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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01924

Material Information

Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 11-11-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01954

Related Items

Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01924

Material Information

Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 11-11-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01954

Related Items

Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

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CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Opinion ................ 4ABusiness ................ 5AObituaries .............. 6A Advice & Comics ......... 8B Puzzles ................. 2B TODAY IN PEOPLE Bieber, Gomez break up. COMING TUESDAY Local news roundup. 91 64 T-Storm Chance WEATHER, 2A Opinion ................ 4ABusiness ................ 1CObituaries .............. 5AAdvice.................. 5DPuzzles ................. 5B 77 55 Partly cloudy WEATHER, 8A Lake City ReporterSUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | $1.00 LAKECITYREPORTER.COM Vol. 138, No. 204 S&S reaches the$1 million markfor children. March of Dimesauction will be a ‘magic’ moment. SUNDAYEDITION 1D 1C 1A High-speed Web? Not for a while NFBA continued on 7AFILEThe Lake City office of the North Florida Broadband Authority.Honoring those who serve Broadband project repsays rural areas won’t be served for up to 5 years. Lake City pays homage to its veterans COURTESYJason Williams, Lt. Commander, US Navy Reserves and Dr. Brad Gurney, Maj. US Air Force Reserves made presentatio ns to veterans on at the Lake City VA Medical Center Hospice Unit and to memb ers of the Honor Guard Friday, presenting them with hats fro m their branch of service and a pin thanking them for their service.By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comF riday morning more than 100 people gathered at the Lake City VA Medical Center to recognize vet-erans for their service and honor them for answering the calls in their hearts to serve the country. It was one of several events planned in loval veterans’ honor over the weekend. Guy Diffenbaugh, Department of Florida Disabled American Veterans Senior Vice Commander, who served as the event’s keynote speaker, talked of the importance of recognizing veterans. He said he appreciated the crowd attending the event, as well as all of the students in attendance. “I think it’s wonderful to see the kids and others come out to the service,” he said. “The youth of our nation are so courageous and bold and they have so many pressures that we didn’t have to grow up with and I really appreciate them.” Diffenbaugh, an Army veteran of the Vietnam War, said his overall message was to have people sup-port the country’s veterans. “The veterans need you as bad as you’ve needed us,” he said. Daphine Kirby sat and smiled throughout the event, noting she felt it was important to support vet-erans. In addition, her granddaugh-ter was singing with the Lake City Middle School choral ensemble. She said she was proud to see her granddaughter participate in an event that honored veterans. “It makes me have a good feeling that she realizes the importance that the veterans have done for our country,” Kirby said. Debbie Hornbrook, of Branford, is a member of the Patriot Guard Riders and rode her motorcycle VETERANS continued on 6A Ceremony, parade, more mark Veterans Day weekend here.TONY BRITT/ Lake City ReporterKenny Altman, of the United Methodist Church of White Springs, gives miniature flags to children during Saturday’s Veterans Day parade. By DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comRural North Central Florida, don’t expect high-speed Internet anytime soon. The main priority of the North Florida Broadband Authority, an interlocal governmental organiza-tion tasked with constructing an Internet utility and funded with $30 million of federal stimulus funds, has been to supply Internet to hospitals, schools, libraries and other “anchor institutions” for the last three years. According to Richelle Sucara, general manager of the project, the goal was never to supply full Internet access for the entire 9,700-square mile area by the end of the grant period. Instead, the goal was to provide the infrastructure to allow private com-panies to build out the network, she said. But Todd Manning, information security officer for Columbia County and a former member of the opera-tions committee of the NFBA, said he doesn’t see how the network will ever serve some of the least populated Trooper won’t face trialBy TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comLIVE OAK — A shirtless man, with his hands behind his head and a gun in one hand, walked toward a Florida Highway Patrol trooper, defying the trooper’s com-mands to stop until the trooper shot him five times. That is how a grand jury report depicts a Sunday, Aug. 26 confrontation between Florida Highway Patrol trooper Keith Maclaren and Lake City resident Brent Lee Blevins. The incident occurred around 2 p.m. when Blevins was shot by six-year vet-eran Florida Highway Patrol trooper Derek Maclaren after they were involved in a confrontation following a high-speed chase along US 90, east of Live Oak. Blevins worked at Happy House, a childcare facility in Lake City. A Suwannee County grand jury concluded Maclaren’s actions were reasonable and justified, the report says. The 21-member grand jury issued a “no true bill” finding Wednesday after hearing evidence from witnesses and determined the cause did not warrant prosecution. The report, released to the Lake City Reporter on Friday, indicated Blevins’ had a blood alcohol level of .22, more than twice the legal limit. The three-page summary contained seven points by the grand jury detailing why the grand jury declined to return an indictment against Maclaren. The grand jury concluded:• “The 911 calls indicated credible concerns about Brent Blevins’ erratic and dangerous driving; Grand jury rules thatshooting of Lake Cityman was justified.Teen faces charges for injuries to infantTROOPER continued on 6A TEEN continued on 6A By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comA Columbia County teenager faces child cruelty charges after she report-edly admitted shaking an 11-week-old baby for which she cared, according to the Columbia County Sheriff’s Office. The 11-week-old baby has been hospi-talized since Tuesday with injuries indica-tive of shaken-baby syndrome, sheriff’s reports said. Summer Brooke Albritton, 19, of 148 SW Bloomington Terrace, was Albritton

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PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Daily Scripture Celebrity Birthdays Comedian Jonathan Winters is 87. Sen. Barbara Boxer, DCalif., is 72. The president of Nicaragua, Daniel Ortega, is 67. Golfer Fuzzy Zoeller is 61. Pop singer-musician Paul Cowsill (The Cowsills) is 61. Rock singer Dave Alvin is 57. Actress Demi Moore is 50. Actress Calista Flockhart is 48. Actor Philip McKeon is 48. Actor David DeLuise is 41. Actor Leonardo DiCaprio is 38. CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. AROUND FLORIDA W ednes day: 13-20-27-35 18 Friday: 8-10-12-21-31 Saturday: Afternoon: 1-2-8 Evening: N/A Saturday: Afternoon: 5-6-7-9 Evening: N/A Saturday: 7-11-15-18-24-43 x5 Congressman refuses to accept election results WEST PALM BEACH Republican U.S. Rep. Allen West is refusing to concede even as the state says he lost his re-elec tion bid to Democrat Patrick Murphy by 2,442 votes. In a complete though unoffi cial tally of votes reported Saturday, Murphy main tained a lead outside the parameters of an automatic recount. Wests campaign said he would not concede until St. Lucie County allows him to examine poll records. Murphy, a Democratic newcomer, had 50.4 percent of the vote in the returns reported Saturday. West, a freshman Republican, is a tea party favorite with a national profile. A judge denied the court order West sought to impound ballots and voting booths. The race was the most expensive House contest in the country and one of both parties top targets. Hostage drama ends peacefully LEHIGH ACRES A hostage situation between an armed man and two family members in south west Florida has ended peacefully. Lee County Sheriffs deputies headed into a duplex early Saturday morning after reports of gunshots where they say an armed man was holed up inside with two family members. Sheriffs spokesman Lt. Larry King said hostage negotiators talked with the man inside while one of the women escaped through a back window. But the mans mother, who is in a wheelchair, was still inside. Negotiators even tually convinced him to bring her outside. At that time the unidentified sus pect was arrested. Authorities said the incident escalated from an argument the night before. Man dies in home fire JACKSONVILLE A man has died after a fire broke out in his Jacksonville home. Investigators say a space heater in the bedroom may be to blame. Firefighters responded to the home around 5:30 a.m. Saturday and found the house engulfed in flames. After extinguish ing the blaze, firefighters found a mans body in the bedroom. News accounts said the victim has not been identi fied, but authorities said he appeared to be in his 60s or 70s. Authorities said the man died because of the fire, and they do not suspect foul play. Shooting leaves man dead FORT MYERS Authorities are investigat ing a fatal shooting in Fort Myers. Lee County Sheriffs deputies responded to a call about a shooting Friday night and found a critically injured man. He was transported to the hospital and later died. Deputies with K-9 dogs and a helicopter searched the area for a possible sus pect, but authorities didnt find anyone. Investigators questioned witnesses and collected evidence Saturday. The victim has not been identified, and authorities did not say how many times he was shot or release any other details. Police charge school bus aide FORT LAUDERDALE A Broward County school bus attendant has been charged with chok ing an autistic boy. The sheriffs office reports that 48-year-old Darryl Blue was arrested and charged Wednesday with aggravated child abuse. During an Oct. 9 ride home from Westglades Middle School, surveil lance video shows Blue sit ting behind the 13-year-old boy and pulling a restrain ing harness tight against the boys body and neck. The boy had apparently urinated on himself. School officials and deputies began investigat ing after the boys mother reported the alleged abuse. Blue has been reas signed to a position away from children pending the outcome of an administra tive investigation. Risk of wildfire, rip currents rise TALLAHASSEE Florida officials are warning of elevated risks of dangerous rip currents and wildfires across the state. The Florida Division of Emergency Management said Saturday that 15 to 20 mph winds and large waves could create strong rip currents along Florida beaches from Volusia County through MiamiDade County. Dry air and breezy conditions also elevate the risk for wildfires this weekend across most of the state, especially in the western Panhandle and in southwest Florida. Florida Division of Emergency Management Meteorologist Brad Schaaf encouraged residents to check local weather out looks and follow instruc tions from local officials. Man found dead on Orlando street ORLANDO A mans body has been found in a pool of blood outside an Orlando drug-treatment center. Orlando Police said residents of the treatment center found the man in the parking lot Saturday morning. NEW YORK A source confirms to The Associated Press that Justin Bieber is no longer Selena Gomezs boy friend. The source is not authorized to discuss the split with the press and spoke on condition of anonymity. The breakup apparently happened last week. Distance and their busy schedules were cited as factors. Eighteen-year-old Bieber is tour ing to promote his latest album, Believe, which contains the hit Boyfriend. Twenty-year-old Gomez is filming a Wizards of Waverly Place reunion for the Disney Channel. The pair made their relationship public in February 2011. E! News was the first to report the split. Bieber seems to be doing OK, at least publicly. On the red carpet of Wednesdays Victorias Secret fash ion show he said, Id rather be here than anywhere in the world. Dancing co-host has thyroid cancer NEW YORK Dancing with the Stars co-host Brooke Burke says she has thyroid cancer. Burke posted a video message Thursday on YouTube disclosing her condition and her plans for surgery to remove her thyroid. The 41-year-old mother of four says a lump on her thyroid was found during a routine biopsy. She says in the video that the surgery has been scheduled, but she doesnt specify when. She says it will leave a nice big scar right here, tracing a line across her throat. Although initially shocked by the diagnosis, Burke says she now feels strong and confident and her doctors are optimistic. She vows to make a positive out of this negative thing. Found in the front of the neck, the thyroid secretes several hormones that influence metabolism, growth and development. Jermaine Jackson wants to alter his name LOS ANGELES Jermaine Jackson wants to change his name to something a little brighter. Hes asking a court to allow him to alter his famous surname and become Jermaine Jacksun. The older brother of Michael Jackson filed a name change petition on Tuesday in Los Angeles, stating the switch was for artistic reasons. The filing doesnt elaborate, but Jacksons friend Steve Dennis, who was speaking on the singers behalf, said its not unheard of for artists to change their names. Phonetically, it changes nothing, he said. It is something he has chosen to do, and its fair to say that you can not blame this one on the boogie, youve got to blame it on the sun shine, Dennis said, in a play on the Jackson 5 disco hit, Blame it on the Boogie. A hearing on whether Jackson will become Jacksun is scheduled for Feb. 22 in Los Angeles. Judge: Hemsley can be buried EL PASO, Texas Deceased actor Sherman Hemsleys long time friend can proceed with his burial and running his estate, a Texas judge ruled Friday over the objections of his half-brother from Philadelphia. Hemsley, who played George Jefferson on the TV sitcom The Jeffersons, died July 24 of lung cancer. His body has been in refrig erated storage at an El Paso funeral home since. Judge Patricia B. Chew sided Friday with Flora Enchinton Bernal, who was named in Hemsleys will as the executor of his estate. Justin Bieber, Selena Gomez break up Wednesday: 32-34-45-52-58 PB 20 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter 2A Gods voice thunders in mar velous ways; he does great things beyond our understand ing. He says to the snow, Fall on the earth, and to the rain shower, Be a mighty down pour. Job 37:5-6 ASSOCIATED PRESS Marine Sgt. Michael Reinert receives a red, white and blue carnation Friday from his daugh ter, Ariana, 6, while attending Gulfside Elementary Schools 14th annual Veterans Day Celebration in Holiday. A list of local veterans and those currently serving in the military was read during the ceremony. West Murphy Burke Jackson ASSOCIATED PRESS Teen heartthrob Justin Bieber and actress-girlfriend Selena Gomez are no longer together, a source confirms to the AP. The split happened last week. Distance and their busy schedules were contributing factors. Associated Press Associated Press

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From staff reports Two tractor trailers crashed into each other about three miles north of US 41/441 on I-75 Saturday at 3:54 p.m., according to a Florida Highway Patrol report. Jose H. Soto Perez, 55, Wimauma, was driving in the right lane going north when he drifted into the center lane, according to the report. Ihosvany Diaz Cruz, 36, Orlando, attempted to avoid the crash by swerving into the left lane, but the rear of Perezs semi struck the front right side of Cruzs semi causing his vehicle to crash into the guardrail overturning onto its side, according to the report. The trailer was destroyed, and boxes of cargo were scattered throughout the area, according to a wit ness. After the collision, Perezs vehicle slid onto the right inside shoulder of the roadway and then struck the guardrail. Neither driver was injured, the report said. Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & ST A TE SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 3A 3A Lake City Institute of Neurology 4355 American Ln Lake City, FL Ph: 386-755-1211 Fax: 386-755-1219 About Dr. Nid Dr. Nidadavolu has completed his medical training at Siddhartha Medical College, India and completed his residence & EMG/ Neuromuscular Fellowship training from renowned University of Miami, FL. He is Board Certi ed, member of American Academy of Neurology. Dr. Nidadavolu provides services in general neurology, Stroke, MS (Multiple Sclerosis), Epilepsy, Dementias, encephalopathies, Parkinsons and other movement disorders. He also performs outpatient EEG (electroencephalogram) and Lumbarc punctures procedures. Dr. Nidadavolu is trained in EMG (electromyography)/ Never Conduction Studies for diagnosing various neurological conditions at his clinic. We are glad to inform that we are now offering Neurological services in the heart of Lake City and surrounding areas. Dr. NL Prasad Nidadavolu and his staff offer excellent neurological services to the community in a caring, parofessional environment. url: lcneuro.com SPECIALIZING IN: Non-Invasive Laparoscopic Gynecological Surgery Adolescent Gynecology High and Low Risk Obstetrics Contraception Delivering at Shands Lake Shore In-Ofce ultrasounds for our patients 3D/4D Entertainment Scans offering DaVinci Robotic Surgeries. New Patients Welcome Call today for a personal appointment: 386-755-0500 449 SE Baya Drive Lake City, Floraida 32025 www.dainagreenemd.com WE ARE WOMEN, WE ARE M OTHERS, WE UNDERST A ND Obama declared winner in Florida By TAMARA LUSH Associated Press ST. PETERSBURG President Barack Obama was declared the winner of Floridas 29 electoral votes Saturday, ending a fourday count with a razor-thin margin that narrowly avoided an automatic recount that would have brought back memories of 2000. No matter the outcome, Obama had already clinched re-election and now has 332 electoral votes to Romneys 206. The Florida Secretary of States Office said that with almost 100 percent of the vote counted, Obama led Republican chal lenger Mitt Romney 50 percent to 49.1 percent, a difference of about 74,000 votes. That was over the half-percent margin where a computer recount would have been automatically ordered unless Romney had waived it. There is a Nov. 16 deadline for overseas and military ballots, but under Florida law, recounts are based on Saturdays results. Only a handful of overseas and military ballots are believed to remain outstand ing. Its normal for election supervisors in Florida and other states to spend days after any election counting absentee, pro visional, military and overseas ballots. Usually, though, the election has already been called on election night or soon after because the winners margin is beyond reach. Florida has spoken loudly in support of moving our nation forward, Ashley Walker, the Obama campaigns director for Florida, said in a news release. She added that the win was a testament to the campaigns volunteers and staff. When reached by phone Saturday, Mitt Romneys communications director Gail Gitcho said the campaign had no com ment. Obamas win came in part from heavy support from black, Hispanic and young er voters. Exit polls conducted for The Associated Press showed Obama was favored by more than 9 of 10 black voters and 3 of 5 Hispanic voters in Florida. The president also was the choice of two-thirds of voters under age 30. Republican challenger Mitt Romney led among both white and older voters. In the end, the facts of who voted for which candidate in Florida faded into memory as voting issues emerged elec tion night. On election night this year, it was diffi cult for officials and the media to call the presidential race here, in part because the margin was so close and the voting stretched into the evening. In Miami-Dade, for instance, so many people were in line at 7 p.m. in certain pre cincts that some people didnt vote until after midnight. The hours-long wait at the polls in some areas, a lengthy ballot and the fact that Gov. Rick Scott refused to extend early voting hours has led some to criticize Floridas voting process. Some officials have vowed to investigate why there were problems at the polls and how that led to a lengthy vote count. If there had been a recount, it would not be as difficult as the lengthy one in 2000. The state no longer uses punch-card bal lots, which became known for their hang ing chads. All 67 counties now use optical scan ballots where voters mark their selec tions manually. Republican George W. Bush won the 2000 contest after the Supreme Court declared him the winner over Democrat Al Gore by a scant 537 votes. Promotion at CCSO COURTESY Capt. Chuck Brewington (from left) stands with Columbia County Sheriff Mark Hunter Friday after Brewington was promoted to the rank of captain during a brief ceremony at the sheriffs office. Fort White man dead following a.m. crash From staff reports A Fort White man is dead following a Saturday morning crash on State Road 47, according to a report from the Florida Highway Patrol. Nathaniel Watson, 76, was ejected from his 2001 Suzuki Esteem after the vehicle overturned. The report said a medical condition is suspected to be a contributing factor in the crash. The Suzuki struck several mailboxes along with multiple trees before overturn ing. the crash occurred at 7:09 a.m. Watson was airlifted to Shands at the University of Florida where he was pro nounced dead. COURTESY Jairein Bradley (front left) and Hope Thomas (front right) proudly display their new bikes they won at First Federal Bank of Floridas recent Super Savers event last Saturday. The Lake City Police Department participated in the event by giving out free bike helmets to kids and showing them the correct way to wear them. From left, standing: standing: Mike Lee, Crime Prevention Officer, and Police Chief Argatha Gilmore joined First Federal Financial Center Managers Gloria Markham, Renee McIntosh and Nicole Storer when the new bikes were given to Jairein and Hope. First Federal Super Savers Crash of 2 semis blocks I-75

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D isbelief is the word that defines the Republican state of mind in the wake of the 2012 re-election of President Barack Obama. The obvious questions are: “How can Americans have re-elected a president who has presided over an economy where unemployment still hovers at 8 percent?” And, “How can Americans have re-elected a president who still doesn’t grasp that his big-government policies are what have blocked our eco-nomic recovery?” The Republican Party needs to take responsibility for this disaster. Nothing in the outcome of this election is a surprise. The realities that produced these election results have been looming before us not for months, but for years. Yet Republicans have made a point of ignoring it all. Now, “the chickens have come home to roost.” What are these realities?The profoundly changing demographics of the nation. And, the challenge of getting a nation that is already addicted to government off it. In a column I wrote a month ago, I noted: “What was once the exception to the rule in America — not being white, not being married, not having traditional values on family, sex and abortion — is becoming the rule. And these constituencies are becoming sufficiently large to elect a president.” I explained 10 years ago in my book, “Uncle Sam’s Plantation,” how big gov-ernment and welfare-state policies were destroying black communities. Ironically, the Republican political establishment, and particularly this year’s candi-date, Mitt Romney, presented themselves as the party of businessmen who know how economies work. Well, businessmen pay attention to their markets. They make sure that they understand their product and present it clearly and that they stay attuned to their customer base. But Republican Party operatives ignored both. Instead, they chose wishful thinking: simply hope that more and more white voters will turn out and vote Republican to make up for their shrinking part of the electorate. When polls showed what was really happening, these same Republican operatives chose to deny them, too, charging they were biased. Republicans must do more than showcase a few black and brown faces at their con-vention every four years and call this outreach. Conservatives must get into black and Latino communities, talk to their clergy and com-munity leaders, and explain how conservative policies of limited government and tra-ditional values will save their communities and our nation at the same time. GOP has no one to blame but itself ANOTHER VIEW T he Philippi Baptist Church celebrated its 135th homecom-ing on Nov. 4. It was a joyful occasion, and the Still Kicking Bluegrass band provided high-spirited enter-tainment from the first twang of their guitars to the final note of the break-neck tempo, blue-grass-on-fire “Orange Blossom Special.” Master musician Lenvil Dicks was in the congregation and explained that the fiddle the fiddle player was using was formerly owned by Lake City’s Chubby Wise, the grand master of all bluegrass fiddlers. Guest preacher, Rev. Ivan Clements, long time Baptist minister, commented on the band’s “Still Kicking” name and said he, himself, was still kick-ing, “but not nearly as high as I used to.” Part of the church’s cemetery history tells of the end of a lov-ing grave decoration tradition. “Years ago, when a person was buried, the custom was to place on the grave the person’s favorite article such as a vase, a lamp, a china cup, saucers, and dishes. On the graves of chil-dren were placed their favorite toys, such as dolls and small ceramic lambs. “Graves of men were adorned with lovely shaving mugs or cof-fee mugs. “People would regularly clean these items and place them back on the graves. Over time, these loving gestures ceased because vandals start-ing robbing this sacred place of those lovely, heartfelt items.” Also in the cemetery, there is a tree stump with steps cut into it that dates back to the 1800s. The steps were used by women horseback riders so they could get onto their horses easier. High School grad at 24The late W.B. (Bill) Feagle of Fort White started in Fort White Public School’s first grade about 1910 and attended until the 10th grade, when he took and passed the Florida teachers’ test. He then dropped out of school and became a teacher at the Deep Creek School. He later returned to Fort White and graduated from Fort White High School at age 24. Still later he became principal of CHS and several other Florida high schools in an edu-cational career that spanned 47 years.Happy birthday, QuintonJ. Quinton Rumph (FWHS 1941) was 89 years old on Nov. 8. He has a near-legendary reputation for his generosity, having made large donations to the University of Florida, Florida Southern College, the University of North Florida, the Advent Christian Village, the United Methodist Church and our school system. He has donated nearly a quarter of a million dollars for college schol-arships to FWHS graduates, and he continues to give. On Dec. 20, 2003, Florida Southern College awarded him an honorary degree, doctor of public service. No one could have deserved it more.Thanks, AliceSchool Museum thanks go to Alice Dicks Mangle (CHS 1945) for donating several treasured items from CHS’s past. Q A ‘Collector’s Edition’ of a reunion book created for the combined CHS classes of 1941 through 1945. Q A “Golden Anniversary Celebration” booklet from CHS 1944’s 50th reunion and a “Golden Memories” booklet from CHS 1943’s 50th reunion. Q A full color, 8-by-10-inch photo of the CHS 1944’s class at their 50th reunion, with mem-bers’ names. Alice explained that these booklets actually belonged to her late cousin, Sibyl Toney Ivie (CHS 1944), who wanted them passed on to our School Museum. Sincere thanks go to Alice and Sibyl!Ready to driveThe ultra-serious Cuban Missile Crisis of 50 years ago required special planning from our school system. One part of that planning was to be sure that all school bus drivers were immediately available to trans-port students home or to shel-ters in case a war started. Contacting bus drivers did not cause too much of a prob-lem at FWHS. Some of their bus drivers were students at the school.Poor preacherThis from Lowell Osteen, pastor at Bethlehem Baptist Church: A highway patrolman stopped a speeding driver and the driver said, “Officer, please have mercy on me. I’m just a poor preacher.” The trooper said, “I know that. I heard you preach last Sunday!” Still Kicking Bluegrass band F or a unique person to symbolize this Veterans Day you could not go far wrong choosing Tammy Duckworth, who was elected to Congress Tuesday to represent Chicago’s northwestern sub-urbs. Duckworth will become the first female veteran of Iraq and Afghanistan to serve in Congress. She was a captain in the National Guard and a helicopter pilot when she was shot down in Iraq in 2004, losing both legs and the partial use of her right arm. She is not unique serving in Congress after being badly wounded in wartime. Sen. John McCain of Arizona was tortured by the North Vietnamese after breaking both legs and an arm. Sen. Max Cleland of Georgia lost both legs and his forearm to a grenade in Vietnam. What is unique about Duckworth is simply that she’s a veteran. Once veterans dominated Congress; from the 1960s to the mid-1970s veterans comprised about three-quarters of the U.S. House, according to political science associate pro-fessor Jeremy Teigen of Ramapo College in New Jersey. He told the military newspaper Stars & Stripes that number is down to 25 percent and falling. In fact, after World War II, it was hard for a nonveteran to get elected; military service was practically a prerequisite for political office. But with the end of the draft, the advent of the all-volunteer army and the concept of a leaner military, the percent-age of Americans who have served has fallen precipitously. Less than 1 percent of the popu-lation has served in Iraq and Afghanistan. Veterans groups were hoping that this election would arrest a 32-year slide in the number of ex-military in Congress. It might have happened. Some House vote counts are still incom-plete that could add two more members, but the Associated Press says 16 veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan were elected Tuesday, nine of them first-time officeholders. Most of the congressional vets are Republicans, but anyone who expects them to march in lockstep on the issues is badly out of touch with our modern military. They are as opinionated and diverse as the democracy they chose to defend. Veterans Day asks little of us other than we take a moment to observe the 11th minute of the 11th hour of the 11th month to mark the moment in 1918 when the armistice brought an end to the blood and carnage of World War I. Fewer veterans but they still serve Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding counties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, publisher Robert Bridges, editor Sue Brannon, controller Dink NeSmith, president Tom Wood, chairman LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY E-MAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com A fter taking a moment to savor a well-earned victory, [President Barack Obama] have to roll up his sleeves. An agenda packed with formidable chal-lenges awaits resolution. The message of this election is that voters are sick of grid-lock and extreme partisanship. For Mr. Obama, this means a readjustment of relations with Congress. ... He vowed to fight harder in his second term by taking his issues to the country. Fine, but lawmakers have the power to make or break a presi-dency. Successful presidents work The Hill like a pol works a key precinct. Republicans in Congress have a similar duty to change course. They lost ground in the House, and they not only failed to win the Senate but fell further behind. The GOP brand has lost some of its lus-ter, thanks to its obstructionist label. It’s time to rebrand. Good start: Majority Leader John Boehner said he called President Obama on Wednesday to offer this mes-sage: “The Republican majority stands ready to work with you.” He went on to make the argu-ment against tax cuts (here we go again), but he also said he read the election results as a mandate from the American people “to work together.” Let’s hope he means it. Not so good start: In the Senate, Republican Minority Leader Mitch McConnell has become the personification of obstructionism. In contrast to the graceful concession state-ment offered by Mitt Romney, the Kentucky senator managed to strike a sour note. “The voters have not endorsed the failures or excesses of the president’s first term, they have simply given him more time to finish the job they asked him to do.”... The president fought for a second term. He earned one. Now he has to show Americans that they made the right choice. Nation requires working together Q The Miami Herald OPINION Sunday, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A4AEDIT Morris WilliamsPhone: (386) 755-8183williams_h2@firn.edu372 W. Duval St.Lake City, FL 32055 Q Morris Williams is a local historian and long-time Columbia County resident. Star Parkerparker@urbancure.org Q Star Parker is president of CURE, Coalition on Urban Renewal and Education (www.urbancure.org) and author of three books. Q Dale McFeatters is editorial writer for Scripps Howard News Service. Dale McFeattersmcfeattersd@shns.com

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Dorothy N. Shelton Dorothy N. Shelton, 78, of Lake City, Florida died Thurs day, November 8, 2012 at the Suwannee Valley Care Center (Haven Hospice) after an ex tended illness. She was born in Buchanan County, Virginia to the late John and Pearl (Addi son) Meadows but had lived in Columbia County since 1963. She was a loving mother, grand & great grandmother who loved her family, and enjoyed watch ing NASCAR Racing, Florida Gator Football, and watching the Atlanta Braves & Tampa Bay Rays play baseball. She was preceded in death by her parents, and her sister, Trula Watkins. Survivors include her son, Jeff Shelton of Lake City, FL; daughter, Cindy (Emerson) North of Lake City, FL; daugh ter in law, Lora Roberts Shelton of Lake City, FL; 8 grandchil dren and 18 great grandchildren. Funeral services will be con ducted at 1:00 p.m. on Mon day, November 12, 2012 in the chapel of GatewayForest Lawn Funeral Home with Visitation with the family will be one hour prior to service time. (12:00 p.m. until 1:00 p.m., Monday) GATEWAYFOREST LAWN FUNERAL HOME, 3596 South U.S. Hwy 441, Lake City, Florida 32025, (386) 752-1954 is in charge of arrangements. Please leave com forting words for the family at www.gatewayforestlawn.com. Violet Ann Sanders Violet Ann Sanders, 57, entered into eternal peace on Tues day November 6, 2012 at her home in Fort White, Florida. Violet was born on July 24, 1955 at Tampa General Hospital in Tampa, Florida. She was preceded in death by Eldon Eugene Sanders Jr. (son) and Earl Warren (brother). She leaves her loving memo ries to be cherished by; Eldon Eugene Sanders Sr. (husband), Raymond & Sandra Warren (parents), (three-daughters) Karen (Ben) Hazlip, Victo ria (Alexander) Longoria, Virginia (Roger) Ward, Seven grandchildren; Jen nifer L. Crews, Alexander T. Longoria, J. Dalton Gerow, Anthony M. Longoria, Santana M. Sanders, Angela J. Longo ria, Charles D. Ward, (greatgrandson) Aidan J. E. Chase and her dear friend in life Libby Wilson. She leaves behind many extended family members and friends to carry on her memories. LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 5A 5A C o l u m b ia C o u n t y T o b a c c o F r e e P a r t n e r s h i p T he C o l um b i a C ount y T oba c c o F r e e P a r t n e r s h i p a nd t he C o l um b i a C ount y H e a l t h D e p a r t m e nt ha ve c om e t oge t he r t o f o r m a pa r t ne r s h i p i n or de r t o c r e a t e a t oba c c o f r e e c o m m un i t y. T h i s y e a r t he pa r t ne r s h i p i s f o c u s i ng on po l i c i e s t ha t e f f e c t o u r yo ut h W e a r e pl e a s e d t o r e po r t t ha t r e s o l ut i ons ha v e be e n a c h i e v e d i n bot h t he C i t y o f L a ke C i t y a nd C o l um b i a C ount y t o ba n t he s a l e a nd m a r ke t i ng of c a ndy f l a vor e d t oba c c o W e i nv i t e a l l c o m m un i t y m e m be r s s e r v i c e w o r ke r s a nd s c h oo l a g e d yout h t o a t t e nd t he up c o m i ng m e e t i ng t o d i s c u s s t o ba c c o r e l a t e d i s s ue s i n ou r c o un t y C o l u m b i a C o u n t y T o b a c c o F r e e P a r t n e r s hi p M e e t i n g C e n t r a l S c h o ol B oa r d O f f i c e R o o m 1 5 3 T h u r s da y N ove m be r 15 2 0 1 2 3 7 2 W e s t D u v a l S t r e e t L a ke C i t y, F L 3 2 0 5 5 T i m e : 1 : 0 0p m A l l p a r t ne r s h i p m e e t i ngs a r e ope n t o t he p ub l i c F o r m o r e i nf o r m a t i on on ho w t o m a ke a d i f f e r e n c e i n your c o m m un i t y t h r ou gh you r l o c a l T oba c c o F r e e P a r t ne r s h i p p l e a s e c o nt a c t : L a ur e n P i n c hou c k C ol u m b i a C oun t y H e a l t h D e pa r t m e n t ( 386) 758 1193 or L a ur e n_P i n c hou c k@ doh s t a t e f l us NEW LOCATION Virginia Tiner BOOKKEEPING AND TAX SERVICE Corner of Baya & S.E. Llewellyn Ave. Lake City, FL (across from East Side School ) (386) 758-9808 Over Years Touchstone Heating and Air, Inc. www.touchstoneheatingandaironline.com Oer Expires December 22, 2012 Mark Touchstone, President Lic# CACO58099 SERVICE CHECK FREE ...of this simple way to SAVE and get the peace of mind in time for the holiday and before the end of 2012. Take ADVANTAGE OBITUARIES Obituaries are paid advertise ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporters classified depart ment at 752-1293. Nov. 11 Gospel trio at church The Diadem Trio gospel singing group of Nashville, Tenn., will be ministering at 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. at Glad Tidings Assembly of God, 1571 E. Duval St. in Lake City. Call (386) 3651533 for more information. Nov. 12 CHS band concert Columbia High School Band will present a free Salute to Our Veterans con cert at 7 p.m. in the high school auditorium. The marching band, jazz band and wind ensemble will perform. Recovery group to meet A 12-step addiction recovery group meets every Friday at 6 p.m. at the Community Revival Center, 244 NE Patterson Ave. in Lake City. For infor mation, call 867-6288. Nov. 13 March of Dimes auction The March of Dimes will have a Signature Chefs Auction at 5:30 p.m. in the Rountreee Moore Toyota showroom, U.S. 90 West in Lake City. The date is a change from the earlier publicized date. There will be live and silent auctions, a selection of specialty foods presented by more than 20 area restaurants and caterers and compli mentary wine tasting. For more information, contact Kathy McCallister at 7550507 or Maureen Lloyd at 397-0598. Put this event on your calendar as we work together to give every baby a healthy start. Photo club Lake City Photo Club meets the second Tuesday of each month from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Lifestyle Enrichment Center at Baya Avenue. Share your photos and ideas with the group. Newcomers are welcome. Caregiver conference The Alzheimers Association, Central and North Florida Chapter, is coordinating a caregiver conference in partnership with Elder Options. The event will be held at the UF Hilton and Conference Center in Gainesville on from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. We plan to have speakers on a variety of topics related to care-giving as well as health screenings, exhibi tors, activities, door prizes, and more. Breakfast and lunch will be provided. There is no charge to attend. However, pre-reg istration is required. Please call (800) 272-3900 to reserve seats as soon as possible. Medicare seminar Lifestyle Enrichment Center is sponsoring a free Medicare seminar from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. The seminar will be moderated by Irv Crowetz of C/C & Associates. Learn about Medicare, when to enroll, whats covered and when a supplement is needed. Call 755-3475 ext. 107 to reserve a seat. Native plants meeting Join the Sparkleberry Chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society at 6:30 p.m. at Hatch Park in Branford, 403 SE Craven St. Our November pro gram will feature hands-on instructions from members about how to weave a bas ket from a saw palmetto frond. These baskets can be used for holiday table decorations. Supplies will be provided. For more information, contact presi dent Carol Sullivan, (386) 364-9309. Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon at the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane, to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. Nov. 14 Olustee battle meeting The Blue-Grey Army will meet at 5:30 p.m. Nov. 14 to plan the Olustee Battle Festival. The meeting will be at the school district central building room 153, 409 SW St. Johns St. The 2013 Olustee Battle Festival/Re-enactment poster prepared by local artist Duffy Soto will be unveiled. Irrigation clinic Save water, save money with the University of Florida Master Gardeners hands-on workshop on set ting up a home irrigation system from 1 to 4 p.m. This will be the first program for the Master Gardener dem onstration garden at the Fort White Branch Library, 17700 SW Route 47. There is no charge. Call 497-1108 for information. Newcomers meeting The Lake City Newcomers will meet at 11 a.m. at Guang Dong in the Lake City mall. Guest speaker will be Detective Katina Dicks of the Columbia County Sheriffs Department, who will talk about fraud crimes and how to prevent them and careful Christmas shop ping. The group also will have its annual Arts, Crafts and Collectibles show. Members are welcome to take items to show andor sell. Luncheon will cost $11. Sale of 50-50 tickets will end at 11:25. United Way luncheon United Way of Suwannee Valley will have its November report lun cheon Wednesday, Nov. 14 at noon at the PotashCorpWhite Springs conference center, 16071 SE 78th Place in White Springs. Lunch is $12 per person. Call at 752-5604, ext. 102 for more information. Class of luncheon The Columbia High School class of 1946 will have its quarterly luncheon from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Phish Heads Restaurant. Reservations are not needed. Nov. 15 Retired educators meet The Columbia Retired Educators will meet at 1 p.m. at the School Board Adult Center, room 120. Remember to take a cov ered dish to shaer. For more information, contact Will Brown at 752-2431. Nov. 16 Fish dinner Our Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5056 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, pre pares fish dinners every Friday from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The dinner is $6 for two Alaskan pollock filets, corn, baked beans, hush puppies, cole slaw and tarter sauce. Take out or eat in. Nov. 17 FFA chapter fundraiser The Columbia High School FFA Junior Chapter will have a yard sale start ing at 8 a.m. Location will be U.S. 90 West, across from the Fifth Generation Farms market. Donations can be dropped off at the Land Lab on the hill at CHS, or contact Ms. Starnes at 7558080 or Lauren Townsend at (386) 288-0636 for more information. Community theater High Springs Community Theater will present a staged reading of Bad for Each Other, a new com edy-thriller by Leroy Clark, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $5 and available at the door. COMMUNITY CALENDAR To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr@lakecityreporter.com. COURTESY PHOTO North Central Florida Regional Planning Council officials display a proclamation designating November as Jobs Month in the region. From left are Kenrick Thomas, secretary-treasurer; Lorene Thomas, chairwoman; Carolyn Spooner, executive committee member; and Scott Koons, executive director. Jobs Month proclamation issued

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6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-04286A VETERANS: Lake City honors them with events throughout the we ekend Continued From Page 1A TEEN: Faces charges for injuries to 11-week-old she was b aby-sitting Continued From Page 1A TROOPER: Grand jury declines to issue indictment in Aug. 26 shooting Continued From Page 1Ato the ceremony with other Patriot Guard Riders from different parts of the Southeast. “It means a great deal for me to attend today’s service,” she said. “I remember back when I was a child growing up and Veterans Day was a big thing. We had parades, we all went to the cemeteries and there were ceremonies everywhere and it’s kind of nice to be a part of that again.” She said it’s important to continue to support the veterans. “We need to support our people who have gone out there and stood for us and done the hardest job in the world for us,” she said. “We need to support them in any and every way we possibly can and say, ‘Thank you’.” Donald Runyon offered the benediction to close the service and he said, “It would take us forever to call each veteran’s name, but each name is important.” On Saturday there was a Veterans Day parade (see photos this page and 1A), and the local farmers market kicked off its VA Hospital Holiday Fundraiser. Donation boxes will be placed at the market each Saturday until Dec. 8. Items collected will be distributed at the Lake City VA Medical Center. Items needed this year are: coffee and personal care items such as shampoo, shaving cream and good quality razors. Popcorn and water will be for sale at the site of the donation boxes. The project is led by city employee David Pettey. On Friday, local veterans honored patients at the hospital with Veterans Day pins. • “The 911 call also informed law enforcement that Blevins already had hit a vehicle and failed to stop; • “Maclaren’s in-car video and witness testimony demonstrate Blevins’ refusal to comply with orders to stop as a marked patrol car with lights and sirens is in pur-suit; • “Testimony of witnesses that Blevins’ actions of exiting the truck with a handgun at the ready, his deliberate movement in the direction of Maclaren, and his refusal to stop and drop the weapon indicated credible threats of violence were imminent toward the trooper; • “Whether Blevins’ impairment diminished his criminal culpability the danger-ousness of his actions is what is consid-ered in determining the reasonableness of the law enforcement response; • “The grand jury, therefore, feels the actions of Trooper Maclaren were reason-able and justified given the immediate threat to himself; and • “The jury believes the actions of Brent Blevins support a finding of prob-able cause that he committed the acts of felony fleeing a police officer, driving while under the influence, grand theft III: Motor vehicle, and leaving the scene of a crash, and a true bill, had he survived, would accompany this report.” According to the report, which includes testimony from several witnesses, on Aug. 26 the Florida Highway Patrol office in Lake City received a 911 call from Lawrence Rentz, who told them the driver in a red Dodge truck, later identified as Blevins, was driving in an unsafe manner on US 90. Rentz said the driver of the truck was driving erratically and running other vehicles off the road. He told authorities he and his wife saw a crash where Blevins pulled into a driveway and backed out into oncoming traffic, hitting another vehicle and Blevins failed to stop. Rentz followed the truck and said he saw Blevins inside the truck fumbling around under the seat and yelling out the window at the trooper after the trooper pulled in behind him. Rentz later said he saw a Suwannee County Sheriff’s Office patrol car race to get in front of the truck and almost imme-diately the truck stopped and the FHP patrol car stopped next to the truck. The SCSO patrol car turned around and came back towards the two stopped vehicles, eventually parking in front of the truck. Rentz reported seeing Blevins, shirtless, get out of the truck and put his hands up, somewhere behind his head as he walked between the vehicles toward the trooper. He said it appeared Blevins had something in his hand. Rentz heard the trooper yell at Blevins, but noted continued to move toward him, with the trooper backing up several steps until he fired his weapon and Blevins fell to the ground. The report said Maclaren was traveling east on US 90 when he was flagged down by several people who told him a red truck with a broken tailgate had just run into their vehicle and fled west. Maclaren turned around and with lights and siren activated caught up with the truck. Reports said Blevins refused to stop, continued to swerve from lane to lane and steered the truck directly into oncom-ing traffic. Blevins refused to stop until a SCSO patrol vehicle pulled in front of him, when the vehicles stopped in the roadway with Maclaren’s patrol car in the left lane nearly next to the truck. Blevins reportedly exited his truck, his arms up and slightly behind his head with a handgun in his right hand. After numer-ous orders to stop and drop the gun, with Blevins moving toward Maclaren, Maclaren shot at Blevins six times, hit-ting him 5 times in the chest area. Blevins fell to the ground and his gun fell next to him. The investigation was turned over to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement and Maclaren, 33, was placed on paid administrative leave for three days. The FDLE has not yet released its investigative report into the incident. “It is very sad that the young man lost his life that day,” said Third Judicial Circuit State Attorney Robert “Skip” Jarvis. “However, when an officer is con-fronted by someone with a firearm who refuses to submit, it places the officer’s safety in jeopardy, sometimes an officer has no choice but to use force for their own self protection. My heart goes out to the young man’s family, however, the officer acted justifiably.” Jarvis said he wanted to present the case to the grand jury. “What we had was a situation where a young man died in an altercation with a law enforcement officer,” he said. “I personally was at that scene right after the shooting, to make certain I saw what was going on. Ultimately, because of the situation and my years in law enforcement wanting to make certain I was not being overly protective of an officer, I went ahead and choose to look at it and I had determined my personal thoughts on it, but I decided to play it safe and make certain that family and the victim was equally considered in this. I went ahead and choose to present it to the Suwannee County grand jury and let 21 people who are the conscience of Suwannee County look at it with me and tell me what they think.” The grand jury returned a “no true bill” in the case and filed a written report detail-ing its findings in the case. TONY BRITT/ Lake City ReporterVeterans ride past the Lake City VA Medical Center durin g Saturday’s parade on a float representing the USS Pittsb urgh. arrested on a warrant Friday afternoon when she failed to show up for a police interview. She was charged with cruel-ty toward a child and booked into the Columbia County Detention Facility on $50,000 bond. She has bonded out. According to Columbia County Sheriff’s reports, around 6:40 p.m. Tuesday, Deputy Scott Staley responded to Shands Lake Shore Regional Medical Center in refer-ence to a child abuse case. After speaking to the emergency room staff Staley was told an 11-week-old female was brought to the hospital with injuries indicative of shaken-baby syndrome. Staley reported there was bruising inside the child’s ears, on her neck and on the inside of her shoul-ders or armpits. The child’s parents, Matt and Carrie Cason of Lake City, said they left their child with the baby sitter, Albritton, who has been baby-sitting for them for the past 10 months. According to reports, Carrie Cason told law enforcement officials she received a call from Albritton around 5:27 p.m. Tuesday and said Albritton told her the child was unresponsive. Cason told Albritton to call 911 and she would meet them at the hospital. The child was later airlifted from Shands Lake Shore Regional Medical Center to Shands at the University of Florida. When authorities asked Carrie Cason whether there had been any other times of concern when Albritton was with the chil-dren and she told them around two weeks ago she noticed a bruise on the infant’s head. Albritton told her the bruise was from where another child had dropped a toy on the baby, Cason said. Cason told authorities she did not think Albritton was being entirely honest with her about that incident, according to the report. When questioned, Albritton initially told law enforcement officers that when she lay the infant on the floor after her bath, her head hit the floor, but on the bath rug, “harder than it should have,” in the words of the report. Albritton said the infant showed no real response to the bump as far as crying. The seven-page police report chronicles several instances where authorities inter-viewed Albritton between Tuesday and Friday about what happened on the day the infant became injured. Reports indi-cate she told detectives several different stories about what happened that led to the child’s injuries. As authorities questioned Albritton, they told her that in a situation like this, the truth usually comes out and that doctors will end up with a conclusion as to what happened. After multiple interviews, sheriff’s office reports indicate Albritton confessed to detectives and said, “I shook her. I did. I’m just going to come out and tell you, after the bath I did,” reports said. Albritton report-edly told the investigator she remembered thinking, “Why did I do that?” Detectives questioned Albritton about what was going on in her life for her to be “so overwhelmed” and she reportedly told them her parents are separated and it has been stressful to her and she has been having a hard time. Friday morning authorities secured an arrest warrant for Albritton for cruelty toward a child and she was taken into cus-tody.

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areas. Theres no Internet service provider whos going to go into (District 1 County Commissioner Ron Williamss) area and put equipment on those tow ers, he said. The cost for equipment and the lack of a custom er base prevents private industry from making the investment, he said. Sucara said for the NFBA to put equipment on a tower, the tower had to serve an anchor institution. But after the grant period ends, she will be able to put equipment on towers that would serve areas that arent close to anchor insti tutions. The grant period ends Jan. 31. At that time, the NFBA has to give any money remaining back to the federal government. Theres $4.9 million left, Sucara wrote in an email on Nov. 2. She said the NFBA plans on spending all the grant money. Some of the ways she plans to spend the money is by promo tions designed at targeting anchor institutions. She said if an anchor institution wants the NFBAs service she will provide the equip ment free of charge. Donnie Lort, project manager of the NFBA, said the ultimate goal is to have the region blanketed with Internet service in five years. He said to reach the goal, the NFBA will need to produce $750,000 per month by the fifth year. The NFBA currently has revenues of $12,000 a month, Sucara said. However, she added, Its doubling everyday. Jessica Springfield, a lawyer with the NFBA, said the project is transitioning from a capital project into a sales effort. The NFBAs goal, plan and desire is to reach any body who wants service..., she said. But were talking about a very large area and few employees. We all can only get so much done in a day. The expenses of the NFBA are about $250,000 a month, Sucara said. She said the largest expenses are commercial tower leas es and payroll. Lort said that about 90 percent of NFBAs cover age area is already served by private Internet provid ers. Lort said NFBA will be able to provide supe rior service more in line with the needs of hospitals, schools and other anchor institutions. Nonetheless, the idea of competing with private enterprise has put NFBA at odds with members of the Columbia County Commission and others. THE COUNTY COMMISSION Williams said he knew something was wrong when he was at the Lake City Mall trying to connect his home to the NFBAs network through a private company that was buying bandwidth from the NFBA. He said he tried to get service through the com pany, but was told his house wasnt in a service area. Williams said he was very disappointed with the NFBA because his area needs the service. He said the NFBA has become just another Internet company. They gone into the heart of Lake City and skimming the cream off the top, he said. He said that was wrong. That $30 million was supposed to go to serve rural America, he said. District 5 County Commissioner Scarlet Frisina was the alternate representative to the NFBA for Columbia County. She said the county withdrew from the NFBA because commissioners thought there was a lack of commu nication, but she still hopes for a positive outcome. I want to believe because I believed from the begin ning, she said. District 3 Commissioner Jodie DuPree said there is a reason high-speed Internet isnt available in certain areas of the county, and to his understanding the purpose of the NFBA was to bridge the gap to make it profitable. He said because Columbia County wasnt funding the project, he didnt think like the county commission had the right to ask how the money was being spent. However, when the NFBA failed to supply simple records on employee salaries and information about how the project was going to be sus tainable, he said it was time to pull the trigger and pull out of the NFBA. They did that for two reasons: Either they didnt have a plan or they felt like they didnt have to give us a plan, he said. DuPree said the board gave the NFBA more than a month to supply the infor mation. The county withdrew from the FNFBA on Nov. 1. The NFBA attorney said that information has now been supplied to the board. Springfield said those records requests werent supplied earlier because Faith Doyle, executive administrative assistant, was on vacation. Doyle was the person responsible for records requests. Everybody working on this project has been under a lot of pressure to get the job done, Springfield said. It might be that the public records request wasnt the most important thing they were doing. Springfield went on to say that Doyles position had reached a flash point and that she was no longer an employee of the NFBA. She said the NFBA is reor ganizing and eliminating some expenses. Doyle had been paid a salary of $80,000 a year. THE NETWORK Sucara acknowledged that the NFBAs revenues are pretty slim, but now that the network is opera tional, the NFBAs focus is on customer acquisition. Everyday we hook up between five and 10 cus tomers, she said. She said shes had talks with three financial institu tions about the possibility of bridge loans to finance the project while the NFBA works to make the network solvent. The best case scenario is that the NFBA will be able to meet expenses by May, she said. She said in the worst case, the NFBA will need other financing through September or October of 2013. She said she is working on a deal that could land the NFBA an account that would bring $500,000 over three years. Sucara said the National Telecommunications and Information Administration has complimented the NFBA on its customer acquisition process and asked the NFBA to make a presentation to other Broadband Technology Opportunity Projects at a NTIA conference in May. There are 123 infra structure BTOP projects throughout the nation with $3.5 billion in funding from the federal government. Lort, NFBA project man ager, said the signal from the NFBAs towers carries Internet signals a maxi mum of eight miles. The core network consists of eight rings spread over the 9,700 square miles. Each ring consists of multiple towers that would allow a Internet service provider to penetrate into the geographical area of North Central Florida. He said because Jefferson and Putnam counties have worked with the NFBA by providing the promised inkind donations, those coun ties will receive service much sooner than some of the counties that have not provided its in-kind dona tions. The counties and munici palities that are members of the NFBA have provided in-kind donations in the form of leases to use tower space to hang NFBA equip ment. Part of the requirements of the grant were $10 mil lion of in-kind donations. Lort said that other BTOP programs had to provide funding in the form of cash. He said the NFBA received a waiver to use inkind dona tions. He said most of Jefferson and Putnam can access the network. Lort said if Columbia County had given their inkind donations more of the county would have NFBA service. If (the county commis sioners) gave me the leases I could have gone out to Lulu, he said. He went on to say that the counties drafted legally binding resolutions to pro vide leases of public towers to the NFBA. If the NFBA wanted to they could go back and sue them..., he said. I doubt the NFBA will ever do that. Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY NOVEMBER 11, 2012 7A 7A WILSONS O UTFITTERS 1291 SE Baya Dr, Lake City (386) 755-7060 WilsonsOutfitters@comcast.net Camo, Camo, Camo Shirts, Pants, Coveralls, Hats, Gloves Start Shopping early! Christmas is on the way! Happy Birthday Doris Starling November 10th, 1922 April 8, 1999 Mama, It has been 14 years since youve been gone to be with Daddy in Heaven. We all miss and love you. From your beloved children, Linda, Johnny, Joann, Larry, Arthur, Joseph and Teresa. Also from your son-in-laws, daughter-in-laws, grandchildren and great grandchildren with all their love, too. 2X4 Advertisement for Dr. J. T. Cooper for placement in the Sunday paper Sunday 11 November 2012 IS YOUR READY FOR THE HOLIDAYS!! J.T.Cooper, M.D. Can help you with safe, supervised Dr. Cooper will be in his Lake Park, GA office on Wed., Thur., Fri. & Sun. Sat. (In the outlet mall) www.dietDrTom.com NFBA: High-speed Internet service wont be coming here anytime soon Continued From Page 1A From staff reports United Way of Suwannee Valley will hold its November community fund raising campaign report luncheon at the beautiful PCS Conference Center at noon on Nov. 14. Terry Baker, General Manager, PotashCorp White Springs will wel come all guests to the Conference Center and the report luncheon will feature KameronRobinson, Voices for Children / Guardian ad Litem, one of the 21 United Way of Suwannee Valley affiliated agencies. The theme for this years cam paign is Imagine Me. Dr. Helen Miller, Mayor of White Springs, will speak about the BEST Neighborhoods project in White Springs. BEST Neighborhoods is a grant received by United Way of Suwannee Valley from Volunteer Florida. Seven projects were conducted in our local communities. Stan Posey, member of the United Way of Suwannee Valley Challengers Club, the organizations lead ership donors, will speak about investing in our com munity as a member of the Challengers Club. During each month of United Ways annual com munity fundraising cam paign, the local United Way conducts a campaign report luncheon to provide an opportunity for campaign team volunteers, commu nity citizens, business rep resentatives and agency personnel to learn more about the partner agency services and more. United Way of Suwannee Valley is a community impact and fundraising organization that dvances the common good by iden tifying unmet community needs and seeking to alle viate those needs through United Way of Suwannee Valley initiatives and the funding of 21 health and human service agencies. UW November luncheon set

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8A LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04248AWEATHER Sometimes “ no” makes you say Call 754-9088 and press 7 or apply online at campuscu.com today!Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Columbia a nd Suwannee counties! 21. Offer is for new loans only. Existing CAMPUS loans not eligible. Rate based on the September 15th rate sheet and is subject to change daily. Please call 800-367-6440 and press 7 for the most accurate rate information. Must mention offer at time of loan application. No closing cost offer is available only when obtaining a CAMPUS mortgage and only in the State of Florida. Offer applies only to standard buyer’s closing costs as itemized in the CAMPUS Good Faith Estimate and does not apply if seller pays buyer’s closing costs. Offer subject to credit approval, sufficient income, adequate property valuation, and maximum $417,000 loan amount. CAMPUS will pay up to $5,000 of closing costs. Owner-occupied property only. Offer excludes mobile homes, new construction, FHA and VA loans. Prepaid interest,initial escrow deposit and fees for rate buy down, if any, must be paid by borrower. Property, Flood and Mortgage insurance may be required at an additional expense to the borrower. If loan is paid in full within the first 24 months, closing costs paid by CAMPUS will be added to the loan payoff amount. For example, a $150,000 loan with a 20% down payment of $37,500 and prepaid interest of $215.70 at a 3.5% rate for 180 months would require 179 payments of $1072.33 and a final payment of $1,070.82; finance charge of $44,719.59 for a total of payments of $193,017.89. The amount financed is $148,298.30, the APR is 3.67%. APR=Annual Percentage Rate. Certain other restrictions apply. 2. Credit approval and initial $5 deposit required. Mention this ad and we’ll waive the $15 new member fee. Typical Closing Costs on a $150,000 Mortgage$3,428 CAMPUS Closing Costs on a $150,000 Mortgage No Cost! vs. NO -Closing-Cost Mortgage1from CAMPUS. “YES!” 3.6 7% APR1As low as FIXED RATE No points Purchase or refinance As little as 5% down Ask about discounted closing costs on construction loans Lake City 183 SW Bascom Norris Dr.G’ville E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunter’s Walk 5115 NW 43rd St. Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St. Shands at UF Room H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Alachua 14759 NW 157th Ln. Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E. Silver Springs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. Summer eld 17950 US Hwy. 441 Tallahassee 1511 Killearn Center Blvd. This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration.

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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Sunday, November 11, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas? Contact Tim Kirby Sports Editor 754-0421 tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS Honesty. Integrity. Professional. Honesty. Integrity. Professional. Three simple words, but its been our way of doing business since 1967. G L E N N I J O N E S I N C C E L E B R A T I N G 4 5 Y E A R S O F S E R V I C E Thank you to our customers for making Glenn I. Jones the largest heating and cooling contractor in North Central Florida. Trust the Name You Know... Call 552 NW Hilton Avenue, Lake City, FL 32055 www.glennijonesinc. com License# CAC051486 386-752-5389 Did You Know... Customer Appreciation Special $10 OFF $10 OFF $150 OFF $150 OFF A noble act COURTESY OF AUBURN ATHLETICS Lake City native Blayne Barber hits a chip shot while competing for Auburn University. Barber displays morals By BRANDON FINLEY bfinley@lakecityreporter.com G olf is a game of character and no finer display of character has ever been shown by Blayne Barber. Barber put his dream on hold to become a PGA Tour professional after a battle with his conscience. On the 13th hole of qualifying school, Barber believes he may have nicked a leaf. Problem was, Barber wasnt sure. He assessed himself a onestroke penalty, but later found out that if he did in fact hit the leaf, the rule states that its a two-shot penalty. I felt that I may have slightly touched the leaf, Barber said. Nobody else saw it and I asked my brother, Shayne, who was my caddie and he said I didnt touch it. Still, Barber couldnt get the incident out of his head. He wasnt certain and it weighed on his conscience. At first, I had convinced myself that I hadnt touched it, Barber said. BARBER continued on 2B JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Columbia Highs Trey Marshall (21) plucks the ball out of the air as he intercepts a pass intended for a Suwannee receiver. Another one in the bucket By BRANDON FINLEY bfinley@lakecityreporter.com It was a battle for a buck et, but this one was for Braxton. Columbia High lost running back Braxton Stockton to an eye injury that could cost the senior his eye on Tuesday and the Tigers responded winning its biggest rival ry game with a 40-0 final against Suwannee High in the battle for the Oaken Bucket on Friday. Trey Marshall grabbed a pick on the Bulldogs first drive and the Tigers responded with an 11-play, 63-yard drive to take a 7-0 lead after Ronald Timmons broke free from 14-yards away to put Columbia on the board with 7:22 remain ing in the first quarter. The Tigers went dry for over a quarter before Javere Smith recovered a fumble to set Columbia up at the Bulldogs 47yard line. Two-plays later, Timmons reached the end zone for a second time on a 41-yard run to give Columbia a 13-0 lead with 5:11 remaining int he half. From that point, Columbia would turn on the gas. Drew Clark sacked Kyle Stebbins and the Tigers came up with the ball at the Bulldogs 15yard line. It only took one play to score when Nate Ayers took a wide receiver screen from quarterback Jayce Barber to the house for a 20-0 lead with 2:47 remaining in the half. It was Ayers second score in as many weeks. I havent been clicking in the passing game, but coach told me he was going to get me one last week, Ayers said. Tonight it was a good way to go out with a win in the Oaken Bucket Columbia High dominates Suwannee, 40-0. CHS continued on 2B

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CHS FOOTBALL Playoff tickets on sale at McDuffie’s Columbia High playoff tickets for the home game against Bartram Trail High on Nov. 16 are on sale at McDuffie Marine & Sporting Goods on U.S. Highway 90 west. Reserved seating is $9. For details, call the school at 755-8080. BOYS CLUB Registration for basketball league The Boys Club of Columbia County is taking registration for its basketball program. Three leagues are offered: Training for ages 6-7-8; Jr. Varsity for ages 8-9-10; Varsity for ages 11-12-13-14. Practices are twice weekly and games are played on Saturday, with the exception of the Training League. Cost is $45. For details, call 752-4184. ZUMBA Food for Zumba event planned Lake City Zumba is hosting Food for Zumba at Teen Town on Saturday. An introduction class will be offered from 9-10 a.m., followed by a regular Zumba class from 10-11 a.m. Admission is a canned or non-perishable food item which will be donated to Christian Service Center. For details, call Sarah Sandlin at 438-9292. DUCKS UNLIMITED Banquet Friday at fairgrounds The 35th annual Ducks Unlimited Banquet is Friday at the Columbia County Fairgrounds entertainment building. Doors open at 6 p.m. for a social hour, followed by a seafood dinner at 7 p.m. There will be a silent auction and tier raffle. Cost is $50 for a single ticket and $70 for a couple. For details, call Jimmy Sparks at 365-0446. FORT WHITE BASEBALL Craft Bazaar at Deese Park The Fort White High baseball program is sponsoring a booth at the Craft Bazaar from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday at Deese Park in Fort White. The team also will be at Moe’s Southwest Grill in Alachua on from 4 p.m. to closing on Nov. 19. For details, call Jeanne Howell at 288-5537. YOUTH SOCCER Winter sign-up through Nov. 29 Columbia Youth Soccer Association’s 2013 Winter Recreational Soccer Season registration for ages 3-16 is 6-7 p.m. Thursdays and 1-2:30 p.m. Saturdays through Nov. 29 (not Thanksgiving week). All teams will be gender specific. Fee of $65 includes uniform and year-end trophy. For details, go to colum biayouthsoccerassociation.com or call 288-2504. RUNNING Chomp Cancer Foundation 5K Chomp Cancer Foundation has its second Chomp Cancer 5K Run/Walk planned for 8 a.m. Dec. 15 in Fort White. UF Shands Cancer Center is the beneficiary. There will be music, post-race snacks, an awards ceremony and a silent auction/raffle. Sponsorships at several levels are available. For details, call Lauren Valentine at (321) 501-9526.Q From staff reports SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today AUTO RACING 3 p.m. ESPN — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, AdvoCare 500, at Avondale, Ariz. 7 p.m. ESPN2 — NHRA, Southern California Finals, at Pomona, Calif. (same-day tape) 11 p.m. SPEED — FIA World Rally, at Lloret de Mar, Spain (same-day tape) CFL FOOTBALL 6:30 p.m. NBCSN — Playoffs, division semifinal, Saskatchewan at Calgary (same-day tape) 11 p.m. NBCSN — Playoffs, division semifinal, Edmonton at Toronto (same-day tape) GOLF 1 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals Classic, final round, at Lake Buena Vista MOTORSPORTS 8 a.m. SPEED — MotoGP World Championship, at Valencia, Spain 3 p.m. SPEED — MotoGP Moto2, at Valencia, Spain (same-day tape) NFL FOOTBALL 1 p.m. CBS — Regional coverageFOX — Regional coverage 4 p.m. CBS — Regional coverage 4:25 p.m. FOX — Doubleheader game 8:20 p.m. NBC — Houston at Chicago SOCCER 4 p.m. NBCSN — MLS, playoffs, Eastern Conference championship, first leg, D.C. United at Houston 9 p.m. ESPN — MLS, playoffs, Western Conference championship, first leg, Seattle at Los Angeles TENNIS 9 a.m. ESPN2 — ATP World Tour Finals, semifinal, at London 2:30 p.m. ESPN2 — ATP World Tour Finals, semifinal, at London ——— Monday MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 12 Midnight ESPN — West Virginia at Gonzaga 2 a.m. ESPN — Davidson at New Mexico 4 a.m. ESPN — Houston Baptist at Hawaii NFL FOOTBALL 8:30 p.m. ESPN — Kansas City at Pittsburgh TENNIS 3 p.m. ESPN2 — ATP World Tour Finals, championship match, at LondonFOOTBALLNFL standings AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PANew England 5 3 0 .625 262 170Miami 4 4 0 .500 170 149N.Y. Jets 3 5 0 .375 168 200Buffalo 3 5 0 .375 180 248 South W L T Pct PF PAHouston 7 1 0 .875 237 137Indianapolis 6 3 0 .667 186 201Tennessee 3 6 0 .333 182 308Jacksonville 1 8 0 .111 127 246 North W L T Pct PF PABaltimore 6 2 0 .750 199 176Pittsburgh 5 3 0 .625 191 164Cincinnati 3 5 0 .375 189 218Cleveland 2 7 0 .222 169 211 West W L T Pct PF PADenver 5 3 0 .625 235 175San Diego 4 4 0 .500 185 157Oakland 3 5 0 .375 171 229Kansas City 1 7 0 .125 133 240 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAN.Y. Giants 6 3 0 .667 254 185Philadelphia 3 5 0 .375 133 183Dallas 3 5 0 .375 150 181Washington 3 6 0 .333 226 248 South W L T Pct PF PAAtlanta 8 0 0 1.000 220 143Tampa Bay 4 4 0 .500 226 185New Orleans 3 5 0 .375 218 229Carolina 2 6 0 .250 149 180 North W L T Pct PF PAChicago 7 1 0 .875 236 120Green Bay 6 3 0 .667 239 187Minnesota 5 4 0 .556 204 197Detroit 4 4 0 .500 192 188 West W L T Pct PF PASan Francisco 6 2 0 .750 189 103Seattle 5 4 0 .556 170 154Arizona 4 5 0 .444 144 173St. Louis 3 5 0 .375 137 186 Thursday’s Game Indianapolis 27, Jacksonville 10 Today’s Games Atlanta at New Orleans, 1 p.m.Detroit at Minnesota, 1 p.m.Denver at Carolina, 1 p.m.San Diego at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.Tennessee at Miami, 1 p.m.Buffalo at New England, 1 p.m.Oakland at Baltimore, 1 p.m.N.Y. Giants at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.N.Y. Jets at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.St. Louis at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.Dallas at Philadelphia, 4:25 p.m.Houston at Chicago, 8:20 p.m. Monday’s Game Kansas City at Pittsburgh, 8:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 15 Miami at Buffalo, 8:20 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 18 Cleveland at Dallas, 1 p.m.N.Y. Jets at St. Louis, 1 p.m.Jacksonville at Houston, 1 p.m.Cincinnati at Kansas City, 1 p.m.Philadelphia at Washington, 1 p.m.Green Bay at Detroit, 1 p.m.Arizona at Atlanta, 1 p.m.Tampa Bay at Carolina, 1 p.m.New Orleans at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.San Diego at Denver, 4:25 p.m.Indianapolis at New England, 4:25 p.m.Baltimore at Pittsburgh, 8:20 p.m. Monday, Nov. 19 Chicago at San Francisco, 8:30 p.m.BASKETBALLNBA schedule Today’s Games Orlando at Brooklyn, 3 p.m.Atlanta at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m.Miami at Memphis, 6 p.m.Cleveland at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.Sacramento at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m. Monday’s Games Utah at Toronto, 7 p.m.Milwaukee at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.Oklahoma City at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.Boston at Chicago, 8 p.m.Miami at Houston, 8 p.m.Minnesota at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.Denver at Phoenix, 9 p.m.Atlanta at Portland, 10 p.m. AP Top 25 schedule Today’s Games No. 2 Louisville vs. Manhattan, 4 p.m.No. 4 Ohio State vs. Albany (NY), 2 p.m. No. 10 Florida vs. Alabama State, 3:30 p.m. No. 11 North Carolina vs. Florida Atlantic, 2:30 p.m. No. 12 Arizona vs. Charleston Southern, 6 p.m. No. 19 Baylor vs. Jackson State, 5 p.m.No. 20 San Diego State vs. San Diego Christian, 10:30 p.m. No. 23 Wisconsin vs. Southeastern Louisiana, 2 p.m. No. 24 Cincinnati vs. TennesseeMartin, 2 p.m.SOCCERMLS playoffs Semifinals EASTERN CONFERENCE Thursday New York 0, D.C. United 1, D.C. United advances on 2-1 aggregate WESTERN CONFERENCE Thursday Seattle 1, Real Salt Lake 0, Seattle advances on 1-0 aggregate Championships Today Houston vs. D.C. United, 4 p.m.Los Angeles vs. Seattle, 9 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04202BSPORTS BRIEFS BARBER: Plays with conscience Continued From Page 1B “It was obviously a big moment as my career goes and I had a lot going through my head. I would think about it all day, every day. It bothered me a lot. It was a toss up of emotions.” Barber knew what would happen if he reported the incident to the PGA Tour, but he couldn’t accept making the tour if it meant disregarding his morals. “I didn’t want to do something that was wrong,” Barber said. “I knew in my heart, for whatever reason, that I hit it. I had to make the situation right.” Barber said that it may delay his dream to make it to golf’s major leagues, but his dream is by no means dead. “I’m going to continue what I’ve been doing and playing in MGA events,” Barber said. “I hope to receive some sponsors’ exemptions and to get a couple of starts on the Web.com tour. Hopefully, I can play my way in if I continue to play sharp.” Barber won three of the five MGA events he entered last fall. “I was feeling comfortable and confident,” he said. “I know I can compete for my tour card, but I’m getting good competition in the meantime. I can do this and it’s close to being a reality.” And when Barber does make it to the tour, he said he’ll feel good about doing it the right way. “I know by God’s grace I’ll be successful,” he said. “Whether it’s two years or five years, I feel like it will happen. The short-term success wasn’t worth it to live with the guilt. There’s more to my life than golf and it won’t be what defines me even if it’s what I do for a living.” game. From now on, it’s win or go home.” On Suwannee’s following possession Charles Combs recovered a fumble and the Tigers again scored on their first offensive play. This time, it was Lonnie Underwood breaking free for a 29-yard score with 50 seconds remaining in the half. The Tigers picked up another fumble on the fol-lowing kickoff and used three plays to make the edge 34-0 going into the half. Barber hit Alex Weber from 11-yards out for his second touchdown pass of the game to give Columbia a 34-0 lead. “It was exciting to go out and play in our last regu-lar season home game,” Barber said. “To go out 4-0 against Suwannee is pretty special, but hopefully we still have another two or three home games. The last two games, we’ve only got to play a couple of quar-ters, but now it’s time to go into war and prepare for battles.” The second half brought on a running clock and Columbia used 29 and 28-yard field goals from Brent Nelson to close out the Bulldogs 40-0. In the end, it was about finishing the season on a right note and doing it for a player that has been a big part of a 9-1 regular season with Bartram Trail coming in for the first round of the 6A playoffs next week. “We set a goal at the beginning of the season to be district champions,” Allen said. “We did that. Secondly, we wanted to go 10-0, and we didn’t do that, but 9-1 is pretty dang good. Our third goal is to be state champions and that begins on Friday. It’s a win or go home situation and the thing I’m most proud of about this team is I’ve found out how much they love each other. They’ve seen a brother go down and I’ve seen the emotion from all them. I’ve had kids sobbing for their brother.” Columbia will continue to try to finish the mission for their brother at 7:30 p.m. against Bartram Trail on Friday. Tickets are on sale at McDuffie’s. CHS: Tigers win 5th straight bucket Continued From Page 1B Manziel, No. 15 Texas A&M stuns No. 1 Bama, 29-24Associated PressTUSCALOOSA, Ala. — Johnny Manziel and No. 15 Texas A&M shook-up the national championship race by beating No. 1 Alabama 29-24 on Saturday. The Aggies (8-2, 5-2 Southeastern Conference) also might have ended the league’s run of BCS titles at six years. The Crimson Tide (9-1, 6-1) didn’t go quietly. AJ McCarron nearly pulled off a second straight scintillating comeback. He threw one touchdown pass and motored the ball downfield before Deshazor Everett stepped in front of his fourth-down pass at the goal line with 1:36 left. Manziel passed for 253 yards and rushed for 92 and led the Aggies to a 20-0 first quarter lead. Alabama, the nation’s top scoring defense, forced a punt with less than a min-ute left, but was called for offsides, giving Texas A&M a first down and a chance to run out the clock. McCarron breathed new life into Alabama with a 54-yard touchdown pass down the left sideline to freshman Amari Cooper to make it 29-24 with 4:29 left.

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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 3B3BSPORTSTigers bully Bulldogs JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Ronald Timmons (23) escapes a tackle in order to ease into the end zone against Suwannee on Friday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High running back Braxton Stockton is seen on the field at Friday’s game against Suwannee. Stockton was sidelined due to an eye injury sustained during practi ce earlier this week. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Alex Weber (15) catches a Jayce Barb er pass for a touchdown against Suwannee High on Friday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High quarterback Jayce Barber (15) gets to thr ow a pass before a Suwannee High defender reaches him on Friday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Drew Clark (34) puts pressure on the Suwannee quarterback during Friday’s game. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Nathaniel Ayers (81) jogs into the end zone during the Tigers 40-0 win against Suwannee High.

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4B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04204BSports Indians are Paddle tested JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Michael Mulberry (4) runs the ball ag ainst Santa Fe High during a game on Thursday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High quarterback Andrew Baker (15) is taken down by a Santa Fe High defender while running the ball on a quarterback keeper on Thursday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White’s Kellen Snider (7) assists Shayne Newman (8 2) in tackling the Santa Fe quarterback on Thursday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Trey Phillips (5) drives down the fiel d against Santa Fe High. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White’s Michael Mulberry (4) runs the ball against Santa Fe during a game on Thursday.

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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 5B5BSports Tompkins takes over Lady TigersBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High is bringing in a new basketball coach for the Lady Tigers this season, but he’s no new face to the area. David Tompkins takes over after previously serv-ing as basketball coach at Richardson Middle School. “It’s very exciting for me,” Tompkins said. “I grew up here and have always been a basketball fan from play-ing growing up beginning with the boys’ club. I’m a Columbia graduate and it’s an honor to be given the chance.” Tompkins will coach his first game at Suwannee High at 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday. But the foundation for the season has already been laid. “What I like is that we started with conditioning early,” he said. “We have a lot of young girls that I’ve coached or coached against at Lake City Middle School. We’re building for the future and trying to establish a program.” Tompkins wants to be a model for consistency. “In the last few years, they’ve been through sev-eral coaches,” Tompkins said. “I’m trying to be the base for the coming years.” Tompkins said that he’s also trying to bring in boys’ coach Horace Jefferson, who formerly served as head coach of the Lady Tigers to help with the program. “We’re going to incorporate what he’s done,” he said. “We also have Mike Reynalds, who coached with Jefferson and he’s helping out tremendously. He’s been a real big help and I appreciate every-thing he’s done as well as Jefferson for his guidance.” The Lady Tigers will have three seniors in the start-ing lineup to go along with two sophomores. Stephanie Silva, Marnae Gaskins and Justice Campbell make up the old guard, while Lona Wilson and Akiria Richburgh make up the new blood. “Stephanie is going to be one of our key players in the post and one of our leaders,” Tompkins said. “Marnae lived away and just moved back. She’s got a lot of all-around potential. Justice has a lot of experi-ence. Lona, she’s a model leader and could be some-thing special. Richburgh, I coached for three years and she will start with the varsity for four years.” Tompkins also expects Sierra Vanderpool and Jasmine Robinson to be big contributors off the bench. Ashley Cordner, Pashen Williams, Arneranna Bryant, Elizabeth Saxon, Adrianna Young, Bernisha Clark and Alora Avery make up the remainder of the squad. Wolfson High will host the district tournament beginning on Jan. 28. St. Augustine High won the tournament last year and Stanton Prep and Lee high schools are also in the district. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Stephanie Silva dives for a loose bal l in a game last season. The Lady Tigers tip off the year on Tuesday. Tigers respond to adversityBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High head coach said that if his team could get two percent better each week that the Tigers would be where they need-ed to be heading into the playoffs. After a 40-0 win against Suwannee High in a game that marked the third shut-out in four weeks, the coach admitted that the Tigers are pretty close. Columbia held an opponent to negative yardage for the second time this season as the Bulldogs were held to -12 yards of offense. “We’re right there close to 100 percent,” Allen said. “I’m upset with a couple of series we had coming out in the first half where we didn’t execute and had some foolish mistakes including roughing a kicker. We were able to get into gear and force a couple of turnovers before the half, so I was pleased with that.” One thing that the Tigers have had to deal with this week is losing yet anoth-er starter for the season as Braxton Stockton went down with an eye injury. Quarterback Jayce Barber said the Tigers are not only playing for Stockton, but every Tiger that can’t con-tribute on the field anymore due to injury. “Coach Allen always says that a team that is talented and plays with emotion can’t be beat,” Barber said. “We have talent and we’re play-ing with emotion after what has happened to Braxton and Blake (Kuykendall), Jesse Stokes and Tyrone (Sands).” Allen said he was up front with his team after Stockton’s injury, one that could cost the running back his eye if the news doesn’t turn for the better. “I was extremely open with our kids,” Allen said. “I called a meeting on Wednesday before practice to let them know what’s going. I sat down with the kid that made the tackle to let him know that it’s not his fault, because he was feeling horrible. I’ve been around the game for years and never seen anything like it.” Allen said, the adversity will only help the Tigers come closer together. “We’re a family,” he said. “That’s how we break down. We’re only going to continue to grow in our bond. The community out-cry has been tremendous even from people that have never met Braxton. They don’t know how much of an affect they’re having. It’s great to see the community rally around us. It’s really helped him deal with it and the way he has responded has been unbelievable.” Homecoming hangover for UFBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comGAINESVILLE — For nearly a full 60 minutes it looked like the biggest upset in the history of Louisiana-Lafayette was on the horizon. Florida’s Jelani Jenkins returned a blocked punt 36 yards with two seconds remaining in the game to help No. 7 Florida pull off a 27-20 win against the Rajin’ Cajuns. Louisiana-Lafayette led 20-13 after a two-yard run from Alonzo Harris and Florida was without starting quarterback Jeff Driskel, who left the game with an ankle injury. Backup quarterback Jacoby Brissett helped rally the Gators in the final minutes of the game as Florida’s offense, which had been dormant all day, finally woke up. Brissett hit Jordan Reed on a 39-yard pass and Quinton Dunbar for a three-yard score to tie the game with 1:42 remaining in the contest. The game looked headed to overtime, but Loucheiz Purifoy came through to block the punt and Jenkins did the rest to save the Gators. “They executed it perfectly and I just happened to be in the right place at the right time,” Jenkins said. “I was surprised I happened to be there, but it came right to me and I just tried to run as fast as I could.” It was a play to help the Gators overcome a other-wise forgettable performance after finishing up SEC play at 7-1. “We overcome adversity,” Purifoy said. “That’s what we do.” Florida hopes not to have the same type of adversity next week when Jacksonville State visits. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFlorida defensive back Marcus Roberson (5) breaks up a pass intended for Louisianna-Lafayette wide receiver Jam al Robinson (15) Saturday at the Ben Hill Griffin Stadium i n Gainesville. Florida won 27-20.

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Hall of Fame Drive, Lake City, FL 386-719-2540 JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Fort White Highs players bust through a banner during the Battle for the Paddle on Friday. Another paddling By TIM KIRBY tkirby@lakecityreporter.com ALACHUA The Battle for the Paddle trophy has been in Fort White so long it is beginning to grow roots. Fort White High beat host Santa Fe High, 22-7, in the annual matchup to determine football domina tion on either side of the Santa Fe River. It is the eighth straight win for Fort White in the series. They understand, Fort White head coach Demetric Jackson said. It means a lot to our team. We needed a big victory and we need the momentum. Im proud of the effort. They kept fight ing and pulled the victory out. It was big for us. Despite the look of a mis match with Fort White play off bound at 5-4 and Santa Fe playing out the string at 1-8, it was a 10-7 game after three quarters. The Indians took over down the stretch, scor ing two touchdowns in the fourth quarter. The first came on an eight-play, 88yard drive and the other on a quick strike by Trey Phillips from 41 yards out. It was the hat-trick touch down for Phillips, who rushed for 244 yards. Fort White missed chanc es to pull away early from the Raiders. Michael Mulberry returned the opening kick off 64 yards to the Santa Fe 21. The Indians had a first-and-goal at the 10, but settled for a 21-yard field goal by Nathan Escalante. Melton Sanders snagged his second interception of the season on Santa Fes first series and returned it 16 yards to midfield. Andrew Baker threw to Phillips over the middle for a 42-yard gainer and another first-and goal. This time, the Raiders defended the end zone on four plays. The Raiders punched the ball out to their 27, then punted to Fort Whites 39. Phillips blasted up the middle for 56 yards. Fort White cashed in on this firstand-goal with Phillips scoring from one yard out. Escalante added the extra point. Fort White forced a quick punt and was poised to score again after Sanders returned the kick 26 yards to the Raiders 25. The Indians turned the ball over on downs. The Raiders again gave themselves some breathing room, but came up short on fourth down at the Fort White 29. Fort White fumbled the ball away on first down and Santa Fe struck in two plays from 32 yards out. Damian Johnson carried two times, once for 12 yards and again for 20 and the touchdown. Dakota Garcia tacked on the PAT with 3:18 left in the half. The teams traded posses sions the rest of the second quarter and throughout the third quarter. Baker hit Mulberry on a 37-yard pass play mid way through the quarter, but the drive stalled on four plays from the Raiders 14. When Fort White got the ball back at the start of the fourth quarter, Jackson was through fooling around. I said lets just run it, Jackson said. We can do that. The Indians did, scoring the final two touchdowns along the way. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Fort White Highs Trey Phillips (5) throws a ball into the air after a touchdown against Santa Fe High. Proud moment for father, coach By TIM KIRBY tkirby@lakecityreporter.com ALACHUA Fort White High senior Trey Phillips is subject to more scruti ny than from coaches and fans. Phillips dad, Isiah Phillips, is a long-time coach for the Indians. In an interview before the season started, Trey said it was great to grow up around football but there were drawbacks. You know what to do and what to expect, Trey said. Sometimes you get those nights where he is still going on about that play. As a coach Isiah is reluc tant to talk about his son, but Treys performance against Santa Fe led dad to break his silence. Trey carried the ball 21 times for a 244 yards and scored all three of Fort Whites touchdowns. Phillips also had one reception for 42 yards. Trey was pressed into tailback duties from his receiver position, plus he played on the defensive side in a new spot. We had to move him to tailback and he played line backer, too, Coach Phillips said. They are both new positions for him. He just wants to win. He said put me wherever you need me to play. Treys three touchdowns gave him 11 on the season and he leads the Indians in scoring with the 66 points. He is the leading receiv er for the Indians with 37 catches for 488 yards. He now has 60 carries for 430 yards. Trey also has four wins over Santa Fe, a game he told teammates this week at practice was one of the most important games of the year. He didnt want to give up the paddle his senior year, Coach Phillips said. It was a team effort. He told his offensive linemen to give him a crease and he would run hard. They did, and he did with the highest single-game rushing total at Fort White in Treys four years on he varsity. One more thing. Im proud of him, Coach Phillips said.

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1CBIZ FRONT ON BUSINESS Jerry Osteryoung (850) 644-3372 jostery@comcast.net If you want one year of prosperity, grow grain. If you want 10 years of prosperity, grow trees. If you want 100 years of prosperity, grow people. Chinese Proverb E very business should have suc cession plans for its key person nel as part of its overall strategic plan. It is critical to identify personnel vulnerabilities and deter mine how you might over come them. It is so easy to ignore these issues, but doing so puts the firm in a very precarious position. I was helping a firm that had lost a key executive to an unexpected illness. When I was called in, the Planning to replace key people is needed Lake City Reporter 1CBIZ FRONT Week of Nov. 11 Nov. 17 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section C Columbia, Inc. Your marketplace source for Lake City and Columbia County 1CColumbia Inc. $ 15 $ 15 Two Medium 2-topping Pizzas, an order of our NEW Flavored Howie Bread, one Free Dipping Sauce and a 2-Liter! Two for or 59 each NEW DIPPING SAUCES Jalapeno Cheese, Garlic Butter, Bleu Cheese, Ranch, BBQ & Pizza Sauce $ 1 FLAVORED BREADS: Garlic Herb Sesame Ranch Onion Cajun Plus sales tax. Delivery Extra. Limited time offer. Plus sales tax. Delivery Extra. Limited time offer. $ 12 $ 10 PIZZA & WINGS PICK TWO Medium 1-Topping Pizza, Small Oven Baked Sub, 8 Piece Wings, Any Medium Salad or Baked Pasta FT. WHITE 7905 S.W. Hwy 27 corner of Hwy. 27 & Hwy. 47 inside the B&B Food Store 497-1484 CARRY-OUT ONLY LAKE CITY 5735 SW State Rd. 247 corner of SR 242 & SR 247 inside the B&B Food Store 752-3111 CARRY-OUT ONLY LAKE BUTLER 280 West Main St. next to Mercantile Bank 496-2878 CARRY-OUT ONLY LIVE OAK 6852 Suwanee Plaza Ln. In Walmart Plaza 330-0331 CARRYOUT ONLY LAKE CITY 857 Southwest Main Blvd. in Lake City Plaza 755-7050 DELIVERY CARRYOUT 21645_LCReporter_11/12/12 Plus sales tax. Limited time offer LARGE PIZZA Cheese or Pepperoni Any Specialty Carry-out Veggie, Howie Maui, Meat Eaters or Works Additional toppings available Large 1-Topping Pizza PLUS 8 Wings, Cajun Bread and Dipping Sauce PLAN continued on 2C $1 million for children By DEREK GILLIAM dgilliam@lakecityreporter.com A local company has surpassed $1 million in fundraising efforts for the Childrens Miracle Network and Shands Hospital for Children. Employees and custom ers at S&S Food Stores and Scaffs Markets have raised a combined total of $1,037,914. The fundraising efforts began back in 1987, Keith Brown, vice-presi dent of marketing, said. Tracy Duranty, man ager of the S&S Food Store near the Columbia County fairgrounds, has first-hand experience with the Childrens Miracle net work. Her daughter gave birth to a little girl who weighed 2 pounds, 3 ounc es and was 14 inches long. Izabella Wagner spent the first seven weeks of her life in the hospital. Shes now 2 years old. Every year in February, the Childrens Miracle Network gives a presen tation at the employee award luncheon. Duranty said until she went through her ordeal she didnt really understand the importance of the fundraising efforts that have been a staple of S&S for 25 years. I didnt understand what they were talking about, Duranty said. I didnt know what a draft bed was. After Izabellas birth, COURTESY PHOTO Kali Wagner visits with her newborn daughter, Izabella, who weighed just 2 pounds, 3 ounces at birth. Now 2 years old, Izabella benefited from funding provided by Childrens Miracle Network, which coincidentally is a major recipient of funds raised by S&S Food Stores, where her grandmother, Tracy Duranty works as a store manager. S&S Food Stores, Scaffs Markets exceeds target. FUNDS continued on 3C

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firm was reeling from the loss of this very well-liked executive. In addition to the staff’s grief, the business was in dire straights as they had been unable to find a replacement. Without someone to take over, the executive’s work fell to his staff who lacked the necessary experience. As a result, the profitability of firm fell dramatically. Had this firm had a succession plan in place, they would have been in a much better position. Succession planning must address the loss of key staff members both in the event they pass away suddenly or become significantly incapacitated and in the event they simply retire. The difference between these two situations, of course, is how much time you have to find a replacement. There are two general ways a business can work through the unexpected loss of key personnel. One way would be to ensure that the remaining staff is able to pick up the slack. That way, the business can keep moving forward until a replacement is found either by promotion or a new hire. A second alternative would be to hire someone who can come in and fill the role on a temporary basis. There are many firms out there that specialize in locating temporary CEOs or CFOs. When planning for the retirement of a key executive, you can take one of two approaches. Firstly, you can groom a successor in advance so they are ready to step in once the executive steps down. This plan should involve providing any requisite training and experience. If the firm is small, however, providing the necessary training may be cost prohibitive. In the event grooming an internal candidate is not a feasible option, the business can hire a replacement in advance of the retirement, which would allow the successor an opportunity to work alongside the executive, thereby helping ensure a smooth transition. Of course, as with all hiring decisions, a significant amount of time and money should be invested in finding the right person for the key position. 2C LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF NOVEMBER 11, 2012 2CBIZ/MOTLEY Q FSU Finance Professor Dr. Jerry Osteryoung is Executive Director of the Jim Moran Institute for Global Entrepreneurship at Florida State University’s College of Business. PLAN: Business succession.Continued From Page 1D Fears about flood-damaged cars flooding market not warrantedBy TOM KRISHERAssociated PressDETROIT — In the days since Superstorm Sandy, an alarming prediction has flashed across the Internet: Hundreds of thousands of flood-damaged vehicles will inundate the nation’s used-car market, and buy-ers might not be told which cars have been marred. Not true, according to insurance-claims data reviewed by The Associated Press. The actual number of affected vehicles is far smaller, and some of those cars will be repaired and kept by their owners. The dire predictions are being spread by a company that sells vehicle title and repair histories and by the larg-est group representing American car dealers. They claim the number of cars damaged by Sandy could be larger than when Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast in 2005 and marred more than 600,000 vehicles. But an AP analy-sis of claims data supplied by major insurance compa-nies shows the number of cars reported damaged so far is a fraction of that. The companies ‚ State Farm, Progressive, New Jersey Manufacturers, Nationwide and USAA ‚ have received about 38,000 car-damage claims. “It’s not anything near what we’re talking about in the Katrina situation,” said James Appleton, president of the New Jersey Coalition of Automotive Retailers, a statewide association of more than 500 dealers. Frank Scafidi, a spokesman for the National Insurance Crime Bureau, an insurance company group that monitors fraud and other trends, concurred, saying insurers watched by his group are logging far fewer claims than they did with Katrina. “It doesn’t translate to there’s going to be 2, 3, 400,000 cars out of this thing just because this is such a huge geographic storm,” Scafidi said. Other large insurers, such as Farmers, Allstate, Geico and Liberty Mutual, either did not return calls or declined to release claims information. Because many communities are still cleaning up from the superstorm, more claims are bound to come in. But the total is not likely to grow significantly. Ten days after Sandy, the rate of claim submissions is already starting to slow. And many of those cars will have relatively minor damage unrelated to water, meaning they can be fixed and returned to their own-ers. About 14,000 new cars were also damaged by Sandy while they sat on docks in the New York area awaiting shipment to dealers. But most of those vehicles won’t end up on sales lots. Automakers will have severely damaged cars crushed because they don’t want their brand name hurt by substandard vehicles circulating in the marketplace. To be sure, flood-damaged cars can be a serious problem. Once a vehicle is dried out, the damage may not be immediately appar-ent, so the car can often be sold to an unsuspecting buyer. ASSOCIATED PRESSCars are submerged at the entrance to a parking garage in New York after superstorm Sandy. Alarming claims that flood-damaged cars from Sandy will inundate the used ca r market aren’t backed up by insurance company claim da ta, The Associated Press has found.

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LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF NOVEMBER 11, 2012 3CWorld worried about US fiscal cliffThe Associated PressWorld stocks mostly fell Friday as fears persisted over the so-called U.S. “fiscal cliff” that’s seen as a big threat to the economic recovery. By midafternoon in Europe, Britain’s FTSE 100 index of lead-ing companies was down 0.5 per-cent at 5,749.88 while Germany’s DAX was 1.2 percent lower at 7,120.13. The CAC-40 in France slipped 0.3 percent to 3,397.53. Asian indexes closed lower but U.S. stocks eked out some gains on the open. The Dow was up 0.1 percent to 12,826 while the broader S&P 500 gained 0.3 percent to 1,381.41. Markets slumped worldwide this week as investors refocused on challenges to the world econ-omy following President Barack Obama’s re-election. Many worry that gridlock in Washington will prevent the president and Congress from reaching a deal before $800 bil-lion of tax increases and govern-ment spending cuts kicks in on Jan. 1. Investors also have renewed fears about Europe’s lingering debt crisis. European Central Bank President Mario Draghi warned that the economy of the 17 nation grouping that uses the euro remains weak and will struggle to grow even with “visi-bly improved” confidence among the currency union’s financial markets. Those fears offset somewhat upbeat indicators in China that provided signs of a possible recovery in the world’s second-largest economy. The latest data showed that Chinese factory output rose, investment growth strengthened and inflation eased in October. Japan’s Nikkei 225 index fell 0.9 percent to close at 8,757.60 and Hong Kong’s Hang Seng shed 0.9 percent to end at 21,384.38. South Korea’s Kospi retreated 0.5 percent to 1,904.41. The Shanghai Composite Index closed down 0.1 percent to 2,069.07 and the Shenzhen Composite Index edged 0.4 per-cent lower to 828.46. Australia’s S&P ASX 200 dropped 0.5 percent to 4,462.00 after the central bank released a downbeat assessment of the country’s economy. Australian stocks fell after the country’s central bank said in a quarterly report it was trim-ming growth forecasts as min-ing companies scale back invest-ment plans because of declining iron ore and coal prices and the strong currency. In currencies, the euro weakened to $1.2712 from to $1.2750 late Thursday. The dollar was roughly unchanged against the Japanese yen at 79.31 yen. Crude oil for December delivery was up 20 cents to $85.29 in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. The contract rose 65 cents to close at $85.09 on Thursday. Duranty’s daughter Kali Wagner was exhausted. She couldn’t stand. Her daughter was too fragile to hold, and if it weren’t for the Children’s Miracle Network it may have been days before she could have seen her daughter. Hospital staff wheeled Kali Wagner up to a draft bed, lowered the bed, and raised the lid. There was her daughter. “The equipment that Children’s Miracle Network provides, it’s amazing to me,” she said. She said she saw a plaque with the S&S logo naming the company as one of the major supporters of the network. “It made me feel proud and determined to raise more money,” she said. She posted her daughter’s and granddaughter’s story next to the familiar fundrais-ing collection buckets. The story touched some people and her store raised $5,000, the most in the company. Brown said the company expects to exceed $60,000 this year. Lester Scaff, president and CEO of S&S, said Shand’s Hospital serves many people in the area. “There are so many people who have been touched in this area by Shands,” he said. FUNDS: Old goal reached. Continued From Page 1A By DAVID McHUGHand DON MELVINAssociated PressFRANKFURT, Germany — The worst of Europe’s financial crisis appears to be over. European leaders have taken steps to ease the panic that has plagued the region for three turbulent years. Financial markets are no longer in a state of emergency over Europe’s high government debts and weak banks. And this gives politicians from the 17 countries that use the euro breathing room to fix their remaining problems. Threats remain in Greece and Spain, and Europe’s economy is fore-cast to get worse before it gets better. But an imminent breakup of the euro now seems unlikely, analysts say. “We are probably well beyond the worst,” says Holger Schmieding, chief economist at Berenberg Bank in London. He says occasional flare-ups in financial markets are likely, but “coming waves of turmoil will be less severe.” Evidence that Europe has turned a corner can be found in countries’ falling borrowing costs, rising stock markets and a slow but steady sta-bilization of the region’s banking system: — The interest rates investors are demanding to lend to struggling countries such as Spain and Italy have plunged — a sign that inves-tors are less fearful about defaults. Spain’s two-year bonds carry an interest rate, or yield, of just under 3 percent — down from a July 24 peak of 6.6 percent. Italy’s bond yields have dropped just as sharply. — The Stoxx 50 index of leading European shares has surged 26 per-cent since June 1, while the euro has risen from $1.26 to $1.29 over the same period. — After months of withdrawals, deposits are trickling back into Greek and Spanish banks, signaling that fears of their imminent finan-cial collapse are abating. And U.S. money market mutual funds loaned 16 percent more to eurozone banks in September. That was the third straight monthly increase in short-term funding to European banks, and follows a 70 percent reduction since May 2011. More proof the crisis is easing: Gatherings of European financial ministers no longer cause global stock and bond markets to gyrate with every sign of progress or a setback. As financial-market panic recedes, euro leaders have more time to try to fix the flaws in their currency union. Among the challenges are reducing regulations and other costs for businesses in order to stimu-late economic growth, and imposing more centralized authority over bud-gets to prevent countries from ever again spending beyond their means. That’s important because a major cause of the crisis was Greece’s over-spending during the calm years after the euro’s introduction in 1999, and Italy’s failure to cut the high levels of debt it joined with. Other govern-ments — such as Spain and Ireland — were saddled with debt piled up by banks and real estate developers during boom years. Much of the credit for easing Europe’s financial crisis goes to the European Central Bank, which has become more aggressive over the past year under the leadership of Mario Draghi. The ECB said Sept. 6 that it was willing to buy unlimited amounts of government bonds issued by coun-tries struggling to pay their debts. The ECB’s pledge instantly lowered borrowing costs for Spain and Italy, which earlier in the year had faced the same kinds of financial pressures that forced Ireland, Greece and Spain to seek bailouts. “Financial market confidence has visibly improved,” Draghi said Thursday during a press confer-ence. The ECB’s actions are reminiscent of some of the emergency steps the Federal Reserve took after the U.S. financial crisis struck in 2007. The Fed offered banks cheap loans, cut short-term interest rates to record lows and started buying bonds to ease long-term borrowing rates and boost the confidence of consumers and businesses. The Fed couldn’t prevent the United States from enduring its worst recession since the Great Depression. But its actions defused panic in the financial markets and helped restore the health of U.S. banks. German Chancellor Angela Merkel has also helped ease financial ten-sions across Europe by speaking more forcefully about the need to hold the euro together. Merkel’s support is critical because Germany, the eurozone’s largest economy, has the most at stake financially in any bailouts. Merkel has backed the ECB’s bond-buying plan and has made concilia-tory statements toward Greece. That has paved the way for the socalled troika of international lenders — the ECB, the European Union and the International Monetary Fund — to allow Greece more time to meet deficit-reduction targets. The Greek Parliament took a big step Wednesday toward securing its next batch of rescue loans from the troika by approving a new round of tax hikes and spending cuts. Another key breakthrough in the financial crisis came in late June, when leaders meeting in Brussels took new steps to steady banks and governments. They agreed to ease up somewhat on austerity demands; to use bailout funds to buy govern-ment bonds and help ailing banks; and to create a single supervisor for all of Europe’s banks. Some analysts worry that as the financial pressure eases Europe’s leaders could lose their recent momentum. A breakup of the euro “is still possible,” says Marie Diron, senior economic adviser to Ernst & Young. “I don’t think we have removed the risk altogether.” Europe’s leaders have big challenges left. The most pressing is saving Greece. If the country was forced into a default and began printing its own currency, investors would assume other countries might go next and begin pulling their money out of those countries too, or demand higher returns to keep it there. The coming months could severely test Germany’s new willingness to help. Despite two bailouts totaling 240 billion ($311.3 billion) since 2010, Greece needs an estimated 30 bil-lion more from the other eurozone countries as its economy shrinks. Berenberg’s Schmieding thinks there’s a 25 percent chance that Greece will leave the euro in the next six months, if its parliament balks at painful austerity measures and euro members are reluctant to provide more help. But he thinks a Greek departure would cause “only temporary damage.” ASSOCIATED PRESSA currency trader watches monitors in front of screens sh owing the Korea Composite Stock Price Index and foreign exchange rate at the foreign exchange dealing room of the Korea Exchange Bank headquarters in Seoul, South Korea, on Thursday. South Korea’s Kospi dropped 1.1 9 percent at 1,914.43 as world markets reacted to concerns about the United States’ ability to solve its pend ing financial difficulties. ASSOCIATED PRESSGerman Chancellor Angela Merkel (center) speaks with European Central Bank President Mario Draghi (left) and Italian Prime Minister Mario Monti during a round table meeting at a EU Summit in Brussels in June. The worst of Europe’s financial crisis appears to be over. European leaders have taken steps to ease the panic that has plagued the region for three turbulent y ears. After 3 bumpy years, Europe turns corner on financial crisisUS trade deficit narrows to $41.5B, lowest in two yearsMARTIN CRUTSINGERAssociated PressWASHINGTON — The U.S. trade deficit declined to the lowest level in nearly two years because exports rose to a record high. The gain may not last given the global economic slowdown. Still, the narrower trade deficit could lead the gov-ernment to revise its July-September economic growth estimate slightly higher than the 2 percent annual rate reported last month. That’s because U.S. companies earned more from overseas sales while consumers and businesses spent less on foreign prod-ucts. The deficit narrowed to $41.5 billion in September, the Commerce Department said Thursday. That is 5.1 percent below the August deficit and the smallest imbalance since December 2010. Exports climbed 3.1 percent to an all-time high of $187 billion. That followed two monthly declines and reflected stronger sales of commercial aircraft, heavy machinery and farm goods. Imports rose 1.5 percent to $228.5 billion. An increase in consumer goods drove the gain, including shipments of the new Apple iPhone5. Higher oil pric-es also contributed to the gain. Economists cautioned that the increase in exports may only be temporary. One reason is soybean exports rose 32 percent in September from August, in part because of a jump in prices linked to the sum-mer drought. “More generally, export growth has slowed by more than import growth as the weak global backdrop has taken its toll,” said Paul Dales, senior U.S. economist at Capital Economics. “So while these data may boost third-quarter ... growth by a couple of tenths of a percent, further ahead net exports may not add anything to growth.” Europe’s debt crisis and slower global growth in emerging markets had weakened demand for U.S. goods overseas in the previ-ous months. That subtract-ed from economic growth in the third quarter. Exports to the 27-nation European Union were unchanged in September from August. Exports to Latin America grew 4.2 percent, although exports to Brazil declined. Brazil is South America’s biggest economy. So far this year, the U.S. deficit is running at an annu-al rate of $554 billion, slight-ly below last year’s $559.9 billion imbalance. The U.S. deficit with China increased to $29.1 billion in September. It is running 6.8 percent ahead of last year’s record pace. America’s deficit with China last year was the highest imbalance ever recorded with a single country. The widening trade gap with China has heightened trade tensions between the two countries. Many have complained that China’s trade practices are unfair. American manufacturers say China has kept the yuan undervalued against the U.S. dollar. A lower valued yuan makes Chinese goods cheaper for U.S. consum-ers and American products more expensive in China.

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDSUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 Classified Department: 755-5440 4C CLASSIFIED AD vantageTake ADvantage of the Reporter Classifieds!755-5440Lake City Reporter FIND IT SELL IT BUY IT $17504 lines 3 days Includes 2 Signs Each additional line $1.65 Garage Sale Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$10104 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.10One item per ad Under $500 Personal Merchandise Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$16754 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.15One item per ad Under $1,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$23704 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.45One item per ad Under $2,500 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $4,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$27404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.55One item per ad Under $4,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$30404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.65One item per ad Under $6,000 Placing An Ad Service Guide Limited to service type advertis-ing only.4 lines, one month....$92.00 $10.80 each additional lineIncludes an additional $2.00 per ad for each Wednesday insertion. DeadlinesBe Sure to Call Early You can call us at 755-5440 Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.Some people prefer to place their classified ads in person, and some ad categories will require prepay-ment. Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street.You can also fax or email your ad copy to the Reporter.FAX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the Classified Department.EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreporter.comAd is to Appear:TuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday Call by:Mon., 10:00 a.m.Mon., 10:00 a.m.Wed., 10:00 a.m.Thurs., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fax/Email by:Mon., 9:00 a.m.Mon., 9:00 a.m.Wed., 9:00 a.m.Thurs., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.These deadlines are subject to change without notice. Cancellations, Changes & Billing Questions Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject, or classify all advertisements under appropriate headings. Copy should be checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day of pub-lication. Credit for published errors will be allowed for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement which was incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be published, nor for any general, special or consequential damages. Advertising language must comply with Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition of discrimi-nation in employment, housing and public accommodations. Standard abbreviations are acceptable; how-ever, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated. Ad Errors-Please read your ad on the first day of publication. Weaccept responsibility for only the first incorrect insertion, and only the charge for the ad space in error. Please call 755-5440 immediately for prompt correc-tion and billing adjustments.CancellationsNormal advertising deadlines apply for cancellation.Billing InquiriesCall 755-5440. Should further information be required regarding payments or credit limits, your call will be trans-ferred to the accounting depart-ment. General Information In Print and Onlinewww.lakecityreporter.com Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$2504 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $.25One item per ad Under $100 ADJUNCT INSTRUCTORS SPRING TERM 2013COMPUTER SCIENCE Energetic, outgoing, and detail oriented candidates needed to fill adjunct Computer Science Instructor position. Must be able to TEACH ON CAMPUS during the day. Master’s Degree in Computer Science or related educational/instructional technology field required. Email resume/ transcripts to Pamela. carswell@fgc.edu ENGLISH English adjunct needed to teach during the day. Master’s in English required or 18 graduate hours in English plus master’s in related area. Contact Tim Moses at tim.moses@ fgc.edu HISTORY History adjunct needed to teach during the day. Master’s in History required or 18 graduate hours in History plus master’s in related area. Contact Tim Moses at tim.moses@fgc.edu NURSING CLINICAL BSN Required. Master’s degree in nursing preferred. At least two years of recent clinical experience required. Contact Mattie Jones at 386-754-4368 or mattie.jones@fgc.edu. DEVELOPMENTAL MATHEMATICS Bachelor’s degree in mathematics, engineering, secondary mathematics education, or other related field. Requirements include morning and/or early afternoon availability for on-campus courses. Contact Carrie Rodesiler at 386.754.4413 or carrie.rodesiler@fgc.edu for more information.College application and copies of transcripts required. All foreign transcripts must be submitted with a translation and evaluation. Application available at www.fgc.eduFGC is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools VP/ADA/EA/EO College in Education & Employment LegalNOTICE OFPUBLIC SALE: Notice is hereby given that on 11/28/2012 at 08:30 am the following vehicle(s) will be sold at public auction for monies owed on vehicle repairs and for storage costs pursuant to Florida Statutes, Section 713.585. The lie-nor’s name, address and telephone number and auction location are: JIM’.S AUTO SERVICE 2550 SWMAIN BLVD. LAKE CITY, FL32025, 386-752-7305. Please note, parties claiming interest have a right to a hearing prior to the date of sale with the Clerk of the Court as re-flected in the notice. The owner has the right to recover possession of the vehicle with judicial proceedings as pursuant to Florida Statue Section 559.917. Any proceeds recovered from the sale of the vehicle over the amount of the lien will be deposited with the Clerk of the Court for dispo-sition upon court order.1B7GL23Y1SS1282901995 DODGE05535759NOVEMBER 11, 2012 The Columbia County Local Mitiga-tion Strategy working group will meet on Monday, November 19, 2012 at 9 a.m. The meeting will be held at the Columbia County Emer-gency Operations Center, 263 NWLake City Avenue, Lake City, FL32055.The purpose of this meeting is to re-view and select potential projects to be pursued using the Hazard Mitiga-tion Grant Program (HMGP) Fund-ing.The public is invited to attend this meeting.05535712November 11, 18, 2012 020Lost & Found LOSTSmall Reward Diamond Pendant from necklace. Stopped at following locations: Dr. Gonzales, N.F. Pharm., Dr. Charles, Ruby Tuesdays, Diamond Nails general areas, Contact 386-752-0593 100Job Opportunities05534241NOWHIRING Cashiers & Baggers forHigh Springs fruit & gift stores. Benefits avail: health, dental, & vacation. Apply in person: Florida Citrus Center(Chevron) 18603 NWCR 236, High Springs (exit 404 & I-75) 05535697Seeking experienced applicants for Bridge/Structural Concrete crew positions. Positions open; Bridge Carpenter, Formsetter, Concrete Finisher. Rigging and light operator experience is a plus. Work area will be Central North Florida thru Big Bend.” You may apply at 841 NW Guerdon Street, Lake City, FL 32056, fax your resume to 386-755-9132 or visit website at www.andersoncolumbia.com. CDLClass A Truck Driver Flatbed exp. for F/TSE area. 3 years exp or more. Medical benefits offered. Contact Melissa or Sandy@ 386-935-2773 100Job OpportunitiesDental Hygienist: Golden Opportunity! Full time, Part time, Fill in, we have a great opportunity waiting for you! An immediate opening has just come up! That’s great news in this job market! If you have a friendly can-do attitude, a gentle touch, a great work ethic, you are orgainized, and self motivated with a god sense of humor, then you should apply. Call 888-486-2408 to hear a message with more details about the position and instructions on how to apply for this position in Madison, FL. Great benefits! Experienced Servers and Cooks Only need apply. Must be available: days, nights, weekends, and holidays. Apply in person I HOP, Lak City Drivers: All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-ACDLFlatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down CALL: 888-880-5916 SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 120Medical Employment05535629LAKE BUTLER HOSPITAL F/T ADON/RN Must be Florida Licensed Management Experience Preferred. PHYSICALTHERAPIST Will be required to evaluate and treat a variety of diagnoses/post surgical conditions in a hospital/swing-bed and out patient setting. Hand experience preferred /not required. Serious inquiries only. For further information, please visit our website: www.lakebutlerhospital.com (386) 496-2323 EXT9258, FAX (386) 496-9399 Equal Employment Opportunity / Drug & Tobacco Free Workplace 05535706Dietary Aide Laundry Attendant Avalon Healthcare Center is currently accepting applications for the part time positions of Dietary Aide and Laundry Attendant Please apply at Avalon Healthcare and Rehabilitation Center. 1270 S.W. Main Blvd. Lake City, Florida 32025 or fax resume to 386-752-8556 EOE 05535742RN/LPN/C.N.A Full Time RN Unit Manager Avalon Healthcare Center is currently accepting applications for the part time positions of RN/LPN/C.N.Aand Full Time RN Unit Manager Please apply at Avalon Healthcare and Rehabilitation Center. 1270 S.W. Main Blvd. Lake City, Florida 32025 or fax resume to 386-752-8556 EOE 05535750RN OncologyFast paced Oncology Hematology practice currently seeking a permanent, full time ONCOLOGYINFUSION RN to work in outpatient chemotherapy at their Lake City location. Work schedule M-F, 8am-5pm. Please send resume with salary req. to jsmith@ccofnf.com. Resumes without salary req. will not be considered. Busy Family Practice Office seeks F/TNursing Personnel Must be Motivated and Organized Office Experience Preferred Fax Resume to (386) 719-9494. Giebeig Family Medicine Exp. CAPor Licensed Mental Health Professional for counseling and assessments in an outpatient SAtreatment program. Ref. Req'd. PT Email resume to bsmith@itmflorida.com 240Schools & Education05535484Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class12/24/2012• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-11/05/12• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 05535592Interested in a Security Officer Career? North Florida Firearms Training Center Lic# DS8900001 Offers•Instruction for Class “D” Security Officer License in Lake City, 40 hr course.•Security Officer Class “D” License Training Certification $120.00. Fees incl. application instructions, books, supplies, exam, next class 11/12/12. Call 386-984-5530 310Pets & Supplies PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 330Livestock & SuppliesDeep Creek Farms Barn kept Square or Net Wrapped Round Hay Bales For Sale Ronnie Hughes (386)365-1425 408Furniture Beautiful Over Stuffed Sleeper Sofa, Queen Size, Nice Floral Print. Like New. $125. Contact Jeanne 386-288-8898 Queen-Size Cherry Wood Bdrm Set. Lrg Dresser w/ Mirror, Headboard, Nightstand,BoxSpring/Mattress &Metal Rails. $700 OBO. Can email pics. (386) 397-2389 430Garage Sales PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 440Miscellaneous All Children are artists! Ages 2-10 Fall Session Receive $10 off tuition October 22nd Nov. 16th Phone: (386) 438-8060 Noahs-art.com *located across the highway from Honda ANYONE WANTING AMeat: Chicken or Duck, around 7 or 8 lbs ready now for Thanksgiving. We will dress chicken, Quail, or Pheasants. For Hunters have good flying Pheasant. RSVPfor 1st Sat. of Dec. for Pheasant shooting call for tickets available 754-9127 450Good Things to EatThe Nut Cracker Robert Taylor Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans 2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024 Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville 386-963-4138 or 961-1420 460Firewood Free Oak Firewood Need to brings your own gloves to gather the wood. Contact 935-2461 630Mobile Homes forRent14 x70 MH.Real clean,2br/2ba garden tub,Water furn.,Good Location $575 mo. $300 dep. No Pets 386-755-0064 or (904) 771-5924 2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $450. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 2/1 SW US 90 W, LC,Remodeled, lg yard, porch, quiet area. 1st mth $575 & $500 dep. No pets. 386752-1941 or 965-0932 Efficency Apt and Rv Lots for Rent. Between Lake City & G’ville. Access to I-75 & 441 (352)317-1326. Call for terms. 630Mobile Homes forRent2/2 Screened porch, Lg. lot, in very nice, clean, well maintained, safe, small park, credit/background check, no pets, really nice place to live, with long term tenants, $485 mo., $485 sec. dep. 386-719-9169 or 386-965-3003. Mobile Homes for rent in White Springs & Ft. White. Contact 386-623-3404 Move-in Special 1st mth Free, 1, 2 or 3bdrm $350/mth. $450 to m/i. Call today m/i tomorrow. 305-984-5511 or 386-344-0830 Newer2/2. Super clean on 1 ac North by distribution center. Perfect for Target employee. $550. mo Call for details. 386-867-9231 Quiet Country Park 3br/2ba $525. Very clean NO PETS! References & Deposit required 386-758-2280 WATERTOWN AREA 3br/2ba DW, Handicap accessible, $650 mth, $500 dep. Call 386-344-0144, 386-344-5791 640Mobile Homes forSale575 Credit Score=10% Down on your choice of select New 3/2 or 4/2 Double. Limited time offer for Challenged Credit. North Pointe Homes, 352-872-5566 NEW3/2JACOBSEN HOMES Starting at $43,995. Painted WAlls-Del-Set-AC-Skirting-and Steps. North Pointe Homes Hwy 441 N, Gainesville, FL 352-872-5566 NEWJacobsen Model Homes Sale! 13 Left with up to $25,000 off. Don’t buy until you shop North Pointe Homes 4545 NW 13th St Gainesville 352-872-5566 Own YourProperty? No Money Down with good credit. Great Rates Available. North Pointe Homes 352-872-5566 Palm Harbor Homes 4/2 From 499 Mo Loaded3/2 From 399 Mo Loaded $0 Down, Singlewides $299/Mo 800-622-2832 ext 210 Several Bank Repos and Used Homes in stock At North Pointe in Gainesville 352-872-5566 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05535481We’ve got it all!$89 Deposit Limited Avail. Call Today! Windsong Apts. *Free afterschool program386-758-8455 1BR APT. Downtown Location, Clean. New Carpet $450 mo, plus Security. NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456 2BR/1BA$600/MO & $575 Sec. Dep. Lovely, Private, re-done CR 242 West of RT47 386-365-7193 or 867-6319 2br/1ba Apt. Quiet Lake View CH/A$500. mo $500 dep. No pets. 386-344-2170 2BR/2BAw/garage 5 minutes from VAhospital and Timco. Call for details. 386-365-5150 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Brandywine Apartments Now Renting 1, 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-752-3033 W. Grandview Ave. Equal Housing Opportunity TDD Number 1-800-955-8771 Brandywine Apartments Now Renting 1, 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-752-3033 W. Grandview Ave. Equal Housing Opportunity BRANFORD VILLAS 386-935-2319 2br/1ba Apts. Now available. $570. mo. Equal Housing Opportunity Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Updated Apt, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 720Furnished Apts. ForRentRooms forRent Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent2BD /1.5BA Country, South of Lake City, private river access. w/boat ramp, 2 garages, clean, $625 mo. + sec. 386-590-0642 2BR, 1/2 acre, Fenced, Close-in, Huge Den, Carport, Smoke Free, $800 mo. App & Ref Req’d Short Term Avail 386-758-9824 3br/1.5ba. Very clean, Brick great area w/bonus room. Carport, shed & Fenced (privacy) back yard. $825. mo $825. dep. Ref’s req’d. (941)920-4535 ALandlord You Can Love! 3br/1+ba, Eat in Kitchen, Laundry Room, CH/A, deck, 2 car carport 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Beautiful Yard, Close to shopping Lots of natural light. 3BD/1.5BA CH/A, $700 mth & $700 dep. Contact 386-344-2170 Very Nice 3BD/2ba brick home, $745 mth & $500 dep. Application Required. Call 386-935-1485 to see. 750Business & Office RentalsCk out this Awesome Deal. Fort White, Newly Remodled. Multi use Comm Prop. Approx 850sqft. Elec & water incl. Free WFI & yard Maint. High Traffic Area $725 mth 941-924-5183. FOR LEASE: Downtown Office Space. Convenient to Court house. Call 386-755-3456 ForRent orLease: Former Doctors office, Former professional office & Lg open space: avail on East Baya Ave. Competitive rates. Weekdays 386-984-0622 evenings/weekends 497-4762 PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 805Lots forSale PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 810Home forSale 2 OwnerFinanced Homes/ 1 RentalLake City, Mayo, Branford 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 3BR/1.5BA Eat in Kitchen Elec. Appl., &W/D Utility Room, Porch, Carport, Lg lot, Close to VA& shopping. $68,000 386-288-5240 or 386-984-0207 820Farms & Acreage10 acres with well/septic/pp (not guar); $300 dwn; $580 a mth. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 PublishedMonthlybythe Lake City Reporter nr 5 a week days Lake City Reporter

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By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comThe holiday season traditionally ushers in a season of caring and giving. In Columbia County, the season of caring and giving is usu-ally defined as helping others in less fortunate circumstances — especially premature babies fighting for their lives. Next week organizers for a March of Dimes fundraiser are hoping to see the generous side of the holiday season when it comes to giving funds for prema-ture babies. The Holiday Magic March of Dimes Signature Chefs Auction will take place 5:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Rountree Moore Toyota showroom. Tickets are $50, and are available at: Ward’s Jewelers, Suwannee Democrat, TD Bank (U.S. 90 West at Baya Drive) and Rountree Moore Toyota. Ferne Mann, a volunteer with event organizers Maureen and Vern Lloyd, said this year marks the eighth year the fundraiser has been scheduled locally. “Rountree Moore is the host sponsor,” she said. Organizers are expecting 300 to 350 people to attend. “The purpose of the event is to raise money for the March of Dimes.” The event will feature chef specialty foods, complimentary wine tasting, live music by Harry, Sally & Billy, live and silent auc-tions and a festival of trees and wreaths. Silent auction items are $100 or less, while premier auc-tion items are $100 or more. “The presenting sponsor is TD Bank,” Mann said. “Our honorary chair is Suzanne Norris of TD Bank. Norris is a person of high standing in the community and she has always been a supporter of the March of Dimes.” Mann said the March of Dimes offers community programs to promote healthy babies being born and to try to learn what causes babies to be born prema-turely. The funds will help with research. “The Neonatal Intensive Care Units are an initiative of the March of Dimes,” she said. “The March of Dimes spearheaded the effort to get these NICUs in regional hospitals throughout the United States.” This year’s fundraiser will also feature a drawing, tickets for which are being sold for $25 each. Only 100 tickets were print-ed for the drawing. The winner will have the choice among three items: one-carat total weight diamond stud earrings in 14k gold settings, donated by George Ward of Ward’s Jewelers and valued at $1,500; an 18-inch, 8-8.5 mm pearl necklace, donated by Peter Francis of Joye’s Gems and Things and valued at $1,050; or a 12-gauge Remington pump-action Model 870 shotgun donated by Mike and Patti Kahlich of North Florida Automotive Rebuilders and valued at $500. “We’ve had a drawing every year for the last three years, but this is the first time we’ve had a shotgun,” Mann said. “We are LIFE Sunday, November 11, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section D O n a shop-ping trip to Gainesville recently, we decided to have lunch at one of our favorite spots, Mildred’s Big City Food. Mildred’s opened 10 years ago in Gainesville and continues to provide an outstanding menu with selections just a little above the norm. Owner and chef Bert Gill uses the fresh-est ingredients, purchased locally when possible, with the meat being pro-vided by the University of Florida Agriculture Department and seafood from a Jacksonville seafood market. Gill trained at the New England Culinary Institute, and after working in Boston several years, decided to return to his Florida roots — and it was definitely a win for us. Mildred’s has specials every day. This day, one of the quiches was kale and ricotta cheese. Soups were black bean and cream of mushroom. The terrine was made from pork. The toasted pimento cheese sandwich ($7) was delicious and very different from your mama’s rendi-tion. It is made with their own roasted red peppers cut into strips and mixed into the cheese-mayonnaise mixture. It was absolutely delicious and full of pimen-tos. It was served with a side salad of fresh baby greens. The mushroom soup wasn’t too thick or too thin, and was served with their homemade foccacia bread. The curry chicken salad ($8) is our all-time favorite selection. It is made with all white meat chicken, with celery, raisins, chut-ney and a mayonnaise-based dressing. It also is served with the fresh green salad and foccacia. At lunch, you order and pay at the counter, and your meal is delivered to your table. The wait staff is absolutely some of the best. Courteous, profes-sional and just plain nice. Mildred’s is open for Sunday brunch, which certainly would be worth a trip to try it out. Dinner is served in a different atmo-sphere, with white table-cloths, muted lighting and table service. There are so many interesting choices on the menu. Just a few include braised oxtail served with potato gnocchi ($20); pink porgy (fish) with Seminole pumpkin and saffron nage ($23); and hanger steak with creamy polenta and garlic spinach ($19). Interesting appetizers include escargot carbon-ara with garlic cream, egg noddles and peas ($8); goat cheese-stuffed yellow squash with walnut Mildred’s menu isa diningdelight Story ideas?ContactRobert BridgesEditor754-0428rbridges@lakecityreporter.com Lake City Reporter1DLIFEGenie Norman and Mary Kay HollingsworthTasteBuddiesLakeCity@gmail.com TASTE BUDDIES Rain barrels help with outdoor wateringR ain barrels serve the pri-mary purpose of supplementing irrigation water used for watering plants. The average water use for watering lawns and plants, washing cars and doing other outdoor projects is estimated to be about 30 to 35 gallons per person each day. This can be costly if you pay city water and sewer bills. Most people use the roof, gutters and down-spouts to fill their rain barrel. A one-inch rain on 100 square feet of roof can just about fill a 50-gallon barrel. Our average annual rainfall in Lake City is a little over 56 inches, with summer months being the wettest. By harvesting rain and using it between rainfalls, a homeowner can use about 1,300 gallons of water from the barrel over the summer months. Used food-grade barrels are the easiest to find and the most affordable. These 50to 80-gallon plastic drums were used to ship food items such as pickles, olives, and juice. Be very careful that you do not purchase drums that have been filled with chemicals or detergents. Oak whiskey barrels have been popular in the past and are very attractive in many locations. Even large plastic trash cans can serve the purpose. There are many ways that you can set up a rain barrel. Some are covered with screen and placed under areas with heavy water runoff like roof val-leys. Or you can use a lidded barrel and insert a downspout. Put your bar-rel up on a platform, insert a spigot, and easily fill a watering can or attach a soaker hose. However you set up your system, just make sure your barrel is located near the area you want to water because there will be only enough pres-sure for a short hose. For a complete guide to making and using your very own rain barrel visit http://sarasota.extension.ufl.edu/Hort/Pubs/rain_ barrels_guide.pdf The UF Master Gardeners are available to help solve gardening problems on Tuesday and Thursday mornings at 752-5384. Join us for our free Edible Landscape Workshop at the Fort White Library on Thursday at 5:45 p.m. It will also be offered at the downtown Lake City Library on Saturday at 2 pm. Q D. Nichelle Demorest is a horticulture agent with the Columbia County Extension of the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. GARDEN TALK Nichelle Demorestdndemorest@ufl.edu TASTE continued on 6D Holiday Magic auction set Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterA participant in last year’s March of Dimes’ ‘Holiday M agic’ fundraiser enters a bid on one of the silent auctio n items. The event raised more than $42,000 to aid premature babies. This year’s fundraiser will be at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday in the Rountree Moore Toyota showroom Eighth annual event to feature an array foods prepa red by local chefsMARCH OF DIMES FUNDRAISERZac and Mandy Cook of Lake City hold their triplets durin g last year’s event. The girls, then 18 months old, were born prematurely but received help from the March of Dimes. MAGIC continued on 2D Diamond stud earrings and a pearl necklace are among prizes to choose from for the winner of a limited-ticket raffle.

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By LEANNE ITALIE Associated Press NEW YORK Buy a sheep, adopt a soldier or name a piece of rainforest. There are lots of ways to honor loved ones for the holidays with gifts through charitable-minded naming and adoption programs. Heifer Internationals catalog at heifer.org offers shoppers a unique way to make giving more mean ingful by buying cows, goats, sheep, llamas, water buffalos, bees, trees and more to benefit people in need around the world. A card of explanation goes to the giftee. The National Wildlife Federation has an adoptan-animal program. The adoptions are symbolic and represent a general dona tion to the cause but do include certificates and small tokens of appre ciation, such as a stuffed animal, depending on the amount spent. An array of endangered species are covered, from sea turtles to baby pandas. Order online at nwf.org. Or try one of these less well known programs: Deforestation Cuipo, a preserva tion organization based in Newport Beach, Calif., has purchased swaths of Panama rainforest and allows supporters through its One Meter at a Time Foundation to help foot the bill. Pay $5 to $100 at Cuipo. org for various amounts of land or purchase gifts that come with codes on their tags where a meter of rainforest can be named through the website. New partner Sigg, the water bottle people, are offering Cuipo-branded bottles with the codes on tags for nam ing. The bottles are avail able for purchase at Whole Foods markets around the country. New Orleans The Audubon Nature Institute in New Orleans went through tough times after Hurricane Katrina. For $15 to $500, ani mal adoptions that ben efit the institutes various attractions, including a zoo, aquarium and insectarium, are available at audubonin stitute.org. Donations help feed and care for more than 15,000 invertebrates, fish, amphibians, rep tiles, birds, mammals and insects. Special gift pack ages include a personalized certificate, photo and fun facts. More unusual adop tions include an Amazon milk frog and a giant ant eater. Classrooms At adoptaclassroom.org, make a generation dona tion to benefit schools damaged by superstorm Sandy. The site promises 100 percent of donations will go directly to teach ers for their students. A donor selects a classroom from hundreds registered by teachers to contribute by region of the country, school name, teacher name and other search criteria. If a donor has no prefer ence, Adopt-A-Classroom partners the donor with an underserved classroom in their community. Soldiers Lots of organizations arrange for holiday care packages shipped to active duty servicepeople. At the nonprofit adoptaussoldier. org, the experience goes deeper. The site assigns a U.S. soldier serving in one of more than 128 coun tries to send care pack ages and write letters to. Soldiers sign up to partici pate. Details of the soldier youre matched with arrive via email, easy to gift to a charitable-minded person on your list. Whales While some animal adop tions are symbolic, without a specific animal to bring the experience to life for children, the Pacific Whale Foundation in Maui, Hawaii, offers the personal story of a specific dolphin or whale. And kids gifted a turtle get to name one! It means a lot to young recipients who might not be so jazzed by a more general donation made in lieu of a holiday gift in his or her name. Adoption packages range from $25 to $75 and offer download able adoption certificates and plush animal toys in the higher range. Go to pacificwhale.org. 2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 2DLIFE Stop by the Lake City Reporter for your complimentary engagement package. Aisle Style Complimentary Engagement Package Sweetwater Branch Inn 800-595-7760 Wards Jewelry & Gifts 752-5470 Camp Weed Cerveny Conference Center 386-364-5250 GeGees Studio 758-2088 Holiday Inn 754-1411, ext. 106 Go for charitable adoption as more meaningful holiday gifts ASSOCIATED PRESS Penda Ndong, of Diarrere, Senegal, plays with a goat provided through Heifer International. There are lots of ways to honor loved ones for the holidays with gifts through charitable naming and adoption programs. Heifer Internationals catalog at heifer.org offers shoppers a unique way to make giving more meaningful by buying cows, goats, sheep, llamas, water buffaloes, bees, trees and more to benefit people in need around the world. Variety of ways to give and help at same time. Neil Armstrongs Corvette geting careful makeover By RICK NEALE Florida Today MERRITT ISLAND Aiming a swivel-lens digital camera, Roger Kallins meticulously cap tured close-up images of the Corvettes wheel well, brake assembly and front coil spring. The Ormond Beach photojournalist is collect ing hundreds of images documenting the restora tion of one of Americas most unique vehicles: former NASA astronaut Neil Armstrongs 1967 Corvette Sting Ray. We have to document every square inch of this car, inside and out. We have to record every single part of this car in its current condition, Kallins said. Merritt Island resident Joe Crosby bought the one-of-a-kind coupe from an undisclosed Georgia owner in February. Crosby wont say how much he paid for the car. In January 2007, a 1967 Corvette formerly owned by astronaut Gus Grissom sold at auction for $275,000 in Scottsdale, Ariz. Initially, Crosby offered the vehicle on eBay where it garnered offers exceeding $250,000. However, he has now decided to repair 45 years of wear and refurbish the sports car to its same con dition as when Armstrong cruised across the Space Coast during the Apollo era. Its a piece of history to me its not a car. Its like owning Samuel Colts first revolver ever made, Crosby said, eyeing the marina blue Corvette. HAPPENINGS McCall-Anderson engagement Dale and Debbie McCall, of Belton, S.C., announce the engage ment of theier daughter, Keitha Marie McCall, of Gainesville, to Ethan Michael Anderson, of Gainesville, son of Eddie and Donna Anderson, of Lake City. The wedding is planned for 11 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 18, at the Hippodrome Theatre in Gainesville. The reception will follow at the theater. The bride-elect is a 1997 graduate of Belton -Honea Path High School in Path, S.C., and a 2001 magna cum laude graduate of the University of South Carolina with a bachelor of arts degree in political science and English. She enjoys photography and travel. The future groom graduated in 2000 from Columbia High School in Lake City and in 2002 graduate of Lake City Community College. He graduated cum laude in 2008 from the University of Florida with a bachelors degree in psychology and in 2012 received a doctoral degree in neuroscience from the university. He is a member of the Society for Neuroscience. Birth announcement A daugher, Kloey Emma, was born to Kevin Jr. and Amy Bendenbaugh of Lake City on Aug. 31 at Shands Lake Shore. She weighed 7 pounds, 4 ounces and measured 19 inches. He siblings are Kailey Elizabeth, 7; Chase Lyttleton, 5, and Mason Mann, 2. The grandparents are Stephen and Mary Parsons, Tony and Marcy Robinson, and Kevin Sr. and Marla Bendenbaugh. Great-grandparents are Helen Dukes and the late Peter Mann Dukes, Arthur and Janie Bendenbaugh and the late Lillian Bennett. Ethan Michael Anderson and Keitha Marie McCall. pre-selling tickets, and they are going really fast. Mann said organizers focused on getting items of interest to men for this years auction. Live-auction items include a fishing trip out of Steinhatchee, a quail hunting trip for two people at Tiger Creek Hunting Preserve, a stay at a house on the St. Johns River to fish in Astor.. No chefs auction would be complete without food, and Mann said sev eral local chefs agreed to participate in this years fundraiser. The chefs have done a really nice job for us this year, she said. New chefs taking part will come from the Players Club Seafood Bar and Grill, who will serve prime rib, homemade tur key pot pie and oysters on the half shell. The chef from Hannahs is going to serve seafood bisque and crab and shrimp dip. The Rose Mary Catering Co. will serve salmon en croute, while Publix will have deca dent dessert cakes and Cakes By Pat will have a tiered wedding cake at the event. Tracy Hicks from Catering For All Occasions will serve appetizers and hors doeuvres. These chefs are anx ious to give the very best, Mann said. Its going to be a wonderful event. MAGIC: For a good cause. Continued From Page 1D PotashCorp.White Springs last year donated $10,000 to the March of Dimes during the seventh annual Holiday Magic fundraiser.

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Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 3D3DLIFEExperts: Travel with pets is worth hassleBy SUE MANNINGAssociated PressLOS ANGELES — Travel for humans during holidays is tough enough: Long lines, crowds everywhere, extra bags full of presents. Throw a pet in the mix, and it’s a recipe for disaster. But Sheron Long, a frequent traveler and author of “Dog Trots Globe — To Paris and Provence,” say it’s worth the trouble. “Every trip was better when Chula could be with us,” she said of her Shetland sheepdog. “She was so excited, I could imagine her dog’s eye view of the world. It causes you to explore and go see different things and meet people.” The U.S. Department of Transportation estimates more than 2 million pets and other animals are transported by air each year. Pets aren’t allowed on Amtrak trains, Greyhound buses or cruise lines, but they can go on many regional train, bus and boat lines. The majority of four-legged carry-on passengers are dogs, but some airlines allow rabbits, birds and other small animals. Experts say before including a pet in travel plans, consider whether it would enjoy the experience. “Some dogs don’t like to travel, some love it,” said Kelly E. Carter, the pet travel expert for AOL’s Paw Nation and a Chihuahua owner. “You have to know your pet.” Caroline Golon’s two Persian cats “are not big fans of car trav-el” — the only way that they can travel since their breed is banned by many airlines — so they don’t go on trips. Golon said when they travel, the family stops at pet-friendly hotels rather than drive nonstop. “Stopping overnight gives them a chance to use the litter box at their leisure and eat and drink comfortably,” said Golon, the founder of High Paw Media. Gwen Cooper, the author of “Homer’s Odyssey: A Fearless Feline Tale, or How I Learned About Love and Life with a Blind Wonder Cat,” said animals pick up on their owners’ moods, “which means if you’re nervous, your cat or dog is going to be nervous too. The best way to avoid being nervous is to prepare you and your pet ahead of time and think through as many contingencies as possible.” For eligible cats, as well as dogs, airlines have size requirements for pets in the cabin, so a small pet must fit in a carrier that can be stowed under a seat and larger ones must be checked in. Long’s dog weighs 30 pounds, so 9-year-old Chula has to fly in cargo. During the holidays, though, when planes are fuller and lines are longer, some airlines ban pets in cargo, as well as times when the heat or cold is intense. Certain breeds can never fly on some air-lines, including those considered to have bullying characteristics, like pit bulls, and snub-nosed ani-mals like shih tzus or Persian cats because of potential breath-ing problems. Animals that travel on Amtrak, Greyhound or cruises get a tick-et to ride through their roles as service animals. Under the Americans with Disabilities Act, trained helper animals such as guide dogs or signal dogs must be allowed. Pet accommodations at airports differ, though every air-port has animal-relief areas. Some are easy to find — San Francisco’s has paw prints on the floor leading to them — and most or all areas are located outside of security checkpoints. Federal transportation guidelines require animals to be removed from car-riers, so pets should be collared and leashed — especially cats. Pet carriers are not X-rayed, but owners’ hands may be wiped for chemical testing. The hassle of traveling is only half over once the plane lands. Carter, who once canceled a trip in which she and her dog were hoping to try a new hotel in Northern California, recounted how the hotel worded its pet policy online: “We are smoke-free and pet-free.” “My God, are pets being considered killers, like smoke? That’s a sign people don’t want to be around pets,” she said. Lisa Porter, CEO of a website that lists pet-friendly places to stay and activities around the country, said more businesses are catering to customers with a pet in tow than ever before. For example, vineyards and winer-ies have opened their tours to pets, and as many as 90 percent of hotels in some cities are pet-friendly, she said. Most five-star hotels have accommodations and perks for well-behaved pets, and even most discount hotels, including Red Roof Inns, Motel 6 and Extended Stay America, are pet-friendly. Other hotels have weight limits on animals. Some charge a night-ly fee for animals, some have cleaning deposits and some will charge only if there is damage. In France, where Long and Chula spend four months every year, so many people take their dogs to restaurants that there is an “under-table culture going on,” she said. The French hospi-tality for dogs stops at museums, though: “The French prize their dogs, but they prize their art work even more,” she said. Chula has been such a good travel buddy that she inspired Long’s book, which is a travel-ogue written from a dog’s point of view. Long said having Chula around means never being lonely — partly because of all the people who stop to admire the dog. “If you want to be a hermit, go (traveling) alone,” Long said. ASSOCIATED PRESSTravel for humans during holidays is tough enough: Lon g lines, crowds everywhere, extra bags full of presents. Throw a pet in the mix, and it’s a recipe for disaster. But Sheron Long, author of ‘Dog Trots Globe — To Paris and Provene,’ says pets also can add new dimensions to the experiene. Finding transport, hotels that allow pets is challenging. Tricks for perfect Brussels sproutsBy SARA MOULTONFor The Associated PressBrussels sprouts can generate some pretty strong opinions. As with cilantro or goat cheese, you either love them or hate them. The little stinkers are the smallest of the crucifers and, when prepared incor-rectly, can develop a scary aroma and deadly taste. Weirdly, they somehow remain a perennial feature on many Thanksgiving menus. In fairness, it’s hard to cook Brussels sprouts to their best advantage because they are so dense-ly constructed. By the time the heat gets to the core, there’s a good chance that the outside has been over-cooked. It used to be that I had no better idea about what to do with them than any-one else. I just followed the procedure I learned in cooking school — trim them, use a knife to score the bottom in a crisscross pattern 1/4 inch deep (so they cook more evenly), and boil or steam them until done. The results were not exactly inspiring. It wasn’t until the Two Hot Tamales showed me a better way that I fell in love. The Tamales — chefs Sue Fenniger and Mary Sue Milliken, the co-hosts of their own show on the Food Network once upon a time — sliced the sprouts very thin, then quickly sauteed them. And I do mean quickly — 3 to 5 minutes in the pan and they’re good to go. The simplicity of this technique is, of course, a huge bonus on Thanksgiving Day, when you are trying to cook 500 other dishes at the same time. You can either pre-saute the sprouts, then quickly reheat them when the moment is right, or just cook them from start to finish while someone else is carving the turkey. Even more impressive than the process is the result — the surprising deliciousness of these shredded sauteed Brussels sprouts. You don’t need a lot of fat to cook them in, and the little guys pair up nicely with all sorts of toasted nuts. I’ve opted for walnuts in this recipe, but swap in your favorite. And a tart little spritz of lemon provides the finish-ing touch. Take my word for it; when it comes to Brussels sprouts, this recipe has turned haters into believ-ers over and over again. By the way, who put the Brussels in Brussels sprouts? The Belgians, of course. The sprouts were first cultivated in large quantities in Belgium in the late 1500s, and intro-duced to the U.S. in the 1800s.Quick Sauteed Brussels Sprouts with Toasted Walnuts and LemonStart to finish: 15 minutes Servings: 61/2 cup coarsely chopped walnuts 1 1/2 pounds Brussels sprouts 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil Zest and juice of 1 lemonKosher salt and ground black pepper Heat the oven to 350 F.Put the walnuts in a pie plate and toast them in the oven for 8 to 10 minutes, or until they are fragrant and are a shade darker. Trim the Brussels sprouts and discard any damaged outside leaves. Use a food processor fitted with the thin slicing blade to shred the sprouts. In a large skillet over medium-high, heat the oil. Add the sprouts and lemon zest, then reduce the heat to medium. Cook, stirring, until crisp tender, about 5 minutes. The pan will seem very crowded in the begin-ning, but the Brussels sprouts will shrink down quickly. Season with salt and pepper, 1 to 2 table-spoons of the lemon juice, and the walnuts. Serve right away. Nutrition information per serving: 150 calories; 100 calories from fat (67 percent of total calories); 11 g fat (1.5 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 0 mg choles-terol; 12 g carbohydrate; 5 g fiber; 3 g sugar; 5 g pro-tein; 190 mg sodium.Tweaking tradition: New takes on old holiday cornucopiaBy KIM COOKAssociated PressThe cornucopia, that symbol of abundance and the harvest, has graced the Thanskgiving table or sideboard for generations. While the original version, in ancient Greece, was a goat’s horn, the American cornucopia is typically a horn-shaped wicker basket filled with a colorful array of fall vegetables and fruit. With a little shopping and some creative time set aside, it’s easy to update the traditional cornucopia with-out diminishing its sense of plenty and celebration. Instead of the usual variety of produce, consider a group of similarly hued fruits, vegetables and plant material. A coordinating vessel adds style. For instance, West Elm has an ivory cast-terracotta cornucopia that would look lovely filled with creamand caramel-colored good-ies. Think wheat sheaves, golden apples, pears and mini white pumpkins for a display that’s sophisticated yet still warm and homey. Pottery Barn has a selection of realistic-looking faux pumpkins, gourds, dried artichokes and figs which can be reused each year. You could mix them or use multiples of just one. Consider incorporating a few pheasant feathers and, to amp up the flair, some copper or bronze glitter. Martha Stewart’s craft editors suggest making mini cornucopias out of chair caning, or larger ones for door decor. The small ones, stuffed with tissue and a handful of nuts, make clever party favors. The big versions, filled with pear branches, seeded eucalyp-tus and dried flowers, would look great right through to winter’s holiday season. Craft suppliers stock grapevine horn-shaped bas-kets; they’re available in sizes from 12 to 48 inches, and even mini place-card or table-favor sizes. You can create your own horn-shaped receptacle out of all sorts of materials. Artist Natalie Raevsky has instructions on her blog to make one out of papier mache, lined with burlap and wrapped with raffia. Or make a mold by sanding a foam cone into the shape of a horn, wrapping it with jute and painting it with glue. When the glue dries, pull out the foam and fill. Better Homes and Gardens’ November issue has another twist: Wrap double layers of shimmery gold-green floral mesh into a loose horn shape and fin-ish with a silky ribbon. ASSOCIATED PRESSThe traditional wicker cornucopia can be replaced, as i n this casw with one made of terracotta and filled with gourds.ASSOCIATED PRESSSauteed Brussels sprouts with toasted walnuts and lemon m akes a quick, tasty side dish for any dinner. FOOD

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4D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 4DLIFE SUNDAY EVENING NOVEMBER 11, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsAmerica’s Funniest Home Videos (N) Once Upon a Time (N) Revenge “Penance” (N) (:01) 666 Park Avenue (N) News at 11Inside Edition 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsThe Insider (N) Love-RaymondBig Bang TheoryCSI: Miami “Target Speci c” Criminal Minds “Hanley Waters” NewsSports ZoneChann 4 NewsBig Bang Theory 5-PBS 5 -Keeping Up AppearancesNOVA “Mystery of Easter Island” (N) National Salute to Veterans (N) Masterpiece Classic (N) Broadway: The American MusicalMI-5 “The Innocent” 7-CBS 7 47 47CBS Evening NewsAction News Jax60 Minutes (N) The Amazing Race (N) The Good Wife “Anatomy of a Joke” The Mentalist A reporter is murdered. Action News JaxTwo and Half Men 9-CW 9 17 17Amity HorrorAccording to JimYourJax MusicVoid TVLaw & Order “Encore” Local HauntsLocal HauntsTMZ (N) The Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30e(4:00) NFL Football Dallas Cowboys at Philadelphia Eagles. The OT (N) The Simpsons (N) Bob’s Burgers (N) Family Guy (N) NewsAction Sports 360Leverage “The Snow Job” 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsFootball Night in America (N) (Live) e(:20) NFL Football Houston Texans at Chicago Bears. (N) News CSPAN 14 210 350NewsmakersWashington This Week Q & APrime MinisterRoad to the White House Q & A WGN-A 16 239 307Funny VideosBloopers!Bloopers!How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine(:40) Instant Replay30 Rock “College” 30 Rock TVLAND 17 106 304M*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*H “O.R.” M*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Oprah: Where Are They Now?Oprah: Where Are They Now? Hanson. Oprah’s Next ChapterOprah’s Next Chapter (N) Oprah’s Next ChapterOprah’s Next Chapter A&E 19 118 265Duck DynastyDuck DynastyStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage War s(:01) Storage Wars(:31) Storage Wars HALL 20 185 312“A Princess for Christmas” (2011) Katie McGrath, Roger Moore. “The Christmas Secret” (2000, Fantasy) Richard Thomas, Beau Bridges. “Debbie Macomber’s Call Me Mrs. Miracle” (2010, Drama) Doris Roberts. FX 22 136 248(5:30)“X-Men Origins: Wolverine” (2009) Hugh Jackman, Liev Schreiber.“Predators” (2010, Science Fiction) Adrien Brody, Topher Grace.“Predators” (2010, Science Fiction) Adrien Brody, Topher Grace. CNN 24 200 202CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) World According to LancePiers Morgan TonightCNN Newsroom (N) World According to Lance TNT 25 138 245(5:45)“Clash of the Titans” (2010, Fantasy) Sam Worthington. (DVS)“300” (2007) Gerard Butler. Badly outnumbered Spartan warriors battle the Persian army.“Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest” (2006) NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobBig Time RushiCarlySee Dad Run (N)“Legally Blonde 2: Red, White & Blonde” (2003) Reese Witherspoon. The NannyFriendsFriends SPIKE 28 168 241Band of BrothersBand of Brothers Winters becomes battalion leader. Band of Brothers Easy company defends Bastogne. Band of Brothers “The Breaking Point” Band of Brothers “The Last Patrol” MY-TV 29 32 -Combat! “Hills Are for Heroes” M*A*S*HM*A*S*HColumbo “Negative Reaction” Thriller “Till Death Do Us Part” The Twilight ZoneThe Twilight Zone DISN 31 172 290Austin & AllyShake It Up!A.N.T. FarmGood Luck CharlieDog With a BlogAustin & Ally (N) Shake It Up! (N) JessieShake It Up!Good Luck CharlieAustin & AllyA.N.T. Farm LIFE 32 108 252(5:00) “Undercover Christmas” (2003) “The Christmas Consultant” (2012) David Hasselhoff, Caroline Rhea. “Dear Santa” (2011, Drama) Amy Acker, Brooklynn Proulx, Gina Holden. (:01) “The Christmas Consultant” USA 33 105 242NCIS Tip on terrorists was a trap. NCIS A petty of cer is murdered. NCIS “Caged” Women’s prison riot. NCIS A blogger turns up dead. NCIS “Endgame” “The Ugly Truth” (2009) BET 34 124 329(3:30)“The Women of Brewster Place” (1989, Drama) Oprah Winfrey, Robin Givens. “The Hurricane” (1999, Drama) Denzel Washington, Vicellous Reon Shannon. Premiere. Don’t Sleep!Don’t Sleep! ESPN 35 140 206h NASCAR RacingSportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) BCS Countdownf MLS Soccer Conference Final: Teams TBA. (N) SportsCenter (N) ESPN2 36 144 209 NHRA Drag Racing NHRA Drag Racing Automobile Club of Southern California Finals. From Pomona, Calif. (N Same-day Tape) NASCAR Now (N) SportsCenter (N) World/Poker SUNSP 37 -Fishing the FlatsSport FishingSportsman’s Adv. College Football Florida State at Virginia Tech. Ship Shape TVSport FishingFuture Phenoms DISCV 38 182 278MythBustersMythBustersMythBusters “Cannonball Chemistry” Sex in America (N) Breaking Magic “Cannonball Fall” MythBusters “Cannonball Chemistry” TBS 39 139 247“The House Bunny” (2008, Comedy) Anna Faris, Colin Hanks. “Valentine’s Day” (2010, Romance-Comedy) Jessica Alba, Kathy Bates, Jessica Biel. (DVS)“Valentine’s Day” (2010) Jessica Alba. (DVS) HLN 40 202 204Murder by the BookDominick Dunne: Power, PrivilegeDominick Dunne: Power, PrivilegeWhat Would You Do?What Would You Do?Dominick Dunne: Power, Privilege FNC 41 205 360FOX News Sunday With Chris WallaceFOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) FOX News Sunday With Chris WallaceGeraldo at Large (N) Huckabee E! 45 114 236(4:30)“Sex and the City” (2008) Sarah Jessica Parker.“He’s Just Not That Into You” (2009, Romance-Comedy) Ben Af eck, Jennifer Aniston. Ice Loves Coco (N) Nicki Minaj: My Chelsea LatelyThe Soup TRAVEL 46 196 277House HuntersHouse Hunters: RVTricked Out TrailersKiller RV UpgradesExtreme RVs (N) Extreme RVs (N) Extreme RVs (N) HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lMillion Dollar RoomsExtreme HomesProperty BrothersHouse Hunters Renovation (N) House Hunters Renovation TLC 48 183 280Breaking Amish “Final Days” Breaking Amish “Decision Time” Breaking Amish “Party Time” Breaking Amish “Finale” (N) Breaking Amish: The Shunning TruthBreaking Amish “Finale” HIST 49 120 269The Men Who Built AmericaThe Men Who Built AmericaThe Men Who Built America (Season Finale) The changing face of America. (N) Outback Hunters “Ghost Croc” (N) 10 Things About10 Things About ANPL 50 184 282Finding BigfootFinding Bigfoot: Birth of a Legend: Further EvidenceFinding Bigfoot “Untold Stories” (N) Finding Bigfoot (N) Finding Bigfoot “Untold Stories” FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveThe Next Iron Chef: Redemption “Resourcefulness” Cupcake Wars (N) The Next Iron Chef: Redemption (N) Iron Chef America (N) Restaurant Stakeout TBN 52 260 372T.D. JakesJoyce MeyerLeading the WayThe Blessed LifeJoel OsteenKerry ShookBelieverVoiceCre o DollarFall Praise-A-Thon Kickoff FSN-FL 56 Bull Riding CBR World Championship Part 2. (Taped) XTERRA Advent.World Poker Tour: Season 10UFC Unleashed (N) UFC PrimetimeXTERRA Advent.World Poker Tour: Season 10 SYFY 58 122 244(4:00) The Mist“Outlander” (2008) James Caviezel. An alien joins forces with Vikings to hunt his enemy. “G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra” (2009, Action) Channing Tatum, Dennis Quaid. Name of King AMC 60 130 254(4:00)“The Green Mile” (1999, Drama) Tom Hanks, David Morse. The Walking Dead “Killer Within” The Walking Dead “Say the Word” (N) (:01) The Walking DeadTalking Dead (N) Comic Book Men COM 62 107 249“Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls”(:01) Daniel Tosh: Completely Serious(:01) Gabriel Iglesias: Hot and Fluffy(:02) Jeff Dunham: Arguing With Myself(:02) Key & Peele(:33) Tosh.0(:03) Brickleberry(:33) Brickleberry CMT 63 166 327(5:15)“Son-in-Law” (1993) Pauly Shore, Carla Gugino.“Grumpier Old Men” (1995, Comedy) Jack Lemmon, Walter Matthau. (:45)“Starsky & Hutch” (2004) Ben Stiller. Two detectives investigate a cocaine dealer. NGWILD 108 190 283SharkvilleShark Attack ExperimentKingdom of the Blue Whale Red Sea JawsKingdom of the Blue Whale NGC 109 186 276Doomsday Preppers Bugged OutSpace Dive Felix Baumgartner’s 120,00 foot jump. (N) Drugs, Inc. “Hawaiian Ice” (N) Alaska State Troopers (N) Alaska State Troopers SCIENCE 110 193 284Fire y Saffron steals a valuable gun. Fire y “The Message” Fire y “Heart of Gold” Fire y “Objects in Space” Fire y 10th Anniversary: Browncoats Fire y “Heart of Gold” ID 111 192 285Homicide Hunter: Lt. Joe KendaFinal Witness “What the Boy Saw” 48 Hours on ID “Fatal Attraction” Sins & Secrets “Omaha” (N) Unusual Suspects “Triple Threat” (N) 48 Hours on ID “Fatal Attraction” HBO 302 300 501(5:30)“Little Fockers” (2010) (:10)“Tower Heist” (2011, Comedy) Ben Stiller. ‘PG-13’ Boardwalk Empire (N) Treme Desautel’s opens; Sonny pawns. Boardwalk Empire MAX 320 310 515The Pool Boys“3000 Miles to Graceland” (2001, Action) Kurt Russell. ‘R’ (:35)“Chronicle” (2012) Dane DeHaan. ‘PG-13’ “In Time” (2011, Science Fiction) Justin Timberlake. ‘PG-13’ SHOW 340 318 545(5:00)“Ransom” (1996) ‘R’ Dexter “Do the Wrong Thing” Homeland “A Gettysburg Address” Dexter “Chemistry” (N) Homeland “The Clearing” (N) Dexter “Chemistry” MONDAY EVENING NOVEMBER 12, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Dancing With the Stars: All-Stars (N) (Live) (:01) Castle A guitarist is murdered. (N) News at 11(:35) Nightline (N) 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) The Insider 5-PBS 5 -JournalNightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Antiques Roadshow “Cats & Dogs” (N) Market Warriors (N) Independent Lens (N) (DVS) BBC World NewsTavis Smiley (N) 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJaguars AccessTwo and Half MenHow I Met/MotherPartners (N) 2 Broke Girls (N) Mike & Molly (N) Hawaii Five-0 “I Ka Wa Mamua” (N) Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of Payne90210 “Hate 2 Love” (N) Gossip Girl “Monstrous Ball” (N) TMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ceThe Of ce “Fire” 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family GuyFamily GuyThe SimpsonsBones “The Patriot in Purgatory” (N) The Mob Doctor “Complications” (N) NewsAction News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) The Voice “Live Top 12 Performances” The top 12 artists perform. (N) (:01) Revolution “Ties That Bind” (N) NewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(5:00) Public Affairs Politics & Public Policy Today WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosWGN News at Nine (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304M*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Personal JusticePersonal Justice Melinda Elkins. Dateline on OWNDateline on OWN “The Edge” (N) Dateline on OWNDateline on OWN A&E 19 118 265Intervention “Kimberly” Intervention “Dorothy; Ivan” Intervention “Christina” Intervention “Nichole” Intervention “Kaylene” (:01) Intervention “Skyler & Jessa” HALL 20 185 312(5:00) “Christmas Song” (2012) Trans Siberian Orchesta“Thomas Kinkade’s Christmas Cottage” (2008, Drama) Jared Padalecki. “The Christmas Card” (2006, Romance) Ed Asner, John Newton. FX 22 136 248How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherTwo and Half MenTwo and Half Men“Shrek Forever After” (2010, Comedy) Voices of Mike Myers. Premiere.“Shrek Forever After” (2010) Voices of Mike Myers, Eddie Murphy. CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245The Mentalist “Red John’s Footsteps” The Mentalist “Redemption” The Mentalist “Red Menace” The Mentalist Haunted mansion. The MentalistCSI: NY NIK 26 170 299Kung Fu Panda: Legends of AwesomeDrake & JoshFigure It Out (N) Full HouseFull HouseFull HouseFull HouseThe NannyThe NannyFriends(:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241Band of Brothers“Kick-Ass” (2010, Action) Aaron Johnson. An ordinary teen decides to become a superhero.“Kick-Ass” (2010, Action) Aaron Johnson. An ordinary teen decides to become a superhero. Repo Games MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*HM*A*S*HLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitSeinfeldFrasier “Detour” The Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290JessieAustin & AllyA.N.T. FarmShake It Up!“A Bug’s Life” (1998) Voices of Dave Foley. Phineas and FerbGravity FallsPhineas and FerbJessieA.N.T. Farm LIFE 32 108 252“All She Wants for Christmas” (2006, Drama) Monica Keena. “A Nanny for Christmas” (2010) Emmanuelle Vaugier, Dean Cain. “A Dad for Christmas” (2006, Drama) Kristopher Turner, Louise Fletcher. USA 33 105 242NCIS DiNozzo investigates a suicide. NCIS: Los Angeles “Anonymous” WWE Monday Night RAW (N) (:05) CSI: Crime Scene Investigation BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live Swizz Beatz’s brand new music. New York UndercoverNew York UndercoverNew York Undercover “Tough Love” The Soul ManThe Soul Man ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) Monday Night Countdown (N) (Live) e NFL Football Kansas City Chiefs at Pittsburgh Steelers. (N Subject to Blackout) SportsCenter (N) ESPN2 36 144 209SportsNation (N) SportsCenter (N) E:60 2012 World Series of Poker 2012 World Series of PokerCollege Basketball Live (N) (Live) SUNSP 37 -Sport Fishing3 Wide LifeInside the Heat (N) Drivend College Basketball Troy at Texas A&M. (N) Halls of FameSeminole SportsFishing the FlatsSport Fishing DISCV 38 182 278I (Almost) Got Away With ItAmerican ChopperAmerican ChopperAmerican Chopper (N) Jesse James: Outlaw Garage (N) American Chopper TBS 39 139 247King of QueensKing of QueensSeinfeldSeinfeldFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyConan Russell Brand; Big K.R.I.T. HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) Dr. Drew on Call (N) Nancy GraceShowbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236(4:30) “He’s Just Not That Into You”E! News (N) Studio E! (N) E! Special (N) Nicki Minaj: My Nicki Minaj: My Ice Loves CocoIce Loves CocoChelsea Lately (N) E! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. FoodMan v. FoodAnthony Bourdain: No ReservationsAnthony Bourdain: No ReservationsAnthony Bourdain: No ReservationsThe Layover “Miami” HGTV 47 112 229Property VirginsProperty VirginsLove It or List It “Mark & Desta” Love It or List ItLove It or List It (N) House HuntersHunters Int’lLove It or List It “The Pliskat Family” TLC 48 183 280Long Island Medium: On the RoadIsland MediumIsland MediumLong Island MeLong Island MeLong Island Medium: Extended EpiLong Island MeLong Island MeLong Island MeLong Island Me HIST 49 120 269American Pickers “Back Breaker” American Pickers “Sturgis or Bust” Pawn StarsPawn StarsAmerican Pickers (N) Pawn Stars (N) (:31) Pawn StarsI Love the 1880’sI Love the 1880’s ANPL 50 184 282Rattlesnake RepublicRattlesnake Republic “Hell ’n’ Back” Finding Bigfoot “Untold Stories” Finding BigfootFinding Bigfoot: Further EvidenceFinding Bigfoot “Untold Stories” FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveMystery DinersHealth Inspectors TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Fall Praise-A-Thon Fall Praise-A-Thon FSN-FL 56 -World Poker Tour: Season 10Ship Shape TVThe Game 365d College Basketball Morehead State at Maryland. (N) World Poker Tour: Season 10Inside West Coast Customs SYFY 58 122 244(4:00)Outlander“G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra” (2009, Action) Channing Tatum, Dennis Quaid. “Jeepers Creepers 2” (2003, Horror) Ray Wise, Jonathan Breck. “Daybreakers” (2009) AMC 60 130 254(5:00)“Midway” (1976, War) Charlton Heston, Henry Fonda. “Apocalypse Now Redux” (2001, War) Marlon Brando, Robert Duvall, Martin Sheen. An Army agent goes upriver in Cambodia to kill a renegade. COM 62 107 249It’s Always Sunny(:29) Tosh.0The Colbert ReportDaily ShowJeff Dunham: Arguing With MyselfSouth ParkSouth ParkBrickleberrySouth ParkDaily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327RebaRebaRebaRebaReba “Roll With It” RebaRon White: They Call Me Tater Salad(:15) Ron White’s Comedy Salute to the Troops 2012Country Fried Vids NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer “Bad Blood” Wild on Tape Wildest animal clips. Predators in Paradise (N) An Animal... My Vacation!Caught on Safari: Battle at KrugerPredators in Paradise NGC 109 186 276To Catch a SmugglerBikers and MobstersManhattan Mob RampageAlaska State TroopersDrugged “High on Heroin” Manhattan Mob Rampage SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeThe Science of Sex AppealThe Science of Sex Appeal The evolution of human sex appeal. Anatomy of Sex Attraction and mating. The Science of Sex Appeal ID 111 192 285Unusual Suspects “Terror in Gulfport” I Didn’t Do ItBlood, Lies & Alibis (N) I Didn’t Do It (N) Final Witness “The Devil You Know” Blood, Lies & Alibis HBO 302 300 501(5:45)“X2: X-Men United” (2003, Fantasy) Patrick Stewart. ‘PG-13’ Real Time With Bill MaherWitness Michael Christopher Brown.“Little Fockers” (2010) Robert De Niro. ‘PG-13’ Boxing MAX 320 310 515(4:20) Cape Fear“Contagion” (2011) Marion Cotillard. ‘PG-13’ (:15)“Rise of the Planet of the Apes” (2011) James Franco. ‘PG-13’ “What’s Your Number?” (2011, Romance-Comedy) Anna Faris. ‘R’ SHOW 340 318 545(5:00) Five Fingers“Serious Moonlight” (2009) Meg Ryan, Kristen Bell. ‘R’ Untold History of the United StatesHomeland “The Clearing” Dexter “Chemistry” Homeland “The Clearing” WEEKDAY AFTERNOON Comcast Dish DirecTV 12 PM12:301 PM1:302 PM2:303 PM3:304 PM4:305 PM5:30 3-ABC 3 -NewsBe a MillionaireThe ChewGeneral HospitalMauryDr. PhilBe a MillionaireNews 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsPaid ProgramVaried ProgramsAndy Grif th ShowThe Jeff Probst ShowSteve HarveyThe Dr. Oz ShowChann 4 NewsChann 4 News 5-PBS 5 -WordWorldBarney & FriendsCaillouDaniel TigerSuper Why!Dinosaur TrainCat in the HatCurious GeorgeWild KrattsElectric Comp.WUFT NewsWorld News 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxThe Young and the RestlessBold/BeautifulThe TalkLet’s Make a DealJudge Joe BrownJudge JudyAction News JaxAction News Jax 9-CW 9 17 17The Trisha Goddard ShowLaw & Order: Criminal IntentJudge MathisThe Bill Cunningham ShowMauryThe People’s Court 10-FOX 10 30 30Jerry SpringerThe Jeremy Kyle ShowJudge Joe BrownWe the PeopleThe DoctorsDr. PhilFamily FeudFamily Feud 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsBe a MillionaireDays of our LivesFirst Coast LivingKatie The Ellen DeGeneres ShowNewsNews CSPAN 14 210 350(9:00) Public AffairsPublic AffairsVaried Programs Public Affairs WGN-A 16 239 307In the Heat of the NightWGN Midday NewsWalker, Texas RangerWalker, Texas RangerWalker, Texas RangerLaw & Order: Criminal Intent TVLAND 17 106 304Andy Grif th Show(:38) GunsmokeVaried Programs(1:49) GunsmokeBonanzaBonanzaBonanza OWN 18 189 279Dr. PhilDr. PhilVaried Programs A&E 19 118 265CSI: MiamiCriminal MindsCriminal MindsThe First 48The First 48The First 48 HALL 20 185 312Marie Home & FamilyVaried Programs Little House on the PrairieMovieVaried Programs FX 22 136 248(11:00) MovieVaried Programs CNN 24 200 202CNN Newsroom CNN Newsroom The Situation Room TNT 25 138 245Varied Programs NIK 26 170 299Team UmizoomiMax & RubyDora the ExplorerGo, Diego, Go!SpongeBobSpongeBobOdd ParentsOdd ParentsOdd ParentsSpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBob SPIKE 28 168 241Varied Programs MY-TV 29 32 -Hawaii Five-0GunsmokeBonanzaThe Big ValleyThe Wild, Wild WestEmergency! DISN 31 172 290Varied Programs Phineas and FerbVaried Programs Good Luck CharlieVaried Programs LIFE 32 108 252Old ChristineOld ChristineHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherGrey’s AnatomyGrey’s AnatomyTo Be AnnouncedVaried Programs USA 33 105 242Varied Programs BET 34 124 329(:13) The ParkersThe ParkersMy Wife and KidsMy Wife and KidsJamie FoxxJamie FoxxThe ParkersMovieVaried Programs ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenterSportsCenterSportsCenterOutside the LinesColl. Football LiveNFL LiveAround the HornInterruption ESPN2 36 144 209First TakeVaried Programs Dan Le BatardVaried Programs SUNSP 37 -Varied Programs DISCV 38 182 278Varied Programs TBS 39 139 247Fresh PrinceAmerican DadAmerican DadLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondSeinfeldFriendsFriendsFriendsFriends HLN 40 202 204News Now Making It in AmericaEvening Express FNC 41 205 360(11:00) Happening NowAmerica Live Studio B With Shepard SmithYour World With Neil CavutoThe Five E! 45 114 236E! NewsSex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CityVaried Programs TRAVEL 46 196 277Varied Programs Anthony Bourdain: No ReservationsBizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. FoodMan v. FoodAnthony Bourdain: No Reservations HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lVaried Programs TLC 48 183 280What Not to WearA Baby StoryA Baby StoryVaried Programs Say Yes, DressSay Yes, Dress HIST 49 120 269Varied Programs ANPL 50 184 282Animal Cops HoustonAnimal Cops HoustonAnimal Cops HoustonAnimal Cops HoustonThe HauntedMonsters Inside Me FOOD 51 110 231Best DishesBarefoot ContessaVaried Programs10 Dollar DinnersSecrets/Restaurant30-Minute MealsGiada at HomeGiada at HomeBarefoot ContessaBarefoot ContessaBest DishesBest Dishes TBN 52 260 372(11:30) Fall Praise-A-ThonFall Praise-A-ThonVaried Programs Fall Praise-A-Thon FSN-FL 56 -Varied Programs SYFY 58 122 244MovieVaried Programs AMC 60 130 254(11:00) MovieVaried Programs COM 62 107 249Varied Programs Movie Comedy Central(:26) Futurama(4:57) FuturamaIt’s Always Sunny CMT 63 166 327Varied Programs Yes, DearYes, DearYes, DearYes, DearRoseanneRoseanneRoseanneRoseanne NGWILD 108 190 283Dog WhispererVaried Programs NGC 109 186 276Alaska State TroopersBorder WarsTabooVaried Programs SCIENCE 110 193 284Varied Programs Factory MadeFactory MadeMythBustersThey Do It?They Do It? ID 111 192 285Dateline on IDVaried Programs HBO 302 300 501(:15) MovieVaried ProgramsMovieVaried Programs MAX 320 310 515(10:45) MovieVaried Programs SHOW 340 318 545(11:45) MovieVaried Programs

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DEAR ABBY: A friend’s daughter was married sev-eral years ago. I attended the shower and her wed-ding, and gave gifts for both. Two months after the wedding, I received a thank-you note in which a form letter was enclosed that read, “By the way, we are now separated and getting a divorce”! I was shocked not only by the news, but even more that my gifts were not returned with the divorce announce-ment. This young lady is now being married again to a different man. If I attend the shower/wedding, am I obligated to give her another set of gifts? Or should I skip the shower and go to the wedding without giving another gift? What is proper in this case? -CONFUSED IN MASSACHUSETTS DEAR CONFUSED: The rule of etiquette regard-ing disposition of wed-ding gifts when a couple divorces after a short time is that any UNUSED items (preferably in their original packaging) go back to the givers. However, to return cookware, linens, china, glassware, etc., that have been used is impractical, so please don’t hold a grudge. If you decide to attend the shower and/or wed-ding for your friend’s daughter, it is customary to give a gift. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: I recently began a new job, and although I love what I do, I have only one problem. My boss, “Harold,” does not like eating lunch by himself. Every day, he asks me what I’m doing for lunch. If I say I brought my lunch, he wants me to eat it in his office with him. If I tell him I’m going out, he wants us to go out together. I don’t think he’s attracted to me; I just think he hates being alone. He’s entirely too clingy, and I feel my lunch break is sup-posed to be a time to do whatever I want to do. I don’t believe the last lady who worked for him had a problem with this, but I do. How do I tell him “no” without offending him or hurting his feelings? -LUNCH BUDDY IN SOUTH CAROLINA DEAR LUNCH BUDDY: Tell your boss politely but firmly that you need your lunch hour to perform personal tasks -go shop-ping, make personal phone calls or catch up on some reading. You are entitled to that break time, and that is what it should be used for. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: A family member has six cats and wants to have the Thanksgiving meal at her house. Every time I eat there, I find cat hair on the table, on the plates and in the food. I don’t want to cause hard feelings, but how do I handle this? I’m allergic to cats. -HOLD THE FUR IN AMARILLO, TEXAS DEAR HOLD THE FUR: Arrange to celebrate Thanksgiving elsewhere and curtail your visit. If the relative attempts to “guilt” you into changing plans, explain that you cannot because you are allergic to cat hair and dander and your doctor has instructed you to avoid exposure. DEAR ABBY HOROSCOPES ARIES (March 21-April 19): Refuse to let emotions tamper with your plans. Be honest about the lifestyle changes you want to make and it will help you bypass any opposition that someone might present. A relationship will play a role in a decision you must make. +++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Spice things up -add a little excitement to your life. Get out and do things that will make you think or chal-lenge you physically. Take on a project that will help oth-ers help themselves. Creative suggestions will enhance your reputation. +++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You can chat all you like, but don’t stretch the truth. Sticking to facts will give you credibility. Getting together with someone you want to work with creatively will lead to a long-lasting work-related partnership. +++++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Emotional moments will surface while socializing. Keep an open mind and don’t take what’s said personally. Criticism can be productive if delivered diplomatically. Size up your situation and make it clear that charity begins at home. ++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Problems at home will esca-late if you don’t take care of your responsibilities. You may want to socialize, but it won’t be much fun if you have left chores unfinished. Organize your day and you’ll fit both work and pleasure into your schedule. ++++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): You can’t please every-one. Avoid arguments you cannot win. You are better off doing what’s expected of you and moving along to the pastimes that you find more enjoyable. +++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Put love and romance at the top of your to-do list. It’s important to have some fun with someone you find enter-taining and interesting to be around. A short day trip will enhance your personal life and help establish a future commitment. +++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Embrace the moment and do whatever it takes to follow through with your plans. Sitting back and letting negativity and depression take over will not get you heading in the right direction. Live, love and laugh and you will attract positive people and encounters. +++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Make a difference by lending a helping hand to a cause you believe in. Spend time with people who have the same interests, as that will lead to an adventure that will change your personal life. ++++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Don’t show emo-tion when dealing with any-one competing with you. Complete whatever you start and execute your plans only when you are positive that you have taken care of every detail. It’s what you do that will count. ++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Take care of private mat-ters such as your finances, medical issues or pending settlements. You should col-lect debts or pay off what you owe. +++++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Less talk and more action will bring rewards. Go the distance and don’t leave anything unfinished. If you surpass expectations, you will win favors and enhance your reputation. If someone wants to argue, back away -it’s a waste of time. +++ Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com THE LAST WORD Eugenia Word SUNDAY CROSSWORD Across 1 One to take a complaint to: Abbr. 4 It can get the blood flowing 9 Like calves at a rodeo 16 Crush, e.g.19 Some soft words20 Lost deliberately21 Wave receiver22 Card game with stakes 23 Subject of three Oliver Stone films,informally 24 Fixed-term agreement 25 Marseille mothers who are notgoddesses? 27 Half-court game?29 Sailing%DUEHUVFKDOOHQJH32 Hawaiian coffees33 Back-to-school purchase 35 Sense37 Hot ___(DV\:RUNLQJRQRQHV biceps and tricepsin Toulon? 43 On the up and up44 Soldier under Braxton Bragg, forshort 45 Female suffix46 Org. with badges48 Country whose name PHDQVKHWKDWVWULYHVZLWK*RG >7KDWVDZIXO@52 Quality that produces taste 57 Stinging insect59 Cowardly end in Cannes? 62 Innocent one63 Issue (from)64 Tiara component65 It may contain traces of lead 66 Tony winner Schreiber 67 Less refined/LNHDQLQIDQWV fingers, typically 71 Matisse masterpiece73 Actress Bosworth74 Pathetic group76 The limbo, once7XUNH\VWKLUG largest city 79 John Maynard .H\QHVVDOPDmater 80 Bordeaux bear cub?,QGLDQVVKRHV3KRRH\85 Fiji competitor86 Cosa ___88 Nevada county89 Spy, at times91 With 98-Down, 0DG0RQH\KRVW 92 First capital of Alaska 94 Online feline in Lyon? :KRVDLG,RZH WKHSXEOLFQRWKLQJ 103 Dead ringers?104 ___ Inn106 Home of Gannon Univ. 107 Short-tailed weasel108 Crib side part110 First college frat to charter a chapter inall 50 states (QYLURQPHQWDO portmanteau 113 Nine to five, generally, inGrenoble? 116 Certain work of subway art 118 Word with salad or roll 119 Mauna ___ Observatory 120 Surround with shrubbery 121 Rocks for Jocks, most likely (OHDQRU5RRVHYHOW ___ Roosevelt 123 Take a wrong turn:KDWVLWJRQQD EH" 125 What to wear126 Healy who created the Three StoogesDown 1 QB Donovan2 Net guard3 Prizefighter in a Parisian novel? 4 The Rams, on sports tickers ([SHUWDWEUHZLQJ oolong in Orlans? 4('SDUW7 Mysterious Scottish figure, informally 0DQ\DQL&DUO\ fan 9 Hasty flight10 Weakness11 Layers of clouds12 On TV, say*RWD+ROGBBB (1984 top 10 hit) /X[FRPSRVHU Brian 15 Lost time?16 Two-dimensional'HHHOX[H(QWRXUDJHV26 Indiana Jones venue28 ___ fixe30 Comic Dave34 Ramjets, e.g.36 Populous area37 Country music channel 39 Paper size: Abbr.41 Some foam toys42 Area close to home44 Put on the job again46 Large fern47 Toothed49 58-Down 29-Across6WDU7UHNYLOODLQV51 Not present at53 Flaming54 Overseeing of a Bayonne bakery? 55 Issue for Michelle Obama 56 R in a car58 Go-ahead60 Showed, as a seat61 Org. for big shots?64 Family nickname68 That, to Toms70 Tucson school, briefly (\HVXUJHRQV instrument 75 Was concerned (with) 77 Cretin81 QB legend QLFNQDPHGWKH *ROGHQ$UP 82 French-speaking country whereillegal activity runsrampant? (ODVWLF,WVPRUHWKDQD pinch: Abbr. 90 Interview seg.91 What a photocopier light may indicate $PHULFDQ,GRO winner Allen 94 Relief for plantar fasciitis 95 Against96 Outside of walking distance, say 97 Actor Morales98 See 91-Across99 Millinery item100 Operating system between Puma andPanther 101 Most distant point102 Rode hard105 Nickel-and-___(3$LVVXDQFHV Abbr. 109 Kind of brick111 The language Gidhlig 114 Shoe width115 ___-Seal (leather protector) 117 ___ Palmas, Spain No. 1104 5(/($6('$7( )5$1./<63($.,1*%\%UHQGDQ(PPHWW4XLJOH\(GLWHG E\:LOO6KRUW] For any three answers,call from a touch-tonephone: 1-900-285-5656,$1.49 each minute; or,with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. 123456789101112131415161718192021 22 232425 26 27282930313233343536373839404142 434445 4647484950515253545556575859606162636465 66 67686970717273747576777879808182838485868788 8990919293 949596979899100101102103 104105106 107108109110111112113114115116117118119120 121122 123124 125126 Divorce announcement arrives with wedding thank-you note KIWIATOPPARDPISCES IRANLEDAISAWAPOLLO LATHELADYLATHEROSIER EENYJPEGMELTONCE SPRATSOAVESBOYCOTTS CAPTAINBLITHEOBIT ADAIMASODSUTHANT BURGLARWAITANDSEETHE SAKEDESERTMIAMOLE MAECRUELCABLEMEN MAGTITHEBREAKERSSRS SKELETALAANDEATA NINOPOTTAURUSPROFBREATHECHEESEPITBULLCASTROKAZBOZOMOA HONGWRITHENEWYORK SAFEWORDAREOLENERDY ONEBROUEISNTFILM ATTLEESCYTHEOFRELIEF PICONETHAIYULEELMO SCHWASSOWSSTUDDLIX Answers to last Sunday’s Crossword. Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. CELEBRITY CIPHER Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 5D

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6D LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012 6DLIFE ROUNTREE MOORE TOYOTA SHOWROOM November 13th, 2012 5:30 pm Contact Info: (386) 755-0507 or kmccallister@marchofdimes.com www.marchofdimes.com/orida Tickets ($50) available at: Wards Jewelers First Street Music Suwannee Democrat TD Bank (US 90 W, Baya Dr.) Rountree Moore Toyota TD Bank Silver Sponsors SiTEL ShandsLakeShore Maureen and Vern Lloyd Dees-Parrish Family Funeral Home Edward Jones Investments(Steve Jones) Media Sponsors Lake City Reporter Lake City Advertiser Suwannee Democrat Newman Broadcasting 96.5 The Jet Newman Media Mix 94.3 Oldies 97.1 Oldies 1340 Northoridanow.com Power Country 102.1 Big 98/ The X 106.5 Gold Sponsors Honorary Chair Suzanne Norris TD Bank Rountree Moore Auto Group Walmart American Pawn Brokers State Corporate Sponsor: Womens Center of Florida Live Auction Sponsor Bronze Sponsors SERVPRO Holiday Inn Baya Pharmacy Haven Hospice Peoples State Bank Campus USA Credit Union Heritage Bank of the South Florida Power and Light Co. The Health Center of Lake City Lake City Medical Center Auxiliary State Farm Insurance (John Burns III) Pete & Doris Johnson / Industry Services, Inc. If you have an orthopedic injury, its good to know that quality care is available right here in Lake City. Lake City Bone and Joint offers treatment for a wide range of orthopedic issues. From sports injuries to carpel tunnel syndrome to rotator cuff injuries to arthroscopic hip, knee and shoulder surgery, Lake City Bone and Joint is ready for you. To schedule an appointment, call 386-755-9720 3140 NW Medical Center Lane, Suite 130, Lake City, FL 32055 Dr. Jeffrey Glenn is Lake Citys only board-certied Orthopedic Surgeon who is fellowship-trained in joint replacement surgery. www.LCBoneandJoint.com Excellence. I B... J. Excellence. I B... J. LCM-3109 Physician Ads 5.25x10_L7.indd 1 8/15/12 11:53:29 AM New flower varieties excel at overwintering TASTE: Some of Gainesvilles best. Continued From Page 1D vinaigrette and pepitas; pigs-feet pate with field greens, sherried egg vin aigrette and walnuts($6) just to name a few. There are several wine choices, and for $15 you can have a wine-tasting with three, 3-ounce serv ings of three different wines. For $21 you can have six, 3-ounce servings. This is a creative way to try new wines and make your dinner even more interesting. Cant forget the cakes, which are homemade on the premises by chef April Williams. According to Williams, the most popular are fresh fruit cheesecake and coconut cream cake. The Chocolate Fudge Corruption and the Italian espresso torte caught our attention, too. Just didnt have room this visit. Next door to Mildreds is the New Deal Caf. It offers more delicious choices, including their renowned burgers. Their classic burger ($10) is served with all the trimmings of your choice. Other burgers are bleu cheese and bacon ($11); mushroom, Swiss and caramelized onion ($11); and local tempeh burger with sprouts, tomato and avocado aioli ($8). All are served with fries. There are other spe cialty sandwiches, appetiz ers and entries to choose from. Cant go wrong here either. Mildreds and the New Deal Caf are located in the Westgate Regency Shopping Center between Newberry Road and Second Avenue. Check out their websites, www.mil dredsbigcityfood.com and www.newdealcafegaines ville.com, for directions and operating times. By DEAN FOSDICK Associated Press Overwintering plants usually means deadhead ing, dividing, pruning, mulching or bringing them indoors to protect them from the cold. Increasingly, though, varieties are being introduced that flower into winter and rebound in spring. They need no spe cial care and deliver more blooms for the buck. Two noteworthy exam ples are Ball Horticultural Co.s Cool Wave petunias and pansies. These flowers have more hardiness because they were developed in many different locations, and strains were cho sen from breeding stock that did best in tempera ture extremes, said Cool Wave plant manager Claire Watson. Not only are they resistant to cold but they also are more tolerant of heat. Some other flower variet ies introduced recently to provide color over longer periods of time are bearded iris, daylilies, clematis and shrub roses. Many of those perennials bloom repeat edly through the growing season, unlike earlier edi tions. Cool Waves extended flowering petunias have been on the market five years, quickly becoming consumer favorites. Pansies were introduced this year. They need less mainte nance, have large-size flow ers and their colors intensify with the cold, Watson said. They tolerate several light frosts and simply go dor mant after a hard frost. They bloom even in the snow. Cool Wave series flow ers can be mixed with tra ditional late-season plants like ornamental cabbage and peppers, kale, mums, lavender and millet. They return in spring to comple ment such early arriving bulb varieties as daffodils, tulips, hyacinth and crocus es. In short, they display well with others. These are vigorous flow ers, capable of spreading 24 to 30 inches. That makes them a vibrant groundcov er. It also means that not as many plants are needed per pot or for filling bare spaces in borders or beds. Their extended bloom abil ity gives gardeners more versatility for flowerbed design. The new pansies and petunias provide three full seasons of bloom when grown in the South. Those planted in the Snowbelt are capable of surviving Zone 5 conditions (-10 to -20 degrees Fahrenheit) and will reappear soon after the snow melts. They can use a light layer of mulch as winter time insurance but dont really require it, Watson said. A great deal of breeding work has been done over the past several decades to insert the cold gene into different plant varieties, said Anthony Tesselaar, president and co-founder of Tesselaar Plants in Silvan, Australia. Winter gardening is the ultimate challenge in this kind of work, Tesselaar said. Thats what we all aspire to. Many plants are tested. Few, however, make the cut. Hybridizers who do upwards of 200,000 plant crosses a year might be lucky to emerge after a cou ple of seasons with just one to 10 plants that look new or promising enough to bring to market, Tesselaar said. On average, anytime you get good genetics in plants it takes 18 to 25 years before you can get comfort able with them or predict their behavior, Tesselaar said. They dont just pop out of the box. ASSOCIATED PRESS Cool wave pansies tolerate several light frosts and go dormant after a hard frost. Their colors intensify in the cold and they bloom even in the snow, and recover in early spring. Online: For more about extend ed bloom flowers, see this Utah State University Fact Sheet: http://www.extension. usu.edu/files/publications/ factsheet/pub-585335. htm ASSOCIATED PRESS Ornamental cabbage and kale are among the new seasonextending flowers. They fit in nicely with other traditional favorites, suc as ornamental peppers, mums, lavender and millet. They rebound in spring, looking good when intermixed with daffodils, tulips and hyacinth. GARDENING Holiday air travel to be difficult Associated Press NEW YORK The rec ipe for Thanksgiving travel is likely to make travelers a little bitter this year. Americans can expect airports to be busier and planes to be fuller than ever, according to a fore cast by the main trade association for U.S. air lines two weeks ahead of the holiday. And fares are already more expensive. Airlines for America expects nearly 24 mil lion travelers to fly from Friday, Nov. 16, through Tuesday, Nov. 27. Thats up narrowly from a year earlier. Last years tally was flat from 2010. But traffic on the nations airlines is still 10 percent below the peak travel years of 2006 and 2007. For those traveling on the busiest days around Thanksgiving, planes are expected to be close to 90 percent full, the trade group says. That would be a record for the hol iday. Sunday, Nov. 25 is projected as the busiest travel day, followed by Wednesday, Nov. 21 and Monday, Nov. 26. Genie Norman and Mary Kay Hollingswoth are Columbia County Residents who love good food and fun. Their column on area restau rants appears twice monthly. You can contact them at TasteBuddiesLakeCity@ gmail.com.