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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01924

Material Information

Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 11-29-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01967

Related Items

Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01924

Material Information

Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 11-29-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01967

Related Items

Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comFormer Lake City Police Department Capt. John Blanchard, who resigned earlier this year amid a departmental investigation, violated LCPD professional standards by accepting gifts and cash, an internal LCPD report said. The findings from the investigation were released Wednesday and indicate Blanchard violated two departmental poli-cies by accepting gifts from a former crime victim he befriended. The report said he had engaged in “unbecoming conduct” that could “adversely affect the morale or efficiency of the department.” The report also said Blanchard violated the department’s policy on accepting gratuities. The policy states that no employee “shall solicit or accept any gift/gratuity or anything of value including a loan, reward; and nor shall an employee accept any gift which is defined as anything accepted by person or indirectly for that person’s benefit and for which equal or greater consideration (pay-ment) is not given. Gifts can include real property or the use of real property, food, beverage, dues, fees and tickets or plants or flowers, personal services for which a fee is normally charged by the provider or Opinion ................ 4APeople.................. 2A Advice & Comics ......... 3B Puzzles ................. 4B TODAY IN PEOPLE Pitt frets about time. COMING FRIDAY Local news roundup. 72 46 Mostly sunny WEATHER, 2A Lake City ReporterTHURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2012 | YOUR COMMUNIT Y NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | 75¢ LAKECITYREPORTER.COM CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 138, No. 217 1 Officer’s conduct ‘unbecoming’ LCPD ex-captain Blanchardviolated department policyon taking gifts, report says. CONDUCT continued on 6A NAACP continued on 3A Blanchard A Christmas greeting JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterA pedestrian walks past the Lake City Reporter Christmas card Wednesday afternoon posted at Lake DeSoto. The Lake C ity-Columbia County Chamber of Commerce sponsored the promotion, in which local bus inesses wish residents Merry Christmas and Happy New Year on signs posted around the downtown lake. The cards will be up until Christmas. Statebranchto run NAACPelection Vote suspended until December after complaint.By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comThe Columbia County NAACP branch local elec-tion has been suspended and will be conducted by state or national representatives in December, according to Debra White, second vice president of the branch. The election was suspended after a complaint was filed with the Florida State Conference of the NAACP, according to an email provided by White. The complaint is said to cen-ter on “violation of process” regarding the local branch’s Nominating Committee. Local NAACP officials did not return calls seeking fur-ther information or comment. Dale R. Landry, president of the Tallahassee branch NAACP and fourth vice president of the Florida State Conference NAACP, said it was an internal matter and declined comment on the complaint. Members of the local NAACP chapter were provided with a copy of the email Nov. 19 where local NAACP presi-dent John Mayo announced the election was suspended. Adora Obi Nweze, president of the Florida State Conference of the NAACP, authorized the suspension of the election after consult-ing with the national office and after discussing the issue with Mayo and Landry. The e-mail said she suspended the election “to protect the voting rights of the members of the branch.” An e-mail from Landry to White said 10 days’ notice will be provided to all mem-bers of the branch notifying them of the new election date which is slated to take place in December. On Monday Nov. 19, White sent a memorandum to Landry explaining the issue at hand. The memorandum read:“I was contacted by State Representatives of NAACP on Nov. 16 and Nov. 19, inform-ing me that the election scheduled for the Columbia County Branch NAACP on Nov. 19 has been canceled and will be conducted by state or national representatives at a later time,” White wrote. “As instructed I have contacted officers of our local branch and requested the branch Republicans, Dems seem ready to give ground as ‘fiscal cliff’ deadline nearsBy DAVID ESPOAP Special CorrespondentWASHINGTON — The White House and a key congressional Democrat hinted at fresh concessions on taxes and cuts to Medicare and other government benefit programs Wednesday as bargaining with Republicans lurched ahead to avoid the year-end “fiscal cliff” that threatens to send the economy into a tailspin. Increasing numbers of rank-and-file Republicans also said they were ready to give ground, a boost for House Speaker John Boehner and other party leaders who say they will agree to higher tax revenues as part of a deal if it also curbs benefit programs as a way to rein in federal deficits. “I’ll go anywhere and I’ll do whatever it takes to get this done,” President Barack Obama said as he sought to build pressure on Republicans to accept his terms — a swift renewal of expiring tax cuts for all but the highest income earners. “It’s too impor-tant for Washington to screw this up,” he declared. For all the talk, there was no sign of tangible progress on an issue that marks a first CLIFF continued on 3ACredit card thieves sought Trees, trees and more treesJASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterHaven Lee (left), of Lake Butler, assists Freddy Patterson in searching for the perfect Christmas tree while looking at a 7-foot Fraser fir from Spruce Pine, N.C., on Wednesday. ‘ When we were younger, we used to go out and cut down cedars,’ Patterson said. ‘Christmas ain’t nothing lik e it was.’ By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comThe Columbia County Sheriff’s Office is asking the public for assistance as agen-cy detectives work to solve a credit card theft. According to Columbia County Sheriff’s Office reports, the theft occurred Oct. 31, when the victim’s credit card was stolen from his vehicle. THIEVES continued on 3A

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CORRECTION In a story on page 1A of Wednesdays paper, it was incor rectly reported that state Rep. Elizabeth Porter will be starting her third term in office in 2013. She will start her second term. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Hall-of-Fame sportscaster Vin Scully is 85. Former French President Jacques Chirac is 80. Blues singer-musician John Mayall is 79. Actress Diane Ladd is 77. Composer-musician Chuck Mangione is 72. Pop singer-musician Felix Cavaliere (The Rascals) is 70. AROUND FLORIDA Feds seek delay for water rules TALLAHASSEE Environmental groups are opposing another delay for new Florida water pollu tion rules designed to stop algae blooms from chok ing state waters. They argued in court papers filed Wednesday in Tallahassee that federal law doesnt permit delay ing a Friday deadline on grounds cited by the Environmental Protection Agency. The federal agency wants a 120-day delay to continue talks with the Florida Department of Environmental Protection on its proposed alternative the EPAs rules. U.S. District Judge Robert Hinkle approved similar requests in the past, but in June he said a postponement until Nov. 30 would be the last. State officials as well as business, agriculture and utility interests support the states proposal and oppose the federal rules, arguing they would be too costly. Environmentalists say the state rules would be too weak. Lottery winner death trial starts TAMPA Prosecutors say the woman on trial for killing a Florida lottery winner swindled the barely literate man out of nearly $1.5 million before shooting him and burying his body in her backyard. Opening statements were given in a Tampa courtroom Wednesday in the trial of Dorice Dee Dee Moore. Shes accused of killing Abraham Shakespeare in 2009. Her lawyer said most of the evidence against his client is circumstantial and that there is nothing tying Moore to the gun used to kill Shakespeare. Shakespeare won $30 million in the Florida lot tery in 2006. His decom posed body was found under a concrete slab, bur ied in the back of Moores home in January 2010. The trial is expected to last two weeks. Autopsies reveal boys drowned CLEARWATER A medical examiner has determined two boys killed in a murder-suicide involv ing their mother drowned. The Tampa Bay Times reports the deaths of 9year-old Zander Brown and his 5-year-old brother Zayden have been ruled homicides. Their 34year-old mother Dawn Brown committed sui cide by hanging herself from a ceiling fan in their Clearwater home. The Times reported the medical examiner found unusually high levels of diphenhydramine, a chem ical compound found in sleep medications, in the boys blood. The drug was ruled a contributing condi tion in their deaths. The boys father, Murphy Brown, found them dead in bed when he returned home Sept. 22. Suspect shot outside store PALM BAY A police officer shot an armed rob bery suspect outside a Walgreens drug store. Florida Today reported the shooting happened late Tuesday after police received a call about a masked man threatening the pharmacist. Arriving police officers saw the suspect running from the store and shots were fired. Authorities said the sus pect was airlifted to a hos pital. There was no word on his condition. The newspaper reported painkillers and cash were taken from the store. Thought for Today Statistics can prove anything even the truth. Sir Noel Moynihan, British physician and writer (1916-1994) Nearing 50, Pitt frets about time NEW YORK T he face is hardly wrinkled and the long blond locks appear unchanged, but Brad Pitt, who will turn 49 in December, is increasingly preoccupied with the passage of time and the thought that his rarefied place in movies is fleeting. Its now been more than 20 years since Pitt broke out as the heartthrob of Thelma & Louise. While nothing has diminished his status as one of the few genuine movie stars on the planet, Pitt says hes now working as if an expiration date lurks. Im definitely past halfway, says Pitt. I think about it very much as a father. You just want to be around to see (your children) do everything. If I have so many days left, how am I filling those days? Ive been agonizing over that one a bit like I never have before. But that sense of urgency has helped fuel some of Pitts best, most daring work, including his new film, Killing Them Softly. In the adaption of George V. Higgins 1974 crime novel, Cogans Trade, Pitt plays a hit man operating in a shab by underworld of image-conscious gangsters. As he approaches 50, Pitts career longevity even surprises him. Its amazing Ive stuck with this this long because Im not usually like that. I hit the road, says Pitt. Exploring within it has been the thing thats kept me in it. Woman locked up in Alec Baldwin stalking NEW YORK Police surprised a Canadian actress accused of stalk ing Alec Baldwin by locking her up again Tuesday at the close of an oth erwise-routine court appearance. Authorities wouldnt discuss why Genevieve Sabourin was re-arrested in Manhattan. But a judge had ordered her to stay away from the Rock star, and there were recent media reports that she had posted angry tweets about his new wife. Defense attorney Rick Pasacreta confirmed his client was back in custody, but he said he hadnt been informed of any new charges. ABC celebrating Dick Clark on New Years Eve NEW YORK ABC is turning its first New Years Eve without Dick Clark in four decades partly into a celebration of the longtime showbiz impresarios life. Clark, who did the first annual New Years Rockin Eve special on ABC in 1972, died at age 82 in April. Fergie and Jenny McCarthy will be hosts of a two-hour tribute to Clark that will air at 8 p.m. ET on New Years Eve. ABC said Wednesday that Ryan Seacrest will host the countdown show from Times Square, with Taylor Swift, Carly Rae Jepsen, Neon Trees, Flo Rida and Pitbull among the musi cal guests. Seacrest hosted the past few years with Clark making short appearances. A stroke had dimin ished Clarks communications skills. Al Green, Helen Reddy and Three Dog Night performed at Clarks first New Years special. Wednesd ay: Afternoon: 4-8-0 Evening: N/A Wednesd ay: Afternoon: 4-0-2-3 Evening: N/A Tuesd ay: 2-4-7-10-17 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAIL Y BRIEFING THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 2AWEATHER HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter Daily Scripture Give praise to the Lord, pro claim his name; make known among the nations what he has done. Chronicles 16:8 AssocIated Press ASSOCIATED PRESS Brad Pitt, seen here in a scene from Killing Them Softly, says he is increasingly conscious that he is nearing 50 and wonders how long his career will last. AssocIated Press Sabourin ASSOCIATED PRESS John Staluppi shows off his 1929 Pierce-Arrow Custom Brougham from his private collection in North Palm Beach. Staluppi is liquidating his Cars of Dreams Museum and its 115 collector vehicles in an auction Saturday. Clark Moore

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Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2012 3A 3A L e a v e s a r e n t t h e o n l y t h i n g OFFER NOT AVAILABLE ON EXISTING CAMPUS LOANS. OFFER IS FOR NEW LOANS ONL Y MAY NOT BE COMBINED WITH ANY OTHER OFFER. 1. Credit approval required. Your rate may be higher based on creditworthiness, ve hicle and term of loan. For example, a $39,000.00 loan with no money down at 2.14% for 48 months would require 47 monthly payments of $854.12 and a final payment of $833.58, finance charge of $1,8 39.67, for a total of payments of $40,977.22. The amount financed is $39,237.55, the APR is 2.26%. APR = Annual Percentage Rate .. 2. Interest will accrue from date of purchase. Choosing this option will increase the total amount of interest you pay. 3. Credit approval and initial $5 d eposit required. Mention this ad and well waive the $15 new membership fee. This credit union is federally insured by the Nati onal Credit Union Administration. Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Columbia and Suwannee counties!! 3 Accelerate your approval, apply today! Call 754-9088 Click campuscu.com Visit your local service center 2 26 % AP R 1 for up to 60 months As low as Any vehicle 2 0 1 0 or newer No payments until 2 0 1 3 2 Accelerate your approval, apply today! Accelerate your approval, apply today! Accelerate your approval, apply today! Accelerate your approval, apply today! Accelerate your approval, apply today! Accelerate your approval, apply today! Shop the dealership with a CAMPUS Pre-Approved Loan Draft and negotiate as a cash buyer! Have a loan with another lender? Lower your payment by bringing it to CAMPUS! Our rates are falling too! Lake City 183 SW Bascom Norris Dr. Gville E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunters Walk 5115 NW 43rd St. Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St. Shands at UF Room H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Alachua 14759 NW 157th Ln. Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E. Silver Springs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. Summer eld 17950 US Hwy. 441 Tallahassee 1511 Killearn Center Blvd. NAACP Cont. From 1A CLIFF: Both sides appear ready to give ground as deadline nears Continued From Page 1A THIEVES: Columbia County Sheriffs Office seeks help from the public Continued From Page 1A The burglary occurred to a vehicle parked at a residence off NW Weighty Glen, said Sgt. Ed Seifert, Columbia County Sheriffs Office public informa tion officer. No other burglaries were reported in the area during the same time frame. Reports indicate the victims credit card was then used at two stores in Columbia County, at U.S. 441 and Interstate 10. The suspects then traveled to Tallahassee where they used the same stolen credit card at a Walmart. The suspects charged less than $200 combined at the three stores the stolen card was used at, Seifert said. A few weeks ago, the Lake City Police Department investigated a case where a woman had her credit cards stolen, and the LCPD attributed the crime to the Felony Lane Gang, a band of thieves who target women, stealing their purses from vehicles and using their checkbooks and credit cards to make expensive pur chases. Seifert said he doesnt believe the crimes are connected. There is nothing to indicate that this crime is related to the Felony Lane Gang, he said. The suspects are described as a young, white woman with shoulder-length blonde hair and a young white man. We do not have a vehicle description that the suspects are using, Seifert said. Detectives have been following up on leads from the moment the burglary was reported. We are asking for the public to assist us in identifying these burglary suspects and hope that additional inves tigative leads will be generated from the media exposure. Anyone with information about the iden tity of the two suspects is asked to call the Columbia County Sheriffs Office at 758-0195. Citizens also may call Crime Stoppers of Columbia County at 754-7099. The identi ties of callers to Crime Stoppers always remain anonymous, and callers may be eligible for cash rewards of up to $1,000 if their information proves useful. COURTESY CCSO Images from surveillance video cameras show two suspects in a recent credit card theft under investigation by the Columbia County Sheriffs Office. Anyone with information about the case or who believes he can identify either of the suspects is asked to call the sheriffs office at 758-0195. president make the appropriate announce ment to the local coun cil at the general body meeting. A news release sent to the Lake City Reporter indicated the elections would take place Nov. 15. However, local NAACP officials said they had provided the wrong date. The elections were set to be held Nov. 19 but never took place. test for divided government since elections that assured Obama a second term in the White House while renewing Republican control in the House of Representatives. Its time for the president and Democrats to get serious about the spending problem that our country has, Boehner said at a news confer ence in the Capitol. He, like Obama, expressed optimism that a deal could be reached. At the same time, he publicly disagreed with one GOP lawmaker, Rep. Tom Cole of Oklahoma, who said he was ready to go along with Obamas plan to renew most but not all of the expiring income tax cuts. Itll hurt the economy to raise rates for any one, Boehner said. Separately, at a closed-door meeting with the rank and file, the speaker told fellow Republicans they are on solid political ground in refusing to let tax rates rise. He circulated polling data showing the public favors closing loopholes to raise revenue far more than it supports raising rates on incomes over $250,000. There were no face-to-face talks between the administration and lawmakers during the day, although the White House is dispatching Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner and top leg islative aide Rob Nabors to a series of sessions with congressional leaders on Thursday. On Wednesday, a group of corporate CEOs pushing for a deal met separately with top Democratic and Republican leaders in the House, joined by Erskine Bowles, who was co-chairman of a deficit commission Obama appointed earlier in his term. Speaking to reporters before a session with business leaders, House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi of California said the bargaining ought to begin where deficit talks between Obama and Boehner broke down 18 months ago and go from there to reach an agreement. She didnt say so, but at the time, the two men were exchanging offers that called for at least $250 billion in cuts from Medicare over a decade, and another $100 billion from Medicaid and other federal health programs. Among the changes under discussion with Obamas approval was a gradual increase in the eligibility age for Medicare from 65 to 67, as well as higher fees for beneficiaries.

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I f immigration reform is to be achieved — and it is pretty clear that it must be — the solution likely will not be a sweeping overhaul but a series of small-er, politically digestible steps. By executive order this year, President Barack Obama took the first of those baby steps by halting deportation of young illegal immigrants. Youngsters who were brought to this country before age 16, were in school or had graduated or had served in the military and had clean criminal records and were younger than 30 were eligible for work permits that could be renewed every two years. Congressional Republicans cried foul, charging that it was a backdoor attempt to revive the DREAM Act rejected by the Senate two years earlier. The DREAM Act would have cul-minated in full U.S. citizenship, which Obama, in his executive order couldn’t do without con-gressional approval, which he had no chance of getting. Republicans also dismissed it as a grandstand play for the Latino vote, coming as it did three months before the November election. If so, the ploy certainly helped, since Obama beat Mitt Romney by 44 percentage points among Latinos. Republicans, generally the most vigorous opponents of changes in the immigration laws other than building longer and higher walls on the border, took notice. This week the House will take up a GOP-sponsored measure to make it easier for foreign students who earn advanced degrees from U.S. universities to obtain green cards and stay here. Injecting a rare note of common sense into the immigration debate, Rep. Lamar Smith, R-Texas, chair-man of the House Judiciary Committee, said, “We cannot afford to educate these foreign graduates in the United States and then send them back home to work for our competitors.” Even though some Democrats will vote against, because the bill falls short of the massive immigration over-haul they seek, the measure should pass. The Senate will likely run out of time before it can take up the bill. Meanwhile, the Senate has a Republican-backed measure of its own that closely tracks Obama’s order but sets up a three-tiered visa process, culmi-nating in a permanent nonimmi-grant visa that can be renewed every five years. The bill was introduced by outgoing GOP Sens. Kay Bailey Hutchison of Texas and Jon Kyl of Arizona. Like the House bill, the Senate is unlikely get around to the measure for lack of time. But the Senate GOP immigration torch, so to speak, has been passed to Sens. Marco Rubio of Florida and John McCain of Arizona, meaning that the full Senate will get another crack at it next year. It is through this kind of incremental change that our immigration laws will be rewrit-ten and eventually the idea of a path to full citizenship will become acceptable. Baby steps toward reform OUR OPINION HIGHLIGHTS IN HISTORY On this date:In 1864, a Colorado militia killed at least 150 peaceful Cheyenne Indians in the Sand Creek Massacre. In 1912, the Maryland Agricultural College, located in College Park, was destroyed by fire. In 1924, Italian composer Giacomo Puccini died in Brussels before he could com-plete his opera “Turandot.” (It was finished by Franco Alfano.) In 1947, the U.N. General Assembly passed a resolution calling for the partitioning of Palestine between Arabs and Jews. In 1961, Enos the chimp was launched from Cape Canaveral aboard the Mercury-Atlas 5 spacecraft, which orbited earth twice before returning. In 1967, Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara announced he was leaving the Johnson administration to become president of the World Bank. T here was no uncer-tainly about who won the battle for Constantinople in 1453 (the Ottoman Caliphate), or who lost the battle for Vienna in 1529 (the Ottoman Caliphate). In the Civil War, the North decisively defeated the South. In the Battle of the Bulge, the Allies prevailed and the Axis never recovered. These days, however, the fog of war shrouds not only conflicts while they are under way but even conflicts that have ended. And so there is now a debate about the out-come of what might be called November’s Battle of Gaza. On one hand, Israeli Defense Forces hit with extraordinary precision — and astonishingly limited civilian casualties con-sidering Hamas’ use of civilians as human shields — more than 1,600 targets during their eight-day campaign, demolishing Hamas’ command-and-control apparatus, killing more than 100 Hamas commanders, crip-pling Hamas’ rocket-launching capability, destroying 26 weap-ons caches and more than 200 tunnels used for arms smug-gling and terrorist attacks. On the other hand, the Wall Street Journal editorialized that Hamas emerged politically intact and strategically stronger after eight days of inconclusive fighting. The terrorist group fired more than 1,500 rockets at Israel, forcing millions of Israelis into bunkers and bomb shelters but suffered no deci-sive military defeat. Hamas openly dared Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to invade the Gaza Strip, and by not doing so Netanyahu left the terror leaders alive to strike again. Hamas also won a new international patron in Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi, who brokered the cease-fire. Who is right? I think it will take time before it is clear whether one side substan-tially improved its position at the expense of the other. But it seems to me that Michael Oren, the Israeli ambassador to the U.S., made a cogent point when he told reporters that in this battle “Israel was not con-fronting Gaza, but Iran.” Here’s how I interpret that: Israel’s priority — in addition to simple self-defense and dem-onstrating that missiles cannot be fired at Israeli citizens with impunity indefinitely — was to render Hamas incapable of opening a second front over the coming months, a period during which Israel may decide whether to use draconian meth-ods to deprive Iran’s Jihadist rulers of a military nuclear capability. Integral to that effort: elimination of most of the longer-range, Fajr-5 mis-siles that Iran has been sup-plying to Hamas, missiles that can threaten not just villages near Gaza, but Tel Aviv and Jerusalem. According to one poll, 70 percent of Israelis in the south, where missiles often hit, opposed the cease-fire that brought a halt to the conflict. Does that imply that Netanyahu was wrong to refrain from sending ground troops into Gaza? Not at all. Such an offen-sive would have been bloody, and would have brought con-demnation — albeit unjustified — from the so-called interna-tional community. A drawn-out conflict in Gaza would have benefited Iran’s rulers, who are eager to distract attention from the atrocities they are support-ing in Syria as well as their nuclear weapons program. Also, once Israeli forces were in Gaza, they might have found it difficult to get out. The time may come for Israelis to ask, “After Hamas, what?” But that time is probably not now. There is no ambiguity about this: The Battle of Gaza was a defeat for Mahmoud Abbas, titular ruler of the West Bank. Abbas wields no power in Gaza. That is only one of the reasons it will be a farce when the U.N. General Assembly this week grants Abbas’ petition for Palestinian “non-member state” status. Finally, there is Morsi who ended the week looking like a winner — praised by Obama as a “straight shooter who deliv-ered on what he promised and did not promise what he could not deliver.” Within hours, Morsi moved to grasp dictato-rial powers at home. That set off waves of protests by brave Egyptians who now fear that their revolution will end up replacing an autocracy with a theocracy. Best-case scenario: Morsi decides to rein in Hamas and accedes to the demands of the protesters, allowing Egypt’s democratic experiment to survive another day. That may require more pressure than Washington has applied so far. Worst-case scenario: Morsi becomes an Islamist pha-raoh and, sooner or later, lets Hamas, with Iran’s backing, drag Egypt into another war, one as damaging — if also as inconclusive — as were the wars Egypt fought against Israel in 1948, 1956, 1967 and 1973. Who won battle of Gaza? LETTERS TO THE EDITOR To the Editor: Citizens of Columbia County: Do you elect your county com-misioner so he/she can then use the position to promote their pet projects? Projects that they eventually will want you to pay for? Do you know that within the last year, a committee was selected, several trips were made to other areas in our state as well as Georgia and that a consulting firm in Georgia was hired to come up with a propos-al for what is now being called an “Events Center?” All under the table. This is a huge, multi-milliondollar pipe dream of a group of good ole boys, some of which will benefit greatly as the tax-payers of Columbia County are saddled with the cost. Some own the land, some envision lucrative construction jobs and some anticipate cushy county jobs in their future. They’ve already snuck it through to phase 2 without as much as floating a proposal to county residents to see if the majority of us even want such a thing. The “events center” project will be built on a 200 acre parcel that they’ve proposed to pay $4 million for. That’s $20,000 per acre or about four or five times what large parcels of land are selling for right now. The esti-mated price of the project is $28 million, but, as usual, with solic-ited estimates like these, it will probably double before it’s com-pleted. We’ve already been stuck with some big consulting fees. They expect to sell our Fairgrounds (87.5 acres), which has been plenty adequate for all our events in the past, to commercial enterprises to help offset the cost. Our fair, our rodeo, our home show, our gun shows would now be held at the new facility, which is likely to be located in Ellisville. So, if you don’t want to drive 15 miles south to attend what used to be local events. If you are sick of the good-ole-boy crowd dominating local politics, call your commissioner right away and tell them to quit spending our money on their pet projects that we don’t want, don’t need and can’t afford, especially in the economic cli-mate we live in today. Edward S. Harris Lake City ‘Events’ at your expense Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding counties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, publisher Robert Bridges, editor Sue Brannon, controller Dink NeSmith, president Tom Wood, chairman LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY E-MAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com O ur own state Rep. Elizabeth Porter is well-positioned as she prepares for her second term in the Florida Legislature. Her committee appointments seem especially well-suited to the local landscape. Porter will serve as vice chair of the Education Committee and of the Economic Development and Tourism Subcommittee. She will also serve on the Agriculture and Natural Resources Subcommittee, the Transportation Economic Development Appropriations Subcommittee and the K-12 Education Subcommittee. All are important, but in Columbia County we have a particular interest in economic development, tourism and agri-culture. Congratulations on your new assignments, Rep. Porter. We know you will represent us well. Our woman in Tally OPINION Thursday, November 29, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A4AOPINION Cliff May Q Clifford D. May is president of the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies, a policy institute focusing on terrorism. Q Dale McFeatters is editorial writer for Scripps Howard News Service. Dale McFeattersmcfeattersd@shns.com

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Nov. 29 Brain health class Maintain Your Brain at the Lifestyle Enrichment Center, 628 SE Allison Court, from 10 to 11:30 a.m. This free presentation explores insights about what a person can do to maintain life-long brain health. Attendees will learn basic brain facts, ways to keep memories sharp and the close connection between brain health and heart health. Call (800) 272-3900 to register or for more information. Landlords to meet Lake City area landlords will meet at the IHOP res taurant. Dinner will be at 5 p.m., and the program will begin at 6. Columbia County Fire Chief David Boozer will be the speak er. Call (386) 755-0110 for more information. Community theater High Springs Commnity Theater will present the comedy Christmas Belles, tonight through Dec.16. The play is about Christmas time in the small town of Fayro, Texas, but the Futrelle sisters are not exactly in a festive mood. A cranky Frankie is weeks overdue with her sec ond set of twins. Twink, recently jilted, is in jail for inadvertently burning down half the town. And hot-flash-suffering Honey Raye is desperately trying to keep the Tabernacle of the Lambs Christmas pro gram from spiraling into chaos. Their hilarious holi day journey through a mis adventure-filled Christmas Eve is guaranteed to bring joy to your world. Tickets are available for pur chase at The Framery of Lake City (386) 754-2780, Pampered Paws in High Springs (386) 454-4464 or online at highsprings communitytheater.com. A preview performance is open to the public at 8 tonight. Friday and Saturday shows will be at at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m. Doors open a halfhour before show time. Tickets are $11 for adults, $8 for children 12 and younger and $9 for seniors on Sundays. The theater is at 130 N. First Ave. in High Springs. Nov. 30 Hospital garage sale The auxiliary at Shands Lakeshore Hospital will have a garage sale from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the hospi tals first-floor conference room and outside for larger items. Fish dinner Our Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5056 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, pre pares fish dinners every Friday from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The dinner is $6 for two Alaskan pollock filets, corn, baked beans, hush puppies, cole slaw and tarter sauce. Take out or eat in. Dec. 1 Breakfast with chief Lake City Police Chief Argatha Gilmore will have her quarterly community meeting, Breakfast With The Chief, from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at the Public Safety Building. The event is an opportunity for community members to discuss issues or concerns with Gilmore. A complimentary breakfast will be available. For more information, contact Audre Washington, police depart ment community relations coordinator, at (386) 7195742. Fish fry The Columbia County Chapter of the Bethune Cookman University Alumni will have a fish fry scholarship fundraiser beginning at 11 a.m. at the old Amtrak station, corner of Lake Jeffrey Road and Kimberly Drive. Sandwiches will be $6 and dinners will be $7.50. Dinner includesfish, grit baked beans, bread, cake and a drink. To order ahead, call (386) 752-7054. Christmas toy ride Riders with Caring Hearts Christmas Toy Ride will begin at 10 a.m. at Rountree Moore Toyota on Route 90 West. Entry fee is $10 per bike, plus a new, unwrapped toy and a nonperishable food item. The ride will start at noon. It will end at American Legion Post 57, where an after party will be held, fea turing a live band, food, refreshments, raffles and auctions. All donations will benefit the Christian Service Center of Columbia County. For more informa tion, call (386) 758-9811 or (386) 984-9565 or email danny@columbiacountycy cles.com or billhugginssr@ hotmail.com. Farmers market The Lake DeSoto Farmers Market will have new hours of operation starting today. The market will be open from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. each Saturday. The fall harvest season contin ues and the holiday sea son is picking up the pace with shoppers looking for healthy local foods and cre ative locally made gift items. The market is in Wilson Park, along Lake DeSoto between the Columbia County Courthouse and Shands Lakeshore Hospital in downtown Lake City. For more information, call (386) 719-5766 or visit market.lcfla.com. Farm day event Suwanee Valley Alpacas will have a Farm Day from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. today and Sunday. Spend the day learning about alpacas. Pet an alpaca. Learn to spin the fiber into yarn. A free Beanie Baby for each child. Air-brush art. Alpaca prod ucts available for sale for unique Christmas gifts. The farm is at 524 NW Sleepy Court in White Springs. For more informa tion, call (386) 397-2678 or (386) 965-1800. Civil War program Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave. in Fernandina Beach, will host a Union Garrison event today and Sunday. The program will allow visi tors to interact with living historians to experience life in the fort as it was in 1864. Soldiers in period costumes will conduct fir ing demonstrations, march ing drills, cooking and daily activities. Ladies in period dresses will be pre pare a Christmas tree and decorate the mantles for the holiday season. Sutlers will display their wares, and drummer boys will project the sounds of the Civil War era. Activities will be held from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. today and 9 a.m. to noon Sunday. For additional information, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www. FloridaStateParks.org. Dec. 5 Book sale fundraiser The auxiliary at Shands Lakeshore Hospital will hold a Christmas book sale to support the hospital from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the firstfloor cafe at the hospital. Builders association Columbia County Builders Association will hold a General Council lunch at Guang Dong res taurant in the Lake City Mall. The sponsor is the Foundation Professionals Inc. of Florida. The speaker will be Sgt. David Greene from Crime Prevention Division of the Columbia County Sheriffs Office. The winning ticket for our raffle will be drawn, with a prize of either a $500 golf gift certificate for County Club of Lake City Pro Shop, a 20-gauge shotgun or an iPad from Verizon. We will also have the 50-50 HammerClaw drawing for a jackpot of $275. Reservations are appreciated and can be made by calling (386) 8671998. Tickets are $12 for members and $15 for nonmembers.Arrive about 11:30 to enjoy the buffet. The meeting will start at 12:00 noon. Newcomers luncheon The Newcomers Friendship Luncheon will be at 11:30 a.m. at Hannahs, 4196 W US 90 in the Premier Plaza. For those who want to par ticipate, there will be an exchange of wrapped gifts, with a $10 value limit. For more information, contact Barbara Test at 754-7272 or Rose Taylor at 755-2175. Olustee battle meeting The Blue-Grey Army will meet at 5:30 p.m. to plan the Olustee Battle Festival. The meeting will be at the school district central building room 153, 409 SW St. Johns St. Dec. 6 Book sale fundraiser The auxiliary at Shands Lakeshore Hospital will hold a Christmas book sale to support the hospi tal from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the first-floor cafe at the hospital. Dec. 7 Holiday music concert The combined music ministries of Pine Grove Baptist Church and Southside Baptist Church will present Season of Joy holiday music concert at 7 p.m. at Pine Grove Church, 1989 N Highway 441, and at 7 p.m. Sunday at Southside Baptist, 388 SE Baya Drive. Admission is free, but seat ing is limited. Nursery will be available for children 4 and younger. For advance tickets or more informa tion, contact Pine Grove Church a (386) 752-2664 or Southside Baptist at (386) 755-5553. De. 8 Breakfast with Santa Come join us at Holiday Inn & Suites for breakfast with Santa from 8 to11 a.m. The event will include a breakfast buffet with scram bled eggs, bacon, sausage, biscuits and gravy, juice, coffee, hot chocolate and a waffle station. Enjoy holi day music, fun and fellow ship, complete with a visit from Santa. Cost is $9.95 for adults and $4.95 for chil dren ages 3 to 12. Proceeds will benefit the Childrens Medical Services of North Florida. A collection box for donations of unwrapped toys also will be available. For more information, call (386) 754-1411. Canned food giveaway North Side Church of Christ, 378 NW Gibson Lane, will have a canned food giveaway from 8 a.m. to noon. Anyone in need is welcome. For more infor mation, contact the church office at 755-0393, by email secretarynscofc@gmail. com or visit the church website, Thenorthsidecoc. org. Farmers market Once again, local art ists and crafters will be at the Lake DeSoto Farmers Market, selling original works for that perfect hol iday gift. Middle Ground will provide live music, and the Lake City Chamber of Commerce will host its Snow Day 2012 at neigh boring Olustee Park. Thirty tons of real snow, 10 bounce houses, live entertainment and several food vendors will make all of Downtown Lake City hopping. And at 8 a.m., early risers can catch the second annual Dashing to the Snow Reindeer 5k Run/Walk around down town. The farmers market is open every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Wilson Park, along Lake DeSoto between the Columbia County Courthouse and Shands Lakeshore Hospital in downtown Lake City. For more information, call (386) 719-5766 or visit market.lcfla.com. Dec. 9 Holiday cantata Covenant First Presbyterian Church (for merly First Presbyterian) of Live Oak will present the Christmas cantata, God with Us Emmanuel, by Phillip Young on at 6:00 p.m. Bill Poplin will be directing. The church is off U.S. 90 on White Avenue in Live Oak. For more infor mation, contact Bill Poplin at 365-4932. Holiday music concert The combined music ministries of Pine Grove Baptist Church and Southside Baptist Church will present Season of Joy holiday music con cert at 7 p.m. at Southside Baptist, 388 SE Baya Drive. Admission is free, but seat ing is limited. Nursery will be available for children 4 and younger. For advance tickets or more informa tion, contact Pine Grove Church a (386) 752-2664 or Southside Baptist at (386) 755-5553. LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2012 5A 5A statefarm.com With competitive rates and personal service, its no wonder more drivers trust State Farm Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there. CALL FOR A QUOTE 24/7. Ride with the #1 car insurer in 1001143.1 State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company State Farm Indemnity Company Bloomington, IL John Kasak, Agent 904 SW SR 247 Branford Hwy Lake City, FL 32025 Bus: 386-752-7521 johnkasak.com John Burns III, Agent 234 SW Main Boulevard Lake City, FL 32056 Bus: 386-752-5866 johnburnsinsurance.com FLORIDA. NOTICE Attention Humana Walmart Medicare Part D patients: We accept this plan and all other Part D plans. Baya East 755-6677 Baya West 755-2233 Medical 755-2277 Call one of our pharmacies to see which plan is best for you. COMMUNITY CALENDAR To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0427 or by email at jbarr@lakecityreporter.com.

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anything or service having an attributable value. Blanchard resigned his position with the LCPD Feb. 2. The internal inves tigation interviews were conducted between March 15 and July 12. A Florida Department of Law Enforcement investi gation into the case already had cleared Blanchard of any criminal wrongdoing. Claims were made that Blanchard accepted nearly $300,000 and a 10-acre tract of land from Lake City resi dent Olema Wilson. The case began in November 2006 when Wilson was the victim of theft and forgery and LCPD Sgt. Clint VanBennekom conducted the investigation into the case. Wilson kept in contact with him and sent him flowers and cards, and later offered to set up a $50,000 trust account for him. VanBennekom told his superiors about the offer and was told to read the departments policy and let that be his guide. VanBennekom declined the offer and cut off contact with Wilson, He told inves tigators that he understood that Blanchard was sent to check on her. According to the report, police provided Wilsons son, James Y. Wilson Jr., with copies of six checks that were written to Blanchard between March 6, 2008, and Aug. 24, 2009, totaling $145,000. Penny Wilson Weber, Wilsons daughter, said dur ing a class reunion in 2008 she was asked when her mother began renting the top room of her home to a police officer. Weber later learned that Blanchard was stopping by to see Wilson approximately four times a week. Weber said she and her family routinely checked the property appraisers website to ensure that nobody was taking advan tage of her mother. During a check in August 2009, she learned that her mother had signed over a 10-acre tract of land to Blanchard. In January 2010 the Wilson children met with Blanchard at a local restau rant where they presented him with a quit claim deed and asked him to sign the land back to their mother. Weber said that Blanchard reluctantly signed the document and expressed surprise that the land had ever been given to him. Weber told investigators that her mother was upset about the land being signed over to her again and she began the process of giving it back to Blanchard. When interviewed Wilson said Blanchard began to stop by regularly after work and when he couldnt stop by, he would call. She said that they just visited and that Blanchard made a dif ference in her life and gave her reason to live. After some time had passed, Wilson became aware that Blanchards wifes job was moving and they discussed whether she should commute. Ultimately, Wilson believed Blanchards wife was not working and offered him some money to help him, and he refused to take it. Wilson said she had sweet ways and was able to con vince Blanchard to take it. An interview was con ducted with Blanchard on Aug. 12, to which Blanchard brought a prepared state ment and spoke to the investigators. He told investigators he first met Wilson as the result of a well-being check that he conducted as a police officer and over time they became friends. Blanchard told investiga tors that he did not believe he violated LCPD policy and said that the gifts and money Wilson gave him were as a result of their friendship and had nothing to do with his job as a police officer. Blanchard also acknowl edged that Wilson gave him more money than the checks and that she had given him cash, but stated he did not know the amount. Blanchard told investiga tors that during his career at the LCPD he had been offered other gifts and chose not to accept them because he knew that it would constitute a policy violation. He said that because these gifts were from a friend, he did not feel it was a violation. Based on the informa tion gathered during the investigation Sgt. Andy Miles, who interviewed Blanchard and sat in on the other witness interviews, recommended the allega tion against Blanchard for unbecoming conduct be ruled substantiated. Miles recommended the allegations of acceptance of gifts/gratuities also be substantiated. Blanchard was not immediately available for comment. 6A LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 6A Your landline is your lifeline. Its a reliable, safe and secure way to stay connected. Because landline phone service is so important in todays world, Windstream believes everyone should have access to it. Thats why we offer a discounted telephone service plan to make basic phone service even more affordable for quali ed customers. Windstream participates in the government bene t program Lifeline that provides quali ed, low-income telephone customers with a discount off monthly telephone service charges. The program is limited to one bene t per household. We provide a complete menu of optional services, including discounted bundles and basic services at the rates, terms, and conditions speci ed in our tariffs. For questions please call: Residential customers 1-800-347-1991, Business customers 1-800-843-9214, or go to www.windstream.com Reliable service at a sensible price SERVICES Residential Service (includes Federal Subscriber Line Charge and mandatory expanded calling) Business Service (includes Federal Subscriber Line Charge and mandatory expanded calling) Residential Low Income MONTHLY RATES LOW $16.08 $32.75 $3.33 $19.15 $6.40 $40.48 HIGH US 90 West Lake City 386-752-9303 2012 PLAYOFF SEC CHAMPIONSHIP GAME Mikells First Federal Peoples Bank ALABAMA TO T AL POIN T S 44 ALABAMA TO T AL POIN T S 46 ALABAMA TO T AL POIN T S 44 CORRECTION CONDUCT: Unbecoming, says LCPD report Continued From Page 1A Zimmerman plans fundraising push ORLANDO Former neighborhood watch lead er George Zimmerman plans to step up fundraising efforts to pay for expenses while he awaits trial for fatally shooting Trayvon Martin. Zimmermans attor ney said Wednesday that Zimmerman plans to launch a new defense fund next month with a new fund manager. Donors to the New George Zimmerman Defense Fund will receive thank you cards individually signed by Zimmerman. Zimmermans attorney, Mark OMara, said an existing fund has raised $140,000 since it was launched last May, but funds currently are at the lowest they have ever been. Zimmerman has pleaded not guilty to second-degree murder and claims the shooting was self-defense under the states stand your ground law. A trial is set for June, but a stand your ground hearing could be held by April. Felon escapes sheriffs cruiser BARTOW A woman who escaped from the back seat of a Polk County Sheriffs cruiser has been located, authori ties daid. Bartow police found 31-year-old Vinzena Wardell on the railroad tracks just after 7:30 a.m. Wednesday. She had been missing since early Wednesday when she opened the cruisers door as she was being taken to the jail for book ing. She faces multiple charges, including grand theft, scheming to defend, exploitation of the elderly, and escape. Deputies used a stun gun while arresting Wardell Tuesday night. They took her to a hospi tal for medical clearance and were taking her to jail when she escaped. AROUND FLORIDA By MIKE SCHNEIDER Associated Press ORLANDO Attorneys for Florida A&M University on Wednesday asked a judge to dismiss a lawsuit brought by the family of a drum major who died last year after being hazed by fellow band members, claiming Robert Champion was a willing participant in the ritual. University attorney Richard Mitchell said Champion wasnt forced to board a bus parked outside an Orlando hotel where the hazing took place. He was an adult able to make his own decisions at age 26, and he had risen through the ranks of the famed Marching 100 band with out taking part in hazing until that fateful night in November 2011, Mitchell said. Champions willingness to take part in an illegal act gives the university immunity from the wrong ful death lawsuit, Mitchell said. Robert Champion knew exactly what he was doing, he said. If Mr. Champion had not gotten on that bus, he would not have been hazed. Circuit Judge Walter Komanski didnt immedi ately issue a ruling. Champions parents filed a lawsuit contending uni versity officials did not take action to stop hazing even though a school dean had proposed suspending the Marching 100 band just days before their son died. The lawsuit also alleges that school officials fell short in enforcing anti-haz ing policies. An attorney for Champions family asked the judge to allow a jury to decide who was responsi ble for Champions death. A jury needs to decide how to allocate responsi bility for the death of Mr. Champion, said lawyer Kenneth Bell. Please allow that to be heard. Champions parents, Robert and Pamela Champion of Decatur, Ga., rejected a $300,000 settle ment offer from the uni versity earlier this month. An attorney for the family, Chris Chestnut, said no fur ther talks are taking place. Ten FAMU band mem bers face felony hazing charges in the case, while two others face misde meanor counts. They have pleaded not guilty. Hazing that involves bodily harm is a third-degree felony in Florida. This is a commonsense case. Its complex but com mon sense, Chestnut said after the hearing. There is a clear history of hazing at FAMU. Champions parents also are suing the bus com pany that operated the bus on which the hazing took place, as well as its driver. An attorney for the bus driver said her duty to protect the students ended when she dropped them off at the hotel. An attorney for the bus company told the judge that Champions participation relieved them of liability. It is not an issue of whether he was a par ticipant in hazing, said Dick Ford, an attorney for Fabulous Coach Lines. He certainly was a participant in hazing. FAMU wants hazing suit dismissed Associated Press

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By LINDSEY TANNERAP Medical WriterCHICAGO — They may be a big hit at kids’ birth-day parties, but inflatable bounce houses can be dan-gerous, with the number of injuries soaring in recent years, a nationwide study found. Kids often crowd into bounce houses, and jump-ing up and down can send other children flying into the air, too. The numbers suggest 30 U.S. children a day are treated in emergency rooms for broken bones, sprains, cuts and concus-sions from bounce house accidents. Most involve children falling inside or out of the inflated play-things, and many children get hurt when they collide with other bouncing kids. The number of children aged 17 and younger who got emergency-room treat-ment for bounce house injuries has climbed along with the popularity of bounce houses — from fewer than 1,000 in 1995 to nearly 11,000 in 2010. That’s a 15-fold increase, and a doubling just since 2008. “I was surprised by the number, especially by the rapid increase in the num-ber of injuries,” said lead author Dr. Gary Smith, director of the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio. Amusement parks and fairs have bounce houses, and the playthings can also be rented or purchased for home use. Smith and colleagues analyzed national surveillance data on ER treat-ment for nonfatal injuries linked with bounce houses, maintained by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. Their study was published online Monday in the journal Pediatrics. Only about 3 percent of children were hospitalized, mostly for broken bones. More than one-third of the injuries were in chil-dren aged 5 and younger. The safety commission recommends against let-ting children younger than 6 use full-size trampolines, and Smith said barring kids that young from even smaller, home-use bounce houses would make sense. “There is no evidence that the size or location of an inflatable bouncer affects the injury risk,” he said. Other recommendations, often listed in manufactur-ers’ instruction pamphlets, include not overloading bounce houses with too many kids and not allowing young children to bounce with much older, heavier kids or adults, said Laura Woodburn, a spokeswoman for the National Association of Amusement Ride Safety Officials. The study didn’t include deaths, but some accidents are fatal. Separate data from the product safety com-mission show four bounce house deaths from 2003 to 2007, all involving children striking their heads on a hard surface. Several nonfatal accidents occurred last year when bounce houses col-lapsed or were lifted by high winds. A group that issues voluntary industry standards says bounce houses should be supervised by trained operators and recommends that bouncers be prohib-ited from doing flips and purposefully colliding with others, the study authors noted. Bounce house injuries are similar to those linked with trampolines, and the American Academy of Pediatrics has recommend-ed against using trampo-lines at home. Policymakers should consider whether bounce houses warrant similar precautions, the authors said.Associated PressPORTLAND, Ore. — A 7year-old girl suffering from leukemia is one of Oregon’s youngest medical marijuana patients. Her mother says she gives her daughter marijuana pills to combat the effects of che-motherapy, but her father, who lives in North Dakota, worries about the effects of the drug on her brain devel-opment. Mykayla Comstock was diagnosed with leukemia last spring. Her mother treats her with a gram of canna-bis oil daily, The Oregonian reported. Mykayla’s mother credits the drug for the leukemia’s remission. “As a mother, I am going to try anything before she can potentially fall on the other side,” said Erin Purchase, 25, who with her boyfriend administers Mykayla’s cannabis. The girl says the drug helps her eat and sleep but also makes her feel “funny.” “It helps me eat and sleep,” Mykayla said. “The chemotherapy makes you feel like you want to stay up all night long.” Mykayla’s father, who is divorced from the girl’s mother, was so disturbed by his daughter’s marijuana use that he contacted child welfare officials, police and her oncologist. The father, Jesse Comstock, said his concerns were prompted by a visit with Mykayla in August. “She was stoned out of her mind,” said Comstock, 26. “All she wanted to do was lay on the bed and play video games.” Comstock, who works in the North Dakota oil field, pays child support to Purchase and covers Mykayla’s health insurance. He said he observed strange behavior during an August visit and took Mykayla to a private lab, where techni-cians detected THC levels of an adult daily marijuana user. Gladstone police contacted the girl’s mother, exam-ined Mykayla’s medical marijuana paperwork, then told Comstock there was little they could do. Comstock, who used pot in the past, said he doesn’t object to people over 16 using medical marijuana. But he worries about his daughter’s well-being and the potential for addiction. “She’s not terminally ill,” Comstock said. “She is going to get over this, and with all this pot, they are going to hinder her brain growth. “It’s going to limit her options in life because of the decisions her mother has made for her,” he added. Oregon law requires no monitoring of a child’s medical marijuana use by a pediatrician. The law instead invests authority in parents to decide the dosage, frequen-cy and manner of a child’s marijuana consumption. Many doctors worry about introducing a child to marijuana when they say other drugs can treat pain and nausea more effectively. Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2012 7A7AHEALTH on their Nov. 19, 2012 Ribbon Cutting ceremony for their location at 3525 N.W. Bascom Norris Drive Owner Terri Grebs3525 N.W. Bascom Norris Drive(386) 243-8623 would like to congratulate Terri’s Sweet Tweets Terri’s Sweet Tweets The Combined Music Ministries ofPine Grove Baptist Church & Southside Baptist Churchpresent Friday December 7th at 7:00 p.m.Pine Grove Baptist Church 1989 N. Hwy 441Sunday December 9th at 7:00 p.m.Southside Baptist Church 388 S.E. Baya Drive Admission is free, but seating is limited. For advanced tickets or for further information, please call: Pine Grove Baptist Church 386-752-2664 Southside Baptist Church 386-755-5553 Nursery will be provided for up to four years old ASSOCIATED PRESSChildren play in a bounce house in Vidor, Texas. A na tionwide study released Monday found inflatable bounce houses can be dangerous and the numb er of kids injured in related accidents has soared 15-fold in recent years. The numbers su ggest 30 U.S. children a day are treated in emergency rooms for broken bones, sprains, cu ts and concussions from bounce house accidents. Bounce house injuries of kids soarPinellas County to put fluoride back in water Girl, 7, takes marijuana pills to counteract chemotherapy By TAMARA LUSHAssociated PressCLEARWATER — One of the largest counties in Florida voted on Tuesday to add fluoride back into the water supply, capping a lengthy debate over whether adding the chemi-cal is beneficial for fighting tooth decay or toxic and an affront to personal liberty. The Pinellas County Commission voted 6-1 to return fluoride to the water. It was removed in October 2011. Shame, shame, shame,” one anti-fluoride resident yelled out after the vote. The board reversed its decision because two new commissioners who ran on a pro-fluoride platform were elected in November. The October, 2011 move affected some 700,000 people and touched off a political controversy that pitted dentists and ortho-dontists against people who feel fluoride is harm-ful, even toxic, and that the county shouldn’t pay for residents’ personal health decisions. Fluoride proponents say the chemical, which has been added to many U.S. water supplies for decades, prevents cavities and is safe. Opponents say it is toxic and that citizens should decide for them-selves whether to use it for dental health. Fluoride is a mineral that exists naturally in water and soil, and fluc-tuates depending on the day. Officials in Pinellas will add fluoride to bring the level up to the federal recommendations. Norm Roche, the board’s lone dissenter, who had also voted against fluoride in the water in 2011, said he’s seen studies and sci-ence on both sides of the issue, and isn’t convinced that it’s safe. “If there are questions, it should not go in our drinking water,” he said. The fluoride will be added back into the water in March 2013. Officials said it will take that long to notify residents that the substance will be put back in the water supply. About 100 people attended Tuesday’s meet-ing, some toting signs and oversized toothbrushes. Public comment on the issue lasted more than three hours. ASSOCIATED PRESSMykayla Comstock, 7, one of Oregon’s youngest medic al marijuana patients, spends time with her mother, Erin P urchase, in Gladstone, Ore. Purchase says she gives her daughte r marijuana pills to combat the effects of chemotherapy. Broken bones, concussions rise among children.

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8A LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04248AHealth 1B;J?>r!?>;L ;H>*?SF;H>!SJL?MM US 90 E to Sanderson, left on Hwy 127 go 8 miles, left on Hwy 125 at caution light. Go 6/10 mile, turn right at Noah Raulerson Rd., 3 miles to farm.For more info call (904) 259-7703 WE BUY CARS AND WE SELL TIRES! WE BUY CARSWE BUY CARSWE BUY CARS AND WE SELL TIRES! ASSOCIATED PRESSNaked AIDS activists, with painted slogans on their bodies protest inside the lobby of the Capitol Hill office of Hou se Speaker John Boehner of Ohio, on Tuesday, prior to Worl d AIDS Day, which will be observed Saturday. Three women AIDS activists saying they wanted to highlight the “naked truth” about potential spending cuts in HIV programs were arres ted after taking their clothes off in the lobby Boehner’s office. Petitioning their government Placebo effect works on rats, UF researchers findFrom staff reportsGAINESVILLE — Rats and humans have at least one thing in common: They both react the same way to a placebo, according to a new University of Florida study. “That was the big finding — that the animals that expected pain relief actu-ally got pain relief when you gave them an inert sub-stance,” said co-author John Neubert, D.D.S., Ph.D., a pain specialist and an asso-ciate professor with the UF College of Dentistry depart-ment of orthodontics. “It helps validate our model that what we do in the rats, we believe, is a good representation of what’s being seen in humans.” he said. The investigation of placebo effects might lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets in the brain and of novel treat-ment strategies for a vari-ety of health conditions. A placebo response is a response seemingly to a treatment that has not actually been administered. For this study researchers looked at placebo respons-es in reference to pain and pain relief by evaluating how an animal responds when it “thinks” it’s getting a pain reliever. UF researchers conditioned rats to expect morphine or salt water by giving injections of one or the other for two sessions. Then during the third ses-sion, researchers gave both groups the saline injection. About 30 to 40 percent of the group that had previously received morphine acted as if they had received mor-phine again and showed pain relief. “What that means is we can then go ahead and do more mechanistic studies and do pharmacological studies targeting different receptors,” he said. “We could do different pro-cedures and try to apply that knowledge into what we think is going on in humans.” The two-year study published in the journal PAIN in October was the result of collaboration between Neubert and Niall Murphy, Ph.D., an addiction special-ist and adjunct associate professor at the University of California Los Angeles. The two decided to look at placebo responses because that deals with pathways and mechanisms that relate to pain, reward and addiction.

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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Thursday, November 29, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS (05*(&34 ALL THE WAY TO STATE! Register To Win Stuff From Santa’s Toybox!Drawings to be held 12/19/12 • One entry per visit! BRIEFS GAMES Today Q Fort White High girls basketball at Santa Fe High, 6 p.m. Q Fort White High soccer at P.K. Yonge School, 7 p.m. (girls-5) Q Columbia High girls basketball at Atlantic Coast High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-5:30) Q Columbia High boys basketball at Suwannee High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Friday Q Columbia High girls soccer at Hamilton County High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Q Columbia High boys soccer vs. Lincoln High at CYSA fields, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Q Fort White High girls basketball vs. North Florida Christian School, 7 p.m. Q Fort White High boys basketball at Melody Christian Academy, 7 p.m. Q Columbia High football at Navarre High in regional final, 7:30 p.m. (CST) Saturday Q Columbia High wrestling hosts Tiger Invitational, 10 a.m. Q Columbia High boys basketball at Union County High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) YOUTH SOCCER Winter sign-up ends today Columbia Youth Soccer Association’s 2013 Winter Recreational Soccer Season final registration for ages 3-16 is 6-7 p.m. today. Fee is $65. For details, call 288-2504. TRUCK SERIES Southern Monster Truck Showdown A Southern Monster Truck Showdown event is scheduled for Friday and Saturday at the Columbia County Fairgrounds. Southern Monster Truck drivers will compete in wheelie contests, circle-track racing and freestyle. There will be free competition for local mud truck owners and a free singing talent contest. A live concert will follow the showdown on Saturday. Cost is $10 for ages 3-12 and $15 for teens and adults. For details, call (386) 288-3689. BOYS CLUB Registration for basketball league The Boys Club of Columbia County is taking registration for its basketball program. Cost is $45. For details, call the club at 752-4184.Q From staff reports No time for change JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High quarterback Jayce Barber (5) looks to c onnect with an open receiver during a game against St. A ugustine High on Friday.Tigers travel to Navarre for regional finalBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comAlthough the game will be played nearly five hours away, there’s no change in direction for Columbia High as the Tigers prepare to take on Navarre High in the regional final at 7:30 p.m. Central Time on Friday. While many around the state are starting to predict Columbia as a state title contender, head coach Brian Allen isn’t paying attention to the talk of the Tigers throughout the state. “We’re going about our business the same way we have all year,” Allen said. “We don’t talk about rankings or predictions.” Allen is old school and more worried about earning the Tigers’ title at the end of the season. “The thing we say is that we earn respect with helmets and shoulder pads,” Allen said. “We’re not patting ourselves on the back. We’re taking it one game at a time and continuing to try to get better. We’re focused on this game agianst Navarre and we’re going to keep to the same routine we’ve used all season.” One thing Allen could promise is a team that plays with intensity on Friday. “We’re going to go out there with a ton of emotion,” Allen said. “It’s a good thing to be noticed, but that talk doesn’t help us win games.” The Tigers continue to prepare to win games the only way they know how. “The competition we have in practice,” Allen said. “We have to go in an execute while adding a new wrinkle here or there.” And despite the fact that the Tigers have been dominant throughout the playoffs, Allen isn’t letting the team rest think-ing they’ve already reached their potential. “We’re still not flawless,” Allen said. “At this point in the season turning the ball over one or two times can cost us the game. Missing an extra point can cost us a game, let alone a fumble. We can’t turn the ball over on our side of the 50. We can’t miss field goals. At this point, there’s a lot of parity and teams can match up player for player. The difference could be turnovers. We have to continue to play sharp and identify the mistakes we’re making so that we can correct them.” Although Allen knows the game could be close, the Tigers aren’t changing their preparation to account for a tight game. Columbia will continue to prepare just as they have all year. “We don’t prepare for things of that nature,” Allen said. “These men are mature beyond their years. We’ve had games that have prepared us for that going back to Oakleaf and Gainesville.” For Allen, it all goes back to playing the way they practice. “We’re prepared for turnovers or explosive plays,” he said. “We’re prepared to face adversity and we’ll fight through the intensity. It all goes back to the summer and that’s CHS continued on 2B JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Dakota Waters (18) attempts to head the ba ll against Mosley High’s Anthony Gentili (9) during a game on Wednesday.Tigers take down MoselyBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comIt was a night to remember for Dylan Sessions as he had a foot in every Columbia High goal as the Tigers defeated Mosely High, 5-1, in a district contest. Sessions opened the scoring in the first half with an assist from Dakota Waters and gave the Tigers a 2-1 halftime lead when Travis Berry assisted Sessions on his second goal. Sessions gave one back in the second half with an assist to Austin Kim in the first minute of play. Sessions’ hat trick came only minutes later with an assist from Alex Ray and he capped off the scoring by assisting Rogelio Sosa for the game’s final goal. “He showed that leadership quality,” Columbia head coach Trevor Tyler said. “The defense did a good job of setting up the attack and I don’t think we had a ball that wasn’t contested. Tristan O’Steen, Kevin Pittman, Travis Berry and Rogelio Sosa all played well. The Tigers are 6-2. Sessions shines for Columbia in 5-1 win at CYSA.

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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today COLLEGE FOOTBALL 7:30 p.m. ESPN — Louisville at Rutgers GOLF 9:30 a.m. TGC — Sunshine Tour, Nedbank Challenge, first round, at Sun City, South Africa (same-day tape) 3 p.m. TGC — World Challenge, first round, at Thousand Oaks, Calif. MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN2 — Kentucky at Notre Dame 9 p.m. ESPN2 — Marquette at Florida NBA BASKETBALL 8 p.m. TNT — San Antonio at Miami 10:30 p.m. TNT — Denver at Golden State NFL FOOTBALL 8 p.m. NFL — New Orleans at AtlantaFOOTBALLNFL standings AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PANew England 8 3 0 .727 407 244 Miami 5 6 0 .455 211 226 N.Y. Jets 4 7 0 .364 221 290 Buffalo 4 7 0 .364 243 319 South W L T Pct PF PAHouston 10 1 0 .909 327 211 Indianapolis 7 4 0 .636 230 273 Tennessee 4 7 0 .364 238 335Jacksonville 2 9 0 .182 188 308 North W L T Pct PF PABaltimore 9 2 0 .818 283 219Pittsburgh 6 5 0 .545 231 210Cincinnati 6 5 0 .545 282 247Cleveland 3 8 0 .273 209 248 West W L T Pct PF PADenver 8 3 0 .727 318 221San Diego 4 7 0 .364 245 237 Oakland 3 8 0 .273 218 356 Kansas City 1 10 0 .091 161 301 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAN.Y. Giants 7 4 0 .636 305 226 Washington 5 6 0 .455 295 285 Dallas 5 6 0 .455 242 262Philadelphia 3 8 0 .273 184 282 South W L T Pct PF PAAtlanta 10 1 0 .909 294 216 Tampa Bay 6 5 0 .545 310 254New Orleans 5 6 0 .455 308 304Carolina 3 8 0 .273 214 265 North W L T Pct PF PAChicago 8 3 0 .727 277 175 Green Bay 7 4 0 .636 273 245Minnesota 6 5 0 .545 248 249Detroit 4 7 0 .364 267 280 West W L T Pct PF PASan Francisco 8 2 1 .773 276 155 Seattle 6 5 0 .545 219 185 St. Louis 4 6 1 .409 205 254 Arizona 4 7 0 364 180 227 Today’s Game New Orleans at Atlanta, 8:20 p.m. Sunday’s Games Seattle at Chicago, 1 p.m.Minnesota at Green Bay, 1 p.m.San Francisco at St. Louis, 1 p.m.Carolina at Kansas City, 1 p.m.Houston at Tennessee, 1 p.m.Arizona at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m.Indianapolis at Detroit, 1 p.m.Jacksonville at Buffalo, 1 p.m.New England at Miami, 1 p.m.Tampa Bay at Denver, 4:05 p.m.Cleveland at Oakland, 4:25 p.m.Cincinnati at San Diego, 4:25 p.m.Pittsburgh at Baltimore, 4:25 p.m.Philadelphia at Dallas, 8:20 p.m. Monday’s Game N.Y. Giants at Washington, 8:30 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 6 Denver at Oakland, 8:20 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 9 Chicago at Minnesota, 1 p.m.Baltimore at Washington, 1 p.m.Kansas City at Cleveland, 1 p.m.San Diego at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.Tennessee at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.N.Y. Jets at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.Atlanta at Carolina, 1 p.m.Philadelphia at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.St. Louis at Buffalo, 1 p.m.Dallas at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.Miami at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.Arizona at Seattle, 4:25 p.m.New Orleans at N.Y. Giants, 4:25 p.m.Detroit at Green Bay, 8:20 p.m. Monday, Dec. 10 Houston at New England, 8:30 p.m. Playoff scenarios HOUSTON Clinches playoff spot with:— Win or tie, or— Miami and Pittsburgh loss or tie, or — Miami and Cincinnati loss or tie, or — Pittsburgh and Cincinnati loss BALTIMORE Clinches AFC North with:— Win and Cincinnati lossClinches a playoff spot with:— Win, or— Tie and Cincinnati loss and Miami loss or tie NEW ENGLAND Clinches AFC East with:— Win DENVER Clinches AFC West with:— Win, or— Tie and San Diego loss or tie, or— San Diego loss ATLANTA Clinches NFC South division with:— Win and Tampa Bay loss or tie, or— Tie and Tampa Bay lossClinches a playoff spot with:— Win and Seattle loss or tie, or— Tie and Seattle loss and Minnesota lossAP Top 25 schedule Friday No. 8 Stanford vs. No. 17 UCLA, Pac-12 championship, 8 p.m. No. 18 Kent State vs. No. 19 Northern Illinois, MAC championship at Detroit, 7 p.m. Saturday No. 2 Alabama vs. No. 3 Georgia, SEC championship at Atlanta, 4 p.m. No. 7 Kansas State vs. No. 23 Texas, 8 p.m. No. 12 Oklahoma at TCU, NoonNo. 13 Florida State vs. Georgia Tech, ACC championship at Charlotte, N.C., 8 p.m. No. 14 Nebraska vs. Wisconsin, Big Ten championship at Indianapolis, 8:15 p.m. No. 16 Oregon State vs. Nicholls State, 2:30 p.m. No. 24 Oklahoma State at Baylor, Noon No. 25 Boise State at Nevada, 3:30 p.m.BASKETBALLNBA schedule Today’s Games San Antonio at Miami, 8 p.m.Denver at Golden State, 10:30 p.m. Friday’s Games Philadelphia at Charlotte, 7 p.m.Phoenix at Toronto, 7 p.m.Brooklyn at Orlando, 7 p.m.Portland at Boston, 7:30 p.m.Cleveland at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.Washington at New York, 7:30 p.m.Milwaukee at Minnesota, 8 p.m.Detroit at Memphis, 8 p.m.Utah at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.Indiana at Sacramento, 10 p.m.Denver at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m. AP Top 25 schedule Today’s Games No. 7 Florida vs. Marquette, 9 p.m. No. 8 Kentucky at Notre Dame, 7 p.m. No. 12 Gonzaga vs. Lewis-Clark State, 9 p.m.Minnesota 77, Florida St. 68 At Tallahassee MINNESOTA (7-1) Williams Jr. 4-10 5-5 14, An. Hollins 5-10 0-0 12, Au. Hollins 3-9 6-8 13, Coleman 8-13 0-0 16, Eliason 1-4 2-4 4, Walker 0-0 0-0 0, Osenieks 1-1 0-0 2, Ingram 0-0 0-0 0, Mbakwe 1-3 4-7 6, Welch 3-4 0-0 7, Ahanmisi 0-1 3-4 3. Totals 26-55 20-28 77.FLORIDA ST. (4-2) Snaer 3-9 4-4 12, Turpin 2-6 1-2 5, Brandon 3-9 0-0 6, White 1-2 7-10 10, Miller 1-7 0-1 2, Bojanovsky 1-2 1-2 3, Bookert 0-1 0-0 0, Thomas 2-5 2-2 6, Shannon 6-12 2-2 14, Whisnant II 3-5 2-2 10. Totals 22-58 19-25 68. Halftime—Minnesota 38-25. 3-Point Goals—Minnesota 5-14 (An. Hollins 2-5, Williams Jr. 1-1, Welch 1-2, Au. Hollins 1-4, Coleman 0-1, Ahanmisi 0-1), Florida St. 5-16 (Snaer 2-2, Whisnant II 2-4, White 1-1, Bookert 0-1, Miller 0-2, Thomas 0-3, Brandon 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Minnesota 34 (Eliason 10), Florida St. 35 (Shannon 11). Assists—Minnesota 17 (An. Hollins 5), Florida St. 8 (Brandon 5). Total Fouls—Minnesota 19, Florida St. 23. A—7,941. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2012 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04202BAGATE THURSDAY EVENING NOVEMBER 29, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Last Resort “Big Chicken Dinner” (N) Grey’s Anatomy (N) (:02) Scandal “De ance” (N) News at 11(:35) Nightline (N) 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) The Insider 5-PBS 5 -Journal Nightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Doo Wop Discoveries (My Music) R&B and pop vocal groups. Dr. Fuhrman’s Immunity Solution! Tavis Smiley 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge Judy Two and Half MenBig Bang TheoryTwo and Half Men(:01) Person of Interest “Til Death” (N) (:01) Elementary “The Long Fuse” (N) Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneThe Vampire Diaries (N) Beauty and the Beast “Out of Control” TMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ce The Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family Guy Family Guy The SimpsonsThe X Factor “Live Results” (N) Glee “Thanksgiving” (N) (DVS) NewsAction News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) 30 Rock (N) Up All Night (N) The Of ce (N) Parks/Recreat(:01) Rock Center With Brian WilliamsNewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(5:00) Public Affairs Capitol Hill Hearings WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304(5:11) Bonanza(:22) M*A*S*HM*A*S*H “Deluge” The Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279The Will: Family Secrets RevealedThe Will: Family Secrets Revealed48 Hours: Hard Evidence 48 Hours: Hard Evidence 48 Hours: Hard Evidence “Sleep Tight” 48 Hours: Hard Evidence A&E 19 118 265The First 48 “Caught in the Middle” The First 48 The First 48 The First 48 (N) Panic 9-1-1 (Series Premiere) (N) (:01) Panic 9-1-1 HALL 20 185 312 “A Princess for Christmas” (2011) Katie McGrath, Roger Moore. “Naughty or Nice” (2012, Fantasy) Hilarie Burton, Gabriel Tigerman. “The Santa Incident” (2010, Comedy) Ione Skye, Greg Germann. FX 22 136 248Two and Half MenTwo and Half Men “Iron Man” (2008) Robert Downey Jr., Terrence Howard. A billionaire dons an armored suit to ght criminals. It’s Always SunnyThe League (N) Totally BiasedBrandX With CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245The Mentalist “Red Sky at Night” The Mentalist “Cackle-Bladder Blood”d NBA Basketball San Antonio Spurs at Miami Heat. From the AmericanAirlines Arena in Miami. (N)d NBA Basketball Denver Nuggets at Golden State Warriors. NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBob“A Fairly Odd Christmas” (2012) Drake Bell. Premiere. Full House Full House Full House The Nanny The Nanny Friends (:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241Jail Jail Jail Jail (N) iMPACT Wrestling (N) Tattoo NightmaresTattoo NightmaresMMA UncensoredGT Academy (N) MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*H M*A*S*H White Collar Neal goes undercover. White Collar Neal has a copycat thief. Seinfeld Frasier “Oops!” The Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Phineas and FerbGood Luck CharlieShake It Up! A.N.T. Farm Jessie “Spy Kids” (2001, Adventure) Antonio Banderas. Dog With a BlogPhineas and FerbGood Luck CharlieA.N.T. Farm LIFE 32 108 252Trading Spouses: Meet New MommyTrading Spouses: Meet New MommyProject Runway All Stars Project Runway All Stars (N) Abby’s Ultimate Dance CompetitionProject Runway All Stars USA 33 105 242NCIS The team tries to replace Ziva. NCIS “Ships in the Night” NCIS A coast guard of cer is murdered. NCIS “Thirst” (DVS) Burn Notice “Down & Out” (N) (:01) NCIS “Jet Lag” BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Top 10 Countdown” (N) Apollo Live (N) BET Hip Hop Awards 2011 Hosted by Mike Epps at the Atlantic Civic Center. The Game The Game ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) Coll. Football Livee College Football Louisville at Rutgers. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209SportsNation (N) d College Basketball Kentucky at Notre Dame. (N)d College Basketball Marquette at Florida. (N) Boxing Boxing SUNSP 37 -how to Do oridaPleasure BoaterInside the Heat (N) Future PhenomsLightning Classics From Oct. 5, 2005. (N) Inside Israeli Bask.C-USA ShowcaseThe New College Football Show DISCV 38 182 278Jungle Gold “Broken Man” Jungle Gold “Desperate Measures” Moonshiners Moonshiners “Storm’s a Brewing” Ghost Town Gold “Trailing Outlaws” Moonshiners “Storm’s a Brewing” TBS 39 139 247King of QueensKing of QueensSeinfeld “The Pie” Seinfeld Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryConan (N) HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) What Would You Do?What Would You Do?Showbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236Ice Loves CocoIce Loves CocoE! News (N) The SoupLove You, Mean ItKardashianKardashianKourtney & KhloKardashianChelsea Lately (N) E! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. Food Man v. Food Mysteries at the Museum Mysteries at the Museum (N) Mysteries at the Museum The Dead Files HGTV 47 112 229Property VirginsProperty VirginsHunters Int’lHouse HuntersBuying and Selling “Halley & Justin” Extreme Homes (N) House HuntersHunters Int’lExtreme Homes TLC 48 183 280Island MediumIsland MediumAlong for the BrideAlong for the BrideSay Yes, DressSay Yes, DressFour Weddings “...and a Circus” (N) Along for the BrideTo Be AnnouncedFour Weddings “...and a Circus” HIST 49 120 269101 Gadgets That Changed the World A panel discusses in uential gadgets. Ancient Aliens “Aliens and Bigfoot” Ancient Aliens “Aliens and Dinosaurs” Ancient Aliens (:02) Ancient Aliens ANPL 50 184 282Swamp Wars “Killer in Your Mailbox” Rattlesnake Republic “Mutiny” Rattlesnake Republic Rattlesnake Republic Rattlesnake RepublicRattlesnake Republic FOOD 51 110 231Chopped “Have a Heart” Cupcake WarsSugar Dome “A Dragon’s Tale” Sweet Genius “Golden Genius” Sweet Genius “Magic Genius” The Next Iron Chef: Redemption TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the Lord Always Good NewThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesJoel Osteen Joseph PrinceHillsong TVPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -Football PrevUFC InsiderWorld Poker Tour: Season 10World Poker Tour: Season 10DrivenFootball PrevUFC InsiderUFC Unleashed SYFY 58 122 244Name of King“Dungeons & Dragons: Wrath of the Dragon God” (2005, Fantasy) Bruce Payne, Mark Dymond. “Dungeons & Dragons: The Book of Vile Darkness” (2011) Jack Derges. “Age of the Dragons” (2011) AMC 60 130 254CSI: Miami “Bait” CSI: Miami Harpooned yachtsman. “Fargo” (1996, Suspense) Frances McDormand, Steve Buscemi. “Casino” (1995, Crime Drama) Robert De Niro, Sharon Stone. COM 62 107 249(5:58) South Park(:29) Tosh.0 The Colbert ReportDaily Show(7:59) “Accepted” (2006, Comedy) Justin Long, Jonah Hill, Blake Lively. Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Daily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327Reba Bar brawl. Reba Suspicions. Reba Reba Reba Reba Ron White’s Comedy Salute to the Troops 2012 Ron White: They Call Me Tater SaladRon White’s Com NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer “Blood Brothers” Chimps: Next of KinSwamp of the BaboonsMystery GorillasKiller CatsSwamp of the Baboons NGC 109 186 276Drugs, Inc. “Hawaiian Ice” Alaska State TroopersWicked Tuna: Hooked UpRocket CityRocket CityAm. ChainsawAm. ChainsawRocket CityRocket City SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeThey Do It?They Do It?How It’s MadeHow It’s Made ID 111 192 285Scorned: Love Kills Scorned: Love Kills Sins & Secrets “Hilo” The Will: Family Secrets Revealed (N) Very Bad Men (N) Very Bad MenSins & Secrets “Hilo” HBO 302 300 501(4:45) Tower Heist “Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban” (2004, Fantasy) Daniel Radcliffe. ‘PG’ “Safe House” (2012, Action) Denzel Washington, Ryan Reynolds. ‘R’ Cathouse: Menage a Trois MAX 320 310 515The Rocketeer(:35) “Mercury Rising” (1998, Suspense) Bruce Willis, Alec Baldwin. ‘R’ “Firestorm” (1998, Action) Howie Long. ‘R’ “Rise of the Planet of the Apes” (2011) ‘PG-13’ Teenie Weenie SHOW 340 318 545Trouble-Bliss(:20) “50/50” (2011) Joseph Gordon-Levitt. ‘R’ “Apollo 18” (2011) Lloyd Owen. ‘PG-13’ (:25) “Goon” (2011, Comedy) Seann William Scott. ‘R’ Dave’s Old PornReality Show (N) CHS: Prepares for its biggest game Continued From Page 1B JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterBrian Allen, Columbia High School football head coach, delivers a speech to the team before handing the game ball over to Ronald Timmons following their 34-8 victory over St. Augustine High on Friday.Miles, LSU agree to extensionAssociated PressBATON ROUGE, La. — LSU athletic director Joe Alleva says football coach Les Miles is getting a raise and an extension through 2019. Alleva confirmed the length of the deal after he and Miles’s agent, George Bass reached an agreement on Wednesday afternoon. Alleva says financial details of the contract are still in the negotiation pro-cess and will be announced at a later date. Miles’ previous contract paid about $3.75 million annually through 2017. He has not received a raise since 2008, though he has since received an extension and raises for assistants. Miles is 85-20 at LSU since arriving in 2005, with one national title in the 2007 season and two BCS championship appearances. LSU’s victory over Arkansas last Friday clinched Miles’ fifth 10-win season with the Tigers. why we beat these men down only to pick them back up.” And as far as how big of a game this will be for the Tigers, don’t expect the coach to change his phi-losophy just because its a regional final. “It’s going to continue to be the biggest game we’ve played all year,” Allen said. “They’re the best team that we’ve played all year, because they’re the next one. We’re excited for another opportunity to showcase who we are.” ACC votes to add Louisville as memberBy AARON BEARDAssociated PressThe Atlantic Coast Conference announced Wednesday that its presi-dents and chancellors unanimously voted to add Louisville as the replace-ment for Maryland. ACC Commissioner John Swofford said Louisville was the best fit for the league following Maryland’s announcement last week that it would join the Big Ten in 2014. “When you look at Louisville, you see a uni-versity and an athletic pro-gram that has all the arrows pointed up — a tremen-dous uptick there, tremen-dous energy,” Swofford said on a teleconference. “It’s always an overall fit in every respect and I think that’s what we found.” Louisville is the fourth school in 15 months and seventh in the past decade to leave the Big East for the ACC. Pittsburgh and Syracuse announced their move in September 2011 and will join the league next year, while Notre Dame said two months ago that it would eventually join in all conference sports except football. Louisville athletic director Tom Jurich said it was hard not to worry about constantly shifting con-ference alignments and whether the school might be left out when everything finally settles. Louisville was a candidate to join the Big 12 last year before that league took West Virginia. “We wanted to make sure all our opportunities were looked at,” Jurich said. “But having the opportu-nity to go into the ACC is I think second to none, especially for our commu-nity around here. ... I can just tell you from our stand-point, we couldn’t be in a better fit.” A person familiar with the situation told The Associated Press that ACC leaders also considered Connecticut and Cincinnati over the past week before the vote to add Louisville during a confer-ence call Wednesday morn-ing. The person spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity because the ACC hasn’t released details of the expansion discussions. Politicians around Kentucky cheered the move. Louisville mayor Greg Fischer issued a statement calling the ACC’s decision “a fantastic development for the university, the city and the state.” U.S. Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky said in a statement the move was a credit to Jurich’s leadership of the athletic department. It’s unclear exactly when Louisville will join the ACC. Swofford said that would have to be worked out between the school and the Big East. He also said the league is comfortable stay-ing at 14 full members with the addition of Louisville. The Big East has a 27month notification peri-od for any member that wants to leave. The Big East has shown a willing-ness to negotiate, as it did with Pittsburgh and Syracuse, who paid $7.5 million each to get out early when the exit fee was $5 million.

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DEAR ABBY: My husband committed suicide 2 1/2 years ago. We had been married for 13 years and had two daughters who are now 15 and 9. The l5-year-old seems to be doing fine. The 9-year-old is not. But my biggest problem is my live-in boyfriend, “Tim.” While I love him and mostly enjoy his com-pany, he appears to dislike my 9-year-old. She needs male attention because her dad was an attentive, won-derful father. I have dis-cussed this with Tim. His response is he has a hard time doing it because she is “totally out of control and crazy.” Abby, she is none of that. She is a child with a lot of energy. I don’t know what to do. I know it isn’t fair to my daughter, but I’m lonely and miss Tim when he’s not there. I’d appreciate any advice you can give me. -TRYING TO MOVE ON IN OHIO DEAR TRYING: I am so sorry for your loss. However, parents get only one chance at parenting, which is why it’s so impor-tant to do it right the first time. What is happening in your household is unfair to your daughter. She should not be forced to live with a man who doesn’t like her and can’t give her positive reinforcement. That’s why, for her sake, it would be better for you and Tim to live apart. If you choose him over your daughter, you will later regret it and could cause her serious emotional problems for decades. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: The holidays are right around the corner, and my husband and I have had a difficult couple of years financially. I’m a full-time student; he is the only one bringing in an income while we raise two young boys. I love the holidays except for shopping for others. I hate spending money I don’t have look-ing for that perfect gift for everyone on my list. More often than not, the gift ends up being re-gifted or in the summer garage sale. I know for a fact that my extended family is as strapped for cash as I am, but they charge on credit cards. Should I refuse a gift I can’t reciprocate or thank them and try not to feel guilty? The name exchange option didn’t work. I feel there should be more to the holidays than going into debt for gifts. -MA HUMBUG IN OREGON DEAR MA HUMBUG: Thank your relatives for their gifts. Reiterate that money is tight, so you will be giving gifts to the youngest family members only. If you feel you must reciprocate in some way, whip up a batch of holiday cookies or fudge brownies and make that your holi-day gift. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: My husband and I have been mar-ried for six years. Before I met him, I was with a woman. I don’t want my husband to find out about it because I’m afraid it will turn him on and he’ll want to have threesomes. (He enjoys looking at lesbian porn.) Should I feel this way about telling him? -WANTS MY PAST IN THE PAST DEAR WANTS YOUR PAST IN THE PAST: If you think there is a chance that your husband will find out, then the person he should hear it from is you. DILBERT BABY BLUES HOROSCOPES DEAR ABBY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Listen to what’s being asked of you. Don’t let anger take over. Assess what you are dealing with and minimize any negativ-ity by focusing on what you can accomplish and the people who are willing to work with you instead of against you. ++++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Speak up. There is plenty you can do to secure your position or find a new one. Traveling and communication will allow you to promote what you have to offer. Educational pursuits add to your resume and lead to interesting connections. Love is highlighted. +++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Someone from your past will help plug you into a good group of people in your chosen field. Share your creative ideas. Expose a plan you have and you are likely to get great input and a proposal as well. +++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Make a point of con-tacting someone you miss or want to get to know bet-ter. Interacting with friends or colleagues will lead to an unusual change in the way you move forward or the lifestyle you choose to live. Love is enhanced. +++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Take a closer look at your personal situation and you will discover something that may help you avoid a turn of events that will cost you emotionally or financially. Compromise can make a difference as long as it is reciprocated. ++++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Step away from any-one pressuring you. Take a serious step toward mak-ing your life better. Getting involved in an event that will enable you to meet new people will help you adjust to a new way of life. ++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Consider how you can earn more money. Update your resume and discuss future prospects with people you have worked with. Don’t let what oth-ers think or say deter you from doing what will make you happy. Make a move. +++++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Money matters will cause uncertainty. An impulsive move to over-come your lack of funds will set you back. Sticking to a budget and drumming up extra work will help relieve stress. Time is of the essence, so don’t pro-crastinate. +++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Size up any relationships that are caus-ing you concern. It’s time to weed out some of the people who are either cost-ing you too much or caus-ing you grief. Be truthful regarding your motives and you will avoid an unsa-vory situation. +++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Do whatever is necessary to get ahead. Live up to your promises and take control of what-ever you face. You have everything to gain by speaking up and getting whatever troubles exist out in the open. It’s time to move forward. +++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Do what’s expected of you and you will avoid backlash. Show responsibility and you will gain respect. Change your living arrangements and you will make your envi-ronment less stressful. Say less and do more. You will make a good impression. +++++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Implement your ideas and plans. You can make some favorable changes at home that will influence your financial situation as well as your relationship with those you live with. Romance and sharing with someone special will be fulfilling. ++ CELEBRITY CIPHER Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com BLONDIE BEETLE BAILEY B.C. FRANK & ERNEST FOR BETTER OR WORSE ZITS HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH GARFIELD THE LAST WORD Eugenia Last Boyfriend can’t fill father’s shoes for 9-year-old daughter Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. CLASSIC PEANUTS Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2012 3B

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTHURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2012 Classified Department: 755-5440 4B CLASSIFIED AD vantageTake ADvantage of the Reporter Classifieds!755-5440Lake City Reporter FIND IT SELL IT BUY IT $17504 lines 3 days Includes 2 Signs Each additional line $1.65 Garage Sale Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$10104 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.10One item per ad Under $500 Personal Merchandise Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$16754 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.15One item per ad Under $1,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$23704 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.45One item per ad Under $2,500 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $4,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$27404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.55One item per ad Under $4,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$30404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.65One item per ad Under $6,000 Placing An Ad Service Guide Limited to service type advertis-ing only.4 lines, one month....$92.00 $10.80 each additional lineIncludes an additional $2.00 per ad for each Wednesday insertion. DeadlinesBe Sure to Call Early You can call us at 755-5440 Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.Some people prefer to place their classified ads in person, and some ad categories will require prepay-ment. Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street.You can also fax or email your ad copy to the Reporter.FAX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the Classified Department.EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreporter.comAd is to Appear:TuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday Call by:Mon., 10:00 a.m.Mon., 10:00 a.m.Wed., 10:00 a.m.Thurs., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fax/Email by:Mon., 9:00 a.m.Mon., 9:00 a.m.Wed., 9:00 a.m.Thurs., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.These deadlines are subject to change without notice. Cancellations, Changes & Billing Questions Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject, or classify all advertisements under appropriate headings. Copy should be checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day of pub-lication. Credit for published errors will be allowed for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement which was incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be published, nor for any general, special or consequential damages. Advertising language must comply with Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition of discrimi-nation in employment, housing and public accommodations. Standard abbreviations are acceptable; how-ever, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated. Ad Errors-Please read your ad on the first day of publication. Weaccept responsibility for only the first incorrect insertion, and only the charge for the ad space in error. Please call 755-5440 immediately for prompt correc-tion and billing adjustments.CancellationsNormal advertising deadlines apply for cancellation.Billing InquiriesCall 755-5440. Should further information be required regarding payments or credit limits, your call will be trans-ferred to the accounting depart-ment. General Information In Print and Onlinewww.lakecityreporter.com Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$2504 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $.25One item per ad Under $100 CLASSIFIED AD vantageTake ADvantage of the Reporter Classifieds!755-5440Lake City Reporter FIND IT SELL IT BUY IT $17504 lines 3 days Includes 2 Signs Each additional line $1.65 Garage Sale Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$10104 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.10One item per ad Under $500 Personal Merchandise Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$16754 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.15One item per ad Under $1,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$23704 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.45One item per ad Under $2,500 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $4,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$27404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.55One item per ad Under $4,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$30404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.65One item per ad Under $6,000 Placing An Ad Service Guide Limited to service type advertis-ing only.4 lines, one month....$92.00 $10.80 each additional lineIncludes an additional $2.00 per ad for each Wednesday insertion. DeadlinesBe Sure to Call Early You can call us at 755-5440 Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.Some people prefer to place their classified ads in person, and some ad categories will require prepay-ment. Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street.You can also fax or email your ad copy to the Reporter.FAX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the Classified Department.EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreporter.comAd is to Appear:TuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday Call by:Mon., 10:00 a.m.Mon., 10:00 a.m.Wed., 10:00 a.m.Thurs., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fax/Email by:Mon., 9:00 a.m.Mon., 9:00 a.m.Wed., 9:00 a.m.Thurs., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.These deadlines are subject to change without notice. Cancellations, Changes & Billing Questions Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject, or classify all advertisements under appropriate headings. Copy should be checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day of pub-lication. Credit for published errors will be allowed for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement which was incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be published, nor for any general, special or consequential damages. Advertising language must comply with Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition of discrimi-nation in employment, housing and public accommodations. Standard abbreviations are acceptable; how-ever, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated. Ad Errors-Please read your ad on the first day of publication. Weaccept responsibility for only the first incorrect insertion, and only the charge for the ad space in error. Please call 755-5440 immediately for prompt correc-tion and billing adjustments.CancellationsNormal advertising deadlines apply for cancellation.Billing InquiriesCall 755-5440. Should further information be required regarding payments or credit limits, your call will be trans-ferred to the accounting depart-ment. General Information In Print and Onlinewww.lakecityreporter.com Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$2504 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $.25One item per ad Under $100 Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 ServicesFLCert. Teacher with 10 yrs exp. Offering a homeshooling group in Jan. Reasonably priced. Interested parents 386-288-0954. LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTFOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.CIVILDIVISIONCASE NO. 12-2012CA000532XXXXXXWELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFI-CATE HOLDERS OF BANC OF AMERICAALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST2005-12 MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFI-CATES, SERIES 2005-12Plaintiff,vs.MIR A. GOFUR A/K/AMIR AB-DULGOFUR; et al,.Defendants.NOTICE OF ACTIONTO: MIR A. GOFUR A/K/AMIR ABDULGOFUR and F.M. NOOR SULTANALast Known Address7137 S US HIGHWAY441LAKE CITY, FL32025-0250Current Residence is UnknownYOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the fol-lowing described property in Colum-bia County, Florida:BEGINNING ATAPOINTWHERE THE EASTLINE OF HIGHWAYNO. 2 INTERSECTS THE SOUTH LINE OF LANE RUNNING EASTAND WESTALONG THE CENTER LINE OF SECTION 34, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, AND RUNNING THENCE EASTALONG THE SAID SOUTH LINE OF SAID LANE 858 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 278.1 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 87.5 WEST672 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE EASTLINE OF HIGHWAYNO. 2; THENCE IN ANORTHERLYDI-RECTION ALONG THE EASTLINE OF HIGHWAYNO. 2, ADISTANCE OF 317 FEET, MORE OR LESS TO THE POINTOF BE-GINNING, LYING AND BEING IN COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.LESS AND EXCEPT: THATPOR-TION OF THE ABOVE DESCRI-BED LANDS DEEDED TO THE STATE OF FLORIDAIN DEED BOOK 87, PAGES 31 AND 32 OF THE OFFICIALRECORDS OF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on SMITH, HIATT& DIAZ, P.A., Plaintiff's attorneys, whose address is PO BOX 11438 Fort Lauderdale, FL33339-1438, (954) 564-0071, within 30 days from the first date of publi-cation, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney’s or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the com-plaint or petition.DATED on 11/15/2012./s/ P. Dewitt CasonAs Clerk of the CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioAs Deputy ClerkIn accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, per-sons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Court no later than five business days prior to the proceeding at the Columbia County Courthouse. Telephone 904-758-1041 or 1-800-955-8770 via Florida Relay Service.05535960November 29, 2012December 6, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO. 12-280-CACOLUMBIABANK, a Florida banking corporationPlaintiff,vs.SCOTTCURRYand JULIE CUR-RY, husband and wife,Defendants.CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE UN-DER F.S. CHAPTER 45 COUNTIINOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accord-ance with the Summary Final Judg-ment of Foreclosure dated November 20, 2012, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bid-der for cash at the Columbia County Courthouse, Courtroom 1, 173 Northeast Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055 at 11:00 a.m. on 12/19/2012, the following described property:Lot 13, Block 6, MCFARLANE PARK, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book B, Page 5, of the Public Records of Columbia County, Florida.ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN IN-TERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.Dated: 11/20/12P. DeWitt CasonClerk of CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy Clerk05535993November 29, 2012December 6, 2012 Public Auction to be held JANUARY5, 2013 at 8AM at Ozzie’s Towing & Auto, LLC 2492 SE Baya Ave. Lake City FL, 32025.(386)719-5608Following Vin Number:1983 OLDSVin# 1G3AW69Y2DM89493605536036NOVEMBER 29, 2012 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO. 12-280-CACOLUMBIABANK, a Florida banking corporationPlaintiff,vs.SCOTTCURRYand JULIE CUR-RY, husband and wife,Defendants.CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE UN-DER F.S. CHAPTER 45 COUNTINOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accord-ance with the Summary Final Judg-ment of Foreclosure dated November 20, 2012, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bid-der for cash at the Columbia County Courthouse, Courtroom 1, 173 Northeast Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055 at 11:00 a.m. on 12/19/2012, the following described property:Lot 1, Unit 1, SUNNYACRES, ac-cording to the plat therof as recorded in Plat Book 6, Page 44, of the Pub-lic records of Columbia County, Florida, together with a 1999 Harbor doublewide mobile home Serial No. GAFLX35A1611OHL21 and GAFLX35B1611OHL21ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN IN-TERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.Dated: 11/20/12P. DeWitt CasonClerk of CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy Clerk05535994November 29, 2012December 6, 2012 100Job Opportunities05534241NOWHIRING Cashiers & Baggers forHigh Springs fruit & gift stores. Benefits avail: health, dental, & vacation. Apply in person: Florida Citrus Center(Chevron) 18603 NWCR 236, High Springs (exit 404 & I-75) 05536033Administrative Assistant White Springs, Florida Verifiable job history. Strong computer skills. Able to be trained in our specialty. Able to perform without constant supervision. Must be flexible and team player. Great communication skills. Must want to work for a stable company. POSITION NEEDS TO BE FILLED IMMEDIATELY Please email resume to hr@speced.org BARTENDER NEEDED Experienced & Dependable, Must have your own phone & car. 386-752-2412 CDLClass A Truck Driver Flatbed exp. for F/TSE area. 3 years exp or more. Medical benefits offered. Contact Melissa or Sandy@ 386-935-2773 EXP. TRAINER: Responsible for Teaching individuals about the Judicial system. Associates degree, Background and reference checks, and valid DLreq’d. PT. E-mail resume to jshaw@itmflorida.com Mechanic needed at Fla.Rock & Tank Lines In White Springs. Diesel exprnc reqr'd in maintenance & repair of tractor trailers. 45-50hrs/wk Class A CDLlicense preferred. Excellent Benefits! email: mcomer@patriottrans.com or fax 904-858-9008 Mechanic needed for general semi-truck and tire repairs. Steady employment with benefits. Salary dependent on experience. Must have own hand tools. Please contact Greg @ 755-7700 Night Clerk Needed. Permanent Part Time, 12-8am. Two days a week. Apply in Person. No Calls Please. America’s Best Value Inn. 3835 West US Hwy 90, Lake City Person to cut cloth material for small sewing factory. Also person to attend gun shows selling same product. 386-755-6481 SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 120Medical Employment05536058RN/LPN/C.N.A Full Time RN Unit Manager Avalon Healthcare Center is currently accepting applications for the part time positions of RN/LPN/C.N.Aand Full Time RN Unit Manager Please apply at Avalon Healthcare and Rehabilitation Center. 1270 S.W. Main Blvd. Lake City, Florida 32025 or fax resume to 386-752-8556 EOE Exp. CAP or Licensed Mental Health Professional for counseling and assessments in an outpatient SAtreatment program. Ref. Req'd. PT Email resume to bsmith@itmflorida.com 120Medical EmploymentDIET AR Y MANAGER Needed CDM, Chef, LTC, 2 years experience preferred Must be able to manage large staff and oversee daily food preparation for a 180 bed SNF. Full time with excellent benefits. E-mail resume to Greg Roberts: groberts@gulfcoasthealthcare.com or fax to: (386)362-4417. Live Oak, FLEOE/V/D/M/F GREATOPPORTUNITY•Full Time Experienced RN’s, LPN’s 7a-7p & 7p-7a•Full Time Experienced C.N.A’s All Shifts Apply in person at Suwannee Health Care & Rehab. 1620 Helevenston Street S.E. Live Oak, FL32064 EOE/m/f/d/v 140Work Wanted Experienced House/Office Cleaner Looking for Clients. References Available upon request. Contact for information 904-504-2620 240Schools & Education05535484Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class12/24/2012• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-11/05/12• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies New Igloo Dog house. Med size, $50.00 Contact 386-466-5022 PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. Yorkie-Poo puppy, Playful and Smart. Ready December 1st. $300-600 386-365-7002. 408Furniture King Size Mattress, box spring, frame, head board and foot board. $200 obo. 386-984-7586 408Furniture Solid Wood Dining Room Table and six (6) chairs. $125.00 Contact 386-752-3245 420Wanted to Buy 2BR/1BA$600/MO & $575 Sec. Dep. Lovely, Private, re-done CR 242 West of RT47 386-365-7193 or 867-6319 430Garage Sales 11/30-12/1, 8-1 Misc Baby items, kids clothing/shoes, baby items, toys, furn, HH, adult clothing. Woodcrest Sub. Woodview Way DEC 1, 8am Noon, Rain Cancels US 90Wto Pinemount Rd (252) approx 7 miles turn Rt on 29th Rd. Alittle bit of everything. Estate Sale Sat. 12/1, 7-?, 198 SW Azalea Place off Hwy. 47. Lots of Christmas, hshld. & crafts. Some catering supplies & lots of misc. Multi Family 12/1 8am-? No Early Birds. 441N turn Rt on Gum Swamp Rd, 4.8 miles. Christmas Items and More! PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. Sat, Sun, Mon 8 am-? Furn., Tools, Clothes, HH items, 5’Plants, Decor & More. 1259 Nw Turner Ave 430Garage Sales Sat. December 1st, 7am-Noon Russwood Estates off Troy Rd. Multi Family Too Much to Mention. Must See! Saturday, Dec 1st 7:30 am to ? 2 Homes 90 WCypress Lakes Lots Of Stuff 440Miscellaneous 05535950GUNSHOW: 12/01 &12/02 @ The Columbia County Fairgrounds, Hwy 247 Lake City. Admin. $5 Sat 9am4pm, Sun 9am-3pm. Info: 386-325-6114 75 ft. Antenna Tower w/guy wires. On ground-you disassemble. $125. Call 386-497-2592 Free To a small church that can use 13 pew cushions 10 ft long, good cond., olive green color. Also, 16 choir robes, olive green color. Call 386-497-2592 Pr. Of patio doors, all metal w/ full thermal glass, snap in grilles and sliding screen door. No frame. $50. Call 386-497-2592 Three Poulan chain saws Need Tune up. $100 for all. Call 386-497-2592REPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Linewww.lakecityreporter.com

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTHURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2012 5B Classified Department: 755-5440 450Good Things to EatThe Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans 2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024 Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville 386-963-4138 or 961-1420 630Mobile Homes forRent2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $450. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 2 BR/1BA $475/mth. Located in center of Lake City Close to Everything !!! 305-984-5511 or 386-344-0830 3 BR/2 BA, Doublewide in Lake City, $700 mo. Call Linda 386-623-0295 Clean 2br/1ba partially furnished Lots of trees on Turner Rd. Leave message if no answer. 386-752-6269 Mobile Homes for rent in White Springs & Ft. White. Contact 386-623-3404 Quiet Country Park 3br/2ba $525. Very clean NO PETS! References & Deposit required 386-758-2280 Very nice 3bd/2ba on 1 ac, close to Westside Elem. No pets, $650 mth, $375 dep. Avail Now. Contact 386-365-7532 after 5 pm WATERTOWN AREA 3br/2ba DW, Handicap accessible, $650 mth, $500 dep. Call 386-344-0144, 386-344-5791 640Mobile Homes forSale2 MFG HOMES on 5 ACRES! Great for 2 families in Godbold Acres west of Lake City $79,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCY INC. 755-5110 #81421 2013 DOUBLEWIDE $33,995 inc. set-up, trim-out & A/C Call 386-288-8379. 3BR/2BA28X64 in a great location, a lot of upgrades, fireplace. Only $2,500 down $399 a month. Call Paula at 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com 5 LIKENew Mobile Homes!!! For under $30,000. MUSTSEE Call John T. 386-752-1452 BANK REPO 3BR/2BADoublewide ’09 Excellent condition. Only $999 down $377 a month. Call Paula 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com CLOSE TO VAMED CTR! 3BR/2BAw/beautiful interior, new CH&A$59,900 DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #81428 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #75661 Must be 55+, Manufacture home, 1 ac, fireplace, laundry, open & bright $79,900. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 EASTSIDE VILLAGE 2BR/2BAw/lg kitchen, open floor plan $79,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #80972 HALLMARK REALESTATE What a Deal! 2003 3/2 MH over 1600 sqft,in Trenton, .92 ac ONLY case # 091-379757 MLS# 82117 Robin Williams 386-365-5146 LIVE OAK! Cute home in city limits; 3BR/1BA& 1,294 SqFt $49,500 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #81410 MUSTSEE 2013 2x6 walls, R30 insulation, OSB wrap, house wrap, real wood cabinets, and thermal pain windows. Payment $399 per month call John T386-752-1452. Palm Harbor Stilt Homes Waterfront Beach, 34 Years Experience www.plantcity.palmharbor.com John Lyons 800-622-2832 x210 Poole Realty 3/2 MH, fireplace, screened back porch, storage shed and all the amenities necessary for a relaxing lifestyle, Irvin Dees, 208-4276. MLS 82226 WANTED…CASH PAID for your Mobile Home, Singlewide or Doublewide flood homes welcome. Call 386-288-8379 WOODGATE VILLAGE Move-in ready! Open 3BR/2BA floor plan on nice shaded lot $49,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC 755-5110 #82259 WOODGATE VILLAGE Nice 3BR/2BADWMH w/fenced yd, workshop; $39,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCY, INC 755-5110 #79078 650Mobile Home & Land2br, 2ba, 3.51 acres. 1512 sqft, nice affordable DW. Perfect Rental. Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473 MLS #882216 $65,000 Great Value 24 acres, 3/2 DWMH open floor plan, in ground pool. MLS 79000. Poole Realty $115,000 Nelda Hatcher. Call 688-8067 Hallmark Real Estate Deer & turkey roam, 3000 sqft brick home, detached garagesworkshops on 18 ac. MLS #81005 Ginger Parker 386-365-2135 Out of State owner, Anxious to sell. Nice 2br/2ba 1996 DW, Energy Efficient, 3/4 frnshd, 3 yr old roof, 1/2 ac lot in Oak Wd subdv in Live Oak $39,900 or best resonable offer. Call 309-645-2659 OwnerFinanced 3/22.5 ac.River Access. Small down $625 mo 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 705Rooms forRent RV for Rent $400 mth utilities included, Avail now. Contact 386-497-3524 or 386-288-9110 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent1BR APT. Downtown Location, Clean. New Carpet $450 mo, plus Security. NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456 2 bedroom / 1 Bath Apts for rent in Live Oak. Call for price. Contact 386-623-3404 & 386-362-9806 2BR/2BAw/garage 5 minutes from VAhospital and Timco. Call for details. 386-365-5150 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Amberwood Hills Apts. Private Patio area. Beautiful yard. Washer/dryer hkup. Free water & sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special. 386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com Brandywine Apartments Now Renting 1, 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-752-3033 W. Grandview Ave. Equal Housing Opportunity TDD Number 1-800-955-8771 BRANFORD VILLAS 386-935-2319 2br/1ba Apts. Now available.$570. mo. TDD number 1-800-955-8771 Equal Housing Opportunity Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2 mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet Friendly. Pool laundry & balcony. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A$530 month $530 deposit. No pets. 386-344-2170 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Greentree Townhouse Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free water & sewer. Balcony & patio. Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com Redwine Apartments Pets welcome. with 5 complexes, we have a home for you. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com UPDATED APT, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 Wayne ManorApts. Spacious 2bedroom washer/dryer. Behind Kens off Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 www .myflapts.com WindsorArms Apartments. Move in! 2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free 200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent2BR, 1/2 acre, Fenced, Close-in, Huge Den, Carport, Smoke Free, $800 mo. App & Ref Req’d Short Term Avail 386-758-9824 2br/1ba $575 mo. + sec., 4mi S. Lake City. Clean & Quiet 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 3bd/2ba Lots of Natural Light. CH/A, $1,400 month & $1,400 deposit. Fenced in back yard. Contact 386-344-2170 3br/1.5ba. Very clean, Brick great area w/bonus room. Carport, shed & Fenced (privacy) back yard. $825. mo $825. dep. Ref’s req’d. (941)920-4535 ALandlord You Can Love! 3br/1.5ba, Eat in Kitchen, CH/A, 2 car carport $750 mth + dep 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Avail. for Rent 1206 McFarlane Ave. 3 BR/2 BAhouse. Smoke Free and No Pets allowed. $850 a mo. $500 dep. Call for appt. 904-813-8864. 750Business & Office RentalsForRent orLease : Former Doctors office, Former professional office & Lg open space: avail on East Baya Ave. Competitive rates. Weekdays 386-984-0622 evenings/weekends 497-4762 Office or Retail Space. Many to choose from. Tom Eagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 805Lots forSale Beautiful lot on Suwannee. Property features stairway to dock, on Suwannee. MLS# 78842, $35,000 Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473 Results Realty Charming, like new, well Maintainted 3br, 2b, split floor plan, Corner lot. REMAX Missy Zecher 623-0237 MLS# 81632 $100,000 Custom genesis modular home, finest amenities, lg oaks, custom drapery, f/p, fine detail throughout. RemaxMissy Zecher 623-0237 MLS 81634 $299,000 Great family home, 3/2 recently upgraded, great location. REMAX PROFESSIONALS Missy Zecher 623-0237 MLS# 81683 $75,000 805Lots forSale HALLMARK REAL Estate 2.68 acres homes only. Gorgeous neighborhood, Deed restricted. $34,000. Owner Fin. MLS# 80588. Tanya Shaffer 386-397-4766 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #76668 $32,000 Must be 55+, Buildable lot for site built homes only. In Forest Country. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #80401 $60,000. Must be 55+ 130x750 right on Suwannee, Beautiful lot, minutes from Royal Springs, Denise Bose 752-5290 Nice 2 acre lot in Timberlake s/d. New Owner will have fishing rights. MLS #79025 Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473 $13,500 Nice vacant lot in Desirable River Community, MLS #73268 $15,000 Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert397-3473 PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. REMAX PROFESSIONALS Missy Zecher 623-0237. 25 acre parcel, Corner lot, many possibilities. MLS 77720 $175,000 Spacious 4br, split floor plan, separate Living & family rm, gas f/p, a true pleasure to view. REMAX Missy Zecher 623-0237. MLS 81472 $237,000 810Home forSale Access Realty Gorgeous views 3bd/3ba on Lake Montgomery. Elevator, fishing dock & jacuzzi. MLS 81438 $249,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access RealtySpacious 4 bd/3ba Cypress Lake w/ 3643 sqft 1.25 acres on lake. Vaulted ceilings. MLS 81314 $279,900. Patti Taylor386-623-6896 Access RealtyTwo story 1895 Victorian house w/ electrical upgrades throughout. double -deck porches, MLS 71594 $149,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Affordable 4/2 on 10 acres in Bell. Home features over 2,200 heated sqft. MLS# 76585, Results Realty $67,500. Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Eastside Village Adult community, Great location, community pool Elaine Tolar 755-6488 MLS 74823, $84,900 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Emerald Forest repaired Brick home 3b, 2ba, Lg recreation rm, fireplace, MLS 82021 $134,900 Sherry Ratliff 365-8414 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Exceptional home on 5 ac, 3200 sf 4b, 2.5ba. Lots of storage, 3 out buildings. Elaine Tolar 755-6488 MLS 80325 $287,500 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Hallmark Real Estate 4.3 acres on the Santa Fe River. Wooded. Natures lover’s paradise. Paved Rd frontage, septic. MLS 81946. Ron Feagle 386-288-2901 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81958-, $115,000. Must be 55+, 3br/2ba, Site Built w/ lots of room, split plan mstr suite, FL. Rm. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81959 Must be 55+, 2br/2ba, $79,900. Site Built Home w/eat in kitchen, laundry rm, scrn porch. Denise Bose @ 752-5290 On Suwannee River, 4 acres, Needs some elbow grease, 3br, 3058 sqft, beautiful view, Poole Realty MLS 82075. Call Glenda McCall $299,900 Private Estate on 39 + ac, city limits. 6br, 3.5ba, 3 fireplaces, much more.MLS76111 Mary Brown Whitehurst 965-0887 $994,000. Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Reduced, 6500 plus sqft home boasts of oversized rooms, 6br, 3.5ba to many amenities to mention. Call Prell Gwinn, Poole Realty MLS 80949 $280,000 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, Golfers Dream 3B,2B formal living & dining, cover back porch. MLS 81110 $189,000 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, South Oaks C/C, 3Br or 2Br & den, 2Ba over looking 9th hole, fenced backyard & more MLS 81191 $179,000 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, Beautiful Mountainside 3b,2ba, 1662sqft, .45 ac. open floor plan, so much more MLS 80447 $144,900 Terrific home on 5+ acres. 3br, 2.5ba, large kitchen, covered deck. MLS 81630 $199,000 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Elaine Tolar 755-6488 Unique home with 2800 sqft, large upstairs game room, on 1.37 acres in Live Oak, Poole Realty MLS 82214 $67,500. 362-4539 820Farms & Acreage10 acres with well/septic/pp (not guar); $300 dwn; $580 a mth. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com Access Realty10 acre square tract, High & Dry, OF Avail. w/ 25% down. Convenient Location MLS 81258$39,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access Realty43.64 acres wooded acreage in N.Columbia County. Scenic & Private. MLS 74429 $89,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Hallmark Real Estate Hunters Paradise! 3/2 brick, over 1700 sqft on 10 acres, 24x24 barn, fruit trees. MLS #80851 Ginger Parker 386-365-2135 830Commercial PropertyIndustrial warehouse7+ acres fenced 17,000 sq ft Barn $1,500 mo. TomEagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 940Trucks 2006 Toyota Tundra SR-5, Crew Cab, Class 3 Tow Package. Cruise, power windows, Seats Five. 152,000 miles, $7,800. 386-365-1901 2006 Toyota Tundra SR-5Crew cab, Class 3 Tow Package, cruise, power windows, seats five. 152,000 miles.$7,800 386-365-1901 ADVERTISE YOUR Job Opportunities in the Lake City Reporter Classifieds. Enhance Your Ad with Your Individual Logo For just pennies a day. Call today, 755-5440.

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6B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2012 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 6BSports Jump New Patient Exam and Necessary X-rays DO150, DO330 First-time patient Reg. $136 $ 29 SAVINGS OF $107 Expires November 30, 2012 ASPEN DENTAL GROUP Located at SHANDS Lake City, Live Oak & Starke Womens Center of Florida ALL MAJOR INSURANCES ACCEPTED INCLUDING MEDICAID & MEDICARE FREE Pregnancy Ultrasound WITH THIS AD* *Insurance billing may occur if necessary. Some Restrictions apply. OBSTRETRICS & GYNECOLOGY PRENATAL CARE & ULTRASOUNDS STDS & HPV TESTING BIRTH CONTROL & INFERTILITY MENOPAUSE & INCONTINENCE WEIGHT LOSS & 4D ULTRASOUNDS BOTOX & LASER HAIR REMOVAL NO INSURANCE VISITS ASK ABOUT OUR $ 50 CHANDLER MOHAN, MD EMAD ATTA, MD NOW HIRING MID-LEVEL PROVIDERS 386-466-1106 SERVICES: OB-GYN www.myobcare.com G. W. HUNTER, INC. 1130 US Hwy 90 W (386) 752-5890 WE NOW HAVE ETHANOL FREE PLUS GASOLINE ONLY AT INTENDED USES: BOATS & WATERCRAFTS COLLECTABLE VEHICLES OFF-ROAD VEHICLES MOTORCYCLES SMALL ENGINES T IMELESS M EMORIES 386-466-1888 Gator Jewelry Has Arrived Large Selection To Choose From GO GATORS Suwannee County Chamber of Commerce For More Information Contact 386-362-3071 Santa! Parade! Handcrafted Christmas Gifts! Saturday, December 1st 8am 6pm Downtown Live Oak, FL on the 28th Annual Jam Auditions Saturday in Auditions Start at 3 pm Suwannee County Chamber of Commerce Suwannee County Chamber of Commerce Suwannee County Chamber of Commerce Suwannee County Chamber of Commerce Suwannee County Chamber of Commerce Suwannee County Chamber of Commerce Suwannee County Chamber of Commerce Suwannee County Chamber of Commerce Annual Annual Annual Annual Saturday, December 1st 8am 6pm Saturday, December 1st 8am 6pm Suwannee County Chamber of Commerce Suwannee County Chamber of Commerce Suwannee County Chamber of Commerce on the on the on the 28th 28th 28th 28th 28th 28th 28th 28th 28th 28th 28th Annual Annual Annual Annual Annual Annual Annual Annual Annual Christmas Square presents www. SuwanneeChamber .com Gruden: No offer to coach Vols By STEVE MEGARGEE Associated Press KNOXVILLE, Tenn. Jon Gruden says he hasnt received an offer to coach the Tennessee Volunteers in a deal that would include becoming part owner of the Cleveland Browns. Memphis television station WREG reported Gruden was weighing a Tennessee offer that would give him a piece of the Browns, who are owned by Jimmy Haslam brother of Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam. Their father, Jim Haslam, played on Tennessees 1951 national championship team and has donated millions of dollars to the university. Gruden, a former NFL coach and current ESPN analyst, said Wednesday on ESPNs Mike & Mike In The Morning show that there is no truth to the report. I like what Im doing, said Gruden, who was a graduate assistant with the Volunteers and whose wife Cindy is a former Tennessee cheerleader. Im just trying to hang on to the job I have, to be honest with you. Browns spokesman Neal Gulkis said the report was inaccurate. Jimmy Haslam has no involvement in the University of Tennessee head coaching search, and the report that Jon Gruden would potentially have an ownership stake in the Browns is completely erro neous, Gulkis said. Tennessee is seeking to replace Derek Dooley, who was fired Nov. 18 after going 15-21 in three seasons. Volunteers athletic depart ment spokesman Jimmy Stanton said the university would not discuss details of its coaching search. We wont talk about any of the dynamics of the search until it is finalized, Stanton said. Gruden, 49, helped the Tampa Bay Buccaneers win the Super Bowl in the 2002 season. He posted a com bined 100-85 record and won five division titles in 11 years as an NFL head coach with the Oakland Raiders (1998-2001) and Tampa Bay (2002-08). Gruden began his coach ing career as a graduate assistant on Johnny Majors Tennessee staff in 1986-87, but he hasnt worked in the college ranks since a oneyear stint as Pittsburghs wide receivers coach in 1991. His other college experience includes one year as Southeast Missouri States passing game coor dinator (1988) and one season as the University of Pacifics wide receivers coach (1989). Clemson QB Boyd named ACC player of year Associated Press GREENSBORO, N.C. Clemson quarterback Tajh Boyd is the Atlantic Coast Conferences overall and offensive player of the year, and Florida State defensive end Bjoern Werner is the leagues top defensive play er. The league released its players of the year Wednesday. Boyd won both of his awards by one vote over North Carolina running back Gio Bernard. Boyd received 20 of a possible 46 votes from members of the Atlantic Coast Sports Media Association while Bernard had 19. Boyd had 22 votes for the offensive award to Bernards 21. One point? Boyd said, smiling. Ill take it. Werner had 27 votes for the defensive award and teammate Tank Carradine had nine. Boyd averaged nearly 337 total yards per game and led the league with a pass-efficiency rating of 168.5 with a school-record 34 touchdown passes while operating the leagues top offense. It marks the eighth time the player of the year award went to a Tiger and first since C.J. Spiller won it in 2009. As a kid, you work your whole career to get to an accomplishment of this magnitude, Boyd said. Its definitely a blessing. This program, we put a lot of work into it. I think this award speaks volumes about where this program is and where its going. Werner is the leagues career active leader with 23.5 sacks and matched a career-high with 3.5 sacks in last weeks loss to Florida.