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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01924

Material Information

Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 11-25-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01964

Related Items

Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01924

Material Information

Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 11-25-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01964

Related Items

Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

By DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comFor the third straight year, Jim Cantore, a meteorologist for The Weather Channel, spent an hour of his vacation helping raise money for the Salvation Army at the Publix in Lake City on Friday morning. Many people stopped, posed for a picture and fed dollar bills into the familiar red kettle. Preston Lewis, a lieutenant in the Salvation Army, said he doesn’t usually see that much attention around the kettle, as people pushed $5 bills through the slot. He said the Salvation Army helps people “down on their luck,” and that the money goes to help pay rent, utilities and sends kids to summer camp. Lewis said the Salvation Army has been helping local people since the 1920s. He said the Salvation Army also helps with disaster relief. “To have a celebrity come out, it’s great for us in every way,” he said. Cantore said he didn’t mind lending his celebrity status to a good cause, especially since his sister asked. Carole Dotson coordinates the employees of Altrusa International of Lake City who volunteer as bell ringers. Cantore said meteorologists have become “weather rock stars,” and he is recognized everywhere he goes. He said he believes the reason people stop him on the street and ask to take a picture has to do with his giving useful information without injecting his own views into the story — unlike other tele-vision news personalities. “We’re not trying to get you out to vote one way or another,” he said. “We’re trying to get you out of harm’s way.” CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Opinion ................ 4ABusiness ................ 5AObituaries .............. 6A Advice & Comics ......... 8B Puzzles ................. 2B TODAY IN PEOPLE Singer aids orphanage. COMING TUESDAY Local news roundup. 91 64 T-Storm Chance WEATHER, 2A Opinion ................ 4ABusiness ................ 1CObituaries .............. 5AAdvice.................. 5DPuzzles ................. 5B 67 31 Sunny WEATHER, 6A Lake City ReporterSUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | $1.00 LAKECITYREPORTER.COM Gators dumpSeminoles in Tallahassee. Local teen nears pinnacle of Scouting. SUNDAYEDITION Vol. 138, No. 214 1D 1B Black Friday bonanza DEREK GILLIAM/ Lake City ReporterHundreds are lined up late Thursday awaiting the midnig ht opening of the Belk store in the Lake City Mall. Up to 8 00 people were waiting in line, according to store manager Will Batte. Many local retailers rep orted big gains over last year’s Black Friday totals. ‘J.R.’ ofDallasfame dead at 81 Inside Swift soldiers on By LYNN ELBERAP Television WriterJ.R. Ewing was a business cheat, faithless husband and bottom-less well of corrup-tion. Yet with his sparkling grin, Larry Hagman masterfully created the charmingly loathsome oil baron — and coaxed forth a Texas-size gusher of ratings — on tele-vision’s long-running and hugely successful night-time soap, “Dallas.” Although he first gained fame as nice guy Major Tony Nelson on the fluffy 1965-70 NBC comedy “I Dream of Jeannie,” Hagman earned his greatest stardom with J.R. The CBS serial drama about the Ewing family and those in their orbit aired from April 1978 to May 1991, and broke viewing records with its “Who shot J.R.?” 1980 cliffhanger that left unclear if Hagman’s Hagman WAITING continued on 3A HAGMAN continued on 3A ‘Gloom, despair and agony on me’ – butall in good fun. Christmas shopping season’s opening weekend looks good for local retailersBy DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comAs the dust settles after the stampede of shoppers and managers tally the sales fig-ures, for some the numbers look good. Belk did 24 percent better then last Black Friday, store manager William Bette said. “We’re looking forward to a great holiday season,” he said. He said the promotional giveaway and the extensive marketing of early-bird spe-cials drove the sales numbers. Across the mall at JC Penney, store manager Gayle Cruse said the numbers shouldn’t be compared to last year, because the store has an entirely differ-ent stategy. She said JC Penney is pushing the “button” program and expects that to bring more shoppers to the store. The program will give away 80 million buttons nationwide, each with a code on the back that the customer can redeem online. One in four buttons is a winner, she said. She said there’s no purchase necessary, and anyone who enters the store can ask for a button. “We had a good day, very pleased,” she said. “We hope to see great crowds and pro-duce a good shopping experi-ence for our customers.” George Ward, owner of Ward’s Jewelry and Gifts, said he did 40 percent more busi-ness than last year, but overall he’s a little behind 2011, his best year ever. He said he wasn’t sure why last year was so strong. “We were busy and steady most of the day,” he said. Sales figures up double digits over 2011 for some.DEREK GILLIAM/ Lake City ReporterWeather Channel meteorologist Jim Cantore poses with mem bers of his family in front of the Salvation Army red kettle collection sign outside the Publix in Lake City on Friday. From Left: Carole Dotson, Dotson’s nephew Josh McCabe, Dotson’s son Luke Dotson, Jim Cantore and LT. Pre ston Lewis of the Salvation Army. By DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comT he line stretched nearly around the building at Belk near midnight on Thursday. The Thanksgiving leftovers now put away, the football games and parades long over, hundreds of Columbia County residents stood for hours in chilly weather, some SmokecloudsUS 90,I-10From staff reportsThe Florida Highway Patrol reported it is moni-toring US 90 and Interstate 10 near the Columbia/Baker counties line for smoke due to a brush fire. According to FHP, the area near NW Queens Court and NW Senior Court also was under watch for smoke. Motorists are urged to use caution when driving in those areas. Visibility may deteriorate quickly due to smoke or fog. especially at night, FHP warned. Drivers should reduce their speed and use low-beam headlights under such conditions, FHP said. Cantore back to lend a hand yet again1A

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PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Daily Scripture Celebrity Birthdays Actress Noel Neill is 92. Playwright Murray Schisgal is 86. Actress Kathryn Crosby is 79. Actor Christopher Riordan is 75. Singer Percy Sledge is 72. Pro Football Hall of Fame coach Joe Gibbs is 72. Author, actor and econo mist Ben Stein is 68. Singer Bob Lind is 68. Actor John Larroquette is 65. Actor Tracey Walter is 65. Movie director Jonathan Kaplan is 65. Author Charlaine Harris is 61. CORRECTIONS The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. AROUND FLORIDA Friday: 2-17-19-41 5 Friday: 16-17-20-25-31 Saturday: Afternoon: 0-7-6 Evening: N/A Saturday: Afternoon: 9-0-2-2 Evening: N/A Wednes day: 3-19-24-34-37-41 x2 Man, woman shot at Walmart in Tallahassee TALLAHASSEE Investigators believe a disagreement over a park ing space led to two people being shot and wounded outside a Tallahassee Walmart. Police said officers responded to the shoot ing shortly after noon on Black Friday, one of the busiest shopping days of the year. A man and a woman were taken to a nearby hospital with wounds that were not con sidered life-threatening. They were expected to make a full recovery. No arrests were made, but police were search ing for dark green Toyota Camry in connection with the case. 2 pedestrians killed in Ocala OCALA Officials said two pedestrians were killed while crossing busy roadways in Ocala on Thanksgiving. Ocala police said a red Chevrolet Trailblazer struck 23-year-old William McDonald in a crosswalk before fleeing early Thursday. Police later arrested 25-year-old Joseph Stewart on charges of leaving the scene of an accident. He told police panicked when he hit the pedestrian. The Ocala Star-Banner reported McDonald was home from college for the holiday break. Later Thursday, 42year-old Patrick Joseph Wisocky was fatally struck as he walked along U.S. 301. It was his birthday. The Florida Highway Patrol said 49-year-old John Syme was driving the Jeep Cherokee that struck Wisockiy. They said speed was not a factor. Manatee-riding arrest made ST. PETERSBURG A St. Petersburg woman has been charged with violat ing Florida law by riding a manatee. Ana Gloria Garcia Gutierrez was arrested on a misdemeanor warrant Saturday. Pinellas County sheriffs deputies said she was photographed riding the manatee at Fort De Soto Park last September. Sheriff Bob Gualtieri held a press conference a few days later asking for the publics help in identifying the woman. Gutierrez called deputies and allegedly admitted touching the endangered sea mammal. She told them she was new to the area and didnt know it was illegal to touch a manatee. The manatee was not hurt. The maximum penalty is a $500 fine and six months in jail. Gutierrez was released on $1,500 bail. Superintendent cuts testing JACKSONVILLE The new superintendent of Duval County schools is cutting out a series of stu dent testing that leave too little time for learning. The new policy begins Nov. 26. School officials said the policy wont affect the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Tests, which are required by the state. The district will cut eight other types of test ing of students in reading, math and science, accord ing to news reports. Superintendent Nikolai Vitti said the new policy will make room for anoth er five to 10 days of teach ing each school year. Vitti said schools had booked more tests than the calen dar could handle. Teachers union presi dent Terrie Brady called the move a huge step in the right direction. Construction mishap kills man SEMINOLE Authorities said a Tampa Bay area man died when an 8-foot concrete wall fell on him while doing con struction on a home. The Pinellas County Sheriffs Office said that 52-year-old Arben Berberi died Friday afternoon. Berberi and two other men had purchased the home in the spring and were working on an addi tion when the slab fell. The homes two other owners also were working but uninjured. Woman dies after 42-year coma MIAM A Miami woman who spent 42 years in a coma has died. The Miami Herald reported Ewarda OBara was a high school student in 1970 when she fell ill, threw up her medicine and slipped into a diabetic coma. She passed away Wednesday at age 59. The Herald reported that before the teen lost consciousness, she asked her mother, Kay OBara, to never leave her side. She kept her promise, tak ing care of her daughter until she died five years ago. Thats when Colleen OBara stepped in and continued taking care of her sister in the Miami Gardens home. Woman killed during argument JACKSONVILLE Authorities say a woman was fatally shot in the middle of a Jacksonville street as she tried to end her relationship with her boyfriend. Jacksonville Sheriffs Office spokesman Shawn Coarsey said 24-yearold Rolisha Thomas and Calvin Wright got into an argument just after noon on Thanksgiving Day. The argument escalated as the two went outside and on Almeda Street in north west Jacksonville. News reports said thats when 24-year-old Wright took out a handgun and shot Thomas several times. She was taken to the hospital, where she died. Wright fled the scene. Police said he turned him self in on Friday morning. There was no word on what charges he faces. Officials say Wright had a criminal record and recently was released from prison. Man pleads guilty to fatal hit-run ORANGE PARK A Jacksonville man has pleaded guilty to leaving the scene of a crash that killed a 13-year-old boy. Anthony Michael Margadonna entered his plea in Clay County on Monday. The 23-year-old man was arrested last November, two days after the collision that left Brien Andrew Alvezios dead. News out lets reported that Alvezios was riding his bike when he was hit from behind. Margadonna is sched uled to be sentenced on Feb. 1. Man charged in post office threat MARATHON A man is charged with threaten ing to blow up a Florida Keys post office. The Monroe County Sheriffs Office said 69year-old Juan Zigler hand ed clerks at the Marathon post office a garbled note Friday that threatened to blow up the Keys. They said he then threw an object over the counter that clerks thought might be a firecracker. When deputies arrived, they arrested Zigler. The object appeared to be a battery with a wire attached to it. Zigler was charged with making a false bomb report and delivering a hoax bomb and released. Drug suspect flushes recorder LAKELAND A man accused of being a methamphetamine traf ficker allegedly confessed and then flushed the detectives recorder down the toilet. The Ledger reported Saturday that Polk County deputies said they found 30-year-old Patrick Townsend driving with 32.4 grams of meth in his boxers during a Wednesday traffic stop. Deputies said Townsend confessed, saying he usu ally deals in kilograms. A detective allegedly record ed the confession but left the recorder sitting on a desk. Townsend allegedly grabbed it, hid it in his armpit and asked to use the bathroom, where he flushed it. When the detective looked for recorder, Townsend allegedly mocked him by saying, Tighten up on your job, homie. Townsend was jailed without bail Saturday, charged with meth traf ficking and destroying evidence. SANTO DOMINGO, Dominican Republic S inger Marc Anthony is com ing to the aid of an orphan age in the Dominican Republic. A foundation run by Anthony with music and sports pro ducer Henry Cardenas plans to build a new residence hall, classrooms and a baseball field for the Children of Christ orphanage in the eastern city of La Romana. Anthony attended the groundbreaking ceremony Friday with his model girlfriend Shannon de Lima. Children of Christ Foundation Director Sonia Hane said Anthony visited the orphanage previously and decided to help. His Maestro Cares Foundation raised $200,000 for the expansion on land donated by a sugar company. The orphanage was founded in 1996 for children who were abused or abandoned or whose parents were unable to care for them. Halle Berrys ex arrested after fight at her house LOS ANGELES Halle Berrys ex-boyfriend Gabriel Aubry was arrested for inves tigation of battery Thursday after he and the Oscar-win ning actresss cur rent boyfriend got into a fight at her Hollywood Hills home, police said. Aubry, 37, was booked for investi gation of a battery, a misdemeanor, and released on $20,000 bail, accord ing to online jail records. Hes sched uled to appear in court Dec. 13. Aubry came to Berrys house Thanksgiving morning and police responded to a report of an assault, said Los Angeles Police Officer Julie Boyer. Aubry was injured in the altercation and was taken to a hospital where he was treated and released. Emails sent to Berrys publicist, Meredith OSullivan, and Aubrys family law attorney, Gary Fishbein, were not immediately returned. Berry and Aubry have been involved in a custody dispute involv ing their 4-year-old daughter, Nahla. The proceedings were sealed because the former couple are not married. Both appeared in the case as recently as Nov. 9, but neither side commented on the outcome of the hearing. Berry has been dating French actor Olivier Martinez, and he said earlier this year that they are engaged. Tom Hanks, Will Ferrell offer custom recordings NEW YORK Imagine having William Shatner supply your outgo ing voicemail message. Or maybe youd prefer Morgan Freeman coolly telling callers to wait for the beep. Or perhaps having Betty White joke around is more your speed. All it takes is $299 and some luck. The advocacy group Autism Speaks is offering custom-recorded messages from those celebrities as well as Will Ferrell, Carrie Fisher, Tom Hanks, Derek Jeter, Leonard Nimoy, Patrick Stewart and Ed Asner. From Dec. 3 to Dec. 9, a limited number of 20-second long MP3 messages will be recorded by each celebrity on a first-come, first-served basis for fans to do with as they wish. All requests must be of the PG variety. London sale features Elvis Presleys Rolex LONDON A watch which was one of Elvis Presleys last Christmas presents and a corset worn by Madonna on her 1990 Blond Ambition tour will be featured at a London auction. The watch, estimated to sell for 6,000 pounds ($9,500) or more, is a diamond-set Rolex given to Presley by his longtime manager, Tom Parker. It is engraved, Elvis merry Christmas your pal Col. Tom Parker. It was the last Christmas for Presley, who died the following year. Singer aids Dominican orphanage Wednes day: 8-18-24-30-39 PB 26 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter Associated Press Associated Press ASSOCIATED PRESS Singer Marc Anthony poses with children from the Children of Christ orphanage in La Romana, Dominican Republic, on Friday. The foundation, run by Anthony with music and sports producer Henry Cardenas, plans to build a new residence hall, classrooms and a baseball field for the orphanage, founded in 1996. Aubrey So then, just as you received Christ Jesus as Lord, continue to live your lives in him, rooted and built up in him, strength ened in the faith as you were taught, and overflowing with thankfulness. Colossians 2:6-7 2A

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even singing an old tune from TVs Hee-Haw to pass the time. Billy Shaw showed up at Belk on a dare from his grandchil dren. They said he wouldnt. He did. Shaw was the first in line at 7 p.m., he said. The store opened its doors at midnight. The 75-year-old had been to just on one Black Friday before. A couple years ago he fought through the crowds, hunting for GPSs. He said his grandchildren had been calling him all day, making sure he was all right. The people behind Shaw were wrapped in blankets, and said their coffee, once warm, had long since grown cold. The low temperature Thursday night was 39 degrees. The line at Belk started early, most with hopes of getting the $1,000 gift card promised to one of the first 260 people who went through the doors. Wendy Holton was the 260th person in line when store employees passed out pieces of paper that were exchanged for the gift cards when the doors opened. She said there was a woman in front of her, but she left about 15 minutes before the place-holder cards were distrib uted. She said she went to Walmart first. Holton went alone this year after her family didnt want to help push through the crowds. She didnt mind. Holton laughs and talks fast, and she has never had trouble making friends. You dont have to bring any body, you just make your friends along the way, she said. While at Walmart, Holton went to the sporting goods aisle and snagged a fold-up chair, then took her spot in line in the juice aisle for one of the 40-inch TVs. While in line, she said, she heard a woman singing an old song from Hee-Haw: Gloom, despair and agony on me. Deep dark depression, excessive misery. If it werent for bad luck. Id have no luck at all. Gloom, despair and agony on me. Soon there was a chorus. She said it was all in good fun. She said she sat in line from 6:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. and got her TV, although she didnt win the $1,000 prize at Belk. Jason Williams, a lieuten ant commander with the Navy Reserves, waited in line for about two hours, he said. When he scratched off his gift card, he didnt realize he had won. He handed it to his wife, Tina Williams, who promptly whis pered, Honey, you won. From years of discipline or maybe just due to his reserved nature, Williams still didnt whoop and holler. He slowly slipped through the crowd and found the store manager. He said he didnt want to ruin any ones excitement at the chance for $1,000. Williams, 45, said he as been working at the Lake City Veterans Affairs Medical Center since he got back from Afganhastan in September 2011. He said most of the $1,000 would be spent on gifts for his three girls. The Williamses have daugh ters aged 20, 16 and 5. They werent there. Williams wasnt sure if he had to spend all of the $1,000 that night. I hope not, cause my girls arent here, he said. Theyre going to get most of it, for sure. For the record, Belk said they did not have to spend the money that night. Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012 3A character was dead. The actor, who returned as J.R. in a new edition of Dallas this year, had a long history of health prob lems and died Friday due to complications from his battle with cancer, his fam ily said. Larry was back in his beloved hometown of Dallas, re-enacting the icon ic role he loved the most. Larrys family and closest friends had joined him in Dallas for the Thanksgiving holiday, the family said in a statement that was provid ed to The Associated Press by Warner Bros., producer of the show. The 81-year-old actor was surrounded by friends and family before he passed peacefully, just as hed wished for, the statement said. Linda Gray, his on-screen wife and later ex-wife in the original series and the sequel, was among those with Hagman in his final moments in a Dallas hos pital, said her publicist, Jeffrey Lane. He brought joy to everyone he knew. He was creative, generous, funny, loving and talented, and I will miss him enormously. He was an original and lived life to the fullest, the actress said. Years before Dallas, Hagman had gained TV fame on I Dream of Jeannie, in which he played an astronaut whose life is disrupted when he finds a comely genie, por trayed by Barbara Eden, and takes her home to live with him. Eden recalled late Friday shooting the series pilot in the frigid cold on a Malibu beach. From that day, for five more years, Larry was the center of so many fun, wild and sometimes crazy times. And in retrospect, memorable moments that will remain in my heart for ever, Eden said. Hagman also starred in two short-lived sitcoms, The Good Life (NBC, 1971-72) and Here We Go Again (ABC, 1973). His film work included wellregarded performances in The Group, Harry and Tonto and Primary Colors. But it was Hagmans masterful portrayal of J.R. that brought him the most fame. And the Who shot J.R.? story twist fueled international speculation and millions of dollars in betting-parlor wagers. It also helped give the series a place in ratings history. When the answer was revealed in a November 1980 episode, an average 41 million U.S. viewers tuned in to make Dallas one of the most-watched entertainment shows of all time, trailing only the MASH finale in 1983 with 50 million viewers. It was J.R.s sister-in-law, Kristin (Mary Crosby) who plugged him he had made her pregnant, then threatened to frame her as a prostitute unless she left town but others had equal motivation. Hagman played Ewing as a bottomless well of cor ruption with a charming grin: a business cheat and a faithless husband who tried to get his alcoholic wife, Sue Ellen (Gray), institu tionalized. I know what I want on J.R.s tombstone, Hagman said in 1988. It should say: Here lies upright citizen J.R. Ewing. This is the only deal he ever lost. On Friday night, Victoria Principal, who co-starred in the original series, recalled Hagman as bigger than life, on-screen and off. He is unforgettable, and irre placeable, to millions of fans around the world, and in the hearts of each of us, who was lucky enough to know and love him. Ten episodes of the new edition of Dallas aired this past summer and proved a hit for TNT. Filming was in progress on the sixth epi sode of season two, which is set to begin airing Jan. 28, the network said. There was no immedi ate comment from Warner or TNT on how the series would deal with Hagmans loss. In 2006, he did a guest shot on FXs drama series Nip/Tuck, playing a macho business mogul. He also got new exposure in recent years with the DVD releases of I Dream of Jeannie and Dallas. Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings said Saturday morning in a statement that Hagmans role as J.R. helped the city gain world wide recognition. Larry is a North Texas jewel that was larger than life and he will be missed by many in Dallas and around the world, Rawlings said. The Fort Worth, Texas, native was the son of sing er-actress Mary Martin, who starred in such clas sics as South Pacific and Peter Pan. Martin was still in her teens when he was born in 1931 during her marriage to attorney Ben Hagman. As a youngster, Hagman gained a reputation for mischief-making as he was bumped from one private school to another. He made a stab at New York theater in the early 1950s, then served in the Air Force from 1952-56 in England. While there, he met and married young Swedish designer Maj Axelsson. The couple had two chil dren, Preston and Heidi, and were longtime resi dents of the Malibu area. WAITING: Hours in line for local residents hunting bargains on Black Friday Continued From Page 1A HAGMAN: Starred in I Dream of Jeannie, Dallas Continued From Page 1A DEREK GILLIAM/ Lake City Reporter Tina and Jason Williams, who won the $1,000 door prize at Belk early Friday. DEREK GILLIAM /Lake City Reporter President of the Farm Bureau Charlie Crawford and President of the Kiwanis Club Dan Devers take a timeout to pose for a picture at the Farm-City Week Luncheon on Tuesday. Farm-City Week aims to bring awareness of the codependency that exists between the urban and agricultural communities. Farm-City Week DEREK GILLIAM/ Lake City Reporter A Belk manager hands out gift cards to customers who had waited hours in line for the chance to win a prize. The prizes ranged from $5 to $1,000. Explosion rocks homes From staff reports Preliminary reports identified a bonfire as the likely source of an explo sion that rocked homes in southeastern Columbia County Saturday night. According to police radio traffic, about 10 resi dents called 911 to say an explosion had shaken their homes at about 7:15 p.m. The fire was near 1867 Peacock Road. The cause of the explosion was not immediately known. There were no initial reports of damage. 3A SPECIALIZING IN: Non-Invasive Laparoscopic Gynecological Surgery Adolescent Gynecology High and Low Risk Obstetrics Contraception Delivering at Shands Lake Shore In-Ofce ultrasounds for our patients 3D/4D Entertainment Scans offering DaVinci Robotic Surgeries. New Patients Welcome Call today for a personal appointment: 386-755-0500 449 SE Baya Drive Lake City, Floraida 32025 www.dainagreenemd.com WE ARE WOMEN, WE ARE M OTHERS, WE UNDERST A ND NOTICE Attention Humana Walmart Medicare Part D patients: We accept this plan and all other Part D plans. Baya East 755-6677 Baya West 755-2233 Medical 755-2277 Call one of our pharmacies to see which plan is best for you.

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C airo’s Tahrir Square, the epicen-ter of the protests that ousted Egypt’s longtime dictator Hosni Mubarak, is again filled with angry demonstrators fear-ful that their first democratical-ly elected leader, Mohammed Morsi, is himself intent on becoming a dictator. Morsi feels, with some justification, that a judiciary still heavily stocked with Mubarak loyalists is out to thwart his political agenda, which seems to consist largely of allow-ing his allies in the Islamist Muslim Brotherhood to write the constitution and laws that will determine Egypt’s future. Morsi’s critics say he has concentrated on these inter-necine political battles to the exclusion of dealing with Egypt’s serious long-term eco-nomic problems. At the end of the week, Morsi granted himself the legal protections typical of a dictatorship: He made himself and his decrees immune from judicial oversight and gave himself broad and ill-defined authority to crack down on any “threats to the revolu-tion.” Maybe Morsi didn’t intend it that way, but this is a stan-dard template of legislation that allows dictators to lock up their opponents indefinitely and, mind you, there is no judicial review. The courts had earlier blocked a constitutional panel and dissolved the lower house of parliament as unrepresenta-tive. Morsi extended judicial immunity to the new panel drafting a constitution and to the upper house, domi-nated by Morsi’s own Islamist Muslim Brotherhood party. That prompted the resignation of one of his top aides and a denunciation by Mohammed ElBaradei, a former top U.N. official and Morsi ally, that the Egyptian president was intent on making himself “a new pharaoh.” Morsi’s performance in office is of more than aca-demic interest to the United States. Egypt is one of the largest recipients of U.S. aid and was instrumental in bro-kering a ceasefire, however fragile, between Israel and Hamas in Gaza. The ceasefire has been a ray of sunshine in a situation that is threatening to turn dark and bloody. The fact is we need a motivated Morsi in the Mideast. But his unpopular decrees provoked the largest demon-strations since those against Mubarak. Protestor also fanned out to burn several Muslim Brotherhood facilities and attacked Brotherhood members leaving Friday prayers. Most discouragingly, Morsi trotted out the old Mubarak justification that these dic-tatorial powers were neces-sary to guide Egypt to a new democratic future — a future that somehow never seemed to come until mass rioting brought it about. Average Egyptians can be excused for suspecting that they may have exchanged one dictatorship for another. Morsi takes on Mubarak powers OUR OPINION HIGHLIGHTS IN HISTORY In 1783, the British evacuated New York, their last military position in the United States during the Revolutionary War. In 1881, Pope John XXIII was born Angelo Giuseppe Roncalli at Sotto il Monte, Italy. In 1908, the first issue of The Christian Science Monitor was published. In 1940, the cartoon character Woody Woodpecker made his debut in the animated short “Knock Knock.” In 1952, the play “The Mousetrap,” a murder mys-tery by Agatha Christie, first opened in London’s West End; it would go on to become the longest continuously running show in history. D ennis Roberts, our retiring pub-lic defender, has received just about every accolade in the book and he deserves every one of them. One of Dennis’s most profound contributions to our com-munity has been a singularly great contribution to our school system. He once led a fund rais-ing project that netted $10,000 for our schools to buy more reading books. About 10 years ago, our schools were trying to build up our highly successful Accelerated Reader (AR) pro-gram, a program that had proved incredibly successful from the outset. AR books excited the kids and most of them read dozens and dozens of the books. School-wide the numbers sometimes ran into the thousands. The wildfire success of AR created a situation where students were running out of AR books to read and many more new books were needed to keep up with the pace of the avid young readers. This was a special problem for our schools because the county school’s budget was very tight. So, one of our industrious employees wrote a successful grant application for $20,000 to buy more AR books. However, this money was contingent on our raising a matching $20,000 cash. We were able to raise $10,000 through private donations but then we hit a stone wall and donations ground to a stop with $10,000 still to go. So, we called Dennis, knowing his reputation for supporting our schools, to see if he had any ideas. He said he thought he could raise the needed $10,000 by asking the local legal commu-nity to step in and help. Then, Dennis personally solicited and got donations from every attorney and judge in our community and raised the needed $10,000. Thus, combin-ing the $20,000 grant money and the $20,000 in private money, we were able to buy nearly $40,000 of new AR books. A jubilant group of AR teachers met the judges and lawyers in the School Board Complex to profusely thank them. Later our school board met in official session to thank Dennis for leading the successful drive and presented him a resolution and plaque for his exemplary service. Fast forwarding to the present, you can be sure there are young adults in our commu-nity right now whose lives were enriched by reading AR books that Dennis Roberts’ sterling leadership helped to buy those years ago. Thank you, Dennis Roberts, for your major support of our community and our school sys-tem over the years. Now, feel free to take a step back and catch your breath. Happy retire-ment!Edgar Watson revisitedLots of readers called to react to my column “Who Killed Belle Starr?” and the possibility the killer was Edgar J. Watson, an allegedly notorious criminal from Fort White. Loye Barnard of Fort White especially had lots of informa-tion and actually knows the loca-tion of the Watson farm. She also told me of nationally recognized writer Peter Matthiessen, who had spent years researching Edgar Watson’s life and writing three books. Q “Killing Mr. Watson”: A first-person account of Watson’s rise to power and his eventual death at the hands of his neigh-bors. Q “Lost Man’s River”: Watson’s youngest son tries to reconstruct his father’s life to see if he was really a murderer and an outlaw. Q “Bone by Bone”: Watson tells his own story of his child-hood in South Carolina and for-ward to the time of his violent death. (NOTE: Book summaries from Google.”) Then Dr. Matthiessen edited the three books into one book, “Shadow Country” If you decide to read “Shadow Country,” bring your lunch. It’s 890 pages long.Talking turkeyDid you hear about the man who crossed a turkey with a centipede? On Thanksgiving Day, everybody got a drum-stick. … Also, Thanksgiving Day for turkeys is the day AFTER Thanksgiving—they’re thankful they survived another year! Thanks to Dennis Roberts, premier education booster LETTERS TO THE EDITOR To the Editor:If you missed the young people’s producion of “Into the Woods, Jr.,” you missed a real treat. I never cease to be amazed at how these students, who all have to keep up with their school work, can learn all the lines of a lengthy play and even sing the songs so beautifully. Congratulations to all of you students for a really great pro-duction, and also to your new director, Tara Hollingsworth. Mary Beaty Lake City The election: another point of view To the Editor:I read the letter to the editor “America No More,” which said: “The takers outvot-ed the producers. If you voted for Barack Obama for president on Nov. 6, 2012, you did it for free stuff. There is no other pos-sible reason.” Chuckle.I have been working since I was 4 years old (52 years). “Free stuff?” What free stuff? I believe that narrow-minded belief is one of the many rea-sons why Mitt Romney lost by 126 electoral votes and by 3,369,383 popular votes. 62,306,898 votes speak volumes about your argument. Yes, I believe we took America back from the big cor-porations and special interests that tried to buy the presidency. “One donor” contributed $53 million to Mitt Romney’s cam-paign. I know that contributor and other big-money wasters felt awful around 11:15 p.m. Tuesday night, Nov. 6, 2012, when they heard the news “President Barack Obama has been re-elected president of the United States of America.” I am delighted to know that the one person, one vote sys-tem can veto big money and special interest. I do not have a problem [with] my tax dollars going to a person or family in need rather than big oil and people that deposit their money in Cayman Island and Swiss banks and only pay below mini-mum income taxes on billions. I would rather support a strug-gling family than someone who owns a yacht or two. Yes, I voted for the best qualified man for the job, and so did 62,306,897 other “eligilble” vot-ers. May God continue to bless the United States of America. Dwight Pollock Lake City Congratulations to young performers Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding counties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, publisher Robert Bridges, editor Sue Brannon, controller Dink NeSmith, president Tom Wood, chairman LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY E-MAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com W e do things a little differ-ently here in Columbia County, and more often than not that’s a good thing. Take Black Friday, for instance. As reported in the national press, folks elsewhere were running one another down in parking lots and trading punches — or at least sharp-ened elbows — to get a jump on fellow shoppers for mega-bargains. Not so much here.While waiting in line at Walmart, they were singing the old Hee-Haw standard, “Gloom, Despair and Agony on Me.” All in fun, of course.That’s not to say it was all sweetness and light Thursday night, or that tempers won’t at some point fray as Christmas nears and the holiday stress rises. We’re only human, after all.Still, Thursday night’s display was a nice reminder of where we live and the kind of folks we’re glad to call our neighbors. In thespirit of theseason OPINION Sunday, November 25, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A Morris WilliamsPhone: (386) 755-8183williams_h2@firn.edu372 W. Duval St.Lake City, FL 32055 Q Morris Williams is a local historian and long-time Columbia County resident. Q Dale McFeatters is editorial writer for Scripps Howard News Service. Dale McFeattersmcfeattersd@shns.com4AEDIT

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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012 5A Nov. 27 Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon at the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane, to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. Nov. 28 Senators staff visit Staff members of U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio will be available to help area resi dents with issues involving federal agencies from 1:30 to 4 p.m. at the Lifestyle Enrichment Center, 628 SE Allison Court. For more information, all Rubios Jacksonville Regional Office at (904) 398-8586. Senior theater The GeriActors Thearter will present three 0ne-act plays from 6:60 to 8 p.m. at the Lifestyle Enrichment Center, 628 SE Allison Court in Lake City. The plays are A Collie for Christmas; Where Is Misha; and the Louisiana version of The Night Before Christmas.Light refreshments will be served. Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Wednesday from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Fort White Public Library on Route 47to answer ques tions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. Nov. 29 Brain health class Maintain Your Brain at the Lifestyle Enrichment Center, 628 SE Allison Court, from 10 to 11:30 a.m. This free presentation explores insights about what a person can do to maintain life-long brain health. Attendees will learn basic brain facts, ways to keep memories sharp and the close connection between brain health and heart health. Call (800) 272-3900 to register or for more information. Landlords to meet Lake City area landlords will meet at the IHOP res taurant. Dinner will be at 5 p.m., and the program will begin at 6. Columbia County Fire Chief David Boozer will be the speak er. Call (386) 755-0110 for more information. Community theater High Springs Commnity Theater will present the comedy Christmas Belles, tonight through Dec.16. A preview perfor mance is open to the public on at 8 p.m. Tickets are available for purchase at The Framery of Lake City (386) 754-2780, Pampered Paws in High Springs (386) 454-4464 or online at high springscommunitytheater. com. Nov. 30 Hospital garage sale The auxiliary at Shands Lakeshore Hospital will have a garage sale from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the hospi tals first-floor conference room and outside for larger items. Dec. 1 Breakfast with chief Lake City Police Chief Argatha Gilmore will have her quarterly community meeting, Breakfast With The Chief, from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at the Public Safety Building. The event is an opportunity for community members to discuss issues or concerns with Gilmore. A complimentary breakfast will be available. For more information, contact Audre Washington, police depart ment community rela tions coordinator, at (386) 719-5742. Farm day event Suwanee Valley Alpacas will have a Farm Day from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. today and Sunday. Spend the day learning about alpacas. Pet an alpaca. Learn to spin the fiber into yarn. A free Beanie Baby for each child. Air-brush art. Alpaca prod ucts available for sale for unique Christmas gifts. The farm is at 524 NW Sleepy Court in White Springs. For more informa tion, call (386) 397-2678 or (386) 965-1800. Civil War program Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave. in Fernandina Beach, will host a Union Garrison event today and Sunday. The program will allow visi tors to interact with living historians to experience life in the fort as it was in 1864. Soldiers in period costumes will conduct fir ing demonstrations, march ing drills, cooking and daily activities. Ladies in period dresses will be preparea Christmas tree and deco rate the mantles for the holiday season. Sutlers will display their wares, and drummer boys will project the sounds of the Civil War era. Activities will be held from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. today and 9 a.m. to noon Sunday. For additional information, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www. FloridaStateParks.org. Dec. 5 Book sale fundraiser The auxiliary at Shands Lakeshore Hospital will hold a Christmas book sale to support the hospi tal from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the first-floor cafe at the hospital. Builders association Columbia County Builders Association will hold a General Council lunch at Guang Dong res taurant in the Lake City Mall. The sponsor is the Foundation Professionals Inc. of Florida. The speaker will be Sgt. David Greene from Crime Prevention Division of the Columbia County Sheriffs Office. The winning ticket for our raffle will be drawn, with a prize of either a $500 golf gift certificate for County Club of Lake City Pro Shop, a 20-gauge shotgun or an iPad from Verizon. We will also have the 50-50 HammerClaw drawing for a jackpot of $275. Reservations are appreciated and can be made by calling (386) 8671998. Tickets are $12 for members and $15 for nonmembers.Arrive about 11:30 to enjoy the buffet. The meeting will start at 12:00 noon. Newcomers luncheon The Newcomers Friendship Luncheon will be at 11:30 a.m. at Hannahs, 4196 W US 90 in the Premier Plaza. For those who want to par ticipate, there will be an exchange of wrapped gifts, with a $10 value limit. For more information, con tact Barbara Test at 7547272 or Rose Taylor at 755-2175. Dec. 6 Book sale fundraiser The auxiliary at Shands Lakeshore Hospital will hold a Christmas book sale to support the hospi tal from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the first-floor cafe at the hospital. De. 8 Breakfast with Santa Come join us at Holiday Inn & Suites for break fast with Santa from 8 to11 a.m. The event will include a breakfast buf fet with scrambled eggs, bacon, sausage, biscuits and gravy, juice, cof fee, hot chocolate and a waffle station. Enjoy holi day music, fun and fel lowship, complete with a visit from Santa. Cost is $9.95 for adults and $4.95 for children ages 3 to 12. Proceeds will benefit the Childrens Medical Services of North Florida. A collection box for dona tions of unwrapped toys also will be available. For more information, call (386) 754-1411. Canned food giveaway North Side Church of Christ, 378 NW Gibson Lane, will have a canned food giveaway from 8 a.m. to noon. Anyone in need is welcome. For more infor mation, contact the church office at 755-0393, by email secretarynscofc@gmail. com or visit the church website, Thenorthsidecoc. org. Dec. 9 Holiday cantata Covenant First Presbyterian Church (for merly First Presbyterian) of Live Oak will present the Christmas cantata, God with Us Emmanuel, by Phillip Young on at 6:00 p.m. Bill Poplin will be directing. The church is off U.S. 90 on White Avenue in Live Oak. For more information, contact Bill Poplin at 365-4932. Dec. 11 Medicare seminar Lifestyle Enrichment Center is sponsoring a free Medicare seminar from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. The seminar will be moderated by Irv Crowetz of C/C & Associates. Subjects to be covered include: what you need to know about Medicare, when to enroll, whats covered and when a supplement is needed. Call 755-3475 ext. 107 to reserve a seat. 5A TH E C I TY O F L A K E C I TY I S S E EK I N G A P P LI C A N TS T O F I L L A V A C A N C Y O N T H E P LA N N I N G A N D Z O N I N G B O A R D TH I S I S A V O LU N TA R Y P O S I TI O N A P P LI C A TI O N S A V A I LA BL E I N TH E C I TY C LE R K S O F F I C E LO C A TE D I N C I TY H A LL A T 205 N O R T H M A R I O N A V EN U E, L A K E C I TY F L O R I D A M O N D A Y F R I D A Y 8A M T O 5 P M O R WW W. LC F LA C O M R EP O R TS A N D D O C U M EN TS T A B (C I TY B O A R D / C O M M I TT EE A P P LI C A TI O N ) A p p l i c at i on d e ad l i n e W e d n e s d ay, N ove mb e r 28, 20 12 n oon T h e Ci t y Pl an n i n g an d Z o n i n g Bo ard s co n s i s t o f fi v e ( 5 ) memb ers w h o s h al l b e res i d en t s o f t h e Ci t y T h e Pl an n i n g Bo ard i s al s o r efe rred t o as t h e L o cal Pl an n i n g A g en cy ( L P A ) Me mb ers are ap p o i n t ed b y t h e Ci t y Co u n ci l fo r t h ree (3 ) y ear t erms an d may b e reap p o i n t ed fo r ad d i t i o n al t erms b y t h e Co u n ci l Fi n an ci al d i s cl o s u r e i s req u i red an n u al l y t o Co u n ci l o n E t h i cs St at e o f Fl o ri d a. T h i s Bo ard a ct s i n an ad v i s o ry cap a ci t y t h ro u g h reco m men d at i o n s t o t h e Ci t y Co u n ci l fo r fi n al act i o n T h e Pl an n i n g an d Z o n i n g Bo a rd me et s o n a mo n t h l y b as i s an d meet i n g s are h el d i n t h e Co u n ci l Ch amb ers l o cat ed i n Ci t y H al l N o t i ce o f al l me et i n g s i s p ro v i d ed t o t h e memb ers an d p o s t ed o n t h e b u l l et i n b o ard at Ci t y H al l at l eas t t w en t y fo u r (2 4 ) h o u rs i n ad v an ce o f t h e meet i n g an d i s s u b j ect t o Sect i o n 2 8 6 0 1 1 Fl o ri d a St at u t es ( Pu b l i c M eet i n g L a w ). A maj o r res p o n s i b i l i t y o f t h e Pl an n i n g Bo ard i s t h e man ag e men t an d u p d at e o f t h e Ci t y Co mp r eh en s i v e Pl an an d L an d U s e Reg u l at i o n s T h e Pl an n i n g Bo ard al s o fu n ct i o n s i n t h e d u al ro l e as t h e Z o n i n g Bo ard fo r t h e Ci t y an d s h al l h av e t h e d u t i es an d res p o n s i b i l i t i es as s et fo rt h i n t h e L an d U s e Reg u l at i o n s an d t h e Ci t y Co d e. Mo s t co m mo n amo n g t h e Z o n i n g Bo ard d u t i es i s t o rev i ew an d co n s i d er ci t i zen req u es t s fo r zo n i n g an d l an d u s e ch an g es s p eci al ex cep t i o n s o r v ari an ces t o cert ai n l an d u s e reg u l a t i o n s an d s u b d i v i s i o n o f p ro p ert y w i t h i n t h e Ci t y T h i s b o ard d o es n o t o p er at e u n d e r a s ep a rat e b u d g et T h e Ci t y D i re ct o r o f G ro w t h Man ag em en t p ro v i d es ad mi n i s t rat i v e s u p p o rt P l eas e n o t e me mb ers o f t h e Pl an n i n g an d Z o n i n g Bo ard s erv e d u al ro l es a n d al s o s erv e i n t h e cap aci t y o f t h e Bo a rd o f A d j u s t men t T h e Bo a rd o f A d j u s t men t m eet s o n an as n eed ed b as i s W he n a va c a nc y oc c ur s or a t e r m e xpi r e s on t he boa r d( s ) a ppl i c a t i ons w i l l be a c c e pt e d. A t t he di s c r e t i on of t he C i t y C ounc i l i nt e r vi e w s m a y b e s c he dul e d a nd, i f r e qui r e d, e ve r y a t t e m pt w i l l be m a de t o s c he dul e a n i nt e r vi e w a t your c onve ni e nc e A p p l i c at i on s m u s t b e t u r n e d i n t o t h e C i t y C l e r k s O f f i c e b y We d n e s d ay, N ove m b e r 28 2012 at n oon T h e C i t y C l e r k s O f f i c e i s l oc at e d at C i t y H al l 2 05 N or t h M ar i on A ve n u e L ak e C i t y, F l or i d a 32055 or a p p l i c at i o n s m ay b e e m a i l e d t o s i k e s a@ l c f l a. c om A U D R E Y E S I K E S M M C C i t y C l e r k WILSONS O UTFITTERS WilsonsOutfitters@comcast.net Holiday Blowout! Kids In sulated Camo.. Bibs & Overalls 40% Off! We have great Christmas ideas! Instock! Game cameras 20% Off! New items added to our Sale Racks! Bennard Coy Pearce Bennard Coy Pearce, 75, a resi dent of Lulu, Florida passed away Thursday November 22, 2012 at the Suwannee Valley Care Cen ter following an extended illness. Mr. Pearce was born in Lulu, Florida and was a lifelong resi dent of Lulu. He is the son of the late Lafayette and Lester Agnes Cox Pearce. He attend ed the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. He was employed by the Department of Transportation as a truck Survivors include two sis ters: Jeanette (Randy) Guntner, Lulu, Fl. and Juanita Young, Okeechobee, Fl. Numerous Nieces and Nephews also survive. Funeral services will be con ducted Tuesday November 27, 2012 at 2:00 P.M. in the Chapel of Dees-Parrish Funeral Home with Bro. David Morse and ing. Interment will follow in the New Zion Cemetery in Union County, Florida. The family will receive friends Tuesday Novem ber 27, 2012 for ONE hour prior to the service. Arrangements are under the direction of the DEES-PARRISH FAMILY FUNERAL HOME 458 S. Mar ion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025 752-1234 Please share your thoughts and wishes for the family at our on-line family guestbook at parrishfamilyfuneralhome.com Obituaries are paid advertise ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporters classified depart ment at 752-1293. OBITUARIES COMMUNITY CALENDAR To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0427 or by email at jbarr@lakecityreporter.com. DEREK GILLIAM/ Lake City Reporter Three Martinez sisters (from left) Nevia, 9; Willow, 15; and Ember, 11 sing I Want a Hippopotamus for Christmas at the Festival of Lights at Olustee Park in downtown Lake City Saturday in front of a crowd of about 20 people.

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5A LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY APRIL XX, 2011 Page Editor: Xxx, 754-xxxx 6A LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY NOVEMBER 25, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 6Aweather Lake City 183 SW Bascom Norris Drive Lowest Rate EVER MONDAY WEDNESDAY, N OVE M BER 26, 27 & 28 Get our OFFER NOT AVAILABLE ON EXISTING CAMPUS LOANS. OFFER IS FOR NEW LOANS ONLY. 1. Oers only available on 11/26/12-11/28/12 and may not be combined with any other oer. Credit approval required. Lines of Credit and CD-secured loans not eligible. Your APR may vary based on yourcredit worthiness, loan amount, term of loan, vehicle (2010 or newer) and property valuation (70% LTV). Owner-occupied properties and personal vehicles only; mobile homes not eligible. Property insurance is required; an appraisal, ood and/or title insurance may be required at an additional expense to the borrower. Borrower is responsible for all closing costs which may be added to your loan. On a mortgage or home equity, a $50,000 loan at 1.75% for 60 months would require 59 monthly payments of $871.01 and one nal payment of $831.32, total nance charge of $2,452.24; for a total of payments of $52,260.24. The amount nanced is $49,808.00 the APR is 1.90%. For other secured loans, a $25,000 loan with no money down at 1.75% for 60 months would require 59 monthly payments of $438.96 and a nal payment of $425.01, nance charge of $1,235.45, for a total of payments of $26,323.65. The amount nanced is $25,088.20, the APR is 1.9%. APR = Annual Percentage Rate. 2. Credit approval and initial $5 deposit required. Mention this ad and well waive the $15 new membership fee. Other restrictions may apply. This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration. ATTN: EILEEN BENNETT LAKE CITY REPORTER Runs: Sunday, November 25, 2012 Size: 6 col. (10.625) x 10.5, Full Color File name: 11-25_CAMPUS_CyberSale_ LC.pdf Sent out: by e-mail 11/19/12 Anne Powell, Clark/Nikdel/Powell Advertising, 863-299-9980 x1024 Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Columbia and Suwannee counties! 2 Apply online at www.campuscu.com visit any CAMPUS USA Credit Union Service Center or call 754-9088 and press 4. 1 90 % As low as for 60 months when you purchase or refinance! autos boats bikes mortgages and home equities all secured loans 1 APR 1 Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Marion, Lake and Sumter counties! 237-9060

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6B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 14-0 lead. The Tigers defense forced its second interception in as many drives as Trey Marshall picked another Mims’ pass and returned it 38 yards to the 25-yard line with 43 seconds remaining in the first half. Columbia needed only four plays to take a 21-0 lead going into the half. Timmons capped off the drive with his second touch-down rush of the half. Brant Nelson added the extra point. The Tigers continued to add to their lead during the second drive of the second half when Ronald Timmons broke the all-time Columbia single season rushing record. The senior has 1,539 yards on the year. This time, it was the special teams getting into the mix as the Tigers used a 45-yard run from Marshall on a fake punt score in all three phases of the game. St. Augustine capitalized on one of the few Columbia mistakes of the night on the Tigers’ next drive when Marcus Victory jumped on a fumble and returned it 87-yards for a touchdown. Bobby Mitchell ran in a fake kick for a two-point conver-sion and cut the Columbia lead to 28-8. The Tigers added to their lead and worked on the clock during their final drive of the night. Columbia used 13 plays and 6:24 of the game clock to move 55 yards for the final score which came on a 10-yard run from Lonnie Underwood. The drive included 12 runs and an 18-yard pass from Jayce Barber to Nate Ayers. Columbia’s defense nearly added a second score from Cray when Drew Clark sacked Mims forcing a fumble on St. Augustine’s final drive. Cray returned it 55 yards to the end zone, but a block in the back negated the touchdown. While Timmons carried the Tigers to victory with 209 rushing yards and two touchdowns, it will be bus-ses carrying the Tigers to the panhandle next week when the Tigers take on Navarre High. Columbia head coach Brian Allen ended the game with a first for himself as a head coach. “I’ve never given a game ball, but tonight No. 23 (Timmons) earned it,” Allen said while speaking to the team after the game.——— Columbia 0 21 6 7 — 34 St. Augustine 0 0 0 8 — 8 Second Quarter CHS—Timmons 52 run (kick blocked), 10:03 CHS—Cray 47 yard interception return (Timmons 2-pt conversion) 1:21 CHS—Timmons 3 run (Nelson kick) 0:17 Third Quarter CHS—Marshall 45 fake punt run (kick failed) 4:44 Fourth Quarter SA—Victory 87 fumble return (Mitchell 2-pt conversion) 8:48 CHS—Underwood 10 run (Nelson kick) 2:22 ——— Columbia St. AugustineFirst downs 16 9Rushes-yards 45-334 12-45Passing 62 129Comp-Att-Int 8-11-0 14-34-2Penalties-Yards 4-35 12-80 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Columbia, Timmons 24-209, Underwood 12-67, Barber 4-0, Marshall 5-58. St. Augustine, Sands 6-33, Stewart 1-4, Mims 5-9. PASSING—Columbia, Barber 8-11-620. St. Augustine, Mims 14-34-129-2. RECEIVING—Columbia, Ayers 2-16, Johnson 1-4. Weber 4-26, Pelham 1-3. St. Augustine, Williams 4-40, Nelms 4-27. CHS: Tigers sting Jackets, 34-8 Continued From Page 1B JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterMembers of the Columbia High football team run out onto the field to play against St. Augustine High before the Tigers ’ 34-8 victory on Friday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Ronald Timmons (23) dodges an attempte d tackle by St. Augustine High’s Larry Woodard (16) on Friday. Defense pitches another shutout in playoff winBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High’s defense continues to shine as the backbone of the Tigers and it showed again during the 34-8 win against St. Augustine High in the Class 6A regional semifinal in Lake City on Friday. While the Yellow Jackets picked up eight points in the contest, it wasn’t the defense allowing the points. St. Augustine scored when Marcus Victory picked up a fum-ble and returned it 87 yards for a score in the fourth quarter. The Tigers’ defense had already done enough damage to put the game away by that point. With only a 6-0 lead at 1:21 remaining in the first half, the defense started to show its claws. Roger Cray picked off a Sandon Mims pass and returned it 47 yards for a touchdown. Three plays later, the Tigers had another interception when Trey Marshall picked off a Mims’ pass and returned it 38 yards to set up another Tigers’ score. The defense helped Columbia put 15 points on the board in only a minute and four seconds. But it wasn’t just the interceptions to set up scores that show-cased the defense on Friday. Brett Newcomb had a sack on fourth down to stall a St. Augustine drive and Drew Clark’s sack on the Yellow Jackets’ final play forced a fumble that was also picked up by Cray. Columbia’s defensive shutout marked the fifth time this sea-son that the Tigers have kept an opposing offense off the score-board. The Tigers have kept opposing offenses out of the end zone in six games. “The thing is even though we pitched a shutout, I can guarantee you when we look at the film at 4:30 on Monday that it will sound like we lost the game,” Columbia head coach Brian Allen said. “There’s no laughing, no joking. We pay intense attention to detail and that’s what has allowed us to continue to get better. We have to look at the small things so that we don’t make the small mistakes two weeks in a row.” Right now, Columbia’s not making many mistakes. Kuykendall glad to be back when it mattersBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High’s Blake Kuykendall has had a senior season he’ll never forget. The senior was hurt during the spring and it looked like he wouldn’t play foot-ball at all for the Tigers this season. On Tuesday, that all changed. Kuykendall had been sidelined with a back inju-ry all year, but he hasn’t missed a practice or game. The only difference is the senior wasn’t suiting up. After visiting the doctor on Tuesday, Kuykendall found out that he finally received his clearance. On Friday, he ran out of the tunnel for the first time with pads on and helped the Tigers’ defense pitch its fifth shutout of the year in Columbia’s 34-8 victory against St. Augustine High in the Class 6A regional semifinals in Lake City. St. Augustine’s only score came after a Columbia fumble was returned for a touchdown. “It felt great to be back out there instead of watch-ing from the sidelines,” Kuykendall said. “Until now, I had been out there watching my boys win.” Kuykendall felt that he played pretty good given that he hasn’t been practic-ing for a full week yet. “I felt good,” he said. “I made a lot of mistakes but that will come.” The biggest thing holding Kuykendall back at this point is his conditioning after missing an extended period of time. “After Tuesday’s practice, I was sore from head to toe,” Kuykendall said. “Once I get out there more, I’ll get back into shape.” Still, Kuykendall was in on a number of plays in his first game back and feels that he’ll continue to improve an already impres-sive Tigers’ defense. “I think we’re playing good,” he said. “I know that I made some mistakes, but I’m out there running to the ball. There’s no jogging.” JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Blake Kuykendall (20) assists in a ta ckle Friday.6BSPORTS

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By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comTALLAHASSEE — It was a game of momen-tum swings reminiscent of a heavyweight fight, but Florida’s Mike Gillislee provided the most powerful punches to lead the Gators to the signature win of Will Muschamp’s career, 37-26, over rival Florida State. Gillislee provided the Gators (11-1) with a consis-tent running game through-out the day and finished the day with 140 yards on 24 touches including two touchdown runs. Combined with five turnovers forced by the Florida defense, the Gators were able to come up with a double-digit win. Florida’s running game was effective through-out the day as the Gators racked up 244 yards on the ground, including another 81 yards from Matt Jones on eight carries. Lake City Reporter SPORTS Sunday, November 25, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com BRIEFS GATORS continued on 5B Florida knocks off Florida St., 37-26, in Tallahassee. GAMES Monday Q Fort White High girls soccer at Williston High, 6 p.m. Q Columbia High soccer vs. Oak Hall School at CYSA fields, 7 p.m. (girls-5) Q Columbia High girls basketball at Madison County High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Tuesday Q Columbia High girls soccer at Chiles High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Q Fort White High soccer vs. Interlachen High, 7 p.m. (girls-5) Q Fort White High basketball at Union County High, 7:30 p.m. (girls-6) Wednesday Q Columbia High boys soccer vs. Mosley High at CYSA fields, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Q Fort White High boys basketball vs. Newberry High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Thursday Q Fort White High girls basketball at Santa Fe High, 6 p.m. Q Fort White High soccer at P.K. Yonge School, 7 p.m. (girls-5) Q Columbia High girls basketball at Atlantic Coast High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-5:30) Q Columbia High boys basketball at Suwannee High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Friday Q Columbia High girls soccer at Hamilton County High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Q Columbia High boys soccer vs. Lincoln High at CYSA fields, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Q Fort White High girls basketball vs. North Florida Christian School, 7 p.m. Q Fort White High boys basketball at Melody Christian Academy, 7 p.m. Q Columbia High football at Navarre High in regional final, 7:30 p.m. (CST) Saturday Q Columbia High wrestling hosts Tiger Invitational, 10 a.m. Q Columbia High boys basketball at Union County High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterColumbia High captains Javontae Foster (left) and Morris Marshall expect the Tigers to be a high-energy team this season. Three to go Columbia High hoops looks for 20-win seasonBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comAfter 19 wins last season, Columbia High has its eyes set on a 20-win campaign in year three of head coach Horace Jefferson’s tenure with the Tigers’ basketball team. “Our goal is to do better than we did last year by whatever means it takes,” Jefferson said. “We want to play longer than we did last year.” Columbia was eliminated in the first round of the playoffs after losing to Ridgeview High, but the Tigers have their eyes set on hosting a playoff game this year. The way the Tigers plan on achieving their goal is by changing up their tempo. Columbia will play a faster-paced brand of basketball this season. “I think the community wants to see us run the ball and I do too,” Jefferson said. “Last year, I didn’t Coach Horace Jefferson expects high-energy team. TIGERS continued on 5B Tigers take sting out of Jackets, 34-8 By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comSt. Augustine came into Lake City looking to improve on its undefeat-ed record against Columbia High in the Class 6A regional semifinal on Friday. The Yellow Jackets are undefeated no more as that Tigers took the sting out of the Jackets in a 34-8 win to advance to the regional final at Navarre High on Friday. Both teams struggled to find much offense in the first quarter as Columbia and St. Augustine com-bined for three first downs in the opening period. The Tigers began to sustain an offense with 1:37 remaining in the first quarter and put together an eight-play, 77-yard drive that ended with 10:03 remaining in the second quarter when Ronald Timmons busted free from 52-yards out for a score. The extra point was blocked to leave Columbia with a 6-0 lead. St. Augustine moved the ball into Columbia territory on the follow-ing drive, but the Yellow Jackets faced a fourth-and-6 situation at the 41-yard line. The Tigers’ Brett Newcomb came up with a sack of Sandon Mims and St. Augustine would turn the ball over on downs. The Tigers responded with 10 plays, but were forced to attempt a 26-yard field goal. Brayden Thomas’ attempt was no good. Columbia’s defense would get the Tigers on the board for the second time with an interception returned 47 yards for a touchdown from Roger Cray with 1:21 remaining in the first half. Timmons converted a two-point try to give Columbia a CHS continued on 6BJASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Ronald Timmons (23) breaks through S t. Augustine High defenders during the Tigers’ 34-8 Clas s 3A regional semifinal win on Friday. CHS FOOTBALL Charter bus for Navarre game The Columbia County Quarterback Club is planning on taking a charter bus to Columbia High’s playoff game at Navarre High. Cost for a seat on the bus will be confirmed Monday; estimate is $36 with game ticket extra. Deadline to reserve a seat is Monday. For details, call Joe Martino at 984-0452 or come to the Quarterback Club meeting at 7 p.m. Monday at Jones Fieldhouse. FORT WHITE FOOTBALL Q-back Club meeting Monday The Fort White Quarterback Club will meet at 7 p.m. Monday in the faculty lounge at the high school. Banquet plans and other year-end topics will be discussed. For details, call club president Harold Bundy at 365-5731.Q From staff reports JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFlorida’s Mike Gillislee (23) runs in a nine-yard tou chdown against Florida State on Saturday.Chomped 1BSPORTS

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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today AUTO RACING 10:30 a.m. SPEED — Formula One, Grand Prix of Brazil, at Sao Paulo CFL FOOTBALL 6 p.m. NBCSN — Playoffs, Grey Cup, Calgary vs. Toronto, at Toronto MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN2 — Old Spice Classic, championship game, Davidson vs. Gonzaga at Orlando 9 p.m. ESPN2 — DirecTV Classic, championship game, Pacific vs. Georgia Tech-California winner at Anaheim, Calif. 10 p.m. FSN — San Diego St. at Southern Cal NFL FOOTBALL 1 p.m. CBS — Regional coverageFOX — Regional coverage 4 p.m. CBS — Regional coverageFOX — Doubleheader game 8:20 p.m. NBC — Green Bay at N.Y. Giants SOCCER 8:15 a.m. ESPN2 — Premier League, Liverpool at Swansea ——— Monday NBA BASKETBALL 7 p.m. TNT — New York at Brooklyn NFL FOOTBALL 8:30 p.m. ESPN — Carolina at PhiladelphiaFOOTBALLNFL standings AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PANew England 8 3 0 .727 407 244Buffalo 4 6 0 .400 230 299Miami 4 6 0 .400 187 205N.Y. Jets 4 7 0 .364 221 290 South W L T Pct PF PAHouston 10 1 0 .909 327 211 Indianapolis 6 4 0 .600 210 260 Tennessee 4 6 0 .400 219 311 Jacksonville 1 9 0 .100 164 289 North W L T Pct PF PABaltimore 8 2 0 .800 267 206 Pittsburgh 6 4 0 .600 217 190 Cincinnati 5 5 0 .500 248 237 Cleveland 2 8 0 .200 189 234 West W L T Pct PF PADenver 7 3 0 .700 301 212 San Diego 4 6 0 .400 232 221 Oakland 3 7 0 .300 208 322Kansas City 1 9 0 .100 152 284 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAN.Y. Giants 6 4 0 .600 267 216Washington 5 6 0 .455 295 285 Dallas 5 6 0 .455 242 262Philadelphia 3 7 0 .300 162 252 South W L T Pct PF PAAtlanta 9 1 0 .900 270 193 Tampa Bay 6 4 0 .600 287 230 New Orleans 5 5 0 .500 287 273 Carolina 2 8 0 .200 184 243 North W L T Pct PF PAGreen Bay 7 3 0 .700 263 207Chicago 7 3 0 .700 249 165Minnesota 6 4 0 .600 238 221 Detroit 4 7 0 .364 267 280 West W L T Pct PF PASan Francisco 7 2 1 .750 245 134 Seattle 6 4 0 .600 198 161 Arizona 4 6 0 .400 163 196 St. Louis 3 6 1 .350 174 237 Thursday’s Games Houston 34, Detroit 31, OTWashington 38, Dallas 31New England 49, N.Y. Jets 19 Today’s Games Denver at Kansas City, 1 p.m.Minnesota at Chicago, 1 p.m.Oakland at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.Pittsburgh at Cleveland, 1 p.m.Buffalo at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.Tennessee at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.Atlanta at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.Seattle at Miami, 1 p.m. Baltimore at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.St. Louis at Arizona, 4:25 p.m.San Francisco at New Orleans, 4:25 p.m. Green Bay at N.Y. Giants, 8:20 p.m. Monday’s Game Carolina at Philadelphia, 8:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 29 New Orleans at Atlanta, 8:20 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 2 Seattle at Chicago, 1 p.m.Minnesota at Green Bay, 1 p.m.San Francisco at St. Louis, 1 p.m.Carolina at Kansas City, 1 p.m.Houston at Tennessee, 1 p.m.Arizona at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m.Indianapolis at Detroit, 1 p.m.Jacksonville at Buffalo, 1 p.m.New England at Miami, 1 p.m.Tampa Bay at Denver, 4:05 p.m.Cleveland at Oakland, 4:25 p.m.Cincinnati at San Diego, 4:25 p.m.Pittsburgh at Baltimore, 4:25 p.m.Philadelphia at Dallas, 8:20 p.m. Monday, Dec. 3 N.Y. Giants at Washington, 8:30 p.m. NFL 200-win coaches (including post season) Don Shula, Bal-Mia 347George Halas, Chi 324Tom Landry, Dal 270 Curly Lambeau, GB-ChiCards-Was 229Chuck Noll, Pit 209M, Schottenheimer, Cle-KC-Was-SD 205Dan Reeves, Den-NYG-Atl 201Bill Belichick, Cle-NE 200BASKETBALLNBA schedule Today’s Games Detroit at New York, 1 p.m.San Antonio at Toronto, 1 p.m.Portland at Brooklyn, 3 p.m.Phoenix at Philadelphia, 6 p.m.Boston at Orlando, 6 p.m.New Orleans at Denver, 8 p.m. Monday’s Games San Antonio at Washington, 7 p.m.New York at Brooklyn, 7 p.m.Portland at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.Milwaukee at Chicago, 8 p.m.Cleveland at Memphis, 8 p.m.Charlotte at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.Denver at Utah, 9 p.m.New Orleans at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.AP Top 25 schedule Today’s Games No. 1 Indiana vs. Ball State, 6 p.m.No. 6 Syracuse vs. Colgate, 1 p.m.No. 11 UCLA vs. Cal Poly, 10 p.m.No. 15 Michigan State vs. LouisianaLafayette, Noon No. 17 Gonzaga at Old Spice Classic, HP Field House, Orlando, TBA No. 20 Oklahoma State vs. Portland State, 2 p.m. No. 21 UConn vs. Stony Brook, 4 p.m.No. 23 Colorado vs. Air Force, 8 p.m.No. 25 San Diego State at Southern Cal, 10 p.m.Florida 79, UCF 66 At Gainesville UCF (3-2) Spurlock 4-9 4-4 14, Wilson 6-11 3-4 20, Clanton 4-9 2-3 11, Sykes 5-10 2-3 12, Walker 3-6 0-0 9, Horodyski 0-0 0-0 0, Days 0-1 0-0 0, Karell 0-0 0-0 0, Blair 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 22-47 11-14 66.FLORIDA (5-0) Yeguete 2-4 0-1 4, Murphy 4-10 0-0 9, Young 4-8 2-3 10, Boynton 7-15 6-6 24, Rosario 2-9 0-0 4, Wilbekin 6-12 1-2 17, Ogbueze 0-0 0-0 0, Frazier II 1-7 0-0 3, Prather 3-3 2-2 8, Walker 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 29-68 11-14 79. Halftime—Florida 42-24. 3-Point Goals—UCF 11-20 (Wilson 5-6, Walker 3-6, Spurlock 2-3, Clanton 1-4, Days 0-1), Florida 10-33 (Wilbekin 4-9, Boynton 4-9, Frazier II 1-5, Murphy 1-6, Rosario 0-4). Fouled Out—Walker. Rebounds—UCF 27 (Sykes 9), Florida 41 (Boynton 8). Assists—UCF 14 (Sykes 6), Florida 17 (Wilbekin 8). Total Fouls—UCF 14, Florida 14. A—10,195.AUTO RACINGSprint Cup final (x-non-points race) Feb. 18 — x-Budweiser Shootout, Daytona Beach (Kyle Busch) Feb. 23 — x-Gatorade Duel 1, Daytona Beach (Tony Stewart) Feb. 23 — x-Gatorade Duel 2, Daytona Beach (Matt Kenseth) Feb. 26 — Daytona 500, Daytona Beach (Matt Kenseth) March 4 — Subway Fresh Fit 500, Avondale, Ariz. (Denny Hamlin) March 11 — Kobalt Tools 400, Las Vegas (Tony Stewart) March 18 — Food City 500, Bristol, Tenn. (Brad Keselowski) March 25 — Auto Club 400, Fontana, Calif. (Tony Stewart) April 1 — Goody’s Fast Relief 500, Ridgeway, Va. (Ryan Newman) April 14 — Samsung Mobile 500, Fort Worth, Texas (Greg Biffle) April 22 — STP 400, Kansas City, Kan. (Denny Hamlin) April 28 — Richmond 400, Richmond, Va. (Kyle Busch) May 6 — Aaron’s 499, Talladega, Ala. (Brad Keselowski) May 12 — Southern 500, Darlington, S.C. (Jimmie Johnson) May 19 — x-Sprint Showdown, Concord, N.C. (Jimmie Johnson) May 19 — x-Sprint All-Star, Concord, N.C. (Dale Earnhardt Jr.) May 27 — Coca-Cola 600, Concord, N.C. (Kasey Kahne) June 3 — Dover 400, Dover, Del. (Jimmie Johnson) June 10 — Pocono 400, Long Pond, Pa. (Joey Logano) June 17 — Quicken Loans 400, Brooklyn, Mich. (Dale Earnhardt Jr.) June 24 — Toyota/Save Mart 350, Sonoma, Calif. (Clint Bowyer) June 30 — Quaker State 400, Sparta, Ky. (Brad Keselowski) July 7 — Coke Zero 400, Daytona Beach (Tony Stewart) July 15 — Lenox Industrial Tools 301, Loudon, N.H. (Kasey Kahne) July 29 — Crown Royal Presents The Curtiss Shaver 400 at The Brickyard, Indianapolis (Jimmie Johnson) Aug. 5 — Pennsylvania 400, Long Pond, Pa. (Jeff Gordon) Aug. 12 — NASCAR Sprint Cup Series at The Glen, Watkins Glen, N.Y. (Marcos Ambrose) Aug. 19 — Pure Michigan 400, Brooklyn, Mich. (Greg Biffle) Aug. 25 — Irwin Tools Night Race, Bristol, Tenn. (Denny Hamlin) Sept. 2 — AdvoCare 500, Hampton, Ga. (Denny Hamlin) Sept. 8 — Federated Auto Parts 400, Richmond, Va. (Clint Bowyer) Sept. 16 — GEICO 400, Joliet, Ill. (Brad Keselowski) Sept. 23 — Sylvania 300, Loudon, N.H. (Denny Hamlin) Sept. 30 — AAA 400, Dover, Del. (Brad Keselowski) Oct. 7 — Good Sam Roadside Assistance 500, Talladega, Ala. (Matt Kenseth) Oct. 13 — Bank of America 500, Concord, N.C. (Clint Bowyer) Oct. 21 — Hollywood Casino 400, Kansas City, Kan. (Matt Kenseth) Oct. 28 — TUMS Fast Relief 500, Ridgeway, Va. (Jimmie Johnson) Nov. 4 — AAA Texas 500, Fort Worth, Texas (Jimmie Johnson) Nov. 11 — AdvoCare 500, Avondale, Ariz. (Kevin Harvick) Nov. 18 — Ford EcoBoost 400, Homestead (Jeff Gordon) ——— Driver standings 1. Brad Keselowski, 2,400.2. Clint Bowyer, 2,361.3. Jimmie Johnson, 2,360.4. Kasey Kahne, 2,345.5. Greg Biffle, 2,332.6. Denny Hamlin, 2,329.7. Matt Kenseth, 2,324.8. Kevin Harvick, 2,321.9. Tony Stewart, 2,311.10. Jeff Gordon, 2,303.11. Martin Truex Jr., 2,299.12. Dale Earnhardt Jr., 2,245.13. Kyle Busch, 1,133.14. Ryan Newman, 1,051.15. Carl Edwards, 1,030.16. Paul Menard, 1,006.17. Joey Logano, 965.18. Marcos Ambrose, 950.19. Jeff Burton, 883.20. Aric Almirola, 868.21. Jamie McMurray, 868.SOCCERMLS Cup Saturday Houston at Los Angeles, 4:30 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421 Miami downs DevilsAssociated PressDURHAM, N.C. — Freshman Duke Johnson rushed for season highs of 176 yards and three touch-downs, Stephen Morris had three passing scores and Miami held on to beat Duke 52-45 on Saturday and claim a share of the ACC’s Coastal Division title. Morris finished 15 of 25 for 369 yards for the Hurricanes (7-5, 5-3), who never trailed.Buckeyes stay perfectBy RUSTY MILLERAssociated PressCOLUMBUS, Ohio — The only thing Urban Meyer lost during his first season at Ohio State was his cool — at the end of the last game. Carlos Hyde ran for 146 yards and the fourth-ranked Buckeyes’ defense shut out No. 20 Michigan in the sec-ond half to grab a bruising 26-21 win on Saturday, com-pleting an improbable 12-0 season for the Buckeyes. Meyer got emotional as the final seconds ticked off, embracing his players on the sideline at a raucous Ohio Stadium. Too emo-tional, he said later. “I’ve got to keep a little more composure, I guess,” he said sheepishly. “In the coaching manual, I think it’s chapter 13, it says, ‘Keep cool.’ I lost it there for a couple of minutes.” Well, give the guy a break. Almost no one — up to and including Meyer — expected such a rapid turn-around for the Buckeyes, who were just 6-7 last sea-son with a loss to their archrivals in a transitional year when they were fac-ing heavy NCAA penalties. A month after Meyer took the job last November, they were socked with a bowl ban after this season — and still ran the table. “You get all the wins you can, especially against the Team Up North, especially at home on top of that,” said exuberant Buckeyes quar-terback Braxton Miller. Ohio State (12-0, 8-0 Big Ten) is ineligible for a BCS national title but still has an outside shot at finishing No. 1 in the final Associated Press Top 25 if other contenders lose. Michigan (8-4, 6-2) will now await a minor bowl bid. “At this point in time, Ohio State can go and play with anybody in America,” Meyer said. “I wouldn’t say that five weeks ago, but you’ve seen the growth, what we did today and the growth of our defense.” Drew Basil matched his season output with four field goals and the defense did the rest, forcing three turnovers in the second half. It was played before 105,899, the largest crowd ever to witness “The Game” in Columbus. Meyer and his players were mobbed by thousands of fans who flooded the field after the Buckeyes’ ninth victory in the last 11 years in the rivalry (the 2010 win was vacated by sanctions). Hyde also ran for a touchdown. Miller completed 14 of 18 passes for 189 yards and a score to Corey Brown. Georgia, ’Bama set championship stageAssociated PressATHENS, Ga. — Aaron Murray threw two touch-down passes, Todd Gurley and Keith Marshall each ran for a pair of TDs, and No. 3 Georgia stayed right in the thick of the national championship race with a 42-10 rout of Georgia Tech on Saturday. The Bulldogs (11-1) extended the domination of the Yellow Jackets, beating their state rival for the 11th time in 12 meetings. This one was a laugher from the start as the home team scored just over a minute into the game, built a 28-3 halftime lead and was up 42-3 before Georgia Tech (6-6) scored its lone TD. Georgia will face No. 2 Alabama for the Southeastern Conference championship next Saturday. The winner of that contest will likely play in the BCS title game on Jan. 7. Murray completed 14 of 17 for 215 yards, becom-ing the first quarterback in SEC history to pass from more than 3,000 yards in three straight seasons. Gurley finished with 97 yards on 12 carries and now has 14 touchdowns on the season, one shy of Herschel Walker’s school freshman record set in 1980. Marshall, also a fresh-man, piled up 66 yards on just seven carries. Bacarri Rambo and Alec Ogletree came up big for the Georgia defense. Rambo stripped the ball away at the Georgia 1 to stop the Yellow Jackets’ first possession, as well as grab-bing his 16th career inter-ception to tie Jake Scott’s school record. Ogletree had 15 tackles, several of which were downright bru-tal and the highest total by a Georgia defender this season. For good measure, the Bulldogs ran their season total to 456 points, break-ing the school scoring mark set by the 2002 SEC championship team.Alabama 49, Auburn 0TUSCALOOSA, Ala. — AJ McCarron passed for four touchdowns and Eddie Lacy rushed for 131 yards and two scores to lead the Crimson Tide to a beat-down of rival Auburn in the most lopsided Iron Bowl in 64 years. The Crimson Tide (101, 7-1 SEC) clinched the Western Division title out-right and a spot in the conference title game against No. 3 Georgia. None of that will come as easily as this one. Auburn (3-9, 0-8) completed the worst season for any team within two years of winning an Associated Press national title in what might have been the last game for embattled coach Gene Chizik. University President Jay Gogue has only said he’ll evaluate the program at season’s end. Chizik met Tide coach Nick Saban briefly at mid-field, hugged McCarron, and walked off the field. The biggest Iron Bowl margin was Alabama’s 55-0 victory in 1948. This one could have topped that but Saban played subs for much of the second half. The Tide lost a fumble inside Auburn’s 10 and ran out the final sec-onds after getting to the 5. Alabama outgained the Tigers 483-163 and had 25 first downs to Auburn’s seven. Auburn hasn’t scored an offensive touchdown in the last two meetings since Cam Newton & Co. com-pleted the rivalry’s largest comeback in the last visit to Bryant-Denny Stadium two years ago. 2BSPORTS

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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012 3B3BSPORTS Tigers move one step closer JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Antonio Pelham (10) is dragged down while driving up the field against St. Augustine High on Friday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterInjured running back Braxton Stockton watches the game be tween Columbia High and St. Augustine High on Friday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Roger Cray (9) trips up a St. Augustine High runner during the game on Friday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterSt. Augustine High’s Weston Powers (22) attempts to stop Col umbia High running back Ronald Timmons (23) as he runs in for a touchdown. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Laremy Tunsil (77) blocks a St. Augus tine High defender in Friday’s game.

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4B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04204BSportsCHS wins 34-8 against Jackets JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Trey Marshall (21) covers St. Augustin e High’s Bobby Mitchell (7) as he attempts to catch a pas s during the Tigers’ 34-8 win on Friday night. Marshall knocked the ball loose with his hit. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterSt. Augustine High’s J.P. Bennett (3) fails in his attempt to ta ckle Columbia High’s Ronald Timmons (23). JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Lonnie Underwood (24) powers down th e field against St. Augustine High during the Tigers’ 34-8 victory on Friday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High quarterback Jayce Barber (5) looks to e scape a blitz by St. Augustine High’s John Mills (55) on Friday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High head football head coach Brian Allen (r ight) shakes hands with St. Augustine High head coach Joey Wiles following the T igers’ 34-8 win on Friday.

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Florida led 13-3 at the half after controlling the clock to the tune of a 21:58-8:02 edge, but the Seminoles (10-2) came out firing in the second half. Kenny Shaw had a 26-yard punt return to set up the Seminoles at the Gators 25-yard line. Four plays later, the Seminoles cut the Gators’ lead to three points after EJ Manuel hit Nick O’Leary for a six-yard score. Bjoern Werner recovered a Jeff Driskel fumble on the Gators’ first offensive play of the next series and Manuel put the Seminoles up 17-13 with a one-yard run on a bootleg pass play. The Seminoles would close out the quarter with a 53-yard field goal to go up 20-13, but the Gators caught fire again in the fourth quarter. After Caleb Sturgis added another field goal from 32 yards out, the Gators’ Dominique Easley recov-ered a Manuel fumble that was jarred loose by Antonio Morrison. Gillislee provid-ed a 37-yard run on the first play and Florida took a 23-20 lead. After a three-and-out by the Seminoles, Marcus Roberson returned a punt 50-yards and the Gators added to their lead with a Driskel pass to Quinton Dunbar from 14 yards out to go up 30-20. Jones added a 32-yard touchdown run, and Manuel scored on the final play of the game. “I know this is an important game to beat Florida State and get the state back to where it’s supposed to be,” Florida coach Will Muschamp said. Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012 5B GATORS: Move to 11-1 Continued From Page 1Bknow if my kids were ready to do that, but it’s my job to teach them.” The players are excited about the new brand of basketball including cap-tains Morris Marshall and Javontae Foster. “It’s both an advantage and disadvantage for me as a point guard (to play fast),” Foster said. “I think we will have a better men-tality though. We’re going to play fast and look to get to the goal.” Marshall said the biggest difference will be in philosophy. “The difference between playing slow and fast is that on a slow team you have to perfect the fundamentals,” Marshall said. “By playing fast, we just have to beat the team down the court.” But playing fast comes with a price. The Tigers must condition them-selves to be in better shape than any team they go up against. “We have to be in better condition to play up-tempo,” Jefferson said. “They know what’s at stake and we’re running drills condusive to the up-tempo game. We’re going to push teams at breakneck speed.” Jefferson said the team will rely on his ‘Big 3’ to make its run this sea-son. The ‘Big 3’ includes Foster, Marshall and Tre Simmons. “For us to be successful, we’ve got to have the ‘Big 3’ playing great,” Jefferson said. “Marshall had a great summer. He’s matured as a leader and become more vocal. Foster is a gym rat and thinks just like me. We tend to go a little faster when Tre has the ball in his hand and Javontae is capa-ble of moving to the two guard, but when the game is on the line, Foster will have the ball in his hands as the director.” Jefferson said sophomore Andrew Momeka has been the Tigers’ biggest surprise. “He’s been a real pleasant addition,” Jefferson said. “I don’t want to dis-credit anyone that’s return-ing, but he’s been the big-gest surprise. He can block shots and defend the perimeter. The stronger he gets, the better he’s going to be.” Abram Rossin was slated to be a starter, but went down with an ankle injury during the teams’ preseason and won’t be ready to go to start the season. Filling out the rest of the Tigers’ starting five will be Wayne Broom and Kelvin Jonas. “Wayne has been a pleasant surprise,” Jefferson said. “He’s a young kid, but he’s a starter. Having two sopho-mores that can play is what you need to challenge for a district. Jonas allows us to play four guards at times and change it up. He’ll allow us to do a lot of trapping and press.” To capture the district championship, the Tigers must dethrone Wolfson High. “They’re like us,” Jefferson said. “Their returning class is not bad. It should be a good matchup, but I think we’re the fastest team in the league. We’re going to compete for dis-trict. We know how it feels to be in the hunt, but now we have to bring it home.” Columbia begins the season at Suwannee High at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday. “Jimmy Taylor III is the most productive returning player in the area,” Jefferson said. “But as good as Taylor is, I wouldn’t take him over my guy Marshall.” TIGERS: Looking for district title Continued From Page 1B Timmons sets Tigers rushing markBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High has a new all-time leading rush-er and his name is Ronald Timmons. With 209 yards against St. Augustine High in the Tigers’ 34-8 win in the Class 6A regional semifinal on Friday, Timmons edged into the history books. “It feels really good,” Timmons said. “I just come out and work hard and I wouldn’t be where I’m at without my offensive line. Without them blocking, I wouldn’t be able to get any-thing done.” Timmons has 180 carries for 1,539 yards this season and the running back isn’t done yet as he will lead the Tigers into Navarre High for the Region 1 final on Friday in the Class 6A playoffs. “We’ve got to continue to work hard,” Timmons said. “We have to go out and have good practices and keep playing with confidence.” Timmons was more worried about next week than he was about setting records. “We have to win games and move on,” he said. But his left tackle was sure to give Timmons his props. “I’m proud of him,” Laremy Tunsil said. “Like he said, he just grabs the ball and runs. It’s a big com-pliment for us to have him break the rushing record.” Indeed it says a lot about Timmons and the line in front of him that along with Tunsil includes Milla Chasteen, Thomas Holmes, John Sweat and Deonte Crumitie. Tight end Shaq Johnson and fullback Darren Birch also make up part of Columbia’s blocking machine. “It starts with Shaq,” Columbia head coach Brian Allen said. “He’s had a heck of a year blocking. Laremy looks like a NFL defensive tackle playing left tackle for us and he can run with any linebacker. Darren gives us 45 to 50 snaps of smash mouth. Milla is a young guy that allows a lot of these runs to spit. Holmes is a throwback in that he leaves everything he has on the football field. Sweat may not be the most physical specimen, but he’s the guy that pulls for us every week. When Braxton Stockton went down he was crying like it was his eye and that’s something you can’t account for — how much this team cares about each other. Deonte Crumitie plays with a fire under him and he’s a tremendous player.” But the coach saved his biggest compliments for his running back that led the Tigers to over 3,000 yards on the ground this season. “He’s had a special season,” Allen said. “He’s bought into everything that we asked of him which is to work hard and go to school and he has the confidence of this coaching staff. When I came in, it gave a lot of these kids a clean slate. He’s out there working the hardest for an opportunity to play. Last year, he not only made the offense better, but he made the defense better as well because he’s out there running scout team for us ever day. “He’s blessed with speed that runs in this family, but he’s also committed him-self in the weight room. Coach (Mitch) Shoup has done a phenomenal job and it all starts with him in put-ting Timmons in position to have such a phenomenal year. I’m extremely proud of them.” JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Ronald Timmons (23) bypasses a tackl er during the Tigers 34-8 win in a playoff game agai nst St. Augustine High on Friday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFlorida’s Jordan Reed (11) is wrapped up by FSU’s Ter rence Brooks (31) while driving down the field Saturday.5BSports

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ON BUSINESS Jerry Osteryoung(850) 644-3372jostery@comcast.net “Treat with utmost respect your power of form-ing opinions, for this power alone guards you against making assumptions that are contrary to nature and judgments that overthrow the rule of reason. “ — Marcus Aurelius A sking your cus-tomers about your business is so important for each and every business. If you are selling a product or service, then both the trends in the mar-kets and customers desires should be part and parcel of your decisions about your business, especially those decisions in which you are considering a shift in orien-tation of your business. While a customer satisfaction survey about the quality of your customer service is great information, there is so much more that you should be periodically asking your customers. We are dealing with a very neat entrepreneur who had an exercise/spa business. The spa was not doing well for numerous reasons, includ-ing the difficulty of find-ing qualified nail and hair technicians and attracting new business. As she saw that the spa space was not being used effectively, she decided to use this space for a “wellness center.” In this “wellness center they planned on having a dieti-cian and a formal weight-loss program. While this “wellness center” sounded so appealing to overcome the difficulties of running she was having with the spa, the owner decided to move in this direction, as it just seemed as if this was a national wide trend. However, she never asked her custom-ers if they would support this change in orientation of her business. Once I asked her if she had asked her customers about this change, she quickly realized that she had missed this critical peace of information and needed to survey her customers before she pro-ceeded with this change in her business. If you are going to survey customers, you must ask the right questions to insure that you get valid informa-tion to base decisions on. A student of mine was considering starting a busi-ness to sell custom made motorcycles. As part of this project, he had to do a sur-vey to insure that there was a demand for this new busi-ness. He went to a motor-cycle event and proceeded to ask questions from as many motorcycle owners as he could get to fill out his questionnaire. He decided that his planned business was going to be so successful because the response was so posi-tive. He made this judgment Advice you need is closeat hand Lake City Reporter Week of Nov. 25 Dec. 1, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section C Columbia, Inc. Your marketplace source for Lake City and Columbia County WILMA continued on 2C GASOLINE PRICES By Derek Gilliamdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comMany drivers are giving more at the pump than a year ago but it’s not as bad as it was. Prices in many parts of the country have fallen recently, and AAA says gas prices could end the year lower than where they started. The national average Wednesday was $3.43, down 44 cents from mid-September although still 8 cents higher than a year earlier. Gas started the year at $3.28 a gallon. AAA says it should be between $3.10 and $3.30 when 2012 ends. In Columbia County on Friday afternoon, the gas prices ranged from $3.389 at the Stop N Go at US 41 and Guinevere Court to $3.459 at the BP at SW Florida Gateway Avenue. Joe Robinson, 62, put $10 in his truck Friday morning at the S&S on US 90. He said although gas prices had decreased some, he wanted to see the price go down to $3 a gallon again. “I just hope it goes down a little bit more, but I’m not going to bet the farm on it,” he said. Josh Boris, 23, said he puts about $40 a week in the tank, and any relief was welcome. “(Prices) need to go down more,” he said. Because the price was so high for so much of the year, Americans are likely to spend a record amount for gas in 2012. Tom Kloza of the Oil Price Information Service esti-mates that Americans will spend about $483 billion on fuel this year, eclipsing last year’s record of $471 billion. And that’s even as Americans use less gas by taking shorter trips or driving more fuel efficient cars. The Energy Department estimates that gas prices will aver-age $3.64 a gallon this year after averaging a record $3.53 a gallon in 2011. A number of things affect the price of gasoline. It starts with the price of oil, which can be impacted by everything from the strength, or weakness, of the global econo-my to tensions in the Middle East. That oil is turned into gasoline and other products at refineries. The U.S. has about half the num-ber of refineries it did 30 years ago. When one goes down due to a fire or unplanned maintenance, it can lead to a shortage of gaso-line, which sends prices higher. All of these factors have come into play in a big way this year. That’s why prices haven’t just been high — they’ve been on a roller coaster. There have been four separate swings of at least 40 cents — two higher and two lower. The wild swings have been even more notable in individual states. Here’s a look at how vol-atility has contributed to wide swings in certain states over the past year:New York and New Jersey:The long lines are gone but motorists in New York and New Jersey are still paying as much as 30 cents more per gallon than they did a year ago. Even before Superstorm Sandy, drivers in the both states — and elsewhere in the Northeast — were paying higher prices because refinery issues caused temporary supply shortages in late summer. Just as supplies were being replenished, Sandy hit. Refineries were shut down, oil imports were delayed and many gas stations were with-out power. Drivers who didn’t want to risk running out of gas waited on lines for hours to fill up. New Jersey and then New York imposed gas rationing. Prices rose more than 10 cents in New York City, Long Island and certain parts of New Jersey, according to AAA. New York:Wednesday average price: $3.92/gal Versus year ago: Up 27 centsNew Jersey:Wednesday’s average price: $3.55 Versus year ago: Up 30 centsWashington:Gas prices have dropped about 70 cents after jumping above $4 a gallon in May. Most drivers are now getting a discount of about 20 cents compared with last year. The reason: West Coast refineries, which had been closed for fires or other maintenance, are operating again. That includes BP’s Cherry Point refinery in Blaine, Wash. Washington also is benefiting from cheaper crude delivered by rail from the Bakken shale region in North Dakota, where oil production is boom-ing. Bakken crude is on average about $4 cheaper than oil at the Clearbrook, Minn., pricing hub, says Tom Kloza, chief oil analyst at Oil Price Information Service. Washington:Wednesday average price: $3.51 Versus year ago: Down 19 centsUtah and Nevada:Utah’s gain has been Nevada’s loss — and in this case Nevada is happier. Utahns are paying about 30 cents more per gallon than last year. Traditionally, the gas produced by Utah’s five refineries was kept in-state, meaning lower gas prices, particularly when demand fell during the winter. That changed in the fall of 2011 when a pipeline opened between Utah and Las Vegas. That’s taken the extra capacity away from Utah and helped balance supplies in Nevada, which also gets some gasoline from California, Kloza said. The average price for gas in Las Vegas is about 6 cents cheaper than Utah’s state average. A year ago, Utah prices were about 18 cents cheaper than in Las Vegas. Utah:Wednesday’s average price: $3.63 Versus year ago: Up 30 cents.Nevada:Wednesday’s average price: $3.61 Versus year ago: Up 6 centsCalifornia:The price is about the same as a year ago, but that belies the wild ride motorists have taken. Gas soared to an all-time high of $4.67 in October because gas sup-plies ran short. The state’s energy infrastructure took it on the chin. A fire closed part of Chevron’s Richmond, Calif., refinery in early August. Plus, a Chevron pipeline that moves crude oil to refineries in Northern California also was shut down and operations at an Exxon Mobil refinery in Southern California were disrupted for days after it lost power. Since few refineries outside the state make California’s special blend of sum-mer gas, there were few outside sources to draw from for help. Prices since have fallen nearly 90 cents as supply shortages eased and refiners shifted to winter blends. California:Wednesday’s average price: $3.77 Versus year ago: Up 1 centGeorgia;Drivers are getting a small break at the pump as an indirect result of Superstorm Sandy. Georgia was one of several states allowed to sell a blend of reformulated and con-ventional gasoline after the mas-sive storm battered the Northeast in late October even though it wasn’t in the storm’s direct path. It’s cheaper for refiners to produce conventional gasoline than blends formulated to control pollution. Georgia also has the advantage of plentiful supplies. The state gets gas shipped through two major pipelines and from refineries in Texas, Louisiana and Mississippi. And its state gas tax is fairly low, Kloza says. Georgia:Wednesday’s average price: $3.28 per gallon Versus year ago: Up 1 centThe Associated Press contributed to this report. DEREK GILLIAM/ Lake City ReporterJosh Boris, 23, pumps gas at the S&S on US 90 Friday after noon. He said he spends about $40 a week on gas and h opes that the price will drop more. Less pain at the pumpPrices trending downward after year of wild swings1CColumbia Inc.

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2C LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF NOVEMBER 25, 2012 Q FSU Finance Professor Dr. Jerry Osteryoung is Executive Director of the Jim Moran Institute for Global Entrepreneurship at Florida State University’s College of Business. on the fact that he got a 98% positive response to the question, “Would you con-sider to purchase a custom made motorcycle?” After he had some time to reflect on this survey and question, he realized that this question was not valid as he realized that most people would con-sider a custom motorcycle. He changed the question to, “Would you buy a custom motorcycle that was priced about $5,000 more than a standard motorcycle?” The positive response to this revised question was only 1% and he quickly abandoned this idea and he learned from this experi-ence that asking a wrong question on a survey could possibly sink a new venture. You need to continually and constantly be asking your customers how you can serve them better. Obviously, not only must you ask your customers about your business but also you must frame the questions in a way that extracts the information that you need. You can do this! FUNDS: Continued From Page 1C EU summit ends without budget dealCARLO PIOVANO and DON MELVINAssociated PressBRUSSELS — A summit of the European Union’s 27 national leaders, charged with agreeing on a long-term budget for the bloc, broke up Friday afternoon without being able to reach a deal. Coming just days after the 17 eurogroup finance ministers failed, yet again, to agree on the conditions for releasing badly needed bailout money for Greece, the failure of the two-day summit raises questions about how the bloc makes important decisions. In most cases, unanimity is required, meaning that each country wields veto power. The EU’s top officials, who put in long hours trying to soften up the national leaders individually before putting them together in the same meeting room, tried to put a brave face on the budget deadlock. European Council President Herman Van Rompuy, who pre-sides over the summits, said the “constructive discussions” at the summit meant an agree-ment could be reached early next year. He added that the national leaders had instructed him and European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso to continue working toward consensus over the coming weeks. Barroso, too, called the talks constructive. But he added, “we are not yet at the point of reaching consensus.” The prospect of failure had hung over the EU leaders’ sum-mit, charged with agreeing on a long-term spending plan of around $1.25 trillion for the 27-country bloc, even before the meeting began. Some countries wanted the budget to rise, while others insisted it had to fall. Van Rompuy tried to thread the needle. He proposed a budget with some cuts, but in a post-summit press conference, he also offered a nod to those countries who believe greater spending is essential to spur growth in coun-tries hit by recession. “Growth in one country benefits all,” he said. British Prime Minister David Cameron, the most vocal propo-nent of holding the line on EU spending, said he had found “strong allies” in the Dutch and Swedish leaders. And, indeed, it appeared that some countries, including Germany, took pains to ensure that Britain — a country some fear may eventually with-draw from the EU — did not find itself isolated. Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte stressed that it was impor-tant that Britain “remain engaged” with Europe “because Britain is important to the EU as a whole.” For his part, Cameron was firm. “The deal on the table from the EU President was just not good enough,” Cameron told reporters after the summit broke up. “”We haven’t got the deal we wanted but we’ve stopped what would have been an unacceptable deal,” he said. “And in European terms I think that goes down as progress.” The EU budget funds primarily programs to help farming and spur growth. ASSOCIATED PRESSFrench President Francois Hollande (right) participates i n a trilateral meeting with British Prime Minister David Cameron (left) and Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte (secon d left) on the sidelines of an EU summit in Brussels on Friday. European Union leaders failed to reach agreemen t on the 27-country bloc’s long-term spending plans.2CBIZ/MOTLEY Sometimes the market reacts poorly to world events, but just be-cause the market reacts doesn’t mean you should. Still, if current events are making you feel uncertain about your nances, you should schedule a complimentary portfolio review. That way, you can make sure you’re in control of where you want to go and how you get there. YOU CAN’T CONTROL THE WORLD,BUT YOU CAN CONTROL YOUR DECISIONS.

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By CHRISTOPHER S. RUGABERAP Economics WriterWASHINGTON — Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke on Tuesday urged Congress and the Obama administration to strike a budget deal to avert tax increases and spending cuts that could trigger a recession next year. Without a deal, the measures known as the “fiscal cliff” will take effect in January. Bernanke also said that Congress must raise the fed-eral debt limit to prevent the government from defaulting on Treasurys debt. Failure to do so would impose heavy costs on the economy, he said. Bernanke said Congress also needs to reduce the federal debt over the long run to ensure economic growth and stability. Uncertainty about all these issues is likely holding back spending and investment and troubling investors, the Fed chairman said in a speech to the Economic Club of New York. Resolving the fiscal crisis would prevent a sudden and severe shock to the economy, help reduce unemployment and strengthen growth, he said. That could make the new year “a very good one for the American economy,” he said. “A stronger economy will, in turn, reduce the deficit and con-tribute to achieving long-term fiscal sustainability,” Bernanke told the group. When asked during a question and answer session after the speech whether the Fed could soften the impact of the fiscal cliff, Bernanke was firm in his warning. “In the worst-case scenario where the economy goes off the broad fiscal cliff ... I don’t think the Fed has the tools to offset that,” Bernanke said. Bernanke also said the severity of the Great Recession may have reduced the U.S. econo-my’s potential growth rate. He didn’t say by how much or how long slower-than-normal growth might persist. Over the long run, the U.S. economy has grown an aver-age of about 2.5 percent each year. Economists predict growth in the July-September quarter will be revised up to an annual rate of around 3 percent, above the government’s initial 2 percent estimate. But they think the economy is slowing to an annual growth rate below 2 percent in the October-December quarter — too slow to make much of a dent in unemployment. Bernanke said several factors have weighed on growth: Long-term unemployment has eroded many workers’ skills and led some who have lost jobs to stop looking for one. Companies have spent less on machinery, computers and other goods, reducing their produc-tion capacity. Stricter lending rules and uncertainty about the economy may have discouraged would-be entrepreneurs from starting more companies, the Fed chair-man said. Even assuming the economy’s potential growth has declined, Bernanke said that unemploy-ment, now at 7.9 percent, is abnormally high. He suggested, though, that the drags on eco-nomic growth should fade as the economy heals. By the end of December, just as the fiscal cliff nears, the fed-eral government is expected to hit its borrowing limit. Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner has said he will resort to the same maneuvers he used during the last debt standoff in 2011 to prevent the government from defaulting on its debt. But these maneuvers would buy only a few weeks’ time, until late February or early March, before the government would face the prospect of a first-ever debt default. After the last debt standoff in the summer of 2011, Standard & Poor’s downgraded the gov-ernment’s credit rating on long-term securities one notch from the highest level of AAA to AA+. It was the first ever downgrade of U.S. government debt. After the presidential election, Fitch Ratings said Obama would need to quickly reach a bud-get agreement with Congress over the fiscal cliff or risk losing Fitch’s AAA rating on U.S. debt. It’s unclear what, if anything, the Fed could do to cushion the economy from the fiscal cliff beyond the bond purchases it’s already making to try to lower long-term borrowing rates and stimulate spending. The minutes of the Fed’s last policy meeting suggest that it will likely unveil a bond buying program in December to try to drive down long-term rates. The new purchases would replace a bond-buying program that expires at year’s end. Most analysts said Bernanke’s comments suggest that is likely. A new bond buying program would come on top of a program the Fed launched in September to buy $40 billion a month in mortgage bonds to try to reduce long-term interest rates and make home buying more afford-able. That program represented the Fed’s third round of major bond purchases to expand its holdings. Fed officials also announced at the September meeting that they planned to keep the Fed’s benchmark short-term interest rate near zero through mid-2015. This rate for overnight loans has been at a record low since December 2008. By MICHAEL LIEDTKEAP Technology WriterSAN FRANCISCO — Hewlett-Packard’s $9.7 bil-lion acquisition of Autonomy seemed like a bad idea long before Tuesday’s alle-gations of an accounting scandal made clear it was a deal that should never have happened. It’s the latest in a cavalcade of costly blunders at HP. The Silicon Valley pioneer has squandered billions of dollars on ill-advised acquisitions, com-pounding the challenges it already faces as it scram-bles to adjust to a world that is shifting away from PCs to smartphones and tablets. On Tuesday, HP took an $8.8 billion write-down for the Autonomy acquisition. Hewlett-Packard Co. CEO Meg Whitman alleged that executives at Autonomy used various accounting tricks to make the British software company appear more profitable. The Autonomy deal may amplify the pressure on HP to reshuffle its board of directors, which already had been overhauled after a series of previous embar-rassments. The debacles, dating back to 2006, include prying into the personal phone records of reporters covering the company to its widely criticized hiring of Leo Apotheker as CEO after the company’s previ-ous leader, Mark Hurd, resigned amid questions about his relationship with a female contractor. Although HP says it was duped into paying too much for Autonomy under the since-fired Apotheker, the deal ultimately was approved by 10 of its cur-rent 11 directors, including Whitman, who served on the board for eight months before being appointed as CEO in September 2011. Only shareholder activist Ralph Whitworth wasn’t on the board when HP autho-rized Apotheker to buy Autonomy in August 2011. Just five weeks after the deal was announced, HP’s directors fired Apotheker, a move some analysts trace to the company’s almost immediate remorse over the Autonomy acquisition. But Apotheker’s ouster may not be enough to pla-cate shareholders who are seething with renewed anger over the deal. The allegation that Autonomy had been “willfully” decep-tive leading up to HP’s pur-chase raises the specter of a criminal investigation. It also opens a torrent of potentially distracting class-action lawsuits on behalf of shareholders alleging HP’s board was negligent. “When I talk to investors, that is what they are concerned about: the cred-ibility of the board,” said Sterne Agee analyst Shaw Wu. “There already has been a lot of turmoil at this company, but maybe they still need more change.” Wu said he isn’t even sure Whitman’s job as CEO is safe because of her pres-ence on the board when the Autonomy deal was approved. In a research note, Topeka Capital Markets analyst Brian White called for a new purge of HP’s board. Whitman said she regrets voting in favor of the Autonomy acquisition while insisting HP did its due diligence. That was an assertion echoed by Apotheker in a prepared statement. HP Chairman Ray Lane, who joined the board when Apotheker was hired in 2010, still wasn’t available for an interview as of late Tuesday, according to com-pany spokesman Michael Thacker. Mark Williams, a finance professor at Boston University and a former bank examiner for the Federal Reserve, called HP’s accusations against Autonomy “due diligence deflection”. “Just to say ‘we paid too much because of fraud’ doesn’t negate the fact of inadequate due diligence,” said Williams. “Some responsibility needs to come back to HP.” At least one of HP’s board members, McKesson Corp. CEO John Hammergren, has experience the aftermath of an accounting scandal. McKesson named Hammergren as its CEO after revealing it had been conned into buying soft-ware maker HBO & Co. for $12 billion in 1999. The accounting fraud wiped out half of McKesson’s market value. The San Francisco company has since bounced back under Hammergren, but the comeback took years to pull off. Investors are losing hope that HP will rebound because the company has made so many questionable decisions in the five years since Apple Inc.’s release of the first iPhone changed the way people use technology. The upheaval has reduced demand for HP’s PCs and printers. “I don’t see how anyone could invest in this company any longer,” said ISI Group analyst Brian Marshall, who described HP as “an unmiti-gated train wreck.” HP’s stock plunged $1.59, or nearly 12 percent, to fin-ish Tuesday at $11.71. The shares haven’t closed this low since October 2002 when HP was still facing a shareholder backlash over its acquisition of rival Compaq Computer. That deal has turned out better than the acquisitions HP has made during the past five years under three different CEOs. In that time, HP has spent more than $40 billion to buy dozens of companies. In a reflection of how poorly the biggest of those deals have per-formed, HP’s market value has fallen to just $23 billion. That’s about 70 percent less than what HP was worth in June 2007 when the first iPhone went on sale. In the last three months, HP has absorbed nearly $17 billion in non-cash charges to account for the dimin-ished value of its 2008 acqui-sition of technology consult-ing service Electronic Data Systems and its 2011 pur-chase Autonomy. Last year, HP took a nearly $900 mil-lion hit for its purchase of device maker Palm Inc. Other deals for computer networking gear maker 3Com ($2.7 billion deal), data storage service 3Par $2.4 billion) and software maker ArcSight ($1.5 bil-lion) are working out better, so far. But the Autonomy deal never seemed to make sense to anyone outside HP. “Something smelled bad about it from the begin-ning,” said 451 Research analyst Alan Pelz-Sharpe, who has been following Autonomy since the com-pany went public in 1998. Autonomy, which was based in Cambridge, England, had been known for a “dog-eat-dog” sales culture that drove employ-ees to do whatever it took to hit their quarterly targets or risk incurring the wrath of CEO Mike Lynch, Pelz-Sharpe said. “It was never a happy company,” the ana-lyst said. “It was always a place where people were frightened to speak out.” Whitman fired Lynch in May because she was frustrated with Autonomy’s poor results since the acqui-sition, which closed less than two weeks into her ten-ure as HP’s CEO. She said she had no idea that she would uncover conduct that led her to allege Autonomy had been fabricating sales before she ousted Lynch. In a statement to the Financial Times, Lynch denied any wrongdoing at Autonomy. By the spring of 2011, Autonomy was desperately seeking a buyer, according to Oracle Corp. CEO Larry Ellison, whose company has become a bitter HP rival. In a series of state-ments last year, Ellison said Lynch and investment banker Frank Quattrone tried to persuade Oracle to buy Autonomy. The most serious pitch came in an April 1, 2011 meet-ing, according to Ellison, who described Autonomy’s asking price as “absurdly high.” Quattrone, who faced charges of misconduct for his handling of IPOs during the Internet boom in the late 1990s, and Lynch have acknowledged meeting with Oracle executives. But they have denied offering to sell Autonomy. HP wound up buying Autonomy at a price that was 64 percent above the company’s market value. On the same day the Autonomy deal was announced, Apotheker also revealed he was scrapping HP’s attempt to sell mobile devices run-ning on Palm’s software. He also said he was mulling a possible sale of the PC division. All those develop-ments stunned investors, leading to a one-day drop of 20 percent in HP’s stock price. Even if HP’s board had doubts about the Autonomy deal after Apotheker’s exit, the company probably had little choice but to consum-mate it because the laws of England make it dif-ficult to renege once an offer is made, Pelz-Sharpe said. “About the only way you can do it is if you can prove fraud has been committed.” LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF NOVEMBER 25, 2012 3C ASSOCIATED PRESSFederal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke addresses a lu ncheon gathering of The Economic Club of New York, in New York on Tuesday. Bernanke urged Congress and the Obama administration to strike a budget deal to avert tax increases and spending cuts that could trigger a recession next year. Without a deal, the measures known as the “fiscal cliff” will take effect in January. Bernanke warns Congress to avoid ‘cliff’Pattern of bad ideas damages Hewlett-Packard ASSOCIATED PRESSThe Hewlett-Packard Co. logo is seen outside the company’ s headquarters in Palo Alto, Calif. HP said Autonomy Corporation PLC, a British company it b ought for $10 billion last year, lied about its finances, resulting in a massive write-down of th e value of the business. HP’s net loss for the fiscal fourth quarter amounted to $6.85 billion or $3.49 per share. Fed chairman warns of recession if deal not reached.

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Position details and applications available on web at: www.fgc.edu Human Resources Florida Gateway College 149 S.E. College Place Lake City Fl 32025-2007 Phone (386) 754-4314 Fax (386) 754-4814 E-Mail: humanr@fgc.edu FGC is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. VP/ADA/EA/EO College in Education and Employment Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service Directory To place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding Counties Highlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Artwork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 Services FLCert. Teacher with 10 yrs exp. Offering a homeshooling group in Jan. Reasonably priced. Interested parents 386-288-0954. Legal PUBLIC NOTICE The Suwannee Valley Florida State Employees' Charitable Campaign (FSECC) Local Steering Committee announces a meeting of the local FSECC Steering Committee to which all persons are invited: Date: December 14 T ime: 8:30 a.m. Place: Florida Department of Transportation office1109 S. Marion A venue, Lake City, FL This meeting of the FSECC Steering Committee will be to review the 2011 Campaign and distribute the T ier Two undesignated funds. For more information about the meeting, for a copy of the agenda, or if special accommodations are needed to attend this meeting because of a disability, please contact: Jayne L. Wilson, United Way of Suwannee Valley, 325 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, FL386-752-5604 x 102. 05535968 November 25, 2012 100 Job Opportunities 05534241 NOWHIRING Cashiers & Baggers forHigh Springs fruit & gift stores. Benefits avail: health, dental, & vacation. Apply in person: Florida Citrus Center(Chevron) 18603 NWCR 236, High Springs (exit 404 & I-75) CDLClass A T ruck Driver Flatbed exp. for F/TSE area. 3 years exp or more. Medical benefits offered. Contact Melissa or Sandy@ 386-935-2773 Dental Hygienist: Golden Opportunity! Full time, Part time, Fill in, we have a great opportunity waiting for you! An immediate opening has just come up! Thats great news in this job market! If you have a friendly can-do attitude, a gentle touch, a great work ethic, you are orgainized, and self motivated with a god sense of humor, then you should apply. Call 888-486-2408 to hear a message with more details about the position and instructions on how to apply for this position in Madison, FL. Great benefits! EXP. TRAINER: Responsible for T eaching individuals about the Judicial system. Associates degree, Background and reference checks, and valid DLreqd. PT. E-mail resume to jshaw@itmflorida.com Mechanic needed at Fla.Rock & Tank Lines In White Springs. Diesel exprnc reqr'd in maintenance & repair of tractor trailers. 45-50hrs/wk Class A CDLlicense preferred. Excellent Benefits! email: mcomer@patriottrans.com or fax 904-858-9008 Drivers: All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-ACDLFlatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down CALL: 866-823-0323 Professional Office Mng For construction office; proficient w/ computer, Qbks, motivated individual, excellent communication skills, fax resume 386-758-8920, email resume8920@gmail.com SALES POSITION A vailable for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 120 Medical Employment 05535945 Gainesville Womens Center ForRadiology Arlene Weinshelbaum, M.D. EXP. MAMMOGRAPHY TECH wanted full time or part time,for private Radiology office. AART& Mammography certification req. Fax resume to: T racy: (352)331-2044 DIET AR Y MANAGER Needed CDM, Chef, LTC, 2 years experience preferred Must be able to manage large staff and oversee daily food preparation for a 180 bed SNF. Full time with excellent benefits. E-mail resume to Greg Roberts: groberts@gulfcoasthealthcare.com or fax to: (386)362-4417. Live Oak, FLEOE/V/D/M/F Exp. CAP or Licensed Mental Health Professional for counseling and assessments in an outpatient SAtreatment program. Ref. Req'd. PT Email resume to bsmith@itmflorida.com 120 Medical Employment Great Opportunity Full Time Experienced RNs, LPNs 7a-7p & 7p-7a Full Time Experienced C.N.As All Shifts Full Time Experienced Activity Assistance Apply in person at Suwannee Health Care & Rehab. 1620 Helevenston Street S.E. Live Oak, FL32064 EOE/m/f/d/v GREATOPPORTUNITY Full Time Experienced RNs, LPNs 7a-7p & 7p-7a Full Time Experienced C.N.As All Shifts Full Time Experienced Activity Assistance Apply in person at Suwannee Health Care & Rehab. 1620 Helevenston Street S.E. Live Oak, FL32064 EOE/m/f/d/v 240 Schools & Education 05535484 Interested in a Medical Career? Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp Nursing Assistant, $479 next class12/24/2012 Phlebotomy national certification, $800 next class-11/05/12 LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 05535592 Interested in a Security Officer Career? North Florida Firearms T raining Center Lic# DS8900001 Offers Instruction for Class D Security Officer License in Lake City, 40 hr course. Security Officer Class D License Training Certification $120.00. Fees incl. application instructions, books, supplies, exam, next class 11/26/12. Call 386-984-5530 310 Pets & Supplies New Igloo Dog house. Med size, $50.00 Contact 386-466-5022 PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. Y orkie-Poo puppy, Playful and Smart. Ready December 1st. $300-600 386-365-7002. 402 Appliances Brand New Whirlpool W/D W arranty until 8/2017. $950 For Both Contact 386-752-8978 407 Computers DELLComputer $100.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 408 Furniture Solid Wood Dining Room Table and six (6) chairs. $125.00 Contact 386-752-3245 430 Garage Sales PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 440 Miscellaneous 05535950 GUNSHOW: 12/01 &12/02 @ The Columbia County Fairgrounds, Hwy 247 Lake City. Admin. $5 Sat 9am4pm, Sun 9am-3pm. Info: 386-325-6114 450 Good Things to Eat The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans 2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024 Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville 386-963-4138 or 961-1420 630 Mobile Homes forRent 2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $450. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 2 BR/1BA $475/mth. Located in center of Lake City Close to Everything !!! 305-984-5511 or 386-344-0830 2/1 SW US 90 W, LC,Remodeled, lg yard, porch, quiet area. 1st mth $575 & $500 dep. No pets. 386752-1941 or 965-0932 Newer2/2. Super clean on 1 ac North by distribution center. Perfect for Target employee. $550. mo Call for details. 386-867-9231 Quiet Country Park 3br/2ba $525. Very clean NO PETS! References & Deposit required 386-758-2280 WA TERTOWN AREA 3br/2ba DW, Handicap accessible, $650 mth, $500 dep. Call 386-344-0144, 386-344-5791 640 Mobile Homes forSale Palm Harbor Stilt Homes W aterfront Beach, 34 Years Experience www.plantcity.palmharbor.com John Lyons 800-622-2832 x210 650 Mobile Home & Land Out of State owner, Anxious to sell. Nice 2br/2ba 1996 DW, Energy Efficient, 3/4 frnshd, 3 yr old roof, 1/2 ac lot in Oak Wd subdv in Live Oak $39,900 or best resonable offer. Call 309-645-2659 OwnerFinanced 3/22.5 ac River Access. Small down $625 mo 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833 www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 710 Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05535481 W eve got it all! $89 Deposit Limited Avail. Call Today! W indsong Apts. *Free afterschool program 386-758-8455 1BR APT. Downtown Location, Clean. New Carpet $450 mo, plus Security. NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456 2br/1ba Apt. Quiet Lake View CH/A$500. mo $500 dep. No pets. 386-344-2170 2BR/2BAw/garage 5 minutes from VAhospital and T imco. Call for details. 386-365-5150 A Landlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Brandywine Apartments Now Renting 1, 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-752-3033 W. Grandview Ave. Equal Housing Opportunity TDD Number 1-800-955-8771 BRANFORD VILLAS 386-935-2319 2br/1ba Apts. Now available.$570. mo. TDD number 1-800-955-8771 Equal Housing Opportunity Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 720 Furnished Apts. ForRent Rooms forRent Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730 Unfurnished Home ForRent 2BR, 1/2 acre, Fenced, Close-in, Huge Den, Carport, Smoke Free, $800 mo. App & Ref Reqd Short Term Avail 386-758-9824 2br/1ba $575 mo. + sec., 4mi S. Lake City. Clean & Quiet 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833 www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 3br/1.5ba. Very clean, Brick great area w/bonus room. Carport, shed & Fenced (privacy) back yard. $825. mo $825. dep. Refs reqd. (941)920-4535 3BR/2BA Carport hardwood floors. CH/AFenced yard. Good area. $750 mo plus security. 386-752-0118 or 623-1698 A Landlord You Can Love! 3br/1.5ba, Eat in Kitchen, CH/A, 2 car carport $750 mth + dep 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Avail. for Rent 1206 McFarlane A ve. 3 BR/2 BAhouse. Smoke Free and No Pets allowed. $850 a mo. $500 dep. Call for appt. 904-813-8864. V ery Nice 3BD/2ba brick home, $745 mth & $500 dep. Application Required. Call 386-935-1482 to see. 750 Business & Office Rentals ForRent orLease: Former Doctors office, Former professional office & Lg open space: avail on East Baya Ave. Competitive rates. W eekdays 386-984-0622 evenings/weekends 497-4762 PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 805 Lots forSale PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 820 Farms & Acreage 10 acres with well/septic/pp (not guar); $300 dwn; $580 a mth. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com 860 Investment Property 2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870 Real Estate W anted I Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 940 T rucks 2006 Toyota T undra SR-5, Crew Cab, Class 3 Tow Package. Cruise, power windows, Seats Five. 152,000 miles, $7,800. 386-365-1901 755-5440 To place your classified ad call REPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Line www.lakecityreporter.com BEST WAY ...to never miss a days worth of all the Lake City Reporter has to offer: Home delivery To subscribe call 755-5445

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LIFE Sunday, November 25, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section D L ast Sunday we took a ride to Branford looking for a new place to have lunch. We spotted a large light blue building with lots of cars parked around it and a big sign that says “Sisters Caf.” We decided to give it a try. We were in for a big surprise. The place seats 150 people and this Sunday there were at least 100 patrons enjoying the lavish buffet. We even had to share a table with two ladies, there were that many people. Seemed most of them were the after church crowd and mostly locals. We choose the buffet although there was a large menu of selections. The choice of meats were ham, fried chicken, fried pollock and fried shrimp. Side choices were numer-ous: green beans, carrots, corn, fried okra, mashed potatoes and gravy, grits, dressing, okra and toma-toes, and rice. Breads were hush puppies, rolls and cornbread muffins. A large salad bar included cottage cheese, cole slaw, potato salad and the usual green stuff with lots of toppings. There was also barbecue sauce, which I saw one lady spoon over her fried chicken. Interesting. The soup was broccoli and cheese. The absolute best fried chicken made us want sec-onds but there just wasn’t room. Have to say that many times fried chicken can be good but usually just average, but this was absolutely first class. Hot, crispy, moist and tender in the middle. Just phe-nomenal. The next favorite was the fried pollock. The Sisters definitely know how to fry. Instead of eating that second piece of chicken, we saved room for the desserts. There were hot desserts: peach cobbler, apple crisp, chocolate pud-ding cake and bread pud-ding. The cold dessert bar included cupcakes, cook-ies, pecan pie, banana pud-ding, cookies and cream pudding and rocky road bars. They were all good but hands down the best was the warm bread pud-ding with a glaze drizzled on top. We may be tempted to just have the fried chick-en and the bread pudding next time and just risk the calories. Sunday buffet is $9.25. We asked to speak with one of the owners and were escorted to the kitchen, where we met Pat Samperio, who had her hands stuck in the flour she was using to bread chicken. By the way, on the way to the kitchen we Sisters offersgreatbuffet Story ideas?ContactRobert BridgesEditor754-0428rbridges@lakecityreporter.com Lake City Reporter1DLIFEBy DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comJeremy Barwick spent the first seven years of his life in a home that wasn’t a place anyone would ever want to grow up. His mother was a drug addict with six chil-dren. He has five sisters and sometimes they all went hungry. One of his goals is to help as many people as possible. Last year, the memory of those days drove Barwick, now 16-years old, to attempt to break the world record for most food collected for a food drive in a 24-hour period. “It’s a personal matter,” he said. “We went without food.” He fell short by a lot, but it didn’t matter to him. “We fed a lot of people,” he said. His grandmother, Terri Phillips, said Barwick sees things that are wrong and doesn’t just shake his head; he challenges himself to do something about them. She said he’s not like your average 16-year-old. He doesn’t have a cellphone or a car, and she said he doesn’t want those things. In the past, Barwick and one of his sisters gave their Christmas money to charities, she said. He joined the Explorer Post 386 program with the Lake City Police Department about six months ago. “I think it’s an awesome program, and I’m helping out with my community,” he said. He said when he graduates from high school, he thinks he might want to be a police officer or join the military. “I’ve tossed up a couple of things, but nothing for sure,” he said. In the Explorer program, Barwick learned some of the duties of a law enforcement officer. He learned police codes, worked parades and gained ser-vice hours. He’s a Eagle Scout, and in Scouts, service hours mean everything. They are a require-ment to advance through the dif-ferent levels of Scouting. Barwick joined Scouts about seven years ago. He said scouting gave him chances to do things he wouldn’t have been able to do. He went to the Bahamas in 2010, and looks forward to going back in 2013. “It’s allowed me to travel and make friends with other boys my age,” he said. He said when he first joined the Scouts, he didn’t have many friends that were boys his age. He grew up with only sisters, and they didn’t want to do the things he wanted to, he said. “Boy scouts was an opening for me,” he said. Once a Boy Scout graduates to Eagle Scout, there’s three more ranks to reach. They are called palm leaves and you have to earn five additional merit badges for each palm leaf. It takes 20 merit badges, being a leader in Scouts, and a whole lot of service hours to reach Eagle Scout, Barwick said. At the end of July, he said, he received the bronze palm leaf. This month, he received the gold palm leaf. Phillips said he plans to get his silver palm leaf sometime in February. She said that would make him one of the only Eagle Scouts in the 90-year history of Lake City Troop 85 to have all three palm leaves. Cast iron plant is great ground cover in shadeP lants often are given common names that describe charac-teristics of the plant. The common name “cast iron plant” offers a very good description of the tough but often for-gotten landscape plant, Aspidistra elatior. We often like to think of the cast iron plant as ‘one of our own.’ This non-native was introduced into the United States from Asia in 1824. Aspidistra quickly became the staple ground cover plant of shady gardens from zone 7 and south. In historical southern gardens, the shaded understories of magnifi-cent moss-draped live oaks still are sustained by this dependable, long-lived perennial. This is one of those often overlooked plants that seems too good to be true. Imagine a landscape plant that has no seri-ous pests, is an upright evergreen that can fill in as a ground cover, thrives in heavy shade and has a glossy dark-green color. Add the facts that it survives our hot, humid summers, drought condi-tions and poor sandy soils. Don’t we all have a place for this iron gem? Two planting sites to avoid are those with poorly drained soil or too much sunlight. Although it is as tough as a skillet, the cast iron plant will respond well to soil amended with organic matter, a balanced fertilizer in the spring or summer and supplemental water during drought conditions. The species Aspidistra elatior has wide, lance-shaped green leaves and reaches a height of one to two feet. New cultivars of this shade-loving plant can offer a little spark of light to a dark corner of the garden. These new plants have leaves that appear splashed with spots, stripes or frostings of yel-low and white highlights. Miniature cultivars also have been developed with finer textured foliage. Our winter conditions often cause winter burn on cast iron plant leaves. Trim back browned foli-age in the spring or cut the entire planting to the ground each year to pro-vide fresh new growth. Too much sun, rich soil or excessive fertilizer may cause leaves to become faded and unattractive. Variegated cultivars also tend to lose coloration in these conditions. Although Aspidistra is a spreading ground cover, growth is slow and not threatening to our native plants. Clumps can be divided easily at any time GARDEN TALK Nichelle Demorestdndemorest@ufl.edu Soaring with eagles ABOVE: Jeremy Barwick poses with three scoutmasters at his Eagle Court of Honor Ceremony on Nov. 10, (from left) David Finley, Jeremy Barwick, Jeff Simmons and Jim Martin. RIGHT: Barwick and Lake City Police Chief Argatha Gilmore pose at his graduation from the Explorer Post 386 program on Oct. 9. Barwick said he may want to be a police officer or join the military. Local youth on verge of attaining highest honors in Scouting. Even apes have midlife crises, researchers findBy MALCOLM RITTERAP Science WriterNEW YORK — Chimpanzees going through a midlife crisis? It sounds like a setup for a joke. But there it is, in the title of a report published Monday in a scientific jour-nal: “Evidence for a midlife crisis in great apes.” So what do these apes do? Buy red Ferraris? Leave their mates for some cute young bonobos? Uh, no.“I believe no ape has ever purchased a sports car,” said Andrew Oswald, an author of the study. But researchers report that captive chimps and orangutans do show the same low ebb in emotional COURTESY PHOTOS GARDEN continued on 2D APES continued on 2D ASSOCIATED PRESSChimpanzees sit in an enclosure at the Chimpanzee Eden rehabilitation center, near Nelspruit, South Africa. A study of chimps and orangutans has the same pattern of changes in happiness through life as many studies find in people. Genie Norman and Mary Kay HollingsworthTasteBuddiesLakeCity@gmail.com TASTE BUDDIES SISTER’S continued on 2D

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spotted a young man with three fried chicken breasts piled on his plate and he didnt lift his head. He obviously had it all figured out. Pat and her sister, Bobbi Dunn, have owned the Sisters Caf for 12 years and are local ladies. The building has housed numerous businesses, including a filling station and another restaurant. Kimberlynne asked her the secret of the bread pudding and she said homemade and lots of cinnamon. Sisters allows takeout from the buffet and is also open for breakfast and dinner. Dinner menu includes country fried steak, liver and onions, hamburger steak, chicken strips, etc. Their address is 208 Suwannee Ave. in Branford, on the main street. You cant miss the blue building. Telephone number is (386) 935-6989. They are open seven days a week, 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. and on Fridays 10:30 to 8. Friday nights the buffet is a fried chicken and seafood. They serve fried chicken every day, thank goodness. Its worth the ride from Lake City, so give it a try soon. We dont think youll be disappointed. well-being at midlife that some studies find in people. That suggests the human tendency toward midlife discontent may have been passed on through evolu tion, rather than resulting simply from the hassles of modern life, said Oswald, a professor of economics at the University of Warwick in England who presented his work Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. A second study in the journal looks at a younger age group and finds that happiness in youth can lead to higher income a few years down the road. More on that later. Lets get back to those apes. Several studies have con cluded that happiness in human adults tends to follow a certain course between ages 20 and 70: It starts high and declines over the years to reach a low point in the late 40s, then turns around and rises to anoth er peak at 70. On a graph, thats a U-shaped pattern. Some researchers question whether that trend is real, but to Oswald the mystery is what causes it. This is one of the great patterns of human life. Were all going to slide along this U for good or ill, he said. So what explains it? When he learned that others had been measur ing well-being in apes, it just seemed worth pursu ing the hunch that the U might be more general than in humans, he said. He and co-authors assem bled data on 508 great apes from zoos and research cen ters in the U.S., Australia, Canada, Singapore and Japan. Caretakers and other observers had filled out a four-item question naire to assess well-being in the apes. The questions asked such things as the degree to which each ani mal was in a positive or negative mood, how much pleasure it got from social situations, and how suc cessful it was in achiev ing goals. The raters were even asked how happy they would be if they were the animal for a week. Sounds wacky? Oswald and his co-authors say research suggests its a valid approach. And they found that the survey results pro duced that familiar U-shaped curve, adjusted to an apes shorter lifespan. We find it for these crea tures that dont have a mort gage and dont have to go to work and dont have mar riage and all the other stuff, Oswald said. Its as though the U shape is deep in the biology of humans rather than a result of uniquely human experiences. Yes, apes do have social lives, so it could still be something human-like that we share with our social cousins, he said. But our result does seem to push away the likelihood that its dominantly something to do with human life. Oswald said its not clear what the evolutionary pay off might be from such discontent. Maybe it prods parents to be restless, to help find new worlds for the next generation to breed, he said. Frans de Waal, an author ity in primate behavior at Emory University, cau tioned that when people judge the happiness of apes, there may be a human bias. But in an email he called the results intuitively correct and said the notion of biological influence over the human pattern is an intriguing possibility. By JENNIFER FORKER Associated Press The advent calendar, which eases anxiety by counting down those pesky 24 days until Christmas Eve, is as much a holiday tradition for my family as the tree. Sure, you can buy one and save the crafting time, but making an advent cal endar adds to its allure. Check out images post ed on various do-it-yourself websites and youll see that DIYers are getting beyond way beyond the treeon-a-felt-background calen dar popular when I was a child in the 1970s. Those felt-made calendars are still with us and updated cre atively but now theres also a mind-boggling array of advent calendar options, all ready for a DIY twist. Kelly Wilkinson, edito rial director at Creativebug, an online crafts class site, reminisces about sewing matching calendars with her sister a few years ago. Pulling that advent cal endar out and hanging it on the wall is a reminder of the time we spent making it together, says Wilkinson. That is a big part of my attachment to it. My own advent calendar memories include fighting with my sister over whod place the last piece in our case, a 1-inch, naked, plastic baby Jesus on the day marking Christmas Eve. This is the stuff of advent calendar lore the memories and childhood traditions we carry into adulthood and hope to share with the next genera tion. I still completely dork out and put that one orna ment on a day, says Wilkinson. Its a simple gesture that reminds me of being a kid and how excited I was. An advent calendar can be a simple thing and easy to make. Shelly Ridenour, Country Living magazines executive editor, recom mends visiting the web site Pinterest for inspira tion: Ingenious ideas there include small paper bags or colorful baby socks clipped with decorative clothespins to a line; stacked matchbox es, painted cans or Chinese takeout boxes; and diminu tive metal buckets hanging from a board or old ladder. Even a large tree branch stuck in a sturdy vase can have artsy envelopes or wrapped gifts numbered 1 to 24 hanging from it. Jessie Tanner of Charlotte, N.C., made an advent calendar out of dif ferently sized metal tins attached magnetically to the refrigerator for her two childrens daily thrill. Tanner, 31, didnt grow up with a Christmas advent calendar, but as a parent Im always trying to find new traditions for my kids and new ways to make all kinds of experiences spe cial, she says. Each of the 25 tins in the Tanners advent cal endar includes something the family can do together. One day its go sledding. Another invites the fam ily to do a service project together. Occasionally, a tin will include candy. Its sort of a checklist for me of things I want my family to experience at that time, says Tanner, who has two daughters, ages 4 and 7. She blogs about her life at Call Me Badger. Jessica Anderson of Rancho Cordova, Calif., carefully cut out and sewed a Nativity scene using the same felt wall-hanging con cept employed by my child hood calendar. Anderson, 28, and the mother of three, believes advent calendars promote family bonding. Its something they will remember when they grow up, says Anderson, who blogs at Cutesy Crafts. And maybe Ill make one for them when they have their own families. For now, the two older Anderson kids, ages 3 and 5, behave not unlike my sis ter and I did 40 years ago. They fight about it every day, says Anderson. of year, with spring being the most favorable. Try growing some transplants in pretty containers placed in shaded corners of the patio or porch. This tough cast iron plant can even grace a container in a dark kitchen corner. Find answers to garden ing questions at www. solutionsforyourlife.com or call the Columbia County Extension Office at (386) 752-5384. 2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 2DLIFE Stop by the Lake City Reporter for your complimentary engagement package. Aisle Style Complimentary Engagement Package Sweetwater Branch Inn 800-595-7760 Wards Jewelry & Gifts 752-5470 Camp Weed Cerveny Conference Center 386-364-5250 GeGees Studio 758-2088 Holiday Inn 754-1411, ext. 106 Make an advent calendar and a Christmas tradition Counting down helps kids bear the anticipation. CRAFTS By DAN JOLING Associated Press ANCHORAGE, Alaska It was likely easier than ever to see a migrat ing trumpeter swan this year, as the big white birds continued a remark able comeback from near extinction in the Lower 48 states and much of their Alaska habitat, a federal wildlife biologist said. They still have not recovered to their full range that they once occu pied prior to the 1880s, but theyve done fantastically in Alaska, said Deborah Groves, who has counted Alaska swans since 1990. A 1968 Alaska census found just 2,847 of the birds. Random sampling in 2010 estimated 25,347 a nearly nine-fold increase. Trumpeters are known for their distinctive call that the Cornell Lab of Ornithology calls hol low, nasal honking. The Alaska Department of Fish and Game says its deep, like a French horn. With 7-foot wing spans, trumpeters are North Americas largest waterfowl. Males aver age 28 pounds, females 22 pounds, and eggs are up to 5 inches long, the department says. The birds were hunted throughout the 1800s for meat and feathers, which made fine quill pens. By the early 1930s, Groves said, there were only 69 known trumpeters in Yellowstone National Park. Hunting ended and biol ogists made a happy dis covery when they began bird work in Alaska: A remnant population of a couple of thousand trum peters remained, Groves said. Alaska biologists did their first formal trumpet er survey in 1968, another in 1975 and every five years since then. They were increasing almost exponentially for a while, Groves said. D. Nichelle Demorest is a horticulture agent with the Columbia County Extension of the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. GARDEN: Adaptable cast iron plant Continued From Page 1A APES: Midlife crises not reserved to humans Continued From Page 1D ASSOCIATED PRESS TOP: Country Living magazine published plans for an advent calendar made from match boxes, gift wrap and filled with daily treats. ABOVE: Jessica Anderson of Rancho Cordova, Calif., made a nativity scene of colorful felt for her young childrens advent calendar. Genie Norman and Mary Kay Hollingswoth are Columbia County Residents who love good food and fun. Their col umn on area restaurants appears twice monthly. You can contact them at TasteBuddiesLakeCity@ gmail.com. Sisters: A Branford buffet Continued From Page 1D Trumpeter swans make comeback A trumpeter swan stretches its wings on a lake in Anchorage, Alaska. Trumpeter swans continue a remark able comeback from near extinction.

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Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012 3D3DLIFE Get more space with a cottage out backBy CEDAR BURNETTAssociated PressSomething small is afoot. Backyard cottages — from 800-square-foot bungalows to Lilliputian studio cabins — are springing up behind houses in many cities, some of which have changed zon-ing laws to accommodate them. Often, the cottages are built for aging parents or grown children. Sometimes, they’re rented out for extra income, or are used as stu-dios or offices. “Backyard cottages increase density in a nice way,” says Bruce Parker, principal of the Seattle-based design collective Microhouse. “They use existing infrastructure and ... they’re inherently sus-tainable. A cottage is the antithesis of a big house on a tiny lot.” Seattle updated its zoning laws in 2009 to allow for “accessory dwelling units” on single-family lots of at least 4,000 square feet. (Permits are needed depending on the size of the cottage and whether it has plumbing and electricity.) While Parker had been designing small homes for several years, the micro-house law inspired him to focus on backyard dwell-ings. Soon, he was teach-ing classes on backyard cot-tages with the Seattle firm NCompass Construction. About 90 percent of his students, he said, wanted to build a cottage for their parents. “Rather than paying thousands of dollars a month for assisted living, you can have your parents with you and they can help with the kids — but everyone gets their own space,” says Parker. Often, it’s the parents who pay to build the cot-tages. “It’s an investment for their comfort and a way to improve their children’s property,” says Parker. “One pragmatic woman told me she hoped her great-granddaughter would use it for college housing after she was gone.” In Portland, Ore., which changed zoning rules in 2010 to allow for back-yard cottages, Jasmine Deatherage and her mother, Diane Hoglund, looked for a house with a large yard specifically with this living arrangement in mind. “We really wanted to live together,” says Deatherage. “I have a 2-year-old and my mom will be taking on some of the childcare. It’s a spe-cial time to live together.” Before her mother bought the house, they asked the previous owner to build a basic single-car garage, which they plan to convert into a fully function-ing mother-in-law cottage by next summer. While not every young family would opt to have their parents so close, Deatherage notes that it’s common historically and globally. “My husband is from Mexico where it’s very normal to live with your family,” she says. “His whole family lives together and if we lived there we’d live with them too.” For other homeowners, backyard cottages are an opportunity for small-scale entrepreneurship. Bob DiPalma of Burlington, Vt., didn’t set out to run a mini-hotel out of his yard but the project “crept up on me.” While rehabilitating their 100-year-old barn, he and his wife saw the opportunity to convert the space into an apartment above a garage. They drew up designs, hired a contractor and soon had a fully-functioning vaca-tion rental. “Over the last four years, we’ve had really wonderful guests who have appreci-ated the space,” DiPalma says. Sometimes, the need for more space is just a need for more space. “So many people are working from home,” says Gayle Zalduondo, principal of the Miami-based Cabin Fever, which sells prefab cabins. “Rather than going offsite, they’re adding a cabin. People need more space, but they’re not com-fortable upsizing to a larger house, especially in this economy.” Some of her customers want a guest house, while others are artists, musicians and independent service providers — from freelance graphic designers to mas-sage therapists. Unlike the fully outfitted miniature homes being used for rental properties and mother-in-law quarters, small backyard cabins with-out kitchens and bathrooms do not require permits in many states. “We have a model you can build in a weekend,” says Zalduondo. “It comes flat-packed. It’s tight and weather-proofed and you don’t even need to pour a full slab. You can just pre-pare a lightweight founda-tion and put the cabin on top of it.” Seattle resident Isaac Vicknair pioneered a new kind of off-the-grid, back-yard living in his quest for affordable housing. He builds simple 8-by-8-foot sheds in exchange for free rent in them for three to six months after completion. “It’s a great deal for everyone,” says Vicknair. “They cost me about $800 in materials and then I save around $5,000 in rent while I live there. All the homeowner has to pay for is the electricity I use, which is almost nothing.” Vicknair picks a neighborhood he wants to live in and posts flyers advertising his trade proposal. He says he generally receives calls from three or four inter-ested parties, and takes the project that seems most appealing. The cabins are built without plumbing or electricity, so Vicknair runs an exten-sion cord from the house and makes do with a space heater, electric skillet, small fridge and a couple of lamps. He bought a portable marine toilet that he sets up behind the cabin, and he showers at friends’ houses or the gym. “The only downside is it’s really hard to get a date to come back to a miniature house in a backyard,” says Vicknair. “But I don’t think I’m ever going to pay rent again.” ASSOCIATED PRESSA prefabricated backyard studio is under constructi on in Cabin Fever’s manufacturing plant in Miami. The cabin was disassembled after this photo was taken, and shipped to Alp ine,Texas, where it was reassembled in the owner’s backyard. Prefab buildings popping up in many backyards. Give chic gifts that give backBy KIM COOKAssociated PressGift giving feels good, and can feel even better if you know your purchase is helping those less for-tunate. Luckily, a number of home d 3 cor retailers partner with charitable organizations; many do so year round, with additional initiatives during the holi-day season. As you’re making your list this year or primping your own home for the holi-days, you might consider giving something that not only looks good but sup-ports good works. At www.pillowdreamsproject.com, a fair-trade business started by Denver-based Renee Rietmeijer and Laura Tilley, you’ll find silk, cotton or hemp throw-pillow cases from South Africa, Vietnam and Thailand. Prices range from $25 to $40 per case; sales from the Vietnamese ones support KOTO, which pro-vides hospitality work train-ing for homeless teens, while sales from the South African cases benefit the Open Arms orphanage in Malawi. “Accept and Be” is the sentiment expressed on a limited-edition, graffiti-esque poster printed in pig-mented inks and available at CB2 for $16.95, with all sales going to the Trevor Project, a national non-profit that focuses on suicide pre-vention among gay youth. The retailer has been involved for several years with San Francisco’s Creativity Explored, a col-lective of developmentally disabled artists. Each sea-son presents a different collection of home acces-sories, and this fall there is an interesting variety of soft goods, plates and prints, including Anne Connelly’s vibrant, impres-sionistic “Color Field” rug and Selene Perez’ charm-ing trio of owls printed on white cotton velvet. (Rug, $399; pillow, $39.95; www.cb2.com ) CB2 also aims to donate 500,000 meals through food banks nationwide this holi-day season; each interac-tion with the retailer, online or in person, with or with-out a purchase, will count toward the goal. Rural Peruvian women crafters are supported by Crate & Barrel, which is selling the artisans’ win-some holiday ornaments. A trio of plump little penguins or owls ($29.95) and a quar-tet of woodland creatures ($39.95) are hand-knit from alpaca blend wool.(www.crateandbarrel.com) For travelers and animal lovers on your list, have a look at Carol Stevenson’s hauntingly intimate photo-graphic prints of elephants, taken at a sanctuary in Thailand, at www.thetrav-elerscollection.com. Sales of the signed, numbered, limited-edition works ben-efit the Golden Triangle Asian Elephant Foundation ($1,895 and up). If you’d like to peruse a larger variety of gifts, check out www.giftsthatgive.com. Hundreds of home d 3 cor and design houses, includ-ing Jonathan Adler, Simon Pearce, Lily Pulitzer and Michael Aram, are represented on the site, and 1 out of every $5 goes to the cause of your choice — among them, Cancer Care, Lupus Foundation and Save the Whales. For a romantic gift, consider a boudoir pillow from Anne Koch’s washable silk Braille collection for kumi kookoon; each is embel-lished with the phrase “I love you” in Braille appli-que, and a percentage of sales goes to the American Foundation for the Blind. ($110-$200, www.kumikoo-koon.com) At Bloomingdales, celebrities have been enlisted to create ornaments benefit-ing the Child Mind Institute, which focuses on children’s mental health.Some gifts fall into the love-it-later categoryBy SAMANTHA CRITCHELLAP Fashion WriterNEW YORK — Have you ever said “thank you” through clenched teeth? The gift in that nicely wrapped box was so not what you wanted: comfy clothes instead of designer duds, or a kitchen gadget instead of a shiny piece of jewelry. Sometimes, though, the best gifts are the ones you use, and, frankly, most of us probably wear hoodies more than haute couture. With a closet full of beautiful boots and gravity-defy-ing heels, flat-foot, furry Uggs weren’t at the top of celebrity stylist-designer Rachel Zoe’s shopping list. They were OK for other people — she might even have suggested them — but she didn’t see them fitting into her closet until someone gave her a pair. “Once you put them on, you can’t go back,” Zoe says. “In my house, it’s now the family at-home shoe. I wear them all the time. My son has 10 pairs and my husband has 10 pairs.” Bradford Shellhammer, founder of Fab.com, which sells unusual items like can-vas carryalls screen-print-ed with images of designer handbags, says gifts fit into three categories: the things everyone knows you want, the bad surprises and the amazing things that make you wonder, “How did I live without it?” A. Mitra Morgan, founder and chief curator of decorative home-goods website Joss & Main, can’t imagine her busy life with-out the wallet-phone case wristlet her mother gave her last year. Morgan has almost unlimited access to the pretty things on so many gift lists. Her mother, how-ever, thought her daily necessities were too scat-tered. She didn’t know it at the time, Morgan admits, but mom was right. Morgan received another love-it-later gift, this one from her husband. He gave her flat-bottomed pizza scissors. “Coming from my husband, this was at the level of receiving a vacuum. I thought, ‘Really, this is what we’ve come to?’” Morgan says. “But it’s awesome!” Christine Frietchen, a shopping expert who is advising TJ Maxx and Marshall’s this year on their gift-giving programs, says a gift is something you wouldn’t get for your-self. And the best way to know you’ve given a suc-cessful gift, she says, is if the receiver becomes an evangelist for it. Adam Glassman, creative director at O, The Oprah magazine, was never at risk of buy-ing the Patagonia fleece sweatpants his brother got for him a few years ago. “Never in my life did I think I’d need sweatpants, but I live in them,” he gushes. “When I come home from work, they are my go-to item. I wear them more than any other clothes in my closet.” The only gift he might treasure more is the Eddie Bauer silk long johns his other brother gave him, something else he didn’t think he needed or wanted.ASSOCIATED PRESSAlpaca Woodland Creatures ornaments made of soft alpaca blend wool by rural Peruvian women are available from Crate and Barrel, which colla borated on the collection with a fair trade group that helps the women earn money to support an d sustain their families. HOMES HOLIDAY IDEAS ASSOCIATED PRESSA prefabricated cabin is used as a backyard artist studi o in Pasadena, Calif. The Zip model by Cabin Fever in Miami comes flat-packed and can be asse mbled in just a few days.

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4D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012 4DLIFE SUNDAY EVENING NOVEMBER 25, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsAmerica’s Funniest Home Videos (N) Once Upon a Time “Into the Deep” (N) Revenge “Lineage” (N) (:01) 666 Park Avenue (N) News at 11Inside Edition 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsThe Insider (N) Love-RaymondBig Bang TheoryCSI: Miami “Collateral Damage” Criminal Minds “Supply & Demand” NewsSports ZoneChann 4 NewsBig Bang Theory 5-PBS 5 -Doo Wop Discoveries (My Music) R&B and pop vocal groups. Downton Abbey Revisited Behind-the-scenes footage. (N) Downton Abbey Revisited Behind-the-scenes footage. MI-5 “The Russian” 7-CBS 7 47 47CBS Evening NewsAction News Jax60 Minutes (N) The Amazing Race “Fishy Kiss” (N) The Good Wife (N) The Mentalist “Black Cherry” (N) Action Sports 360Two and Half Men 9-CW 9 17 17Nobody’s FoolAccording to JimYourJax MusicVoid TVLaw & Order “Slave” Local HauntsLocal HauntsTMZ (N) The Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30e(4:00) NFL Football Regional Coverage. (N) The OT (N) The Simpsons (N) Bob’s Burgers (N) Family Guy (N) Cleveland ShowNewsAction Sports 360Leverage Stolen airplane designs. 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsFootball Night in America (N) (Live) e(:20) NFL Football Green Bay Packers at New York Giants. (N) News CSPAN 14 210 350NewsmakersWashington This Week Q & APrime MinisterRoad to the White House Q & A WGN-A 16 239 307Funny VideosBloopers!Bloopers!How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine(:40) Instant Replay30 Rock30 Rock TVLAND 17 106 304Hot in ClevelandHot in ClevelandHot in ClevelandHot in ClevelandHot in ClevelandHot in ClevelandHot in ClevelandHot in ClevelandHot in ClevelandHappily DivorcedLove-RaymondLove-Raymond OWN 18 189 279Oprah’s Next Chapter “Lady Gaga and Her Mother Cynthia” Lady Gaga. Oprah’s Next ChapterOprah’s Next Chapter Justin Bieber. Oprah’s Next Chapter Justin Bieber. Oprah’s Next Chapter A&E 19 118 265Storage-TexasStorage-TexasStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage War sStorage Wars(:01) Storage Wars(:31) Storage Wars HALL 20 185 312“Moonlight and Mistletoe” (2008, Drama) Candace Cameron Bure. “Hitched for the Holidays” (2012) Joey Lawrence. Premiere. “Annie Claus Is Coming to Town” (2011) Maria Thayer, Vivica A. Fox. FX 22 136 248“Grown Ups” (2010, Comedy) Adam Sandler, Kevin James, Chris Rock.“How to Train Your Dragon” (2010) Voices of Jay Baruchel, Gerard Butler.“How to Train Your Dragon” (2010) Voices of Jay Baruchel, Gerard Butler. CNN 24 200 202CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN PresentsPiers Morgan TonightCNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents TNT 25 138 245(5:00)“Angels & Demons” (2009) Tom Hanks, Ewan McGregor. (DVS)“A Time to Kill” (1996) Sandra Bullock. A lawyer’s defense of a black man arouses the Klan’s ire. (DVS)“Hide and Seek” (2005) Premiere. NIK 26 170 299“The SpongeBob SquarePants Movie” (2004) Voices of Tom Kenny. See Dad Run (N)“Hotel for Dogs” (2009, Comedy) Emma Roberts, Jake T. Austin. FriendsFriends(:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241(4:10)“Star Wars IV: A New Hope” (1977)“Star Wars V: The Empire Strikes Back” (1980) Mark Hamill. Luke Skywalker, Han Solo and Princess Leia face Darth Vader’s wrath. (10:50)“Red Dawn” (1984) MY-TV 29 32 -TaxiTaxiM*A*S*HM*A*S*HColumbo “Now You See Him” Thriller A murderer utilizes time travel. The Twilight ZoneThe Twilight Zone DISN 31 172 290A.N.T. Farm “chANTS of a lifetime” Phineas and FerbJessieDog With a BlogGravity FallsA.N.T. FarmGood Luck CharlieDog With a BlogShake It Up!Jessie “Badfellas” A.N.T. Farm LIFE 32 108 252“The March Sisters at Christmas”“Love at the Christmas Table” (2012) Danica McKellar. Premiere. “Liz & Dick” (2012) Lindsay Lohan, Grant Bowler. Premiere. (:03)“Liz & Dick” (2012) USA 33 105 242NCIS “Spider and the Fly” NCIS A girl is kidnapped. NCIS Dinozzo’s father helps investigate. NCIS A murder at a college fair. NCIS “Out of the Frying Pan ...”“Shutter Island” (2010) BET 34 124 329(4:30)“Madea’s Family Reunion”2012 Soul Train Awards Red Carpet2012 Soul Train Awards Musical celebration and performance. (N) Apollo Live Musical guest Faith Evans. Moesha ESPN 35 140 206(4:30) 2012 World Series of Poker Final Table. SportsCenter (N) (Live) BCS Countdown30 for 30 SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209(5:30) 30 for 30d College Basketball Old Spice Classic, Final: Teams TBA. From Orlando, Fla. (N)d College Basketball DirecTV Classic, Final: Teams TBA. From Anaheim, Calif. (N) 2012 World Series of Poker SUNSP 37 -Fishing the FlatsSport FishingSportsman’s Adv. College Football Florida at Florida State. Seminole SportsSaltwater Exp.Into the Blue DISCV 38 182 278Alaska: The Last FrontierAlaska: The Last Frontier “Fall Feast” MythBusters “Explosions A to Z” (N) Mankind Rising (N) Gold Rush “The Ultimatum” MythBusters “Explosions A to Z” TBS 39 139 247“Shrek the Third” (2007) Voices of Mike Myers, Eddie Murphy. “Ice Age” (2002) Voices of Ray Romano. Premiere. (:45)“Ice Age” (2002) Voices of Ray Romano, John Leguizamo. (DVS) Wedding Band HLN 40 202 204Murder by the BookDominick Dunne: Power, PrivilegeDominick Dunne: Power, PrivilegeWhat Would You Do?What Would You Do?Dominick Dunne: Power, Privilege FNC 41 205 360FOX News Sunday With Chris WallaceFOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Fox FilesFox News ReportingHuckabee E! 45 114 236(5:30)“She’s Out of My League” (2010) Jay Baruchel.“Ocean’s Thirteen” (2007) George Clooney. Danny Ocean and his gang seek to right a wrong. Ice Loves Coco (N) Nicki Minaj: My The SoupChelsea Lately TRAVEL 46 196 277Tastiest Places to ChowdownChristmas to the ExtremeChristmas Crazier (N) Christmas Rush (N) Instant Christmas (N) Toy Hunter HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lMillion Dollar Rooms A Texas mansion. 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FSN-FL 56 -d NBA Basketball Boston Celtics at Orlando Magic. From Amway Center in Orlando, Fla. Magic Live! (Live) Inside the MagicThe Game 365d College Basketball San Diego State at USC. (N) SYFY 58 122 244Name of King“National Treasure: Book of Secrets” (2007, Action) Nicolas Cage, Jon Voight. “Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom” (1984) Harrison Ford, Kate Capshaw. Groundhog Day AMC 60 130 254“Land of the Dead” (2005, Horror) Simon Baker, John Leguizamo. The Walking Dead “Hounded” The Walking Dead (N) (:01) The Walking DeadTalking Dead (N) Comic Book Men COM 62 107 249“Mean Girls” (2004, Comedy) Lindsay Lohan, Rachel McAdams. “The House Bunny” (2008) Anna Faris, Colin Hanks. Premiere. (:02)“The House Bunny” (2008, Comedy) Anna Faris, Colin Hanks. CMT 63 166 327(4:00) The 46th Annual CMA Awards“Fireproof” (2008) Kirk Cameron. A divorcing couple turn to God to save their marriage. (:45)“Fireproof” (2008) Kirk Cameron. A divorcing couple turn to God to save their marriage. NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer “Playboy Playmates” Dog WhispererDog Whisperer “Cesar’s Worst Bite” Cesar Millan: The Real Story (N) Cesar Millan’s Leader of the PackDog Whisperer “Cesar’s Worst Bite” NGC 109 186 276Narco BlingSex for Sale: American EscortInside Underground Poker (N) Drugs, Inc. “Hurricane Blow” (N) Alaska State Troopers (N) Inside Underground Poker SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadePunkin Chunkin Punkin Chunkin Punkin Chunkin Punkin Chunkin 2012 “Punkin Chunkin 2012” Challenge the air cannons. Punkin Chunkin Punkin Chunkin ID 111 192 285Disappeared A man goes missing. Homicide Hunter: Lt. Joe Kenda48 Hours on ID “Murder at the Manor” Sins & Secrets “Carthage” (N) Unusual Suspects (N) 48 Hours on ID “Murder at the Manor” HBO 302 300 501(5:00)“Red Tails” (2012) ‘PG-13’ (:05)“Knight and Day” (2010, Action) Tom Cruise. ‘PG-13’ Boardwalk Empire “Two Imposters” Treme “Tipitina” (Season Finale) (N) (:15) Boardwalk Empire MAX 320 310 515(:05)“Unknown” (2011, Suspense) Liam Neeson. ‘PG-13’ “Die Hard 2” (1990, Action) Bruce Willis, Bonnie Bedelia. ‘R’ “Fast Five” (2011, Action) Vin Diesel, Paul Walker. ‘PG-13’ SHOW 340 318 545Untold History of the United StatesDexter “Argentina” Homeland “I’ll Fly Away” Dexter “Helter Skelter” (N) Homeland “Two Hats” (N) Dexter “Helter Skelter” MONDAY EVENING NOVEMBER 26, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Dancing With the Stars: All-Stars (N) (:01) Extreme Makeover: Home EditionExtreme Makeover: Home Edition (N) News at 11(:35) Nightline (N) 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) The Insider 5-PBS 5 -JournalNightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Motown: Big Hits and More (My Music) Original Motown classics. Christmas With Nathan PachecoTavis Smiley 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJaguars AccessTwo and Half MenHow I Met/MotherBig Bang Theory2 Broke Girls (N) Mike & Molly (N) Hawaii Five-0 “Wahine’inoloa” (N) Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of Payne90210 Liam is threatened. (N) Gossip Girl Chuck is betrayed. (N) TMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family GuyFamily GuyThe SimpsonsBones “The But in the Joke” (N) (PA) (:01) The Mob Doctor (N) NewsAction News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) The Voice “Live Top 8 Performances” The top 8 artists perform. (N) (:01) Revolution (N) NewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(5:00) Public Affairs Politics & Public Policy Today WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosWGN News at Nine (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304M*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Prison Diaries “Deadly Love Triangles” Prison DiariesDateline on OWNMarried to the Army: AlaskaMarried to the Army: Alaska (N) Dateline on OWN A&E 19 118 265Intervention “Latisha” Intervention “Dorothy; Ivan” Intervention “Nichole” Intervention “Kelly” (N) Intervention “Nick” (N) (:01) Intervention “Megan H.” HALL 20 185 312“Annie Claus Is Coming to Town” (2011) Maria Thayer, Vivica A. Fox. “The Most Wonderful Time of the Year” (2008, Drama) Henry Winkler. “Debbie Macomber’s Trading Christmas” (2011) Tom Cavanagh. FX 22 136 248How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherTwo and Half MenTwo and Half Men“The Proposal” (2009) Sandra Bullock, Ryan Reynolds. A woman pretends to be engaged to evade deportation.“The Proposal” (2009) CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245The Mentalist “Aingavite Baa” d NBA Basketball New York Knicks at Brooklyn Nets. From Barclays Center in Brooklyn, N.Y. (N) Inside the NBA (N) The Mentalist “Bleeding Heart” CSI: NY A music mogul is murdered. NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobDrake & JoshDrake & JoshNews W/LindaFull HouseFull HouseFull HouseThe NannyThe NannyFriends(:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241(4:42)“Star Wars VI: Return of the Jedi” (1983) Mark Hamill.“Star Wars VI: Return of the Jedi” (1983) Mark Hamill, Harrison Ford. Luke and his allies have a confrontation with Darth Vader. Tattoo Nightmares MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*HM*A*S*H “Tuttle” Law & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitSeinfeldFrasierThe Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Phineas and FerbGood Luck CharlieShake It Up!A.N.T. FarmJessie“Sky High” (2005, Comedy) Michael Angarano. Phineas and FerbPhineas and FerbJessieA.N.T. Farm LIFE 32 108 252“His and Her Christmas” (2005) Paula Devicq, David Sutcliffe. “Liz & Dick” (2012, Docudrama) Lindsay Lohan, Grant Bowler. “Dear Santa” (2011, Drama) Amy Acker, Brooklynn Proulx, Gina Holden. USA 33 105 242NCIS “Hide and Seek” NCIS: Los Angeles “Absolution” WWE Monday Night RAW (N) (:05) The SoupCSI: Crime Scene BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Top 10 Countdown” (N) “Bad Boys II” (2003) Martin Lawrence. Premiere. Two detectives battle a drug kingpin in Miami. Family FirstFamily FirstThe Soul Man ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) Monday Night Countdown (N) (Live) e NFL Football Carolina Panthers at Philadelphia Eagles. From Lincoln Financial Field in Philadelphia. SportsCenter (N) ESPN2 36 144 209SportsNation (N) Around the HornInterruption 2012 World Series of Poker 2012 World Series of Poker 2012 World Series of PokerSportsCenter (N) Coll. Football Live SUNSP 37 -Sport FishingShip Shape TVd College Basketball Oakland at Tennessee. (N)d College Basketball Northwestern State at Texas A&M. (N) Inside Israeli Bask.Fight Sports: In 60 DISCV 38 182 278I (Almost) Got Away With ItAmerican ChopperFast N’ LoudAmerican Chopper (N) Jesse James: Outlaw Garage (N) American Chopper TBS 39 139 247King of QueensKing of QueensSeinfeldSeinfeldFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily Guy The story of “Star Wars.” Conan (N) HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) Dr. Drew on Call (N) Nancy GraceShowbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236The SoupThe SoupE! News (N) Studio E! (N) Nicki Minaj: My “Sweet Home Alabama” (2002) Reese Witherspoon, Josh Lucas. Chelsea Lately (N) E! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. Food “DC” Man v. FoodThe Layover with Anthony BourdainThe Layover with Anthony BourdainHotel ImpossibleHotel Impossible HGTV 47 112 229Property Brothers “Kate & Cole” Love It or List It James and Sharon. Love It or List It A couple is torn. Love It or List It Chris needs structure. House HuntersHunters Int’lLove It or List It Victoria and Scott. TLC 48 183 280Cake BossCake BossCake BossCake BossCake BossCake BossCake Boss: Next Great Baker “Game On!” Cake Boss (N) Cake Boss: Next Great Baker HIST 49 120 269American Pickers “Backroad Samurai” American Pickers “Duke of Oil” Pawn StarsPawn StarsAmerican Pickers “Substitute Picker” Pawn Stars (N) (:31) Pawn Stars(:02) Invention USA(:32) Pawn Stars ANPL 50 184 282Swamp Wars Pythons are turning up. Gator Boys “Warrior Gator” Rattlesnake RepublicFinding Bigfoot “CSI Bigfoot” Finding Bigfoot: Further EvidenceRattlesnake Republic FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveMystery DinersHealth Inspectors TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the LordMax LucadoThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesLiving EdgeKingdom Conn.Jesse DuplantisPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -World Poker Tour: Season 10 College Football Teams TBA. World Poker Tour: Season 10Driven SYFY 58 122 244Nat’l Treasure“Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom” (1984) Harrison Ford, Kate Capshaw. “The Mist” (2007, Horror) Thomas Jane. A deadly fog engulfs terri ed townspeople. The Arrival AMC 60 130 254(5:30)“Top Gun” (1986, Adventure) Tom Cruise, Kelly McGillis. “A Few Good Men” (1992, Drama) Tom Cruise. A Navy lawyer defends two Marines in a comrade’s death. “First Blood” (1982, Action) COM 62 107 249(5:58) South Park(:29) Tosh.0The Colbert ReportDaily Show(7:59) FuturamaFuturamaFuturamaSouth ParkBrickleberrySouth ParkDaily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327RebaRebaRebaReba “Encounters” RebaRebaBig Texas HeatBig Texas HeatBig Texas HeatChainsaw GangChainsaw GangChainsaw Gang NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer “Healing the Hoarded” How Big Can It Get?How Big Can It Get? “Croczilla” How Big Can It Get? “Snakezilla” Hogzilla Large pig. How Big Can It Get? “Croczilla” NGC 109 186 276Drugs, Inc. “Meth” Taboo “Changing Gender” Taboo “Beauty” Taboo Standards of beauty in cultures. Taboo “Fat” Taboo “Beauty” SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeThe CellDo You See What I SeeMankind Rising (N) What Happened Before the Big Bang?Do You See What I See ID 111 192 285Dateline on ID (Part 1 of 2) Dateline on ID (Part 2 of 2) Blood, Lies & Alibis (N) I Didn’t Do It (N) Disappeared “The Soldiers’s Wife” (N) Blood, Lies & Alibis HBO 302 300 501(5:40)“Mr. Popper’s Penguins”(:15) “Little Fockers” (2010, Comedy) Robert De Niro. ‘PG-13’ Witness Photographer Eros Hoagland.“Tower Heist” (2011) Ben Stiller. ‘PG-13’ 24/7 Pacquiao MAX 320 310 515Bruce Almighty“End of Days” (1999, Horror) Arnold Schwarzenegger. ‘R’ “Chronicle” (2012) Dane DeHaan. ‘PG-13’ “Horrible Bosses” (2011) Jason Bateman. ‘NR’ (:45) Hunted SHOW 340 318 545(4:50)Loosies(:20) “50/50” (2011) Joseph Gordon-Levitt. ‘R’ Untold History of the United States (N) Homeland “Two Hats” Dexter “Helter Skelter” Homeland “Two Hats” WEEKDAY AFTERNOON Comcast Dish DirecTV 12 PM12:301 PM1:302 PM2:303 PM3:304 PM4:305 PM5:30 3-ABC 3 -NewsBe a MillionaireThe ChewGeneral HospitalMauryVaried ProgramsDr. PhilBe a MillionaireNews 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsPaid ProgramVaried ProgramsAndy Grif th ShowThe Jeff Probst ShowSteve HarveyThe Dr. Oz ShowChann 4 NewsChann 4 News 5-PBS 5 -WordWorldBarney & FriendsCaillouDaniel TigerSuper Why!Dinosaur TrainCat in the HatCurious GeorgeWild KrattsElectric Comp.WUFT NewsWorld News 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxThe Young and the RestlessBold/BeautifulThe TalkVaried ProgramsLet’s Make a DealJudge Joe BrownJudge JudyAction News JaxAction News Jax 9-CW 9 17 17The Trisha Goddard ShowLaw & Order: Criminal IntentJudge MathisThe Bill Cunningham ShowMauryThe People’s Court 10-FOX 10 30 30Jerry SpringerThe Jeremy Kyle ShowJudge Joe BrownWe the PeopleThe DoctorsVaried ProgramsDr. PhilFamily FeudFamily Feud 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsBe a MillionaireDays of our LivesFirst Coast LivingKatie The Ellen DeGeneres ShowNewsNews CSPAN 14 210 350(9:00) Public AffairsPublic AffairsVaried Programs Public Affairs WGN-A 16 239 307In the Heat of the NightWGN Midday NewsWalker, Texas RangerWalker, Texas RangerWalker, Texas RangerLaw & Order: Criminal Intent TVLAND 17 106 304Andy Grif th ShowVaried Programs GunsmokeVaried ProgramsBonanzaVaried ProgramsBonanzaVaried ProgramsBonanzaVaried Programs OWN 18 189 279Dr. PhilDr. PhilVaried Programs A&E 19 118 265CSI: MiamiVaried ProgramsCriminal MindsVaried ProgramsCriminal MindsVaried ProgramsThe First 48Varied ProgramsThe First 48Varied ProgramsThe First 48Varied Programs HALL 20 185 312MovieVaried ProgramsMovieVaried ProgramsMovieVaried Programs FX 22 136 248Movie MovieVaried Programs CNN 24 200 202CNN Newsroom CNN Newsroom The Situation Room TNT 25 138 245Varied Programs NIK 26 170 299Team UmizoomiMax & RubyVaried ProgramsSpongeBobSpongeBobOdd ParentsOdd ParentsOdd ParentsSpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBob SPIKE 28 168 241Varied Programs MY-TV 29 32 -Hawaii Five-0GunsmokeBonanzaThe Big ValleyThe Wild, Wild WestEmergency! DISN 31 172 290Mickey MouseLittle EinsteinsVaried ProgramsPhineas and FerbVaried Programs LIFE 32 108 252Old ChristineOld ChristineHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherFrasierFrasierFrasierFrasierVaried Programs USA 33 105 242Varied Programs BET 34 124 329(:05) The Parkers(:40) The ParkersMy Wife and KidsMy Wife and KidsJamie Foxx ShowJamie Foxx ShowThe ParkersMovieVaried Programs ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenterVaried ProgramsSportsCenterSportsCenterVaried ProgramsColl. Football LiveNFL LiveVaried ProgramsAround the HornInterruption ESPN2 36 144 209(1:00) First Take Numbers Never LieVaried Programs Numbers Never LieDan Le BatardNFL32Varied Programs SUNSP 37 -Varied Programs DISCV 38 182 278FBI: Criminal PursuitVaried Programs TBS 39 139 247Fresh PrinceAmerican DadAmerican DadLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondSeinfeldFriendsFriendsFriendsFriends HLN 40 202 204News Now Making It in AmericaEvening Express FNC 41 205 360(11:00) Happening NowAmerica Live Studio B With Shepard SmithYour World With Neil CavutoThe Five E! 45 114 236E! NewsVaried ProgramsSex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CityVaried Programs TRAVEL 46 196 277Varied Programs No ReservationVaried Programs Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. FoodMan v. Food HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lHoliday BattleVaried Programs TLC 48 183 280What Not to WearVaried ProgramsA Baby StoryA Baby StoryCake BossCake BossWhat Not to WearVaried ProgramsSay Yes, DressSay Yes, DressSay Yes, DressSay Yes, Dress HIST 49 120 269Varied Programs ANPL 50 184 282Animal Cops HoustonAnimal Cops HoustonAnimal Cops HoustonAnimal Cops HoustonThe HauntedMonsters Inside Me FOOD 51 110 231Varied ProgramsBarefoot ContessaVaried Programs10 Dollar DinnersSecrets/Restaurant30-Minute MealsGiada at HomeGiada at HomeBarefoot ContessaBarefoot ContessaBest DishesPaula’s Cooking TBN 52 260 372Varied ProgramsBehind the ScenesVaried ProgramsJames RobisonTodayThe 700 ClubJohn Hagee TodayVaried ProgramsPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -Varied Programs SYFY 58 122 244MovieVaried Programs MovieVaried Programs AMC 60 130 254Movie Varied Programs COM 62 107 249Varied Programs Movie Comedy CentralFuturamaFuturamaIt’s Always Sunny CMT 63 166 327Extreme Makeover: Home EditionExtreme MakeoverVaried ProgramsStrictest ParentsVaried ProgramsStrictest ParentsVaried ProgramsRoseanneRoseanneRoseanneRoseanne NGWILD 108 190 283Dog WhispererVaried Programs NGC 109 186 276Alaska State TroopersBorder WarsTabooVaried Programs SCIENCE 110 193 284Varied Programs Factory MadeFactory MadeMythBustersThey Do It?They Do It? ID 111 192 285Dateline on IDUnusual SuspectsNightmare Next DoorFatal EncountersFatal EncountersVaried Programs HBO 302 300 501(11:45) MovieMovieVaried Programs MAX 320 310 515(11:20) MovieVaried Programs(:15) MovieVaried Programs MovieVaried Programs SHOW 340 318 545(11:00) MovieVaried Programs (2:50) Movie MovieVaried Programs

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DEAR ABBY: My darling mother-in-law passed away recently. She was a wonderful woman, a caring and loving role model to her children and grand-children. In her will she left a diamond ring to her daughter, “Mimi,” a dia-mond ring to me, and the remainder of her jewelry to her grandchildren. Her house and its contents were to be divided equally between her son and daughter. My children received a box from Mimi filled with Mom’s costume jewelry. All of her expensive jew-elry was missing. When I asked about the missing items, Mimi said they were in the box, and she had taken photos to prove it. My husband noticed that many valuable items were missing from the family home as well. Recently my daughter and I ran into my sister-in-law in a restaurant and saw she was wearing one of the pieces of jewelry that had been intended for my children. When I asked Mimi to please take it off and give it to my daughter, she replied that she couldn’t because she was “still grieving.” Any advice on how to handle this? -HEARTBROKEN IN WASHINGTON DEAR HEARTBROKEN: What a shame. Who was the executor of your mother-in-law’s will? That person should have been oversee-ing the disposition of her property, and that is the person you should contact now to see the deceased’s wishes are complied with. If Mimi WAS the executor, then your next step should be to contact an attorney. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: I am a 25-year-old male who is still a virgin. It bugs me knowing that uglier, disgusting, less intelligent guys are having sex, while I -compassion-ate, smart, educated and good-looking -am not. What am I supposed to do? What is the secret to finally losing my virginity? This has been bothering me lately because I have lost a lot of weight and feel better about myself, but it still isn’t happening. I used to be extremely shy, but the confidence I gained from the weight loss has helped me in talking to strangers. I don’t get it. I feel like life is playing a cruel joke on me. I feel like the only virgin in the room. Please give me some advice. -READY FOR MORE DEAR READY: Please take a moment and re-read the second sentence of your letter. If you do, you will realize that while you have lost the weight, you have not lost the anger you must have felt when, for years, you went unnoticed. The chances of losing your virginity -and more important, having a RELATIONSHIP -will improve if you talk to a psychologist. Unless you do, as smart, educated and good-looking as you now are, the “vibe” you emit may continue to repel women. I have seen this happen, so please give my advice serious consider-ation. DEAR ABBY HOROSCOPES ARIES (March 21-April 19): Impulsive action and techniques will bring results but must be moni-tored carefully. You can end up looking like a genius, but expect to have to undergo some argu-ments before you come out on top. +++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You are in the zone, so don’t let anyone tell you you aren’t, or that you cannot do things your way. Dealing with people who interest you will lead to greater professional and personal opportunities. A romantic evening should be scheduled. +++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Keep your life simple and moderate. If you stray too far from home, you will be vulnerable to situations you have no control over. Being cautious may not excite you, but it will deter trouble. +++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): You’ll lean toward the unusual. Do your research and get involved in proj-ects or fundraisers that touch on problems you feel you can solve. ++++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Ulterior motives are appar-ent. Whether it’s you who has something else in mind or someone else, you must cut through the deception and figure out a way to turn wrongs into rights. Admitting your faults and recognizing others will help you move forward. ++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Time spent with friends, neighbors or at a community event will be rewarding. The encounters you have will lead to a new pastime or lifestyle change that will improve your cur-rent situation. +++++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Get back to basics and remember your past. The experiences you have encountered will help you avoid making the same mistake twice. +++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Make plans with friends, family or your lover. Doing something different or engaging in a passionate or creative endeavor will bring you great satisfaction and a feeling of comfort and opti-mism regarding the future. Update your appearance. +++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Change will be necessary to improve your life. Welcome change and look forward to an opportunity that comes your way. When one door closes, another one opens. +++++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Put your energy and enthusiasm to work for you. Whether a situa-tion pertains to your pro-fession or your personal life, you can make changes that will enhance your life and your future. A com-mitment will stabilize your long-term goals. +++++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Don’t be a follower. Someone will encourage you to make a poor choice. Separate your personal and business situations -focus on one or the other with-out interference. ++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Listen to your heart and your intuition. You can make arrangements that will protect you from any-one trying to take advan-tage of what you’ve worked so hard to accomplish. 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Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. CELEBRITY CIPHER Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012 5D

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6D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04246DLIFEBy KELLI KENNEDYAssociated PressMIAMI — When 15-year-old Kali Gonzalez became pregnant, the honors student considered transferring to an alternative school. She worried teachers would harass her for missing class because of doctor’s appointments and morning sickness. A guidance counselor urged Gonzalez not to, saying that could lower her standards. Instead, her counselor set up a meeting with teachers at her St. Augustine high school to confirm she could make up missed assign-ments, eat in class and use the restroom whenever she needed. Gonzalez, who is now 18, kept an A-average while pregnant. She capitalized on an online school program for parenting students so she could stay home and take care of her baby during her junior year. She returned to school her senior year and graduated with honors in May. But Gonzalez is a rare example of success among pregnant stu-dents. Schools across the country are divided over how to handle them, with some schools kicking them out or penalizing students for pregnancy-related absences. And many schools say they can’t afford costly support programs, including tutoring, child care and transportation for teens who may live just a few miles from school but still too far to walk while preg-nant or with a small child. Nearly 400,000 girls and young women between 15 and 19 years old gave birth in 2010, a rate of 34 per 1,000, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Those statistics have led child advocates to push for greater adherence to a1972 law that bans sex discrimination in feder-ally funded education programs and activities, according to a new report by the National Women’s Law Center. Fatima Goss Graves, the center’s vice president of educa-tion and employment, says offer-ing pregnant teens extra support would ultimately save taxpayers money by helping them become financially independent and not dependent on welfare. But budget cuts have eaten into such efforts. California lawmakers slashed a successful program for such students in 2008, ruling it was no longer mandatory, and allowed school districts to use the money for other programs. More than 100,000 pregnant and parenting students have par-ticipated in the program that helps them with classwork and con-nects them with social services. It boasted a 73 percent graduation rate in 2010 — close to the state’s normal rate — and advocates said participants were less reliant on welfare and less likely to become pregnant again. That compares to several counties where only 30 percent of pregnant and parenting teens graduated. “It’s unfortunate that this effective program fell prey to the enormous budget challenges we are facing as a state,” said State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson. Three years ago in Wisconsin, cost-cutting lawmakers dropped a requirement for school districts to give pregnant students who live within two miles of a school building free rides to school. The requirement had been part of an effort to improve access to education and reduce infant mortality rates. Less than half of the states have programs that send home assign-ments to homebound or hospital-ized student parents, according to the study. In almost half of the states, including Idaho, Nevada, Nebraska, South Dakota and Utah, the definition of excused absences is not broad enough to include pregnant and parenting students. That typically results in a patchwork of policies where some school districts don’t excuse absences even if the student is in the hospital giving birth, accord-ing to the study. But a few states have developed programs to help improve gradu-ate rates among pregnant girls and young mothers. In Washington, D.C., caseworkers in the New Heights Teen Parent Program often stand by the school entrance or text preg-nant students and young moms to make sure they are attending classes. When students do miss school, caseworkers take them home-work assignments. About 600 stu-dents participate in the program which also helps students with housing, child care and parent-ing skills. But the $1.6 million federal grant funding the program runs out next year and officials said they don’t have a clear future funding source. Roughly 4,500 male and female student parents participated in a Pennsylvania program last year where case workers helped them balance school and child care. Nearly 1,300 graduated or received an equivalent, state offi-cials said. The ELECT program, which started in 1990 as a partner-ship between state child welfare and education officials, monitors students’ attendance, coordinates summer programs and links them with support systems in the com-munity. Florida allows pregnant and parenting students to receive homebound instruction and lays out a clear process to make up missed work. The state also gives those students the option of tak-ing online classes. In St. Johns County, where Gonzalez lives, the school district provides free day care for teen moms and bus transportation for students and their children. Pregnant students are often stereotyped as low-achievers, but advocates say pregnancy actually motivates some to do better in school. Gonzalez, whose daughter is now 2, said her grades improved after she became pregnant. “I did push myself a lot harder and I made sure that I wasn’t going to be that statistic,” said Gonzalez, who is now married and pursuing a nursing degree. Study: School support key for pregnant teens ASSOCIATED PRESSKali Gonzalez plays with her daughter Kiah, 2, at their home in St. Augustine. A new report by the National Women’s Law Center says offering pregnant teens extra su pport would ultimately save taxpayers money by helping them become financially independent and not dep endent on welfare. PIRG finds fewer unsafe toysBy JENNIFER C. KERRAssociated PressWASHINGTON — Toys are safer than ever before, consumer advocates say, but parents should remain vigilant in keeping their little ones away from pow-erful magnets and small items that can easily cause choking. “The main trend that we saw this year was that we didn’t find as many toxic toys as we thought we would,” said Nasima Hossain, a public health advocate for U.S. Public Interest Research Group. PIRG examined more than 200 toys on store shelves at major retailers and dollar stores and tested about three dozen toys for lead and chemicals called phthalates, which are used to make plastic products softer but have been linked to reproductive defects and other health problems. A 2008 product safety law ushered in new standards for children’s products, including strict limits on lead and phthalates allowed in toys. Of the toys tested, only one — a Morphobot action figure — turned up lead levels that exceeded the new stricter federal limit on how much metal can be in the toy. For phthal-ates, the toys all met the federal standard for what’s allowed, though a Dora the Explorer backpack had lev-els that would trigger dis-closure under Washington state and California law, the report said. Small toys that could choke children and loud toys that could possibly lead to hearing loss were the primary concern of this year’s report. A Dora the Explorer guitar and a set of color-ful toy car keys for infants were cited for being exces-sively loud. Play food sets of everything from little strawberries to miniature sausage as well as small dragster cars that had tiny rubber traction bands on the wheels that could come loose were all listed as small enough to cause a child to choke. The group also highlighted renewed concerns about magnets, especially the high-powered magnets in executive desktop toys for adults or a finger-play magnet toy for kids called Snake Eggs that PIRG found at a dollar store. PIRG cited government estimates of 1,700 emer-gency room visits between 2009 and 2011 involving the ingestion of high-powered magnets. Most cases involved children between 4 and 12 years old. Older children have accidentally ingested the balls while trying to mimic tongue piercings. The mag-nets, such as the ones in the popular Buckyball desktop toys, can cling together if swallowed, pinch internal tissue and lead to serious injuries. The Toy Industry Association’s Stacy Leistner says his group agrees that strong magnets are a risk for children and should not be available to them. The Consumer Product Safety Commission this summer sued New York-based Maxfield and Oberton, the maker of the Buckyball desktop toys, to stop their sale. The finger-fidget toys are designed for adults, but CPSC said it was seeing too many inju-ries involving children. Maxfield has maintained the toys are for adults, mar-keted to adults and carry clear warning labels — but it announced last month that it would stop making the Buckyball series. CPSC is considering a ban on high-powered magnet sets. 1936 Coke delivery truck finds new home By DAVE KURTZThe (Indianapolis) StarAUBURN, Ind. — Don Monesmith’s collection of Coke memorabilia doesn’t all fit at his house anymore. That’s why his latest addition, a 1936 Coke delivery truck, sits on display at the National Auto & Truck Museum in Auburn, where Monesmith serves as a vol-unteer and board member. The truck arrived last month, and next summer it will become a traveling ambassador for the muse-um. Monesmith, of Avilla, said he has collected Coke mem-orabilia for 40 years. One day he acquired a photo of a Coke delivery truck painted with a sign advertising the brand’s 50th anniversary in 1936. “I thought, ‘That is a cool Coke truck. Wonder if I could build that?’” he said. Monesmith recently had retired as president of Community State Bank in Avilla. “I thought that would just be a neat project for me — something I could throw myself into in retirement and not get bored,” he said about recreating the Coke truck. “It was good. I’m ready to do another one.” Monesmith started last summer by finding and buy-ing the chassis of a 1936 Ford truck and began the transformation. His vintage photograph showed the truck fully load-ed with wooden cases of Coke bottles. “By knowing the exact dimensions of the wood cases in that picture, I was able to scale out exactly what the dimensions of that truck body were,” he said. He built a delivery truck body from scratch and restored the cab and engine to gleaming per-fection. “I’ve done a few farm tractors, but this is the first time I’ve taken something like this on. It was just a fun proj-ect,” he said. Next, he wanted to load the truck with its fizzy cargo. Monesmith acquired a few authentic, wooden Coke cases from the era. “But they’re getting very, very hard to find, so I had to build 160 of them,” he said. It took 120 hours in his shop to produce new cases that are hard to tell from the real thing. “When I was all done, I had more sawdust than I could fit in my pickup truck.” he said. Now, Monesmith has ordered 1,920 small bottles of Coke to fill the cases. “I’m anxious to see it loaded, because it will look a lot more impressive,” he said. His final objective is to give away all that Coke as he turns the truck into a travel-ing exhibit. “Our goal next year is to start taking it to area car shows to promote the muse-um,” he said. “If we hand people a bottle of Coke, we’ve got a captive audience for a minute, we can tell them about the museum and hopefully pull more people in to what I what I think’s a hidden treasure here in Auburn.” ASSOCIATED PRESSConsumer Product Safety Commission Commissioner Robert S. Adler (left); Public Interest Research Group (PIRG) advocate Nasima Hossain, and Dr. Bryan Rudolph, meet reporters during a news conference in Washington on last wee k. PIRG released its 27th annual Trouble in Toyland report on hazardous toy. HOLIDAY SAFETY Summary: Q TOYING WITH TROUBLE: In its annual “Trouble in Toyland” report, the U.S. Public Interest Research Group examined more than 200 toys at major retailers and dollar stores and found about a dozen that could be dangerous to children. Q NAUGHTY, NOT NICE: A Dora the Explorer guitar, dragster cars with small wheels and finger-fidget desktop magnets are among the toys that consumer advocates warn about. Q GOT THE LEAD OUT: Lead and other toxins were less a concern, thanks to a 2008 product safety law that ushered in stricter limits on metals and chemicals in toys. Choking still a serious dangerfor toddlers.“I thought that would just be a neat project for me — something I could throw myself into in retirement and not get bored.”— Don Monesmith, retired banker