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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01924

Material Information

Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 11-22-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01962

Related Items

Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01924

Material Information

Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 11-22-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01962

Related Items

Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

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By DEREK GILLIAMdcgllam@gmail.comThe biggest sale, with the best door-busting deals, comes tomor-row and creates a frenzy among shoppers like nothing else. Just to say the name, Black Friday, sends shivers down the spine of extreme bargain hunters every-where. The Lake City Mall will open at midnight, and Belk will have sales from then to 1 p.m. Will Batte, the store manager, said the sale Belk runs this Black Friday is called, in retail lingo, an early bird sale. He said the first 250 customers will receive a gift card ranging from $5 to $1,000. The shopping fun doesn’t end on Friday. “It’s a whole shopping weekend,” he said. Sales will continue until Monday. He said Black Friday is the top sales day for most retail stores, including Belk. He said that last year the store opened at 3 a.m. and had around 500 people waiting in line. He said because the competition will be opening earlier, so will Belk. Gayle Cruse, manager of the local JC Penny, will open the store at 6 a.m. The retail giant no longer runs sales, but Black Friday is special. Cruse said this is the only day of the year JC Penny runs a sale. Also, Curse said that JC Penny will kick off its button program. The program will give away 20 million prizes nationwide, she said. The buttons have a code on the back that the customer can redeem online. She said there’s no purchase necessary, and anyone who enters the store can ask for a button. At Walmart, the fun starts even before the clock strikes midnight. According to Reuters news service, Walmart will be open at 8 p.m. on Thanksgiving day. Walmart will have a second phase starting with new sales at 10 p.m. The store manager couldn’t be contacted to confirm these sales, and the number that was given for media relations didn’t respond to questions. While the big box stores open early and promise eye popping deals, most of the local retail stores downtown will be open, said George Ward, owner of Ward’s Jewelry and Gifts. Ward’s is starting a sale this Black Friday, but the sale will continue until he has sold out of the items. He said his hours will stay the same as always -9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Like retailers everywhere, stores around Lake City use the Opinion ................ 4APeople.................. 2AObituaries .............. 3A Advice & Comics ......... 3B Puzzles ................. 4B TODAY IN PEOPLE One Direction’s 2nd CD a hit. COMING FRIDAY Local news roundup. 71 39 Sunny WEATHER, 2A THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2012 | YOUR COMMUNIT Y NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | 75¢ LAKECITYREPORTER.COM CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 138, No. 212 1 FILEChristie Cantore, 17, helps her father Jim Cantore, The Weath er Channel meteorologist, solicit donations during his shift ringing for the Salvation Army in Lake City last year. By JASON KEYSERAssociated PressCHICAGO — Feeling the pinch of the sluggish economic recovery, many Americans setting out on the nation’s annual Thanksgiving migration had to sacrifice summer vacations, rely on rela-tives for airfare or scour the Web for travel deals to ensure they made it home. It’s not just tight family finances making travel tough. Airlines struggling to save on jet fuel and other expenses have cut the number of flights, leading to a jump in airfares. Those hitting the roads face high gas prices and rising tolls. Now, with talk of the nation sliding off a “fiscal cliff” come January, many travelers said they’re accepting that sacrifices for pricy holiday journeys have become the norm. “You become immune to it, I guess,” said Chris Zukowski, a 43-year-old locomo-tive engineer from the Chicago suburb of Huntley, as he hugged his wife and three children goodbye at Chicago’s O’Hare Airport and lamented he could not afford to join them on the holiday trip to New Jersey. “You have to cut back on things just to make sure that you can afford to do stuff like this, so they can go visit grandma,” he said, referring to his son and two daugh-ters. Weather was also upsetting some travel From staff reportsCANTON, Conn. — A husband and wife from Live Oak who were killed in a small plane crash in west-ern Connecticut were headed to a family funeral. According to published reports, 73-year-old Donald Derocher of Live Oak was to attend the funeral of his 96-year-old father. Derocher was piloting the plane and his wife, Josephine, was the passenger. The plane crashed late Monday on a ridge along Onion Mountain in Canton. It was headed to Simsbury. Bob Derocher, who lives in Coventry, said his brother was a good pilot and had flown many times to Connecticut where they lived before moving to Florida. He said he is in disbelief. The Federal Aviation Administration says the small plane was being tracked by Bradley International Airport and dropped off the radar. The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating.High hopes here for Black Friday Local, national retailers poisedfor big day. SALES continued on 3ALake City Reporter Live Oakcouplewas on way tofuneral PLANE CRASH Cruiser,garbage truck in crashFrom staff reportsA Columbia County sheriff’s cruiser and a garbage truck were involved in a traffic crash early Wednesday, according to the Florida Highway Patrol. No one was injured.According to FHP, the cruiser, driven by Chad H. Guerry, 24, no address given, was at a stop on southbound NW Lake City Avenue at 5 a.m. when the garbage truck, headed west in the right turn lane on US 90, continued past the inter-section to turn in at a convenience store. The cruiser, attempting to turn left onto eastbound US 90, struck the right front of the 1998 Peterbilt garbage truck, according to FHP. The garbage truck was driven by John L. Seguin, 54, of Lake City, FHP said. Damage to the cruiser was estimated at $5,500. No dameage was reported to the truck.Holiday travel a struggle Weather Channel star Cantore back to aid good causeFrom staff reportsAltrusa International of Lake City will kick off its annual Salvation Army Red Kettle bell-ringing campaign at Publix starting at 11 a.m. Friday with a special guest — The Weather Channel’s Jim Cantore. This will be Cantore’s third time attending the opening of the campaign. His sister, Carole Dotson of Lake City, said Cantore comes every year for the holidays to visit. She said he is active in many charitable causes, includ-ing the Salvation Army and the Red Cross. “He’s in the middle of such sad situations all the time and he helps when he can,” she said. Dotson said that Cantore will be at the Columbia High School football game Friday night. Cantore celebrated his 25th year at The Weather Channel last year and is the network’s top-rated meteorologist. Cantore is also a frequent contributor to NBC Nightly News, local NBC news programs and the Today show, where he is a frequent stand-in for Al Roker. Cantore was recently a guest on the David Letterman show while he was covering the dev-astation in New York City from Hurricane Sandy. BELLS continued on 3AASSOCIATED PRESSAn unidentified woman and her son mark a suitcase at the Jet Blue check-in area in the Fort Lauderdale airport T uesday as airport officials braced for a busy Thanksgiving travel season.Pinching pennies to make it back home TRAVEL continued on 3A

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HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter NEW YORK O ne Directions Take Me Home is the taking the boys to the top of the charts and to new heights. The groups sophomore album has sold 540,000 in its first week, according to Nielsen SoundScan. Its the years third-highest debut behind Taylor Swifts Red, which sold 1.2 million units its first week earlier this month, and Mumford & Sons Babel, which sold more than 600,000 albums in September in its debut week. We just want to say a massive thanks to all the fans who have sup ported us, band member Harry Styles, 18, said in an interview Tuesday from London. We can send tweets and thank them, but 140 char acters is never going be enough to say how much it means. The album also debuted at No. 1 in the United Kingdom this week and is No. 1 in more than 30 coun tries, Columbia Records said. Ex-Price is Right model wins suit against show LOS ANGELES A jury says a former model on The Price is Right was discriminated against by producers because of her pregnancy. The Superior Court jury awarded $776,944 to Brandi Cochran on Tuesday after deliberations that began last week. City News Service reports that a second phase of the trial will deter mine whether Cochran should be awarded punitive damages. The 41-year-old Cochran is a former Miss USA. She claimed she was rejected by producers when she tried to rejoin The Price is Right in 2010 after taking maternity leave. FremantleMedia North America, one of the producers named in the suit, blamed the verdict on a flawed process. Lohan says return to red carpet feels great LOS ANGELES Lindsay Lohan arrived an hour late to the red car pet to celebrate the premiere of Liz & Dick but basked in the media frenzy saying it felt good to have the focus on her work as an actress. It feels great to be on a red carpet for working hard. It feels good, Lohan said. Lohan went for an old-Hollywood glamour look in a slinky ivory slip dress, her long hair wavy and parted on the side and ruby red lips. Lohan plays screen icon Elizabeth Taylor in the made-for-TV film about her romance with Richard Burton that airs on Lifetime Sunday at 9 p.m. Bieber wont face charge for May encounter LOS ANGELES Prosecutors decided not to file any charges against Justin Bieber after investigators found no evidence that the pop star had kicked and punched a photographer after leaving a movie theater in May, a document obtained Wednesday states. Prosecutors had been asked by police to consider filing a mis demeanor battery charge against Bieber, but investigators found no visible injuries or photographs to confirm the allegations by the photographer. Bieber, 18, was leaving the the ater in suburban Calabasas with girlfriend Selena Gomez on May 27 when the encounter occurred in a parking lot. CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Movie director Arthur Hiller is 89. Actor Robert Vaughn is 80. Actor Allen Garfield is 73. Animator and movie direc tor Terry Gilliam is 72. Actor Tom Conti is 71. Singer Jesse Colin Young is 71. Astronaut Guion Bluford is 70. International Tennis Hall of Famer Billie Jean King is 69. Rock musician-actor Steve Van Zandt (a.k.a. Little Steven) is 62. Rock musician Tina Weymouth (The Heads; Talking Heads; The Tom Tom Club) is 62. Retired MLB All-Star Greg Luzinski is 62. Rock musician Lawrence Gowan is 56. AROUND FLORIDA Mans neighbors awarded $1.6M GOODLAND A southwest Florida jury awarded $1.65 million to neighbors of a man accused of taunting the neighborhood. Following a two-day trial last week, the Collier County jury agreed that 52-year-old Richard Blinkie Karnes had inflicted emotional distress and assaults on the five neighbors who sued him. The Naples Daily News reported neighbors had obtained restraining orders to keep Karnes from harassing them. They said he antagonized chil dren, cursed at them and threatened to toss them into a canal. Jurors awarded $1.1 million to Anna and Leo Popour, both 74. According to the newspa per, Karnes once sprayed Leo Popour with a chemi cal and threatened to do something bad to his home. Karnes told the newspa per he denied the allega tions in his answer to the lawsuit, filed in 2007. Woman reports turkey stolen OCALA An Ocala woman says thieves stole her Thanksgiving turkey from a freezer in her garage. The Ocala Star-Banner reported Joyce Romer called the Marion County Sheriffs Office Monday to report the theft of the 12.5pound bird. Romer said she asked her husband to get the turkey from the freezer so she could start defrosting it for their Thanksgiving Day meal. He went back in the house and asked, Whered you put the thing? The Romers checked the freezer again, but there was no turkey inside. Romer said she guesses someone was hungry. But shes puzzled that the thief didnt take the beer she had stored in the garage. Deputies noted that Romer didnt want an investigation, she simply wanted to document the theft. And, she bought a new turkey. Justices decide rear-end cases TALLAHASSEE The Florida Supreme Court says the second driver is not automatically solely at fault in rear end collisions. The justices on Thursday unanimously ruled in two conflicting cases that juries should be allowed to compare the negligence of each driver. They upheld one appel late court ruling that came to the same conclusion in Seminole County case and quashed another in a Palm Beach County case. The 4th District Court of Appeal reversed a trial judges decision that Maria Cevallos, the rear driver, was solely at fault in the Palm Beach case. Cevallos now will be able to argue that blame should be shared by the front driver, who was on her cellphone and sudden ly slammed on the brakes before also rear-ending a car in front of her. Neighbor charged with killing turkey GULF BREEZE Investigators say a neighbor and his friend used a bow and arrow to shoot and kill a Panhandle familys pet turkey for their Thanksgiving dinner. Sheriffs deputies arrest ed two Santa Rosa County teens on Monday. Theyre charged with armed bur glary, armed trespassing, theft of livestock and ani mal cruelty. The teens told depu ties they planned to eat the 30-pound turkey for Thanksgiving. One Directions 2nd CD hits No. 1 Wednesday: Afternoon: 0-2-0 Evening:N/A Wednesday: Afternoon: 4-1-9-3 Evening: N/A Tuesday: 13-16-17-28-34 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAIL Y BRIEFING THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2012 Page Editor: Jm Barr, 754-0424 2AWEATHER I always thank my God for you because of his grace given you in Christ Jesus. For in him you have been enriched in every way with all kinds of speech and with all knowledge. Corinthians 1:4-5 Daily Scripture ASSOCIATED PRESS One Direction members (from left) Niall Horan, Zayn Malik, Louis Tomlinson, Liam Payne and Harry Styles released their second album, Take Me Home, which instantly shot to the top of the charts. ASSOCIATED PRESS Veterinarian Dr. Maya Rodriguez (left) and John Cassady, of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission, tend to a manatee calf that was rescued in a canal in Key Largo, Fla., on Tuesday. Named Pilgrim for the Thanksgiving holiday, the manatee likely was struck by a boat. It was transported to the Miami Seaquarium, where it is expected to recover, Rodriguez said. Associated Press Associated Press Lohan Bieber

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Doris Jean Anderson Ms. Doris Jean Anderson, age 58 resident of Lake City, Fl. passed away November 11, 2012 at the Lake City Medical Center, terminating a sudden illness. She leaves to cherish her memo ries; Jessie Lee Anderson, (2) Sons, Adrian Anderson, and Davontay Anderson; (4) Daugh ters, Serina Williams, Shelethea Harris (Ron), Chandrice Wil liams and Adana Kelsey. (1) Sis ter, June Campbell, 15 Grand children, and 3 Great Grand. Funeral services for the late Ms. Doris Jean Anderson will be held Saturday, November 24, 2012 at 2:00pm at the Cooper Funeral Home Chapel, Pastor, Luvisa will follow in the Garden of Rest Cemetery in Lake City, Fl. Arrangements Entrusted to: COOPER FUNERAL HOME 251 N.E. Washing ton St. Lake City, Florida, 32055, Willis O. Cooper, L.F.D. Carrie Pearl Crawford Ms. Carrie Pearl (Perry) Craw ford, age 89, resident of Bar tow, Florida and former resi dent of Lake City, Florida died November 10th at the Bartow Nursing and Rehab Center terminating an extended ill ness. Born in Lake Park, Ga., she was the daughter of the late Mr. Columbus Perry and Mrs. Essie Mae (Dixion) Perry. She was educated in the public schools of Hamilton County. She is preceded in death by her son, Wilson Holton, Jr. and be loved sisters and brothers, Mary Lee Howell, Rev. W.J. Perry, Jeanne Mae Perry, Nelson Perry, Darnithel Per ry, and Mansie Perry. Those who will cher ish her memo ries of a joyful life include two sisters-inlaws, Pearlie Mae Perry of Jacksonville, Fl., and Annie Bell Perry of Live Oak, Fl. Rev L.C. Hunt Pastor; ment will follow in the Bethle hem Baptist Church Cemetery. Arrangements Entrusted to: COOPER FUNERAL HOME 251 N.E. Washing ton St., Lake City, Fl. 32055, Willis O. Cooper, L.F.D. Johnny Dixon Elder, Johnny Dixon, age 69, resident of Lake City, Florida passed November 17, 2012 at the Shands Hospital in Live Oak, Fl., terminating a brief ill ness. Born on August 12, 1943 to the late Bishop, Chief Apostle Jessie Dixon and Mrs. Bernice Bell Dixon of Lake City, Fl. He was educated in the public schools of Columbia County and graduated from Richardson High School with the Class of 1962. He leaves to cherish his memo ries: (1) son, Dr. Lorenzo L. Dixon, PHD; (8) Siblings, Shirly Jesse Dixon Jr. (Veronica), Dea., Willie Dixon (Barbara), Felton Dixon, Bernard Dix on (Eunice), Evang., Rose Lee, Pastor, Leonard Dix on (Co-Pastor Elaine), Mi chael Johnson (Wilunda) all of Lake City, Florida. (1) Surviv ing Uncle Mr. Johnnie Dixon of Madison, Fl. A devoted longtime spiritual friend and overseer, Richard L. Jones Jr. of Waldo, Fl. And a host of nieces, neph ews, cousins, and dear friends. Funeral services for the late El der, Johnny Dixon will be on Saturday, November 24, 2012 at 11:00 am at St. Paul Missionary Baptist Church, Lake City, Fl. The family will receive friends Friday, November 23, 2012 from 5:00pm until 7:00pm at the Cooper Funeral Home Cha pel. Arrangements Entrusted to: COOPER FUNERAL HOME 251 N.E. Washing ton St., Lake City, Fl., 32055, Willis O. Cooper, L.F.D. Bessie Lee Sheppard There is a time for everything and a season for every activity under heaven: A time to be born and a time to die. Ecclesiastes 3:1-2 Mrs. Bessie Lee Sheppard en tered into eternal rest on No vember 16, 2012. She was born February 2, 1924 in Lake City, Florida. Parents, Louis Mur phy and Su sie Bell Perry preceded her in death. Mrs. Sheppard was educated in the schools of Colum bia County. She was united in Holy Mat rimony to Obidhe Shep pard in September 1948. He precedes her in death also. She leaves many family members and friends to cherish memories. Funeral services for Mrs. Bessie Lee Sheppard will be 11:00 a.m. Saturday, November 24, 2012 at Mt. Tabor A.M.E. Church. 2 SW L.M. Aaron Drive. Lake City, FL.,Rev. Robert Postell, Pas tor of the church. Rev. Linton Arrangements entrusted to COMBS FUNERAL HOME 292 NE Washington Street. Lake City, FL. (386) 752-4366. The Caring Professionals Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2012 3A 3A statefarm.com With competitive rates and personal service, its no wonder more drivers trust State Farm Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there. CALL FOR A QUOTE 24/7. Ride with the #1 car insurer in 1001143.1 State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company State Farm Indemnity Company Bloomington, IL John Kasak, Agent 904 SW SR 247 Branford Hwy Lake City, FL 32025 Bus: 386-752-7521 johnkasak.com John Burns III, Agent 234 SW Main Boulevard Lake City, FL 32056 Bus: 386-752-5866 johnburnsinsurance.com FLORIDA. Lake City 183 SW Bascom Norris Dr. Gville E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunters Walk 5115 NW 43rd St. Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St. Shands at UF Room H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Alachua 14759 NW 157th Ln. Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E. Silver Springs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. Summer eld 17950 US Hwy. 441 Tallahassee 1511 Killearn Center Blvd. Apply online at campuscu.com or call 754-9088 and press 4 today! Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Columbia and Suwannee counties 2 APR Fixed 1 1. Offer does not apply to existing CAMPUS loans. Offer is for new loans only. Credit approval, sufficient income, adequate property valuation (maximum LTV of 70%), and first mortgage position are required Owner-occupied property only. Offer excludes mobile homes; certain other restrictions apply. Property insurance is required; an appraisal, flood and/or title insurance may be requ ired at an additional expense to the borrower. If loan is paid in full within the first 24 months, closing costs paid by CAMPUS will be added to the loan payoff amount. Example: a $105,000 loan at 3.25% for 120 months would require 119 monthly payments of $1,026.27 and one final payment of $1,022.09, total finance charge of $18,343.93; for a total of payments of $123,151.93. The amount finance d is $104,808.00 the APR is 3.288%. APR=Annual Percentage Rate. 2. Credit approval and initial deposit of $5 required. Mention this ad and well waive the $15 new member fee. This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration. % Other rates and terms also available! Bust out of your 30-year mortgage! Free n Clear IN 1 0 YEARS you have 3 0 % or more equity in your hom e ... you want to avoid high closing cost s ... I F Pay off your home in 1 0 years! TOTAL CLOSING COSTS 1 (Loans of $200,000 or less) 10-year FIXED APR 1 First Mortgage (Please call for other rates & terms) Apply Now! SALES: Black Friday Continued From Page 1A BELLS: Theyll be ringing in Lake City come Friday Continued From Page 1A holiday rush to generate revenue to balance out the slower periods. We are ready for Christmas business and we all depend on Christmas business, Ward said. The money that gets turned over here, stays here, he said. Paul Mabile, owner of Morrells Home Furnishings, said everything in his store will be on sale this Black Friday. Mabile said that his store will open at 9 a.m. and close at 6 p.m. While the bigger stores open early, he said even if he wanted to, he wouldnt. We feel like we take care of our employees a lot bet ter then the big guys, he said. Obituaries are paid advertise ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporters classified depart ment at 752-1293. OBITUARIES Earlier this year, Cantore was in the area covering Tropical Storm Debby. On Dec. 12 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Heni Onodi Haley also will ring the red bell for the Salvation Army as a special guest. Haley is a gold medal Olympic gymnast. She lives in Lake City but was born and raised in Hungary. She competed in the 1992 and 1996 Olympics, various world championships, the Goodwill Games and World University Games. She won a number of gold, silver and bronze medals while competing in gymnastics. Altrusa will cover about 220 hours of bell ringing at Publix this holiday season. The jingle of the bells will be heard between 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. on weekdays. On Friday at 11 a.m., Cantore will be available to take pictures and sign autographs. He will stay for one hour. From staff reports TALLAHASSEE A suspended Madison County supervisor of elec tions is seeking dismissal of charges against her in a voting fraud case. A hearing set for Wednesday in Tallahassee on the request from Jada Woods Williams, though, has been delayed until Jan. 30. Gov. Rick Scott suspended Woods Williams as Madison Countys top election official after she was charged with neglect of duty and corrupt prac tices a year ago. Eight other people were charged in connection with the case, includ ing Madison County School Board member Abra Tina Johnson, who also was suspended. They were accused of fraudulently obtaining absentee ballots to help Johnson win election in 2010. Williams case was moved to Leon County at her request. Six defen dants, meanwhile, have filed motions to dismiss in Madison. The remaining two defendants resolved their cases through pretrial intervention. Madison elections officials hearing delayed TRAVEL: Friday Continued From Page 1A plans. Dense fog in the Chicago area forced the cancel lation of 90 inbound and outbound flights at the citys two airports Wednesday morning, according to flight stats.com. More than 400 other flights were delayed at OHare and Midway. Visibility was near zero at both airports for several hours, said National Weather Service meteorologist Richard Castro. The fog was expected to lift as the day progressed.

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S eemingly not a day goes by when there aren’t recalls, warn-ings and outright bans on Chinese exports. China, it seems, became the world’s largest exporter by its willingness to export anything Even when tests on Chinese consumers proved that the products were hazardous, if not downright lethal, Chinese exporters con-tinued to ship their products to unsuspecting countries. ... It’s all because, according to a business website that monitors Chinese products, quality control and food-safety regulations tend to be “lax or nonexistent.” That’s why the news that China plans to build the tallest skyscraper in the world, to be named “Sky City,” and, more-over, complete it in 90 days, has drawn a lot of skepticism. Generally, the public gets excited about the planned construction of some huge, new technical marvel, say the Hindenburg or the Titanic, but news of Sky City was greeted with restraint. The company building Sky City has employed many of the engineers and architects who worked on construction of the Burj Khalifa in Dubai, at 2,717 feet the world’s tallest building at the moment. ... The Broad Sustainable Building Co. plans a work schedule of five floors a day, a timetable to be achieved by building much of the skyscrap-er offsite in modular form. And the company does have a track record of sorts. Using the modular technology, it completed a 30-story hotel in 15 days in China in December 2011, which 11 months later “is still standing ...” Words per-haps not quite as reassuring as they were meant to sound. The Burj Khalifa cost $1.5 billion, about $450 per square foot; Sky City, the company claims, will cost $628 million or $63 a square foot. Those figures have aroused suspicions, among them those of an associate director of a Mideast engineering firm who told an Arabian business web-site, “If you are doing it for half of the cost it suggests you are only putting half of the materi-als in there, which means you will only have half the stiffness and half the strength. I think this is not going to fly.” Worse yet, the building might actually fly — literally. At over a half-mile long, it could take out a lot of neigh-borhoods before it finally landed. The company says it can withstand 9.0 earthquakes and resist fire for up to three hours. Sky City is designed to house 31,400 people, along with offices, shops, hospitals and restaurants all serviced by 104 high-speed elevators, which of course won’t work in an emergency. “The Towering Inferno” and the various accounts of the 9/11 attacks on the Twin Towers (106 stories) will prob-ably be missing from the Big Sky library. The building may take only 90 days to build, but it could also take almost as long to evacuate. China plans tallest building OUR OPINION HIGHLIGHTS IN HISTORY On this date:In 1718, English pirate Edward Teach — better known as “Blackbeard” — was killed during a battle off present-day North Carolina. In 1862, Giuseppe Verdi’s opera “La Forza del Destino” had its world premiere in St. Petersburg, Russia. In 1928, “Bolero” by Maurice Ravel (rah-VEL’) was first per-formed, in Paris. In 1930, listeners of the British Broadcasting Corp. heard, for the first time, radio coverage of an American col-lege football game as Harvard defeated Yale, 13-0. In 1935, a flying boat, the China Clipper, took off from Alameda, Calif., carrying more than 100,000 pieces of mail on the first trans-Pacific airmail flight. In 1954, the Humane Society of the United States was incorporated as the National Humane Society. T he question to be asked about the ter-rorist attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi is simple: Have the lessons learned three decades ago about who and what are needed to physically protect American interests over-seas been forgotten? The lapses during the Carter administra-tion — which resulted in both the Iranian hostage crisis in 1979 and Moscow bugging of the U.S. Embassy in Moscow in the early ‘80s led ultimately to security reforms within the State Department. But the attack in Libya that killed Ambassador Christopher Stevens and three other Americans — a disaster that apparently had been in the mak-ing for some time — appears to have come about in a policy shift that downgraded protec-tions for American embassies and personnel throughout the Middle East. Stevens may or may not have been in Benghazi for a covert nighttime meet-ing that he thought was safe with minimal personal security. Certainly, the consulate itself was not well-enough protected. The minimalist approach to security advocated by the “black dragons” — career foreign ser-vice officers who have risen to the upper echelons of the State Department — that stimulated a major overhaul during the Reagan White House following a study by Adm. Bobby Inman appeared to be creeping back into vogue under Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton. There have been some $300 million cuts in the department’s security bud-get despite the obvious continu-ing threat to U.S personnel and interests in the world’s biggest tinderbox. Al-Qaida operatives throughout the Middle East as well as Europe are constantly searching for soft targets as opposed to the bigger embassies, which are well fortified and reinforced by Marine detachments. Obviously a consulate in Benghazi was high on their list. They seemed to have been able to track the movement of Stevens and Sean Smith, a Foreign Service infor-mation officer. The ambassador’s popularity among several of the key factions in Libya also worked against him by giving him a false sense of security, accord-ing to those close to the situ-ation. The two highly trained former Navy SEALs with him — Tyrone Woods and Glen Doherty — while capable enough, were overwhelmed. There have been unverified rumors that the SEALs had been able to laser target the attackers from a rooftop to call in an air strike. If that was the case, either help didn’t get there in time or, for whatever reason, was called back. What appears indisputable are these facts. The tragedy was aided and abetted by seri-ous budget cuts, refusal to heed numerous warnings that Libya was increasingly unstable, and failure to respond to several requests for beefed-up forces. Why the State Department’s policy and budget wonks refused to shift money to make up the cuts in security is anyone’s guess, but election pressures on the administration to bring the budget into balance may have played a role. Gen. David Patraeus’ statements may be true that the CIA knew from the start of the attack that it was not a demon-stration gone bad but did not announce that in an effort to protect vital intelligence about terrorist activities. It is, how-ever, a pretty lame excuse. That was compounded by the admin-istration’s decision to put the spotlight on U.N. Ambassador Susan Rice as a possible replacement for Clinton, who has announced her intention to retire. Rice knew little about the incident nor was that her area of expertise. Accused on Capitol Hill of playing politics, Obama seemed to want to have it both ways by giving Rice exposure but denying that this was politi-cally motivated. Expect much more of this tit-for-tat in the coming weeks. Historically, Congress closes the gate after the animals have fled. So one can expect not only a thorough examination of what went wrong, but an action or overreaction in fixing it. This tragedy is not going away and the president can expect to enter his second term facing a major crisis in how he protects American men and women abroad. Going back to the days when security was in the hands of an “admin” officer answer-ing to the striped-pants set that never thought it necessary is certain to produce more tragedies. Whatever it takes to fortify and defend our embassies should be spent. We already have trouble with outsourcing protective services to private contractors, so why not beef up the Bureau of Diplomatic Security and make sure there are enough Marines with the firepower to hold off the terror-ists until help arrives? Beef up embassy security ANOTHER VIEW T o his credit, even though he was at the center of a burgeon-ing scandal, former CIA Director David Petraeus had sense enough to see that the leader of the nation’s principal intelligence agency could not deal with both a personal scandal and, simulta-neously, answer tough questions about his agency’s role in the Benghazi attack that claimed four American lives. Members of Congress insist on getting to the bottom of what happened in the consul-ate attack in Libya, as well they should. They need to know what the CIA knew and when, whether it failed to provide timely intelligence to the White House and the rest of the gov-ernment. Above all, they need to investigate whether lives were lost due to intelligence failures by the CIA or any other U.S. agency. Petraeus decided to deal with his twin headaches by getting ahead of the personal scandal and making the issue of his own leadership moot. He resigned before detractors demanded his scalp so that he could face the Benghazi controversy squarely, without having his continuing role as head of the CIA come under fire. ... Don’t make this a partisan issue. ... Petraeus, now out of government, has volunteered to testify at the hearings. Let’s hear what he has to say before jumping to unwarranted conclusions. Let’s hear Petraeus’ Benghazi story first Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding counties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, publisher Robert Bridges, editor Sue Brannon, controller Dink NeSmith, president Tom Wood, chairman LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY E-MAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com T here’s plenty to be thankful for here in Columbia County. For most, a simple look out the window will tell you why. We live in a near-pristime setting surrounded by woods, water and a rolling green lans-cape we’d put up against any-place else in Florida. We live in peace and relative calm, certainly compared to much of the rest of the Sunshine State. Perhaps most importantly, we live among folks who aren’t afraid to reach out and help their neighbors, good times or bad. Lately, times have been tough. But year in and year out, friends and neighbors are always there to help. They are here today, and they’ll be here tomorrow and throughout the holiday season. What’s more, they’ll be here when all the holiday hoopla has died away and folks are ready to just get on with the business of living. That’s just one of the many things we’re thankful for. Thanks Q The Miami Herald OPINION Thursday, November 22, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A4AOPINION Q Dale McFeatters is editorial writer for Scripps Howard News Service. Dale McFeattersmcfeattersd@shns.com Dan K. Thomasson Q Dan K. Thomasson is former editor of Scripps Howard News Service.

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Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2012 5A 5A RED DOT: *Limited exclusions in Brighton, St. John, Eileen Fisher, Lilly Pulitzer, Resort, Bridge Collection, Levis, Coach, designer handbags and junior denim. Juniors total savings are 70-80% off. Fashion Accessories, Handbags, Small Leather Goods, Hosiery, Home Store and Mens Tailored Clothing total savings are 60-75%. COUPONS NOT VALID ON RED DOT r e d d o t 7 5 % & more 50 % o ff the current ticketed price* when you take an e x tra save *see back cover. 250 Belk gift cards per store valued anywhere from $5 to $1,000 will be given away on Friday, Nov. 23 starting at 12AM. *While quantities last. Limit one per customer. Must be 18 or older to receive a gift card. Excludes belk.com. See store for details. customers at each store 250 1000 winner in every store $ FREE 12am o ve r 330 E a rly 12 AM 1 PM EXTRA 20 % OFF 20 12AM-1PM FRIDAY, NOV. 23 with your Belk Rewards Card LIMITED TIME OFFER regular & sale purchases* storewide 15% OFF home and shoes OR with this shopping pass 15% OFF reg. & sale purchases* storewide 10% OFF home and shoes *Only excludes Red Dot, Clearance, EarlyBirds, Night Owls, Doorbusters, Bonus Buys, Everyday Values, Alegria, All Clad, Austin Reed, Ben Sherman, Brighton, b.temptd, Buffalo, Casio, Citizens of Humanity, Coach, Cole Haan, Columbia, cosmetics/fragrances, Dansko, designer handbags, designer sunglasses, Dockers, Donald J Pliner, Dooney & Bourke, Eileen Fisher; Fine Jewelry watches, trunk shows and service plans; Free People, Furla, Gear For Sports, Hanky Panky, Hart Schaffner Marx, Herend, Hickey Freeman, Hugo Boss, Joseph Abboud, Kate Spade, Keen, kitchen/novelty electrics/coffee, Lacoste, Gameday, ladies better swim, ladies designer & contemporary sportswear & dresses; ladies, kids & mens designer shoes; Le Creuset, Levis, Lilly Pulitzer, Lucky, Mattel, Merrell, Minnetonka Moccasin, Miss Me, Munro, Nautica, Original Penguin, Ralph Lauren/Polo, Roberto Coin, Seven for All Mankind, Spanx, Stuart Weitzman, Thomas Dean, Tommy Bahama, Tumi, Ugg, Under Armour, Vineyard Vines, Wacoal, Wusthof; nonmerchandise depts., lease depts. and Belk gift cards. Not valid on prior purchases or special orders. Cannot be redeemed for cash, credit or refund, used in combination with any other discount or coupon offer. Valid 12AM-1PM November 23, 2012. 84805533 EXTRA 16 99 Heart pendant. Made with Swarovski Elements. Orig. 70.00. Plus, 75% off ENTIRE STOCK Belk Silverworks. Orig. 26.00-180.00 Sale 6.50-45.00 Coupon Excluded 19 9 9 Kim Rogers Sweaters For misses & petites. Orig. 40.00-52.00 In Todays Woman at slightly higher prices. Coupon Excluded 40-50 % off ENTIRE STOCK Coffeemakers and accessories Orig. 6.99-329.99 Sale 4.99-229.99 After Extra 15% off 4.24-195.49 Coupon Excluded after extra 15% off Shop all offers, including EarlyBirds, anytime Thanksgiving Day at belk.com o ve Shop all offers, including EarlyBirds, anytime Thanksgiving Day at belk.com 9 9 9 Chaps sweaters In solid crew, v-neck & striped styles In assorted colors. Orig. 59.50 Coupon Excluded 19 99 Rampage boots Choose from a large selection Shown, Baxter. Orig. 59.00-89.00 Coupon Excluded bu y 1 ge t, 2 free ENTIRE STOCK mens casual & dress pants from Savane Izod & Haggar In straight, slim & classic fits. Orig. 59.50-70.00 *Free items must be of equal or lesser value. **Haggar Life Khaki pants not included. Coupon Excluded FRI. 12 AM 10 PM EARLIEST OPENING EVER Connect with us for special offers and promotions at Belk.com/getconnected A Thanksgiving dinner to die for From the Columbia County Extension Office After a great meal, sometimes we say that was to die for. However, if proper measures arent taken during the holidays, illness could become a reality. There are several factors to consider when planning for holiday parties. One important factor is keeping the food safe. The USDA recommends a few turkey basics to keep safe from foodborne ill nesses. If you buy a fresh turkey, cook it within two days of purchase. If you prefer a frozen turkey, you can defrost the turkey in the refrigerator. It takes about 24 hours for every five pounds of bird. Another safe alternative for defrosting a frozen turkey is to submerge the turkey in cold water, changing the water every 30 minutes until the turkey is thawed. You dont want the temperature of the water to get above 41 degrees Fahrenheit. Never thaw the turkey on the kitchen counter at room temperature. Once thawed, cook the bird immedi ately. Make sure to clean and sanitize the areas where raw turkey juice may have been. Food should be refrigerated within four hours, if kept out of the temperature dan ger zone, (41F to 140F). If the food is left out at room tempera ture, then it should be refrigerated within two hours or discarded. Food in the tem perature danger zone can be dangerous because bacteria grows at a faster rate, and can cause foodborne illnesses like ecoli & salmonella. While you want your family feasts to be memorable, using precautions to keep your family safe from foodborne illness will help make sure you remember the feast for the right reasons! Tips for safe turkey frying From the Columbia County Extension Office Dont overfill the oil. Place the fryer on a flat surface to prevent it from tipping over. Always use the fryer out side away from buildings. Keep in mind while thawing not to let the tur key get over 40 degrees Fahrenheit. Make sure the turkey is not partially frozen. The ice crystals turn into water when thawing, and OIL AND WATER DO NOT MIX. Turn off flames when lowering turkey into the fryer. In case of fire, do not add water. If fire occurs, first, turn off energy source, sec ond use a fire extinguisher. If you do not have an extin guisher use salt or baking soda. Remember never leave the fryer, or any open flame, unattended. Remember, its the turkey you want to cook, not you! Give yourself plenty of time to have the turkey cooked, and after its cooked, you can keep it warm in the oven at a minimum of 150 degrees Fahrenheit until time to serve. Healthy holidays really are possible From the Columbia County Extension Office As the holidays quickly approach, so do dinner par ties. Lets focus on ways to enjoy the holiday treats, while creating healthy ver sions of holiday favorites. When most folks think holidays, they think cakes, cookies, pies and more. While there is no such thing as a bad food, you truly CAN have too much of a good thing. This holiday try to reduce the amount of sweets you eat. For example, before head ing for the desert table, pick up something from the veg etable tray. Try and have more fresh foods available at your holiday celebra tions. Also see if you can find a healthier version of your holiday favorites. For example, try some of these substitutes to reduce not only sugar but also fat and calories: Make cakes and cup cakes with a box mix & 100% Pure Pumpkin (15 oz can), then bake according to directions thus reduc ing the calories and fat that would have been added by eggs and oil. Use portion control! You can have a slice of pie, cake, even one or two cookies, just dont get a helping of every sweet available. Talk between eating. This gives your brain, and stom ach, time to signal when its full. This might prevent the wobble after youve gobbled.

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Today Thanksgiving dinner First Presbyterian Church invites the commu nity to a free Thanksgiving Day dinner from 1130 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in the churchs fellowship hall, 697 SW Baya Drive. We will serve all the traditional turkey meal items, including des serts and drinks. This is our 12th annual dinner, and we served about 500 people last year. Free dinner Fort White United Methodist Church, 185 Sw Well St. in Fort White, will be serving free Thanksgiving dinner from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. The meal will include turkey, ham and all the fixings. Nov. 23 Fish dinner Our Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5056 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, pre pares fish dinners every Friday from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The dinner is $6 for two Alaskan pollock filets, corn, baked beans, hush puppies, cole slaw and tarter sauce. Take out or eat in. Winter program The Boys and Girls Club of Columbia County, on Jones Way in Lake City, is now accepting registra tions for its winter pro gram, which will run Dec. 1 through March 1. The fee is $200, which includes transportation from all ele mentary, middle and high schools. The club offers a variety of activities, includ ing sports, arts and crafts, game room, livrary and special events. It also offers a homework program with tutorial help for children. A computer lab also is avail able. For more information, call the club at 752-4184. Nov. 24 Craft Festival Local artists and craft ers are invited to partii pate in the second annual Holiday Craft Festival at the Lake DeSoto Farmers Market from 8 a.m. until noon. The festival will highlight local artists and crafters whose original work will be for sale, in addition to foods grown by area farmers. Vendor applications are available at market.lcfla.com. Fees are $10 per market day, plus tax. Live music will be provided by Quartermoon, from High Springs. The farmers Market is open every Saturday from 8 to noon in Wilson Park, along Lake DeSoto between the Columbia County Courthouse and Shands Lakeshore Hospital in downtown Lake City. For more information about the market, call (386) 719-5766 or visit market.lcfla.com. Country-Western night The Pride of B&S Combs Elks Temple will be have its annual Country-Western Night. Come out and enjoy an evening with the Elks family. Donation is $10 per person. Nov. 27 Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon at the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane, to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. Nov. 28 Senators staff visit Staff members of U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio will be available to help area resi dents with issues involving federal agencies from 1:30 to 4 p.m. at the Lifestyle Enrichment Center, 628 SE Allison Court. For more information, all Rubios Jacksonville Regional Office at (904) 398-8586. Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Wednesday from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Fort White Public Library on Route 47to answer ques tions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. Nov. 29 Brain health class Maintain Your Brain at the Lifestyle Enrichment Center, 628 SE Allison Court, from 10 to 11:30 a.m. This free presentation explores insights about what a person can do to maintain life-long brain health. Attendees will learn basic brain facts, ways to keep memories sharp and the close connection between brain health and heart health. Call (800) 272-3900 to register or for more information. Landlords to meet Lake City area landlords will meet at the IHOP res taurant. Dinner will be at 5 p.m., and the program will begin at 6. Columbia County Fire Chief David Boozer will be the speak er. Call (386) 755-0110 for more information. Nov. 30 Hospital garage sale The auxiliary at Shands Lakeshore Hospital will have a garage sale from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the hospi tals first-floor conference room and outside for larger items. Dec. 1 Breakfast with chief Lake City Police Chief Argatha Gilmore will have her quarterly community meeting, Breakfast With The Chief, from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at the Public Safety Building. The event is an opportunity for community members to discuss issues or concerns with Gilmore. A complimentary breakfast will be available. For more information, contact Audre Washington, police depart ment community relations coordinator, at (386) 7195742. Grief support The Grief Share Support Group, a ministry of Orchard Community Church, meets every Saturday from 2 to 4 p.m. in room D at the Willowbrook Assisted Living center, 1580 S. Marion Ave. The group offers caring sup port for those who have lost a loved one, through videos, discussion time, and prayer. There are fees. For information call 2887429. Union Garrison Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave. in Fernandina Beach, will host a Union Garrison event today and Sunday. The program will allow visi tors to interact with living historians to experience life in the fort as it was in 1864. Soldiers in period costumes will conduct fir ing demonstrations, march ing drills, cooking and daily activities. Ladies in period dresses will be preparea Christmas tree and deco rate the mantles for the holiday season. Sutlers will display their wares, and drummer boys will project the sounds of the Civil War era. Activities will be held from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. today and 9 a.m. to noon Sunday. For additional information, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www. FloridaStateParks.org. Dec. 5 Book sale fundraiser The auxiliary at Shands Lakeshore Hospital will hold a Christmas book sale to support the hospital from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the firstfloor cafe at the hospital. Builders association Columbia County Builders Association will hold a General Council lunch at Guang Dong res taurant in the Lake City Mall. The sponsor is the Foundation Professionals Inc. of Florida. The speaker will be Sgt. David Greene from Crime Prevention Division of the Columbia County Sheriffs Office. The winning ticket for our raffle will be drawn, with a prize of either a $500 golf gift certificate for County Club of Lake City Pro Shop, a 20-gauge shotgun or an iPad from Verizon. We will also have the 50-50 HammerClaw drawing for a jackpot of $275. Reservations are appreciated and can be made by calling (386) 867-1998. Tickets are $12 for members and $15 for non-members.Arrive about 11:30 to enjoy the buffet. The meeting will start at 12:00 noon. Dec. 6 Book sale fundraiser The auxiliary at Shands Lakeshore Hospital will hold a Christmas book sale to support the hospi tal from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the first-floor cafe at the hospital. Dec. 8 Breakfast with Santa Come join us at Holiday Inn & Suites for breakfast with Santa from 8 to11 a.m. The event will include a breakfast buffet with scram bled eggs, bacon, sausage, biscuits and gravy, juice, coffee, hot chocolate and a waffle station. Enjoy holi day music, fun and fellow ship, complete with a visit from Santa. Cost is $9.95 for adults and $4.95 for chil dren ages 3 to 12. Proceeds will benefit the Childrens Medical Services of North Florida. A collection box for donations of unwrapped toys also will be available. For more information, call (386) 754-1411. Canned food giveaway North Side Church of Christ, 378 NW Gibson Lane, will have a canned food giveaway from 8 a.m. to noon. Anyone in need is welcome. For more infor mation, contact the church office at 755-0393, by email secretarynscofc@gmail. com or visit the church website, Thenorthsidecoc. org. Dec. 9 Holiday cantata Covenant First Presbyterian Church (for merly First Presbyterian) of Live Oak will present the Christmas cantata, God with Us Emmanuel, by Phillip Young on at 6:00 p.m. Bill Poplin will be directing. The church is off U.S. 90 on White Avenue in Live Oak. For more information, contact Bill Poplin at 365-4932. Dec. 11 Medicare seminar Lifestyle Enrichment Center is sponsoring a free Medicare seminar from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. The seminar will be moderat ed by Irv Crowetz of C/C & Associates. Subjects to be covered include: what you need to know about Medicare, when to enroll, whats covered and when a supplement is needed. Call 755-3475 ext. 107 to reserve a seat. Dec. 13 Woodturners Club Bell Woodturners Club meets the second Thursday of the month in the Bell community Center at 7 p.m. Every meeting features a show and tell of members current projects. There is also a full demon stration of a woodturning project by a club member. There are opportunities to take home project wood, tools and receive help from other turners. All experi ence levels are welcome. For additional info contact Kent Harriss at 365-7086. Dec. 14 Class reunion Columbia High School classes of 1949 through 1953 will have a reunion luncheon at 11:30 a.m. at Mason City Community Center. All former CHS stu dents are welcome. Bring a covered dish to share. For more information, contact Julia Osburn at 752-7544 or Morris Williams at 7524710. Dec. 21 Quilt raffle Columbia County Senior Services will raffle a sam pler quilt to support the center. Tickets are $1 and the drawing will be held Dec. 21. See Carol for tick ets. Jan. 8 Medicare seminar Lifestyle Enrichment Center is sponsoring a free Medicare seminar from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. The seminar will be moderat ed by Irv Crowetz of C/C & Associates. Subjects to be covered include: what you need to know about Medicare, when to enroll, whats covered and when a supplement is needed. Call 755-3475 ext. 107 to reserve a seat. Ongoing Winter program The Boys and Girls Club of Columbia County, on Jones Way in Lake City, is now accepting registra tions for its winter pro gram, which will run Dec. 1 through March 1. The fee is $200, which includes transportation from all ele mentary, middle and high schools. The club offers a variety of activities, includ ing sports, arts and crafts, game room, livrary and special events. It also offers a homework program with tutorial help for children. A computer lab also is avail able. For more information, call the club at 752-4184. Woodturners Club Bell Woodturners Club meets the second Thursday of the month in the Bell com munity Center, Bell Florida at 7 p.m.. Every meeting features a show and tell of members current projects. There is also a full demon stration of a woodturning project by a club member. There are opportunities to take home project wood, tools and receive help from other turners. All experi ence levels are welcome. For additional info contact Kent Harriss at 365-7086. Photo club Lake City Photo Club meets every 2nd Tuesday 6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2012 Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 6A NOTICE Attention Humana Walmart Medicare Part D patients: We accept this plan and all other Part D plans. Baya East 755-6677 Baya West 755-2233 Medical 755-2277 Call one of our pharmacies to see which plan is best for you. John A. Kasak CLU CPCU 904 SW SR 247 Lake City, FL 32025 Bus: 386-752-7521 John W. Burns III, Agent 234 SW Main Blvd. Lake City, FL 32056 Bus: 386-752-5866 Happy Thanksgiving from your good neighbor agents. John Kasak and John Burns. TH E C I TY O F L A K E C I TY I S S E EK I N G A P P LI C A N TS T O F I L L A V A C A N C Y O N T H E P LA N N I N G A N D Z O N I N G B O A R D TH I S I S A V O LU N TA R Y P O S I TI O N A P P LI C A TI O N S A V A I LA BL E I N TH E C I TY C LE R K S O F F I C E LO C A TE D I N C I TY H A LL A T 205 N O R T H M A R I O N A V EN U E, L A K E C I TY F L O R I D A M O N D A Y F R I D A Y 8A M T O 5 P M O R WW W. 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T h i s Bo ard a ct s i n an ad v i s o ry cap a ci t y t h ro u g h reco m men d at i o n s t o t h e Ci t y Co u n ci l fo r fi n al act i o n T h e Pl an n i n g an d Z o n i n g Bo a rd me et s o n a mo n t h l y b as i s an d meet i n g s are h el d i n t h e Co u n ci l Ch amb ers l o cat ed i n Ci t y H al l N o t i ce o f al l me et i n g s i s p ro v i d ed t o t h e memb ers an d p o s t ed o n t h e b u l l et i n b o ard at Ci t y H al l at l eas t t w en t y fo u r (2 4 ) h o u rs i n ad v an ce o f t h e meet i n g an d i s s u b j ect t o Sect i o n 2 8 6 0 1 1 Fl o ri d a St at u t es ( Pu b l i c M eet i n g L a w ). A maj o r res p o n s i b i l i t y o f t h e Pl an n i n g Bo ard i s t h e man ag e men t an d u p d at e o f t h e Ci t y Co mp r eh en s i v e Pl an an d L an d U s e Reg u l at i o n s T h e Pl an n i n g Bo ard al s o fu n ct i o n s i n t h e d u al ro l e as t h e Z o n i n g Bo ard fo r t h e Ci t y an d s h al l h av e t h e d u t i es an d res p o n s i b i l i t i es as s et fo rt h i n t h e L an d U s e Reg u l at i o n s an d t h e Ci t y Co d e. Mo s t co m mo n amo n g t h e Z o n i n g Bo ard d u t i es i s t o rev i ew an d co n s i d er ci t i zen req u es t s fo r zo n i n g an d l an d u s e ch an g es s p eci al ex cep t i o n s o r v ari an ces t o cert ai n l an d u s e reg u l a t i o n s an d s u b d i v i s i o n o f p ro p ert y w i t h i n t h e Ci t y T h i s b o ard d o es n o t o p er at e u n d e r a s ep a rat e b u d g et T h e Ci t y D i re ct o r o f G ro w t h Man ag em en t p ro v i d es ad mi n i s t rat i v e s u p p o rt P l eas e n o t e me mb ers o f t h e Pl an n i n g an d Z o n i n g Bo ard s erv e d u al ro l es a n d al s o s erv e i n t h e cap aci t y o f t h e Bo a rd o f A d j u s t men t T h e Bo a rd o f A d j u s t men t m eet s o n an as n eed ed b as i s W he n a va c a nc y oc c ur s or a t e r m e xpi r e s on t he boa r d( s ) a ppl i c a t i ons w i l l be a c c e pt e d. A t t he di s c r e t i on of t he C i t y C ounc i l i nt e r vi e w s m a y b e s c he dul e d a nd, i f r e qui r e d, e ve r y a t t e m pt w i l l be m a de t o s c he dul e a n i nt e r vi e w a t your c onve ni e nc e A p p l i c at i on s m u s t b e t u r n e d i n t o t h e C i t y C l e r k s O f f i c e b y We d n e s d ay, N ove m b e r 28 2012 at n oon T h e C i t y C l e r k s O f f i c e i s l oc at e d at C i t y H al l 2 05 N or t h M ar i on A ve n u e L ak e C i t y, F l or i d a 32055 or a p p l i c at i o n s m ay b e e m a i l e d t o s i k e s a@ l c f l a. c om A U D R E Y E S I K E S M M C C i t y C l e r k COMMUNITY CALENDAR To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr@lakecityreporter.com.

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Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2012 7A7AHEALTHHealth care reform push under wayBy TOM MURPHYAssociated PressThe Obama administration has strengthened the prescription drug coverage that will be available to the millions of people who will get insurance through the nation’s new health care overhaul starting late next year. The increase in prescription benefits was part of a long-awaited package of rules to implement the law formally announced on Tuesday by the Health and Human Services Department. The govern-ment laid out minimum requirements for health insurance coverage and banned denying coverage to people with pre-existing health problems. The new rules, once made final, will govern the operation of new health insurance marketplaces, called exchanges, that will debut in 2014. Having the federal government set minimum standards for what health insurance must cover is a departure from normal practice. Usually, insurance companies, their state reg-ulators and employers play that role. But the Affordable Care Act requires that Washington establish a baseline for minimum cov-erage in areas that include inpatient and outpatient care, emergency services, maternity and childhood care, prescription drugs, preventive screenings and lab work. It must also cover mental health and substance abuse treatment, as well as rehabilitation for physi-cal and cognitive disorders, and dental and vision care for children. Such addi-tional benefits are often not fully covered by frugal plans that are now the best that many small businesses can afford. Many of the details the administration released on Tuesday had been previously announced, but Dan Mendelson, CEO of the market analysis firm Avalere Health, saw one key change: Health insur-ance plans will now have to cover the same number of prescription drugs as the benchmark plan in their states. That basically means there will be a higher num-ber of prescription drugs covered in each class, such as antipsychotics or antide-pressants, than had previously been required. “It’s going to dramatically increase access to pharmaceuticals in the exchanges,” Mendelson said. “It’s a big deal. This makes the exchange offer-ings more consistent with what employers offer.” The administration also laid out more details behind previously announced rules that govern how insurers cover people. The rules prevent insurers from denying coverage to some-one because he or she has a pre-existing or chronic condition, and they also limit how much insurers can vary premiums by age. Starting in 2014, the overhaul will expand coverage to millions of people in part by offering tax credits that help them buy coverage on the exchanges. Enrollment for plans sold on the exchanges will start next October, and HHS officials said Tuesday they were confident the exchanges and the coverage sold on them will be ready. “Now that the law is here to stay, I’m hopeful that states and other partners will continue to work with us to implement the law,” ealth and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius said. The latest update from the administration seems to be keeping “with the spirit of providing com-prehensive benefits at an affordable price,” said Neil Trautwein, a vice presi-dent of the National Retail Federation, a business group whose members will be heavily affected by the law. “Of course, the proof is in the price tag of the policy,” he said, noting that it’s still unclear how the required benefits will affect premiums. HHS and the Labor Department issued the pro-posed rules and will take feedback or comments on them for the next 30 days. After that, the government will issue the final rules. Mendelson said the Obama administration is filling in details of the law that will help insurers and government officials plan for the coverage expan-sions. “The administration has to get specific about what the rules of the road are going to be for 2014,” he said. “What they’re doing now is coming out with all those details.”Panel recommends most should get tested for HIVBy LAURAN NEERGAARDAP Medical WriterWASHINGTON — There’s a new push to make testing for the AIDS virus as common as cholesterol checks. Americans ages 15 to 64 should get an HIV test at least once — not just people considered at high risk for the virus, an independent panel that sets screening guidelines pro-posed Monday. The draft guidelines from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force are the latest recommendations that aim to make HIV screening simply a rou-tine part of a check-up, something a doctor can order with as little fuss as a cholesterol test or a mammogram. Since 2006, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also has pushed for widespread, routine HIV screening. Yet not nearly enough people have heeded that call: Of the more than 1.1 million Americans living with HIV, nearly 1 in 5 — almost 240,000 people — don’t know it. Not only is their own health at risk without treatment, they could unwittingly be spreading the virus to others. The updated guidelines will bring this long-simmering issue before doctors and their patients again — emphasizing that public health experts agree on how important it is to test even people who don’t think they’re at risk, because they could be. “It allows you to say, ‘This is a recommended test that we believe everybody should have. We’re not singling you out in any way,’” said task force member Dr. Douglas Owens, of Stanford University and the Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System. And if finalized, the task force guidelines could extend the number of people eligible for an HIV screen-ing without a copay in their doctor’s office, as part of free preventive care under the Obama administration’s health care law. Under the task force’s previous guidelines, only people at increased risk for HIV — which includes gay and bisex-ual men and injecting drug users — were eligible for that no-copay screening. There are a number of ways to get tested. If you’re having blood drawn for other exams, the doctor can merely add HIV to the list, no extra pokes or swabs needed. Today’s rapid tests can cost less than $20 and require just rubbing a swab over the gums, with results ready in as little as 20 minutes. Last sum-mer, the government approved a do-it-yourself at-home version that’s selling for about $40. Free testing is available through various community programs around the country, including a CDC pilot program in drugstores in 24 cities and rural sites. Monday’s proposal also recommends: Q Testing people older and younger than 15-64 if they are at increased risk of HIV infection, Q People at very high risk for HIV infection should be tested at least annually. Q It’s not clear how often to retest people at somewhat increased risk, but perhaps every three to five years. Q Women should be tested during each pregnancy, something the task force has long recommended. The draft guidelines are open for public comment through Dec. 17. Most of the 50,000 new HIV infections in the U.S. every year are among gay and bisexual men, followed by heterosexual black women. “We are not doing as well in America with HIV testing as we would like,” Dr. Jonathan Mermin, CDC’s HIV prevention chief, said Monday. The CDC recommends at least one routine test for everyone ages 13 to 64, starting two years younger than the task force recommended. That small difference aside, CDC data suggests fewer than half of adults under 65 have been tested. “It can sometimes be awkward to ask your doctor for an HIV test,” Mermin said — the reason making it routine during any health care encounter could help. But even though nearly threefourths of gay and bisexual men with undiagnosed HIV had visited some sort of health provider in the previous year, 48 percent weren’t tested for HIV, a recent CDC sur-vey found. Emergency rooms are considered a good spot to catch the undiagnosed, after their illnesses and injuries have been treated, but Mermin said only about 2 percent of ER patients known to be at increased risk were tested while there. Mermin calls that “a tragedy. It’s a missed opportunity.”OB/GYNs: Sell birth control pills over the counterBy LAURAN NEERGAARDAP Medical WriterWASHINGTON — No prescription or doctor’s exam needed: The nation’s largest group of obstetri-cians and gynecologists says birth control pills should be sold over the counter, like condoms. Tuesday’s surprise opinion from these gatekeep-ers of contraception could boost longtime efforts by women’s advocates to make the pill more accessible. But no one expects the pill to be sold without a prescription any time soon: A company would have to seek government permis-sion first, and it’s not clear if any are considering it. Plus there are big ques-tions about what such a move would mean for many women’s wallets if it were no longer covered by insur-ance. Still, momentum may be building. Already, anyone 17 or older doesn’t need to see a doctor before buy-ing the morning-after pill — a higher-dose version of regular birth control that can prevent pregnancy if taken shortly after unpro-tected sex. Earlier this year, the Food and Drug Administration held a meet-ing to gather ideas about how to sell regular oral contraceptives without a prescription, too. Now the influential American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists is declaring it’s safe to sell the pill that way. Wait, why would doctors who make money from women’s yearly visits for a birth-control prescription advocate giving that up? Half of the nation’s pregnancies every year are unin-tended, a rate that hasn’t changed in 20 years — and easier access to birth con-trol pills could help, said Dr. Kavita Nanda, an OB/GYN who co-authored the opin-ion for the doctors group. “It’s unfortunate that in this country where we have all these contracep-tive methods available, unintended pregnancy is still a major public health problem,” said Nanda, a scientist with the North Carolina nonprofit FHI 360, formerly known as Family Health International. Many women have trouble affording a doctor’s visit, or getting an appoint-ment in time when their pills are running low — which can lead to skipped doses, Nanda added. If the pill didn’t require a prescription, women could “pick it up in the middle of the night if they run out,” she said. “It removes those ASSOCIATED PRESSPresident Barack Obama reaches for a pen to sign the he alth care bill in the East Room of the White House in Was hington on March 23, 2010. Obama’s re-election has guaranteed the s urvival of his health care law. Now the administration is in a sprint to the finish line to put it into place. In just 11 months, mil lions of uninsured people can start signing up for cove rage. But there are hurdles in the way. Republican governors wil l have to decide whether they can join the team and help carry out what they’ve dismissed as “Obamacare.” And the administration could stumble under the sheer strain of implementing the complex legislation, or get tripped up in budget talks with Congre ss. ASSOCIATED PRESSThe nation’s largest group of obstetricians and gynecolog ists says estrogen/progestin birth control pills like the ones above should be sold over the counter, like condoms. The surpr ise opinion announced Tuesday could boost longtime efforts by women’s advocates to make the pills more accessible. ASSOCIATED PRESSA patient usies an oral test for HIV, inside the HIV Testing Room at the District of Columbia Department of Motor Vehicles, in southeast Wash ington. All Americans ages 15 to 64 should get an HIV test at least on ce — not just people considered at high risk for the virus, a panel of govern ment advisers proposed Monday. The draft guidelines from the U.S. Preventive Servic es Task Force are the latest recommendations that aim to make HIV screening s imply a routine. Online: Q Task force recommendation: http://www.uspreventive servicestaskforce.org PILLS continued on 8A

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types of barriers. Tuesday, the FDA said it was willing to meet with any company interested in making the pill nonpre scription, to discuss what if any studies would be needed. Then theres the price question. The Obama administrations new health care law requires FDA-approved contracep tives to be available without copays for women enrolled in most workplace health plans. If the pill were sold without a prescription, it wouldnt be covered under that provision, just as con doms arent, said Health and Human Services spokesman Tait Sye. ACOGs opinion, pub lished in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology, says any move toward mak ing the pill nonprescription should address that cost issue. Not all women are eligible for the free birth control provision, it noted, citing a recent survey that found young women and the uninsured pay an aver age of $16 per months supply. The doctors group made clear that: Birth control pills are very safe. Blood clots, the main serious side effect, happen very rarely, and are a bigger threat during pregnancy and right after giving birth. Women can easily tell if they have risk fac tors, such as smoking or having a previous clot, and should avoid the pill. Other over-thecounter drugs are sold despite rare but serious side effects, such as stomach bleeding from aspirin and liver damage from acetaminophen. And theres no need for a Pap smear or pelvic exam before using birth control pills. But women should be told to continue getting check-ups as need ed, or if theyd like to dis cuss other forms of birth control such as implant able contraceptives that do require a physicians involvement. The group didnt address teen use of contraception. Despite protests from reproductive health spe cialists, current U.S. policy requires girls younger than 17 to produce a prescrip tion for the morning-after pill, meaning pharmacists must check customers ages. Presumably regular birth control pills would be treated the same way. Prescription-only oral contraceptives have long been the rule in the U.S., Canada, Western Europe, Australia and a few other places, but many countries dont require a prescrip tion. Switching isnt a new idea. In Washington state a few years ago, a pilot project concluded that pharmacists successful ly supplied women with a variety of hormonal contraceptives, including birth control pills, without a doctors involvement. The question was how to pay for it. Some pharmacies in parts of London have a sim ilar project under way, and a recent report from that countrys health officials concluded the program is working well enough that it should be expanded. And in El Paso, Texas, researchers studied 500 women who regularly crossed the border into Mexico to buy birth con trol pills, where some U.S. brands sell over the counter for a few dollars a pack. Over nine months, the women who bought in Mexico stuck with their contraception better than another 500 women who received the pill from public clinics in El Paso, possibly because the clinic users had to wait for appointments, said Dr. Dan Grossman of the University of California, San Francisco, and the nonprofit research group Ibis Reproductive Health. Being able to easily get the pill when you need it makes a difference, he said. 8A LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 8AHealth Same Day Service Open Saturday See Now Pay Later with financing available through Lake City Lake City Commons Center (Publix Shopping) 752-3733 BUY 1 Pair Eyeglasses Includes lenses & frames. Some Restrictions Apply. COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES NOV 3 0 2012 Where you get the Best for Less Credit approval required. See store for details. GET 1 Pair FREE E YE EXAM S by Independent Optometrist US 90 E to Sanderson, left on Hwy 127 go 8 miles, left on Hwy 125 at caution light. Go 6/10 mile, turn right at Noah Raulerson Rd., 3 miles to farm. For more info call (904) 259-7703 By TIM TALLEY Associated Press OKLAHOMA CITY A federal judge Monday rejected Hobby Lobby Stores Inc.s request to block part of the federal health care overhaul that requires the arts and craft supply company to provide insurance coverage for the morning-after and weekafter birth control pills. In a 28-page ruling, U.S. District Judge Joe Heaton denied a request by Hobby Lobby to prevent the gov ernment from enforcing portions of the health care law mandating insurance coverage for contraceptives the companys Christian owners consider objection able. The Oklahoma Citybased company and a sis ter company, Mardel Inc., sued the government in September, claiming the mandate violates the own ers religious beliefs. The owners contend the morn ing-after and week-after birth control pills are tanta mount to abortion because they can prevent a fertil ized egg from implanting in a womans womb. They also object to providing coverage for certain kinds of intrauterine devices. At a hearing earlier this month, a government law yer said the drugs do not cause abortions and that the U.S. has a compelling interest in mandating insur ance coverage for them. In his ruling denying Hobby Lobbys request for an injunction, Heaton said that while churches and other religious organi zations have been granted constitutional protection from the birth-control pro visions, Hobby Lobby and Mardel are not religious organizations. Plaintiffs have not cited, and the court has not found, any case concluding that secular, for-profit cor porations such as Hobby Lobby and Mardel have a constitutional right to the free exercise of religion, the ruling said. Heaton wrote that the court is not unsympathet ic to the problems cited by Hobby Lobby and their owners, the Green fam ily. He said the health care laws expansion of employ er obligations results in concerns and issues not previously confronted by companies or their own ers. The question of wheth er the Greens can establish a free exercise constitu tional violation by reason of restrictions or require ments imposed on general business corporations they own or control involves largely uncharted waters, Heaton wrote. Hobby Lobbys attorney said the companies owners will appeal. Every American, includ ing family business owners like the Greens, should be free to live and do business according to their religious beliefs, Kyle Duncan, gen eral counsel for the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty, said in a statement. The morning-after pill works by preventing ovu lation or fertilization. In medical terms, pregnancy begins when a fertilized egg attaches itself to the wall of the uterus. If taken within 72 hours of unpro tected sex, it can reduce a womans chances of preg nancy by as much as 89 percent. Critics of contraception say it is the equivalent of an abortion pill because it can prevent a fertilized egg from attaching to the uterus. The lawsuit also alleges that certain kinds of intrauterine devices can destroy an embryo by pre venting it from implanting in a womans uterus. Hobby Lobby is the larg est business to file a lawsuit against the mandate. Hobby Lobby calls itself a biblically founded busi ness and is closed on Sundays. Founded in 1972, the company now operates more than 500 stores. ASSOCIATED PRESS Customers walk to a Hobby Lobby store in Dallas. The arts and craft supply company owned by a Christian family asked federal court to block a portion of the new federal health care law, claiming that mandated coverage for certain kinds of birth control medications violates the companys religious freedom rights. The court rejected the request. PILLS: No good reason not to Continued From Page 7A Judge: Hobby Lobby must cover morning-after pill

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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Thursday, November 22, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS Cooler Weather is Here! Prices good thru 11/30/12Enjoy a cup of 24oz. Fresh-Brewed AXmX:fXjk Fine Coffee or Cappuccino and get a Little Debbie Honey Bun FREE! RITZ SODAAssorted Flavors 3 Liter $1.79 RITZ SODAAssorted Flavors 12 Pack Cans 2/$7 Gustafson’s Farm MilkGallon $3.99 BRIEFS GAMES Friday Q Columbia High football vs. St. Augustine High in regional semifinal, 7:30 p.m. N. FLORIDA SPEEDWAY Turkey Trot races toy drive North Florida Speedway’s annual Turkey Trot races in honor of Harvey Jones are Friday and Saturday. The track is sponsoring a charity toy drive by asking all fans and drivers to bring an unwrapped, unopened toy to donate to a charity for children. There will be a bicycle race for girls and boys ages 6-12 on Saturday. The winners will receive a new bike. The race card for the two nights is United Dirt Late Models, Florida Mini-sprints, Pure Stocks, Street Stocks, Sportsman, Box Stocks, TQ Late Models and Limited Modifieds. It is the final race competition of the season. For details, call the track at 754-8800. RUNNING Chomp Cancer Foundation 5K Chomp Cancer Foundation has its second Chomp Cancer 5K Run/Walk planned for 8 a.m. Dec. 15 in Fort White. UF Shands Cancer Center is the beneficiary. There will be music, post-race snacks, an awards ceremony and a silent auction/raffle. Sponsorships at several levels are available. The race will be chip timed by Half Mile Timing. For details, call Lauren Valentine at (321) 501-9526. OUTDOORS Hunter safety course offered Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is offering a hunter safety Internet completion course for Columbia County from 6-9 p.m. Nov. 29 and 8 a.m. to noon Dec. 1. Students who have taken the online course and wish to complete the classroom portion must bring the online completion report. Firearms, ammunition and materials are provided. Students should bring pen and paper. An adult must accompany children younger than 16. Class locations will be given to those who register in advance. Call the regional office at 758-0525 or go to www. myfwc.com /HunterSafety. Q From staff reports Tigers ready to feast BRENT KUYKENDALL /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Ronald Timmons plows through a group of Bartram Trail High defenders in the Tigers’ 35-14 w in over the Bears on Friday.Columbia hosts St. Augustine on FridayBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comIt’s always said throughout high school football that it’s a good thing to be practicing on Thanksgiving and for the second year in a row the Columbia High will take to the field before taking to the turkey. Thanksgiving is today and the Tigers are ready to continue its football feast. Columbia is scheduled for an 8:30 a.m. practice in preparation for Friday’s game against St. Augustine High in the second round of the Class 6A playoffs. The Tigers host the Yellow Jackets at 7:30 p.m. at Tiger Stadium. Head coach Brian Allen is again encouraging the fans to bring their family and friends to cheer on the Tigers beginning at 5:30 p.m. when the North side of the end zone will open up for on-the-field tailgators. Patrons wishing to tailgate on the field can purchase a pass for $40 that includes two tick-ets to the game. More people may come in the vehicle, but must have a ticket purchased. As for the game, Allen is looking for a physical contest and doesn’t expect any of his players to take the game lightly with the Yellow Jackets bringing in an 11-0 record. “The thing that has been the most impressive about this group of kids is how they have han-dled things,” Allen said. “They continue to work hard each week looking to improve. They’re not looking past anybody and they know that they have to go out and play 48 minutes just like they did last week for a chance to move on.” Despite a 24-9 win last year, Allen doesn’t expect the Tigers to take too much of that tape into account in preparing for the Yellow Jackets. “We’ve glanced at it,” Allen said. “We wanted to look at some of the mistakes we made and our opponent. We’re not going to go in and scheme from it. They’ve had some players change and it’s a different group. We just wanted to see some things that hurt us and what they may try to hit us with.” Last year, Allen said the Tigers needed 17 points to beat the Yellow Jackets, but Columbia took the sting away in the second half. Columbia trailed St. Augustine 9-7 at the half before shutting down the Yellow Jackets in the second half and coming away with a 24-9 win. “I told the guys that St. Augustine had never seen a second half like we were about to give them,” Allen said after last year’s contest. “We were only down 9-7 and hadn’t played our best football.” Columbia started fast, scoring on its first drive, but that was the only score the Tigers would come up with in the first half. Quarterback PLAYOFFS continued on 2B JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterJacksonville State defenders attempt to bring down Florida’ s Omarius Hines (20) as he powers up the field during the Gators’ 23-0 win on Satur day. Driskel to start against SeminolesBy MARK LONGAssociated PressGAINESVILLE — Florida quarterback Jeff Driskel will start Saturday’s game at rival Florida State. Coach Will Muschamp announced Driskel’s sta-tus Wednesday on the SEC coaches teleconference. Muschamp says Driskel “looked very good in prac-tice” Tuesday and will be “ready to go” when the sixthranked Gators (10-1) travel to Tallahassee to face the 10th-ranked Seminoles (10-1). Driskel sprained his right ankle Nov. 17 against Jacksonville State. He sat out last weekend’s 23-0 win over lower-division Jacksonville State. Jacoby Brissett started in his place and completed 14 of 22 passes for 154 yards. Driskel was on the sideline during the game with-out a walking boot, worked out Sunday and was cleared to practice. He has completed 65 percent of his passes for 1,324 yards. Gators get QB back after missing Jacksonville State.

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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today COLLEGE FOOTBALL 7:30 p.m. ESPN — TCU at Texas GOLF 3 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, DP World Tour Championship, second round, at Dubai, United Arab Emirates MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL Noon ESPN2 — Old Spice Classic, first round, West Virginia vs. Marist, at Orlando 2 p.m. ESPN2 — Old Spice Classic, first round, Vanderbilt vs. Davidson, at Orlando 4:30 p.m. ESPN2 — DirecTV Classic, first round, Drexel vs. Saint Mary’s (Cal), at Anaheim, Calif. 7 p.m. ESPN2 — Old Spice Classic, first round, UTEP vs. Oklahoma, at Orlando NBCSN — Battle 4 Atlantis, first round, Memphis vs. VCU, at Paradise Island, Bahamas 9 p.m. ESPN2 — Old Spice Classic, first round, Clemson vs. Gonzaga, at Orlando 9:30 p.m. NBCSN — Battle 4 Atlantis, first round, Louisville vs. N. Iowa, at Paradise Island, Bahamas 11:30 p.m. ESPN2 — DirecTV Classic, first round, Drake vs. California, at Anaheim, Calif. NFL FOOTBALL 12:30 p.m. CBS — Houston at Detroit 4:15 p.m. FOX — Washington at Dallas 8:30 p.m. NBC — New England at N.Y. JetsFOOTBALLNFL standings AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PANew England 7 3 0 .700 358 225N.Y. Jets 4 6 0 .400 202 241 Buffalo 4 6 0 .400 230 299Miami 4 6 0 .400 187 205 South W L T Pct PF PAHouston 9 1 0 .900 293 180 Indianapolis 6 4 0 .600 210 260 Tennessee 4 6 0 .400 219 311 Jacksonville 1 9 0 .100 164 289 North W L T Pct PF PABaltimore 8 2 0 .800 267 206 Pittsburgh 6 4 0 .600 217 190 Cincinnati 5 5 0 .500 248 237 Cleveland 2 8 0 .200 189 234 West W L T Pct PF PADenver 7 3 0 .700 301 212 San Diego 4 6 0 .400 232 221 Oakland 3 7 0 .300 208 322Kansas City 1 9 0 .100 152 284 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAN.Y. Giants 6 4 0 .600 267 216Dallas 5 5 0 .500 211 224Washington 4 6 0 .400 257 254 Philadelphia 3 7 0 .300 162 252 South W L T Pct PF PAAtlanta 9 1 0 .900 270 193 Tampa Bay 6 4 0 .600 287 230 New Orleans 5 5 0 .500 287 273 Carolina 2 8 0 .200 184 243 North W L T Pct PF PAGreen Bay 7 3 0 .700 263 207Chicago 7 3 0 .700 249 165Minnesota 6 4 0 .600 238 221 Detroit 4 6 0 .400 236 246 West W L T Pct PF PASan Francisco 7 2 1 .750 245 134 Seattle 6 4 0 .600 198 161 Arizona 4 6 0 .400 163 196 St. Louis 3 6 1 .350 174 237 Today’s Games Houston at Detroit, 12:30 p.m.Washington at Dallas, 4:15 p.m.New England at N.Y. Jets, 8:20 p.m. Sunday’s Games Denver at Kansas City, 1 p.m.Minnesota at Chicago, 1 p.m.Oakland at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.Pittsburgh at Cleveland, 1 p.m.Buffalo at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.Tennessee at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.Atlanta at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.Seattle at Miami, 1 p.m.Baltimore at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.St. Louis at Arizona, 4:25 p.m.San Francisco at New Orleans, 4:25 p.m. Green Bay at N.Y. Giants, 8:20 p.m. Monday’s Game Carolina at Philadelphia, 8:30 p.m. AP Top 25 schedule Today No. 18 Texas vs. TCU, 7:30 p.m. Friday No. 8 LSU at Arkansas, 2:30 p.m.No. 17 Nebraska at Iowa, NoonNo. 23 Kent State vs. Ohio, 11 a.m.No. 24 Northern Illinois at Eastern Michigan, 1 p.m. Saturday No. 1 Notre Dame at Southern Cal, 8 p.m. No. 2 Alabama vs. Auburn, 3;30 p.m.No. 3 Georgia vs. Georgia Tech, NoonNo. 4 Ohio State vs. No. 20 Michigan, Noon No. 5 Oregon at No. 16 Oregon State, 3 p.m. No. 6 Florida at No. 10 Florida State, 3:30 p.m. No. 9 Texas A&M vs. Missouri, 7 p.m.No. 11 Stanford at No. 15 UCLA, 6:30 p.m. No. 12 Clemson vs. No. 13 South Carolina, 7 p.m. No. 14 Oklahoma vs. No. 22 Oklahoma State, 3:30 p.m. No. 19 Louisville vs. UConn, NoonNo. 21 Rutgers at Pittsburgh, NoonNo. 25 Miss.State at Mississippi, 7 p.m.No. 25 Utah State vs. Idaho, 3 p.m.BASKETBALLNBA schedule Today’s Games No games scheduled Friday’s Games Atlanta at Charlotte, 7 p.m.Cleveland at Orlando, 7 p.m.Oklahoma City at Boston, 7:30 p.m.L.A. Clippers at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.Toronto at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.New York at Houston, 8 p.m.L.A. Lakers at Memphis, 8 p.m.San Antonio at Indiana, 8 p.m.Golden State at Denver, 9 p.m.New Orleans at Phoenix, 9 p.m.Sacramento at Utah, 9 p.m.Minnesota at Portland, 10 p.m. AP Top 25 schedule Today’s Games No. 2 Louisville vs. Northern Iowa at Imperial Arena, Nassau, Bahamas, 9:30 p.m. No. 5 Duke vs. Minnesota at Imperial Arena, Nassau, Bahamas, 3:30 p.m. No. 13 Missouri vs. Stanford at Imperial Arena, Nassau, Bahamas, 1 p.m. No. 17 Gonzaga vs. Clemson at HP Field House, Orlando 9 p.m. No. 19 Memphis vs. VCU at Imperial Arena, Nassau, Bahamas, 7 p.m. Friday’s Games No. 2 Louisville vs. No. 13 Missouri or Stanford at Imperial Arena, Nassau, Bahamas, TBA No. 3 Ohio State vs. UMKC, 6 p.m.No. 4 Michigan vs. Kansas State or Delaware at Madison Square Garden, 2:30 or 4:30 p.m. No. 5 Duke vs. No. 19 Memphis or VCU at Imperial Arena, Nassau, Bahamas, TBA No. 7 Florida vs. UCF, 4 p.m.No. 8 Kentucky vs. LIU Brooklyn, 7 p.m. No. 14 Creighton vs. Wisconsin at Orleans Arena, Las Vegas, 10 p.m. No. 15 Michigan State vs. Oakland, 8:15 p.m. No. 16 N.C. State vs. UNC Asheville, 7 p.m. No. 17 Gonzaga vs. UTEP or Oklahoma at HP Field House, Orlando 5:30 or 8 p.m. No. 18 UNLV vs. Oregon, 9 p.m.No. 22 Cincinnati vs. Iowa State at The Thomas & Mack Center, Las Vegas, 9:30 p.m. Saturday’s Games No. 2 Louisville at Battle 4 Atlantis, Imperial Arena, Nassau, Bahamas, TBA No. 5 Duke at Battle 4 Atlantis, Imperial Arena, Nassau, Bahamas, TBA No. 13 Missouri at Battle 4 Atlantis, Imperial Arena, Nassau, Bahamas, TBA No. 15 Creighton vs. Arkansas or Arizona State at Orleans Arena, Las Vegas, 8:30 or 11 p.m. No. 19 Memphis at Battle 4 Atlantis, Imperial Arena, Nassau, Bahamas, TBA No. 24 Baylor vs. College of Charleston, 9 p.m. Sunday’s Games No. 1 Indiana vs. Ball State, 6 p.m.No. 6 Syracuse vs. Colgate, 1 p.m.No. 11 UCLA vs. Cal Poly, 10 p.m.No. 15 Michigan State vs. LouisianaLafayette, Noon No. 17 Gonzaga at Old Spice Classic, HP Field House, Orlando, TBA No. 20 Oklahoma State vs. Portland State, 2 p.m. No. 21 UConn vs. Stony Brook, 4 p.m.No. 23 Colorado vs. Air Force, 8 p.m.No. 25 San Diego State at Southern Cal, 10 p.m.Florida 58, Savannah State 40 At Gainesville SAVANNAH ST. (3-3) Hassan 5-12 1-2 11, J. Smith 0-0 0-0 0, Blackman 1-9 0-0 3, C. Smith 5-8 1-1 11, Wilson 0-3 0-1 0, Burger 0-2 0-0 0, White 1-2 1-2 3, Hendley 1-2 0-0 3, Williams 0-1 0-0 0, Spears 0-0 0-0 0, Louis 3-7 3-4 9. Totals 16-46 6-10 40.FLORIDA (4-0) Yeguete 2-2 3-5 7, Murphy 3-10 2-4 10, Young 5-10 3-6 13, Boynton 1-6 2-2 5, Rosario 4-10 3-3 13, Kurtz 0-0 0-0 0, Wilbekin 1-4 1-2 4, Ogbueze 1-3 1-2 3, Graham 0-0 0-0 0, Frazier II 0-1 0-0 0, Walker 0-2 3-4 3. Totals 17-48 18-28 58. Halftime—Florida 28-14. 3-Point Goals—Savannah St. 2-4 (Hendley 1-1, Blackman 1-3), Florida 6-14 (Rosario 2-4, Murphy 2-5, Wilbekin 1-1, Boynton 1-4). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Savannah St. 35 (Louis 11), Florida 37 (Young 11). Assists—Savannah St. 6 (Hassan 2), Florida 7 (Rosario 3). Total Fouls—Savannah St. 21, Florida 14. A—7,323.BASEBALLManagerial changes American League BOSTON RED SOX — Bobby Valentine, fired (Oct. 4); John Farrell (Oct. 21) CLEVELAND INDIANS — Manny Acta, fired (Sept. 27); Sandy Alomar Jr. (interim); Terry Francona (Oct. 6). TORONTO BLUE JAYS — John Farrell, traded to Boston (Oct. 21); John Gibbons (Nov. 20). National League COLORADO ROCKIES — Jim Tracy, resigned (Oct. 7); Walt Weiss (Nov. 7). HOUSTON ASTORS — Brad Mills, fired (Aug. 18); Tony DeFrancesco (interim); Bo Porter (Sept. 27). MIAMI MARLINS — Ozzie Guillen, fired (Oct. 23); Mike Redmond (Nov. 1).MLB calendar Dec. 2 — Last day for teams to offer 2013 contracts to unsigned players. Dec. 3-6 — Winter meetings, Nashville, Tenn. Dec. 3 — Hall of Fame pre-integration era committee (before 1946) vote announced, Nashville, Tenn. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2012 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04202BAGATE THURSDAY EVENING NOVEMBER 22, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving Modern Family “Bad 25” (2012, Documentary) Premiere. 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(N) News CSPAN 14 210 350(5:00) Public Affairs Capitol Hill Hearings WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304Andy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondHot in ClevelandHappily DivorcedLove-RaymondLove-Raymond OWN 18 189 279Who the BleepWho the BleepWho the BleepWho the Bleep48 Hours: Hard Evidence 48 Hours: Hard Evidence 48 Hours: Hard Evidence 48 Hours: Hard Evidence A&E 19 118 265The First 48 The First 48 The First 48 The First 48 The First 48 “Ultimate Price” (:01) After the First 48 HALL 20 185 312“Love at the Thanksgiving Day Parade” (2012, Romance) Autumn Reeser. “A Christmas Wish” (2011, Drama) Kristy Swanson, Tess Harper. “Lucky Christmas” (2011) Elizabeth Berkley, Jason Gray-Stanford. 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Castle “Cuffed” Castle “An Embarrassment of Bitches” Castle “Undead Again” CSI: NY “The Lying Game” NIK 26 170 299SpongeBob SquarePants See Dad RunSee Dad RunSee Dad RunSee Dad RunFull House Full House The Nanny The Nanny Friends (:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241Ink Master “Star Wars Forever” Ink Master “Holy Ink” iMPACT Wrestling (N) Ink Master “Holy Ink” Tattoo NightmaresGT Academy (N) MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*H M*A*S*H “Edwina” White Collar “Out of the Box” White Collar “Withdrawal” Seinfeld Frasier The Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Gravity Falls Austin & Ally Jessie Dog With a BlogDog With a BlogGood Luck CharlieJessie A.N.T. Farm Austin & Ally Phineas and FerbJessie A.N.T. Farm LIFE 32 108 252 “A Christmas Proposal” (2008) Nicole Eggert, David O’Donnell. “Holiday High School Reunion” (2012) Rachel Boston, Marilu Henner. “A Nanny for Christmas” (2010) Emmanuelle Vaugier, Dean Cain. USA 33 105 242NCIS “Hiatus” (DVS) NCIS “Shalom” Political assassination. 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HGTV 47 112 229Buying and Selling “Cristal and Scott” Buying and Selling Extreme Homes Extreme Homes (N) House HuntersHunters Int’lExtreme Homes TLC 48 183 280Breaking Amish “Decision Time” Breaking Amish “Party Time” Breaking Amish “Finale” Four Weddings “Mother Knows Best” Along for the BrideAlong for the BrideFour Weddings “Mother Knows Best” HIST 49 120 269Hat elds & McCoys A Hat eld murders a McCoy. (Part 1 of 3) Hat elds & McCoys The McCoys murder Anse’s brother. (Part 2 of 3) Hat elds & McCoys A shattering New Year’s Day battle. (Part 3 of 3) ANPL 50 184 282Finding Bigfoot “Mother Bigfoot” Dragons: A Fantasy Made Real Myths and legends of many cultures. Mermaids: The Body Found Half-man, halfsh, all conjecture. Mermaids: The Body Found FOOD 51 110 231The Next Iron Chef: RedemptionThe Next Iron Chef: RedemptionCupcake WarsSweet Genius “Turkey Genius” Sweet Genius “Squeaky Genius” (N) The Next Iron Chef: Redemption TBN 52 260 372(4:30) Jesus of Nazareth The Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesJoel Osteen Joseph PrinceHillsong TVJesus of Nazareth Art portraying Jesus. FSN-FL 56 -Football PrevUFC Insider Bull Riding CBR World Championship Part 2. Game TimePremier League Review ShowFootball PrevUFC InsiderUFC Unleashed SYFY 58 122 244(3:30) GoldenEye “Tomorrow Never Dies” (1997, Action) Pierce Brosnan, Jonathan Pryce, Michelle Yeoh. “The World Is Not Enough” (1999, Action) Pierce Brosnan, Sophie Marceau. Die Another Day AMC 60 130 254(3:30) “The Godfather, Part II” (1974) Al Pacino, Robert Duvall. “The Godfather” (1972, Crime Drama) Marlon Brando, Al Pacino, James Caan. A ma a patriarch tries to hold his empire together. COM 62 107 249(5:00) “Bad Santa” (2003) Jeff Dunham Christmas SpecialJeff Dunham: Minding the Monsters(:02) Jeff Dunham: Controlled Chaos (:32) The Comedy Central Roast Actor Charlie Sheen. CMT 63 166 327Reba Reba Reba Reba “The Rings” Reba Reba “Invasion” “Fireproof” (2008) Kirk Cameron. A divorcing couple turn to God to save their marriage. Fireproof (2008) NGWILD 108 190 283Africa’s Deadliest “Lethal Weapons” Great Migrations “Race to Survive” Great Migrations “Born to Move” Great Migrations “Feast or Famine” Great Migrations “Need to Breed” Great Migrations “Behind the Scenes” NGC 109 186 276Untamed Americas “Coasts” Untamed Americas “Forests” Untamed Americas “Deserts” Untamed Americas “Mountains” Winged Seduction: Birds of ParadiseUntamed Americas “Deserts” SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadePunkin Chunkin Punkin Chunkin Punkin Chunkin Punkin Chunkin 2012 Odd Folks HomeOdd Folks HomePunkin Chunkin 2012 ID 111 192 285Deadly Affairs “Lethal Acquisition” Deadly Affairs “Fatal Finale” Deadly Affairs “Lust for the Job” Deadly Affairs “In Too Deep” Deadly Affairs “Battle of the Sexes” Deadly Affairs “Lust for the Job” HBO 302 300 501(5:30) “Liar Liar” (1997) ‘PG-13’ “The Girl” (2012, Docudrama) Toby Jones. “We Bought a Zoo” (2011, Comedy-Drama) Matt Damon. ‘PG’ (:45) Witness The Orgasm Special: A Real Sex Xtra MAX 320 310 515(4:35) Road House “Horrible Bosses” (2011, Comedy) Jason Bateman, Charlie Day. ‘NR’ (:20) “Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy” “A Very Harold & Kumar 3D Christmas” (2011) ‘R’ Busty Coeds SHOW 340 318 545(4:45) “Ransom” (1996) ‘R’ (6:55) “The Twilight Saga: Eclipse” (2010) Kristen Stewart. ‘PG-13’ “The Three Musketeers” (2011, Action) Matthew MacFadyen. ‘PG-13’ Dave’s Old PornReality Show (N) PLAYOFFS: Tigers look for repeat win Continued From Page 1BJayce Barber led the Tigers on an 11-play, 80-yard scor-ing drive that was capped off by a touchdown pass to Shaq Johnson from 11 yards out. Coming out of the second half, Ben Kuykendall picked off a Sandon Mims’ pass to give Columbia the ball on their own 27-yard line. The Tigers responded with nine plays to score a touchdown and take a 14-9 lead. Barber again capped off the drive with a touchdown pass when he hit Nate Ayers on a sluggo route for a 24-yard strike. The defense made a crucial stop with 7:50 remain-ing as the Tigers held on a fourth-and-one situation. Columbia then converted a fourth-and-four situation of its own when Trey Marshall faked a punt and ran 27 yards for a first down. Two Tigers that are no longer with the team then accounted for 10 points to give Columbia the 24-9 final. Graduating kicker Hayden Lunde kicked a 47-yard field goal. Lunde has been replaced this year with Brant Nelson. Davontae Levy transferred to Fort White High this season and had an interception return for a touchdown for the Tigers final score. Roc Battle, who has eight interceptions this season, and freshman Roger Cray make up the two corner spots. Darius Williams was the Tigers other corner last season before graduating. Columbia’s strategy was simple last season and it’s one that Allen has again echoed at practice this week. “I told them bend, but don’t break,” Allen said. ASSOCIATED PRESSThis image provided by Grinnell College shows Grinne ll guard Jack Taylor (3) shooting one of 108 shots during Tuesday’s game against Faith Baptist B ible in Grinnell, Iowa. Taylor scored 138 points to shatter the NCAA scoring record in Division III. Taylor scores 138 pointsBy LUKE MEREDITHAssociated PressAfter a poor shooting weekend, Grinnell guard Jack Taylor was given the green light to shoot his way out of a slump. It only took 108 shots for Taylor to make a mockery of the college basketball record books. Taylor scored 138 points to shatter the NCAA scor-ing record in Division III Grinnell’s 179-104 victory over Faith Baptist Bible on Tuesday night in Grinnell, Iowa. Taylor, a 5-foot-10, 170pound sophomore from Black River Falls, Wis., made 27 of 71 3-point attempts, was 52 of 108 overall from the field and added seven free throws on 10 attempts in 36 minutes. “It felt like anything I tossed up was going in,” Taylor told The Associated Press Rio Grande’s Bevo Francis held the NCAA scoring record with 113 points against Hillsdale in 1954. In 1953, Francis had 116 against Ashland Junior College. Frank Selvy is the only other player to reach triple figures, scor-ing 100 points for Division I Furman against Newberry in 1954. The previous Grinnell record was 89 by Griffin Lentsch last Nov. 19 against Principia. Under coach David Arseneault, the Pioneers press and shoot 3s like nobody else in the country in any level. They’ve led the nation in scoring for 17 of the past 19 seasons while rank-ing first nationally in 3-point shooting for the 15 of those past 19 years. But none of them have had a night quite like Taylor — who never saw this coming. Taylor recently transferred to Grinnell, located about 50 miles east of Des Moines, after playing one season for Wisconsin-La Crosse. He struggled in his debut at the nearby Wartburg Tournament over the weekend by hit-ting only 11 of 41 shots — including only 6 of 34 3-point attempts Still, he aver-aged 23.5 points a game.

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DEAR ABBY: My daughter thinks if people are busy they should not answer the phone. I believe it’s better to answer and tell the per-son you’re busy and that you will return their call. Sometimes she doesn’t call me back for nine hours or even the next day. Then I find out she was watch-ing a movie or walking her dog, and didn’t think my call was “important” enough to respond prompt-ly. As her mother, if I don’t hear back, I start to worry, even though she’s in her 20s and married with a family. KARI IN MONTANADEAR KARI: OK. I think that for your daughter to keep you waiting nine hours for a return call if she can answer more promptly shows a lack of respect for your feelings. And for you to obsess that something awful might have happened is a waste of your time because, trust me, bad news travels fast. It’s also possible that you may be calling too often. But only you can answer that. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: Some members of my family con-tinually ask me for money. I feel obligated because they are family and they helped me in the past. But since then, I have turned my life around. I have a great job, a home and I’m in a serious relationship. This isn’t the first time they have asked. I have tried refusing, but they persist and after a while I feel guilty. This is creating a rift between my girlfriend and me. She feels these fam-ily members need to take responsibility for their own problems and make choic-es to better themselves rather than rely on others to enable their bad habits. How do I put an end to this annoyance? -CASHED OUT DEAR CASHED OUT: There is a difference between giving people money to enable them to continue making poor choices, and giving them money if they are really in need. Because your relatives helped you when you needed money to tide you over, there is a moral obligation for you to recip-rocate if they are truly in need. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: When I met my husband he was married. I told him at first that I was not interested. But as time went on he ended up divorcing his wife. We have been togeth-er for 11 years, married for three. The problem is his kids. They are all adults. His youngest was 15 when he left. The daughter is angry and blames me for his leaving. This was not the first time he had left her mother. He had a child from another relationship who was conceived during one of his absences. Should we divorce? -SECOND WIFE IN CALIFORNIA DEAR SECOND WIFE: Heck, no! If you love your husband, stick with him. Because your husband’s daughter is creating drama, he should set her straight. She may feel that he didn’t love HER enough to stay, when the truth is that his marriage to her mother had been on the rocks for years. He should also make sure she under-stands that if she wants him in her life, she will need to make an attitude adjustment. DILBERT BABY BLUES HOROSCOPES DEAR ABBY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Take one step at a time. Precision will be what makes you success-ful. Emotional impatience and unpredictability will stand between you and advancement. Listen to your head and take the practical approach to what-ever you face. +++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Take the initiative and instigate what you want to see happen. Partnerships, interviews and business meetings can all be dealt with practically. Personal partnerships will highlight your day and keep up your spirits and confidence. ++++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Discipline must be implemented if you want to finish what you start. Don’t allow anyone to sidetrack you -it will end up costing you. A contract, settlement or other personal paper-work must be addressed without overreacting -pick and choose wisely. ++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): You’ll be right on the money. Don’t procrastinate or wait to see what oth-ers do. Be a leader, not a follower. You have what it takes to excel if you fol-low your heart and your instincts. Mixing business with pleasure will ensure success. +++++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Take on a new project or look for an unusual pastime that will motivate you to move in different circles. Troubles at home or with friends will disrupt your plans if you don’t put distance between you and poor influences. +++++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Meetings, talks and dealing with experienced individuals will lead to solid plans that will help you move in new direc-tions. Someone needing exactly what you have to offer will recognize your talents. Love and romance are looking good. +++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Learn from past expe-rience. Remember what you witnessed during your growing years and apply the knowledge you gained to a situation you face. A problem with regard to real estate contracts or a partnership must be dealt with swiftly. +++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Check out items that you think you might like to purchase or services you may want to use to make your life easier. Home improvements will brighten your mood and enhance a relationship that means a lot to you. Love is highlighted. +++++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Honor a promise or find a solution that will help redeem your reputa-tion. Diplomacy will be required both at home and at work. Call in a favor if it will allow you to outma-neuver someone trying to make you look bad. ++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Load up your plate and show everyone what you are capable of handling. Your diplomatic approach will help control a situation you face with a friend or neighbor. Love is on the rise, and making romantic plans will pay off. ++++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Demanding peo-ple will stand in your way. Focus on what you can accomplish on your own. Stick close to home and you’ll avoid an unsavory encounter with someone unreasonable. Decorate your home to suit your comfort and needs. +++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Listen, observe and prepare to make your move personally or pro-fessionally. An improved reputation will be due to recognition for something you accomplished. A unique approach to money, legal and health issues will bring good results. Love is highlighted. +++ CELEBRITY CIPHER Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com BLONDIE BEETLE BAILEY B.C. FRANK & ERNEST FOR BETTER OR WORSE ZITS HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH GARFIELD THE LAST WORD Eugenia Last Mom, daughter at odds over phone-answering etiquette Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. CLASSIC PEANUTS Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2012 3B

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTHURSDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2012 Classified Department: 755-5440 4B CLASSIFIED AD vantageTake ADvantage of the Reporter Classifieds!755-5440Lake City Reporter FIND IT SELL IT BUY IT $17504 lines 3 days Includes 2 Signs Each additional line $1.65 Garage Sale Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$10104 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.10One item per ad Under $500 Personal Merchandise Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$16754 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.15One item per ad Under $1,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$23704 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.45One item per ad Under $2,500 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $4,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$27404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.55One item per ad Under $4,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$30404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.65One item per ad Under $6,000 Placing An Ad Service Guide Limited to service type advertis-ing only.4 lines, one month....$92.00 $10.80 each additional lineIncludes an additional $2.00 per ad for each Wednesday insertion. DeadlinesBe Sure to Call Early You can call us at 755-5440 Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.Some people prefer to place their classified ads in person, and some ad categories will require prepay-ment. Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street.You can also fax or email your ad copy to the Reporter.FAX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the Classified Department.EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreporter.comAd is to Appear:TuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday Call by:Mon., 10:00 a.m.Mon., 10:00 a.m.Wed., 10:00 a.m.Thurs., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fax/Email by:Mon., 9:00 a.m.Mon., 9:00 a.m.Wed., 9:00 a.m.Thurs., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.These deadlines are subject to change without notice. Cancellations, Changes & Billing Questions Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject, or classify all advertisements under appropriate headings. Copy should be checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day of pub-lication. Credit for published errors will be allowed for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement which was incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be published, nor for any general, special or consequential damages. Advertising language must comply with Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition of discrimi-nation in employment, housing and public accommodations. Standard abbreviations are acceptable; how-ever, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated. Ad Errors-Please read your ad on the first day of publication. Weaccept responsibility for only the first incorrect insertion, and only the charge for the ad space in error. Please call 755-5440 immediately for prompt correc-tion and billing adjustments.CancellationsNormal advertising deadlines apply for cancellation.Billing InquiriesCall 755-5440. Should further information be required regarding payments or credit limits, your call will be trans-ferred to the accounting depart-ment. General Information In Print and Onlinewww.lakecityreporter.com Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$2504 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $.25One item per ad Under $100 CLASSIFIED AD vantageTake ADvantage of the Reporter Classifieds!755-5440Lake City Reporter FIND IT SELL IT BUY IT $17504 lines 3 days Includes 2 Signs Each additional line $1.65 Garage Sale Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$10104 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.10One item per ad Under $500 Personal Merchandise Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$16754 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.15One item per ad Under $1,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$23704 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.45One item per ad Under $2,500 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $4,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$27404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.55One item per ad Under $4,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$30404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.65One item per ad Under $6,000 Placing An Ad Service Guide Limited to service type advertis-ing only.4 lines, one month....$92.00 $10.80 each additional lineIncludes an additional $2.00 per ad for each Wednesday insertion. DeadlinesBe Sure to Call Early You can call us at 755-5440 Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.Some people prefer to place their classified ads in person, and some ad categories will require prepay-ment. Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street.You can also fax or email your ad copy to the Reporter.FAX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the Classified Department.EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreporter.comAd is to Appear:TuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday Call by:Mon., 10:00 a.m.Mon., 10:00 a.m.Wed., 10:00 a.m.Thurs., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fax/Email by:Mon., 9:00 a.m.Mon., 9:00 a.m.Wed., 9:00 a.m.Thurs., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.These deadlines are subject to change without notice. Cancellations, Changes & Billing Questions Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject, or classify all advertisements under appropriate headings. Copy should be checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day of pub-lication. Credit for published errors will be allowed for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement which was incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be published, nor for any general, special or consequential damages. Advertising language must comply with Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition of discrimi-nation in employment, housing and public accommodations. Standard abbreviations are acceptable; how-ever, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated. Ad Errors-Please read your ad on the first day of publication. Weaccept responsibility for only the first incorrect insertion, and only the charge for the ad space in error. Please call 755-5440 immediately for prompt correc-tion and billing adjustments.CancellationsNormal advertising deadlines apply for cancellation.Billing InquiriesCall 755-5440. Should further information be required regarding payments or credit limits, your call will be trans-ferred to the accounting depart-ment. General Information In Print and Onlinewww.lakecityreporter.com Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$2504 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $.25One item per ad Under $100 The Town of White Springs, Florida is seeking a Town Manager.Applications may be picked up at Town Hall 10363 Bridge St.#"*"*!0)$#('*)$#'$"#')$*' .'$!!$'*#+'().,)!$'/('#*!$'*(#(("#()')$#%'$'((+!.'(%$#(!-%'##"*#%!$'$'%$')"#"#),$' #!*#-%'##(#$'"#"#)%$()$#$'#.&*+!#)$"#)$#$)'###-%'#*()%$((((+!r!$''+'/(#(!'.#$)! $,#$)%'#((#n'*r'$' %! Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 ServicesFLCert. Teacher with 10 yrs exp. Offering a homeshooling group in Jan. Reasonably priced. Interested parents 386-288-0954. LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAGENERALJURISDICTION DIVI-SIONCASE NO. 2012-CA-000183DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONALTRUSTCOMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR ARGENTSECURITIES INC., ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SER-IES 2006-W1,Plaintiff,vs.PATRICIAYOUNGER, AS TRUSTEE OF THE PATRICIAYOUNGER REVOCABLE TRUSTDATED 12.27.2006, et. al.Defendant.NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated No-vember 7, 2012, and entered in 2012-CA-000183 of the Circuit Court of the Third Judicial Circuit in and for Columbia County, Florida, wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONALTRUSTCOMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR ARGENTSECURITIES INC., ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SER-IES 2006-W1, is the Plaintiff and PATRICIAYOUNGER, AS TRUSTEE OF THE PATRICIAYOUNGER REVOCABLE TRUSTDATED 12.27.2006; PATRICIAYOUNGER A/K/APATRICIAD. YOUNGER; UNKNOWN BENEFI-CIARIES OF THE PATRICIAYOUNGER REVOCABLE TRUSTDATED 12.27.2006; UNKNOWN TENANT(S) are the Defendant(s). P. Dewitt Cason as the Clerk of the Cir-cuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at 173 NE Her-nando Ave., Lake City, FL32056, at 11:00 AM on December 12, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit:LOT16, BLOCK 5, OF OAK HILLESTATES REPLAT, ACCORDING TOTHE PLATTHEREOF AS RE-CORDED IN PLATBOOK 3, PAGE 52 OF THE PUBLIC RE-CORDS OF COLUMBIACOUN-TY, FLORIDAAny person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-er than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.Dated this 8 day of November, 2012.P. Dewitt CasonAs Clerk of the courtBy: /s/ B. ScippioAs Deputy ClerkIMPORTANTIf you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceed-ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assis-tance. Persons with a disability who need any accommodation to partici-pate should call the ADACoordina-tor, Jacquetta Bradley, P.O. Box 1569, Lake City, FL32056, 386-719-7428, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or im-mediately upon receiving this notifi-cation if the time before the sched-uled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if you are voice impaired call (800) 955-8770.02500415November 15, 22, 2012 NOTICE OFSUSPENSIONTO: Dwann D. RossCase No: 201201351ANotice of Suspension to suspend your license and eligibility for licen-sure has been filed against you. You have the right to request a hearing pursuant to Sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes, by mailing a request for same to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Licensing, Post Office Box 3168, Tallahassee, Florida 32315-3168. If a request for hearing is not received by 21 days from the date of the last publication, the right to hearing in this matter will be waived and the Department will dispose of this cause in accordance with law.05535295November 1, 8, 15, 22, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURTFOR THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUN-TY, FLORIDACASE NO.: 12-173-CA21STMORTGAGE CORPORA-TION, a Delaware corporation au-thorized to transact business in Flori-da,Plaintiff,vs.ESTATE OF RANDALLP. MULL-ENS, a/k/a RANDALLPAULMULLENS, DECEASED; DOTTIE D. MULLENS, surviving spouse, known Heir and Personal Represen-tative of the Estate of Randall Paul Mullens, deceased; JOSHUAP. MULLENS, known heir of Randall Paul Mullens, deceased; JUNE M. GORNEY, known heir of Randall Paul Mullens, deceased;Defendants.CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALENOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accord-ance with the Plaintiff’s Final Judg-ment of Foreclosure entered on No-vember 1, 2012 in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on January 9, 2013, at 11:00 A.M. (EST), at the Columbia County Courthouse, 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, FL32055, the following described property:Exhibit ALOTNO. 12, BLOCK A, SOUTHLegalERN HILLS, ASUBDIVISION AC-CORDING TO PLATTHEREOF RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 5, PAGE 63-63A, PUBLIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLOR-IDA. LESS AND EXCEPTTHE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED LAND: APARTOF LOT12 IN BLOCK AOF SOUTHERN HILLS, MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRI-BED AS FOLLOWS; BEGIN ATTHE NORTHEASTCORNER OF SAID LOT12 IN BLOCK A, SAID POINTBEING ON THE WESTER-LYRIGHTOF WAYLINE OF SOUTHERN HILLS CIRCLE, AL-SO SAID POINTBEING ON ACURVE; THENCE SOUTHEAS-TERLYALONG THE SAID WESTERLYRIGHTOF WAYLINE ON CURVE TO THE LEFTHAVING ARADIUS OF 260.00 FEETAND AN INCLUDED AN-GLE OF 3755’41” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 172.11 FEET; THENCE S 7514’21” W, 312.50 FEET; THENCE N 1445’39” W, 160.04 FEETTO APOINTON THE NORTHERLYLINE OF SAID LOT12; THENCE N 7514’21” E, ALONG SAID NORTHERLYLINE 258.25 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING. SAID PARCELLYING IN THE N 1/2 OF SEC-TION 21, TOWNSHIP5 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.TOGETHER WITH that certain 1992 Homestead 64’MFC Home, bearing Identification Numbers HMST6589AGAand HMST6589BGAProperty Address: 999 SWSebastian Circle, Lake City, FL32024.ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN IN-TERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.Dated: November 5, 2012P. DEWITTCASON, CLERKCOLUMBIACOUNTYCIRCUITCOURTBy: B.. ScippioDeputy Clerk02500405November 15, 22, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILDIVISIONCase #: 2012-CA-000166JPMorgan Chase Bank, National As-sociationPlaintiff,vs.Linda K. Nellinger, Surviving Spouse of Lewis W. Nellinger, De-ceasedDefendant(s)NOTICE OF SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 6, 2012, entered in Civil Case No. 2012-CA-000166 of the Circuit Court of the 3rd Judicial Circuit in and for Columbia County, Florida, wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, Na-tional Association, Plaintiff and Lin-da K. Nellinger, Surviving Spouse of Lewis W. Nellinger, Deceased are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, J.K. “BUDDY” IRBY, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ATTHE COURTROOM ONE OF THE COLUMBIACOUNTYCOURT-HOUSE, LOCATED AT173 HER-NANDO AVENUE, LAKE CITY, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AT11:00 A.M. on January 9, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit:LOT12, SHERWOOD FORESTUNITNO. 3, ASUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLATTHEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 5, PAGE 8, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF COLUM-BIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.TOGETHER WITH THATCER-TAIN MANUFACTURED HOME, YEAR: 2006, MAKE: HOMES OF MERIT, VIN#: FLHML2F163730235AAND VIN #: FLHML2F163730235B, WHICH IS AFFIXED THERETO.ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN IN-TERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceed-ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assis-tance. Please contact the ADACoor-dinator; 173 Northeast Hernando Street, Room 408, Lake City, Florida 32056; (386) 719-7576 at least 7 days before your scheduled court ap-pearance, or immediately upon re-ceiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711.ATTORNEYFOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360Boca Raton, Florida 33431(561) 998-6700(561) 998-670702500409November 15, 22, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAGENERALJURISDICTION DIVI-SIONCase No. 2011-00571-CACitiMortgage, Inc. successor by merger to Citifinancial Mortgage Company, Inc.,Plaintiff,vs.Nathan D. Petersen, a/k/a Nathan Pe-tersen; Jennifer L. Peterson; Sunstate Federal Credit Union; Unknown Tenant #1 and Unknown Tenant #2,Defendants.NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to a Summary Final Judgment Legalof Foreclosure dated November 1, 2012, entered in Case No. 2011-00571-CAof the Circuit Court of the Third Judicial Circuit, in and for Co-lumbia County, Florida, wherein CitiMortgage, Inc. successor by merger to Citifinancial Mortgage Company, Inc. is the Plaintiff and Nathan D. Petersen, a/k/a Nathan Pe-tersen; Jennifer L. Petersen; Sunstate Federal Credit Union; Unknown Tenant #1 and Unknown Tenant #2 are the Defendants, that I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at, the Columbia County Courthouse, 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, FL32055, beginning at 11:00 AM on the 9th day of January, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit:SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP5 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST: APARTOF THE SOUTH 1/2 OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP5 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EASTMORE PARTICULARLYDESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE ATTHE SOUTHWESTCORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST1/4 OF SAID SOUTH 1/2 AND RUN NORTH 020’00” WEST, ALONG THE WESTLINE THEREOF, 1656.39 FEETFOR APOINTOF BEGIN-NING; THENCE SOUTH 8911’23” WEST, 19.09 FEETTO APOINTON THE EASTRIGHTOF WAYLINE OF BOYETTE LANE; THENCE NORTH 059’33” WEST, ALONG SAID EASTRIGHTOF WAYLINE, 331.27 FEET, TO A POINTON THE EXTENSION OF THE SOUTH LINE OF THE NORTH 1/2 OF THE NORTH-WEST1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST1/4 OF SAID SOUTH 1/2; THENCE NORTH 8911’41” EAST, ALONG THE SOUTH LINE THEREOF AND ITS EXTENSION, 1352.09 FEET, TO APOINTON THE EASTLINE OF THE WEST1/2 OF THE SOUTHEAST1/4 OF SAID SOUTH 1/2; THENCE SOUTH 027’14” EASTALONG THE EASTLINE THEREOF, 331.16 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 8911’23” WEST, 1329.89 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING, COLUM-BIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.Dated this 5th day of November, 2012.P. Dewitt CasonAs Clerk of the CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioAs Deputy ClerkIf you are a person with a disability who requires accommodations in or-der to participate in a court proceed-ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of certain assis-tance. Individuals with a disability who require special accommodations in order to participate in a court pro-ceeding should contact the ADACo-ordinator, 173 NE Hernando Ave-nue, Room 408, Lake City, FL32055, (386) 719-7428, within two (2) business days of receipt of notice to appear. Individuals who are hear-ing impaired should call (800) 955-8771. Individuals who are voice im-paired should call (800) 955-8770.02500407November 15, 22, 2012 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURT, THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO.: 12-38-CAFIRSTFEDERALBANK OF FLORIDA, a Banking corporation organized under the laws of the Unit-ed States of America, f/k/a FIRSTFEDERALSAVINGS BANK OF FLORIDAPlaintiff,vs.PHILLIPD. WITT, a/k/a PHILLIPDANIELWITT, STEPHANIE E. WITT, STATE OF FLORIDA, CO-LUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA,Defendants.NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALENOTICE is hereby given that P. Dewitt Cason, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Columbia County, Florida, will on the 12 day of December, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. at the Columbia County Courthouse, Courtroom 1, 173 N.E. Hernando Avenue, in the City of Lake City, Florida 32055, of-fer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for Legalcash, the following described proper-ty situated in Columbia County, Florida, to-wit:EXHIBIT“A”Commence at the point of intersec-tion of the South right of way of S.R. #S-242 with the East line of the SW1/4 of NE 1/4 of Section 25, Town-ship 4 South, Range 16 East and run S 8856’30” West along said right of way, 260.0 feet to the West right of way line of Rayburn Road (50’wide); thence S 002’30” East along said West right of way line 630.0 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence continue S 002’30” East, 210.0 feet; thence S 8856’30” West, 210.0 feet; thence N 002’30” West 210.0 feet; thence N 8856’30” East, 210.0 feet to the Point of Beginning, Columbia County, Florida.Pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in a case pend-ing in said Court, the style of which is as set out above, and the docket number of which is 12-38-CA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the REPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Linewww.lakecityreporter.com

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTHURSDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2012 5B Classified Department: 755-5440 Legaldate of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.WITNESS my hand and the official seal of said Court, this 6 day of No-vember, 2012.P. DEWITTCASONClerk of the Circuit CourtColumbia County, Florida/s/ B. ScippioBy: Deputy ClerkFIRSTFEDERALBANK OF FLORIDAc/o PAULV. SMITH, ESQ.P.O. Box 20294705 U.S. Highway 90 WestLake City, FL32056Email: smithp@ffsb.com02500410November 15, 22, 2012 100Job Opportunities05534241NOWHIRING Cashiers & Baggers forHigh Springs fruit & gift stores. Benefits avail: health, dental, & vacation. Apply in person: Florida Citrus Center(Chevron) 18603 NWCR 236, High Springs (exit 404 & I-75) CDLClass A Truck Driver Flatbed exp. for F/TSE area. 3 years exp or more. Medical benefits offered. Contact Melissa or Sandy@ 386-935-2773 Dental Hygienist: Golden Opportunity! Full time, Part time, Fill in, we have a great opportunity waiting for you! An immediate opening has just come up! That’s great news in this job market! If you have a friendly can-do attitude, a gentle touch, a great work ethic, you are orgainized, and self motivated with a god sense of humor, then you should apply. Call 888-486-2408 to hear a message with more details about the position and instructions on how to apply for this position in Madison, FL. Great benefits! EXP. TRAINER: Responsible for Teaching individuals about the Judicial system. Associates degree, Background and reference checks, and valid DLreq’d. PT. E-mail resume to jshaw@itmflorida.com Mechanic needed at Fla.Rock & Tank Lines In White Springs. Diesel exprnc reqr'd in maintenance & repair of tractor trailers. 45-50hrs/wk Class A CDLlicense preferred. Excellent Benefits! email: mcomer@patriottrans.com or fax 904-858-9008 Part-Time, General office skills and experience desired. Flexible hours, dependability a must. Strong computer skills, MS Office required. Send resume to: PO Box 1239, Lake City, FL32056. Professional Office Mng For construction office; proficient w/ computer, Qbks, motivated individual, excellent communication skills, fax resume 386-758-8920, email resume8920@gmail.com SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 Two Child Care Helpers for After School Care Program. Requirements: Must be at least 18 yrs old, 20-25 hours a wk. Call 365-2128. 120Medical EmploymentExp. CAP or Licensed Mental Health Professional for counseling and assessments in an outpatient SAtreatment program. Ref. Req'd. PT Email resume to bsmith@itmflorida.com Great Opportunity•Full Time Experienced RN’s, LPN’s 71-7p & 7p-7a•Full Time Experienced C.N.A’s All Shifts•Full Time Experienced Activity Assistance Apply in person at Suwannee Health Care & Rehab. 1620 Helevenston Street S.E. Live Oak, FL32064 EOE/m/f/d/v 240Schools & Education05535484Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class12/24/2012• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-11/05/12• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 402Appliances Brand New Whirlpool W/D Warranty until 8/2017. $950 For Both Contact 386-752-8978 407Computers DELLComputer $100.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 408Furniture Solid Wood Dining Room Table and six (6) chairs. $125.00 Contact 386-752-3245 430Garage Sales BYRDS STORE CR 49. Fri. Sat.& Sun, (8-4). 247-240R CR 49R, 247 Beachville. CR 49N, 252 Pinemount Rd CR 49L. Lots of antiques, new items inside, outside if no Rain watch for signs. Fri 8-5, oak dr suite, king mattress w/sprng, electronics, HH items, cd’s & much more. 187 SWTimber Ridge Dr, SW252B & SWSR 247, Across from Dollar Store Fri. 11/23 & Sat. 11/24, 8-?, 1175 S.W. Yorktown Place in Grandview Village, tools, antiques & lots of collectibles. PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. SAT. NOV. 24th, 7 AM-?, 575 N.W. Gwen Lake Ave., Pak-n-Play, car seat, toys, hshold. items, ladies bike, clothes & misc. 450Good Things to EatThe Nut Cracker Robert Taylor Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans 2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024 Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville 386-963-4138 or 961-1420 630Mobile Homes forRent14 x70 MH.Real clean,2br/2ba garden tub,Water furn.,Good Location $575 mo. $300 dep. No Pets 386-755-0064 or (904) 771-5924 2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $450. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 2 BR/1BA $475/mth. Located in center of Lake City Close to Everything !!! 305-984-5511 or 386-344-0830 2/1 SW US 90 W, LC,Remodeled, lg yard, porch, quiet area. 1st mth $575 & $500 dep. No pets. 386752-1941 or 965-0932 Mobile Homes for rent in White Springs & Ft. White. Contact 386-623-3404 Newer2/2. Super clean on 1 ac North by distribution center. Perfect for Target employee. $550. mo Call for details. 386-867-9231 Quiet Country Park 3br/2ba $525. Very clean NO PETS! References & Deposit required 386-758-2280 WATERTOWN AREA 3br/2ba DW, Handicap accessible, $650 mth, $500 dep. Call 386-344-0144, 386-344-5791 640Mobile Homes forSale2 MFG HOMES on 5 ACRES! Great for 2 families in Godbold Acres west of Lake City $79,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCY INC. 755-5110 #81421 2013 DOUBLEWIDE $33,995 inc. set-up, trim-out & A/C Call 386-288-8379. 3BR/2BA28X64 in a great location, a lot of upgrades, fireplace. Only $2,500 down $399 a month. Call Paula at 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com 5 LIKENew Mobile Homes!!! For under $30,000. MUSTSEE Call John T. 386-752-1452 575 Credit Score=10% Down on your choice of select New 3/2 or 4/2 Double. Limited time offer for Challenged Credit. North Pointe Homes, 352-872-5566 640Mobile Homes forSaleBANK REPO 3BR/2BADoublewide ’09 Excellent condition. Only $999 down $377 a month. Call Paula 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com CLOSE TO VAMED CTR! 3BR/2BAw/beautiful interior, new CH&A$59,900 DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #81428 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #75661 Must be 55+, Manufacture home, 1 ac, fireplace, laundry, open & bright $79,900. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 EASTSIDE VILLAGE 2BR/2BAw/lg kitchen, open floor plan $79,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #80972 HALLMARK REALESTATE What a Deal! 2003 3/2 MH over 1600 sqft,in Trenton, .92 ac ONLY case # 091-379757 MLS# 82117 Robin Williams 386-365-5146 LIVE OAK! Cute home in city limits; 3BR/1BA& 1,294 SqFt $49,500 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC. 755-5110 #81410 MUSTSEE 2013 2x6 walls, R30 insulation, OSB wrap, house wrap, real wood cabinets, and thermal pain windows. Payment $399 per month call John T386-752-1452. NEW3/2JACOBSEN HOMES Starting at $43,995. Painted WAlls-Del-Set-AC-Skirting-and Steps. North Pointe Homes Hwy 441 N, Gainesville, FL 352-872-5566 NEWJacobsen Model Homes Sale! 13 Left with up to $25,000 off. Don’t buy until you shop North Pointe Homes 4545 NW 13th St Gainesville 352-872-5566 Own YourProperty? No Money Down with good credit. Great Rates Available. North Pointe Homes 352-872-5566 Palm Harbor Home 14 x 50 Mobile Condo 2/2 $29,900 Park Special 800-622-2832 x210 Poole Realty 3/2 MH, fireplace, screened back porch, storage shed and all the amenities necessary for a relaxing lifestyle, Irvin Dees, 208-4276. MLS 82226 Several Bank Repos and Used Homes in stock At North Pointe in Gainesville 352-872-5566 WANTED…CASH PAID for your Mobile Home, Singlewide or Doublewide flood homes welcome. Call 386-288-8379 WOODGATE VILLAGE Move-in ready! Open 3BR/2BA floor plan on nice shaded lot $49,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCYINC 755-5110 #82259 WOODGATE VILLAGE Nice 3BR/2BADWMH w/fenced yd, workshop; $39,900 DANIELCRAPPS AGENCY, INC 755-5110 #79078 650Mobile Home & Land2br, 2ba, 3.51 acres. 1512 sqft, nice affordable DW. Perfect Rental. Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473 MLS #882216 $65,000 Great Value 24 acres, 3/2 DWMH open floor plan, in ground pool. MLS 79000. Poole Realty $115,000 Nelda Hatcher. Call 688-8067 Hallmark Real Estate Deer & turkey roam, 3000 sqft brick home, detached garagesworkshops on 18 ac. MLS #81005 Ginger Parker 386-365-2135 Out of State owner, Anxious to sell. Nice 2br/2ba 1996 DW, Energy Efficient, 3/4 frnshd, 3 yr old roof, 1/2 ac lot in Oak Wd subdv in Live Oak $39,900 or best resonable offer. Call 309-645-2659 OwnerFinanced 3/22.5 ac.River Access. Small down $625 mo 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05535481We’ve got it all!$89 Deposit Limited Avail. Call Today! Windsong Apts. *Free afterschool program386-758-8455 1BR APT. Downtown Location, Clean. New Carpet $450 mo, plus Security. NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456 2br/1ba Apt. Quiet Lake View CH/A$500. mo $500 dep. No pets. 386-344-2170 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRentALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Amberwood Hills Apts. Private Patio area. Beautiful yard. Washer/dryer hkup. Free water & sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special. 386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com Brandywine Apartments Now Renting 1, 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-752-3033 W. Grandview Ave. Equal Housing Opportunity TDD Number 1-800-955-8771 BRANFORD VILLAS 386-935-2319 2br/1ba Apts. Now available.$570. mo. TDD number 1-800-955-8771 Equal Housing Opportunity Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2 mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet Friendly. Pool laundry & balcony. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com COZYCOTTAGE 1 BRNew paint & carpet. 10 mins. South of LC, all util. & satellite incl. $550 mo. Pet ok, 386-758-2408 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Greentree Townhouse Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free water & sewer. Balcony & patio. Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com Redwine Apartments Pets welcome. with 5 complexes, we have a home for you. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com Updated Apt, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 Wayne ManorApts. Spacious 2bedroom washer/dryer. Behind Kens off Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 www .myflapts.com WindsorArms Apartments. Move in! 2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free 200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com 720Furnished Apts. ForRentRooms forRent Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent2BR, 1/2 acre, Fenced, Close-in, Huge Den, Carport, Smoke Free, $800 mo. App & Ref Req’d Short Term Avail 386-758-9824 2br/1ba $575 mo. + sec., 4mi S. Lake City. Clean & Quiet 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 3br/1.5ba. Very clean, Brick great area w/bonus room. Carport, shed & Fenced (privacy) back yard. $825. mo $825. dep. Ref’s req’d. (941)920-4535 3BR/2BA Carport hardwood floors. CH/AFenced yard. Good area. $750 mo plus security. 386-752-0118 or 623-1698 ALandlord You Can Love! 3br/1.5ba, Eat in Kitchen, CH/A, 2 car carport $750 mth + dep 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Avail. for Rent 1206 McFarlane Ave. 3 BR/2 BAhouse. Smoke Free and No Pets allowed. $850 a mo. $500 dep. Call for appt. 904-813-8864. Very Nice 3BD/2ba brick home, $745 mth & $500 dep. Application Required. Call 386-935-1482 to see. 750Business & Office RentalsForRent orLease: Former Doctors office, Former professional office & Lg open space: avail on East Baya Ave. Competitive rates. Weekdays 386-984-0622 evenings/weekends 497-4762 PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 805Lots forSale Beautiful lot on Suwannee. Property features stairway to dock, on Suwannee. MLS# 78842, $35,000 Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473 Results Realty Charming, like new, well Maintainted 3br, 2b, split floor plan, Corner lot. REMAX Missy Zecher 623-0237 MLS# 81632 $100,000 805Lots forSale Custom genesis modular home, finest amenities, lg oaks, custom drapery, f/p, fine detail throughout. RemaxMissy Zecher 623-0237 MLS 81634 $299,000 Great family home, 3/2 recently upgraded, great location. REMAX PROFESSIONALS Missy Zecher 623-0237 MLS# 81683 $75,000 HALLMARK REAL Estate 2.68 acres homes only. Gorgeous neighborhood, Deed restricted. $34,000. Owner Fin. MLS# 80588. Tanya Shaffer 386-397-4766 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #76668 $32,000 Must be 55+, Buildable lot for site built homes only. In Forest Country. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #80401 $60,000. Must be 55+ 130x750 right on Suwannee, Beautiful lot, minutes from Royal Springs, Denise Bose 752-5290 Nice 2 acre lot in Timberlake s/d. New Owner will have fishing rights. MLS #79025 Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473 $13,500 Nice vacant lot in Desirable River Community, MLS #73268 $15,000 Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert397-3473 PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. REMAX PROFESSIONALS Missy Zecher 623-0237. 25 acre parcel, Corner lot, many possibilities. MLS 77720 $175,000 Spacious 4br, split floor plan, separate Living & family rm, gas f/p, a true pleasure to view. REMAX Missy Zecher 623-0237. MLS 81472 $237,000 810Home forSale Access Realty Gorgeous views 3bd/3ba on Lake Montgomery. Elevator, fishing dock & jacuzzi. MLS 81438 $249,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access RealtySpacious 4 bd/3ba Cypress Lake w/ 3643 sqft 1.25 acres on lake. Vaulted ceilings. MLS 81314 $279,900. Patti Taylor386-623-6896 Access RealtyTwo story 1895 Victorian house w/ electrical upgrades throughout. double -deck porches, MLS 71594 $149,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Affordable 4/2 on 10 acres in Bell. Home features over 2,200 heated sqft. MLS# 76585, Results Realty $67,500. Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Eastside Village Adult community, Great location, community pool Elaine Tolar 755-6488 MLS 74823, $84,900 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Emerald Forest repaired Brick home 3b, 2ba, Lg recreation rm, fireplace, MLS 82021 $134,900 Sherry Ratliff 365-8414 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Exceptional home on 5 ac, 3200 sf 4b, 2.5ba. Lots of storage, 3 out buildings. Elaine Tolar 755-6488 MLS 80325 $287,500 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Hallmark Real Estate 4.3 acres on the Santa Fe River. Wooded. Natures lover’s paradise. Paved Rd frontage, septic. MLS 81946. Ron Feagle 386-288-2901 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81958-, $115,000. Must be 55+, 3br/2ba, Site Built w/ lots of room, split plan mstr suite, FL. Rm. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81959 Must be 55+, 2br/2ba, $79,900. Site Built Home w/eat in kitchen, laundry rm, scrn porch. Denise Bose @ 752-5290 On Suwannee River, 4 acres, Needs some elbow grease, 3br, 3058 sqft, beautiful view, Poole Realty MLS 82075. Call Glenda McCall $299,900 810Home forSale Private Estate on 39 + ac, city limits. 6br, 3.5ba, 3 fireplaces, much more.MLS76111 Mary Brown Whitehurst 965-0887 $994,000. Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Reduced, 6500 plus sqft home boasts of oversized rooms, 6br, 3.5ba to many amenities to mention. Call Prell Gwinn, Poole Realty MLS 80949 $280,000 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, Golfers Dream 3B,2B formal living & dining, cover back porch. MLS 81110 $189,000 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, South Oaks C/C, 3Br or 2Br & den, 2Ba over looking 9th hole, fenced backyard & more MLS 81191 $179,000 RemaxPam Beauchamp 386-303-2505, Beautiful Mountainside 3b,2ba, 1662sqft, .45 ac. open floor plan, so much more MLS 80447 $144,900 Terrific home on 5+ acres. 3br, 2.5ba, large kitchen, covered deck. MLS 81630 $199,000 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Elaine Tolar 755-6488 Unique home with 2800 sqft, large upstairs game room, on 1.37 acres in Live Oak, Poole Realty MLS 82214 $67,500. 362-4539 820Farms & Acreage10 acres with well/septic/pp (not guar); $300 dwn; $580 a mth. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com Access Realty10 acre square tract, High & Dry, OF Avail. w/ 25% down. Convenient Location MLS 81258$39,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access Realty43.64 acres wooded acreage in N.Columbia County. Scenic & Private. MLS 74429 $89,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Hallmark Real Estate Hunters Paradise! 3/2 brick, over 1700 sqft on 10 acres, 24x24 barn, fruit trees. MLS #80851 Ginger Parker 386-365-2135 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 RECYCLE YOUR PAPER

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6B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2012 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 6BSports Jump New Patient Exam and Necessary X-rays DO150, DO330 First-time patient Reg. $136 $ 29 SAVINGS OF $107 Expires November 30, 2012 ASPEN DENTAL GROUP Lake City Reporter Located at SHANDS Lake City, Live Oak & Starke Womens Center of Florida ALL MAJOR INSURANCES ACCEPTED INCLUDING MEDICAID & MEDICARE FREE Pregnancy Ultrasound WITH THIS AD* *Insurance billing may occur if necessary. Some Restrictions apply. OBSTRETRICS & GYNECOLOGY PRENATAL CARE & ULTRASOUNDS STDS & HPV TESTING BIRTH CONTROL & INFERTILITY MENOPAUSE & INCONTINENCE WEIGHT LOSS & 4D ULTRASOUNDS BOTOX & LASER HAIR REMOVAL NO INSURANCE VISITS ASK ABOUT OUR $ 50 CHANDLER MOHAN, MD EMAD ATTA, MD NOW HIRING MID-LEVEL PROVIDERS 386-466-1106 SERVICES: OB-GYN www.myobcare.com G. W. HUNTER, INC. 1130 US Hwy 90 W (386) 752-5890 WE NOW HAVE ETHANOL FREE PLUS GASOLINE ONLY AT INTENDED USES: BOATS & WATERCRAFTS COLLECTABLE VEHICLES OFF-ROAD VEHICLES MOTORCYCLES SMALL ENGINES T IMELESS M EMORIES 386-466-1888 Layaway Now for Christmas Furniture, Gifts, Jewelry & Home Decor 386-466-1888 Fabric, quilt and custom embroidery 216 S. Marion Blvd. Lake City 754-3741 Fabric Notions Accessories 25% off Entire Stock thru December 22 Retirement Sale Honesty. Integrity. Professional. Honesty. Integrity. Professional. Three simple words, but its been our way of doing business since 1967. G L E N N I J O N E S I N C C E L E B R A T I N G 4 5 Y E A R S O F S E R V I C E Thank you to our customers for making Glenn I. Jones the largest heating and cooling contractor in North Central Florida. Trust the Name You Know... Call 552 NW Hilton Avenue, Lake City, FL 32055 www.glennijonesinc. com License# CAC051486 386-752-5389 Did You Know... Customer Appreciation Special $10 OFF $10 OFF $150 OFF $150 OFF Forgotten Georgia in thick of championship running By PAUL NEWBERRY Associated Press ATHENS, Ga. When Oregon and Kansas State both went down, Aaron Murray whooped it up as much as any Georgia fan. He knew what that meant for the Bulldogs a shot at the national championship. Ive never screamed so much at the television and prayed so much in my life, Georgias star quarterback said Tuesday. It was defi nitely an exciting night. We were screaming, high-fiv ing, hugging, group hugs. It was a lot of fun. Funny thing, though. Outside of this state, hardly anyone is talking about the SECs other title contender. Instead, everyone is gush ing about the possibility of two storied programs Notre Dame and Alabama playing for No. 1. Georgia, it seems, is just an afterthought. We dont mind being the underdogs, Murray said. We know what we have to do, and thats win games. If we do that, well be good to go. Indeed, while it may appear the third-ranked Bulldogs are trying to sneak in the back door, they have exactly the same path to the championship as the topranked Fighting Irish and second-ranked Crimson Tide. Win out. Win it all. For Georgia, it starts with Saturdays regularseason finale against state rival Georgia Tech (6-5). The Bulldogs have won 10 of 11 in the series and are a two-touchdown favorite to extend that domination against the high-scoring Yellow Jackets. Still, coach Mark Richt is working hard to ensure his team doesnt get caught looking ahead to the SEC championship game against Alabama the following week. Hes gone to some rather extreme measures to keep the one-game-at-a-time mentality. Richt refuses to even say whether he was watching last Saturday night when Kansas State got blown out by Baylor and Oregon lost in over time to Stanford, allowing Georgia to jump to No. 3 in the BCS standings.