advertising sales rep to join our digital media network team. Unlimited earning potential. Contact (863) 662-0883 or email resume to: imc1832@aol.com Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 ServicesFLCert. Teacher with 10 yrs exp. Offering a homeshooling group in Jan. Reasonably priced. Interested parents 386-288-0954. 2006 Toyota Tundra SR-5Crew cab, Class 3 Tow Package, cruise, power windows, seats five. 152,000 miles.$7,800 386-365-1901 2007 Signature Lincoln Town Car28,200 miles$15,500 386-397-3568 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTFOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAPROBATE DIVISION File No. 12 CP-263IN RE: ESTATE OF KENNETH ARCHIBALD McAL-PIN, a/k/a KENNETH A. McAL-PIN,Deceased.NOTICE T O CREDIT ORS The administration of the estate of KENNETH ARCHIBALD McAL-PIN, deceased, whose date of death was September 9, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Columbia County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Post Office Box 2069, Lake City, Florida 32056-2069. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below.All creditors of the decedent and oth-er persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICA-TION OF THIS NOTICE.ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITH-IN THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED.NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.The date of first publication of this notice is December 7, 2012.Personal Representative:KENNETH ARCHIBOLD MCAL-PIN, JR.708 Harvest LaneMcGregor, Texas 76657Attorney for Personal Representa-tive:Richard A. Miller, Esquire Florida Bar Number: 328911 Miller, Crosby & Miller, P.A. Post Office Box 8169Lakeland, FL33802Telephone: (863) 688-7038Fax: (863) 688-261905536168December 7, 14, 2012 INVITATION TOSUBMITSTATEMENTS OFINTERESTBIDE FILE #3277The School District of Columbia County, Florida will receive State-ments of Interest from firms for the purpose of providing professional services. The required services are for small projects as defined by F.S. 287.055(2)g. Continuing Contract. The firms selected will be asked to provide a rate or rates for basic serv-ices and reimbursables. Preference will be given to firms that maintain an established office in Columbia County or within a 150-mile radius of the county.Firms providing the following serv-ices are invited to submit Statements of Interest and other information re-quested in the Supplement:ENGINEERING ElectricalMechanicalARCHITECTURAL Basic ServicesSUR VEYING Land SurveyingProfessional Services are being re-quested for any project that may fall under a Continuing Contract as op-posed to any specific contract. Firms should review the Five Year Work Plan at www.columbia.k12.fl.us/pur-chasing/construction.html. Interested firms should submit a letter of inter-est and supporting data to:R.M. “Mike” NullDirector of Purchasing Columbia County School Board372 West Duval Street-Room 233Lake City, FL32055In addition to the Statement of Inter-est, firms shall be required to submit other specific material as outlined in the Supplement, available on the Purchasing Department website at: www.columbia k12.fl.us/purchaing. Failure to comply with the specific requirements of submission will re-sult in the proposal being deemed non-responsive. All material must be submitted to the Purchasing Depart-ment to arrive no later than Thursday December 20, 2012, 2:00 p.m. E.S.T Statements of Inter est shall r efer ence, CONTINUING CONTRACT BID FILE #3277 The selection of the successful firm(s) will be in accordance with Florida Statutes 287.055. Staff will tentatively review and rank qualified firms in Room 227 on January 11, 2012 beginning at 10:00 A.M. E.S.T. Final recommendations will be sub-mitted to the School Board during a subsequent meeting.THE COLUMBIACOUNTYSCHOOLBOARDBy:/s/ Terry L. Huddleston05536090December 7, 14, 2012 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILACTIONCASE NO.: 12-000576-CABANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,Plaintiffvs.FRANK A. FEELEYA/K/AFRANK FEELEY, et al, Defendant(s)NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLO-SURE PROCEEDINGS-PROPER-TYTO: OMAR PUPO: ADDRESS UN-KNOWN BUTWHOSE LASTKNOWN ADDRESS IS:11670 SWTUSTENUGGEE AVE, FORTWHITE, FL32038UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF OMAR PUPO: ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUTWHOSE LASTKNOWN AD-DRESS IS: 11670 SWTUSTENUG-GEE AVE, FORTWHITE, FL32038Residence unknown and if living, in-cluding any unknown spouse of the Defendant, if remarried and if said Defendant is dead, his/her respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all other persons claim-ing by, through, under or against the named Defendant; and the aforemen-tioned named Defendant and such of the aforementioned unknown De-fendant and such of the unknown name Defendant as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui ju-ris.YOU ARE HEREBYNOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mort-gage on the following described property to-wit:LOT14, OF TUSTENUGGEE RIDGE AS PER PLATTHEREOF RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 6, PAGE 212 OF THE PUBLIC RE-CORDS OF COLUMBIACOUN-TY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH A1993 OMNI DOUBLEWIDE MO-BILE HOME, VIN #036229A/B, HUD#GEO0735475/76more commonly known as: 11670 SWTUSTENUGGEE AVE, FORTWHITE, FL32038This action has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, to it on the Plaintiff’s attorney, FLORIDAFORECLOSURE AT-TORNEYS, PLLC, whose address is 601 Cleveland Street, Suite 690, Clearwater, FL33755, on or before 30 days after the date of first publi-cation, response due by 12/27/12, and file the original with the Clerk of the Circuit Court either before serv-ice on Plaintiff’s attorney or immedi-ately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint.WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 27th day of Nov., 2012.Clerk of the CourtColumbia County, FloridaBy: /s/ B.ScippioDeputy ClerkSEAL05536111December 7, 14, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURTFOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAPROBATE DIVISIONNOTICE TO CREDITORSThe administration of the estate of WILLIE BROWN, deceased, whosedate of death was October 20, 2011; File Number 12-254-CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for Columbia County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Post Office Box 2069, Lake City, FL32056. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal rep-resentatives attorney are set forth be-low. All creditors of the decedent and oth-er persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-TER THE DATE OF SERVICE O ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICA-TION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITH-IN THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED.NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.The date of first publication of this notice is: December 6, 2012.Derek B. Alvarez, EsquireFBN: 114278Anthony F. Diecidue, EsquireFBN: 146528afd@gendersalvarez.comGenders, Alvarez, Diecidue, P.A.2307 West Cleveland StreetTampa, Florida 33609Phone: (813) 254-4744Fax: (813) 254-5222Clifford Brown, Sr.Personal Representative 401 NWGovernment and Express AvenueBranford, FL3200805536182December 7, 14, 2012 PUBLIC AUCTION 1999 MERCURYVIN# 4M2ZU52E8XUJ081851998 CHEVYVIN# 1GNDT13WTW2295505CREAMER’S WRECKER SERVICE 290 NE SUNNYBROOK ST.LAKE CITY, FL32055COLUMBIACOUNTY386-752-2861SALE DATE: December 31, 20128:00 AM05536197December 7, 2012 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILACTIONCASE NO.: 12-2009-CA-000304DIVISION:THE BANK OF NEWYORK MEL-LON FKATHE BANK OF NEWYORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFITOF THE ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SER-IES 2007-2Plaintiff,vs.THERON E. WATERS, et al,Defendant(s)NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated November 1, 2012 and entered in Case NO. 12-2009-CA-000304 of the Circuit Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit in and for COLUMBIACounty, Florida wherein THE BANK OF NEWYORK MELLON FKATHE BANK OF NEWYORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFITOF THE ASSET-BACKED CERTIFI-CATES, SERIES 2007-2, is the Plaintiff and THERON E. WA-TERS; CHANDRAD. WATERS; MARVYNE A. WATERS A/K/AMARVYNE C. WATERS; TEN-ANT#1 N/K/ALANITRASAPPare the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at COURTROOM ONE OF THE COLUMBIACOUN-TYCOURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the 9th day of January, 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment:LOT2 AND THE WEST1/2 OF LOT3, BLOCK D, NORTHSIDE ESTATES, ASUBDIVISION, AS PER PLATTHEREOF, RECORD-ED IN PLATBOOK 4, PAGE 18, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORI-DA..A/K/A822 NWSPRINGDALE GLENN, LAKE CITY, FL32055Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-er than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on November 5, 2012.P. DeWitt CasonClerk of the Circuit CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkNOTICEIn accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons need-ing a special accommodation to par-ticipate in this proceeding should contact the Deputy Court Adminis-trator whose office is located at 3301 East Tamiami Trail, Building L, Na-ples, Florida 33962, telephone num-ber (813) 774-8124; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD), or 1-800-955-8770 (v), via Florida Relay Service, not later than seven (7) days prior to this proceed-ing.05536072November 30, 2012December 7, 2012 IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO: 2012-341-CAFRIER FINANCE, INC., a Florida Corporation 12788 U.S. Highway 90 West, Live Oak, Florida 32060Plaintiff,FREDRICK ALLEN and VERONI-CATROWELLDefendants.NOTICE OF ACTIONTO: FREDRICK ALLEN and VER-ONICATROWELL:YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a civil action has been filed against you in the Circuit Court, County of Colum-bia, State of Florida, to foreclose cer-tain real property described as fol-lows:SECTION 33: ONE ACRE OFF THE NORTH END OF LOT5 IN THE NE 1/4 OF NW1/4, COLUM-BIACOUNTY, FLORIDATOGETHER WITH: A1999 28X56 GREENHILLDOUBLEWIDE MO-BILE HOME, I.D. #FLFLX70A/B26964GH21,You are required to file a written re-sponse with the Court and serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Timothy D. Padgett, Plain-tiff’s attorney, whose address is 2878 Remington Green Circle, Tallahas-see, Florida 3230, at least thirty (30) days from the date of first publica-tion, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before serv-ice on Plaintiff’s attorney or immedi-ately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint.Dated this 5th day of Nov., 2012.CLERK OF COURTBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkSEAL05536019November 30, 2012December 7, 2012 Shands Lake Shore Orthopedics will be closing effective January 4, 2013. All records will be maintained by Lake Shore HMAMedical Group. Patients may make arrangements to pick up their records at Shands Lake Shore Orthopedics, 348 NE Method-ist Terrace, Suitte 101, Lake City, FL32055 or by calling 386-755-4007.05536188December 7, 14, 21, 28, 2012 Notice is hereby given per Florida Statue 98.075(2):CLIFFORD FLETCHER185 SE BAYADRLAKE CITY, FL32025ANDREWC. KONVALINKA2880 N US HIGHWAY441LAKE CITY, FL32055is potentially ineligible to be regis-tered to vote. Please respond within 30 days of publication of this notice by contacting the Supervisor of Elec-tions Office at the address or phone number below. If no response is re-ceived within 30 days of this publiLegalcation, it may result in determination of ineligibility by the supervisor and removal of the registered voter’s name from the statewide voter regis-tration system. Published one time in the Lake City ReporterElizabeth "Liz" P. HorneColumbia County Supervisor of Elections971 W. Duval Street, Suite 102Lake City, FL32055(386) 758-102605536184December 7, 2012 NOTICE OFENACTMENTOF ORDINANCEBYTHE BOARD OF COUNTYCOMMISSIONERS OFCOLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDANOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN that the ordinance, which title hereinafter appears, will be considered for enact-ment by the Board of County Com-missioners of Columbia County, Florida, at a public hearing on De-cember 20, 2012 at 7:00 p.m., or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard, in the School Board Adminis-trative Complex located at 372 West Duval Street, Lake City, Florida.Copies of said ordinance may be in-spected by any member of the public at the Office of the County Manager, County Administrative Offices locat-ed at 135 Northeast Hernando Ave-nue, Lake City, Florida, during regu-lar business hours.On the date, time and place first above mentioned, all interested persons may appear and be heard with respect to the ordinance.AN ORDINANCE OF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. 98-1, COLUM-BIACOUNTYLAND DEVELOP-MENTREGULATIONS, AS AMENDED; RELATING TO AN AMENDMENTOF LESS THAN TEN CONTIGUOUS ACRES OF LAND TO THE OFFICIALZON-ING ATLAS OF THE COLUMBIACOUNTYLAND DEVELOPMENTREGULATIONS, AS AMENDED, PURSUANTTO AN APPLICA-TION, Z 0533, BYTHE PROPER-TYOWNER OF SAID ACREAGE; PROVIDING FOR REZONING FROM RESIDENTIAL, SINGLE FAMILY(RSF-2) TO COMMER-CIAL, GENERAL(CG) OF CER-TAIN LANDS WITHIN THE UN-INCORPORATED AREAOF CO-LUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA; PROVIDING SEVERABILITY; REPEALING ALLORDINANCES IN CONFLICT; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATEThe public hearing may be continued to one or more future dates.Any in-terested party shall be advised that the date, time and place of any con-tinuation of the public hearing shall be announced during the public hear-ing and that no further notice con-cerning the matter will be published.All persons are advised that, if they decide to appeal any decisions made at the public hearing, they will need a record of the proceedings and, for such purpose, they may need to en-sure that a verbatim record of the proceedings are made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons need-ing a special accommodation or an interpreter to participate in the pro-ceeding should contact Lisa K. B. Roberts, at least seven (7) days prior to the date of the hearing.Ms. Rob-erts may be contacted by telephone at (386)758-1005 or by Telecommu-nication Device for Deaf at (386)758-2139.05536162December 7, 2012 NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETINGThe North Florida Broadband Authority (NFBA) Board of Direc-tors announces its regular monthly public meeting to which all interest-ed persons are invited. The NFBAis a public body created by Interlocal Agreement pursuant to Section 163.01, Florida Statutes. The Wed-nesday, December 12, 2012 meeting will be held at the headquarters of the St. Johns River Water Manage-ment District, 4049 Reid Street /Highway 100 West, Palatka, FL32177 at 2:00 p.m. The meeting agenda will be posted to the NFBAwebsite at least 48 hours prior to the scheduled meeting. The Board will address general policy and operation-al matters of the NFBA. If a person decides to appeal any decision of the NFBABoard made at the meeting, such person may need a record of the proceedings, including the testimony and evidence upon which the deci-sion was made. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing special accommoda-tions or an interpreter to participate in this meeting should contact Springfield Law, P.A. at (352) 371-9909 at least two business days prior to the date of the meeting.05535745December 7, 2012 100Job Opportunities05536164T eachers Join our team of over 100 professional teachers! Want to make a difference in the lives of children? Infant/Toddler 10 Mo Ft Teacher (Lake City) Child Development Associate (CDA) or equivalent credential (FCCPC or ECPC) required. Three years experience with birth to 3 preferred. High School Diploma/ GED Required. Must be able to pass DCF background screenings. Excellent Benefits, Paid Holidays, Sick/Annual Leave, Health/Dental Insurance, and more. Apply at 236 SW Columbia Ave, Lake City, FLor send resume to: employment@sv4cs.org Fax (386) 754-2220 or Call 754-2225 EOE EOE 05536167Local insurance agency seeks Licensed CSR Experience preferred. Send reply to Box 05099, C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056 05536192Large Construciton Company has an immediate opening for an experienced Account Payable Clerk. Qualified candidate(s) may apply in person at Anderson Columbia, Co., Inc., 871 NWGuerdon Street, Lake City, Florida 32056, fax your resume to 386-755-9132 or visit website at www.andersoncolumbia.com. EOE & Drug Free Workplace Desoto Home Care Now hiring for part time position of Delivery technician. Looking for person with good mechanical abilities and a positive attitude. Drop resume off at 311 N. Marion St. L.C. FL32055 Mechanic needed at Fla.Rock & Tank Lines In White Springs. Diesel exprnc reqr'd in maintenance & repair of tractor trailers. 45-50hrs/wk Class A CDLlicense preferred. Excellent Benefits! email: mcomer@patriottrans.com or fax 904-858-9008 Mechanic needed for general semi-truck and tire repairs. Steady employment with benefits. Salary dependent on experience. Must have own hand tools. Please contact Greg @ 755-7700 Mechanic needed with tools and experience. Southern Specialize Truck & Trailer. 386-752-9754 Real Estate Co. looking for Office Staff Computer knowledge required. Real Estate Exp. is a plus! Fax resume to 386-496-4309 Seeking a full-time Office Manager for a local mortgage company. Mortgage experience is very important. Email resume to: lakecityresume@yahoo.com 120Medical EmploymentP/THousekeeper Needed Occasional Nights And Weekends. Fax Resume to 386-487-1232 F/T LPN or equivalent needed for family practice office. Must have pharmacology exp. 1PAGE RESUME’S ONLYWILLBE ACCEPTEDFax resume to 386-487-1232. 755-5440Toplace your classified ad call REPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Linewww.lakecityreporter.com