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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01924

Material Information

Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 11-18-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01959

Related Items

Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01924

Material Information

Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 11-18-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01959

Related Items

Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

By DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.com When Michael Millikin, Charles Maxwell and Glenn Hunter leave the Columbia County School District, they will leave a void that’s hard to fill. Their combined experience in the school district totals more than 60 years. With a new mix of faces and ideas the district’s poli-cies and direction may be shifting. Incoming Superintendent Terry Huddleston and school board members Stephanie Finnell and Dana Brady take office Tuesday. This will be the first time in at least 75 years that two women have served on the school board at the same time, and may be the first time in history, said Morris Williams, a local historian and a long-time Columbia County resi-dent. The Lake City Reporter conducted separate interviews with all three at the newspaper’s office Friday afternoon. The first big question was about the budget. Huddleston said he understands money will be tight, and the school district must find ways to save where it can. He said the district By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comThe arrival of Santa Claus is usually a somewhat stealthy operation, but that wasn’t the case at the Lake City Mall Saturday. Children wearing Christmasthemed clothing danced while Christmas music played on the loud-speaker as parents with video and digital cameras snapped photos, and the jolly old man in red sat in his chair waiting for children to tell him their Christmas wishes. Santa’s arrival drew more than 100 people to the Lake City Mall Saturday to welcome the holiday hero and take photographs with him. The welcome ceremony featured entertainment by area dance, karate and gymnastics groups. Brandon Brown, of Live Oak, held the hand of his daughter, Gabrielle, as he walked her up to speak with Santa. “It’s just a yearly thing to come over here and see Santa,” he said. “This has been a family tradition and some-thing that we always do as a family.” Laurie Schmidt, of Lake City Dance Arts, was instrumental in much of the action Saturday. She said Lake City Dance Arts had about 60 children, from 3-5 years old, participate in small dance routines as part of the event. “We did seven songs today and we’ve been practicing before Halloween,” she said. “It was the chil-dren’s first performance so they could get a feel for the crowd.” Schmidt said the children were enthused and excited about Saturday’s performance. “This is the best time of the year for kids and the adults get to share in it, too,” she said. “It’s fun to watch. The kids were very excited. Some of the kids were scared of Santa, but they danced anyway, and some didn’t want to take their eyes off Santa. It was fun.” CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 TODAY IN PEOPLE Colbert on display in wax. COMING TUESDAY City council coverage. 91 64 T-Storm Chance WEATHER, 2A Opinion ................ 4ABusiness ................ 1CAdvice.................. 5DPuzzles ................. 5B 68 47 Partly Sunny WEATHER, 8A Lake City ReporterSUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | $1.00 LAKECITYREPORTER.COM Gators send offseniors with 23-0 win over JSU. Christmas DreamMachine in high gear for holidays. SUNDAYEDITION Vol. 138, No. 209 1D 1B 1ASchools: New faces, new ideas Brady Finnell Huddleston TONY BRITT /Lake City ReporterLake City Dance Art pupils perform a dance during the S anta’s Arrival At The Mall event Saturday. A crowd of abou t 100 attended. Dancing for SantaTONY BRITT/ Lake City ReporterGabrielle Brown tells Santa Claus what’s on her Christm as wish list Saturday during the Santa’s Arrival At The Mall event. Joblessrate isdown to 7.5% Daycarebrawl:2 jailed New superintendent, 2 new board memberstake over on Tuesday. Unemployment in county falls half a percent in October. JOBS continued on 6A By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comThe Columbia County unemployment rate continues to decrease and last month dropped to 7.5 percent, below the state and national aver-age, according to information released Friday by the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity. The local jobless rate fell by .5 percent from October when it was 8.0 percent. Florida’s unemployment rate dropped to 8.5 percent in October, down .2 percent from September. The state’s unemployment rate is now at its lowest since December 2008. The national unemploy-ment rate was 7.9 percent in October. The Columbia County labor St. Nick hits town, hears kids’ wishes City will consider repaving DeSoto CircleBy TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comCity officials may decide whether Lake DeSoto Circle gets a new paving job in the near future, during Monday’s city council meeting. The meeting will take place at 7 p.m. at City Hall, 205 N. Marion Ave., and one of the items on the agenda is a proposal recom-mended by city staff to have Lake DeSoto Circle repaved. The city could use funds from a sales tax bond revenue where BB&T Bank of Jacksonville is proposing to refund the city’s sales tax revenue and refunding bonds and General Fund Capital proceeds of $400,000 for additional street and drainage projects will be available. City officials would also have to approve accepting the refund from the bank. Anderson Columbia has provided a projected cost for Lake DeSoto Circle overlay at approximately $80,000, and indicated it can begin work on the project within two to three weeks. City staff recommended council approve the proposal to repave the roadway. According to city staff, the distance of Lake DeSoto Circle is seven-tenths of a mile. The city will host a reception from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. in the Customer Service lobby of City Hall, in appreciation of outgoing Councilman Jake Hill, as well as welcoming back of Mayor Stephen Witt and council member Melinda Moses. City officials also will formally introduce Zack Paulk, the newly elected councilman representing District 12. Crowd of about 100 gathers at mall to greet him on his arrival. By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comA Lake City couple faces felony charges after an argument at a local daycare center escalated into a fight in which two daycare cen-ter employees were injured Thursday. Reports said children attending the daycare facil-ity witnessed the alterca-tion. Byron Bay Bradley, 19, of 379 NW Bascom Norris Drive was charged with simple assault, aggravated battery and DAYCARE continued on 6A Bradley Law SCHOOLS continued on 3A

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WASHINGTON S tephen Colbert is taking his place among the presidents at the Madame Tussauds wax museum in Washington and will be featured in a new media gallery. Colbert visited the museum Friday to unveil a wax figure created to represent him. The museum says Colbert donated his own clothes to dress the figure in a suit, tie, cuff links and lapel pin. Colbert wore an identical outfit. The new figure will be the center piece of a new media gallery with a replica of The Colbert Report set where guests can sit next to Colberts figure behind his fake news desk. Designers from Madame Tussauds went to Colberts New York studio in June to take more than 250 measurements and photo graphs of the Comedy Central star to create the wax figure. Singer Deana Carter files for separation LOS ANGELES Court records show country singer Deana Carter has filed for legal separation from her husband of three years. The Strawberry Wine singer cites irreconcilable differ ences for her break up from Brandon Malone. Her filing states the couple separated in August 2011, less than two years after they were married in October 2009. Records showed Carter filed her petition on Tuesday in Los Angeles. Carter co-wrote the song You and Tequila, which she recorded and became a hit after it appeared on Kenny Chesneys recent album Hemingways Whiskey. Carter and Malone have no chil dren together. Her filing indicates the couple does not have any agree ment on how the couples assets will be divided. Bobby Brown pleads not guilty to DUI LOS ANGELES A lawyer for Bobby Brown has entered not guilty pleas to drunken driving and other charges faced by the R&B singer after his arrest last month in Los Angeles. City attorneys spokesman Frank Mateljan (mahTEHL-jin) says the pleas were entered Friday. Browns case is scheduled for its next hearing on Dec. 13. Brown was arrested in October on suspicion of driving while under the influence. It was his second arrest for DUI this year in Los Angeles. He also faces charges he was driv ing on a suspended license and did not have an ignition locking device on his car, as required from a previous case. Brown pleaded no contest to drunken driving in April and entered rehab in August. The 43-year-old is the former hus band of Whitney Houston. Judge grants Miley Cyrus civil restraining order LOS ANGELES A judge has granted Miley Cyrus a three-year civil restraining order against a man convicted of trespassing at her home in Los Angeles. The stay-away order was granted Friday against Jason Luis Rivera by Superior Court Judge William D. Stewart. The 40-year-old Rivera was con victed in October of trespassing at the singers home and sentenced to 18 months in jail. He is scheduled to be released in May. FORT PIERCE Election workers are pre paring to begin a recount of early votes in the race between Republican U.S. Rep. Allen West and the man who apparently unseated him. The countys canvassing board voted Friday night in favor of the recount. Because three days of early ballots were recount ed last week, the decision was intended to apply to only the other five days of early voting. But election workers said the ballots are no longer separated by the day they were cast, so all of them will be fed through scanners. Democrat Patrick Murphys campaign was readying court papers seeking an injunction to stop the recount. They say the county can only recount ballots in which there is evidence a count ing mistake was made. Attorneys for West on Friday asked a judge to order a recount of more than 37,000 ballots as West contests the apparent vic tory by Murphy. A St. Lucie County judge heard arguments Friday afternoon. It was not clear when the judge will rule. Unofficial returns show Murphy ahead of West by just over 1,900 votes. Officers wait out suspect in tree LAND OLAKES A Pasco County man who spent eleven hours in a tree to avoid being arrest ed is now behind bars. Jail records show 37year-old Ray Allen Charron was taken into custody early Saturday morning. Hes being held in the Land OLakes Detention Center on charges that include strong arm rob bery, battery on a law enforcement officer and resisting arrest with vio lence. A sheriffs office report said deputies received a call Friday afternoon about a man who stole a bike by pushing the passenger off. When a deputy arrived, the report said, Charron began fighting the deputy, who called for backup. Charron then fled and climbed a 30-foot tree. He didnt come down until 11 hours later. Teen convicted in fatal carjacking JACKSONVILLE A Jacksonville teen has been convicted in the fatal car jacking of an 83-year-old Gainesville man who was leaving the Jacksonville International Airport. A Duval County jury found 19-year-old Raymond Matthew Austin Jr. guilty Thursday of first-degree murder, kidnapping and armed robbery. He faces a life sentence. Authorities said Austin along with co-defen dants 36-year-old Shanda Nedreia Merritt, 19-yearold Corey Harrington and 19-year-old Marquavious Avery strangled and shot Charles Soukup in October 2010 before dumping his body in a wooded area. Merritt is awaiting trial, while Harrington and Avery already pleaded guilty to second-degree murder, kidnapping and armed robbery. Austin is already serving 45 years for the attempted murder of Merritts exboyfriend, then-37-year-old Carl Davis, a day after the attack on Soukup. Details revealed in students death GAINESVILLE A grand jury indictment says a University of Florida stu dent who was missing for three weeks was poisoned and suffocated before his body was dumped in woods. The indictment released Thursday says 18-year-old college freshman Christian Aguilar was sedated with a chemical compound and then suffocated. The docu ment does not specify the type of chemical used. Aguilar went miss ing Sept. 20. The Miami natives body wasnt found until three weeks later by hunters in a rural Levy County location. Aguilars former friend, 18-year-old Pedro Bravo, is charged with first-degree murder and kidnapping. Police said Bravo told them he beat Aguilar and left him alive in a parking. Bravo has pleaded not guilty. Scott seeks meet on health care TALLAHASSEE Gov. Rick Scott told federal health officials in a let ter Friday that he isnt convinced a state health exchange will lower health care costs for Floridians, and that hes worried the actual costs could end up exceeding early estimates. The Republican gov ernor, who has recently softened his staunch opposition to the federal health care law, requested a meeting with federal health officials in hopes of working together to set up a state health exchange to help the nearly 4 million uninsured in the state. But Scott said he needs more information before making a decision. Food stamp system down MIAMI Millions of Floridians cant use their foods stamps because of a technical glitch. The Department of Children and Families said a national outage Friday at JPMorgan Chase is pre venting about 3.6 million recipients from being able to use their food stamp debit cards to buy grocer ies. Crews are working on the outage, which began around 7 a.m. The agency couldnt estimate when the outage might be fixed. Stores can choose to run a manual processing of up to $40. Wal-Mart stores can also process manual transactions of up to $100. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Actress Brenda Vaccaro is 73. Actress Linda Evans is 70. Actress Susan Sullivan is 70. Country singer Jacky Ward is 66. Actor Jameson Parker is 65. Actress-singer Andrea Marcovicci is 64. Rock musician Herman Rarebell is 63. Singer Graham Parker is 62. Actor Delroy Lindo is 60. Comedian Kevin Nealon is 59. Pro Football Hall of Fame quarterback Warren Moon is 56. Actor Oscar Nunez is 54. Actress Elizabeth Perkins is 52. Daily Scripture Your word is a lamp for my feet, a light on my path. Psalm 119:105 CORRECTION A story on Page 1A of Fridays edition of the Lake City Reporter should have indicated the Prayers For Carly Facebook page had more than 1,100 likes in less than 12 hours. The name of District 3 County Commissioner Jody DuPree was misspelled in an article on Page 1A of Fridays edition. AROUND FLORIDA Friday: 1-5-17-26 20 Friday: 2-9-10-19-21 Saturday: Afternoon: 6-6-4 Evening: N/A Saturday: Afternoon: 8-8-7-6 Evening: N/A Wednes day: 10-12-19-48-49-53 x4 Recount, litigation loom in West-Murphy race Colbert on diplay at wax museum Wednesd ay: 8-10-30-44-58 PB 13 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 2A HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter DEREK GILLIAM/ Lake City Reporter Helping hungry kids David Rountree, Lake City Rotary Club president, hands off a $250 check to Sharon Richards, coordinator for St. James Episcopal Church. Richards said the money will go to a program to help feed children in Columbia County. Backpack Ministries, a nationwide program, provides food-filled backpacks for children to take home, Richards said. ASSOCIATED PRESS Comedian Stephen Colbert clowns around with a wax figure of him at Madame Tussauds wax museum in Washington. Colbert helped unveil his wax likeness Friday in the attractions Media Room, which was renovated to include a replica set of The Colbert Report. Associated Press Associated Press Carter Brown

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should stress the impor tance of saving every penny, and implement an energy campaign. He said school staff should turn off lights when they arent used, and bus drivers shouldnt let their buses idle until they are ready to leave. He said his goal is for the general funds balance to stay above five percent of total revenue. Should that happen, the district wouldnt have the cash flow problems that con tinue to pop up. We need an aware ness in our county among teachers and staff mem bers that we do need to save, that we do need to be frugal, and we must do that in order to improve our fund balance by June, Huddleston said. The fund balance has fallen below three per cent of total revenue and a plan has been submitted to the state detailing how the school district would bring the balance back above the three percent threshold, he said. Finnell said to solve the budget problems, the school board will have to find additional resources. She said she thinks pub lic-private partnerships are the way to go. She suggested that the school board should continue to build partnerships with corporations and local companies. Theres a lot out there that we are not getting, she said. We can get more. While Finnell said facili ties should never take a back seat, she did say board members would have to be honest with themselves and county residents. She said the auditorium for Fort White High School is something that should be built, but shes not sure if its some thing that can be done in the next four years. I would like to see that come along, I think every body would, she said. When the budget can allow it, absolutely. Can I promise that? No, I cant. She said this type of can dor is something people should expect from her and that the school board needs to be transparent. Communication is the most important policy here, she said. Brady said the budget issues stretch further then just whats on the surface. She said one of the big gest problems remains the retention and recruit ment of teachers. She said shes going to focus on those problems and try and find creative solutions, but that if the budget problems arent solved, the best teach ers wont stay, and oth ers wont find Columbia County an attractive desti nation to begin with. Its the Rubiks Cube, she said Its a statewide problem. While the problem with the budget may take more than a few meetings to fix, the new superintendents first priority is to fill the vacant spot at Columbia High School and to find a long-term principal at Richardson Middle School. Those position were advertised on Wednesday, Huddleston said. I want to change the perception of principals at our schools, he said. They must be instruc tional leaders. Finnell said that she expected to receive a reprieve from the grind of the campaign, but that didnt happen. She said a 10-minute trip to Publix now has turned into a half-day affair. She said it doesnt bother her, and she enjoys the text mes sages of congratulations and encouragement from students. She said she finds them inspirational. She said her first prior ity is to keep the prom ises she made on the cam paign. She wants to visit the schools often and lis ten to teachers, students and parents. Brady said it was a relief that she won her race in the primary and didnt have to compete in a run off. She said she doesnt feel any pressure because of her victory, but that it put some things in per spective. I feel humbled by that, that people have that type of confidence in me, she said. I find it inspiring. Brady said District schools have performed well, with 10 of 13 county schools receiving As or Bs in the statewide grad ing system. She said while thats good, she wants to make it 13 of 13. Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012 3A 3A SPECIALIZING IN: Non-Invasive Laparoscopic Gynecological Surgery Adolescent Gynecology High and Low Risk Obstetrics Contraception Delivering at Shands Lake Shore In-Ofce ultrasounds for our patients 3D/4D Entertainment Scans offering DaVinci Robotic Surgeries. New Patients Welcome Call today for a personal appointment: 386-755-0500 449 SE Baya Drive Lake City, Floraida 32025 www.dainagreenemd.com WE ARE WOMEN, WE ARE M OTHERS, WE UNDERST A ND Outstanding Leader of Inpatient Therapy Our therapy program is designed to rehabilitate individuals back to their highest level of independence and functioning. Our therapists and nurses work closely with the physician and resident in order to create a plan of treatment that will combine comprehensive care with the patients personal goals. Take a step towards your independence. Individualized Physical Occupational & Joint Replacement (Knee, Hip. etc) Stroke Cardiac Disease Fractures (Hip, Shoulder, Pelvic, etc) Arthritis Neck/Back Pain Balance Disturbances Dif culties Walking Generalized Weakness Impaired Abilities to Perform Activities (Bathing, Ambulating, Dressing, Eating and Transferring) Wound Care OUR SPECIALTIES INCLUDE: 560 SW McFarlane Ave. Lake City, FL 32025 386-758-4777 Call to pre-register or for a tour. NOTICE Attention Humana Walmart Medicare Part D patients: We accept this plan and all other Part D plans. Baya East 755-6677 Baya West 755-2233 Medical 755-2277 Call one of our pharmacies to see which plan is best for you. From staff reports LIVE OAK A 900-yearold Indian canoenow rests in the lobby of the Cerveny Conference Center and Camp Weed. A contribution to the Episcopal Diocese of Florida by Edward (Ted) Baker, the 10 1/2foot-long pine canoe was carbon-dated to 1090 A.D. The ancient canoe was unearthed at a site near Grandin and is virtually intact, with char ring inside, clearly evident from the original hollowing process. This canoe is in very good condition and we doubt there will be any prob lem, say Elise LeCompte and Lee A. Newsom, arche ologists with the University of Floridas Department of Anthropology, which over saw the preservation pro cedures. For nearly a year follow ing the canoes discovery in late 1989, the universi ty soaked it in a wax and water bath to restore the hulls proper water content and seal the wood to offset the effects of evaporation. The canoe is a product of the Timucuan Indian peo ple who flourished in North Florida until the 17th cen tury when Spanish domina tion and European plagues decimated their population. We are very thankful for Mr. Bakers contribution, said Joe Chamberlain, Camp Weed executive director. It is very fitting that the authentic dugout canoe be placed at Camp Weed since the University of Florida and the National Park Service documented this site as a place where Hernando De Soto encoun tered Indigenous people here in 1539. I can imagine White Lake having several canoes just like this one moving across the water 800 years ago. Camp Weed offers a special program about its archeological discovery to the public each year and will schedule a program for any group when requested. 900-year-old canoe on display in Suwannee COURTESY Ted Baker (left) bequeathed a 900-year-old dugout canoe to Camp Weed Executive Director Joe Chamberlain; Timucuan dug out canoe, carbon dated 1090 A.D.. is on display in Camp Weed lobby. From staff reports The Prayers For Carly candlelight prayer service for Carly Cason, who has been diagnosed as a victim of shaken baby syndrome, will take place at 6 p.m. Monday at Olustee Park in downtown Lake City. Prayers for Carly set for Monday From staff reports The Columbia County Public Library has once again partnered with the Christian Service Center for the Food for Fines Project which con tinues through Nov. 19. For every one non-expired, sealed, non-perishable food item that is brought to any one of the three CCPL locations, the library patron will be able to exchange the item for $1 in overdue fines and fees. One item equals $1, five items equals $5 and so on. The food collected will be deliv ered to the Christian Service Center in Lake City for local distribution. Food collected at the Fort White Branch Library will be delivered to the Fort White Methodist Church food bank. Food will be accepted only during the seven-day proj ect period. For more, call 386-758-2101. Food for Fines at library SCHOOLS: Superintendent, board members to take office Continued From Page 1A

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H ere’s an excerpt from a letter I received the other day from a college professor: “Throughout this election I discussed with students the differences between ideolo-gies. The majority of them are on federal financial aid. They are fine with more taxes as long as they will be taken care of. It is disturbing to hear that they are willing to spend their own money on tattoos and cellphones but cannot buy the book for class until the financial aid comes in.” For those who see social conservatism as an annoyance and argue that Republicans must purge this agenda from their party to survive, I say: “Think again.” If Republicans want revival, we need an honest focus on what’s really wrong in America and what must be done to assure that a great nation will be standing for our grandchil-dren and great-grandchildren. This kind of thinking is different from polls and focus groups and clever schemes to manage media and voter turn-out. Leadership is about identifying the truth, believing it and telling it in a way that people can grasp. Then they will respond and follow. The professor’s letter provides a snapshot, a hint, of what America’s most basic problem is today. It’s a problem of char-acter and values. Having lectured on more than 180 college campuses over the past 20 years, I have seen exactly what the professor is talking about. Of course, government is too big. But how did it get this way? Americans vote every two years. They voted every two years during the whole period over which government grew to its current unwieldy size. With the majority of the country now on one kind of government program or anoth-er, does anybody really think we can change this without talking about the human atti-tudes and values that produced it? Democrats have a much easier problem than Republicans. They are not trying to change America. The trends and attitudes that got the whole country on welfare, that pro-duced the moral relativism that is destroying our families and character, is the platform of the Democratic Party. Democratic politicians have just one job: Deny the patient is sick. Republicans, if they are going to be a real opposition party, have a much tougher job. ... There may be Republicans who think that we can ignore the crisis in character and val-ues that underlie our fiscal cri-sis. There may be Republicans that think if we have a better tax system it doesn’t matter if we have a country of single mothers, sexually ambigu-ous and confused men, and abortion and euthanasia on demand. Ignoring these things would mean not just the end of the Republican Party but also the end of our country. We havea nationalcrisis incharacter OUR OPINION HIGHLIGHTS IN HISTORY On this date:In 1865, “The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County” by Mark Twain was first published under the title “Jim Smiley and His Jumping Frog” in the New York Saturday Press. In 1883, the United States and Canada adopted a system of Standard Time zones. In 1886, the 21st president of the United States, Chester A. Arthur, died in New York. In 1910, British suffragists clashed with police outside Parliament on what became known as “Black Friday.” In 1928, Walt Disney’s first sound-synchronized animated cartoon, “Steamboat Willie” starring Mickey Mouse, pre-miered in New York. In 1962, Nobel Prize-winning physicist Niels Bohr died in his native Denmark at age 77. O n Sunday, Sept. 23, I worshipped with the good people of Siloam United Methodist Church as they celebrated their 143rd homecoming. It was a great day for one and all, but I was a bit disap-pointed that the Sopchoppy (Fla.) Seventy Sousaphones and Drum Symphony did not show up to provide the special music. I’ll come back to that later. The church building was almost packed, mainly with the Terry Family, their ancestors and successors. Jimmy Terry had turned 72 the previous week and wife Carol led the congregation in singing “Happy Birthday” to him. Along with all the Terrys, I was glad to see the ever-smiling Myrtle Principato, former employee of the year at Columiba High School, who is a staunch supporter of her church at every turn. I was also glad to see friend Roger Noll, former director of data processing for our school system, now retired. He grew up near Siloam. Now to go back to the Sopchoppy Band, which Pastor A. F. Donovan said was “sched-uled” to appear. Pastor Donovan is a rock solid Gospel preacher when he is in the pulpit, but oth-erwise he does have his jovial side and I love it. To him, “scheduled” is a word that has flexible meanings. For example, when he says the Sopchoppy Band is scheduled to appear, that likely means there’s no such band and they will not appear — and his congregation is wise to his antics every step of the way. Similarly, when he announces that the Queen of England or the nation’s president is “sched-uled” to attend, don’t get your hopes too high. Nor when he announces that the day’s offer-ing was $12,000 or $14,000 — cash, “more or less” — don’t expect those numbers to show up in the official treasurer’s report. And when he announces that the homecoming meal will feature prime rib, filet mignon and pheasant under glass, take that with a grain of salt. So, no one was surprised when the Sopchoppy Band was a no-show nor when the bulletin said the offertory music would be “Ode to Country Ham and Red Eyed Gravy.” It was just Pastor Al up to his old tricks. Just like when he calls his Honda Civic a “faux Ferrari.” You get the idea. With so many senior citizens in his congregation and a very senior pastor in the pulpit, he refers to the church as “God’s Waiting Room.” So, no, I was not disappointed at all that the Sopchoppy Band was a no-show, because I know Pastor Al and his wonderfully creative sense of humor. At this point, I must come clean with a full disclosure. This column today is payback to Pastor Al, who arranged for me to be first in the long food line in exchange for a mention in my column. Debt paid, Brother! By the way, although I may have missed my chance to hear the Sopchoppy Band, I still have time to attend the annual Sopchoppy Worm Grunting Festival (for real) held the sec-ond Saturday in April.Lynyrd Skynyrd BandThe famous Lynyrd Skynyrd Band (“Free Bird,” “Sweet Home Alabama”) was inducted into the Rock and Rock Hall of Fame in 2006. Bob Burns, the band’s drummer and percus-sionist, has direct ties to Lake City and CHS. Bob is the son of CHS graduates Robert and Jane Elizabeth (Betty) Blasingame Burns, both of whom are planning to attend the CHS 1949-53 class reunion on Friday, Dec. 14, at the Mason City Community Center. Sour milk; CoughingQ From friend Jimmy Musser: “Where does milk go when it sours? It becomes a ‘cereal killer.’” Q Crosby Jansen says, “People who cough incessantly never seem to go to a doctor. Instead, they go to movies, ban-quets, concerts and churches.” Missing the Sopchoppy Band M aybe the story is true as told: Hostess, the maker of such iconic and fattening snack foods as Twinkies, Ho Hos, Ding Dongs and Zingers, is going out of business because of an intractable dispute between the company and its second largest union. But it’s hard not to suspect that secret operatives for good-food-goodie-two-shoes like first lady Michelle Obama and New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg are behind the demise of a com-pany whose products are practi-cally synonymous with partially hydrogenated fat, high-fructose corn syrup and sodium stearoyl lactylate. However, one feels about the dubious nutritional benefits of Hostess’ brands, and the hold they had on the palates of our young until the lunch box police began snooping around, no one wants to see 18,500 bakers, warehouse workers, delivery drivers and counter workers lose their jobs. Hostess’ signature product, the Twinkie, was described as a “Golden Sponge Cake with Creamy Filling,” but they were so much more. For genera-tions of school kids, arriving home peaked and listless, they provided a reviving sugar rush, not to mention 13 percent of the recommended daily intake of saturated fat, and prompted a maternal cry that should have been printed on the label, “You’ll spoil you dinner!” When the Texas State Fair began deep-frying them, Twinkies pioneered new ave-nues of gustatory excess. They even gave their name to a mur-der defense when the killer of a San Francisco city supervisor successfully argued diminished capacity because of an excess of junk food. Politics was even dragged into the company’s apparent demise, with AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka blaming Mitt Romney, Bain-style vulture capitalism, even though two private-equity companies did their best to save the company. Hostess itself blamed its failure on an intransigent union, the Bakery, Confectionary, Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers International Union, whose name alone should attract the attention of Bloomberg and Obama. Even if the company goes, some of the brands are likely to survive, bought up by competi-tors and less health-conscious foreign companies. (What do you suppose Ding Dong means in Chinese?) Almost immedi-ately Twinkies and Zingers had a second-life on eBay. Even if manufacture stops, if what they say about Twinkies is true, that the cakes have a shelf life of 20 years or more — which the company says is only an urban legend — they will be around for a long, long time to come. There’s still plenty of time to spoil your dinner. America will be less without Twinkies Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding counties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, publisher Robert Bridges, editor Sue Brannon, controller Dink NeSmith, president Tom Wood, chairman LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY E-MAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com A bruising, some-times bitter cam-paign season has come to an end in Columbia County, and now it’s time to get on with the job of governing. City officials will be sworn in Monday, their county and school district counterparts, Tuesday. We wish them well and have confidence each will perform up to expectations and beyond. That’s certainly true for county schools, if our recent conversations with the incom-ing superintendent and two new school board members are any indication. We sat down with each Friday for a separate chat about their hopes, plans and expecta-tions for coming term. (See story, Page 1A.) Each was impressive in a different way, but all shared the crucial traits of intelligence, intellectual curiosity and a will-ingness to do whatever it takes to make our schools better. We look forward to working with all three – as well as newcomers to other city and county offices, and returning imcumbents back for another term as well. Should be a fascinating four years. Let’s getto work OPINION Sunday, November 18, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A4AEDIT Morris WilliamsPhone: (386) 755-8183williams_h2@firn.edu372 W. Duval St.Lake City, FL 32055 Q Morris Williams is a local historian and long-time Columbia County resident. Q Dale McFeatters is editorial writer for Scripps Howard News Service. Dale McFeattersmcfeattersd@shns.com Star Parkerparker@urbancure.org Q Star Parker is president of CURE, Coalition on Urban Renewal and Education (www.urbancure.org) and author of three books.

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Nov. 18 La Leche meeting La Leche League of Live Oak will meet from 6 to 7 p.m. at the Suwannee County Museum, 208 N. Ohio Ave. in Live Oak. La Leche Leagues is an inter national organization dedi cated to providing educa tion, information, support, and encouragement to women who want to breast feed. All breastfeeding mothers and mothers-to-be interested in breastfeed ing are welcome. Babies are always welcome at our meetings. Contact Laura Bashaw at laurabashaw@ hotmail.com or visit http:// La Leche League of Live Oak on Facebook. Musical performance Masterpiece Theatre of the Arts, a youth theater company, will perform the musical Into the Woods, Junior, at 6:30 p.m. in the Florida Gateway College Performing Arts Center. Tickets are $10, with chil dren younger than 5 free. Call (386) 984-0504 for more information. Nov. 20 Traffic safety team The Community Traffic Safety Team comprised of the 4 Es (Enforcement, Engineering, Emergency Services and Education) will meet at 1:30 p.m. at the Florida Department of Transportation Operations Complex, 710 NW Lake Jeffery Road. The team responds to traffic con cerns from citizens and looks for ways to reduce crashes and fatalities in Columbia County. The pub lic is invited to attend or to send in their traffic issues. Contact Gina Busscher at FDOT at 758-3714 or by email at gina.busscher@ dot.state.fl.us. Art League meeting The Art League of North Florida will meet at 6:30 p.m. at Haven Hospice on US 90 west. There will be refreshments, fellow ship, a short meeting and speaker. The speaker is Art League president Jeanne Van Arsdall, who will give a slideshow of her safari to Tanzania, Africa. Exciting photos of lions, elephants, giraffes, zebras, wilde beests, cheetahs, leopards and many more animals will be seen. Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon at the Columbia County Extenstion Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane, to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. Nov. 21 Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Wednesday from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Fort White Public Library on Route 47to answer ques tions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. Nov. 22 Thanksgiving dinner First Presbyterian Church invites the commu nity to a free Thanksgiving Day dinner from 1130 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in the churchs fellowship hall, 697 SW Baya Drive. We will serve all the traditional turkey meal items, including des serts and drinks. This is our 12th annual dinner, and we served about 500 peo ple last year. Come and join in on the feast and obser vance of this traditional cel ebration, beginning 11:30 AM through 1:30 PM. Nov. 23 Fish dinner Our Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5056 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, pre pares fish dinners every Friday from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The dinner is $6 for two Alaskan pollock filets, corn, baked beans, hush puppies, cole slaw and tarter sauce. Take out or eat in. Nov. 24 Craft festival Local artists and crafters are invited to partiipate in the second annual Holiday Craft Festival at the Lake DeSoto Farmers Market form 8 a.m. until noon. The festival will highlight local artists and crafters whose original work will be for sale, in addition to foods grown by area farm ers. Vendor applications are available at market. lcfla.com. Fees are $10 per market day, plus tax. Liive music will be pro vided by Quartermoon, from High Springs. The farmers Market is open every Saturday from 8 to noon in Wilson Park, along Lake DeSoto between the Columbia County Courthouse and Shands Lakeshore Hospital in downtown Lake City. For more information about the market, call (386) 719-5766 or visit market.lcfla.com. Country-Western night The Pride of B&S Combs Elks Temple will be have its annual Country-Western Night. Donation is $10 per person. Nov. 27 Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon at the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane, to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. Nov. 28 Senators staff visit Staff members of U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio will be available to help area resi dents with issues involving federal agencies from 1:30 to 4 p.m. at the Lifestyle Enrichment Center, 628 SE Allison Court. For more information, all Rubios Jacksonville Regional Office at (904) 398-8586. Landlords to meet Lake City area landlords will meet at the IHOP res taurant. Dinner will be at 5 p.m., and the program will begin at 6. Columbia County Fire Chief David Boozer will be the speak er. Call (386) 755-0110 for more information. Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Wednesday from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Fort White Public Library on Route 47to answer ques tions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. Nov. 29 Brain health class Maintain Your Brain at the Lifestyle Enrichment Center, 628 SE Allison Court, from 10 to 11:30 a.m. This free presentation explores insights about what a person can do to maintain life-long brain health. Attendees will learn basic brain facts, ways to keep memories sharp and the close connection between brain health and heart health. Call (800) 272-3900 to register or for more information. Nov. 30 Hospital garage sale The auxiliary at Shands Lakeshore Hospital will have a garage sale from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the hospi tals first-floor conference room and outside for larger items. Dec. 5 Book sale fundraiser The auxiliary at Shands Lakeshore Hospital will hold a Christmas book sale to support the hospital from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the firstfloor cafe at the hospital. LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012 5A 5A Lake City Institute of Neurology 4355 American Ln Lake City, FL Ph: 386-755-1211 Fax: 386-755-1219 About Dr. Nid Dr. Nidadavolu has completed his medical training at Siddhartha Medical College, India and completed his residence & EMG/ Neuromuscular Fellowship training from renowned University of Miami, FL. He is Board Certi ed, member of American Academy of Neurology. Dr. Nidadavolu provides services in general neurology, Stroke, MS (Multiple Sclerosis), Epilepsy, Dementias, encephalopathies, Parkinsons and other movement disorders. He also performs outpatient EEG (electroencephalogram) and Lumbarc punctures procedures. Dr. Nidadavolu is trained in EMG (electromyography)/ Never Conduction Studies for diagnosing various neurological conditions at his clinic. We are glad to inform that we are now offering Neurological services in the heart of Lake City and surrounding areas. Dr. NL Prasad Nidadavolu and his staff offer excellent neurological services to the community in a caring, parofessional environment. url: lcneuro.com *See Players Club for complete details. Must be at least 21 years old and a Seminole Players Club member to participate. Valid ID required. Management reserves all rights. Offers are non-negotiable, non-transferable and must be redeemed in person at the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel and Casino Tampa. Offer is for the slot and gaming machine of your choice, not valid for live Poker or Table Games. No cash value. Persons who have been trespassed or banned by the Seminole Tribe of Florida or those who have opted into the self-exclusion program are not eligible. If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, please call 1-888-ADMIT-IT. 2011 Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino. All rights reserved. 4 813.627 SEMINOLE HARD ROCK HOTEL & CASINO TAMPA YOU PAY: $ 40 00 PACKAGE INCLUDES: $ 35 00 FREE PLAY Plus $ 5 Meal Voucher & Roundtrip Transportation OVER 4,100 OF THE HOTTEST SLOT MACHINES, 90 TABLE GAMES AND 50 LIVE POKER TABLES. MORE WAYS TO WIN. Service from Valdosta/Lake City/Gainesville PICK-UP LOCATIONS & TIMES NEW SERVICE! For group charter information, please call the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino 877.529.7653 For more information call FABULOUS COACH LINES at 1.866.352.7295 or visit their website at fabulouscoach.com HOP ON THE BUS GUS YOU PAY: $ 35 00 From Valdosta From Lake City & Gainesville TUESDAYS & SATURDAYS VALDOSTA MALL VALDOSTA, GA 1700 Norman Drive LAKE CITY MALL LAKE CITY 2469 West US Hwy. 90 OAKS MALL GAINESVILLE 6419 Newberry Road 8:15 AM 7:00 AM 9:00 AM WELCOME A.J. Ward Pharmacy Mgr. We welcome AJ Ward to Baya Pharmacy. AJ is the Pharmacist Manager at Baya Pharmacy East. He is a graduate of the University of Florida School of Pharmacy. Come by Baya Pharmacy East and meet him. You can also get your flu shot while youre there. 780 S.E. Baya Drive Lake City www.baya.com 386.755.6677 COMMUNITY CALENDAR To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at ljbarr@lakecityreporter.com.

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From staff reports First Federal Bank of Florida announce that the Boys Club of Columbia County received the most votes in the recent 50th Anniversary Donation Giveaway. In this contest, three local organizations were candidates to receive $1,000 from First Federal and the community voted on which organization will receive the donation. In honor of our 50th Anniversary, we wanted to reiterate our commitment to our community by asking the community to choose an organization that could ben efit from additional funds this year, says Keith Leibfried, President and CEO. We also hope that our contribution can be an encouragement to other local businesses to donate money to any of these organiza tions. Voting began October 1st and ended on Oct. 13. During that time, the com munity voted once a day for their favorite organization. Advisory Councils in each county identified three organizations in their county that they felt could benefit the most from the donation. Each county in First Federals market area participated in the contest. disorderly conduct in con nection with the case. He also faces charges for an out of county warrant. He is being held in the Columbia County Detention Facility without bond. Carlissa Jenay Law, 21, 378 NW Bascom Norris Drive, was charged with simple assault, battery, aggravated battery and dis orderly conduct. She was booked into the Columbia County Detention Facility on $17,000 bond. According to Columbia County Sheriffs reports, Law telephoned authori ties in reference to a fight she was involved in with a daycare teacher at Doras Paradise Daycare Center, but when the deputy was driving to her address to get her statement, another deputy called him and told him he was at the Hip Hop Chicken restaurant park ing lot on Marion Avenue where other people who witnessed the alterca tion were in the middle of a heated yelling match between each other. After questioning people at the restaurant the dep uty interviewed one of the teachers involved in the incident and she told him Law caused a disturbance inside the daycare facility and while she was trying to get Law to leave, Law start ed shouting at her again and grabbed her face and scratched her nose, accord ing to reports. The daycare teacher reportedly said she tried to defend herself and she and Law fell to the ground fight ing and Law bit her on her right arm and on the right side of her torso, break ing the skin and drawing blood. Reports said Bradley was present during the incident and jumped between the two women and grabbed the daycare teacher in a violent manner and threw her back to the ground. Another teacher report edly witnessed what was happening and came out side to help, but as she approached, Bradley alleg edly punched her in the chest. Law and Bradley then left the scene, reports said. An ambulance respond ed to the scene and treated one of the teachers for her injuries. The other day care center employee also requested medical treat ment because she was hav ing breathing problems from where Bradley alleg edly punched her. Authorities spoke to other people who were at the daycare and who arrived at the end of the fight, Several people confirmed they saw Law standing over the teacher at the end of the fight yell ing and threatening the teacher while Bradley held her down. Based on the evidence proving (Carlissa) Law and (Byron) Bradley to be the primary aggressors of the fight, they were both miran dized by card and placed under arrest, Deputy John Snipes wrote in his report. 6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY NOVEMBER 18, 2012 Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 6A EBT SNAP Debit All Major Credit Cards Ad Good 11-15-12 through 11-21-12 Nettles Smoked Turkeys 24.99 Ea. Nettles Sugar Cured Smoked Whole Hams 1.69 Lb Nettles Sugar Cured Smoked Picnics 99 Lb. Boston Butt Pork Roast 2-Pack 1.29 Lb. Nettles Pork Chops 6# Box 10.00 Boneless Top Sirloin Steak Family Packs 3.99 Lb. Boneless New York Strip Steaks Whole or Half Loin 4.99 Lb. Fresh Ground Chuck Family Pack 2.69 Lb. Hormel St. Louis Style Pork Ribs 2.99 Lb. Whole Boneless Pork Loins 2.19 Lb. Sweet Potatoes 40# Box 14.00 Nettles Sausage 190 SW CR 240 Lake City, FL 32025 (386) 752-2510 Store Hours: MondaySaturday 8ampm SiouxPreme PreWashed Pork Chitterlings 5# Bag 4.99 WILSONS O UTFITTERS 1291 SE Baya Dr, Lake City (386) 755-7060 WilsonsOutfitters@comcast.net Holiday Blowout! Kids Insulated Camo... Bibs & Overalls 40% Off! We have great Christmas ideas! Instock! Game cameras 20% Off! Reef Sandals! Yeti Coolers! Tervis Tumblers! Check out our Sales Rack! New Items Added! JOBS Continued From 1A DAYCARE: Two face charges following altercation at local daycare center Continued From Page 1A force consists of approximately 31,759 people. In October, 29,362 residents were employed, while an estimated 2,397 people were jobless. In September the local unemployment rate was 8.0 percent. Then the countys workforce was listed at 31,858 people with 29,298 employed. The local jobless numbers are vastly improved from 2011 when the unem ployment rate was 9.5 percent. Monroe County had the states low est unemployment rate for October at 4.7 percent, followed by Walton County, where the jobless rate was 5.4 percent. Hendry County has the states high est unemployment rate for October, at 12.6 percent, followed by Flagler County with an 11.3 percent unemployment rate. There were six Florida counties with double-digit unemployment rates in October, down from 12 counties in September. According to state employment offi cials, the number of jobs in Florida was listed as 7,371,500 in October, up 67,600 jobs compared to a year ago. October was the 27th consecutive month with positive annual job growth after the state lost jobs for three years. COURTESY The Boys Club of Columbia County received the most votes in the recent 50th Anniversary Donation Giveaway, which earned the club a $1,000 donation from First Federal Bank of Florida. Boys Club gets $1,000 from First Federal

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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY NOVEMBER 18, 2012 7A 7A TH E C I TY O F L A K E C I TY I N V I TES A L L R ES I D EN TS TO A TTE N D A R EC E P TI O N TO BE H ELD O N M O N D A Y N O V E M BE R 19, 201 2 F R O M 5:3 0 P M 6:30 P M A T C I TY H A L L I N T H E C I TY C O U N C I L C H A M B ER S L O C A TED O N T H E S EC O N D F L O O R A T 20 5 N O R TH M A R I O N A V EN U E, LA K E C I TY F LO R I D A TH E P U R P O S E O F T H E R E C E P T I O N I S T O A P P R EC I A TE O U T G O I N G C O U N C I L M E M B ER JA K E H I L L, JR ; W ELC O M E B A C K C O U N C I L M E M B ER M E LI N D A M O S ES A N D M A Y O R S TEP H EN WI TT; I N TR O D U C E TH E C O M M U N I TY TO T H E N EW C I TY C O U N C I L D I S TR I C T 12 M E M B E R ZA C K P A U L K R EF R E S H M EN TS WI LL B E S ER V ED A U D R E Y E S I K E S M M C C i t y C l e r k TH E C I TY O F L A K E C I TY I S S E EK I N G A P P LI C A N TS T O F I L L A V A C A N C Y O N T H E P LA N N I N G A N D Z O N I N G B O A R D TH I S I S A V O LU N TA R Y P O S I TI O N A P P LI C A TI O N S A V A I LA BL E I N TH E C I TY C LE R K S O F F I C E LO C A TE D I N C I TY H A LL A T 205 N O R T H M A R I O N A V EN U E, L A K E C I TY F L O R I D A M O N D A Y F R I D A Y 8A M T O 5 P M O R WW W. LC F LA C O M R EP O R TS A N D D O C U M EN TS T A B (C I TY B O A R D / C O M M I TT EE A P P LI C A TI O N ) A p p l i c at i on d e ad l i n e W e d n e s d ay, N ove mb e r 28, 20 12 n oon T h e Ci t y Pl an n i n g an d Z o n i n g Bo ard s co n s i s t o f fi v e ( 5 ) memb ers w h o s h al l b e res i d en t s o f t h e Ci t y T h e Pl an n i n g Bo ard i s al s o r efe rred t o as t h e L o cal Pl an n i n g A g en cy ( L P A ) Me mb ers are ap p o i n t ed b y t h e Ci t y Co u n ci l fo r t h ree (3 ) y ear t erms an d may b e reap p o i n t ed fo r ad d i t i o n al t erms b y t h e Co u n ci l Fi n an ci al d i s cl o s u r e i s req u i red an n u al l y t o Co u n ci l o n E t h i cs St at e o f Fl o ri d a. T h i s Bo ard a ct s i n an ad v i s o ry cap a ci t y t h ro u g h reco m men d at i o n s t o t h e Ci t y Co u n ci l fo r fi n al act i o n T h e Pl an n i n g an d Z o n i n g Bo a rd me et s o n a mo n t h l y b as i s an d meet i n g s are h el d i n t h e Co u n ci l Ch amb ers l o cat ed i n Ci t y H al l N o t i ce o f al l me et i n g s i s p ro v i d ed t o t h e memb ers an d p o s t ed o n t h e b u l l et i n b o ard at Ci t y H al l at l eas t t w en t y fo u r (2 4 ) h o u rs i n ad v an ce o f t h e meet i n g an d i s s u b j ect t o Sect i o n 2 8 6 0 1 1 Fl o ri d a St at u t es ( Pu b l i c M eet i n g L a w ). A maj o r res p o n s i b i l i t y o f t h e Pl an n i n g Bo ard i s t h e man ag e men t an d u p d at e o f t h e Ci t y Co mp r eh en s i v e Pl an an d L an d U s e Reg u l at i o n s T h e Pl an n i n g Bo ard al s o fu n ct i o n s i n t h e d u al ro l e as t h e Z o n i n g Bo ard fo r t h e Ci t y an d s h al l h av e t h e d u t i es an d res p o n s i b i l i t i es as s et fo rt h i n t h e L an d U s e Reg u l at i o n s an d t h e Ci t y Co d e. Mo s t co m mo n amo n g t h e Z o n i n g Bo ard d u t i es i s t o rev i ew an d co n s i d er ci t i zen req u es t s fo r zo n i n g an d l an d u s e ch an g es s p eci al ex cep t i o n s o r v ari an ces t o cert ai n l an d u s e reg u l a t i o n s an d s u b d i v i s i o n o f p ro p ert y w i t h i n t h e Ci t y T h i s b o ard d o es n o t o p er at e u n d e r a s ep a rat e b u d g et T h e Ci t y D i re ct o r o f G ro w t h Man ag em en t p ro v i d es ad mi n i s t rat i v e s u p p o rt P l eas e n o t e me mb ers o f t h e Pl an n i n g an d Z o n i n g Bo ard s erv e d u al ro l es a n d al s o s erv e i n t h e cap aci t y o f t h e Bo a rd o f A d j u s t men t T h e Bo a rd o f A d j u s t men t m eet s o n an as n eed ed b as i s W he n a va c a nc y oc c ur s or a t e r m e xpi r e s on t he boa r d( s ) a ppl i c a t i ons w i l l be a c c e pt e d. A t t he di s c r e t i on of t he C i t y C ounc i l i nt e r vi e w s m a y b e s c he dul e d a nd, i f r e qui r e d, e ve r y a t t e m pt w i l l be m a de t o s c he dul e a n i nt e r vi e w a t your c onve ni e nc e A p p l i c at i on s m u s t b e t u r n e d i n t o t h e C i t y C l e r k s O f f i c e b y We d n e s d ay, N ove m b e r 28 2012 at n oon T h e C i t y C l e r k s O f f i c e i s l oc at e d at C i t y H al l 2 05 N or t h M ar i on A ve n u e L ak e C i t y, F l or i d a 32055 or a p p l i c at i o n s m ay b e e m a i l e d t o s i k e s a@ l c f l a. c om A U D R E Y E S I K E S M M C C i t y C l e r k Ambulance service offers free transport home on holidays From staff reports Lifeguard Ambulance Service, the emergency medical services provider in Columbia County, will offer complimentary ambu lance transportation on a space-available basis to local residents who other wise would be unable to be home for Thanksgiving or Christmas. The Home for the Holidays program will provide transportation on Thanksgiving day and Christmas day between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m. This program is designed to allow patients in skilled nursing and assisted-living facilities to be home for the holidays when they might otherwise be separated from family due to limite specialized transportation. The holiday season is always a special time for families, and this program is a small gift that always makes a difference in the lives of those we are fortu nate to be serving, Jason Kimbrell, regional execu tive, said. All request for transpor tation must be received by Monday for Thanksgiving, and by Friday, Dec. 21, for Christmas day participa tion. Lifeguard Ambulance Service will provide com plimentary, round-trip transportation originating and eding in Columbia County. Participants must be self-supporting while at the residence and be under the care of a responsible family member. For additional informa tion or to schedule a free transport, call (386) 4873911, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. DEREK GILLIAM/ Lake City Reporter Bellamy the Beaver, mascot of The Ichetucknee Partnership, shows off a $7,000 donation presented to the organization by TD Bank. Joining in the presentation Friday are (from left) Dennille Decker, executive director of the Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of Commerce; Suzanne Norris, regional vice president of North Central Florida for TD Bank; Heather Gray, vice president atthe bank; and Abbie Chasteen, marketing coordinator of the chamber. Our bank has a long-standing commitment to environmental concerns, Norris said. JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City Reporter Melrose Park Elementary School students (from left) Lorenzo Azuara, 11; Chas Hill, 10; Jacob Pauell, 10; and Antara Horne, 10, practice cup stacking during the seventh annual World Sport Stacking Association STACK UP! event on Thursday, which was the Guinness World Records Day. (Cup stacking) is a good way to have fun with friends, Lorenzo said. It helps you move your hands and is a good motivation to keep you out of trouble. Banking on clean water Practicin stackin ROAD PROJECTS From staff reports Florida Department of Transporation announced the following road projects will be active during the coming week: Note: All work will be suspended for the Thanksgiving holiday peri od, Wednesday through Sunday, for the anticipated increase in traffic. Alachua County Archer Road (State Road 24), daytime lane closures between the Levy County line and Southwest 13th Street (U.S. 441) to repaint roadway markings. Northwest 23rd Avenue (SR 120), daytime lane closures between Northwest Sixth and 13th streets from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. to repair sidewalks. Northwest 34th Street (SR 121), daytime lane closures just south of U.S. 441 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. to improve the entrance to the new Wal-mart. Southwest 13th Street (U.S. 441) Daytime lane closures just north of Archer Road from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. for landscaping in the medians, and just south of Archer Road for modifications to the pedes trian overpass. Waldo Road (SR 24), daytime lane closures from East University Avenue (SR 26) to U.S. 301 in Waldo to repaint roadway markings. Williston Road (SR 331), daytime lane clo sures from Southwest 13th Street (U.S. 441) to East University Avenue (SR 26) to repaint roadway mark ings. Columbia County U.S. 41, daytime lane closures from Interstate 10 to Winfield area Monday from 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. to clean ditches. Hamilton County Interstate 75, daytime lane closures Monday for northbound traffic and Tuesday for southbound traffic between SR 6 (Exit 460) and the Georgia line for resurfacing. The speed limit will be reduced to 60 mph during lane closures. U.S. 41, daytime lane closures after 8:30 a.m. between the Columbia County line (Suwannee River bridge) and White Springs for drainage work and from U.S. 129 just south of Jasper for resur facing. U.S. 129, daytime lane closures between the west ern city limits of Jasper and the Georgia line after 8:30 a.m. for resurfacing. Suwanee County U.S. 129, daytime lane closures scheduled between Live Oak and the Hal Adams Bridge in Luraville have been post poned until the week of Nov. 26. General FDOT offices will be closed Nov. 22 and 23 in observance of Thanksgiving.

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8A LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY NOVEMBER 18, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 8AWEATHER L e a v e s a r e n t t h e o n l y t h i n g OFFER NOT AVAILABLE ON EXISTING CAMPUS LOANS. OFFER IS FOR NEW LOANS ONL Y MAY NOT BE COMBINED WITH ANY OTHER OFFER. 1. Credit approval required. Your rate may be higher based on creditworthiness, ve hicle and term of loan. For example, a $39,000.00 loan with no money down at 2.14% for 48 months would require 47 monthly payments of $854.12 and a final payment of $833.58, finance charge of $1,8 39.67, for a total of payments of $40,977.22. The amount financed is $39,237.55, the APR is 2.26%. APR = Annual Percentage Rate .. 2. Interest will accrue from date of purchase. Choosing this option will increase the total amount of interest you pay. 3. Credit approval and initial $5 d eposit required. Mention this ad and well waive the $15 new membership fee. This credit union is federally insured by the Nati onal Credit Union Administration. Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Columbia and Suwannee counties!! 3 Accelerate your approval, apply today! Call 754-9088 Click campuscu.com Visit your local service center 2 26 % AP R 1 for up to 60 months As low as Any vehicle 2 0 1 0 or newer No payments until 2 0 1 3 2 Accelerate your approval, apply today! Accelerate your approval, apply today! Accelerate your approval, apply today! Accelerate your approval, apply today! Accelerate your approval, apply today! Accelerate your approval, apply today! Shop the dealership with a CAMPUS Pre-Approved Loan Draft and negotiate as a cash buyer! Have a loan with another lender? Lower your payment by bringing it to CAMPUS! Our rates are falling too! Lake City 183 SW Bascom Norris Dr. Gville E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunters Walk 5115 NW 43rd St. Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St. Shands at UF Room H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Alachua 14759 NW 157th Ln. Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E. Silver Springs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. Summer eld 17950 US Hwy. 441 Tallahassee 1511 Killearn Center Blvd.

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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Sunday, November 18, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS BRIEFS Columbia gets redemption against Bears. Revenge served coldBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High had waited 51 weeks for a chance at redemption, but the Tigers only needed to wait one drive to take a lead they would never give back. Columbia defeated Bartram Trail High, 35-14, in a rematch with the team that knocked the Tigers out of the playoffs last season. The Tigers used a bit of trickery on their first drive with a 26-yard fake punt executed by Felix Woods to set up a 32-yard pass from Jayce Barber to Nate Ayers on the next play. It was the only time the Tigers would line up in a punt formation during the first half. Brant Nelson added the extra point to give Columbia a 7-0 lead with 8:33 remain-ing in the first quarter. Columbia tried more trickery on the following kickoff, but an onside kick was recovered by Cameron Kenyon to set Bartram Trail up at its 42. The Tigers’ defense sunk their paws in and forced a punt to give Columbia possession back at its own 35-yard line. This drive was more methodical, but the end result was the same as Columbia went up 15-0 after Ronald Timmons scored from two yards out. Timmons had 20 rushing yards on the drive that stretched 11 plays and took 3:22 off the clock before scoring with 1:39 remaining in the first quarter. He also added the two-point conver-sion after the Bears jumped offside. Bartram Trail drove to first and goal on its follow-ing possession, but Trey Marshall came away with a pick in the end zone to hand the ball back to Columbia. The Tigers kept their foot on the gas and respond-ed with a 12 play, 80-yard drive. Columbia received two key conversions on the drive. The first came when Jayce Barber hit Shaq Johnson on third-and-7 for a gain of 12 yards to move the chains. The second came on a fourth-and-6 situation. Marshall began the drive with his interception and ended it with a 27-yard touchdown run on fourth down to give Columbia a 22-0 lead. Roc Battle continued the pick party on the Bears’ next possession and returned it 42 yards to set up Columbia at the 47-yard line. Barber accounted for all but seven yards as the Tigers drove nine plays and scored when the quar-terback hit Alex Weber for an eight-yard score to give Columbia a 28-0 lead with 1:13 remaining in the half. The extra point was blocked. “We stuck with the run a lot early,” Barber said. “We established the run and it really opened up the pass, because they were starting to bring eight men into the box.” Felix Woods ended the half for the Tigers by sack-ing Bartram Trail quarter-back P.J. Blazejowski and forcing the Bears to run out the rest of the clock. Bartram Trail finally got on the board on the open-ing drive of the second half, but the Bears were their own worse enemy by using up 7:13 from the clock to score. The drive covered 16 plays with Blazejowski hitting Nick Uruburu on fourth-and-goal from the BRENT KUYKENDALL /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Trey Marshall runs around the edge fo r a touchdown against Bartram Trail High in the Tigers’ 35-14 playoff win against the Bears on Friday at Tiger Stadium. CHS continued on 5B GAMES Monday Q Columbia High boys soccer at Chiles High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Q Fort White High soccer at Interlachen High, 7 p.m. (boys-5) Q Columbia High girls basketball vs. Santa Fe High, 7p.m. Q Fort White High girls basketball at Bradford High, 7 p.m. Tuesday Q Fort White High girls soccer vs. Columbia High, 5 p.m. Q Columbia High girls basketball vs. Madison County High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) Friday Q Columbia High football vs. St. Augustine High in regional semifinal, 7:30 p.m. Monday, Nov. 26 Q Fort White High girls soccer at Newberry High, 6 p.m. Q Columbia High soccer vs. Oak Hall School at CYSA fields, 7 p.m. (girls-5) Tuesday, Nov. 27 Q Columbia High girls soccer at Chiles High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Q Fort White High soccer vs. Interlachen High, 7 p.m. (girls-5) Wednesday, Nov. 28 Q Columbia High boys soccer vs. Mosley High at CYSA fields, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Q Fort White High boys basketball vs. Newberry High, 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 29 Q Fort White High soccer at P.K. Yonge School, 7 p.m. (boys-5) Q Fort White High girls basketball at Santa Fe High, 7 p.m. Friday, Nov. 30 Q Columbia High girls soccer at Hamilton County High, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Q Columbia High boys soccer vs. Lincoln High at CYSA fields, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Saturday, Dec. 1 Q Columbia High wrestling hosts Tiger Invitational, 10 a.m. FORT WHITE BASEBALL Moe’s Night in Alachua Monday Fort White High’s baseball teams will be at Moe’s Southwest Grill in Alachua on Monday. The program will earn a percentage of profit for all tickets turned in from 4 p.m. to closing. There will be a sales table. For details, call Fort White Dugout Club president Jeanne Howell at 288-5537. N. FLORIDA SPEEDWAY Toy drive for weekend races North Florida Speedway’s annual Turkey Trot races in honor of Harvey Jones are Friday and Saturday. The track is sponsoring a charity toy drive by asking all fans and drivers to bring an unwrapped, unopened toy to donate to a charity for children. There will be a bicycle race for girls and boys ages 6-12 on Nov. 24. The winners will receive a new bike. The race card features eight classes. For details, call the track at 754-8800.Q From staff reports JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High quarterback Andrew Baker (12) is brough t down by The First Academy’s John Tate (53) and Dominic Garrity (58) during Friday’ s game. By TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comORLANDO — The First Academy lived up to its unbeaten record with a 42-17 Class 3A playoff win over Fort White High in Orlando on Friday. The District 4 champion Royals improved to 11-0 and avenged Fort White’s 21-14 win last year. “We couldn’t put it together,” said Fort White head coach Demetric Jackson, whose team ended the sea-son at 6-5. “We couldn’t get the stops when we needed them.” First Academy bolted out to a 14-0 lead, scoring on its first two drives. After accepting the opening kickoff, the Royals marched 68 yards in nine plays with Colton Plante scoring on a one-yard run. First Academy followed that up with an 11-play, 53-yard drive. Fletcher Magee did the scoring hon-ors on a 14-yard run. Following an exchange of punts, Fort White got First Academy knocks Fort White out of playoffs. Rough royal treatment INDIANS continued on 2B JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFlorida senior linebacker Jonathan Bostic (1) jogs into the end zone after making an interception against Jacksonvil le State University during a game on at Ben Hill Griffin Sta dium in Gainesville on Saturday. Florida beat JSU 23-0. Florida sends off seniors with 23-0 winBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comGAINESVILLE — It was another day of struggles for Florida’s offense, but the defense picked up the slack to send off 19 seniors with a win in their final home game. Florida also became only the third team in the school’s history to finish with an undefeated home record and the 10th team to win 10 or more games in a season. Florida’s offense started hot and it looked like the struggles that have plagued the Gators since the Georgia game would disappear. Jacoby Brissett took over for an injured Jeff Driskel, but didn’t have to do much to lead the Gators on a scoring drive to open the game. It was Florida’s last offensive touchdown. Mike Gillislee capped off the drive with a seven yard score. It was the first time he had reached the end zone since LSU. Gillislee finished with 122 rushing yards and now has 964 on the season need-ing only 36 yards against Florida State next week to break the 1,000-yard bar-rier. Florida’s other offensive score came in the third quarter when senior Jonathan Bostic picked off a pass and returned it seven yards to give the Gators a 17-0 lead. Florida’s defense continued to lead the Gators and after allowing a 76-yard pass on the first play of the game Florida sunk its teeth in to hold the Gamecocks to only 176 yards the rest of the game. All of Florida’s points were scored by seniors Defense picks up slack for struggling offense. GATORS continued on 2B

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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today AUTO RACING 1:30 p.m. SPEED — Formula One, Grand Prix of the United States, at Austin, Texas 3 p.m. ESPN — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Ford EcoBoost 400, at Homestead CANADIAN FOOTBALL LEAGUE 6:30 p.m. NBCSN — Playoffs, Western Division finals, Calgary at B.C. (same-day tape) 11 p.m. NBCSN — Playoffs, Eastern Division finals, Toronto at Montreal (same-day tape) GOLF 9 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, SA Open Championship, final round, at Ekurhuleni, South Africa (same-day tape) 1:30 p.m. TGC — LPGA, Titleholders, final round, at Naples MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 4:30 p.m. ESPN2 — Hall of Fame Tip-Off Classic, Ohio State or Rhode Island vs. Seton Hall or Washington, at Uncasville, Conn. 6:30 p.m. ESPN2 — Puerto Rico Tip-Off, Oklahoma State vs. N.C. State, at Bayamon, Puerto Rico 8:30 p.m. ESPN2 — Charleston Classic, Colorado vs. Murray State, at Charleston, S.C. NBA BASKETBALL 9 p.m. WGN — Chicago at Portland NFL FOOTBALL 1 p.m. CBS — Regional coverageFOX — Regional coverage 4 p.m. FOX — Regional coverage 4:25 p.m. CBS — Doubleheader game 8:20 p.m. NBC — Baltimore at Pittsburgh SOCCER 4 p.m. NBCSN — MLS, playoffs, Eastern Conference championship, second leg, Houston at D.C. United 9 p.m. ESPN — MLS, playoffs, conference championship, second leg, LA at Seattle 11:30 p.m. ESPN2 — Indoor, FIFA, Futsal World Cup, final, Spain vs. Brazil, at Bangkok (same-day tape) WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 2:30 p.m. ESPN2 — UConn at Texas A&M ——— Monday MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 3:30 p.m. ESPN2 — Maui Invitational, first round, Butler vs. Marquette, at Lahaina, Hawaii 6 p.m. ESPN2 — Maui Invitational, first round, Mississippi St. vs. North Carolina, at Lahaina, Hawaii 8 p.m. ESPN2 — Legends Classic, first round, UCLA vs. Georgetown, at Brooklyn, N.Y. 10 p.m. ESPN2 — CBE Hall of Fame Classic, first round, Washington St. vs. Kansas, at Kansas City, Mo. 12 Midnight ESPN2 — Maui Invitational, first round, Southern Cal vs. Illinois, at Lahaina, Hawaii NFL FOOTBALL 8:30 p.m. ESPN — Chicago at San FranciscoFOOTBALLNFL standings AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PANew England 6 3 0 .667 299 201Buffalo 4 6 0 .400 230 299Miami 4 6 0 .400 187 205N.Y. Jets 3 6 0 .333 175 228 South W L T Pct PF PAHouston 8 1 0 .889 250 143Indianapolis 6 3 0 .667 186 201Tennessee 4 6 0 .400 219 311Jacksonville 1 8 0 .111 127 246 North W L T Pct PF PABaltimore 7 2 0 .778 254 196 Pittsburgh 6 3 0 .667 207 177 Cincinnati 4 5 0 .444 220 231 Cleveland 2 7 0 .222 169 211 West W L T Pct PF PADenver 6 3 0 .667 271 189San Diego 4 5 0 .444 209 191Oakland 3 6 0 .333 191 284Kansas City 1 8 0 .111 146 256 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAN.Y. Giants 6 4 0 .600 267 216Dallas 4 5 0 .444 188 204Philadelphia 3 6 0 .333 156 221Washington 3 6 0 .333 226 248 South W L T Pct PF PAAtlanta 8 1 0 .889 247 174Tampa Bay 5 4 0 .556 260 209New Orleans 4 5 0 .444 249 256 Carolina 2 7 0 .222 163 216 North W L T Pct PF PAChicago 7 2 0 .778 242 133Green Bay 6 3 0 .667 239 187Minnesota 6 4 0 .600 238 221 Detroit 4 5 0 .444 216 222 West W L T Pct PF PASan Francisco 6 2 1 .722 213 127 Seattle 6 4 0 .600 198 161Arizona 4 5 0 .444 144 173 St. Louis 3 5 1 .389 161 210 Today’s Games Cleveland at Dallas, 1 p.m.N.Y. Jets at St. Louis, 1 p.m.Jacksonville at Houston, 1 p.m.Cincinnati at Kansas City, 1 p.m.Philadelphia at Washington, 1 p.m.Green Bay at Detroit, 1 p.m.Arizona at Atlanta, 1 p.m.Tampa Bay at Carolina, 1 p.m.New Orleans at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.San Diego at Denver, 4:25 p.m.Indianapolis at New England, 4:25 p.m.Baltimore at Pittsburgh, 8:20 p.m. Monday’s Game Chicago at San Francisco, 8:30 p.m.Open: Minnesota, N.Y. Giants, Seattle, Tennessee Thursday’s Games Houston at Detroit, 12:30 p.m.Washington at Dallas, 4:15 p.m.New England at N.Y. Jets, 8:20 p.m.BASKETBALLNBA schedule Today’s Games Indiana at New York, 12 p.m.Orlando at Toronto, 1 p.m.Brooklyn at Sacramento, 6 p.m.Cleveland at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Golden State at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.Boston at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.Chicago at Portland, 9 p.m.Houston at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m. Monday’s Games Indiana at Washington, 7 p.m.Milwaukee at Charlotte, 7 p.m.Orlando at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.Denver at Memphis, 8 p.m.Golden State at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.L.A. Clippers at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.Houston at Utah, 9 p.m. AP Top 25 schedule Today’s Games No. 2 Louisville vs. Miami (Ohio), 4 p.m. No. 6 N.C. State vs. TBD at Colieo Ruben Rodriguez, Bayamon, Puerto Rico, TBA No. 8 Syracuse vs. Wagner, 1 p.m.No. 9 Duke vs. Florida Gulf Coast, 8 p.m. No. 10 Florida vs. Middle Tennessee at Tampa Bay Times Forum, 4 p.m. No. 15 Creighton vs. Presbyterian, 3:05 p.m. No. 16 Baylor vs. TBD at TD Arena, Charleston, S.C., TBA No. 19 Gonzaga vs. South Dakota, 4 p.m. No. 21 Michigan State vs. Texas Southern, Noon No. 22 Wisconsin vs. Cornell, 6 p.m.No. 23 UConn vs. Quinnipiac or Iona at the USVI Sports & Fitness Center, St. Thomas, Virgin Islands, 9 p.m. No. 24 Cincinnati vs. N.C. A&T, 2 p.m. Florida St. 88, BYU 80 At New York BYU (2-1) Davies 6-11 6-8 19, Sharp 0-0 0-0 0, Haws 10-20 2-2 23, Carlino 0-9 0-1 0, Zylstra 3-10 2-2 10, Delgado 0-2 0-0 0, Cusick 3-11 2-2 10, Ambrosino 0-1 0-0 0, Winder 0-0 0-0 0, Calvert 2-5 0-0 4, Austin 1-6 2-4 4, Harward 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 25-75 14-19 70.FLORIDA ST. (2-1) White 5-6 6-7 17, Turpin 1-3 0-0 2, Brandon 0-3 1-4 1, Snaer 4-9 5-5 16, Miller 6-8 0-0 15, Bookert 5-7 2-3 15, Shannon 4-6 0-1 8, Gilchrist 0-1 0-0 0, Bojanovsky 1-1 2-2 4, Thomas 2-4 2-4 6, Whisnant II 1-2 1-1 4, Ojo 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 29-50 19-27 88. Halftime—Florida St. 44-35. 3-Point Goals—BYU 6-25 (Zylstra 2-5, Cusick 2-7, Davies 1-1, Haws 1-4, Delgado 0-1, Austin 0-1, Ambrosino 0-1, Calvert 0-1, Carlino 0-4), Florida St. 11-20 (Bookert 3-4, Snaer 3-5, Miller 3-5, Whisnant II 1-2, White 1-2, Brandon 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—BYU 40 (Haws 9), Florida St. 41 (Snaer 10). Assists—BYU 18 (Haws 5), Florida St. 20 (Bookert 5). Total Fouls—BYU 26, Florida St. 23.SOCCERMLS playoffs EASTERN CONFERENCE Championship Houston 3, D.C. United 1 Today D.C. United vs. Houston, 4 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE Championship Los Angeles 3, Seattle 0 Today Seattle vs. Los Angeles, 9 p.m. MLS CUP Saturday, Dec. 1 Eastern champion vs. Western champion, 4:30 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04202BSPORTS INDIANS: Last game for nine seniors Continued From Page 1B a big play on a 51-yard pass from Andrew Baker to Michael Mulberry. The Indians turned that into a 43-yard field goal by Nathan Escalante. First Academy answered with its own big pass play — 62 yards from Curt Cramer to M.J. Mathis. The Royals got seven points out of their opportunity when Lloyd Hylton scored on a three-yard run and Landon Scheer booted the third of his six PATs. “The defense was just one step behind the whole game,” Jackson said. “They have good backs and a good line and they kept pounding us. Every single play we ran was there, we just didn’t execute.” Jackson’s assessment was proved when Tavaris Williams broke a 71-yard touchdown run on the third play of the third quarter. Escalante’s extra point put the Indians back in it, down 21-10 with plenty of time to play. But, it was the Indians who blinked. The defense forced a punt. Mulberry, who has three punt-return touch-downs on the season, tried to do too much and fum-bled the ball away at the Fort White 26. Three plays later, Ben Deluzio scored from the 8. “We gave them life after the fumble,” Jackson said. “We kind of stopped ourselves.” Williams sparked another Fort White score with a 68-yard kickoff return. Baker set it up with a 14-yard completion to Trey Phillips and scored on a sneak. It was 28-17 with 15 minutes left in the game, and just “maybe.” However, on the following kickoff, Fort White was flagged for two unsports-manlike conduct penalties. D.J. Middleton got the first for strutting around after making the tackle on the kickoff. The second came on a comment from one of Fort White’s coaches. The 30-yard gift gave the Royals a first down at the Indians’ 43. They methodi-cally scored in nine plays. Magee got the points on a six-yard run. Fort White fumbled the ball away again and First Academy drove 57 yards for its final score. Garrett Williams got in on the action from seven yards out. It was the final game for nine Fort White seniors. “I told them I was proud of their leadership and the effort they played with all season,” Jackson said. “They brought us to where we are tonight and gave us our best chance.” ——— 1st Academy 14 7 7 14 — 42 Fort White 0 3 14 0 — 17 First Quarter FA—Plante 1 run (Scheer kick), 7:57FA—Magee 14 run (Scheer kick), :17 Second Quarter FW—Escalante 43 FG, 5:36FA—Hylton 3 run (Scheer kick), 2:14 Third Quarter FW—T. Williams 71 run (Escalante kick), 10:47 FA—Deluzio 8 run (Scheer kick), 5:51FW—Baker 1 run (Escalante kick), 3:23 Fourth Quarter FA—Magee 6 run (Scheer kick), 11:08FA—Williams 7 run (Scheer kick), 5:09 —— Fort White 1st AcademyFirst downs 7 16Rushes-yards 23-121 53-240Passing 134 101Comp-Att-Int 11-19-0 6-6-0Punts-Avg. 2-40 2-44.5Fumbles-Lost 2-2 0-0 Penalties-Yards 3-35 1-2 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Fort White, T. Williams 10-99, Phillips 3-19, R. Williams 5-13, Baker 5-(-10). 1st Academy, Deluzio 13-85, Williams 8-58, Hylton 13-48, Magee 6-35, Plante 4-12, Larson 1-4, D. Taht 1-2, Cu. Cramer 5-(-2), A. Taht 1-(-1), Ch. Cramer 1-(-1). PASSING—Fort White, Baker 11-19-134-0. 1st Academy, Cu.Cramer 6-6-101-0. RECEIVING—Fort White, Phillips 5-36, Mulberry 2-57, T. Williams 2-12, Sanders 1-30, Newman 1-(-1). 1st Academy, Magee 3-34, Williams 2-5, Mathis 1-62. Fort White faces scoring machineBy TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comORLANDO — The First Academy is a scoring machine. In nine of their 11 games, the Royals have put up at least 45 points. The First Academy beat Fort White High, 42-17, in the opening round of the Class 3A playoffs on Friday. Fort White defensive coordinator Ken Snider knew the Indians would have their hands full. “They are well-coached and very talented,” Snider said. “We didn’t have an answer for what they were doing. We barely held them under their season average (actually 53.1 points per game).” First Academy rolled up 240 yard rushing in its Wing-T variation that puts a back in motion on almost every play and hands him the ball to take off tackle or around the end. The Royals used six running backs and that’s not counting the quarter-back or the bench players that mopped up. Five of the main six backs scored touchdowns. Quarterback Curt Cramer benefited when the Indians gathered to stop the run. After faking to his backs, Cramer was a per-fect 6-of-6 passing for 101 yards. The Indians did get one sack from Cameron White for a loss of five yards, but no other negative stops until the subs entered. “We gave it our best shot,” Snider said. “We tried to put our kids in the best situations. (First Academy) is very athletic and very crisp in what they do. Some teams are just better.” Snider said the second round of the playoffs will be interesting when First Academy takes on Trinity Catholic High. with Caleb Sturgis account-ing for nine more points off of three field goals. “It’s crazy to think it’s the last time (I’ll play in The Swamp),” Sturgis said. “I don’t think it’s completely hit me yet, and we still have a few more games, a big one next week obviously, but it’s crazy that it’s over in The Swamp. I’ve had a lot of good memories here and I’m glad I could finish it off with a pretty good day.” Florida finishes the regular season against in-state rival Florida State at 3:30 p.m. on Saturday at Doak Campbell Stadium in Tallahassee. GATORS From Page 1B FSU hammers MarylandBy DAVID GINSBURGAssociated PressCOLLEGE PARK, Md. — Having realized its quest to earn a berth in the Atlantic Coast Conference title game, No. 10 Florida State can now turn its atten-tion toward other objectives — such as beating Florida, winning the league title and maybe, just maybe, making a run at the national cham-pionship. Devonta Freeman ran for 148 yards and two touch-downs, FSU’s top-ranked defense lived up to its billing and the Seminoles rolled past Maryland 41-14 Saturday to capture the Atlantic Division crown. “One of our first goals is to win the division,” coach Jimbo Fisher said. “Now we have to play the Florida game, get in the ACC cham-pionship game and see where that goes.” The Seminoles (10-1, 7-1) need a lot of things to fall into place before they can begin thinking about finishing No. 1. But who knows? “Hey, there are still a lot of things out there to play for,” Fisher said. “You don’t know what’s going to hap-pen these last two or three weeks. A guy loses here, a couple people lose there...” Regardless, FSU has already accomplished what Fisher called “one of our major goals.” “Before you can talk about winning a national championship, you’ve got to win your conference. You’ve got to be able to win your division, and that’s what we did,” Fisher said. “And also to have 10 regular-season wins, that’s the first time since that’s happened since I don’t know when.” The answer: 2003.Florida State led 27-0 at halftime and cruised to its fifth straight victory. In the process, the Seminoles earned the right to play for their 13th ACC crown on Dec. 1.

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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012 3B3BSPORTSIndians’ season comes to end JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High captains Trey Phillips (5), Shayne Newma n (82), Michael Blackmon (73) and Michael Mulberry ( 4) watch as the referee conducts the coin toss before the s tart of the Class 3A regional semifinal game against The First Acade my at Kroy Crofoot Field in Orlando on Friday. Fort White fel l to First Academy, 42-17. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High head coach Demetric Jackson (left) congra tulates The First Academy head coach Leroy Kinard on a well-fought game Friday night. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Blair Chapman (22) drags down The Firs t Academy’s Chase Cramer (31) as he runs the ball Friday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterThe First Academy’s Garrett Williams (44) is tripped up b y Fort White High’s Kellen Snider (7) and Michael Mulberry (4). JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s D.J. Middleton (11) pushes Ben Deluzio (2) out of bounds after a pass completion on Friday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterThe First Academy’s Kwadarrius Smith (4) breaks up an A ndrew Baker pass intended for Michael Mulberry (4).

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4B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04204BSportsTigers earn revenge over Bears BRENT KUYKENDALL /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Ronald Timmons runs through a tackle during the Tigers’ 35-14 win against Bartram Trail Hig h in the opening round of the Class 6A playoffs at Tiger Stadium on Friday. BRENT KUYKENDALL /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Javere Smith wraps up Bartram Trail H igh’s Dillon Ragusa. BRENT KUYKENDALL /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Shaq Johnson (18) runs through a Bar tram Trail High defender after making a catch. BRENT KUYKENDALL /Lake City ReporterColumbia Highs’ Lonnie Underwood is met by Bartram Tr ail High’s Hayden Good during the Tigers’ 35-14 win on Friday. BRENT KUYKENDALL /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Alex Weber crosses the goal line for a touchdown in the Tigers’ 35-14 win. BRENT KUYKENDALL /Lake City ReporterColumbia High quarterback Jayce Barber surveys the fie ld for an open receiver during the Tigers’ 35-14 playoff win against Bartram Trail High o n Friday.

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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012 5B5BSports CHS: St. Augustine next in line Continued From Page 1Bseven for the score to cut the lead to 28-7 with 4:44 remaining in the third quarter. The teams exchanged possessions before Columbia would put the dagger in on a drive that spanned the third quar-ter and finished with 9:40 remaining in the contest. The drive saw Nate Ayers make a highlight-reel catch of 31 yards and Timmons cap off his night with a 20-yard run for the excla-mation point. Nelson’s extra point gave the Tigers a 35-7 lead. Roc Battle added his second interception of the game on the follow-ing drive, but Columbia’s offense punted for the only time in the game when the Tigers got the ball back. Austin Williams responded with a 44-yard punt. Bartram Trail cut the lead to 35-14 with 4:14 remaining in the contest when Gabe Davis carried it in from five yards out. Columbia then turned to its ground game and responded with two first down runs to run the remaining 4:12 off the game clock. Head coach Brian Allen joked last week that he would smile if the Tigers could put four solid quarters together against a dominant football team. At the conclu-sion of Friday’s contest, he found time to smile. “Absolutely, I’m smiling,” Allen said. “We played well in all three phases. The offense came out and established itself right away. When you’re able to do that and put other teams in a hole, it forces them to change their philosophy.” But Allen didn’t focus solely on what the Tigers had accomplished on Friday. The coach is already thinking about continu-ing the journey against St. Augustine High at 7:30 p.m. Friday. “We’re going to approach next week the same way that we are going to approach every game and that’s by saying it’s the best team we’ve faced all year,” Allen said. “We’re going to go out and work just as hard as we did this week.” The hard work seems to be paying off. Tigers respond with redemption By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comIt was a story they wanted written. Three Columbia High players were called out by coach Brian Allen this week and three Tigers respond-ed with key plays in the Tigers’ 35-14 win against Bartram Trail High in the first round of the Class 6A playoffs on Friday. Allen wasn’t saying anything that these players had not said themselves. Nate Ayers, Trey Marshall and Shaq Johnson each felt that they let their team down in last year’s 27-24 loss to the Bears. If they were seeking redemption, each of them earned it on Friday. Ayers was the first to earn his redemption and he came through time and time again for the Tigers on Friday. The senior receiver opened up the Tigers’ scor-ing with a 31-yard touch-down reception from Jayce Barber on Columbia’s open-ing drive. “It felt so good,” Ayers said. “I felt like I had dropped two big passes last year and that cost us. I was focused all week on making sure that wouldn’t happen again.” Marshall’s chance at redemption came on Bartram Trail’s first oppor-tunity to score. The junior cornerback stepped in front of a P.J. Blazejowski pass in the end zone to keep the Tigers ahead 15-0 in the first quarter. “It felt good to get redemption,” Marshall said. “I knew that they were going to their key player, No. 20, (Nick) Uruburu and I keyed on him to make the play.” Johnson earned his redemption in the same way he felt he let the team down last year. Last season, the senior tight end felt he dropped a pass on fourth down that could have helped the Tigers win the game. On Friday, he came through on a pivotal third-and-7 to keep the Tigers’ drive alive. “I was out there just trying to do this for all the other seniors,” Johnson said. “I felt I let the team down last year. It feels good to go out there and do this for all the seniors, just to respond.” And Allen felt good about the way his players responded after being pub-licly called out this week. “I know Nate especially felt horrible about last year’s game,” Allen said. “It’s been a great week for him as he came out and passed the FCAT and then came out and had an out-standing night.” For Marshall, the coach had much praise. “It’s no secret how me or this coaching staff feel about Trey Marshall,” Allen said. “He’s playing as well as anyone.” And for Johnson, Allen was sure to give credit for more than his catching. “What people don’t see is he’s out there blocking big time as well,” Allen said. “Looking back at a year ago with the pass he dropped, it’s good to see him make a big one tonight and run a guy over.” It was a storybook night. BRENT KUYKENDALL /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Nate Ayers looks at the crowd after maki ng a 32-yard touchdown catch on Friday. BRENT KUYKENDALL /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Roc Battle looks for running room after an interception against Bartram Trail High on Friday.Battle’s fieldBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comPerhaps no move has paid off as much for Columbia High this sea-son than Roc Battle’s move from running back to cor-nerback in the fall. The junior grabbed two interceptions against Bartram Trail High deep in Tiger territory to help Columbia come away with a 35-14 win against the Bears in the opening round of the Class 6A playoffs. “He played humongous for us,” Columbia High head coach Brian Allen said. “What he lacks in physical stature, he makes up for with heart.” Battle said early this year that he still thinks of himself as a running back, but lately is starting to come around to the idea that he can have just as big of an impact by playing corner. “It feels good to be able to come away with the plays,” Battle said. “I just have to remember to stay humble and ask God to help Him play through me.” If it wasn’t skill on Friday, it must have been God on Battle’s side as he was able to come away with play after play. BRENT KUYKENDALL /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s defense takes down Bartram Trail High quarterback P.J. Blazejowski. Tigers not ready to slow downBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High head coach Brian Allen wants his team to live by the 24-hour rule. After any win or loss, the Tigers have 24 hours to get the game out of their system. Friday’s 35-14 win against Bartram Trail High in the opening round of the play-offs didn’t take the Tigers that long. After the game, Columbia players were already focused on what it’s going to take to win the next game. The Tigers knocked St. Augustine High out of the playoffs last year, so the Yellow Jackets will cer-tainly be looking for a little redemption against the Tigers on Friday. “It’s a big game and I’m sure they’re going to be coming at us with a head of steam,” cornerback Roc Battle said. The Yellow Jackets knocked off Ridgeview High, 35-26, to set up the rematch with Columbia at 7:30 p.m. on Friday in Lake City. But no Tiger is celebrating their first-round win, as each player is focused on the ultimate prize and St. Augustine is the next team in line preventing the Tigers from capturing a state title. “We have to come in prepared to work just like we did for Bartram Trail,” wide receiver Nate Ayers said. “We have to be ready just like we were this week.” Although the Tigers won last year’s contest, quar-terback Jayce Barber said the Tigers won’t be think-ing of themselves as easy favorites. “We’re thinking about this game like we’re David and they’re Goliath,” Barber said. “We’ve got to continue to prepare the same way and be ready to go out and play the game.” The players are modeling a humble sense of charac-ter. It starts from the coach-ing staff and head coach Brian Allen who echoed what his players said after the game. “We’ve got to approach them like they’re the best team we’ll ever play,” Allen said. “We’re going to work just as hard and hopefully we can continue to surprise teams with how physical we are. I can guarantee you there’s not many teams that haven’t taken their shoulder pads off in practice at this point during the season.”

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6B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 6BSPORTS Lung Cancer is not exclusive to smokers and the numbers keep rising Advanced treatment options and our patient-focused care make a great difference in your cancer treatment from diagnosis to survivorship I am not a Columbia High graduate, but I have been here long enough and become emotionally involved to the point that I can call myself a Tiger. Its Friday night and Columbia is coming off a 35-14 playoff win against Bartram Trail High the team that eliminated these same Tigers from the playoffs last season. It would make sense that Id be happy right now. Instead the mood is that of aggravation. How can this be possible? This community talks about supporting Tiger football. Everyone I meet asks me about Tiger football. They ask what I think about this weeks game. Now, I have a question. How can a community that talks about supporting these Tigers a 10-1 district champion football team with only a three-point road loss against the states top ranked Gainesville High Hurricanes by the score of 17-14 leave so many empty seats for a playoff game. For those that showed on Friday, I thank you. I know the players and coaches thank you as well. For those that have made it all season, I give even more thanks. Thats how its supposed to be with Friday night football in the south. I realize that there are those of you that arent able to make it for various reasons, but theres plenty of people out there that can find their way to Tiger Stadium. This isnt a community of fair-weather fans and 58 degrees shouldnt be cold enough to keep most fans huddled indoors. This isnt just a team for the students and faculty at Columbia. This is your team. For every player that has ever put on the pads at Columbia, for everyone that had anything to do with this program or any child that will one day be a Tiger, its our duty to support this group of players and coaches. What more can they do to deserve this support? While there were a good number of people at the game, a good number simply wont do. People should be scrambling to find tickets to watch this team as they try to achieve something special. And its not just for them its also for you. If you werent there, shame on you. Columbia hosts St. Augustine High at 7:30 p.m. on Friday. Its your opportunity to show the Tigers support no matter the outcome. Show the coaches and players you support what they stand for. Theyre doing a great job of shaping young men. If youre not a football fan, be a fan of building character. Show some character by showing support. FROM THE SIDELINE Brandon FinleyPhone: (386) 754-0420 bfinley@lakecityreporter.com Time to show support Brandon Finley covers sports for the Lake City Reporter Tigers fall at buzzer JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Columbia Highs Morris Marshall pulls down a rebound during a game last season. By BRANDON FINLEY bfinley@lakecityreporter.com It was only preseason, but Columbia High head coach Horace Jefferson said he saw enough to feel good about the Tigers upcoming season. The Tigers fell at Hawthorne High, 62-61, in an exhibition game, but Jefforson liked what he saw. We had a slight defen sive breakdown to allow them to get an open shot at the buzzer, but I am very pleased with our effort, he said. Were going to be pretty good. We havent played any type of scrimmages and all weve done is drilled and run. Thats the first time weve faced any competition including ourselves and I think we did a tremendous job. Columbia was led by the dual-scoring threats of Morris Marshall and Javontae Foster as both players turned in 19 points for the Tigers. Wayne Broom pitched in 11 points and Tre Simmons scored seven more for the Tigers. Jefferson said that the Tigers will be changing their style to a more uptempo pace this season and while theyre still learning he can see greener pastures in front of Columbia. I knew wed be pretty good, but I think were already further along than I thought we would be at this point, Jefferson said. The biggest thing for the Tigers adjusting to the new style will be conditioning for the new pace of play that Columbia looks to force this season. Everything we do will require running the floor, Jefferson said. So far prac tice has showed them what its going to take to be the kind of team that we want to be. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Columbia Highs Ellie Garcia-Gomez (13) takes an elbow as she fights for possession of a ball against Chiles High on Tuesday. Lady Tigers soccer falls to Leon High, 2-0 By BRANDON FINLEY bfinley@lakecityreporter.com Despite falling to a 2-5 record after a 2-0 loss against Leon High on Friday, Columbia High head coach Ashley Brown feels better about the way things are taking form this season for the Lady Tigers. I feel this season will go well, Brown said. We have a core group of seniors, but also a lot of freshmen and sophomores. Weve definitely improved since last year. Columbia is led by senior cap tains Keeley Murray, who had 16 saves in a 1-0 win against Chiles High on Tuesday, and Holly Boris, who is currently injured. Weve been plagued by injures so far, but Keeley is playing really well, Brown said. Keeley defi nitely wants to play at the next level and shes shown that by her work in the offseason. Shes got a great work ethic, is very coachable and responds well to contructive criticism. The Lady Tigers are currently 1-4 in the district with two losses to Mosely as well as a loss to Leon and Lincoln. The Tigers defeated Chiles for their only district win. Columbia will take a break from the district schedule by travelling to Fort White High at 5 p.m. on Tuesday.

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ON BUSINESS Jerry Osteryoung(850) 644-3372jostery@comcast.net “Be everywhere, do everything, and never fail to astonish the customer.” — Macy’s motto I am often asked how you achieve great customer service in a business. This is a fair question, because though customer satisfac-tion surveys and mystery shoppers provide very effective ways of measuring the success of the existing customer experience, they do not tell us how to create great customer service in the first place. Providing great customer service is not as simple as saying “exceed customer expectations.” Rather, it involves a series of interac-tions from the moment the customer first encounters your business until the time he or she leaves. Too often businesses define the success of their customer service based on the experience created by only one person in the business, ignoring all other interactions. For instance, medical doctors frequently think they give excellent patient service but com-pletely forget about all the other touch points from the front office staff to the bill-ing department. For another example, I frequently see businesses provide a great sales expe-rience only to fail on the last impression (e.g. late delivery) and destroy all the good they created in the ear-lier stages of the interaction. I advise each business I work with to define all of their customer touch points from the first point of con-tact until the service event is complete. These can include a customer’s phone call, the condition of your restrooms, the cleanliness of your win-dows, the way you welcome a returning customer and the list goes on. For example, consider the interaction between a clerk and a customer. You need to break it down and go through each part of the transaction, evaluating how effective it was. How did the clerk communicate with the customer? How friendly were they? If it was a return-ing customer, how quickly did the clerk recognize them? This list of questions could vary based on the position, but customer ser-vice must be thought of as a series of interrelated pro-cesses. Great customer ser-vice is achieved by ensuring that each of these points is identified and measured for success. Now go out and make sure that you identify each customer touch point and establish a plan of evaluating the service you provide at every one. Achieve great customer service Lake City Reporter Q FSU Finance Professor Dr. Jerry Osteryoung is Executive Director of the Jim Moran Institute for Global Entrepreneurship at Florida State University’s College of Business. Week of Nov. 18 Nov. 24, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section C Columbia, Inc. Your marketplace source for Lake City and Columbia County1CColumbia Inc. Get ready for the fiscal cliffBy DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comW ith the “fiscal cliff” fast approach-ing, congress must either com-promise or risk plunging the U.S. economy back into recession. A local investment advisor believes the increase in the capital gains tax rate will be bad for everyone. John Kuykendall, chief executive officer and president of GulfCoast Financial Services, said he believes the stock mar-ket will take a dive in December if Congress can’t find a way to extend the tax cuts enacted by the administration of former President George W. Bush. “If these tax cuts don’t get extended and we reach this cliff, we should go ahead and take advantage of (the current capital gains tax rate) this year,” he said. After the stock market declines in December, Kuykendall said, with the increases in capital gains rate and the additional increase in taxes on dividends, he thinks fewer people will invest in the stock market. When fewer people invest in companies, companies don’t have the money to expand, and when companies aren’t expanding, they don’t hire. If the United States falls off the fiscal cliff, companies’ capital investments would no longer be written off in one large chunk, but the depreciation of the asset would be calculated over the life of that investment. Capital invest-ments include large purchases of equipment — including anything from trucks to computers. Kuykendall said companies probably won’t buy new equip-ment if that part of the tax code isn’t extended. The ripples across the economy will reach far if that happens, he said. He said because of the ability to claim the entire value of equipment in a single tax year, his company bought a new truck last year. Otherwise, he would have kept the old truck and driv-en it for another 10 years. “We wouldn’t have bought the truck, the dealership wouldn’t have made a profit, the company wouldn’t have made the profit, So it affects a lot of different things than just buying a truck,” he said. While the increase in capital gains rate may seem like some-thing that only affects people with money to invest, many peo-ple who are retired without large incomes have investments. Those investments, if a person holds the investment longer than a year, would be considered a capital gain if sold for a profit. Also, when someone sells a house, the profit is a capital gain, he said. Another affect of going over the cliff would be across the board reductions in services and programs funded by the fed-eral government. While he does believe cuts are needed in spend-ing, he said the spending cuts could push the economy back into recession also. He said the debt is caused by the government spending too much on services and programs. “We need to cut back on how much we are spending, it’s what any business would do,” he said. “If you’re in the red you have to cut back you don’t just print your own money.” JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City ReporterJohn Kuykendall, CEO and president of GulfCoast Financial Services in Lake City, discusses the impacts of the impe nding fiscal cliff. Investment counselor sees trouble ahead if solution not found Health care law advances in the statesBy RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVARAssociated PressWASHINGTON— Threatened with repeal just weeks ago, President Barack Obama’s health care law now appears on track in close to half the states, with others playing catch-up and the adminis-tration readying a fallback for states not wishing to participate. Friday was the original deadline for states to notify Washington if they would play a role in building new health insurance markets through which the unin-sured can get coverage starting in 2014. Though the administration granted a month’s extension, most states have already made their intentions known. As of Friday, 23 states plus Washington, D.C., were proceeding; 15 said they’d defer to the federal government to run their markets and 12 were still mulling over their options. The mostly blue group proceeding included five Republican-led states. The undecided included several states that seemed to be moving toward an active role. “Postelection it’s really been ‘game on,’” said Kelly Barnes, leader of the health care group at the PricewaterhouseCoopers consulting firm. Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney had vowed to begin dismantling “Obamacare” his first day in office. But Romney lost, and instead GOP gover-nors are scrambling to see if they can find an accom-modation with the admin-istration after two years of fighting the president’s sig-nature law. “The president won the election...and New Jersey is going to comply with the Affordable Care Act,” Republican Gov. Chris Christie said Friday. Christie said he still has questions about costs and is weighing his decision. Earlier this year he vetoed legislation creating a state exchange, as the new insurance markets are called. A check by The Associated Press found that 16 states plus Washington, D.C., want to build their own exchanges. Starting Jan. 1, 2014, individuals, families and small busi-nesses will be able to buy private coverage through an exchange in their state, with most consumers get-ting government assistance to pay premiums. The exchanges will also help steer low-income, uninsured people into expanded Medicaid pro-grams in many states. Another seven states have indicated they want to partner with Washington to build their exchanges. Ohio joined this group Friday and West Virginia officials said they’re heading in the same direction. Fifteen mostly Republican-led states say they’ll defer to the federal government to build and run their markets. Georgia and Wisconsin formally joined that group Friday. However, New Hampshire, where Democrats won ASSOCIATED PRESSNew Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, a Republican, said Frida y that New Jersey is going to comply with the Affordable Care Act. Threatened with repeal ju st weeks ago, President Barack Obama’s health care law now appears on track in close to half the states, with others playing catch-up and the administration readying a fallback for s tates not wanting to participate. WILMA continued on 3A

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By MARY CLARE JALONICKAssociated PressWASHINGTON — The Environmental Protection Agency on Friday denied requests from several gov-ernors to waive production requirements for corn-based ethanol. A renewable fuels law requires that 13.2 billion gallons of ethanol be pro-duced by this year and 15 billion gallons be pro-duced by 2015. That’s good for corn farmers, but it’s angered poultry, hog and cattle farmers. They say they’ve seen big jumps in corn-based feed costs as corn is diverted to make ethanol vehicle fuel. States requesting the waiver say reduced corn production due to this year’s drought has made the problem even worse. Gov. Mike Beebe, DArk., said in a letter to the EPA in August that etha-nol production was taking a “terrible toll” on animal agriculture in his state and that consumers would pay more for food as a result. Governors of North Carolina, New Mexico, Georgia, Texas, Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, Utah, and Wyoming also asked for the waiver, along with members of Congress and a coalition of farm groups and other industries that have opposed increased ethanol production. The EPA said Friday that the agency has stud-ied the effects of waiving the requirement and offi-cials believe it would have had little impact on corn prices. “We recognize that this year’s drought has created hardship in some sectors of the economy, particu-larly for livestock produc-ers,” said Gina McCarthy, assistant administrator of the EPA’s Office of Air and Radiation. “But our exten-sive analysis makes clear that congressional requirements for a waiver have not been met and that waiv-ing the Renewable Fuel Standard will have little, if any, impact.” Under the EPA’s interpretation of the renewable fuels law, first passed in 2005 and then significantly expanded in 2007, it is not easy to qualify for a waiver. The EPA can grant a waiver if the agency determines that the set ethanol produc-tion would “severely harm” the economy of a state, region or the entire coun-try. It’s not enough that the standard just contributes to the harm, the EPA said, noting the agency also has a high threshold for the degree of harm done. A coalition of livestock, poultry and dairy organiza-tions reacted angrily to the decision. “We are extremely frustrated and discouraged that EPA chose to ignore the clear economic argu-ment from tens of thou-sands of family farmers and livestock and poultry producers that the food-to-fuel policy is causing and will cause severe harm to regions in which those farmers and producers operate,” the coalition said in a statement. Environmental groups also have opposed increased ethanol production, saying the excess corn planting is tearing up the land. Scott Faber, a lobbyist for the Environmental Working Group, said this most recent waiver denial may further ener-gize ethanol opponents to lobby Congress to repeal the entire renewable fuels law and not “tinker with a safety valve that is too tight for either a Democratic or Republican administration to turn.” The Bush administration turned down a request by Texas Gov. Rick Perry in 2008 to waive the mandate because of drought. 2C LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF NOVEMBER 18, 2012 2CBIZ/MOTLEY HEALTH CARE: Continued From Page 1Ccontrol of the state House in the election, is taking a second look at its decision to default to the feds. Finally, another 12 undecided states now have until Dec. 14 to determine what role, if any, they’ll play. Obama’s election victory guaranteed the survival of his health care law, which is eventually expected to pro-vide coverage to more than 30 million people through the exchanges and expand-ed Medicaid programs. It was the final hurdle, after the Supreme Court upheld a legal challenge from 26 states. In the aftermath of the election, some Republican state leaders say it’s time to accept the law. “I don’t like it; I would not vote for it; I think it needs to be repealed. But it is the law,” said Mississippi Insurance Commissioner Mike Chaney, after announc-ing that his state wants to set up its own exchange. “If you default to the federal government, you forever give the keys to the state’s health insurance market to the federal government.” Traditionally, states have regulated the private health insurance market. But other Republicanled states say they don’t have enough information to make a decision at this point and are clamoring for the Obama administration to release major regulations bottled up for months. “States are struggling with many unanswered questions and are not able to make comprehensive far-reaching decisions prudent-ly,” Govs. Bob McDonnell of Virginia and Bobby Jindal of Louisiana wrote Obama earlier this week. Some of their main concerns are hidden costs of operating the exchanges and the sheer bureaucratic com-plexity of the new system. The Obama administration has steadfastly maintained it will not postpone the Jan. 1, 2014, launch date for the law’s coverage expansion, and it will go ahead in all 50 states. Although the public remains divided about the health care law, the idea of states running the new insurance markets is popular, especially with Republicans and political independents. A recent AP poll found that 63 percent of Americans would prefer states to run the exchanges, with 32 percent favoring fed-eral control. Among Republicans, 81 percent were in favor of state control, while inde-pendents lined up 65-28 percent. EPA rejects ethanol waivers ASSOCIATED PRESSA tanker truck passes an oil refinery in Richmond, Cali f. California has the country’s toughest controls on greenho use gas emissions.

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LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF NOVEMBER 18, 2012 3C FRESNO, Calif. — A landmark $500 million agreement was reached to settle a slaughterhouse abuse case in California that led to the biggest meat recall in U.S. history in 2008, an animal welfare group announced Friday. The civil settlement with the owners of Westland/Hallmark Meat Co. is the largest-ever penalty for an animal abuse case, and the first time federal fraud statutes have been used, according to the Humane Society of the United States, the lead plaintiff. The settlement is largely symbolic because the com-pany is bankrupt. “It’s a deterrence judgment,” said Jonathan R. Lovvorn, chief counsel for animal protection litiga-tion at the Humane Society of the United States. “It informs other federal gov-ernment contractors that when your contract says you provide humane han-dling, if you don’t do that you’re likely to end up bankrupt as well.” As a supplier of meats for the national school lunch program, the Riverside County company had signed federal contracts certifying that it would provide humane treatment of animals sent there for slaughter. The animal welfare group filed a civil complaint in U.S. District Court in Riverside in 2009, and the U.S. Justice Department intervened after research showed that one of the packing plant partners had two felony convictions related to illegal industry practices. “This is a first-of-its-kind lawsuit regarding farm ani-mals, the first time federal fraud statutes have been applied,” Lovvorn said. “When you look at the video, it’s about as far from humane treatment as you can get.” The widely circulated video shot by an under-cover operative showed “downer cows” — those too weak or sick to walk — being dragged by chains, rammed by forklifts and sprayed with high-pressure water by employees who wanted them to stand and walk to slaughter. Downed cows can pose an increased risk for mad cow and other diseases. Thus far, no mad cow cases have been linked to the recalled meat from Westland/Hallmark Meat Co. The video sparked the largest beef recall in U.S. history. Nearly 37 million pounds of the 143 million pounds recalled had gone to school lunch programs, and most had been eaten by the time of the recall. The recall cost taxpayers $150 million. The lawsuit alleged the government paid the com-pany money it was not enti-tled to because the compa-ny lied about meeting the conditions of its contracts. The settlement agreement followed another slaughterhouse abuse investigation in August in Central California. In that case, the federal government suspended school lunch purchases from Central Valley Meat Co. of Hanford after a video by an undercover opera-tive from Compassion Over Killing showed downed animals being repeatedly kicked, shocked, shot and pulled by the tails by work-ers trying to get them to stand. That cruelty investi-gation is ongoing. In the Hallmark case, the partial settlement announced Friday is with two of nine defendants in the case, Donald Hallmark Sr. and Donald Hallmark Jr. Neither is the packing plant partner with the felony con-victions. Under the terms, the father and son also have five years to pay $316,802, or the bulk of their remaining per-sonal assets. They have also agreed to cooperate fully with the Justice Department and the Humane Society of the United States in set-tling the litigation against the remaining seven defendants. Attorneys for the defendants and the Justice Department did not imme-diately return calls seeking comment. The symbolic settlement will become final when the cases against the other defendants are resolved, Lovvorn said. Twinkie maker Hostess to fold By CANDICE CHOI and TOM MURPHYAssociated PressNEW YORK — Twinkies may not last forever after all. Hostess Brands Inc., the maker of the spongy snack with a myste-rious cream filling, said Friday it would shutter is operations after years of struggling with man-agement turmoil, rising labor costs, intensifying competition and America’s move toward eat-ing healthier snacks even as its pantry of sugary dessert cakes seemed suspended in time. Some of Hostess beloved brands such as Ding Dongs and Ho Ho’s likely will be snapped up by buyers and find a second life, but for now the company says its snack cakes should be on shelves for another week or so. The news stoked an outpouring of nostalgia around kitchen tables, water coolers and online people relived childhood mem-ories of their favorite Hostess goodies. Customer streamed into the Wonder Hostess Bakery Outlet in a strip mall on the west side of Indianapolis Friday afternoon after they heard about the com-pany’s demise. Charles Selke, 42, pulled a pack of Zingers rasp-berry-flavored dessert cakes out of a plastic bag stuffed with treats as he left the store. “How do these just disappear from your life?” he asked. “That’s just not right, man. I’m loyal, I love these things, and I’m dia-betic.” After hearing the news on the radio Friday morning, Samantha Caldwell of Chicago took a detour on her way to work to stop at a CVS store for a package of Twinkies to have with her morn-ing tea and got one for her 4-year-old son as well. “This way he can say, ‘I had one of those,’” Caldwell, 41, said. It’s a sober end to a storied company. Hostess, whose roster of brands dates as far back as 1888, hadn’t invested heavily in marketing or innovation in recent years as it struggled with debt and management changes. As larger competitors inundated supermarket shelves with a dizzying array of new snacks and variations on popular brands, Hostess cakes seemed caught in time. The company took small stabs at keeping up with Americans’ movement toward healthier foods, such as the intro-duction of its 100-calorie packs of cupcakes. But the efforts did little to change its image as a purveyor of empty calories with a seemingly unlimited shelf life. Even taking into account changing tastes and competition, Hostess’ problems were ultimate-ly rooted in its own financials. The company, based in Irving, Texas, had been saddled with high pension, wage and medi-cal costs related to its union-ized workforce. It was making its second trip through bankruptcy court in less than three years. Before the Chapter 11 filing in January, citing growing competition from rivals that expanded their reach over the years, the company had been contributing $100 million a year in pension costs. The new contract offer would’ve slashed that to $25 mil-lion a year, in addition to wage cuts and a 17 percent reduction in health benefits. Tensions between management and workers were also an ongoing problem. Hostess came under fire this year after it was revealed that nearly a dozen executives received pay hikes of up to 80 percent even as the com-pany was struggling last year. Although some of those execu-tives later agree to reduced sala-ries, others — including the for-mer CEO Brain Driscoll — had left the company by the time the pay hikes came to light. Hostess filed a motion to liquidate Friday with U.S. Bankruptcy Court after it said striking work-ers across the country crippled its ability to maintain production. The shuttering means the loss of about 18,500 jobs. Hostess said employees at its 33 factories were sent home and operations suspended Friday. Its roughly 500 bakery outlet stores will stay open for several days to sell remaining products. CEO Gregory Rayburn, who was hired as a restructur-ing expert, said Friday that the company booked about $2.5 bil-lion in revenue a year, and that sales volume was flat to slightly down in recent years. So far this year, the company said Twinkies alone accounted for $68 million in sales. The move to liquidate comes after thousands of members of the Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers International Union went on strike last week after reject-ing the latest contract offer. The bakers union represents about 30 percent of the company’s work-force. A representative for the bakers union did not return a call seeking comment. Although many workers decided to cross picket lines this week, Hostess said it wasn’t enough to keep operations at normal levels; three plants were closed earlier this week. Hostess CEO Gregory Rayburn said Hostess was already operating on thin margins and that the strike was a final blow. “The strike impacted us in terms of cash flow. The plants were operating well below 50 per-cent capacity and customers were not getting products,” he said. The company had reached a contract agreement with its largest union, the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, which this week urged the bakery union to hold a secret ballot on whether to continue striking. Ken Hall, general secretarytreasurer for the Teamsters, said his union members decided to make concessions after hiring consultants who found the com-pany’s financials were in a dire situation. “We believed there was a pathway for this company to return to profitability,” Hall said Although Hall agreed that it was unlikely anyone would buy the entire company, he said “peo-ple are going to look for some fire sale prices” for some of the brands. “Frankly it’s tragic, particularly at this this time of year with the holidays around the corner,” Hall said, noting that his 6,700 mem-bers at Hostess were now out of a job. Kenneth McGregor, a shipper for Hostess in East Windsor, Conn., arrived at the plant Friday morning and said he was told he was laid off immediately. He blamed the bakery workers union for rejecting a proposed contract. In a statement on the company website, CEO Rayburn said there would be “severe limits” on the assistance the company could offer workers because of the bankruptcy. The liquidation hearing will go before a bank-ruptcy judge Monday afternoon; Rayburn said he’s confident the judge will approve the motion. “There’s no other alternative,” Rayburn said. ASSOCIATED PRESSA Wonder Bread truck pulls out of the Hostess plant in Og den, Utah, on Thursday. Hostess Brands Inc. said Friday it will move to liquidate its business, after the com pany had set a Thursday deadline for striking employees to return to work. ASSOCIATED PRESSA worker throws cattle carcass scraps into a truck traile r at the Hallmark Meat Packing slaughterhouse in Chino Calif. The owners of a Southern California slaughterhouse where cr uel treatment of cows led to the biggest meat recall in US history in 2008 have settled a civil case with the Humane Socie ty of the United States and the U.S. Justice Department for a ne arly $500 million. The settlement is the largest animal abuse s ettlement in U.S. history by tenfold and the first time U.S. fraud statues were used to sue animal abusers.Huge animal abuse settlement reached Federal housing agency facing $16.3B in lossesBy MARCY GORDONAP Business WriterWASHINGTON — A federal agency that insures mortgages for millions of lowand middle-income borrowers is facing losses of $16.3 billion and may require taxpayer support, according to an indepen-dent audit released Friday. The Federal Housing Administration’s estimated losses were steeper than earlier projections. That shows high numbers of mortgage defaults trig-gered by the housing cri-sis have reduced the FHA’s reserve funds. The Department of Housing and Urban Development, which over-sees the FHA, stressed the agency has sufficient cash to pay insurance claims against mortgage defaults. Still, HUD said the Obama administration will consider seeking taxpayer assistance for the agency. That will be decided early next year when the admin-istration puts together its budget request for fiscal 2014. The FHA has taken steps to shore up its reserves over the next few years, HUD said in a news release accompanying the audit. Among them: Expanding so-called short sales — when a home sells for less than what is owed on the mortgage — and raising annual insurance premiums paid by FHA borrowers by an average of $13 a month. Lower mortgages rates contributed the FHA’s bleaker financial situation, HUD said. When people refinances at lower rates, it reduced revenue earned from loans. The FHA insures about $1 trillion in home loans. The FHA and government-controlled Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac together back around 90 percent of new mortgages. Fannie and Freddie were bailed out by the government in 2008 during the financial crisis and have cost taxpayers about $170 billion, Sen. Tim Johnson, chairman of the Senate Banking Committee, said he was “deeply concerned” by the audit. The South Dakota Democrat said he will ask HUD Secretary Shaun Donovan at a hearing about what actions are needed to shore up the FHA’s finances. Pension insurer hurtingAssociated PressWASHINGTON — The federal agency that insures pensions for more than 40 million Americans last year ran the widest deficit in its 38-year history. The Pension Benefit Guaranty Corp. says its def-icit grew to $34 billion for the budget year that ended Sept. 30. That compares with a $26 billion shortfall in the previous year. Pension obligations grew by $12 billion to $119 billion last year. Assets used to cover those obligations increased by only $4 billion to $85 billion. The agency has now run deficits for 10 straight years. The gap has grown wider in recent years because the weak economy has trig-gered more corporate bank-ruptcies and failed pension plans. If the trend continues, the agency could be forced to struggle to pay benefits without an infusion of tax-payer funds.

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDSUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012 Classified Department: 755-5440 4C CLASSIFIED AD vantageTake ADvantage of the Reporter Classifieds!755-5440Lake City Reporter FIND IT SELL IT BUY IT $17504 lines 3 days Includes 2 Signs Each additional line $1.65 Garage Sale Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$10104 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.10One item per ad Under $500 Personal Merchandise Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$16754 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.15One item per ad Under $1,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less. Each item must include a price. 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Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be published, nor for any general, special or consequential damages. Advertising language must comply with Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition of discrimi-nation in employment, housing and public accommodations. Standard abbreviations are acceptable; how-ever, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated. Ad Errors-Please read your ad on the first day of publication. Weaccept responsibility for only the first incorrect insertion, and only the charge for the ad space in error. Please call 755-5440 immediately for prompt correc-tion and billing adjustments.CancellationsNormal advertising deadlines apply for cancellation.Billing InquiriesCall 755-5440. Should further information be required regarding payments or credit limits, your call will be trans-ferred to the accounting depart-ment. General Information In Print and Onlinewww.lakecityreporter.com Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$2504 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $.25One item per ad Under $100 www.salliemae.candidatecare.com Sallie Mae promotes a drug-free workplace and is an Equal Opportunity/Afrmative Action employer Temporary Collectors Sallie Mae is seeking highly motivated individuals to join our Collections Team. We specialize in collecting court debt. We have fulland part-time Temporary Collector positions available. The position offers a rate of $8 per hour PLUS an incentive program. This position runs from mid-December to February with the opportunity for permanent placement for high performers. Sallie Mae is a Fortune 500 company. Come grow with us! Apply online at: www.salliemae.candidatecare.com LegalThe Columbia County Local Mitiga-tion Strategy working group will meet on Monday, November 19, 2012 at 9 a.m. The meeting will be held at the Columbia County Emer-gency Operations Center, 263 NWLake City Avenue, Lake City, FL32055.The purpose of this meeting is to re-view and select potential projects to be pursued using the Hazard Mitiga-tion Grant Program (HMGP) Fund-ing.The public is invited to attend this meeting.05535712November 11, 14, 18, 2012 100Job Opportunities05534241NOWHIRING Cashiers & Baggers forHigh Springs fruit & gift stores. Benefits avail: health, dental, & vacation. Apply in person: Florida Citrus Center(Chevron) 18603 NWCR 236, High Springs (exit 404 & I-75) 05535697Seeking experienced applicants for Bridge/Structural Concrete crew positions. Positions open; Bridge Carpenter, Formsetter, Concrete Finisher. Rigging and light operator experience is a plus. Work area will be Central North Florida thru Big Bend.” You may apply at 841 NW Guerdon Street, Lake City, FL 32056, fax your resume to 386-755-9132 or visit website at www.andersoncolumbia.com. CDLClass A Truck Driver Flatbed exp. for F/TSE area. 3 years exp or more. Medical benefits offered. Contact Melissa or Sandy@ 386-935-2773 Dental Hygienist: Golden Opportunity! Full time, Part time, Fill in, we have a great opportunity waiting for you! An immediate opening has just come up! That’s great news in this job market! If you have a friendly can-do attitude, a gentle touch, a great work ethic, you are orgainized, and self motivated with a god sense of humor, then you should apply. Call 888-486-2408 to hear a message with more details about the position and instructions on how to apply for this position in Madison, FL. Great benefits! EXP. TRAINER: Responsible for Teaching individuals about the Judicial system. Associates degree, Background and reference checks, and valid DLreq’d. PT. E-mail resume to jshaw@itmflorida.com Experience Preferred, Full or Part Time Furniture Sales Person. Pick up application in person at Morrell’s. No phone calls please. Part-Time, General office skills and experience desired. Flexible hours, dependability a must. Strong computer skills, MS Office required. Send resume to: PO Box 1239, Lake City, FL32056.05535917T eachers Join our team of over 100 professional teachers! Want to make a difference in the lives of children? Infant/Toddler: 10 Mo FTTeacher/Floater (Lake City) Child Development Associate (CDA) or equivalent credential (FCCPC or ECPC) required. Three years experience with birth to 3 preferred. High School Diploma/GED Required. Must be able to pass DCF background screenings. Excellent Benefits, Paid Holidays, Sick/Annual Leave, Health/Dental Insurance, and more. Apply at 236 SW Columbia Ave, Lake City, FL or send resume to: employment@sv4cs.org Fax (386) 754-2220 or Call 754-2225 EOE EOE Professional Office Mng For construction office; proficient w/ computer, Qbks, motivated individual, excellent communication skills, fax resume 386-758-8920, email resume8920@gmail.com SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 Two Child Care Helpers for After School Care Program. Requirements: Must be at least 18 yrs old, 20-25 hours a wk. Call 365-2128. 120Medical Employment05533149Medical Billing Manager Several years experience in all aspects in medical insurance billing required. Salary based on experience. Email resume in confidence to mafaisal05@yahoo.com or fax to 386-758-5987. 120Medical Employment05535460Gainesville Women’s Center ForRadiology Arlene Weinshelbaum, M.D. EXP. MAMMOGRAPHY TECH wanted full time or part time,for private Radiology office. AART& Mammography certification req. Fax resume to: Tracy: (352)331-2044 05535750RN OncologyFast paced Oncology Hematology practice currently seeking a permanent, full time ONCOLOGYINFUSION RN to work in outpatient chemotherapy at their Lake City location. Work schedule M-F, 8am-5pm. Please send resume with salary req. to jsmith@ccofnf.com. Resumes without salary req. will not be considered. 05535863LPN needed for Ambulatory Surgery Center Please send resume to 256 SWProfessional Glen Lake City, Florida 32025 or e-mail to admin@nfsc.comcastbiz.net 05535914RN, Nursing Supervisor Weekends Only, Excellent Pay Please apply Baya Pointe Nursing & Rehabilitation Center 587 SE Ermine Ave., Lake City, Fl 32025 EOE/DFWP Exp. CAPor Licensed Mental Health Professional for counseling and assessments in an outpatient SAtreatment program. Ref. Req'd. PT Email resume to bsmith@itmflorida.com 240Schools & Education05535484Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class12/24/2012• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-11/05/12• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 05535592Interested in a Security Officer Career? North Florida Firearms Training Center Lic# DS8900001 Offers•Instruction for Class “D” Security Officer License in Lake City, 40 hr course.•Security Officer Class “D” License Training Certification $120.00. Fees incl. application instructions, books, supplies, exam, next class 11/19/12. Call 386-984-5530 310Pets & Supplies PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 407Computers DELLComputer $100.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 430Garage Sales PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 440Miscellaneous All Children are artists! Ages 2-10 Fall Session Receive $10 off tuition October 22nd Nov. 16th Phone: (386) 438-8060 Noahs-art.com *located across the highway from Honda 450Good Things to EatThe Nut Cracker Robert Taylor Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans 2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024 Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville 386-963-4138 or 961-1420 630Mobile Homes forRent14 x70 MH.Real clean,2br/2ba garden tub,Water furn.,Good Location $575 mo. $300 dep. No Pets 386-755-0064 or (904) 771-5924 630Mobile Homes forRent2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $450. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 3/2 SWMH $500 deposit & $500 month 386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410 Efficency Apt and Rv Lots for Rent. Between Lake City & G’ville. Access to I-75 & 441 (352)317-1326. Call for terms. Mobile Homes for rent in White Springs & Ft. White. Contact 386-623-3404 Newer2/2. Super clean on 1 ac North by distribution center. Perfect for Target employee. $550. mo Call for details. 386-867-9231 Quiet Country Park 3br/2ba $525. Very clean NO PETS! References & Deposit required 386-758-2280 WATERTOWN AREA 3br/2ba DW, Handicap accessible, $650 mth, $500 dep. Call 386-344-0144, 386-344-5791 640Mobile Homes forSale575 Credit Score=10% Down on your choice of select New 3/2 or 4/2 Double. Limited time offer for Challenged Credit. North Pointe Homes, 352-872-5566 NEW3/2JACOBSEN HOMES Starting at $43,995. Painted WAlls-Del-Set-AC-Skirting-and Steps. North Pointe Homes Hwy 441 N, Gainesville, FL 352-872-5566 NEWJacobsen Model Homes Sale! 13 Left with up to $25,000 off. Don’t buy until you shop North Pointe Homes 4545 NW 13th St Gainesville 352-872-5566 Own YourProperty? No Money Down with good credit. Great Rates Available. North Pointe Homes 352-872-5566 Palm Harbor Homes New 2012 …30x76 4bd/3ba $0 Down, $399/Month 800-622-2832 ext 210 Several Bank Repos and Used Homes in stock At North Pointe in Gainesville 352-872-5566 650Mobile Home & LandOwnerFinanced 3/22.5 ac.River Access. Small down $625 mo 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05535481We’ve got it all!$89 Deposit Limited Avail. Call Today! Windsong Apts. *Free afterschool program386-758-8455 1BR APT. Downtown Location, Clean. New Carpet $450 mo, plus Security. NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456 2BR/1BA$600/MO & $575 Sec. Dep. Lovely, Private, re-done CR 242 West of RT47 386-365-7193 or 867-6319 2br/1ba Apt. Quiet Lake View CH/A$500. mo $500 dep. No pets. 386-344-2170 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Brandywine Apartments Now Renting 1, 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-752-3033 W. Grandview Ave. Equal Housing Opportunity TDD Number 1-800-955-8771 Brandywine Apartments Now Renting 1, 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-752-3033 W. Grandview Ave. Equal Housing Opportunity BRANFORD VILLAS 386-935-2319 2br/1ba Apts. Now available. $570. mo. Equal Housing Opportunity COZYCOTTAGE 1 BRNew paint & carpet. 10 mins. South of LC, all util. & satellite incl. $550 mo. Pet ok, 386-758-2408 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Updated Apt, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 720Furnished Apts. ForRentRooms forRent Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent2BR, 1/2 acre, Fenced, Close-in, Huge Den, Carport, Smoke Free, $800 mo. App & Ref Req’d Short Term Avail 386-758-9824 2br/1ba $575 mo. + sec., 4mi S. Lake City. Clean & Quiet 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 3br/1.5ba. Very clean, Brick great area w/bonus room. Carport, shed & Fenced (privacy) back yard. $825. mo $825. dep. Ref’s req’d. (941)920-4535 3BR/2BACB home Carport hardwood floors. CH/AFenced yard. Good area. $750 mo plus security. 386-752-0118 or 623-1698 ALandlord You Can Love! 3br/1.5ba, Eat in Kitchen, CH/A, 2 car carport $750 mth + dep 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Avail. for Rent 1206 McFarlane Ave. 3 BR/2 BAhouse. Smoke Free and No Pets allowed. $850 a mo. $500 dep. Call for appt. 904-813-8864. 750Business & Office RentalsForRent orLease: Former Doctors office, Former professional office & Lg open space: avail on East Baya Ave. Competitive rates. Weekdays 386-984-0622 evenings/weekends 497-4762 PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 805Lots forSale PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 820Farms & Acreage10 acres with well/septic/pp (not guar); $300 dwn; $580 a mth. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605REPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Linewww.lakecityreporter.com 180 East Duval St. Lake City, FLorida 32055Contact us at the paper.Mon.-Fri.: 8 a.m.5:00 p.m.CLASSIFIED ADS 386-755-5440 SUBSCRIPTION 386-755-5445 ALL OTHER DEPARTMENTS 386-752-1293 ELECTRONIC ADS SEND TOads@lakecityreporter.com THIS REPORTER WORKS FOR YOU! Lake City Reporter ServicesFLCert. Teacher with 10 yrs exp. Offering a homeshooling group in Jan. Reasonably priced. Interested parents 386-288-0954. Print Template 375 copy.indd 1 11/16/12 11:41:15 AM

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LIFE Sunday, November 18, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section D Story ideas?ContactRobert BridgesEditor754-0428rbridges@lakecityreporter.com Lake City Reporter1DLIFEBy DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comH elping people makes Meally Jenkins feel good. For the past 23 years, the organization she founded, The Chrismas Dream Machine, has helped put presents under the trees of children who otherwise wouldn’t have gifts. The Christmas Dream Machine doesn’t provide gifts to just anybody, she said. The orga-nization focuses on those work-ing to better themselves. “I love helping people,” she said. “I love helping those that are helping themselves.” The staging ground for the organization is located in the Lake City Mall across from Bath & Body Works. Inside the space where The Christmas Dream Machine processes applicants and stores gifts, stands a tree with colored paper decorations. The names of the children wait-ing to be sponsered hang from the branches. The organization requires people who ask for help go through an application process where Jenkins and her staff verify the number of children and the need of the family. She said most people don’t ask for outlandish things. It’s usually very manageable — things like a watch or little toy truck, she said. The staff is all volunteer, she said. This time of the year, she puts everything else on the back burner and focuses all her efforts on helping the children. “The whole purpose of this is so they can wake up in the morn-ing with a gift under the tree,” she said. Jenkins moved to Lake City 42 years ago. She adopted four children all at once. She said her heart saddens when she knows that a child is living through tough times. Jacqueline Moore, 37, has three children. She said the program was ecxellent and that at one time she had all three of, her children enrolled. One of her children is out of high school, but she still receives help for her other two. “It’s a struggle always for me,” she said. “I wish there were more programs like that — truely a blessing.” The Christmas Dream Machine accepts applicants starting Nov. 1 and doens’t stop processing interviews until Dec. 1. Jenkins said there is a year-long effort to buy gifts. The volunteers for the Christmas Dream Machine are always on the lookout for great deals, and know when toys go on clearence, she said. “They’re clean, new and all good stuff,” she said. “We’re good stewards with the money. Everything will be spent on gifts. Every year the Chiristmas Dream Machine helps about1,000 children, not all in Lake City, but all in either Columbia County or nieghboring counties. Jenkins said the Christmas Dream Machine doesn’t ask for help from those in the community, but if anyone would like to spon-sor a child, she accepts gladly. To contact Jenkins, call (386) 758-8398. A hhh, beautiful Mackinac Island, Mich. — its streets lined with Victorian era homes and historic store fronts. The vibrant colors of the hanging flower baskets and gardens are sharp in contrast to the building posts and asphalt roads. The eight-mile scenic coastline shows off the Mackinac Bridge and lighthouses. You can see bicycles that line the curbs where you would normally see cars parked and it’s a refreshing throw back to another time. But wait, what’s that smell? Oh right, its horse poop! Yes, really! In addition to the bicycles, there are many horse drawn car-riages, buggies and wag-ons. The horses pulling these buggies and wagons are pooping in the streets. They do not wear horse diapers; or bun bags or butt flaps. They just go in the street as they walk along doing their dutylit-erally sometimes. Not only does it smell bad, but you have to navigate around it too. We were really surprised by this because so many other places that we’d been to and ridden a horse and carriage, like Central Park in New York, downtown Charleston and even Saint Augustine, the horses wear diapers. The only way to access Mackinac Island is by ferry. So once you arrive, you walk, bike or use a horse and buggy. They use the buggies to transport people, like a taxi. Some are two-seaters, plus the driver and some are large enough to carry about eight people. They use the wagons and trailers for things like delivering luggage to the hotels, pack-age delivery and garbage pick-up. We saw examples of all three, but especially liked seeing “UPS deliv-ery Mackinac style” and the garbage man walking behind a horse-drawn wagon picking up the bags of garbage curbside and throwing them into the back. These are things you don’t think about when you know that there aren’t any motorized vehicles. We rented bicycles and rode around the entire island — all the while maneuvering through the horse manure. You surely didn’t want to hit a pile and have it spatter up off of your tire. Not to mention the other bicyclists or tour-ists coming towards you and not paying attention to where they were going. Our hotel bar and restaurant was called the Pink Pony. I guess it was fitting considering all of the ponies (horses) on the island. We especially liked Horsemanure part of island’s charmWeed killers in manure can harm your gardenM any garden-ers know that the best soil additive for the garden is made of composted manure from farm livestock. But the same measures taken on the farm to keep livestock healthy may be responsible for a degree of failure in the home garden. Farmers must often do battle with weeds in pas-tures. Weeds can not only cut down on the production of good forage crops for livestock, but many weeds are poisonous and deadly to animals. Pasture manag-ers must work to control weeds just as gardeners do. In some cases, however, cultural and mechanical methods aren’t enough. Herbicides that are registered safe for livestock and will not contaminate meat may be needed. Sometimes this may cause a problem for gardeners who use hay or manure for garden-ing. There are a handful of products that travel straight through livestock when they eat treated grass or hay without breaking down. A few chemicals can remain in the waste (manure) for a period of time, especially if the waste is piled up and not exposed to sunlight and rain. If one of those chemicals was used on the pasture and a gardener uses the resulting manure, sensitive garden plants might be harmed. You may be wondering how to find out what is in the composted manure you are using. Just ask the farmer what he uses. The product label will include a statement if the manure could damage sensitive plants such as lettuce, tomatoes, peas, peppers or beans. Chemicals of concern to gardeners include picloram, clopyalid and aminopyralid because they stay active longer in manure and baled hay. Read more about pasture herbicides at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wg006. Another way to find out if your compost is safe for the garden is to do your GARDEN TALK Nichelle Demorestdndemorest@ufl.edu Presents under the tree DEREK GILLIAM/ Lake City ReporterMeally Jenkins hangs another name on the tree. The names represent area children who will receive gifts through The Christmas Dream Machine, a charitable program Jenki ns has been running for 23 years..THE CHRISTMAS DREAM MACHINE Travel Tales Sandy Kishton TRAVEL continued on 2D Local woman works year-round to gather gifts for those in need. GARDEN continued on 2D Project fails to improve water in St. Johns RiverBy JIM WAYMERFlorida TodayVERO BEACH — A $200 million, 30-year replumb-ing of the St. Johns River’s headwaters west of Vero Beach has so far failed to improve water quality in the river’s regional lakes, data show. Instead, it just kept the water from getting much worse, biologists say, as new homes and businesses sprang up nearby. That’s been a disappointment for sport fishermen who had hoped that clean-er lakes would have led to more fish. It also is a potential check on future growth since clean water from the St. Johns is vital to the region’s ability to handle more people. The biggest problem is with nitrogen and phosphorus, key ingre-dients of life, and thus chemical fertilizers. They foster green, fluffy lawns, but in excess, fishkilling algae blooms as well. Their levels in most St. Johns lakes remain high enough to make the water prone to algae and weed explosions that can clog water plant intakes or leave behind potentially unhealthy byproducts in drinking water, state data shows. Despite all the money spent to cleanse the river at its origins, nitrogen and phosphorus levels in lakes in the St. Johns drainage have mostly increased dur-ing the past decade. From 1996 to 2010, all seven upper basin lake sampling sites tested by RIVER continued on 2D

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By JENNIFER FORKER Associated Press Crafts dont have to be complicated. With the holi day season ahead, an easy, enjoyable craft can cover many gifting bases. What could be more fun than experimenting with a sim ple tie-dye? A few do-it-yourself sources have taken tie-dye up a notch, away from the explosions of primary col ors seen on camp T-shirts into a more elegant realm thats perfect for gift giv ing. One such project tiedying tights appears in The Bust DIY Guide to Life (STC Craft, 2011), edited by Laurie Henzel and Debbie Stoller. And the idea transcends tights. Besides making gifts, it works for anything that you have that either you didnt like the original color or you think needs spruc ing up, says Callie Watts of Bust magazine, which aims its pop-culture content at young women. In the book, a pair of white tights is folded accor dion-style from toe to top and secured with rubber bands. Its boiled in a pot of black fabric dye, such as Rit, for about 15 minutes, stirred constantly, then removed and rinsed. The bands are removed and the tights laid flat to dry. Another option adds a sec ond color. A DIYer can get a lot of variety out of this proj ect without much work, says Watts. From socks to shirts, she recommends experimenting with fold ing or bunching the fabric before it hits the dye bath. Another option: Dip an item partially into the dye bath, allowing the color to bleed upward into the fabric. Itll fade dark to light, Watts says. Any fabric that can soak up dye color will do, but Watts says knits will come out as a blurry splotch. Youre not going to have the same distinctiveness. A similar craft, using white scarves, appears in the October pages of Martha Stewart Living magazine. Inspired by shibori, an intricate Japanese tech nique in which textiles are folded, twisted or bound with thread before dyeing, this craft requires little besides a plastic, shoeboxsize bin and a bottle of fabric dye. own simple test. Take a few random samples from deep inside your com posted manure pile and mix the samples together. Fill several small pots with a mix of half potting soil and half manure. Fill three additional pots with potting soil only. Then plant each pot with three pea or bean seeds, water, and tend them for several weeks. If the plants have grown much better in straight potting soil, chances are you have some contamination and you should compost the manure longer. Your com posted manure is prob ably ready to be added to improve your garden soil if all the plants have grown similarly. Read more about this bioassay procedure by searching publication E105180 at http://www. ces.ncsu.edu. 2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 2DLIFE Stop by the Lake City Reporter for your complimentary engagement package. Aisle Style Complimentary Engagement Package Sweetwater Branch Inn 800-595-7760 Wards Jewelry & Gifts 752-5470 Camp Weed Cerveny Conference Center 386-364-5250 GeGees Studio 758-2088 Holiday Inn 754-1411, ext. 106 By J.M. HIRSCH AP Food Editor Nothing says Yum! like a bit of nomenclatural con fusion especially with a side of near extinction. But thats what you get once you venture down the culinary path with bison, an alternative red meat that is showing up at more and more grocers nationwide. And these massive shaggy creatures are such a deli cious and good for us meat, its worth sorting it all out. So lets start with the name. The critter you know as the American buffalo (yes, of rolling plains and Native American fame) real ly isnt a buffalo at all. Turns out there are only a few types of buffalo in the world (including the Asian water buffalo and African cape buffalo). The American buf falo (technically a bison) is more closely related to your run-of-the-mill cow. Still, people tend to use the terms interchangeably and were not going to get bent out of shape over it. Once, bison were hunt ed to near extinction. But theyve made a pretty good turnaround, and these days are raised primarily for consumption. Why do you care? Because bison meat (which is raised without hormones or antibiotics) can be incredibly tender and flavorful, with a sweet, rich beefy flavor. It also happens to be amazingly lean, packing fewer calories and less fat than beef and even skinless chicken. That low-fat profile comes with a price, however. Like any lean meat, bison has a tendency to cook quickly, so quickly that its easy to overcook it. And that is why bison has a reputation for being tough. It isnt. If you have bison that is tough, that just means it was overcooked. Though bison is available in most of the same cuts as traditional beef, the most common varieties at gro cers are ground and steaks. Well stick with those. You can use bison much as you would beef. The trick is to modify the cook ing method (rather than the flavors or other ingre dients) to account for the leanness. When cooking ground bison, its best to work in some sort of liquid flavor to keep the meat moist. This might mean eggs or tomato paste for a meatloaf, or some sort of pan sauce or gravy if you are brown ing it in a skillet. That also makes it ideal for meatballs simmered in sauce or for using in chili. For bison steaks, think fast and furious. Season them, then pop them under the broiler or on the grill for just a few minutes per side. Seared bison with sage and gnocchi Start to finish: 15 min utes Servings: 6 Ingredients: 1 pound package gnocchi pasta 2 tablespoons olive oil 2 cloves garlic, minced Pinch red pepper flakes 1 1/2 pounds bison steak, thinly sliced across the grain 1/4 cup chopped fresh sage 1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese Salt and ground black pepper Instructions: Bring a large saucepan of salted water to a boil. Add the gnocchi and cook according to package direc tions. Reserve 1/4 cup of the cooking water, then drain the gnocchi and set aside. In a large skillet over medium-high, heat the oil. Add the garlic and red pep per flakes, then saute the garlic for 30 seconds. Add the steak and sear on each side for about 1 minute. Dont crowd the pan or the steak with steam rather than sear. If needed, work in batches. Once the steak is seared, add the sage and cooked gnocchi. Cook for 30 seconds, then add the Parmesan. Drizzle in just enough of the reserved cooking water to form a sauce with the melted cheese. Toss, then season with salt and pepper. Nutrition information per serving (values are round ed to the nearest whole number): 360 calories; 90 calories from fat. Learning to love bison as the other red meat ASSOCIATED PRESS A taste-tempting meal of seared bison with sage and gnocchi can be pulled together with about 15 minutes preparation. Lean and tasty, it requires care when cooking. HAPPENINGS Gerald and Connie Ward, of Chiefland, announce the engagement and approaching marriage of their daughter, Shannon Denise Ward, of Chiefland, to Clinton Alan Boone, of High Springs, the son of Martin and Jane Boone, of Fort White. The wedding is planned for the first week of December at the Trenton Womens Club, with the reception following at the same location. The bride-elect is a 2010 graduate of the University of Florida. The future groom is a 2006 graduate of St. Leo University. Shannon Denise Ward and Clinton Alan Boone. Ward-Boone engagement FOOD the St Johns River Water Management District showed increasing levels of nitrogen. Two lakes Washington and Poinsett increased in phospho rus. None of the seven lake sampling stations had a decreasing trend in nitro gen or phosphorus. Biologists say ongo ing farming and develop ment may have tempered the expected ecological gains from the so-called upper basin project. Cattle waste and fertilizer con tinue to add phosphorus to soils already rich with the nutrient, as do leaky septic tanks. But regional water managers say the landmark project fended off what could have been much worse. Future growth in the region hinges on the abil ity of the St. Johns system to provide water supply thats clean, and therefore cheap to treat. The river also brings multi-millions annually to the region from bass fishing, ecotourism and other recreation. Lake Washington is among the most important lakes of the St. Johns. It supplies two-thirds of the water for the 150,000 peo ple the city of Melbourne serves. Its a little bit frustrat ing, you want to see a decrease in the phospho rus. We dont see that, said Dean Dobberfuhl, a program manager for the St. Johns River Water Management District. What happened? Farming and cattle ranching have been part of the St. Johns basin since the mid-19th century. Agricultural activities increased dramatically in order to feed the troops during World War II. The land around the river was diked, channeled and drained in order to raise more crops. By the 1970s, about 70 percent of the basins fertile wetlands had been converted into agricultural fields to support citrus, row crops and beef cattle. In the 1950s, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers began planning a flood control project in the upper basin. It included a net work of storage reservoirs and canals to divert flood waters from the upper St. Johns to the Indian River Lagoon. By 1973, portions of the project, including Canal 54 along Brevards southern border, had been built. But President Richard Nixon stopped the project after a federal study found that channeling the rivers freshwater east would harm the lagoons ecology. In the 1980s, the effort evolved into the upper basin project, which aimed to mimic the St. Johns natural meandering flow. The project reflooded vast farmlands to return them to the floodplain marshes that filter excess nutrients, sediment and contami nants. The project was consid ered a model for replumb ing the Everglades, so regional water managers want to know whether or not, and to what extent, it reduced nutrients and improved the overall health of the river and its lakes. But as the project pro gressed, newcomers con tinued to bring more nutri ents to the basin via fertil izer, septic tanks and other sources. That helped fuel a vicious cycle. Sandy Kishton is a free lance travel writer who lives in Lake City. Email her at skishton@comcast.net. TRAVEL Continued From Page 1D their outdoor patio for our lunch spot on the water. And we probably had the best dinner at the Carriage House at the Hotel Iroquois. All of this being said, I think Mackinac Island is still a must-do. It really is a beautiful place to visit. The views of Lake Huron, the Grand Hotel porch, the many shops and good restaurants definitely make it worthwhile. In addition to seeing the island by bicycle, there are hiking trails, a golf course, and other water activities. They are also known for their fudge! So much so that they refer to the tourists as fudgies. Id recommend going in early fall to avoid the crowds of summer. But beware, Mackinac Island has its own special scent. D. Nichelle Demorest is a horticulture agent with the Columbia County Extension of the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. GARDEN: Avoid trouble. Continued From Page 1D RIVER: Nutrients remain. Continued From Page 1D Easy projects rethink tie-dye for elegant gifts

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Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012 3D3DLIFEStiltsville evokes past in waters near MiamiBy SUZETTE LABOYAssociated PressMIAMI — Perched above the shallow turquoise waters of Biscayne Bay are shacks on stilts that have hosted some of Florida’s wildest parties, from the days when alcohol and gam-bling were outlawed, to a bach-elor party for a member of the Kennedy clan. Seven homes still stand in Stiltsville, as the commu-nity is called, located about a mile out in the Biscayne chan-nel in Biscayne National Park, just a short boat ride or kayak trip from the Key Biscayne coastline. “When you are out there and there’s nobody there, it’s one of the most desolate settings imaginable,” said Paul George, a history professor at Miami-Dade College. “And yet in other ways it’s one of the most striking.” The first dozen homes were built close to the surface of the water in the late 1920s, but they were vulnerable to storm surges and hurricane damage. By the 1930s and ’40s, the homes were built higher off the water on wooden stilts held up by steel-reinforced concrete pilings driv-en through the sand below. The houses had boat docks, wraparound verandas and plenty of windows to pick up the breeze. Generators fueled electricity, cis-terns collected rain water and sewage was sent to a disposal facility. Over two dozen homes existed during Stiltsville’s heyday in the 1960s. Seven are still stand-ing, but they are now part of Biscayne National Park and they are no longer privately owned. HistoryMiami, a local cultural institution and museum, runs occasional three-hour boat tours led by George to see Stiltsville, though the boats do not dock at the homes. Kayakers can tie up at the base of a home and at least stand on the deck for stun-ning sunset views. The homes, now used for tours and other events, are locked when no one is there. George says the homes were a last bastion for what he calls “old Miami’s good ol’ boy network,” a place where acquaintances could fish, drink, tell stories, carouse and get away from city life. “When you get out there, you’ve left your cares behind,” George said. Stiltsville even had its own clubs, hosting members-only par-ties known for bikini-clad women and sometimes nude sunbathers. During Prohibition, there was illegal gambling and alcohol. A local known as Crawfish Charlie was an almost mythological fig-ure in the community, schmooz-ing boaters and selling them bait and chowder. In 1992, one of the homes collapsed as more than 100 visi-tors partied during a rainstorm. Stiltsville was also known as the site of a party for then-bachelor Ted Kennedy, with a live band. But many of the homes were damaged or destroyed in hur-ricanes and fires, and they were not infrequent targets of police raids. Beginning in the 1950s, the community also faced oppo-sition from residents of nearby Key Biscayne, who called the shacks eyesores and its resi-dents squatters, George said. “People over here started complaining about the wild hap-penings over there,” George said as he pointed at Stiltsville from Key Biscayne, which is about 10 miles from Miami. Stiltsville homeowners tried to portray the community as family friendly. “We’re a family type colony, not a scruffy bunch of squatters,” Frank Knuck, a local judge, was quoted as saying in several publications, including a report by the Stiltsville Trust, a non-profit created to preserve the remaining Stiltsville struc-tures. But the complaints pushed the state to eventually order Stiltsvillians (as the residents called themselves) to abandon the homes when their property leases expired in 1999. George, an author and local celebrity, gives several tours of South Florida. Gretchen Weissner of Hollywood, Fla., is a regular on his tours. “He’s got some nice anecdotes. This guy is really good,” she said. The Stiltsville, Cape Florida Lighthouse and Key Biscayne Boat Tour starts from Bayside Marketplace near the Port of Miami. Birds fly alongside the slow-moving boat as cool breez-es pass through the open cabin. The boat does not make any stops, but George supplies fact-packed lessons about the Miami River’s building boom, the Key Biscayne bridge and the city’s ties to politicians like the late Sen. Ted Kennedy, who, George said, “loved the sea.” The tour also offers stunning views of Bill Baggs Cape Florida State Park and the Cape Florida Lighthouse before it heads off to the Biscayne Channel and the heart of Stiltsville. Karen Clark of Saratoga Springs, N.Y., said she had tried to make it on other tours, but the timing wasn’t right until this trip. “This was something I really wanted to do,” said Clark. As a crowd gathered near the front of the boat to take a last pic-ture of the homes, George said: “I just wish there were 27 for me to show you.” ASSOCIATED PRESSOne of seven remaining homes in Stiltsville, a once-thri ving community built in Biscayne Bay near Miami. A nar rated boat tour tells the colorful story of these homes perc hed above the bay’s shallow waters. Boat tours take visitors to isolated community in bay. Guide to coffee table books By LEANNE ITALIEAssociated PressNEW YORK — Even people without coffee tables enjoy coffee table books as gifts, especially if they’re thoughtfully chosen rather than hastily snatched from a store shelf at the last min-ute. The holidays bring fresh choices every year among large-format, photo-driven books. A sampler among new releases:Fashion and Style“Vogue: The Editor’s Eye,” Abrams Books, fea-tures interviews with eight of the magazine’s stylists through time. Celebrity portraits and behind-the-scenes candids by the fash-ion industry’s top photog-raphers, including Irving Penn, Mario Testino, Richard Avedon and Annie Leibovitz. “Icons,” Running Press, stunning up-close photogra-phy by Markus and Indrani of Kate Winslet and Kanye West, along with more stag-ey and dramatic commer-cial jobs featuring the duo’s A-list clientele, from album covers to magazine work. “Tim Walker: Story Teller,” Abrams Books, with the photographer turn-ing fashion into fairy tales. Singer Kate Bush wrote a foreword and Walker includes personal observa-tions of the full-page, color-saturated shoots. There’s Tim Burton as a skanky Santa and model Xiao Wen with a huge insect on her open mouth.Film and TV“Bond on Bond,” Lyons Press, the Roger Moore years, by Roger Moore. Lots of trivia in text span-ning all 50 years of 007, not just Moore’s stint. His rec-ollections are cheeky and well informed. He includes snapshots of famous pals who showed up on set, details gadgetry and includes a great color beef-cake shot of Daniel Craig, shirt off. “Steven Spielberg: A Retrospective,” Sterling, featuring text with the director and film critic Richard Schickel in conver-sation as Spielberg looks back on the last 40 years. Chapters are chronological by movie. Photos heavy on film stills. “All the Bits: Monty Python’s Flying Circus,” Black Dog & Leventhal Publishers, by Luke Dempsey. A colorful door-stop of a book offering complete scripts for every one of the show’s 45 epi-sodes, with marginalia and fun graphic details.Art and Illustrators“Ralph Steadman’s Extinct Boids,” Bloomsbury, with com-mentary from Ceri Levy. Levy, a filmmaker, asked the cartoonist best known for his work with Hunter S. Thompson to produce one painting for an art exhi-bition on birds. Steadman didn’t stop there, docu-menting in beautiful color 100 birds in all. His full-size paintings are punctu-ated by humorous emails and phone conversations between the two. “Mad’s Greatest Artists: Mort Drucker, Five Decades of His Finest Work,” Running Press. A collection of movie and TV satire plucked in comic-strip format from the pages of the magazine. George Lucas, Steven Spielberg and others among Drucker’s targets wrote notes of appreciation.Music and Politics“The Rolling Stones: 50,” Hyperion, by Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Charlie Watts and Ronnie Wood. In celebration of the band’s 50th anniversary, stark commentary from the Stones themselves to go with tour photos, candids and close-ups. “Green Day: The Ultimate Unauthorized History,” Voyageur Press, by Alan di Perna. The rock journalist includes concert visuals, posters and memo-rabilia such as backstage passes in this retrospec-tive spanning the band’s 25 years. Out on Dec. 16.Politics and Food“Capturing Camelot,” by Kitty Kelley. Features intimate images of John F. Kennedy by Kelley’s close friend, photojournal-ist Stanley Tretick, known for incredible access to the president and his fam-ily. Scenes from ticker tape parades to John Jr. running for Marine One. Lots of Jackie. “Come In, We’re Closed,” Running Press, by Christine Carroll and Jody Eddy, with foreword by Ferran Adria. How do the world’s best restaurants feed their staffs? Contains recipes fit for many based on the good eats for the “families” of a variety around the country. Includes staff meals from wd-50 in New York, Ad Hoc, in Yountville, Calif., Cochon in New Orleans and Mugaritz in Spain. ‘Star Wars’ figures, dominoes make Toy Hall of FameBy CAROLYN THOMPSONAssociated PressROCHESTER, N.Y. — Luke Skywalker and Princess Leia outmuscled little green army men for a spot in the National Toy Hall of Fame. “Star Wars” action figures join centuries-old dominoes in the class of 2012, which was announced by the Rochester hall Thursday. A national selection committee chose them from among 12 finalists, pluck-ing the most ancient and most modern toys from the list. “Star Wars” action figures went on the market in 1978, following the 1977 release of the 20th Century Fox movie. The 3 3/4-inch figures of Han Solo, Chewbacca, R2-D2 and company were sold until 1985 and again from the mid-1990s to today. Museum officials say their phenomenal popu-larity inspired other toy makers to tie their prod-ucts to movies and televi-sion series and they note the toys’ appeal extends to adults who continue to col-lect them. “They are a force to be reckoned with,” said Patricia Hogan, curator at The Strong museum, which houses the Toy Hall of Fame. More than 20 lines of “Star Wars” figures have launched, propelling the film series’ merchandise sales to $20 billion over the past 35 years. The action figures were first made by Kenner, which was bought by Tonka and later Hasbro. Dominoes originated in China in the 1300s and appeared later in Europe in a slightly different form. A standard set of 28 tiles represents all possible results when rolling a pair of six-sided dice, with the addition of two blank sides. Although there’s a variety of ways to play with them, the cascading toppling of lined-up tiles put the “domino effect” into the American lexicon. The toys beat out plastic green army men, the board game Clue, the Fisher-Price Corn Popper, Lite-Brite, the Magic 8 Ball, the pogo stick, sidewalk chalk, the electronic game Simon, the tea set and Twister. ASSOCIATED PRESS “Star Wars” action figures, including Darth Vader (righ t) and Ben (Obi-Wan) Kenobi (left)will be inducted into the Nati onal Toy Hall of Fame class of 2012.ASSOCIATED PRESSCoffee table books like the two above being released in time for Christmas often are surefire gifts, appreciated even by people who don’t have cof fee tables. TRAVEL If you go... Q STILTSVILLE TOURS: HistoryMiami — www.histor-ymiami.org/tours — offers a three-hour boat tour on the history of Key Biscayne and Stiltsville. Spring dates include March 30, April 13, and June 9; adults, $54, children, $25. Boats depart from Bayside Marketplace, 401 Biscayne Blvd., an outdoor mall next to the American Airlines Arena; ticket buyers will receive detailed instructions on meeting place. Q TIPS: Bring sunscreen, hat and binoculars to see the Stiltsville homes and other sights from a distance. Q STILTSVILLE HISTORY: www.stiltsville.org BOOKS

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4D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012 4DLIFE SUNDAY EVENING NOVEMBER 18, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsAmerica’s Funniest Home Videos (N) The 40th Anniversary American Music Awards Musical acts are honored. (N) (Live) News at 11Inside Edition 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsThe InsiderLove-RaymondBig Bang TheoryCSI: Miami “Chip/Tuck” Criminal Minds “Out of the Light” NewsSports ZoneChann 4 NewsBig Bang Theory 5-PBS 5 -Keeping UpKeeping UpConsider the ConversationThe Dust Bowl “The Great Plow Up” The dust storms of the 1930s. (N) The Dust Bowl “The Great Plow Up” The dust storms of the 1930s. 7-CBS 7 47 47e NFL Football Indianapolis Colts at New England Patriots. 60 Minutes (N) The Amazing Race “Was He Robbed” The Good Wife (N) The Mentalist (N) Action News Jax 9-CW 9 17 17(4:00)“The Majestic” (2001) YourJax MusicVoid TVLaw & Order “Deceit” Local HauntsLocal HauntsTMZ (N) The Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30e NFL Football: Saints at Raiders Bob’s Burgers (PA) Cleveland ShowThe Simpsons (N) Bob’s Burgers (N) Family Guy (N) American Dad (N) NewsAction Sports 360Leverage An alcoholic nancier. 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsFootball Night in America (N) (Live) e(:20) NFL Football Baltimore Ravens at Pittsburgh Steelers. (N) News CSPAN 14 210 350NewsmakersWashington This Week Q & APrime MinisterRoad to the White House Q & A WGN-A 16 239 307Funny VideosBloopers!Bloopers!How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/Motherd NBA Basketball Chicago Bulls at Portland Trail Blazers. From the Rose Garden in Portland, Ore. (N) WGN News at Nine TVLAND 17 106 304M*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Oprah: Where Are They Now?Oprah: Where Are They Now?Oprah’s Favorite Things: 2012 Military wives are awarded. (N) Married to the Army: AlaskaOprah’s Favorite Things: 2012 A&E 19 118 265To Be AnnouncedStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage Wars(:01) Stora ge Wars(:31) Storage Wars HALL 20 185 312“The Most Wonderful Time of the Year” (2008, Drama) Henry Winkler. “It’s Christmas, Carol!” (2012, Fantasy) Carrie Fisher. Premiere. “Eve’s Christmas” (2004, Comedy-Drama) Elisa Donovan, Cheryl Ladd. FX 22 136 248(5:30)“Twilight” (2008, Romance) Kristen Stewart, Robert Pattinson.“The Twilight Saga: New Moon” (2009) Kristen Stewart. Bella nds herself drawn into the world of werewolves.“Twilight” (2008) Kristen Stewart. CNN 24 200 202CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN PresentsPiers Morgan TonightCNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents TNT 25 138 245“The Bourne Supremacy” (2004) Matt Damon, Franka Potente. “The Bourne Ultimatum” (2007, Action) Matt Damon, Julia Stiles, Joan Allen. (DVS)“The Bourne Ultimatum” (2007, Action) Matt Damon. NIK 26 170 299VictoriousSpongeBob SquarePants Patrick cannot afford a vacation. See Dad Run (N)“Aquamarine” (2006, Comedy-Drama) Sara Paxton, Joanna “JoJo” Levesque. Friends(:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241(5:30)“The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift” (2006) Lucas Black.“Independence Day” (1996) Will Smith, Bill Pullman. Premiere. Earthlings vs. evil aliens in 15-mile-wide ships.“Independence Day” (1996) MY-TV 29 32 -The Little RascalsThe Little RascalsM*A*S*HM*A*S*HColumbo “Forgotten Lady” Actress stages husband’s suicide. Thriller “The Hollow Watcher” The Twilight ZoneThe Twilight Zone DISN 31 172 290(5:10)“Toy Story 3” (2010) “So a the First: Once Upon”Dog With a BlogAustin & AllyShake It Up!JessieA.N.T. FarmGood Luck CharlieJessieShake It Up! LIFE 32 108 252(5:00) “Under the Mistletoe” (2006) “Holiday High School Reunion” (2012) Rachel Boston, Marilu Henner. “Holiday Spin” (2012, Drama) Ralph Macchio, Garrett Clayton. Premiere. (:01) “Holiday High School Reunion” USA 33 105 242Law & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims Unit“It’s Complicated” (2009) BET 34 124 329“Welcome Home Roscoe Jenkins” (2008, Comedy) Martin Lawrence, James Earl Jones. “Big Momma’s House 2” (2006, Comedy) Martin Lawrence, Nia Long, Emily Procter. Don’t Sleep!Don’t Sleep! ESPN 35 140 206h NASCAR RacingSportsCenter (N) (Live) BCS Countdownf MLS Soccer Western Conference, Final Leg 2 -Los Angeles Galaxy at Seattle Sounders FC. (N) SportsCenter (N) ESPN2 36 144 209d College Basketballd College Basketball Puerto Rico Tip-Off, Final: Teams TBA. (N)d College Basketball Charleston Classic, Final: Teams TBA. (N) NASCAR Now (N) SportsCenter (N) Soccer SUNSP 37 -Ship Shape TVFlorida SportsmanFishing the Flats College Football Florida State at Maryland. (Taped) Sport FishingSportsman’s Adv.Saltwater Exp. DISCV 38 182 278America’s Most Secret: StructuresMythBusters “Storm Chasing Myths” MythBusters “Surreal Gourmet Hour” Superstorm Apocalypse (N) Breaking Magic (N) Breaking Magic (N) MythBusters “Surreal Gourmet Hour” TBS 39 139 247(5:30)“17 Again” (2009) Zac Efron, Leslie Mann. Dr. Seuss’ Grinch“The Wizard of Oz” (1939) Judy Garland, Frank Morgan. (DVS) Dr. Seuss’ Grinch(:45) “Madagascar” (2005) Voices of Ben Stiller. HLN 40 202 204Murder by the BookDominick Dunne: Power, PrivilegeDominick Dunne: Power, PrivilegeWhat Would You Do?What Would You Do?Dominick Dunne: Power, Privilege FNC 41 205 360FOX News Sunday With Chris WallaceFOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) FOX News Sunday With Chris WallaceGeraldo at Large (N) Huckabee E! 45 114 236(5:30)“He’s Just Not That Into You” (2009) Ben Af eck, Jennifer Aniston. Dateline on E! (N) Ice Loves CocoIce Loves CocoIce Loves CocoIce Loves Coco (N) Nicki Minaj: My Chelsea LatelyThe Soup TRAVEL 46 196 277The Layover with Anthony BourdainExtreme PoolsLuxury YachtsExtreme Yachts (N) Extreme Yachts (N) Extreme Yachts (N) HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lMillion Dollar RoomsExtreme Homes French bubble palace. Property BrothersHouse Hunters Renovation (N) House Hunters Renovation TLC 48 183 280Sister WivesSister WivesSister WivesSister WivesSister WivesSister WivesSister Wives “Polygamist Debt Threat” Breaking Amish: The Shunning TruthSister Wives “Polygamist Debt Threat” HIST 49 120 269Pawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsSuperstorm 2012: Hell and High WaterSwampsgiving(:02) Outback Hunters (N) ANPL 50 184 282Rattlesnake Republic “The Albino” Rattlesnake RepublicRattlesnake RepublicFinding BigfootFinding Bigfoot “Mother Bigfoot” (N) Finding Bigfoot FOOD 51 110 231Thanksgiving Live All-star cast are answering questions. Cupcake Wars (N) The Next Iron Chef: Redemption (N) All-Star Family Cook-off (N) Restaurant Stakeout TBN 52 260 372(3:00) Fall Praise-A-ThonFall Praise-A-Thon Fall Praise-A-Thon FSN-FL 56 Bull Riding CBR World Championship Part 2. XTERRA Advent.World Poker Tour: Season 10UFC Unleashed (N) DrivenXTERRA Advent.World Poker Tour: Season 10 SYFY 58 122 244(5:00)“Resident Evil” (2002) “Resident Evil: Afterlife” (2010, Horror) Milla Jovovich, Ali Larter. “Zombie Apocalypse” (2011, Horror) Ving Rhames, Taryn Manning. “Rise of the Zombies” (2012) AMC 60 130 254(5:00)“Terminator 2: Judgment Day” (1991) Arnold Schwarzenegger. The Walking Dead “Say the Word” The Walking Dead “Hounded” (N) (:01) The Walking Dead “Hounded” Talking Dead (N) Comic Book Men COM 62 107 249(5:30)“Accepted” (2006) Justin Long, Jonah Hill. (:31)“Dumb & Dumber” (1994, Comedy) Jim Carrey, Jeff Daniels, Lauren Holly. (:02) Tosh.0(:33) Brickleberry(:03) Key & Peele(:33) Half Baked CMT 63 166 327Starsky & HutchBig Texas HeatBig Texas Heat(:45) “Rocky II” (1979) Sylvester Stallone. Underdog Philly ghter gets another shot at heavyweight champ. “Rocky IV” (1985) Sylvester Stallone, Talia Shire. NGWILD 108 190 283Ultimate Predators “Death by Dragon” Ultimate Predators “Animal Assassins” Seahorses: Freaky FishKiller ShrimpMega PiranhaSeahorses: Freaky Fish NGC 109 186 276The Truth Behind UFOs: PoppedSuperstorm 2012Border Wars “Traf c” Drugs, Inc. “Drug Kings of New York” Alaska State Troopers (N) Border Wars “Traf c” SCIENCE 110 193 284Ingenious MindsIngenious MindsDo You See What I SeeWhat Makes a Genius?Do You See What I SeeSecret BrainWhat Makes a Genius? ID 111 192 285Homicide Hunter: Lt. Joe KendaFinal Witness “The Devil You Know” 48 Hours on ID (N) Sins & Secrets “Palo Alto” (N) Unusual Suspects “City Under Siege” 48 Hours on ID HBO 302 300 501(5:00) “Cross re Hurricane” (2012)“Safe House” (2012, Action) Denzel Washington, Ryan Reynolds. ‘R’ Boardwalk Empire “A Man, a Plan...” Treme “Poor Man’s Paradise” (N) Boardwalk Empire “A Man, a Plan...” MAX 320 310 515(:15)“Rise of the Planet of the Apes” (2011) James Franco. ‘PG-13’ “Contraband” (2012, Action) Mark Wahlberg, Kate Beckinsale. ‘R’ “Bridesmaids” (2011, Comedy) Kristen Wiig, Maya Rudolph. ‘NR’ SHOW 340 318 545Untold History of the United StatesDexter Dexter and Hannah grow closer. Homeland Carrie tries to regain control. Dexter “Argentina” (N) Homeland “I’ll Fly Away” (N) Dexter “Argentina” MONDAY EVENING NOVEMBER 19, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Dancing With the Stars: All-Stars (N) (Live) (:01) Castle “After Hours” (N) News at 11(:35) Nightline (N) 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) The Insider 5-PBS 5 -JournalNightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) The Dust Bowl “Reaping the Whirlwind” Families nd relief in California. (N) The Dust Bowl “Reaping the Whirlwind” Families nd relief in California. 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJaguars AccessTwo and Half MenHow I Met/MotherPartners (N) 2 Broke Girls (N) Mike & Molly (N) Hawaii Five-0 “Ohuna” (N) Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of Payne90210 “The Con” (N) Gossip Girl (N) TMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family GuyFamily GuyThe SimpsonsBones Remains wash onto a beach. (N) The Mob Doctor “Turf War” (N) NewsAction News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) The Voice “Live Top 10 Performances” The top-10 artists perform. (N) (:01) Revolution “Kashmir” (N) NewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(5:00) Public Affairs Politics & Public Policy Today WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosWGN News at Nine (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304M*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-Raymond OWN 18 189 279Sins & Secrets “Ocean City” Sins & Secrets “Missoula” Dateline on OWNMarried to the Army: AlaskaMarried to the Army: Alaska (N) Dateline on OWN A&E 19 118 265InterventionInterventionIntervention “Richard K.” InterventionIntervention (N) (:01) Intervention HALL 20 185 312“The Christmas Pageant” (2011) Melissa Gilbert, Robert Mailhouse. “The Wishing Tree” (2012, Drama) Jason Gedrick, Richard Harmon. “A Season for Miracles” (1999, Drama) Carla Gugino, David Conrad. FX 22 136 248Two and Half MenTwo and Half Men“Spider-Man 3” (2007, Action) Tobey Maguire, Kirsten Dunst, James Franco. Peter Parker falls under the in uence of his dark side.“Spider-Man 3” (2007) Tobey Maguire, Kirsten Dunst. CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245The Mentalist “Throwing Fire” The Mentalist “Rose-Colored Glasses” The Mentalist “Red Bulls” The Mentalist “His Right Red Hand” The Mentalist “A Price Above Rubies” CSI: NY Sheldon Hawkes is suspected. NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobDrake & JoshFigure It Out (N) The TeenNick 2012 HALO Awards (N) Full HouseThe NannyThe NannyFriends(:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241Repo GamesRepo Games“Red Dawn” (1984) Patrick Swayze. High-school guerrillas take on invading Soviet troops.“Red Dawn” (1984) Patrick Swayze. High-school guerrillas take on invading Soviet troops. MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*HM*A*S*HLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitSeinfeldFrasierThe Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Phineas and FerbShake It Up!JessieDog With a Blog“The Princess and the Frog” (2009, Comedy) Phineas and FerbGood Luck CharliePhineas and FerbShake It Up!A.N.T. Farm LIFE 32 108 252“Comfort and Joy” (2003) Nancy McKeon, Dixie Carter, Steve Eckholdt. “Christmas Angel” (2009, Comedy-Drama) K.C. Clyde, Kari Hawker. “The Christmas Blessing” (2005, Drama) Neil Patrick Harris. USA 33 105 242NCIS Gibbs nds a cryptic message. NCIS: Los Angeles “Bounty” WWE Monday Night RAW (N) (:05)“The Ugly Truth” (2009) BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Top 10 Countdown” (N) “He Got Game” (1998) Denzel Washington, Ray Allen. A high-school basketball star faces his estranged father. Family FirstThe Soul Man ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) Monday Night Countdown (N) (Live) e NFL Football Chicago Bears at San Francisco 49ers. (N Subject to Blackout) SportsCenter (N) ESPN2 36 144 209d College Basketball: EA Sports Maui Invitationald College Basketball Legends Classic -Georgetown vs. UCLA. (N)d College Basketball Hall of Fame Classic -Kansas vs. Washington State. (N) SUNSP 37 -Sport FishingShip Shape TVd College Basketball Rider at South Carolina. (N) Reel AnimalsSaltwater Exp.Into the BlueTaylorMade: Outside the RopesFight Sports: In 60 DISCV 38 182 278I (Almost) Got Away With ItOverhaulin’: DeconstructedOverhaulin’: Deconstructed (N) American Chopper “Troubled Waters” Jesse James: Outlaw Garage (N) American Chopper “Troubled Waters” TBS 39 139 247King of QueensKing of QueensSeinfeldSeinfeldFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyConan HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) Dr. Drew on Call (N) Nancy GraceShowbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236Ice Loves CocoIce Loves CocoE! News (N) Studio E! (N) Dateline on E!Ice Loves CocoIce Loves CocoNicki Minaj: My Nicki Minaj: My Chelsea Lately (N) E! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. FoodMan v. FoodAnthony Bourdain: No ReservationsThe Layover with Anthony BourdainAnthony Bourdain: No ReservationsWorld’s Best Bartender (N) HGTV 47 112 229Income Property “Buyer’s Edition” Love It or List It John and Cecil. Love It or List It “The Smout Family” Love It or List It (N) House HuntersHunters Int’lLove It or List It TLC 48 183 280Breaking Amish “Decision Time” Breaking Amish “Party Time” Breaking Amish “Finale” Breaking Amish: The Shunning TruthBreaking Amish: The Shunning TruthBreaking Amish: The Shunning Truth HIST 49 120 269Pawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsAmerican Pickers “Duke of Oil” (N) Pawn Stars (N) (:31) Pawn StarsI Love the 1880’s(:32) Pawn Stars ANPL 50 184 282Swamp Wars “Killer Pythons” Gator Boys “Alligator Face-Off” Rattlesnake RepublicFinding Bigfoot “Mother Bigfoot” Finding Bigfoot: Further EvidenceRattlesnake Republic FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveMystery DinersWhat’s on the TBN 52 260 372(4:30) Joseph The Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesLiving EdgeKingdom Conn.Jesse Duplantis“Fireproof” (2008, Drama) Kirk Cameron, Erin Bethea, Alex Kendrick. FSN-FL 56 -World Poker Tour: Season 10Magic Live! (Live)d NBA Basketball Orlando Magic at Atlanta Hawks. From Philips Arena in Atlanta. Magic Live! (Live) Inside the MagicUFC Unleashed SYFY 58 122 244(5:00) “Pegasus vs. Chimera” (2012)“The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian” (2008, Fantasy) Georgie Henley, Skandar Keynes, William Moseley.“The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian” (2008) Georgie Henley. AMC 60 130 254“The Princess Bride” (1987, Adventure) Cary Elwes, Robin Wright. “The Lake House” (2006) Keanu Reeves, Sandra Bullock. Premiere. “The Princess Bride” (1987, Adventure) Cary Elwes, Robin Wright. COM 62 107 249It’s Always Sunny(:29) Tosh.0The Colbert ReportDaily Show(7:59) FuturamaFuturamaSouth ParkSouth ParkBrickleberrySouth ParkDaily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327RebaRebaRebaRebaRebaRebaBig Texas HeatBig Texas HeatChainsaw GangChainsaw GangRedneck Island NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer “Run Home Roscoe!” World’s Weirdest “Strange Love” World’s Weirdest “Bizarre Battles” World’s Weirdest “Freaky All-Stars” World’s Weirdest “Freaks on Land” World’s Weirdest “Bizarre Battles” NGC 109 186 276Drugged “High on Heroin” Taboo People who dwell on the fringes. Taboo Uncommon relationships. Taboo “Devils and Demons” (N) Drugs, Inc. “Meth” Taboo Uncommon relationships. SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeThe Devil’s TriangleGlobal WeirdingCuriosity “Hindenberg” The Threat to Planet EarthGlobal Weirding ID 111 192 285Disappeared “Final Exam” Disappeared “Hometown Hero” Blood, Lies & Alibis (N) I Didn’t Do It (N) Disappeared A man goes missing. (N) Blood, Lies & Alibis HBO 302 300 501Sucker Punch“Alvin and the Chipmunks: Chipwrecked” (2011) ‘G’ Real Time With Bill MaherWitness Veronique de Viguerie. “The Hangover Part II” (2011) Bradley Cooper. ‘R’ 24/7 Pacquiao MAX 320 310 515(:15)“Fast Five” (2011) Vin Diesel. Dom Toretto and company ramp up the action in Brazil.“A Very Harold & Kumar 3D Christmas” (2011) ‘R’“The Grudge” (2004) Sarah Michelle Gellar. ‘PG-13’ Hunted SHOW 340 318 545(5:35)“Primary Colors” (1998, Comedy-Drama) John Travolta. ‘R’ Untold History of the United States (N) Homeland “I’ll Fly Away” Dexter “Argentina” Homeland “I’ll Fly Away” WEEKDAY AFTERNOON Comcast Dish DirecTV 12 PM12:301 PM1:302 PM2:303 PM3:304 PM4:305 PM5:30 3-ABC 3 -NewsBe a MillionaireThe ChewGeneral HospitalMauryDr. PhilBe a MillionaireNews 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsVaried ProgramsAndy Grif th ShowThe Jeff Probst ShowSteve HarveyThe Dr. Oz ShowChann 4 NewsChann 4 News 5-PBS 5 -WordWorldBarney & FriendsCaillouDaniel TigerSuper Why!Dinosaur TrainCat in the HatCurious GeorgeWild KrattsElectric Comp.WUFT NewsWorld News 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxThe Young and the RestlessBold/BeautifulThe TalkLet’s Make a DealJudge Joe BrownJudge JudyAction News JaxAction News Jax 9-CW 9 17 17The Trisha Goddard ShowLaw & Order: Criminal IntentJudge MathisThe Bill Cunningham ShowMauryThe People’s Court 10-FOX 10 30 30Jerry SpringerThe Jeremy Kyle ShowJudge Joe BrownWe the PeopleThe DoctorsDr. PhilVaried ProgramsFamily FeudFamily Feud 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsBe a MillionaireDays of our LivesFirst Coast LivingKatie The Ellen DeGeneres ShowNewsNews CSPAN 14 210 350(9:00) Public AffairsPublic AffairsVaried Programs Public Affairs WGN-A 16 239 307In the Heat of the NightWGN Midday NewsWalker, Texas RangerWalker, Texas RangerWalker, Texas RangerLaw & Order: Criminal Intent TVLAND 17 106 304Andy Grif th ShowVaried Programs GunsmokeVaried ProgramsBonanzaVaried ProgramsBonanzaVaried ProgramsBonanza OWN 18 189 279Dr. PhilDr. PhilVaried Programs A&E 19 118 265Varied ProgramsCriminal MindsCriminal MindsVaried Programs The First 48The First 48Varied Programs HALL 20 185 312Movie Movie Movie FX 22 136 248(10:30) MovieVaried Programs MovieVaried Programs CNN 24 200 202CNN Newsroom CNN Newsroom The Situation Room TNT 25 138 245Varied Programs NIK 26 170 299Team UmizoomiMax & RubyDora the ExplorerDora the ExplorerSpongeBobSpongeBobOdd ParentsOdd ParentsOdd ParentsSpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBob SPIKE 28 168 241(:34) CSI: NYVaried Programs MY-TV 29 32 -Hawaii Five-0GunsmokeBonanzaThe Big ValleyThe Wild, Wild WestEmergency! DISN 31 172 290Good Luck CharlieJessiePhineas and FerbShake It Up!Varied ProgramsGood Luck CharlieVaried ProgramsGood Luck CharlieAustin & AllyShake It Up!A.N.T. Farm LIFE 32 108 252Varied ProgramsHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherFrasierFrasierFrasierFrasierMovieVaried Programs USA 33 105 242Varied Programs BET 34 124 329The ParkersThe ParkersMy Wife and KidsMy Wife and KidsJamie Foxx ShowJamie Foxx ShowThe ParkersVaried Programs ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenterSportsCenterSportsCenterVaried ProgramsColl. Football LiveNFL LiveAround the HornInterruption ESPN2 36 144 209First Take Varied Programs College BasketballVaried Programs SUNSP 37 -Varied Programs DISCV 38 182 278FBI: Criminal PursuitAuction KingsAuction KingsMythBustersVaried Programs TBS 39 139 247Fresh PrinceAmerican DadAmerican DadLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondSeinfeldFriendsFriendsFriendsFriends HLN 40 202 204News Now Making It in AmericaEvening Express FNC 41 205 360(11:00) Happening NowAmerica Live Studio B With Shepard SmithYour World With Neil CavutoThe Five E! 45 114 236E! NewsSex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CityVaried Programs TRAVEL 46 196 277Varied Programs Anthony Bourdain: No ReservationsVaried ProgramsBizarre FoodsVaried ProgramsMan v. FoodMan v. Food HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lVaried Programs TLC 48 183 280What Not to WearA Baby StoryA Baby StoryVaried Programs HIST 49 120 269Varied Programs ANPL 50 184 282Varied Programs Fatal AttractionsMonsters Inside Me FOOD 51 110 231Best DishesBarefoot ContessaVaried ProgramsSecrets/Restaurant30-Minute MealsGiada at HomeGiada at HomeBarefoot ContessaBarefoot ContessaBest DishesPaula’s Cooking TBN 52 260 372Varied ProgramsBehind the ScenesVaried ProgramsJames RobisonTodayThe 700 ClubJohn Hagee TodayVaried Programs FSN-FL 56 -NBA BasketballVaried Programs SYFY 58 122 244MovieVaried Programs AMC 60 130 254MovieVaried Programs COM 62 107 249MovieVaried Programs MovieVaried ProgramsComedy Central(:26) Futurama(4:57) FuturamaIt’s Always Sunny CMT 63 166 327Varied Programs Extreme MakeoverVaried Programs NGWILD 108 190 283Dog WhispererVaried Programs NGC 109 186 276Alaska State TroopersBorder WarsTabooVaried Programs SCIENCE 110 193 284Varied Programs Factory MadeFactory MadeMythBustersVaried ProgramsThey Do It?They Do It? ID 111 192 285Dateline on IDVaried Programs HBO 302 300 501MovieVaried Programs MovieVaried ProgramsMovie MAX 320 310 515(11:00) Movie(:35) MovieVaried Programs (:35) Movie Varied Programs SHOW 340 318 545(11:30) MovieVaried ProgramsMovieVaried Programs(:25) MovieVaried ProgramsMovieVaried Programs

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DEAR ABBY: My parents are in their 80s. I have two brothers. “Pete,” the oldest, is in his 50s and lives with them. “Dave” lives next door. My parents support them both finan-cially. Neither one works or even tries to find a job. Both of them are addicted to meth, and one is hooked on prescription pills as well. My parents know it but enable them by paying their bills. Pete and Dave steal and blame each other or any innocent family member who comes to visit. My parents are in total denial. There is major drug use going on every day, as well as potential violence. Pete and Dave threaten to shoot people all the time. I’m ready to sever all ties because there’s no stopping this train wreck. Any advice? -NO NAME IN THE SOUTHWEST DEAR NO NAME: I agree there is nothing you can do to “save” your par-ents -or your brothers, for that matter. You can, how-ever, save yourself. If seeing them is too painful, you have my per-mission to distance your-self from what appears to be their unhealthy symbi-otic situation. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: I live in a generally quiet neighbor-hood, but my next-door neighbors yell at each other and their children a lot. The shouting sounds like it is escalating. This morning, the father yelled at his young son, telling him to name the letters of the alphabet he was pointing to. His “les-son” was filled with anger and profanity when the boy made mistakes. It was finally interrupted by the mother, shouting for him to stop. He then screamed, “Shut your mouth!” and she responded, “Don’t you TOUCH me!” I don’t know what to do. At what point should I call the police, or is this none of my business? -WORRIED NEIGHBOR IN CALIFORNIA DEAR WORRIED NEIGHBOR: The turmoil in that household isn’t healthy for the children. The next time the father starts shouting, call the police to report a “domes-tic disturbance.” The ver-bal abuse could very well escalate to physical vio-lence (if it hasn’t already). ** ** **DEAR ABBY: My brother-in-law, a doctor, had an affair a few years ago with his nurse. It destroyed his more than 20-year mar-riage to my former sister-in-law. He married the nurse. I want nothing to do with him or his new wife now. He stayed with us for a while and lied about the affair. I have no respect for either of them. I usu-ally ignore them at fam-ily gatherings because I don’t like to associate with people who do not share my values. Abby, do you think I should accept his new wife? -PRINCIPLED IN DAYTON DEAR PRINCIPLED: Good manners dictate that when you see them you be civil to them. It doesn’t have to extend beyond, “Hello. How are you?” and moving on to talk with other relatives -and it doesn’t indicate “accep-tance.” DEAR ABBY HOROSCOPES ARIES (March 21-April 19): Proceed with caution. Impulsive action will be your downfall. Protect your health, wealth and profes-sional reputation. Listen to complaints, find solutions and you will bypass some of the negativity around you. ++++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Keep an open mind and listen to what others have to contribute. You mustn’t allow your emo-tions to take over, causing you to make a stubborn mistake that will hurt an important relationship you have with someone. ++ GEMINI (May 21June 20): Take a creative approach to something you enjoy doing and you will find a way to market a ser-vice that will bring in some extra cash. +++++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Try doing something unique or visiting a desti-nation you’ve never been before. Time spent with people looking for a similar experience will lead to last-ing friendships. Repackage and present what you have to offer. +++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Review your relationships with friends, relatives and your peers. You may have to back up and recon-sider a pending problem. Have the courage to take responsibility for whatever you may have done wrong. +++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Be a leader. Don’t shy away from delegating who should be doing what. Your ability to understand what will and what won’t work will be respected and admired by the people around you. +++++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): If someone you live with or must deal with is ranting or giving you a hard time, back away and do your own thing. You are best to visit someone you find less stressful or sign up for an event that brings you pleasure. ++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Don’t wait to see what others do. Step up, be a leader and enjoy the rewards you get for taking the initiative to develop and present what you have to offer. ++++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Don’t be too eager to share your plans. Someone will take advan-tage of your generosity and good nature if you are too giving. Make changes at home that will make your life less stressful and more comfortable. ++++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Plan your upcom-ing week in order to make the most of your skills and any growing opportunity. A serious look at your per-sonal papers and plans will help you mastermind the best way to increase your assets and decrease your liabilities. +++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Not everyone will be respectful of your privacy. You have to pick and choose the personal information you share with others. Put greater empha-sis on you, your home, your loved ones and what you can do to protect what you cherish. +++ PISCES (Feb. 19March 20): Talk will help you drum up interest in what you want to pursue. Developing a skill or tal-ent and incorporating it in a trendy or popular way will bring fabulous results as long as you do not let excessiveness cut into your profits. +++ Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com THE LAST WORD Eugenia Word SUNDAY CROSSWORD Across &ROOVWXGHQWV declaration 4 Must9 Three-stripers: Abbr.13 Cut line17 Big score, maybe19 Leisure suit fabric20 Carved Polynesian talisman 21 Shoe brand,WBBBULJKW23 Pipe-fitting and others 25 Lie-abed27 Not hoof it, maybe7RR/DWHWKH 3KDODURSHQRYHOLVW +HZURWH:RUGVDUH ORDGHGSLVWROV 32 Subject to double jeopardy, say 33 Animal in una casaBBB
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The Associated Press NEW YORK Not all the testers for Good Housekeepings annual Best Toys list wear lab coats. Some are barely out of diapers. For its 2012 list, engi neers reviewed hundreds of toys for safety and educa tional merits. But the true test comes from 140 kids, ages 3 to 13, who play with the top 135 new toys at the magazines product-testing laboratory in New York. There are more priceconscious choices under $25 to choose from this year, according to the Good Housekeeping Research Institute, along with toys that teach, including robot ics for very young children and sophisticated art proj ects and models for older kids. Others fall into the cat egory of back-to-basics, abandoning tech in favor of more open-ended play. Parents can feel confi dent that our winners are safe, fun and encourage creativity, imagination, and problem-solving skills, said Rosemary Ellis, edi tor in chief of Good Housekeeping. The winners of Good Housekeepings 2012 Best Toy Awards are revealed in the December issue, on newsstands Tuesday: Ages 3 and up: The Hexbug Hive Habitat Set ($35) has mechanical bugs running through a cus tomizable maze, and the Techno Source Glow Crazy Doodle Dome ($20) is a tent that allows children to draw on the walls with a green light wand. Ages 4 and up: T.S. Shure ArchiQuest Architectural Elements ($30) is a set of wooden blocks in fresh shapes and bright hues while the Playmates Shellraiser ($35) is a car for Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles ($10 each). Ages 5 and up: Moose Toys Fortune Cookie Maker ($25) lets kids make their own fortunes and cookies with a little help from the microwave, and the Jakks Pacific Power Trains Auto Loader City ($40) has a five-car train and 18 feet of track for an affordable alternative to die-cast mod els. Ages 6 and up: The Moose Toys Micro Chargers Loop Track ($20) has fast-charging cars that shoot through a stunt track, the Crayola Marker Airbrush ($25) uses mark ers to create spray paintstyle art and the Lego Friends Adventure Camper ($30) creates a motor home with dolls, bikes and a surf board. Ages 7 and up: The Techno Source Codee ($8) is a twistable chain of blocks that can be made into creatures like a bright flamingo or robot, and the Playmobil E-Rangers Headquarters ($130), has a swiveling LED spotlight and a working solar panel. Ages 8 and up: The Silverlit Porsche 911 Carrera ($80) is a replica of the sports car that can be steered by iPhone, or kids can create colorful domino-type patterns with Colorfall from Marbles: The Brain Store ($45). Wild Planet Night Sight ($40) is head-mounted infrared night-vision goggles, and Hasbros Bop It! Smash ($23) has players trying to hit a moving light Ages 9 and up: The KNex Atomic Coaster ($71) is a motorized ride for dueling cars that requires assembly of more than 1,000 pieces. Ages 10 and up: The Ravensburger 3D Building Set ($26) is a puzzle kit to create replicas of famous sites like the Eiffel Tower or the Empire State Building. 6D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 6DLIFE Honesty. Integrity. Professional. Honesty. Integrity. Professional. Three simple words, but its been our way of doing business since 1967. G L E N N I J O N E S I N C C E L E B R A T I N G 4 5 Y E A R S O F S E R V I C E Thank you to our customers for making Glenn I. Jones the largest heating and cooling contractor in North Central Florida. Trust the Name You Know... Call 552 NW Hilton Avenue, Lake City, FL 32055 www.glennijonesinc. com License# CAC051486 386-752-5389 Did You Know... Customer Appreciation Special $10 OFF $10 OFF $150 OFF $150 OFF Magazine picks top toys HOLIDAY GIFTS ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS ASSOCIATED PRESS The Breast Milk Baby doll from Berjuan Toys makes suck ling sounds when prompted by sensors sewn into a halter top. The doll, intended for prepubescent girls, has caught some flak since hitting the U.S. market. Breastfeeding baby doll: creepy or groundbreaking? By LEANNE ITALIE Associated Press NEW YORK Weve got dolls that wet, crawl and talk. Weve got dolls with perfect hourglass fig ures. Weve got dolls with swagger. And weve got plenty that come with itty bitty baby bottles. But its a breastfeeding doll whose suckling sounds are prompted by sensors sewn into a halter top at the nipples of little girls that caught some flak after hitting the U.S. market. I just want the kids to be kids, Bill OReilly said on his Fox News show when he learned of the Breast Milk Baby. And this kind of stuff. We dont need this. What, exactly, people dont need is unclear to Dennis Lewis, the U.S. representative for Berjuan Toys, a family-owned, 40year-old doll maker in Spain that cant get the dolls onto mainstream shelves more than a year after introduc ing the line in this country and blowing OReillys and others minds. Weve had a lot of sup port from lots of breast feeding organizations, lots of mothers, lots of educators, said Lewis, in Orlando. There also has been a lot of blowback from people who maybe havent thought to think about really why the doll is there and what its purpose is. Usually they are people that either have problems with breastfeeding in gen eral, or they see it as some thing sexual. The dolls, eight in all with a variety of skin tones and facial features, look like many others, until children don the little top with petal appliques at the nipples. Thats where the sensors are located, setting off the suckling noise when the dolls mouth makes contact. Cost is $89. The Lego Friends Adventure Camper (above) and the Playmates Shellraiser toy vehicle (left) for Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles were among top safe and educa tional toys for this holiday season picked by Good Houskeepings judges, who included 140 children who ranged in age from 3 to 13.