<%BANNER%>

The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01924

Material Information

Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 11-27-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01965

Related Items

Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01924

Material Information

Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 11-27-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01965

Related Items

Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

Opinion ................ 4APeople.................. 2AObituaries .............. 5A Advice & Comics ......... 4B Puzzles ................. 5B TODAY IN PEOPLE Rolling Stones storm London. COMING WEDNESDAY Local news roundup. 70 46 Mostly cloudy WEATHER, 2A Lake City ReporterTUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2012 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | 75¢ LAKECITYREPORTER.COM CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 138, No. 215 1 Webscamstake anastyturn Local woman is told she’s beenmarked for death.By DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comMost Internet scams promise huge fortunes in exchange for a small down payment up front. A Lake City woman on Monday received an email threaten-ing her life if she didn’t fol-low its instructions. The scammer said he had been hired to kill the woman but that if she sent him $5,000 he would show mercy on her and relent. The email said she shouldn’t notify authorities or he “might be pushed do what I have been paid to do.” The woman didn’t send the money and called the Columbia County Sheriff’s Office instead. Internet scams have a life cycle, said Ed Seifert, pub-lic information officer with the sheriff’s office. This one dates back to at least 2007. In the email, the scammer said he had been paid SCAM continued on 3AWoman suffers burns in search for grandkids during house re Children had already been rescued; woman still hospitalized for burns, smoke inhalation Murdersuspectremains at largeFrom staff reportsA suspect in the April 27 shooting death of a local convenience store owner is still at large and local police are reminding residents that a $10,000 reward remains in effect for informa-tion lead-ing to his capture. Ernest Larry Grandison, 42, shot the owner of A&M Discount Beverage to death during an April 27 robbery, police say. His alleged accomplice and son-in-law, James Leonard Johnson, was arrested May 19 in Jacksonville. The store owner was identified as Rajni Patel, 55, of Lake City. His wife, Daxa Patel, was fired at by Gandison but escaped harm, police said. Grandson and Johnson reportedly entered the store at about 1:30 p.m. Johnson went behind the counter and took some cash, at which point Rajni Patel came out of a utility room and was shot. In a statement issued Monday, LCPD asked any-one with information about the crime to call police at (386) 719-2068. GrandisonPhotos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterTonya Jones (left), hugs her cousin, Shantel Kelsey, after viewing the damage to Kelsey’s home from a Sunday morn ing fire. Six people were in the home when the fire started. Kelsey’s mother, Rosa, remained hosp italized Monday for burns and smoke inhalation. Shantel Kelsey (left) and her cousin, Cherriot Barber, su rvey the scene of the fire. ‘This is very painful, very hurtful,’ Kels ey said. ‘Twenty-three years worth of memories gone. As long as m y mom is doing OK all I can do is thank the Lord.’ By DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comA woman was airlifted to Shands at the University of Florida after she was injured while trying to find her grandchildren in a burn-ing house. The children had been removed from the house by their grandfather. Rosa Kelsey suffered burns, but the main reason she was airlifted was due to smoke inhalation, Rosa Kelsey’s daughter Shantel Kelsey said. Shantel Kelsey was at her aunt’s house, which is next to the house that caught fire. The house that was engulfed in flames, 142 Arcadia Court, was destroyed with all the Kelseys’ belongings. “All they have is what was on their backs,” she said. Shantel Kelsey said the family does have fire insurance. Avery Kelsey, Shantel Kelsey’s father, was awakened by the cries of the grandchildren in the living room early Sunday morning, according to Shantel Kelsey. Three children, ages 4, 5 and 6, were in the home while it was burning, she said. She said her father broke out a window and jumped through, landing on the front porch, then broke down the front door and took the children from the house. Shantel Kelsey said that her mother didn’t know that Avery Kelsey had removed the children, because they ran to her aunt’s house after Avery Kelsey rescued them. Everything was lost, including irreplaceablefamily photographs. FIRE continued on 3A Shed fire damages homeJASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterBryan Thomas, 28, walks past Lake City firefighter Austin Tho mas as he douses the remains of a shed that caught on fire next to the home Brya n Thomas was renting at 117 Vet Loop. Lake City and Columbia County fire crews r esponded to the fire. The heat melted the side panels on the home. No one was hurt. Scott challenges colleges to offerlow-cost degreesBy BILL KACZORAssociated PressTALLAHASSEE — Gov. Rick Scott on Monday chal-lenged Florida’s community and state colleges to develop four-year degrees that would cost no more than $10,000, which also would continue their move into an area that was once the sole domain of the state’s public universi-ties. The mean level of tuition and fees was $3,328 during the 2011-12 academic year, according the Department of Education’s 2012 annu-al report for the Florida College System. At that rate, a four-year degree would cost about $13,300, or $3,300 above Scott’s goal. Tuition and fees for four years at a Florida university aver-age about $25,000, or nearly twice as much as for the 28 col-leges. Scott made his proposal before an audience of elected offi-cials as well as college and community leaders at the Clearwater campus of St. Petersburg College. It’s the first school to take up his challenge. The Republican governor, STATE NEWS DEGREES continued on 3A Scott

PAGE 2

CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Actor James Avery is 64. Academy Award-winning director Kathryn Bigelow (Film: The Hurt Locker) is 61. TV host Bill Nye (Bill Nye, the Science Guy) is 57. Actor William Fichtner (FIHK-nuhr) is 56. Caroline Kennedy is 55. Academy Award-winning screenwriter Callie Khouri (Film: Thelma and Louise) is 55. Rock musician Charlie Burchill (Simple Minds) is 53. Former Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty is 52. Rock musician Charlie Benante (Anthrax) is 50. Rock musician Mike Bordin (Faith No More) is 50. Actor Fisher Stevens is 49. Actress Robin Givens is 48. Actor Michael Vartan is 44. Rapper Skoob (DAS EFX) is 42. AROUND FLORIDA Walmart shooting suspects caught TALLAHASSEE Tallahassee police plan to charge two suspects with attempted murder after a shooting over a Walmart parking space. An arrest affidavit shows Earl White III and Tiffany Yancey were captured in Grady County, Georgia, on Saturday. They face charg es of attempted robbery with a firearm, attempted murder and possession of firearm by convicted felon in connection to the store shooting. Police said a disagree ment over a parking space led to the shooting outside the store on Black Friday. The affidavit said Yancey pointed a gun at a female, demanding everything in your purse. Police sais White then shot the woman and a male passen ger outside the store. Man charged with hitting firefighter PORT CHARLOTTE Authorities say a south west Florida man hit a fire fighter with a shovel while he was attempting to put out a fire at the suspects home. The Charlotte County Sheriffs Office reports that 44-year-old Gregory Turner was charged Friday with aggravated battery on a firefighter with a deadly weapon. Authorities said Turner yelled at the fire lieuten ant to get off his property as a mattress, blinds and several home appliances burned. The firefighter went back to his truck to grab a hose to extinguish the blaze. Thats when Turner added more items to the fire, then grabbed a shovel, and hit the victim on his helmet, authorities said. Deputies shot Turner with a stun gun. He later admitted to starting the fire. Regulators to rule on power rates TALLAHASSEE State regulators are considering requests from Floridas two largest electric utili ties to continue passing on nuclear facility costs to their customers in 2013. The Public Service Commission is taking up the proposals from Florida Power & Light Co. and Progress Energy Florida on Monday. FPL is seeking $151 million, which would be $1.65 per month for a typi cal residential customer using 1,000 kilowatt hours. Thats 55 cents less than this years nuclear cost recovery charge. Progress wants $143 million. That would increase the current charge for a 1,000-kilowatthour customer by $1.80 to $4.73 per month. Teen shoots dad to protect mom PLANT CITY Police said a teenager defending his mother fatally shot his father. The shooting happened late Saturday as a group of family and friends were gathered around a bonfire outside a mobile home in a rural area northeast of Tampa. Police said the teens parents got into an argument. The Tampa Bay Times reported the father began beating the mother and was choking her when the 17-year-old son rushed in. Police said the teen shot his father with a handgun before calling 911. Police found the father dead in the master bedroom. The mother was shot in the thigh. She was treated at a nearby hospital. Police did not arrest the teen, who was left in the custody of his mother. Student accused in dorm explosion MELBOURNE A col lege student faces felony charges of making, pos session and discharging a destructive device after an explosion rocked a dorm at Florida Institute of Technology om Saturday. Melbourne Police said 19-year-old Christian Barnes Duke told authori ties he learned how to make the device by watch ing Mythbusters on the Discovery Channel. Duke is accused of mak ing the device from com mon household chemicals to create a reaction inside a container. Police said he put the device in a stairwell at dorm and detonated it causing a loud blast that disrupted other students. Police shoot robbery suspects MIAMI Authorities are investigating after police officers shot two home invasion suspects one fatally at a flea market filled with holiday shoppers. Miami-Dade police said the incident began Sunday when the suspects broke into a home. The victim followed the suspect and alerted police that the car involved in the home inva sion was parked at the flea market. Police in the area spotted the vehicle and approached it. The driver tried to flee, struck a patrol car and shots were fired. The driver was dead at the scene. A passenger was taken to the hospital in critical condition. Rolling Stones storm London LONDON T he verdict is in: The Rolling Stones are back. They may look old, but they still sound young. That was the consen sus Monday as Britains rock critics responded to the Stones 50th anni versary bash Sunday night, the first of five shows to commemorate their half century of rhythm and bluestinged rock. It was the bands first London performance in five years, and their own advancing years had led some to be skeptical that they could still perform at the highest level. They were led by the seemingly ageless Mick Jagger, whose strut ting style has not been dimmed, and backed by brilliant guitarists Keith Richards and Ronnie Wood and the energetic drumming of Charlie Watts, who is now past 70 but shows no sign of slowing down. The Daily Mails Jan Moir said the Stones had somehow beaten the aging process: You might imagine that they had been worn down by life, by wives, by arthritis, by scan dals old and new, by drugs, but no they seemed indestructible. She said their swampy, gritty sound remains unique after half a century. Elton John dedicates show to dissident BEIJING Pop icon Elton John publicly dedicated his only concert in Beijing to Chinese artist and political critic Ai Weiwei, sending a murmur of shock through an audience accus tomed to tight cen sorship of entertainment. Minutes into a more than two-hour show Sunday night, John told the audience that the performance was dedicated to the spirit and talent of Ai Weiwei, according to several audience members. They said the crowd rumbled in recognition that Ai remains a touchy subject for the Chinese government. Beyonce documentary premiering in February NEW YORK Beyonce is getting personal. HBO announced Monday that a documentary about the Grammywinning singer will debut Feb. 16. Beyonce is directing the film, which will include footage she shot herself with her laptop. The network said the documentary will include video that provides raw, unprecedented access to the private entertainment icon and high-voltage per formances. It will also feature home videos of her family and of the singer as a new mother and owner of her company, Parkwood Entertainment. Beyonce said in a statement the untitled project was personal to her. Sunday: 3-4-8-9-10 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAIL Y BRIEFING TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 Monday: Afternoon: 8-0-2-8 Evening: N/A Monday: Afternoon: 0-5-0 Evening: N/A Saturday: 26-28-36-41-50-51 x4 HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter 2AWEATHER Daily Scripture Therefore, since we are receiv ing a kingdom that cannot be shaken, let us be thankful, and so worship God acceptably with reverence and awe. Hebrews 12:28 ASSOCIATED PRESS The Rolling Stones (from left) Ronnie Wood, Mick Jagger, Keith Richards and Charlie Watts perform at the O2 arena in London on Sunday. The band will play five gigs to celebrate its 50th anniversary, including three shows in New York. Associated Press Associated Press Beyonce John

PAGE 3

Today Summers Elementary Fall picture retakes; PTO meeting, 5:30 p.m. Fort White Elementary Picture retakes in library Richardson Middle School Wolf wrestling vs. Suwannee, 4:30/5 p.m., home; Wolf soccer vs Suwannee, 5/6:15 p.m., home; Wolf basketball vs Baker, 5/6:15 p.m., away Fort White High School Indian girls/boys varsity soccer vs. Interlachen, 5/7 p.m., home; Indian JV/var sity girls/varsity boys bas ketball vs. Union County, 4:30/6/7:30 p.m., away Fort White Middle School Indian girls/boys basket ball vs. Chiefland, 5/6:30 p.m., home Wednesday Summers Elementary Miles of Smiles Dental Bus on campus Pinemount Elementary second-grade students to VA Hospital, 10 a.m. Eastside Elementary Science Guy visits third and fifth grades; High Touch High Tech Consultants to speak with thirdand fifthgrade classes Fort White Elementary Book study in library, 2:45 to 3:45 p.m. Westside Elementary Tiersa Stalvey, Vickie Steward and Gary Hamm class play, 9 a.m. FWHS Indian boys bas ketball vs. Newberry, 6/7:30 p.m.. home Thursday Eastside Elementary Second-grade classes of Lisa Thoreson, Patricia Harrell & Michelle Janson to Morningside Farm; High Touch High Tech Consultants to speak with fourth-grade classes Fort White Elementary Fourthand fifth-grade Spelling Bee in auditori um, 8 to 11:00 a.m.; Diane Peterson retirement party in cafeteria, 2:30 p.m. Westside Parent Write Night for fourth-grade par ents, 6:30 p.m. RMS Wolf soccer vs. Lake City Middle School, 5/6:15 p.m., away; Wolf bas ketball vs. Taylor, 5/6:15 p.m., away FWHS Indian girls/ boys varsity soccer vs. P. K. Yonge, 5/7 p.m., away; Indian varsity girls basket ball vs. Santa Fe. 6:00 p.m., away FWMS Indian girls/ boys basketball vs. Bradford, 5/6:30 p.m., home Friday Eastside Elementary Tiger of the Month recog nized in cafeteria, 8 a.m. Summers Elementary Young Writers Luncheon in cafeteria, 11:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.; fourth-grade lit erature circles in Read 180 room, 12:15 to 1 p.m.; thirdgrade making banners for NFRMC, 1 to 2 p.m. Westside Elementary Spelling Bee, 8:15 a.m. FWHS Indian varsity girls basketball vs. North Florida Christian, 7 p.m., home; Indian varsity boys basketball vs. Melody Christian, 7 p.m.. away Columbia City Elementary Box tops and soup labels collected Saturday RMS Wolf wrestling Lake Asbury Invitational. who campaigned in 2010 on a promise of job creation, said the degrees should be in fields that will provide the graduates with the best opportunity for employ ment. The idea drew applause from state education offi cials, but the Florida Democratic Party criticized his proposal, noting Scott supported a $300 million spending cut for state uni versities this year and reduc tions in merit-based Bright Futures scholarships. Weve heard these empty words from Rick Scott before, and Floridas middle class families are looking for real leadership not failed gimmicks masquerading as sound bites, the Democrats said in a statement. The colleges in recent years have begun offering a limited number of fouryear degrees, but the bulk of their students remain in two-year programs. Most of Floridas bache lors degrees still are award ed by the states 12 public universities. Their gradu ates, though, include thou sands of former community and state college students who transfer for their final two years Scotts challenge came just three weeks after his Blue Ribbon Task Force on State Higher Education Reform recommended that Floridas 12 universities be allowed to increase tuition rates if they meet certain quality criteria. Thats some thing Scott opposed in the past, although Floridas tuition rates are among the lowest in the nation. As I travel the state, fami lies tell me that they care about three things get ting a good job, a quality education, and enjoying a low cost of living, Scott said in a statement. As a former community college student myself, I know how impor tant it is for us to keep costs low. St. Petersburg College President Bill Law said the school, which was the first Florida community college to offer four-year degrees, is once again excited about the opportunity to be part of a statewide col lege pilot program that lowers the cost of a college education. Scotts proposal also won the immediate support of several members of the State Board of Education, which oversees the state and community colleges. Board Chairman Gary Chartrand said it would help reduce the need for student loans or lower the amount people have to borrow. Having to take out large loans may be discouraging people from going to col lege even though statistics show the value of a degree in lifetime earning poten tial, he said. State University System Chancellor Frank Brogan was out sick and not immediately available for comment. Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2012 3A 3A No Runaround -No Hassle We can help. Denied Social Security Disability? GBIS Disability, Inc. Free Consultation 1-800-782-0059 20 years of Social Security Disability Experience www.GBISOnline.com Let us help your business SHINE! COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL Janitorial Services Tile, Grout and General Floor Maintenance Fire, Water and Storm Restoration Upholstery Cleaning Emergency Water Extraction & Dry Down Carpet & Rug Cleaning Odor Control 24 hours a day 7 days a week emergency call out (386) 362-2244 (386) 755-6142 1-888-849-8234 email: bayway1@windstream.net Fax: (386) 362-6822 636 Helvenston St. SE, Live Oak, Florida www.baywayservices.biz The Bayway Group, LLC dba Bayway Services NOTICE Attention Humana Walmart Medicare Part D patients: We accept this plan and all other Part D plans. Baya East 755-6677 Baya West 755-2233 Medical 755-2277 Call one of our pharmacies to see which plan is best for you. FIRE: Belongings gone, but life goes on Continued From Page 1A SCAM: Police allay fears Continued From Page 1A DEGREES: Some education leaders applaud idea Continued From Page 1A some ransom in advance to terminate the victim. The email said that the person who wanted the woman killed was some one she thought was a friend. The would-be killer said he had been following the victim and knew she was innocent of the accusations leveled against her. The email goes on to say that the killer was tak ing pity on the victim and that the killer could only help if you are willing to help yourself. The way the victim was to help herself was to send the killer $5,000 in two installments. The first $2,000 was a show of good faith. The next $3,000 would grant the victim a videotape that would show who wanted her dead. The scam warned the victim to stay indoors after 7:30 p.m. and said if she didnt follow instruc tions she would only have (herself) to blame. The email also stressed the importance of acting immediately. Seifert said hes seen this kind of scam before and that the best thing to do is think before any money is sent. Dont wire anybody money if you havent veri fied who they are, he said. Once you send them the money, its gone. Local law enforcement has a hard time dealing with this type of scam because most Internet scams originate overseas. Seifert said that people who receive an email from someone they dont know asking for money should contact the Secret Service field office in Jacksonville at (904) 296-0133. He said the most com mon scam involves an email claiming the recipi ent had won the lottery or had inherited a large amount of money from a long-lost relative, usually an African king or queen. We urge our residents to use common sense, he said. Rosa Kelsey went to the front door and didnt see the children, then went inside the burning house to find them, Shantel said. Avery Kelsey then went back inside and brought his wife out of the fire. A neighbor was the first to call the fire department after hearing loud pops and smelling smoke, Shantel said. The Lake City Fire Department received the call that a structure was on fire at 1:35 a.m., according to a report. The fire department arrived at the house at 1:44 a.m. Fire Chief Frank Armijo said the fire took about 25 minutes to extinguish. Armijo said the cause of the fire hasnt been determined, and the state fire marshal is investigating. Shantels brother, Avery Jr., and his children went to Shands Lake Shore by ambulance as a precaution. Shantel and her father went directly to Shands at UF to be by her mother, she said. She said the family had lots of pho tographs, and they are all gone. You cant replace pictures, but we have the memories, she said. Some members of the family believe the fire was caused by faulty wires. You could see sparks just going up everywhere, Cherriot Baber, a niece of Rosa Kelsey, said. Baber said the smell of the burn ing house was everywhere, and she would never forget the odor. Shantel Kelsey said things could have been a lot worse. I just thank God that everybody made it out alive, she said. She said although the family lost everything, the family will work it out some way. What we going to do is start all over from scratch all we can do. she said. We all have jobs, but its going to take a while. She said the family has an account with DOT Credit Union, and if people wanted to donate, the account is in Avery Kelseys name. If anyone wants to donate cloth ing, the New Dayspring Missionary Baptist Church, 709 NW Long Street, is where the family worships. Shantel said she would be fine, but her mother, father, brother and the three children lost all their clothes in the fire. SCHOOL CALENDAR Trial starts in foster child murder that shook state By CURT ANDERSON AP Legal Affairs Writer MIAMI The foster parent of 4-year-old Rilya Wilson abused the girl for months before finally smothering her, and then lied to child welfare work ers who failed to discover the girl had been missing for more than a year, a prosecutor said Monday. Rilyas case led to new laws and a massive shakeup at Floridas child wel fare agency after she van ished in 2000. Authorities long suspected caretaker Geralyn Graham in Rilyas disappearance, but didnt charge her until 2005 when she confessed to an inmate while serving time on an unrelated fraud charge, prosecutors said. Graham is on trial for first-degree murder, kid napping and child abuse. She faces life in prison if convicted. Grahams attorney raised the possibility that Rilya could still be alive because her body has not been found. Attorney Scott Sakin suggested Rilya couldve been relocated to a new home and lost in a system that has a history of caseworker incompetence. Sakin also reminded jurors that jailhouse snitches have much to gain for helping out prosecutors. Is there any evidence at all that this child is dead? Sakin said. Where is the body? We dont have to prove that shes alive. They have to prove that this child is dead. Prosecutors said Graham confessed to killing Rilya, who would be 16 now, because she believed the girl was evil and possessed by demons. Other witness es will testify that Graham repeatedly lied about the girls whereabouts after she disappeared, Assistant State Attorney Joshua Weintraub said. She snuffed the life out of this child, he said. ASSOCIATED PRESS Geralyn Graham, a former foster caregiver charged with abuse and murder of young Rilya Wilson, raises her hand in court Monday in Miami.

PAGE 4

Q Phil Hudgins is senior editor of Community Newspapers Inc. L amar “Boots” Pitts didn’t know his friend’s given name. He just called him Po Boy. So did everybody else on the Norfolk Southern Railway, where Po Boy conducted freight trains that made short runs, mostly in Georgia. “He was a prince of a man, in my opinion,” Pitts said as he talked about a gaggle of retired railroad men who gather at the Corner Cafe in Lula, Ga., the first Tuesday of every month to eat breakfast and reminisce. One of them is Johnny “Peanut” Sheridan, who got a job on the railroad partly because Po Boy put in a good word for him with the train-master. That was 1959. “You’re sort of light for heavy work,” the trainmaster told him during an interview, but he hired him anyway. Nearly 44 years later, Sheridan retired from the railroad. He loved working with Po Boy, who he said would come to work every day looking like he was supposed to report to the president of the railroad. “He’d have his pants starched, his hat starched, and he’d work as hard as anybody,” Sheridan said. “And whenever we got off …, he still had a crease down the leg.” Tommy “Big Foot” Pitchford remembered that Po Boy liked to have fun while he worked. “He sang these little jingles,” he said: “‘Water boy, set your bucket down,’ and ‘They’re burning down the house I was brung up in.’ “He was a good guy to work with. He kept you feeling good.” Charlie Phillips remembered, too. “He was always joking and carrying on all the time,” he said of Po Boy. “I don’t remember seeing the man ever get upset and mad. He was an easygoing fellow.” No doubt Po Boy wasn’t always jovial and carrying on, always making sure everybody felt good about working on the railroad. It wasn’t always fun. But time has a way of fading bad memories, like the sun fades a pair of overalls hung out on the line week after week. Old railroad men like to recall the good times, the funny times, the jingles sung by a lanky conductor who shined his work shoes every day. They forget so they can remember a little better. But Po Boy really was a nice guy. He took his work serious-ly; he provided for his wife and three kids; he voted in every election. Not sure, though, that he would join the 20 or so railroad men who gather every month to talk about old times. He loved the railroad and his fel-low laborers, but he wouldn’t tell you. He just wanted to stay at home, eat at his own kitchen table and drink from his own coffee cup. I knew Po Boy pretty well. And I’m remembering him now because 25 years ago on Nov. 30, he drew his last labored breath. His name was Joseph Edwin Hudgins. Everybody on the railroad called him Po Boy. I called him Daddy. And I miss him. Po Boy madehis mark in life OUR OPINION HIGHLIGHTS IN HISTORY On this date:In 1839, the American Statistical Association was founded in Boston. In 1901, the U.S. Army War College was established in Washington, D.C. L ike thousands of other African-Americans of my generation who attended Florida’s public schools, I never missed an opportunity to see the Marching 100, Florida A&M University’s famous band. And like many of my contemporaries, I regret the band’s fall from grace in the wake of last year’s hazing death of drum major Robert Champion. The band is under indefinite suspen-sion until FAMU’s interim presi-dent, Larry Robinson, decides when it will be reactivated. When I was a child, black high school bands across Florida imitated the 100. Many kids dreamed of becoming members of what a 1958 Miami Herald headline proclaimed as “The Marchingest, Playingest Band in the Land.” One of my teachers at Dillard High in Fort Lauderdale had known many FAMU band mem-bers. She said that to become a member of the band, not only did the prospect have to be a competent instrumentalist and possess “a body that could make all the moves,” you had to pass “initiation.” She did not use the term hazing, but we knew that ini-tiation made belonging to the Marching 100 sacred and that only the best could wear the sparkling orange-and-green uniform. Attending the Florida Classic, the annual football game between FAMU and its in-state rival Bethune-Cookman University (my alma mater), was the event of the year. It was a rite of passage. Robert Champion was beaten to death in a bus after performing at the 2011 Classic. During my youth, many of us attended FAMU games exclu-sively for the halftime shows, when the 100 performed. ... On the surface, these dynamic performances were pure entertainment. We knew, however, that they represented the essence of African-American culture, rhythmic celebrations of our way of life. ... Which is why so many in my generation lament what has hap-pened to the Marching 100. And we also are angry that hazing — ritualized brutality — became accepted practice and resulted in the death of Champion. This young man’s death is what I consider a black-on-black crime in the academy. For that reason, I am contemptuous of the newly formed “Free the 100” campaign at FAMU involv-ing many current and former students fighting to have the band come back before litiga-tion surrounding Champion’s death has ended — even before a respectable period of healing has passed. The imagery of the campaign, “Free the 100,” crudely evokes an injustice. But band members beat Champion to death. They were not framed by an unjust outside force. They chose to brutalize him. What, then, is the band to be freed from? Which of their rights has been violated? ... Marissa West, FAMU student body president who also serves on the Board of Trustees, said: “I know why the students feel the way they do, but I think it’s important to acknowledge that there was a tragedy that took place. We’re in no rush or any haste to speed this process up when we could miss steps or be negligent of things that could potentially be hostile to us in the future.” ... My hope is that FAMU officials seek mature voices such as West’s as they contemplate the Marching 100’s future. Soon after Champion died, I wanted the band to be given the death penalty. I no longer hold that view after hearing what his mother, Pam Champion, said: “Our goal is never to stop the music because that’s what my son loved. He loved music, but we certainly want to end the hazing. There is no need for it.” Consider mature voices on future of FAMU’s band T he week after the election, a few of my students said that they were planning vacations in Colorado or in Washington state. They were kidding. I think. On Nov. 6, voters in both states approved referenda that permit the recreational use of small amounts of marijuana, subject to the same sorts of regulations that apply to the use of alcohol. Relaxed marijuana laws are at odds with federal laws, and the Drug Enforcement Administration acted quickly to remind the defiant voters that marijuana is a Schedule I controlled substance, and that the DEA’s enforcement of the Controlled Substances Act will continue. Some experts suggest that it will take the Supreme Court to resolve this classic clash between the rights of the states and the authority of the federal government. These events provide the occasion to consider the place and uses of “stupefaction” in our culture. I use the quaint term in homage to the iconic Russian writer Leo Tolstoy, the author of really big books, including the really, really big “War and Peace.” After a dis-solute youth and a long, pro-ductive life Tolstoy adopted a radical version of Christianity and a drastic asceticism that resulted in 1890 in a short essay titled, “Why Do Men Stupefy Themselves?” Tolstoy laments the extravagant use of drugs in late 19th-century Russia, including vodka, wine, beer, hashish, opium, mor-phine and even tobacco. ... Tolstoy’s definition of a stupefacient was anything that dulled the mind enough to make it lose sight of its conscience. ... Tolstoy’s answer was total absti-nence. Tolstoy was a genius, but his views sound unrealistic in a cul-ture like ours, with its enormous capacity for and attraction to stu-pefaction. To us, stupefaction, in all its various forms and degrees, is a synonym for pleasure, and while it can certainly separate us from our consciences, we use it also, for good or ill, to separate ourselves from the stresses and tedium of life. ... Tolstoy would have recognized that we stupefy ourselves in all sorts of ways —booze and illegal drugs, of course, but also with plenty of legal drugs, food, TV, getting and spending on enormous amounts of electronic entertainment, diversion and distraction — more than enough to keep our consciences at bay, as well as the realities of the bad things that are happening in the world. Stupefaction is at the heart of American life, and it might be healthier to admit that, in moderation, it’s fun. But Tolstoy’s idealism probably would have been most offended by the irony and hypocrisy in our attitude toward marijuana, which accepts and even admires its admitted use by celebrities (Bill Maher, Willie Nelson, Cheech and Chong) and presidents (Bill Clinton, Barack Obama), while running up the world’s highest incarceration rate by the disproportionate prosecution of minorities. So, congratulations to the voters of Washington and Colorado for their realism and honesty. May other states follow suit. May the voters not befuddle their consciences and visions with excessive stupefaction. And may the Obama administration defer to the will of the voters and wind down the futile war on drugs. Most of us will never live up to Tolstoy’s rigid idealism, but we can reach in the direction of his integrity. End the futile war on drugs Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding counties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, publisher Robert Bridges, editor Sue Brannon, controller Dink NeSmith, president Tom Wood, chairman LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY E-MAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com Phil Hudginsphudgins@cninewspapers.com G ov. Rick Scott on Monday challenged Florida’s commu-nity and state col-leges to cut costs. Specifically, he wants them to develop four-year degrees that cost no more than $10,000, thus making them even better able to compete with the state’s elite public universities. We can hear the wagging of academic tongues already: The man doesn’t understand the value of a “real” education and wants to cheapen – in every sense of the term – learning in the Sunshine State. By “learning,” we bet most of them mean the liberal arts, including history, literature, philosophy and even anthropol-ogy, which Scott last year told a radio audience the state had had its fill of. All those folks ought to relax.Nobody wants to ship anthropologists and their academic cousins to New Zealand or the North Pole – unless of course they’ve got a good grant pro-posal and really want to go. There is genuine value in studying the liberal arts. Always has been, always will be. But there is also value in studying something that will actually land you a job. And maybe we do finally need to ponder the question, just how many thinkers – as opposed to doers – can a civi-lized culture sustain? Let’s at least make sure young folks have plenty of options and can choose a future that suits them. Lowering the cost of a good education sounds like a fine place to start. The $10,000 degree OPINION Tuesday, November 27, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A4AOPINION Bill Maxwellmaxwell@sptimes.com Q Bill Maxwell is a columnist and editorial writer for the St. Petersburg Times. Q John M. Crisp teaches in the English Department at Del Mar College in Corpus Christi, Texas. John Crispjcrisp@delmar.edu

PAGE 5

Philip Earl Gerlach, Jr. Philip Earl Gerlach, Jr. 77, of Tampa, formerly of Lake City, passed away on November 23, 2012, surrounded by all of his children and grandchildren. Phil was born on July 1, 1935, in West Palm Beach, Florida, to Helen (Brust) and Philip Ger lach. Phil attended the Univer sity of Florida where he majored in Civil Engineering and went on to receive his Juris Doctor degree from the University of Florida College of Law. Phil enjoyed a successful career in civil en gineering in the state of Florida. Phil married the love of his life, Sandra Lee Belden, on July 27, 1956. Sandy and Phil were best friends and enjoyed 56 years together raising their three chil dren, entertaining friends, trav eling and serving Christ by their many acts of kindness and gen erosity. Phil was heartbroken after the sudden death of his be loved Sandra on August 6, 2012. Phil is survived by his son Philip Gerlach, III (Robin), Bonnie Gerlach Henry (Barry), and Betsy Gerlach Johnson (Jim). Phil was a very loving Peepaw to his grandchildren Philip Gerlach, IV, Elizabeth Lynne Gerlach, Mary Katherine Henry, and Philip David Henry. A memorial service for the fam ily will be held at a later date. The family would like to express their sincere thanks to Reverend Bernie Lieving, Reverend Jim Harnish and the entire ministe rial staff at Hyde Park United Methodist Church during the passing of our beloved parents. ily suggests donations to Hyde Park United Method ist Church, 500 West Platt Street, Tampa, Fl 33606. Ephesians 2:10 For we are Gods workmanship, cre ated in Christ Jesus to do good works, which God pre pared in advance for us to do. Joseph T. Haltiwanger Mr. Joseph T. Haltiwanger, 60, devoted husband and father, passed away on Sunday, Novem ber 25th at the Haven Hospice of the Suwannee Valley Care Center. A life-long resident of Columbia County, Joe was born in Lake City on January 18th, 1952 to Jack and Betty Thompson Haltiwanger. He loved his family, his church, his friends, and his river. Joe enjoyed tinkering around in his barn, Gator football, and the occasional good story, whether true or not. He was a Faith ful member and Deacon of Mt. Carmel Baptist Church. He is survived by his father, Jack, wife Lonnie Jean, sister Jeni (Robert) Brewin, daugh ters Jodi (Seth) Kelley and Ju lie, and granddaughter Jillian. Funeral services for Mr. Haltiwanger will be conduct ed at 3:30P.M. on Wednesday November 28, 2012 in the Mt. Carmel Baptist Church with ing. Interment will follow in the Mt. Carmel Baptist Church Cemetery. The family will re ceive friends from 5:00-7:00 Tuesday evening in the Chapel of the Dees-Parrish Family Fu neral Home. The family requests tions are made in his name to the Childrens Programs (Awana) or the Cemetery Fund, of the Mt. Carmel Baptist Church. 1205 S.W. Mount Carmel Ave, Lake City, FL 32024. Arrangements are under the direction of the DEES-PARRISH FAMILY FUNERAL HOME 458 S. Marion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025, 752-1234 please sign the online family guestbook at parrishfamilyfuneralhome.com Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2012 5A 5A WILSONS CONTAINERS Construction/Debris Containers Available 755-7060 Delivered to your job site today Bring your unwanted Gold, Silver & Platinum to someone you can trust Precious metals are seeing record values. Please call me for a private and con dential appointment to sell or trade your unwanted gold, silver and platinum. George R. Ward Downtown Lake City (386) 752-5470 Name Brand Gently Used Childrens Clothing Maternity Clothing Cribs High Chairs Toys 471 SW 247 Branford Crossing 752-9885 (Across from the fairgrounds) NEW MERCHA N DISE A RRIVI N G D AILY 234 SW Main Blvd. 752-5866 For Life Insurance Go With Someone You Know RIBS COUNTRY STYLE Fifth Generation Farms offers exceptional quality, down-home prices and a little southern charm, too! Monday Friday 8am 7pm | Saturday 8am -6pm | Sunday CLOSED Offering Local & Fresh Foods THE MARKE T M EA T PRODUCE and M ORE 3739 WEST HWY. 90, LAKE CITY, FL (386) 243-8335 Why Not Fresh? Prices good thru 12-1-12, while supplies last. No rainchecks. GREAT FOR GRILLIN G WHOLE FRYERS FRESH B ABYBACK RIBS $ 3 59 LB BUR G ERS FOR THE G RILL VINE RIPE FLORIDA FRESH $ 1 39 $ 5 99 LB L OOK T OMATOES T ENDER RED POTATOES TORTILLA CHIPS SUNSHINE ACRES NO W OFFERIN G LB $ 1 99 LB $ 1 99 LB P ORK STEAKS NFN G OURMET ( B LUE C HEESE, I TALIAN, BACON CHEDDAR) 100% Natural, No Preservatives $ 1 99 16 OZ. BA G 49 LB WHITE CHEF POTATOES 49 LB $ 1 29 LB #1 C ITRUS BANANAS 49 LB NORTH FLORIDA NATURAL BLACK AN G US P remium quality beef from our family farm. NFNB A is raised on green pastures and natural grains with N O added hormones, antibiotics or animal by-products. NFN is locally processed, U S DA certied and dry aged for tenderness and full avor. We are committed to producing beef for our family and friends that is nutritious and delicious Naturally! SPECIAL E VENT ROOM A VAILABLE Gift Baskets, Fruit & Veggie Trays G REAT DEAL G OIN Navels Tangerines Grapefruits Jay Poole, AAMS Financial Advisor 846 S W Baya Drive Lake City, FL 32025 386-752-3545 www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC How much will you need to retire? Lets talk. Obituaries are paid advertise ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporters classified depart ment at 752-1293. OBITUARIES COMMUNITY CALENDAR To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr@lakecityreporter.com. Nov. 27 Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon at the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane, to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. Nov. 28 Senators staff visit Staff members of U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio will be available to help area resi dents with issues involving federal agencies from 1:30 to 4 p.m. at the Lifestyle Enrichment Center, 628 SE Allison Court. For more information, all Rubios Jacksonville Regional Office at (904) 398-8586. Senior theater The GeriActors Thearter will present three 0ne-act plays from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Lifestyle Enrichment Center, 628 SE Allison Court in Lake City. The plays are A Collie for Christmas; Where Is Misha; and the Louisiana version of The Night Before Christmas. Light refreshments will be served. Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Wednesday from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Fort White Public Library on Route 47to answer ques tions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. Nov. 29 Landlords to meet Lake City area landlords will meet at the IHOP res taurant. Dinner will be at 5 p.m., and the program will begin at 6. Columbia County Fire Chief David Boozer will be the speak er. Call (386) 755-0110 for more information. Brain health class Maintain Your Brain at the Lifestyle Enrichment Center, 628 SE Allison Court, from 10 to 11:30 a.m. This free presentation explores insights about what a person can do to maintain life-long brain health. Attendees will learn basic brain facts, ways to keep memories sharp and the close connection between brain health and heart health. Call (800) 272-3900 to register or for more information. Community theater High Springs Commnity Theater will present the comedy Christmas Belles, tonight through Dec.16. Tickets are available for purchase at The Framery of Lake City (386) 754-2780, Pampered Paws in High Springs (386) 454-4464 or online at highspringscom munitytheater.com. A pre view performance is open to the public on at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday shows will be at at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m. Doors open a half-hour before show time. Tickets are $11 for adults, $8 for children 12 and younger and $9 fro seniors on Sundays. The theater is at 130 N First Ave. in High Springs. Nov. 30 Hospital garage sale The auxiliary at Shands Lakeshore Hospital will have a garage sale from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the hospi tals first-floor conference room and outside for larger items. Dec. 1 Breakfast with chief Lake City Police Chief Argatha Gilmore will have her quarterly community meeting, Breakfast With The Chief, from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at the Public Safety Building. The event is an opportunity for community members to discuss issues or concerns with Gilmore. A complimentary breakfast will be available. For more information, contact Audre Washington, police depart ment community relations coordinator, at (386) 7195742. Farm day event Suwanee Valley Alpacas will have a Farm Day from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. today and Sunday. Spend the day learning about alpacas. Pet an alpaca. Learn to spin the fiber into yarn. A free Beanie Baby for each child. Air-brush art. Alpaca prod ucts available for sale for unique Christmas gifts. The farm is at 524 NW Sleepy Court in White Springs. For more information, call (386) 397-2678. Civil War program Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave. in Fernandina Beach, will have a Union Garrison event today and Sunday. The program will allow visi tors to interact with living historians to experience life in the fort as it was in 1864. Soldiers in period costumes will conduct firing demon strations, marching drills and daily activities. Ladies in period dresses will be decorate a Christmas tree and the mantles for the holiday season. Sutlers will display their wares, and drummer boys will project the sounds of the Civil War era. Activities will be held from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. today and 9 a.m. to noon Sunday. For additional information, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www. FloridaStateParks.org. Dec. 5 Book sale fundraiser The auxiliary at Shands Lakeshore Hospital will hold a Christmas book sale to support the hospital from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the firstfloor cafe at the hospital. Builders association Columbia County Builders Association will hold a General Council lunch at Guang Dong res taurant in the Lake City Mall. The sponsor is the Foundation Professionals Inc. of Florida. The speaker will be Sgt. David Greene from Crime Prevention Division of the Columbia County Sheriffs Office. Therew will be raffle and a 50-50 drawing. Reservations are appreciated and can be made by calling (386) 867-1998. Tickets are $12 for members and $15 for non-members.Arrive about 11:30 to enjoy the buffet. The meeting will start at 12:00 noon. Newcomers luncheon The Newcomers Friendship Luncheon will be at 11:30 a.m. at Hannahs, 4196 W US 90 in the Premier Plaza. For those who want to par ticipate, there will be an exchange of wrapped gifts, with a $10 value limit. For more information, contact Barbara Test at 754-7272 or Rose Taylor at 755-2175.

PAGE 6

From staff reports Niblack Elementary School held a royal celebra tion on Nov. 8. Hard work and pride were certainly evident in the decorations and plan ning. The event was a huge success based on the atten dance by the parents, com munity, families, faculty and staff. The fundraiser was open to pre-kindergar ten through fifth grades. Students raising the high est amount of money were recognized as the prince and princess for each preK through fourth-grade homeroom. The titles of king and queen went to the fifth-grade boy and girl who raised the most money. The yearbook fundraiser was the brain-child of our yearbook sponsor, Mamie Jackson. Ms. Jackson plans to make the celebration an annual event, giving the Niblack families an evening of elegance to look forward to. The beauty of our chil dren was displayed, not only in their outer appear ance but in their exemplary behavior. The fifth-grade king was Darrell Jones, and the queen was Akilah Bowden. Also crowned prince was Jayveion Hall. Princes and princesses were winners from each of the lower grades were: Fourth-grade princes were Deveion Folston, Dkhari Jernigan, and Calep McNeil. Princesses were: Katrina Combs, Rosa Williams, Carltoni Claridy, and Omarrea Lowe. Third-grade princes were Felix Warren, Shawn Raggins II, Demaurion Jernigan and Dionne Leslie. Princesses were Teonna Myers, Kaiya Bowden, and Cailiana Mobley. Second-grade princes were Carlis Lindsey, Daniel Benjamin and Jakeel Murphy. Princesses were Kyara Thomas, Christianna Johnson and Samantha Edwards. First-grade princes were Tyler Bailey and DShawn Brown. Princesses were Briana Bell, Arienna Kim, and Kaniyjah Robinson. Kindergarten princes were Deterrion Benjamin, Micah Williams and Mekhi Ling. Princesses were Alydia Hawkins, Renia Cherry, and Tralynn Mullins. The pre-K prince was Tyson Reaves and the pre-K princess was Ebony Jones. 6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL TUESDAY NOVEMBER 27, 2012 6A New Patient Exam and Necessary X-rays DO150, DO330 First-time patient Reg. $136 $ 29 SAVINGS OF $107 Expires November 30, 2012 ASPEN DENTAL GROUP Lake City Reporter Located at SHANDS Lake City, Live Oak & Starke Womens Center of Florida ALL MAJOR INSURANCES ACCEPTED INCLUDING MEDICAID & MEDICARE FREE Pregnancy Ultrasound WITH THIS AD* *Insurance billing may occur if necessary. Some Restrictions apply. OBSTRETRICS & GYNECOLOGY PRENATAL CARE & ULTRASOUNDS STDS & HPV TESTING BIRTH CONTROL & INFERTILITY MENOPAUSE & INCONTINENCE WEIGHT LOSS & 4D ULTRASOUNDS BOTOX & LASER HAIR REMOVAL NO INSURANCE VISITS ASK ABOUT OUR $ 50 CHANDLER MOHAN, MD EMAD ATTA, MD NOW HIRING MID-LEVEL PROVIDERS 386-466-1106 SERVICES: OB-GYN www.myobcare.com G. W. HUNTER, INC. 1130 US Hwy 90 W (386) 752-5890 WE NOW HAVE ETHANOL FREE PLUS GASOLINE ONLY AT INTENDED USES: BOATS & WATERCRAFTS COLLECTABLE VEHICLES OFF-ROAD VEHICLES MOTORCYCLES SMALL ENGINES T IMELESS M EMORIES 386-466-1888 Gator Jewelry Has Arrived Large Selection To Choose From GO GATORS *Student Savers: is is an interest bearing account. No monthly service charge and no minimum balance required. $2 charge per withdrawal over 3 per month. Current Annual Percentage Yield (APY) is 0.05% for balances over $5 and is eective as of 8/1/12. e interest rate and APY are subject to change without notice. Account will earn no interest any day the balance falls below $5. Fees may reduce earnings. A parent or guardian must be a signer the account with the minor. student savers Sign up today! Call 386-755-0600 or come in to one of our branches. Gloria Markham 707 SW Main Blvd. Renee McIntosh 4705 US Hwy 90 W Nicole Storer 2571 US Hwy 90 W Just $5 to open No monthly service charge Free online banking and bill pay Free mobile banking Free eStatement $ 399 95 $ 199 95 Rancher 455 .5cc .5hp "-20" .8 lbs. Husqvarna 240 .2cc hp "-16" .3 lbs. Pole Saw 327P5X .5cc .21hp /8" .5 US pint $ 559 95 Chain Saw School honors yearbook royalty COURTESY PHOTO Melrose Park Elementary Schools young writers of the month for November are: (front row, from left) Veronica Bohley-Miller, first grade; Jacob Sheldon, second grade; Avery Crosier, fourth grade; and Nicholas Melton, third grade. In back are (from left) J. T. Roper, Mix 94.3 Morning co-host; Quianna Dillard, fifth grade young writer of the month; and Curriculum Resource Teacher Courtney Baisden. COURTESY PHOTO Four Fort White Future Farmers of America chapter members (from left) Steven McMahan, Rebecca Bailey, Hunter Koon and Frank Sandall attended the National FFA Convention in Indianapolis, Ind., Oct. 24. The students were recognized on stage for the accomplish ments of the Fort White Middle School and Fort White High School FFA chapters during the 2011 year. The chapters submitted an extensive application showcasing their activities in the areas of student development, chapter development and community service. An example of activities were painting the fire hydrants in Fort White, caring for the old Ichetucknee Cemetery, attending various leadership events and hosting a career fair. The members also attended convention sessions where they heard motivational speakers and learned about the future of agriculture. National recognition Melrose Park young writers CAMPUS NEWS Five Points Elementary Native American project Mrs. Wendi Fulwood, Ms. Teresa McCullough, and Mr. Anthony Perrys fifh-grade classes are finishing their Native American unit. The student projects depict ing a scene from Native American life are being displayed in the library for the next week. Fundraiser set We will start our Krispy Kream Doughnut fundrais er Monday, Dec. 3. They will be $6 for a dozen or a voucher to buy a dozen from the Krispy Kream doughnut shop. Toy donations We are collecting new or slightly used toys for our annual toy drive for Christmas. They are being kept in the Parent Involvement Room.

PAGE 7

By TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comFORT WHITE — Fort White High’s basketball team needs to take one more step to make the state playoffs for the first time. The Indians open the season today in a double-header with the girls at Union County High. Tipoff is 6 p.m. for the girls and 7:30 p.m. for the boys (boys junior varsity starts at 4:30 p.m.). Coach Isiah Phillips’ team was 11-10 in 2011-12 and 5-5 in District 5-4A. The Indians beat Interlachen High in the district tournament, but lost to eventual champion Williston High in the semi-finals. Bradford, Keystone Heights and Santa Fe high schools round out the By TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comFORT WHITE — The First Academy completed a playoff sweep of District 3-3A with a 27-17 win over Trinity Catholic High in Orlando last week. The District 4 champion Royals travel to Madison County High for the state semifinal round on Friday. First Academy’s Ben Deluzio scored on touch-down runs of 55 and five years and caught a 52-yard touchdown pass from Curt Cramer. Deluzio, who has signed a baseball scholarship with Florida State, totaled 206 yards on offense. Landon Scheer kicked field goals of 40 and 48 yards. Joe Sandstrom scored both touchdowns for the Celtics (8-4) and rushed for 113 yards before leaving with an injury in the third quarter. Juan Vargas booted a 35-yard field goal and Demonta Blunt rushed for 99 yards. Newberry High won the rematch with Union County High, knocking the Tigers (11-1) from the list of unbeatens, 18-13. Union County scored first on a 13-yard pass from Caleb Cox to Daquin Edwards and followed with a possession that went to the Panthers’ 1-yard line. Newberry stopped the score and responded with a 99-yard scoring drive. Ra’kheem Hoyt scored on a five-yard run and later added a one-yard touch-down run. Hoyt rushed for 103 yards. With the game tied 6-all in By KRISTIE RIEKENAssociated PressCOLLEGE STATION, Texas — The legend of Johnny Football has grown all season while Johnny Manziel piled up yards and the Texas A&M Aggies piled up wins. On Monday, the freshman quarterback finally weighed in on his catchy nickname as he spoke to the media for the first time all season. “I think a lot of people here in Aggieland enjoy it,” he said. “But I find it extremely funny.” The success of Manziel and the Aggies is no joke. His 4,600 yards of total offense have helped No. 10 A&M to its first 10-win sea-son since 1998, and has him among the top contenders for the Heisman Trophy. Manziel said he respected coach Kevin Sumlin’s deci-sion for him not to speak to the media this season By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High shares many similarities with the team it will meet next in the Class 6A region-al final at 8:30 p.m. Friday. The Tigers travel over one time zone to take on the Navarre High Raiders at 7:30 p.m. in the Panhandle. Like Columbia, Navarre is 11-1 on the season. Like Columbia, the Raiders are on a nine-game winning streak. Like Columbia, Navarre’s only loss came against a perennial power-house on the road. The Raiders lost to Pensacola High, 25-24, in week two, but have rebounded like the Tigers. Another similarity to the Tigers is that the Raiders like to do it with a stingy defense. Columbia has the edge on shutouts as the Raiders only have one this season, but Navarre has held opposing teams to 14 points or less in eight games this season. The Tigers have five defensive shutouts. The Raiders defeated Pace High, 30-10, and Milton High, 20-12, to reach the regional final. Navarre trailed Milton, 12-7, at the half before the Raiders pitched a second-half shutout to stop the Panthers on Friday. For their only first-half score, the Raiders used a bit of trickery as Johnny Robinson-Pettus hit Christian Gill on a three-yard jump pass to get on the board. Andre Flakes and Roy Wise each had touchdown runs for Milton in the first half. The Raiders’ special teams set up Navarre out of the half break, as Nick Benton returned the kick to the 42-yard line. Andrew Reives found Jordan Leggett for a 12-yard touchdown pass and the Raiders took command with a 14-12 lead. A three-and-out forced by Navarre’s defense set up the sec-ond big play from the Raiders’ special teams, as a punt block gave Navarre the ball back at the Milton 10-yard line. Reives capped off the drive on a five-yard score. Columbia’s win was more convincing in a 34-8 fashion over St. Augustine High, but this will be the first time the Tigers have traveled since Oct. 18 against Middleburg High. Columbia (58-0 win) was convincing in that game, too. Lake City Reporter SPORTS Tuesday, November 27, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS BRIEFS Two 11-1 teams face off in third round of Class 6A playoffs. A&M continued on 3B Freshman gag rule removed for Heisman hopeful. PLAYOFFS continued on 3B Newberry, First Academy remain alive in playoffs. HOOPS continued on 3B Fort White boys play first game at Union County. GAMES Today Q Columbia High girls soccer at Chiles High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Q Fort White High soccer vs. Interlachen High, 7 p.m. (girls-5) Q Fort White High basketball at Union County High, 7:30 p.m. (girls-6) Wednesday Q Columbia High boys soccer vs. Mosley High at CYSA fields, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Q Fort White High boys basketball vs. Newberry High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Thursday Q Fort White High girls basketball at Santa Fe High, 6 p.m. Q Fort White High soccer at P.K. Yonge School, 7 p.m. (girls-5) Q Columbia High girls basketball at Atlantic Coast High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-5:30) Q Columbia High boys basketball at Suwannee High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Friday Q Columbia High girls soccer at Hamilton County High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Q Columbia High boys soccer vs. Lincoln High at CYSA fields, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Q Fort White High girls basketball vs. North Florida Christian School, 7 p.m. Q Fort White High boys basketball at Melody Christian Academy, 7 p.m. Q Columbia High football at Navarre High in regional final, 7:30 p.m. (CST) Saturday Q Columbia High wrestling hosts Tiger Invitational, 10 a.m. Q Columbia High boys basketball at Union County High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) CHS FOOTBALL Charter bus for Navarre game The Columbia County Quarterback Club is taking a charter bus to Columbia High’s playoff game at Navarre High. Cost for a seat on the bus is $36. It will leave at 1 p.m. The game ticket is an extra $8 at the gate. For details, call club president Joe Martino at 984-0452. YOUTH SOCCER Winter sign-up ends Thursday Columbia Youth Soccer Association’s 2013 Winter Recreational Soccer Season final registration for ages 3-16 is 6-7 p.m. Thursday. All teams will be gender specific. Fee of $65 includes uniform. For details, go to columbiayouthsoccer association.com or call 288-2504. RUNNING Chomp Cancer Foundation 5K Chomp Cancer Foundation has its second Chomp Cancer 5K Run/Walk planned for 8 a.m. Dec. 15 in Fort White. Sponsorships are available. For details, call Lauren Valentine at (321) 501-9526.Q From staff reports CHS, Navarre have similaritiesJASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Trey Marshall (21) runs for a touchdo wn on a fake punt in the Tigers’ 34-8 win over St. Augustine High. Johnny Football speaksASSOCIATED PRESSTexas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel (2) sings the Ag gie War Hymn with Ryan Swope (25) and Conner McQueen (14) after A&M’s 59-29 win over Missouri in College Station, Texas, on Saturday. Two foes still standing Indians hoops tips off today

PAGE 8

USA Today Top 25 The USA Today Top 25 football coaches poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Nov. 24, total points and previous ranking: Record Pts Pvs1. Notre Dame (56) 12-0 1,469 12. Alabama (2) 11-1 1,398 23. Georgia (1) 11-1 1,341 34. Oregon 11-1 1,277 45. Florida 11-1 1,265 66. LSU 10-2 1,124 77. Kansas State 10-1 1,114 88. Texas A&M 10-2 1,076 109. Stanford 10-2 1,008 1110. South Carolina 10-2 972 1211. Oklahoma 9-2 878 1312. Florida State 10-2 829 513. Nebraska 10-2 765 1414. Clemson 10-2 720 915. Boise State 9-2 479 2216. UCLA 9-3 445 1617. Oregon State 8-3 410 1718. Northern Illinois 11-1 377 2319. Kent State 11-1 337 2520. Northwestern 9-3 314 NR21. Texas 8-3 312 1522. Utah State 10-2 264 NR23. Louisville 9-2 184 1824. Michigan 8-4 158 2025. Rutgers 9-2 152 19 Others receiving votes: Oklahoma State 129; San Jose State 105; Vanderbilt 94; Fresno State 39; TCU 34; San Diego State 28; Cincinnati 17; Arizona State 13; Arkansas State 13; Mississippi State 11; Middle Tennessee 7; UCF 5 ; Louisiana Tech 5; Arizona 3; Toledo 2; Baylor 1; Southern California 1.Harris Top 25 The Top 25 teams in the Harris Interactive College Football Poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Nov. 24, total points and previous ranking: Record Pts Pvs1. Notre Dame (109) 12-0 2869 12. Alabama (6) 11-1 2740 23. Georgia 11-1 2599 34. Oregon 11-1 2507 45. Florida 11-1 2435 56. Kansas State 10-1 2229 77. LSU 10-2 2142 88. Stanford 10-2 2059 119. Texas A&M 10-2 2038 1010. South Carolina 10-2 1862 1211. Oklahoma 9-2 1706 1312. Florida State 10-2 1614 613. Nebraska 10-2 1493 1414. Clemson 10-2 1446 915. Oregon State 8-3 975 1516. UCLA 9-3 919 1617. Boise State 9-2 817 2118. Kent State 11-1 705 2519. Northern Illinois 11-1 619 2420. Texas 8-3 564 1721. Northwestern 9-3 479 NR22. Utah State 10-2 438 NR 23. Michigan 8-4 434 2024. Louisville 9-2 394 1825. Oklahoma State 7-4 392 22 Others receiving votes: Rutgers 302, TCU 134, San Jose State 118, Vanderbilt 67, Southern Cal 57, San Diego State 39, Fresno State 36, Baylor 31, Mississippi State 26, Louisiana Tech 19, Cincinnati 12, Arizona State 11, Syracuse 10, Tulsa 10, UCF 9 Arizona 6, Toledo 6, East Carolina 4, Arkansas State 1, Louisiana-Monroe 1, Washington 1.AP Top 25 The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press college football poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Nov. 24, total points and previous ranking: Record Pts Pv1. Notre Dame (60) 12-0 1,500 12. Alabama 11-1 1,400 23. Georgia 11-1 1,331 34. Ohio St. 12-0 1,294 45. Florida 11-1 1,262 66. Oregon 11-1 1,242 57. Kansas St. 10-1 1,079 78. Stanford 10-2 1,061 119. LSU 10-2 1,056 810. Texas A&M 10-2 1,043 911. South Carolina 10-2 916 1312. Oklahoma 9-2 834 1413. Florida St. 10-2 764 1014. Nebraska 10-2 704 1715. Clemson 10-2 667 1216. Oregon St. 8-3 528 16 17. UCLA 9-3 505 1518. Kent St. 11-1 355 2319. N. Illinois 11-1 349 2420. Utah St. 10-2 274 2521. Michigan 8-4 217 2022. Northwestern 9-3 189 NR23. Texas 8-3 185 1824. Oklahoma St. 7-4 174 2225. Boise St. 9-2 145 NR Others receiving votes: San Jose St. 78, Louisville 73, TCU 67, Penn St. 61, Rutgers 50, Vanderbilt 48, San Diego St. 15, Fresno St. 12, Southern Cal 7, Arkansas St. 5, Arizona 4, Cincinnati 3, Ball St. 1, Mississippi St. 1, North Carolina 1.SEC standings East W L PF PA Georgia 7 1 268 145 Florida 7 1 207 95 South Carolina 6 2 229 169 Vanderbilt 5 3 177 168 Missouri 2 6 175 264 Tennessee 1 7 246 320 Kentucky 0 8 89 291 West Alabama 7 1 303 90 LSU 6 2 180 150 Texas A&M 6 2 313 168 Mississippi St. 4 4 202 223 Mississippi 3 5 224 239 Arkansas 2 6 157 257 Auburn 0 8 81 272 ACC standings Atlantic Division W L PF PA Florida St. 7 1 318 124 Clemson 7 1 372 219 NC State 4 4 227 232 Wake Forest 3 5 132 235 Maryland 2 6 156 238 Boston College 1 7 154 276 Coastal Division North Carolina 5 3 298 263 Miami 5 3 283 254 Georgia Tech 5 3 320 233 Virginia Tech 4 4 193 218 Duke 3 5 225 313 Virginia 2 6 168 241 College games Thursday Louisville at Rutgers, 7:30 p.m. Friday MAC Championship, N. Illinois vs. Kent St. at Detroit, 7 p.m. Pac-12 Championship, UCLA at Stanford, 8 p.m. Saturday EAST Kansas at West Virginia, 2:30 p.m.Cincinnati at UConn, 3:30 p.m. SOUTH Louisiana-Lafayette at FAU, 3 p.m.SEC Championship, Alabama vs. Georgia at Atlanta, 4 p.m. Pittsburgh at South Florida, 7 p.m.ACC Championship, Georgia Tech vs. Florida State at Charlotte, N.C., 8 p.m. MIDWEST Texas at Kansas St., 8 p.m.Big Ten Championship, Nebraska vs. Wisconsin at Indianapolis, 8:15 p.m. SOUTHWEST C-USA Championship, UCF at Tulsa, Noon Oklahoma St. at Baylor, NoonOklahoma at TCU, NoonNew Mexico St. at Texas St., 4 p.m. FAR WEST Nicholls St. at Oregon St., 2:30 p.m.Boise St. at Nevada, 3:30 p.m. D-I career touchdowns 79 — Montee Ball, Wisconsin (2009-)78 — Travis Prentice, Miami, Ohio (1996-99) 75 — Ricky Williams, Texas (1995-98)69 — Taurean Henderson, Texas Tech (2002-05) 68 — Brock Forsey, Boise St. (1999-02)67 — Cedric Benson, Texas (2001-04)65 — DeMarco Murray, Oklahoma (2007-10) 65 — Anthony Thompson, Indiana (1986-89) 63 — Ron Dayne, Wisconsin (1996-99)62 — Marshall Faulk, San Diego St. (1991-93) SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. NBCSN — Vermont at Harvard 7:15 p.m. ESPN2 — Minnesota at Florida St. 7:30 p.m. ESPN — NC State at Michigan 9:15 p.m. ESPN2 — Maryland at Northwestern 9:30 p.m. ESPN — North Carolina at IndianaFOOTBALLNFL standings AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PANew England 8 3 0 .727 407 244 Miami 5 6 0 .455 211 226 N.Y. Jets 4 7 0 .364 221 290 Buffalo 4 7 0 .364 243 319 South W L T Pct PF PAHouston 10 1 0 .909 327 211 Indianapolis 7 4 0 .636 230 273 Tennessee 4 7 0 .364 238 335Jacksonville 2 9 0 .182 188 308 North W L T Pct PF PABaltimore 9 2 0 .818 283 219Pittsburgh 6 5 0 .545 231 210Cincinnati 6 5 0 .545 282 247Cleveland 3 8 0 .273 209 248 West W L T Pct PF PADenver 8 3 0 .727 318 221San Diego 4 7 0 .364 245 237 Oakland 3 8 0 .273 218 356 Kansas City 1 10 0 .091 161 301 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAN.Y. Giants 7 4 0 .636 305 226 Washington 5 6 0 .455 295 285 Dallas 5 6 0 .455 242 262Philadelphia 3 7 0 .300 162 252 South W L T Pct PF PAAtlanta 10 1 0 .909 294 216 Tampa Bay 6 5 0 .545 310 254New Orleans 5 6 0 .455 308 304Carolina 2 8 0 .200 184 243 North W L T Pct PF PAChicago 8 3 0 .727 277 175 Green Bay 7 4 0 .636 273 245Minnesota 6 5 0 .545 248 249Detroit 4 7 0 .364 267 280 West W L T Pct PF PASan Francisco 8 2 1 .773 276 155Seattle 6 5 0 .545 219 185 St. Louis 4 6 1 .409 205 254 Arizona 4 7 0 364 180 227 Thursday’s Games Houston 34, Detroit 31, OTWashington 38, Dallas 31New England 49, N.Y. Jets 19 Sunday’s Games Denver 17, Kansas City 9Chicago 28, Minnesota 10Cincinnati 34, Oakland 10Cleveland 20, Pittsburgh 14Indianapolis 20, Buffalo 13Jacksonville 24, Tennessee 19Atlanta 24, Tampa Bay 23Miami 24, Seattle 21Baltimore 16, San Diego 13, OTSt. Louis 31, Arizona 17San Francisco 31, New Orleans 21N.Y. Giants 38, Green Bay 10 Monday’s Game Carolina at Philadelphia (n) Thursday, Nov. 29 New Orleans at Atlanta, 8:20 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 2 Seattle at Chicago, 1 p.m.Minnesota at Green Bay, 1 p.m.San Francisco at St. Louis, 1 p.m.Carolina at Kansas City, 1 p.m.Houston at Tennessee, 1 p.m.Arizona at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m.Indianapolis at Detroit, 1 p.m.Jacksonville at Buffalo, 1 p.m.New England at Miami, 1 p.m. Tampa Bay at Denver, 4:05 p.m.Cleveland at Oakland, 4:25 p.m.Cincinnati at San Diego, 4:25 p.m.Pittsburgh at Baltimore, 4:25 p.m.Philadelphia at Dallas, 8:20 p.m. Monday, Dec. 3 N.Y. Giants at Washington, 8:30 p.m. All-ACC GREENSBORO, N.C — The 2012 all-Atlantic Coast Conference football team, as determined by a vote of 46 members of the Atlantic Coast Sports Media Association, with voting results in parenthesis. A first-team vote is worth two points and second-team vote is worth one. FIRST TEAM Offense QB—Tajh Boyd, Clemson (86) RB—Gio Bernard, North Carolina (91) RB—Andre Ellington, Clemson (77)WR—DeAndre Hopkins, Clemson (80) WR—Alex Amidon, Boston College (53) OT—Oday Aboushi, Virginia (53) OT—Brandon Thomas, Clemson (51) OG—Jonathan Cooper, North Carolina (79) OG—Omoregie Uzzi, Georgia Tech (64) C—Dalton Freeman, Clemson (78) TE—Brandon Ford, Clemson (54) K—Dustin Hopkins, Florida State (79) Specialist—Gio Bernard, North Carolina (48) Defense DE—Bjoern Werner, Florida State (89) DE—Cornellius Carradine, Florida State (77) DT—Joe Vellano, Maryland (80) DT—Sylvester Williams, North Carolina (63) LB—Nick Clancy, Boston College (66) LB—Kevin Reddick, North Carolina (65) LB—Steve Greer, Virginia (58)CB—Xavier Rhodes, Florida State (66) CB—Ross Cockrell, Duke (50) S—Lamarcus Joyner, Florida State (59) S—Earl Wolff, NC State (46) P—Will Monday, Duke (73) ——— SECOND TEAM Offense QB—EJ Manuel, Florida State (25) RB—Duke Johnson, Miami (47)RB—Chris Thompson, Florida State (31) WR—Conner Vernon, Duke (51) WR—Michael Campanaro, Wake Forest (32) OT—James Hurst, North Carolina (50) OT—Cameron Erving, Florida State (21) OT—Emmett Cleary, Boston College (21) OG—Tre’ Jackson, Florida State (26) OG—R.J. Matttes, NC State (24) C— Bryan Stork, Florida State (19) TE—Eric Ebron, North Carolina (51) K—Chandler Catanzaro, Clemson (22) K—Casey Barth, North Carolina (22)Specialist—Duke Johnson, Miami (44) Defense DE—James Gayle, Virginia Tech (30) DE—Kareem Martin, North Carolina (22) DT—Everett Dawkins, Florida State (34) DT—Nikita Whitlock, Wake Forest (24) LB—Demetrius Hartsfield, Maryland (34) LB—Christian Jones, Florida State (31) LB—Jack Tyler Virginia Tech (28) CB—David Amerson, NC State (46) CB—Antone Exum, Virginia Tech (44)S—Rashard Hall, Clemson (43) S— Walt Canty, Duke (31) P—Tommy Hibbard, North Carolina (40)BASKETBALLNBA schedule Today’s Games Phoenix at Cleveland, 7 p.m.Dallas at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.Toronto at Houston, 8 p.m.Minnesota at Sacramento, 10 p.m.Indiana at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m. Wednesday’s Games San Antonio at Orlando, 7 p.m.Portland at Washington, 7 p.m.Brooklyn at Boston, 7:30 p.m.Charlotte at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.Phoenix at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.Dallas at Chicago, 8 p.m.Toronto at Memphis, 8 p.m.Utah at New Orleans, 8 p.m.Houston at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.New York at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.Minnesota at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.AP Top 25 The top 25 teams in The Associated Press ’ college basketball poll, with firstplace votes in parentheses, records through Nov. 25, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and last week’s ranking: Record Pts Prv 1. Indiana (47) 6-0 1,606 1 2. Duke (18) 6-0 1,554 5 3. Michigan 5-0 1,421 4 4. Ohio St. 4-0 1,416 3 5. Louisville 5-1 1,347 2 6. Syracuse 4-0 1,323 6 7. Florida 5-0 1,227 7 8. Kentucky 4-1 1,180 8 9. Arizona 3-0 1,076 1010. Kansas 4-1 937 1211. Creighton 6-0 926 1412. Gonzaga 6-0 854 1713. Michigan St. 5-1 818 1514. North Carolina 5-1 718 915. Oklahoma St. 5-0 668 2016. Missouri 5-1 665 1317. Cincinnati 6-0 571 2218. NC State 4-1 553 1619. Colorado 5-0 478 2320. Georgetown 4-1 257 —21. Minnesota 6-1 197 —22. Illinois 7-0 185 —23. San Diego St. 4-1 182 2524. UNLV 3-1 175 1825. New Mexico 6-0 141 — Others receiving votes: Alabama 108, Wichita St. 99, UConn 93, UCLA 85, Pittsburgh 55, Oregon 44, Notre Dame 42, Memphis 23, Butler 20, Wisconsin 16, California 12, Florida St. 10 Saint Joseph’s 9, Ohio 8, Marquette 7, Murray St. 5, Temple 5, Baylor 4, Tennessee 3, Colorado St. 1, VCU 1.AP Top 25 schedule Today’s Games No. 1 Indiana vs. No. 14 North Carolina, 9:30 p.m. No. 3 Michigan vs. No. 18 N.C. State, 7:30 p.m. No. 19 Colorado vs. Texas Southern, 9:30 p.m. No. 21 Minnesota at Florida State, 7:15 p.m. Wednesday’s Games No. 2 Duke vs. No. 4 Ohio State, 9:30 p.m. No. 9 Arizona vs. Northern Arizona, 10 p.m. No. 11 Creighton vs. Boise State, 8:05 p.m. No. 13 Michigan State at Miami, 7:30 p.m. No. 22 Illinois vs. Georgia Tech, 9 p.m.No. 24 UNLV vs. UC Irvine, 10 p.m.No. 25 New Mexico vs. Mercer, 9 p.m. Thursday’s Games No. 7 Florida vs. Marquette, 9 p.m. No. 8 Kentucky at Notre Dame, 7 p.m. No. 12 Gonzaga vs. Lewis-Clark State, 9 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2012 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-04212BAGATE TUESDAY EVENING NOVEMBER 27, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Dr. Seuss’ GrinchShrek the HallsDancing With the Stars: All-Stars (Season Finale) (N) (Live) News at 11(:35) Nightline (N) 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) The Insider 5-PBS 5 -Journal Nightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Use Your Brain to Change Your Age With Dr. Daniel Amen The Heart of Perfect Health With Brenda Watson Tavis Smiley 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge Judy Two and Half MenNCIS “Gone” (N) (DVS) NCIS: Los Angeles “Collateral” (N) Vegas “Exposure” (N) Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneHart of Dixie “Achy Breaky Hearts” (N) Emily Owens, M.D. (N) TMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ce The Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family Guy Family Guy The SimpsonsRaising Hope (N) Ben and Kate (N) New Girl “Eggs” The Mindy ProjectNewsAction News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) The Voice “Live Results Show” (N) (:01) Go On (N) The New Normal(:01) Parenthood (N) NewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(5:00) Public Affairs Capitol Hill Hearings WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H The Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Disappeared “A Lost Soul” Oprah: Where Are They Now? Oprah: Where Are They Now? Oprah: Where Are They Now? Oprah: Where Are They Now?Oprah: Where Are They Now? A&E 19 118 265Storage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage Wars(:01) Storage Wars(:31) Storage Wars HALL 20 185 312“Fallen Angel” (2003, Drama) Gary Sinise, Joely Richardson. “Eve’s Christmas” (2004, Comedy-Drama) Elisa Donovan, Cheryl Ladd. “The Case for Christmas” (2011, Fantasy) Dean Cain, Rachel Blanchard. FX 22 136 248Two and Half MenTwo and Half Men “Mr. & Mrs. Smith” (2005) Brad Pitt, Angelina Jolie. A husband and wife are assassins for rival organizations. Sons of Anarchy Jax takes the club in a new direction. (N) Sons of Anarchy CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245The Mentalist “Red All Over” The Mentalist “18-5-4” Rizzoli & Isles Rizzoli & Isles (N) Leverage “The Low Low Price Job” (N) Rizzoli & Isles NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobDrake & JoshDrake & JoshFull House Full House Full House Full House The Nanny The Nanny Friends (:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241Ink Master “Trick or Freak” Ink Master Ink Master “Star Wars Forever” Ink Master “Holy Ink” Ink Master “Buck Off” (N) Tattoo NightmaresTattoo Nightmares MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*H M*A*S*H House “Fall From Grace” House “The Dig” Seinfeld Frasier The Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Phineas and FerbGood Luck CharlieShake It Up! A.N.T. Farm Jessie “Wizards of Waverly Place: The Movie” (2009) Phineas and FerbPhineas and FerbA.N.T. Farm Good Luck Charlie LIFE 32 108 252Wife Swap “Allemon/Johnson” Wife Swap No rules; structure. Abby’s Ultimate Dance CompetitionAbby’s Ultimate Dance Competition (N) Off Their RockersOff Their RockersOff Their RockersOff Their Rockers USA 33 105 242Law & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims Unit BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Top 10 Countdown” (N) 2012 Soul Train Awards Musical celebration and performance. Family FirstThe Soul ManFamily FirstThe Soul Man ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPY Speechd College Basketball North Carolina State at Michigan. (N)d College Basketball North Carolina at Indiana. (N) SportsCenter (N) ESPN2 36 144 209SportsNation (N) d(:15) College Basketball Minnesota at Florida State. (N)d(:15) College Basketball Maryland at Northwestern. (N) (:15) NBA Coast to Coast (N) SUNSP 37 -Pleasure Boaterhow to Do orida College Football Maryland at North Carolina. Driven College Football DISCV 38 182 278Deadliest Catch Alaska: The Last Frontier Alaska: The Last Frontier “Fall Feast” Alaska: The Last Frontier (N) Buying AlaskaBuying AlaskaAlaska: The Last Frontier TBS 39 139 247King of QueensKing of QueensSeinfeld Seinfeld Big Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryConan (N) HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) Dr. Drew on Call (N) Nancy GraceShowbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236(5:00) “Sweet Home Alabama”E! News (N) The SoupThe SoupNicki Minaj: My Nicki Minaj: My When Teens KillChelsea Lately (N) E! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. Food Man v. Food Dangerous Grounds “Madagascar” Dangerous Grounds “Borneo” (N) Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernBizarre Foods With Andrew Zimmern HGTV 47 112 229The UnsellablesThe UnsellablesHunters Int’lHouse HuntersLove It or List It Jim and Connie. Property VirginsProperty VirginsHouse HuntersHunters Int’lMillion Dollar Rooms (N) TLC 48 183 280Island MediumIsland MediumSister Wives Little People Big World: Wedding FarmLittle People Big World: Wedding FarmExtreme CouponExtreme CouponLittle People Big World: Wedding Farm HIST 49 120 269The Universe Mankind The Story of All of Us Mankind The Story of All of Us Mankind The Story of All of Us Genghis Khan creates a mighty empire. (N) RestorationRestoration ANPL 50 184 282Swamp Wars “Cannibal Gator” River Monsters: Unhooked Frontier Earth (N) The Blue Planet: Seas of Life The Blue Planet: Seas of Life Frontier Earth FOOD 51 110 231Chopped Duck con t in the rst basket. Chopped Tongue in the rst round. Chopped “For Sake’s Sake” Chopped “Reversal of Fortune” Chopped “Bird in the Pan” (N) Chopped “A Guts Reaction” TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the Lord Way Of MasterThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesJoyce MeyerJoseph PrinceRod ParsleyPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -Game TimeShip Shape TVWorld Poker Tour: Season 10 UEFA Champions League Soccer Arsenal FC vs Montpellier HSC. Football PrevUFC Unleashed SYFY 58 122 244(4:00) The Arrival “The Mist” (2007, Horror) Thomas Jane. A deadly fog engulfs terri ed townspeople. Total BlackoutTotal BlackoutScare TacticsScare Tactics“Carny” (2009) Lou Diamond Phillips. AMC 60 130 254 “First Blood” (1982, Action) Sylvester Stallone, Richard Crenna. “Rambo” (2008, Action) Sylvester Stallone, Julie Benz. “Constantine” (2005, Fantasy) Keanu Reeves, Rachel Weisz. COM 62 107 249(5:58) South Park(:29) Tosh.0 The Colbert ReportDaily Show(7:59) WorkaholicsTosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 (N) Brickleberry (N) Daily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327Reba Reba Reba Reba Reba Reba “Gridiron Gang” (2006, Drama) The Rock, Xzibit. A counselor turns juvenile criminals into football players. NGWILD 108 190 283Dog WhispererCorkscrew KillerAnimal SuperpowersAnimal Superpowers “Extreme Killers” Animal SuperpowersAnimal Superpowers NGC 109 186 276Doomsday PreppersDrugs, Inc. “Drug Kings of New York” Drugs, Inc. “Alaska Heroin Rush” Doomsday Preppers (N) Doomsday PreppersDoomsday Preppers SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeFringe “A New Day in the Old Town” Fringe “Night of Desirable Objects” Fringe Investigation leads to Iraq. Fringe “A New Day in the Old Town” ID 111 192 285FBI: Criminal Pursuit “Deadly Seven” FBI: Criminal Pursuit “Killer Fantasy” FBI: Criminal Pursuit Homicide Hunter: Lt. Joe Kenda (N) Alaska: Ice Cold Killers FBI: Criminal Pursuit HBO 302 300 501(5:30) “Megamind” (2010) ‘PG’ (:15) “Red Tails” (2012, Historical Drama) Cuba Gooding Jr., Terrence Howard. ‘PG-13’ 24/7 PacquiaoTreme “Tipitina” (:10) Boardwalk Empire MAX 320 310 515(5:15) Stag Night(:45) “In & Out” (1997, Comedy) Kevin Kline, Joan Cusack. ‘PG-13’ (:20) “Philly Kid” (2012, Action) Wes Chatham. ‘R’ “Road House” (1989, Action) Patrick Swayze, Kelly Lynch. ‘R’ SHOW 340 318 545“Hugh Hefner: Playboy, Activist and Rebel” (2009) Hugh M. Hefner. ‘R’ (:15) “Faster” (2010, Action) Dwayne Johnson, Billy Bob Thornton. ‘R’ Homeland “Two Hats” Dexter “Helter Skelter” COLLEGE POLLS, STANDINGS BOWL CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES Harris USA Today Computer BCS Rk Pts Pct Rk Pts Pct Rk Pct Avg Pv 1. N. Dame 1 2869 .9979 1 1469 .9959 1 1.0000 .9979 1 2. Alabama 2 2740 .9530 2 1398 .9478 3 .8700 .9236 2 3. Georgia 3 2599 .9040 3 1341 .9092 4 .8600 .8911 3 4. Florida 5 2435 .8470 5 1265 .8576 2 .9600 .8882 4 5. Oregon 4 2507 .8720 4 1277 .8658 5 .8500 .8626 5 6. Kansas St. 6 2229 .7753 7 1114 .7553 6 .7900 .7735 6 7. LSU 7 2142 .7450 6 1124 .7620 8 .7000 .7357 7 8. Stanford 8 2059 .7162 9 1008 .6834 6 .7900 .7299 8 9. Tex A&M 9 2038 .7089 8 1076 .7295 11 .6200 .6861 9 10. S. C’lina 10 1862 .6477 10 972 .6590 8 .7000 .6689 12 11. Okla. 11 1706 .5934 11 878 .5953 10 .6500 .6129 13 12. Nebr. 13 1493 .5193 13 765 .5186 12 .5800 .5393 14 13. FSU 12 1614 .5614 12 829 .5620 19 .2700 .4645 10 14. Clemson 14 1446 .5030 14 720 .4881 14 .3800 .4570 11 15. Ore. St. 15 975 .3391 17 410 .2780 13 .5200 .3790 15 16. UCLA 16 919 .3197 16 445 .3017 15 .3700 .3304 17 17. Kent St. 18 705 .2452 19 337 .2285 18 .2800 .2512 23 18. Texas 20 564 .1962 21 312 .2115 17 .3400 .2492 16 19. Michigan 23 434 .1510 24 158 .1071 15 .3700 .2094 19 20. Boise St. 17 817 .2842 15 479 .3247 30 .0000 .2030 22 21. N.Illinois 19 619 .2153 18 377 .2556 23 .1100 .1936 NR 22. N’estern 21 479 .1666 20 314 .2129 21 .1800 .1865 NR 23. Okla. St. 25 392 .1363 26 129 .0875 19 .2700 .1646 21 24. Utah St. 22 438 .1523 22 264 .1790 28 .0200 .1171 NR 25. S.Jose St. 28 118 .0410 27 105 .0712 21 .1800 .0974 NR

PAGE 9

Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY NOVEMBER 27, 2012 3B 3BSports 2012 PLAYOFF SEC CHAMPIONSHIP GAME JOHN BURNS STATE FARM JOHN KASAK STATE FARM CHRIS S AMSON C M S P R O-STA FF ING T O DD SAM P SON COLU M B IA B AN K MA TT V ANN AN D MAR C V ANN V ANN C ARPET O NE This weeks reader winner: Scott Kent CHRIS PO TT LE F U RNIT U RE SH O WP L A C E S KYLAR, PARKER & R EYHAN (THE MONEY MANS LI TTL E MONIES ) T HE MO NEY M AN 99-31 93-37 98-32 S HIRLEY M IKELL M I K E LL S PO WER E Q U IPMENT 102-28 J ANA HURS T AN D B E V ERLY B ASS BA K ER S C O MM U NI C ATI O N 96-34 100-30 101-29 101-29 LA C RE C IA W ILLIAMS & B REN T W ILLIAMS F IR S T F E D ERA L 102-28 C HRIS D AM P IER AN D RO B IN G REEN PE O P L E S S TATE B AN K 102-28 Mikells First Federal Peoples Bank ALABAMA TO T AL POIN T S 46 ALABAMA TO T AL POIN T S 44 ALABAMA TO T AL POIN T S 44 THREE-WAY TIE WILL MOVE ON T O T HE T IE-BREAKING PLAYOFF SEC CHAMPIONSHIP GAME GOO D GAME! HOOPS From Page 1B PLAYOFFS: State semis Continued From Page 1B A&M: Led Aggies to 10-win season Continued From Page 1B because hes a freshman. But says hes happy to have a chance to talk about this season. Its kind of nice now to be able to kind of let you guys know how I am a little bit more, he said. Theres so many question marks out there. Sumlin, who is in his first year at A&M after four seasons at Houston, raved about Manziel and said he was a catalyst for what his team was able to do in its first season in the Southeastern Conference. Hes a tremendous com petitor and a tremendous leader, and thats something that you really dont see in a player as a redshirt fresh man, Sumlin said. His leadership on and off the field throughout the season has made our season a real successful one. Manziel has thrown for 3,419 yards and 24 touch downs and ran for 1,181 yards and 19 more scores in a regular season the Aggies capped with five straight wins including an upset of then top-ranked Alabama. He is second in the nation in total offense and broke Cam Newtons SEC record for total offense in a season on Saturday. The quarterback is a bit surprised at how well Texas A&M did in its transition from the Big 12. I dont think I ever really envisioned how big this sea son would be for us, he said. I dont really think anybody envisioned that we would win 10 games at the beginning of this sea son and that we would all have so much success as a team. The celebrity status has been shocking to Manziel, who will turn 20 two days before the Dec. 8 Heisman announcement. Hes still surprised when people approach him at restaurants and other places around College Station to ask for photos and autographs, even though its become a daily occurrence. Im a small-town kid, he said. I come from Kerrville, Texas, and I still see myself that way. I dont see myself as Johnny Football, I still see myself as Jonathan Manziel, a small town guy from Kerrville who is extremely fortunate and extremely blessed to be able to play football here at A&M. He seemed amused by the attention given to some online photos of him at a Halloween party dressed as Scooby Doo alongside some beautiful and scantilyclad young women. That Halloween night was something where a lot of guys on the team dressed up and kind of just wanted to get away from all the seriousness and the grind that is college football sea son and go out and be kids again and dress up and just have fun, he said, without specifically addressing the pictures. Manziel said winning the Heisman is something he dreamed about as a child, but that he hasnt spent a lot of time worrying about it or any other awards. No freshman has ever won the award given to college footballs most outstanding player. I feel like that situa tion will play itself out, and whatevers meant to be will happen, he said. Im just doing whatever coach Sumlin and them ask me to do ... so we can take care of things in a bowl game. But Manziel did admit that when he was younger hed play college football video games and build a quarterback that would win the award as a freshman. Funny thing is, the players he made rarely resembled his 6-foot-1, 200-pound frame. When I created a video game player I probably made him 6-6, probably 230 pounds, he said. I definite ly didnt make him my size. But Ive played so many video games maybe a few times I did. But typically I would have made him look something like Cam Newton. Manziel has trouble grasping the whirlwind this season has been for him, and considers himself lucky to have had the opportunity to be in the position hes in now. This season has been incredibly surreal, he said. Its beyond my wildest imagination. Its a true tes tament to how this team has grown every week, because without these guys none of my individual success would be anything. the third quarter, Newberry pulled a fake punt and Alex Wilkens threw to Devonte Flagg for the first down. Brandon Herbert soon connected with Flagg on a 14-yard touchdown pass. Herbert was 6 of 9 for 53 yards with three comple tions to Tray Presley for 44 yards. Prince Alexander, who rushed for 80 yards, scored on a six-yard run to get the Tigers within five points. Newberry (9-3) hosts Trenton High in the state semifinals this week. Wakulla High (11-1) also saw its undefeated season go down to a district oppo nent, as Godby High beat the host War Eagles, 14-7. Wakullas scored came on an 11-yard run by Caleb Stephens. The War Eagles misfired on a scoring threat from the 1 when a fumble went through the end zone for a touchback. Godby plays at Bishop Kenny High on Friday. district. Williston advanced to the third round of the playoffs last season with wins over Trinity Catholic High and Mount Dora High. The Red Devils lost to Lake Highland Prep. Bradford was district runner-up and lost to Mount Dora in the first round. Fort Whites home opener is 7:30 p.m. Wednesday against Newberry High. ASSOCIATED PRESS Tampa Bay Rays Evan Longoria reacts after hitting a home run off Baltimore Orioles relief pitcher Jake Arrieta during a game in St. Petersburg on Oct. 3. Rays lock up Longoria Associated Press ST. PETERSBURG Evan Longoria wants to be with the Tampa Bay Rays for his entire big league career. The 27-year-old slugging third baseman got his wish Monday when they Rays agreed to a $136.6 million, 10-year contract that adds six guaranteed seasons and $100 million. I always wanted to be kind of a benchmark player ... the guy that you could think about or associate with the organization, Longoria said. My goal from Day One was to be the first player that played their whole career here, to be the first guy that came into the organization and went out in the organization, and played all the years in between. Theres no better place for me. The new deal includes a team option for 2023 that could make the deal worth $144.6 million over 11 years. A no-trade clause is not included. Its a very exciting day for us, Rays principal owner Stuart Sternberg said. For Evan to have the confidence in us, and I know the confidence that we have in him, to re-up so to speak for the long haul. This is just an enormous commitment for us.

PAGE 10

DEAR ABBY: I am writing to you in response to “Not on My Watch” (Sept. 19), about the little boy who repeatedly exposes himself to other children. While correcting this behavior to protect the other children is some-thing the parents and other concerned adults in this child’s life should be doing, there may be more going on here that needs to be addressed. Children who have been victims of sexual abuse can exhibit overtly sexualized behav-ior that goes beyond typi-cal curiosity or age-appro-priate sexual development. There are several issues happening with this boy that bother me. The repeated exposure of his private parts to oth-ers is the first. While this behavior is not unusual in young children and can be a normal part of sexual curiosity, the com-pulsive continuation and frequency of his behavior raises red flags. He also mentioned keeping a “secret.” This is a common tool used by people who abuse children. The man-ner in which he interacted with “Not on My Watch’s” daughter sounds a lot like an interaction between an adult abuser and a child -something he may have been mimicking. Young children who are sexually abused may not have the developmental or verbal capabilities to dis-close what is happening. Often it is through behav-ioral or emotional signs that we discover the abuse. While it is important to protect the children this boy interacts with, the more appropriate response to this situation would be to calmly explain to him why his behavior is inap-propriate, along with a discussion to find out if he has witnessed this behav-ior in others or if he has “secrets” with anyone. If he discloses something during the discus-sion, it should be immedi-ately reported to the local child protective services and/or police. And if his behavior continues, it would be best to seek professional interven-tion. -JUDY AT CHILD ADVOCACY CENTER DEAR JUDY: Your letter echoes the sentiments of the majority of responses I received about 5-yearold “Billy.” Thank you for articulating it so clearly. Read on: DEAR ABBY: My wife witnessed a similar sce-nario last year during a play date. A 4-year-old girl was observed putting her hands down the pants of boys her age. Initially we thought it was normal curi-osity; then we suspected she might be a victim. The authorities investigated, and it turned out that her male teenage cousin had been abusing her. -CONCERNED DAD DEAR ABBY: I am a psychiatric nurse who works with children who have suffered various types of abuse. This kind of repeated behavior is a big indication that Billy is being sexually abused himself. The fact that he wants to keep it “secret” indicates that it is a learned behav-ior. That boy should be taken to see a doctor for a full evaluation, and a call to social services is in order. The call can be anony-mous. It is better to be safe than sorry in this case. -NURSE WHO CARES IN OHIO DILBERT BABY BLUES HOROSCOPES DEAR ABBY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Check your finances. An interesting observation based on your past records will help you curb a habit. Shake things up, cut cor-ners where you can and you will get ahead. Dump deadweight and you will find your way to victory. +++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Strive for perfection and you’ll make a lasting impression. Negotiating a better position or consid-ering a partnership looks promising. Putting time aside for a little romance in the evening hours will enhance your life. +++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You’ll have choices to make. Head in what-ever direction promises to expand your knowl-edge, brings you the most experience and positions you for future endeavors. Honesty regarding what you have to offer will increase your chance to excel. +++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Mingle, network and share your stories and experiences and you will get something in return. Giving a unique spin to a talent or skill you have can help you find a new source of income. A partnership will undergo change. Negotiate and adjust your position. ++++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Personal problems will escalate, causing a setback regarding your profes-sional productivity. Don’t mix business with pleasure or you’ll put a dent in your reputation. Creative accounting will be neces-sary. Honesty will help you avoid trouble. ++++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Talks and negotiations will work out well and help send you in a positive direction. Your ability to do things according to plan in a unique and detailed manner will bring you recognition. A partnership will help you excel beyond your expectations. ++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): You will overreact if someone confronts you. Put whatever situation you face in perspective. Rethink your strategy, and focus more on how you can up your income or cut your overhead. Negotiate a deal that will help you handle your money better. +++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23Nov. 21): Don’t make comparisons when what you should be doing is focusing on your skills, knowledge and getting ahead. You have more options than you realize. Recognize where you must put your time and effort to advance. Finish what you start. +++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Your efforts must be directed toward maintaining what you’ve got. Rework an old idea or incorporate something you’ve learned into a plan that needs to be revamped. Stability can be yours but only if you are willing to make changes. +++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Jump at any chance you get to mingle with colleagues or to dis-cuss plans you feel will streamline what you’ve been asked to achieve. You will impress higher-ups with your leadership qual-ity and your dedication and relentless drive. +++++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Proceed with cau-tion. Learning something new will not be easy, but it will be necessary. You can bring in more money if you pick up skills that will enable you to offer a ser-vice that is in demand in your community. ++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Learn from experi-ence. Discuss business deals and negotiate your position. Don’t settle for less when you are capable of moving forward on your own. Love is on the rise, and a personal partnership will be beneficial. ++++ CELEBRITY CIPHER Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com BLONDIE BEETLE BAILEY B.C. FRANK & ERNEST FOR BETTER OR WORSE ZITS HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH GARFIELD THE LAST WORD Eugenia Last Little boy’s exposing himself may signal he’s being abused Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. CLASSIC PEANUTS Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2012 4B

PAGE 11

LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2012 5B Classified Department: 755-5440 CLASSIFIED AD vantageTake ADvantage of the Reporter Classifieds!755-5440Lake City Reporter FIND IT SELL IT BUY IT $17504 lines 3 days Includes 2 Signs Each additional line $1.65 Garage Sale Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$10104 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.10One item per ad Under $500 Personal Merchandise Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$16754 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.15One item per ad Under $1,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$23704 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.45One item per ad Under $2,500 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $4,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$27404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.55One item per ad Under $4,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$30404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.65One item per ad Under $6,000 Placing An Ad Service Guide Limited to service type advertis-ing only.4 lines, one month....$92.00 $10.80 each additional lineIncludes an additional $2.00 per ad for each Wednesday insertion. DeadlinesBe Sure to Call Early You can call us at 755-5440 Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.Some people prefer to place their classified ads in person, and some ad categories will require prepay-ment. Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street.You can also fax or email your ad copy to the Reporter.FAX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the Classified Department.EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreporter.comAd is to Appear:TuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday Call by:Mon., 10:00 a.m.Mon., 10:00 a.m.Wed., 10:00 a.m.Thurs., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fax/Email by:Mon., 9:00 a.m.Mon., 9:00 a.m.Wed., 9:00 a.m.Thurs., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.These deadlines are subject to change without notice. Cancellations, Changes & Billing Questions Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject, or classify all advertisements under appropriate headings. Copy should be checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day of pub-lication. Credit for published errors will be allowed for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement which was incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be published, nor for any general, special or consequential damages. Advertising language must comply with Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition of discrimi-nation in employment, housing and public accommodations. Standard abbreviations are acceptable; how-ever, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated. Ad Errors-Please read your ad on the first day of publication. Weaccept responsibility for only the first incorrect insertion, and only the charge for the ad space in error. Please call 755-5440 immediately for prompt correc-tion and billing adjustments.CancellationsNormal advertising deadlines apply for cancellation.Billing InquiriesCall 755-5440. Should further information be required regarding payments or credit limits, your call will be trans-ferred to the accounting depart-ment. General Information In Print and Onlinewww.lakecityreporter.com Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$2504 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $.25One item per ad Under $100 Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Artwo rk-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 ServicesFLCert. Teacher with 10 yrs exp. Offering a homeshooling group in Jan. Reasonably priced. Interested parents 386-288-0954. LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTFOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO. 09-30-CANOTICE OF SALECENTERSTATE BANK OF FLOR-IDA, as assignee of CENTRALFLORIDASTATE BANK,Plaintiff,vs.ANDREWMICHAELMCCRORY,and TRACYM. MCCRORY,Defendants.NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 7th day of No-vember, 2012, in the above styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the 3rd floor of the Columbia County Courthouse in Lake City, Florida, at 11:00 A.M. on Wednesday the 19th day of De-cember, 2012, the following descri-bed property:Lot 18 of SUNVIEWESTATES ADDITION, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 7, Page(s) 107, of the Public Records of Columbia County, Florida, TO-GETHER WITH 2003 Fleetwood Oak Knoll double wide mobile home (Serial No. GAFL334A76092-OK21 and GAFL334B76092-OK21)IF YOU ARE APERSON CLAIM-ING ARIGHTTO FUNDS RE-MAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUSTFILE AACLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAILTO FILE ACLAIM, YOU WILLNOTBE EN-TITLED TO ANYREMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS ONLYTHE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PEN-DENS MAYCLAIM THE SUR-PLUS.DATED this 9th day of November, 2012.P. DeWITTCASONClerk of the CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioAs Deputy Clerk05535880November 20, 27, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURT, THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO.: 12-308-CAFIRSTFEDERALBANK OF FLORIDA, a Banking corporation organized under the laws of the Unit-ed States of America, f/k/a FIRSTFEDERALSAVINGS BANK OF FLORIDAPlaintiff,vs.JAMES L. HAIR, II, and WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.Defendants.NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALENOTICE is hereby given than P. DEWITTCASON, Clerk of the Cir-cuit Court of Columbia County, Flor-ida, will on the 9th day of January, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. in the Columbia County courthouse, Courtroom 1, 173 N.E. Hernando Avenue, in the City of Lake City, Florida 32055 Florida offer for sale and sell at pub-lic outcry to the highest and best bid-der for cash, the following described property situated in Columbia Coun-ty, Florida, to-wit:EXHIBIT“A”Begin at the Southeast corner of Block Twenty-Four (24), where First Street and Putnam Street intersect and run North and parallel with West side of First Street 52.5 feet to a Point of Beginning; thence West 105 feet; thence North 52.5 feet; thence East 105 feet to First Street; thence South and parallel with West side of First Street 52.5 feet to Point of Be-ginning, except Right of Way for Highway 41. Said property being further described as Lot 3, Block 24 of Moodie Subdivision of Southwest Division of the City of Lake City, Columbia County, Florida.Pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in a case pend-ing in said Court, the style of which is as set out above, and the docket number of which is 12-308-CA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.WITNESS my hand and the official seal of said Court, this 5 day of No-vember, 2012.P. DeWitt CasonP. DEWITTCASONClerk of the Circuit CourtColumbia County, Florida/s/ B. ScippioBy: Deputy Clerk02500406November 20, 27, 2012 NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE: FORTWHITE AUTOMOTIVE gives Notice of Foreclosure of Lien and intent to sell these vehicles on 12/13/2012, 8:00 am at 8493 SWUS Hwy 27, Fort White, Fl. 32038, pursuant to subjection 713.78 of the Florida Statutes. FORTWHITE AUTOMOTIVE reserves the right to accept or reject and and/or all bids.1G2WP52K4WF3102301998 PONTIAC05535977NOVEMBER 27, 2012 LegalNOTICE TOCONTRACTORSNotice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received in the Columbia County Manager’s office until 11:00 A.M. on November 30, 2012, for Co-lumbia County Project No. 2012-12. This office is located on the second floor of the Courthouse Annex at 135 Hernando Avenue, Room 203 Lake City FL32055.The scope of services consists of sales and delivery of concrete storm-water pipes and concrete stormwater structures to Columbia County Pub-lic Works Department. This contract will be utilized on an as-needed basis during Fiscal Year 2012/2013, which begins October 1, 2012, and ends September 30, 2013.The Bid Forms and Construction specifications may be obtained from the County’s web site at http://www .columbiacountyfla.com/ PurchasingBids.asp Deadline for questions regarding specifications and/or bid documents must be re-ceived before 11:00 P.M. on Novem-ber 28, 2012.The successful bidder will be re-quired to furnish the County Manag-er with liability insurance prior to commencing work.The Columbia County Commission reserves the right to reject any or all bids and to add to the contract or de-lete from the contract to stay within their funding capabilities.Columbia County Board of County CommissionersScarlet Frisina, Chair05535922November 20, 27, 2012 STATE OF FLORIDA, CRIMINALJUSTICE STANDARDS & TRAIN-ING COMMISSION,Petitionervs.RYAN J. JENNINGS, Case # 32683RespondentNOTICE OF ACTIONTO: RYAN J. JENNINGS, Residence UnknownYOU ARE NOTIFIED that an Ad-ministrative Complaint has been filed against you seeking to revoke your CORRECTIONALCertificate in accordance with Section 943.1395, F.S., and any rules pro-mulgated thereunder.You are required to serve a written copy of your intent to request a hear-ing pursuant to Section 120.57, F.S. upon Jennifer C. Pritt, Program Di-rector, Criminal Justice Professional-ism Program, Florida Department of Law Enforcement, P. O. Box 1489, Tallahassee, Florida 32302-1489, on or before January 8, 2013. Failure to do so will result in a default being entered against you to Revoke said certification pursuant to Section 120.60, F.S., and Rule 11B-27, F.A.C.Dated: November 8, 2012Ernest W. GeorgeCHAIRMAN CRIMINALJUS-TICE STANDARDSAND TRAINING COMMISSIONBy: -sKarla Whiddon, Division Representative05535748November 13, 20, 27, 2012December 4, 2012 STATE OF FLORIDA, CRIMINALJUSTICE STANDARDS & TRAIN-ING COMMISSION,Petitionervs.BRETTALLEN, Case # 33238RespondentNOTICE OF ACTIONTO: BRETTALLEN, Residence UnknownYOU ARE NOTIFIED that an Ad-ministrative Complaint has been filed against you seeking to revoke your CORRECTIONALCertificate in accordance with Section 943.1395, F.S., and any rules pro-mulgated thereunder.You are required to serve a written copy of your intent to request a hear-ing pursuant to Section 120.57, F.S. upon Jennifer C. Pritt, Program Di-rector, Criminal Justice Professional-ism Program, Florida Department of Law Enforcement, P. O. Box 1489, Tallahassee, Florida 32302-1489, on or before January 8, 2013. Failure to do so will result in a default being entered against you to Revoke said certification pursuant to Section 120.60, F.S., and Rule 11B-27, F.A.C.Dated: November 8, 2012Ernest W. GeorgeCHAIRMAN CRIMINALJUS-TICE STANDARDSAND TRAINING COMMISSIONBy: -sKarla Whiddon, Division Representative05535747November 13, 20, 27, 2012December 4, 2012 PUBLIC AUCTIONWill be held by Gainey Automotive, Inc, in Columbia County at 3468 S.W. CR 138, Fort White, Fl. 32038Date 12/11/2012Time: 8:00 A.M.2003 ACURAVin #19UUA56643A0335091982 FORDVin #1FTDF14F3CPA2314305535995NOVEMBER 27, 2012 Wewill sell the following tenants units at Community Self Storage 814 SWState Road 247/Branford Hwy., on December 17, 2012 at 9:00AM. WE SELLFOR CASH ONLY. 386-961-9926.DONNATUZI (2 units)Personal PropertyKATRISHAHERRINGFurniture & TV& BoxesWANDAPERRYBoxes & Totes of Household GoodsWHITNEYAVERYHousehold ItemsNICHOLAS HIRSTFurniture & Household GoodsWANDAJONESFurniture & Household Goods LegalTASHAS WILSONFurnitureWE RESERVE THE RIGHTTO REFUSE ALLBIDS.Cash only, 10% Buyers premium, Jerry Duncan #AU527.05535761November 27, 2012December 4, 2012 100Job Opportunities05534241NOWHIRING Cashiers & Baggers forHigh Springs fruit & gift stores. Benefits avail: health, dental, & vacation. Apply in person: Florida Citrus Center(Chevron) 18603 NWCR 236, High Springs (exit 404 & I-75) BARTENDER NEEDED Experienced & Dependable, Must have your own phone & car. 386-752-2412 4 TEMPNursery workers needed 12/31/12 – 11/01/13. Workers will plant, cultivate & harvest greenhouse and nursery stock. Must have 3 month experience operating 50+ HPequipment. Guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours. Tools, supplies, equipment provided at no cost. Free housing provided for non-commuting workers. Random drug testing at employer’s expense. Transportation & subsistence reimbursed to worker upon completion of 50% of contract or earlier if appropriate. $9.39/hr. Worksite in Mobile Co AL. Report or send a resume to nearest local FLAgency of Workforce Innovation 386-755-9026 & reference Job # 908305 Big Creek Nursery – Dairyland Nursery – Wilmer, AL CDLClass A Truck Driver Flatbed exp. for F/TSE area. 3 years exp or more. Medical benefits offered. Contact Melissa or Sandy@ 386-935-2773 Dental Hygienist: Golden Opportunity! Full time, Part time, Fill in, we have a great opportunity waiting for you! An immediate opening has just come up! That’s great news in this job market! If you have a friendly can-do attitude, a gentle touch, a great work ethic, you are orgainized, and self motivated with a god sense of humor, then you should apply. Call 888-486-2408 to hear a message with more details about the position and instructions on how to apply for this position in Madison, FL. Great benefits! Mechanic needed at Fla.Rock & Tank Lines In White Springs. Diesel exprnc reqr'd in maintenance & repair of tractor trailers. 45-50hrs/wk Class A CDLlicense preferred. Excellent Benefits! email: mcomer@patriottrans.com or fax 904-858-9008 100Job Opportunities45 Temp Farm Workers & Laborers needed 12/31/12 8/20/13. Wrkrs will perform a variety of duties associated with growing peaches. Wrkrs will be involved with planting, thinning, pruning, cultivating, harvesting, & packing peaches. Guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours. All work tools, supplies and equipment will be provided at no cost to the worker. Free housing provided for noncommuting workers. Transportation & subsistence reimbursed to worker upon completion of 50% of contract, or earlier if appropriate. Pay rate is $9.39/hr or applicable piece rates depending on crop activity. Worksites in Saluda, Aiken and Edgefield Co’s. SC. Applicants should report or send a resume to the nearest FLAgency of Workforce Innovation Office or call 386-755-9026 & reference job # 544485. Dixie Belle Peach Farms – Ward, SC EXP. TRAINER: Responsible for Teaching individuals about the Judicial system. Associates degree, Background and reference checks, and valid DLreq’d. PT. E-mail resume to jshaw@itmflorida.com Professional Office Mng For construction office; proficient w/ computer, Qbks, motivated individual, excellent communication skills, fax resume 386-758-8920, email resume8920@gmail.com Person to cut cloth material for small sewing factory. Also person to attend gun shows selling same product. 386-755-6481 100Job Opportunities4 Temp Horticultural Workers needed 12/31/12 7/31/13. Hickory Hill Greenhouses, Olmstead, KY. Must have 3 mo. verifiable exp. operating 55 + HP nursery equipment. Worksites in various greenhouses, fields in Olmstead, KYPlants, cultivates, & harvests horticultural specialties, such as flowers & vegetables, & performs related duties in environmentally controlled structure. Random drug testing at employer’s expense. Guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours. All tools, supplies, equipment provided at no cost. Transportation & subsistence reimbursed to worker upon completion of 50% of contract or earlier if appropriate. Free housing provided for non-commuting workers. $9.38/hr. Applicants should report/send resume to nearest FL Agency of Workforce Innovation office 386-755-9026 & ref. job order # KY0468267. SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 PublishedMonthlybythe Lake City Reporter

PAGE 12

LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2012 Classified Department: 755-5440 6B 2006 Toyota Tundra SR-5Crew cab, Class 3 Tow Package, cruise, power windows, seats five. 152,000 miles.$7,800 386-365-1901 100Job Opportunities4 Temp Nursery Workers needed 12/28/12 – 9/30/13. 3 months verifiable exp. properly pruning nursery stock. Worksite in George Co. MS. Workers will perform a combination of duties to plant, cultivate, and harvest nursery stock. Workers will be required to harvest both container and field grown plants, trees and shrubs. Random drug testing at employer’s expense. Guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours. All tools, supplies, equip, provided at no cost. Free housing provided for non-commuting workers. Transportation & subsistence reimbursed to worker upon completion of 50% of contract, or earlier if appropriate. Pay is $9.30/hr. Applicants should report/send a resume to the nearest FLAgency of Workforce Innovation Office & ref. job # 63656 or call 386-755-9026. JDS Nursery – Lucedale, MS 275 Temp Farm Workers needed 12/21/12 8/31/13. 3 months experience hand harvesting a perishable crop. Workers will plant, cultivate, and harvest diversified crops. Worksite in Edgefield Co. SC. Random drug testing at employer’s expense. Guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours. Work tools, supplies, equip provided at no cost. Free housing provided for non-commuting workers. Transportation & subsistence reimbursed to worker upon completion of 50% of contract, or earlier, if appropriate. Work tools, supplies, and equipment will be provided at no cost to the worker. $9.39/hr plus applicable piece rates depending on crop activity. Report or send a resume to the nearest FLAgency of Workforce Innovation 386-755-9026 & ref. job order # 543794. Titan Peach Farms – Ridge Springs, SC 120Medical EmploymentDIET AR Y MANAGER Needed CDM, Chef, LTC, 2 years experience preferred Must be able to manage large staff and oversee daily food preparation for a 180 bed SNF. Full time with excellent benefits. E-mail resume to Greg Roberts: groberts@gulfcoasthealthcare.com or fax to: (386)362-4417. Live Oak, FLEOE/V/D/M/F Exp. CAP or Licensed Mental Health Professional for counseling and assessments in an outpatient SAtreatment program. Ref. Req'd. PT Email resume to bsmith@itmflorida.com GREATOPPORTUNITY•Full Time Experienced RN’s, LPN’s 7a-7p & 7p-7a•Full Time Experienced C.N.A’s All Shifts•Full Time Experienced Activity Assistance Apply in person at Suwannee Health Care & Rehab. 1620 Helevenston Street S.E. Live Oak, FL32064 EOE/m/f/d/v 240Schools & Education05535484Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class12/24/2012• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-11/05/12• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies New Igloo Dog house. Med size, $50.00 Contact 386-466-5022 PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. Yorkie-Poo puppy, Playful and Smart. Ready December 1st. $300-600 386-365-7002. 402Appliances Brand New Whirlpool W/D Warranty until 8/2017. $950 For Both Contact 386-752-8978 407Computers DELLComputer $100.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 408Furniture Solid Wood Dining Room Table and six (6) chairs. $125.00 Contact 386-752-3245 430Garage Sales PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 440Miscellaneous 05535950GUNSHOW: 12/01 &12/02 @ The Columbia County Fairgrounds, Hwy 247 Lake City. Admin. $5 Sat 9am4pm, Sun 9am-3pm. Info: 386-325-6114 450Good Things to EatThe Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans 2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024 Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville 386-963-4138 or 961-1420 630Mobile Homes forRent2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $450. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 2 BR/1BA $475/mth. Located in center of Lake City Close to Everything !!! 305-984-5511 or 386-344-0830 Quiet Country Park 3br/2ba $525. Very clean NO PETS! References & Deposit required 386-758-2280 WATERTOWN AREA 3br/2ba DW, Handicap accessible, $650 mth, $500 dep. Call 386-344-0144, 386-344-5791 640Mobile Homes forSale2 MFG HOMES on 5 ACRES! Great for 2 families in Godbold Acres west of Lake City $79,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCY INC. 755-5110 #81421 2013 DOUBLEWIDE $33,995 inc. set-up, trim-out & A/C Call 386-288-8379. 3BR/2BA28X64 in a great location, a lot of upgrades, fireplace. Only $2,500 down $399 a month. Call Paula at 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com 5 LIKENew Mobile Homes!!! For under $30,000. MUSTSEE Call John T. 386-752-1452 BANK REPO 3BR/2BADoublewide ’09 Excellent condition. Only $999 down $377 a month. Call Paula 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com CLOSE TO VAMED CTR! 3BR/2BAw/beautiful interior, new CH&A$59,900 DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #81428 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #75661 Must be 55+, Manufacture home, 1 ac, fireplace, laundry, open & bright $79,900. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 EASTSIDE VILLAGE 2BR/2BAw/lg kitchen, open floor plan $79,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #80972 HALLMARK REALESTATE What a Deal! 2003 3/2 MH over 1600 sqft,in Trenton, .92 ac ONLY case # 091-379757 MLS# 82117 Robin Williams 386-365-5146 LIVE OAK! Cute home in city limits; 3BR/1BA& 1,294 SqFt $49,500 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #81410 MUSTSEE 2013 2x6 walls, R30 insulation, OSB wrap, house wrap, real wood cabinets, and thermal pain windows. Payment $399 per month call John T386-752-1452. Palm Harbor Stilt Homes Waterfront Beach, 34 Years Experience www.plantcity.palmharbor.com John Lyons 800-622-2832 x210 Poole Realty 3/2 MH, fireplace, screened back porch, storage shed and all the amenities necessary for a relaxing lifestyle, Irvin Dees, 208-4276. MLS 82226 WANTED…CASH PAID for your Mobile Home, Singlewide or Doublewide flood homes welcome. Call 386-288-8379 WOODGATE VILLAGE Move-in ready! Open 3BR/2BA floor plan on nice shaded lot $49,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC 755-5110 #82259 WOODGATE VILLAGE Nice 3BR/2BADWMH w/fenced yd, workshop; $39,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCY, INC 755-5110 #79078 650Mobile Home & Land2br, 2ba, 3.51 acres. 1512 sqft, nice affordable DW. Perfect Rental. Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473 MLS #882216 $65,000 Great Value 24 acres, 3/2 DWMH open floor plan, in ground pool. MLS 79000. Poole Realty $115,000 Nelda Hatcher. Call 688-8067 Hallmark Real Estate Deer & turkey roam, 3000 sqft brick home, detached garagesworkshops on 18 ac. MLS #81005 Ginger Parker 386-365-2135 OwnerFinanced 3/22.5 ac.River Access. Small down $625 mo 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05535481We’ve got it all!$89 Deposit Limited Avail. Call Today! Windsong Apts. *Free afterschool program386-758-8455 1BR APT. Downtown Location, Clean. New Carpet $450 mo, plus Security. NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent2BR/2BAw/garage 5 minutes from VAhospital and Timco. Call for details. 386-365-5150 Amberwood Hills Apts. Private Patio area. Beautiful yard. Washer/dryer hkup. Free water & sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special. 386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com Brandywine Apartments Now Renting 1, 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-752-3033 W. Grandview Ave. Equal Housing Opportunity TDD Number 1-800-955-8771 BRANFORD VILLAS 386-935-2319 2br/1ba Apts. Now available.$570. mo. TDD number 1-800-955-8771 Equal Housing Opportunity Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2 mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet Friendly. Pool laundry & balcony. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com Gorgeous Lake View 2br/1ba Apt. CH/A$530 month $530 deposit. No pets. 386-344-2170 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Greentree Townhouse Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free water & sewer. Balcony & patio. Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com Redwine Apartments Pets welcome. with 5 complexes, we have a home for you. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com Wayne ManorApts. Spacious 2bedroom washer/dryer. Behind Kens off Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 www .myflapts.com WindsorArms Apartments. Move in! 2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free 200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com 720Furnished Apts. ForRentROOMS FOR Rent. Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent2BR, 1/2 acre, Fenced, Close-in, Huge Den, Carport, Smoke Free, $800 mo. App & Ref Req’d Short Term Avail 386-758-9824 2br/1ba $575 mo. + sec., 4mi S. Lake City. Clean & Quiet 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 3br/1.5ba. Very clean, Brick great area w/bonus room. Carport, shed & Fenced (privacy) back yard. $825. mo $825. dep. Ref’s req’d. (941)920-4535 3BR/2BA Carport hardwood floors. CH/AFenced yard. Good area. $750 mo plus security. 386-752-0118 or 623-1698 Avail. for Rent 1206 McFarlane Ave. 3 BR/2 BAhouse. Smoke Free and No Pets allowed. $850 a mo. $500 dep. Call for appt. 904-813-8864. Very Nice 3BD/2ba brick home, $745 mth & $500 dep. Application Required. Call 386-935-1482 to see. 750Business & Office RentalsForRent orLease: Former Doctors office, Former professional office & Lg open space: avail on East Baya Ave. Competitive rates. Weekdays 386-984-0622 evenings/weekends 497-4762 PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 805Lots forSale Beautiful lot on Suwannee. Property features stairway to dock, on Suwannee. MLS# 78842, $35,000 Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473 Results Realty Charming, like new, well Maintainted 3br, 2b, split floor plan, Corner lot. REMAX Missy Zecher 623-0237 MLS# 81632 $100,000 Custom genesis modular home, finest amenities, lg oaks, custom drapery, f/p, fine detail throughout. RemaxMissy Zecher 623-0237 MLS 81634 $299,000 Great family home, 3/2 recently upgraded, great location. REMAX PROFESSIONALS Missy Zecher 623-0237 MLS# 81683 $75,000 HALLMARK REAL Estate 2.68 acres homes only. Gorgeous neighborhood, Deed restricted. $34,000. Owner Fin. MLS# 80588. Tanya Shaffer 386-397-4766 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #76668 $32,000 Must be 55+, Buildable lot for site built homes only. In Forest Country. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #80401 $60,000. Must be 55+ 130x750 right on Suwannee, Beautiful lot, minutes from Royal Springs, Denise Bose 752-5290 Nice 2 acre lot in Timberlake s/d. New Owner will have fishing rights. MLS #79025 Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473 $13,500 Nice vacant lot in Desirable River Community, MLS #73268 $15,000 Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert397-3473 REMAX PROFESSIONALS Missy Zecher 623-0237. 25 acre parcel, Corner lot, many possibilities. MLS 77720 $175,000 805Lots forSale PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Spacious 4br, split floor plan, separate Living & family rm, gas f/p, a true pleasure to view. REMAX Missy Zecher 623-0237. MLS 81472 $237,000 810Home forSale Access Realty Gorgeous views 3bd/3ba on Lake Montgomery. Elevator, fishing dock & jacuzzi. MLS 81438 $249,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access RealtySpacious 4 bd/3ba Cypress Lake w/ 3643 sqft 1.25 acres on lake. Vaulted ceilings. MLS 81314 $279,900. Patti Taylor386-623-6896 Access RealtyTwo story 1895 Victorian house w/ electrical upgrades throughout. double -deck porches, MLS 71594 $149,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Affordable 4/2 on 10 acres in Bell. Home features over 2,200 heated sqft. MLS# 76585, Results Realty $67,500. Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Eastside Village Adult community, Great location, community pool Elaine Tolar 755-6488 MLS 74823, $84,900 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Emerald Forest repaired Brick home 3b, 2ba, Lg recreation rm, fireplace, MLS 82021 $134,900 Sherry Ratliff 365-8414 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Exceptional home on 5 ac, 3200 sf 4b, 2.5ba. Lots of storage, 3 out buildings. Elaine Tolar 755-6488 MLS 80325 $287,500 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Hallmark Real Estate 4.3 acres on the Santa Fe River. Wooded. Natures lover’s paradise. Paved Rd frontage, septic. MLS 81946. Ron Feagle 386-288-2901 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81958-, $115,000. Must be 55+, 3br/2ba, Site Built w/ lots of room, split plan mstr suite, FL. Rm. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81959 Must be 55+, 2br/2ba, $79,900. Site Built Home w/eat in kitchen, laundry rm, scrn porch. Denise Bose @ 752-5290 On Suwannee River, 4 acres, Needs some elbow grease, 3br, 3058 sqft, beautiful view, Poole Realty MLS 82075. Call Glenda McCall $299,900 Private Estate on 39 + ac, city limits. 6br, 3.5ba, 3 fireplaces, much more.MLS76111 Mary Brown Whitehurst 965-0887 $994,000. Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Reduced, 6500 plus sqft home boasts of oversized rooms, 6br, 3.5ba to many amenities to mention. Call Prell Gwinn, Poole Realty MLS 80949 $280,000 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, Golfers Dream 3B,2B formal living & dining, cover back porch. MLS 81110 $189,000 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, South Oaks C/C, 3Br or 2Br & den, 2Ba over looking 9th hole, fenced backyard & more MLS 81191 $179,000 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, Beautiful Mountainside 3b,2ba, 1662sqft, .45 ac. open floor plan, so much more MLS 80447 $144,900 Terrific home on 5+ acres. 3br, 2.5ba, large kitchen, covered deck. MLS 81630 $199,000 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Elaine Tolar 755-6488 Unique home with 2800 sqft, large upstairs game room, on 1.37 acres in Live Oak, Poole Realty MLS 82214 $67,500. 362-4539 820Farms & Acreage10 acres with well/septic/pp (not guar); $300 dwn; $580 a mth. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com Access Realty10 acre square tract, High & Dry, OF Avail. w/ 25% down. Convenient Location MLS 81258$39,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access Realty43.64 acres wooded acreage in N.Columbia County. Scenic & Private. MLS 74429 $89,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Hallmark Real Estate Hunters Paradise! 3/2 brick, over 1700 sqft on 10 acres, 24x24 barn, fruit trees. MLS #80851 Ginger Parker 386-365-2135 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 940Trucks 2006 Toyota Tundra SR-5, Crew Cab, Class 3 Tow Package. Cruise, power windows, Seats Five. 152,000 miles, $7,800. 386-365-1901 755-5440Toplace your classified ad call We’re on target! days a weekSubscribe Today 386-755-5445 ADVERTISE YOUR Job Opportunities in the Lake City Reporter Classifieds. Enhance Your Ad with Your Individual Logo For just pennies a day. Call today, 755-5440.