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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
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Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:01969

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Place of Publication:
Lake City Fla
Creation Date:
March 3, 2012
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates:
30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID:
UF00028308:01969

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

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By DEREK GILLIAM dgilliam@lakecityreporter.com The damage to the Callaway subdivision caused by Tropical Storm Debby in June is still far from fixed, while a six-year debate over who is responsible for drain age issues in the neighborhood continues. While nothing can turn back the clock on the current dam age, however, a possible deal is in the works that would put the burden of managing future prob lems there and elsewhere on the county government. Meanwhile, there remain unan swered questions about just how and from where the water flowed into Callaway. The Suwannee River Water Management District and the Board of County Commissioners have been dis cussing whos responsible for operation and maintenance for one of the retention ponds since at least 2006. County Manager Dale Williams said the county doesnt have the legal right to work on the roughly oval-shaped, half-acre pond. And the plat, a planning document approved by the county commis sion, shows the home owners association owns the land. Steve Minnis, director of gov ernmental affairs and communi cations for the management dis trict, said according to SRWMD records, the county was respon sible for operation and mainte nance for the retention pond in question. Williams said the county doesnt have easements to put equipment on to repair the pond; plus, the CALL US: (386) 752-1293 SUBSCRIBE TO THE REPORTER: Voice: 755-5445 Fax: 752-9400 Opinion ............... 4A Business ............... 5A Obituaries ............. 6A Advice & Comics ......... 8B Puzzles ................. 2B TODAY IN PEOPLE JLo tones it down. COMING TUESDAY City council coverage. 91 64 T-Storm Chance WEATHER, 2A Opinion ............... 4A Business ............... 1C Obituaries ............. 5A Advice ................. 5D Puzzles ................. 5B 78 56 Fog early WEATHER, 8A Lake City ReporterSUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | $1 00 LAKECITYRE PO RTER COM Comeback falls short for Tigers. Snow Day, more set for Saturday in Lake City SUNDAY EDITION Vol. 138, No 219 1C 1B 1A From staff reports The former head of the Suwannee River Water Management District opposed a per mit by the Jacksonville Electric Authority to pump up to 155 million gallons of water a day from the Floridan Aquifer, but was muzzled by officials of the state Department of Environmental Protection, according to a report by the Tampa Bay Times David Still, who was fired as executive director of the water district Feb. 14, was forced out by Gov. Rick Scott as part of a massive shakeup and budget cutback of all five districts, the paper reported in its Nov. 23 edition. Still said that before he left, he persuaded col leagues at the St. Johns Water Management District, which approved the JEA permit, to ask the National Research Council to study the effect of over pumping on Floridas fresh water springs as well as the aquifer. The Council agreed to the $400,000 study but the water districts said they could not fund it. Still scoffs at that, the Times reported. They can fund what they want to fund, he said. There just wasnt the will to do it. Still told the Times that the districts apparently feared coming to the conclusion Ex-water chief muzzled on JEA David Still says DEP kept him silent on 155M gallon per day water permit. STILL continued on 3A CITY continued on 3A RIDERS continued on 3A Still Riders raise big bucks for CSC Whos to blame? Motorcycle event nets $12,900 for local charity. By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com Going for a nice, relax ing ride on your motorcy cle took on new meaning Saturday when more than 150 motorcycles roared off from the Rountree-Moore Toyota dealership, hop ing to raise food, clothing and toys for the Christian Service Center. The Riders with Caring Hearts Christmas Toy ride began around 10 a.m. at Rountree-Moore auto deal ership, which was the cor porate sponsor, as motor cycles began to fill the park ing area. The entry fee for the event was $10 per bike, an unwrapped toy and a non-perishable food item for the event that was set to begin at noon. CALLAWAY FLOODING JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Calloway resident Chris Williams (top) paddles (from left) his wife Mandi and neighbors A.J. and Dennille Decker through flooded streets of their neighbor hood last summer as they survey the damage done by Tropical Storm Debby. FILE Nicole Roth sits in a boat near the front lawn of the home that she and her family were renting when Tropical Storm Debby struck in June. Dispute over drainage in Callaway has gone on more than 6 years However, county may be close to deal with water management. CALLAWAY continued on 7A Bonuses on table for city workers By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com A token of appreciation can go a long way. Monday night city offi cials are scheduled to dis cuss whether a token of appreciation will amount to something city employees can take to the bank. City Council members are scheduled to discuss the possibility of giving city employees a one-time token of appreciation during the council meeting at 7 p.m. Monday in council cham bers, 205 N. Marion Ave. According to the meet ing agenda, City Manager Wendell Johnson is suggest ing that fulland part-time employees get a financial token of appreciation. The proposal is that all city employees who are on a part-time basis and those with less than one

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PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Actress Julie Harris is 87. Former Attorney General Edwin Meese III is 81. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., is 73. Actress Cathy Lee Crosby is 68. Movie director Penelope Spheeris is 67. Actor Ron Raines is 63. Country singer John Wesley Ryles is 62. Actor Keith Szarabajka is 60. CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading. AROUND FLORIDA Friday: 3-14-17-29 4 Friday: 8-18-25-28-34 Saturday: Afternoon: 5-3-3 Evening: N/A Saturday: Afternoon: 3-0-1-9 Evening: N/A W ednes day: 7-12-15-20-34-49 x5 Feds impose water pollution rules on Florida TALLAHASSEE The federal government is imposing tough water pol lution rules on Florida in a long-delayed victory for environmental groups. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Lisa Jackson filed a notice in federal court in Tallahassee on Friday, saying she has complied with a consent decree requiring adoption of the rules. They are designed to curtail pollution blamed for algae blooms that have choked Floridas water ways. State officials, as well as agriculture, business and utility interests, opposed the rules, arguing theyd be too expensive to imple ment. They had touted an alternative proposal offered by the state, which environmentalists said was too weak. Earthjustice lawyer David Guest, who rep resented environmental groups in a lengthy court battle, said Jacksons action was absolutely everything we hoped for. Friday was a courtordered deadline for the EPA to act. Graduation rate jumps this year TALLAHASSEE State education officials said Floridas federal gradu ation rate dramatically increased by 3.9 percent age points this year. They announced on Friday that 74.5 percent of Floridas high school students graduated within four years. Its the biggest increase since 2003. The rate has climbed 18 percentage points since then. The rate is based only on standard diplomas as required by federal regula tions effective last year. Until then, Florida used its own system that included other diplomas to arrive at a higher rate. Department of Education officials dont know yet where Florida ranks nationally. The state traditionally has had one of the nations lowest rates. Minority rates have increased sharply in recent years but still lag. The rates this year are 63.7 percent for blacks and 72.9 percent for Hispanics. 500 foster kids adopted in month TALLAHASSEE More than 500 foster chil dren from around the state were adopted in November for National Adoption Month. Parents who adopt fos ter kids receive a monthly adoption subsidy for the family, health benefits for the child, and free college tuition. Roughly 750 foster children are still waiting for a family. The children most in need of homes are teens, sibling groups and children with special needs. A newly redesigned website at www.adopt florida.org highlights chil dren and sibling groups in foster care each day of the month with photos and videos. Last year, 3,250 chil dren were adopted from Floridas foster care sys tem. Human relations panel denies bias TALLAHASSEE The Florida Human Relations Commission is denying its biased against workers who file complaints against their employers. The commission com mented Friday on a report issued a day earlier by a group of lawyers who rep resent employees in dis crimination, reprisal and whistle-blower protection cases. The state chapter of the National Employment Lawyers Association said the commission is a rogue agency thats politicized, favors employ ers and should be fixed or abolished. The commission responded in a statement saying the report is inac curate and makes selfserving recommendations. The agency maintains its investigations are fair and impartial and that it strives to be fair to everyone accuser and accused alike. Teen gets prison for fatal crash WEST PALM BEACH A South Florida teen has been sentenced to 14 years in prison for a crash in a stolen car that left a woman dead. A Palm Beach County judge sentenced 18-yearold Jermaine Nixon on Friday. He was convicted in September of vehicular homicide with failure to render aid, leaving the scene of a crash, grand theft and fleeing and elud ing law enforcement. Authorities said police were chasing Nixon in March 2010 shortly before he hit a pedestrian, 21year-old Kathryn Veroxie, and then crashed. The Palm Beach Post reported that Nixon fled on foot but was captured a short time later. Man gets another death sentence BARTOW A central Florida man already on death row for murdering two women has received another death sentence for killing two gas station workers. A Polk County judge sentenced 34-year-old Leon Davis Jr. on Friday. He was convicted in October of two counts of first-degree murder and several other crimes. Authorities said Davis fatally shot 33-year-old Pravinkumar Patel and 51-year-old Dashrath Patel during a Lake Alfred BP station robbery in December 2007. Davis was previously sentenced to death for kill ing two women 26-yearold Yvonne Bustamante and 23-year-old Juanita Luciano during the robbery of a Lake Wales insurance company, about a week after the fatal gas station robbery. JAKARTA, Indonesia S inger Jennifer Lopez wowed thousands of fans in Indonesia, but they didnt see as much of her as con certgoers in other countries the American pop star toned down both her sexy outfits and her dance moves during her show in the worlds most populous Muslim coun try, promoters said Saturday. Lopezs Dance Again World Tour was performed in the countrys capital, Jakarta, on Friday in line with promises Lopez made to make her show more appropriate for the audience, said Chairi Ibrahim from Dyandra Entertainment, the concert promoter. JLo was very cooperative ... she respected our culture, Ibrahim said, adding that Lopezs managers also asked whether she could perform her usual sexy dance moves, but were told that making love moves were not appropriate for Indonesia. Lopez changed several times dur ing her 90-minute concert along with several dancers, who also dressed modestly without revealing their chests or cleavage. Protests flare in Bahrain for Kim Kardashian visit MANAMA, Bahrain Just hours after reality TV star Kim Kardashian gushed about her impressions of Bahrain, riot police fired tear gas to dis perse more than 50 hardline Islamic pro testers denouncing her presence in the Gulf kingdom. The clashes took place just before Kardashian opened the Bahrain branch of her Millions of Milkshakes shop. An Associated Press journalist saw protesters chanting God is Great near the shopping complex in Riffa, about 20 kilometers (12 miles) south of the capital Manama. The demonstrators were cleared before Kardashian appeared late Saturday. Earlier, she posted glowing remarks about Bahrain on her Twitter account, calling it the prettiest place on earth. It was reTweeted by Bahrains foreign min ister. Kardashian was in Kuwait earlier this week to open another branch of the shop. Stevie Wonder cancels concert for Israeli group WASHINGTON Stevie Wonder is calling off a concert for a group that raises money for the Israeli military. Wonder had been scheduled to per form next week for Friends of the Israel Defense Forces, which raises money for Israeli soldiers and their families. Wonder said the United Nations recommended canceling his per formance because he is an official Messenger of Peace for the organization. The United Nations overwhelmingly voted to recognize a Palestinian state on Thursday over vehement U.S. and Israeli objections as hopes for Mideast peace talks stalled. Wonder said in a statement he was canceling with a heavy heart but that I am and have always been against war, any war, anywhere. Katy Perry gets top Billboard honor NEW YORK Billboard named Katy Perry its woman of the year, but the pop star thought her year was 2011. I felt like my year was last year ... I thought my moment had passed, Perry said in an interview with Jon Stewart at Billboards Women in Music event Friday in New York City. Perry released Teenage Dream in 2010, and the double platinum album sparked five No. 1 hits on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. JLo tones down concert in Indonesia Wednes day: 5-16-22-23-29 PB 6 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter 2A Daily Scripture Associated Press ASSOCIATED PRESS Joe Wasilewski shows off a Nile crocodile he caught near his Homestead, Fla., home. State wildlife officials have given their agents a rare order to shoot to kill in the hunt for a young and potentially dangerous Nile crocodile loose near Miami. They get big. Theyre vicious. The animals are just more aggressive and they learn that humans are easy targets, says Wasilewski, a reptile expert and veteran alligator wrangler. ASSOCIATED PRESS Jennifer Lopez performs during her concert in Shanghai, China, on Nov. 24. Lopez toned down both her revealing costumes and suggestive dance moves for a con cert in Jakarta, Indonesia, so as not to offend Muslim sensibilities. Associated Press Wonder Kardashian In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was with God in the begin ning. The Word became flesh and made his dwelling among us. We have seen his glory, the glory of the one and only Son, who came from the Father, full of grace and truth. John 1:1-2, 14

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Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012 3A 3A EBT SNAP Debit All Major Credit Cards No Rain Checks While Supplies Last Nettles Smoked Turkeys $ 24.99 each IBP Cleaned Pork Chitterlings 5Lb. Bag $ 4.99 each Nettles Sugar Cured Smoked Whole Hams $ 1.19 Lb. Nettles Sugar Cured Smoked Picnics 99 Lb. Nettles Pork Chops 6Lb. Box $ 10.00 Boston Butt Pork Roast 2 Pack $ 1.29 Lb. Boneless Sirloin Tip Roast Whole In Bag $ 2.99 Lb. Boneless Top Sirloin Steaks Family Pack $ 3.99 Lb. Boneless New York Strip Steaks Whole or Half Loin $ 4.99 Lb. Bone-In Ribeye Steaks or Roast Whole or Half Loin $ 4.99 Lb. Whole Boneless Pork Loins $ 2.19 Lb. Sanderson Farms Fryer Thighs or Drumsticks Family Pack 99 Lb. Sanderson Farms Cryovac Whole Frying Chicken 99 Lb. Peeled Beef Butt Tenderloin 3 Lb. Avg. Wt. $ 7.99 Lb. Fresh Ground Chuck Family Pack $ 2.69 Lb. Ad Good 12-5-12 through 12-12-12 Store Hours: Monday Saturday 8am 6pm Nettles Sausage 190 SW CR 240 Lake City, FL 32025 (386) 752-2510 Country Made By Country Folks Bill Huggins, a Riders with Caring Hearts com mittee member and busi ness manager at RountreeMoore auto group, estimat ed that a total of $12,960 was raised during the fund raiser. Riders raised $6,480 and Rountree-Moore auto group also raised $2,250 for the fundraiser. Huggins said a donor agreed to match each dollar raised, bringing the final tally to the $12,960 amount. The ride was organized by Danny Murray, Polly Murray and the Riders with Caring Hearts Committee and also sponsored by Columbia County Cycles. Danny Murray, Columbia County Cycles owner, said there were 275 to 300 people at the event, which featured about 140 to 150 motorcycles. The benefit ride focused on raising supplies for the Christian Service Center and Murray said the foord and other items contributed by riders were excellent. We have a Chevrolet, Toyota and Ford truck. One truck is for toys, another for non-perishable food and the other truck is for clothing, he said. It looks like clothing is the truck that beating everyone else out. The 32-mile trek through Columbia County was scheduled to last about 90 minutes. The caravan of motorcycles finished at American Legion Post 57, where an after party, fea turing a live band and food, was waiting. The motorcyclists left from the auto dealership, heading west with a police escor. Riders bearing the American flag were leading the way. Lake City resident J.D. Howell was one of many local residents taking part in the benefit ride. He chose to ride with a huge Teddy bear dressed in a Santa Claus outfit as his riding partner. Ive been participat ing in the benefit ride for several years, and its for needy kids and needy fami lies and I to it to help out by bringing toys and food, he said. I think its real good that we have so many bikes. It shows strong support for the people that are putting the event on. RIDERS Continued From 1A TONY BRITT /Lake City Reporter Motorcyclists participating in the Riders With Caring Hearts Christmas Toy Ride make last minute adjustments Saturday morning as they prepare to take part in a benefit ride for the Christian Service Center. year of employment get $50, and while other full time employees would receive $100. In the memorandum Johnson explained that a nominal level of mon etary appreciation is customarily pro vided to employees on an annual basis during December and amounts tradi tionally range from $50 to $100. The funding will come from the citys annual budget and is expected to have a $24,000 impact. The council is also scheduled to discuss reclassification of three fire department battalion chief positions as firefighters. The three battalion chief positions are not currently filled. The fire department currently con sists of 20 assigned personnel which were authorized in the city budget in September. The department has one fire chief, one assistant chief, three battalion chiefs, three fire lieutenants, six driver/engineers and six firefight ers. The fire departments 2013 budget for personnel services is $1,485,789. City documents indicate reclassify ing the departments three battalion chief positions wont have a negative supervisory or operational impact on the department, since the senior offi cers in the department consist of the fire chief, assistant fire chief and three veteran fire lieutenants, with at least one of those officers assigned to each shift. The reclassification will result in an approximate $65,000 reduction in personnel cost and provide for more equal distribution of supervisory per sonnel, the proposal said. CITY: Worker bonuses proposed Continued From Page 1A that groundwater pumping was depleting the aquifer and that other, more expensive methods of obtaining water might be necessary, such as desalination. Still told the Times that when springs had dried up in the past, overpumping was named as the cause. Still was fired by the SRWMD governing board Feb. 14, after reportedly telling board mem bers some weeks earlier he planned to resign then saying he had changed his mind. The Times report, by staff writer Craig Pittman, focused on the continued decline of Floridas fresh water springs statewide. STILL: Was muzzled by DEP on JEA Continued From Page 1A

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I f the U.N.’s eleva-tion of Palestine to nonmember observer status had come at the end of the Clinton administra-tion when Israel and the Palestinians were achingly close to a peace settle-ment, it might have truly meant something. But while Thursday’s 138 to 9 vote among the U.N.’s more than 190 members is a triumph for the Palestinians — at least that part of them led by Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas — it is hardly likely to change that stalemate in the short run. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has shown little interest in pursuing the two-state solution — Israel and an independent Palestine liv-ing peacefully side by side — favored by the last four U.S. presidents. Instead, he has used the time to gradually encroach on parts of East Jerusalem and the West Bank that the Palestinians consider their own and, in the case of East Jerusalem, want for their capital. If anything, however, progress is beginning to look more like a three-state problem: Israel, the West Bank and Gaza, the latter run for the last five years by Hamas, a radical Islamic group that did not join in the Palestinian mer-riment over its diplomatic promotion because Hamas does not recognize Israel and claims all of the old Palestine for itself. Needless to say, this gives the Israelis little incentive to deal with Hamas, and Israel’s successful “Iron Dome” missile defense seems to have temporarily, at least, defanged Hamas of its prin-cipal terror weapon, ran-dom missile attacks against Israeli civilian targets. However, in the long term, the vote was hardly meaningless, as Netanyahu and U.S. ambassador to the U.N. Susan Rice put it. The Palestinians have steadily been building an inter-national presence, and it has been recognized as an independent state by 132 countries and has embas-sies in 80 of them. The vote was a harsh rebuke to the U.S and Israel: The nine nations that voted against observer status also included — aside from the U.S. and Israel — Canada, the Czech Republic, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Nauru, Palau and Panama, hardly a mur-derers’ row of diplomatic might. The new status gives Palestine access to U.N. international agencies, including the International Criminal Court where Israeli annexation of Palestinian land would not fare well under interna-tional law. Curiously, the current situation disarray in the Arab world has bought Israel some time — not necessarily “benign neglect,” but neglect when the Islamic nations are preoccupied elsewhere — to start resolving the Palestinian situation. T erry Huddleston, our new school superintendent, is the 24th superintendent to serve our county. The first was P.A. Holt, who served from 1869-1870. Before that, seven different probate judges acted as county school superintendent. We now have seven living former superinten-dents: Dr. Silas Pitman, Dr. Frank Philips, Dr. Dianne Lane, Michael Flanagan, Sam Markham, and Mike Millikin. Dr. Pitman was the longest serving superintendent of the group, with 16 years. Johnny Starling (Columbia High School Class of 1967) told me he had seen Dr. Pitman, the dean of the group, in the local Gondolier Restaurant recently and he looked and sounded fine. By the way, for many years no, CHS graduate had ever been elected school superintendent. Now, the most recent four were also CHS gradu-ates: Flanagan, Markham, Millikin, and now Huddleston.Thanking ‘Mr. X’On a Saturday night two weeks ago I got home from an outing and discov-ered my wallet was miss-ing. Panic! Then I remembered that I had last seen my wallet when paying for some purchases at the Dollar General store on Branford Highway (SR 247). So, I went back to the store and a wonder-ful cashier named Kathy Clements returned my wallet with all the contents intact. What a relief! I profusely thanked Kathy and even called their corporate office to commend her. However, the man who actually found my wallet in the store’s parking lot and turned it in to the cashier is unknown to both Kathy and me. I hope that gentlemen will call me at (386) 755-8183 so I can personally thank him. Reunion reminderThe next class reunion for the combined classes of 1949-53 will be held on Friday, Dec. 14, at the Mason City Community Center, starting at 11:30 a.m. Everyone should being a covered dish. James Clayton will provide the chicken pilau, and all iced tea and plastic ware will be provided. Questions? Call Julia Geohagen Osborn at (386) 752-7544.Computer problemWhen our school system first started comput-erizing all records, there were predictably several glitches. According to school lore, this was one: The computer programmers needed each student to provide a first, middle and last name. However, one male student’s name was RB Smith. The RB didn’t stand for anything; that was his full, given name. When the school’s first computer printout came back, the kid’s name was mistakenly listed at “Arbie” Smith. Thereafter, every effort was made to correct the name, but the computer just could not handle RB as a first name. Finally the school sent the name in as “R (only) B (only) Smith.” You guessed it. The computer record then showed the kid’s name as “Ronly Bonly Smith.”Political nastinessDuring the recent national elections, did you tire of the name-calling and wish we could return to the good old days of civil discourse? Be careful what you wish for. Noah Webster (17581843), the “dictionary man” and consummate wordsmith, was also a political writer who expressed some contro-versial opinions For expressing his Federalist opinions, here are some of the names he was called: “a pusillani-mous, half-begotten, self-dubbed patriot,” “an incur-able lunatic,” “a deceitful newsmonger,” “ a peda-gogue and a quack,” “a traitor to the cause of Federalism,” “a toad in the service of sans-cullottism,” “a prostitute wretch,” “a great fool and a barefaced liar,” “a spiteful viper” and “a maniacal pedant.” Still want to go back to the good old days of “polite political dis-course”?Christmas quoteFrom Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol:” “Christmas is a good time, the only time when men and women open their hearts freely, and think of people below them as if they were really fellow passengers to the grave and not another race of creatures bound on their journeys. “And, therefore, though Christmas has never put a scrape of gold or silver in my pocket, I believe it has done me good, and will do me good; and I say God bless it!” HIGHLIGHTS IN HISTORY On this date:In 1804, Napoleon crowned himself Emperor of the French. In 1812, the Electoral College chose President James Madison to serve a second term of office. In 1823, President James Monroe outlined his doctrine opposing European expansion in the Western Hemisphere. In 1859, militant abolitionist John Brown was hanged for his raid on Harpers Ferry the previous October. Artist Georges-Pierre Seurat was born in Paris. In 1927, Ford Motor Co. unveiled its Model A automobile that replaced its Model T. In 1939, New York Municipal Airport-LaGuardia Field (later LaGuardia Airport) went into operation as an airliner from Chicago landed at one minute past midnight. In 1942, an artificially created, self-sustaining nuclear chain reaction was demonstrated for the first time at the University of Chicago. In 1954, the Senate voted to condemn Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy, R-Wis., for conduct that “tends to bring the Senate into disrepute.” In 1961, Cuban leader Fidel Castro declared himself a Marxist-Leninist who would eventually lead Cuba to Communism. In 1970, the newly created Environmental Protection Agency opened its doors. (Its first director was William D. Ruckelshaus.) In 1982, in the first operation of its kind, doctors at the University of Utah Medical Center implanted a permanent artificial heart in the chest of retired dentist Dr. Barney Clark, who lived 112 days with the device. In 1991, American hostage Joseph Cicippio (sihSIHP’-ee-oh), held captive in Lebanon for more than five years, was released. In 2001, in one of the largest corporate bankruptcies in U.S. history, Enron filed for Chapter 11 protection. Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding coun-ties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, Publisher Robert Bridges, Editor Sue Brannon, Controller Dink NeSmith, President Tom Wood, Chairman LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com N o, they didn’t go all the way this year. And no, they didn’t get a chance to avenge an early season three-point loss, on the road, to top-ranked Gainesville High. But the Columbia High Tigers, who fell 28-21 to Navarre in the Panhandle on Friday, gave us all something to cheer about this season. Whatever else folks may have disagreed on over the last few months, the Tigers brought us togeth-er and gave us a common cause. What a great year.What a great group.And what a great coach.Top Tiger Brian Allen has considerable teaching skills. And not just in football. While inspiring his team to win, he has instilled in them lessons of even greater importance: The value of hard work, perseverance and refusal to give up, no matter how tough the task. Yes, these are old values.But they never get old.Tigers, we salute you all. Thanks for a great season OPINION Sunday, December 2, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A4AEDIT OUR OPINION Our 24th superintendent Palestine wins small victory in U.N. Morris WilliamsPhone: (386) 755-8183williams_h2@firn.edu372 W. Duval St.Lake City, FL 32055 Q Morris Williams is a local historian and long-time Columbia County resident. Q Dale McFeatters is an editorial writer for Scripps Howard News Service. Dale McFeattersmcfeattersd@shns.com

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Dec. 2 Civil War program Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave. in Fernandina Beach, will host a Union Garrison event The program will allow visi tors to interact with living historians to experience life in the fort as it was in 1864. Soldiers in period costumes will conduct fir ing demonstrations, march ing drills, cooking and daily activities. Ladies in period dresses will be preparea Christmas tree and deco rate the mantles for the holiday season. Sutlers will display their wares, and drummer boys will project the sounds of the Civil War era. Activities will be held from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. today and 9 a.m. to noon Sunday. For additional information, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www. FloridaStateParks.org. Dec. 5 Book sale fundraiser The auxiliary at Shands Lakeshore Hospital will hold a Christmas book sale to support the hospital from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the firstfloor cafe at the hospital. Builders association Columbia County Builders Association will hold a General Council lunch at Guang Dong res taurant in the Lake City Mall. The sponsor is the Foundation Professionals Inc. of Florida. The speaker will be Sgt. David Greene from Crime Prevention Division of the Columbia County Sheriffs Office. The winning ticket for our raffle will be drawn, with a prize of either a $500 golf gift certificate for County Club of Lake City Pro Shop, a 20-gauge shotgun or an iPad from Verizon. We will also have the 5050 HammerClaw draw ing for a jackpot of $275. Reservations are appre ciated and can be made by calling (386) 867-1998. Tickets are $12 for mem bers and $15 for non-mem bers.Arrive about 11:30 to enjoy the buffet. The meet ing will start at 12:00 noon. Newcomers luncheon The Newcomers Friendship Luncheon will be at 11:30 a.m. at Hannahs, 4196 W US 90 in the Premier Plaza. For those who want to par ticipate, there will be an exchange of wrapped gifts, with a $10 value limit. For more information, contact Barbara Test at 754-7272 or Rose Taylor at 755-2175. Olustee battle meeting The Blue-Grey Army will meet at 5:30 p.m. to plan the Olustee Battle Festival. The meeting will be at the school district central building room 153, 409 SW St. Johns St. Dec. 6 Book sale fundraiser The auxiliary at Shands Lakeshore Hospital will hold a Christmas book sale to support the hospital from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the first-floor cafe at the hospital. Dec. 7 Holiday music concert The combined music ministries of Pine Grove Baptist Church and Southside Baptist Church will present Season of Joy holiday music concert at 7 p.m. at Pine Grove Church, 1989 N Highway 441, and at 7 p.m. Sunday at Southside Baptist, 388 SE Baya Drive. Admission is free, but seat ing is limited. Nursery will be available for children 4 and younger. For advance tickets or more informa tion, contact Pine Grove Church a (386) 752-2664 or Southside Baptist at (386) 755-5553. Community theater High Springs Commnity Theater will present the comedy Christmas Belles, weekends through Dec.16. The play is about Christmas time in the small town of Fayro, Texas, but the Futrelle sisters are not exactly in a festive mood. A cranky Frankie is weeks overdue with her sec ond set of twins. Twink, recently jilted, is in jail for inadvertently burning down half the town. And hot-flash-suffering Honey Raye is desperately trying to keep the Tabernacle of the Lambs Christmas pro gram from spiraling into chaos. Their hilarious holi day journey through a mis adventure-filled Christmas Eve is guaranteed to bring joy to your world. Tickets are available for pur chase at The Framery of Lake City (386) 754-2780, Pampered Paws in High Springs (386) 454-4464 or online at highspringscom munitytheater.com. Friday and Saturday shows will be at at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m. Doors open a halfhour before show time. Tickets are $11 for adults, $8 for children 12 and younger and $9 for seniors on Sundays. The theater is at 130 N. First Ave. in High Springs. Fish dinner Our Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5056 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, pre pares fish dinners every Friday from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The dinner is $6 for two Alaskan pollock filets, corn, baked beans, hush puppies, cole slaw and tarter sauce. Take out or eat in. Dec. 8 Breakfast with Santa Come join us at Holiday Inn & Suites for breakfast with Santa from 8 to11 a.m. The event will include a breakfast buffet with scram bled eggs, bacon, sausage, biscuits and gravy, juice, coffee, hot chocolate and a waffle station. Enjoy holi day music, fun and fellow ship, complete with a visit from Santa. Cost is $9.95 per person for adults and $4.95 for children ages 3 to 12. Proceeds will ben efit the Childrens Medical Services of North Florida. A collection box for dona tions of unwrapped toys also will be available. For more information, call (386) 754-1411. LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012 5A 5A BELK.COM 30 % off ENTIRE STOCK Erica Lyons, ND New Directions, Via Neroli, Ruby Rd., Kim Rogers and Red Camel jewelry Orig. 8.00-68.00, Sale 5.60-47.60 40 % off Mens pants by Chaps, Haggar, Izod, Saddlebred, Savane, Braggi and Louis Raphael. In dress and casual pleated and at front styles Orig. 58.00-75.00, Sale 34.80-45.00 Imported 50 % off Home Accents Christmas ornaments and decor Orig. 8.00-150.00 Sale 4.00-75.00 LIMITED EXCLUSIONS: Only excludes Red Dot, Clearance, Earlybirds, Night Owls, Doorbusters, Bonus Buys, Everyday Values, Alegria, Ben Sherman, Brighton, b.temptd; Designer, Bridge and Contemporary Sportswear and Dresses; Casio, Coach, Cosmetics/Fragrances, Dansko; Fine Jewelry watches, trunk shows and service plans; Gear For Sports, Gameday, Lucchese, Hanky Panky, Herend, Keen, Lacoste, Levis, Lilly Pulitzer, Minnetonka Moccasin, Miss Me, Munro, Original Penguin, Roberto Coin, Spanx, Stuart Weitzman, Thomas Dean, Ugg, Under Armour, Vineyard Vines, Wacoal, non-merchandise depts., lease depts. and Belk gift cards. Frye and Brahmin excluded online. Not valid on prior purchases, phone, special orders or on belk.com. Cannot be redeemed for cash, credit or refund, used in combination with any other discount or coupon offer. Valid December 4, 2012 RED DOT: *Limited exclusions in Brighton, St. John, Eileen Fisher, Lilly Pulitzer, Resort, Bridge Collection, Levis, Coach, designer handbags and junior denim. Juniors total savings are 55-75% off. Fashion Accessories, Handbags, Small Leather Goods, Hosiery, Home Store and Mens Tailored Clothing total savings are 45-65%. COUPONS NOT VALID ON RED DOT 3 0 50 % off Misses & petites better sportswear from Madison, Rafaella, Jones New York Sport, Sunny Leigh and more Orig. 24.00-119.00, Sale 11.99-82.99 Imported. Also available in todays woman sizes at slightly higher prices. 3 0 50 % off Career sportswear by ND New Directions, Choices, Ruby Rd., Kim Rogers and Alfred Dunner for misses, petites & todays woman Orig. 24.00-74.00, Sale 15.99-51.80 Imported and made in USA 4 0 50 % off Mens Izod and Chaps sportswear and Saddlebred sport shirts and sweaters Orig. 26.00-98.00, Sale 14.99-57.99 Imported 40-50 % off ENTIRE STOCK* sleepwear and robes from ND Intimates, Character, Ellen Tracy, HUE, Kim Rogers Intimates, Aria and Miss Elaine Orig. 24.00-78.00, Sale 14.40-46.80 *Excludes Miss Elaine Classics, Honeydew Intimates, romancewear, Jockey. Imported senior Early open 9am Tuesday, Dec. 4 % OFF EXTRA 20 senior DAY with limited exclusions 1 5 % o ff LIMITED EXCLUSIONS Spoiling the grandkids is the greatest job ever r e d d o t c l ea r a n c e 6 5 % 30 % o ff the current ticketed price* when you take an e x tra save *see below. FREE SHIPPING $8 Flat Rate on all other orders. ELITE FREE SHIPPING All the time. No minimum order with Elite Card. See belk.com for details. BELK.COM with $50 purchase Joan L. Schimpf Mrs. Joan L. Schimpf, 87, of Lake City, Florida passed away peacefully Monday, November 26, 2012 with her family by her side. Mrs. Schimpf was born in Canton, Ohio, but had lived in the Lake City area for 29 years after moving here from Miami. Mrs. Schimpf graduated from Lehman High School in Canton, OH in 1943. She attended Pur due University where she was a member of the Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority, and graduated in 1947 with a Bachelor of Sci ence degree. Mrs. Schimpf was a very active member of the Edward Rutledge Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution in Lake City, hav ing joined in 1985. She was a DAR, serving as the Treasurer from 1998-2011. She will always be remembered as a very artistic and creative person who brought great joy to everyone who met her. Mrs. Schimpf was preceded in death by her husband of 59 years Donald R. Schimpf and her son Jeffrey Scott Schimpf. Mrs. Schimpf is survived by her son Mark T. Schimpf of Palm City, Florida, her daughter Joni L. Barnett of Lewistown, Mon tana, her identical twin sister Barbara A. Miller of Tucson, Arizona, and three grandsons, Eric, Colin and Scott. She has nephews and nieces across the country who loved her dearly. Mrs. Schimpf will be buried at Miami Memorial Park. In quests memorial donations be made to Lehman High School Scholarship Fund Alumni As sociation, PO Box 8775 Canton, OH 44711, or Daughters of the American Revolution, Edward Rutledge Chapter, Attn: Nancy Wheaton, 344 NW Zack Dr. Lake City, FL 32055. Arrange ments are under the direction of the DEES-PARRISH FAMILY FUNERAL HOME 458 S. Mar ion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025, (386)752-1234. Please sign the online family guestbook at parrishfamilyfuneralhome.com Obituaries are paid advertise ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporters classified depart ment at 752-1293. OBITUARIES COMMUNITY CALENDAR To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr@lakecityreporter.com.

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LIVE OAK The Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park in Live Oak has opened its annual Suwannee Lights Christmas extravaganza. Suwannee Lights, a tradi tion in North Florida for families, will be held night ly through Dec. 24, from 6 to 10 p.m. Admission fees are charged. Suwannee Lights is a unique experience. Visitors can remain be warm and cozy in their own vehicle as they drive through this Christmas spectacular, regardless of the weather. Children and adults will oooh and aaah as they see more then 5 million twinkling lights on lov ingly handmade Christmas vignettes. The entire attraction was redesigned last year by Steve Briscoe of First Street Music in Lake City. The new features include more music, sound enhance ments and new displays. This event has become a tradition with hundreds of families who take the tour each year, shop the Crafts Village, chat with Santa and enjoy all the spe cial activities going on each evening and weekends at the SOSMP Visitors also can take a walking tour, roast smores over a crackling fire, sit on Santas knee while Christmas music plays in the background. Santas elves will be right there working in Santas unique workshop. The Puppetone Rockers are back again this year to delight young and old with music and the antics of the puppets, along with Dave Blazer. The Kazoobie Guy will also be there beginning Dec. 14 to entertain with his kazoo. Many come early to the SOSMP, enjoy dinner and karaoke Monday and Thursday nights and live music, dancing and dinner Friday and Saturday nights in the Music Hall. The SOSMPs SOS Caf and Restaurant brings won derful culinary creations to delight guests in the Music Hall. Check out beauti ful new improvements, which now features a full-service bar. Suwannee Lights admis sion Sunday through Thursday is $6 per adult and $2 per child 4-12 years old, children 3 and young er are free. Fridays and Saturdays, admission is $8 per adult and $2 per child 412 years old. Discount cou pons are available at Taco Bell with any purchase. SOS Caf and Restaurant opens at 5 p.m. Monday and Thursday; 6 p.m. Friday and Saturday for dinner and events in the Music Hall. Karaoke begins at 7 p.m. Monday and Thursday in the Music Hall. Music Hall live music shows begin at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, closed Tuesday and Wednesday. For more information about SOSMP, call (386) 364-1683, email spirit@ musicliveshere.com or go to www.musicliveshere. com. Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park is located at 3076 95th Drive 4.5 miles north of Live Oak, off U.S. 129. From staff reports Seeing it as a way to make the world a better place, 9-year-old Natalie Green turned over a check Monday to Haven Hospice for $2,600. Natalie decided to raise money for Haven because We had learned in school about making the world a better place, she said. I thought about how I could make the world a better place. So when I got home, I asked my Mom and Dad if I could make the world a better place by doing something for hospice? When asked by Haven staff if she knew what the organization did, she replied, You take care of sick people. Natalies goal of making the world a better place will be achieved in part because this donation will be used to help pay for patient care for those who are unable to pay them selves, and it will be used to provide grief support and bereavement camps for children. Natalies original goal was to raise $1,000, but with the help of her church, which got behind her with a fundraiser of selling dinners and having cake auctions, she man aged to collect $2,600. Natalie was joined by Pastor Stan Elis, of the First Full Gospel Church, when she presented the check to Haven Patient Care Coordinator Angie McClellan. About Haven Hospice Haven Hospice is a notfor-profit community hos pice organization provid ing services since 1979 and licensed in Florida since 1980. Haven is North Floridas expert in endof-life and palliative care, receiving national recog nition as a Circle of Life Award Recipient from the American Hospital Association for its excel lence and innovation. Haven has also been recognized as a Florida Pacesetter for its leader ship in promoting advance directives. For more than 30 years Haven has had the honor and privilege to serve more than 60,000 patients and families in North Florida. For more informa tion, visit www.haven hospice.org or call (800)727-1889. 6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY DECEMBER 2, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 6A NOTICE Attention Humana Wal-mart and CVS Caremark Medicare Part D patients: We accept these plans and all other Part D plans. Baya East 755-6677 Baya West 755-2233 Medical 755-2277 Call one of our pharmacies to see which plan is best for you. From staff reports LIVE OAK The 2012 Old Tyme Farm Days & Swamp Meet Heritage Days at the Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park was one of the largest yet. Thousands of people camped over the holiday weekend of Nov. 22-24 at the SOSMP with family and friends. A huge crowd enjoying a community Thanksgiving dinner Nov. 22. Everyone brought a covered dish and paid $5 to enjoy lunch. Guests feasted on turkey and dressing, ham and all the goodies that guests made. Thursday evening Ted Teddy Mac Elvis McMullen directed kara oke and also performed in the Music Hall. Friday night Justin Case Band played after Rion Paige opened for the popular band. Rion, 12, has become one of the favorite perform ers at the SOSMP, along with Justin Case. Saturday night Southern Rukus keep the crowd entertained with more country, country rock and a variety of other music. Old Tyme Farm Days was held Nov. 23-24, and delighted the hundreds of folks who came to see vintage tractors and farm equipment, a petting zoo, vendors, a tractor and golf cart parade and lots and lots of other fun throughout the weekend. If you want to enjoy Old Tyme Farm Days next year, its time now to make your reservations for camping, cabins or primitive camping to make sure theres space available for you and your family. For more information on SOSMP, call (386) 3641683, email spirit@musi cliveshere.com or go to www.musicliveshere.com. 9-year-old raises $2,600, donates to Haven Hospice COURTESY PHOTO Nine-year-old Natalie Green presents a check for $2,600 to Haven Hospice patient care coordinator Angie McClellan. Joining Natalie for the presentations was Pastor Stan Elis (right) of First Full Gospel Church, Natalies church. Church members helped Natalie raise the money by selling dinners and holding cake auctions. COURTESY PHOTO A band of musician figures made from strings of colorful lights is among numerous displays in the Suwannee Lights attraction at Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park near Live Oak. COURTESY PHOTO Santas Worshop is one of the many holiday-themed and colorfully lighted displays to be seen in the Suwannee Lights attraction at Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park through Dec. 24. COURTESY PHOTO A parade of antique tractors was one of the highlights of Old Tyme Farm Days and Swamp Meet Heritage Days held Nov. 23 and 24 at Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park in Live Oak. Annual Suwannee Lights opens at SOSMP Old Tyme Days draws thousands to Suwannee park

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pond was never built to the proper specifications and the county cant perform work on property that isnt publicly owned. Homeowners have said they are tired of all the fin ger pointing and just want the problems fixed. The Homeowners Roger Parish, a home owner since 2004 in Phase Two of Callaway, said there was a homeowners asso ciation, but the association never collected any money and was dissolved some time near the beginning of 2006. Parish said the county had known about the issues before then,. He contend ed the water that flooded Callaway came into the neighborhood from three different directions. In 2004, while the area was slammed with rain from three hurricanes dumping 30 inches on Columbia County, a berm was constructed on Kirby Road to keep water from entering the subdivision. Some of the houses that flooded in September 2004, during a period of intense rainfall from the passing hurricanes, didnt flood after Tropical Storm Debby, and houses that werent even close to flood ing in the 2004 hurricanes flooded this time, Parish said. Tom Ottum, a hom eowner living in Callaway Subdivision since 2004, said the retention pond from the Emerald Forest Subdivision, directly to the north of Phase Two Callaway subdivision, was connected to a retention pond in the northwestern edge of the neighborhood. Ottum said that work was done without a permit from the water management dis trict, and the flooding this time started in that area. Kevin Kirby, director of public works for Columbia County, on Saturday said a permit isnt always required for that kind of work, but whether a permit existed could not be confirmed by press time. Ottum said he remem bers the flooding started at 3:30 a.m. on Tuesday, June 26, in that area, because he helped some of the fami lies in the subdivision load up their belongings and escape. He said the water from the direction of Kirby Road, along the east edge of Callaway, either topped or breached the berm about 4 p.m. on June 26. Until then, he said, that part of the neighborhood wasnt flooded. And the rain had stopped, he said. He said at 4:30 p.m. the water was a foot deep and by 5 p.m. it was more than three feet deep. By 6 p.m., he sad the water was past peoples chests. They can say what they want, but thats where it came from and thats how fast, Ottum said. He said the other direc tion water flowed from was down Callahan Avenue, the southern edge of the neighborhood. He said anytime theres a heavy rain he sees water rushing into Callaway coming from that direction. Ottum said he under stands when theres 30 inches of rain there will be flooding, but he feels the county is responsible for some of the damage because he feels that water was redirected into the neighborhood. Will they stop it, do they know where its coming from? he asked. I dont know. A.J. Decker, who hasnt moved back to Callaway since his home was badly damaged by Debby, said there were many unan swered questions. Our area of the subdivi sion didnt flood at all when Callaway initially flooded in 2004, he said. With Tropical Storm Debbie, however, our area was the first part of the subdivision to flood. The situation rais es a number of questions as to how this happened and whats different from 2004. Williams in an earlier interview said that he has yet to find an engineer, one that will say Yes, (the linkage of the two retention ponds) did contribute to the Callaway flooding. SRWMD and the County Williams said the county accepts operation and main tenance for retention ponds if the developer designs the retention ponds to coun ty specifications. Some requirements call for the county to have enough land to be able to move equip ment onto the site. That can limit the number of homes in a development. In Callaway, the retention pond was not built so as to allow the county to oper ate and maintain the pond, Williams said. There is a string of written correspondence between county staff and the water district about needed improvements to the retention pond. Leroy Marshall II, an engineer with the water district, wrote multiple letters to the county, and an email to the develop er, Daniel Crapps, stating that after a site visit staff found that there has been additional, unpermitted work in the retention pond and the retention pond is in need of repair. Marshall lives in the Callaway subdivision. Jody DuPree filed a for mal complaint with water management that said Marshall was disseminat ing incorrect information to Callaway residents concerning storm water management. Callaway resident Chris Williams said Duprees actions were inappropriate and unfounded. Parrish said he never received information from Marshall and hadnt heard from any other homeown ers that were given infor mation from Marhsall. In a Feb. 10, 2006 letter to Callaway homeowner Rick Schultz, in reference to an earlier correspon dence, Dale Williams wrote the retention pond was the property of the Callaway Land Trust, and that it is unlawful for the county to expend public funds on private property. He also noted that the division between the water district and the county extends beyond Callaway subdivision, and that other developments in similar positions exist. This issue is one of legal interpretation, he wrote. It is not adminis trative nor engineering. The repairs were never completed, and in 2010 Jerry Bowden, senior pro fessional engineer with the water district, sent another letter to Dale Williams. I am aware this proj ect has a history dating back to 2006; however the items were never fully resolved, Bowden wrote. According to district records, Columbia County is the designated operation and maintenance entity for the project and thereby responsible for the sys tems upkeep. A letter dated Dec. 29, 2010, from Williams to Jon Dinges, who was then the director of water supply for the water district, said the county would accept operation and maintenance for the pond if four condi tions were met. The county needed legal access to the retention pond and ownership had to be transferred to the pond. Also, an estimated $80,000 to $100,000 was needed for refurbishment. Then, the county commis sion would have to approve acceptance of operation and maintenance. These conditions havent been met, and the repairs still need to be completed. The county has since changed its policy on how surface water drain age systems are accepted for operation and mainte nance. The county com mission has to approve a resolution to accept a retention pond. The county is now nego tiating a deal with water management to settle the question of responsibility for the disputed retention pond in Callaway. Under tems of the pos sible settlement, water management would give the county a 60-acre tract adjacent to Alligator Lake in exchange for the coun tys accepting responsibil ity for maintenance of the disputed retention pond. The county would also take on maintenance of three other ponds for which the responsibility of operation and maintenance is in question. Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY DECEMBER 2, 2012 7A 7A Lake City 352-374-4534 426 S.W. Commerce Dr., Suite 130 Entire Stock Sandals 25% off Mens Womens Children WILSONS OUTFITTERS 1291 SE Baya Dr, Lake City (386) 755-7060 WilsonsOutfitters@comcast.net Open Saturdays until Christmas Knife Insulated Camo Bibs & Coveralls (Youth) Check out all our Camo 40% off The rising cost of storm mantenance By DEREK GILLIAM dgilliam@lakecityreporter.com County Manager Dale Williams said during the economic boom years the coun ty commission would sometimes approve two or three plats for development during a single meeting. Before the boom, the board would see one every month or so, he said. Many of those plats dedicated the sur face water drainage maintenance and oper ation to the county. In addition, the county maintains drainage ditches on either side of public roads. Recently, the county created a crew just for the maintenance of drainage systems. The 2012-13 budget for maintenance of drainage systems more than doubled from $310,182 to $632,592. Williams said the increase to the budget and the addition of a crew to work just on drainage issues was due to multiple factors. The county commission wanted the increases because of aging infrastructure and the increased number of projects, he said. You could take the entire public works budget and spend it on drainage and not waste it, Williams said. The county commission knew about the problems associated with drainage issues as far back as 2004. The combination of three hurricanes over the span of about one month caused tremendous flooding across the county. In the minutes from one meeting, District 1 Commissioner Ron Williams said if the county didnt act quickly, the county would be faced with the same problems the next time a big storm comes through the area. I think we really need to revisit our stormwater management district. Were talking about millions of dollars to truly fix the problem, and if were going to fix it, it needs to be really fixed, he said at that meeting. We as commissioners are going to have to have the backbone to stand up and turely fix the flooding problems. He said at that meeting that the only way the problem will be solved is if the county has a stormwater management system. Williams said Saturday that his position hasnt changed, aside from the fact that the county should enter into a partnership to pay for the storm ater management system. He said in his district, the county is responsible for about one-third of the water. He said the Suwannee River Water Management District, Lake City gov ernment and the state Department of Transportation should be the partners with the county to pay for the stromwater management system. CALLAWAY: County may be near deal with Suwannee River Water District Continued From Page 1A DEREK GILLIAM /Lake City Reporter This retention pond has been at the center of numerous letters between the Suwannee River Water Management District and the county commission. The pond was dedicated to the Callaway homeowners association, but water management says the county is responsible for operation and maintenance. DEREK GILLIAM/ Lake City Reporter The Emerald Forest retention pond was con nected by a ditch to the retention pond at the northern end of the Callaway subdivision.

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8A LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY DECEMBER 2, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 8AWEATHER plus all the ( jingle ) bells & whistles! tis the time to buy! 2 26 % APR 1 for up to 60 months As low as No payments until 2 0 1 3 2 Shop the dealership with a CAMPUS Pre-Approved Loan Draft and negotiate as a cash buyer! Have a loan with another lender? Lower your payment by bringing it to CAMPUS! M M Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Columbia and Suwannee counties! 3 Accelerate your approval, apply today! Call 754-2219 Click campuscu.com Visit your local service center OFFER NOT AVAILABLE ON EXISTING CAMPUS LOANS. OFFER IS FOR NEW LOANS ONLY. MAY NOT BE COMBINED WITH ANY OTHER OFFER. 1. Credit approval required. Your rate may be higher based on creditworthiness, vehicle and term of loan. For example, a $39,000.00 loan with no money down at 2.14% for 48 months would require 47 monthly payments of $854.12 and a final payment of $833.58, finance charge o f $1,839.67, for a total of payments of $40,977.22. The amount financed is $39,237.55, the APR is 2.26%. APR = Annual Percentag e Rate. 2. Interest will accrue from date of purchase. Choosing this option will increase the total amount of interest you pay. 3. Credit approval and initial $5 deposit required. Mention this ad and well waive the $15 new membership fee. This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration. Lake City 183 SW Bascom Norris Dr. Gville E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunters Walk 5115 NW 43rd St. Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St. Shands at UF Room H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Alachua 14759 NW 157th Ln. Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E. Silver Springs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. Summer eld 17950 US Hwy. 441 Tallahassee 1511 Killearn Center Blvd.

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By STEVE REEDAssociated PressCHARLOTTE, N.C. — James Wilder Jr. ran for two touchdowns as No. 13 Florida State held off Georgia Tech 21-15 Saturday night to capture its first Atlantic Coast Conference champions since 2005 and earn a trip to the Orange Bowl. It was Florida State’s 13th ACC title. The heavily favored Seminoles (11-2) built a 21-6 lead at the half and held on to win. Despite its record, Georgia Tech (6-7) is bowl eligible after receiv-ing a waiver from the NCAA on Thursday. It looked like Georgia Tech, a two-touchdown underdog, might get blown out, but the game wasn’t decided until Karlos Williams inter-cepted Tevin Washington with less than a minute remaining. By PAUL NEWBERRYAssociated PressATLANTA — Alabama is heading back to the national championship game — by a mere 4 yards. AJ McCarron threw a 45-yard touchdown pass to Amari Cooper with 3:15 remaining, and the No. 2 Crimson Tide barely held off No. 3 Georgia 32-28 in a Southeastern Conference title game for the ages Saturday. After an apparent gameclinching interception by Alabama was overturned by replay, Georgia’s Aaron Murray completed a 15-yard pass to Arthur Lynch, a 23-yarder to Tavarres King and a 26-yarder to Lynch, who was hauled down at the Alabama 8 as the clock continued to run. Out of timeouts, the Bulldog snapped the ball with 9 seconds to go. Murray threw a pass in the flat to Chris Conley, who slipped down at the 4. Georgia couldn’t get off another play. In a back-and-forth second half that looked noth-ing like a game in the defensive-minded SEC, the Crimson Tide trailed 21-10 after Alec Ogletree returned a blocked field goal for a touchdown in the third quarter. Alabama rallied behind a punishing run game, finish-ing with 350 yards on the ground, an SEC champion-ship game record. Eddie Lacy finished with 181 yards on 20 carries, including two TDs. Freshman T.J. Yeldon had 153 yards on 25 carries, also scoring a TD. But the Tide won it through the air. With Georgia stacking the line, McCarron fooled the Bulldogs with play action and delivered a perfectly thrown pass to Cooper. A s the clock ticked down on Columbia High’s year, tears fell on the sideline as the Tigers watched Navarre High celebrate a 28-21 win in the Class 6A Region 1 final. And while the Tigers will certainly think of this game for a long time, those tears will one day subside. The tears of sadness will turn into tears of happiness. These players have absolutely nothing to be ashamed of and should be proud of everything they’ve done for this program. A couple of years ago this community needed someone to breathe life back into the Tigers’ program. The stadium was empty at times as the Tigers celebrated victories. Along came Brian Allen and he brought the fans back, as witnessed last week in the Tigers’ 34-8 victory against St. Augustine High. Not only did the community support the Tigers at home, they packed the stands on Friday to see this team give its all. What they saw was something special. What they saw was a team that doesn’t quit. By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.com NAVARRE — Columbia High was able to over-come a 21-0 deficit on the road by fighting through adversity, but in the end it was Navarre High com-ing away with a 28-21 win in the Region 1 final on Friday. The Raiders came out firing on all cylinders and struck gold on the first play of the game, as Nick Benton took the opening kickoff at the 19-yard line and returned it 81 yards for a touchdown. Chandler Moorer added the extra point and Navarre had a 7-0 lead before either team had taken an offensive snap. After an exchange of possessions, Columbia moved the ball into Navarre terri-tory but came up short on a fourth-and-4 when quarter-back Jayce Barber’s pass fell incomplete. Navarre found the end zone again only four plays later. Facing a third-and-7 at the Tigers’ 39, quarterback Andrew Reives couldn’t find an open receiver, but found an open running lane and scrambled to the end zone for a 14-0 lead with 5:18 remaining in the first quarter. Columbia again moved the ball into Navarre ter-ritory before facing a sec-ond fourth-down situation. This time Trey Marshall slipped and came up short on fourth-and-2. The Raiders used Columbia’s second miscue on fourth down to set up a six-play, 65-yard drive and take a 21-0 lead when Reives hit running back Jay Warren on a 21-yard screen pass for a score. Columbia’s offense went three-and-out on the next drive, but freshman cor-nerback Roger Cray picked off a Reives’ pass to give the Tigers another shot. It woke up the Tigers.Columbia used three running plays to account for 60 yards — all from Ronald Timmons — to cut the lead to 21-7. Timmons capped off the drive with a Lake City Reporter SPORTS Sunday, December 2, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS BRIEFS Late touchdown pass sends ’Bama to 32-28 victory. TIGERS continued on 6B CHS continued on 6B ACC Championship victory earns Florida State BCS bowl game. GAMES Monday Q Columbia High girls soccer vs. Fort White High, 6 p.m. Q Columbia High boys soccer vs. St. Francis Catholic High, 6 p.m. Q Columbia High girls basketball vs. Suwannee High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Tuesday Q Fort White High girls basketball vs. Bradford High, 6 p.m. Q Fort White High soccer vs. P.K. Yonge School, 7 p.m. (boys-5) Q Columbia High boys basketball vs. Lee High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Q Fort White High boys basketball at Williston High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Wednesday Q Columbia High boys soccer vs. Chiles High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Thursday Q Columbia High girls weightlifting vs. Baker County High, 4 p.m. Q Fort White High girls basketball at Suwannee High, 6 p.m. Q Fort White High soccer at Keystone Heights High, 7 p.m. (girls-5) Q Fort White High boys basketball vs. Santa Fe High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Friday Q Columbia High wrestling at Capital City Classic at Lincoln High, TBA Q Columbia High girls soccer at Timberwolves Classic in Tallahassee, TBA Q Fort White High boys basketball vs. Bradford High, 6:30 p.m. (JV-5) Q Columbia High girls basketball at Lee High, 7 p.m. (JV-5:30) Q Columbia High boys basketball at Stanton Prep, 7 p.m. (JV-5:30) Q Columbia High boys soccer at Mosley High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) CST Saturday Q Columbia High wrestling at Capital City Classic at Lincoln High, TBD Q Columbia High girls soccer at Timberwolves Classic in Tallahassee, TBD Q Columbia High boys basketball vs. Palatka High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) FROM THE SIDELINE Brandon FinleyPhone: (386) 754-0420bfinley@lakecityreporter.comTigers have plenty to be proud of BOYS CLUB Registration for basketball league The Boys Club of Columbia County is taking registration for its basketball program. Three leagues are offered: Training for ages 6-7-8; Jr. Varsity for ages 8-9-10; Varsity for ages 11-12-13-14. Cost is $45. For details, call the club at 752-4184. ADULT BASKETBALL Charity games for USSSA youth Richardson Community Center/Annie Mattox North, Inc., is sponsoring the third annual charity basketball games at the Lake City Middle School on Jan. 5. The games feature women and men teams — Live Oak vs. Lake City. Game times are 6 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Admission is $5, with proceeds going to USSSA youth basketball. For details, call Nicole Smith at 754-7095.Q From staff reports HEARTBREAKER JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High running back Ronald Timmons (23) spri nts to the end zone against Navarre High in the Region 1 final on Friday. Timmons ran for 221 yards and two touchdowns in the Tigers’ 28-21 loss to the Raiders. CHS fights back, but falls at Navarre, 28-21 ASSOCIATED PRESSAlabama running back Eddie Lacy (42) celebrates with linesman D.J. Fluker (76) after scoring a touchdown.Tide wins thrillerSeminoles hold on ASSOCIATED PRESSFlorida State’s Timmy Jernigan (8) reacts after a sack ag ainst Georgia Tech during the ACC Championship game in Charlotte, N.C., on Sa turday.

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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today COLLEGE FOOTBALL 8:30 p.m. ESPN — BCS Selection Show, at Bristol, Conn. GOLF 7:30 a.m. TGC — Sunshine Tour, Nedbank Challenge, final round, at Sun City, South Africa (same-day tape) 1 p.m. TGC — World Challenge, final round, at Thousand Oaks, Calif. 3 p.m. NBC — World Challenge, final round, at Thousand Oaks, Calif. MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 12:15 p.m. FSN — Manhattan vs. George Washington, at Washington 2:45 p.m. FSN — Maryland vs. George Mason, at Washington NFL FOOTBALL 1 p.m. CBS — Regional coverageFOX — Regional coverage 4 p.m. FOX — Regional coverage 4:25 p.m. CBS — Doubleheader game 8:20 p.m. NBC — Philadelphia at Dallas ——— Monday NFL FOOTBALL 8:30 p.m. ESPN — N.Y. Giants at Washington SOCCER 2:55 p.m. ESPN2 — Premier League, Wigan at Newcastle WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN2 — Jimmy V Classic, Maryland vs. UConn, at Hartford, Conn.FOOTBALLNFL standings AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PANew England 8 3 0 .727 407 244 Miami 5 6 0 .455 211 226 N.Y. Jets 4 7 0 .364 221 290 Buffalo 4 7 0 .364 243 319 South W L T Pct PF PAHouston 10 1 0 .909 327 211 Indianapolis 7 4 0 .636 230 273 Tennessee 4 7 0 .364 238 335Jacksonville 2 9 0 .182 188 308 North W L T Pct PF PABaltimore 9 2 0 .818 283 219Pittsburgh 6 5 0 .545 231 210Cincinnati 6 5 0 .545 282 247Cleveland 3 8 0 .273 209 248 West W L T Pct PF PADenver 8 3 0 .727 318 221San Diego 4 7 0 .364 245 237 Oakland 3 8 0 .273 218 356 Kansas City 1 10 0 .091 161 301 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAN.Y. Giants 7 4 0 .636 305 226 Washington 5 6 0 .455 295 285 Dallas 5 6 0 .455 242 262Philadelphia 3 8 0 .273 184 282 South W L T Pct PF PAAtlanta 11 1 0 .917 317 229 Tampa Bay 6 5 0 .545 310 254New Orleans 5 7 0 .417 321 327Carolina 3 8 0 .273 214 265 North W L T Pct PF PAChicago 8 3 0 .727 277 175 Green Bay 7 4 0 .636 273 245Minnesota 6 5 0 .545 248 249Detroit 4 7 0 .364 267 280 West W L T Pct PF PASan Francisco 8 2 1 .773 276 155Seattle 6 5 0 .545 219 185 St. Louis 4 6 1 .409 205 254 Arizona 4 7 0 364 180 227 Thursday’s Game Atlanta 23, New Orleans 13 Today’s Games Seattle at Chicago, 1 p.m.Minnesota at Green Bay, 1 p.m.San Francisco at St. Louis, 1 p.m.Carolina at Kansas City, 1 p.m.Houston at Tennessee, 1 p.m.Arizona at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m.Indianapolis at Detroit, 1 p.m.Jacksonville at Buffalo, 1 p.m.New England at Miami, 1 p.m.Tampa Bay at Denver, 4:05 p.m.Cleveland at Oakland, 4:25 p.m.Cincinnati at San Diego, 4:25 p.m.Pittsburgh at Baltimore, 4:25 p.m.Philadelphia at Dallas, 8:20 p.m. Monday’s Game N.Y. Giants at Washington, 8:30 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 6 Denver at Oakland, 8:20 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 9 Chicago at Minnesota, 1 p.m.Baltimore at Washington, 1 p.m.Kansas City at Cleveland, 1 p.m.San Diego at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.Tennessee at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.N.Y. Jets at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.Atlanta at Carolina, 1 p.m.Philadelphia at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.St. Louis at Buffalo, 1 p.m.Dallas at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.Miami at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.Arizona at Seattle, 4:25 p.m.New Orleans at N.Y. Giants, 4:25 p.m.Detroit at Green Bay, 8:20 p.m. Monday, Dec. 10 Houston at New England, 8:30 p.m. Consecutive TD pass 54 — Drew Brees, New Orleans, Oct. 18, 2009-Nov. 29, 2012 47 — Johnny Unitas, Baltimore Colts, Dec. 9, 1956-Dec. 4, 1960 43 — Tom Brady, New England, Sept. 12, 2010-present 36 — Brett Favre, Green Bay, Nov. 4, 2002-Nov. 29, 2004 30 — Dan Marino, Miami, Nov. 10, 1985-Nov. 22, 1987High school playoffs REGION FINALS Class 8A Apopka 52, Fletcher 19Christopher Columbus Catholic 36, Miami Killian 19 Cypress Bay 31, Seminole Ridge 14Dr. Phillips 31, East Lake 21 Class 7A Kissimmee Osceola 21, Newsome 18Lincoln 35, Oviedo 29Manatee 51, Fort Pierce Central 0St. Thomas Aquinas 38, Boyd Anderson 24 Class 6A Gainesville 42, Armwood 10Miami Central 38, Palm Bay 2Naples 41, Mainland 14Navarre 28, Columbia 21 Class 5A Godby 64, Bishop Kenny 29Immokalee 38, Lake Wales 21Miami Jackson 33, Glades Central 24Robinson 49, Pasco 21 STATE SEMIFINALS Class 4A Bolles School 45, Yulee 35Miami Washington 41, Cocoa 13 Class 3A Fort Lauderdale University 42, Clearwater Central Catholic 0 Madison County 27, Orlando The First Academy 3 Class 2A Dade Christian 27, First Baptist 13University Christian 26, Warner Christian 21 Class 1A Northview 48, Liberty County 14Trenton 36, Newberry 35, OTBASKETBALLNBA schedule Today’s Games Phoenix at New York, 12 p.m.Orlando at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m. Monday’s Games Portland at Charlotte, 7 p.m.Cleveland at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.Milwaukee at New Orleans, 8 p.m.Toronto at Denver, 9 p.m.L.A. Clippers at Utah, 9 p.m.Orlando at Golden State, 10:30 p.m. Florida 82, Marquette 49 At Gainesville MARQUETTE (5-2) Otule 0-1 0-0 0, J. Wilson 1-8 1-2 3, Cadougan 1-4 0-0 2, Blue 8-14 2-4 20, Lockett 2-7 1-3 5, Ferguson 0-1 0-0 0, Anderson 0-1 0-0 0, D. Wilson 3-5 0-0 6, Thomas 1-3 0-0 3, Taylor, Jr. 2-3 0-0 4, Gardner 3-4 0-0 6. Totals 21-51 4-9 49.FLORIDA (6-0) Yeguete 5-6 1-2 11, Murphy 4-7 0-0 10, Boynton 2-11 2-3 6, Rosario 2-6 6-6 11, Wilbekin 2-6 0-0 4, Kurtz 0-0 0-0 0, Young 3-6 4-5 10, Ogbueze 0-0 0-0 0, Graham 0-0 0-0 0, Frazier II 6-9 0-0 17, Prather 4-4 2-2 11, Walker 0-0 2-2 2. Totals 28-55 17-20 82. Halftime—Florida 38-24. 3-Point Goals—Marquette 3-12 (Blue 2-5, Thomas 1-2, Cadougan 0-1, Lockett 0-1, Taylor, Jr. 0-1, J. Wilson 0-2), Florida 9-24 (Frazier II 5-8, Murphy 2-3, Prather 1-1, Rosario 1-4, Yeguete 0-1, Wilbekin 0-2, Boynton 0-5). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Marquette 23 (J. Wilson 6), Florida 37 (Young 10). Assists—Marquette 12 (Blue, Cadougan, Lockett, D. Wilson 2), Florida 16 (Boynton 5). Total Fouls—Marquette 15, Florida 9. A—10,245.SOCCERMLS Cup Los Angeles 3, Houston 1 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-04212BSPORTS JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Rykia Jackson (10) drives around Col umbia High’s Marnae Gaskins (23) in a game on Nov. 15.Lady Indians defeat North Florida ChristianFrom staff reportsFort White High’s girls basketball team evened its record with a 61-18 home win over North Florida Christian School on Friday. Kasha Cook scored a career high 26 points to lead the Lady Indians. Tasha Robinson and Cenise Armstrong also hit double figures with 11 and 10 points, respectively. N’Mandria Reynolds added eight points with two each from Makhael Rolack, Rykia Jackson and Khadijah Ingram. Fort White lost a district game, 37-31, at Santa Fe High on Thursday. Robinson scored 12 points and Ingram scored nine. The Lady Indians opened the week on Tuesday with a 43-28 win at Union County High. Armstrong led with 14 points and Cook scored 11. Fort White (3-3, 0-2) hosts Bradford High at 6 p.m. Tuesday.Lady Tigers basketballColumbia High’s girls basketball team dropped a pair of road games last week. The Lady Tigers lost 57-38 to Atlantic Coast High on Thursday and 63-60 to Madison County High on Monday. Marnae Gaskins scored 17 points against Atlantic Coast and Justice Campbell also hit double figures with 12. Other scorers were Lona Wilson 8, Stephanie Silva, 7, Sierra Vanderpool, 2, and Adrienna Young, 2. Campbell poured in 24 points in the Madison County game. Wilson scored 16 and Gaskins scored 12. Other scorers were Silva, 4, Bernisha Clark, 2, and Arnereanna Bryant, 2. “We had the lead in the fourth quarter in both games,” coach David Tompkins said. “We’re right there and the girls are playing hard. We have got to find a way to pull it out at the end.” Columbia’s junior varsity improved to 4-0 with a 43-34 win over Atlantic Coast and a 48-18 win over Madison County. Jazman Myers scored 20 at Madison County and Lyric Boyd scored 12. Against Atlantic Coast, Myers scored 10 and Kristal Smith scored nine. Columbia (2-4, 0-1) hosts Suwannee High at 7:30 p.m. Monday.From staff reportsColumbia High’s girls weightlifting team host-ed Fort White High on Wednesday. The teams split first-place honors in the 10 weight divisions. The winners follow by weight class with bench press, clean and jerk and total lift listed. Q 101 pounds — Jessica Burns, Fort White, 65-75-140; Q 110 pounds — Kayla Carman, Columbia, 90-95-185; Q 119 pounds — Savannah Thomas, Columbia, 70-80-150; Q 120 pounds — Charlie Watson, Columbia, 100-120-220; Q 139 pounds — Jessica Widlan, Fort White, 95-100-195; Q 154 pounds — Jordan Parks, Columbia, 100-110-210; Q 169 pounds — Emily Roach, Fort White, 110-100-210; Q 183 pounds — Barbara Mendez, Fort White, 95-115-210; Q 199 pounds — Taylor Law, Fort White, 90-100-190; Q Unlimited — Dana Roberts, Columbia, 165-150-315. Columbia hosts Baker County High at 4 p.m. Thursday.Lady Tiger, Lady Indian weightlifters split ten divisions McDowell leads World ChallengeAssociated PressTHOUSAND OAKS, Calif. — Graeme McDowell rolled in two long putts early and kept bogeys off his card to keep the lead in the World Challenge on Saturday. McDowell, trying to win at Sherwood for the second time in three years, had a 4-under 68 for a two-shot lead over Keegan Bradley (67). Tiger Woods failed to birdie any of the five par 5s at Sherwood, though the tournament host and defending champion stayed in the game with enough birdies late in his round for a 69. He was five shots behind, along with Bo Van Pelt (70). Los Angeles defends MLS Cup titleAssociated PressCARSON, Calif. — Landon Donovan scored the tiebreaking goal on a penalty kick in the 65th minute, and the Los Angeles Galaxy posted a 3-1 victory over the Houston Dynamo in the MLS Cup on Saturday. Omar Gonzalez tied it in the 61st minute with a long header for the Galaxy, who defended their title. Los Angeles won its fourth MLS Cup, tying the mark of D.C. United.

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Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012 3B3BSPORTSAdvance to region JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High captains Darren Burch (36), (from right) Blake Kuykendall (20), Felix Woods (4) and Jayce Barb er (5) listen to an official before the coin toss at the be ginning of the Region 1 final game against Navarre High on Friday.JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High head coach Brian Allen reacts after his team scores a touchdown during Friday’s game against Navarre High. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Solomon Bell (30) tackles Navarre Hi gh’s Jordan Leggett (6). JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Ben Kuykendall (11) runs with the bal l after intercepting a pass against Navarre High.JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High fan Haley Thomas, 24, (left) smiles as her 2-year-old neice, Emma, hugs a stuffed tiger before the start of the game against Navarre High on Friday.

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4B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-04214BSportsFinal disappointment JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterMembers of the Columbia High football team show their dis appointment after a 28-21 loss to host Navarre High in the Region 1 final Friday night. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Roger Cray (9) and Charles Combs (5 4) shake hands with Navarre High players after the game on Friday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High quarterback Jayce Barber (5) attempts to b reak away from Navarre High’s Jessie Holmes (29) while on a keeper JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Kody Mixon (71) is consoled after the Tigers loss to Navarre High. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Shaquille Johnson (18) loses control of a pass from Jayce Barber in the end zone during the game against Navarre High.

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Associated PressTULSA, Okla. — UCF will head to the Big East without another Conference USA championship. Alex Singleton ran for 100 yards and plunged over the top for a 1-yard score in overtime to lift Tulsa to a 33-27 victory over the Golden Knights on Saturday for its first Conference USA title and Liberty Bowl bid since 2005. It was the final game in C-USA play for UCF, which will settle for a close-to-home trip to the Beef ‘O’ Brady’s Bowl in St. Petersburg. “We’re both the best in the conference and it showed,” offensive lineman Jordan Rae said. “They made a couple more plays than we did. You have to give them credit.” Singleton came up with just the second 100-yard game of his career, break-ing the school record for touchdowns in the process. After Cory Dorris blocked Shawn Moffitt’s 38-yard field goal on UCF’s possession to start over-time, Tulsa (10-3) kept the ball on the ground on five straight plays. “We didn’t make plays when we needed to, both on offense and defense. It came down to one more stop or us putting the ball in the end zone one more time,” said running back Latavius Murray, who became the first player in UCF history to rush for touchdowns in eight straight games in a single season. Blake Bortles threw for 194 yards and a pair of 8-yard touchdown passes to Breshad Perriman and Quincy McDuffie for UCF (9-4). He also ran for 60 yards and another score.No. 25 Boise St. 27, Nevada 21RENO, Nev. — Joe Southwick threw two touch-down passes to lead No. 25 Boise State to a 27-21 victo-ry over Nevada on Saturday, earning the Broncos a share of the Mountain West Conference title and ensuring their nation’s best seventh consecutive 10-win season. D.J. Harper ran for 130 yards for Boise State (10-2, 7-1) and the Broncos’ defense put the clamps on a Nevada offense that was averaging 38 points per game. Stefphon Jefferson ran for 139 yards and a touch-down and Cody Fajardo passed for 203 yards and ran for 81 for the Wolf Pack (7-5, 4-4), who lost four of their last five games after starting the season 6-1. Matt Miller caught seven passes for 127 yards, includ-ing a 52-yard touchdown from Southwick that put Boise ahead late 24-7. Southwick completed 19 of 26 for 199 yards. The Broncos will share the league title with Fresno State and San Diego State. Nevada accepted an invitation earlier in the week to play a Pac-12 opponent in the New Mexico Bowl on Dec. 15.No. 16 Oregon St. 77, Nicholls St. 3CORVALLIS, Ore. — Storm Woods ran for two touchdowns in the first quar-ter and No. 16 Oregon State put up its highest point total ever, routing Nicholls State 77-3 on Saturday in a game postponed by Hurricane Isaac. The Beavers surpassed their 76-0 win over Willamette in 1931. Oregon State (9-3) started playing its substitutes against the lower-division Colonels after taking a 35-0 halftime lead. Markus Wheaton caught 12 passes for 123 yards and a touchdown. The Beavers had a complete turnaround from their 3-9 finish last year. Oregon State is possibly headed to the Holiday Bowl in San Diego on Dec. 27. Oregon State piled up 683 yards against the FCS Southland Conference Colonels (1-10), who lost their eighth straight. Woods scored on runs from the 8 and 1. Wheaton added a 10-yard score early in the second for a 24-0 lead. Terron Ward added a 15yard TD run after Oregon State took out starting quarterback Sean Mannion and put in Cody Vaz, who missed the past two games.Baylor 41, No. 24 Oklahoma St. 34WACO, Texas — Lache Seastrunk rushed for 178 yards, including a 76-yard touchdown in the fourth quarter, and Nick Florence passed for 296 yards as Baylor beat No. 24 Oklahoma State 41-34 Saturday. Baylor (7-5, 4-5 Big 12) has won at least seven games in three straight sea-sons — the first time the Bears have done that since 1949-51. Seastrunk’s long scoring run gave Baylor a 41-27 lead with 5:11 left in the game. By STEPHEN HAWKINSAssociated PressFORT WORTH, Texas — Landry Jones and Oklahoma treated their regular-season finale like a championship game — and finished wearing caps and T-shirts declaring the 12th-ranked Sooners the Big 12 champions. They then had to wait to see if they would have to share their eighth Big 12 title, or win it outright. “Technically, we’re not sharing anything with anybody right now,” Sooners defensive end R.J. Washington said. “Right now, we’re the only Big 12 champions. We’ll see what happens later. Sharing it or not sharing it, winning the conference championship is great.” With their 24-17 victory Saturday, after TCU’s fourth-down pass to the goal line in the final minute was knocked down incom-plete, the Sooners (10-2, 8-1 Big 12) clinched at least a share of their Big 12 title — and likely a BCS berth no matter what happens. “In the end, it’s just great to be in this position and to be a winner again,” coach Bob Stoops said. “For these guys, Big 12 champs, or co-champs, they’re recognized as champions.” Jones threw for 244 yards and two touchdowns as the Sooners won their eighth consecutive Big 12 game since a late-September loss to Kansas State. The Sooners, whose only other loss was to No. 1 Notre Dame, are in good shape for the final at-large BCS berth if K-State wins. Kent State’s double-overtime loss to Northern Illinois in the MAC championship game likely ended any chance for that league to get in the Bowl Championship Series. TCU (7-5, 4-5), the twotime BCS buster in its first Big 12 season, lost all four of its conference games at home despite winning four on the road. “We had a chance to win the game, simple as that,” coach Gary Patterson said. “We gave up an easy touch-down when freshmen blew an assignment.” The Frogs were still within a touchdown when Oklahoma’s Mike Hunnicut missed a 42-yard field goal attempt for with just under 3 minutes left. After the Sooners won their last two games by scoring in the final minute — to win at West Virginia and with 4 seconds left to force overtime and beat Oklahoma State — they depended upon their defense this time. Frogs freshman quarterback Trevone Boykin, who finished with 231 yards passing, threw a 35-yard-er to Cam White to the Oklahoma 12. On third-and-10 from there, Boykin got in the end zone on a keeper, but the play was called back because of a holding call — an obvious penalty that cleared the way for the score. After hitting Josh Boyce for 7 yards, the Frogs had fourth-and-13 from the 15 in the final minute when Boykin threw toward Boyce again. But he couldn’t make the play between two defenders. “We like to make them interesting around this place,” Jones said. “Unfortunately we didn’t finish it the way we want-ed to offensively, but the defense did.” The Horned Frogs’ fourgame home losing streak is their longest since five in a row from November 1996 to November 1997. Before this year, they hadn’t lost consecutive home games in a season since 1998. Oklahoma has won the Big 12 in every even-numbered year since Bob Stoops became coach in 1999. The Sooners, who also won a conference title in 2007, have been to eight BCS games in that span. Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012 5B5BSports Sooners stake Big 12 claim ASSOCIATED PRESSOklahoma quarterback Landry Jones (12) passes agains t TCU during a game in Fort Worth, Texas, on Saturday. UCF falls in C-USA title game ASSOCIATED PRESSBoise State’s Grant Hedrick (9) streaks down the sidelin e against Nevada in a Mountain West Conference game in Reno, Nev., on Saturday.

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They saw a team that fights and claws. They saw a team that wins and loses with emotion. They saw a team that left everything they had on the field this season. Allen calls the Tigers the hardest working team in America and that showed this season. The Tigers never quit. They often wore teams down. They may have come up short on the scoreboard in two games, but they won respect from every team they faced. And they won back the community. This is Tiger Town and football is back to stay. This group of coaches and players are to thank for showing what Tiger football should be. And were all proud of them. 6B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421 6BSPORTS Honesty. Integrity. Professional. Honesty. Integrity. Professional. Three simple words, but its been our way of doing business since 1967. G L E N N I J O N E S I N C C E L E B R A T I N G 4 5 Y E A R S O F S E R V I C E Thank you to our customers for making Glenn I. Jones the largest heating and cooling contractor in North Central Florida. Trust the Name You Know... Call 552 NW Hilton Avenue, Lake City, FL 32055 www.glennijonesinc. com License# CAC051486 386-752-5389 Did You Know... Customer Appreciation Special $10 OFF $10 OFF $150 OFF $150 OFF TIGERS: Poor field position a factor in second half Continued From Page 1B CHS: Tiger Town again Continued From Page 1B Brandon Finley covers sports for the Lake City Reporter Tigers set the bar high By BRANDON FINLEY bfinley@lakecityreporter.com NAVARRE Columbia High might not have reached its ultimate goal this season, but the Tigers set the ground work for what is expected out of the football program. An 11-2 season is noth ing to be disappointed about, following the 28-21 loss to Navarre High in the Class 6A Region 1 final. Columbia fell down 21-0 before fighting back to tie the game on the opening play of the third quarter. Timmons finished with 221 yards in the game as the Tigers running attack brought Columbia back when it looked like the game could be over early. Lonnie Underwood added another 89 for Columbia. Thats just who we are, head coach Brian Allen said about the Tigers fight ing back through adver sity. You have to credit our players and staff. The defense also did its part by holding Navarre after falling behind 21-0 early. Senior Felix Woods summed it up by describ ing the Tigers faith in each other. Were one big fam ily, Woods said. Were a brotherhood. I told the guys that we wouldnt give up. We had to continue to fight. Thats what the Tigers have done all season push ing Columbia to a 10-game winning streak to show future players what the team is capable of. I think we set the bar really high, Woods said. Im proud of the guys and I think were going to be ready to make another run next year. Allen said this teams fight is a credit to his seniors. Anytime you have a senior-heavy group, you expect to have a good team, Allen said. They worked their butts off to be in the game late. Were going to try to do the same things next year and look for a chance to redeem ourselves. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Columbia Highs Brett Newcomb (99) sacks Navarre High quarterback Andrew Reives (8) in the Class 6A region final Friday. 37-yard run at the 8:17 mark of the second quarter. After Moorer missed a 38-yard field goal on the Raiders following drive, Columbias offense began to sync. Barber hit Alex Weber for 10 yards on the first play and the running game did the rest. Timmons broke off 31-yard run before handing the duties over to Lonnie Underwood. Underwood responded with a 25-yard run and then a 15-yard touchdown to cut the lead to one score with 5:36 remaining in the half. Columbia had an oppor tunity to tie the game going into the half, but the Tigers came up short after reach ing the 22-yard line. Columbia didnt take long to tie the game in the second half, as Timmons broke free for a 65-yard touchdown on the first play. Brant Nelson added the extra point to tie the game. The second half turned into a defensive struggle with only four first downs between the two teams. Ben Kuykendall stalled the Raiders best chance to score when he intercepted a pass at the Tigers 7. The Tigers never saw good starting field position in the third quarter with drives beginning at the 3, 7 and 20-yard lines. Columbia attempted a fake punt on the first play of the fourth quarter, but Felix Woods run came up short after slipping on the wet field. The Raiders began their game winning drive with 8:57 remaining. Facing a third-and-8, Reives hit Gavin Casey for 24 yards and four plays later Warren ran in from eight yards out for the 28-21 lead at 7:11. Columbia marched down the field and reached the Raiders 6 before the drive stalled. On the Tigers fifth fourth-down attempt of the game Barber threw to Shaq Johnson, who appeared to make the catch in the end zone, but the call on the field was incomplete. Columbia received one more possession with 1:20 left on the clock, but the game ended on an intercep tion with 24 seconds left. Anytime you spot a team 21 points, youre going to be in for a fight, Columbia head coach Brian Allen said. We havent had to face that in the last two weeks and had to change our game plan. Were going to stay just as grateful in defeat and Im proud of the way we fought back through adversity. Navarre advances to host Gainesville High at 7:30 p.m. CST on Friday for a shot at the state championship. Raiders coach Jay Walls was proud of the way his team played against the Tigers. Anytime you make those guys change their plan from the running game, youre proud, Walls said. Anytime you make them punt, you know youve done something.

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1CBIZ FRONT ON BUSINESS Jerry Osteryoung (850) 644-3372 jostery@comcast.net There are two levers for moving men interest and fear. Napoleon Bonaparte F inding out what motivates staff is more of an art than a science. So many people believe that money is the proper incentive for all workers, but that just is not always the case. I have seen so many employees who are simply not motivated by money. They just do not value it enough to alter their behav ior. Time off, on the other hand, may hold greater value for some espe cially Gen Y staff. Bottom line is incentives have to be structured so they relate to the things your staff values. One manager had been looking for an incentive to motivate one of his employ ees. He had tried every thing to no avail and had become very frustrated. Finally out of despera tion, he got her a $500 gift certificate to an upscale womens apparel shop. This worked and actually ended up being a whole lot less expensive than the other incentives he had tried, but it was successful because he was able to customize the incentive to this staff members wants. On the other end of the spectrum from incentives and rewards is loss aver sion. The theory here is that the hurt associated with a loss is much more motivating than the satis faction of a gain. To use myself as an example, I have been to Las Vegas many times, but I never gamble because the idea of losing money is so much more repugnant to me than a financial windfall is appealing. Using teachers in Chicago, three researchers did a neat experiment to test this theory and how it might relate to perfor mance. Participants were randomly selected and divided into two groups. Both groups were given a set of performance goals for the year, and their suc cess would be measured at the end of the year. The first group was immediately given a $4,000 incentive and told that they would have to pay back a portion for every goal that was unmet at the end of the year. For the second group, they set up a bonus system that would pay each teacher up to $8,000 for meeting their goals. In the first case, the reward was given up front, but with the second group, the incen tive though not paid until the end of the year could potentially be double that of the first group. Results showed that What really moves staff? Lake City Reporter 1CBIZ FRONT Week of Dec. 2 Dec. 8, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section C Columbia, Inc. Your marketplace source for Lake City and Columbia County 1CColumbia Inc. Lake City residents now have access to quality joint replacement surgery, close to home. Under the medical direction of Dr. Jeffrey Glenn, Lake City Bone and Joint offers many surgical options to the community from hip and knee replacement to partial knee replacement. Dr. Glenn is a board-certied orthopedic surgeon fellowship trained in adult reconstructive surgery. To schedule an appointment, call 386-755-9720. 3140 NW Medical Center Lane, Suite 130, Lake City, FL 32055 Dr. Jeffrey Glenn is Lake Citys only board-certied Orthopedic Surgeon who is fellowship-trained in joint replacement surgery. www.LCBoneandJoint.com Excellence. I B... J. Excellence. I B... J. LCM-3109 Physician Ads 5.25x10_L7.indd 2 8/15/12 11:53:31 AM Holiday season kickoff By DEREK GILLIAM dgilliam@lakecityreporter.com W hen Saturday rolls around dont expect snow to fall from the sky, but be ready for it to be trucked in and then for the wet, white stuff to be stacked in Olustee Park in downtown Lake City. Also, Santa will make an appearance, and there will be a 5-kilometer race and a Christmas parade. Snow Day 2012 will be held on Saturday from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m., Dennille Decker, executive direc tor of the Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of Commerce, said. She said the Christmas parade starts at 6 p.m. Decker said Snow Day has been hosted by the chamber for the last three years, and that more than 30 tons of snow is used every year. Santa will be dropping by between noon and 2 p.m., she said. The snow, giveaways, parade and Santa attract large numbers of people to the downtown area and should help boost sales for not just the downtown area, but the entire city, Decker said. She said that many of the peo ple who come for Snow Day will stick around to go shopping or eat at a restaurant in the area. The initial surge of people will be in downtown, but anyone whos coming from our neighbor ing areas will take advantage and shop in Lake City, she said. The fact that no one has seen snow since 1989 and even then the snow was just enough to cover the ground helps attract huge numbers of people for Snow Day. Whether its the snow, the parade or the race, the fact is Lake City businesses are affected by the event every year. Decker said the event has been a part of the yearly calendar for almost 10 years. This year there will be a five kilometer race that starts at 8 a.m. Dashing Through the Snow has attracted runners from as far away as Tallahassee, she said. She said if runners want to Snow Day 2012 I t is beginning to look a lot like Christmas in Lake City! The Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of Commerce is proud to present several Christmas activities for you and your family to enjoy this holiday season. Be sure to check out the beauti ful decorations in Olustee Park. The City of Lake City, Christian Heritage Church, Church on the Way, New Life Restoration Church and chamber members were gracious enough to donate their time to volunteer and decorate the park and Santas House. We would also like to thank the Lake City Garden Club for decorating the gates at the entrances to downtown for the holiday season. It takes a full month to get the downtown area ready for the holiday season and we couldnt do it without the help of our great vol unteers. While in the park, make sure you stop in and see Santa Claus. He will be in his house nightly from 6 to 8 p.m., except on Sunday when he returns to the North Pole to check on the elves. Santa would not be possible without our great sponsors. A special thank you to Buildings and More for the donation of Santas house, Restoration Specialists for providing Santa Claus and Century Ambulance for donating a candy cane for each child who visits Santa. After your visit with Santa, take a ride around Lake DeSoto to see Christmas Card Lane. This is the first year the chamber has hosted a community Christmas card tour, and we have 29 businesses participating. We are excited to share the cards with you all. On Saturday, the Chamber of Commerce will once again host one of the communitys favorite events Snow Day. The day will begin at 8 a.m. with the Dashing to the Snow 5-kilometer race, sponsored by Pro Motion Physical Therapy. The 5k event is for runners and walkers of all ages and abilities. The race will begin and conclude near Olustee Park. There is still time to register. Stick around after the race to help us celebrate the opening festivities of Snow Day at 9 a.m. While at Snow Day, you can expect to see over 30 tons of snow and two snow slides. If you are a true Floridian and the snow doesnt interest you, we will also have live enter tainment, food vendors and other childrens activities, including bounce houses, a 26foot, dual-lane slide and a special appearance by Santa all the way from the North Pole. The title sponsor of Snow Day is Busy Bee B&B, and they will have lots of big surprises and giveaways throughout the day. This is a unique event you dont want to miss and best of all playing in the snow and the childrens activities are absolutely free. Just make sure you arrive before the closing of the fun at 4 p.m. The festivities will CHAMBER BUSINESS Dennille Decker dennille@lakecitychamber.com JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City Reporter Ronnajah Ross, 1, takes the ride of her life down the 60-foot snow slide during last years Snow Day. Snow, parade, more set for Saturday in downtown area. HOLIDAY continued on 2C STAFF continued on 2C SNOW continued on 2C

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grades were as much as 10 percent higher among students whose teachers were members of the first group — the loss group — than they were for stu-dents whose teachers were in the second group. In this example, applying the loss aversion theory really seemed to work. So if loss aversion is so successful, why is it not used more in business? I think this is due to a cou-ple of reasons. First, many managers and owners are just not familiar with this behavioral theory, and second, many employers feel uncomfortable about taking money away from their employees. A more palatable alternative might be to take the money back from future incentives. While many employees relate to a monetary incen-tive, many just do not. To be successful, an incen-tive program needs to be tailored to the individual employee, and there are many potential ways to motivate — including loss aversion. You just have to find what works for your staff. Now go out and make sure that you have the right incentives in place to excite and motivate your staff. You can do this! 2C LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF DECEMBER 2, 2012 2CBIZ/MOTLEY Sometimes the market reacts poorly to world events, but just be-cause the market reacts doesn’t mean you should. Still, if current events are making you feel uncertain about your nances, you should schedule a complimentary portfolio review. That way, you can make sure you’re in control of where you want to go and how you get there. YOU CAN’T CONTROL THE WORLD,BUT YOU CAN CONTROL YOUR DECISIONS. Q FSU Finance Professor Dr. Jerry Osteryoung is Executive Director of the Jim Moran Institute for Global Entrepreneurship at Florida State University’s College of Business. Q Dennille Decker is the executive director of the Lake City/Columbia County Chamber of Commerce. STAFF: Find what works Continued From Page 1C SNOW: Continued From Page 1Ccontinue at 6 p.m., when the Lake City Rotary Club will present the 2012 Christmas parade with the theme, “I’ll Be Home for Christmas.” The parade will honor our community’s returning veterans. It is a day that is sure to put you in the Christmas spirit and provide life-long memories of playing in the Florida snow. For more information on any of these events, please contact the Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of Commerce at (386) 752-3690 or visit us at www.lakecitychamber.com. HOLIDAY: Lots of fun, excitement Continued From Page 1Cregister for the race, it’s $30 before the day of the event and $35 if a runner wants to register the day of the race. She said that registration for the race comes with a Dashing Through the Snow T-shirt. Last year’s Snow Day brought 14,000 people to the downtown area, she said. This year she expects the number to be slightly down because last year Busy Bee B&B Food Stores gave away a Jeep at Snow Day. This year B&B will be taking registration for the jeep giveaway at Snow Day, but no one will be driving away with the prize. Busy Bee B&B has sponsored the event and the company gave $10,000 to be the title sponsor. They will also have prizes people at Snow Day can win. Some come in the form of cash, two prizes of $1,000, four prizes of $500 and four prizes of $250. B&B is also giving away a few gadgets, like an iPad and an Xbox. Decker said the location to register for the prizes will be inside the Olustee Park in Downtown Lake City and that B&B’s both will be hard to miss. While the chamber does receive money from the city to put on Snow Day, the chamber still has to find volunteers to have help, and reach out to members of the business community for help with funding the event. “Most communities don’t bring in 30 tons of snow,” she said. “It’s not a money maker for the Chamber by any means.” But Lake City does, and the crowds come. “Snow Day brings around 10,000 people into the downtown that wouldn’t normally be there on a Saturday,” she said. JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterThe float of the 1st Street Music & Sound Co. took top honors in last year,s Christmas parade. This year’s parade will step off at 6 p.m. Saturday Couple convicted of GM secrets theftAssociated PressDETROIT — A former General Motors engineer with access to the automak-er’s hybrid technology was convicted Friday along with her husband of stealing trade secrets for possible use in China. Shanshan Du won a transfer within GM in 2003 to be closer to the technol-ogy and then copied docu-ments until she accepted a severance offer and left the company in 2005, prosecu-tors said. Du and Yu Qin were found guilty Friday by a federal jury in Detroit after a trial that lasted weeks. Qin also was convicted of wire fraud and attempting to obstruct justice by shredding docu-ments. They shook each other’s hand after the verdict but declined to comment, as did their attorneys. The couple face up to 20 years in prison. No sentencing date has been set. Prosecutors told jurors that GM trade secrets were found on at least seven computers owned by the Oakland County couple. The government doesn’t believe the information ever made it to China, although Qin had set up his own company, Millennium Technology International, and claimed to have made contact with GM competi-tors overseas.

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By KEVIN FREKINGAssociated PressWASHINGTON — American consumers have shown about as much appe-tite for the $1 coin as kids do their spinach. They may not know what’s best for them either. Congressional auditors say doing away with dollar bills entirely and replacing them with dollar coins could save taxpayers some $4.4 billion over the next 30 years. Vending machine operators have long champi-oned the use of $1 coins because they don’t jam the machines, cutting down on repair costs and lost sales. But most people don’t seem to like carrying them. In the past five years, the U.S. Mint has produced 2.4 billion Presidential $1 coins. Most are stored by the Federal Reserve, and production was suspended about a year ago. The latest projection from the Government Accountability Office on the potential savings from switching to dollar coins entirely comes as lawmak-ers begin exploring new ways for the government to save money by changing the money itself. The Mint is preparing a report for Congress showing how changes in the metal content of coins could save money. The last time the government made major metallur-gical changes in U.S. coins was nearly 50 years ago when Congress directed the Mint to remove silver from dimes and quarters and to reduce its content in half dollar coins. Now, Congress is looking at new changes in response to ris-ing prices for copper and nickel. At a House subcommittee hearing Thursday, the focus was on two approach-es: Q Moving to less expensive combinations of metals like steel, aluminum and zinc. Q Gradually taking dollar bills out the economy and replacing them with coins. The GAO’s Lorelei St. James told the House Financial Services panel it would take several years for the benefits of switching from paper bills to dollar coins to catch up with the cost of making the change. Equipment would have to be bought or overhauled and more coins would have to be produced upfront to replace bills as they are taken out of circulation. But over the years, the savings would begin to accrue, she said, largely because a $1 coin could stay in circulation for 30 years while paper bills have to be replaced every four or five years on average. “We continue to believe that replacing the note with a coin is likely to provide a financial benefit to the gov-ernment,” said St. James, who added that such a change would work only if the note was completely eliminated and the public educated about the benefits of the switch. Even the $1 coin’s most ardent supporters recog-nize that they haven’t been popular. Philip Diehl, for-mer director of the Mint, said there was a huge demand for the Sacagawea dollar coin when produc-tion began in 2001, but as time wore on, people stayed with what they knew best. “We’ve never bitten the bullet to remove the $1 bill as every other Western economy has done,” Diehl said. “If you did, it would have the same success the Canadians have had.” Beverly Lepine, chief operating officer of the Royal Canadian Mint, said her country loves its “Loonie,” the nickname for the $1 coin that includes an image of a loon on the back. The switch went over so well that the country also went to a $2 coin called the “Toonie.” Rep. Bill Huizenga, R-Mich., affirmed that Canadians have embraced their dollar coins. “I don’t know anyone who would go back to the $1 and $2 bills,” he said. That sentiment was not shared by some of his fel-low subcommittee mem-bers when it comes to the U.S. version. Rep. Lacy Clay, D-Mo., said men don’t like carrying a bunch of coins around in their pocket or in their suits. And Rep. Carolyn Maloney, D-N.Y., said the $1 coins have proved too hard to dis-tinguish from quarters. “If the people don’t want it and they don’t want to use it,” she said, “why in the world are we even talking about changing it?” “It’s really a matter of just getting used to it,” said Diehl, the former Mint director. Several lawmakers were more intrigued with the idea of using different metal combinations in producing coins. Rep. Steve Stivers, ROhio, said a penny costs more than 2 cents to make and a nickel costs more than 11 cents to make. Moving to multiplated steel for coins would save the government nearly $200 million a year, he said. The Mint’s report, which is due in mid-December, will detail the results of nearly 18 months of work explor-ing a variety of new metal compositions and evaluat-ing test coins for attributes as hardness, resistance to wear, availability of raw materials and costs. Richard Peterson, the Mint’s acting director, declined to give lawmakers a summary of what will be in the report, but he said “several promising alterna-tives” were found. LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF DECEMBER 2, 2012 3C Fed survey: US economy growing By MARTIN CRUTSINGERAP Economics WriterWASHINGTON — pickup in consumer spending and steady home sales helped lift economic growth from October through early November in most parts of the United States, according to a Federal Reserve survey released Wednesday. The one exception was the Northeast, which was slowed by Superstorm Sandy. Growth improved in nine of the Fed’s 12 regional banking dis-tricts, the survey said. Growth was weaker in New York, Philadelphia and Boston — areas where Sandy caused widespread disruptions. The survey noted that growth was better despite nervousness about the “fiscal cliff.” That’s the name for automatic tax increases and spending cuts that could kick in next year if Congress and the Obama administration can’t reach a budget deal before then. Hiring increased in more than half of the districts. But manufac-turing shrank or slowed in seven regions and was mixed in two others. “The weakening in the tone of the Beige Book is clearly linked to the massive disruptions and dam-age related to Hurricane Sandy and there is no evidence of a wider slowdown in the economy,” said Terry Sheehan, an analyst at Stone & McCarthy Research Associates. Sal Guatieri, senior economist at BMO Capital Markets, said the message from the survey was “the economy looks to have improved slightly in the current quarter, led by housing and consumers though businesses remain wor-ried about the outlook.” The report, called the Beige Book, provides anecdotal infor-mation on economic conditions around the country from October through Nov. 14. The information collected by the regional banks will be used as the basis for the Fed’s policy discussion at the Dec. 11-12 meeting. Many economists believe the Fed could announce plans to buy more Treasury bonds at that meeting to replace a program set to expire at the end of the year. The goal of the program is to lower long-term interest rates and encourage more borrowing and spending. The purchases would come on top of the Fed’s mortgage bond buying program, which is intend-ed to lower mortgage rates and make home-buying more afford-able. Recent government and private reports show the economy improved in October and early November, even as Sandy halted business activity along the East Coast. Employers added 171,000 jobs last month and hiring in September and August was stronger than pre-viously thought. Rising home values, more hiring and lower gas prices pushed con-sumer confidence in November to the highest level in nearly five years. A better mood among con-sumers appears to have encour-aged businesses to invest more in October after pulling back over the summer. And it could point to a stronger holiday shopping season. There are already signs that consumer optimism is leading to more spending. A record num-ber of Americans visited stores and shopping websites over the four-day Thanksgiving weekend, according to a survey by the National Retail Federation. Still, if lawmakers and the Obama administration fail to reach a budget deal soon, the threat of tax increases could make consumers more cautious in the final weeks of the year. Many economists say worries about the fiscal cliff could be among a number of factors that keep growth in the October-December quarter below an annu-al rate of 2 percent. That’s too slow to make much of a dent in unemployment and could prompt the Fed to take further action at its next meeting. The Beige Book said that price increases remained modest. The Fed said the prices of some con-struction materials were rising at a faster pace in Cleveland, Chicago, Minneapolis, Kansas City and San Francisco regions. Chicago Fed officials noted that food prices had eased in that region except for the price of meat. Wage growth remained modest, constrained by the high num-bers of people looking for work. But there were exceptions due to shortages of qualified work-ers. North Dakota reported rising wages for oil drilling workers. In Kansas City, wages were pick-ing up for specialized workers in transportation, high-tech indus-tries and energy. San Francisco saw stronger wage growth for truck drivers and health care workers. ASSOCIATED PRESSWomen work on assembly line at Generac Power Systems Inc., one of the largest makers of residential generators in the U.S., in Whitewater, Wis. A pickup in consumer s pending and steady home sales helped lift economic growth in October and early November in most parts of the United States, according to a Federal Reserve survey released this past week. The one exception was the No rtheast, which was slowed by Superstorm Sandy. By JESSE J. HOLLANDAssociated PressWASHINGTON — The Supreme Court announced Friday it will decide wheth-er companies can patent human genes, a decision that could reshape medi-cal research in the United States and the fight against diseases like breast and ovarian cancer. The justices’ decision will likely resolve an ongo-ing battle between scien-tists who believe that genes carrying the secrets of life should not be exploited for commercial gain and com-panies that argue that a patent is a reward for years of expensive research that moves science forward. The current case involves Myriad Genetics Inc. of Salt Lake City, which has patents on two genes linked to increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer. Myriad’s BRACAnalysis test looks for mutations on the breast cancer predis-position gene, or BRCA. Those mutations are asso-ciated with much greater risks of breast and ovarian cancer. But the American Civil Liberties Union chal-lenged those patents, argu-ing that genes couldn’t be patented, and in March 2010, a New York district court agreed. But the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit has now twice ruled that genes can be patented, in Myriad’s case because the isolat-ed DNA has a “markedly different chemical struc-ture” from DNA within the body. Among the ACLU’s plaintiffs are geneticists who said they were not able to continue their work because of Myriad’s patents, as well as breast cancer and women’s health groups. “It’s wrong to think that something as naturally occurring as DNA can be patented by a single company that limits scientific research and the free exchange of ideas,” said Chris Hansen, staff attorney with the ACLU Speech, Privacy and Technology Project. A call to a Myriad spokeswoman was not immediately returned, but in court papers the com-pany’s lawyers said with-out being able to patent and profit from their work, they would not be able to fund the type of medical breakthroughs doctors depend on. The company also said that deciding now that genes can’t be patented would throw into chaos current research and profits structures for drug-makers and medi-cal research companies, who have gotten more than 40,000 DNA-related patents from the Patent and Trademark Office for almost 30 years, according to court papers. “Moving the goalposts of patent eligibility for these patents now would ... undermine the interests of the investing commu-nity: Clear and certain pat-ent protection is critical to honor the interests of past investors, such as those who funded the research behind these inventions,” the company said in court papers. In 2010, a federal judge ruled that genes cannot be patented. U.S. District Judge Robert Sweet said he invalidated the patents because DNA’s existence in an isolated form does not alter the fundamental quality of DNA as it exists in the body or the infor-mation it encodes. But the federal appeals court reversed him in 2011, say-ing Myriad’s genes can be patented because the isolated DNA has a “mark-edly different chemical structure” from DNA in the body. The Supreme Court threw out that decision and sent the case back to the lower courts for rehearing. This came after the high court unanimous-ly threw out patents on a Prometheus Laboratories, Inc., test that could help doctors set drug doses for autoimmune diseases like Crohn’s disease, say-ing the laws of nature are unpatentable. ASSOCIATED PRESSThe President John Adams presidential $1 coin is being produced by the U.S. Mint. Congressional auditors say doing away with dollar bil ls entirely and replacing them with dollar coins could save taxpayers some $4.4 billion over the next 30 years.Congress looks at doing away with the paper dollar bill, again Court to decide if human genes can be patented

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDSUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012 Classified Department: 755-5440 4C CLASSIFIED AD vantageTake ADvantage of the Reporter Classifieds!755-5440Lake City Reporter FIND IT SELL IT BUY IT CLASSIFIED AD vantageTake ADvantage of the Reporter Classifieds!755-5440Lake City Reporter FIND IT SELL IT BUY IT Sales RepSeeking an experienced advertising sales rep to join our digital media network team. Unlimited earning potential. Contact (863) 662-0883 or email resume to: imc1832@aol.com Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 ServicesFLCert. Teacher with 10 yrs exp. Offering a homeshooling group in Jan. Reasonably priced. Interested parents 386-288-0954. WAREHOUSE An inclusive, energetic culture. Incredible opportunity. A community-focused company. 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You can expect a lot from a career at Target.MAINTENANCE TECHNICIANs0ERFORMSNEEDEDREPAIRSONDOORSDOCKPLATESLIGHTING(6!#PLUMBING ANDlREPROTECTIONSYSTEMSTORESOLVEPROBLEMSANDENSURESUCCESSFULOPERATION s0ERFORMSPREVENTIVEMAINTENANCEANDNECESSARYREPAIRSTOMAINTAIN OPERATIONOFCONVEYORSANDSORTEREQUIPMENTANDh2ED4AGvDOWNEQUIPMENTASNECESSARYINVOLVINGrPHASErVOLTANDINDUSTRIALELECTRICALSYSTEMSMOTORCONTROLSANDRELATEDELECTRONICEQUIPMENT s%NSURESTHEMAINTENANCESHOPAREAISORGANIZEDNEATANDCLEAN)DENTIlES ANDACTSIMMEDIATELYREGARDINGANYSAFETYHAZARDSSPILLSETCTOAVOIDTHERISKOFACCIDENTS5SESSAFELIFTINGTECHNIQUESANDOPERATESPOWEREQUIPMENTINASAFEMANNER!BIDESBYALLSTATEDREGULATIONSWHILEPERFORMINGWORKIELOCKOUTTAGOUTPROCEDURESETC-AINTAINSRECORDSTOENSUREACCOUNTABILITYOFTIMEPARTSANDREPAIRS s0ERFORMSCARPENTRYWORKASREQUIREDRequirements:s(IGHSCHOOLGRADUATEOREQUIVALENTINDUSTRIALTRADESCHOOLCOURSESANDONE YEARONrTHErJOBTRAININGINPLANTMAINTENANCE s7ORKINDEPENDENTLYINATEAMENVIRONMENTWITHACUSTOMERGUESTFOCUSs-USTEXHIBITAPTITUDEFORMECHANICALWORKTo Apply:s6ISIT4ARGETCOM careers SELECT(OURLY$ISTRIBUTION#ENTER0OSITIONSTHE STATE OF&LORIDAANDTHE,AKE#ITY$#s!PPLYINPERSONATTHE%MPLOYMENT+IOSKSLOCATED NEARTHEFRONTOFANY 4ARGET3TORE4ARGETISANEQUALEMPLOYMENTOPPORTUNITYEMPLOYER ANDISADRUGrFREEWORKPLACE 4ARGET3TORES4HE"ULLSEYE$ESIGNAND4ARGET AREREGISTEREDTRADEMARKSOF 4ARGET"RANDS)NC!LLRIGHTSRESERVED NOW HIRING 2006 Toyota Tundra SR-5Crew cab, Class 3 Tow Package, cruise, power windows, seats five. 152,000 miles.$7,800 386-365-1901 LegalNOTICE OFPUBLIC MEETINGS OF THE SCHOOLBOARD OF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAThe School Board of Columbia County, Florida announces that the School Board will hold its regular public meetings, to which all persons are invited to attend, as follows: DATES: January 8, 2013January 22, 2013 February 12, 2013*February 26, 2013 March 12, 2013April 9, 2013April 23, 2013 May 14, 2013May 28, 2013 June 11, 2013 June 25, 2013 July 9, 2013July 23, 2013 August 13, 2013August 27, 2013 September 10, 2013September 24, 2013 October 8, 2013October 22, 2013 November 12, 2013November 26, 2013 December 10, 2013 *Meeting to be held at Fort White Elementary School TIME: 7:00 P.M. PLACE: School Board Administra-tive Complex Auditorium 372 W. Duval Street Lake City, Florida 32055 PURPOSE:To consider and act upon business of the School Board. Acopy of each agenda may be ob-tained no earlier than 7 days prior to each meeting by writing to the Su-perintendent of Schools at 372 W. Duval Street, Lake City, Florida 32055 or by calling Mrs. Lynda Croft at (386) 755-8003. Acomplete agenda of each meeting will be avail-able on the School District’s website at: www.columbia.k12.fl.us Pursuant to the provisions of the American with Disabilities Act, any person requiring special accommo-dations to participate in the above meetings are asked to advise the School Board at least 48 hours be-fore the meetings by contacting Mrs. Lynda Croft at (386) 755-8003. School Board of Columbia County, FloridaBy: Terry L. Huddleston Superintendent of Schools 05536029December 2, 2012 ToWhom It May Concern:You are hereby notified that the fol-lowing described livestock, a small calf, is now impounded at an author-ized Columbia County Sheriff’s Of-fice livestock facility and the amount due by reason of such impounding is $183.90 plus $5.00 per day for care and custody of said livestock. The above described livestock will, un-less redeemed within 3 days from date hereof, be offered for sale at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash.Mark Hunter, SheriffColumbia County, Florida05536099December 2, 2012 100Job Opportunities05534241NOWHIRING Cashiers & Baggers forHigh Springs fruit & gift stores. Benefits avail: health, dental, & vacation. Apply in person: Florida Citrus Center(Chevron) 18603 NWCR 236, High Springs (exit 404 & I-75) 05536033Administrative Assistant White Springs, Florida Verifiable job history. Strong computer skills. Able to be trained in our specialty. Able to perform without constant supervision. Must be flexible and team player. Great communication skills. Must want to work for a stable company. POSITION NEEDS TO BE FILLED IMMEDIATELY Please email resume to hr@speced.org CDLClass A Truck Driver Flatbed exp. for F/TSE area. 3 years exp or more. Medical benefits offered. Contact Melissa or Sandy@ 386-935-2773 DRIVERS:ALLMiles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-ACDLFlatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down CALL: 888-880-5916 Night Clerk Needed. Permanent Part Time, 12-8am. Two days a week. Apply in Person. No Calls Please. America’s Best Value Inn. 3835 West US Hwy 90, Lake City 100Job OpportunitiesEXP. TRAINER: Responsible for Teaching individuals about the Judicial system. Associates degree, Background and reference checks, and valid DLreq’d. PT. E-mail resume to jshaw@itmflorida.com Mechanic needed at Fla.Rock & Tank Lines In White Springs. Diesel exprnc reqr'd in maintenance & repair of tractor trailers. 45-50hrs/wk Class A CDLlicense preferred. Excellent Benefits! email: mcomer@patriottrans.com or fax 904-858-9008 Mechanic needed for general semi-truck and tire repairs. Steady employment with benefits. Salary dependent on experience. Must have own hand tools. Please contact Greg @ 755-7700 Mechanic needed with tools and experience. Southern Specialize Truck & Trailer. 386-752-9754 SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 120Medical Employment05536058RN/LPN/C.N.A Full Time RN Unit Manager Avalon Healthcare Center is currently accepting applications for the part time positions of RN/LPN/C.N.Aand Full Time RN Unit Manager Please apply at Avalon Healthcare and Rehabilitation Center. 1270 S.W. Main Blvd. Lake City, Florida 32025 or fax resume to 386-752-8556 EOE 05536060Executive Nursing Director The Florida Department of Veterans Affairs – Jenkins Domiciliary has an immediate opening for an Executive Nursing Director. All applicants must hold a Florida R.N. license and be certified in C.P.R. Requirements for all candidates include a strong clinical background, good communication abilities, and excellent computer skills. Ideal candidates will have nursing management experience. Apply on-line: https://peoplefirst.myflorida.co m/logon.htm Or call Amelia Tompkins for more information at 386-7580600 x1009 Req #50000024 Closing Date 12/10/2012 EEO/AAE 05536063Medical Billing Full-time position for a medical office. Experience in medical coding and billing required. Excellent salary based on experience. Send resume in confidence to: mafaisal05@yahoo.com or fax to 386-758-5987 05536076The Health Center of Lake City Has an opening for RN In the Rehab Unit 7PM-7AM Excellent Salary EOE/ADA/Drug Free Workplace Apply in person or send resume to: 560 SWMcFarlane Avenue Lake City, FL32025 05536078Busy Nursing Facility has an opening for RN UNITMANAGER Full-Time Position Great Benefits Mail Credentials & Resume to: RN Unit Manager PO Box 869 Lake City, FL32055 EOE/ADA Drug Free Workplace Exp. CAP or Licensed Mental Health Professional for counseling and assessments in an outpatient SAtreatment program. Ref. Req'd. PT Email resume to bsmith@itmflorida.com F/T LPN or equivalent needed for family practice office. Must have pharmacology exp. Fax resume to 386-487-1232. P/THousekeeper Needed Occasional Nights And Weekends. Fax Resume to 386-487-1232 140Work Wanted Experienced House/Office Cleaner Looking for Clients. References Available upon request. Contact for information 904-504-2620 170Business Opportunities05535965I am Looking for a partner/ investor to start a recession proof business, capital required less than $20000. I will do the managing. Call me for more info at 386-438-3580 240Schools & Education05535484Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class12/24/2012• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-11/05/12• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies American Bulldog Puppy $100 To the right home Contact 386-466-7662 Approx 7-8 mths old Red Bone Coonhound Free to the right home. 386-466-7662 401Antiques 1950’s dresser, 63” high, 19 deep, Lrg mirror 38x38, 2 small mirrors on base for storage. 4 drawers on bottom. $175. 365-3730 407Computers DELLCOMPUTER $100.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 408Furniture King Size Mattress, box spring, frame, head board and foot board. $200 obo. 386-984-7586 420Wanted to Buy 2BR/1BA$600/MO & $575 Sec. Dep. Lovely, Private, re-done CR 242 West of RT47 386-365-7193 or 867-6319 430Garage Sales Sat, Sun, Mon 8 am-? Furn., Tools, Clothes, HH items, 5’Plants, Decor & More. 1259 Nw Turner Ave 440Miscellaneous 75 ft. Antenna Tower w/guy wires. On ground-you disassemble. $125. Call 386-497-2592 Free To a small church that can use 13 pew cushions 10 ft long, good cond., olive green color. Also, 16 choir robes, olive green color. Call 386-497-2592 Pr. Of patio doors, all metal w/ full thermal glass, snap in grilles and sliding screen door. No frame. $50. Call 386-497-2592 Three Poulan chain saws Need Tune up. $100 for all. Call 386-497-2592 450Good Things to EatThe Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans 2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024 Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville 386-963-4138 or 961-1420 630Mobile Homes forRent2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $450. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 2 BR/1BA $475/mth. Located in center of Lake City Close to Everything !!! 305-984-5511 or 386-344-0830 2 BR/2BASW, Completly furnished, carport, shed, located on 41st Dr., $600 mo.,+ Util. $150 Dep. 935-2461 630Mobile Homes forRentMobile Homes for rent in White Springs & Ft. White. Contact 386-623-3404 Quiet Country Park 3br/2ba $525. Very clean NO PETS! References & Deposit required 386-758-2280 WATERTOWN AREA 3br/2ba DW, Handicap accessible, $650 mth, $500 dep. Call 386-344-0144, 386-344-5791 650Mobile Home & LandOut of State owner, Anxious to sell. Nice 2br/2ba 1996 DW, Energy Efficient, 3/4 frnshd, 3 yr old roof, 1/2 ac lot in Oak Wd subdv in Live Oak $39,900 or best resonable offer. Call 309-645-2659 OwnerFinanced 3/22.5 ac.River Access. Small down $625 mo 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 705Rooms forRent RV for Rent $400 mth utilities included, Avail now. Contact 386-497-3524 or 386-288-9110 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05535481We’ve got it all!$89 Deposit Limited Avail. Call Today! Windsong Apts. *Free afterschool program386-758-8455 1BR APT. Downtown Location, Clean. New Carpet $450 mo, plus Security. NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456 2 bedroom / 1 Bath Apts for rent in Live Oak. Call for price. Contact 386-623-3404 & 386-362-9806 2br/1ba. Close to town. $580.mo plus deposit. Includes water & sewer. 386-965-2922 2BR/2BAw/garage 5 minutes from VAhospital and Timco. Call for details. 386-365-5150 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Brandywine Apartments Now Renting 1, 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-752-3033 W. Grandview Ave. Equal Housing Opportunity TDD Number 1-800-955-8771 BRANFORD VILLAS 386-935-2319 2br/1ba Apts. Now available.$570. mo. TDD number 1-800-955-8771 Equal Housing Opportunity Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A$530 month $530 deposit. No pets. 386-344-2170 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent2BR, 1/2 acre, Fenced, Close-in, Huge Den, Carport, Smoke Free, $800 mo. App & Ref Req’d Short Term Avail 386-758-9824 2br/1ba $575 mo. + sec., 4mi S. Lake City. Clean & Quiet 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 3bd/2ba Lots of Natural Light. CH/A, $1,400 month & $1,400 deposit. Fenced in back yard. Contact 386-344-2170 3br/1.5ba. Very clean, Brick great area w/bonus room. Carport, shed & Fenced (privacy) back yard. $825. mo $825. dep. Ref’s req’d. (941)920-4535 ALandlord You Can Love! 3br/1.5ba, Eat in Kitchen, CH/A, 2 car carport $750 mth + dep 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Avail. for Rent 1206 McFarlane Ave. 3 BR/2 BAhouse. Smoke Free and No Pets allowed. $850 a mo. $500 dep. Call for appt. 904-813-8864. 750Business & Office RentalsCk out this Awesome Deal.Let’s talk Fort White, Newly Remodled. Multi use Comm Prop. Approx 850sqft. Elec & water incl. Free WFI & yard Maint. High Traffic Area $725mth 941-924-5183. ForRent orLease : Former Doctors office, Former professional office & Lg open space: avail on East Baya Ave. Competitive rates. Weekdays 386-984-0622 evenings/weekends 497-4762 Office or Retail Space. Many to choose from. Tom Eagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 820Farms & Acreage10 acres with well/septic/pp (not guar); $300 dwn; $580 a mth. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com 830Commercial Property05536046Receivership Sale Soneet R. Kapila, Receiver Corbitt Manufacturing Company, Inc. Lake City, FL3 parcels Approx. 55 acres Vacant Industrial & Residential Site Zoned Industrial and Residential Rural Lake City 2 Parcels Approx. 3 acres Vacant Commercial Property Zoned Commercial Intensive Email: blombardo@kapilaco.com or call: 954/712-3185 Industrial warehouse7+ acres fenced 17,000 sq ft Barn $1,500 mo. TomEagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 930Motorcycles 2006 Honda Shadow Aero 750 cc’s $3,900 Contact 386-438-9105 950Cars forSale 2007 Signature Lincoln Town Car 28,200 mi. Extended Warranty until April 2014. Grandmother's car like new! Silver with tan leather. $15,500 386-397-3568 2011 Four door Honda Hybrid 8k miles 44 mpg, $15,900 755-5440Toplace your classified ad call REPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Linewww.lakecityreporter.com ADVERTISE YOUR Job Opportunities in the Lake City Reporter Classifieds. Enhance Your Ad with Your Individual Logo For just pennies a day. Call today, 755-5440.

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LIFE Sunday, December 2, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section D I got ants in my pants! Literally! Thanksgiving — a time for traditions and sometimes travel— or both. For a couple of years, we escaped the traditional family dinners and booked a Bahamas cruise for the Thanksgiving holiday. For me the best part of Thanksgiving dinner on the ship was that I didn’t have to eat dry turkey. On this particular trip, we went to Orlando a few days early to do some shopping before catching the boat out of Port Canaveral. So natu-rally, when we parked the car in the lot, we left shop-ping bags, a cooler, a bag with some snacks in it and a bag of dirty laundry. The cruise was everything I expected it to be. Relaxing, lots of good food, some fun in the sun, overall the perfect escape. What I didn’t expect was what I found upon return-ing to the car in the parking lot at the ship terminal ... ANTS! And lots of them. We opened the back of the Expedition only to find a trail of ants all over the place. They were marching along the carpet, in and out of the cooler, in and out of our bags. It was a night-mare. We parked next to a small median with a tree so that it would be easier to find the car. After looking closely, we realized that in addition to the tree, there were ant beds. The scent trail led from the ground, up the tires, along the bum-pers and into the back of the car. As we began to clean everything out of the back, piece by piece, we found scores of them in the dirty clothes bag — more there than anywhere else. It was strange. I guess they were attracted to the sweat and other bodily fluids one would normally find on soiled clothes. We had to pull each piece of clothing out and beat it on the pave-ment to knock the ants off the clothes. What was really crazy was the pair of shorts that the ants had literally eaten the back end out of. Now that makes you really stop and think. It did us, anyway. Even as we arrived home to unpack everything, we found more ants. Lesson learned: Watch where you park and pay attention to your surroundings. Experiences like this surely don’t stop me from going, only make me laugh and shake my head. I do have to wonder if it was a little pay-back for being selfish and escaping the traditional family dinner at Mom’s. Antsin mypants,literally Story ideas?ContactRobert BridgesEditor754-0428rbridges@lakecityreporter.com Lake City Reporter1DLIFEBy TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comF ORT WHITE — Storm Ford’s penchant for col-lecting and giving away Christmas gifts started innocently enough when he was about 7 years old and he outgrew his bicycle and wanted to give it away. Now his talent for organizing and giving away gifts is an annual benefit for the Children’s Home Society of Florida’s Lake City office as Ford collects toys for less fortunate children. “It just became a thing that each Christmas we started giving toys away and it got bigger and bigger,” he said. Ford, a 14-year-old Fort White Middle School student, said over the past seven years collecting toys for others has become an annual tradition for him and his family. This year Ford has organized the “Fill-A-Blazer” toy collection campaign, and it’s expected to be the largest thus far, because many of Ford’s classmates and chums from school and the com-munity, as well as potentially the school district, plan to pitch-in and give toys to the collection drive. From 8:15 to 9 a.m. on Wednesday, Ford’s mother will have her Trail Blazer in the Fort White High School courtyard, and students are supposed to bring new, unwrapped toys for the gift-giving campaign. Anyone can drop off toys for the cam-paign. “We’re going to try to see whether we can fill our Blazer as much as possible,” Ford said. Wednesday’s toy collection at the school marks the first time Ford has used the school’s popu-lation in the toy collection drive. “The Fill-A-Blazer started this year after my mother and I were talking about a filibuster and I thought of the idea about doing a fill-a-blazer,” he said. Ford already has filled his mother’s 2009 Chevy Trail Blazer with toys for the Children’s’ Home Society once this year, and now he’s attempting to collect another load of toys as Christmas quickly approaches. “I have no idea of how many toys it was; It was a lot of toys,” he said. “We filled the back and middle of the Trail Blazer with toys.” With help from his mother, Inga Dwyer, and his grand-mother, Cecile Holmgren, Ford has made collecting the toys an annual tradition. Kathy Wintons, family support worker with the Children’s Home Society office in Lake City, said the office serves 12 counties. The Children’s Home Society of aids adoptions for children who have been in foster care. She said the office in Lake City provides services for more than 150 children. “Last year when he (Storm) first started with us, the kids were just blessed to have more toys,” Wintons said. “We were able to bless more homes, more families and more children by him adding more toys. Some kids would not have received any toys and other kids were blessed by getting an extra toy thanks to Storm.” Cassie Sparks, Ford’s seventhgrade teacher and Fort White Middle School student council Compatibility applies to plantings, tooM ost homeowners think of a landscap-ing project as a way to add beauty and value to their properties. Landscaping proj-ects can also screen a bad view, enhance a good view or transform a problem area into an attractive one. Islands of plants and mulch are popular for many reasons, includ-ing adding color and interest to the landscape. When building a plant island, start with plants that are compat-ible with each other and with the site. Consider your soil type and the drainage, as well as the amount of sun the site receives. Your final selection of plants should include plants that all require the same pH range, drain-age, moisture, fertilization and general maintenance. The main idea when choosing and combining plants is not to waste time, energy and money by caring for plants that aren’t compatible with the planting site or with each other. Being able to appropriately water, fertilize, prune and mulch everything at the same time is so efficient in terms of all of these major inputs. Even preparing the planting bed at the time of installation should be “all for one,” with the least amount of input. If you have luck with growing acid-loving azaleas, consider a combination planting of native azaleas, camellias and rabbit-eye blueberries. Depending on cultivar selections, they all have similar soil, sun, fertility, irrigation and maintenance requirements. Attractive blooms will add beauty from November through spring, and the fruit will be colorful and delicious in late spring. Evergreen leaves add color while bare limbs offer forms of interest through winter. Start by bringing in a soil sample for a free pH test performed by the Master Gardeners at the Extension Office. In our sandy soil, these plants need amend-ments of peat and organic material to help retain moisture and nutri-ents. All are shallow rooted and require mulch to protect and insu-late roots, reduce weed growth, conserve water, and eventually add to soil organic material. Your site should have acidic soil, good drainage, and receive at least 5 to 6 hours of good sunlight per day. Choose native azaleas that will grow well in sun. Camellias often have faded leaf color in more sun, but flowering is increased. Find information about individual plants at http://solu-tionsforyourlife.ufl.edu/lawn_and_garden/A-Z_index.html Edible landscaping takes the role of landscaping one step fur-ther than adding beauty, home value and enhancing problem areas. By incorporating some plants like blueberries, our land-scapes can provide us with fruits or vegetables for the table, or teas and herbs for some enriched culi-nary experiences. GARDEN TALK Nichelle Demorestdndemorest@ufl.eduInfectious generosity Cassie Sparks (above left), a Fort White Middle School seventh-grade teacher and student council advisor, helps 14-year-old Storm Ford carry and organize boxes of toys donated to Ford’s Fill-A-Blazer toy collection drive to benefit the Children’s Home Society of Florida’s Lake City office. Ford has been collecting toys for less fortunate children for seven years, and this year, his classmates and teachers at the middle school are pitching in to support his efforts. Teen’s selfless action inspires Fort White classmates to help. Photos by TONY BRITT/ Lake City Reporter Q D. Nichelle Demorest is a horticulture agent with the Columbia County Extension of the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. CHRISTMAS TOY DRIVE TOYS continued on 2D Q Sandy Kishton is a freelance travel writer who lives in Lake City. Contact her at skishton@comcast.net. Travel Tales Sandy Kishton

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2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 2DLIFE Stop by the Lake City Reporter for your complimentary engagement package. Aisle Style Complimentary Engagement Package Sweetwater Branch Inn 800-595-7760 Wards Jewelry & Gifts 752-5470 Camp Weed Cerveny Conference Center 386-364-5250 GeGees Studio 758-2088 Holiday Inn 754-1411, ext. 106 Dec. 2012 Scheduled blood drives. Times and dates subject to change. Call Tony at (386)438-3415 if you cannot nd us. Date Location Time 2 Lake City Internet Services 12 p.m. to 7 p.m. 3 Walmart Lake City 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. 4 Direct Insurance 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 4 PEPSI Distribution 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. 5 Hardees Downtown 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. 5 Lake City Reporter 1 p.m. to 5 p.m 6 Hardees by Walmart 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. 7 Columbia High School 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. 8 Lake City Snow Day!!! 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. 9 Epiphany Catholic Church 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. 9 Lake City Mall 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. 10 Downtown Lake City 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 11 Department of Transportation 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 12 Reception Medical Center 10:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. 13 Walmart Lake City 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. 14 Florida State Prison 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 15 Lowes Lake City 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 16 First Christian Church (Lake Butler) 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. 17 Winn Dixie 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. 18 Hardees Downtown 8 a.m. to 11 p.m. 18 New Millennium 12 p.m. to 3 p.m. 19 Subway State Road 47 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. 20 Union Correctional 11 a.m. to 5 :30 p.m. 21 Baker Correctional 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 22 Lake City Mall 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 23 Lake City Mall 12 p.m. to 6 p.m. 24 Lake City Mall 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 26 Lake City Mall 12 p.m. to 6 p.m. 27 Winn Dixie 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. 28 Hardees by Walmart 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 29 Players Club 12 p.m. to 7 p.m. 30 Lake City Mall 12 p.m. to 6 p.m. 31 Walmart Lake City 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. BY JENNIFER FORKER Associated Press ARVADA, Colo. Thousands of ornaments, many of them made by Colorado schoolchildren, have accompanied the majestic Engelmann spruce sent to Washington, D.C., to grace the lawn of the U.S. Capitol building this Christmas. The 73-foot tree is from the White River National Forest in northwestern Colorado. After its lit on Dec. 4, many of the orna ments will be on public view; others will adorn the nearly 70 smaller trees, also from Colorado, that will decorate government office buildings throughout Washington. When Colorado residents were asked to craft orna ments for the trees, they responded enthusiastically: Nearly 10,000 ornaments poured into the U.S. Forest Service office in Meeker, where Mary Cunningham coordinated the campaign. She had needed only about half that number, but start ing in early September, it got crazy, she says. For two weeks we were getting 20 to 30 huge boxes each day of ornaments. Ornaments arrived from every corner of the state. The theme was Celebrating Our Great Outdoors, and it inspired ornaments featur ing skiing, hiking and fish ing; mountain scenes and blue spruce trees; Western attire, from cowboy boots to moccasins; and bears, bison, wolves and moose. Liberty High Schools Art Club and National Honor Society in Colorado Springs contributed 50 small clay pots and baskets crafted from area clay. Students at another Colorado Springs school, Discovery Canyon Campus, were challenged by teachers to use recycled materials, so they made an airplane out of a soda can, a hiking boot from soda pop tabs, and horses made from wine corks, among other ornaments. From Mount Garfield Middle School in Clifton came more than 100 painted ornaments, includ ing jumping trout, cut from plywood in a tech nical education class. The teacher, Kevin Elisha, drove the ornaments near ly two hours from Clifton to Cunninghams home in Meeker. He kept pulling out individual ones and tell ing me about the kid, Cunningham remembers. It was just really neat the time and thought they put into it. She also tells of a Hamilton man, Ray Durham, who donated 1,200 large Aspen slices, or disks, so every kid in the areas school district could make an ornament. While the bulk of orna ments came from schools and scouting groups, three Ute tribes the Northern Utes, Southern Utes and Ute Mountain Utes pro vided a combined 800 ornaments. Northern Ute elders created more than 100 small cradleboards a traditional means of carrying swaddled babies from fabric and poster board, then hand-stitched each one, says Pearleen Ridley, director of the tribes Senior Citizen Program at Fort Duchesne, in north eastern Utah. A small group of elders were really dedicated, Ridley says. They came in at 8:30 and didnt leave until 4:00. They were here every day for two weeks. The tribes ancestors roamed the White River National Forest, says Ridley. Were very appreciative that were representing who and where our people came from, she says. In a tradition dating to 1970, the state from which the Capitol Christmas tree comes also donates the ornament. This is the third time that Colorado has been asked; the last time was in 2000, when the tree came from the San Isabel National Forest, in central Colorado. That year, one of the companion trees came from the Winkelman Farm in Limon. The next spring, owners Steve and Kathy Winkelman were given a seedling from the millenni um Capitol Christmas tree. They planted it, nurtured it and now, 12 years later, the tree is 6 feet tall. Kathy Winkelman and her teaching partner, Cindy Stone, took their Limon Elementary School fourthgrade students to see the communitys millennium tree, as they call it, and gathered pine cones from nearby to make ornaments skiers and snowboard ers. We suffered a severe hailstorm in June of 2003, which destroyed all of our wheat and feed crops and a large part of our tree farm, the class submission form read. But our little millen nium tree survived .... The teachers and stu dents tracked the progress of the Capitol Christmas tree online during its three-week road trip to the nations capital, learning about geography, history and the federal government along the way. Were small-town USA, Stone says. Many of these kids dont get out of Colorado, ever. The idea that something they made might be in the nations capital, thats really cool. Handmade ornaments follow tree to Capitol School children made thousands of decorations. CRAFTS ASSOCIATED PRESS Colorado school children and others crafted and donated 10,000 ornaments for this years the Capitol Christmas tree campaign. Some of the ornaments will adorn the 73-foot Engelmann spruce destined for the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol while others will decorate nearly 70 smaller trees, also from Colorado, destined for government office buildings in Washington, D.C., this holiday season. advisor, got involved with the toy drive last year and enlisted the help of the schools student council. I thought how could I help him because I couldnt believe that a seventh-grader came up with this on his own, she said. You see kids now days with I want, I want instead of let me give, let me give. Sparks and Sheri Keen, Fort White High School student activities director, helped collect toys for last years drive, giving Ford toys from a source he didnt expect. This year I knew I wanted to help again, Sparks said. The student council and leadership students got on board and we wanted to open the drive to the school. My class has three-plus boxes now and there will be more that well be donat ing to the kids ,as well. Its a pretty good thing. Keith Hatcher, Fort White High School prin cipal, spoke about Fords efforts to raise toys for less fortunate kids. I think this is a great thing, he said. Storm has worked really hard on this. He did it last year, and its a very worthy cause. There are so many children out there that are a whole lot less fortu nate than a lot of the kids that go here. To have one who is taking the initia tive and moving forward with a program like this to help less fortunate children is just amazing to me. Hatcher said Fort White students are excit ed about participating in the Fill-A-Blazer toy col lection campaign. He said he forwarded the request for toys to all administra tors in the school district, who have forwarded the request to their faculties and staff members. Its really growing, and were really looking forward to seeing how full this Blazer is going to get, he said. TOYS: For childrens sake Continued From Page 1D Seasonal sweaters: Wear in the spirit By SAMANTHA CRITCHELL AP Fashion Writer NEW YORK The good, the bad, the kitschy. A seasonal sweater is one way to start a conversation at a holiday function. Its a look that can mean all sorts of things: sequins, bows, Fair Isle patterns, bunny rabbits and bird motifs, or even antlers. Theres a fine line between a good seasonal sweater and one gone bad. Even those have a place, though. Yup, there are Ugly Sweater parties and Ugly Sweater blogs. Stand Up To Cancer is hosting a socialmedia online Ugly Sweater fundraising campaign. But before we go there, fashion insiders say theres a way to have your novelty and fun with style: Wear it in the right spirit. From Saks Fifth Avenue to J. Crew and C. Wonder, carry good tidings and festive trimmings wher ever you go. They bring a smile and theyre a good icebreaker, says style commentator Suze Yalof Schwartz. Who could resist com menting on the glitzy giant bow sweater? she says. But wearer beware: You will be the center of attention. The Saks way to do the sweater is tasteful with the right playful attitude, says Colleen Sherin, the retailers senior fashion director. Its not going to be covered in Santas, but it could be decorated with clear or metallic sequins, for example. No estimate on reopening Liberty Island; statue OK Associated Press NEW YORK Tourists will miss out for a while on one of the hallmarks of a visit to New York see ing the Statue of Liberty up close. The statue itself survived Superstorm Sandy intact, but damage to buildings and Liberty Islands power and heating systems means the island will remain closed for now, and authorities dont have an estimate on when it will reopen. The brick paths around the 12-acre island are torn up, and some docks are splintered. The metal railing that surrounds the island is broken in some places. The waterline on some of the buildings reaches 8 feet. The storm flooded the islands power and heating systems, Superintendent David Luchsinger said as he led reporters on a tour Friday. The National Park Service still does not know when the statue will reopen to the public or how much the island repairs will cost. Temporary power has been used to illuminate the statue at night since Nov. 9.

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By JOSEPH PISANIAP Business WriterThis holiday season, the hottest trend among retail-ers isn’t found on a store shelf. It’s taking place at the cash register. Major retailers, from Best Buy to Toys R Us, are prom-ising to match their compet-itors’ prices. Generally cus-tomers just need to bring in an advertisement or print-out to prove that the same item is available elsewhere at a lower price. In some cases, shoppers can come back with a receipt and get a refund for the difference if the price of an item they bought fell. Best Buy Co. Inc., Target Inc., Wal-Mart Stores Inc. and Sears Inc. offer price matching to customers all year round. But what’s different now is that Best Buy and Target are match-ing online retailers such as Amazon.com for the first time. That’s a big deal, since online prices tend to be lower than those at stores. Shoppers will be able to save some extra money, but they’re going to have to read a lot of fine print to do so. “Price matching sounds good, but there are so many exclusions, it sometimes isn’t as good as it sounds,” says Edgar Dworsky, the founder of ConsumerWorld.org, which tracks deals for shoppers. For instance, Target limits the number of online retailers that it will price match against to just five. Best Buy has selected 20, but only matched online prices from Nov. 1 to Nov. 17 and will start again from Nov. 27 to Dec. 24. Toys R Us is offering price matching for the first time and will only match prices that customers find in other brick-and-mortar stores. Walmart also match-es against in-store prices. Toys R Us, Best Buy, Sears and Target say they will match prices found on their own websites. It’s not uncommon for retailers to offer steeper discounts online than in their actual stores. (But Toys R Us says it won’t match prices on its own website if the item is marked as an “online-only price.”) Even the most experienced bargain hunters can get tripped up by all the rules. But shoppers can save some money if they’re diligent. “It really is a way to save money and shop at the store you want instead of one that’s inconvenient,” says Dworsky. Here are five ways to get the most out of price match-ing offers:1. Know the policyIf you want to take advantage of a price match offer, read the store’s policy close-ly. You can find the guide-lines on the store’s website. Print out the policy and bring it with you. Having a hard copy will be helpful if you need to argue your case. “Know their policy backwards or you may be bluffed into thinking some-thing doesn’t qualify,” says Dworsky.2. Bring proofAlways bring the advertisement or the printed web page for the item you want to price match. Walmart doesn’t require bringing the ad because it says cashiers have access to all local advertisements. But Dworsky recommends bringing ads in anyway. If there’s any confusion, you’ll be better prepared to make your case no mat-ter where you shop. The cashiers and customer representatives are always looking for a reason not to approve the transac-tion, says Dworsky.3. Save receiptsSome retailers will give you money back if you see a lower price after you buy an item. Keep a hold of your receipts and, particu-larly for big-ticket items, continue to look for lower prices. Best Buy will issue refunds until the end of January. Toys R Us lets you seek a refund up to seven days after buying an item. Sears custom-ers can get a refund after 14 days. Target is letting customer’s price match against brick-and-mortar retailers until Dec. 24 for any item bought after Nov. 1. You can only ask Target to match the price of an online retailer until Dec. 16.4. Go straight to the customer service deskMany retailers have hired cashiers specifically for the holiday rush, so the new employees may not be up-to-speed on the store’s price matching policy. Heather Wheeler, who runs savings website TheKrazyCouponLady.com, recommends han-dling the transaction at the customer service desk instead on the cashier. “(Those staffers are) trained a little more and are more knowledgeable,” says Wheeler.5. Look beyond retailersYou can also price match depending on how you pay. EBay Inc.’s payment processer, PayPal, prom-ises to match a lower price if you’ve already made a purchase using the ser-vice. That includes airline tickets. PayPal will match the prices of retailers that don’t let customers use PayPal, however. Just fill out a form and upload a receipt when you find a lower price. PayPal will give you back up to $1,000 for all purchases made until Dec. 31. You should also ask your credit card company to see if it offers price matching. It’s rare, but there are a few cards that do. Citi just launched a program for its credit card holders. Called the Citi Price Rewind program, it promises to do the work for you. Register your pur-chases made on the Citi credit card online and it will send you a check for the difference if it finds a lower price from an online retailer. The program is aimed at pricier purchases: It will only issue a discount if the price difference is $25 or more. Citi will give you the amount up to $250 for each item, and up to $1,000 a year. Of course, you’re going to need pay your credit card bill in full and not incur interest charges to truly make this a deal. Summary:The Associated PressALL THE RAGE: Big retailers, from Best Buy to Target to Toys R Us, are offering to match lower prices in an effort to attract holiday shop-pers. HOW IT WORKS: The merchants promise to match a competitor’s price if you bring in an advertisement or print-out that proves that a rival is selling an item at a cheaper price. CONFUSING POLICIES: Price matching policies have a lot of exclusions. Consumers should read the terms and print the policy from a store’s website so that it’s readily available when they request a price match. Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012 3D3DLIFEShoppers can save as retailers battle ASSOCIATED PRESS FILEA new study suggests the western Grand Canyon forme d 70 million years ago. Some scientists disagree and be lieve the canyon was mainly carved in the past 5 to 6 million years. Closing up the house for the holidays By LISA A. FLAMAssociated PressThe flights have been booked, the suitcases retrieved from the attic and your vacation itinerary has been set. But while your mind may be ready to wan-der to a faraway land, don’t forget about home sweet home just yet. Securing your home and making it look occupied while you’re away on a win-ter vacation will help deter thieves. And some simple preparations can save you the anguish and expense of returning home to find damage if something like a dishwasher hose decides to fail in your absence. “If you look at how long it takes compared to repair-ing the potential damage, it seems much easier to take the precautions than it does to make the repairs,” said Richard Stone, a University of Minnesota Extension educator in housing tech-nology. Here’s a checklist for closing up the house prop-erly before you go: Q Daily Check: Arrange for a friend or neighbor to check on the house at least once a day (and feed the fish or water the plants). Give that person a copy of your itinerary and contact numbers. Ask that they call the police if they see or hear anything out of the ordinary. Q Mail/Newspapers: Have the mail held, or ask a neighbor to take it in. The U.S. Postal Service will hold mail from three to 30 days. Sign up for this free service at usps.com, or pick up a form at the post office that can be given to your letter carrier, left in your mailbox or returned to your post office. Cancel newspaper deliveries, and ask your neighbor to take in any unexpected holiday packages, notices of deliv-ery attempts that may be left on your door, or free publications tossed on the driveway. “That’s a sure sign that you’re not there, when all that stuff starts accu-mulating at your house,” said Ernie Long, the crime prevention coordinator for the Aventura Police Department in Florida and an instructor for the National Crime Prevention Council. Q Security: Lock all windows and doors and set your alarm if you have one. The police also might be able to check on your house daily. If your department has one, register with its “vacation watch” or “dark house” list. “We will periodically go by and check your house to make sure everything is on the up and up,” Long said. “Just about every police department offers some kind of vacation watch.” Q Lights: To make your house look lived in, put lights on timers to mimic your typical routine. Long said he’ll set his living room timer to go on in the eve-ning for a bit, and then he’ll set a bedroom light to go on for an hour before his usual bedtime. Exterior motion lights are highly effective in deterring crime because, as Long said, “you can’t sneak up on them.” Q Noise: A radio can also be set on a timer to make it seem like you’re there. Burglars, looking for an empty house, will first knock on a front door, and will flee if they hear a radio, thinking you just didn’t hear the knock. If nobody answers, they typi-cally go around to a back door, where they are less visible, Long said. Q Locks and Doors: The back door should have a high-security lock and a strong door frame. Long recommends replac-ing short screws with 3 1 inch wood screws to rein-force the strike plate on the door, making it harder for a criminal to kick it in. “You need to have good-quality locks but the door frame is just as important, especially on the back door,” he said. “Studies have shown that if you delay him two minutes, he’ll go somewhere else.” Q Valuables: The first place robbers go in a home is the master bedroom, Long said, where they are after money, jewelry and guns. If you have a big stash of cash or an expen-sive jewelry collection, he recommends storing it at a bank safety deposit box and storing any weapons in a gun safe. If you hide valuables in your home, be creative, Long said; place them in a coffee can, paint-ed black and attached to the floor joists overhead in the basement, for instance. “If the guy is there for a while, he’ll knock over everything in your house, empty every drawer, turn every mattress over and look everywhere in your house for good stuff,” Long said. “They’re not neat when they do it.” Q Blinds: Leave the blinds as you normally do. If you raise and lower them daily, Long recommends keeping blinds closed in the rear of the house, in case a would-be robber is watching for movement, and keep them open in the front. Q Water: Turn off the main valve (usually located near the water meter) or, if you have well water, turn off the pump. Then, turn on an upstairs faucet for about 15 seconds to relieve any pressure in the system. Grand Canyon may be as oldas dinosaur eraBy ALICIA CHANGAP Science WriterLOS ANGELES — The awe-inspiring Grand Canyon was probably carved about 70 million years ago, much earlier than thought, a provoca-tive new study suggests — so early that dinosaurs might have roamed near this natural wonder. Using a new dating tool, a team of scientists came up with a different age for the gorge’s western sec-tion, challenging conven-tional wisdom that much of the canyon was scoured by the mighty Colorado River in the last 5 million to 6 million years. Not everyone is convinced with the latest viewpoint published online Thursday in the journal Science. Critics contend the study ignores a moun-tain of evidence pointing to a geologically young landscape and they have doubts about the technique used to date it. The notion that the Grand Canyon existed during the dinosaur era is “ludicrous,” said geolo-gist Karl Karlstrom of the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque. How the Grand Canyon became grand ‚ with its vertical cliffs and flat pla-teaus — has been debated since John Wesley Powell navigated the whitewater rapids and scouted the sheer walls during his famous 1869 expedition. Some 5 million tourists flock to Arizona each year to marvel at the 277-mile-long chasm, which plung-es a mile deep in some places. It’s a geologic layer cake with the most recent rock formations near the rim stacked on top of older rocks that date back 2 billion years. Though the exposed rocks are ancient, most sci-entists believe the Grand Canyon itself was forged in the recent geologic past, created when tectonic forc-es uplifted the land that the Colorado River later carved through. The new work by researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder and California Institute of Technology argued that canyon-cutting occurred long before that. ASSOCIATED PRESSMake sure all windows and doors are locked and set y our alarm if you have one, when closing up the house for vacation. The police also might be able to check on your house daily. If your department has one, register with its “vacatio n watch” or “dark house” list. ON THE MONEY HOLIDAY TRAVEL ASSOCIATED PRESSBig retailers, from Best Buy to Target to Toys R Us, are en gaging in a price war this holiday season, and shoppers can score some good deals if they know how to navigate them. Stores matching online prices is newest trend.

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4D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012 4DLIFE SUNDAY EVENING DECEMBER 2, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsAmerica’s Funniest Home Videos (N) Once Upon a Time “Queen of Hearts” Revenge Daniel’s role is challenged. (N) (:01) 666 Park Avenue “Hypnos” (N) News at 11Inside Edition 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsThe Insider (N) Love-RaymondBig Bang TheoryCSI: Miami Horatio tries to save Yelina. Criminal Minds “Proof” (DVS) NewsSports ZoneChann 4 NewsBig Bang Theory 5-PBS 5 -Motown: Big Hits and More (My Music)Downton Abbey Revisited Behind-the-scenes footage. Downton Abbey Revisited Behind-the-scenes footage. Masterpiece Classic “Downton Abbey” Matthew and others go off to war. 7-CBS 7 47 47e(4:00) NFL Football Pittsburgh Steelers at Baltimore Ravens. 60 Minutes (N) The Amazing Race (N) The Good Wife “Battle of the Proxies” The Mentalist “Fugue in Red” Action Sports 360 9-CW 9 17 17Brideshead RevAccording to JimYourJax MusicVoid TVLaw & Order “Pro Se” Local HauntsLocal HauntsTMZ (N) The Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30e NFL Football: Buccaneers at Broncos Bob’s Burgers (PA) Cleveland ShowThe SimpsonsBob’s Burgers (N) Family GuyAmerican Dad (N) NewsAction Sports 360Leverage “The Homecoming Job” 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsFootball Night in America (N) (Live) e(:20) NFL Football Philadelphia Eagles at Dallas Cowboys. (N) News CSPAN 14 210 350NewsmakersWashington This Week Q & APrime MinisterRoad to the White House Q & A WGN-A 16 239 307Funny VideosBloopers!Bloopers!How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine(:40) Instant Replay30 Rock30 Rock TVLAND 17 106 304“Mission: Impossible” (1996) Tom Cruise. Treachery in Prague puts an agent on the run. Love-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Our America With Lisa LingOur America With Lisa LingOprah’s Next ChapterOprah’s Next Chapter (N) Oprah’s Next Chapter A&E 19 118 265Storage-TexasStorage-TexasStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage-TexasStorage-TexasBe the Boss “Complete Nutrition” (:01) Be the Boss “Complete Nutrition” HALL 20 185 312“A Christmas Wish” (2011, Drama) Kristy Swanson, Tess Harper. “The Christmas Heart” (2012, Drama) Teri Polo, Paul Essiembre. Premiere. “The Christmas Card” (2006, Romance) Ed Asner, John Newton. FX 22 136 248“Kung Fu Panda” (2008, Comedy) Voices of Jack Black, Angelina Jolie.“The Karate Kid” (2010) Jaden Smith, Jackie Chan. A Chinese master schools an American boy in the martial arts.“The Karate Kid” (2010, Drama) CNN 24 200 202CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) Sharing The Spotlight Pre-ShowCNN Heroes: An All-Star Tribute The top 10 heroes of 2012. (N) (Live) CNN Heroes: An All-Star Tribute TNT 25 138 245(5:00)“Catch Me if You Can” (2002) Leonardo DiCaprio. (DVS)“Inception” (2010) Leonardo DiCaprio, Ellen Page. A thief enters people’s dreams and steals their secrets. (:15)“Catch Me if You Can” NIK 26 170 299The Fairly OddParents Timmy gets a special gift. Odd Parents“A Fairly Odd Christmas” (2012, Comedy) Drake Bell. See Dad RunThe NannyThe NannyFriends(:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241(5:12)“The Punisher” (2004, Action) Thomas Jane, John Travolta.“Pitch Black” (2000, Science Fiction) Radha Mitchell, Vin Diesel, Cole Hauser. Premiere. (:45)“Pitch Black” (2000) Radha Mitchell, Vin Diesel. MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*HM*A*S*HColumbo “Last Salute to the Commodore” Columbo’s suspect turns up dead. Thriller “Flowers of Evil” The Twilight ZoneThe Twilight Zone DISN 31 172 290Austin & AllyShake It Up!A.N.T. FarmGood Luck CharlieDog With a BlogShake It Up! (N) Dog With a BlogJessieGood Luck CharlieA.N.T. FarmPhineas and FerbJessie LIFE 32 108 252(5:00)“The Christmas Hope”“Dear Santa” (2011, Drama) Amy Acker, Brooklynn Proulx, Gina Holden. “Finding Mrs. Claus” (2012, Comedy) Mira Sorvino, Will Sasso. Premiere. (:01) “Dear Santa” (2011) Amy Acker. USA 33 105 242NCIS “Two-Faced” (DVS) NCIS A murder is caught on tape. NCIS “Baltimore” (DVS) NCIS Tracking the Port-to-Port killer. NCIS The Port-to-Port killer is revealed. NCIS “Masquerade” (DVS) BET 34 124 329“Not Easily Broken” (2009, Drama) Morris Chestnut, Taraji P. Henson, Maeve Quinlan. “He’s Mine Not Yours” (2011) Caryn Ward. A woman hires a temptress to test her lover’s delity. Lens on TalentDon’t Sleep! ESPN 35 140 2062012 World Series Film (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) BCS SelectionCollege Football Bowl Selection Special (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209 2012 World Series of Poker Final Table. From Las Vegas. 2012 World Series of Poker 2012 World Series of Poker 2012 World Series of Poker SUNSP 37 -Fishing the FlatsSport FishingSportsman’s Adv. College Football ACC Championship -Florida State vs. Georgia Tech. From Charlotte, NC. (Taped) Seminole SportsSaltwater Exp.Into the Blue DISCV 38 182 278Alaska: The Last FrontierMoonshiners “Rise ’n Shine!” Moonshiners “Moonshine Goldmine” MoonshinersMoonshiners “Storm’s a Brewing” Moonshiners TBS 39 139 247(5:15)“The Holiday” (2006) Cameron Diaz, Kate Winslet, Jude Law. “Four Christmases” (2008) Vince Vaughn, Reese Witherspoon. (DVS)“Four Christmases” (2008) Vince Vaughn, Reese Witherspoon. (DVS) HLN 40 202 204Murder by the BookDominick Dunne: Power, PrivilegeDominick Dunne: Power, PrivilegeWhat Would You Do?What Would You Do?Dominick Dunne: Power, Privilege FNC 41 205 360FOX News Sunday With Chris WallaceFOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) FOX News Sunday With Chris WallaceGeraldo at Large (N) Huckabee E! 45 114 236“Of ce Space” (1999, Comedy) Ron Livingston, Jennifer Aniston.“Sweet Home Alabama” (2002) Reese Witherspoon, Josh Lucas. Ice Loves Coco (N) E! SpecialLove You, Mean ItChelsea Lately TRAVEL 46 196 277Extreme RVsExtreme RVsMud PeopleSturgis “Biker Madness” (N) Sturgis “Metal Mania” (N) Sturgis “Wild and Free” (N) HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lMillion Dollar RoomsExtreme HomesProperty BrothersHouse Hunters Renovation (N) House Hunters Renovation TLC 48 183 280Untold Stories of the E.R.Extreme Cougar WivesSister WivesSister Wives “More Sister Wives!” (N) Suddenly Single (N) Sister Wives “More Sister Wives!” HIST 49 120 269Invention USAInvention USAPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn Stars(:31) Pawn Stars(:02) Outback Hunters (N) ANPL 50 184 282To Be AnnouncedFinding Bigfoot “CSI Bigfoot” Rattlesnake Republic (N) Finding Bigfoot: Further Evidence (N) Finding Bigfoot “The Sierra Spy” (N) Finding Bigfoot: Further Evidence FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveThe Next Iron Chef “Transformation” Sugar Dome (N) The Next Iron Chef: Redemption (N) Iron Chef America “Holiday Battle” (N) Restaurant Stakeout TBN 52 260 372T.D. JakesJoyce MeyerLeading the WayThe Blessed LifeJoel OsteenKerry ShookBelieverVoiceCre o Dollar“Love’s Christmas Journey” (2011, Drama) Natalie Hall, Dylan Bruce. FSN-FL 56 Tennis Champions Series: Surprise. Courier vs. McEnroe. (Taped) World Poker Tour: Season 10Magic Live! (Live)d NBA Basketball Orlando Magic at Los Angeles Lakers. From Staples Center in Los Angeles. SYFY 58 122 244(4:00)Outlander“Land of the Lost” (2009, Comedy) Will Ferrell, Anna Friel.“Raiders of the Lost Ark” (1981, Adventure) Harrison Ford, Karen Allen, Paul Freeman.“Land of the Lost” (2009) AMC 60 130 254The Walking Dead “Say the Word” The Walking Dead “Hounded” The Walking DeadThe Walking Dead “Made to Suffer” (:01) The Walking DeadTalking Dead (N) Comic Book Men COM 62 107 249(5:45)“The 40-Year-Old Virgin” (2005) Steve Carell, Catherine Keener. “Dinner for Schmucks” (2010, Comedy) Steve Carell, Paul Rudd. Premiere. (:33) Tosh.0(:03) Brickleberry(:33) Key & Peele CMT 63 166 327(4:45)“Grumpier Old Men” (1995)“Did You Hear About the Morgans?” (2009, Comedy) Hugh Grant, Sarah Jessica Parker. Chainsaw GangChainsaw GangChainsaw GangChainsaw GangRedneck Island NGWILD 108 190 283Man v. Monster “African Werewolf” Moose: Titans of the NorthWild Mississippi “Deep Freeze” Wild Mississippi “Raging Waters” Wild Mississippi “Delta Blues” Wild Mississippi “Deep Freeze” NGC 109 186 276(5:00) Aftermath: Population ZeroOmens of the Apocalypse: The End2012: Countdown to ArmageddonEvacuate Earth How humans would evacuate Earth. (N) 2012: Countdown to Armageddon SCIENCE 110 193 284How the Universe WorksSeeing Black Holes Black holes. Deep Space Marvels “Life” Deep Space Marvels “Survival” Deep Space Marvels “Destiny” Deep Space Marvels “Life” ID 111 192 285Homicide Hunter: Lt. Joe KendaDisappeared “The Soldiers’s Wife” 48 Hours on ID “Family Affair” (N) Fatal Encounters “The Ring” Unusual Suspects “No Mercy” (N) 48 Hours on ID “Family Affair” HBO 302 300 501(5:15)“Elektra” (2005) ‘PG-13’ “Contraband” (2012, Action) Mark Wahlberg, Kate Beckinsale. ‘R’ Boardwalk Empire “Margate Sands” (:05) Boardwalk Empire(:10) Boardwalk Empire MAX 320 310 515(5:40)“Red Riding Hood” (2011) Amanda Seyfried. (:20)“Pulp Fiction” (1994, Crime Drama) John Travolta, Samuel L. Jackson. ‘R’ “Project X” (2012, Comedy) Thomas Mann. ‘R’ Co-Ed SHOW 340 318 545Untold History of the United StatesDexter Dexter gains an advantage. Homeland “Two Hats” Dexter “The Dark... Whatever” (N) Homeland “Broken Hearts” (N) Dexter “The Dark... Whatever” MONDAY EVENING DECEMBER 3, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Extreme Makeover: Home Edition (N) Extreme Makeover: Home Edition (N) Castle “Secret Santa” (N) News at 11(:35) Nightline (N) 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) The Insider 5-PBS 5 -JournalNightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Pledge Programming (N) (Live) Celtic Woman: A Christmas CelebrationBBC World NewsTavis Smiley 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJaguars AccessTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother2 Broke Girls2 Broke Girls (N) Mike & Molly (N) Hawaii Five-0 “Ha’awe Make Loa” (N) Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of Payne90210 “902-100” (N) Gossip Girl “It’s Really Complicated” TMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family GuyFamily GuyThe SimpsonsBones “The Ghost in the Machine” (N) (:01) The Mob Doctor “Fluid Dynamics” NewsAction News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! 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NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobDrake & JoshFigure It OutNews W/LindaFull HouseFull HouseFull HouseThe NannyThe NannyFriends(:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241(5:30)“The Wolfman” (2010, Horror) Benicio Del Toro, Anthony Hopkins.“Halloween” (2007, Horror) Malcolm McDowell, Scout Taylor-Compton, Tyler Mane.“The Last House on the Left” (2009) Tony Goldwyn. MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*HM*A*S*HLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitSeinfeldFrasierThe Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Phineas and FerbGood Luck CharlieJessieAustin & Ally“The Search for Santa Paws” (2010, Comedy) Phineas and FerbGood Luck CharliePhineas and FerbJessie “Star Wars” Shake It Up! LIFE 32 108 252“Christmas at Water’s Edge” (2004) Keshia Knight Pulliam, Tom Bosley. “A Diva’s Christmas Carol” (2000) Vanessa L. Williams, Kathy Grif n. “The Perfect Holiday” (2007, Romance) Gabrielle Union. Premiere. USA 33 105 242NCIS Two mercenaries are found dead. NCIS: Los Angeles “Deliverance” WWE Monday Night RAW (N) (:05) CSI: Crime Scene Investigation BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Top 10 Countdown” (N)“Drumline” (2002) Nick Cannon. Rivalry between two drummers threatens a college band. “My Baby’s Daddy” (2004, Comedy) Eddie Grif n, Anthony Anderson. ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) Monday Night Countdown (N) (Live) e NFL Football New York Giants at Washington Redskins. (N Subject to Blackout) SportsCenter (N) ESPN2 36 144 209SportsNation (N) Women’s College Basketball Jimmy V Classic -Maryland at Connecticut. (N) (:15) 2012 World Series of Poker Final Table. From Las Vegas. SportsCenter (N) Coll. Football Live SUNSP 37 -Reel AnimalsSport FishingShip Shape TVFlorida SportsmanFishing the FlatsSport FishingSportsman’s Adv.Saltwater Exp.Into the BlueAlong the Way2011 XTERRA USA Championship DISCV 38 182 278Fast N’ Loud “Double Trouble Galaxie” Fast N’ Loud “Frankensteined Ford” Fast N’ Loud “Holy Grail Hot Rod” American Chopper (N) Fast N’ Loud (N) American Chopper TBS 39 139 247King of QueensKing of QueensSeinfeldSeinfeldFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyConan Punch Brothers. (N) HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) Dr. Drew on Call (N) Nancy GraceShowbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236(5:00)“Sweet Home Alabama”E! News (N) Studio E! (N) E! SpecialFashion PoliceLove You, Mean ItThe SoupChelsea Lately (N) E! 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Love It or List It “The Wahl Family” (N) House HuntersHunters Int’lLove It or List It “The Pliskat Family” TLC 48 183 280Island MediumIsland MediumCake BossCake Boss: Next Great Baker “Game On!” Cake Boss: Next Great Baker (N) Cake Boss (N) Cake BossCake Boss: Next Great Baker HIST 49 120 269Pawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsAmerican Pickers “Full Steam Ahead” Pawn Stars (N) (:31) Pawn StarsI Love the 1880’s(:32) Pawn Stars ANPL 50 184 282Swamp Wars “Florida’s Born Killers” Gator Boys “Gators Gone Rogue” Rattlesnake RepublicFinding Bigfoot “The Sierra Spy” Finding Bigfoot: Further EvidenceRattlesnake Republic FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveMystery DinersHealth Inspectors TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the LordMax LucadoThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesLiving EdgeKingdom Conn.Jesse DuplantisPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -World Poker Tour: Season 10 College Football Pac-12 Championship -UCLA at Stanford. Magic Live! (Live)d NBA Basketball Orlando Magic at Golden State Warriors. SYFY 58 122 244(5:30)“Raiders of the Lost Ark” (1981) Harrison Ford, Karen Allen.“Star Trek VII” (1994) Patrick Stewart. The Enterprise crew encounters a deranged scientist.“Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan” (1982) AMC 60 130 254(4:45)“The Truman Show”“The Green Mile” (1999, Drama) Tom Hanks, David Morse, Michael Clarke Duncan. A guard thinks an inmate has a supernatural power to heal. “The Green Mile” (1999) COM 62 107 249It’s Always Sunny(:29) Tosh.0The Colbert ReportDaily Show(7:59) FuturamaFuturamaFuturamaSouth ParkBrickleberrySouth ParkDaily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327RebaRebaRebaRebaRebaRebaKitchen Nightmares “Casa Roma” Kitchen Nightmares “Sante La Brea” Kitchen Nightmares “Secret Garden” NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer TV tness trainer’s dog. Return of the White LionWorld’s Deadliest “Pack Hunters” The Pack “Wild Dogs” Clash of the HyenasWorld’s Deadliest “Pack Hunters” NGC 109 186 276Taboo “Fat” 2012: Countdown to ArmageddonDoomsday: Book of RevelationThe Mayan Apocalypse 2012 (N) Maya Underworld: The Real DoomsdayDoomsday: Book of Revelation SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow the Universe WorksI Was Mummi edBrainwashedSex in AmericaI Was Mummi ed ID 111 192 285Cold Blood “The Lost Boy” Cold Blood “Dreams That Kill” Unusual SuspectsI Didn’t Do It (N) Disappeared “The Dutchman’s Curse” Unusual Suspects HBO 302 300 501“Anchorman: Legend of Ron”(:15) “The Big Year” (2011, Comedy) Steve Martin, Jack Black. ‘PG’ “Contagion” (2011, Suspense) Marion Cotillard, Matt Damon. ‘PG-13’ 24/7 PacquiaoThe Art of War MAX 320 310 515“Big Mommas: Like Father, Like Son” (2011) ‘PG-13’ (:45)“The Ring Two” (2005) Naomi Watts. A journalist must protect her son from evil Samara.“50 First Dates” (2004) Adam Sandler. ‘PG-13’ (:40) Life on Top SHOW 340 318 545“The Three Musketeers” (2011, Action) Matthew MacFadyen. ‘PG-13’ Untold History of the United States (N) Homeland “Broken Hearts” Dexter “The Dark... Whatever” Homeland “Broken Hearts” WEEKDAY AFTERNOON Comcast Dish DirecTV 12 PM12:301 PM1:302 PM2:303 PM3:304 PM4:305 PM5:30 3-ABC 3 -NewsBe a MillionaireThe ChewGeneral HospitalMauryDr. PhilBe a MillionaireNews 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsPaid ProgramPaid ProgramAndy Grif th ShowThe Jeff Probst ShowSteve HarveyThe Dr. Oz ShowChann 4 NewsChann 4 News 5-PBS 5 -WordWorldBarney & FriendsCaillouDaniel TigerSuper Why!Dinosaur TrainCat in the HatCurious GeorgeWild KrattsElectric Comp.WUFT NewsWorld News 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxThe Young and the RestlessBold/BeautifulThe TalkLet’s Make a DealJudge Joe BrownJudge JudyAction News JaxAction News Jax 9-CW 9 17 17The Trisha Goddard ShowLaw & Order: Criminal IntentJudge MathisThe Bill Cunningham ShowMauryThe People’s Court 10-FOX 10 30 30Jerry SpringerThe Jeremy Kyle ShowJudge Joe BrownWe the PeopleThe DoctorsDr. PhilFamily FeudFamily Feud 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsBe a MillionaireDays of our LivesFirst Coast LivingKatie The Ellen DeGeneres ShowNewsNews CSPAN 14 210 350(9:00) Public AffairsPublic AffairsVaried Programs Public Affairs WGN-A 16 239 307In the Heat of the NightWGN Midday NewsWalker, Texas RangerWalker, Texas RangerWalker, Texas RangerLaw & Order: Criminal Intent TVLAND 17 106 304Andy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowGunsmokeGunsmokeBonanzaBonanzaBonanza OWN 18 189 279Dr. PhilDr. PhilVaried Programs A&E 19 118 265CSI: MiamiVaried ProgramsCriminal MindsVaried ProgramsCriminal MindsVaried ProgramsThe First 48Varied ProgramsThe First 48Varied ProgramsThe First 48Varied Programs HALL 20 185 312Movie Movie Movie FX 22 136 248MovieVaried Programs CNN 24 200 202CNN Newsroom CNN Newsroom The Situation Room TNT 25 138 245Varied Programs NIK 26 170 299Team UmizoomiMax & RubyDora the ExplorerGo, Diego, Go!SpongeBobSpongeBobOdd ParentsOdd ParentsOdd ParentsSpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBob SPIKE 28 168 241Varied Programs MY-TV 29 32 -Hawaii Five-0GunsmokeBonanzaThe Big ValleyThe Wild, Wild WestEmergency! DISN 31 172 290Varied Programs Phineas and FerbVaried Programs Good Luck CharlieVaried Programs LIFE 32 108 252Old ChristineOld ChristineHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherFrasierFrasierFrasierFrasierVaried Programs USA 33 105 242Law & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitVaried Programs BET 34 124 329The ParkersThe ParkersMy Wife and KidsMy Wife and KidsJamie Foxx ShowJamie FoxxThe ParkersVaried Programs ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenterSportsCenterSportsCenterOutside the LinesColl. Football LiveNFL LiveAround the HornInterruption ESPN2 36 144 209First Take Numbers Never LieMike and MikeBest of First TakeVaried ProgramsNumbers Never LieDan Le BatardNFL32Varied Programs SUNSP 37 -College BasketballVaried Programs DISCV 38 182 278FBI: Criminal PursuitAuction KingsAuction KingsMythBustersVaried Programs TBS 39 139 247Fresh PrinceAmerican DadAmerican DadLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondSeinfeldFriendsFriendsFriendsFriends HLN 40 202 204News Now Making It in AmericaEvening Express FNC 41 205 360(11:00) Happening NowAmerica Live Studio B With Shepard SmithYour World With Neil CavutoThe Five E! 45 114 236E! NewsSex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CityVaried Programs TRAVEL 46 196 277Varied Programs Anthony Bourdain: No ReservationsTastiest PlacesTastiest PlacesBizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. FoodMan v. Food HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lVaried Programs TLC 48 183 280What Not to WearA Baby StoryA Baby StoryCake BossCake BossWhat Not to WearFour WeddingsFour Weddings HIST 49 120 269Varied Programs ANPL 50 184 282Varied Programs The HauntedMonsters Inside Me FOOD 51 110 231Best DishesBarefoot ContessaVaried Programs10 Dollar DinnersSecrets/Restaurant30-Minute MealsGiada at HomeGiada at HomeBarefoot ContessaBarefoot ContessaBest DishesPaula’s Cooking TBN 52 260 372Varied ProgramsBehind the ScenesVaried ProgramsJames RobisonTodayThe 700 ClubJohn Hagee TodayVaried ProgramsPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -NBA Basketball Varied Programs SYFY 58 122 244(11:30) MovieVaried Programs AMC 60 130 254MovieVaried Programs COM 62 107 249Varied Programs Movie Comedy Central(:26) Futurama(4:57) FuturamaIt’s Always Sunny CMT 63 166 327Extreme Makeover: Home EditionExtreme MakeoverVaried ProgramsWorld’s Strictest ParentsWorld’s Strictest ParentsRoseanneRoseanneRoseanneRoseanne NGWILD 108 190 283Dog WhispererVaried Programs NGC 109 186 276Alaska State TroopersBorder WarsTabooVaried Programs SCIENCE 110 193 284Varied Programs Factory MadeFactory MadeMythBustersThey Do It?They Do It? 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DEAR ABBY: When I was in grammar school 50 years ago, I was molested by two boys. I recently learned that they are now both dead. I wrote to the sister of one of them and told her what her brother had done to me and how I felt about it. I’m glad that he is dead, and I told her so. She responded, calling my letter sad and bitter for bringing up the mat-ter after so much time has transpired. In the ‘60s the norm was not to tell anyone for fear of being spanked or beaten or called a liar and liv-ing in kid hell. I am a female, and the standard was so different in those days. Please print my letter. -CONFUSED IN CALIFORNIA DEAR CONFUSED: If this was something the sister was unaware of, you shouldn’t be surprised that she responded as she did to your bombshell. I agree that we have become more open about discussing sex and sexual assaults than we were in the ‘60s. And I hope that somewhere along the way you received counseling to help you deal with the molestation, because talk-ing with a qualified mental health professional about it can be therapeutic. However, if you haven’t, please contact RAINN, the Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network. Its toll-free number is 800-656-4673. You can find assis-tance there, and nothing will shock them. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: I have been dating the most wonder-ful man, “Art,” for almost four years. He’s strong, caring and he treats me like a princess. We have discussed marriage several times, and I suspect he will propose soon. I’m sure that Art is “the one,” and I would marry him in a heartbeat. My only worry is that we’ll end up like my parents someday. I know this sounds silly, but while I was growing up, I never saw any signs that my parents really loved each other. Dad always seemed like he was trying too hard to make Mom happy, while she either was indifferent to his affections or dismissed his efforts. They would argue about the smallest things, to the point where I wished they would get divorced so I wouldn’t have to hear them dis-agreeing. I have mentioned my fears to Art and he has told me not to worry, but I can’t help but worry. I love him too much to put him through the same emotion-al abuse, even accidentally, and I’d never want my kids to grow up thinking their parents didn’t love each other. How can I keep the past from repeating? -UNLIKE MY PARENTS DEAR UNLIKE: You don’t have to follow in your parents’ footsteps. Children don’t always grow up to emulate their parents. You are an indi-vidual, and you are well aware of the unhealthy pat-tern you observed while growing up. If you and Art are able to discuss your differences and reach a consensus when problems arise, you should be fine. DEAR ABBY HOROSCOPES ARIES (March 21-April 19): Being serious-minded and intent on getting things done will help allevi-ate stress. The change you make within will set the stage for future gains. ++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Being a participant will be entertaining and invigorating. What you do at home as well as what you offer the people you love will determine how much help you receive. ++++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): When someone gives you something, question what’s expected in return. You have to be smart or you may end up owing favors that go against your better judgment. +++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Follow your heart. Don’t be afraid to try something different or to spend time with someone from a totally different background from you. The experience and what you learn will make you a bet-ter person and lead to a great opportunity. +++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Protect what’s yours. Not everyone will share your concerns. Divvy up what you share with others so you can move on at your own speed. +++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Witness what’s unfold-ing. The wait may have been a long one, but the rewards will be worth-while. Interacting with people who share your interests will make con-tributions that will enable you to reach your goals. Love is in the stars. +++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Reach out to old friends or co-workers and share a little festive cheer. Finding out what others are doing and showing interest will position you well for a potential project that is right up your alley. Don’t let domestic issues ruin your fun. ++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Plan a trip or engage in a pastime that allows you to use your creative input. Take a serious approach to love, life and your future happiness. +++++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Put your energy, hope and trust on the line. Change will be necessary if you want to improve the way you live. Be adven-turesome and you will meet someone who wants to share the experience with you in your personal or professional life. +++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Follow your gut feeling. You can enhance your reputation if you share your thoughts and plans. +++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): You can’t win if you are unreasonable. Reassess your situation. Cut your losses and move on if there is no alterna-tive. Keeping your home base tranquil will be what makes a difference to your emotional wellness. +++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Show your entrepre-neurial spirit and head in a direction that looks promising personally and professionally. Include a loved one or someone you find creative and inspiring and you will double your chance of being successful. +++++ Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com THE LAST WORD Eugenia Word SUNDAY CROSSWORD Across 1 It might appear on a spine 6 In the thick of7KH&RI)',& Abbr. 14 Muslim moguls7KH:UHVWOHU actress 20 Trio on camels7KHEURWKHULQ$P ,P\EURWKHUVNHHSHU" 22 Monosyllabic state23 Bialys)XVV\DERXWUXOHV:UHVWOLQJ achievement &XSKROGHU29 Rain-forest flora&RQWUDLOVRXUFH RQFH$EEU 31 Jurassic suffix1RYHOZULWLQJHJ.H\LQDFKDLQ maybe 35 Two of them make a sawbuck 36 Having everything RQHQHHGV 9LFWRULDV6HFUHW purchase :DONHJ:KL]41 Tormentors of a sort*RDWVFU\ &DUULHUOHWWHUV"46 Je ne sais quoi49 His tomb is a pilgrimage site forERWK0XVOLPVDQGJews 2FFXS\DVDERRWK7RZKRPLWLVVDLG 6RPHWKLQJLVrotten in the stateRI'HQPDUN 'DQLVKHJ56 Grave letters%LJ5HG0DFKLQH hustler )RXUWLPHUROHIRU 3DWULFN6WHZDUW 60 Almost every man in WKHZRUOGKDVRQH 0\UQDRI&KHDSHU E\WKH'R]HQ ,QGHHG)ROORZHUVRID boom? 72 More precise alternative toscissors 80 Largest moon in the solar system %RWWRPOLQHPD\EH
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6D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 6DLIFE Seasons Greetings to our patients, their families and the North Florida community that we are privileged to serve. Hope. 6DLIFE By LEANNE ITALIE Associated Press NEW YORK With a little planning, a little help and a lot of resolve, holiday entertaining doesnt have to mean youre too stressed out to enjoy your own party. Sometimes, said Michelle Morton, a professional organizer and busy mom of three in Raleigh, N.C., its all about attitude. This is not the time to perfect being perfect, she said. This is all about surviving with a smile on your face and at the end of the day making sure you enjoy it as well. If it doesnt make you happy, and youre doing it out of obliga tion, then cross it off your list. If youre a go for hosting, try these tips for maintaining your sanity: Choosing the menu: Mary Giuliani, a high-end caterer and event planner in Manhattan, does 60 to 75 parties from Dec. 1 to Dec. 22 each year. Mad Men and all the 50s and 60s retro stuff is chic again, she said. That means potlucks are cool. Plus these days, everybody wants to be a celebrity chef. But, she cautions, know your crowd. If youre certain your guests wont enjoy showing off their favorite casserole or the lat est recipe they found online, dont do it. Try a dessert party or serve mac-and-cheese with toppings instead, suggests Giuliani, with one signature drink as opposed to an open bar. Your offerings for des sert can be a mix of home-baked and store bought, freeing up time to get more creative with parting gifts for guests, for example. Giuliani calls her go-to party drink served by the pitcher the White Christmas, consisting of white cranberry juice to avoid tough stains vodka and pome granate seeds at the bottom for a bit of extra flavor and holiday color. Chef Jan Birnbaum, co-owner of EPIC Roasthouse in San Francisco, suggests preparing food youve made at least several times. The best way to have fun with your guests and friends is to make the meal doable, Birnbaum said. Preparing a dish that you have never done before will guarantee a less than fun day for you. Make lists: Morton has found success breaking to-do lists into catego ries and prioritizing each task, then syncing the tasks with her electronic calendar. I feel much better when I write things out, she said. When I walk around with it all in my head I cant think, I cant focus, I cant sleep. Dont head off to the market without a list, and plan to shop well in advance, Birnbaum adds. Fresh ingredients will stay that way purchased two days ahead. And dont forget to designate help. Putting on a party alone is foolhardy. Birnbaum said ask yourself a few key questions when planning, like who will set the table while youre finishing off the meal? How much time do you need to shower and dress? Have your help arrive at least several hours in advance. Home decor: Whipping the house into shape for a party is always stressful. Giuliani suggests stocking up on votive candles to give a little warmth without going crazy, especially if you forgot to leave time to buy and arrange flowers. Dana Bowen, executive edi tor of Every Day with Rachael Ray magazine, says avoid buying decorations intended solely for the holidays. Look around your backyard for pine cones or tree branches and turn them into cen terpieces, she suggests. Or try a tip from design guru Nate Berkus and reuse scraps of wrapping paper to cover your vases for a more festive feel with out spending money. Aimee Beatty, the in-house styl ist for Pier 1 Imports, said focus when decorating on high-traffic areas. Simple additions, such as garland to an entryway, adorn ing a table setting with ornament place card holders or perhaps add ing beautiful embroidered pillows to the living room sofa can set the tone for the holidays, she said. At the table, especially if youre on a budget, get funky with a mix of vintage from thrift stores or flea markets, Bowen said. Vintage china and silverware is a great idea, and you can get it for pen nies. I walked out of a bag sale with two armfuls of champagne flutes that I pull out every New Years Eve. Who wants to drink from plastic cups. Loulie Walker, an event plan ner for the rich and famous in Manhattan, is also a mix-andmatch fan. For tableware, take an anything goes approach, such as family heirloom china next to bigbox store plates, and mixing up linens and glassware, she said. This also makes it easy to add an extra setting at the last minute. Holiday wine: Wine pairings are fun, but theyre not everything. Giuliani said choose one wine for holiday hosting and buy it by the case to save money. Kathy Bertone, who wrote The Art of the Visit: Being the Perfect Host; Becoming the Perfect Guest, notes hosts can count on visitors showing up with plenty of wine, anyway. Ken Forte, president of the Harlem Wine Gallery, a small wine shop-art gallery in Harlem, says assume most of your guests will drink one to three glasses. Dont succumb to pressure to buy outside your price range and dont sweat the glassware. Although the current craze for specific wine glasses for each varietal may work for you, it is perfectly acceptable to drink from the glasses you own, he said. If you dont own enough wine glasses to serve all your guests, consider renting or bor rowing additional glasses. Recovery: Dont pour the open cham pagne down the drain once everybody leaves, says Kristin Fraser Cotte, CEO and founder of The Grapeseed Co., an ecofriendly line of vinotherapy spa and skin care products. Take a well-deserved soak in it instead. Combine half a cup of Epsom salt and one cup of powdered milk in a bowl, then add one cup of champagne, she said. Warm one teaspoon of honey in the microwave for 30 seconds, add ing it to the mixture. Pour into running bath water, throw in some rose petals and relax. When you soak in hot water, that opens your pores, Fraser Cotte said. The Epsom salt is great for detoxifying, cleansing and relax ing sore, tight muscles. The champagne helps to detoxify the skin. The carbon dioxide, or bubbles, in sparkling wine aids in tightening and constricting pores. It gives the Epsom salt a little boost. Tips for de-stressing holiday entertaining ASSOCIATED PRESS A young girl wanders through a maze of decorated Christmas trees on display in Dearborn, Mich. With a little planning, a little help and a lot of resolve, holiday entertaining doesnt have to be a test of stress endurance. Food Network Kitchen eatery opens at airport By SUZETTE LABOY Associated Press FORT LAUDERDALE, The Food Network is getting into the restaurant business in a location not always associated with good food: An airport. The channel has opened its first Food Network Kitchen at the Fort LauderdaleHollywood International Airport in South Florida in the JetBlue terminal. The dynamic of food and travel has changed, said Sergei Kuharsky, general manager of Food Networks new business enterprises. You used to never go in and think about eating at an airport. Now, with passengers arriving early to get through security and limited options for in-flight food, theres a market for airport dining. We are responding to that opportunity, Kuharsky said. The Food Network Kitchen is the only eatery serving hot food at the JetBlue concourse. But its the brand that gets attention from travelers as much as the lack of alternatives. I walked by and I said Oh wow, look at that. Food Network restaurant. So I came in, said Richard Wierzbicki of Austin, Texas. And I would look for it again because I thought the sandwich was really good. Since opening Nov. 8, the Food Network Kitchen has averaged 1,500 customers a day. Airport locations are very busy, but this one especially, said Jean-Pierre Turgot, general manager for Delaware North Companies Travel Hospitality Services, which partnered with the Food Network to provide chef-inspired meals at the airport and is also a partner in Food Network-branded food sold at concession stands and stadiums. Its the highest revenue produc er at the airport. There are no waiters, so customers sit at tables after ordering at the counter or they can get takeout food, either made to order or readymade items like sand wiches and salads. While the recipes are developed and branded by the Food Network, the offerings are not named for Food Network personalities, shows or chefs. Instead, the menu prom ises organic and sustainable ingredients and offers dish es with connections to local ingredients and regional culture, such as a Florida shrimp poboy ($13) and a salmon burger with Key lime mayo ($14). South Floridas Latin cul ture is reflected in items such as the Cuban break fast burrito ($8) and a black beans and rice burger with mojo mayo ($12). Also on the menu: fried pickles with Key lime mayo ($6); sweet potato fries with Key lime tartar sauce ($5); and a Cuban sandwich ($12) with cafe con leche mayo pressed on a ciabatta roll. Wait times can back up when flights arrive and the airport gets busy, so its best to arrive early if you plan to sit down, as Liz Lamoureux did before flying back home to San Antonio, Texas. On our way here, I was saying we wanted to get here early to sit down for a drink, she said as she nibbled on edamame and sipped on the house pinot grigio. Beverages range from espresso to entwine, the Food Networks wine brand. ASSOCIATED PRESS Freshly made pastries are on display for travelers at the Food Network Kitchen at the Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport, in Fort Lauderdale. The airport is the first outpost in the nation to offer the Food Network Kitchen, designed to look much like what you would see in the cable networks test kitchen. TRAVEL