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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01924

Material Information

Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 11-08-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01952

Related Items

Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01924

Material Information

Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 11-08-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01952

Related Items

Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

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By NANCY BENAC andNEDRA PICKLERAssociated PressWASHINGTON — President Barack Obama faces a new urgent task now that he has a second term, working with a status-quo Congress to address an impending financial crisis that economists say could send the country back into recession. “You made your voice heard,” Obama said in his acceptance speech, signaling that he believes the bulk of the country is behind his policies. It’s a sticking point for House Republicans, sure to balk at that. The same voters who gave Obama four more years in office also elected a divided Congress, sticking with the dynamic that has made it so hard for the president to advance his agenda. Democrats retained control of the Senate; Republicans kept their House majority. House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, spoke of a dual mandate. “If there is a mandate, it is a mandate for both parties to find common ground and take steps together to help our economy grow and create jobs,” he said. Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky had a more harsh assessment. “The voters have not endorsed the failures or excesses of the president’s first term,” McConnell Opinion ................ 4APeople.................. 2AObituaries .............. 5A Advice & Comics ......... 3B Puzzles ................. 4B TODAY IN PEOPLE Lady Gaga gives $1M to Red Cross. COMING FRIDAY Local news roundup. 68 36 Sunny WEATHER, 2A Lake City ReporterTHURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2012 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | 75¢ LAKECITYREPORTER.COM CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 138, No. 202 1 The task aheadASSOCIATED PRESSPresident Barack Obama waves as he walks on stage with first lady Michelle Obama and daughters Malia and Sas ha at his election night party Wednesday in Chicago. Obama defeated Republican challe nger former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney.An old ritualthat never‘dies’ COURTESYGlenn Hunter, who lost the race for superintendent of schools Tuesday, was the latest target of local politi-cal hijinks. This ‘grave’ was discov-ered late Tuesday in front of the county courthouse. Obama now faces issue of ‘fiscal cliff’ By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comColumbia County officials are trying to attract an aerospace/ aviation corpo-ration to the area that could potentially bring hundreds of jobs ben-efiting the local economy. “It’s an Enterprise Florida-generated lead for an aerospace/aviation -related prospect that could potentially employ 400 peo-ple and would have a capital investment of about $4 million,” said Jesse Quillen, Columbia County Economic Development Director. Quillen released the information during the Columbia County Economic Development Advisory Board meeting Wednesday after-noon, when he gave a director’s report detailing active projects. He said he doesn’t know the prospect, but indicated the proj-ect is referred to as “Project Spark” by Enterprise Florida JOBS continued on 6A RITUAL continued on 6A County courts aerospace firm By BILL KACZORAssociated PressTALLAHASSEE — Style as well as substance likely played a role in the rejection by Florida voters of eight of 11 proposed state constitutional amendments. The Republican-dominated Florida Legislature put all 11 on Tuesday’s ballot. Most were designed to advance the GOP’s conservative social and fiscal agendas. The three amendments that won 60 percent approval, which all amendments must get to pass, were simple and easy to under-stand. They offered property tax breaks tar-geted to groups difficult to oppose: disabled veterans, low-income seniors and spouses of military personnel and first responders By DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@gmail.comE very election cycle campaigns come to an end, but in Columbia County, sometimes they get buried. This year Glenn Hunter’s campaign for superintendent of schools was the centerpiece of the local tradition. A mock grave was constructed in front of the Columbia County Courthouse sometime before midnight Tuesday, com-plete with a grave marker and a mound of dirt. Other campaigns and local politicians’ wooden headstones ringed the Hunter campaign’s final resting place. James Montgomery, 79, remembers when he was young, and the tradition popular. Now, he said, he didn’t even think to Sexting lands man in jail, saypoliceFrom staff reportsA Columbia County man, who police said thought he was sex-ting an 11-year-old child, sent sexually explicit text messages to an undercover sheriff’s dep-uty and was arrested Tuesday afternoon. Daniel Nelson Long, 23, of 230 SW Turner Place, was charged with two counts of obscene com-munications in connection with the case. He was booked into the Columbia County Detention Facility without bond. According to Columbia County sheriff’s reports, in October Long began using a cellular phone to send sexually explicit Long ‘Project Spark’ could bring as many as 400 jobs to county. Quillen JAILED continued on 6A Taking a spinJASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White resident David Creech takes his daughters Sara h (left), 2, and Savannah, 5, for a ride on the carousel while visiting the Columbia County Fair this week. Must address impending financial crisis. OBAMA continued on 6AAmendments failed on style and substanceAMENDMENTS continued on 6A

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HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Rock musician Al Berger is 63. Country singer Bonnie Raitt is 63. Rock musician Larry Burnette (Firefall) is 61. TV hostess Mary Hart (Entertainment Tonight) is 61. Former Major League baseball player Jerry Remy is 60. Federal Emergency Management Director Michael D. Brown is 59. Actress Courtney Thorne-Smith is 45. Actress Parker Posey is 44. Tom Anderson, cofounder of MySpace, is 42. AROUND FLORIDA Red light camera cases to be heard TALLAHASSEE The Florida Supreme Court will hear two cases on the legality of fines collected from motorists caught by red light cameras before the Legislature passed a law authorizing their use. The justices on Tuesday accepted jurisdiction of appeals from conflicting lower court decisions. At stake could be mil lions of dollars in fines collected across the state. They may have to be refunded if the justices side with the 5th District Court of Appeal. The city of Orlando is appealing the Daytona Beach-based courts ruling that fines collected before the law was passed in 2010 were illegal. The 3rd District Court of Appeal in Miami came to the opposite conclusion in upholding fines collect ed by the city of Aventura. The cases will not affect motorists ticketed after the law was passed. Owner of store fatally shot DAVISVILLE Authorities said the owner of a Florida Panhandle convenience store was fatally shot during an apparent robbery. Escambia County Sheriffs spokesman Mike Ward said two men wear ing ski masks shot the owner of State Line OYes Lotto Tuesday afternoon. The pink store sells lot tery tickets and beer and is located on Highway 97 near the Florida-Alabama line. The Pensacola News Journal reported the body of 74-year-old Thomas Tommy Kroll was found behind the counter. Kroll and his wife, Kathy, have owned the store for about 11 years. The sheriffs office and officers from the nearby Century Correctional Institute searched for the suspects, causing three nearby schools to go on lock-down for about 45 minutes. Woman guilty of dragging deputy NEW PORT RICHEY A Tampa Bay area woman has been convicted of battery on a law enforce ment officer for dragging a deputy with her truck while trying to escape. A Pasco County jury found 22-year-old Brittany Miles guilty Wednesday. She had been facing an attempted murder charge, which would have carried a possible life sentence. Authorities said Miles was pulled over for pos sible DUI last year. She was handcuffed and placed in the back of Deputy Ashley Gradys cruiser. Miles managed to escape and drive off. Grady was seriously injured when she tried to stop the truck. After getting away from the deputy, authori ties said, Miles made her way to Hernando County, where she hit and killed 67-year-old motorcyclist Henry McCain. She is set to be tried for McCains death next year. Greer will get to see GOP emails ORLANDO The attorney for former Florida GOP chair Jim Greer says its conceivable his criminal fraud case could begin as scheduled next year after he worked out a deal for a defense com puter expert to search GOP computer servers for emails he believes are per tinent to his defense. Greers attorney, Damon Chase, struck the deal at a hearing Wednesday. Chase expects it take only a day, which would speed along the discovery process. In September, Judge Marc Lubet set a Feb. 11 start date for trial. Some prominent Florida Republicans are named as witnesses for Greers trial on felony charges that he funneled GOP money to a private company he formed. Greer has pleaded not guilty. Woman, unborn child killed WINTER HAVEN Authorities said a pregnant central Florida woman and her unborn child were killed in a crash involving a drunken driver. The Polk County Sheriffs Office reported that 37-year-old Thomas Dick rear-ended a van at a Winter Haven intersection Sunday night. One of the vans passengers, 19-yearold Tiffany Woodham, died on the way to the hospital. Her unborn daughter died after doctors attempted to perform a cesarean section. The News Chief said Woodham was nine months pregnant. Dick was jailed on multi ple charges, including two counts of driving under the influence manslaughter. Tampa car dealer pleads guilty TAMPA A Tampa car dealer admitted in a plea agreement filed in U.S. District Court that he helped bilk the govern ment out of almost $1.2 million in fraudulent tax returns. The document filed Tuesday followed the May arrest of 42-year-old Russell Bruce Simmons Jr. on a 32-count indictment. Lady Gaga donates $1M to Red Cross NEW YORK L ady Gaga is donating $1 million to the Red Cross to aid those affected by Superstorm Sandy. The New Yorkborn singer posted on her blog Wednesday that she is pledging the money on behalf of her parents and sister. She also said she would not be the woman or artist that I am today if it werent for places like the Lower Eastside, Harlem, the Bronx and Brooklyn. She writes: Thank you for helping me build my spirit. I will now help you rebuild yours. Superstorm Sandy made landfall more than a week ago, killing many of its more than 100 victims in New York City and New Jersey and leav ing millions without power. Lady Gaga added that New York is a place full of relentless ambition. Donald Trump deletes parts of Twitter tirade LOS ANGELES Donald Trump has deleted some of the Twitter tirade he posted following President Barack Obamas re-election, and added new critiques of NBCs Brian Williams. Trump began tweeting before the election was called that it was a total sham and a travesty. After news outlets projected that Obama won the election, Trump tweeted, Well, back to the drawing board! He posted more than 10 angry tweets, declaring our nation is a once great nation divided and the world is laughing at us. He encouraged a revolution in this country. The electoral college is a disaster for a democracy, fumed the celeb rity mogul. Williams showed some of Trumps tweets on air, saying he had driven well past the last exit to relevance and veered into something closer to irresponsible. Trump also deleted some of Tuesday nights tirade, including tweets calling for revolution and incorrectly saying that Obama had lost the popular vote. Tucson mayor: banned Rod Stewart can return TUCSON The mayor of Tucson doesnt exactly know what Rod Stewart did that got him banned from a Tucson hotel 40 years ago. But Mayor Jonathan Rothschild wants the sexagenarian rocker to know that he can return to the city. The Arizona Daily Star reported that Rothschild reached out to Stewart recently when the British television show Loose Women contacted the mayor about Stewarts standing in Tucson. Rothschild wrote, while I cannot speak to any legal obligations he may have, I can say that Mr. Stewart is welcome in our city, and we would be happy to have him visit. According to his biography, Stewart and his former band mates in Faces trashed several rooms and a miniature train at an unidentified local hotel in retribution for the hotel bar being temporarily closed. Wednes day: Afternoon: 1-1-3 Evening: N/A Wednes day: Afternoon: 0-6-6-9 Evening: N/A Tues day: 12-23-26-34-35 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAIL Y BRIEFING THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 2AWEATHER ASSOCIATED PRESS Entertainer Lady Gaga is donating $1 million to the Red Cross to aid those affect ed by Superstorm Sandy. The New York-born singer posted on her blog Wednesda that she is pledging the money on behalf of her parents and sister. Daily Scripture I urge, then, first of all, that petitions, prayers, intercession and thanksgiving be made for all people for kings and all those in authority, that we may live peaceful and quiet lives in all godliness and holiness. 1 Timothy 2:1-2 Trump Stewart Associated Press Associated Press

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Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2012 3A 3A All children are artists! Ages 2-10 Fall Session Receive $10 off tuition October 22nd Nov. 16th Phone: (386) 438-8060 Noahs-art.com *located across the highway from Honda statefarm.com With competitive rates and personal service, its no wonder more drivers trust State Farm Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there. CALL FOR A QUOTE 24/7. Ride with the #1 car insurer in 1001143.1 State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company State Farm Indemnity Company Bloomington, IL John Kasak, Agent 904 SW SR 247 Branford Hwy Lake City, FL 32025 Bus: 386-752-7521 johnkasak.com John Burns III, Agent 234 SW Main Boulevard Lake City, FL 32056 Bus: 386-752-5866 johnburnsinsurance.com FLORIDA. *Retail sales only. Discount taken o of full retail price. Sale pricing or other oers that result in greater savings will supersede this oer. Not valid on previous purchases. Excludes Multi-Purpose primers, Minwax Wood Finishes Quarts, ladders, spray equipment and accessories & gift cards. Other exclusions may apply. See store or sherwin-williams.com for details. Valid at Sherwin-Williams and Sherwin-Williams operated retail paint stores only. Not valid in Canada. 2012 The Sherwin-Williams Company Join us on MON & FRI: 7 A M TO 8 P M SAT: 8 A M TO 6 P M SUN: 10 A M TO 6 P M Store hours may vary. See store for details. EX T E N DED STOR E HOUR S : 30 % O FF painting supplies 15 % O FF custom order wallpaper N OVEMBER 9 12 T o locate a Sherwin-Williams store near you visit sherwin-williams.com or call 1-800-4-SHE R W IN P AI N TS & S TAI N S 40 % O FF T HE 4 D AY S U P ER S ALE Columbia goes to the polls More scenes from Tuesdays election Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City Reporter ABOVE: Bucky Nash, the winning candidate in the Columbia County Commission District 3 race, is seen with his wife, Alice, at the supervisor of elections office after the polls closed Tuesday. TOP RIGHT: Nancy Huddleston hugs her husband, Terry, after he won the election for Columbia County superintendent of schools. RIGHT: Newly elected school board member Stephanie Finnell congratulates state attorney-elect Jeff Siegmeister at his office Tuesday night. BELOW: Kyler Keen (left), 3, watches as Laney Grinstead, 5, plays a game on a smart phone as adults are preoccupied with election returns. Ribbon-cutting for Clubhouse Lake City Garden Club and Lake City Womans Club will hold an open house and ribbon-cutting to celebrate renovations to the club house, 257 SE Hernando St. The event will be from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Refreshments will be served. DAR to meet The Edward Rutledge Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, will hold its monthly meeting on Thursday, Nov. 8 10:30 a. m., at the Senior Lifestyle Enrichment Center, 28 SE Allison Court off Baya Avenue. Guests are always welcomed. BRIEFS

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H ow many mistakes did Republicans make in the 2012 political season? They are so numerous, it is hard to count. Probably the biggest lesson from Tuesday’s election is that a party cannot back a candidate who has been on all sides of every issue. Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney was for abortion rights before he was against them. He was for health care reform before he was against it. And so on. His campaign will evoke the memory of the Etch-a-Sketch toy, based on an unfortunate but oh-so-true remark by a Romney campaign aide who explained that his candidate would transition from the extremely conserva-tive positions he’d taken dur-ing the primary by shaking the Etch-a-Sketch, erasing the pic-ture and starting all over again. This is not the 1970s, and former President Richard Nixon’s “Southern Strategy” is no longer viable. A candidate simply cannot pick up enough Electoral College votes by cobbling together most of the South and much of the Midwest and ceding the big cities on both coasts to the other side. Ah, and then let’s remember that abortion rights and access to contraception are now criti-cal issues for women voters. That has not been the case since the 1980s. But when a string of Republican congressional can-didates came out with a series of unbelievably backward statements about contracep-tives, female biology, rape and pregnancy, women voters took notice. Democrats have been waiting for decades to work reproductive rights back into the national political dialogue, and candidates Todd Akin of Missouri, Richard Mourdock of Indiana and Joe Walsh of Illinois did it for them. Among women voters, 54 percent supported Obama and 44 percent chose Romney. The coalition that allowed Democrats to recapture the White House and maintain control of the Senate was made up of women, young voters, Hispanics, African-Americans, urban voters and college-educated voters. That is the coalition of tomorrow as we become a much more diverse nation. Republicans must decide within the next few months whether they want to build a base made up of religious conservatives and older white voters. No party ever wants to drop a constituency that helps make up its base. But Republicans face intrinsic problems if they want to try to keep these groups. I have been saying for a long time that the GOP coali-tion of the future is also one of the GOP coalitions of the past. Republicans need to emphasize fiscal issues and de-emphasize socially conservative issues. They need to return to the days of the so-called Rockefeller Republicans. Do I believe they will do that? No, I think they’re going to have stomach more significant losses until they learn their lessons. GOP: Take hint and move to middle ANOTHER VIEW N ow that the elec-tion is behind us, perhaps we can put politics aside and acknowledge a hard fact: On Sept. 11 of this year, America was defeated by al-Qaida in the Battle of Benghazi. About this battle many questions remain. The media and Congress have a responsibil-ity to get answers — not only because we should know the truth, not only to assign blame but also to learn from failure. At the very least, we should try to understand what les-sons our enemies have learned — because they will apply those lessons in the future. It is possible to lose many battles and still win a war. It is possible to win many battles and still lose a war. What is perilous is to misunderstand your enemies and underesti-mate the threats they pose. This was the case prior to Sept. 11, 2001, as Condoleezza Rice candidly admitted to the 9/11 Commission in 2004. “The ter-rorists were at war with us,” she said, “but we were not yet at war with them.” On Sept. 11, 2012, the situation was similar. Peter Bergen, a director of the New America Foundation and CNN’s national security analyst, had been say-ing for months that al-Qaida was “defeated,” a thesis endorsed by, among others, retired Lt. Col. Thomas Lynch III, a distin-guished research fellow at the National Defense University. President Barack Obama made this claim a central theme of his re-election campaign. Post-Benghazi, in his final stump speech, in Des Moines, he reassured voters that “the war in Iraq has ended, the war in Afghanistan is ending. Osama bin Laden is dead!” But in Afghanistan, we have not broken the Taliban; in Iraq, al-Qaida has been increasing the tempo of its suicide attacks; in Syria, al-Qaida is playing an increasingly significant role in the civil war; in Yemen, al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula is far from beaten; in Mali, al-Qaida has taken control of vast territories; in Iran, a regime whose ideology is no less anti-American than al-Qaida’s contin-ues to develop nuclear weapons despite tightening sanctions. According to The New York Times, in the months leading up to the “attacks on the American diplomatic mission in Benghazi, the Obama administration received intelligence reports that Islamic extremist groups were operating training camps in the mountains near Benghazi and that some of the fighters were ‘al-Qaida leaning.’” That’s an oddly tentative way to refer to al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb, an affili-ate; Ansar al-Sharia, recently described by U.S government researchers as a group that “has increasingly embodied al-Qaida’s presence in Libya”; and the Muhammad Jamal network, which openly defends al-Qaida and, to quote Muhammad Jamal, “all jihad movements in the world. ...” These three groups were primary partici-pants in the Benghazi attacks, American officials have said. AFRICOM, the American regional combatant command for Africa, established in 2007, had drones monitoring the ter-rorist training camps. But those drones were unarmed, as were the drones at the Sigonella naval air station in Sicily, a short flight from Benghazi. Had there been armed drones to deploy, would it have made a differ-ence? Perhaps: According to Fox News’ Jennifer Griffin, who has done some of the best report-ing on this story, former Navy SEALs Tyrone Woods and Glen Doherty had laser rangefind-ers on the roof of the building, where they were attempting to hold out against the terrorists. Using those rangefinders, they had pinpointed the coordinates of the mortars firing at them, and requested air support. That support never arrived and, even-tually, mortars struck the roof, killing both men. What’s to stop “al-Qaida leaning” groups from replicating the Benghazi model elsewhere? What can be done to prevent jihadist training camps from springing up like weeds across North Africa and the broader Middle East and training wave after wave of bomb makers, suicide bombers and guerrillas? Are these threats even being taken seriously? I’m not confi-dent. The controversy over Benghazi initially focused on the mischaracterization of the recent 9/11 attacks as a pro-test against “Islamophobia” that spun out of control. Next, it became a debate over who should be blamed for what was clearly an inadequate response. Increasingly, however, it appears that insufficient prepa-ration made impotence inevi-table. And the cause of that may be this simple: Too many other-wise smart and powerful people can’t come to terms with the reality that a serious, if uncon-ventional, war is being waged — a war that has not ended and will not end any time soon. Learning from Benghazi T he story gets compli-cated, but apparently Iceland is consider-ing changing its name to something more commensurate with the island’s natural beauties and amenities, among which, appar-ently, ice plays only a small part. For years, Iceland has been known to Americans — the young ones, at least — as a stop on a grueling but very cheap flight to Europe aboard the aged prop planes of Icelandic Air. Then it was a participant in the banking and real-estate bubble that made many people quite wealthy on paper until the bubble popped, the banks failed and the government fell. Then, in 2010 and 2011, two volcanic eruptions disrupted air travel to Europe, reminding unsophisticated travelers think-ing of a trip to Iceland that if a fast-moving glacier didn’t get you, maybe a volcano would. Indeed, one of the suggested names that we suspect won’t make the cut is “Volcanicland.” In any case, perhaps a new name is in order; countries do it more often than you might think. Sometimes it’s to mark an end to colonial rule. Rhodesia became Zimbabwe; the Gold Coast became Ghana (although now that “Gold Coast” is up for grabs, Iceland might want to consider throwing it into the mix); British Honduras is Belize, and there is a whole bunch of Pacific Islands with new names that few can keep straight. (Vanuatu? Tuvalu?) Sometimes one suspects that a country changes its name in hopes of changing its luck. The Belgian Congo became the Democratic Republic of Congo and then became Zaire and, finally, just Congo. It suffered terribly under each name. Anyway, the island’s tourist authorities are holding a contest to choose a new name, selection by the Promote Iceland commit-tee to be done sometime after March 21. Frankly, the early suggestions make keeping the current name look more and more attrac-tive — Niceland, Rockland, Catch-A-Cloud Land, Spiritland, Birdsland, Volcanicland and one that will never get by the real-estate people, Eyjafjlakojland, after the giant volcano that recently blew up. Icelanders seem to be honest in their choice of names. Warming up Iceland’s image Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding counties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, publisher Robert Bridges, editor Sue Brannon, controller Dink NeSmith, president Tom Wood, chairman LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY E-MAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com Bonnie Erbebonnieerbe@compuserve.com Q Bonnie Erbe is a TV host and writes this column for Scripps Howard News Service. H ope springs qua-drennially after every presidential election. Americans are naturally optimistic (although you wouldn’t know it from listening to most of our politi-cians). For a while after the winner has gracefully accepted the loser’s traditional phone call to concede, they allow themselves to believe that this time will be different, that the nation has moved on to some-thing better than politics as usual. Republican Mitt Romney, in his concession speech, told his supporters: “The nation, as you know, is at a critical point, and at a time like this we can’t risk partisan bickering and political posturing. Our leaders have to reach across the aisle to do the people’s work.” It was as if the charges that Obama was a socialist, who apologized for America on bended knees, who was over his head in the job and wedded to policies of proven failure had never been made. In his acceptance speech, Obama said that he and Romney had “battled fiercely” — an understatement if there ever was one — “but it’s only because we love this country deeply.” As if Romney had never run a series of nasty and dishonest ads accusing Obama of shipping manufacturing of the iconic American Jeep over-seas. When members of Congress return to Washington next week, for a few fleeting mil-liseconds they may allow them-selves to think that maybe the problems they left behind might have been solved in their absence. But still looming is the “fiscal cliff” of tax increases and automatic budget cuts, largely of the GOP’s doing, and Obama is in position to wield considerable influence simply by doing nothing. Hope truly does spring quadrennially in Washington, but it takes only a week or so for reality to set in. Expectongoing gridlock Q Scripps Howard News Service OPINION Thursday, November 8, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A4AOPINION Q Dale McFeatters is editorial writer for Scripps Howard News Service. Dale McFeattersmcfeattersd@shns.com Cliff May Q Clifford D. May is president of the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies, a policy institute focusing on terrorism.

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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2012 5A5AJohnnie B. ChatmonMr. Johnnie B. Chatmon, age 86 resident of Lake City went home to be with the Lord Tues-day, Novem-ber 6, 2012 at the Lake City Medical Cen-ter terminating an extended illness. Born in Wellborn, FL., he was the son of the late Elbert Chatmon and Heneretta Epps Chatmon. He was employed for several years as a school bus driver in Suwannee County and later was self-employed in the pulp wood industry. He attended Wellborn Community Church in Well-born, FL. Survivors include six GDXJKWHUVDQGYHVRQV3DWULFLDKing of Miami, FL.; Barbara (James) Haynes, of Miami, FL.; Emmitt Redmond, of Ft. White, FL.; Johnnie Mae, of Ft. Lau-derdale, FL.; Harold Chatmon of Lake City, FL.; Mike (Christine) Chatmon, of Lake City, FL.; Larry Chatmon, of Lake City, FL.; Sgt. First Class Sandra Chatmon of Kuwait & Ft. Lau-derdale, FL.; Johnny Chatmon of Lake City, FL.; Dorothy (El-der Borie) Hudson, of Lake City, FL.; Vearice (Rev. Antwine) Jones, of Lake City, FL.; Three sister-in-laws, Louise Lloyd of 0LDPL)/3ULVFLOOD:LOOLDP son, of Wellborn, FL.; and Clar-etha Allen of Lake City, FL.; 16 grandchildren; 17 great grand-children; four god-children, Wil-lie (Maria) Montgomery; Char-lie, Roger and Rutha Mae Mayo; A host of nieces, nephews, cousins, and sorrowing friends.Funeral services for Mr. John-nie b. Chatmon, will be 1:00 pm Saturday, November 10, 2012 at Wellborn Community Church with Dr. James S. Jones, SDVWRURIFLDWLQJ,QWHUPHQWwill follow in Lake Jackson Cemetery. The family will re-ceive friends Friday, Novem-ber 9, 2012 at Cooper Funeral Home, chapel from 5:00 pm.Arrangements entrusted to COOPER FUNERALHOME 251 N.E. Washington Street, Lake City, FL. Willis O. Cooper, L.F.D..Marilyn Ann DidasMarilyn Ann Didas, 71, of Franklin, NC, passed away Tuesday, November 6, 2012.Born in St. Augustine, FL, she was the daughter of the late John Burb Higginbotham and Ruth Vera 3HDUO$OOHQ,QDGGLWLRQWRher parents, she was preceded in death by KHUUVWKXVEDQG*HWKUR/HHBryant and husband Leon Ar-WKXU'LGDVDQGDVRQ*DU\/HHBryant. Marilyn loved lottery tickets, westerns and reading and was of the Baptist faith. 6KHLVVXUYLYHGE\YHFKLOGUHQLisa Smith and husband Barry of Franklin, Joseph Lee Bryant RI/DNH&LW\)/,YD5LYHQEDUNand husband Dana of Lake City, FL, Becky Jackson of Dade City, FL and Tillman Bryant and wife Judy of Lake City, FL; a sister, Emma Jean Depoe of Lake City, FL; nineteen grandchildren; ten great grandchildren and several nieces and nephews. A Memorial Service will be held at a later date in Lake City, FL. Memorial donations can be made to the Wounded War-ULRU3URMHFW32%2;Topeka, KS 66675. MACON FUNERAL HOME is in charge of the arrangements.Online condolences can be made at maconfuneralhome.com Wilbur E. FordWilbur E. Ford, 71, passed away Tuesday, November 6, 2012 at the Suwannee Valley Care Center (Haven Hospice). He was born in Lake City, Florida to the late Ashley and Susie (Robin-son) Ford and remained here all of his life. He owned and oper-ated A & B Construction for a number f years doing residen-tial and road construction. He was a loving husband, father, grand and great grandfather who HQMR\HGVSHQGLQJWLPHZLWKKLVIDPLO\VKLQJZDWFKLQJUDF LQJDQG)ORULGD*DWRU)RRW ball. He was a faithful member of The New Beginning church where he was a Senior Deacon.He is preceded in death by his par-ents, and his brother, Robert Ford.Survivors include his devoted wife of 52 years, Lillie M. (Nor-ris) Ford; sons, Tim (Renee) Ford, Bobby (Donna) Ford, and Rocky (Lisa) Ford; daughters, 4XLQQ)RUG3DWULFLD5D\)RUGDebbie Whorley, Diane (Mike) Avery and Fran (Donnie) Cole; brothers, Alford Ford, Ronnie Ford, and Quinton Ford; sister, Allene Hall; 19 grandchildren and 21 great grandchildren.Funeral services will be con-ducted at 3:00 p.m. on Friday, November 9, 2012 at The New %HJLQQLQJ&KXUFKZLWK3DV WRU8OLV7D\ORURIFLDWLQJ,QWHUPHQWZLOOIROORZLQ6L loam Cemetery. Visitation with the family will be held Thursday evening, November 8, 2012 from 6:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. at the funeral home. GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN FUNERAL HOME 3596 South U.S. Hwy 441, Lake City, Florida 32025, (386) 752-1954 is in charge of arrangements. 3OHDVHOHDYHZRUGVRIORYHand kindness for the family at www.gatewayforestlawn.comEdward Lee Jackson, Sr. Edward “Squirrel” Jackson passed away October 27, 2012. Edward, 43, was born July 17, 1969 in *DLQHVYLOOHFlorida to Jessie Lee Jackson and Mae Francis Jenkins. Ms. Jenkins pre-ceded him in death. He attended school in Columbia County, graduating from Co-lumbia High School. Mr. Jack-son was a member of Salvation Holiness Church, Bishop C.K. 7URXSH3DVWRU+HDOVRVDQJZLWKWKH*RVSHO+DUPRQHHUVEmployment included Veter-ans Administration Hospital and Lake City Medical Center. Cherishing memories: daugh-ters, Roxanne Jackson (Jessie), Edreonna LaShay Jackson; son, Edward Lee Jackson, Jr.; father, Jessie Lee Jackson; sis-ters, Cassandra Richardson, Jessica Jenkins (Larry), Shev-RQGD-DFNVRQ5HHG3DWULFNbrother, Alex Jackson (Sharika); (2) grandchildren; a special IULHQG3DPHOD
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who have died while on duty. The amendments that went down had a different style. Their ballot summaries often were complex, lengthy and written in hard to understand legalize. Also, their substance was different. Most dealt with high-profile, hotly con-tested issues including abortion, taxpayer funding of religious organizations such as parochial schools, “Obamacare,” capping state revenue and tax breaks for busi-nesses and out-of-state residents who own second homes in Florida. “It was like a cruise ship buffet that nobody could get through,” said Deirdre Macnab, president of the League of Women Voters of Florida. “Florida voters should get an A-plus for doing their home-work. For many voters it was like taking the FCAT.” That’s the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test, the state’s standardized exam for public school students. None of the losing amendments received even 50 percent support, much less the required 60 percent. The league urged voters to reject all 11 amendments. It initially raised substan-tive objections, arguing that the proposals didn’t belong in the Florida Constitution and that some attacked basic freedoms while others could have harmed the state’s economy. After getting more than 1,000 calls from voters who were confused and frustrated by the lengthy and complex ballot sum-maries, the league urged that they be defeated, as well, on style points. That would send a message to lawmakers to quit drafting proposals that only a consti-tutional lawyer can understand, Macnab said. Supporters of Amendment 4, the broad property tax relief measure, poured $4.7 million into their campaign, led by the Florida Association of Realtors. The pro-posal, though, drew only 43 percent sup-port at the polls. “In a way, we were victims of our own success,” said Trey Price, the association’s public policy representative. The Realtors and other business interests persuaded Republican lawmakers to increase the requirement for passing amendments from a simple majority to 60 percent and impose other restrictions on amendments offered through citizen-initia-tive petitions, although not those offered by the Legislature. They also participated in public awareness campaigns that urged voters to be cautious about making chang-es in the constitution. They were worried about such proposals as the Hometown Democracy initiative that would have given local voters veto power over changes in comprehensive plans. Voters overwhelmingly rejected it two years ago, but they also resoundingly passed two other citizen initiatives that were strongly opposed by Republicans. The successful Fair Districts amendments, one each for congressional and legislative redistricting, are designed to curtail ger-rymandering by the party in power. The league was part of a coalition that backed the redistricting amendments. Unlike legislative amendments, the initia-tives had to undergo review by the Florida Supreme Court to make sure their ballot summaries were clear and accurate and adhered to a 75-word limit. The justices kicked back the amendments before the coalition got them right. Legislative amendments aren’t bound by the word limit and don’t undergo court review unless challenged through a law-suit. By contrast, Amendment 4’s 690-word ballot summary was a “monstrosity,” Price acknowledged. Amendment 4 was so complex because it included three separate tax breaks. One would have benefited businesses and owners of second homes. The others targeted first-time home buyers and existing hom-eowners whose property values decline. Price, though, noted that voters overwhelmingly approved a more complex tax relief amendment in January 2008. He said the difference then was that the amendment was the only thing on the ballot besides the presidential primary, and a popular governor, Charlie Crist, led the campaign. Gov. Rick Scott this year steered clear of the amendments, but if he had actively campaigned the unpopular Republican may have hurt them. Besides being long and confusing, Amendment 4 drew strong opposition from local government officials, who argued it could have led to tax increases for long-time homeowners to make up for benefits that would have gone to other taxpayers including out-of-state “snowbirds.” Price argued that voters had been misinformed while Macnab said they simply did their homework. “Clearly, the Legislature overreached,” Macnab said. “I hope and believe this has been a wakeup call for the Legislature.” 6A LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2012 Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-04286A officials. Local officials just began working with the prospect last week. “From my understanding, they are actually looking at several locations in Florida and other states,” he said. “Right now it’s very early in this process and we’ve sub-mitted a basic, initial proposal. Whether or not we make the cut for a second or third round, who knows. I hope we stay in the game.” Enterprise Florida is the state’s economic development arm. “Typically some leads are generated through them and they filter those down to the local level,” Quillen said. “We’ve had an inquiry and we’ve submitted a response and I hope we’re able to compete for it.” JOBS: Aerospace firm courted Continued From Page 1A look. “If you got into politics and you lost, you expected it to happen,” he said. Montgomery recalled seeing the political grave markers as far back as the 1950s, and thought the tradition probably went back longer then that. Montgomery was a long-time teacher at Columbia High School, and won seven terms as a county commissioner. He said he was never buried. Jack Berry, executive director of the Lake Shore Hospital Authority, has been buried before, but said there were no hard feelings. “It’s a fun thing,” he said. “Lets the campaign workers let off some steam.” Ron Williams, elected Tuesday to a ninth term as county commissioner from District 1, was buried once too. He said he lost in 1976 and his campaign ended as a pile of dirt on the steps of the court-house. While the main focus of the mock burial is to jab at the politicians, Williams said supporters of the candidates are buried to show that people have their eye on them as well. “In a small town everyone knows what everyone is doing,” he said. In decades past, the Lake City Reporter has been buried at the courthouse, usu-ally when the paper’s endorsements flopped. Hunter said he didn’t see the grave, but understands the local custom. He said he didn’t have any problem with his cam-paign being buried at the courthouse. “I was very proud of my campaign,” he said. As a long-time school board member, Hunter said he hopes for the best for the Columbia County school system, and that he hasn’t shut any doors as regards run-ning for office again in Columbia County. “I learned an awful lot from this campaign and I’m going to carry that experi-ence with me,” Hunter said. RITUAL: Long-time local tradition Continued From Page 1A messages to an 11-year-old girl. Detective Katina Dicks, posing as the 11-year-old, then began communicating with Long via texting and social media outlets. For several weeks Long allegedly engaged in sexually explicit conversations with Dicks, still assuming that he was com-municating with an 11-year-old girl. Reports said Long finally wanted to meet the child in person for the purpose of engaging in sexual acts. Still posing as the child, Dicks agreed Tuesday to meet Long at the Columbia County Library. Detectives saw Long at the library, actively texting Dicks, telling her that he was there and waiting for her. Long was immediately taken into custody without incident and taken to the county jail, reports said. JAILED: Sting leads to man’s arrest Continued From Page 1A AMENDMENTS: Failed in style and substance; voters approved only three Continued From Page 1A said. “They have simply given him more time to finish the job they asked him to do together” with a balanced Congress. Obama’s more narrow victory was nothing like the jubilant celebration in 2008, when his hope-and-change election as the nation’s first black president captivated the world. This time, Obama ground it out with a stay-the-course pitch that essen-tially boiled down to a plea for more time to make things right and a hope that Congress will be more accommodating than in the past. The most pressing challenges immediately ahead for the 44th president are all too familiar: an economy still baby-step-ping its way toward full health; 23 million people out of work or in search of better jobs; civil war in Syria; a menacing stand-off over Iran’s nuclear program. Sharp differences with Republicans in Congress on taxes, spending, deficit reduction, immigration and more await. While Republicans control the House, Democrats have at least 53 votes in the Senate and Republicans 45. One newly elected independent isn’t saying which party he’ll side with, and North Dakota’s race not yet called. Votes also were being counted Wednesday in the Montana and Washington guberna-torial races. Obama’s list of promises to keep includes many holdovers he was unable to deliver on in his first term, such as roll-ing back tax cuts for upper-income people, overhauling immigration policy and reduc-ing federal deficits. Six in 10 voters said in exit polls that taxes should be increased, and nearly half of voters said taxes should be increased on incomes over $250,000, as Obama has called for. “It’s very clear from the exit polling that a majority of Americans recognize that we need to share responsibility for reduc-ing the deficit,” Maryland Rep. Chris Van Hollen, the top Democrat on the House Budget Committee, told CNN. “That means asking higher-income earners to contribute more to reducing the deficit.” But Sara Taylor Fagen, who served as political director in President George W. Bush’s second term, warned the current White House to pay heed to the closely divided electorate, a lesson her party learned after 2004. With more than 90 percent of precincts reporting, the popular vote went 50 percent for Obama to 48.4 percent for Romney, “It’ll be interesting if the Obama team misinterprets the size of their victory,” Fagen said. “I think if you look back at history, we pushed Social Security and the Congress wasn’t ready for that and wasn’t going to do it. And had President Bush gone after immigration, we may be sitting in a very different position as a party.” Obama predicted in the waning days of the campaign that his victory would motivate Republicans to make a deal on immigration policy next year to make up for having “so alienated the fastest-grow-ing demographic group in the country, the Latino community.” Former Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour agreed that a lesson of 2012 is for his Republican Party to change the party’s approach on immigration. “Republicans say, ‘We don’t want to reward people for breaking the law,’” Barbour told CBS. “The way we need to look at it is, how are we going to grow the American economy and where does our immigration policy fit into that?” Even before Obama gets to his second inaugural on Jan. 20, he must deal with the threatened “fiscal cliff.” A combination of automatic tax increases and steep across-the-board spending cuts are set to take effect in January if Washington doesn’t quickly reach a budget deal. Experts have warned that the economy could tip back into recession without an agreement. Newly elected Democrats signaled they want compromise to avoid the fiscal cliff. Sen.-elect Tim Kaine, a former Virginia governor who defeated Republican George Allen, said on NBC’s “Today” show that voters sent a message they want “coop-erative government.” But he also says the election results show that the public doesn’t want “all the levers in one party’s hands” on Capitol Hill. From Massachusetts, Elizabeth Warren said on “CBS This Morning” that those who voted for her opponent, Republican Sen. Scott Brown, expressed a desire for lawmakers to work together. OBAMA: President will face numerous challenges over the ne xt four years Continued From Page 1A

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Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2012 7A7AHEALTHStrangers’ stem cells can repair heartsBy MARILYNN MARCHIONEAP Chief Medical WriterLOS ANGELES — Researchers are reporting a key advance in using stem cells to repair hearts damaged by heart attacks. In a study, stem cells donated by strangers proved as safe and effective as patients’ own cells for helping restore heart tissue. The work involved just 30 patients in Miami and Baltimore, but it proves the concept that any-one’s cells can be used to treat such cases. Doctors are excited because this suggests that stem cells could be banked for off-the-shelf use after heart attacks, just as blood is kept on hand now. Results were discussed Monday at an American Heart Association conference in California and published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The study used a specific type of stem cells from bone marrow that researchers believed would not be rejected by recipients. Unlike other cells, these lack a key feature on their surface that makes the immune system see them as foreign tissue and attack them, explained the study’s leader, Dr. Joshua Hare of the University of Miami. The patients in the study had suffered heart attacks years ear-lier, some as long as 30 years ago. All had developed heart failure because the scar tissue from the heart attack had weakened their hearts so much that they grew large and flabby, unable to pump blood effectively. Researchers advertised for people to supply marrow, which is removed using a needle into a hip bone. The cells were taken from the marrow and amplified for about a month in a lab at Baltimore’s Johns Hopkins University, then returned to Miami to be used for treatment, which did not involve surgery. The cells were delivered through a tube pushed through a groin artery into the heart near the scarred area. Fifteen patients were given cells from their own marrow and 15 others, cells from strangers. About a year later, scar tissue had been reduced by about one-third. Both groups had improve-ments in how far they could walk and in quality of life. There was no significant difference in one measure of how well their hearts were able to pump blood, but doctors hope these patients will continue to improve over time, or that refinements in treatment will lead to better results. The big attraction is being able to use cells supplied by others, with no blood or tissue matching needed. “You could have the cells ready to go in the blood bank so when the patient comes in for a therapy ‚ there’s no delay,” Hare said. “It’s also cheaper to make the donor cells,” and a single marrow donor can supply enough cells to treat as many as 10 people. Dr. Elliott Antman of Harvardaffiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston who heads the heart conference, praised the work. “That opens up an entire new avenue for stem cell therapy, like a sophisticated version of a blood bank,” he said. There’s an advan-tage in not having to create a cell therapy for each patient, and it could spare them the pain and wait of having their own marrow harvested, he said. The study was sponsored by the National Institutes of Health. Hare owns stock in a biotech company working on a treatment using a mixture of cells. Juan Lopez received his own cells in the study, and said it improved his symptoms so much that at age 70, he was able to return to his job as an engineer and sales manager for a roofing manufacturer and ride an exercise bike. “It has been a life-changing experience,” said Lopez, who lives in Miami. “I can feel day by day, week by week, month by month, my improvement. I don’t have any shortness of breath and my ener-gy level is way up there. I don’t have any fluid in my lungs.” And, he said happily, “My sex drive has improved!”Mass. pharmacy board director fired over meningitis outbreakBy JAY LINDSAYAssociated PressBOSTON — The director of the Massachusetts phar-macy board has been fired for ignoring a complaint that a company linked to a deadly meningitis outbreak was violating its license by shipping drugs in bulk. The Colorado pharmacy board complained about the New England Compounding Center in July, before the third of three batches of tainted ste-roids tied to the outbreak was shipped in August. A spokesman said state inves-tigators are still looking into any sickness or deaths related to that third batch. After receiving the report, director James D. Coffey told Colorado officials that the Board of Registration in Pharmacy would “respond as soon as possible follow-ing a thorough analysis of (the report).” Coffey forwarded the complaint to the board’s attorney, Susan Manning, who also failed to act, state officials said. The two didn’t notify leadership at the state Department of Public Health about the Colorado complaint, which inves-tigators discovered last weekend while sifting through Coffey’s emails, said Massachusetts Office of Health and Human Services spokesman Alec Loftus. Coffey was fired Tuesday; Manning has been placed on administra-tive leave. Their replace-ments have not been pub-licly announced. Massachusetts Interim Public Health Commissioner Dr. Lauren Smith said it was ultimate-ly Coffey’s duty as board director to initiate an inves-tigation. She called it “incomprehensible” that Coffey and Manning did nothing, especially given past problems at the NECC. “I ... expect the staff charged with oversight to perform their duties to the highest standards,” Smith said. “That failed to happen here.” Efforts to contact Coffey and Manning for comment were not successful. Compounding pharmacies custom-mix drugs in doses or forms that gen-erally aren’t commercially available. A contaminated steroid produced at the New England Compounding Center and used mainly to treat back pain has been linked to a fungal meningi-tis outbreak that has spread to 19 states, sickening more than 400 people, including 31 who died. In September, the company recalled three batches of steroids, totaling 17,676 single-dose vials of medi-cine, made since May. The NECC, located in Framingham, outside Boston, was authorized by its state license only to fill specific prescriptions for individual patients. Pharmacies that produce drugs in bulk are subject to federal oversight, and state officials have accused the NECC of masking its true nature as a drug manufac-turer to escape more strin-gent regulation. Colorado officials first dealt with the company in April 2011, when the board there issued a cease-and-desist order for the NECC, ordering it to stop “the unlawful distribution of pre-scription drugs in the state of Colorado.” The order came after an inspector discovered NECC drugs stored for general use at a hospital in Lone Tree, Colo., near Denver. Then in July, another inspector found bulk quan-tities of other NECC-made drugs at a hospital in St. Delta, Colo. After confirming with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration that the NECC was not registered as a drug manufacturer, the Colorado officials emailed Coffey. The NECC has been closed since early last month, and Massachusetts officials have taken steps to revoke its license. ASSOCIATED PRESSBrian Vicente co-director of the Yes on 64 campaign wai ts to start a news conference about the legalization of marijuan a at Civic Center Park in Denver on Wednesday. Colorado v oters passed Amendment 64 on Tuesday legalizing marijuana in Colorado for recreational use. By KRISTEN WYATTAssociated PressDENVER — First came marijuana as medicine. Now comes legal pot for the people. Those who have argued for decades that legalizing and taxing weed would be better than a costly, failed U.S. drug war have their chance to prove it, as Colorado and Washington became the first states to allow pot for recreational use. While the measures earned support from broad swaths of the electorate in both states Tuesday, they are likely to face resistance from federal drug warriors. As of Wednesday, authori-ties did not say whether they would challenge the new laws. Pot advocates say a fight is exactly what they want. “I think we are at a tipping point on marijuana policy,” said Brian Vicente, co-author of Colorado’s marijuana measure. “We are going to see whether mari-juana prohibition survives, or whether we should try a new and more sensible approach.” Soon after the measures passed, cheering people poured out of bars in Denver, the tangy scent of pot filling the air, and others in Seattle lit up in celebration. Authorities in Colorado, however, urged caution. “Federal law still says mari-juana is an illegal drug, so don’t break out the Cheetos or Goldfish too quickly,” said Democratic Gov. John Hickenlooper, who opposed the measure. As the initial celebration dies down and the process to implement the laws pro-gresses over the next year, other states and countries will be watching to see if the measures can both help reduce money going to drug cartels and raise it for governments. Governments in Latin America where drugs are produced for the U.S. mar-ket were largely quiet about the measures, but the main adviser to Mexico’s presi-dent-elect said the new laws will force the U.S. and his country to reassess how they fight cross-border pot smuggling. Analysts said that there would likely be an impact Marijuana voted legal in 2 states ASSOCIATED PRESSA Food and Drug Administration Agent stands at the doorway of New England Compounding Center in Framingham, Mass., as investigators work inside. The company’s steroid medication has been linked to a deadly meningi tis outbreak. ASSOCIATED PRESSDr. Joshua Hare (left) watches in the Cardiac Catheterizati on Lab at the University of Miami Hospital as Dr. Alan He ldman (right) prepares to inject stem cells into the heart of a patient participating in a cl inical trial. Hare and Heldman led a team that has repor ted key advances using stem cells to fix weakened, damaged hearts. In one study, bone marrow ce lls donated by unrelated strangers helped repair hearts suggesting that cells could be banked for off-the-shelf use in patients after heart attacks th e way blood is banked now. Researchers report advances in waysto reverse damage. Outbreak’s toll keeps growingThe Associated PressAn outbreak of fungal meningitis has been linked to steroid shots for back pain made by a specialty pharmacy in Massachusetts. The medication was recalled in late September. Latest numbers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:Q Illnesses: 424, including 10 joint infec-tions. Q Deaths: 31. Q States: 19; Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and Virginia. POT continued on 8A

PAGE 8

on cartels in Mexico that send pot to the U.S., but differed on how soon and how much. Both measures call for the drug to be heav-ily taxed, with the profits headed to state coffers. Colorado would devote the potential tax revenue first to school construction, while Washington’s sends pot taxes to an array of health programs. Estimates vary widely on how much they would raise. Colorado officials anticipate somewhere between $5 mil-lion and $22 million a year. Washington analysts estimated legal pot could pro-duce nearly $2 billion over five years. Both state estimates came with big caveats: The current illegal marijuana mar-ket is hard to gauge and any revenue would be contin-gent upon federal authori-ties allowing commercial pot sales in the first place, some-thing that is very much still in question. Both measures remove criminal penalties for adults over 21 possessing small amounts of the drug ‚ the boldest rejection of pot pro-hibition laws passed across the country in the 1930s. Pot has come a long way since. In the 1960s, it was a counterculture fixture. In 1971, President Richard Nixon declared the War on Drugs. Twenty-five years later, California approved medical marijuana. Now, 17 states and Washington, D.C., allow it. Meanwhile, many more cities either took pot posses-sion crimes off the books or directed officers to make pot arrests a low priority. On Tuesday night, broad sections of the electorate in Colorado and Washington backed the measures, some because they thought the drug war had failed and oth-ers because they viewed potential revenue as a boon for their states in lean times. A similar measure in Oregon failed. “People think little old ladies with glaucoma should be able to use marijuana. This is different. This is a step further than anything we have seen to date,” said Sam Kamin, a University of Denver law professor who has studied the history of pot prohibition. The Justice Department says it is evaluating the measures. When California was considering legalization in 2010, Attorney General Eric Holder said it would be a “significant impedi-ment” to joint federal and local efforts to combat drug traffickers. 8A LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04248AHealth ,1*1/0!,+0'+1#0,-40&##"'!.#.0-.#*' 1*&##.,,+0&)4)+.#*'1*,+)4--)'#/0,0 &#+"-)+/ '*'00',+/!,-4*#+0/+".#/0.'!0',+/*4--)4 &# #+#60'+$,.*0',+-.,2'"#"'/ .'#$/1**.4 +,0!,*-)#0#"#/!.'-0',+,$ #+#60/,.*,.#'+$,.*0',+!,+0!00&#-)+# +#60/$,.*1).4-&.*!4+#03,.(-.#*'1*+",. !,-4*#+0/!,'+/1.+!#*4 !&+%#,++1.4,$#!&4#.r)'!#+/#"%#+0 3')) #-.#/#+03'0&'+$,.*0',++"--)'!0',+/ ),.'")1#'/#"'!.#r"2+0%# ,.%+'50',+3'0&#"'!.#!,+0.!0r#"'!.# --.,2#".0/-,+/,.),.'")1#'/0."#+* #,$)1#.,//+")1#&'#)",$ ),.'"+!++"#-#+"#+0'!#+/##,$0&#)1# .,//+")1#&'#)"r//,!'0',+nnnr!!#-0#" ZeroMonthly Plan Premium* Blue nrA new generation of plans for your generation.Call today to attend a Medicare seminar near you. Holiday Inn Lake City 213 SW Commerce Dr. Lake City, FL 32024 H & F Restaurant Jasper 202 Hatley Street SE Jasper, FL 10/189:30 a.m.10/232:00 p.m.10/182:00 p.m.11/142:00 p.m. You can reach customer service from 8 a.m. 9 p.m. ET, 7 days a week, at 1-855-601-9465; TTY users call 1-800-955-8771. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings, call 1-855-425-5985; TTY users call 1-855-955-8771. Priority Code: 5051000Alliance & Associates770 NW 15th AvenueJasper, FL 32052855-425-5985 9 a.m. 5 p.m. ET, Monday Friday to speak with a licensed agent. THEALACHUABUSINESSLEAGUE PRESENTSALACHUA HARVESTFESTIVALSUNDAY,NOVEMBER11th,201211am i 5pm MainStreet,Alachua FOODRIDESSHOPPINGENTERTAINMENTFor more information www.alachuabusiness.com Thanks to our Sponsors 10th Annual City of Alachua Downtown Redevelopment Board CUZ CONSIGNMENT 6SHFLDOWKDQNVWRAlachua Design and Printing Celebrating Veterans! Asterisk Communications6WDU6PRRWK)07KH*DPH POT: Legalization complicates drug war. Continued From Page 7A Pfizer says FDA approves arthritis drugAssociated PressNEW YORK — Pfizer says the Food and Drug Administration approved its rheumatoid arthritis pill Xeljanz (ZEL’jans), seen as potential big sell-er for the world’s largest pharmaceutical company. Pfizer Inc. says the FDA approved Xeljanz as a treatment for moder-ate to severe rheumatoid arthritis in patients who can’t take methotrexate or haven’t been helped by it. Xeljanz is intended to slow the progression of the disease. Study: Looking old may be a sign of heart risksMARILYNN MARCHIONEAP Chief Medical WriterLOS ANGELES — Want a clue to your risk of heart disease? Look in the mir-ror. People who look old — with receding hairlines, bald heads, creases near their ear lobes or bumpy deposits on their eyelids —have a greater chance of developing of heart dis-ease than younger-looking people the same age do, new research suggests. Doctors say the study highlights the difference between biological and chronological age. “Looking old for your age marks poor cardiovas-cular health,” said Dr. Anne Tybjaerg-Hansen of the University of Copenhagen in Denmark. She led the study and gave results Tuesday at an American Heart Association conference in Los Angeles. A small consolation: Wrinkles elsewhere on the face and gray hair seemed just ordinary consequenc-es of aging and did not cor-relate with heart risks. The research involved 11,000 Danish people and began in 1976. At the start, the participants were 40 and older. Researchers documented their appear-ance, tallying crow’s feet, wrinkles and other signs of age. In the next 35 years, 3,400 participants developed heart disease (clogged arteries) and 1,700 suffered a heart attack. The risk of these problems increased with each additional sign of aging present at the start of the study. This was true at all ages and among men and women, even after taking into account other factors such as family history of heart disease. Those with three to four of the following aging signs — receding hairline at the temples, baldness at the crown of the head, earlobe creases or yellowish fatty deposits around the eyelids — had a 57 percent greater risk for heart attack and a 39 percent greater risk for heart disease compared to people with none of those signs. Having yellowish eyelid bumps, which could be signs of cholesterol build-up, conferred the most risk, researchers found. Baldness in men has been tied to heart risk before, possibly related to testos-terone levels. They could only guess why earlobe creases might raise risk. Dr. Kathy Magliato, a heart surgeon at St. John’s Health Center in Santa Monica, Calif., said doctors need to pay more attention to signs literally staring them in the face. “We’re so rushed to put on a blood pressure cuff or put a stethoscope on the chest” that obvious, visible signs of risk are missed, she said. Doctors: Aging signs connected to health danger. Online: Q Heart Association: www.heart.org

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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Thursday, November 8, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS SirloinDelmonicoT-BoneCube Steak Cabbage 4lb Potatoes BananasLettuce $4.99 /lb$9.99 /lb$9.09 /lb$4.09 /lb $.49 /lb2/$4.00$.45 /lb$0.99 837 N.W. Main Blvd. Lake City, FL 32055 Sunday-Saturday 7:00am-9:00pm Over 300 New Items at $1.00 Fresh BBQ Cooked Daily BRIEFS Stockton has eye surgery, could miss rest of year. Indians close out regular season against Santa Fe. GAMES Today Q Columbia High’s Hannah Burns, Lindsay Lee in state swim meet at Central Florida YMCA Aquatic Complex in Orlando, 9 a.m. Q Columbia High bowling in state tournament at Boardwalk Bowl in Orlando,TBD Q Columbia High boys soccer vs. Suwannee High at CYSA field, 7 p.m. (JV-5) Q Fort White High football at Santa Fe High, 7:30 p.m. Friday Q Columbia High football vs. Suwannee High, 7:30 p.m. Q Columbia High soccer at Florida Capital Invitational in Tallahassee, TBA Saturday Q Columbia High girls cross country in Region 1-3A meet at Sunny Hills Farms in Tallahassee, 8 a.m. Q Columbia High soccer at Florida Capital Invitational in Tallahassee, TBA MEMORIAL BOWL Midget league games today Lake City Recreation Department’s Memorial Bowl has Midget team play at Memorial Stadium. Today’s games are: Lake City Wildcats vs. Jasper Redhawks at 6 p.m.; Lake City Eagles vs. Madison Lions at 7:15 p.m. For details, call Heyward Christie at 754-3607. DUCKS UNLIMITED Banquet planned for Nov. 16 The 35th annual Ducks Unlimited Banquet is Nov. 16 at the Columbia County Fairgrounds entertainment building. Doors open at 6 p.m. for a social hour, followed by a seafood dinner at 7 p.m. There will be a silent auction and tier raffle. Cost is $50 for a single ticket and $70 for a couple. For details, call Jimmy Sparks at 365-0446. RUNNING Wright Brothers 5K for veterans The Race Against the Wright Brothers 5K is 8 a.m. Saturday at Olustee Park in Lake City. Proceeds go to Volunteer Service Programs for Disabled American Veterans at the Lake City VA Medical Center. Registration is at www. stepfitnessonline.com or at Carquest. For details, call Michelle Richards at 208-2447.Q From staff reports JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterRunning to regionColumbia High’s girls cross country team advanced to th e Region 1-3A meet at Sunny Hills Farms in Tallahassee on Saturday. The Lady Tigers qualified by placing third in the district meet. Team members are (front row, from left) Syd ni Jones, Hayley Lewis, Michaelle Charlotin and Ashley Jones. Ba ck row (from left) are alternate Nicole Morse, Ashlyn Mar tin, Abby Williams and Emma Tucker. Not pictured is Samantha Zeigaus. Bad news for CHS Paddle battle tonightBy TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comFORT WHITE — Before Fort White High’s football team can look ahead to a playoff rematch with The First Academy, there is the business of a “Battle for the Paddle.” The Indians travel to Santa Fe High today for the annual meeting between the two teams. Kickoff is 7:30 p.m. Santa Fe is the only football team Fort White has played every year since the school opened. Today’s game will be the 13th. The “Battle for the Paddle” tro-phy began a few years into the series. Fort White (5-4) has dominated the meetings, leading 9-3, and has won all five games under Coach Demetric Jackson. The Raiders are 1-8 with that win coming last week over a district champion in Eastside High. That was a reminder to the Indians they can’t be looking back or ahead. “You never want to overlook anybody, especially when it is a rival game,” Jackson said. “Santa Fe has a tendency to play above how they have played all year.” It appeared Santa Fe might snap its losing streak last year. The Raiders led 10-0 after the first quarter. Fort White scored 19 points in the second quarter and the 19-10 lead stood up in a scoreless second half. Indians quarterback Andrew Baker threw a touchdown pass to Trey Phillips and also ran for a score. A.J. Legree had a pick-6 for Fort White. The 2011 game produce 18 penalties for a total of 175 yards. That included seven personal fouls or unsportsmanlike conduct penalties spread between the teams. “Their fullback and tailback run real hard,” Jackson said. “On defense they do some things unorthodox with their blitzes. They sit JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Kellen Snider had a sack against Trin ity Catholic on Friday. INDIANS continued on 2B By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High’s football team received some bad news on Wednesday morning as the Tigers found out they could be without senior running back Braxton Stockton for the remainder of the season. Stockton was one part of the Tigers’ three-head-ed monster at running back as head coach Brian Allen has referred to the trio all season. He helped guide the Tigers to an 8-1 record and a District 3-6A Championship. Stockton was taken in for surgery at 1 a.m. on Wednesday morn-ing after taking a finger deep into his eye at prac-tice on Tuesday. Initial reports were not good for Stockton. “Right now, it’s just wait and see,” Allen said. “He had five hours of surgery this morning and came out about 7 a.m. as they were looking to repair the damage. It was more severe than we originally anticipated.” Another surgery looks possible for Stockton and his return for the playoffs is very much in question. “He has no vision right now,” Allen said. “We don’t know whether they’re going to have to remove his eye or not and put in an artificial. We’re hoping for a miracle. There’s sig-nificant damage. They’re probably going to have to go in and have another surgery, we’re just hoping for the best and he’s in our prayers.” Stockton’s first question when coming out of the surgery was whether he would be able to return to the field with his team-mates on the playoff run. “We were told last night that it’s going to be at least six weeks,” Allen said. “We don’t know a lot right now. He’s going back tomor-row, so we’re just going to continue to hope for the best. Hopefully there’s a miracle in our midst.” Stockton’s injury is the latest to the Columbia trio as lead rusher Ronald Timmons is nursing an ankle injury that limited him to five carries for 75 yards last week against Leon High. Allen said that will be an opportunity for sophomore Lonnie CHS continued on 3B

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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today COLLEGE FOOTBALL 7:30 p.m. ESPN — Florida St. at Virginia Tech GOLF 1 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals Classic, first round, at Lake Buena Vista 12 Midnight TGC — European PGA Tour, Singapore Open, second round NBA BASKETBALL 8 p.m. TNT — Oklahoma City at Chicago 10:30 p.m. TNT — L.A. Clippers at Portland NFL FOOTBALL 8 p.m. NFL — Indianapolis at Jacksonville SOCCER 9:30 p.m. ESPN2 — MLS, playoffs, conference semifinal, leg 2, Seattle at Real Salt Lake TENNIS 2 p.m. ESPN2 — ATP World Tour Finals, round robin, at London (same-day tape)FOOTBALLNFL schedule Today’s Game Indianapolis at Jacksonville, 8:20 p.m. Sunday’s Games Atlanta at New Orleans, 1 p.m.Detroit at Minnesota, 1 p.m.Denver at Carolina, 1 p.m.San Diego at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.Tennessee at Miami, 1 p.m.Buffalo at New England, 1 p.m.Oakland at Baltimore, 1 p.m.N.Y. Giants at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.N.Y. Jets at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.St. Louis at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.Dallas at Philadelphia, 4:25 p.m.Houston at Chicago, 8:20 p.m. Monday’s Game Kansas City at Pittsburgh, 8:30 p.m.Open: Arizona, Cleveland, Green Bay, WashingtonTop 25 schedule Today No. 8 Florida State at Virginia Tech, 7:30 p.m. Saturday No. 1 Alabama vs. No. 15 Texas A&M, 3:30 p.m. No. 2 Oregon vs. California, 10:30 p.m.No. 3 Kansas State at TCU, 7 p.m.No. 4 Notre Dame at Boston College, 8 p.m. No. 5 Georgia at Auburn, 7 p.m.No. 7 Florida vs. LouisianaLafayette, 12:21 p.m. No. 9 LSU vs. No. 23 Mississippi State, 7 p.m. No. 10 Clemson vs. Maryland, 3:30 p.m. No. 11 Louisville at Syracuse, NoonNo. 12 South Carolina vs. Arkansas, Noon No. 13 Oregon State at No. 16 Stanford, 3 p.m. No. 14 Oklahoma vs. Baylor, 3:30 p.m.No. 17 UCLA at Washington State, 10:30 p.m. No. 18 Nebraska vs. Penn State, 3:30 p.m. No. 19 Louisiana Tech at Texas State, 7 p.m. No. 19 Texas vs. Iowa State, NoonNo. 21 Southern Cal vs. Arizona State, 3:30 p.m. No. 24 Rutgers vs. Army, NoonNo. 25 Texas Tech vs. Kansas, NoonBASKETBALLNBA schedule Today’s Games Oklahoma City at Chicago, 8 p.m.L.A.Clippers at Portland, 10:30 p.m. Friday’sGames Brooklyn at Orlando, 7 p.m.Milwaukee at Washington, 7 p.m.Philadelphia at Boston, 7:30 p.m.Miami at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.Dallas at New York, 7:30 p.m.Indiana at Minnesota, 8 p.m.Houston at Memphis, 8 p.m.Charlotte at New Orleans, 8 p.m.Detroit at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.Cleveland at Phoenix, 9 p.m.San Antonio at Sacramento, 10 p.m.Golden State at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.Utah at Denver, 10:30 p.m. AP Top 25 schedule Friday’s Games No. 1 Indiana vs. Bryant, 8 p.m.No. 3 Kentucky vs. Maryland at Barclays Center, 8:30 p.m. No. 4 Ohio State vs. Marquette on the USS Yorktown, Charleston, S.C., 7 p.m. No. 5 Michigan vs. Slippery Rock, 8:30 p.m. No. 6 N.C. State vs. Miami (Ohio), 7 p.m. No. 7 Kansas vs. Southeast Missouri, 8 p.m. No. 8 Duke vs. Georgia State, 7 p.m. No. 9 Syracuse vs. No. 20 San Diego State on the USS Midway, San Diego, 8 p.m. No. 10 Florida vs. Georgetown on the USS Battan, Jacksonville, 9 p.m. No. 11 North Carolina vs. GardnerWebb, 7 p.m. No. 13 UCLA vs. Indiana State, 11 p.m. No. 14 Michigan State vs. UConn at Ramstein Air Force Base, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany, 5:30 p.m. No. 16 Creighton vs. North Texas, 8:05 p.m. No. 19 Baylor vs. Lehigh, 5 p.m.No. 21 Gonzaga vs. Southern Utah, 9 p.m. No. 25 Florida State vs. South Alabama, 7 p.m Saturday’s Games No. 15 Missouri vs. Southern IllinoisEdwardsville, 4 p.m. No. 22 Notre Dame vs. Evansville, 2 p.m. Sunday’s Games No. 2 Louisville vs. Manhattan, 4 p.m.No. 4 Ohio State vs. Albany (NY), 2 p.m. No. 10 Florida vs. Alabama State, 3:30 p.m. No. 11 North Carolina vs. Florida Atlantic, 2:30 p.m. No. 12 Arizona vs. Charleston Southern, 6 p.m. No. 19 Baylor vs. Jackson State, 5 p.m.No. 20 San Diego State vs. San Diego Christian, 10:30 p.m. No. 23 Wisconsin vs. Southeastern Louisiana, 2 p.m. No. 24 Cincinnati vs. TennesseeMartin, 2 p.m.SOCCERMLS playoffs EASTERN CONFERENCE Semifinals D.C. United vs. New York New York 1, D.C. United 1 Wednesday D.C. United at New York (n) Kansas City vs. Houston Houston 2, Kansas City 0 Wednesday Houston at Kansas City (n) WESTERN CONFERENCE Semifinals San Jose vs. Los Angeles San Jose 1, Los Angeles 0 Wednesday Los Angeles at San Jose (n) Seattle vs. Real Salt Lake Seattle 0, Real Salt Lake 0 Today Seattle at Real Salt Lake, 9:30 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2012 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0422BAGATE THURSDAY EVENING NOVEMBER 8, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Last Resort “Another Fine Navy Day” Grey’s Anatomy “Beautiful Doom” (N) (:02) Scandal “All Roads Lead to Fitz” News at 11(:35) Nightline (N) 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsCountdown to Kickoffe NFL Football Indianapolis Colts at Jacksonville Jaguars. From EverBank Field in Jacksonville, Fla. (N) Jaguars Post 5-PBS 5 -Journal Nightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) The This Old House Hour (N) Ferrets: The Pursuit of ExcellenceAntiques Roadshow BBC World NewsTavis Smiley 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge Judy Two and Half MenBig Bang TheoryTwo and Half Men(:01) Person of Interest (N) (:01) Elementary A small plane crashes. Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneThe Vampire Diaries “The Killer” (N) Beauty and the Beast (N) TMZ (N) Access HollywoodThe Of ce The Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family Guy Family Guy The SimpsonsThe X Factor “Live Results” (N) Glee (N) NewsAction News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) The Voice Contestants face elimination. The Of ce (N) Parks/Recreat(:01) Rock Center With Brian WilliamsNewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(5:00) Public Affairs Capitol Hill Hearings WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304(5:11) Bonanza(:22) M*A*S*HM*A*S*H “George” The Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Hardcover Mysteries “David Baldacci” Hardcover Mysteries “Sandra Brown” 48 Hours: Hard Evidence 48 Hours: Hard Evidence 48 Hours: Hard Evidence 48 Hours: Hard Evidence A&E 19 118 265The First 48 A gun ght at a gas station. The First 48 “Hot Lot; Blind Faith” The First 48 The First 48 (N) Beyond Scared Straight (N) (:01) Beyond Scared Straight HALL 20 185 312 “Hachi: A Dog’s Tale” (2009, Drama) Richard Gere, Joan Allen. American Humane Association Hero Dog Awards (N) “A Dog Named Christmas” (2009, Drama) Bruce Greenwood, Noel Fisher. FX 22 136 248How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherTwo and Half MenTwo and Half Men “Step Brothers” (2008, Comedy) Will Ferrell, John C. Reilly. It’s Always SunnyThe League (N) BrandX WithTotally Biased CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245The Mentalist “A Dozen Red Roses” The Mentalist “Red Sauce” d NBA Basketball Oklahoma City Thunder at Chicago Bulls. From the United Center in Chicago. (N)d NBA Basketball: Clippers at Trail Blazers NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobFigure It Out Drake & JoshSee Dad RunYou Gotta SeeFull House Full House The Nanny The Nanny Friends (:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241Jail “Off the Edge” Jail Jail Jail iMPACT Wrestling (N) Ink Master MMA UncensoredGT Academy (N) MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*H M*A*S*H White Collar “Vital Signs” White Collar “Home Invasion” Seinfeld Frasier The Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Phineas and FerbGood Luck CharlieWizards-PlaceJessie Austin & Ally “Let It Shine” (2012, Comedy-Drama) Tyler James Williams, Coco Jones. Phineas and FerbA.N.T. Farm Jessie LIFE 32 108 252Trading Spouses: Meet New MommyTrading Spouses: Meet New MommyProject Runway All Stars Project Runway All Stars (N) Abby’s Ultimate Dance CompetitionProject Runway All Stars USA 33 105 242NCIS A mortar attack in Baghdad. NCIS “Dead Air” NCIS Tony searches for answers. Burn Notice “Desperate Measures; Means & Ends” (N) (:02) NCIS “About Face” BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Top 10 Countdown” (N) Black Girls Rock 2012 Honoring accomplishments of black women; Alicia Keys and Dionne Warwick. Family FirstDon’t Sleep!The Game ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) Coll. Football Livee College Football Florida State at Virginia Tech. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209NFL32 (N) (Live) Audibles (N) (Live) SportsCenter Special (N) f MLS Soccer Conference Semi nal: Teams TBA. (N) NASCAR Now (N) SUNSP 37 -how to Do oridaFSU First LookThe New College Football Show (N) Lightning Classics (N Subject to Blackout) Prep Zone SpoDrivenTaylorMade: Outside the Ropes DISCV 38 182 278Auction KingsAuction KingsProperty Wars Property Wars Auction KingsAuction KingsTexas Car Wars Auction KingsAuction Kings TBS 39 139 247King of QueensKing of QueensSeinfeld Seinfeld Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryConan Javier Bardem; Brandil Carlile. HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) What Would You Do?What Would You Do?Showbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236(5:00) “She’s Out of My League”E! News (N) The SoupIce Loves CocoKardashianKourtney & KhloKourtney & KhloKardashianChelsea Lately (N) E! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. Food Man v. Food Mysteries at the Museum Mysteries at the Museum Mysteries at the Museum The Dead Files HGTV 47 112 229Selling New YorkSelling New YorkHunters Int’lHouse HuntersBuying and Selling Extreme Homes (N) House HuntersHunters Int’lYou Live in What? TLC 48 183 280Island MediumIsland MediumMy Big Fat American Gypsy WeddingSay Yes, DressSay Yes, DressFour Weddings “Mother Knows Best” Bada Bling Brides (N) Four Weddings “Mother Knows Best” HIST 49 120 269Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Bamazon The group arrives in Guyana. Outback Hunters “Revenge” Cajun Pawn StarsCajun Pawn Stars ANPL 50 184 282North Woods Law: On the Hunt Swamp Wars “Flesh-Eating Lizards” Finding Bigfoot: Further EvidenceFinding Bigfoot “Buckeye Bigfoot” Finding Bigfoot: Further EvidenceFinding Bigfoot: Further Evidence FOOD 51 110 231Chopped Candy and chicken feet. Cupcake Wars “Magical Cupcakes” Cupcake WarsSweet Genius “Dancing Genius” Sweet Genius “Wicked Genius” (N) The Next Iron Chef “Resourcefulness” TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Billy Graham Birthday SpecialAlways Good NewThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesJoel Osteen Joseph PrinceHillsong TVPraise the Lord From Caesarea With Matthew & Laurie Crouch & Joseph FSN-FL 56 -Football PrevUFC Primetime Bull Riding CBR World Championship Part 2. Football PrevPremier League Review ShowDrivenUFC Unleashed SYFY 58 122 244Haunted Collector“Anaconda 3: Offspring” (2008, Horror) David Hasselhoff, Crystal Allen. “Anaconda” (1997, Suspense) Jennifer Lopez, Ice Cube, Jon Voight. “Anacondas: Trail of Blood” (2009) AMC 60 130 254CSI: Miami “Last Straw” CSI: Miami “No Good Deed” “Rambo” (2008, Action) Sylvester Stallone, Julie Benz. “Predator” (1987) Arnold Schwarzenegger, Carl Weathers. COM 62 107 249(5:58) South Park(:29) Tosh.0 The Colbert ReportDaily ShowChappelle’s ShowStand-Up Rev.Gabriel Iglesias: Hot and Fluffy Stand-Up Rev.Tosh.0 Daily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327Reba Reba Reba “Invasion” Reba Therapist. Reba Reba “Grumpier Old Men” (1995, Comedy) Jack Lemmon, Walter Matthau. (:15) “Son-in-Law” (1993, Comedy) NGWILD 108 190 283Dog WhispererWild Justice “Night Patrol” Waking the Baby Mammoth Prehistoric Predators “Terror Bird” Waking the Baby Mammoth NGC 109 186 276Drugs, Inc. “Alaska Heroin Rush” Taboo Unconventional relationships. Taboo Individuals leading double lives. Taboo “Bizarre Burials” Drugs, Inc. “Hash” Taboo Individuals leading double lives. SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s Made (N) How It’s MadePunkin Chunkin How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s Made ID 111 192 28548 Hours on ID “Lady in the Harbor” Sins & Secrets “Fresno” Sins & Secrets “Nashville” The Will: Family Secrets Revealed (N) Very Bad Men (N) Very Bad MenSins & Secrets “Nashville” HBO 302 300 501(5:45) “Little Fockers” (2010) Robert De Niro. ‘PG-13’ “Along Came Polly” (2004) Ben Stiller. ‘PG-13’ “Crazy, Stupid, Love.” (2011) Steve Carell, Ryan Gosling. ‘PG-13’ Real Sex MAX 320 310 515 The Sixth Man “The Dilemma” (2011, Comedy) Vince Vaughn, Kevin James. ‘PG-13’ (:20) “Resident Evil: Apocalypse” (2004) Milla Jovovich. “Contraband” (2012, Action) Mark Wahlberg, Kate Beckinsale. ‘R’ SHOW 340 318 545(4:45) The Skulls II“Nice Guy Johnny” (2010) Matt Bush. ‘NR’ “Faster” (2010, Action) Dwayne Johnson, Billy Bob Thornton. ‘R’ Shaquille O’Neal: ComedyDave’s Old PornReality Show (N) A. J. Lavin collected his third career hole-in-one on No. 15 to seal the win in Sunday’s blitz. He added a closest to the pin on No. 7 and a skin to complete a lucrative day’s work. Lavin’s +8 was two points better than Tom Wade’s +6. Cory DePratter (+5) and Steve Thomas (+4) also finished in the money. Shelton Keen took the closest to the pin prize on No. 5 and DePratter was closest on No. 17. DePratter picked up two skins. Don Howard, Buddy Slay and Thomas joined Lavin with one skin apiece. Randy Sommers and Tom Wade had two birdies each in the Saturday blitz, but Sommers pulled out the victory over Wade by a point. Bob Randall posted a + 7 for third place, followed by Mike Carr at +6 in third and a tie between Scott Kishton and Chris Land for fourth. Sommers, Wade and Joe Paul each had a pair of skins. Cory DePratter had one. Bob Randall (+7) rolled in three birdies to over-come a four-birdie day by Jordan Hale (+6) for the win in Wednesday’s blitz. Eddy Brown took third at +4, a point ahead of Emerson Darst. Buddy Slay was fifth with +2. Two of Randall’s birdies held up for skins. Cory Depratter, Steve Patterson, Slay and Hale split the remaining skins. Both pot holes carried over. The LGA let the ladies post their “Low Net 9” to produce a winner. After handicaps were deducted, Katrina Counts and Cathy Steen tied for the top spot with 32.5. Ann Bormolini finished at 34 for third place and Nicole Ste-Marie was a shot back in fourth. Both Good Old Boys matches were closely con-tested three-team affairs. Match one ended with the team of Ed Snow, Howard Whitaker, Steve Peters and Joe Persons on top with 5 points. The second-place team at 4 points included Monty Montgomery, Rhea Hart, Tom Elmore and Emerson Darst. The team of Jerry West, Eli Witt, Larry Ward and Carl Wilson finished with a respectable 3 points. In match two. The team of Barney Hart, Tony Branch, Paul Davis, Dave Cannon and Jim Bell totaled only 3 points in a winning effort. Marc Risk, Jim Stevens, Stan Woolbert, Bill Rogers and Dan Stephens man-aged 2 points for second, one point better than Don Howard, Merle Hibbard, Dennis Hendershot, Bobby Simmons and Hugh Sherrill. Ed Snow retained the medalist spot with a round of 34-39-73. Hart fell a stroke short with 37-37-74. Montgomery (75), Stephens (76), West and Risk (76), Woolbert and Hibbard (77) and Hart (78) posted good rounds. The MGA 3-on 3 is Nov. 17 and the Mixed Team event is Nov. 18. After over 25 matches Garrett Odom and Phillip Russell will play to deter-mine the Quail Heights Match Play Champion. Russell will have to defeat Odom twice to come away with the title. In their first contest the match came down to the final hole with Odom prevailing 1 up. In the Wednesday Blitz Butch Howe and Gerald Smithy tied for first place with a blitz score of +2 Third place was shared by Frog Niewisch, Todd Carter, Ralph Minster, and Jack Tuggle, all at +1. Skin winners were Niewish, Brandon Goss, Chris Sanders, Ralph Minster (2) and Carter (2). The Friday Dogfight was dominated by Randy Heavrin. He scored +5 for first place, took closest to the pin on Ponds No. 5, and accumulated six skins. Second place went to Tim Tortorice at +1. Other skin winners were Joe Herring, Jerry Perkins, Tortorice, and Jack Tuggle (4). Closest to the pin winners were Perkins on No. 3 and Tuggle on Nos. 5 and 17. Sunday’s scramble was won by the team of David Sharpe, Ralph Minster and Ryan Minster at 2 under. The pot hole drawn was No. 3, which was birdied by the winning team. A new pot starts Sunday at 3 pm. On another note the staff and members here at Quail Heights are very proud of the integrity displayed by Lake City’s own Blayne Barber. His personal conviction of applying the principles he was raised with no mat-ter how the consequences may affect the pursuit of his dreams speaks vol-umes about the character of Blayne. Calling a penalty on himself is a true testament to his respect for not only the game of golf but his convic-tion of living the word of God. Thanks, Blayne, you have made all of your neighbors proud and we all wish you the best of luck in pursuing your dream of playing on the PGA Tour. QUAIL HEIGHTS COUNTRY CLUB Chet Carter COUNTRY CLUB at LAKE CITY Ed Goff Barber DQ’d at Q-School From staff reportsLake City golfer Blayne Barber disqualified him-self from the PGA Tour Q-School. Barber, who had advanced to the second round, called the PGA Tour to report he had signed an incorrect scorecard. The incident occurred on No. 13 at Callaway Gardens in Pine Mountain, Ga. Believing he might have brushed a leaf in the bunker — something not witnessed by any of his playing partners or his caddie — Barber imposed a one-stroke penalty on himself at the next tee. While discussing the penalty following the round, Barber was told the pen-alty should have been two strokes. After playing the final two rounds of the tournament, a step to earning a spot on the PGA Tour, Barber reported the penalty mis-take and was disqualified. Odom vs. Russell in finals Lavin’s ace leads to big day INDIANS From Page 1Bback in a deep zone. You have to take what they give you.” Santa Fe coach Bill Wiles has spent time in this area — at Trenton High (play-off appearances in 1997-98-99) and Branford High. A two-win finish to the season would be a boon for the Raiders. “You can’t look ahead to the playoffs when you have a big rivalry game,” Jackson said. “We have got to come out with great emotion and do a better job of ball security.” Directions : Take U.S. 441 south through High Springs; the school is on the left just before Interstate 10 crosses in Alachua.

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DEAR ABBY: As Veterans Day approaches, may I share a few guide-lines that can be helpful when interacting with vet-erans or service members? 1. It is never OK to ask a veteran if he or she has killed someone or to joke about it. If we have, we can’t even talk about it with our spouses, much less a stranger. 2. When you thank us for our service or pay for our meal, it is really appre-ciated. We also appreciate packages and notes. 3. Please don’t tell us that wars are a waste of dollars or lives or were fought for oil. What we hear is that, in your opin-ion, our best friend died for nothing. We know many people disagree with war, but it’s better to keep your opinions to yourself. 4. Many of us now have PTSD. If you see us acting anxious or moving away from crowds, turning our backs to the wall or fidget-ing, simple kindness or a little distraction will be appreciated. Talk to us about something inter-esting and give us some breathing room. 5. Please remember that 15 percent of those who serve in the military are women, and some have been in combat. It’s better to ask, “Are you a vet-eran?” rather than, “Was your husband a soldier?” 6. As with any person who has a disability, please do not stare at us. We can be sensitive about our scars or injuries and would prefer not to be asked to relive a difficult experience by being quizzed about what happened. Please also understand that war injuries today are very different than in the past and are often not visible. It is not OK to tell someone they “don’t look disabled” or appear to need help. Those of us with disabilities appreciate light con-versation and assistance if we look like we are in need. It was my pleasure to serve our country. -AMANDA C., U.S. ARMY DISABLED VETERAN DEAR AMANDA C.: Thank you for your ser-vice. And thank you, too, for your helpful sugges-tions, which are sure to be appreciated not only by civilians, but also by active and retired members of our military. Readers, as the war in Afghanistan winds down, many thousands of service members are returning home and entering the job market. Please, if pos-sible, honor their courage, dedication and sacrifice by doing your part and pro-viding them with employ-ment. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: I’m afraid I’m an abusive girlfriend. When I get mad at my boyfriend, I yell at him and call him names. Sometimes I hit him. Even though he really makes me angry, I do love him. I don’t want to go to counseling or group class-es. I don’t really hit him a lot. I yell more. I also have jealousy issues. What can I do? -PROBLEM GIRLFRIEND DEAR GIRLFRIEND: Your concern is justi-fied, because you ARE an abusive girlfriend. While I applaud your growing self-awareness, it is very important that you under-stand the reasons you are behaving this way so you can stop. While you may not like the idea of coun-seling, it would be better if you went voluntarily rather than one day having them court-mandated. DILBERT BABY BLUES HOROSCOPES DEAR ABBY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Staying active is key. Exploring new avenues and discovering informa-tion that will help you make financial gains or finalize a settlement, con-tract or investment will pay off. Love is highlighted. Reconnecting with people from your past will be enlightening. +++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Think outside the box. Check out new interests. Positive thought and action will bring excellent results. Love is simple; don’t make it so complex. Settle into a routine that will enable you to show stability, disci-pline and good intentions. +++++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Not everyone is on your side. Don’t share your thoughts and plans. Have a secondary plan ready and know ahead of time what your bottom line is. The quicker you resolve negative situations, the sooner you can get back on track. ++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Strut your stuff and share your thoughts. Socializing, networking and discovering what’s available that can help you excel will lead to an interesting turn of events. Dependents will offer wise suggestions that should be considered. ++++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Be careful how you approach personal change. Not everyone in your life will be on the same page as you when it comes to how you should proceed emotionally, financially or physically. Talk is cheap and will help you sort out what’s best. +++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Participate in activities that get you pumped up and ready to make a dif-ference. A challenge will motivate you to make a life-altering change. Listen to what’s being offered and respond diplomatically. Don’t let your emotions get you into trouble. +++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Mobility and versatil-ity will help you get ahead. Posturing and playing to win will keep you in the game. Love is in the stars. Being vocal about what you want and expect from someone in your life will bring you personal rewards. +++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): A serious attitude coupled with originality and discipline will lead to an interesting offer, but before you settle for what’s being suggested, you are best to consider what you are worth and if you need to defer to others. ++++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Update your look and you will boost your confidence. Don’t let the changes going on around you cause self-doubt. Prepare for new beginnings. It’s up to you to pave the way for others who would like to follow in your footsteps. ++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Stick to work and finding original ways to market what you have to offer. Not everyone will be in agreement with the way you do things, but you must follow the path that works for you. Avoid mak-ing personal changes of any kind. +++++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Getting involved in a cause you believe in will lead to working with interesting people. The connections you make will have an impact on the way you handle your financial affairs in the future. Make home improvements that will ease your stress. +++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Don’t say anything if you cannot give an honest opinion. Walk away from anyone trying to put you on the spot regarding a sit-uation you face at work or in your personal life. The less said, the better. Avoid excessive behavior. +++ CELEBRITY CIPHER Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com BLONDIE BEETLE BAILEY B.C. FRANK & ERNEST FOR BETTER OR WORSE ZITS HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH GARFIELD THE LAST WORD Eugenia Last Veterans appreciate grateful acknowledgement of service Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. CLASSIC PEANUTS Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2012 3B

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTHURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2012 Classified Department: 755-5440 4B CLASSIFIED AD vantageTake ADvantage of the Reporter Classifieds!755-5440Lake City Reporter FIND IT SELL IT BUY IT LegalIN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUN-TY, FLORIDACIVILACTIONCASE NO.: 11-000643-CAFIFTH THIRD MORTGAGE COM-PANY,Plaintiff,vs.KIMBERLYAMORRIS, et al.Defendant(s)NOTICE OF SALENotice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure or Order dated 10/18/2012, entered in Civil Case Number 11-000643-CA, in the Circuit court for Colum-bia county, Florida, wherein FIFTH THIRD MORTGAGE COMPANYis the Plaintiff, and KIMBERLYA. MORRIS, et al., are the Defendants, I will sell to the property situated in Columbia County, Florida, described as:LOT16, COUNTRYLAKE IN WOODBOROUGH, PHASE 1, AC-CORDING TO THE PLATTHERE-OF, AS RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 8, PAGE 97, OF THE PUB-LIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at Columbia County Courthouse, 173 N.E. Hernando Avenue, Lake City, FL32055 at 11:00 AM, on the 23rd day of Jan, 2013. Any person claiming an inter-est in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.Dated: 10/18/12Columbia County Clerk of CourtCLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURTBy: /s/ B. ScippioSEALIn accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act persons in need of a special accommodation to par-ticipate in this proceeding shall, within seven (7) days prior to any proceeding, contact the Administra-tive Office of the Court, Columbia County Courthouse, P.O. Box 2069, Lake City, FL32056-2069, tele-phone (386) 758-1342, TDD 1-800-955-8771 or 1-800-955-8770 via Florida Relay Service.05535688November 8, 15, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO. 2012-98-CATD BANK, N.A.,Plaintiff,vs.WILLIAM KIRK KOON and SAN-DRACONNELL, f/k/a SANDRALEE KOON,Defendants.SECOND AMENDED NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALENOTICE IS HEREBYgiven that the real property located in Columbia County, Florida, described as fol-lows:PARCEL1:Part of the Northwest 1/4 of Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 16 East, Columbia County, Florida, being more particularly described as fol-lows: For Point of Beginning com-mence at the Northeast Corner of said Northwest 1/4, thence run South 0123'24” West along the east line of said Northwest 1/4, a distance of 2586.07 feet to the Southeast Corner of said Northwest 1/4; Thence run North 8906’52” West along the South line of said Northwest 1/4, a distance of 1307.68 feet; Thence run North 0025’18” West a distance of 827.23 feet; Thence run North 3015’12” East, a distance of 161.45 feet; Thence run North 0750’10” East a distance of 186.69 feet; Thence run North 2416’04” West, a distance of 176.24 feet; Thence run North 0223’52” East, a distance of 1265.89 feet to the North line of said Section 5; Thence run South 8928’04” East along said North line, a distance of 1289.08 feet to the Point of Beginning. Containing 77.11 acres, more or less.TAX PARCELNO.: 05-7S-16-04138-003AndPARCEL2:The East 1/2 of the West 1/2 of the Northeast 1/4 and the West 1/2 of the East 1/2 of the Northeast 1/4 of Sec-tion 34, Township 6 South, Range 17 East, Columbia County, Florida.TAX PARCELNO.: 34-6S-17-09850-000shall be sold by the Clerk of this Court, at public sale, pursuant to the Summary Final Judgment of Fore-closure rendered in the above styled action dated September 4, 2012, and the Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated September 24, 2012, and the Amended Order rescheduling Foreclosure Sale, dated October 29, 2012 at the Columbia County Court-house, in Lake City, Columbia County, Florida, at 11:00 A.M. on Wednesday, January 16, 2013, to the best and highest bidder for cash.ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN IN-TERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.WITNESS my hand and official seal in the State and County aforesaid this 1st day of November, 2012.Dewitt CasonClerk of CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkSEAL05535679November 8, 15, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILACTIONCASE NO.: 12-2009-CA-000656DIVISION:BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,Plaintiff,vs.RONALD JAMES SCHOEFFLER, et al,Defendant(s)NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to a Final Judgment of Mort-gage Foreclosure dated October 18, 2012 and entered in Case No. 12-2009-CA-000656 of the Circuit Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit in and for COLUMBIACounty, Florida wherein BANK OF AMERI-CA, N.A. is the Plaintiff and RO-NALD JAMES SCHOEFFLER; MARYANN SCHOEFFLER; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, FL, 3RD Floor, Courtroom 1 OF THE COLUMBIACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the 28 day of November, 2012, the following described prop-erty as set forth in said Final Judg-ment:APARTOF THE SOUTHWEST1/4 OF SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, CO-LUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRI-BED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE ATTHE SOUTHWESTCORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST1/4 AND RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 04 MI-NUTES 06 SECONDS EAST, ALONG THE WESTLINE OF SAID SOUTHWEST1/4, 1427.47 FEET; THENCE NORTH 88 DE-GREES 45 MINUTES 23 SEC-ONDS EAST, 1272.46 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING; AL-SO BEING APOINTON THE SOUTH RIGHTOF WAYLINE OF A60.00 FEETEASEMENT; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 03 SECONDS WEST, 60.02 FEET; THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 46 SEC-ONDS EAST, 98.13 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 26 SECONDS EAST, TOTHE SAID SOUTH RIGHTOF WAYLINE OF EASEMENT, 60.02 FEET; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 43 MI-NUTES 26 SECONDS EAST, 164.67 FEET; THENCE NORTH 87 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 24 SEC-ONDS WEST, 98.27 FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 03 SECONDS WEST, 158.42 FEETTO THE SAID SOUTH RIGHTOF WAYLINE OF EASEMENT, ALSO THE POINTOF BEGINNING.SUBJECTTO AN EASEMENTFOR INGRESS AND EGRESS OVER AND ACROSS THE NORTH 60.00 FEETTHEREOF. TOGETHER WITH AN EASE-MENTFOR INGRESS AND EGRESS OVER AND ACROSS THE SOUTH 60 FEETOF THE NORTHWEST1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST1/4 SUBJECTTO AUTILITYEASEMENT4 FEETIN WIDTH ALONG THE WESTLINE OF PARCEL. TOGETHER WITH AMOBILE HOME LOCATED THEREON AS AFIXTURE AND APPURTENANCE THERETO..A/K/A348 SE BUCK GLEN ROAD, LAKE CITY, FL32025Any person claiming an interest in the surplus form the sale, if any, oth-er than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on October 30, 2012.P. DeWitt CasonClerk of the Circuit CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkIn accordance with the Americans with Disability Act, persons needing a special accommodation to partici-pate in this proceeding should con-tact the Deputy Court Administrator whose office is located at 3001 East Tamiami Trail, Building L, Naples, Florida 33962, telephone number (813) 774-8124; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD), or 1-800-955-8770 (v), via Florida Relay Service, not later than seven (7) days prior to this proceed-ing.02500402November 8, 15, 2012 NOTICE OFSUSPENSIONTO: Dwann D. RossCase No: 201201351ANotice of Suspension to suspend your license and eligibility for licen-sure has been filed against you. You have the right to request a hearing pursuant to Sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes, by mailing a request for same to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Licensing, Post Office Box 3168, Tallahassee, Florida 32315-3168. If a request for hearing is not received by 21 days from the date of the last publication, the right to hearing in this matter will be waived and the Department will dispose of this cause in accordance with law.05535295November 1, 8, 15, 22, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILACTIONCASE NO.: 12-2012-CA-000218DIVISION:US BANK, NATIONALASSOCIA-TION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF BANC OF AMERICAFUNDING CORPORATION 2009-FT1 TRUST, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SER-IES 2009-FT1,Plaintiff,vs.JOHN ROGERS, JR., et al,Defendant(s).NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to a Final Judgment of Mort-gage Foreclosure dated October 18, 2012 and entered in Case No. 12-2012-CA-000218 of the Circuit Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit in and for COLUMBIACounty, Florida wherein US BANK, NA-TIONALASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICA-TEHOLDERS OF BANC OF AMERICAFUNDING CORPORA-TION 2009-FT1 TRUST, MORT-GAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIF-ICATES, SERIES 2009-FT1, is the Plaintiff and JOHN ROGERS, JR; BANK OF AMERICA, NA; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bid-der for cash at 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, FL, 3RD Floor, Courtroom One OF THE COLUM-BIACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the 28 day of Novem-ber, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment:LOT13, BLOCK 5, OAK HILLRE-PLAT, ASUBDIVISION AC-CORDING TO THE PLATTHERE-OF RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 3, PAGE 52, PUBLIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLOR-IDA.A/K/A173 SE OSCEOLAPLACE, LAKE CITY, FL32025Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-er than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on October 30, 2012.P. DeWitt CasonClerk of the Circuit CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkIn accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons need-ing a special accommodation to par-ticipate in this proceeding should contact the Deputy Court Adminis-trator whose office is located at 3301 East Tamiami Trail, Building L, Na-ples, Florida 33962, telephone num-ber (813) 774-8124; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD), or 1-800-955-8770 (v), via Florida Relay Service, not later than seven (7) days prior to this proceed-ing.02500401November 8, 15, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILACTION CASE NO.: 12-2012-CA-0000064SUNTRUSTMORTGAGE, INC.Plaintiff,vs.SHARON M. CLIFTON A/K/ASHARON MARIE CLIFTON, et al,Defendant(s).NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated October 18, 2012 and entered in Case No. 12-2012-CA-000064 of the Circuit Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit in and for COLUMBIACounty, Florida wherein SUNTRUSTMORTGAGE, INC is the Plaintiff and SHARON M. CLIFTON A/K/ASHARON MARIE CLIFTON; DEER CREEK LANDING HOMEOWNERS AS-SOCIATION, INC.; TENANT#1 N/K/ACHRISTOPHER LITTLE, and TENANT#2 N/K/ASAMAN-THACHAPMAN are the Defend-ants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash as, at Columbia County Court-house, 173 N.E. Hernando Avenue, Lake City, FL32055at 11:00 AM, on the 28th day of Nov., 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment:LOT17, DEER CREEK SUBDIVI-SION, ACCORDING TO THE PLATTHEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 6, PAGE 213, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CO-LUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.TOGETHER WITH ACERTAIN 1999 REDMAN MOBILE HOME LOCATED THEREON AS AFIX-TURE AND APPURTENANCE.THERETO: VIN# FLA14614305A, FLA14614302CA/K/A172 SWWHITETAILCIR-CLE, LAKE CITY, FL32024Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-er than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on 10/18/2012.P. DeWitt CasonClerk of the Circuit CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkSEALIn accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons need-ing a special accommodation to par-ticipate in this proceeding should contact the Deputy Court Adminis-trator whose office is located at 3301 East Tamiami Trail, Building L, Na-ples, Florida 33962, telephone num-ber (813) 774-8124; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD), or 1-800-955-8770 (v), via Florida Relay Service, not later than seven (7) days prior to this proceed-ing.05535544November 1, 8, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURTFOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAPROBATE DIVISIONFile No. 12-258-CPIN RE: ESTATE OF GWENDO-LYN G. NORRIS,Deceased.NOTICE TO CREDITORSThe administration of the estate of Gwendolyn G.. Norris, deceased, whose date of death was October 15, 2012; File Number 12-258-CPis pending in the Circuit Court for Co-lumbia County, Florida, Probate Di-vision, the address of which is 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055. the names and ad-dresses of the personal representative and personal representative’s attor-ney are set forth below.All creditors of the decedent and oth-er persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICA-TION OF THIS NOTICE.ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITH-IN THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED.NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.The date of first publication of this notice is: November 8, 2012./s/ Laura Ruth NorrisPersonal Representatives:Laura Ruth NorrisMary Anne Norris/s/ Duane E. ThomasDuane E. ThomasAttorney for Personal RepresentativeFlorida Bar No. 202916Duane E. Thomas Attorney At Law206 S. Marion AveLake City, FL32055(386) 755-501405535707November 8, 15, 2012 NOTICETOWHOM ITMAYCONCERN:NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN THATTHE BOARD OF COUNTYCOMMISSIONERS OF COLUM-BIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, will conduct a public hearing on Novem-ber 15, 2012 at 7:00 p.m. in the Commissioners Meeting at the School Board Administration Build-ing in Lake City, Florida and will consider and determine whether or not the County will vacate, abandon, discontinue, renounce and disclaim any right of County, a portion of Lil-lian Acres, a subdivision, recorded in ORB 1021/2390, Public Records of Columbia County, Florida; consist-ing of a 40 acre subdivision with a dedicated roadway particularly de-scribed as:The SW1/4 of the SW1/4 except 5 acres in the NE corner, also the NW1/4 south of County Grad (Jim Witt Road), all in Section 3, Township 5 5 South, Range 17 East, more partic-ularly described as followsBegin at the Southwest corner of said Section 3, and run N 031’06”E along the west line thereof, 1454.1 feet to the south Right-of-Way of a County Graded Road (Jim Witt Road); Thence S8257’19”E along said south Right-of-Way, 867.45 feet; thence S 026’35”W, 487.74 feet; thence N 8829’45”E, 462.0 feet; thence S 026’35”W, 841.87 feet to the Southeast Corner of the SW1/4 of the SW1/4 of said Sec-tion 3; thence S 8841’36”Walong the South line of said Section 3, 1325.90 feet to the Point of Begin-ning. Columbia County, Florida. Containing 36.39 acres more or less.If you have any questions, please contact the Board of County Com-missioners of Columbia County, Florida, at 386-755-4100.BOARD OF COUNTYCOMMIS-SIONERSCOLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA/s/ P. DeWitt CasonClerk of CourtColumbia County05535540November 1, 8, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILACTIONCASE NO.: 12-2010-CA-000144BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,Plaintiff,vs.THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVI-SEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUST-EES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UN-DER, OR AGAINST, FREDERICK J. HAYDEN A/K/AFREDERICK JAMES HAYDEN, DECEASED, et al,Defendant(s).NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to a Final Judgment of Mort-gage Foreclosure dated October 18, 2012 and entered in Case No. 12-2010-CA-0000144 of the Circuit Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit in and for COLUMBIACounty, Florida wherein BANK OF AMERI-CA, N.Ais Plaintiff and THE UN-KNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIE-NORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIM-ING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST, FREDERICK J. HAY-DEN A/K/AFREDERICK JAMES HAYDEN, DECEASED; LINDAR RUTH HAYDEN A/K/ALINDAR. HAYDEN, AS HEIR OF THE ES-TATE OF FREDERICK J. HAY-DEN, DECEASED; CHRISTENAM. DUTROW, AS HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF FREDERICK J. HAY-DEN, DECEASED; FRANK HAY-DEN A/K/AALEXANDER HAY-DEN A/K/AALEXANDER F. HAYDEN, AS HEIR OF ESTATE OF FREDERICK J. HAYDEN, DE-CEASED; ALAN P. CARTER, AS HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF FRED-ERICK J. HAYDEN, DECEASED; DEBBIE P. SHARPA/K/ADEBBIE SHARP, AS HEIR OF THE ES-TATE OF FREDERICK J. HAY-DEN, DECEASED; CHARLES S. HAYDEN II A/K/ACHARLES S. HAYDEN, AS HEIR OF THE ES-TATE OF FREDERICK J. HAY-DEN, DECEASED; KRISTI R. MOORE, AS HEIR OF THE ES-TATE OF FREDERICK J. HAY-DEN, DECEASED; LISATAUL-MAN, AS HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF FREDERICK J. HAYDEN, DE-CEASED; MARK GREGORYHAYDEN A/K/AMARK G. HAY-DEN A/K/AMARK GREGORYHAYDEN II, AS HEIR OF THE ES-TATE OF FREDERICK J. HAY-DEN, DECEASED; SHARON LYNN MEADOWS A/K/ASHAR-ON L. MEADOWS, AS HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF FREDERICK J. HAYDEN, DECEASED; DO-LORES J. HAAS, AS HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF FREDERICK J. HAYDEN, DECEASED; JANE G. WILSON, AS HEIR OF THE ES-TATE OF FREDERICK J. HAY-DEN, DECEASED; ROBERTJO-SEPH HAYDEN, AS HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF FREDERICK J. HAYDEN, DECEASED; JAMES L. HAYDEN, AS HEIR OF THE ES-TATE OF FREDERICK J. HAY-DEN, DECEASED; SHANE A. HAYDEN A/K/ASHANE HAY-DEN, AS HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF FREDERICK J. HAYDEN, DE-CEASED; SHAE TAYLOR A/K/ASHAE LYNN TAYLOR F/K/ASHAE LYNN HAYDEN, AS HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF FREDERICK J. HAYDEN, DECEASED; JOHN HOWARD HAYDEN JR. A/K/AJOHN HAYDEN JR., AS HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF FREDERICK J. HAYDEN, DECEASED; HEATH-ER A. HAYDEN A/K/AHEATHER HAYDEN, AS HEIR OF THE ES-TATE OF FREDERICK J. HAY-DEN, DECEASED; HAYDEN SANDERS, AMINOR, AS HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF FREDERICK J. HAYDEN, DECEASED; WAL-TER J. BENJAMIN, AS HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF FREDERICK J. HAYDEN, DECEASED; BETTIE-JEAN LUKEN, AS HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF FREDERICK J. HAY-DEN, DECEASED; MARK A. BENJAMIN AS HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF FREDERICK J. HAY-DEN, DECEASED; ERIC E. KA-BLER, AS HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF FREDERICK J. HAYDEN, DE-CEASED; DONNAR. HOBBS A/K/ADONNARENEE HOBBS, AS HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF FREDERICK J. HAYDEN, DE-CEASED; HAROLD S. WELLS A/K/AH. SCOTTWELLS A/K/AH.S. WELLS, S HEIR OF THE ES-TATE OF FREDERICK J. HAY-DEN, DECEASED; RICKYR. WELLS A/K/ARICKYRAYWELLS, AS HEIR OF THE ES-TATE OF FREDERICK J. HAY-DEN, DECEASED; KENNETH L. WELLS A/K/AKENNETH WELLS, AS HEIR OF THE ES-TATE OF FREDERICK J. HAY-DEN, DECEASED; ANYAND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UN-DER, AND AGAINSTTHE HERE-IN NAMED INDIVIDUALDE-FENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN-KNOWN PARTIES MAYCLAIM AN INTERESTAS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bid-der for cash, at Columbia County Courthouse, 173. N.E. Hernado Ave-nue, Lake City, FL32055at 11:00 AM, on the 28th day of Nov., 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment:LOT4, SUNNYDALE FARMS, ASUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO PLATTHEREOF RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 6, PAGE 53, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF COLUM-BIACOUNTY, FLORIDA. TO-GETHER WITH AMOBILE HOME LOCATED THEREON AS APERMANENTFIXTURE AND AN APPURTENANCE THERETO.VIN FLHMBFP127845501AAND FLHMBFP127845501B.A/K/A1223 SWBARNEYROAD, HIGH SPRINGS, FL32643Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-er than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on 10/18/2012.P. DeWitt CasonClerk of the Circuit CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkSEALIn accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons need-ing a special accommodation to par-ticipate in this proceeding should contact the Deputy Court Adminis-trator whose office is located at 3301 East Tamiami Trail, Building L, Na-ples, Florida 33962, telephone num-ber (813) 774-8124; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD), or 1-800-955-8770 (v), via PublishedMonthlybythe Lake City Reporter

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTHURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2012 5B Classified Department: 755-5440 LegalFlorida Relay Service, no later than seven (7) days prior to this proceed-ing.05535543November 1, 8, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILACTIONCASE NO.: 12-2010-CA-000324CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC,Plaintiff,vs.EMMAHAVIARAS, et al, Defendant(s).NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to a Final Judgment of Mort-gage Foreclosure dated October 18, 2012 and entered in Case No. 12-2010-CA-000324 of the Circuit Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit in and for COLUMBIACounty, Florida wherein JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONALAS-SOCIATION, SUCCESSOR BYMERGER TO CHASE HOME FI-NANCE LLC, is the Plaintiff and EMMAHAVIARAS; JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A.; THREE RIV-ERS ESTATES PROPERTYOWN-ERS, INC.; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash atColumbia County Courthouse, 173 N.E. Hernando Avenue, Lake City, FL32055at 11:00 AM, on the 28th day of Nov., 2012, the following de-scribed property as set forth in said Final Judgment:PARCEL1LOT115, MORE PARTICULARLYKNOWN AS LOT43, UNIT14 OF 3 RIVERS ESTATES, INC., ASUBDIVISION OF APARTOF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP6 SOUTH, RANGE 15 EAST, CO-LUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID UNIT14 BEING BETTER DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS; BE-GIN ATSOUTHWESTCORNER OF SOUTHEAST1/4 OF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP6 SOUTH, RANGE 15 EAST, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 26 MINUTES WEST281.94 FEETALONG SOUTH LINES OF SAID SECTION 36; THENCE NORTH 10 DEGREES 19 MINUTES EAST552.68 FEET; THENCE NORTH 14 DEGREES 11 MINUTES WEST671.26 FEET; THENCE NORTH 38 DEGREES 41 MINUTES WEST276.12 FEET; THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 35 MINUTES WEST313.89 FEET; THENCE NORTH 86 DEGREES 31 MINUTES WEST2.10 FEET; THENCE NORTH 0 DEGREES 42 MINUTES WEST33.09 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 86 DEGREES 31 MINUTES EAST166.20 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 86 DEGREES 31 MINUTES EAST166.20 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 54 DEGREES 35 MINUTES EAST732.07 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 66 DEGREES 49 MINUTES EAST648.55 FEET; THENCE NORTH 10 DEGREES 34 MINUTES WEST621.08 FEET; THENCE NORTH 7 DEGREES 20 MINUTES EAST1900.07 FEET; THENCE NORTH 39 DEGREES 38 MINUTES EAST275.10 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 27 DEGREES 04 MINUTES EAST1369.97 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 0 DEGREES 34 MINUTES EAST748.10 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 26 FEETWEST486.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 0 DEGREES 34 MINUTES EAST748.10 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 26 FEETWEST486.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 0 DEGREES 34 MINUTES EAST1821.80 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 26 MINUTES WEST1120.13 FEETTOTHE POINTOF BEGINNING.ANDPARCELTWOLOT117, SECTION 12 MORE PARTICULARLYKNOWN AS LOT42, UNIT14 OF 3 RIVERS ESTATE, INC., SAID UNIT14 BE-ING BETTER DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGIN ATSOUTH-WESTCORNER OF SOUTHEAST1/4 OF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP6 SOUTH, RANGE 15 EAST, CO-LUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 26 MINUTES WEST281.94 FEETALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SECTION 36; THENCE NORTH 10 DEGREES 19 MI-NUTES EAST552.68 FEET; THENCE NORTH 14 DEGREES 11 MINUTES WEST671.26 FEET; THENCE NORTH 38 DEGREES 41 MINUTES WEST276.12 FEET; THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 35 MINUTES WEST313.89 FEET; THENCE NORTH 86 DEGREES 31 MINUTES WEST2.10 FEET; THENCE NORTH 0 DEGREES 42 MINUTES WEST33.09 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 86 DEGREES 31 MINUTES EAST169.20 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 54 DEGREES 35MINUTES EAST732.07 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 66 DEGREES 49 MINUTES EAST548.55 FEET; THENCE NORTH 10 DEGREES 34 MINUTES WEST621.08 FEET; THENCE NORTH 7 DEGREES 20 MINUTES EAST1900.07 FEET; THENCE NORTH 39 DEGREES 38 MINUTES EAST275.10 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 27 DEGREES 04 MINUTES EAST1369.97 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 0 DEGREES 34 MINUTES EAST748.10 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 34 MINUTES WEST486.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 0 DEGREES 34 MINUTES EAST1821.80 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 26 MINUTES WEST1120.13 FEETTOTHE POINTOF BEGINNING, BEING APARTOF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP6 SOUTH, RANGE 15 EAST, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.A/K/A124 SWVIRGINIAWAY, FORTWHITE, FL32038.Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-er than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on 10/18/2012.P. DeWitt CasonClerk f the Circuit CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkSEALNOTICEIn accordance with the American with Disabilities Act, persons need-ing a special accommodation to par-ticipate in this proceeding should contact the Deputy Court Adminis-trator whose office is located at 3301 East Tamiami Trail, Building L, Na-ples, Florida 33962, telephone numLegalber (813) 774-8124; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD), or 1-800-955-8770 (v), via Florida Relay Service, no later than seven (7) days prior to this proceed-ing.05535545November 1, 8, 2012 100Job Opportunities05534241NOWHIRING Cashiers & Baggers forHigh Springs fruit & gift stores. Benefits avail: health, dental, & vacation. Apply in person: Florida Citrus Center(Chevron) 18603 NWCR 236, High Springs (exit 404 & I-75) 05535697Seeking experienced applicants for Bridge/Structural Concrete crew positions. Positions open; Bridge Carpenter, Formsetter, Concrete Finisher. Rigging and light operator experience is a plus. Work area will be Central North Florida thru Big Bend.” You may apply at 841 NW Guerdon Street, Lake City, FL 32056, fax your resume to 386-755-9132 or visit website at www.andersoncolumbia.com. 114 TEMPFarm Workers needed 12/17/12 – 10/10/13. Workers will perform a variety of duties associ-ated w/ growing peaches: planting, thinning, pruning, cultivating, har-vesting, & packing peaches. 3 Mos. Verifiable exp. harvesting a perishable crop. Guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours. All tools, supplies, & equipment provided at no cost.Free housing provided for non-commuting workers. Transporta-tion & subsistence reimbursed to worker upon completion of 50% of contract or earlier if appropriate. Pay rate is $9.39/hr or applicable piece rates depending on crop ac-tivity. Worksites in Edgefield & Saluda Co’s SC. Applicants should report or send a resume to the nearest FLAgency of Workforce innovation office 386-755-9026 & reference job # 543433.Carolina Farms & Harvesting, Inc. – John-ston, SC CDLClass A Truck Driver Flatbed exp. for F/TSE area. 3 years exp or more. Medical benefits offered. Contact Melissa or Sandy@ 386-935-2773 Dental Hygienist: Golden Opportunity! Full time, Part time, Fill in, we have a great opportunity waiting for you! An immediate opening has just come up! That’s great news in this job market! If you have a friendly can-do attitude, a gentle touch, a great work ethic, you are orgainized, and self motivated with a god sense of humor, then you should apply. Call 888-486-2408 to hear a message with more details about the position and instructions on how to apply for this position in Madison, FL. Great benefits! SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 120Medical Employment05535577RN OncologyFast paced Oncology Hematology practice currently seeking a permanent, full time ONCOLOGYINFUSION RN to work in outpatient chemotherapy at their Lake City location. Work schedule M-F, 8am-5pm. Please send resume with salary req. to jsmith@ccofnf.com. Resumes without salary req. will not be considered. Busy Family Practice Office seeks F/TNursing Personnel Must be Motivated and Organized Office Experience Preferred Fax Resume to (386) 719-9494. Giebeig Family Medicine Exp. CAPor Licensed Mental Health Professional for counseling and assessments in an outpatient SAtreatment program. Ref. Req'd. PT Email resume to bsmith@itmflorida.com F/T Entry Level position in busy Medical Practice. M-F, Benefits Avail. Fax resume to 386-487-1232. 240Schools & Education05535484Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class12/24/2012• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-11/05/12• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 330Livestock & SuppliesDeep Creek Farms Barn kept Square or Net Wrapped Round Hay Bales For Sale Ronnie Hughes (386)365-1425 407Computers DELLComputer $100.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 408Furniture Queen-Size Cherry Wood Bdrm Set. Lrg Dresser w/ Mirror, Headboard, Nightstand,BoxSpring/Mattress &Metal Rails. $700 OBO. Can email pics. (386) 397-2389 413Musical MerchandiseSpinet type piano. $900 OBO Must Sell Contact 386-842-5548 430Garage Sales Are you looking for variety? Fri &Sat 7am-2pm. 121 SWStafford Ct, Calloway Sbd. Lg variety of power tools, scissor jacks, 6x12 enclosed Cargo Mate trailer, Furn, Refrig Bev Machine, Misc HH Items, Clothes. No Early Birds Multi Family NOV.10 7A-1P 1621 SWST. JAMES CT (Chapel Hill SDV) Household Items, Kids toys, Clothes, Misc. Multi Family Fri. & Sat. 7am-4 Lots of HH Items, Furn, Nice prom dresses, man/women/children’s clothing & shoes all sizes, elect, various vhs tapes + more. Brown Rd to Bert St, Rt to Nash Rd, Lft on Nash to Carr Ct, see signs or Lake Jeff. to Nash Rd cont. on to Carr Ct see signs. PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 440Miscellaneous All Children are artists! Ages 2-10 Fall Session Receive $10 off tuition October 22nd Nov. 16th Phone: (386) 438-8060 Noahs-art.com *located across the highway from Honda ANYONE WANTING AMeat: Chicken or Duck, around 7 or 8 lbs ready now for Thanksgiving. We will dress chicken, Quail, or Pheasants. For Hunters have good flying Pheasant. RSVPfor 1st Sat. of Dec. for Pheasant shooting call for tickets available 754-9127 Bowflex Ultimate 2, Complete with instructions and DVD’s showing 164 exercises. $350 extra set of power rods. 386-758-6782 PRO-FORM ELLIPTICAL $200 Like New, Built in fan 386-758-6782 Recumbence Bike by NordicTrak (Step through) $200 Like New Contact 758-6782 450Good Things to EatThe Nut Cracker Robert Taylor Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans 2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024 Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville 386-963-4138 or 961-1420 460Firewood Free Oak Firewood Need to brings your own gloves to gather the wood. Contact 935-2461 630Mobile Homes forRent14 x70 MH.Real clean,2br/2ba garden tub,Water furn.,Good Location $575 mo. $300 dep. No Pets 386-755-0064 or (904) 771-5924 2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $450. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 2/1 SW US 90 W, LC,Remodeled, lg yard, porch, quiet area. 1st mth $575 & $500 dep. No pets. 386752-1941 or 965-0932 2/2 Screened porch, Lg. lot, in very nice, clean, well maintained, safe, small park, credit/background check, no pets, really nice place to live, with long term tenants, $485 mo., $485 sec. dep. 386-719-9169 or 386-965-3003. Efficency Apt and Rv Lots for Rent. Between Lake City & G’ville. Access to I-75 & 441 (352)317-1326. Call for terms. Mobile Homes for rent in White Springs & Ft. White. Contact 386-623-3404 Move-in Special 1st mth Free, 1, 2 or 3bdrm $350/mth. $450 to m/i. Call today m/i tomorrow. 305-984-5511 or 386-344-0830 Newer2/2. Super clean on 1 ac North by distribution center. Perfect for Target employee. $550. mo Call for details. 386-867-9231 Quiet Country Park 3br/2ba $525. Very clean NO PETS! References & Deposit required 386-758-2280 WATERTOWN AREA 3br/2ba DW, Handicap accessible, $650 mth, $500 dep. Call 386-344-0144, 386-344-5791 640Mobile Homes forSale2013 DOUBLEWIDE $33,995 inc. set-up, trim-out & A/C Call 386-288-8379. 640Mobile Homes forSale3/2, 1800 sqft., CBC home, on corner lot, work shop. MLS# 79574 $74,900. REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 3BR/2BA28X64 in a great location, a lot of upgrades, fireplace. Only $2,500 down $399 a month. Call Paula at 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com 4Br/2ba, in town, good investment, current rent set at $825 per mo. MLS # 74958. $74,900 Accredited Real Estate Mike Foster 288-3596 5 LIKENew Mobile Homes!!! For under $30,000. MUSTSEE Call John T. 386-752-1452 575 Credit Score=10% Down on your choice of select New 3/2 or 4/2 Double. Limited time offer for Challenged Credit. North Pointe Homes, 352-872-5566 Accredited Real Estate Nice Home, kitchen redone fenced, backyard, 2br/1ba. MLS#81521, $52,000. Mike Foster 288-3596 BANK REPO 3BR/2BADoublewide ’09 Excellent condition. Only $999 down $377 a month. Call Paula 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #75661 Must be 55+, Manufacture home, 1 ac, fireplace, laundry, open & bright $79,900. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Home in good condition, MH 3br/2ba. Good size kitchen. 4 plus acres. MLS #80235. $63,000 Accredited Real Estate Mike Foster 288-3596 MUSTSEE 2013 2x6 walls, R30 insulation, OSB wrap, house wrap, real wood cabinets, and thermal pain windows. Payment $399 per month call John T386-752-1452. NEW3/2JACOBSEN HOMES Starting at $43,995. Painted WAlls-Del-Set-AC-Skirting-and Steps. North Pointe Homes Hwy 441 N, Gainesville, FL 352-872-5566 NEWJacobsen Model Homes Sale! 13 Left with up to $25,000 off. Don’t buy until you shop North Pointe Homes 4545 NW 13th St Gainesville 352-872-5566 Own YourProperty? No Money Down with good credit. Great Rates Available. North Pointe Homes 352-872-5566 Palm Harbor Homes 4/2 From 499 Mo Loaded3/2 From 399 Mo Loaded $0 Down, Singlewides $299/Mo 800-622-2832 ext 210 Results Realty Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Affordable 4/2 on 10 acres in Bell. over 2,200 sqft. in country setting. $80,000 MLS# 76582 Several Bank Repos and Used Homes in stock At North Pointe in Gainesville 352-872-5566 WANTED…CASH PAID for your Mobile Home, Singlewide or Doublewide flood homes welcome. Call 386-288-8379 650Mobile Home & LandBeautiful brick on 11.16 acres w/ DWfor family or renting. In ground pool. MLS 81203. $252,000. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 Lots of sq ft, 4br/2ba approx 2618 sq ft, Newly remodeled kitchen, new roof. MLS 81733. $99,900. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 What a great home, 3BR/2B, 1860 sqft. DWon 5 acres. MLS#80543 $125,000. REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05535481We’ve got it all!$89 Deposit Limited Avail. Call Today! Windsong Apts. *Free afterschool program386-758-8455 1BR APT. Downtown Location, Clean. New Carpet $450 mo, plus Security. NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456 2BR/1BA$600/MO & $575 Sec. Dep. Lovely, Private, re-done CR 242 West of RT47 386-365-7193 or 867-6319 2br/1ba Apt. Quiet Lake View CH/A$500. mo $500 dep. No pets. 386-344-2170 2BR/2BAw/garage 5 minutes from VAhospital and Timco. Call for details. 386-365-5150 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 ALandlord You Can Love! 3br/1+ba, Eat in Kitchen, Laundry Room, CH/A, deck, 2 car carport 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Amberwood Hills Apts. Private Patio area. Beautiful yard. Washer/dryer hkup. Free water & sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special. 386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com Brandywine Apartments Now Renting 1, 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-752-3033 W. Grandview Ave. Equal Housing Opportunity TDD Number 1-800-955-8771 Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2 mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet Friendly. Pool laundry & balcony. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Greentree Townhouse Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free water & sewer. Balcony & patio. Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRentRedwine Apartments Pets welcome. with 5 complexes, we have a home for you. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com Updated Apt, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 Wayne ManorApts. Spacious 2bedroom washer/dryer. Behind Kens off Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 www .myflapts.com WindsorArms Apartments. Move in! 2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free 200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com 720Furnished Apts. ForRentRooms forRent Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent2BD /1.5BA Country, South of Lake City, private river access. w/boat ramp, 2 garages, clean, $625 mo. + sec. 386-590-0642 3br/1.5ba. Very clean, Block great area. CH/A& indoor laundry. Carport & Fenced (privacy) back yard. $750. mo $750. dep. (941)920-4535 Beautiful Yard, Close to shopping Lots of natural light. 3BD/1.5BA CH/A, $700 mth & $700 dep. Contact 386-344-2170 Very Nice 3BD/2ba brick home, $745 mth & $500 dep. Application Required. Call 386-935-1485 to see. 750Business & Office RentalsFOR LEASE: Downtown Office Space. Convenient to Court house. Call 386-755-3456 ForRent orLease: Former Doctors office, Former professional office & Lg open space: avail on East Baya Ave. Competitive rates. Weekdays 386-984-0622 evenings/weekends 497-4762 PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 805Lots forSale 5 acre lot located in quiet setting River Rise s/d, Homes only, paved street. $65,000 MLS #76151 Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert386-397-3473 6.45 Acres of River front property on Suwannee, Consist of 3 lots, MLS# 77414 $75,000. REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 Beautiful lot on Suwannee. Property features stairway to dock, picnic area. MLS# 78842, $35,000 Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Results Realty Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #80401 $60,000. Must be 55+ 130x750 right on Suwannee, Beautiful lot, minutes from Royal Springs, Denise Bose 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #76668 $32,000 Must be 55+, Buildable lot for site built homes only. In Forest Country. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Lot close to Sante Fe, Suwannee & Ichetucknee MLS 80092 $15,000. REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 Nice vacant lot in Desirable river Community, MLS #73268 $15,000 Brittany Stoeckert386-397-3473 Results Realty, PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Small home on corner lot with 3br, Fenced yards. Needs TLC. MLS # 81204 $23,900 Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Results Realty Vacant land 5.91 acres, part cleared, few miles from Charles Springs & Suwannee $20,500. MLS 80961 REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 810Home forSale 2 OwnerFinanced Homes/ 1 RentalLake City, Mayo, Branford 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 3BR/1.5BA Eat in Kitchen Elec. Appl., &W/D Utility Room, Porch, Carport, Lg lot, Close to VA& shopping. $68,000 386-288-5240 or 386-984-0207 3br/2ba 1677 sqft, close town, Hardy Board Construction Century 21Darby Rogers MLS 81841, $149,900. Call 752-6575 810Home forSale 3br/2ba, 2 car garage, LR w/ stove fire place, lg Master Br, New roof Century 21Darby Rogers MLS 81846, $99,500. Call 752-6575 3br/2ba, extra enclosed carport, Manicured property, huge palm trees. Century 21 Darby Rogers MLS 81753, $84,500. Call 752-6575 Access Realty Gorgeous views 3bd/3ba on Lake Montgomery. Elevator, fishing dock & jacuzzi. MLS 81438 $249,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access RealtySpacious 4 bd/3ba Cypress Lake w/ 3643 sqft 1.25 acres on lake. Vaulted ceilings. MLS 81314 $279,900. Patti Taylor386-623-6896 Access RealtyTwo story 1895 Victorian house w/ electrical upgrades throughout. double -deck porches, MLS 71594 $149,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty MLS # 80175 2 story colonial, 4 br, 2b/2.5b, in ground pool, 3 fireplaces, patio, $315,000. Mary Brown Whitehurst 965-0887 Country home on 4 ac, 3br/2.5ba, formal living room, fireplace, MLS 81775 Coldwell Banker Bishop Realty $179,900 Elaine Tolar 755-6488 Cute home, nice paint, great layout. 3br/2ba. MLS 81746 $112,300. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. Must be 55+, 3br/3ba on 7.48 acres, country living, spacious, heated front porch, brick workshop, Call for appt. 752-5290. Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81958-, $115,000. Must be 55+, 3br/2ba, Site Built w/ lots of room, split plan mstr suite, FL. Rm. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81959 Must be 55+, 2br/2ba, $79,900. Site Built Home w/eat in kitchen, laundry rm, scrn porch. Denise Bose @ 752-5290 Location is the key, 3br/2ba, new a/c compressor split floor plan, MLS 81614 Coldwell Banker Bishop Realty $129,900 Sherry Ratliff 365-8414 Looks brand new 3br/2ba split plan spacious L.room, dinning area & breakfast nook. MLS #81426, Coldwell BankerBishop Agency Elaine Tolar 755-6488$149,900 820Farms & Acreage10 acres with well/septic/pp (not guar); $300 dwn; $580 a mth. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com 40 acre Ranch, Brick 3/3 with 2000 sqft., new roof, kitchen remodeled, pole barn, MLS 81641 $349,5000. REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 Access Realty10 acre square tract, High & Dry, OF Avail. w/ 25% down. Convenient Location MLS 81258$39,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access Realty43.64 acres wooded acreage in N.Columbia County. Scenic & Private. MLS 74429 $89,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Coldwell BankerBishop Agency MLS 79650, Elaine Tolar 755-6488. 10 ac w/ 3br/2.5ba, large master ste, lg porch, barn w/ workshop, $280,900. 830Commercial PropertyHigh profile location, multiple office spaces, Call Neil & Hansel Holton 984-5791 at Coldwell BankerBishop Realty MLS# 81848, $102,500 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 880Duplexes QUAILHEIGHTS Golf Course Community. 2br/1ba W/D hock up. Private, safe, secluded. $725 mo $500 sec. 386-243-8235 nr 5 a week days Lake City Reporter

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6B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2012 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 6BSports Jump New Patient Exam and Necessary X-rays DO150, DO330 First-time patient Reg. $136 $ 29 SAVINGS OF $107 Expires November 30, 2012 ASPEN DENTAL GROUP Lake City Reporter Located at SHANDS Lake City, Live Oak & Starke Womens Center of Florida ALL MAJOR INSURANCES ACCEPTED INCLUDING MEDICAID & MEDICARE FREE Pregnancy Ultrasound WITH THIS AD* *Insurance billing may occur if necessary. Some Restrictions apply. OBSTRETRICS & GYNECOLOGY PRENATAL CARE & ULTRASOUNDS STDS & HPV TESTING BIRTH CONTROL & INFERTILITY MENOPAUSE & INCONTINENCE WEIGHT LOSS & 4D ULTRASOUNDS BOTOX & LASER HAIR REMOVAL NO INSURANCE VISITS ASK ABOUT OUR $ 50 CHANDLER MOHAN, MD EMAD ATTA, MD NOW HIRING MID-LEVEL PROVIDERS 386-466-1106 SERVICES: OB-GYN www.myobcare.com G. W. HUNTER, INC. 1130 US Hwy 90 W (386) 752-5890 WE NOW HAVE ETHANOL FREE PLUS GASOLINE ONLY AT INTENDED USES: BOATS & WATERCRAFTS COLLECTABLE VEHICLES OFF-ROAD VEHICLES MOTORCYCLES SMALL ENGINES T IMELESS M EMORIES 386-466-1888 New Arrival Himalayan Crystal Salt Rocks The worlds only Natural Ionizer & Air Puri er See our lighted arrangements Learn more of this all natural healthy bene t. 4 D A Y S O N L Y 4 4 4 D D 4 4 4 4 4 4 D Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Thurs., Fri., Sat. & Mon. Sat. & Mon. Sat. & Mon. Sat. & Mon. Sat. & Mon. Sat. & Mon. Sat. & Mon. Sat. & Mon. Sat. & Mon. Sat. & Mon. Sat. & Mon. Sat. & Mon. Sat. & Mon. Sat. & Mon. Sat. & Mon. Sat. & Mon. Sat. & Mon. Sat. & Mon. Nov. 8-12 Nov. 8-12 Nov. 8-12 Nov. 8-12 Nov. 8-12 Nov. 8-12 Nov. 8-12 Nov. 8-12 Nov. 8-12 Nov. 8-12 Nov. 8-12 Nov. 8-12 Nov. 8-12 Nov. 8-12 Nov. 8-12 Nov. 8-12 Nov. 8-12 Nov. 8-12 Nov. 8-12 Nov. 8-12 Nov. 8-12 L L Y Y ! When The Tent Goes Up, The Prices Come Down! You Asked For It! You Asked For It! You Got It! You Got It! TENT SALE Nov. 8, 9 & 10th CONTINUES HUGE SAVINGS Jeans Boots Drastically Reduced Shirts $10 Starting At CHS From Page 1B JEN CHASTEEN /Special to the Reporter Pool proficiency Columbia High swimmers Hannah Burns (left) and Lindsay Lee are competing in the FHSAA state swim meet today at the Central Florida YMCA Aquatic Center in Orlando. BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City Reporter A banner year for Lady Tigers Columbia Highs 2012 volleyball season came to an end in the second round of the state playoffs on Tuesday against St. Augustine High in St. Augustine. The Lady Tigers improved from a 13-12 record in year one with head coach Rebecca Golden to finish 21-7 this season. Underwood to carry the load. Were not really going to shift our plan, Allen said. We had three running backs with a ton of ability. Were going to put the load on Lonnie and Timmons. Were going to keep the show rolling. These guys are going to play inspired. Theres not going to be a let down. Timmons is wont be at full capacity, but hell be ready to play. Hes still hobbled slightly, Allen said. Id say hes about 60 percent. Were going to wait and see. Lonnie had a very good practice on Tuesday. Its an opportunity for Lonnie to carry the workload. Weve known that he was a spe cial talent for a long time. Hes eager for the taste. Last year, as a freshman, we saw that he was a guy that could carry the ball 25 times. Hes got great vision and speed and is a little mix between Stockton and Timmons. Underwoods opportu nity will be crucial as the Tigers prepare for the play offs. Columbias final game of the regular season kicks off at 7:30 p.m. against Suwannee High on Friday in Lake City.