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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01924

Material Information

Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 11-30-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01968

Related Items

Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01924

Material Information

Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 11-30-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01968

Related Items

Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

Opinion ............... 4A People ................. 2A Obituaries ............. 5A Advice & Comics ......... 3B Puzzles ................. 4B TODAY IN PEOPLE Lohan arrested yet again. COMING SUNDAY Local news roundup. 75 48 Most ly sunny WEATHER, 2A Lake City ReporterFRIDAY & SATURDAY, NOV 30 & DEC 1, 2012 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | 75LAKECITYREPORTER COM WEEKEND EDITION CALL US: (386) 752-1293 SUBSCRIBE TO THE REPORTER: Voice: 755-5445 Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 138, No 218 1A Friday Playoff football Columbia High travels to Navarre High for the regional final of the Class 6A playoffs at 7:30 p.m. Central time tonight. The Tigers (11-1) will advance to host the winner of the Gainesville-Armwood game with a win over Navarre. Hospital garage sale The auxiliary at Shands Lakeshore Hospital will have a garage sale from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the hospi tals first-floor conference room and outside for larger items. Saturday Breakfast with the Chief Lake City Police Chief Argatha Gilmore will have her quarterly community meeting, Breakfast With The Chief, from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at the Public Safety Building. The event is an opportunity for community members to discuss issues or concerns with Gilmore. A complimentary breakfast will be available. For more information, contact Audre Washington, police depart ment community relations coordinator, at (386) 7195742. Fish fry The Columbia County Chapter of the Bethune Cookman University Alumni will have a fish fry scholar ship fundraiser beginning at 11 a.m. at the old Amtrak station, corner of Lake Jeffrey Road and Kimberly Drive. Sandwiches will be $6 and dinners will be $7.50. Dinner includesfish, grit baked beans, bread, cake and a drink. To order ahead, call (386) 752-7054. Christmas toy ride Riders with Caring Hearts Christmas Toy Ride will begin at 10 a.m. at Rountree Moore Toyota on US 90 West. Entry fee is $10 per bike, plus a new, unwrapped toy and a nonperishable food item. The ride will start at noon. It will end at American Legion Post 57, where an after party will be held, featuring a live band, food, refreshments, raffles and auctions. All donations will benefit the Christian Service Center of Columbia County. For more informa tion, call (386) 758-9811 or (386) 984-9565 or email danny@columbiacountycy cles.com or billhugginssr@ hotmail.com. Farm Day Suwanee Valley Alpacas will have a Farm Day from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. today and Sunday. Spend the day learning about alpacas. Pet an alpaca. Learn to spin the fiber into yarn. A free Beanie Baby for each child. Air-brush art. Alpaca products avail able for sale for unique Christmas gifts. The farm is at 524 NW Sleepy Court in White Springs. For more, call (386) 397-2678 or (386) 9651800. Game time JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Columbia Highs Ronald Timmons (23) breaks through St. Augustine defenders during last weeks 34-8 playoff win over St. Augustine. Tonight the Tigers take on Navarre for a chance to host the state semifinals next week. See stories, Page 1B. Ethics laws: A mixed bag By DEREK GILLIAM dgilliam@lakecityreporter.com Floridas cities and counties are strengthening their ethics laws and enforcement while state officials have essentially remained silent on such issues since the 1970s, a report released Thursday said. Columbia County Manager Dale Williams said he has been told that county officials have a greater obligation then state offi cials many times in the past. A few months ago, Williams declared a con flict of interest about a relative that applied for an ad valorem tax exemption. In his duties as county manager Williams would have had to pro vide a recommendation on the matter to the Board of County Commissioners. He said he believes state law did not require him to declare the conflict. Even if the state law had required Williams declare the conflict of interest, he wouldnt Cities, counties are cracking down; state hasnt followed suit. Williams Johnson ETHICS continued on 3A DRUGS continued on 3A Prison guard faces charges Report: Tried to bring prescription meds into facility. By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com A corrections officer at the CCA-Lake City facility was arrested Wednesday and faces felony charges for allegedly attempt ing to bring drugs into the prison. Katie Sloan Minchin, 33, no address provided, was charged with smuggling contraband into prison in connection with the incident. She was booked into the Columbia County Detention Facility on $25,000 bond. According to Columbia County Sheriffs reports, Deputy Shayne Foote was dis patched to CCA shortly after 10 a.m. Wednesday in refer ence to an employee attempt ing to introduce contraband into the facility. A CCA inspector met Foote and told Foote he would be interviewing the employ ee, Minchin, who allegedly attempted to bring eight and a half 10 mg hydrocodone pills and a capsule contain ing a combination of asprin, butalbital and caffeine, which is classified as a prescriptiononly narcotic, into the facility. The corrections officer who searches employees before they enter the facility told the inspector and Foote that Minchin reported for work around 5:50 a.m. The corrections officer told investigators she checks employees for illegal con traband and weapons and the search process includes employees taking off their boots, belts and emptying their pockets. The search officer said when she asked Minchin whether she had any contra band, prescription medica tion or anything that could be used as a dangerous weapon, Minchin reportedly reached into her pockets and retrieved an Aleve medication bottle and placed it on her desk. She said Minchin told her to hold the bottle because the K9 used to seach employees for illegal narcotics might sniff it. The officer said Minchin provided no detail as to what Minchin Senator, state rep. to field questions By DEREK GILLIAM dgilliam@lakecityreporter.com Columbia County residents will have the chance to voice their opinions about issues that are important to them to their state representive and senator at a public hearing in December. State Rep. Elizabeth Porter, R-Lake City, on Thursday announced three seperate legisla tive delegation hearing HEARINGS continued on 3A Light show Photos by ANDREA THOMAS/ Florida Parks Service ABOVE, BELOW: The Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State Parks annual Festival of Lights kicked off last night in White Springs. The show continues through Dec. 30. The park will be open each evening until 9 p.m., except Christmas Night. Annual Foster festival underway More than five million lights are on display. From staff reports WHITE SPRINGS T he Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State Park will host the annual Festival of Lights, displaying more than five million lights throughout the park, through December 30. The park will be open each evening until 9 p.m., except Christmas Night, Dec. LIGHTS continued on 3A

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CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Actor Efrem Zimbalist Jr. is 94. Actor Robert Guillaume is 85. Radio talk show host G. Gordon Liddy is 82. Country singer-recording executive Jimmy Bowen is 75. Movie director Ridley Scott is 75. Movie writer-director Terrence Malick is 69. Rock musician Roger Glover (Deep Purple) is 67. Actress Margaret Whitton is 62. Actor Mandy Patinkin is 60. Musician Shuggie Otis is 59. Country singer Jeannie Kendall is 58. Singer Billy Idol is 57. Historian Michael Beschloss is 57. Comedian Colin Mochrie is 55. Former football and base ball player Bo Jackson is 50. Rapper Jalil (Whodini) is 49. AROUND FLORIDA Should feds run health exchange? MIAMI Florida health advocates are urg ing the federal government to run the state health exchange, saying Florida officials dragged their heels and have missed cru cial deadlines. Florida CHAIN and several other groups sent a letter Thursday telling U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius that the state hasnt had any public meetings or done any of the other legwork that other states have spent months working on. They said its not realistic for the state to create a quality program in time for federal deadlines. Nearly 9,000 Floridians have signed a petition backing the request. The exchange is an online marketplace where residents can shop for health insurance. Republican Gov. Rick Scott has been a vocal opponent of Obamacare but recently softened his stance, saying he will explore the options. Police: Dad killed daughter, self DAVIE A 6-year-old girl is dead after she was killed by her father in a murder-suicide, police said. Davie Police Capt. Dale Engle says the child, her father and a dog appear to have died from carbon monoxide poisoning. Two schoolchildren discovered the bodies in a van parked outside the Davie home of the girls mother Thursday morning. They alerted a neighbor who pulled the child out of the vehicle and attempted to resuscitate her but could not. Investigators believe the childs father, 30-yearold Paul Andrade, parked outside his ex-wifes home and attached a hose from the exhaust pipe to inside the vehicle. Engle says the man was upset that his wife recently remarried. He had an overnight visitation with his daughter when the deaths occurred. Teen charged with killing guard TAMPA Authorities say a teenager with a violent past fatally shot a security officer outside an apartment complex. Tampa police arrested the 16-year-old late Wednesday. They said DNA samples taken from a bicycle found next to the slain security officer linked the teen to the shooting of 38-year-old Michael Valentin. Valentin was killed while on patrol at the apartment complex on Thanksgiving Eve. Police said the teen was arrested Tuesday night on other charges. The Tampa Bay Times reported that after DNA results arrived Wednesday, the teen was arrested in Valentins death. Tampa police Sgt. Bill Todd says the motive was an attempted robbery. He says the teen acknowl edged the bicycle was his. Police say the teen was first arrested when he was 10 and has a dozen felony convictions. Truck driver dies in train wreck ORLANDO A dump truck driver was killed when his vehicle collided with an Amtrak passenger train south of downtown Orlando. Amtrak spokeswoman Christina Leeds said six passengers and two crew members from the Silver Star Train 91 were taken to hospitals for minor inju ries Thursday. The truck driver wasnt identified by police. The train was traveling from New York to Miami, and was on the Orlandoto-Tampa leg of the route when it collided with the dump truck. There were 139 passen gers on the train, and they were going to be taken to their final destinations in Florida by bus. Leeds says some trains in Florida were being held while crew members cleaned up the tracks and that could cause some delays later in the day. 5 Fla. districts named finalists MIAM Five Florida school districts have been named finalists for the U.S. Department of Educations new Race to the Top com petition. Broward, Charlotte, Manatee, Miami-Dade and Seminole county schools are vying for a slice of close to $400 million to help close the achievement gap and prepare students for college and a career. The Obama administra tion has already awarded more than $4 billion in Race to the Top grants to 18 states and the District of Columbia. The Education Department will now focus on grant ing money to individual districts. The department is concentrating on districts where at least 40 percent of students come from lowincome families. Fifteen to 25 districts are expected to receive fouryear grants ranging from $5 million to $40 million. Sixty-one finalists have been named. Lohan charged in NYC and Calif. NEW YORK A ctress Lindsay Lohan was arrested Thursday in New York City after police said she hit a woman during an argu ment, then hours later was charged in California with lying to police and reckless driving for a June crash in which her Porsche slammed into a dump truck. The Mean Girls and Freaky Friday star was arrested at 4 a.m. and charged with third-degree assault. She left a police precinct nearly four hours later with a black jacket pulled over her head. She drove off in a black SUV with a driver. Lohan, 26, allegedly got into the spat with another woman at Club Avenue. She struck the woman in the face with her hand, police said. The woman did not require medical attention. The charges come just after Lohans portrayal of Elizabeth Taylor in the Lifetime movie Liz & Dick premiered to harsh reviews from critics and the public. After the June crash, the actress told police her assistant was driv ing, but detectives determined Lohan was behind the wheel, police said. Prosecutors charged her with three misdemeanors: providing false information to police, reckless driving and willfully obstructing a police officer from their duties. No date for Lohans arraignment was announced, but the charges are likely to trigger a probation violation for a 2011 necklace theft case. Kim Kardashian divorce inches toward trial LOS ANGELES Kim Kardashians divorce attorney told a judge Wednesday that the reality star wants to move on with her life but is handcuffed to her estranged husband because the case is not yet ready for trial. Superior Court Judge Stephen Moloney told attor neys for Kardashian and NBA player Kris Humphries to return to court in mid-February to set a trial date to either dissolve or annul the couples 72-day marriage. He didnt set a deadline for depositions and other pre-trial investigation to be completed, but indicated a trial could be held early next year if it is ready by Feb. 15. Humphries, a power forward for the Brooklyn Nets, is seeking an annulment based on fraud. Shatner to attend USS Enterprise retirement NORFOLK, Va. Captain James T. Kirk will be on hand when the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise is offi cially retired. A publicist for William Shatner told the Daily Press that the actor will attend the ships inactiva tion ceremony Saturday at Naval Station Norfolk. Shatner is scheduled to perform Friday in Newport News. Shatner played Kirk at the helm of the starship Enterprise in the Star Trek television series and movies. Thurs day: Afternoon: 6-2-6 Evening: N/A Thurs day: Afternoon: 9-4-1-2 Evening: N/A Wednesd ay: 6-9-11-32-34 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAIL Y BRIEFING FRIDAY & SATURDAY, NOV. 30-DEC. 1, 2012 HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter 2A Daily Scripture Give thanks to the Lord, for he is good. His love endures for ever. Give thanks to the God of heaven. His love endures forever. Psalm 136:1,26 ASSOCIATED PRESS Actress Lindsay Lohan covers her head with a jacket as she is escorted from New Yorks 10th Precinct police station Thursday. Lohan was arrested early Thursday morning for allegedly striking a woman at a nightclub. Charges also were filed against Lohan in California for allgedly lying to police about a car wreck. Associated Press Associated Press Kardashian Shatner

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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY & SATURDAY, NOV. 30-DEC. 1, 2012 3A 3A Community Concerts of Lake City Live Arts Series 2012-2013 AT LEVY PERFORMING ARTS CENTERFLORIDA GATEWAY COLLEGE Contact: Community Concerts of Lake City, Inc for further information (386) 466-8999 www.communityconcerts.info THE HUNT FAMILY Christmas Show One of our all-time favorites group is back! The Hunts are a family of nine whose performances cover a wide spectrum of musical genres, ranging from Celtic to country rock, and include a diverse repertoire of original compositions. Champion ddling is mixed with a percussive blend of world-ranked step dancing, drums, djembes, ashikos, and cajons. Guitars accompany soaring piano melodies and beautiful vocal harmonies. The Hunts have released four albums and have won awards in ddle, Irish dance and singing contests around the world. NOTICE Attention Humana Walmart Medicare Part D patients: We accept this plan and all other Part D plans. Baya East 755-6677 Baya West 755-2233 Medical 755-2277 Call one of our pharmacies to see which plan is best for you. Traffic stop ends in drug arrest By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com A Lake City man was arrested dur ing a Thursday morning traffic stop after authorities said they found drugs in the mans vehicle. Tashea Laquez Everett, 36, of 413 SE Sharon Lane, was charged with cocaine distribution, possession of cocaine, pos session of drug equipment and destroying evidence in connection with the case. He was booked into the Columbia County Detention Facility on $36,000 bond. According to Columbia County Sheriffs reports, around 12:24 a.m. Deputy J. Latimer stopped a white Nissan Maxima for improper display of the registration sticker. When Latimer spoke to the vehicles driver, later identified as Everett, he reported he detected the odor of an alcoholic bev erage coming from the vehicle. Latimer also reported that Everett was uncooperative and continued to speak over him when he attempted to explain why he pulled him over. Latimer requested that Everett walk to the hood of his patrol car, but he said Everett was attempting to use his cell phone. When Latimer asked him to walk to his patrol car again, Everett reportedly tried to sit on a garbage can. He was asked again to walk to the patrol car and when Everett got there he began to pace back and forth, reports said. Everett reportedly told Latimer he had three mixed drinks during the evening, then Latimer reported he noticed a patch of white powder on Everetts shirt that appeared to be cocaine. When Latimer went closer to Everett to investigate, he reported that Everett saw the powder and attempted to wipe it off. Everett was then secured in handcuffs and Latimer field-tested the substance on Everetts shirt, which tested positive for cocaine, reports said. Everett admitted to having two eight balls of cocaine in his center console, according to Latimer. When searching the vehicle, Latimer reported he found four, individually pack aged amounts of cocaine, which totaled approximately 11 grams. Latimer also reported Everett had numerous small bags which were new and had not yet been used, adjacent to the cocaine. Everett was then arrested and taken to jail, reports said. Everett From staff reports The Columbia County NAACP branch local election will take place at 10 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 15 at the Richardson Community Center, 255 NE Coach Anders Lane, officials said Thursday. The election is open to the public, but only Columbia County branch NAACP members in good standing can vote. The election, which was originally set for earlier this month, was recently suspended after a com plaint was filed with the Florida State Conference of the NAACP. The com plaint reportedly centered around the violation of process regarding the local branchs nominating committee. The election will be conducted by state and/or national NAACP officials. NAACP election Dec. 15 was inside the bottle. The officer reported she found the behavior as odd and after the morn ing rush of all employees entering the facility, she told her superior about the incident and a K-9 officer was brought in to sniff the bottle. The bottle reportedly contained several white pills and a yellow and green capsule pill. The bottle was then con fiscated. When Minchin was speaking to the CCA investigator, she reportedly said she knew the policy established by her employer about bringing pre scription medication into the facil ity and she identified the pills as Lortab and Flornal, both of which she said she had a prescription for. Her explaination for bringing eight and a half pills in was that she was unaware how many were in the bottle. She told investigators she believed there were no more than six pills in the bottle. It was explained to Minchin that six pills would still constitute a policy violation and she said she made a mistake. Minchin told investigators she put the pills in an Aleve bottle Wednesday morning before work and had forgotten the total number of pills inside. The CCA investigator told her it was odd that she put the pills in the bottle and had already forgotten the number inside. Minchin also told the investigator that she was aware that according to policy, the medication she entered the facility with was sup posed to be in the original container. She said she didnt notify her supervising officers that she would be bringing the medication. Minchin said she had a prescrip tion for both medications. Minchin was then interviewed by Foote but provided no additional det rimental information to the case. She then provided a written statement. Foote also collected two state ments from Minchins supervising officers that confirmed Minchin had not informed them she would be entering the facility with her prescrip tion medication. Minchin was then arrested and taken to jail, reports said. DRUGS: Corrections officer faces felony charges Continued From Page 1A for Suwannee, Columbia and Baker counties. All hearings will take place on Tuesday, Dec. 11. State Sen. Charlie Dean (R-Inverness) will also attend. The legislative delega tion hearing for Columbia County will be at Florida Gateway College Library from 1 p.m. until 2:30 p.m. These hearings will provide our fellow citizens the opportunity to express their concerns, share leg islaive ideas and have per sonal input into the legisla tive process, Porter wrote in a press release. Any member of the pub lic who wants to speak at the hearing should contact Koby Adams to be placed on the agenda. The phone number for Porters office is 386-719-4600. There will be a way for people who dont call in advance to speak at the meeting. The press release asks that if members of the public present a handout, they bring at least four cop ies. The Suwannee County legislative delegation hear ing will be held from 9:30 a.m. until 11 a.m at Live Oak City Hall, and the Baker County hearing will be held from 3:30 p.m. until 5 p.m. in the county com mission chambers. HEARINGS: Legislative delegation set to visit on December 11 Continued From Page 1A have had to recuse himself, he said. I did declare the conflict and I took myself out of the discussion, he said. Williams said the County Code of Conduct sets the policy on ethics for county staff members. Lake City Manager Wendell Johnson also said the city also has tough requirements regarding ethical dilemmas and finan cial disclosure. In 2009, the city council had Johnson draft a CouncilEmployee Interaction Policy, which was adopted by the city council at the Sept. 21, 2009, meeting. It expands well beyond the typical guidelines, he said. The study by the Leroy Collins Institute, a think tank at Florida State University, and a state eth ics group, Integrity Florida, said the Sunshine State has a well-documented problem with corruption at every level of government. It said an increase in exemptions to the states open records laws and the unwillingness of lawmakers to continue ethics reform has led to Florida falling behind the rest of the country in ethics enforcement and govern ment transparency. Too often, Florida has been associated with antiethics reform, said Carol Weissert, a Florida State political science professor and director of the Collins Institute named after a for mer Florida governor. We want to be leading, we dont want to be bad examples. The report pointed out that Florida led the nation in federal public corrup tion convictions from 2000 to 2010, according to data from the U.S. Department of Justice. Although some of these convictions were of state officials, many of the corruption scandals involved local government officials. Dan Krassner, executive director at Integrity Florida, also noted that the Florida Ethics Commission, which is frequently criticized as a paper tiger, simply doesnt have enough authority to be effective. They just dont have the tools, Krassner said. As a result, local govern ments have taken the initia tive on strengthening eth ics laws and not sitting idly waiting on the Legislature to take action. In many of the instances, reform followed the corrup tion, Weissert said. While there is always more to do, Florida counties are tak ing the initiative in creating an ethical culture and can serve as leaders for future state action in Florida and across the nation. Weissert and Krassner each professed confidence that new leaders in the Florida Legislature and Gov. Rick Scotts office are on board with efforts to toughen state ethics laws during the upcoming leg islative session that begins in March. We have a commitment from our top state leaders for ethics reform, said Krassner, noting that their effort focuses on ethics pol icy and enforcement, lob bying, campaign financing and procurement. The Associated Press con tibuted to this report. ETHICS: Cities, counties cracking down; state hasnt done so Continued From Page 1A FOSTER: Annual Festival of Lights now underway Continued From Page 1A 25. The lights were illu minated in a ceeomony Thursday evening at 6 p.m. Named a Top 20 Event in the southeastern United States, visitors can enjoy award-win ning holiday sights and sounds throughout the park, according to a press release. Unique holiday light displays include huge oaks decorated with thou sands of lights, an ante bellum museum dressed in full holiday splendor, a gingerbread village, a candy cane forest, Santas runway, train display and much more. The parks centerpiece is the 200 foot tall Carillon Tower, which illuminates the night sky as holiday music rings from its bells. Cousin Thelma Boltins Gift Shop will be open everyday from noon until 9 p.m. Complimentary hot cocoa and popcorn are served nightly as the Craft Square comes alive with craft demonstrations, a bonfire, marshmallow roasting and holiday sing ing. The entrance fee for this event is $2 per person. The Festival of Lights is spon sored by the Stephen Foster Citizens Support Organization, and made possible by the generous support of numerous local individuals and businesses. For more infor mation, visit www. FloridaStateParks.org/ StephenFoster

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C ongress hates us. There’s no other conclusion to reach. We are SO ready for some holiday spirit, exhausted by politics and gridlock and deficits and tax debates. And what do we get as we’re trying to think about presents and trees and pag-eants and carols and food and family reunions? The fiscal cliff. Not a day goes by that we don’t hear that the average middle-class family (which means most of us) could face higher taxes of $4,000 next year because Republicans and Democrats in Congress can’t get their acts together. For most of us, the idea of paying $4,000 more in taxes is dumb-founding. We’re told 18 percent of people approve of the job Congress is doing. Just as we did last August when that figure was 10 percent, we ask: Who are those people? How can they possibly think Congress is doing a good job? So we’re like the audience at a Ping-Pong game. House Speaker John Boehner says something; the White House responds. Vice versa. And the media ponders: Are they curt? Conciliatory? Did Boehner smile? Cry? Smirk? Is President Barack Obama listening? Are Democrats deserting him? Rallying round him? And once again, it all seems to be about tax cuts for the rich. The really, really rich would have to pay the rates they paid during the Clinton administration, when millions of jobs were created, a surplus seemed in sight and most people were not worried about their next meal. To make us feel better, economists are saying that this isn’t really a cliff (the $4,000 wouldn’t be due Jan. 1) but more of a “slope.” Since most political slopes are usual-ly slippery, that doesn’t make me feel better. Republicans: Tax increases on anybody will foil job growth even though the evi-dence from the recent past doesn’t bear that out at all. Democrats: Any talk of raising the age for Social Security benefits or means-testing it amounts to treason against the middle class. It’s enough to make us scream: “Hey Congress, there wouldn’t be a fiscal cliff crisis if you hadn’t created it.” All they have to do is create jobs by passing one of the massive put-America-back-to-work bills Congress has been ignoring for two years. All they have to do is stop insisting that Medicaid and Social Security have to be cut. (Social Security is self-funding and is not part of the current crisis; Medicaid is for the seri-ously poor.) All they have to do is make certain the rich pay their fair share. Is it fair that Mitt Romney paid only 13 or 14 percent on millions of dollars, way less than most Americans?) All they have to do is extend the current tax rates for Americans earning less than $250,000. Congress doesn’t want us to have a happy holiday. Congress wants us all to be miserable. Congress hates us. Congress hates us OUR OPINION HIGHLIGHTS IN HISTORY On this date:In 1782, the United States and Britain signed preliminary peace articles in Paris, ending the Revolutionary War. In 1803, Spain completed the process of ceding Louisiana to France, which had sold it to the United States. In 1835, Samuel Langhorne Clemens — better known as Mark Twain — was born in Florida, Mo. In 1874, British statesman Sir Winston Churchill was born at Blenheim Palace. In 1900, Irish writer Oscar Wilde died in Paris at age 46. In 1936, London’s famed Crystal Palace, constructed for the Great Exhibition of 1851, was destroyed in a fire. In 1939, the Winter War began as Soviet troops invaded Finland. (The conflict ended the following March with a Soviet victory.) W e were among the 50-million Americans predicted to travel for the Thanksgiving holidays. We shared the Interstate with cars that switched from lane to lane and followed threateningly close. There was a feeling of frustration, stress, impatience, and even hostility in the air. Suddenly there was a flurry of brake lights, as everyone threw on brakes. Highway speeds of 70 miles per hour plus were instantly stopped dead in their tracks, and we found ourselves part of the bumper-to-bumper, stop-and-go routine. I felt a wave of relief and relax-ation. After about 15 minutes of creeping traffic on both lanes going our way, we passed a thoroughly destroyed and mangled vehicle. I found myself wondering if it was a lesson pre-sented to these drivers to slow down and be safe. Later, I learned that we weren’t alone. A hundred vehicles piled up together on Interstate 10 in Texas. On our way back from Virginia, we passed a highway sign in Tennessee — “833 died this year in traffic.” In Georgia, a sign read “1038 traffic deaths so far this year in Georgia.” In the “human growth and development” psychology class that I teach at Florida Gateway College, we learn that the causes of death are different at each age. In infancy, it’s disease that’s the big killer. For senior citizens, it’s heart disease, stroke and cancer. But for teen-agers, young and middle adults, the leading cause of death is accidents. Death in auto acci-dents leads all other accidental deaths, by far. Actuarial tables — charts specifying cause of death for each age group — are used to determine your estimated lon-gevity (that is, how long you can expect to live, on the average.) With all causes of death consid-ered, you may be expected to live well into your 70s But, if we exclude accidents as a cause of death, you might expect to live to 90 or 100. What could this mean to you? If you could reduce your risk of dying in traffic, you might expect to live 10 or 20 more years past your expected lon-gevity! What are some ways that could help you reduce your risk of accidental automotive death? Here are some ideas; and I encourage you to be creative and to come up with some ideas of your own. Q Wear seat belts. Almost everywhere, it’s the law. But maybe one-third to one-fourth still don’t. Q Remove all distractions. It’s estimated that the majority of accidents are due to distractions like cell phones, texting while driving, adjusting the radio or heater. (I noticed one obviously impaired driver reading a book at 70 mph yesterday!) Q Be patient and thoughtful. Don’t follow so close. At 60 mph, if you’re two or three car lengths behind, you have no chance of responding in time if something happens to the car ahead. Drop back two or three seconds behind the car in front of you. Relax. Q Don’t keep changing lanes. The police recognize lane changing as a major cause of accidents. Q Alcohol, even very small doses, impairs your judgment and reaction time. Prescription drugs usually have side effects detrimental to driving ability. Q Are you tired or sleepy? Get off the road. Take a walk, have a coffee, or quit driving for the day. Q The best drivers focus on their driving, look half-a-mile down the road, and anticipate situations before they happen. Move over early, and make room for cars entering the high-way to merge from the access ramps. The holiday season is just getting started. Be safe. Don’t die a senseless, meaningless, and easily preventable death. You’ll not only give yourself extra years, but may help lots of oth-ers you’re sharing the road with to live longer. I hope you thoroughly enjoy the holiday season. Don’t die on the road ANOTHER VIEW T wo reports out this week reveal a trou-bling outlook on teen sexual health in the United States. First, a new policy from the American Academy of Pediatrics suggests members consider routinely prescribing emergen-cy contraception to teen girls “to have on hand in case of future need” as part of sexual health counseling and that boys get the same information regardless of current or intended sexual behavior. Then, a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said that more than 1,000 young people aged 13 to 24 are being infected with human immunodeficiency virus each month -about a quarter of all infections in the U.S. Surveys suggest 60 percent of them don’t know they’re infected. Both documents point to a health system struggling to pro-tect teens. More than 300,000 U.S. teenage girls gave birth last year, with 80 percent of the pregnan-cies unintended. While the teen pregnancy rate has declined in the past few years, it’s still higher than in any other devel-oped nation. The pediatricians say advance prescribing has been shown to increase use of emergency contraception and the odds that it will be used in the critical first 48 hours after unprotected sex. They also say there’s no evidence that access to backup contraception increases teen sexual activity. Public health officials have been recommending for several years that children as young as 11 get vaccinated against sexu-ally transmitted human papil-lomavirus. Yet the nation’s top health officials have overruled efforts to make “morning-after pills” available to girls younger than 17 without a prescription. That leaves it to doctors to try and protect their younger patients not just from unintended pregnancy, but also from HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases. The odds of that care being delivered are daunting. Teens tend to drop out of health care as they age, and particularly avoid pediatricians and family doctors. Teen girls may find their way to gynecologists or women’s health clinics, but the availability of care for the gay and bisexual male teens, who make up the major-ity of the new HIV infections, is much less certain, particularly outside major cities. More than 30 years into the AIDS epidemic, awareness of the risks of unprotected sex remains low even among gay and bisexual teens. Only 13 per-cent of all high school students have been tested for HIV. Getting meaningful warnings and information to the teens most at risk demands new approaches and new messengers. Teen sexual health outlook troubling Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding counties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, publisher Robert Bridges, editor Sue Brannon, controller Dink NeSmith, president Tom Wood, chairman LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY E-MAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com B y which we mean, it’s nearly impos-sible to fathom that our nation’s leaders won’t find some kind of solution to the “fiscal cliff” crisis before we go hurtling over the edge. Surely Congress and the White House will find com-mon ground before New Year’s, when all manner of economic mayhem becomes reality. But by “hard to believe,” we also mean to question the cred-ibility of every single player in this real-life drama. After watching their bickering and posturing for weeks now, it’s difficult to imagine either side truly has the best interests of our nation at heart. It’s tempting to say, “throw the bums out.” In many cases, however, we already have. Plenty of lame ducks are among those who will decide our nation’s economic fate. Maybe at least we’ll soon know for certain what these folks – along with the ones we just put back into office – are really made of. Let’s hope that somehow we are all pleasantly surprised. Hard tobelieve Q Scripps Howard News Service OPINION Friday & Saturday, Nov. 30-Dec. 1, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A4AOPINION Robert DennyBob.Denny8@gmail.com Q Contact Robert Denny at (386) 454-4950. Ann McFeattersamcfeatters@nationalpress.com Q Scripps Howard columnist Ann McFeatters has covered the White House and national politics since 1986. With all causes of death considered, you may be expected to live well into your 70s But, if we exclude accidents as a cause of death, you might expect to live to 90 or 100.

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Nov. 30 Playoff football Columbia High School travels to Navarre High School for the regional final of the Class 6A football playoffs at 7:30 p.m. Central Time tonight. The Tigers (11-1) will advance to host the winner of Gainesville and Armwood high schools with a win over Navarre. Hospital garage sale The auxiliary at Shands Lakeshore Hospital will have a garage sale from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the hospi tals first-floor conference room and outside for larger items. Fish dinner Our Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5056 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, pre pares fish dinners every Friday from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The dinner is $6 for two Alaskan pollock filets, corn, baked beans, hush puppies, cole slaw and tarter sauce. Take out or eat in. Community theater High Springs Commnity Theater will present the comedy Christmas Belles, weekends through Dec.16. The play is about Christmas time in the small town of Fayro, Texas, but the Futrelle sisters are not exactly in a festive mood. A cranky Frankie is weeks overdue with her sec ond set of twins. Twink, recently jilted, is in jail for inadvertently burning down half the town. And hot-flash-suffering Honey Raye is desperately trying to keep the Tabernacle of the Lambs Christmas pro gram from spiraling into chaos. Their hilarious holi day journey through a mis adventure-filled Christmas Eve is guaranteed to bring joy to your world. Tickets are available for pur chase at The Framery of Lake City (386) 754-2780, Pampered Paws in High Springs (386) 454-4464 or online at highspringscom munitytheater.com. Friday and Saturday shows will be at at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m. Doors open a halfhour before show time. Tickets are $11 for adults, $8 for children 12 and younger and $9 for seniors on Sundays. The theater is at 130 N. First Ave. in High Springs. Dec. 1 Breakfast with chief Lake City Police Chief Argatha Gilmore will have her quarterly community meeting, Breakfast With The Chief, from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at the Public Safety Building. The event is an opportunity for community members to discuss issues or concerns with Gilmore. A complimentary breakfast will be available. For more information, contact Audre Washington, police depart ment community rela tions coordinator, at (386) 719-5742. Fish fry The Columbia County Chapter of the Bethune Cookman University Alumni will have a fish fry scholarship fundraiser beginning at 11 a.m. at the old Amtrak station, corner of Lake Jeffrey Road and Kimberly Drive. Sandwiches will be $6 and dinners will be $7.50. Dinner includesfish, grit baked beans, bread, cake and a drink. To order ahead, call (386) 752-7054. Christmas toy ride Riders with Caring Hearts Christmas Toy Ride will begin at 10 a.m. at Rountree Moore Toyota on Route 90 West. Entry fee is $10 per bike, plus a new, unwrapped toy and a nonperishable food item. The ride will start at noon. It will end at American Legion Post 57, where an after party will be held, fea turing a live band, food, refreshments, raffles and auctions. All donations will benefit the Christian Service Center of Columbia County. For more informa tion, call (386) 758-9811 or (386) 984-9565 or email danny@columbiacounty cycles.com or billhuggins sr@hotmail.com. Farmers market The Lake DeSoto Farmers Market will have new hours of operation starting today. The market will be open from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. each Saturday. The fall harvest season contin ues and the holiday sea son is picking up the pace with shoppers looking for healthy local foods and cre ative locally made gift items. The market is in Wilson Park, along Lake DeSoto between the Columbia County Courthouse and Shands Lakeshore Hospital in downtown Lake City. For more information, call (386) 719-5766 or visit market.lcfla.com. Gospel sing, supper Lee Worship Center Church and Living Word of Faith Fellowship will hold a pot-luck Christmas sup per and open-mike gospel sing at the church, 471 SE Magnolia Drive in Lee. Supper will be at 6 p.m., and the singing will start at 7. For more information or to get on the program, call Allen at (850) 971-4135. Crafts bazaar Fort White United Methodist will hold a holi day craft bazaar from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the fellowship hall, 185 SW Well St. in Fort White. Handmade, one-of-a-kind items will be available, along with baked goods. For more informa tion, call the church office at 497-1742. Farm day event Suwanee Valley Alpacas will have a Farm Day from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. today and Sunday. Spend the day learning about alpacas. Pet an alpaca. Learn to spin the fiber into yarn. A free Beanie Baby for each child. Air-brush art. Alpaca prod ucts available for sale for unique Christmas gifts. The farm is at 524 NW Sleepy Court in White Springs. For more informa tion, call (386) 397-2678 or (386) 965-1800. Civil War program Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave. in Fernandina Beach, will host a Union Garrison event today and Sunday. The program will allow vis itors to interact with living historians to experience life in the fort as it was in 1864. Soldiers in period cos tumes will conduct firing demonstrations, marching drills, cooking and daily activities. Ladies in period dresses will be preparea Christmas tree and deco rate the mantles for the holiday season. Sutlers will display their wares, and drummer boys will project the sounds of the Civil War era. Activities will be held from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. today and 9 a.m. to noon Sunday. For additional information, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www. FloridaStateParks.org. Dec. 5 Book sale fundraiser The auxiliary at Shands Lakeshore Hospital will hold a Christmas book sale to support the hospi tal from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the first-floor cafe at the hospital. Builders association Columbia County Builders Association will hold a General Council lunch at Guang Dong res taurant in the Lake City Mall. The sponsor is the Foundation Professionals Inc. of Florida. The speaker will be Sgt. David Greene from Crime Prevention Division of the Columbia County Sheriffs Office. The winning ticket for our raffle will be drawn, with a prize of either a $500 golf gift certificate for County Club of Lake City Pro Shop, a 20-gauge shotgun or an iPad from Verizon. We will also have the 5050 HammerClaw draw ing for a jackpot of $275. Reservations are appre ciated and can be made by calling (386) 867-1998. Tickets are $12 for mem bers and $15 for non-mem bers. Arrive about 11:30 to enjoy the buffet. The meet ing will start at noon. Newcomers luncheon The Newcomers Friendship Luncheon will be at 11:30 a.m. at Hannahs, 4196 W US 90 in the Premier Plaza. For those who want to par ticipate, there will be an exchange of wrapped gifts, with a $10 value limit. For more information, contact Barbara Test at 754-7272 or Rose Taylor at 755-2175. William Howard Henry William Howard Henry died suddenly at his home November 13, 2012. He was the son of the late Edward and Jewell Gay. He was preceded in death by sisters Alana Henry, Linda Diane Henry and Sylvia Lynelle Henry. He is survived by his sister Wanda (Jerry) Conner and many nieces and nephews who will miss him greatly. Bill graduated from CHS with the class of 1967 and joined the U.S. Navy where he was a Radioman. He attended Lake City Community College pursuing a degree in Business. Bill worked in the food service industry many years. He retired from Spires Food Store in 2011. Bill enjoyed many hours of law, Jerry Conner, during his retirement. He loved to cook and experiment with new recipes which he shared with his family. Interment will be 3 pm Wednesday, December 5, 2012 at Philippi Baptist Church with grave side services provided by Jake Richardson, Minister. Thomas Newsome Mr. Thomas Newsome a resident of White Springs, Florida passed away November 21, 2012 in North Florida Medical Cen ter in Gaines ville, Florida. Mr. Thomas Newsome is survived by his children Linnie Pope, Beverly Pope, Thomas New some Jr., Terrill Newsome and Krystal Jones; grandchil dren; the Newsome family of White Springs, Florida; nieces, nephews, cousins and many other relatives and friends. Funeral Services for Mr. Thom as Newsome will be Saturday, December 1, 2012 at 1:00 p.m. at the New Jerusalem Baptist Church in White Springs, Flor ida. Viewing and Visitation for Family and Friends will be Fri day, November 30, 2012 at the New Jerusalem Baptist Church in White Springs, Florida from 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. Dr. Ervin Donaldson, Pastor. Burial will be in the Swift Creek Cem etery in White Springs, Florida. D.M. Udell Funeral Home is in charge of all arrangements. Call D.M. Udell Funeral Home serving Suwannee, Hamilton, Columbia and other surrounding counties with the best of pro fessional services. D.M. Udell Licensed Funeral Direc tor and Douglas M. Udell II Licensed Funeral Director. Call D.M. UDELL AND SONS located at 120 South Walker Ave. family serves your family with the best of professional care.Harry Edgar Plumtree Born September 1, 1935 Wilkinsburg, PA, aged 77. Passed away suddenly at Lake City Medical Center, Novem ber 27, 2012. Mr. Plumtree is survived by wife, Jean A. (Hansen) no children from this marriage. 3 sons, David P. (Irina ), Thono tasassa FL, Daniel C., Lake City, Christopher D. (Christy), Muse, PA, by previous marriage to Ellen Craig Plumtree, Sister, Jean E. Tramontana, San An tonia, FL. 3 granddaughters, Amelia, Audrey, Lib erty Muse, PA Preceded in death by father, Henry C. Pittsburgh, PA mother, Marguerite E.(Colwell) Danzinger, St. Petersburg, FL, brother, Edgar W., St. Petersburg, PA, several nieces and nephews Mr. Plumtree was a member of the 82nd Airborne Para troopers stationed in Ft. Bragg, NC in 1955. He was also sta tioned in Iceland in 1956/57. A remembrance of Harry will be held at his home on Saturday, December 1, at 3:00. Family and friends are invited to attend. the American Heart Association. B. Haygood Summers III B. Haygood (Goody) Sum mers III 55, of Tallahassee for the last 35 years, formally born and raised in Lake City passed away suddenly Oct. 17, 2012, at his home. He was the son of the late B. Haygood Summers Jr. He graduated from Lake City High School and was selected Whos Who American Most Likely to succeed. He graduated from Lake City Jr., College with an AA Degree on the Deans List. And a degree in Cosmatology which he was on Pres. List. He moved to Tallahassee to attend FSU. He is a member of the First Baptist Church of Lake City. He is survived by his lov ing Mother: Iris Thomas Lamb Summers of Lake City. His Brother; John J. Lamb Sr. of Gainesville. His Newphew; John J. Lamb Jr. (Jack) and wife Beth. 2 great newphew and niece; Aiden and Mollie of NJ. 1 Aunt; Ruth Bennett of Lake City A Celebration of Goodys life will be held Wednesday, De cember 5, 2012 in Archer Funeral Home Memorial Chapel in Lake Butler at 2:00 P.M. Fam ily will receive friends after the services. Private Burial will be in Dekle Cemetery in Lake Butler. LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY & SATURDAY, NOV. 30-DEC. 1, 2012 5A 5A $350 $495 High Quality Stainless Steel with Cast Iron Grate. Contemporary Charcoal Grill" Wood Burning Stove WR 244 Gas Logs-All Kinds OBITUARIES Obituaries are paid advertise ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporters classified depart ment at 752-1293. COMMUNITY CALENDAR To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr@lakecityreporter.com.

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FAITH & VALUES Friday & Saturday, Nov. 30-Dec. 1, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 6A6AF&V Assurance of salvation — Part 2 Losing heart and feeling weary“These things have I written unto you that believe on the name of the Son of God; that ye may know that ye have eternal life, and that ye may believe on the name of the Son of God” — I John 5:13 A s we continue our study on assurance, I hope it will help someone find that assurance of salvation. Only when one is sure of their destiny can they live a produc-tive life for Christ. Someone said the other day: “I don’t feel like I am saved, I have never had that feeling that so many talk about”. Let me say to you today that salvation does not depend on feeling, it depends on one placing their hope and faith in what Christ did for us on Calvary. It is amazing to discover that the Bible maintains a profound silence on feelings. The concor-dance shows that the word is used only twice in the Word, and in neither case is it employed in connection with our salvation. In Ephesians 4:19, the word describes a Christ-rejecting and hardened sinner. In Hebrews 4:15 the word denotes Christ’s feeling or His power to sympa-thize. The word “feel” is found in six places, but in no instance is it related to a true Christian experience. Our salvation rests, not upon fluctuating and fitful feelings, but upon the unassailable facts the Scriptures present. Saving faith directs attention away from self to the Savior. The Bible does not say, “He that feeleth good, or feeleth bad, shall be saved”, but “he that believeth”. We are not left to pump dry hearts and bring up feelings, but are to have thoughts wholly occupied with Christ and His finished work on our behalf. We must hasten to say that it is not our experience or even our faith that saves, but Christ alone. He, alone, is the ground of our salvation and certainty. Whatever our changing feelings, our minds must be wholly stayed on the Lord. It cannot be emphasized too strongly that the Bible teaches the truth that all who are regen-erated by the Spirit can be abso-lutely certain of their standing in grace. All who have accepted Christ as Savior are saved, but a few timid souls probe their feel-ings, practicing psychoanalysis. With them it is, “I hope so”, or, “Maybe”, or, “Perhaps so”, while it should be, “I know so”, “I have”, or, “You have”. This is a profound assurance, of which John wrote in I John 5:13. There can be no assurance within unless there is the accep-tance of the direct testimony of the Word of God. Such an assurance is not a mere mental assent to the veracity of scrip-tural statements, but an inner light, produced by believing God. Assurance is no vocal or audible voice or the revelation of an angel, but a condition of being secure, the willingness to take God at His word. Full assurance rests upon unchanging Bible facts. An objective source of our assur-ance are the unconditional promises of God, as in John 6:37; 10:27 & 28; Romans 8:31-39. True assurance is built upon scriptural foundation. What God begins, He will complete (Phil. 1:6). Faith is what the Bible declares produces assurance. O ne of the greatest obstacles to any endeavor is “los-ing heart.” It often occurs when things are difficult or life seems hard. We often “grow weary” in doing what is necessary for us to accomplish our goal. Knowing that people needed to be constantly reminded of not giving up as a follower of Christ, the great encourager, the apostle Paul, wrote to the Galatians, “let us not lose heart in doing good, for in due time we shall reap if we do not grow weary” (Galatians 6:9). He knew that his brethren would sometimes “lose heart” just because of the “daily grind” of living as a Christian. Some days do you wonder if it is really worth all the hassle of living for Jesus? Do you find it hard to do the things which He has asked people to do? Do you just want to give up and forget it all? Everyone, from the days of the apostle Paul until now, has had these thoughts and feelings. It is only natural for these emotions to arise especially when things are not going well. We begin to feel weary. We feel exhausted because of the constant strain to do the right thing. Earlier in this text, Paul said, “Do not be deceived, God is not mocked; for whatever a man sows, this he will also reap” (Galatians 6:7). This pas-sage often is used to speak of the “paybacks” a person gets because of some evil thing they have done. However, the verse is not limited to just evil actions. It will also apply to good actions. We are going to reap what we have sown. So, if we continue to work in the kingdom of God, we will reap the things which God wants us to have. We will enjoy the “fruit” of our labors. We will be able to see and be with God for eternity. For just a moment, let’s think about why we might “grow weary;” why we might “lose heart.” Because of our exhaustion, we might begin to think, “I will never make it, so why keep trying?” We might think, “The odds are against me, so why keep trying?” Because of the constant mental strain that is required to execute the commands of Jesus, we might think “I just cannot take it any longer, so why keep trying?” Why should we keep trying? Why should we not “lose heart”? Why should we not “grow weary”? Because of what we will reap! We will reap eternal life with God. We will spend eternity in His presence. We will be in the company of all the faithful from the beginning of time. We will be surrounded by all those who love the Lord and want to be in His presence. What a wonderful time it will be! From the very first moment that we are in the “bosom of Abraham” we will find great comfort. All the problems and frustrations of this world will be forgotten. Because of all the joy that we will be experiencing we will find it hard to believe that we even gave a thought to quit-ting; to giving up. When you are feeling like you can no longer make it as a Christian, remember that such thoughts are natural but must be overcome. Don’t “grow weary!” Don’t “lose heart!” Stay faithful. You will never regret it! Q Hugh Sherrill is an ordained minister and Bible teacher at Eastside Baptist Church. Hugh Sherrillems-hugh43@comcast.net BIBLE STUDIES BIBLICAL MEDITATION Carlton McPeakcarlton_mc@msn.com Q Carlton G. McPeak is an evangelist working in the Lake City area. All Scriptural quotations are from the New American Standard Bible, Holman Bible Publishers, unless otherwise noted.

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LAKE CITY REPORTER FAITH & VALUES FRIDAY & SATURDAY, NOV. 30-DEC. 1, 2012 7A7AReligionWhen things aren’t ideal, consider why O kay … the time for making your Christmas holiday plans has arrived. So, are you looking forward to all the festivities or are you just hoping to survive? Of all the things we experience during the holidays, time spent with family probably tops both lists: the most wonderful andr the most difficult. Perhaps you are spending Christmas without a loved one this year because of death — or a divorce — in your extended family will leave empty seats at the dinner table. It could even be conflict-ing schedules will cause you to miss out on family celebrations. In any case, Christmas can be a season where we realize that things haven’t turned out like we hoped. Mary knew a little about that: “So Joseph also went up from the town of Nazareth in Galilee to Judea, to Bethlehem the town of David because he belonged to the house and line of David. He went there to register with Mary, who was pledged to be married to him and was expect-ing a child. While they were there, the time came for the baby to be born, and she gave birth to her first-born, a son. She wrapped him in cloths and placed him in a manger, because there was no room for them in the inn.” — Luke 2:4-7 Can you even imagine? About that first real labor pain, Mary had to be thinking, “This is not how it was supposed to be!” Giving birth to your firstborn is a big enough deal, but giving birth to God’s Son? Surely, Mary didn’t see the stable and manger when she pictured her due date. Those pretty Nativity scenes we set up each year are wonderful decorations, but the real deal was dirty and it smelled like animals … not exactly the place for a newborn. Only because Mary had a heart of thanksgiving and was obedient to God’s plan (“I am the Lord’s servant … may it be to me as you have said …” —Luke 1:38) was she able to make those sacrifices with such grace. Instead of a soft, clean bed, she gave birth on the floor of a stable. Instead of her mother and other women tending to her, she was alone with Joseph, who was no doubt as overwhelmed as she was. Instead of a cradle to lay her son, she placed him in a feed trough. Nope … this was not at all what she had in mind. As you think about this, and the rest of the story, consider the fact that if Mary and Joseph had been anywhere else, those shepherds whom God chose to be the first witnesses of the birth of his Son, would have missed it. Shepherds were not exactly high on the social ladder, and maybe not whom Mary and Joseph were expecting, but they were sent by a host of God’s angels. Who better to understand the amazing truth that God had just provided the perfect “Lamb” that would one day be the sacrifice to take away the sins of the world? Could it be that when we feel like there is no room for us someplace, it is because God has made room for us somewhere else … or is making room for someone else to be with us? Try this perspective when dealing with holiday plans for your family. If someone can’t be there, look around and see who that makes room for … perhaps a single adult or someone without any nearby family. If too many miles or your schedule cause you to miss family celebrations, look around to see where God is making room for you. Celebration is ultimately up to us, and the attitude we choose to take … things may not work out exactly like we hoped … but God may just have something extra special in mind for you this year. Believe it … because your heart matters. HEART MATTERS Angie Landangieland3@windstream.net By DAVID McFADDENAssociated PressBULL BAY, Jamaica — The robed Rastafarian priest looked out over the turquoise sea off Jamaica’s southeast coast and fer-vently described his belief that deliverance is at hand. Around him at the sprawling Bobo Ashanti commune on an isolated hilltop, a few women and about 200 dreadlocked men with flowing robes and tightly wrapped turbans prayed, fasted, and fash-ioned handmade brooms — smoking marijuana only as a ceremonial ritual. “Rasta church is rising,” declared Priest Morant, who wore a vest-ment stitched with the words “The Black Christ.” ‘’There’s nothing that can turn it back.” The Rastafarian faith is indeed rising in Jamaica, where new census figures show a roughly 20 percent increase in the number of adherents over a decade, to more than 29,000. While still a tiny sliver of the mostly Christian country’s 2.7 million people, Jalani Niaah, an expert in the Rastafari movement, says the number is more like 8 to 10 percent of the popu-lation, since many Rastas disdain nearly all govern-ment initiatives and not all would have spoken to cen-sus takers. “Its contemporary appeal is particularly fascinating to young men, especially in the absence of alternative sources for their develop-ment,” said Niaah, a lec-turer at the University of the West Indies. Founded 80 years ago by descendants of African slaves, the Rasta movement’s growing appeal is attributable to its rejection of Western materialism, the scarcity of opportu-nities for young men in Jamaica and an increasing acceptance of it. For the black nationalist Bobo Ashanti commune, the Rastafarian faith is a transforming way of life, where Rastas strive to live a frugal existence uncompli-cated by binding relation-ships to “Babylon” — the unflattering term for the Western world. They share a deep alienation from modern life and Jamaica is perceived as a temporary harbor until prophecy is fulfilled and they journey to the promised land of Africa on big ships. Life is highly regimented at the isolated retreat, cut off from most of the comforts of modern soci-ety. But it has a strong appeal for some, among them 27-year-old Adrian Dunkley, who joined the strict sect two months ago after years of questioning his Christian upbringing and struggling to find work as an upholsterer. “This place is helping me a whole heap. I’m learning every day, and things are starting to make sense,” the new recruit known as Prince Adrian said in the shade of one of doz-ens of scrap-board build-ings painted in the bright Rastafarian colors of red, green and gold. Other Rastafari adherents follow a more secu-lar lifestyle, marked by a passion for social justice, the natural world, reggae music and the ritualistic use of pot to bring them closer to the divine. A melding of Old Testament teachings and Pan-Africanism, Rastafarianism emerged in colonial-era Jamaica in the 1930s out of anger over the oppression of blacks. Its message was spread by the reggae songs cre-ated by musical icons Bob Marley, Peter Tosh, Burning Spear and others in the 1970s, and the move-ment has attracted a follow-ing among reggae-loving Americans, Europeans and Asians. Academics believe at least 1 million people practice it worldwide. In the United States, the population of Rastafarians appears to be steadily growing due in part to jail-house conversions, said Charles Price, associate professor of anthropology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the author of “Becoming Rasta: Origins of Rastafari Identity in Jamaica.” “I regularly get letters from inmates seeking information,” Price said. “I also get regular invitations to talk to prisoners at local North Carolina juvenile facilities, often from chap-lains trying to figure out what to do.” Nov. 30Fish dinnerOur Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5056 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, pre-pares fish dinners every Friday from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The dinner is $6 for two Alaskan pollock filets, corn, baked beans, hush-puppies, cole slaw and tart-er sauce.Dec. 1Gospel sing, supperLee Worship Center Church and Living Word of Faith Fellowship will hold a pot-luck Christmas sup-per and open-mike gospel sing at the church, 471 SE Magnolia Drive in Lee. Supper will be at 6 p.m., and the singing will start at 7. For more information or to get on the program, call Allen at (850) 971-4135.Crafts bazaarFort White United Methodist will hold a holi-day craft bazaar from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the fellowship hall, 185 SW Well St. in Fort White. Handmade, one-of-a-kind items will be available, along with baked goods. For more informa-tion, call the church office at 497-1742.Dec. 7Holiday music concertThe combined music ministries of Pine Grove Baptist Church and Southside Baptist Church will present “Season of Joy” holiday music concert at 7 p.m. at Pine Grove Church, 1989 N Highway 441, and at 7 p.m. Sunday at Southside Baptist, 388 SE Baya Drive. Admission is free, but seat-ing is limited. Nursery will be available for children 4 and younger. For advance tickets or more informa-tion, contact Pine Grove Church a (386) 752-2664 or Southside Baptist at (386) 755-5553.Dec. 8Canned food giveawayNorth Side Church of Christ, 378 NW Gibson Lane, will have a canned food giveaway from 8 a.m. to noon. Anyone in need is welcome. For more infor-mation, contact the church office at 755-0393, by email secretarynscofc@gmail.com or visit the church web-site, Thenorthsidecoc.org.Dec. 9 Holiday cantataCovenant First Presbyterian Church (for-merly First Presbyterian) of Live Oak will present the Christmas cantata, “God with Us Emmanuel,” by Phillip Young on at 6:00 p.m. Bill Poplin will be directing. The church is off U.S. 90 on White Avenue in Live Oak. For more information, contact Bill Poplin at 365-4932.Holiday music concertThe combined music ministries of Pine Grove Baptist Church and Southside Baptist Church will present “Season of Joy” holiday music con-cert at 7 p.m. at Southside Baptist, 388 SE Baya Drive. Admission is free, but seat-ing is limited. Nursery will be available for children 4 and younger. For advance tickets or more informa-tion, contact Pine Grove Church a (386) 752-2664 or Southside Baptist at (386) 755-5553.Devotional servicesThe American Legion Rider Chapter 57, South Highway 47, hosts devo-tional services the second Sunday of every month from 8:30 to 9 a.m. There is also a continental breakfast from 8 to 8:30 a.m. Services are held by the Christian Motorcycle Association. Everyone is welcome to join in the fellowship, breakfast and spiritually uplifting morning. OngoingChristian motorcyclistsChristian Motorcyclist Association Iron Shepherds Chapter 826 meets the first Thursday of the month at Ray’s Deli & Grill, Hwy 247 across from the fair-grounds, at 6:30 p.m. We are a Christian motorcy-clist group sharing and showing the love of Jesus Christ to motorcyclists. For more information email Ironshepherds826@gmail.com. Rastafarian church growing in Jamaica after long disdain ASSOCIATED PRESSRobed Rastafarian priests chant prayers while facing the direction of the African nation of Ethiopia at the Bobo Ashanti commune in Bull Bay, Jama ica. More people are joining Jamaica’s homegrown Rastafarian religion some 80 year s after it was founded by the descendants of African slaves in response to black oppr ession on the Caribbean island. Q Heart Matters is a weekly column written by Angie Land, direc tor of the Family Life Ministries of the Lafayette Baptist Association, where she teaches bible studies, leads marriage and family confer ences, and offers biblical counsel ing to individuals, couples and families. CHURCH CALENDAR Q To submit your Church Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr@lakecityreporter.com. ASSOCIATED PRESSExiled Tibetans in New Delhi, India, shout slogans durin g a protest rally to express solidarity with Tibetans who hav e selfimmolated. At least 86 people have set themselves on fire since the immolations began in 2009. Tibetan protests against Chinese rule in new phase By CHRISTOPHER BODEENAssociated PressBEIJING — Two dozen Tibetans have set them-selves on fire in western China this month in a dra-matic acceleration of the protests against authoritar-ian Chinese rule, activist groups say. The surge in self-immolations, along with an increase in large demonstrations, marks a new phase in the Tibetan protests. At least 86 people have set themselves on fire since the immolations began in 2009. In a change in recent months, most self-immola-tors now are lay people — some of them acting togeth-er — rather than Buddhist monks and nuns who live in tightly monitored mon-asteries and thus can be more closely watched by authorities. The protests have also sought to avoid direct attacks on authorities and government property, acts which in the past were used to label them as riots or terrorism, providing an excuse for greater oppression. Despite the altered approach, observers see little short-term possibil-ity of Beijing changing its repressive policies. “I think the problem will just escalate over time. The government shows no inclination to respond positively to recommenda-tions for reform from the outside or Tibetans,” said Michael Davis, a law pro-fessor and expert on Tibet at the University of Hong Kong. In the latest immolation, 24-year-old Kalsang Kyab doused himself with kerosene and set himself alight Tuesday in front of local government offices in Kyangtsa in Aba prefecture, a hotbed of unrest, accord-ing to London-based Free Tibet and other groups. An Aba official said Wednesday he was aware of the immolations but refused to give any details before hanging up. On Monday, about 1,000 students staged a bold pro-test in Qinghai province. Riot police fired shots into the air and released tear gas and beat the students.

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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Friday & Saturday, Nov. 30-Dec. 1, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B CHEAP SEATS Tim KirbyPhone: (386) 754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS Columbia travels to Navarre for regional final. Q Tim Kirby is sports editor of the Lake City Reporter Cancer takes a cousinY ou would have thought he already paid his dues fighting death. Joe was born with a heart defect — a hole in his heart, as it was explained to us cousins. “He never drew a clean breath,” was how our grandmother summed it up. That changed in his eighth year when the condition was corrected at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. Heart surgery back then wasn’t the fairly easy fix it is today, and Joe had the horseshoe scar from his underarm to his chest bone to prove the severity of what he had been through. But, it worked and he grew out of those thin arms and legs in a big way. That was until cancer struck him down this year. By the time it was officially discovered, it was all over. He had the proven record of being a fighter, but this time he never had a chance, and he died on Sunday at 60. Because of the struggles of his younger years, it seemed so unfair. I wanted to be bitter on his behalf. As I wrestled with that mysterious ways thing, I began to see the other side. His death could have happened 50 years ago. Family lore has it that Joe was one of three patients sent to Johns Hopkins, and his doctors thought he was the least likely to make it. Yet, he was the only one to survive. His daddy and mama called before the operation when we were gathered at the grandparents for Sunday dinner. We all spoke to Joe and took turns crying. Joe was on every prayer list in the county, and its power prevailed. My thoughts turned to thanks. Thanks for those years that were given. For his wife and daughters and granddaughter. And for childhood memories of holes dug, helping with the cows and hogs, building forts and hunting days of riding the roads. Watching Joe tear down all manner of machines to see how they worked was a marvel in itself. Thanks, too, for the lives Joe touched with his gentleness, as evidenced by the line at his visitation that could have stretched around the block twice. The mystery began to clear up. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Roger Cray (9) trips up a St. Augustine High runner during a game Nov. 23. No time for CHS to trip upBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High will face an imposing task in the regional final of the Class 6A playoffs at Navarre High at 7:30 p.m. Central time today. Raiders’ head coach Jay Walls has his team primed for the playoff matchup with an 11-1 record and Navarre hasn’t lost since Week 2. Although the two teams share the same record, the philosophies are different for the two coaches. “Offensively, we base out of a spread attack,” Walls said. “We have a running back in Jay Warren that has rushed for over 1,500 yards and Johnny Robinson is also pretty good with over 600 yards rushing. We have what I think is one of the top receivers in the state in Jordan Leggett. We have to get the ball to him and he’s had about 50 catches for over 800 yards. We’re going to throw a good bit as well, but we’re a balanced attack.” Defensively, the Raiders are similar to the Tigers in that they are stingy on the scoreboard. “We’re going to base out of a 3-3 stack,” Walls said. “We’ve been solid all season and only allowed 14-15 points per game. We’ve had some close ball games, but we’ve done a good job of being physical against other teams and pressuring the quarterback.” Walls also showed his respect for the Tigers. “They do a great job of running the football,” Walls said. “From a defensive standpoint, we definite-ly have to stop the run. They’re good at disguis-ing things from going in wide open formations and shifts.” Walls said both teams share the same philosophy for what they ultimately want out of their offenses. “We want to be balanced,” he said. And the coach knows Navarre coach Walls has team ready for regional. Final road block By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comOne more roadblock. That’s all that stands in the way of Columbia High and a chance to play for a shot at the state championship. Columbia can secure a home playoff game against the winner of Gainesville and Armwood high schools by defeating Navarre High at 7:30 p.m. Central time today. The Tigers final road game could be their tough-est test yet in the playoffs, but Columbia is ready for the challenge. “The first time I became familiar with Navarre was when I purchased the speed track machine for our team three springs ago,” Columbia head coach Brian Allen said. “Their coach (Jay Walls) was giv-ing a testimony for the fast-twitch muscle training.” The machine has made a difference for Navarre and Columbia. Now the two teams meet as eight teams remain in the Class 6A playoffs. “Before he got there, they were a below .500 football team,” Allen said. “They have incorporated big plays. They’re having 10-0, 9-1 type seasons.” The Tigers were able to get their hands on film for Navarre early and Allen has been impressed with what he’s seen on tape despite not being a physically imposing football team. “They’re not intimidating in size, but they have a (running) back (Jay Warren) that has run for 1,500 yards,” Allen said. “They have a 6-foot, 6-inch receiver (Jordan Leggett) and players that are capable of making plays. They’ve also got good coaching.” It’s a combination that has proven deadly for opposing teams throughout the rest of the year with Navarre’s only loss coming against Pensacola High in a 25-24 loss during Week 2. Navarre will run an offense similar to what Columbia has seen out of Baker County and Leon high schools this season with a spread attack. “They’ll have a spread mindset,” Allen said. “They’re going to run doubles (at receiver), but they’re going to try to run the ball and pop off a few plays. They’re able to do that at a higher percent-age than most teams. We know they’re going to get after it.” Navarre could also throw some things at the Tigers that aren’t orthodox. “We’ve seen six or seven films and they’ve got a trick play or two that we’ll pre-pare for,’ Allen said. Allen said this is a game where his defense must shine. “This is definitely a game where we need JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High quarterback Jayce Barber (5) looks to e scape a blitz by St. Augustine High’s John Mills (55). CHS continued on 3B PLAYOFFS continued on 3B

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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today COLLEGE FOOTBALL 7 p.m. ESPN2 — Mid-American Conference, championship, Northern Illinois vs. Kent State at Detroit 8 p.m. FOX — Pac-12 Conference, championship, UCLA at Stanford GOLF 9:30 a.m. TGC — Sunshine Tour, Nedbank Challenge, second round, at Sun City, South Africa (same-day tape) 3 p.m. TGC — World Challenge, second round, at Thousand Oaks, Calif. MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 6:30 p.m. ESPN — Tennessee at Georgetown 8:30 p.m. ESPN — Syracuse at Arkansas MEN’S COLLEGE HOCKEY 7:30 p.m. NBCSN — Boston College at Boston U. 10 p.m. NBCSN — Wisconsin at Denver NBA BASKETBALL 10:30 p.m. ESPN — Denver at L.A. Lakers PREP FOOTBALL 10 p.m. FSN — Teams TBA ——— Saturday COLLEGE FOOTBALL Noon ESPN — Teams TBAESPN2 — Teams TBAFX — Oklahoma St. at Baylor or Oklahoma at TCU 2:30 p.m. FSN — Kansas at West Virginia 3:30 p.m. ABC — Teams TBA 4 p.m. CBS — Southeastern Conference, championship game, Alabama vs. Georgia, at Atlanta 7 p.m. ESPN2 — Teams TBA 7:45 p.m. ESPN — Teams TBA 8 p.m. FOX — Big Ten Conference, championship game, Wisconsin vs. Nebraska, at Indianapolis 8:07 p.m. ABC — Atlantic Coast Conference championship game, Florida State vs. Georgia Tech, at Charlotte, N.C. GOLF 9 a.m. TGC — Sunshine Tour, Nedbank Challenge, third round, at Sun City, South Africa (same-day tape) 1 p.m. TGC — World Challenge, third round, at Thousand Oaks, Calif. 3 p.m. NBC — World Challenge, third round, at Thousand Oaks, Calif. MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 12:30 p.m. CBS — Baylor at Kentucky 3 p.m. ESPN2 — Alabama at Cincinnati 5 p.m. ESPN2 — Villanova at Vanderbilt 6:30 p.m. FSN — Texas A&M at Houston MEN’S COLLEGE HOCKEY 7:30 p.m. NBCSN — Boston U. at Boston College NBA BASKETBALL 8 p.m. WGN — Philadelphia at Chicago SOCCER 7:30 a.m. ESPN2 — Premier League, Chelsea at West Ham 4:30 p.m. ESPN — MLS Cup, Houston at Los AngelesFOOTBALLNFL standings AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PANew England 8 3 0 .727 407 244 Miami 5 6 0 .455 211 226 N.Y. Jets 4 7 0 .364 221 290 Buffalo 4 7 0 .364 243 319 South W L T Pct PF PAHouston 10 1 0 .909 327 211 Indianapolis 7 4 0 .636 230 273 Tennessee 4 7 0 .364 238 335Jacksonville 2 9 0 .182 188 308 North W L T Pct PF PABaltimore 9 2 0 .818 283 219Pittsburgh 6 5 0 .545 231 210Cincinnati 6 5 0 .545 282 247Cleveland 3 8 0 .273 209 248 West W L T Pct PF PADenver 8 3 0 .727 318 221San Diego 4 7 0 .364 245 237 Oakland 3 8 0 .273 218 356 Kansas City 1 10 0 .091 161 301 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAN.Y. Giants 7 4 0 .636 305 226 Washington 5 6 0 .455 295 285 Dallas 5 6 0 .455 242 262Philadelphia 3 8 0 .273 184 282 South W L T Pct PF PAAtlanta 10 1 0 .909 294 216 Tampa Bay 6 5 0 .545 310 254New Orleans 5 6 0 .455 308 304Carolina 3 8 0 .273 214 265 North W L T Pct PF PAChicago 8 3 0 .727 277 175 Green Bay 7 4 0 .636 273 245Minnesota 6 5 0 .545 248 249Detroit 4 7 0 .364 267 280 West W L T Pct PF PASan Francisco 8 2 1 .773 276 155Seattle 6 5 0 .545 219 185 St. Louis 4 6 1 .409 205 254 Arizona 4 7 0 364 180 227 Thursday’s Game New Orleans at Atlanta (n) Sunday’s Games Seattle at Chicago, 1 p.m.Minnesota at Green Bay, 1 p.m.San Francisco at St. Louis, 1 p.m.Carolina at Kansas City, 1 p.m.Houston at Tennessee, 1 p.m.Arizona at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m.Indianapolis at Detroit, 1 p.m.Jacksonville at Buffalo, 1 p.m.New England at Miami, 1 p.m.Tampa Bay at Denver, 4:05 p.m.Cleveland at Oakland, 4:25 p.m.Cincinnati at San Diego, 4:25 p.m.Pittsburgh at Baltimore, 4:25 p.m.Philadelphia at Dallas, 8:20 p.m. Monday’s Game N.Y. Giants at Washington, 8:30 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 6 Denver at Oakland, 8:20 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 9 Chicago at Minnesota, 1 p.m.Baltimore at Washington, 1 p.m.Kansas City at Cleveland, 1 p.m.San Diego at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.Tennessee at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.N.Y. Jets at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.Atlanta at Carolina, 1 p.m.Philadelphia at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.St. Louis at Buffalo, 1 p.m.Dallas at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.Miami at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.Arizona at Seattle, 4:25 p.m.New Orleans at N.Y. Giants, 4:25 p.m.Detroit at Green Bay, 8:20 p.m. Monday, Dec. 10 Houston at New England, 8:30 p.m. AP Top 25 schedule Today No. 8 Stanford vs. No. 17 UCLA, Pac-12 championship, 8 p.m. No. 18 Kent State vs. No. 19 Northern Illinois, MAC championship at Detroit, 7 p.m. Saturday No. 2 Alabama vs. No. 3 Georgia, SEC championship at Atlanta, 4 p.m. No. 7 Kansas State vs. No. 23 Texas, 8 p.m. No. 12 Oklahoma at TCU, NoonNo. 13 Florida State vs. Georgia Tech, ACC championship at Charlotte, N.C., 8 p.m. No. 14 Nebraska vs. Wisconsin, Big Ten championship at Indianapolis, 8:15 p.m. No. 16 Oregon State vs. Nicholls State, 2:30 p.m. No. 24 Oklahoma State at Baylor, Noon No. 25 Boise State at Nevada, 3:30 p.m.FCS playoffs Second Round Saturday New Hampshire (8-3) at Wofford (8-3), 2 p.m. Central Arkansas (9-2) at Georgia Southern (8-3), 2 p.m. Coastal Carolina (8-4) at Old Dominion (10-1), 2 p.m. Illinois State (8-3) at Appalachian State (8-3), 2 p.m. Cal Poly (9-2) at Sam Houston State (8-3), 4 p.m. South Dakota State (9-3) at North Dakota State (10-1), 4 p.m. Wagner (9-3) at Eastern Washington (9-2), 6 p.m. Stony Brook (10-2) at Montana State (10-1), 7 p.m.NCAA Div. II playoffs Quarterfinals Saturday Indiana (Pa.) (12-1) at Winston-Salem (12-0), Noon Carson-Newman (9-2) at Valdosta State (9-2), Noon Missouri Western State (12-1) at Minnesota State Mankato (12-0), 1 p.m. West Texas A&M (11-2) at Colorado State-Pueblo (12-0), 2 p.m.NCAA Div. III playoffs Quarterfinals Saturday Widener (11-0) at Mount Union (12-0), Noon Wesley (10-1) at Mary Hardin-Baylor (12-0), 1 p.m. Hobart (12-0) at St. Thomas (Minn.) (12-0), 1 p.m. Wisconsin-Oshkosh (12-0) at Linfield (11-0), 3 p.m.NAIA playoffs Semifinals Saturday Saint Xavier (Ill.) (11-1) at Morningside (Iowa) (12-0), 1 p.m. Marian (Ind.) (10-1) at Missouri Valley (12-0), 2 p.m.BASKETBALLNBA schedule Today’s Games Philadelphia at Charlotte, 7 p.m.Phoenix at Toronto, 7 p.m.Brooklyn at Orlando, 7 p.m.Portland at Boston, 7:30 p.m.Cleveland at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.Washington at New York, 7:30 p.m.Milwaukee at Minnesota, 8 p.m.Detroit at Memphis, 8 p.m.Utah at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.Indiana at Sacramento, 10 p.m.Denver at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m. Saturday’s Games Portland at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.Brooklyn at Miami, 7:30 p.m.Philadelphia at Chicago, 8 p.m.Utah at Houston, 8 p.m.Oklahoma City at New Orleans, 8 p.m. Memphis at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.Boston at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.Detroit at Dallas, 9 p.m.Indiana at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.Sacramento at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.AP Top 25 schedule Today’s Games No. 6 Syracuse at Arkansas, 8:30 p.m.No. 20 Georgetown vs. Tennessee, 6:30 p.m. No. 10 Kansas vs. Oregon State at the Sprint Center, Kansas City, Mo., 8 p.m. Saturday’s Games No. 1 Indiana vs. Coppin State, 7:30 p.m. No. 2 Duke vs. Delaware, 2 p.m.No. 3 Michigan at Bradley, 4 p.m.No. 4 Ohio State vs. Northern Kentucky, 4:30 p.m. No. 5 Louisville vs. Illinois State, 1 p.m. No. 8 Kentucky vs. Baylor, 12:30 p.m.No. 9 Arizona at Texas Tech, 8 p.m.No. 11 Creighton vs. Saint Joseph’s, 3 p.m. No. 12 Gonzaga vs. Pacific, 8 p.m.No. 13 Michigan State vs. Nicholls State, Noon No. 14 North Carolina vs. UAB, 6 p.m. No. 15 Oklahoma State at Virginia Tech, 2 p.m. No. 16 Missouri vs. Appalachian State, 3 p.m. No. 17 Cincinnati vs. Alabama, 3 p.m.No. 19 Colorado at Wyoming, 10 p.m.No. 21 Minnesota vs. North Florida, 2 p.m. No. 23 San Diego State vs. UCLA at the Honda Center, Anaheim, Calif., 10 p.m. No. 24 UNLV vs. Hawaii, 7 p.m.No. 25 New Mexico at Indiana State, 2:05 p.m.SOCCERMLS Cup Saturday Houston at Los Angeles, 4:30 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, NOV. 30-DEC. 1, 20122BSPORTS BOWLING BRIEFS TRUCK SERIES Southern Monster Truck Showdown A Southern Monster Truck Showdown event is scheduled for today and Saturday at the Columbia County Fairgrounds. Southern Monster Truck drivers will compete in wheelie contests, circle-track racing and freestyle. There will be free competition for local mud truck owners and a free singing talent contest that will pay a $500 first prize. A live concert will follow the showdown on Saturday. Cost is $10 for ages 3-12 and $15 for teens and adults. Several local businesses are offering discounts on teen and adult tickets. There also is a charity food drive. Sunbelt Dodge and The Players Club are sponsors. For details, call (386) 288-3689. ADULT FLAG FOOTBALL Registration for 7 on 7 league Lake City Recreation Department is taking registration for its Adult 7 on 7 Flag Football League. Entry fee of $600 includes trophies, officials and scorekeeper/clock operator for a minimum of 10 games. Roster forms can be picked up at Teen Town Center. Deadline for fee and to return rosters is Dec. 14. A coaches meeting and rules clinic is 6:30 p.m. Dec. 6 at Teen Town. For details, call Hayward Christie at 754-3607. ADULT SOFTBALL Winter league planned in 2013 An adult softball winter league is planned to begin on Jan. 21. Women, men and co-ed leagues will be offered. Registration deadline is Jan. 11. For details, call Pete Bonilla at 623-6561. ZUMBA Classes offered at Teen Town Zumba classes are 5:30-6:30 p.m. Sundays, Tuesdays and Thursdays at Teen Town. Cost is $5 per class. For details, call Heyward Christie at 754-3607.Q From staff reports League resultsLake City Bowl league play: HIT & MISS Team standings: 1. All Mrs’s (37-19); 2. Spare Us (34-22); 3. Legal Ladies (33.5-22.5). Team high handicap game: 1. All Mrs’s 790; 2. Legal Ladies 763; 3. Oddballs 753. Team high handicap series: 1. Silver Ladies 2,302; 2. Sandbaggers 2,271; 3. Spare Us 2,225. High handicap game: 1. Sandy Black 235; 2. Cathy Pelley 222; 3. Cythe Shiver 215. High handicap series: 1. Angie Meek 628; 2. Karen Clampett 605; 3. Harriet Woods 603.(results from Nov. 20) ——— MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS Team standings: 1. BENCOR (234-156); 2. Ronsonet Service (232-158); 3. Bias Well Drilling (229-161). High scratch game: 1. Bill Duncan 258; 2. Roger Webb 255; 3. Dave Duncan 252. High scratch series: 1. Bill Duncan 671; 2. Dale Coleman 665; 3. Roger Webb 653. High handicap game: 1. Jamie Ritzman 287; 2. Roger Webb 277; 3. Tanner Wayne 275. High handicap series: 1. Steve Madsen 753; 2. Roger Webb 719; 3. Dave Duncan 718. High average: 1. Dale Coleman 218.7; 2. Bill Duncan 214.31; 3. Wally Howard 206.69.(results from Nov. 19) ——— SEXY SENIORS Team standings: 1. Jo’s Crew (70-42); 2. Outcasts (69-43); 3. Handicappers (67-45). Team high handicap game: 1. Jo’s Crew 864; 2. Keglers 806. Team high handicap series: 1. Pin Droppers 2,429; 2. Pin Busters 2,374; 3. Double Up 2,263. High scratch game: 1. Betty Carmichael 157; 2. Joyce Crandall 152; 3. Sandra Johns 139. 1. Wayne Johns 194; 2. Vernon Black 179; 3. Mike Helvey 174. High scratch series: 1. Joanne Denton 442; 2. Yvonne Finley 418; 3. Diane Madsen 398. 1. Michael Murrey 610; 2. Dan Ritter 510; 3. Ric Yates 496. High handicap game: 1. Janie Posey 219; 2. Ellie DeRosa 212; 3. Louise Atwood 206. 1. Jerry Crandall 236; 2. Morrell Atwood 227; 3. Ray Denton 221. High handicap series: 1. Janet Nash 679; 2. Barbara Croft 620; 3. Vy Ritter 603. 1. Ross Meyers 628; 2. Earl Hayward 617; 3. Wendell Shay 606.(results from Nov. 13) ——— TGIF Team standings: 1. Oh Split! (34-18); 2. Gutter Dusters (33.5-18.5); 3. The Incredi-Bowls (33-19). Team high handicap game: 1. Da Spares 1,003; 2. Back At Ya Again 969; 3. The Bowling Stones 945. Team high handicap series: 1. Da Spares 2,765; 2. Back At Ya Again 2,729; 3. The Gutter Ball Gang 2,685. High scratch game: 1. Karen Coleman 190; 2. (tie) Chrissy Fancy, Christine Williams 179. 1. Wally Howard 259; 2. Zech Strohl 257; 3. Bill Duncan 243. High scratch series: 1. Karen Coleman 550; 2. Shannon Howard 514; 3. Desiree Stemp 495. 1. Zech Strohl 682; 2. Wally Howard 664; 3. Bill Duncan 646. High handicap game: 1. Samantha Jolliffe 240; 2.Chrissy Fancy 235; 3. Tina Sherrod 234. 1. Charlie Jolliffe 289; 2. Wayne Conk 279; 3. Wally Howard 274. High handicap series: 1. Linda Andrews 664; 2. Donna Duncan 662; 3. (tie) Carol Younger, Samantha Jolliffe 660. 1. Charlie Jolliffe 752; 2. Alex Jolliffe 734; 3. Zech Strohl 730.(results from Nov. 16) ——— WATERGUARD LEAGUE Team high handicap game: 1. All In The Family 879; 2. All In 844; 3. 10 In The Pitt 807. Team high handicap series: 1. Wolf Pack 2,552; 2. Scooby Doo 2,470; 3. Dominators 2,378. High scratch game: 1. Mary Lobaugh 220; 2. Mary Lobaugh 219; 3. Debbie Walters 199. 1. Dess Fennell 213; 2. Dave Ward 212; 3. Steve Fancy 210. High scratch series: 1. Mary Lobaugh 626; 2. Joyce Hooper 518; 3. Susie Camacho 509. 1. George Mulligan 579; 2. Dess Fennell 578; 3. Dave Ward 561. High handicap game: 1. Debbie Walters 263; 2. Julie Bell 248; 3. Jane Blais 227. 1. Jack Stanfield 249; 2. Dave Ward 239; 3. Steve Fancy 231. High handicap series: 1. Mary Lobaugh 701; 2. Joyce Hooper 665; 3. Susie Camacho 653. 1. Dess Fennell 674; 2. Steve Greaves 666; 3. George Mulligan 660. High average: Mary Lobaugh 181; James Price 194.(results from Nov. 20)Youth leaguesMAJORS SCRATCH Team standings: 1. Ten in the Pit (112-80); 2. The CBC (106-86); 3. Ninja Bowling Inc. (105.5-86.5). High scratch game: 1. Christine Peters 204; 2. Courtney Schmitt 182; 3. Victoria Wise 174. 1. Cody Howard 299; 2. Cody Howard 235; 3. Gary Beames 233. High scratch series: 1. Courtney Schmitt 514; 2. Christine Peters 509; 3. Lauren Snipes 501. 1. Cody Howard 711; 2. Gary Beames 622; 3. Jesse Morrow 599. MAJORS Team standings: 1. Team 3 (27.5-20.5); 2. Team Ace (27-21); 3. Holy Splitz (26-22). Team high handicap game: 1. The Destructors 656; 2. Holy Splitz 619; 3. Team 3 613. Team high handicap series: 1. The Destructors 1,819; 2. Holy Splitz 1,771; 3. The Ballers 1,769. High handicap game: 1. Crystal Campbell 220; 2. Sara Jones 212; 2. Tiffany Ritch 204. 1. Caleb Moulton 236; 2. (tie) Blake Lyons, Sean Burleson 227. High handicap series: 1. Crystal Campbell 614; 2. Sara Jones 594; 2. Tiffany Ritch 580. 1. Caleb Moulton 643; 2. Jordan Salzer 641; 3. Eric Anderson 608. JUNIORS Team standings: 1. The Emergency Exits (29-19); 2. Dynamite (28.5-19.5); 3. Bearded Dragons (27.5-20.5). Team high handicap game: 1. Go Bowl or Go Home 572; 2. The Emergency Exits 567; 3. Black Ops Dominators 559. Team high handicap series: 1. Go Bowl or Go Home 1,674; 2. Black Ops Dominators 1,642; 3. Bearded Dragons 1,627. High handicap game: 1. Jadyn Freeman 207; 2. (tie) Savannah Barr, Taiya Driggers 203. 1. Ian Beckman 227; 2. Aaron Rouse 205; 3. Josh Johnson 201. High handicap series: 1. Taiya Driggers 580; 2. Jadyn Freeman 554; 3. Beth Saylor 552. 1. Ian Beckman 601; 2. Aaron Rouse 582; 3. Josh Johnson 572. BANTAMS High handicap game: 1. Allison Presnell 155; 2. Aliyah Rouse 153; 2. Amber Rouse 152. 1. Jacob Burch 205; 2. Kolby Sherrod 165. High handicap series: 1. Amber Rouse 446; 2. Koral Grimsley 439; 3. Aliyah Rouse 431. 1. Jacob Burch 547; 2. Kolby Sherrod 457.(results from Nov. 17) COURTESY PHOTOTiger Invitational wrestling SaturdayColumbia High’s wrestling team is hosting a second Tig er Invitational tournament on Saturday. Action begins at 10 a.m. In the Tigers Invitational on Nov. 17, Kaleb Warner (above right) won the 126-pound weight class with a 5-0 record. Bulldogs beat Tigers in basketball openerBy TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comLIVE OAK — Columbia High’s basketball team lost on the road to Suwannee High, 67-46, in the opener for both teams. The matchup of Columbia’s Morris Marshall and Suwannee’s Jimmie Taylor III proved out. Marshall hit five 3-pointers and scored 19 points, while Taylor led all scorers with 22 points. “Our help defense and lack of scoring was our nemesis tonight,” Columbia head coach Horace Jefferson said. “Suwannee shot lights-out; you have to give them credit.” While Morris was the only Tiger in double fig-ures, Suwannee got five treys and 17 points from Deangelo Ross. Raymond Gardner hit four 3-point-ers in the first half as the Bulldogs built a 40-28 lead. Kevarrius Hayes chipped in nine points. Suwannee wrapped things up with a 9-0 spurt midway through the fourth quarter. Marshall had a steal and highlight dunk in the first quarter for an 11-10 Suwannee lead, then the Bulldogs closed the quar-ter on a 10-3 run for a 21-13 lead and Columbia couldn’t get any closer. Other scorers for CHS were Tr Simmons with eight points, Andrew Momeka with seven, Wayne Broom with four, and Dillan Hall, Kevin Louder, Kelvin Jonas and Dylan Hinson each with two. Columbia plays Union County High at 7:30 p.m. Saturday in Lake Butler. Columbia’s junior varsity fought back from a 34-27 halftime deficit and won a 63-62 thriller.

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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, NOV. 30-DEC. 1, 2012 3B3BSports CHS: Tigers will parade through town Continued From Page 1B BCS implications in final weekBy RALPH D. RUSSOAssociated PressTime to put the BCS puzzle together. There’s not a lot of mystery going into champi-onship weekend. Mostly, everything should simply fall into place. The spot opposite Notre Dame in the championship game will go to Alabama or Georgia, whichever one takes the SEC title. The winners of the Pac-12, Big Ten and ACC championship games will each advance to a big game, as will the team that comes out on top in the Big East matchup between Louisville and Rutgers on Thursday night. Florida and Oregon aren’t playing this weekend, but both are safe bets to land at-large bids to BCS games. Pencil in the Gators for the Sugar Bowl and the Ducks for the Fiesta. The real BCS intrigue this weekend will happen at a most unlikely place: Detroit, where No. 18 Kent State and No. 19 Northern Illinois will be playing for the Mid-American Conference title Friday. The MAC has never sent a team to the BCS, but it could benefit from the Big East’s struggles this sea-son. BCS rules state that if a champion from a confer-ence without an automat-ic bid, such as the MAC, ranks in the top 16 of the final BCS standings and is ranked higher than a cham-pion from one of the AQ leagues, such as the Big East, that non-AQ champ is guaranteed a spot in the BCS. Neither Rutgers nor Louisville was ranked in last week’s BCS standings, so that opens the back door to a bid for the MAC champ. Kent State was 17th and stands a good chance to move up one spot with a victory. UCLA is in 16th place and has to play at Stanford in the Pac-12 title game on Friday night. “I won’t talk about that at all,” MAC coach of the year Darrell Hazell said about Kent State’s BCS prospects. “I’ll talk about Northern Illinois. If our guys don’t focus on this Friday we won’t have the opportunity to play in some of those big games. “This is huge, huge game for this university.” Northern Illinois is 21st in the BCS standings and could also get into the top 16, but would need a little extra help. It’s just as likely an NIU victory in the MAC title game will eliminate both the Huskies and the Golden Flashes. Boise State, 20th in the standings, plays at Nevada on Saturday and can win a share of the Mountain West title. The Broncos also have a long shot chance at getting into the top 16, but it’d be tough for them to jump the MAC champion. If a BCS buster does emerge, the biggest loser could be the Big 12. No. 12 Oklahoma plays TCU on Saturday with a chance to close its season 10-2 (losses against Notre Dame and Kansas State) and earn a share of the con-ference title. The Sooners can still win the Big 12 if they win and Kansas State loses to Texas. Still, there’s room for both in the BCS unless space needs to be created for Kent State or one of the other potential BCS busters. If the Golden Flashes (11-1), who lost to Kentucky by 33 early in the season and later won at Rutgers, do find their way into the BCS, expect it to be in the Orange Bowl. The Orange Bowl has the last selection among the BCS bowls and it’s not likely any other game will be rushing to take Kent State, or Northern Illinois (11-1) for that matter. But rest assured those teams won’t be picky. The picks: Today No. 17 UCLA (plus 8 12 ) at No. 8 Stanford, Pac-12 championship Rematch for the Rose Bowl ... STANFORD 31-21. No. 18 Kent State (plus 6) vs. No. 19 Northern Illinois, MAC champion-ship at Detroit KSU RB Dri Archer and NIU QB Jordan Lynch are MACtion stars ... NORTHERN ILLINOIS 35-28. ——— Saturday No. 2 Alabama (minus 7) vs. No. 3 Georgia, SEC championship at Atlanta Winner gets the Irish in Miami ... ALABAMA 28-24. No. 23 Texas (plus 11 12 ) at No. 7 Kansas State Wildcats get Big 12 title and Fiesta Bowl bid with victory ... KANSAS STATE 38-24. UPSET SPECIAL No. 12 Oklahoma (minus 6 12 ) at TCU Sooners need to bounce back quickly from Bedlam ... TCU 34-31. BEST BET No. 13 Florida State (minus 14) vs. Georgia Tech, ACC champion-ship at Charlotte Seminoles looking for first ACC title since 2005, and Orange Bowl bid ... FLORIDA STATE 44-21. No. 14 Nebraska (minus 3) vs. Wisconsin, Big Ten championship at Indianapolis Winner goes to Rose Bowl because Ohio State can’t ... NEBRASKA 24-17. Nicholls State (no line) at No. 16 Oregon State Postponed by Hurricane Isaac earlier in season ... OREGON STATE 48-14. No. 24 Oklahoma State (minus 4) at Baylor Cowboys and Bears combine to average 1,122 yards per game ... OKLAHOMA STATE 51-45. No. 25 Boise State (minus 9 12 ) at Nevada Last time Broncos visited Reno, an OT loss kept them out of BCS ... BOISE STATE 31-24. ——— Last week’s record : 14-5 (straight); 12-7 (vs. points) Season record : 211-48 (straight); 122-111 (vs. points) Best bets : 5-8. Upset specials : 8-5. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFlorida State’s Vince Williams (11) leaps over Timmy J ernigan (8) and Bjoern Werner (95) as they take down Florida’s Mike Gillislee (23) in Tallahassee on Saturday. Terry (Calloway) and Felix (Woods) to play really good out there,” Allen said. “They’ve played extremely well all year. We need Roger (Cray) to play good. We need Roc (Battle) to play good.” But one unit will be key for the defense. “We need the defensive line,” Allen said. “They will be key. We need penetra-tion so that they’re not able to let their quarterback sit there and look at the cover-age. They have a tendency to put the ball up in the air and let kids make plays. If we’re able to make a cou-ple plays on them, I’ll feel good.” Despite Leggett’s size advantage over Columbia’s secondary, Allen feels good about the matchup. “Our line has to get after their butt early up front so that he has a hand in his face while trying to com-plete the pass,” Allen said. “He’s a big target and our guys might not be that tall, but they can jump. It’s going to take more than one guy to beat us.” Defensively, the Tigers will prepare for a look they’ve already seen once in the playoffs. “They’re going to run a 3-3 stack,” Allen said. “We last saw that against Bartram Trail. They’re not big on the ball, but they’re 11-1 so they’re getting after it pretty good.” Allen said the Tigers won’t change many things up on the offensive end as Columbia looks to keep the ground game pounding the front. “We’ve got to continue to do the things we’ve been doing well all season,” Allen said. “We’ll pass when we need to, but it’s imperative that we establish the run quickly.” The school is asking that the fans try to give the team a send off on Friday at 10 a.m. as the Tigers leave the school. The procession will proceed up Marion St. and through downtown. The charter buses will have a police escort with sirens as the buses come through town. Fans are asked to wear their purple and gold and wave at the players as they make their way up to I-10. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Ronald Timmons breaks through a tackl e during the Tigers’ 34-8 win against St. Augustine High on Friday. that at this point, turn-overs could be key to the contest. “There are only eight teams left at this point and they’re all really good,” Walls said. “We have to protect the football and play without mistakes.” But Walls said the Raiders can’t play tight. “We still have to make plays,” he said. “We need to make plays in the kicking game as well. I think we’ll see some big plays. We’ve done well in that area and we’re kind of aggressive.” Walls expects the travel to give the Raiders a leg up. “I hope it’s a huge factor,” Walls said. “We know that a good football team can play anywhere, but we’re in the advantage that we get to stay in our routine and don’t have to travel.” Both teams enter on 10-game winning streaks and Walls said the Raiders will play with a lot of confidence. “I think it’s a positive for us that we lost early,” Walls said. “Each week we’ve gained a bit of confidence and we’ve seen our team build in confidence. We’re still taking it one game at a time and not looking back or ahead. We want to get better in what we do every day. We have to continue to keep doing the things that we do. Football is a tough sport, but winning makes it fun.” PLAYOFFS: Regional final today Continued From Page 1B JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Lonnie Underwood pulls out of a tackle during the Tigers’ 34-8 win against St. Augustine High in the second round of the Class 6A pl ayoffs.

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4B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, NOV. 30-DEC. 1, 20124BSPORTS Backfields come in two’s for SECBy JOHN ZENORAssociated PressTUSCALOOSA, Ala. — That running back duo in the Southeastern Conference championship game has been punishingly effective all season. Pick a team — No. 3 Georgia or No. 2 Alabama — the description fits. Bulldogs freshmen Todd Gurley and Keith Marshall roll into Saturday’s game with 1,858 combined yards and 22 touchdowns. The Crimson Tide counters with Eddie Lacy, fresh-man T.J. Yeldon and their collective 1,848 yards and 24 TDs. The stats hardly settle the debate of which tail-back tandem is better. “They’ve got two great running backs,” Tide cor-nerback Dee Milliner said. “We’ve got two, three great running backs here.” Well, that’s no help.There’s not an easy answer. Both backfield combinations have been terrific. If one player gets winded, the other goes in. One gets a little dinged up, no problem. Fresh legs, and no rest for the weary defenses. It has been Alabama’s formula since Nick Saban arrived. The two-tailback system has flourished with 2009 Heisman Trophy win-ner Mark Ingram and 2011 finalist Trent Richardson, and both gained 700-plus yards as freshmen. Yeldon has already surpassed the first-season pro-duction of either of those two first-round NFL draft picks with 847 yards and 10 touchdowns. Saban said the system is especially effective if the backs present defenses with different styles, like Gurley and Marshall. “Todd is a little bit like our guys in a way,” he said. “He’s big, physical, can run inside, can run outside. He’ll make you miss, but has power. Their second guy is a very, very good back in all those regards, but he’s a very fast guy. There’s a change of pace there that the players have to be aware of.” Gurley has been the most prolific of the bunch. He is second in the SEC with 1,138 yards while he and Lacy’s 14 touchdowns are tied for tops among run-ning backs. Lacy has 1,001 yards. Georgia linebacker Christian Robinson said Yeldon and Gurley compare favorably. “They both run really hard,” Robinson said. “When I look at Todd I just see lower body. You know, people try to hit him high a lot of times, and he just keeps turning his legs and gets those extra yards and makes a lot of people miss. “What I’ve seen of Yeldon, he has the speed to get around the edge. He turns up a lot on people that don’t think he’s as fast as he really is. You’ve got to hold the edge of the defense or else he’s gone. I think Todd has speed as well. He’s obviously looking a little bit faster. But I would say Todd’s a little bit bigger and more of a bruiser.” Georgia’s backs have the clear advantage in one area: Nickname. No. 3 Gurley and No. 4 Marshall (720 yards, eight touchdowns)) have been dubbed “Gurshall” after Herschel Walker, who led the Bulldogs to the 1980 national title as a freshman. Their numbers just happen to smush into his 34, and Walker has praised the two freshmen. “That’s great, to have one of the best players to ever come through college football to say great things about me,” Gurley said. “But I’ve got to keep work-ing.” He’s not into any comparisons with the former superstar, either. “We’re not trying to be like nobody else,” Gurley said. “But it’s a cool thing for the fans.” Gurley is one touchdown away from matching Walker’s 15 as a freshman. He and Marshall have already blown by the 1,739 yards and 14 combined touchdowns by Arkansas freshmen and future first-rounders Darren McFadden and Felix Jones in 2005. “Playing as a true freshman in the SEC, two guys, that’s enough said right there — at the University of the Georgia,” Alabama defensive end Damion Square said. “I know they’ve got some big-time guys there. For those guys to come in and play early and often, that makes them great. Those guys run hard. They’re going to make you pay when you make mistakes. Come in and tackling those guys, they’re going to make a 2-yard gain a 7-yard gain. You’ve got to be really fundamentally sound when you’re playing against those guys.” Square passed on the question of which tailback tandem is the best. “I play for the University of Alabama. So...” he said. Maybe Saturday’s game will provide a more conclu-sive answer. ASSOCIATED PRESSGeorgia running back Todd Gurley (3) reacts after scor ing a touchdown against Georgia Tech during the first qu arter of an NCAA college football game on Nov. 24 in Athens, Ga. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia County native and Florida State defensive tackle Timmy Jernigan is seen on the sidelines before the start of the game against Florida on S aturday.FSU looks to secure ACCAssociated PressGeorgia Tech (6-6, 5-3) vs. No.13 Florida St (10-2, 7-1, 8 p.m. (ABC) Line : Florida State by 14. Series record : Florida State 12-9-1. What’s at stake : Atlantic Division winner Florida State has won a dozen league championships since joining the league in 1992. Georgia Tech, which qualified after Miami offi-cials decided to skip the game in anticipation of NCAA sanctions, defeated Clemson in the league’s championship game in 2009, but was forced to vacate the title because of NCAA sanctions. Georgia Tech’s string of 16 straight seasons being bowl eligible may also be in jeopardy if it loses. Key matchup : Florida State’s defense, which is ranked second nationally, against Georgia Tech’s high-powered triple-option offense that averaged an ACC record 323.3 yards a game on the ground. The Seminoles allowed just 85 yards a game rushing. A high-scoring affair could occur if Florida State has trou-ble containing the Jackets although if it comes down to a kick, the Seminoles have all-time NCAA field goal and scoring leader Dustin Hopkins available. Players to watch : Florida State: DE Bjoern Werner, a Nagurski finalist who wreaked havoc with opposing offensive lineman all season and was the top vote getter in the ACC’s all-conference defensive unit. Werner has 13 sacks and seven deflected passes despite having been fre-quently double-teamed during the season. His abil-ity to stop the run will be tested. Georgia Tech: QBs Tevin Washington and Vad Lee are the igniters in the Georgia Tech offense and will need some protection against Werner and others in Florida State’s ACC-best defense to have a chance at upsetting the Seminoles. The Yellow Jackets didn’t get into the end zone last week in a 42-10 drub-bing at Georgia until mid-way through the fourth quarter. Facts and Figures : Florida State won the first ACC championship game in 2005 and is mak-ing its third appearance. Stanford, UCLA Pac-12 title rematch a ‘mind game’By ANTONIO GONZALEZAssociated PressSTANFORD, Calif. — This week has been unlike any other in the 20 years Mike Gleeson has been Stanford football’s video director. Even though there’s a tight turnaround between the Cardinal’s 35-17 victory last Saturday at UCLA and the Pac-12 championship game rematch Friday night, Gleeson’s typical task is simplified. All he has to do is add video from the first game and recalculate statis-tics to the preparation done last week. After that, things get complicated. “The staff, in a way, they have to shuffle the deck as if it didn’t happen. Or did it?” Gleeson said. “How do you want to look at it? Do you want to change things? Do you want to keep things? Now we’ve got the mind games with UCLA. What did they show? What do we think they showed com-pared to what they’ll do this week? “Well, we have 11 other games. So we kind of know what they’re about, just like they know what we’re about. But did they show everything that they could against us? Maybe. Maybe not. That’s the mind game.” Call last week a dress rehearsal, although even that may be in question. Stanford will wear its black uniforms, helmets and shoes for only the fourth time. UCLA is expected to swap out those dark blue “L.A. Night” jerseys for its traditional white tops, gold pants and gold helmets on the road. With the league title at stake, what else the eighth-ranked Cardinal (10-2, 8-1) and the No. 17 Bruins (9-3, 6-3) bring out of the closet for the sequel at Stanford Stadium might not be so obvious. They will be the first opponents in major college football matched against each other for a regular-season finale and conference title game in consecutive weeks. After the opener at the Rose Bowl, booking a return trip to Pasadena for “The Granddaddy of Them All” on Jan. 1 could be tricky. Both staffs lost a day of game planning and prac-tice, and the preparation has everybody involved con-templating how to approach Part II. “I cannot recall ever being in this situation before,” UCLA coach Jim Mora said. “I don’t know that it benefits either team, or is hard on any team. It just comes down to going out on Friday night and executing. Any familiarity we have with them, they’ll have with us.” Stanford’s video staff usually compiles highlights of about four games from when its opponent faced a team that mirrored what the Cardinal does, includ-ing last season’s meeting if the opponent has the same coaching staff or style. In this case, last week’s game stands for last sea-son’s game. Then producers send the videos and analytical reports to coaches and players through an appli-cation on their iPad play-books. ASSOCIATED PRESSUCLA linebacker Eric Kendricks (6) misses an interce ption on a pass intended for Stanford wide receiver Ty Montgomery (88) during the third quar ter of their game Saturday in Pasadena, Calif. Stanford won the game 35-17.

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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, NOV. 30-DEC. 1, 2012 5B5B FRIDAY EVENING NOVEMBER 30, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Last Man StandingMalibu Country (N) Shark Tank (:01) 20/20 News at 11(:35) Nightline (N) 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) The Insider 5-PBS 5 -Journal Nightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Downton Abbey Revisited Behind-the-scenes footage. The Heart of Perfect Health With Brenda Watson Washington WeekTavis Smiley 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge Judy Two and Half MenUndercover Boss (N) CSI: NY “Blood Out” (N) Blue Bloods “Higher Education” (N) Friday Night BlitzLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneNikita “The Sword’s Edge” (N) Arrow “Muse of Fire” TMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ce The Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family Guy Family Guy Football Pregamee College Football Pac-12 Championship -UCLA at Stanford. (N Subject to Blackout) Action News 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) Christmas in Rockefeller Center Grimm A Wesen church is robbed. Dateline NBC (N) NewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(2:00) Politics & Public Policy Today Politics & Public Policy Today Politics & Public Policy Today WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304(:14) M*A*S*H “Bug Out” (6:54) M*A*S*HThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Police Women of Broward CountyPolice Women of Broward CountyPolice Women of Broward CountyPolice Women of Broward CountyPolice Women of Broward CountyPolice Women of Broward County A&E 19 118 265Parking Wars “Furious Face-Offs” Duck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck Dynasty(:01) Duck Dynasty(:31) Duck Dynasty HALL 20 185 312“Lucky Christmas” (2011) Elizabeth Berkley, Jason Gray-Stanford. “Hitched for the Holidays” (2012) Joey Lawrence, Emily Hampshire. “Battle of the Bulbs” (2010, Comedy-Drama) Daniel Stern, Matt Frewer. FX 22 136 248(5:00) “Iron Man” (2008, Action) Robert Downey Jr., Terrence Howard. “The Waterboy” (1998, Comedy) Adam Sandler, Kathy Bates. The Ultimate Fighter (N) “The Waterboy” (1998, Comedy) CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245The Mentalist The Mentalist “Red Carpet Treatment” “The Dark Knight” (2008, Action) Christian Bale. Batman battles a vicious criminal known as the Joker. (DVS) (:15) “War of the Worlds” (2005) NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobDrake & JoshDrake & Josh“A Fairly Odd Christmas” (2012, Comedy) Drake Bell. See Dad RunThe Nanny The Nanny Friends (:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241(:12) Gangland A deadly gang known as MS-13. (:21) Gangland Women in gangs. “S.W.A.T.” (2003) Samuel L. Jackson. A Los Angeles SWAT team must protect a criminal. (:10) “S.W.A.T.” (2003, Action) MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*H M*A*S*H Monk “Mr. Monk Is on the Run, Part 1” Monk Monk searches for the truth. Seinfeld Frasier The Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Phineas and FerbGood Luck Charlie(6:50) “Radio Rebel” (2012, Drama) Debby Ryan. Jessie (N) Phineas and FerbGravity Falls A.N.T. Farm Good Luck CharlieJessie Good Luck Charlie LIFE 32 108 252 “Together Again for the First Time” (2008, Comedy-Drama) Julia Duffy. “The March Sisters at Christmas” (2012, Drama) Julie Marie Berman. “Nothing Like the Holidays” (2008) John Leguizamo, Elizabeth Pea. USA 33 105 242Law & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitBurn Notice “Down & Out” BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Freestyle Friday” World Aids Day special. (N) One Mic StandOne Mic StandOne Mic StandOne Mic StandOne Mic StandOne Mic StandApollo Live ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N)d College Basketball Tennessee at Georgetown. (N)d College Basketball Syracuse at Arkansas. (N)d NBA Basketball Denver Nuggets at Los Angeles Lakers. (N) ESPN2 36 144 209SportsNation (N) SportsCenter (N)e College Football MAC Championship -Kent State vs. Northern Illinois. From Ford Field in Detroit. (N) NFL Kickoff (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SUNSP 37 -Sport FishingThe Game 365UFC InsiderFight Sports: In 60TaylorMade: Outside the Ropes2011 XTERRA USA Championship2011 XTERRA World ChampionshipInside Israeli Bask. DISCV 38 182 278Gold Rush “Secret Weapons” Gold Rush Todd’s chief investor visits. Gold Rush “Pay Dirt: The Ultimatum” Gold Rush “Game Changer” (N) Jungle Gold A gold-mining dream. (N) Gold Rush “Game Changer” TBS 39 139 247King of QueensKing of QueensSeinfeld Seinfeld Better WorseBetter WorseBetter WorseBetter Worse “Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby” (2006) Will Ferrell. HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace MysteriesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesNancy Grace Mysteries FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236Love You, Mean ItThe SoupE! News (N) Ice Loves CocoIce Loves CocoNicki Minaj: My Nicki Minaj: My Fashion Police (N) Chelsea LatelyE! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernGhost Adventures Ghost Adventures “Union Station” Ghost Adventures (N) The Dead Files (N) The Dead Files “Blood and Gold” HGTV 47 112 229Hunters Int’lHunters Int’lHunters Int’lHunters Int’lLightmares Flea Market FlipFlea Market FlipHouse HuntersHunters Int’lHunters Int’lHunters Int’l TLC 48 183 280Four Weddings Four Weddings Say Yes: BrideSay Yes: BrideSay Yes: BrideSay Yes: BrideBrides-HillsBrides-HillsSay Yes: BrideSay Yes: Bride HIST 49 120 269Modern Marvels “Brewing” American Pickers “A Banner Pick” American Pickers “Substitute Picker” American Pickers “Where’s Aldo?” Invention USA(:31) Invention USAHow the StatesCajun Pawn Stars ANPL 50 184 282Monsters Inside Me Monsters Inside Me Monsters Inside Me (N) Raised Wild “Bird Boy of Fiji” (N) Raised Wild “Dog Girl of Ukraine” Monsters Inside Me FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveRestaurant: Impossible “Zandi’s Grill” Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveMystery DinersHealth InspectorsDiners, DriveDiners, Drive TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the Lord Sid Roth It’s SuThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesHal Lindsey The Harvest Perry StonePraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -Inside the MagicMagic Live! (Live)d NBA Basketball Brooklyn Nets at Orlando Magic. From Amway Center in Orlando, Fla. (N) Magic Live! (Live)e High School Football CIF-SS, Inland Division Final: Centennial at Vista Murrieta. SYFY 58 122 244“Dungeons & Dragons: The Book of Vile Darkness” (2011) Jack Derges. WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) Haven “Burned” (N) Deal-Dark SideDeal-Dark Side AMC 60 130 254 “Survival of the Dead” (2009) Alan Van Sprang, Kenneth Welsh. “Land of the Dead” (2005, Horror) Simon Baker, John Leguizamo. The Walking Dead Comic Book MenComic Book Men COM 62 107 249(5:58) South Park(:28) Tosh.0 The Colbert ReportDaily Show(7:59) Tosh.0 (:29) Tosh.0 (8:59) Key & PeeleTosh.0 South Park Brickleberry “Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story” CMT 63 166 327Reba “Surprise” Reba Reba Reba Reba Reba “Son-in-Law” (1993, Comedy) Pauly Shore, Carla Gugino, Lane Smith. (:15) “In the Army Now” (1994) NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer “Attacking Cujo” Monster Fish “Russian Giants” Monster Fish Australia’s Murray Cod. Monster Fish of MongoliaMan v. Monster “Amazon River Beast” Monster Fish Australia’s Murray Cod. NGC 109 186 276(5:00) Space DiveGrand Canyon SkywalkFamily Guns “Bury the Hatchet” (N) Inside the Afghanistan War Trajectory of the war in Afghanistan. Family Guns “Bury the Hatchet” SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeUnearthing Ancient Secrets Are We Alone? Alien Mummies (N) Are We Alone? ID 111 192 285Deadly Women “Beyond Suspicion” Deadly Women “Secrets and Lies” Facing EvilFacing EvilDeadly Women “Eternal Revenge” (N) Wives With Knives (N) Facing EvilFacing Evil HBO 302 300 501Crazy, Stupid24/7 PacquiaoREAL Sports With Bryant Gumbel “Knight and Day” (2010, Action) Tom Cruise, Cameron Diaz. ‘PG-13’ “The Sitter” (2011, Comedy) Jonah Hill. ‘R’ Collateral ‘R’ MAX 320 310 515(5:15) The Grudge(:45) “The Rundown” (2003, Adventure) The Rock. ‘PG-13’ “Project X” (2012) Thomas Mann. Premiere. ‘R’ Hunted “Khyber” (N) Skin to the MaxHunted “Khyber” SHOW 340 318 545(5:50) “Ransom” (1996, Suspense) Mel Gibson, Rene Russo. ‘R’ (7:55) “The Twilight Saga: Eclipse” (2010) Kristen Stewart. ‘PG-13’ “The Three Musketeers” (2011, Action) Matthew MacFadyen. ‘PG-13’ SATURDAY EVENING DECEMBER 1, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -e College Football Regional Coverage. Entertainment Tonight (N) e College Football Texas at Kansas State. (N) News at 11 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsPaid Program30 Rock “True Crime” (1999) Clint Eastwood. A reporter tries to save an innocent man from execution. NewsInside EditionChann 4 NewsFirst Baptist 5-PBS 5 -Lawrence Welk: Precious Memories Hymns, inspiration, gospel. The Tenors: Lead With Your Heart Muddy Waters & the Rolling Stones Live Austin City Limits 7-CBS 7 47 47e College Football: SEC Championship Two and Half MenMade in Jersey “Payday” (N) Criminal Minds “Hope” (DVS) 48 Hours “The Hunt for Mr. Wright” (N) Action Sports 360Two and Half Men 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneFantasy FootballLike, LoveDaryl’s HouseYourjax MusicYourJax MusicJacksonvilleI Know JaxLocal Haunts 10-FOX 10 30 30The First FamilyMr. Box Of ceTim McCarverFootball Pregamee College Football Big Ten Championship -Nebraska vs. Wisconsin. From Indianapolis. (N Subject to Blackout) Action News 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneNBC Nightly News “It’s a Wonderful Life” (1946) James Stewart. A guardian angel strengthens a man ruined by a miser. (DVS) NewsSat. Night Live CSPAN 14 210 350Washington This CommunicatorsWashington This Week WGN-A 16 239 307Law & Order: Criminal Intent Funny VideosBullseye d NBA Basketball Philadelphia 76ers at Chicago Bulls. From the United Center in Chicago. (N) WGN News at NineBones A stabbing death is investigated. TVLAND 17 106 304(5:38) RoseanneThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Welcome to Sweetie Pie’s Welcome to Sweetie Pie’s Welcome to Sweetie Pie’s Welcome to Sweetie Pie’s (N) Iyanla, Fix My Life (N) Welcome to Sweetie Pie’s A&E 19 118 265Bourne Suprm.Storage-TexasStorage-TexasStorage-TexasStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage War s(:01) Parking Wars(:31) Parking Wars HALL 20 185 312“Debbie Macomber’s Call Me Mrs. Miracle” (2010, Drama) Doris Roberts. “A Bride for Christmas” (2012) Arielle Kebbel, Andrew Walker. Premiere. “All I Want for Christmas” (2007) Gail O’Grady, Robert Mailhouse. FX 22 136 248 “Shrek Forever After” (2010) Voices of Mike Myers, Eddie Murphy. “How to Train Your Dragon” (2010) Voices of Jay Baruchel, Gerard Butler. “Role Models” (2008, Comedy) Seann William Scott, Paul Rudd. CNN 24 200 202The Situation RoomCNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents Piers Morgan TonightCNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents TNT 25 138 245(5:30) “War of the Worlds” (2005) Tom Cruise, Dakota Fanning. “Inception” (2010) Leonardo DiCaprio. Premiere. A thief enters people’s dreams and steals their secrets. (:15) “Inception” (2010) NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobVictorious (N) Marvin Marvin (N) How to Rock (N) Victorious The Nanny The Nanny Friends (:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241(5:33) Ink Master(:38) Ink Master (:42) Ink Master The artists ink Star Wars super-fans. (8:48) Ink Master “Holy Ink” (9:54) Ink Master “Buck Off” “Rocky IV” (1985) Talia Shire MY-TV 29 32 -Hogan’s HeroesHogan’s HeroesBatmanBatmanLost in Space “Hunter’s Moon” Star Trek “House of Frankenstein” (1945, Horror) Boris Karloff, Lon Chaney. DISN 31 172 290Austin & Ally Shake It Up! Good Luck CharlieGood Luck Charlie “The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause” (2006) Good Luck CharlieJessie Austin & Ally A.N.T. Farm Austin & Ally LIFE 32 108 252(5:00) “Pretty Woman” (1990) Richard Gere, Julia Roberts. “Undercover Christmas” (2003) Jami Gertz, Shawn Christian. “Love at the Christmas Table” (2012) Danica McKellar, Lea Thompson. USA 33 105 242Law & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims Unit“Indiana Jones and Crystal Skull” BET 34 124 329Family First “Lottery Ticket” (2010, Comedy) Bow Wow. A young man wins a multimillion-dollar prize. 2012 Soul Train Awards Musical celebration and performance. Not Easily Broken ESPN 35 140 206f MLS Soccer: MLS Cup College Football Scoreboard (N) e College Football ACC Championship -Florida State vs. Georgia Tech. From Charlotte, NC. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209d College Basketballe College Football Pittsburgh at South Florida. (N) SportsCenter (N) (:45) SportsCenterSportsNationSportsNation (N) SUNSP 37 -Inside the HeatFight Sports: In 60Fight Sports: In 60C-USA Showcase College Basketball Appalachian State at Missouri. Inside the HeatInside the HeatInside Israeli Bask. DISCV 38 182 278Jungle Gold “Desperate Measures” Jungle Gold A gold-mining dream. Gold Rush Todd’s chief investor visits. Gold Rush “The Ultimatum” Gold Rush “Game Changer” Gold Rush “The Ultimatum” TBS 39 139 247King of QueensKing of QueensKing of QueensKing of QueensBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryWedding Band “Time of My Life” (N) Wedding Band “Time of My Life” HLN 40 202 204Mystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesMystery DetectivesNancy Grace Mysteries FNC 41 205 360America’s News Headquarters (N) FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Justice With Judge Jeanine (N) Geraldo at Large The Journal Editorial Report E! 45 114 236(4:30) “The Women” (2008) E! News “Of ce Space” (1999, Comedy) Ron Livingston, Jennifer Aniston. Love You, Mean ItIce Loves CocoFashion Police TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods America “Twin Cities” Bizarre Foods America “New Orleans” Ghost Adventures Preston Castle. Ghost Adventures “Ohio Reformatory” Ghost Adventures Venice, Italy. Ghost Adventures HGTV 47 112 229High Low Proj.Hunters Int’lHouse Hunters Renovation Holiday Kitchen Takeover (N) Love It or List It House HuntersHunters Int’lHouse HuntersHunters Int’l TLC 48 183 280Lottery Changed My Life Crazy Christmas Lights Extreme Christmas Trees My Crazy Obsession (N) Holiday ER (N) Extreme Christmas Trees HIST 49 120 269(5:00) Marijuana: A Chronic HistoryPawn Stars Pawn Stars Mankind The Story of All of Us Genghis Khan creates a mighty empire. Pawn Stars (:31) Pawn Stars(:02) Pawn Stars(:32) Pawn Stars ANPL 50 184 282Pit Bulls and Parolees Pit Bulls and Parolees “Saving Prada” Pit Bulls and Parolees “Swamped” Pit Bulls and Parolees Pit Bulls and Parolees (N) Pit Bulls and Parolees FOOD 51 110 231The Next Iron Chef: RedemptionSugar Dome “A Dragon’s Tale” Restaurant: ImpossibleRestaurant: Impossible “Valley Inn” Restaurant: Impossible “Whistle Stop” Iron Chef America TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the Lord Gaither: Precious MemoriesIn Touch With Dr. Charles StanleyHour of Power Billy Graham Classic CrusadesChristmas With a Capital C FSN-FL 56 -Game Timed College Basketball Texas A&M at Houston. (N) College Football Oklahoma State at Baylor. (N Same-day Tape) UFC Insider SYFY 58 122 244 “Starship Troopers” (1997) Casper Van Dien, Dina Meyer. Young troops battle a vicious army of gigantic insects. “Dragon Wasps” (2012) Corin Nemec, Dominika Juillet. Premiere. “Pterodactyl” (2005, Horror) Coolio. AMC 60 130 254(5:00) “Terminator 2: Judgment Day” (1991) Arnold Schwarzenegger. “Terminator 2: Judgment Day” (1991, Science Fiction) Arnold Schwarzenegger, Linda Hamilton. “Predator” (1987, Action) COM 62 107 249(4:45) “The Hot Chick” (2002) (6:46) “Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story” (2004) Vince Vaughn. (8:47) “The 40-Year-Old Virgin” (2005) Steve Carell, Catherine Keener. (:03) Kevin Hart: Seriously Funny CMT 63 166 327(4:30) Son-in-Law(:45) “Grumpier Old Men” (1995, Comedy) Jack Lemmon, Walter Matthau, Ann-Margret. Redneck Island (N) Chainsaw Gang (N) Big Texas Heat (N) Redneck Island NGWILD 108 190 283Fish Warrior “Nile Mammoth” Dog Whisperer “Hounds From Hell” Cesar Millan: The Real StoryAnimal Intervention “Mama’s Boys” Animal InterventionCesar Millan: The Real Story NGC 109 186 276Amish: Out of Order “Amish 101” Alaska State TroopersAlaska State TroopersDoomsday PreppersDoomsday PreppersDoomsday Preppers SCIENCE 110 193 284Survivorman “Canadian Boreal Forest” Survivorman Ten Days Survivorman Ten Days Survivorman Ten Days Survivorman Ten Days Survivorman Ten Days ID 111 192 285Unusual Suspects Devil-KnowDevil-KnowDeadly Women “Ruthless Revenge” Motives & Murders “Queen of Hearts” Fatal Vows “Secrets of a Dying Man” Deadly Women “Ruthless Revenge” HBO 302 300 501(5:30) “In Time” (2011) Justin Timberlake. ‘PG-13’ “Contraband” (2012, Action) Mark Wahlberg, Ben Foster. Premiere. ‘R’ 24/7 Pacquiao “Contraband” (2012, Action) Mark Wahlberg, Kate Beckinsale. ‘R’ MAX 320 310 515(5:20) “The Thing” (2011) ‘R’ (:05) “Hanna” (2011, Action) Saoirse Ronan, Eric Bana. ‘PG-13’ Hunted “Khyber” “Project X” (2012) Thomas Mann. Premiere. ‘R’ Hunted “Khyber” SHOW 340 318 545Homeland “Two Hats” “Fright Night” (2011, Horror) Anton Yelchin, Colin Farrell. ‘R’ s Boxing Miguel Cotto vs. Austin Trout. Cotto vs. Trout, WBA junior middleweight title. (N) Badgers get redemption shot in Big Ten title gameBy NANCY ARMOURAssociated PressWisconsin is in some unfamiliar territory. No, not the Big Ten title game. The Badgers count as grizzled veterans after playing in last year’s inau-gural conference champion-ship, well acquainted with all the hype and hoopla that comes with it. A trip to the Rose Bowl isn’t so daunt-ing, either. The Badgers, after all, rang in the last two New Years in Pasadena. It’s being so, well, mediocre, that’s new for Wisconsin. Winners of the Big Ten title the last two years, the Badgers are get-ting a chance at the first three-peat in school histo-ry Saturday — by default. With Ohio State and Penn State ineligible for the post-season, it’s Wisconsin play-ing No. 14 Nebraska on Saturday for the title and a trip to the Rose Bowl. “Obviously it is different and strange this year because of our record going into this game,” said Montee Ball, who last week became major college foot-ball’s all-time touchdown leader. “But it’s not our fault what happened to the teams that can’t play in this game. We’re most definitely going to take the oppor-tunity and we’re going to run with it. We’re going to go to Indianapolis and play hard.” Wisconsin (7-5, 4-4 Big Ten) stumbled to the fin-ish of the regular season with three losses in its last four games, all in overtime. It tied for fifth in the Big Ten, and lost more than three conference games for only the second time in coach Bret Bielema’s seven seasons. Most years, that would have relegated the Badgers to a bowl named for an automotive company or bar food, played so early they’d be home in plenty of time to watch the BCS bowls from the comfort of their couches. But some-body had to represent the Leaders Division in the Big Ten title game, and without the Buckeyes and Nittany Lions, the Badgers were the best of the rest. “I didn’t set the rules with how everything has worked out. I didn’t pick the teams that were in there,” cen-ter and team captain Travis Frederick said. “This is how it’s worked out, and it’s going to come down to us and Nebraska.” To be fair, the Badgers weren’t all that far from being a good team. Possibly even a really good one. Only one of their losses was by more than three points, and that was the 21-14 OT loss to Ohio State. Wisconsin led or was tied going into the fourth quarter in three of the losses. It also played its last three games with a quarterback who had played all of three snaps — that’s snaps, not starts — since the 2009 regular-season finale. A play here, a play there, and the Badgers could be headed to Indianapolis with a far more impressive record. ASSOCIATED PRESSIn this Sept. 29 file photo, Wisconsin head coach Bret Biel ema (left) and Nebraska head coach Bo Pelini chat prio r to their game in Lincoln, Neb. With Ohio State and Penn State both i neligible for the postseason, Wisconsin will represent th e Leaders Division in the title game. The Badgers play the No. 14 Cornhuskers on Saturday in the Big Ten Champion ship.

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6B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & PUZZLES FRIDAY & SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 1, 2012 DEAR ABBY: I’m engaged to someone I love very much. I am 36 and he is 44. We get along great, but he’s in a rush to get married. It will be my first and his second. We got engaged three months ago, and he wants the wed-ding to be in February. The date he picked is his father’s birthday. My other problem is, he is always pawing at me. He always needs to be touching me or calling me his “beautiful angel.” It’s good to hear that once in a while, but not five times a day. I love being with him, but sometimes I need my own space. If I say no, he gets defensive and worried that I’m going to leave him. We spend practically every waking (and non-waking) moment together. I am almost at a breaking point. Help! -OVERWHELMED IN PENNSYLVANIA DEAR OVERWHELMED: I hope you realize that the behav-ior you are describing is not an indication of love, but of extreme insecurity. His need to constantly touch you, his defensive-ness if you say you need some space, and his fear that you will leave him WON’T CHANGE if you marry him. I am also con-cerned about the way your wedding date was chosen, because the decision wasn’t arrived at mutually. Ask yourself this: If he makes what should be joint decisions, and you have no space for yourself because of his insecurity, is this the way you want to spend a LIFETIME? These could be symptoms of an abuser. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: I’m 25, have an associate’s degree in health management, completed a CRMA (Certified Residential Medication Aide) course, and I’m now on my way to obtaining my bachelor of science in health management. It sounds like I’m head-ing toward a great future, right? My problem is I have zero confidence in myself. I’m scared to death of making mistakes as a CRMA, and equally scared of being success-ful. Everybody says how “proud” they are of me and that I’m headed toward great things, but I’m not sure I can do this. I am struggling to find self-con-fidence because if I don’t believe in myself, I won’t achieve anything. What can I do to put myself out there and take the steps I need to accomplish my goals? -NEEDS A BOOST IN MAINE DEAR NEEDS A BOOST: Self-doubt can be an asset if it causes you to strive harder to master the skills you will need in your profession. However, because you are afraid of both failure AND success, the surest way to conquer your fears would be to talk about them with a coun-selor at your school or to a psychologist. What you are dealing with is not as unusual as you may think. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: My husband insists that wearing a white T-shirt when out and about is the same as wearing a colored one with a design on it. I think he’s wearing underwear as outerwear and is being too casual. We do not live in a rural community. We are in a suburb of San Diego. Life is relaxed here, but not THAT relaxed. Do you have an opinion? -DRESSING UP, NOT DOWN DEAR DRESSING UP: I do have a thought or two on the subject. If your husband is comfortable this way, leave him alone. Because you are the one concerned with appearanc-es, continue dressing up to create the impression you want and let him dress down and suffer the consequences -if there are any, which I doubt. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: My boyfriend “Alex’s” mom is the most controlling person I have ever encountered. We only get to see each other on weekends because he lives an hour away from me. When we do see each other, it’s for one-third of the day. Alex has to spend the other two-thirds with her. I’m 22 and he is 21. He is also not allowed to stay with me. Alex has to lie to her about where he’s staying in order to be able to spend time with me. His mom has added a feature to his cellphone in order to see where he is 24/7, and would cancel his service if he refused it. I love my boyfriend unconditionally, but his mom is driving us both crazy and turning our relationship into a trio. We have tried getting her to back off, but it just makes her worse. I am at a loss as to what to do. What do you think we should do? -EXTREMELY WORRIED IN MISSISSIPPI DEAR EXTREMELY WORRIED: Frankly, you should be worried. Your boyfriend is an adult who seems to be firmly under his mother’s thumb. He is completely dependent. At 21, Alex’s activities should not be monitored, nor should he be spending two-thirds of his day with his mother. If nothing else, he should be looking for a job so he can sever the umbilical cord before it strangles him. You can’t fix this. HE has to do it. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: My former roommate and I took a short trip to Florida. We agreed we would split the hotel costs. I’d reserve the room; she would reim-burse me after the trip. She paid me a month later, and I deposited her check as soon as I could get to my bank, which was three weeks later. When the check went through, she attacked me because she said it drained her account! I apologized, but told her I was upset that she was making it seem like it was my fault. I think that if someone is low on funds, the person should be more diligent in balancing his or her checkbook. Had I known she had money problems, I would have waited to deposit her check. It has been months, and my once best friend still won’t speak to me. Was I wrong? -AT FAULT? IN KENTUCKY DEAR AT FAULT?: No, you were not. It was your friend’s responsibil-ity to make sure there were enough funds in her account to cover the check she gave you. She may be embarrassed, which is why she doesn’t want to talk to you. People who are angry at themselves some-times blame others. It’s a sign of immaturity. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: I have been dating “Kristen” for seven months. She is great as far as personality, physi-cal chemistry, similar likes and dislikes, and patience go. She is ALMOST every-thing I have ever wanted in a girl. However, I have never called her “beauti-ful,” although she has made a couple of “fishing” comments to try to get me to say it. In my eyes, that would be a lie. Kristen is attractive, but not beautiful. I have always thought that anyone I’m planning on spending the rest of my life with would be “beautiful” to ME, and I’d let her know according-ly. Your thoughts? -NOT SHALLOW IN PHOENIX DEAR NOT SHALLOW: Candidly, I think that in spite of all of her wonder-ful qualities, Kristen is not “the one” for you. And you are not “the one” for her because what she needs is validation you can’t give her. Women need to feel beautiful in the eyes of the men they love, and because you plan to spend your life with someone who is beautiful “to you,” you should both move on. HOROSCOPES DEAR ABBY ARIES (March 21-April 19): A change due to an emotional revelation will help you push forward with innovative plans for the future. Pick and choose your friends, part-ners and geographical location to suit your needs. A secret may be difficult to keep. ++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Associate with groups that have something to offer. A partnership will contribute to a more fulfill-ing lifestyle. You will learn from someone accom-plished in your field. Share what you discover and you will receive help in return. Love is in the stars. ++++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Excess will be your downfall. Refrain from making choices based on hearsay. Without knowing exactly where you stand and what’s available, you are likely to end up losing. Your past must be dealt with before you move for-ward. +++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Sharing will be what counts. Getting out with friends or a lover will spice up your life and give you a fresh look at what you can strive for in the future. Love is enhanced. A part-nership will take a serious turn. +++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Don’t put pressure on others, or you may get the same in return. Find an outlet for your stress. Begin an unusual hobby, activity or travel to an exciting destination. A break from tedious work or making personal chang-es will have a positive influence. +++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Satisfaction is what you must strive for. Show everyone what you are capable of doing and you will impress someone who has something that will help you advance further. Traveling will bring posi-tive results. ++++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Stop worrying and start doing. You can’t change the past, but you can change the present. Use your past experience to fix a wrong or to change the way you proceed now. Personal problems will develop if you put up with emotional blackmail. +++++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Don’t hesitate to pur-sue a creative dream. Your biggest hurdle to cross is your lack of belief in your capabilities. Let your tal-ent speak for itself and let your confidence grow. You will find the success you are searching for. Take a chance. +++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Dealing with partnerships will be dicey if you exaggerate. Stick to basics and be honest about the facts. Whether a per-sonal or business relation-ship, maturity and good intentions will determine the outcome. +++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Someone in a powerful position will notice you if you focus on your beliefs and your abilities. Don’t hold back if you have something to say. A partnership looks promising. Love will reign supreme. +++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Protect what you have and say little to raise suspicion. Concentrate on your home and mak-ing your surroundings more desirable and geared toward your health and wellness. Someone from your past can make a dif-ference to a choice you must make. +++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Look over what you need to complete before the year comes to a close. Spend money fixing up your place or investing in something that will ensure that you advance in the future. A promise or com-mitment will improve your lifestyle. +++++ THE LAST WORD Eugenia Last Too much togetherness may result in couple’s breakup Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com Puzzle Solutions on the next page.

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FRIDAY & SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 1, 2012 PUZZLES & COMICS LAKE CITY REPORTER 7B DILBERT BABY BLUES BLONDIE BEETLE BAILEY B.C. FRANK & ERNEST FOR BETTER OR WORSE ZITS HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH GARFIELD CELEBRITY CIPHER CLASSIC PEANUTS PUZZLE ANSWERS

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8B LAKE CITY REPORTER NASCAR FRIDAY & SATURDAY, NOV. 30-DEC. 1, 20128BNASCAR Bright future for ElliotFor Chase Elliott,the teenage son of NASCAR veteran Bill Elliott,the future –immediate and longer term – is looking aspromising as ever. When Elliott shows up at Five Flags Speedway in Pensacola,Fla.,next week tobegin preparations for the 45th annualSnowball Derby,he’ll be in the unique posi-tion of being the defending winner of one ofthe premiere short track races in America,but also still a teenager. Elliott,who will turn 17 on Wednesday, already has won some of short track racing’sbiggest events,including the Winchester 400at Winchester Speedway in Indiana and aLate Model race at North WilkesboroSpeedway.And he’s the youngest winner inthe history of the Snowball Derby,a race thathas been won by some of NASCAR’s best rac-ers including Darrell Waltrip,Donnie Allison,Pete Hamilton,Jody Ridley and Kyle Busch. Elliott has raced at Five Flags several times this summer and feels he’s in positionto contend for the win again. “I’m always excited to get to race at Five Flags,”said Elliott,one of the track’s formerchampions.“We learned some things racingthere this year,and I feel like we’ve got asgood a shot at winning as anybody.” Elliott also is anxious to see if NASCAR’s decision to lower the minimum age for driversin the Camping World Truck Series to 16 atroad courses and ovals less than 1.1 mileswill lead to some truck races for him nextyear. “I was definitely excited when I heard about that,”he said,adding that his participation inthe series would have to be approved byHendrick Motorsports,where he’s been signedas a developmental driver,and by Aaron’s,hisprimary sponsor. “It depends on whether they think it’s the right thing to do,but it’s definitely an option.” Elliott’s 2013 plans,which are uncertain at this point,also could include some ARCAevents.Burton has surgeryNASCAR driver Jeff Burton had surgery last week to alleviate symptoms of carpal tun-nel syndrome. “After feeling some recurring symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome,my physician and Idecided routine surgery would be best for thissituation,”Burton said in a release from hisRichard Childress Racing team.“There is nosuch thing as an off-season in this sport,so Iwanted to get it done as soon as possible to beready for my Caterpillar Visitors Centerappearance with Richard [Childress] earlynext month.Plus,we have many test sessionsplanned in December with the No.31Chevrolet team in preparation for the 2013season with my new crew chief LukeLambert. “I will be ready to go.”Burton is coming off two of the most disappointing seasons of his career.He hasn’t wona race since 2008,posted just two top-five fin-ishes in each of the past two seasons and fin-ished 20th and 19th in the points standings.Tragedy for gas manWWOC in Charlotte reported that Bryce Rueger,the seven-year-old son of RyanNewman’s gas man Andy Rueger,was killedlast week in an ATV accident near his homein Salisbury,N.C.A memorial fund is beingestablished. NOTEBOOK Greg Ives in at JR MotorsportsGreg Ives,who was announced this week as the new crew chief for Regan Smith at JRMotorsports,brings strong credentials to hisnew job.He was the race engineer for all fiveof Jimmie Johnson’s Sprint Cup champi-onships,and he’s been involved in racing formost of his life. His first racing experiences were as a crew member for his father Roger and brotherSteve on the short tracks of the Midwest. “We had an old barn in back of our house with a concrete pad for the car,”said Ives,a33-year-old native of Bark River,Mich.“Theearliest job I can remember was cleaning thecar.I was five or six years old,and small,andcould crawl around and clean the car.Then Iswept everything out.” From there,he eventually drove some himself,with a fair amount of success. “If I showed up,I was a threat to be fast, contending for wins and in the points chase,”he said. JR Motorsports also announced that it likely will field just one full-time car next year,asno sponsor has been signed to back ColeWhitt,who raced for JR Motorsports thisyear along with Danica Patrick,who is mov-ing to a full-time Cup ride next year. Team co-owner Dale Earnhardt Jr.is set to run a limited number of Nationwide Seriesraces for JR Motorsports next year.Patrick announces divorceNASCAR’s Danica Patrick announced on her Facebook page last week that she’s divorcing herhusband,Paul Hospenthal. ‘’I am sad to inform my fans that afterseven years,Paul and Ihave decided to amica-bly end our marriage,’’she said.‘’This isn’teasy for either of us,but mutually it hascome to this.He hasbeen an important per-son and friend in mylife and that’s how wewill remain moving for-ward.’’ Hospenthal,a physical therapist who methis future wife whiletreating her for a yogainjury,is 47.Patrick is 30. Also last week,Patrick received the 2012 Nationwide Series Most Popular Driver Award,which is determined by online voting by racefans.Townley joins Red Horse team Camping World Truck Series driver John Wes Townley said last week that he’ll be driv-ing a truck for Red Horse Racing next season.Townley,22,said he’ll essentially take over theNo.7 team that fielded trucks for John Kingand Parker Kligerman this season. King won at Daytona,and Kligerman was victorious at Talladega.Townley said hebelieves he,too,can win in the Red Horsetruck,which is owned by Tom DeLoach,a for-mer Mobil 1 executive and fellow Georgianative.DeLoach is from Statesboro,whileTownley is from Watkinsville,but it was inDeLoach’s hometown that Townley’s fatherTony and his partner Zach McLeroy foundedthe Zaxby’s restaurant chain that will sponsorTownley’s truck. John Wes Townley,who was criticized early in his career for crashing trucks fairly fre-quently,had a solid season in 2012.He failed tofinish just two races,had two top-10 finishesand eight more of 16th or better in 21 starts. “I feel like I did what I needed to do this year, which was finish races and get experience,”Townley said.“Now the goal is to go out thereand win some races,and I think I can do it.” Townley also said he’s hoping to make several Nationwide Series starts next season. NUMERICALLYSPEAKING Career poles forSprint Cup champion Brad Keselowski (NewHampshire in 2010 andCharlotte in 2011) Career lapsled in Sprint Cup for Brad Keselowski(735 this year) Nationwide Seriesvictories for Brad Keselowski Career top-five fin-ishes for Brad Keselowski (13 of themthis year)1,083 2 24 20 Jeff Burton (NASCAR photo) Danica Patrick(NASCAR photo) In addition to picking up a nice trophy and aplace in NASCAR history for winning the2012 Sprint Cup championship,Brad Keselowski is in line to collect millions of dollar s in bonus money and from other sources.Histake from NASCAR alone,which is split withhis Penske Racing team,is estimated to beabout $6 million. So what does a 28-year-old single person plan to do with that kind of cash? Keselowski said on last week’s NASCAR teleconference that one of the “toys”on his list is atank. “I’ve been looking into that really all summer long,”he said.“It all started with WallyDallenbach,who was telling me a story abouthaving one.I thought,wow,that would be awe-some.So obviously living where I do and beingaround Dale [Earnhardt] Jr.,I thought it wouldbe cool if we both got a tank and chased eachother around in the woods with them.It’s kindof our deal. “I promised myself if I won it,I would buy one whether Dale does or not.It was kind of a littlebit of motivation,I should say.” He said he’s not really into buying trophies for himself,but a tank is different. “I think a tank would be pretty cool,”he said. “I want to put one together and have some funwith it.When I’m done playing with it,I’ll justpark it in the driveway and scare off people whoaren’t supposed to be around.I don’t know.Itwill be fun either way.” He said he’ll likely try to find a vintage model.“I want to get something from World War II to Korea era,something in the ’40s to mid-’50s,era,”he said. A good-running tank shouldn’t put too much of a dent in Keselowski’s wallet.They’refor sale on military vehicle websites startingat around $250,000. As NASCAR’s newest champion,Keselowski drew plenty of notice and some criticism forappearing to have consumed several adult bev-erages before some of his post-race interviewsfrom Homestead-Miami Speedway in the hoursafter he clinched the Cup championship.But ona teleconference with reporters two days later,he expressed no regrets. “I think everybody faces their criticism no matter what you do,”he said.“You’re nevergoing to get all of the people to like somethingthat you do.It’s not possible.Someone’s alwaysgoing to dislike something you do,and you haveto roll that off your shoulders and move on.” He said that if a person remains true to himself,it’ll all work out in the long run. “I had fun,and I wanted to show that fun and enjoy it with others,”he said.“I’m more thrilledthat people enjoyed [it] than I am disappointedto questioning my path because someone elsedidn’t like it.” TV ratings for last week’s Sprint Cup season finale at Homestead-Miami Speedwaycontinued a trend of Chase races drawingfewer viewers than comparable events lastyear. The Ford EcoBoost 400 earned a 3.5 household coverage rating,averaging3,444,706 viewers,according to the NielsenCompany.Those numbers were down fromlast year’s 3.6 rating with 6.8 million view-ers. Overall,the 10 Chase races on ESPN had a rating average of 2.7 with 4.2 millionviewers,compared to a 3.1 rating and 4.763million viewers last year.Chase wrap Champ to buy big toy; downplays criticsBrad Keselowski winning the Sprint Cup title.(NASCAR photo)By RICK MINTER / Universal Uclick By RICK MINTER / Universal Uclick

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General Information In Print and Onlinewww.lakecityreporter.com Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$2504 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $.25One item per ad Under $100 Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 ServicesFLCert. Teacher with 10 yrs exp. Offering a homeshooling group in Jan. Reasonably priced. Interested parents 386-288-0954. LegalAMENDED NOTICETOWHOM ITMAYCONCERN:NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN THATTHE BOARD OF COUNTYCOMMISSIONERS OF COLUM-BIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, will conduct a public hearing on Decem-ber 6, 2012 at 7:00 p.m. in the Com-missioners Meeting at the School Board Administration Building in Lake City, Florida and will consider and determine whether or not the County will vacate, abandon, discon-tinue, renounce and disclaim any right of County, a portion of Lillian Acres, a subdivision, recorded in ORB 1021/2390, Plat Book 5, Page 108, Public Records of Columbia County, Florida; consisting of a 40 acre subdivision with a dedicated roadway particularly described as:APARCELOF LAND BEING THE NORTHWEST1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST1/4 OF SECTION 10, TOWNSHIP5 SOUTH RANGE 17 EAST, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDABEING MORE PARTIC-ULARLYDESCRIBED AS FOL-LOWS:FOR APOINTOF BEGINNING COMMENCE ATTHE NORTH-WESTCORNER OF SECTION 10, TOWNSHIP5 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND RUN NORTH 3841’36” EASTALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SECTION, ADISTANCE OF 1325.90 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 0000’17” EASTADISTANCE OF 1328.17 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 8847’19” WEST, ADISTANCE OF 1327.16 FEETTO THE WESTOF THE AFOREMENTIONED SECTION 10; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID WESTERLYLINE NORTH 0003’07” EAST, ADIS-TANCE OF 1326.00 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING. CON-TAINING 40.404 ACRES MORE OR LESS.If you have any questions, please contact the Board of County Com-missioners of Columbia County, Florida, at 386-755-4100.BOARD OF COUNTYCOMMIS-SIONERSCOLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA/s/ P. DeWitt CasonClerk of CourtColumbia County05535964NOVEMBER 23, 30, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILACTIONCASE NO.: 12-2009-CA-000304DIVISION:THE BANK OF NEWYORK MEL-LON FKATHE BANK OF NEWYORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFITOF THE ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SER-IES 2007-2Plaintiff,vs.THERON E. WATERS, et al,Defendant(s)NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated November 1, 2012 and entered in Case NO. 12-2009-CA-000304 of the Circuit Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit in and for COLUMBIACounty, Florida wherein THE BANK OF NEWYORK MELLON FKATHE BANK OF NEWYORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFITOF THE ASSET-BACKED CERTIFI-CATES, SERIES 2007-2, is the Plaintiff and THERON E. WA-TERS; CHANDRAD. WATERS; MARVYNE A. WATERS A/K/AMARVYNE C. WATERS; TEN-ANT#1 N/K/ALANITRASAPPare the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at COURTROOM ONE OF THE COLUMBIACOUN-TYCOURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the 9th day of January, 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment:LOT2 AND THE WEST1/2 OF LOT3, BLOCK D, NORTHSIDE ESTATES, ASUBDIVISION, AS PER PLATTHEREOF, RECORD-ED IN PLATBOOK 4, PAGE 18, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORI-DA..A/K/A822 NWSPRINGDALE GLENN, LAKE CITY, FL32055Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-er than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on November 5, 2012.P. DeWitt CasonClerk of the Circuit CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkNOTICEIn accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons need-ing a special accommodation to par-ticipate in this proceeding should contact the Deputy Court Adminis-trator whose office is located at 3301 East Tamiami Trail, Building L, Na-ples, Florida 33962, telephone num-ber (813) 774-8124; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD), or 1-800-955-8770 (v), via Florida Relay Service, not later than seven (7) days prior to this proceed-ing.02500408November 30, 2012December 7, 2012 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILACTIONCASE NO.: 12-2009-CA-000304DIVISION:THE BANK OF NEWYORK MEL-LON FKATHE BANK OF NEWYORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFITOF THE ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SER-IES 2007-2Plaintiff,vs.THERON E. WATERS, et al,Defendant(s)NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated November 1, 2012 and entered in Case NO. 12-2009-CA-000304 of the Circuit Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit in and for COLUMBIACounty, Florida wherein THE BANK OF NEWYORK MELLON FKATHE BANK OF NEWYORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFITOF THE ASSET-BACKED CERTIFI-CATES, SERIES 2007-2, is the Plaintiff and THERON E. WA-TERS; CHANDRAD. WATERS; MARVYNE A. WATERS A/K/AMARVYNE C. WATERS; TEN-ANT#1 N/K/ALANITRASAPPare the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at COURTROOM ONE OF THE COLUMBIACOUN-TYCOURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the 9th day of January, 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment:LOT2 AND THE WEST1/2 OF LOT3, BLOCK D, NORTHSIDE ESTATES, ASUBDIVISION, AS PER PLATTHEREOF, RECORD-ED IN PLATBOOK 4, PAGE 18, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORI-DA..A/K/A822 NWSPRINGDALE GLENN, LAKE CITY, FL32055Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-er than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on November 5, 2012.P. DeWitt CasonClerk of the Circuit CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkNOTICEIn accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons need-ing a special accommodation to par-ticipate in this proceeding should contact the Deputy Court Adminis-trator whose office is located at 3301 East Tamiami Trail, Building L, Na-ples, Florida 33962, telephone num-ber (813) 774-8124; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD), or 1-800-955-8770 (v), via Florida Relay Service, not later than seven (7) days prior to this proceed-ing.05536072November 30, 2012December 7, 2012 IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO: 2012-341-CAFRIER FINANCE, INC., a Florida Corporation 12788 U.S. Highway 90 West, Live Oak, Florida 32060Plaintiff,FREDRICK ALLEN and VERONI-CATROWELLDefendants.NOTICE OF ACTIONTO: FREDRICK ALLEN and VER-ONICATROWELL:YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a civil action has been filed against you in the Circuit Court, County of Colum-bia, State of Florida, to foreclose cer-tain real property described as fol-lows:SECTION 33: ONE ACRE OFF THE NORTH END OF LOT5 IN THE NE 1/4 OF NW1/4, COLUM-BIACOUNTY, FLORIDATOGETHER WITH: A1999 28X56 GREENHILLDOUBLEWIDE MO-BILE HOME, I.D. #FLFLX70A/B26964GH21,You are required to file a written re-sponse with the Court and serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Timothy D. Padgett, Plain-tiff’s attorney, whose address is 2878 Remington Green Circle, Tallahas-see, Florida 3230, at least thirty (30) days from the date of first publica-tion, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before serv-ice on Plaintiff’s attorney or immedi-ately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint.Dated this 5th day of Nov., 2012.CLERK OF COURTBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkSEAL05536019November 30, 2012December 7, 2012 NOTICE OFPUBLIC HEARINGCONCERNING ASPECIALEX-CEPTION AS PROVIDED FOR IN THECOLUMBIACOUNTYLAND DE-VELOPMENTREGULATIONS BYTHE BOARD OF ADJUSTMENTOF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN that, pursuant to the Colum-bia County Land Development Reg-ulations as amended, hereinafter re-ferred to as the Land Development Regulations, comments, objections and recommendations concerning the special exception as described be-low, will be heard by the Board of Adjustment of Columbia County, Florida, at a public hearing on No-vember 30, 2012 at 7:00 p.m., or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard, in the School Board Adminis-trative Complex located at 372 West Duval Street, Lake City, Florida.SE 0522, a petition by Louis Thomas Spell, as agent for Eva E. Harrison, to request a special exception be granted as provided for in Section 4.5.7 of the Land Development Reg-ulations to allow for heavy equip-ment and related machinery sales Legaland automotive repair and repair of agricultural equipment within an AGRICULTURAL3 (A-3) zoning district and in accordance with a site plan dated November 15, 2012, and submitted as part of a petition dated November 15, 2012, to be located on property described, as follows:Aparcel of land lying within Sec-tions 30 and 31, Township 4 South, Range 17 East, Columbia County, Florida.Being more particularly de-scribed, as follows: Commence at the Southwest corner of the Southeast 1/4 of said Section 30, said corner al-so being the Point of Beginning; thence North 0011'51" East, along the West line of said Southwest 1/4 of Section 30, a distance of 1,598.78 feet to the Southwesterly right-of-way line of Interstate 75 (State Road 93); thence South 2604’17” East, along said Southwesterly right-of-way line of Interstate 75 (State Road 93) a distance of 2,476.03 feet; thence North 8134’08” West 602.55 feet; thence North 8455’38” West508.63 feet to the East right-of-way line of Southwest Wester Drive; thence North 0317’48” East, along said East right-of-way line of South-west Wester Drive, 427.63 feet to the North right-of-way line of said Southwest Wester Drive; thence North 8847’17” West, along said North right-of-way line of Southwest Wester Drive, 19.99 feet to the said West line of the Southeast 1/ 4 of Section 30; thence North 0352’16” East, along said West line of the Southeast 1/4 of Section 30, a dis-tance of 64.79 feet to the Point of Beginning.Containing 26.07 acres, more or less. The public hearing may be continued to one or more future dates.Any in-terested party shall be advised that the date, time and place of any con-tinuation of the public hearing shall be announced during the public hear-ing and that no further notice con-cerning the matter will be published.At the aforementioned public hear-ing, all interested parties may appear to be heard with respect to the spe-cial exception.Copies of the special exception are available for public inspection at the Office of the County Planner, Coun-ty Administrative Offices, 135 Northeast Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida, during regular business hours.All persons are advised that if they decide to appeal any decision made at the above referenced public hear-ing, they will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such pur-pose, they may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the tes-timony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons need-ing a special accommodation or an interpreter to participate in the pro-ceeding should contact Lisa K. B. Roberts, at least seven (7) days prior to the date of the hearing.Ms. Rob-erts may be contacted by telephone at (386)758-1005 or by Telecommu-nication Device for Deaf at (386)758-2139.05536030NOVEMBER 30, 2012 100Job Opportunities05534241NOWHIRING Cashiers & Baggers forHigh Springs fruit & gift stores. Benefits avail: health, dental, & vacation. Apply in person: Florida Citrus Center(Chevron) 18603 NWCR 236, High Springs (exit 404 & I-75) 05536033Administrative Assistant White Springs, Florida Verifiable job history. Strong computer skills. Able to be trained in our specialty. Able to perform without constant supervision. Must be flexible and team player. Great communication skills. Must want to work for a stable company. POSITION NEEDS TO BE FILLED IMMEDIATELY Please email resume to hr@speced.org 1 TEMPORARYFarm Worker Needed. Employer: Zent Farm LLC – Lexington, KY. Attend to horses. Duties to include, but not limited to: assisting in delivery & care of new born foals; administering vaccinations & medications; cleaning and maintaining animal housing; and general farm maintenance. Employment Dates: 01/16/2013 – 11/16/2013. $9.38 Hourly Wage. Worker guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours. Tools provided at no cost. Free housing provided to non-commuting workers. Transportation & subsistence reimbursed when 50% of contract is met. Random drug testing may be done after hire at the employer’s expense. Apply for this job at the nearest Florida One Stop Career Center or call 386-755-9026 and reference job order KY0469451. CDLClass A Truck Driver Flatbed exp. for F/TSE area. 3 years exp or more. Medical benefits offered. Contact Melissa or Sandy@ 386-935-2773 EXP. TRAINER: Responsible for Teaching individuals about the Judicial system. Associates degree, Background and reference checks, and valid DLreq’d. PT. E-mail resume to jshaw@itmflorida.com SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 100Job OpportunitiesMechanic needed at Fla.Rock & Tank Lines In White Springs. Diesel exprnc reqr'd in maintenance & repair of tractor trailers. 45-50hrs/wk Class A CDLlicense preferred. Excellent Benefits! email: mcomer@patriottrans.com or fax 904-858-9008 Mechanic needed for general semi-truck and tire repairs. Steady employment with benefits. Salary dependent on experience. Must have own hand tools. Please contact Greg @ 755-7700 Mechanic needed with tools and experience. Southern Specialize Truck & Trailer. 386-752-9754 Night Clerk Needed. Permanent Part Time, 12-8am. Two days a week. Apply in Person. No Calls Please. America’s Best Value Inn. 3835 West US Hwy 90, Lake City 120Medical Employment05535945Gainesville Women’s Center ForRadiology Arlene Weinshelbaum, M.D. EXP. MAMMOGRAPHY TECH wanted full time or part time,for private Radiology office. AART& Mammography certification req. Fax resume to: Tracy: (352)331-2044 05536058RN/LPN/C.N.A Full Time RN Unit Manager Avalon Healthcare Center is currently accepting applications for the part time positions of RN/LPN/C.N.Aand Full Time RN Unit Manager Please apply at Avalon Healthcare and Rehabilitation Center. 1270 S.W. Main Blvd. Lake City, Florida 32025 or fax resume to 386-752-8556 EOE 05536060Executive Nursing Director The Florida Department of Veterans Affairs – Jenkins Domiciliary has an immediate opening for an Executive Nursing Director. All applicants must hold a Florida R.N. license and be certified in C.P.R. Requirements for all candidates include a strong clinical background, good communication abilities, and excellent computer skills. Ideal candidates will have nursing management experience. Apply on-line: https://peoplefirst.myflorida.co m/logon.htm Or call Amelia Tompkins for more information at 386-7580600 x1009 Req #50000024 Closing Date 12/10/2012 EEO/AAE 05536063Medical Billing Full-time position for a medical office. Experience in medical coding and billing required. Excellent salary based on experience. Send resume in confidence to: mafaisal05@yahoo.com or fax to 386-758-5987 05536076The Health Center of Lake City Has an opening for RN In the Rehab Unit 7PM-7AM Excellent Salary EOE/ADA/Drug Free Workplace Apply in person or send resume to: 560 SWMcFarlane Avenue Lake City, FL32025 05536078Busy Nursing Facility has an opening for RN UNITMANAGER Full-Time Position Great Benefits Mail Credentials & Resume to: RN Unit Manager PO Box 869 Lake City, FL32055 EOE/ADA Drug Free Workplace DIET AR Y MANAGER Needed CDM, Chef, LTC, 2 years experience preferred Must be able to manage large staff and oversee daily food preparation for a 180 bed SNF. Full time with excellent benefits. E-mail resume to Greg Roberts: groberts@gulfcoasthealthcare.com or fax to: (386)362-4417. Live Oak, FLEOE/V/D/M/F Exp. CAP or Licensed Mental Health Professional for counseling and assessments in an outpatient SAtreatment program. Ref. Req'd. PT Email resume to bsmith@itmflorida.com F/T LPN or equivalent needed for family practice office. Must have pharmacology exp. Fax resume to 386-487-1232. GREATOPPORTUNITY•Full Time Experienced RN’s, LPN’s 7a-7p & 7p-7a•Full Time Experienced C.N.A’s All Shifts Apply in person at Suwannee Health Care & Rehab. 1620 Helevenston Street S.E. Live Oak, FL32064 EOE/m/f/d/v 120Medical EmploymentP/THousekeeper Needed Occasional Nights And Weekends. Fax Resume to 386-487-1232 140Work Wanted Experienced House/Office Cleaner Looking for Clients. References Available upon request. Contact for information 904-504-2620 240Schools & Education05535484Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class12/24/2012• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-11/05/12• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies American Bulldog Puppy $100 To the right home Contact 386-466-7662 Approx 7-8 mths old Red Bone Coonhound Free to the right home. 386-466-7662 New Igloo Dog house. Med size, $50.00 Contact 386-466-5022 PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. Yorkie-Poo puppy, Playful and Smart. Ready December 1st. $300-600 386-365-7002. 401Antiques 1950’s dresser, 63” high, 19 deep, Lrg mirror 38x38, 2 small mirrors on base for storage. 4 drawers on bottom. $175. 365-3730 407Computers DELLCOMPUTER $100.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 408Furniture King Size Mattress, box spring, frame, head board and foot board. $200 obo. 386-984-7586 420Wanted to Buy 2BR/1BA$600/MO & $575 Sec. Dep. Lovely, Private, re-done CR 242 West of RT47 386-365-7193 or 867-6319 430Garage Sales 11/30-12/1, 8-1 Misc Baby items, kids clothing/shoes, baby items, toys, furn, HH, adult clothing. Woodcrest Sub. Woodview Way DEC 1, 8am Noon, Rain Cancels US 90Wto Pinemount Rd (252) approx 7 miles turn Rt on 29th Rd. Alittle bit of everything. Estate Sale Sat. 12/1, 7-?, 198 SW Azalea Place off Hwy. 47. Lots of Christmas, hshld. & crafts. Some catering supplies & lots of misc. Fri & Sat 8 am to Noon, 297 SE Eloise Ave. Tools, bicycles, kids clothes, HH goods, too much to mention. Multi Family 12/1 8am-? No Early Birds. 441N turn Rt on Gum Swamp Rd, 4.8 miles. Christmas Items and More! PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. Sat 12/1 8am-1pm, Furn. Jewelry, HH goods, Clothing, shoes, children’s items. 1105 14th Ave, Wellborn, FL Sat, Sun, Mon 8 am-? Furn., Tools, Clothes, HH items, 5’Plants, Decor & More. 1259 Nw Turner Ave SAT. 12/1, 8am-2pm, 405 E Duval St. Look For signs. Clothing, Furniture, & a variety of quality items. Sat. Dec 1, 8am-? Large 3 family moving sale. 328 SWWoodcrest Drive, L.C. Alittle bit of everything Sat. December 1st, 7am-Noon Russwood Estates off Troy Rd. Multi Family Too Much to Mention. Must See! Saturday only 12/1, 7am -? Multi family yard sale. Lake City Country Club. Next to Club House.

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10B LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDFRIDAY& SATURDAY, NOV. 30-DEC. 1, 2012 2006 Toyota Tundra SR-5Crew cab, Class 3 Tow Package, cruise, power windows, seats five. 152,000 miles.$7,800 386-365-1901 430Garage Sales Saturday, Dec 1st 7:30 am to ? 2 Homes 90 WCypress Lakes Lots Of Stuff 440Miscellaneous 05535950GUNSHOW: 12/01 &12/02 @ The Columbia County Fairgrounds, Hwy 247 Lake City. Admin. $5 Sat 9am4pm, Sun 9am-3pm. Info: 386-325-6114 75 ft. Antenna Tower w/guy wires. On ground-you disassemble. $125. Call 386-497-2592 Florida Hand picked Grapefruits & Tangerines. Fresh off the tree. $5 for a grocery bag. Contact 386-344-4026 Free To a small church that can use 13 pew cushions 10 ft long, good cond., olive green color. Also, 16 choir robes, olive green color. Call 386-497-2592 Pr. Of patio doors, all metal w/ full thermal glass, snap in grilles and sliding screen door. No frame. $50. Call 386-497-2592 Three Poulan chain saws Need Tune up. $100 for all. Call 386-497-2592 450Good Things to EatThe Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans 2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024 Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville 386-963-4138 or 961-1420 630Mobile Homes forRent2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $450. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 2 BR/1BA $475/mth. Located in center of Lake City Close to Everything !!! 305-984-5511 or 386-344-0830 2 BR/2BASW, Completly furnished, carport, shed, located on 41st Dr., $600 mo.,+ Util. $150 Dep. 935-2461 3 BR/2 BA, Doublewide in Lake City, $700 mo. Call Linda 386-623-0295 Clean 2br/1ba partially furnished Lots of trees on Turner Rd. Leave message if no answer. 386-752-6269 Mobile Homes for rent in White Springs & Ft. White. Contact 386-623-3404 Quiet Country Park 3br/2ba $525. Very clean NO PETS! References & Deposit required 386-758-2280 Very nice 3bd/2ba on 1 ac, close to Westside Elem. No pets, $650 mth, $375 dep. Avail Now. Contact 386-365-7532 after 5 pm WATERTOWN AREA 3br/2ba DW, Handicap accessible, $650 mth, $500 dep. Call 386-344-0144, 386-344-5791 640Mobile Homes forSale2 MFG HOMES on 5 ACRES! Great for 2 families in Godbold Acres west of Lake City $79,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCY INC. 755-5110 #81421 2013 DOUBLEWIDE $33,995 inc. set-up, trim-out & A/C Call 386-288-8379. 3BR/2BA28X64 in a great location, a lot of upgrades, fireplace. Only $2,500 down $399 a month. Call Paula at 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com 5 LIKENew Mobile Homes!!! For under $30,000. MUSTSEE Call John T. 386-752-1452 BANK REPO 3BR/2BADoublewide ’09 Excellent condition. Only $999 down $377 a month. Call Paula 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com CLOSE TO VAMED CTR! 3BR/2BAw/beautiful interior, new CH&A$59,900 DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #81428 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #75661 Must be 55+, Manufacture home, 1 ac, fireplace, laundry, open & bright $79,900. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 EASTSIDE VILLAGE 2BR/2BAw/lg kitchen, open floor plan $79,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #80972 HALLMARK REALESTATE What a Deal! 2003 3/2 MH over 1600 sqft,in Trenton, .92 ac ONLY case # 091-379757 MLS# 82117 Robin Williams 386-365-5146 LIVE OAK! Cute home in city limits; 3BR/1BA& 1,294 SqFt $49,500 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #81410 MUSTSEE 2013 2x6 walls, R30 insulation, OSB wrap, house wrap, real wood cabinets, and thermal pain windows. Payment $399 per month call John T386-752-1452. Palm Harbor Stilt Homes Waterfront Beach, 34 Years Experience www.plantcity.palmharbor.com John Lyons 800-622-2832 x210 Poole Realty 3/2 MH, fireplace, screened back porch, storage shed and all the amenities necessary for a relaxing lifestyle, Irvin Dees, 208-4276. MLS 82226 WANTED…CASH PAID for your Mobile Home, Singlewide or Doublewide flood homes welcome. Call 386-288-8379 640Mobile Homes forSaleWOODGATE VILLAGE Move-in ready! Open 3BR/2BA floor plan on nice shaded lot $49,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC 755-5110 #82259 WOODGATE VILLAGE Nice 3BR/2BADWMH w/fenced yd, workshop; $39,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCY, INC 755-5110 #79078 650Mobile Home & Land2br, 2ba, 3.51 acres. 1512 sqft, nice affordable DW. Perfect Rental. Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473 MLS #882216 $65,000 Great Value 24 acres, 3/2 DWMH open floor plan, in ground pool. MLS 79000. Poole Realty $115,000 Nelda Hatcher. Call 688-8067 Hallmark Real Estate Deer & turkey roam, 3000 sqft brick home, detached garagesworkshops on 18 ac. MLS #81005 Ginger Parker 386-365-2135 Out of State owner, Anxious to sell. Nice 2br/2ba 1996 DW, Energy Efficient, 3/4 frnshd, 3 yr old roof, 1/2 ac lot in Oak Wd subdv in Live Oak $39,900 or best resonable offer. Call 309-645-2659 OwnerFinanced 3/22.5 ac.River Access. Small down $625 mo 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 705Rooms forRent RV for Rent $400 mth utilities included, Avail now. Contact 386-497-3524 or 386-288-9110 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent1BR APT. Downtown Location, Clean. New Carpet $450 mo, plus Security. NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456 2 bedroom / 1 Bath Apts for rent in Live Oak. Call for price. Contact 386-623-3404 & 386-362-9806 2BR/2BAw/garage 5 minutes from VAhospital and Timco. Call for details. 386-365-5150 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Amberwood Hills Apts. Private Patio area. Beautiful yard. Washer/dryer hkup. Free water & sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special. 386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com Brandywine Apartments Now Renting 1, 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-752-3033 W. Grandview Ave. Equal Housing Opportunity TDD Number 1-800-955-8771 BRANFORD VILLAS 386-935-2319 2br/1ba Apts. Now available.$570. mo. TDD number 1-800-955-8771 Equal Housing Opportunity Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2 mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet Friendly. Pool laundry & balcony. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A$530 month $530 deposit. No pets. 386-344-2170 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Greentree Townhouse Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free water & sewer. Balcony & patio. Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com Redwine Apartments Pets welcome. with 5 complexes, we have a home for you. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 Wayne ManorApts. Spacious 2bedroom washer/dryer. Behind Kens off Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 www .myflapts.com WindsorArms Apartments. Move in! 2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free 200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent2BR, 1/2 acre, Fenced, Close-in, Huge Den, Carport, Smoke Free, $800 mo. App & Ref Req’d Short Term Avail 386-758-9824 2br/1ba $575 mo. + sec., 4mi S. Lake City. Clean & Quiet 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 3bd/2ba Lots of Natural Light. CH/A, $1,400 month & $1,400 deposit. Fenced in back yard. Contact 386-344-2170 3br/1.5ba. Very clean, Brick great area w/bonus room. Carport, shed & Fenced (privacy) back yard. $825. mo $825. dep. Ref’s req’d. (941)920-4535 ALandlord You Can Love! 3br/1.5ba, Eat in Kitchen, CH/A, 2 car carport $750 mth + dep 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Avail. for Rent 1206 McFarlane Ave. 3 BR/2 BAhouse. Smoke Free and No Pets allowed. $850 a mo. $500 dep. Call for appt. 904-813-8864. 750Business & Office RentalsCk out this Awesome Deal.Let’s talk Fort White, Newly Remodled. Multi use Comm Prop. Approx 850sqft. Elec & water incl. Free WFI & yard Maint. High Traffic Area $725mth 941-924-5183. ForRent orLease : Former Doctors office, Former professional office & Lg open space: avail on East Baya Ave. Competitive rates. Weekdays 386-984-0622 evenings/weekends 497-4762 Office or Retail Space. Many to choose from. Tom Eagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 805Lots forSale Beautiful lot on Suwannee. Property features stairway to dock, on Suwannee. MLS# 78842, $35,000 Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473 Results Realty Charming, like new, well Maintainted 3br, 2b, split floor plan, Corner lot. REMAX Missy Zecher 623-0237 MLS# 81632 $100,000 Custom genesis modular home, finest amenities, lg oaks, custom drapery, f/p, fine detail throughout. RemaxMissy Zecher 623-0237 MLS 81634 $299,000 Great family home, 3/2 recently upgraded, great location. REMAX PROFESSIONALS Missy Zecher 623-0237 MLS# 81683 $75,000 HALLMARK REAL Estate 2.68 acres homes only. Gorgeous neighborhood, Deed restricted. $34,000. Owner Fin. MLS# 80588. Tanya Shaffer 386-397-4766 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #76668 $32,000 Must be 55+, Buildable lot for site built homes only. In Forest Country. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #80401 $60,000. Must be 55+ 130x750 right on Suwannee, Beautiful lot, minutes from Royal Springs, Denise Bose 752-5290 Nice 2 acre lot in Timberlake s/d. New Owner will have fishing rights. MLS #79025 Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473 $13,500 Nice vacant lot in Desirable River Community, MLS #73268 $15,000 Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert397-3473 PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. REMAX PROFESSIONALS Missy Zecher 623-0237. 25 acre parcel, Corner lot, many possibilities. MLS 77720 $175,000 Spacious 4br, split floor plan, separate Living & family rm, gas f/p, a true pleasure to view. REMAX Missy Zecher 623-0237. MLS 81472 $237,000 810Home forSale Access Realty Gorgeous views 3bd/3ba on Lake Montgomery. Elevator, fishing dock & jacuzzi. MLS 81438 $249,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access RealtySpacious 4 bd/3ba Cypress Lake w/ 3643 sqft 1.25 acres on lake. Vaulted ceilings. MLS 81314 $279,900. Patti Taylor386-623-6896 Access RealtyTwo story 1895 Victorian house w/ electrical upgrades throughout. double -deck porches, MLS 71594 $149,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Affordable 4/2 on 10 acres in Bell. Home features over 2,200 heated sqft. MLS# 76585, Results Realty $67,500. Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Eastside Village Adult community, Great location, community pool Elaine Tolar 755-6488 MLS 74823, $84,900 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Emerald Forest repaired Brick home 3b, 2ba, Lg recreation rm, fireplace, MLS 82021 $134,900 Sherry Ratliff 365-8414 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Exceptional home on 5 ac, 3200 sf 4b, 2.5ba. Lots of storage, 3 out buildings. Elaine Tolar 755-6488 MLS 80325 $287,500 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Hallmark Real Estate 4.3 acres on the Santa Fe River. Wooded. Natures lover’s paradise. Paved Rd frontage, septic. MLS 81946. Ron Feagle 386-288-2901 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81958-, $115,000. Must be 55+, 3br/2ba, Site Built w/ lots of room, split plan mstr suite, FL. Rm. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81959 Must be 55+, 2br/2ba, $79,900. Site Built Home w/eat in kitchen, laundry rm, scrn porch. Denise Bose @ 752-5290 810Home forSale On Suwannee River, 4 acres, Needs some elbow grease, 3br, 3058 sqft, beautiful view, Poole Realty MLS 82075. Call Glenda McCall $299,900 Private Estate on 39 + ac, city limits. 6br, 3.5ba, 3 fireplaces, much more.MLS76111 Mary Brown Whitehurst 965-0887 $994,000. Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Reduced, 6500 plus sqft home boasts of oversized rooms, 6br, 3.5ba to many amenities to mention. Call Prell Gwinn, Poole Realty MLS 80949 $280,000 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, Golfers Dream 3B,2B formal living & dining, cover back porch. MLS 81110 $189,000 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, South Oaks C/C, 3Br or 2Br & den, 2Ba over looking 9th hole, fenced backyard & more MLS 81191 $179,000 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, Beautiful Mountainside 3b,2ba, 1662sqft, .45 ac. open floor plan, so much more MLS 80447 $144,900 Terrific home on 5+ acres. 3br, 2.5ba, large kitchen, covered deck. MLS 81630 $199,000 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Elaine Tolar 755-6488 Unique home with 2800 sqft, large upstairs game room, on 1.37 acres in Live Oak, Poole Realty MLS 82214 $67,500. 362-4539 820Farms & Acreage10 acres with well/septic/pp (not guar); $300 dwn; $580 a mth. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com Access Realty10 acre square tract, High & Dry, OF Avail. w/ 25% down. Convenient Location MLS 81258$39,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access Realty43.64 acres wooded acreage in N.Columbia County. Scenic & Private. MLS 74429 $89,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Hallmark Real Estate Hunters Paradise! 3/2 brick, over 1700 sqft on 10 acres, 24x24 barn, fruit trees. MLS #80851 Ginger Parker 386-365-2135 830Commercial Property05536046Receivership Sale Soneet R. Kapila, Receiver Corbitt Manufacturing Company, Inc. Lake City, FL3 parcels Approx. 55 acres Vacant Industrial & Residential Site Zoned Industrial and Residential Rural Lake City 2 Parcels Approx. 3 acres Vacant Commercial Property Zoned Commercial Intensive Email: blombardo@kapilaco.com or call: 954/712-3185 Industrial warehouse7+ acres fenced 17,000 sq ft Barn $1,500 mo. TomEagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 930Motorcycles 2006 Honda Shadow Aero $3,900 Contact 386-438-9105 940Trucks 2006 Toyota Tundra SR-5, Crew Cab, Class 3 Tow Package. Cruise, power windows, Seats Five. 152,000 miles, $7,800. 386-365-1901 nr 5 a week days Lake City ReporterADVERTISE YOUR Job Opportunities in the Lake City Reporter Classifieds. Enhance Your Ad with Your Individual Logo For just pennies a day. Call today, 755-5440. PublishedMonthlybythe Lake City Reporter