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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
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Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:01972

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:01972

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text

PAGE 1

By DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comWith every teacher in the Columbia County School District getting a pass-ing grade on their state evaluations, local educators have a little breathing room, for now. Not one county teacher was rated as “needs improvement” or “unsatisfac-tory,” according to results released Wednesday by the Florida Department of Education. All Columbia County teachers were found to be either “highly effective” or “effective” under the new value-added model – 57.5 percent as highly effec-tive, 42.5 percent as effective. Statewide, 96.7 percent of Florida teachers were judged either highly effective or effective, while 1.9 percent were said to be in need of improvement and 0.3 percent were deemed unsatis-factory. Throughout the state, 22.2 percent of teachers were judged highly effec-tive. Only seven other Florida counties ranked a higher percentage of their teachers as highly effective. There was concern with the accuracy of some of the data used to gener-ate the results statewide. While only about 13,000 teachers were evaluated in Hillsborough County, the report indi-cated Hillsborough had 23,000 teach-ers. “The numbers appear to be questionable so we’re having a hard time coming to any conclusions based on the data,” Hillsborough County school district spokesman Steve Hegarty told The Associated Press. According to the Associated Press, Florida Department of Education spokeswoman Cynthia Sucher reported that Hillsborough district officials said Opinion ................ 4APeople.................. 2AObituaries .............. 5A Advice & Comics ......... 3B Puzzles ................. 4B TODAY IN PEOPLE Dave Brubeck dead at 91. COMING FRIDAY Local news roundup. 74 53 Mostly cloudy WEATHER, 2A Lake City ReporterTHURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | 75¢ LAKECITYREPORTER.COM CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 138, No. 222 1 Top marks for teachers JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterColumbia High School journalism and digital design te acher Tabatha McMahon instructs sophomore Emily Brewer 15, on Adobe Photoshop on Wednesday. Results of a statewide teacher evaluation by the Florida Department of Education were released Wednesday .. ‘My goal is to the best job I can,’ McMahon said. ‘I’m glad to be evaluated. I welcome e valuation. If you’re not striving to improve yourself then y ou are done, and (we, as teachers) are never done.’ 100% of local educators rated ‘effective’ or ‘highly effective’ in state evaluation However, the numbers might not be what they seem, according to supt. Columbia County Teacher EvaluationsHighly Eective Eective Needs Improvement 3 Years – Developing Unsatisfactory Was Not EvaluatedTotal Columbia High 71460001 118 Vocational/Adult/Comm. Ed. 9140001 24 Richardson Middle 13410000 54 Melrose Park Elementary 41230000 64 Eastside Elementary 28180000 46 Five Points Elementary 19300000 49 Fort White Elementary 5290000 61 Fort White High 55310000 86 Summers Elementary 32270000 59 Niblack Elementary 13340000 47 Challenge Learning Center 4100000 14 Lake City Middle 30380000 68 Columbia City Elementary 4170000 48 Westside Elementary 4280000 50 Pinemount Elementary 23230000 46 DAVE KIMLER/ Lake City Reporter By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comCounty officials will determine whether they’ll change their funding methods for the Suwannee Valley Transit Authority after receiving a let-ter requesting the change. County officials are scheduled to discuss the request during tonight’s 7 p.m. county commission meet-ing at the Columbia County School Board Administrative Complex Auditorium, 372 W. Duval St. Gwendolyn Pra, SVTA agency administrator, sent a letter to Dale Williams, county manager, on Nov. 17 requesting the change. Pra’s letter requested that quarterly payments be com-bined into one payment each year. “This is an operations matter for us, and it will greatly assist us in the management of our budget,” Pra wrote. “Our contract is at our attor-ney’s office, and we are cur-rently revising it for this pur-pose. We would appreciate very much any consideration you could extend so that we might receive our check in advance.” In September 2011, county officials authorized Williams to set a meeting date with At tonight’s meeting, will ask county for lump sum payment. Bank suspect soughtDEREK GILLIAM/ Lake City ReporterLake City police plan their next move after an incIdent at the Bank of America on State Road 47 Wednesday morning. Authorities said a man tried to cash a fraudulent or forged check, but when police were called, he reportedly ran into the woods ne ar Michigan Street. Motions to dismiss in Madison Countyelection fraud cases By BILL KACZORAssociated PressMADISON — Lawyers seeking dismissal of voting fraud and related charges against four north Florida residents on Wednesday cited the state Supreme Court’s refusal to throw out thousands of absentee ballots after Republican activists added information to them in the 2000 presidential election. The attorneys argued that allegations their clients obtained about 45 absentee ballots for other Madison County voters without proper authorization in a 2010 school board election was an even lesser technical violation of state law. MOTIONS continued on 3A TEACHERS continued on 6ASVTAwantsall itsmoneyat once COUNTY COMMISSION SVTA continued on 3A Standoffends inmeth arrests POLICE By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comAn investigation into an anonymous tip about pos-sible illegal drug activity at a local residence led to a police standoff that lasted more than two hours after authori-ties alleg-edly found metham-phetamine was being cooked in the resi-dence. The standoff, which began Tuesday night, ended peacefully Wednesday morn-ing when a local man sur-rendered to authorities. Two Lake City men were arrest-ed and face drug-related ARRESTS continued on 3A Keen Wheeldon



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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Thursday, December 6, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS (SFBU4FBTPO5JHFST We are proud of you! Register To Win Stuff From Santa’s Toybox!Drawings to be held 12/19/12 • One entry per visit! BRIEFS GAMES Today Q Columbia High girls weightlifting vs. Baker County High, 4 p.m. Q Fort White High girls basketball at Suwannee High, 6 p.m. Q Fort White High soccer at Keystone Heights High, 7 p.m. (girls-5) Q Fort White High boys basketball vs. Santa Fe High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Friday Q Columbia High wrestling at Capital City Classic at Chiles High, 3 p.m. Q Columbia High girls soccer at Timberwolves Classic in Tallahassee, TBA Q Fort White High boys basketball vs. Bradford High, 6:30 p.m. (JV-5) Q Columbia High girls basketball at Lee High, 7 p.m. (JV-5:30) Q Columbia High boys basketball at Stanton Prep, 7 p.m. (JV-5:30) Q Columbia High boys soccer at Mosley High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) CST Saturday Q Columbia High wrestling at Capital City Classic at Chiles High, 10 a.m. Q Columbia High girls soccer at Timberwolves Classic in Tallahassee, TBD Q Columbia High boys basketball vs. Palatka High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) ADULT FLAG FOOTBALL Coaches meeting for 7 on 7 today Lake City Recreation Department has a coaches meeting and rules clinic at 6:30 p.m. today at Teen Town for its Adult 7 on 7 Flag Football League. Entry fee is $600. Roster forms can be picked up at Teen Town Center. Deadline for fee is Dec. 14. For details, call Hayward Christie at 754-3607. YOUTH BASEBALL Lake City Babe Ruth registration Lake City Babe Ruth Baseball has opened online registration for its spring league. Go to lcccyb.com to sign up. Dates for on-site registration are pending. For details, call Jessica Langley at 867-1897. CHS SOFTBALL Tryouts planned for Jan. 8 Columbia High softball tryouts are 2:45 p.m. Jan. 8 at the CHS field. Participants must meet academic requirements and have completed paperwork. For details, call coach Jimmy Williams at 303-1192.Q From staff reports Blazing a trail COURTESY PHOTOMary Elizabeth Warren is joined by parents Chris and Charlotte Warren and brother John Warren as she signs a national letter of intent to play softball at the University of Alabama-Birmingham. Warren signs to play softball at UABFrom staff reportsH igh school softball season is two months away, and Mary Elizabeth Warren has already hit a home run. Warren, a senior at Ocoee High, signed a national letter of intent on Nov. 14 to play Division 1 softball at the University of Alabama-Birmingham. Warren is the daughter of Chris and Charlotte Warren of Ocoee. Her grandparents are Leon and Dessie Meeks of Lake City, and Bud and Jean Warren of Lake Placid. Warren’s brother, John, also plays ball for the Knights. Warren will earn her fourth varsity letter in softball in the spring and is a three-year letter winner in weightlifting. She is a member of the National Honor Society and carries a 4.5 weighted GPA. An infielder for the Knights, Warren currently holds the school record for RBIs and is closing in on the all-time marks for home runs, doubles, singles and batting average. She is hitting .446 through her first three years, and has led Ocoee in home runs, RBIs, multiple base hits and slugging percentage each season. Warren currently plays travel ball with the U18 Gainesville Gold. Last year she led the Gold in multiple base hits, slugging percentage and home runs. During 2011-12, Warren hit 50 home runs. Warren has been on travel ball teams for 10 years. She was a member of the Oviedo Blaze team that placed fourth in the ISF World Cup and that qualified for the ASA 16U National Championships. She led the Blaze in average, multiple base hits, slugging percentage, RBIs and home runs. While playing for the UAB Blazers, Warren plans to pursue a career in medicine and expressed a desire to major in chemistry and/or biology. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Dakota Waters (18) advances the ball u p the field against Mosely High.Columbia High falls, 2-1, against ChilesBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High’s soccer program lost for only the third time this season as the Tigers went down 2-1 against Chiles High out of Tallahassee at the Columbia Youth Soccer Association Fields in Lake City. The Tigers were held without a goal until the 70th minute of the contest when Dylan Sessions con-nected on an assist from Cody Beadles. “We had a lot of chances under the goal, especially in the final 10 minutes of the game,” Columbia head coach Trevor Tyler said. “We just weren’t able to put any away.” The Tigers will return to the field at Mosely High at 7 p.m. on Friday. Tigers lose district game at CYSA fields Wednesday.



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Therefore Jesus said again, Very truly I tell you, I am the gate for the sheep. I am the gate; whoever enters through me will be saved. They will come in and go out, and find pasture. The thief comes only to steal and kill and destroy; I have come that they may have life, and have it to the full. John 10:7, 9-10 CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Comedy performer David Ossman is 76. Country singer Helen Cornelius is 71. Actor James Naughton is 67. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood is 67. Rhythm-and-blues singer Frankie Beverly (Maze) is 66. Former Sen. Don Nickles, R-Okla., is 64. Actress JoBeth Williams is 64. Actor Tom Hulce is 59. Actor Kin Shriner is 59. AROUND FLORIDA Woman, child, killed in crash OLD TOWN Officials say an 86-year-old woman, a 10-year-old old girl and a horse were killed when they were struck by a vehicle on a dark road in Dixie County. The Florida Highway Patrol said the girl was riding on the horse as Minnie Melba Delaney led it across the road Tuesday night. A minivan driven by 39-year-old John Henry Mash hit them. News reports said Delaney died at the scene. The child, Emma Maria Mercado, was airlifted to Shands at the University of Florida where she died early Wednesday. Trooper Tracy Pace says the woman and child were neighbors. Mash told troopers he didnt see the woman, child and horse. Charges are pending. University leaders seek state funds TALLAHASSEE State university presidents and student government lead ers are offering Florida lawmakers a tuition deal. They said on Wednesday in Tallahassee that they wont seek tuition increases next year if the Legislature agrees to spend $118 million more in state money on the 12school State University System. Gov. Rick Scott praised the proposal. He has stanchly opposed tuition increases but supported a $300 million spending reduction for the universi ties this year. Scott says hes looking forward to working closely with the presidents and student leaders as he puts together his budget recommenda tions and other proposals for the 2013 legislative session. The announcement was part of the kickoff for a student-led campaign focused on uniting in sup port of more funding for higher education. Teen sentenced for school plot TAMPA A Tampa Bay area teen was sen tenced to 15 years in pris on for plotting to blow up his high school last year. A Hillsborough County judge sentenced 18year-old Jared Cano on Wednesday. He pleaded no contest in October to threatening to discharge a destructive device and attempting to discharge a destructive device with intention to harm. Cano was arrested in August 2011 after police said they found bombmaking materials and a manifesto outlining Canos plans in his home. Authorities said Cano was planning to bomb Freedom High School. The intent was to cause more casualties than the 1999 Columbine High School massacre, which resulted in 13 deaths before the two shooters killed themselves. Woman killed by deputys car PORT ST. LUCIE Authorities said a central Florida woman died after being hit by a deputys patrol car. The Florida Highway Patrol reported that 55year-old Karen Kelly was walking across a four-lane street in Port St. Lucie Tuesday night when the deputys marked cruiser hit her. According to Scripps Treasure Coast Newspapers, relatives told investigators they didnt know why she was out on the road alone at night. The deputy remains on duty, and no charges have been filed. 57 apply for Sanford chief job SANFORD Fiftyseven applicants are vying to lead the police force at the center of the Trayvon Martin investigation last February. The new chief of the Sanford Police will be cho sen early next year. The previous fulltime chief, Bill Lee, took a leave of absence in March and was fired last June follow ing outrage over a delay in arresting former neighbor hood watch leader George Zimmerman. Zimmerman is charged with fatally shooting the 17-year-old Martin last February during a con frontation at a gated com munity. The Sanford Police Department was accused of racism and incompe tence before Zimmerman was arrested 44 days after the shooting. Man killed while defending sister DAYTONA BEACH Authorities said a man who came to the defense of his sister was shot to death. Police say Lesley Bouie went to a house in Daytona Beach early Tuesday after his sister Debra Bouie told him she had been beaten up there a few minutes earlier. Police Chief Mike Chitwood said Bouie got into a fight with someone inside. He was shot once in the chest. Police said they have a suspect but havent named him because theyre still looking for him. Jazz pianist Dave Brubeck dies HARTFORD, Conn. L egendary jazz composer and pianist Dave Brubeck, whose pioneering style in pieces such as Take Five caught listeners ears with exotic, challenging rhythms, has died. He was 91. Brubeck, who lived in Wilton, died Wednesday morning at Norwalk Hospital of heart failure after being stricken while on his way to a car diology appointment with his son Darius, said his manager Russell Gloyd. Brubeck would have turned 92 on Thursday. Brubeck had a career that spanned almost all American jazz since World War II. He formed The Dave Brubeck Quartet in 1951 and was the first modern jazz musician to be pictured on the cover of Time magazine on Nov. 8, 1954 and he helped define the swinging, smoky rhythms of 1950s and s club jazz. George Wein, a jazz pianist and founder of the Newport Jazz Festival, had known Brubeck since he first worked in Weins club in Boston in 1952. No one else played like Dave Brubeck, he said. No one had the approach to the music that he did. That approach communicated. The seminal album Time Out, released by the quartet in 1959, was the first ever million-selling jazz LP, and is still among the best-selling jazz albums of all time. Witherspoon honored by March of Dimes LOS ANGELES New mom Reese Witherspoon is being hon ored by March of Dimes for being a model celebrity parent. The 36-year-old Oscar winner and mother of three will receive the orga nizations Grace Kelly Award at its Celebration of Babies event Friday at the Beverly Hills Hotel. The award recognizes celebrity parents committed to healthy pregnan cies and families. Witherspoon gave birth in September to a son, Tennessee, with her husband, talent agent Jim Toth. Shes also mom to Ava, 13, and Deacon, 8, from her previous mar riage to actor Ryan Phillippe. Julie Andrews enjoying her new voice NEW YORK It may take a big spoonful of sugar to make this go down: Julie Andrews says that her four-octave voice is not coming back. The Oscar and Tony Award-win ning actress said in a recent inter view that a botched operation to remove non-cancerous throat nodules in 1997 hasnt gotten better. It has permanent ly limited her range and her ability to hold notes. The operation that I had left me without a voice and without a cer tain piece of my vocal chords, said Andrews, who starred in such quint essential stage and film musicals as The Sound of Music, My Fair Lady and Mary Poppins. The 77-year old, however, says she has rediscovered her voice in her books and in directing theater. Wednesday: Afternoon: 7-4-8 Evening: N/A Wednesday: Afternoon: 8-4-2-7 Evening: N/A Tuesday: 14-23-26-28-30 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAIL Y BRIEFING THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 2AWEATHER Daily Scripture ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE Jazz pianist Dave Brubeck accepts applause as he celebrates his 85th birthday on stage at Londons Barbican Hall in 2006 after a performance with the London Symphony Orchestra. Brubeck, a pioneering jazz composer and pianist died Wednesday. He would have turned 92 today. Associated Press Associated Press HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter Witherspoon Andrews



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Jack Tuggle fired a round of 78 to post a whopping +11 and capture first place in the Friday Dogfight. Larry Boone finished second with a solid +5 performance. Skin winners were Tuggle, Tim Tortorice, Woodrow Lynch, Randy Heavrin, Brandon Goss and Larry Boone. Closest to pin winners were: Goss, Nos. 3 and 11; Tuggle, No. 5; Tortorice, No. 15; and Brian “Cowboy” Shead, No. 17. Wednesday Blitz results were: first-Larry Boone +8; secondJerry Perkins and Gerald Smithy +5 (tie). Skin winners were Randy Heavrin, Tony Kent, and Todd Carter (2). The pot hole was Ponds No. 3 and there were no birdies, so the pot rolls over again. The Sunday Scramble was won by the team of Ralph Minster, Codey Blackwell, Dave Zeman and Brian Shead at 6 under par. The Sunday Scramble is open to all golfers, regard-less of skill level. Teams are picked from sign-ups, just like the old school yard pick-up games. The number of teams is determined by the number of players and the lowest handicap golfers are cap-tains and pick the teams The more golfers the better, and it is a great way to meet fellow golfers of all skill levels. The annual MGA Championship is scheduled for Dec. 15-16. Dan Stephens closed the back nine with two birdies for a personal best round of 36-39-75 in Good Old Boys play. Stephens finished two strokes back of medalist winner Monty Montgomery (37-36-73) and tied with perennial contender Mark Risk (38-37-75). Rhea Hart (78) and Don Howard (79) had the other noteworthy scores. In team competition, Hart, Eli Witt, Bob McGraw and Tony Branch took the measure of the four-some of Howard, Dennis Hendershot, Carl Wilson and Jerry Snowberger by a score of 8-5. Match two ended in a 7-5 win for the team of Montgomery, Shelton Keen, Jim Bell and Hugh Sherrill over the team of Hart, Witt, McGraw and Branch. The final match was the most competitive with Ed Snow, Merle Hibbard, Dave Cannon, Paul Davis and Stephens easing by the team of Risk, Bobby Simmons, Jim Stevens, Joe Persons and Jim McGriff by a count of 4-3. Joe Paul (+7) shined on the par 3 holes to take first place in Sunday’s blitz. Paul had closest to the pin shots on Nos. 5, 7, and 17 that resulted in two birdies to out-pace second place David Rhodes (+5). Bob Randall (+4) was in third, followed by John Brewer, Eddy Brown, Mike Gough and Mickey Willcox, all at +1. Buddy Slay was closest to the pin on No. 15. Paul’s two birdies were good for skins. Steve Thomas, Pete Skantos and Gough each had a skin. Jim Carr rolled in a late birdie to post +10, which was good for a two-point edge over Dave Mehl in Saturday’s blitz. David Rhodes took third with +6. Cory DePratter, Bruce Gibson and Steve Thomas tied for fourth with +4. Bob Randall, Gibson, Thomas and Mehl split the skins pot. Eight players collected for a total of nine skins in Wednesday’s blitz but Mike Jacobs had the big one. His birdie on No. 11 gave him first place in A flight and held up for a very lucrative pot hole win. Mike McCranie (+5) took second place, a point ahead of Buddy Slay in third. Tom Wade (+10) doubled up on second-place Bud Johnston for the B flight win. Pete Skantos and Don Howard tied for third with +4. In addition to Jacobs’ big skin, Eddy Brown had two skins to split the pot with Jonathan Allen, Dennis Crawford, Jordan Hale, Skantos, Wade and Johnson. The LGA format was three-player teams in a full handicap, best ball match. Suzi Davis, Jan Davis and Amanda Grimmett teamed up well to post a 63 for the win. The team of Cathy Steen, Carol Felton, and Anita West battled to a second place tie with the three-some of Caroline Steven, Sally Rivers and Nicole Ste-Marie, one stroke behind the winners. The Titleist club demonstration and fitting is 8 a.m. to noon on Dec. 15. Call 752-2266 for an appoint-ment. A mixed team event is planned for 1 p.m. Dec. 16. SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today BOXING 10 p.m. ESPN2 — Lightweights, Ji-Hoon Kim (24-7-0) vs. Ray Beltran (26-6-0), at Las Vegas GOLF 6:30 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Nelson Mandela Championship, first round, at Durban, South Africa 3:30 p.m. TGC — Ladies European Tour, Dubai Ladies Masters, second round, at Dubai, United Arab Emirates (same-day tape) 8 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour Australasia, Australian Open, second round, at Sydney 1:30 a.m. TGC — Asian Tour, Thailand Championship, second round, at Bangkok MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 8 p.m. ESPN2 — Long Beach St. at Syracuse NBA BASKETBALL 8 p.m. TNT — New York at Miami 10:30 p.m. TNT — Dallas at Phoenix NFL FOOTBALL 8 p.m. NFL — Denver at OaklandFOOTBALLNFL standings AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAy-New England 9 3 0 .750 430 260N.Y. Jets 5 7 0 .417 228 296Buffalo 5 7 0 .417 277 337Miami 5 7 0 .417 227 249 South W L T Pct PF PAx-Houston 11 1 0 .917 351 221Indianapolis 8 4 0 .667 265 306Tennessee 4 8 0 .333 248 359Jacksonville 2 10 0 .167 206 342 North W L T Pct PF PABaltimore 9 3 0 .750 303 242 Pittsburgh 7 5 0 .583 254 230Cincinnati 7 5 0 .583 302 260Cleveland 4 8 0 .333 229 265 West W L T Pct PF PAy-Denver 9 3 0 .750 349 244 San Diego 4 8 0 .333 258 257Oakland 3 9 0 .250 235 376 Kansas City 2 10 0 .167 188 322 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAN.Y. Giants 7 5 0 .583 321 243 Washington 6 6 0 .500 312 301 Dallas 6 6 0 .500 280 295 Philadelphia 3 9 0 .250 217 320 South W L T Pct PF PAy-Atlanta 11 1 0 .917 317 229Tampa Bay 6 6 0 .500 333 285New Orleans 5 7 0 .417 321 327 Carolina 3 9 0 .250 235 292 North W L T Pct PF PAGreen Bay 8 4 0 .667 296 259Chicago 8 4 0 .667 294 198Minnesota 6 6 0 .500 262 272 Detroit 4 8 0 .333 300 315 West W L T Pct PF PASan Francisco 8 3 1 .708 289 171Seattle 7 5 0 .583 242 202St. Louis 5 6 1 .458 221 267Arizona 4 8 0 .333 186 234 x-clinched playoff spoty-clinched division Today’s Game Denver at Oakland, 8:20 p.m. Sunday’s Games Chicago at Minnesota, 1 p.m.Baltimore at Washington, 1 p.m.Kansas City at Cleveland, 1 p.m.San Diego at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.Tennessee at Indianapolis, 1 p.m. N.Y. Jets at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.Atlanta at Carolina, 1 p.m.Philadelphia at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.St. Louis at Buffalo, 1 p.m.Dallas at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.Miami at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.Arizona at Seattle, 4:25 p.m.New Orleans at N.Y. Giants, 4:25 p.m.Detroit at Green Bay, 8:20 p.m. Monday’s Game Houston at New England, 8:30 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 13 Cincinnati at Philadelphia, 8:20 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 16 Green Bay at Chicago, 1 p.m.Tampa Bay at New Orleans, 1 p.m.Minnesota at St. Louis, 1 p.m.Indianapolis at Houston, 1 p.m.N.Y. Giants at Atlanta, 1 p.m.Washington at Cleveland, 1 p.m.Jacksonville at Miami, 1 p.m.Denver at Baltimore, 1 p.m.Carolina at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.Detroit at Arizona, 4:05 p.m.Seattle vs. Buffalo at Toronto, 4:05 p.m.Kansas City at Oakland, 4:25 p.m.Pittsburgh at Dallas, 4:25 p.m.San Francisco at New England, 8:20 p.m. Monday, Dec. 17 N.Y. Jets at Tennessee, 8:30 p.m. College games Jackson St. (7-4) vs. Ark.-Pine Bluff (9-2), SWAC championship at Birmingham, Ala., 1 p.m. Army (2-9) vs. Navy (7-4) at Philadelphia, 3 p.m.All SEC team The 2012 Associated Press AllSoutheastern Conference football team released Monday, with player’s position, name, school, height, weight and class (u-unanimous selection): FIRST TEAM Offense WR — u-Cobi Hamilton, Arkansas, 6-3, 209, Sr. WR — Jordan Matthews, Vanderbilt, 6-3, 205, Jr. L — Chance Warmack, Alabama, 6-3, 320, Sr. L — Luke Joeckel, Texas A&M, 6-6, 310, Jr. L — Jake Matthews, Texas A&M, 6-5, 305, Jr. L — Gabe Jackson, Mississippi State, 6-4, 320, Jr. C — u-Barrett Jones, Alabama, 6-5, 302, Sr. TE — Jordan Reed, Florida, 6-3, 243, Jr. QB — u-Johnny Manziel, Texas A&M, 6-1, 200, Fr. RB — Todd Gurley, Georgia, 6-1, 218, Fr. RB — Mike Gillislee, Florida, 5-11, 209, Sr. K — Caleb Sturgis, Florida, 5-11, 184, Sr. All-Purpose — Cordarrelle Patterson, Tennessee, 6-3, 205, Jr. Defense T — Sharrif Floyd, Florida,6-3, 303, Jr. T — Sheldon Richardson, Missouri, 6-4, 295, Jr. E — u-Jadeveon Clowney, South Carolina, 6-6, 256, So. E — Damontre Moore, Texas A&M, 6-4, 250, Jr. LB — u-Jarvis Jones, Georgia, 6-3, 241, Jr. LB — C.J. Mosley, Alabama, 6-2, 232, Jr. LB — Kevin Minter, LSU, 6-2, 245, Jr.CB — u-Johnthan Banks, Mississippi State, 6-2, 185, Sr. CB — u-Dee Milliner, Alabama, 6-1, 199, Jr. S — Matt Elam, Florida, 5-10, 202, Jr. S — Eric Reid, LSU, 6-2, 212, Jr.P — Kyle Christy, Florida, 6-2, 199, So. SECOND TEAM Offense WR — Justin Hunter, Tennessee, 6-4, 200, Jr. WR — Chad Bumphis, Mississippi State, 5-11, 200, Sr. L — D.J. Fluker, Alabama, 6-6, 335, Jr.L — Larry Warford, Kentucky, 6-3, 343, Sr. L — Antonio Richardson, Tennessee, 6-6, 332, So. L — Dallas Thomas, Tennessee, 6-5, 310, Sr. C — Travis Swanson, Arkansas 6-5, 305, Jr. TE — Mychal Rivera, Tennessee, 6-3, 244, Sr. QB — A.J. McCarron, Alabama, 6-4, 210, Jr. RB — Eddie Lacy, Alabama, 6-0, 220, Jr. RB — Zac Stacy, Vanderbilt, 5-9, 210, Sr. K — Carey Spear, Vanderbilt, 5-10, 190, Jr. All-Purpose — LaDarius Perkins, Mississippi State, 5-10, 190, Jr. All-Purpose — Ace Sanders, South Carolina, 5-8, 175, Jr. Defense T — Jesse Williams, Alabama, 6-4, 320, Sr. T — John Jenkins, Georgia, 6-3, 358, Sr. T — Bennie Logan, LSU, 6-3, 295, Jr.E — Sam Montgomery, LSU, 6-5, 260, Jr. LB — Alec Ogletree, Georgia, 6-3, 232, Jr. LB — Cameron Lawrence, Mississippi State, 6-3, 230, Sr. LB — Barkevious Mingo, LSU, 6-5, 240, Jr. LB — Denzel Nkemdiche, Mississippi, 5-11, 203, Fr. CB — Andre Hal, Vanderbilt, 6-0, 184, Jr. CB — Marcus Roberson, Florida, 6-0, 178, So. S — D.J. Swearinger, South Carolina, 6-0, 210, Sr. S — Craig Loston, LSU, 6-2, 205, Jr.S — Bacarri Rambo, Georgia, 6-0, 210, Sr. P — Dylan Breeding, Arkansas, 6-1, 211, Sr. HONORABLE MENTION Offense La’el Collins, L, LSU, 6-5, 321, So.; Josh Dworaczyk, L, LSU, 6-6, 300, Sr.; Wesley Johnson, L, Vanderbilt, 6-5, 285, Jr.; Marcus Lattimore, RB, South Carolina, 6-0, 218, Jr.; Aaron Murray, QB, Georgia, 6-1, 210, Jr. Defense Robert Lester, S, Alabama, 6-2, 210, Sr.; Chris Smith, E, Arkansas, 6-3, 251, Jr. ——— OFFENSIVE PLAYER of the YEAR u-Johnny Manziel, Texas A&M DEFENSIVE PLAYER of the YEAR Jarvis Jones, Georgia COACH of the YEAR Kevin Sumlim, Texas A&M FRESHMAN of the YEAR Johnny Manziel, Texas A&MBASKETBALLNBA schedule Today’s Games New York at Miami, 8 p.m.Dallas at Phoenix, 10:30 p.m. Friday’s Games Boston at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.Denver at Indiana, 7 p.m.Washington at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.Golden State at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.Chicago at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.Cleveland at Minnesota, 8 p.m.Memphis at New Orleans, 8 p.m.Houston at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.Charlotte at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.Toronto at Utah, 9 p.m.L.A. Lakers at Oklahoma City, 9:30 p.m.Orlando at Sacramento, 10 p.m. AP Top 25 schedule Today’s Games No. 4 Syracuse vs. Long Beach State, 8 p.m. No. 11 Cincinnati vs. Arkansas-Little Rock, 7 p.m. No. 16 Creighton at Nebraska, 8 p.m.No. 17 San Diego State vs. UC Santa Barbara, 10 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-04212BAGATE THURSDAY EVENING DECEMBER 6, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Last Resort “Cinderella Liberty” (N) Grey’s Anatomy (N) (:02) Scandal (N) News at 11(:35) Nightline (N) 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) The Insider 5-PBS 5 -Journal Nightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Downton Abbey Revisited Behind-the-scenes footage. Doo Wop Discoveries (My Music) R&B and pop vocal groups. Tavis Smiley 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge Judy Two and Half MenBig Bang TheoryTwo and Half Men(:01) Person of Interest “C.O.D.” (N) (:01) Elementary (N) Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneThe Vampire Diaries (N) Beauty and the Beast “Trapped” (N) TMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ce The Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family Guy Family Guy The SimpsonsThe X Factor “Live Results” (N) Glee Finn thinks about his future. (N) NewsAction News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) 30 Rock Up All Night (N) The Of ce (N) Parks/Recreat(:01) Rock Center With Brian WilliamsNewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(5:00) Public Affairs Capitol Hill Hearings WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304(5:11) Bonanza(:22) M*A*S*HM*A*S*H The Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Who the BleepWho the BleepWho the BleepWho the Bleep48 Hours: Hard Evidence 48 Hours: Hard Evidence 48 Hours: Hard Evidence 48 Hours: Hard Evidence A&E 19 118 265The First 48 “Marked for Death” The First 48 The First 48 “Brutal Business” The First 48 (N) Panic 9-1-1 (N) (:01) Panic 9-1-1 HALL 20 185 312“It’s Christmas, Carol!” (2012, Fantasy) Carrie Fisher, Emmanuelle Vaugier. “A Bride for Christmas” (2012, Romance) Arielle Kebbel, Andrew Walker. “Eve’s Christmas” (2004, Comedy-Drama) Elisa Donovan, Cheryl Ladd. FX 22 136 248How I Met/MotherTwo and Half MenTwo and Half Men “The Other Guys” (2010, Comedy) Will Ferrell, Mark Wahlberg, Eva Mendes. It’s Always SunnyThe League (N) The League (N) Unsupervised (N) CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245The Mentalist “Bloodsport” The Mentalist “Bloodhounds” d NBA Basketball New York Knicks at Miami Heat. From the AmericanAirlines Arena in Miami. (N)d NBA Basketball Dallas Mavericks at Phoenix Suns. (N) NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobDrake & JoshFigure It Out SpongeBobSpongeBobFull House Full House The Nanny The Nanny Friends (:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241Jail Jail Jail Jail (N) iMPACT Wrestling (N) Tattoo NightmaresTattoo NightmaresMMA UncensoredGT Academy MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*H “Kim” M*A*S*H White Collar “By the Book” White Collar “Un nished Business” Seinfeld Frasier The Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Phineas and FerbGood Luck CharlieJessie Austin & AllyDog With a Blog“Good Luck Charlie, It’s Christmas!” (2011, Comedy) Good Luck CharliePhineas and FerbAustin & AllyA.N.T. Farm LIFE 32 108 252Trading Spouses: Meet New MommyTrading Spouses: Meet New MommyProject Runway All Stars Project Runway All Stars (N) Abby’s Ultimate Dance CompetitionProject Runway All Stars USA 33 105 242NCIS “Guilty Pleasure” NCIS Investigating a Marine’s murder. NCIS “Engaged, Part 1” (DVS) NCIS Searching for a missing Marine. Burn Notice “Best Laid Plans” (N) (:01) NCIS “Moonlighting” BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Top 10 Countdown” (N) Apollo Live Musical guest Angie Stone. 2012 Soul Train Awards Musical celebration and performance. Family First ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) College Football Awards From Orlando, Fla. (N) (Live) 30 for 30 SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209SportsNation (N) Audibles (N) (Live)d College Basketball Long Beach State at Syracuse. (N) 30 for 30 SportsNation SUNSP 37 -how to Do oridaGolf AmericaThe New College Football Show (N) Lightning Classics From March 30, 2007. (N Subject to Blackout) Prep Zone SpoInside Israeli Bask.The New College Football Show DISCV 38 182 278Jungle Gold “Desperate Measures” Jungle Gold A gold-mining dream. Moonshiners “Storm’s a Brewing” Moonshiners “A Shiner’s Last Stand” Ghost Town Gold “Boomtown or Bust” Moonshiners “A Shiner’s Last Stand” TBS 39 139 247King of QueensKing of QueensSeinfeld Seinfeld Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryConan (N) HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) What Would You Do?What Would You Do?Showbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236(5:00) “Of ce Space” (1999) E! News (N) The SoupLove You, Mean ItKardashianKeeping Up With the KardashiansKardashianChelsea Lately (N) E! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. Food Man v. Food Mysteries at the Museum Mysteries at the Museum (N) Mysteries at the Museum Dead Files Revisited HGTV 47 112 229Income PropertyIncome PropertyHunters Int’lHouse HuntersBuying and Selling “Kristin & Craig” Extreme Homes (N) House HuntersHunters Int’lExtreme Homes TLC 48 183 280Island MediumIsland MediumAlong for the Bride “Kara” Say Yes, DressSay Yes, DressFour Weddings: Holiday Showdown (N) Along for the BrideAlong for the BrideFour Weddings: Holiday Showdown HIST 49 120 269Ax Men Travis earns his stripes. Ax Men “Out of Control” American Pickers “Full Steam Ahead” American Pickers “Jurassic Pick” American Pickers (:02) American Pickers ANPL 50 184 282Swamp Wars “Flesh-Eating Lizards” Swamp Wars “Killer Bees Attack” Call-WildmanCall-WildmanCall-WildmanCall-WildmanCall-WildmanCall-WildmanCall-WildmanCall-Wildman FOOD 51 110 231Cupcake WarsSugar DomeCupcake Wars “Cupcakes On Parade” Sweet Genius “Speechless Genius” Sweet Genius “Holiday Genius” (N) The Next Iron Chef: Redemption TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the Lord Always Good NewThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesJoel Osteen Joseph PrinceHillsong TVPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -Football PrevUFC InsiderWorld Poker Tour: Season 10Florida Panthers Encore From Nov. 18, 2011. (N) Football PrevUFC InsiderWorld Poker Tour: Season 10 SYFY 58 122 244 “Starship Troopers” (1997) Casper Van Dien, Dina Meyer. Young troops battle a vicious army of gigantic insects. “Constantine” (2005, Fantasy) Keanu Reeves, Rachel Weisz, Shia LaBeouf. Serenity AMC 60 130 254CSI: Miami “Sunblock” “The Princess Bride” (1987, Adventure) Cary Elwes, Robin Wright. “Yours, Mine & Ours” (2005) Dennis Quaid, Rene Russo. Premiere. “Robin Hood: Men in Tights” COM 62 107 249(5:58) South Park(:29) Tosh.0 The Colbert ReportDaily Show(7:59) FuturamaTosh.0 Tosh.0 The Comedy Central Roast Larry the Cable Guy. Daily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327Reba Reba Reba “Invasion” Reba Therapist. Reba Reba “Starsky & Hutch” (2004, Comedy) Ben Stiller, Owen Wilson. (:15) “Smokey and the Bandit” NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer An aggressive shar-pei. America’s Wild Spaces “Death Valley” Wild Mississippi “Deep Freeze” Wild Mississippi “Raging Waters” Wild Mississippi “Delta Blues” Wild Mississippi “Deep Freeze” NGC 109 186 276Am. ChainsawAm. ChainsawThe IndestructiblesThe IndestructiblesWicked Tuna: Hooked Up (N) Rocket CityRocket CityAm. ChainsawAm. ChainsawRocket CityRocket City SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s Made (N) How It’s MadeThey Do It?They Do It?How It’s MadeHow It’s Made ID 111 192 285The Will: Family Secrets RevealedThe Will: Family Secrets RevealedFatal Vows “Blood and Wine” The Will: Family Secrets Revealed (N) Very Bad Men (N) Very Bad MenFatal Vows “Blood and Wine” HBO 302 300 501(5:00) “In Time” (2011) ‘PG-13’ “Something Borrowed” (2011) Ginnifer Goodwin. ‘PG-13’ In Vogue: The Editor’s Eye (N) Boardwalk Empire “Margate Sands” Real Sex MAX 320 310 515(4:40) The Haunting(:35) “Green Lantern” (2011, Action) Ryan Reynolds. ‘PG-13’ “Project X” (2012, Comedy) Thomas Mann. ‘R’ “Aliens” (1986, Science Fiction) Sigourney Weaver, Carrie Henn. ‘R’ SHOW 340 318 545(5:55) “Fair Game” (2010) Naomi Watts. ‘PG-13’ (:45) “Fright Night” (2011, Horror) Anton Yelchin, Colin Farrell. ‘R’ “Piranha” (2010, Horror) Elisabeth Shue. ‘R’ Dave’s Old PornReality Show (N) GOLF REPORTS QUAIL HEIGHTS COUNTRY CLUB Chet Carter COUNTRY CLUB at LAKE CITY Ed GoffPersonal best for Stephens Tuggle dominates Dogfight McIlroy voted Player of the YearAssociated PressLA QUINTA, Calif. — Rory McIlroy sure didn’t feel like the PGA Tour player of the year when he arrived at Kiawah Island for the final major of the year. He had missed three cuts, had not contended in a major and had one win. The last two months changed everything. McIlroy was announced Tuesday as player of the year, and while the tour does not disclose the vote of its players, this was the equivalent of a tap-in. McIlroy wound up with four wins, including his eight-shot victory in the PGA Championship, and made a clean sweep of the biggest awards by winning the money title and having the lowest adjusted scoring average. “It’s just a great way to end what has been a great year, my best season so far,” McIlroy said. The 23-year-old is the youngest player to win PGA Tour player of the year since Tiger Woods at age 21.



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Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012 3A3A plus all the( jingle )bells& whistles! ’tis the time to buy! 2.26%APR1for up to 60 monthsAs low as No payments until 2013!2 Shop the dealership with a CAMPUS Pre-Approved Loan Draft and negotiate as a cash buyer!Have a loan with another lender? Lower your paymen t by bringing it to CAMPUS! MM Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Columbia and Suwannee counties!3Accelerate your approval, apply today! Call 754-2219 Click campuscu.com Visit your local service center OFFER NOT AVAILABLE ON EXISTING CAMPUS LOANS. OFFER IS FOR NEW LOANS ONLY. MAY NOT BE COMBINED WITH AN Y OTHER OFFER. 1. Credit approval required. Your r ate may be higher based on creditworthiness, vehicl e and term of loan. For example, a $39,000.00 loan with no money down at 2.14% for 48 months would require 47 monthly payments of $854.12 and a final payment of $833.58, finance charge of $1,839.67, for a total o f payments of $40,977.22. The amount financed is $3 9,237.55, the APR is 2.26%. APR = Annual Percentage Rate. 2. Interest will accrue from date of purchase. Choosing this option will in crease the total amount of interest you pay. 3. Cr edit approval and initial $5 deposit required. Ment ion this ad and we’ll waive the $15 new membership fee. This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration. Lake City 183 SW Bascom Norris Dr.G’ville E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunter’s Walk 5115 NW 43rd St. Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St. Shands at UF Room H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Alachua 14759 NW 157th Ln. Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E. Silver Springs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. Summer eld 17950 US Hwy. 441 Tallahassee 1511 Killearn Center Blvd. SVTA: County commission to consider request Continued From Page 1A ARRESTS: Two charged with making methamphetamine Continued From Page 1Acharges in connection with the incident. Keith David Wheeldon, 32, 3708 NW Huntsboro St., and Michael William Keene, 41, 763 SW Poplar Lane, were each charged with manufacture of meth-amphetamine, possession of listed chemicals, posses-sion of methamphetamine and possession of drug par-aphernalia. Wheeldon was booked into the Columbia County Detention Facility in lieu of $30,000 bond, while Keene was booked into the facility in lieu $60,000 bond. According to Columbia County Sheriff’s reports, around 9 p.m. Tuesday deputies found a clandes-tine methamphetamine laboratory at 3708 NW Huntsboro Street. The buildings are duplexes, composed of four buildings with two apartments per building near city limits just west of Interstate 75. Authorities went to inves-tigate the residence after receiving an anonymous tip about alleged illegal drug activity. Authorities did not list the name of the duplexes. Sgt. Ed Seifert, Columbia County Sheriff’s Office public information officer, said when deputies arrived at the scene they noticed a strong chemical odor ema-nating from the apartment and believed it was consis-tent with the manufacture of methamphetamine. Seifert said Keene was detained outside the apartment while deputies contin-ued their investigation. Authorities said they determined another sus-pect was inside the apart-ment, actively processing methamphetamine. Seifert said due to the overwhelming odor from the chemicals, deputies attempted to speak to Wheeldon in the apartment by using a public address system and telephone, but he refused to exit the apart-ment. Deputies evacuated the adjoining apartments as a precautionary measure. Seifert said four families were evacuated as authori-ties negotiated with the suspect. “The residents were inside their homes, minimizing exposure, if any at all (to the chemicals),” he said. “They were temporar-ily asked to leave the area to which all complied.” The Columbia County Fire Department and Life Guard Ambulance units were staged in the area due to the explosive hazards of the methamphetamine lab. Deputies negotiated with Wheeldon for more than two hours and around 12:15 a.m., he exited the home and was taken into custody without incident, reports said. “Deputies and members of the Multi-Jurisdictional Task were able to safely contain the hazardous materials and residents were allowed to return to their homes,” Seifert said. officials from Suwannee and Hamilton counties to discuss the Suwannee Valley Transit Authority and its financial problems. Back then, Pra said the agency did not apply for all the grants available and was in financial straits. The agency was hoping to get a total of $300,000 from Columbia, Suwannee and Hamilton counties, and asked that each county pay a portion of the $300,000 based on its population. Pra requested that Columbia County pay 55 percent of the $300,000 — roughly $165,000. County officials approved giving the Suwannee Valley Transit Authority approxi-mately $164,000, but coun-ty officials stipulated that the authority must provide a corrective action plan to the county within 30 days. However, additional finan-cial issues were found when county officials reviewed the agency’s last audit for the period ending Sept. 30, 2009. Last year, Williams said, the audit showed the agency was collecting less money than it anticipated, yet it didn’t reduce expen-ditures, which resulted in withdrawl of money from its reserves. The authority says it has ironed out its financial problems, and Pra’s letter offered county officials a look at the agency’s finan-cial records. “Our agency is moving well in our recovery and rebuilding process, and we are now paying our month-ly bills on a current basis,” Pra wrote. “Our trip vendors have been paid timely for the last 15 months, and our local, state and federal programs are in full compli-ance with the regulations, accordingly. Our records are open for your inspec-tion at any time.” In other business, the commission is scheduled to discuss adopting a law recommended by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, making it lawful to sell saltwater fish in Columbia, Hamilton and Suwannee counties. MOTIONS: Voter fraud Continued From Page 1AYet, they are facing possible prison time while 12 years ago none of the Republicans was charged with a crime, defense law-yer Robert Cox said. He said the state was “boot-strapping” violations of a civil law to the state’s election fraud law, which is intended for such vio-lations as casting ballots for dead people or other unauthorized voters. Nothing like that hap-pened in Madison County, Cox said. “All these people were intending to do was try to get the vote out,” he said. “There was no intention to do anything evil.” Circuit Judge Julian Collins did not immedi-ately make a decision, saying he needed time to re-examine the motions and study case law. Nine people were charged last year in con-nection with the alleged absentee ballot scheme including Madison County Supervisor of Elections Jada Woods Williams and school board member Abra “Tina” Hill Johnson, both now suspended. Williams is facing misdemeanor negli-gence charges and her case has been moved to Tallahassee. Two defen-dants have settled their cases through pretrial intervention. The remaining six defendants including Johnson, who won by a mere 28 votes, are fac-ing felony election fraud charges. Some also have been charged with perjury and making false reports to law enforcement. Johnson’s case and that of her husband, Ernest Sinclair Johnson Jr., were not heard Wednesday because their lawyer was too ill to attend. Justices hearing appeal in death penalty caseAssociated PressPENSACOLA — An attorney for a man sentenced to die for the 2009 double murder of a Panhandle couple told the Florida Supreme Court on Wednesday that the man should get a new trial because prosecutors preju-diced jurors by putting an imaginary script about what happened on the night of the killings in their minds. Attorney Jose Rodriquez argued jurors convicted Leonard Patrick Gonazalez Jr. in the deaths of Byrd and Melanie Billings and recom-mended the death penalty because a prosecutor told jurors the couples’ final thoughts must have about the safety of their nine young disabled children who were in the home. Gonzalez was accused of leading several men dressed like ninjas who robbed and killed the Billings in their home as their children slept or cow-ered nearby in 2009. The children suffer from such ailments as Down syndrome and autism. Circuit Judge Nickolas Geeker sentenced Gonzalez after a jury voted 10-2 to recommend the death penalty. Other defendants, including Gonzalez’s father, received lesser penalties.



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DEAR ABBY: Alzheimer’s and other dementias are a grow-ing epidemic in America. Frequently, co-workers are the ones who notice a decline in functioning. Could you please remind your readers to speak up to a family member when they see their co-workers struggling? My 62-year-old husband was recently diagnosed, and I have since learned that his co-workers spotted his troubles long before I did at home. Had I been informed, he could pos-sibly have retired on dis-ability and have Medicare today (which he does not now). Additionally, he would have known to have structured his retirement to include survivorship on his pension, which he did not. I realize his co-workers were in a difficult spot, so I’m not blaming them, but I’m hoping a few words from you might get the word out to others: Friends, when you notice someone is declining, please speak up. -DONNA IN VIRGINIA DEAR DONNA: I’m sorry about your hus-band’s diagnosis. Although there have been warnings that it was coming for years, the Alzheimer’s epi-demic is here now and mil-lions more families will be touched by this progres-sive -and ultimately fatal -disease unless its course can be altered. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, knowing the warning signs of Alzheimer’s and speak-ing up when you notice them are CRITICAL to early detection and receiv-ing the best possible care. While this may be an uncomfortable conversa-tion, if you notice these signs in anyone -including a colleague -it is extreme-ly important to share your concerns with the family or with someone in human resources. To learn the 10 Early Signs and Symptoms of Alzheimer’s, visit alz.org/10signs or call 1-800-272-3900. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: Twenty years ago, my brother told me his wife had been hav-ing an affair. Needless to say, they divorced and I sided with my brother. A few days ago, I learned that my brother was actually the one who had been having the affair, not my sister-in-law. He and his current wife had a child they claimed was her first husband’s, and when they married he “adopted” all of her children from her first marriage. Because we lived in different states at the time it was easy to believe what I was told. I think that my ex-sister-in-law deserves an apology from us all. At the same time, I want to confront my brother about the lie. We are still not sure if the child, who is now an adult, knows my brother is really her bio-logical father. -LIED TO IN CALIFORNIA DEAR LIED TO: I don’t think it is ever too late to offer an apology where one is needed, so contact your former sister-in-law and tell her that you now know the truth and you are sorry. Because you feel the need to speak your mind to your brother, do so. HOWEVER, whether your niece knows that your brother is her biological father is not your business, and you certainly should not be the person to enlighten her if she doesn’t know. That news should come from her parents. DILBERT BABY BLUES HOROSCOPES DEAR ABBY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Bide your time. Keep a watchful eye over what’s going on around you. A mistake must be caught before someone points the finger at you. Patience, precision and plenty of detail will help you avoid a mishap that is preventable. +++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Check your options and call in people you know you can rely on. A partnership will help make a difference to a project you want to pursue. You will have an influence on peers and can benefit from face-to-face meetings. +++++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Honesty and integrity in your personal and pro-fessional life will make the difference to the outcome of a situation that devel-ops. Don’t downplay an event that obviously means something to someone who is important in your life. ++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Get involved in a cre-ative project or social event that utilizes your exper-tise in making a situation warm and cozy. Romance is in the picture. Making plans to spend time with someone special will turn a decent day into one of grandeur. ++++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Expect to face a domestic challenge. Quick decisions will have to be made if you don’t want things to spin out of control. A residential move, renovation or deco-rating will be painstaking if too many want to have a say in the outcome. +++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Jump in and do what you do best, but don’t overdo or make promises that are unreasonable. Take care of your own business and issues first and foremost, and make suggestions for those look-ing for hands-on help. Love is magnified. +++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Get your priorities straight with regard to how you are living and what you are going to do to maintain your status quo next year. Tie up loose ends and cut your losses before you get so far behind you have no maneuverability. ++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Don’t back away from change. Embrace whatever comes your way and make it work for you. Partnerships and updating the way you do things and whom you do things with will make a difference that will shape things to come. ++++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Watch your back. If you have shared personal information, you may want to request that you aren’t the topic of con-versation. Your future will depend on how you handle the changes heading your way now. Be fair but savvy in negotiations. ++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Push through paperwork that needs to be addressed before the year ends. Make your point heard and your decisions made regard-ing your financial future and your professional path. Luck is with you and money is headed your way. +++++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Don’t look for handouts or rely on what someone else tells you. Do your own legwork and make things happen. Now is not the time to be a follower, especially if you want to set the record straight and start anew. +++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Make last-minute changes if it will help you gain momentum and sprint to the finish line. A com-mitment made will help you finalize a deal that will set you up financially. Love and romance are high-lighted, and personal plans should be made. +++ CELEBRITY CIPHER Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com BLONDIE BEETLE BAILEY B.C. FRANK & ERNEST FOR BETTER OR WORSE ZITS HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH GARFIELD THE LAST WORD Eugenia Last Signs of dementia were more apparent at work than home Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. CLASSIC PEANUTS Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, DECEMER 6, 2012 3B



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R ussia appar-ently is moder-ating its stance on Syria. So far, President Vladimir Putin has sup-ported Bashar al-Assad’s dictatorial regime through two years of civil war that has cost the lives of 40,000 Syrians and created mil-lions of refugees both inside and outside Syria’s borders. One might ask why. The obvious and first answer is money; Russia has been Syria’s main arms supplier for decades. But the second is more complex and justifiable: The Russians fear that the government replacing the Assad regime could be even worse. A dangerous pattern is emerging. Islamic countries more often than not replace tyrants with religious dictators who can become even more despotic than their pre-decessors. Look at Iran. Unfortunately, look at Egypt. What we now see emerging there is a theoc-racy that appears headed in the direction of becom-ing more oppressive than the autocracy it rebelled against. Westerners naively believed Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi would back down after public protests against his outrageous, undemocratic power grab. As Eric Trager wrote in The New Republic: From Western journalists’ “van-tage point, criticism of Morsi’s move from within his own government, threats of judicial strikes, and the sheer magnitude of popular anger could force Morsi, in the words of The New York Times, ‘to engage in the kind of give and take that democratic government requires.’” So much for that, eh? Western media almost uniformly cheered on Egypt’s second-ever elec-tion (in which there were two candidates) that took place in June. I sat by watching anxiously. Unfortunately, my negative expectations were borne out. First, by assuming total power in his latest move, Morsi has undone the outcome of the hard-fought revolution. Second, since Morsi took power, the status of women in Egypt — my particular area of interest — has been noth-ing but downgraded. Should we be surprised? Not in the least. As The New Republic reported, all you needed to do was read Morsi’s resume to see he is not someone prone to com-promise: “Prior to last year’s uprising and his subsequent emergence as Egypt’s first civilian president, Morsi was the Muslim Brotherhood’s chief internal enforcer ...” So Western journalists and governments should wise up and view the so-called Arab Spring with greater suspicion. Bonnie Erbebonnieerbe@compuserve.com Q Bonnie Erbe is a TV host and writes this column for Scripps Howard News Service. OPINION Thursday, December 6, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A4AOPINIONG oogle “Islamist” and you’ll get more than 24 million hits. Google “jihadist” and you’ll get millions more. Yet I bet the aver-age American could not tell you what it is that Islamists and jihadists believe. And those at the highest levels of the U.S. government refuse to do so. Why? John Brennan, the top counterterror-ism adviser in the White House, argues that it is “counterproductive” to describe America’s “enemy as ‘jihadists’ or ‘Islamists’ because jihad is a holy struggle, a legitimate tenet of Islam, meaning to purify oneself or one’s community, and there is nothing holy or legitimate or Islamic about murdering innocent men, women and children.” I get it. I understand why it would be useful to convince as many of the world’s more than a billion Muslims as pos-sible that Americans are only attempting to defend themselves against “violent extremists.” By now, however, it should be obvious that this spin — one can hardly call it analysis — has spun out. The unpleasant fact is that there is an ideology called Islamism and, as Yale Professor Charles Hill recently noted, it “has been on the rise for gen-erations.” So we need to understand it. We need to understand how Islamism has unfolded from Islam, and how it differs from traditional Islam as practiced in places as far-flung and diverse as Kuala Lumpur, Erbil and Timbuktu. This is what Bassam Tibi attempts in his most recent book, pub-lished this year and titled “Islamism and Islam.” It has received nowhere near the attention it deserves. A Koret Foundation Senior Fellow at Stanford University, Tibi describes himself as an “Arab-Muslim pro-democracy theorist and practitioner.” Raised in Damascus, he has “studied Islam and its civilization for four decades, working in the Middle East, South and Southeast Asia, and Africa.” His research has led him to this simple and stark conclusion: “Islamism is a totalitar-ian ideology.” And just as there cannot be “demo-cratic totalitarianism,” so there cannot be “demo-cratic Islamism.” Brennan and other American and European officials are wrong, Tibi says, to fear that “fighting Islamism is tantamount to declaring all of Islam a violent enemy.” Tibi also faults Noah Feldman, the young scholar who advised the Bush adminis-tration, and who insisted, despite abundant evidence to the contrary, that Shariah, Islamic law, can be viewed as “Islamic con-stitutionalism.” Feldman failed to grasp the sig-nificance of the “Islamist claim to supremacy (siya-dat al-Islam),” the convic-tion that Christians, Jews, Hindus and Buddhists are inferior, and that their inferiority should be reflected under the law and by government insti-tutions. Tibi makes this important distinction: All Jihadists are Islamists, but all Islamists are not Jihadists. In other words, not all Islamists are com-mitted to violence, includ-ing terrorism. He asks: “Can we trust Islamists who forgo violence to par-ticipate in good faith with-in a pluralistic, democratic system?” He answers: “I believe we cannot.” Chief among Islamist goals, Tibi writes, is al-hall al Islami, “the Islamic solution, a kind of magic answer for all of the problems — global and local, socio-economic or value-related — in the cri-sis-ridden world of Islam.” Islamists ignore the fact that such governance has been implemented, for example in Iran over more than 30 years, in Afghanistan under the Taliban, in Gaza under Hamas, and in Sudan. It has never delivered devel-opment, freedom, human rights or democracy. As for Turkey, Tibi sees it as “not yet an Islamist state” but heading in that direc-tion. The debate Tibi is attempting to initiate is necessary — and long overdue. During the Cold War, there was a field of study known as Sovietology. It was taught in our most elite universi-ties with strong U.S. gov-ernment support. Why isn’t Islamology — not Islamic theology or “Muslim-Christian understanding” or “Islamic thought” — a discipline today? For one, Tibi observes, because “Islamists have invented the formula of ‘Islamophobia’ to defame their critics.” And, of course, if such slander fails to intimidate, there are other ways to shut people up: Tibi has “sur-vived attempts on my life by jihadists.” A second reason for the absence of Islamology: The U.S. government cannot back the study of an ideology it stub-bornly insists does not exist. Finally, those who do fund anything to do with Islam on campus — for example, the Gulf petro-princes who have given tens of millions of dollars to Georgetown and Harvard — have a different agenda, one that does not include free and serious inquiry. We ignore what they are doing — and what Tibi is telling us — at great peril. Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com W e’re glad our teachers got great marks on their state evaluations, as document-ed on today’s front page. According to the Florida Deartment of Education, 57 percent of them rate as “highly effective” in the classroom, while all the rest were judged “effective.” No one was declared “unsatisfactory,” and zero county teachers fell into the cat-egory, “needs improvement.” It would be all too easy for district officials to hide behind these numbers and point the finger of blame elsewhere when confronting individual cases of academic failure. If our teachers all qualify as “effective” or better, yet Johnny still can’t read, some-thing must be wrong somewhere else. Maybe.But our teachers, good as they are, simply aren’t perfect. Some do need improvement. We applaud newly-installed Supt. Terry Huddleston for acknowedging there is always room for just that. We feel certain that county teachers will follow suit, and redouble their already con-siderable efforts toward reaching a goal we all share. Perfect candor OUR OPINION Few Americans know what Islamists are so angry about Growing wary of Arab Spring’s results On this date:In 1790, Congress moved to Philadelphia from New York. In 1884, Army engineers completed construction of the Washington Monument by setting an aluminum capstone atop the obelisk. In 1889, Jefferson Davis, the first and only president of the Confederate States of America, died in New Orleans. In 1907, the worst mining disaster in U.S. history occurred as 362 men and boys died in a coal mine explosion in Monongah, W.Va. In 1917, some 2,000 people died when an explosivesladen French cargo ship collided with a Norwegian vessel at the harbor in Halifax, Nova Scotia, setting off a blast that devastated the city. In 1922, the Anglo-Irish Treaty, which established the Irish Free State, came into force one year to the day after it was signed in London. In 1942, comedian Fred Allen premiered “Allen’s Alley,” a recurring sketch on his CBS radio show spoof-ing small town America. In 1947, Everglades National Park in Florida was dedicated by President Harry S. Truman. HIGHLIGHTS IN HISTORY Cliff May Q Clifford D. May is president of the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies, a policy insti-tute focusing on terrorism.



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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTHURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012 Classified Department: 755-5440 4B CLASSIFIED AD vantageTake ADvantage of the Reporter Classifieds!755-5440Lake City Reporter FIND IT SELL IT BUY IT $17504 lines 3 days Includes 2 Signs Each additional line $1.65 Garage Sale Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$10104 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.10One item per ad Under $500 Personal Merchandise Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$16754 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.15One item per ad Under $1,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less. Each item must include a price. 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General Information In Print and Onlinewww.lakecityreporter.com Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$2504 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $.25One item per ad Under $100 ServicesFLCert. Teacher with 10 yrs exp. Offering a homeshooling group in Jan. Reasonably priced. Interested parents 386-288-0954. Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 LegalTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE 3RD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILDIVISIONCASE NO.: 12-2009-CA-000434BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,Plaintiff,vs.SHAWN VAUGHN; BLUE WORLD POOLS, INC.; JOAN M. PIERCE; UNKNOWN TENANT(S); TRACYVAUGHN; IN POSSES-SION OF THE SUBJECTPROPER-TY,Defendants.RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to an Order Resetting Foreclo-sure Sale dated the 28th day ofNov., 2012, and entered in Case No. 12-2009-CA-000434, of the Circuit Court of the 3RD Judicial Circuit in and for Columbia County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is Plaintiff and SHAWN VAUGHN, BLUE WORLD POOLS, INC., JOAN M. PIERCE, UNKNOWN TENANT(S) and TRACYVAUGHN IN POSSES-SION OF THE SUBJECTPROPER-TYare defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the, Columbia County Courthouse, 173 N.E. HER-NANDO AVENUE, LAKE CITY, FL32055, 11:00 AM on the 30th day of Jan., 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit:LOTNO. 14, SPRING RUN, AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION BEING APARTOF THE W1/2 OF SECTION 16, AND ALLOF THE W1/2 OF THE NE 1/4 OF SEC-TION 16, TOWNSHIP6 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRI-BED AS FOLLOWS:COMMENCE ATTHE NWCOR-NER OF SAID SECTION 16 AND RUN N 8811’19E 25.00 FEETTO THE EASTRIGHTOF WAYLINE OF LAZYOAK ROAD (A50 FOOTCOUNTYMANINTAINED DIRTROAD AS NOWESTAB-LISHED); THENCE CONTINUE ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SECTION 16, N 8811’19E ADISTANCE OF 815.61 FEET; THENCE S 0028’58”E, 3792.45 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGIN-NING; THENCE N 8811’19E, 761.35 FEETTO ITS INTERSEC-TION WITH THE WESTERLYRIGHTOF WAYLINE OF 60 FOOTROAD RIGHTOF WAYTO APOINTON ACURVE, SAID CURVE CONCOVE TO THE RIGHTHAVING ARADIUS OF 880.80 FEETAND ACHORD BEARING AND DISTANCE OF S 1706’44”WAND 292.68 FEET; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTHER-LYALONG SAID ARCE OF CURVE 294.04 FEETTO THE PONTOF TANGENCE OF SAID CURVE; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID WESTERLYRIGHTOF WAYLINE S 2640’34”W, 205.49 FEET; THENCE N 6319’26”W, 650.60 FEET, 650.60 FEET; THENCE N 0028’58”W, 147.20 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING.TOGETHER WITH A2003 MERITDOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME WITH VIN #’S FLHML3B121326780AAND FLHML3B121326780BANYPERSON CLAIMING AN IN-TERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.AMERICAN WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disa-bility who requires accommodations in order to participate in a court pro-ceeding, yo uare entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of certain assis-tance. Individiuals with a disability who require special accommodations in order to participate in a court pro-ceeding should contact the ADACo-ordinator, 173 NE Hernando Ave-nue, Room 408, Lake City, FL32055 (386) 719-7428, within two (2) business days of receipt of notice to appear. Individuals who are hear-ing impaired should call (800) 955-8771. Individuals who are voice im-paired should call (800) 955-8770.Dated thi 28th day of Nov., 2012P. DEWITTCASONClerk of the Circuit CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkSEAL05536112December 6, 13, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO.: 12-2012-CA-000053BANK OF AMERICA, NA, SUC-CESSOR BYMERGER TO BACK HOME LOANS SERVICING, LPFKACOUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LPPlaintiff,v.ASHLEYR. WHITELYAKAASH-LEYWHITELY, et alDefendant(s)NOTICE OF ACTION FOR FORE-CLOSURE PROCEEDING-PROP-ERTYTO: ASHLEYR. WHITELYAKAASHLEYWHITELY, ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUTWHOSE LASTKNOWN ADDRESS IS: 8672 NORTHWESTLAKE JEFFERYROAD, LAKE CITY, FL32055-0000 LegalResidence unknown, if living, in-cluding any unknown spouse of the said Defendants, if either has remar-ried and if either or both of said De-fendant(s) are dead, their respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all other persons claim-ing by, through, under or against the named Defendant(s); and the afore-mentioned named Defendant(s) and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendants and such of the afore-mentioned unknown Defendant(s) as may be infants, incompetents or oth-erwise no sui juris.YOU ARE HEREBYNOTIFIED that an action has been commenced to foreclose a mortgage on the fol-lowing real property, lying and being situated in COLUMBIACounty, Florida, more particularly described as follows:COMMENCE ATTHE SOUTH-WESTCORNER OF THE NORTH 1/2 OF THE SOUTHEAST1/4 OF SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP3, RANGE 16 EAST, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND RUN NORTH 8814'58” EASTALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID NORTH 1/2 OF THE SOUTHEAST1/4 OF SECTION 6, ADISTANCE OF 517.40 FEET; THENCE NORTH 0105’00” WESTALONG THE WESTLINE OF APARCELOF LAND RECORDED IN O.R. BOOK 543, PAGES 453-454 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CO-LUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAADISTANCE OF 151.34 FEET; THENCE NORTH 6744’22” WESTADISTANCE OF 229.92 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 6744’22” WESTADISTANCE OF 109.64 FEET; THENCE NORTH 0157’06” WESTADISTANCE OF 305.50 FEET; THENCE NORTH 8711’46” EASTADISTANCE OF 358.36 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 0157’06” EASTADISTANCE OF 210.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 8711’46” WESTADISTANCE OF 258.35 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 0157’06” EASTADISTANCE OF 141.95 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING.TOGETHER WITH AN EASE-MENT, 30.00 FEETIN WIDTH, FOR THE PURPOSE OF INGRESS AND EGRESS, LYING 15.00 FEETEACH SIDE OF THE FOLLOW-ING DESCRIBED CENTERLINE: COMMENCE ATTHE NORTH-WESTCORNER OF APARCELOF LAND RECORDED IN OFFI-CIALRECORD BOOK 543, PAGE 453 AND 454 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND RUN SOUTH 0105’00” EASTALONG THE WESTLINE OF SAID PAR-CELOF LAND ADISTANCE OF 75.00 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING OF SAID CENTER-LINE, THENCE NORTH 6744’22” WESTADISTANCE OF 75.00 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGIN-NING OF SAID CENTERLINE, THENCE NORTH 6744’22” WESTADISTANCE OF 569.55 FEETTO APOINTON THE WESTLINE OF THE NORTH 1/2 OF THE SOUTH-EAST1/4 OF SECTION 6, TOWN-SHIP3 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, (SAID POINTLYING ON THE CENTERLINE OF ACOUNTYGRADED ROAD) AND THE TER-MINALPOINTOF SAID CEN-TERLINE.TOGETHER WITH A2009, SOUTHERN OAK, 28X48, DOU-BLE WIDE MOBILE HOME, ID #’S TBD.THESE MOBILE HOME TITLES WILLBE RETIRED WITH THE FLORIDADEPARTMENTOF MOTOR VEHICLES ACCORDING TOFLORIDASTATUE SECTION 319.261 AND HEREAFTER AL-WAYS APARTOF THIS REALPROPERTY.COMMONLYKNOWN AS: 8672 NORTHWESTLAKE JEFFERYROAD, LAKE CITY, FL32055-0000this action has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, such Morris Hardwick Schneider, LLC, Attorneys for Plaintiff, whose ad-dress is 5110 Eisenhower Blvd, Suite 120, Tampa, FL33634 on or before 12/27/12, and file the original with the clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or im-mediately there after; otherwise a de-fault will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Com-plaint.WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 27th day of Nov., 2012.P. Dewitt CasonClerk of the Circuit CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkIn accordance with the American with Disabilities Act, persons need-ing a special accommodation to par-ticipate in this hearing, should con-tact ADACoordinator no later than 1 (one ) day prior to the proceeding at Three Rivers Legal Services, Inc. (Columbia), 853 SWSisters Welcome Road, Lake City, FL32056 386-752-5960 and for the hearing and voice impaired 800-955-8770.05536096December 6, 13, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURTFOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.CIVILDIVISIONCASE NO. 12-2012CA000532XXXXXXWELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFI-CATE HOLDERS OF BANC OF AMERICAALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST2005-12 MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFI-CATES, SERIES 2005-12Plaintiff,vs.MIR A. GOFUR A/K/AMIR AB-DULGOFUR; et al,.Defendants.NOTICE OF ACTIONTO: MIR A. GOFUR A/K/AMIR ABDULGOFUR and F.M. NOOR SULTANALast Known Address7137 S US HIGHWAY441LAKE CITY, FL32025-0250Current Residence is Unknown LegalYOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the fol-lowing described property in Colum-bia County, Florida:BEGINNING ATAPOINTWHERE THE EASTLINE OF HIGHWAYNO. 2 INTERSECTS THE SOUTH LINE OF LANE RUNNING EASTAND WESTALONG THE CENTER LINE OF SECTION 34, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, AND RUNNING THENCE EASTALONG THE SAID SOUTH LINE OF SAID LANE 858 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 278.1 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 87.5 WEST672 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE EASTLINE OF HIGHWAYNO. 2; THENCE IN ANORTHERLYDI-RECTION ALONG THE EASTLINE OF HIGHWAYNO. 2, ADISTANCE OF 317 FEET, MORE OR LESS TO THE POINTOF BE-GINNING, LYING AND BEING IN COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.LESS AND EXCEPT: THATPOR-TION OF THE ABOVE DESCRI-BED LANDS DEEDED TO THE STATE OF FLORIDAIN DEED BOOK 87, PAGES 31 AND 32 OF THE OFFICIALRECORDS OF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on SMITH, HIATT& DIAZ, P.A., Plaintiff's attorneys, whose address is PO BOX 11438 Fort Lauderdale, FL33339-1438, (954) 564-0071, within 30 days from the first date of publi-cation, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney’s or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the com-plaint or petition.DATED on 11/15/2012./s/ P. Dewitt CasonAs Clerk of the CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioAs Deputy ClerkIn accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, per-sons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Court no later than five business days prior to the proceeding at the Columbia County Courthouse. Telephone 904-758-1041 or 1-800-955-8770 via Florida Relay Service.05535960November 29, 2012December 6, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE 3RD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILDIVISIONCase No. 12-2009-000801-CATHE BANK OF NEWYORK MEL-LON F/K/ATHE BANK OF NEWYORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATE HOLDERS OF THE CWABS, INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-22,Plaintiffvs.JOELA. MANZANARES, ETAL.,DefendantsNOTICE OF SALENotice if hereby given pursuant to the final judgment/order entered in the above noted case, that I will sell the following property situated in Columbia County, Florida described as:COMMENCE ATTHE NWCORLegalNER OF THE NE 1/4 OF THE SE 1/4 OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP6 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, CO-LUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN N 8803’E 315.00 FEETTOTHE POINTOF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE N 8803’E 210.00 FEET; THENCE S 0157’E 254.00 FEET; THENCE S 8803’W210.00 FEET; THENCE N 0157’W254.00 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING.COMMENCE ATTHE NWCOR-NER OF THE NE 1/4 OF THE SE 1/4 OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP6 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, CO-LUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE N 8803’E 315.00 FEET; THENCE RUN S 0157’E 254.00 FEET; THENCE RUN N 8803’W315.00 FEET; THENCE N 0157’W254.00 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING.at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash, on the 3rd Floor of the Columbia County Courthouse 173 N.E. Hernando Ave., Lake City, Florida, at 11:00 A.M. on 1/2/2013. The highest bidder shall immediately post with the Clerk, a deposit equal to five percent (5%) of the final bid. The deposit must be cash or cash-ier’s check payable to the Clerk of the Court. Final payment must be made on or before 4:30 p.m. on the date of the sale by cash or cashier’s check.ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN IN-TERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS LegalAFTER THE SALE.CLERK OF THE COURTBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkSEALDated 11/27/1205536091December 6, 13, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO. 12-280-CACOLUMBIABANK, a Florida banking corporationPlaintiff,vs.SCOTTCURRYand JULIE CUR-RY, husband and wife,Defendants.CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE UN-DER F.S. CHAPTER 45 COUNTIINOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accord-ance with the Summary Final Judg-ment of Foreclosure dated November 20, 2012, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bid-der for cash at the Columbia County Courthouse, Courtroom 1, 173 Northeast Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055 at 11:00 a.m. on 12/19/2012, the following described property:Lot 13, Block 6, MCFARLANE PARK, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book B, Page 5, of the Public Records of Columbia County, Florida.ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN IN-TERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.Dated: 11/20/12P. DeWitt CasonClerk of CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy Clerk05535993November 29, 2012December 6, 2012 755-5440Toplace your classified ad call REPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Linewww.lakecityreporter.com



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Dec. 6 Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon at the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane, to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. Dec. 7 Holiday music concert The combined music ministries of Pine Grove Baptist Church and Southside Baptist Church will present Season of Joy holiday music concert at 7 p.m. at Pine Grove Church, 1989 N Highway 441, and at 7 p.m. Sunday at Southside Baptist, 388 SE Baya Drive. Admission is free, but seat ing is limited. Nursery will be available for children 4 and younger. For advance tickets or more informa tion, contact Pine Grove Church a (386) 752-2664 or Southside Baptist at (386) 755-5553. Walk-a-thon Fort White High School HOSA will be putting on a walk-a-thon to raise funds for cystic fibrosis research. The event will be from 4 to 8 p.m. at Fort White High School football stadium. Activities will Include a bake sale, food concession and health screenings. For more information, contact Brian Pompili at FWHS or by email at pompili_b@firn. edu. Community theater High Springs Commnity Theater will present the comedy Christmas Belles, weekends through Dec.16. The play is about Christmas time in the small town of Fayro, Texas, but the Futrelle sisters are not exactly in a festive mood. A cranky Frankie is weeks overdue with her sec ond set of twins. Twink, recently jilted, is in jail for inadvertently burning down half the town. And hot-flash-suffering Honey Raye is desperately trying to keep the Tabernacle of the Lambs Christmas pro gram from spiraling into chaos. Their hilarious holi day journey through a mis adventure-filled Christmas Eve is guaranteed to bring joy to your world. Tickets are available for pur chase at The Framery of Lake City (386) 754-2780, Pampered Paws in High Springs (386) 454-4464 or online at highsprings communitytheater.com. Friday and Saturday shows will be at at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m. Doors open a half-hour before show time. Tickets are $11 for adults, $8 for children 12 and younger and $9 for seniors on Sundays. The theater is at 130 N. First Ave. in High Springs. Fish dinner Our Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5056 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, pre pares fish dinners every Friday from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The dinner is $6 for two Alaskan pollock filets, corn, baked beans, hush puppies, cole slaw and tarter sauce. Take out or eat in. Dec. 8 Breakfast with Santa Come join us at Holiday Inn & Suites for breakfast with Santa from 8 to11 a.m. The event will include a breakfast buffet with scram bled eggs, bacon, sausage, biscuits and gravy, juice, coffee, hot chocolate and a waffle station. Enjoy holi day music, fun and fellow ship, complete with a visit from Santa. Cost is $9.95 for adults and $4.95 for chil dren ages 3 to 12. Proceeds will benefit the Childrens Medical Services of North Florida. A collection box for donations of unwrapped toys also will be available. For more information, call (386) 754-1411. Canned food giveaway North Side Church of Christ, 378 NW Gibson Lane, will have a canned food giveaway from 8 a.m. to noon. Anyone in need is welcome. For more infor mation, contact the church office at 755-0393, by email secretarynscofc@gmail. com or visit the church website, Thenorthsidecoc. org. Farmers market Once again, local art ists and crafters will be at the Lake DeSoto Farmers Market, selling original works for that perfect hol iday gift. Middle Ground will provide live music, and the Lake City Chamber of Commerce will host its Snow Day 2012 at neigh boring Olustee Park. Thirty tons of real snow, 10 bounce houses, live entertainment and several food vendors will make all of Downtown Lake City hopping. And at 8 a.m., early risers can catch the second annual Dashing to the Snow Reindeer 5k Run/Walk around down town. The farmers market is open every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Wilson Park, along Lake DeSoto between the Columbia County Courthouse and Shands Lakeshore Hospital in downtown Lake City. For more information, call (386) 719-5766 or visit market.lcfla.com. Beekeeping course The Columbia County Extension will conduct a free Intro to Beekeeping Short-Course Workshop from 8:30 a.m. to noon at the extension office at Columbia County Fairgrounds. The Lake City Beekeepers Club meets every the fourth Monday of each month at 6 p.m. at the extension office. To register for the cour or for more information, call 758-1030. Blanket collection The United Way of the Suwannee Valley will hold Blank-fest Florida Five, a blanket collection event to support the home less, beginning at 5 p.m. in Rock Star Lounge, 723 E. Duval St. in Lake City. Admission is the donation of one blanket. Raffle tick ets for prizes will be given for each blanket donated. Live music will be provided by Kyle Whittaker, Selador, Turquois Raven, Shades of Jade, Jakt Up and Deep South All-Stars. Dec. 9 Holiday cantata Covenant First Presbyterian Church (for merly First Presbyterian) of Live Oak will present the Christmas cantata, God with Us Emmanuel, by Phillip Young on at 6:00 p.m. Bill Poplin will be directing. The church is off U.S. 90 on White Avenue in Live Oak. For more information, contact Bill Poplin at 365-4932. Holiday music concert The combined music ministries of Pine Grove Baptist Church and Southside Baptist Church will present Season of Joy holiday music con cert at 7 p.m. at Southside Baptist, 388 SE Baya Drive. Admission is free, but seat ing is limited. Nursery will be available for children 4 and younger. For advance tickets or more informa tion, contact Pine Grove Church a (386) 752-2664 or Southside Baptist at (386) 755-5553. Church anniversary Mount Pisgah A.M.E Church will celebrate its 135th anniversary at 4 p.m. Pastor Ronald V. Walters and the Olivet Church fam ily will be in charge of the service. For more infor mation, call 752-1830 or 758-5990. Dec. 11 Medicare seminar Lifestyle Enrichment Center is sponsoring a free Medicare seminar from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. The seminar will be moderat ed by Irv Crowetz of C/C & Associates. Subjects to be covered include: what you need to know about Medicare, when to enroll, whats covered and when a supplement is needed. Call 755-3476 ext. 107 to reserve a seat. Author to speak Gainesville policeman and author Art Adkin will be at at the Main Library, 308 NW Columbia Ave., at 7 p.m. as a guest of the Friends of the Columbia County Public Library. Adkins will talk about his book, Leadership Basics: Conquering the Seven Deadly Sins. He is also the author of the thrillers, Power Grid and The Oasis Project. Kids shopping night The Haven Hospice Suwannee Valley Care Center will hold a Kids Holiday Shopping Night from 5 to 7 p.m. Children will be able to shop in the Attic resale store for gifts for family and friends. Each child will receive Santa Bucks to spend, a photo with Santa, punch and cookies and free gift wrap ping. Child must be accom panied by adults. The hos pice is seeking donations of new or lightly used holi day gift items for the event. The hospice is at 6037 W U.S. 90 in Lake City. For more informaiton, all (386) 752-0230. Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon at the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane, to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. Dec. 12 United Way luncheon United Way of Suwannee Valley will conduct its December community fundraising campaign report luncheon at noon at the Columbia County Senior Services LifeStyle Enrichment Center, 928 SE Allison Court, Lake City. Bill Caley, executive director of Boys Club of Columbia County, one of the 21 United Way affiliated agen cies, will utilize the theme for this years campaign, Imagine Me, to enable guests to identify with the needs addressed through United Way affiliated agen cies. Dana Huggins, chair of the Homeless Services Network of Suwannee Valley, will utilize the theme to speak about the work of the homeless coalition in Columbia, Hamilton, Lafayette and Suwannee counties. The cost is $12 per person. For more infor mation, call the United Way office at (386) 752-5604 ext. 102. Water panel meeting The stakeholder adviso ry committee of the North Florida Regional Water Supply Partnership will meet at 1 p.m. at Florida Gateway College, 149 SE College Place, Lake City. The meeting will be in the Wilson S. Rivers Library and Media Center, Building 200, Room 102. The agenda includes discussion and possible committee rec ommendation of the north Florida regional water sup ply boundary area. The meeting is open to the public, and there will be an opportunity for pub lic comment. For more information, visit north floridawater.com. Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Wednesday from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Fort White Public Library on Route 47 to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. Newcomers meeting Lake City Newcomers will meet at 11 a.m. at the Eastside Village Clubhouse. Sale of 50-50 tickets will end at 11:25. Lunch is $11. Those who want to partici pate in a gift exchange are asked to bring a wrapped or bagged gift valued at at least $10. There will be games, singing and a special guest. Directions to clubhouse: Turn into Eastside Village from East Baya Avenue onto Pearl Terrace; turn left onto Sable and follow signs to the clubhouse, which is on Claudia. For more informa tion, call Barbara Test at 754-7227 or Rose Taylor at 755-2175. Dec. 13 Woodturners Club Bell Woodturners Club meets the second Thursday of the month in the Bell community Center at 7 p.m. Every meeting features a show and tell of members current projects. There is also a full demon stration of a woodturning project by a club member. There are opportunities to take home project wood, tools and receive help from other turners. All experi ence levels are welcome. For additional info contact Kent Harriss at 365-7086. Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon at the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane, to answer questions about lawns and plants. Joann Bryant Mrs. Joann Jo Bryant, 50, passed away Tuesday Decem ber 4, 2012 at Haven Hospice of the Suwannee Valley. Mrs. Bry ant enjoyed spending time with her family especially her granddaughter Peyton. She was also an avid Gator football fan. Her hobbies included crocheting and texting. She was a faithful member of Pine Grove Baptist Church. She was preceded in death by her father Randolph Bry ant and her step-father and mother Bill and Wilma Ryder. Mrs. Bryant is survived by her husband of 31 years Mark Bryant, two daughters Ashley and one grand-daughter Peyton Cooper. Five sisters Christine Judy Egantoff Butler, Florida; Barbara Florida. Four brothers Jimmy Raiford, Florida; Dan Florida and Frank Bryant( Funeral services will be con ducted Friday December 7, 2012 at 11:00 A.M. in the Pinegrove Baptist Church with Rever Visitation with the family will be held Thursday December 6, 2012 from 6:00 P.M. until 8:00 P.M. at the Dees-Parrish fam ment will follow at Memorial DEES-PARRISH FAMILY FUNERAL H OME 458 South Marion Av Please sign guess book at www. parrishfamilyfuneralhome.comSimon Honer, Jr. Simon Honer, Jr., resident of from Earth to Heaven on De cember 2, 2012. Simon was born March 6, City to Simon Honer, Sr. and Corean Hodge Honer. Both preceded him in death. He at tended the pub lic schools of Columbia Coun ty, graduating with the Richardson High School of 1959. He was a United States Army Veteran, and in 1963 re ceived a Decorative Medal as a After his tenure in the Army, he attended the Jacksonville Bar degree of Practitioner of Barber ing March 8, 1965 and worked as a Barber for many years. Simon joined forces with the tenant and retired after more than 20 years of ser vice. He was a member of Bethel A.M. E. Church, serv ing faithfully until his death. Cherishing memories: children, brother, Samuel Honer (Verdell Fred Jones; sister-in-law, Edna Mae Honer; grandchil dren, Simetta Honer, Simeon and Cameron; great-grandchil dren, Timotheus and Timarion Reed; devoted companion, Bettie Tillman; aunts, uncles, other relatives and friends. Funeral services for Bro. Si mon Honer will be 11:00 a.m. Saturday, December 8, 2012 at Bethel A.M.E. Church, 838 be in the Bethel Cemetery. The family will receive friends from 6:00 8:00 p.m. Friday, December 7, 2012 at Bethel A.M.E. Church. Arrangements entrusted to C OM B S F UNERAL HOME 292 NE Washing Caring Professionals LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012 5A 5A NOTICE Attention Humana Wal-mart and CVS Caremark Medicare Part D patients: We accept these plans and all other Part D plans. Baya East 755-6677 Baya West 755-2233 Medical 755-2277 Call one of our pharmacies to see which plan is best for you. Obituaries are paid advertise ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporters classified depart ment at 752-1293. OBITUARIES COMMUNITY CALENDAR To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr @lakecityreporter.com.



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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTHURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012 5B Classified Department: 755-5440 2006 Toyota Tundra SR-5Crew cab, Class 3 Tow Package, cruise, power windows, seats five. 152,000 miles.$7,800 386-365-1901 2007 Signature Lincoln Town Car28,200 miles$15,500 386-397-3568 Sales RepSeeking an experienced advertising sales rep to join our digital media network team. Unlimited earning potential. Contact (863) 662-0883 or email resume to: imc1832@aol.com LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO. 12-280-CACOLUMBIABANK, a Florida banking corporationPlaintiff,vs.SCOTTCURRYand JULIE CUR-RY, husband and wife,Defendants.CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE UN-DER F.S. CHAPTER 45 COUNTINOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accord-ance with the Summary Final Judg-ment of Foreclosure dated November 20, 2012, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bid-der for cash at the Columbia County Courthouse, Courtroom 1, 173 Northeast Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055 at 11:00 a.m. on 12/19/2012, the following described property:Lot 1, Unit 1, SUNNYACRES, ac-cording to the plat therof as recorded in Plat Book 6, Page 44, of the Pub-lic records of Columbia County, Florida, together with a 1999 Harbor doublewide mobile home Serial No. GAFLX35A1611OHL21 and GAFLX35B1611OHL21ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN IN-TERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.Dated: 11/20/12P. DeWitt CasonClerk of CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy Clerk05535994November 29, 2012December 6, 2012 100Job Opportunities05534241NOWHIRING Cashiers & Baggers forHigh Springs fruit & gift stores. Benefits avail: health, dental, & vacation. Apply in person: Florida Citrus Center(Chevron) 18603 NWCR 236, High Springs (exit 404 & I-75) 05536164T eachers Join our team of over 100 professional teachers! Want to make a difference in the lives of children? Infant/Toddler 10 Mo Ft Teacher (Lake City) Child Development Associate (CDA) or equivalent credential (FCCPC or ECPC) required. Three years experience with birth to 3 preferred. High School Diploma/ GED Required. Must be able to pass DCF background screenings. Excellent Benefits, Paid Holidays, Sick/Annual Leave, Health/Dental Insurance, and more. Apply at 236 SW Columbia Ave, Lake City, FLor send resume to: employment@sv4cs.org Fax (386) 754-2220 or Call 754-2225 EOE EOE 05536167Local insurance agency seeks Licensed CSR Experience preferred. Send reply to Box 05099, C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056 05536192Large Construciton Company has an immediate opening for an experienced Account Payable Clerk. Qualified candidate(s) may apply in person at Anderson Columbia, Co., Inc., 871 NWGuerdon Street, Lake City, Florida 32056, fax your resume to 386-755-9132 or visit website at www.andersoncolumbia.com. EOE & Drug Free Workplace Desoto Home Care Now hiring for part time position of Delivery technician. Looking for person with good mechanical abilities and a positive attitude. Drop resume off at 311 N. Marion St. L.C. FL32055 Mechanic needed at Fla.Rock & Tank Lines In White Springs. Diesel exprnc reqr'd in maintenance & repair of tractor trailers. 45-50hrs/wk Class A CDLlicense preferred. Excellent Benefits! email: mcomer@patriottrans.com or fax 904-858-9008 Mechanic needed for general semi-truck and tire repairs. Steady employment with benefits. Salary dependent on experience. Must have own hand tools. Please contact Greg @ 755-7700 Mechanic needed with tools and experience. Southern Specialize Truck & Trailer. 386-752-9754 Real Estate Co. looking for Office Staff Computer knowledge required. Real Estate Exp. is a plus! Fax resume to 386-496-4309 Seeking a full-time Office Manager for a local mortgage company. Mortgage experience is very important. Email resume to: lakecityresume@yahoo.com 120Medical Employment05536076The Health Center of Lake City Has an opening for RN In the Rehab Unit 7PM-7AM Excellent Salary EOE/ADA/Drug Free Workplace Apply in person or send resume to: 560 SWMcFarlane Avenue Lake City, FL32025 05536078Busy Nursing Facility has an opening for RN UNITMANAGER Full-Time Position Great Benefits Mail Credentials & Resume to: RN Unit Manager PO Box 869 Lake City, FL32055 EOE/ADA Drug Free Workplace 05536110Advent Christian VillageCurrent JOBS Line Advertisement call 658-5627 orvisit www.acvillage.net 24 hrs/day, 7 days/week Be your BEST, Among the BEST! RN Quality of Care Leader Unrestricted Florida RN license, excellent clinical nursing / assessment skills, current CPR certification, verifiable IVskill (start, regulate, maintain, discontinue IVs) required. Good communication, organizational, and computer skills required; must work as part of interdisciplinary team to assure outstanding quality of life / quality of care for LTC residents. On-call rotation required. Management / supervisory experience and knowledge of LTC regs desired. CNA& LPN FT/PT/ long-term care setting. Florida certification (CNA) or unrestricted license (LPN) required. FTpositions include health, dental, life, disability, AFLAC; 403b; paid time off, access to on site day care and fitness facilities. Apply in person at Personnel Office, Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m., or fax resume/credentials to (386) 658-5160. EOE / Drug Free Workplace/Criminal background checks required. F/T LPN or equivalent needed for family practice office. Must have pharmacology exp. 1PAGE RESUME’S ONLYWILLBE ACCEPTEDFax resume to 386-487-1232. P/THousekeeper Needed Occasional Nights And Weekends. Fax Resume to 386-487-1232 240Schools & Education05535484Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class12/24/2012• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-11/05/12• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies American Bulldog Puppy $100 To the right home Contact 386-466-7662 Approx 7-8 mths old Red Bone Coonhound Free to the right home. 386-466-7662 Free puppy to good home. Miniature Jack Russell & Chihuahua mix, puppy shots have already been started. 386-623-9371 PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 401Antiques 1950’s dresser, 63” high, 19 deep, Lrg mirror 38x38, 2 small mirrors on base for storage. 4 drawers on bottom. $175. 365-3730 ANTIQUE FOR SALE China Cabinets, Wicker Stroller, Dolls, and Glassware. Contact 984-5826 Antique Hutch 82”H, 52” W. 16 drawer. 4 doors: 2 doors up top, 2 larger on the bottom. Plenty of storage space $300. 365-3730 407Computers DELLCOMPUTER $100.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 408Furniture King Size Mattress, box spring, frame, head board and foot board. $200 obo. 386-984-7586 430Garage Sales Huge Yard Sale 8 am-5pm Fri, Sat & Sun. Dec. 7-8-9, off C-250, 9895 Adams Road, Wellborn. Hundreds of items. Details www.lakecityflorida.com PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. SAT12/8 8-?, 181 Blueberry off 242/47. Glassware, electronics, Christmas villages, household items, collectables, and more SAT8-12, 90 Wto Right on Brown, Left on Horizon, 3rd on Rt. Tools, Generator, lawn, HouseHold, Christmas & more. SAT. DEC. 8TH, 7 AM-? 575 N.W. Gwen Lake Ave., Xmas items, stroller, motor stand, HH items, clothing &more. Look for signs. 450Good Things to EatThe Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans 2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024 Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville 386-963-4138 or 961-1420 630Mobile Homes forRent2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $450. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 2 BR/1BA $475/mth. Located in center of Lake City Close to Everything !!! 305-984-5511 or 386-344-0830 2 BR/2BASW, Completly furnished, carport, shed, located on 41st Dr., $600 mo.,+ Util. $300 Dep. 935-2461 Mobile Homes for rent in White Springs & Ft. White. Contact 386-623-3404 Newer2/2. Super clean on 1 ac North by distribution center. $550. mo. Call for details. 386-867-9231 Quiet Country Park 3br/2ba $525. Very clean NO PETS! References & Deposit required 386-758-2280 WATERTOWN AREA 3br/2ba DW, Handicap accessible, $650 mth, $500 dep. Call 386-344-0144, 386-344-5791 640Mobile Homes forSale2 MFG HOMES on 5 ACRES! Great for 2 families in Godbold Acres west of Lake City $79,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCY INC. 755-5110 #81421 2013 DOUBLEWIDE $33,995 inc. set-up, trim-out & A/C Call 386-288-8379. 3BR/2BA28X64 in a great location, a lot of upgrades, fireplace. Only $2,500 down $399 a month. Call Paula at 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com 5 LIKENew Mobile Homes!!! For under $30,000. MUSTSEE Call John T. 386-752-1452 BANK REPO 3BR/2BADoublewide ’09 Excellent condition. Only $999 down $377 a month. Call Paula 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com CLOSE TO VAMED CTR! 3BR/2BAw/beautiful interior, new CH&A$59,900 DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #81428 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #75661 Must be 55+, Manufacture home, 1 ac, fireplace, laundry, open & bright $79,900. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 EASTSIDE VILLAGE 2BR/2BAw/lg kitchen, open floor plan $79,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #80972 HALLMARK REALESTATE What a Deal! 2003 3/2 MH over 1600 sqft,in Trenton, .92 ac ONLY case # 091-379757 MLS# 82117 Robin Williams 386-365-5146 LIVE OAK! Cute home in city limits; 3BR/1BA& 1,294 SqFt $49,500 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #81410 MUSTSEE 2013 2x6 walls, R30 insulation, OSB wrap, house wrap, real wood cabinets, and thermal pain windows. Payment $399 per month call John T386-752-1452. Poole Realty 3/2 MH, fireplace, screened back porch, storage shed and all the amenities necessary for a relaxing lifestyle, Irvin Dees, 208-4276. MLS 82226 WANTED…CASH PAID for your Mobile Home, Singlewide or Doublewide flood homes welcome. Call 386-288-8379 WOODGATE VILLAGE Move-in ready! Open 3BR/2BA floor plan on nice shaded lot $49,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC 755-5110 #82259 WOODGATE VILLAGE Nice 3BR/2BADWMH w/fenced yd, workshop; $39,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCY, INC 755-5110 #79078 650Mobile Home & Land2br, 2ba, 3.51 acres. 1512 sqft, nice affordable DW. Perfect Rental. Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473 MLS #882216 $65,000 Great Value 24 acres, 3/2 DWMH open floor plan, in ground pool. MLS 79000. Poole Realty $115,000 Nelda Hatcher. Call 688-8067 Hallmark Real Estate Deer & turkey roam, 3000 sqft brick home, detached garagesworkshops on 18 ac. MLS #81005 Ginger Parker 386-365-2135 650Mobile Home & LandOwnerFinanced 3/22.5 ac.River Access. Small down $625 mo 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com Reduced Out of State owner, Anxious to sell. Nice 2br/2ba 1996 DW, Energy Efficient, 3/4 frnshd, 3 yr old roof, 1/2 ac lot in Oak Wd subdv in Live Oak $38,900 or best resonable offer. Call 309-645-2659 Reduced Out of State owner, Anxious to sell. Nice 2br/2ba, 1996 DW, Energy Efficient, 3/4 frnshd, 3 yr old roof, 1/2 ac lot in Oak Wd subdv in Live Oak $38,900 or best resonable offer. Call 309-645-2659 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05535481We’ve got it all!$89 Deposit Limited Avail. Call Today! Windsong Apts. *Free afterschool program386-758-8455 1BR APT. Downtown Location, Clean. New Carpet $450 mo, plus Security. NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456 2 bedroom / 1 Bath Apts for rent in Live Oak. Call for price. Contact 386-623-3404 & 386-362-9806 2BR/1BA$600/MO & $575 Sec. Dep. Lovely, Private, re-done CR 242 West of RT47 386-365-7193 or 867-6319 2br/1ba. Close to town. $580.mo plus deposit. Includes water & sewer. 386-965-2922 2BR/2BAw/garage 5 minutes from VAhospital and Timco. Call for details. 386-365-5150 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Amberwood Hills Apts. Private Patio area. Beautiful yard. Washer/dryer hkup. Free water & sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special. 386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com Brandywine & Branford Apartments Now Renting 1, 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-752-3033 W. Grandview Ave. Equal Housing Opportunity TDD Number 1-800-955-8771 BRANFORD VILLAS 386-935-2319 2br/1ba Apts. Now available.$570. mo. TDD number 1-800-955-8771 Equal Housing Opportunity Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2 mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet Friendly. Pool laundry & balcony. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A$530 month $530 deposit. No pets. 386-344-2170 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Greentree Townhouse Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free water & sewer. Balcony & patio. Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com Redwine Apartments Pets welcome. with 5 complexes, we have a home for you. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 Wayne ManorApts. Spacious 2bedroom washer/dryer. Behind Kens off Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 www .myflapts.com WindsorArms Apartments. Move in! 2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free 200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent2BR, 1/2 acre, Fenced, Close-in, Huge Den, Carport, Smoke Free, $800 mo. App & Ref Req’d Short Term Avail 386-758-9824 2br/1ba $575 mo. + sec., 4mi S. Lake City. Clean & Quiet 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 3bdrm very spacious, 2ba, garage, CH/AFenced in backyard. $1,400 mth & $1,400 dep. Contact 386-344-1914 3br/1.5ba. Very clean, Brick great area w/bonus room. Carport, shed & Fenced (privacy) back yard. $825. mo $825. dep. Ref’s req’d. (941)920-4535 ALandlord You Can Love! 3br/1.5ba, Eat in Kitchen, CH/A, 2 car carport $750 mth + dep 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Avail. for Rent 1206 McFarlane Ave. 3 BR/2 BAhouse. Smoke Free and No Pets allowed. $850 a mo. $500 dep. Call for appt. 904-813-8864. 750Business & Office RentalsForRent orLease : Former Doctors office, Former professional office & Lg open space: avail on East Baya Ave. Competitive rates. Weekdays 386-984-0622 evenings/weekends 497-4762 Office or Retail Space. Many to choose from. Tom Eagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor 750Business & Office RentalsPROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 805Lots forSale Beautiful lot on Suwannee. Property features stairway to dock, on Suwannee. MLS# 78842, $35,000 Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473 Results Realty Charming, like new, well Maintainted 3br, 2b, split floor plan, Corner lot. REMAX Missy Zecher 623-0237 MLS# 81632 $100,000 Custom genesis modular home, finest amenities, lg oaks, custom drapery, f/p, fine detail throughout. RemaxMissy Zecher 623-0237 MLS 81634 $299,000 Great family home, 3/2 recently upgraded, great location. REMAX PROFESSIONALS Missy Zecher 623-0237 MLS# 81683 $75,000 HALLMARK REAL Estate 2.68 acres homes only. Gorgeous neighborhood, Deed restricted. $34,000. Owner Fin. MLS# 80588. Tanya Shaffer 386-397-4766 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #76668 $32,000 Must be 55+, Buildable lot for site built homes only. In Forest Country. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #80401 $60,000. Must be 55+ 130x750 right on Suwannee, Beautiful lot, minutes from Royal Springs, Denise Bose 752-5290 Nice 2 acre lot in Timberlake s/d. New Owner will have fishing rights. MLS #79025 Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473 $13,500 Nice vacant lot in Desirable River Community, MLS #73268 $15,000 Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert397-3473 PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. REMAX PROFESSIONALS Missy Zecher 623-0237. 25 acre parcel, Corner lot, many possibilities. MLS 77720 $175,000 Spacious 4br, split floor plan, separate Living & family rm, gas f/p, a true pleasure to view. REMAX Missy Zecher 623-0237. MLS 81472 $237,000 810Home forSale Access Realty Gorgeous views 3bd/3ba on Lake Montgomery. Elevator, fishing dock & jacuzzi. MLS 81438 $249,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access RealtySpacious 4 bd/3ba Cypress Lake w/ 3643 sqft 1.25 acres on lake. Vaulted ceilings. MLS 81314 $279,900. Patti Taylor386-623-6896 Access RealtyTwo story 1895 Victorian house w/ electrical upgrades throughout. double -deck porches, MLS 71594 $149,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Affordable 4/2 on 10 acres in Bell. Home features over 2,200 heated sqft. MLS# 76585, Results Realty $67,500. Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Eastside Village Adult community, Great location, community pool Elaine Tolar 755-6488 MLS 74823, $84,900 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Emerald Forest repaired Brick home 3b, 2ba, Lg recreation rm, fireplace, MLS 82021 $134,900 Sherry Ratliff 365-8414 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Exceptional home on 5 ac, 3200 sf 4b, 2.5ba. Lots of storage, 3 out buildings. Elaine Tolar 755-6488 MLS 80325 $287,500 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Hallmark Real Estate 4.3 acres on the Santa Fe River. Wooded. Natures lover’s paradise. Paved Rd frontage, septic. MLS 81946. Ron Feagle 386-288-2901 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81958-, $115,000. Must be 55+, 3br/2ba, Site Built w/ lots of room, split plan mstr suite, FL. Rm. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 810Home forSale Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81959 Must be 55+, 2br/2ba, $79,900. Site Built Home w/eat in kitchen, laundry rm, scrn porch. Denise Bose @ 752-5290 On Suwannee River, 4 acres, Needs some elbow grease, 3br, 3058 sqft, beautiful view, Poole Realty MLS 82075. Call Glenda McCall $299,900 Private Estate on 39 + ac, city limits. 6br, 3.5ba, 3 fireplaces, much more.MLS76111 Mary Brown Whitehurst 965-0887 $994,000. Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Reduced, 6500 plus sqft home boasts of oversized rooms, 6br, 3.5ba to many amenities to mention. Call Prell Gwinn, Poole Realty MLS 80949 $280,000 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, Golfers Dream 3B,2B formal living & dining, cover back porch. MLS 81110 $189,000 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, South Oaks C/C, 3Br or 2Br & den, 2Ba over looking 9th hole, fenced backyard & more MLS 81191 $179,000 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, Beautiful Mountainside 3b,2ba, 1662sqft, .45 ac. open floor plan, so much more MLS 80447 $144,900 Terrific home on 5+ acres. 3br, 2.5ba, large kitchen, covered deck. MLS 81630 $199,000 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Elaine Tolar 755-6488 Unique home with 2800 sqft, large upstairs game room, on 1.37 acres in Live Oak, Poole Realty MLS 82214 $67,500. 362-4539 820Farms & Acreage10 acres with well/septic/pp (not guar); $300 dwn; $580 a mth. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com Access Realty10 acre square tract, High & Dry, OF Avail. w/ 25% down. Convenient Location MLS 81258$39,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access Realty43.64 acres wooded acreage in N.Columbia County. Scenic & Private. MLS 74429 $89,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Hallmark Real Estate Hunters Paradise! 3/2 brick, over 1700 sqft on 10 acres, 24x24 barn, fruit trees. MLS #80851 Ginger Parker 386-365-2135 830Commercial Property05536046Receivership Sale Soneet R. Kapila, Receiver Corbitt Manufacturing Company, Inc. Lake City, FL3 parcels Approx. 55 acres Vacant Industrial & Residential Site Zoned Industrial and Residential Rural Lake City 2 Parcels Approx. 3 acres Vacant Commercial Property Zoned Commercial Intensive Email: blombardo@kapilaco.com or call: 954/712-3185 Industrial warehouse7+ acres fenced 17,000 sq ft Barn $1,500 mo. TomEagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 930Motorcycles 2006 Honda Shadow Aero 750 cc’s $3,900 Contact 386-438-9105 950Cars forSale 2007 Signature Lincoln Town Car 28,200 mi. Extended Warranty until April 2014. Grandmother's car like new! Silver with tan leather. $15,500 386-397-3568 2011 Honda Insight Hybrid Four door hatchback, like new. 8k miles 44 mpg, 758-7683, $15,900



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6A LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04246A Teachers statewide score well on evaluationsBy KELLI KENNEDYAssociated PressMIAMI — Nearly 97 percent of Florida teachers were rated as “effective” or “highly effective” under a controversial new evalua-tion system released by state offi-cials Wednesday, but within hours they acknowledged there were problems with the results. The scores varied widely among school districts, leaving critics to questions their validity. There were also concerns about the accuracy of the data in the value-added model, or VAM, which is derived from student test scores. Hillsborough County was listed as having about 23,000 teachers, even though only 13,000 teachers were evaluated. “The numbers appear to be questionable so we’re having a hard time coming to any conclu-sions based on the data,” said Hillsborough County school dis-trict spokesman Steve Hegarty. Florida Department of Education spokeswoman Cynthia Sucher later said in an email that Hillsborough staffers notified the agency their report contained duplicate records. The depart-ment then reviewed all records and found duplicate reporting in some other districts, as well, and expects to post an updated report on Thursday, Sucher said. “This is clearly a flawed process that needs much tweaking and revamping before teachers and parents can trust in the valid-ity of the Value Added Model,” said Andy Ford, president of the Florida Education Association, the statewide teachers union. “Florida teachers are not afraid of accountability — we welcome it. But it is essential that everyone believes in the evaluation system and that it accurately reflects what we accomplish in the classroom.” Each school district was allowed to determine its own scoring sys-tem based on curriculum and stu-dents’ learning and performance growth. That led to wide varia-tions in scores across the state. Broward County rated nearly 92 percent of teachers as “effec-tive” and about seven percent as “highly effective”, whereas Flagler County’s figures were almost the reverse. Hillsborough had 42 per-cent as “highly effective” and 55 percent deemed “effective”, while Alachua County scored 61 percent as “effective” and nearly 15 per-cent as needing improvement. Several large districts, including Miami-Dade and Palm Beach counties, had not yet reported their evaluations to the state. State officials said they expected variations in the data in the first year and will run tests to see how the figures compare with each other. “I think it is a valid tool,” Kathy Hebda, the state’s deputy K-12 chancel Fla. teachers score well in new state eval system lor for educator quality. “It’s designed for everyone to begin together and improve each year over time.” Only about 2 percent of teachers in the state were marked as “needs improvement” and less than 0.5 percent were deemed “unsatisfactory.” About 1 percent of teachers fell under a category for teachers in their first three years and considered still devel-oping. In the past, teachers were only rated as “satisfactory” or “unsat-isfactory” with about 99 percent scoring favorably, said Hebda. Teachers will not be penalized for a low score the first year, but will be dinged if they score poorly two years in a row. But some teachers say the new system is flawed and the figures are already outdated. The data is based on the 2011-2012 school year and teachers said it’s not a useful tool for correcting poor performance because it’s being released nearly halfway through another school year. Florida Education Association Vice President Joanne McCall said some teachers are being evalu-ated on scores from students they never taught. Margaret Goodwin, a thirdgrade teacher at St. Petersburg’s Westgate Elementary School, said all kindergarten through third-grade teachers at her school received the same school-wide VAM rating of 11.27 out of 50 possible points based on Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test scores of fourthand fifthgraders because their own pupils don’t take the FCAT. “We want accountability. We want teachers to be evaluated fairly and we want to be able to do what’s best for students ... and the system they’re putting in place isn’t doing that,” said McCall. Ford, the FEA president, unsuccessfully appealed to Gov. Rick Scott to suspend the evalua-tion system in a letter last month. The union now plans to appeal to the Legislature to revise the law it passed last year requiring VAM-based evaluations. Those evaluations will be used to deter-mine which teachers should be retained and which ones should get merit pay when the system is fully effective in three years. data had been duplicated in their report. She said it was later determined that other districts contained similar duplica-tion and that a new report would be issued today. In Columbia County, all but two of the district’s 816 teachers were evaluated, according to FDOE. Columbia County Superintendent Terry Huddleston, contacted late Wednesday at a school offi-cials’ meeting in Ocala, said he believed that to be an accurate figure. Huddleston said that while no local teachers were placed in the catego-ry, “needs improvement,” that doesn’t mean they can’t further hone their skills. He said teachers can have areas where they need improvement and still be evaluated as effective. “Those evaluations do not mean that teachers got perfect on everything...,” he said. “All the informa-tion isn’t presented in the numbers.” Administrators were not comfortable with the model used to generate the evaluations and used cau-tion while grading teach-ers on their performance, Huddleston said. Administrators weren’t given clear instructions on how the the Marzano model would be used in the evalu-ation process, according to Huddleston. This year the district has switched to the Copeland model. “We understand how the model works with Copeland,” he said. The value-added method component of the evalua-tion tool uses a complex formula based partly on predicted test scores, tak-ing into account past perfor-mance compared to actual test scores completed during the current school year, district officials said. The main test used in the formula is the FCAT, and FCAT scores are used to grade teachers that do not teach FCAT-related subjects — such as art and physical education. This is where many teachers said they feel the value-added model doesn’t provide an accurate picture of a teach-ers ability to educate stu-dents. Despite the positive results from the value-added model, Kevin Doyle, president of the Columbia County Teachers Association, said the adop-tion of a new evaluation model was a waste of time and resources, because the scores were similar to past evaluations. “I believe the money and time could have been bet-ter spent providing teach-ers and students with bet-ter resources,” he said. He said the state now has a baseline to use for future evaluations. “There’s no way for the (value-added model) to be accurate on an individual basis,” he said. Tabatha McMahon, a journalism and digital design teacher at Columbia High School, said she doesn’t have a problem with evaluations, but teach-ers can have impacts that can’t be measured with tests. “I see merit in being told wheather I’m doing a good job or not...” she said. “I firmly believe everyone wants to do a good job.” McMahon came from the private sector and said in real life people are evalu-ated every day. In the past, public education has only scratched the surface of any one subject taught in school, but McMahon said she sees the district “mov-ing toward depth instead of breadth.” On Wednesday, the school district held meet-ings across the county for all teachers. The meetings addressed the new core competency requirements that will focus on 10 areas that will be implemented into curriculum. While she sees the district moving in the right direction with curriculum, like most teachers, she has her doubts about the value-added model. She has school-aged children in the school system, and said she also sees the value as a parent. “This is where they learn their skills, this is where they learn critical think-ing,” McMahon said. But unlike the private sector a teacher doesn’t get the oppurtonity to recuit a team to achieve a goal, she said. She said students’ test results aren’t the best way to determine teachers’ salaries. By 2014, state evaluations will be used to determine if a teacher merits a raise. A teacher who receives two unsatisfactory ratings in a three-year span will not be retained. TEACHERS: Still questions about value Continued From Page 1AProblems found with data reported for some counties. “I believe the money and time could have been better spent providing teachers and students with better resources.”— Kevin Doyle, Columbia County Teachers Association president State foster care system’s failures recounted at trialBy CURT ANDERSONAP Legal Affairs WriterMIAMI — A veteran state child welfare worker testified Wednesday that she was dumbfounded to learn in spring 2002 that foster child Rilya Wilson had been missing for more than a year and no records seemed to exist to explain her whereabouts. Dora Betancourt, a 35-year employee of the Department of Children and Families, said she couldn’t understand why the girl’s caretaker, Geralyn Graham, was claiming that an unknown DCF worker had taken her in January 2001 for a mental evaluation and never returned her. “I was in disbelief,” Betancourt testified. “It didn’t make sense at all.” Graham, 66, is on trial for murder in Rilya’s disap-pearance. Prosecutors say Graham smothered Rilya with a pillow and buried her near a lake or canal. Graham insists she did not harm the child, whose body has never been found. The trial is expected to continue for several weeks. Graham faces life in prison if con-victed. Betancourt said she found a number of incon-sistencies as she investi-gated the case. Graham said she was Rilya’s pater-nal grandmother, but state documents said the girl was in the custody of a non-relative — Graham’s com-panion, Pamela Graham. Geralyn Graham also told Betancourt the two were sisters, which is not true. There appeared to be no record of required monthly DCF caseworker visits from January 2001 until April 2002, when Betancourt began prepar-ing papers for the Grahams to adopt Rilya and a young-er sibling. It also appeared that Graham had been receiving welfare checks as if Rilya were living at her home for all those months she was missing. Betancourt said she went to visit Rilya and was met by Graham in the driveway of her home. There was no sign of Rilya. “Where’s Rilya?,” Betancourt testified that she asked Graham. “She said, ‘I thought you were bringing her.’ I said, ‘What do you mean?”’ Graham went on to explain, according to Betancourt, that the men-tal evaluation had been ordered because Rilya was having severe psychologi-cal problems, including urinating and defecating all around the house. Graham told Betancourt she had called a DCF supervisor several times about the girl’s problems and that another employee had taken Rilya for tests and never brought her home. “Did she say ‘Where is my child?’ Did she demand to know?” asked prosecu-tor Sally Weintraub. “No,” Betancourt replied. “She didn’t seem like she was upset.” Monica Porrata, who was Betancourt’s DCF supervisor at the time, said none of the required court orders or medical referrals for a foster child’s men-tal evaluation were found in official files. And even if such an evaluation had been ordered, it would have been highly unusu-al for the girl not to be returned immediately to her home, Porrata added. “After the appointment, she would be brought back home,” she testified. Betancourt said she searched through records at various DCF units for any trace of Rilya and found nothing. She checked coun-ty schools rolls, Medicaid records, anything that might provide a clue. But it seemed as though the girl had simply been lost. ASSOCIATED PRESSProsecuting attorney Joshua Weintraub holds a photo of young Rilya Wilson during opening statements in the tria l of Geralyn Graham, a foster caregiver charged with Rilya ’s murder. AROUND FLORIDA$55M in cocaine seized CAPE CANAVERAL — Coast Guard crew members have recovered $55 mil-lion worth of cocaine found floating off Florida’s east coast. Crew from the Coast Guard Cutter Tampa found more than 5,000 pounds of cocaine in the water Wednesday after smugglers aboard a boat dumped the drugs in an attempt to flee officers. The smugglers got away but without their cocaine. The smugglers were first spotted by a crew aboard a Canadian patrol plane working in the area. A Coast Guard heli-copter crew and the Tampa were then called in to stop the vessel.Judge in hot water TALLAHASSEE — A judge is facing ethics charges alleging she’s using her office to promote a private interest — her for-profit religious ministry. An investigative panel of the Judicial Qualifications Commission filed the allegation on Wednesday against Leon County Judge Judith Hawkins. The panel accused the Tallahasseebased judge of selling or attempting to sell religious books, study guides and other publications to lawyers and staffers at the county courthouse. It noted a website for her business, Gaza Road Ministries, includes pictures of Hawkins in her judicial robes, one show-ing her sitting on the court bench. She’s also accused of using her judicial assistant, courthouse office and equip-ment to create, edit and promote her products.Prayer returns to meetings MIAMI — Miami-Dade Commission meetings will once again begin with a prayer. After a lengthy debate on Tuesday, commissioner voted 8-3 to reinstate prayer before public meetings for the first time since 2004. The Miami Herald reported the vote followed a 18-month lobbying effort by the Christian Family Coalition. Commissioners approved an ordinance that calls for non-denominational prayers. Q Associated Press



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6B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04206BSports Jump Fabric, quilt and custom embroidery216 S. Marion Blvd. • Lake City • 754-3741•Fabric •Notions •Accessories 25% off Entire Stock thru December 22Retirement Sale G. W. HUNTER, INC. 1130 US Hwy 90 W (386) 752-5890 WE NOW HAVE ETHANOL FREE PLUS GASOLINE ONLY AT INTENDED USES: • BOATS & WATERCRAFTS • COLLECTABLE VEHICLES • OFF-ROAD VEHICLES • MOTORCYCLES • SMALL ENGINES Lake City Reporter Located at SHANDS Lake City, Live Oak & Starke Women’s Center of Florida ALL MAJOR INSURANCES ACCEPTED INCLUDING MEDICAID & MEDICARE FREE Pregnancy Ultrasound WITH THIS AD* *Insurance billing may occur if necessary. Some Restrictions apply.• OBSTRETRICS & GYNECOLOGY• PRENATAL CARE & ULTRASOUNDS• STD’S & HPV TESTING• BIRTH CONTROL & INFERTILITY • MENOPAUSE & INCONTINENCE• WEIGHT LOSS & 4D ULTRASOUNDS• BOTOX & LASER HAIR REMOVAL• NO INSURANCE VISITS ASK ABOUT OUR $50 CHANDLER MOHAN, MD • EMAD ATTA, MD“NOW HIRING MID-LEVEL PROVIDERS” 386-466-1106 SERVICES: OB-GYN www.myobcare.com JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFlorida center Patric Young (4) makes a score in an 82 -49 win against Marquette on Thursday. Phillips to coach receivers at FloridaBy MARK LONGAssociated PressGAINESVILLE — It didn’t take Joker Phillips long to find another job. The former Kentucky head coach landed at No. 4 Florida, joining the Gators as receivers coach and recruiting coordinator. Florida coach Will Muschamp said Phillips will begin work Friday. “His background as a head coach and the num-ber of years he has coached wide receivers will be a tremendous asset to our coaching staff and play-ers,” Muschamp said in a statement. “Joker is obvi-ously very familiar with the Southeastern Conference and has always done a great job in recruiting. Obviously, I had a number of experi-ences with Joker both on and off the field, as our paths have crossed often, but I’ve been really impressed with Joker Phillips as a man dur-ing this hiring process.” Kentucky fired Phillips on Nov. 4. He went 13-24 in three seasons at Kentucky. Phillips played at Kentucky (1981-84) and was on the football staff from 1988 to 1996. He returned to his alma mater as offensive coordinator in 2003, and then became the second black coach in SEC history in 2010. His resume also includes stops at South Carolina (2002), Notre Dame (2001), Minnesota (1999-2000) and Cincinnati (1997-98). Three chosen as Heisman finalistsBy RALPH D. RUSSOAssociated PressNEW YORK — Johnny Manziel and Manti Te’o are in position to make Heisman Trophy history. Manziel, the redshirt freshman quarterback from Texas A&M, and Te’o, Notre Dame’s star linebacker, along with Kansas State quarterback Collin Klein, were invited to attend the Heisman pre-sentation ceremony. Manziel is the favorite to win college football’s most famous player of the year award on Saturday night in Manhattan. He would be the first freshman to win the Heisman and the first Texas A&M player since halfback John David Crow won the school’s only Heisman in 1957. “I’m overwhelmed by this tremendous honor of representing Texas A&M, the 12th Man and all my teammates in New York,” Manziel said in a statement. “This is a dream come true for me, and I know it’s a credit to all my coaches and teammates. I definite-ly wouldn’t be a Heisman finalist without my team-mates and coaches.” Three sophomores have won the award (Tim Tebow in 2007, Sam Bradford in 2008 and Mark Ingram in 2009), but the best a first-year player has ever done is second. Adrian Peterson of Oklahoma finished sec-ond to Southern California quarterback Matt Leinart in 2004. Peterson was a true freshman. As a red-shirt freshman, Manziel attended A&M last year and practiced with the team but did not play. Michael Vick of Virginia Tech came in third in 1999 as a redshirt freshman and Herschel Walker was a true freshman for Georgia in 1980 when he finished third in the Heisman balloting. Nicknamed Johnny Football, Manziel quickly became a national sensa-tion this season, putting up huge numbers in first-year Texas A&M coach Kevin Sumlin’s spread offense. He led the 10th-ranked Aggies to a 10-2 record in their first season in the Southeastern Conference. With a knack for improvisation, Manziel racked up an SEC-record 4,600 yards of total offense, including 1,181 rushing to lead the conference. The 6-foot-1, 200-pound Manziel zoomed to the front of the Heisman race on Nov. 10, when he passed for 253 yards and two touchdowns and ran for 92 yards as the Aggies upset then-No. 1 Alabama 29-24 in Tuscaloosa. Manziel and Texas A&M will play No. 12 Oklahoma in the Cotton Bowl. Te’o is trying to become the first defense-only play-er to win the Heisman. The Fighting Irish have seven Heisman winners, tied for the most with Ohio State and Southern California, but none since Tim Brown in 1987. Te’o became the face of the No. 1 team in the country and leader of a defense that has been the toughest to score upon in the nation. The senior intercepted seven passes, second-most in the country and tops for a linebacker. He also led the Fighting Irish with 103 tackles, and earlier Monday won the Butkus Award as country’s best linebacker. Te’o and the Irish face No. 2 Alabama in the BCS championship game on Jan. 7 in Miami. Klein would be the first player from Kansas State to win the Heisman. “I’m just honored with this opportunity that the Lord has provided me here at K-State,” Klein said in a statement. “I’m so proud to represent K-State in this because I feel like my road is very synonymous and in line with the K-State way. It has been a process, it has been a journey. There have been a lot of ups and downs, as well as a lot of hard times and growing pains through it. I’m just very proud to represent the K-State family and our heart and spirit in this envi-ronment.” He seemed to be the front-runner for several weeks until Manziel’s late push. When Klein threw three interceptions in the Wildcats’ late-season loss to Baylor, Manziel moved to the front of the race. Klein is a multitalented quarterback like Manziel, but with a dif-ferent approach. The 6-5, 226-pound senior is a bull-ish runner who scored 22 touchdowns and threw for 15 more, while leading the seventh-ranked Wildcats (11-1) to the Big 12 title. Earlier in the day, Klein won the Johnny Unitas Award given to the top upperclassman quarter-back in the nation. Klein will finish his Kansas State career against No. 5 Oregon in the Fiesta Bowl. ASSOCIATED PRESSIn this Sept. 8 file photo, Texas A&M’s Johnny Manziel rea cts after a touchdown run during the second quarter against Florida in College Station, Tex as. Manziel could become the first freshman to win the Heisman Trophy when the award i s presented on Saturday night. Notre Dame focusing on themselvesBy TOM COYNEAssociated PressSOUTH BEND, Ind. — Notre Dame coach Brian Kelly has bigger things to worry about right now than defending national champion Alabama. With the national championship game between top-ranked Fighting Irish (12-0) and the Crimson Tide (12-1) more than a month away, Kelly’s main concern is making sure his will be ready to play after 44 days without a game. “We’re just trying to be better than Alabama on Monday, Jan. 7,” Kelly said. “So our entire focus will be on a one-game sea-son, trying to be better on Monday, Jan. 7. So you can understand, we don’t want to be better than Alabama on the 27th of December.” Alabama has already shown it knows how to be ready after long layoffs, winning the BCS title game in 2009 and again last sea-son. Kelly said he talked to coaches at LSU, Oregon to get advice on how best pre-pare for a long layoff and they reinforced his plan of starting off slow with fun-damentals. Last week and this week, Irish players have been focusing on conditioning, weightlifting and school work. It’s a chance for play-ers who may have lost a few pounds to get back up to weight and gain strength, he said. Notre Dame will hold its first practices on Friday and Saturday, then hold six more practices before play-ers head home on Dec. 21. They’ll return to campus for practices Dec. 28-31, and then leave for Miami on Jan. 2. They will practice three times in Florida. The early practices will have a preseason camp feel stressing fundamentals and giving younger play-ers more work, then begin to fine tune the practices for Alabama as the game draws nearer, Kelly said. The time away from the field will help some players. Kelly mentioned linebacker Manti Te’o specifically as someone who needs a little time to recover with all the attention he’s been under as he begins traveling the nation for all the awards he’s up for.Florida dunks FSU, 72-47, for easy winBy BRENT KALLESTADAssociated PressTALLAHASSEE — Kenny Boynton and Mike Rosario both scored 14 points Wednesday night and No. 6 Florida romped to a 72-47 victory over defending Atlantic Coast Conference champion Florida State. Boynton’s layup with 8:57 left gave the Gators their largest lead, 62-25. Florida (7-0) has held five opponents to less than 50 points this season while tak-ing its fourth straight win over the Seminoles. Michael Frazier added 12 points and Patric Young finished with 10 points and eight rebounds for the Gators, who cruised to a 35-15 halftime lead in their first road game of the season. Michael Snaer led Florida State with 10 points, all in the second half.



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By LINDA A. JOHNSONAP Business WriterTRENTON, N.J. — For Alzheimer’s patients and their families, desperate for an effective treatment for the epidemic disease, there’s hope from new studies starting up and insights from recent ones that didn’t quite pan out. If the new studies succeed, a medicine that slows or even stops progression of the brain-destroying disease might be ready in three to five years, said Dr. William H. Thies, chief medical officer of the Alzheimer’s Association. The group assists patients and caregivers, lobbies for more research and helps fund studies. “The number of smart people working on this problem means to me we’ll begin to manage it better in the very near future,” Thies said. “It may be as short as three years away.” That’s only if government and other sources provide tens of millions of dollars for additional research and more patients join clinical studies. After decades of stumbles and dozens of promis-ing experimental drugs fail-ing, scientists think they’re now on the right track. They’re targeting what they believe are the mecha-nisms to arrest a disease that steadily steals patients’ personality and ability to remember, think and care for themselves. A vaccine is in mid-stage testing, and drugmakers shy about funding expen-sive treatment tests could start as many as 30 studies once they’re more confi-dent that their approach is sound, Thies said. Early next year, the first study to try to prevent Alzheimer’s begins — in people a decade away from symptoms but who have a genetic muta-tion that causes early onset Alzheimer’s. It will include three drugs that each attack the country’s No. 6 killer in a different way. And in May, the Obama administration unveiled an ambitious national plan to fund new research, bet-ter train those caring for Alzheimer’s patients and help families get needed services via a new website, www.alzheimers.gov The number of Alzheimer’s patients in the U.S. is expected to jump from the current 5.4 million to 16 million by 2050. Costs for care, mostly borne by taxpayers, could skyrocket from roughly $200 billion this year to $1.1 trillion in 2050. The few treatments available only ease symp-toms temporarily. On Monday, drugmaker Merck and Co. announced it’s just begun the first com-bined midand late-stage study of a BACE inhibitor. That’s a new type of drug designed to slow mental and functional decline by limit-ing production of amyloid beta, the protein that’s the main ingredient in brain-damaging amyloid plaques considered the most likely cause of Alzheimer’s. After safety testing of the drug MK-8931 in about 200 patients, the 78-week study, known by the acro-nym EPOCH, will quickly expand to as many as 1,700 patients. That phase will test the daily pill at three different doses, compared with a dummy pill. Combining study phases should shave some time from the years-long, and often billion-dollar, research process. If MK-8931 works, EPOCH would give Merck one of the two major patient studies need-ed to win approval from government regulators, said Darryle D. Schoepp, Merck’s head of neurosci-ence research. Merck also has some backup com-pounds and plans other studies, including some on patients very early in the disease, Schoepp told The Associated Press in an exclusive interview. In earlier research MK8931 blocked formation of almost all the toxic amyloid plaques, he said. Page Editor: Jim Barr 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012 7A7AHEALTH The Combined Music Ministries ofPine Grove Baptist Church & Southside Baptist Churchpresent Friday December 7th at 7:00 p.m.Pine Grove Baptist Church 1989 N. Hwy 441Sunday December 9th at 7:00 p.m.Southside Baptist Church 388 S.E. Baya Drive Admission is free, but seating is limited. For advanced tickets or for further information, please call: Pine Grove Baptist Church 386-752-2664 Southside Baptist Church 386-755-5553 Nursery will be provided for up to four years old New Alzheimer’s drug studies offer hope Social Security to fast-track rare disease disability claims ASSOCIATED PRESSUniversity of Colorado scientist Rob Knight is leading th e American Gut Project. Now for a fee and a stool sample, the curious can find out just what’s l iving in their intestines and help one of the hottest new fields in science. By STEPHN OHLEMACHERAssociated PressWASHINGTON — In an effort to ease the burden of being stricken with a debil-itating condition, the Social Security Administration is expanding a program that fast-tracks disability claims by people who get serious illnesses such as cancer, early-onset Alzheimer’s and Lou Gehrig’s disease — claims that could take months or years to approve in the past. While providing faster benefits, the program also is designed to ease the workload of an agency that has been swamped by disability claims since the economic recession a few years ago. Disability claims are up by more than 20 percent from 2008. The Compassionate Allowances program approves many claims for a select group of conditions within a few days, Social Security Commissioner Michael Astrue said. The program is being expand-ed Thursday to include a total of 200 diseases and conditions. Many of the conditions are rare; all of them are so serious that people who suffer from them easily meet the government’s def-inition of being disabled, Astrue said. With proper documentation, these are relatively easy cases for the agency to decide, too easy to put through the usual time-consuming process that other applicants face, he said. “Why for someone who is going to die within 15 months do we need 15 years of medical records?” Astrue said in an interview. “If somebody’s got a con-firmed diagnosis of ALS, you know that in essence, it’s not only a disability, it’s a death sentence, and there is no use in burdening them with paperwork.” High demand during the sour economy has made it difficult for Social Security to reduce disability claims backlogs and wait times for decisions. About 3.2 mil-lion people have applied for disability benefits this year, Scientists enlist citizens for novel gut check study ASSOCIATED PRESSA cross-section of a normal brain (right) and one of a brain damaged by advanced Alzheimer’s disease are shown in this image provided by drugmaker Merck and Co. For Alzheimer’s patients and their families, new studies and results from past ones that an effective treatment for the epidemic disease could be availabl e in three to five years. No breakthrough, but some signs of real progress.By LAURAN NEERGAARDAP Medical WriterWASHINGTON — The bacterial zoo inside your gut could look very different if you’re a vegetarian or an Atkins dieter, a couch potato or an athlete, fat or thin. Now for a fee — $69 and up — and a stool sample, the curious can find out just what’s living in their intes-tines and take part in one of the hottest new fields in science. Wait a minute: How many average Joes really want to pay for the privilege of mailing such, er, intimate samples to scientists? A lot, hope the researchers running two novel citi-zen-science projects. One, the American Gut Project, aims to enroll 10,000 people — and a bunch of their dogs and cats too — from around the country. The other, uBiome, separately aims to enroll nearly 2,000 people from anywhere in the world. “We’re finally enabling people to realize the power and value of bacteria in our lives,” said microbi-ologist Jack Gilbert of the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory. He’s one of a team of well-known sci-entists involved with the American Gut Project. Don’t be squeamish: Yes, we share our bodies with trillions of microbes, living communities called microbiomes. Many of the bugs, especially those in the intestinal tract, play indispensable roles in keeping us healthy, from good digestion to a robust immune system. But which combinations of bacteria seem to keep us healthy? Which ones might encourage problems like obesity, diabetes or irrita-ble bowel syndrome? And do diet and lifestyle affect those microbes in ways that we might control someday? Answering those questions will require study-ing vast numbers of peo-ple. Getting started with a grassroots movement makes sense, said National Institutes of Health micro-biologist Lita Proctor, who isn’t involved with the new projects but is watching closely. After all, there was much interest in the taxpayer-funded Human Microbiome Project, which last summer provided the first glimpse of what makes up a healthy bacterial community in a few hundred volunteers. Proctor, who coordinated that project, had worried “there would be a real ick factor. That has not been the case,” she said. Many people “want to engage in improving their health.” Scott Jackisch, a computer consultant in Oakland, Calif., ran across American Gut while exploring the science behind different diets, and signed up last week. He’s read with fasci-nation earlier microbiome research: “Most of the genetic matter in what we consider ourselves is not human, and that’s crazy. I wanted to learn about that.” Testing a single stool sample costs $99 in that project, but he picked a three-sample deal for $260 to compare his own bac-terial makeup after eating various foods. “I want to be extra, extra well,” said Jackisch, 42. Differing gut microbes may be the reason “there’s no one magic bullet of diet that people can eat and be healthy.” It’s clear that people’s gut bacteria can change over time. What this new research could accomplish is a first look at how differ-ent diets may play a role, “a much better understanding of what matters and what doesn’t,” said American Gut lead researcher Rob Knight of the University of Colorado, Boulder. “We don’t just want people that have a gut-ache. We want couch potatoes. We want babies. We want veg-ans. We want athletes. We want anybody and every-body because we need that complete diversity,” added American Gut co-founder Jeff Leach, an anthropolo-gist. One challenge is making sure participants don’t expect that a map of their gut bacteria can predict their future health, or sug-gest lifestyle changes, any-time soon. “I understand I’m not going to be able to say, ‘Oh, my gosh, I’ll be suscepti-ble to this,’” said Bradley Heinz, 26, a financial con-sultant in San Francisco. He is paying uBiome $119 to analyze both his gut and mouth microbiomes; just the gut is $69. HOPE continued on 8A CLAIMS continued on 8A



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“No one’s ever done that before,” Schoepp said. “If (amyloid) plaques are the cause, the medicine will work.” Merck’s MK-8931 and some other experimen-tal drugs aim to turn off the Alzheimer’s “faucet” by blocking production of amyloid beta. Other experi-mental drugs instead aim to bail out the sink while the faucet’s still running, either by removing clumps of amyloid plaque from the brain or by binding to bits of amyloid beta protein and clearing them from the brain before they clump into plaques. Researchers were frustrated this year by failures of two drugs that targeted amyloid beta — bapineu-zumab from Pfizer Inc. and Johnson & Johnson, and solanezumab from Eli Lilly and Co. Both drugs are injected because their large molecules can’t pass through the digestive tract into blood vessels. Their size might have limited how much medicine could get inside brain cells. 8A LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr 754-04248AHealth 1B;J?>r!?>;L ;H>*?SF;H>!SJL?MM US 90 E to Sanderson, left on Hwy 127 go 8 miles, left on Hwy 125 at caution light. Go 6/10 mile, turn right at Noah Raulerson Rd., 3 miles to farm.For more info call (904) 259-7703 ASSOCIATED PRESSStudents receive medical attention Monday outside Finch El ementary School in Atlanta. Potentially lethal carbon monoxide levels at the school sent at least 42 students and six adults to hospitals amid the evacuation of about 500 studen ts, authorities said. HOPE: Treatment progress made Continued From Page 7A CLAIMS: Reducing backlog challenging Continued From Page 7Aup from 2.6 million in 2008, the agency said. Disability claims usually increase when the econo-my is bad because people who managed to work even though they had a disabil-ity lose their jobs and apply for benefits. Others who have disabilities may not qualify for benefits but apply anyway because they are unemployed and have nowhere else to turn. Two-thirds of initial applications are rejected, according to the agency. If your benefit claim is rejected, you can appeal to an administrative law judge but the hearing process takes an average of 354 days to get a decision. In 2008, it took an average of 509 days, according to agency statistics. Judge Randy Frye, president of the Association of Administrative Law Judges, said judges have been working hard to reduce back-logs while some decide more than 500 cases a year. But, Frye said, his group was not consulted on the Compassionate Allowances program. “We want claimants that are worthy of the benefits, that meet the definitional standard for disability, to be paid as quickly as possible,” said Frye, an administrative law judge in Charlotte, N.C. By RAY HENRYAssociated PressATLANTA — It’s odorless, colorless and deadly. And if carbon monoxide is leaking in a school, it might not be detected until people are ill. A leak at an Atlanta elementary school that sent 42 students and seven adults to hospitals had school offi-cials considering whether to install carbon monoxide detectors, a possibly life-saving move that is only required in a handful of states. The detectors are not required in schools by law in Georgia and other states. Connecticut requires them in schools, while Maryland requires them in newly built and remodeled schools. Building codes and local rules can require them in schools elsewhere. When properly installed, the detectors give a warn-ing when carbon monoxide reaches unsafe levels. “To me, it’s somewhat of a no-brainer in the sense that you’ve got fire alarms,” said Doug Farquhar, pro-gram director for envi-ronmental health at the National Conference of State Legislatures. “There’s no school in the country that’s going to open unless there’s a fire alarm system. Why not add carbon mon-oxide?” The leak in Atlanta proved serious but not fatal. Superintendent Erroll Davis credited officials at Finch Elementary School with quickly evacuating the school after children started getting sick. The kids are attending classes at a nearby middle school until the problem is fixed. Fire department officials Tuesday said the school is not allowed to reopen until a deficient boiler system is inspected and certified. Carbon monoxide, a byproduct of combustion, was discovered at unsafe levels near a school fur-nace. When it builds up in enclosed spaces, people exposed to the gas can experience headaches, diz-ziness, weakness, nausea and confusion, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Inhaling high levels of the gas can eventually cause loss of consciousness and even death. Carbon monoxide scare at school raises issues