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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01924

Material Information

Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 11-04-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01949

Related Items

Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01924

Material Information

Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 11-04-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01949

Related Items

Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

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By DEREK GILLIAM dgilliam@lakecityreporter.com The early voting period is over, and Columbia County set a new mark to beat. A total of 13,217 ballots were cast during the eight-day early voting period. The previous record was 13,032 set in 2008, when Florida voters had 14 days to reach the polls. The final tally for the Lake City office on Saturday was 1,536. Fort White had the most votes cast during the early election period on Saturday. The total vote for Fort White was 410, bringing the grand total for the day to 1,946. The absentee ballot total is down from 2008. The total 2008 absentee ballot count was 5,494. As of Saturday, the total number of absentee bal lots that had reached the supervi sor of elections was 4,133. Tomi Brown, assisstant super visor of elections for Columbia County, encouraged all voters to turn in their absentee ballots before the election on Tuesday. She said all absentee ballots are due by 7 p.m. on election day. Mondays total saw the larg est turnout by Columbia County residents. On that day, 1,621 vot ers cast a ballot at the Lake City Office and 360 ballots were count ed from the Fort White office for a total of 2,010 votes. On Friday, 1,502 ballots were cast in Lake City and 360 in Fort White, for a total of 1,862. Earlier reports from the super visor of elections office had indi cated the previous record for early voting had been set in 2004. CALL US: (386) 752-1293 SUBSCRIBE TO THE REPORTER: Voice: 755-5445 Fax: 752-9400 TODAY IN PEOPLE Stars come out after Sandy. COMING TUESDAY City council coverage. Opinion ............... 4A Business ............... 1C Obituaries ............. 5A Advice ................. 5D Puzzles ................. 5B 82 56 Partly cloudy WEATHER, 10A Lake City ReporterSUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | $1 00 LAKECITYRE PO RTER COM Gators squeak by Missouri in the Swamp Trying to rise from the ashes: Couple struggles after fire SUNDAY EDITION Vol. 138, No 199 1D 1B 1A TONY BRITT/ Lake City Reporter Columbia County firefighter Jeff Crawford looks over the wreckage of a crash involving two tractor trailers on Interstate 75 Friday. The accident occurred when a semi hauling farm equipment slowed as traffic backed up from another crash a mile ahead, and the other semi struck it from behind. A pickup truck driven by a Lake City man then struck the second tractor trailer from the rear. See story, 3A. JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City Reporter Lake City residents Lilla Chapman (right), 4, Dancy Kendron, 5, Charleigh Brown, 3, and Luci Brown, 2, react as Lake City Police Departments Robbie the Robot passes them during the Columbia High School homecoming parade on Friday. See homecoming queen and court photos, 3A. Lake City man seriously hurt Early voting beats 08 mark More than 13,200 ballots cast over eight-day period. WARRIORS continued on 8A COUNTY FAIR Girl, 13, helping others like her Homecoming smiles Born with bad heart, will donate money from hog sale to cardiac unit. By DEREK GILLIAM dgilliam@gmail.com F or the Summers fam ily, showing animals at the county fair is family tradition, but this year theyre doing something rarely done. Ansleigh Summers, a girl in a wheelchair, will show a pig at the Youth Swine Show. Ansleigh Summers, a 13-yearold, was born with a serious heart condition. Her heart was turned back ward, said Janice Summers, Ansleighs grandmother. Shes a miracle baby. Her blood wasnt efficiently pumped through her body, until surgery corrected her defective heart. Ansleigh Summers has cere bral palsy. That condition affects her ability to communicate with the world. The words struggle to get out, but her father, Rick Summers, said, dont think she doesnt understand whats hap pening. We try and keep her as active and doing normal things so she doesnt feel any different then anybody else, he said. When Ansleigh Summers over heard her grandmother talking about raising money for people with cancer, she wanted to raise money for other children like her. She decided she was going to raise a pig and donate the money to Shands Childrens Heart Unit. The Summers family picked out a pig and raised it from a 60-pound oinker to a 270-pound porker. The pigs name is Bubbles. I said, Dont you want to keep that money for yourself, Janice Summers said. She said, No. Give the money to my doctor. ANSLEIGH continued on 8A Area firms kick in for Wounded Warriors By DEREK GILLIAM dgilliam@gmail.com The Lake City business community decided to have a little fun, and kick the ball for chairty. The Kicking For A Cause inagural kickball tourna ment raised around $8,200 for the Wounded Warrior Project Saturday. Chris Stalvey, electronic services manager for First Federal Bank of Florida, and Tad Cervantes, Columbia County Fire Department shift commander, helped

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PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Daily Scripture Celebrity Birthdays Actress Doris Roberts is 82. Actress Loretta Swit is 75. Rhythm-and-blues singer Harry Elston (Friends of Distinction) is 74. Blues singer Delbert McClinton is 72. Former First Lady Laura Bush is 66. Actress Markie Post is 62. Rock singer-musician Chris Difford (Squeeze) is 58. Country singer Kim Forester (The Forester Sisters) is 52. Actress-comedian Kathy Griffin is 52. Let everyone be subject to the governing authorities, for there is no authority except that which God has established. The authorities that exist have been established by God. Romans 13:1 CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading. AROUND FLORIDA Friday: 3-4-11-37 8 Friday: 23-24-30-33-34 Saturday: Afternoon: 8-0-5 Evening: N/A Saturday: Afternoon: 4-7-0-2 Evening: x-x-x-x Wednes day: 2-17-34-36-43-52 x2 AG reaches deal in mortgage settlement case TALLAHASSEE After a months-long feud, Floridas attorney general and the state Legislature reached a deal Friday intended to clear the way for $300 million in mort gage settlement money to finally start flowing to homeowners and commu nities hurt by the foreclo sure crisis. The money is the states direct share of a mas sive $25 billion national settlement with five of the nations largest mortgage lenders. Attorney General Pam Bondi relented to the idea that state legislators will get to vote on where the money winds up. The new deal also calls for $74 million to go straight into the states main budget account where lawmakers can use it any way they want. Bondi said in a joint statement with the two incoming leaders of the Legislature that it will grant much-needed assis tance and ensures that the settlement funds are spent with the transpar ency, accountability and flexibility that comes from the legislative process. Florida received $334 million directly as part of the national settlement reached among the lend ers and 49 states. The settlement represents money that is in addition to roughly $7.5 billion anticipated to go directly to homeowners in Florida. The settlement was announced last spring, but legislators for months had quietly insisted that the state constitution pre vented Bondi from spend ing the money indepen dently without legislative approval. Woman diagnosed with dengue fever KISSIMMEE An Osceola County woman has been diagnosed with dengue fever as health officials investigate a sec ond suspected case. The Health Department told the Orlando Sentinel it was not immediately known how the 41-yearold woman contracted the disease. Health officials are investigating a second suspected case in a 73year-old man. Last month a 19-year-old Seminole County man was diagnosed with dengue fever based on his symp toms and lab tests. Dengue fever is a viral disease transmitted by mosquitoes. Its sometimes called break bone fever because of the severe joint pain it can cause in extreme cases. The illness once disap peared from the United States, but cases were reported in the Florida Keys in 2009 and 2010. Man gets life for babys death TAMPA A Tampa Bay area man has been sentenced to life in prison for his infant sons death. A Hillsborough County judge sentenced 27-yearold Charles Scoble on Friday after a jury found him guilty of first-degree murder and aggravated child abuse. Authorities said 3month-old Nicholas Scoble was in his fathers care in 2007 when he was found not breathing in his crib. He was taken to a Tampa hospital, where he was pronounced dead. An autopsy found that the child had suffered head trauma, while an investigation determined that Charles Scoble had willfully and intentionally injured the boy. Teen gets life for fatal robbery TAVARES A central Florida teen has been sen tenced to life in prison for a fatal robbery. A Lake County judge sentenced Ryan Ray on Friday. A jury found him guilty in July of firstdegree murder. Authorities say then-16year-old Ray lured 39-yearold Jamin Monte Coyle from Lancaster, Ky., to cen tral Florida in 2010. The Orlando Sentinel reported that Ray had posed online as a 19-year-old interested in having sex with Coyle and then robbed and stran gled the older man. Suit filed over airport name TAMPA The Hillsborough County Aviation Authority has filed a lawsuit against the Hernando County Commission because the commission changed the name of the regional air port. The Tampa Tribune reported that Hernando County commission ers recently agreed to change the name of Hernando County Airport to Brooksville-Tampa Regional Airport. On Thursday, the Hillsborough County Aviation Authority responded by filing a law suit in U.S. District Court in Tampa against the Hernando board. The lawsuit alleges, among other things, trade mark infringement and false advertising. The Hillsborough Aviation Authority lawsuit said consumers are likely to be confused between services offered by the Hillsborough Aviation Authority and the airport in Brooksville. Robbery suspect killed by deputies POMPANO BEACH Authorities say a bank rob bery suspect is dead fol lowing a vehicle chase that left one deputy injured. The Broward Sheriffs Office reported that deputies responded to the Pompano Beach robbery Friday morning. Later, Detective German Bickbau was chas ing the suspects truck on Interstate 95 when Bickbau executed an immobilization maneuver, causing the suspect to crash. Authorities said the sus pect was armed when he crawled out of the wreck age, and two other depu ties fatally shot him. NEW YORK F rom Livin on a Prayer to Living Proof, every song at NBCs benefit concert for superstorm Sandy vic tims became a message song. Fridays hourlong event was hosted by Matt Lauer and featured performances by Christina Aguilera, Billy Joel and Bruce Springsteen. The show was heavy on stars and lyrics identified with New Jersey and the New York metropolitan area, which took the brunt of this weeks deadly storm. The telethon was a mix of music, storm footage and calls for donations from Jon Stewart, Tina Fey, Whoopi Goldberg and others. The mood was somber but hope ful. The show ended, as only it could, with Springsteen and the E Street Band, tearing into Land Of Hope and Dreams. Blake Shelton pulls off surprise win at CMAs NASHVILLE, Tenn. Winning the Country Music Association Awards entertainer of the year is a top honor and always counted as a career high point. But for Blake Shelton it wasnt even the most memorable moment of an amazing Thursday night. The Voice star took home three trophies, including his third straight male vocalist victory, but nothing compared to sharing song of the year with wife Miranda Lambert. The pair wrote Over You, about the death of Sheltons brother Richie in a car wreck 15 years ago. He said that trophy will always have a special place in their Oklahoma home. For me as a songwriter that is as personal as I can get, Shelton said. So that songwriter award, song of the year award, it will have its own shelf. It will have spotlights on it and an alarm and everything. Trip wires and there will be a land mine if you walk towards it. It is a real big deal to Miranda and I. Sheltons entertainer win was the biggest surprise of a night full of them. Even he couldnt believe hed won the award in a field that includ ed Taylor Swift, Jason Aldean, Kenny Chesney and Brad Paisley. George Lucas films rooted in rebellion LOS ANGELES Theres no mistaking the similarities. A child hood on a dusty farm, a love of fast vehicles, a rebel who battles an over powering empire George Lucas is the hero he created, Luke Skywalker. His filmmaking outpost, Skywalker Ranch, is so far removed from the Hollywood moviemaking machine he once despised, that it may as well be on the forest moon of Endor. Thats why this weeks announce ment that Lucas is selling the Star Wars franchise and the entire Lucasfilm business to The Walt Disney Co. for more than $4 billion is like a laser blast from outer space. Lucas built his film operation in Marin County near San Francisco largely to avoid the meddling of Los Angeles-based studios. His aim was to finish the Star Wars series his way. Today the enterprise has far sur passed the 68-year-old filmmakers original goals. The ranch covers 6,100 acres and houses one of the industrys most acclaimed visual effects companies, Industrial Light & Magic. Lucasfilm, with its headquar ters now in San Francisco proper, has ventured into books, video games, merchandise, special effects and marketing. Lucas once the outsider had grown to become the leader of an empire. Stars shine at Sandy benefit show Wednes day: 1-27-31-45-48 PB 5 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter 2A Associated Press Associated Press ASSOCIATED PRESS NASA officials and former astronauts gather around space shuttle Atlantis as it is hauled to its new home at the Visitor Complex at the Kennedy Space Center on Friday in Cape Canaveral. Atlantis, the last space shuttle to orbit the world, will be on permanent displa at the Visitor Complex. ASSOCIATED PRESS Taking part in a benefit to raise funds for victims of superstorm Sandy are (from left) Steven Tyler, Jimmy Fallon, Mark Rivera, and Bruce Springsteen. Hurricane Sandy: Coming Together was staged Friday night by NBC in New York. Shelton Lucas

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Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012 3A3A Lake City Institute of Neurology 4355 American Ln • Lake City, FL Ph: 386-755-1211 Fax: 386-755-1219 About Dr. NidDr. Nidadavolu has completed his medical training at Siddhartha Medical College, India and completed his residence & EMG/ Neuromuscular Fellowship training from renowned University of Miami, FL. He is Board Certi ed, member of American Academy of Neurology.Dr. Nidadavolu provides services in general neurology, Stroke, MS (Multiple Sclerosis), Epilepsy, Dementias, encephalopathies, Parkinson’s and other movement disorders. He also performs outpatient EEG (electroencephalogram) and Lumbarc punctures procedures.Dr. Nidadavolu is trained in EMG (electromyography)/ Never Conduction Studies for diagnosing various neurological conditions at his clinic.We are glad to inform that we are now offering Neurological services in the heart of Lake City and surrounding areas. Dr. NL Prasad Nidadavolu and his staff offer excellent neurological services to the community in a caring, parofessional environment. url: lcneuro.com SPECIALIZING IN:Q Non-Invasive Laparoscopic Gynecological SurgeryQ Adolescent Gynecology Q High and Low Risk Obstetrics Q Contraception Q Delivering at Shands Lake Shore Q In-Ofce ultrasounds for our patients Q 3D/4D Entertainment Scans ?K>>ik^`gZg\rm^lmlbgma^h_\^Zg] offering DaVinci Robotic Surgeries. New Patients Welcome Call today for a personal appointment:386-755-0500 449 SE Baya Drive Lake City, Floraida 32025 www.dainagreenemd.com“WE ARE WOMEN, WE ARE MOTHERS, WE UNDERSTAND” for Columbia County CommissionerDistrict 5 We Need A Commissioner Who Is Able And Willing To Make Di cult Decisions And Stand Accountable! Political Advertisement Paid for and Approved by Tim Murphy for Columbia County Commissioner District 5Your Vote & Support Are Appreciated! Suspect flees scene, nearly hits deputyFrom staff reportsColumbia County Sheriff’s Office deputies arrested two people after an off-duty deputy reported seeing a drug transac-tion and followed the suspects. Willie Folston, 20, 148 NE Poppy Way, was charged with sale of a controlled substance and resisting arrest without violence in connection with the case. He was booked into the Columbia County Detention Facility on $11,000 bond. Catherine Marie Smith, 48, 351 NE Diana Terrace, was charged with possession of a controlled substance, assault on a law enforcement officer and pos-session of listed drugs without prescription in the case. She was booked into jail on $17,000 bond. According to Columbia County Sheriff’s reports, around 11 a.m. Thursday, sheriff’s Sgt. Todd Lussier was stopped at the inter-section of East Duval Street and Country Club Road when he saw a drug trans-action between a man and a woman in the parking lot of Columbia Discount Beverage. Lussier is assigned to the sheriff’s office patrol division as a shift supervi-sor. Lussier identified himself as a deputy sheriff and the male sus-pect, later identified as Folston, fled to his vehicle and left the scene, reports said. Lussier was able to catch up with the woman, later identified as Smith, at her car and she hand-ed Lussier a piece of suspected crack cocaine that was report-edly given to her by Folston. Lussier asked Smith to exit her vehicle, but she did not comply and drove away from the scene, nearly striking Lussier in the pro-cess, according to reports. Lussier followed Smith while he was speaking to 911 operators and sheriff’s office patrol units were able to conduct a traffic stop on Smith’s vehicle at the intersection of East Duval Street and State Road 100. Smith was then taken into custody without incident. Deputies reports they found Folston’s vehicle at the intersec-tion of Cider and Beech streets. A resident of the home near the intersection reported find-ing Folston hiding in a closet. Deputies took Folston into cus-tody without incident and recov-ered narcotics from the closet he was hiding in. Smith Folston Homecoming at CHSLEFT: Reigning 2011 Columbia High Homecoming Queen Brittany Bethea (left) congratulates Sara Ellis, 17, after Ellis was announced as the 2012 Columbia High Homecoming Queen at half-time during Friday night’s game against Leon High. ‘I’m just really blessed,’ Ellis said. ‘This is a great opportunity. I’m so excited to see what comes my way. I was just doing this for fun.’ BELOW LEFT: Columbia High School seniors Jaime Vincent (from left), 17; Stephanie Harris, 17; Homecoming Queen Sara Ellis; Heather Coody, 17; and Akeidria Bailey, 17, pose for a photograph during homecoming ceremonies on Friday.Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City Reporter Local man hurt in crash with 2 semisBy DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporterA Lake City man was seriously hurt after slaming into the back of a tractor trailer that had crashed on Interstate 75 on Friday afternoon, according to a Florida Highway Patrol report. David Parker, 51, Lake City, was headed north behind a semi that crashed into another semi, which had slowed due to an accident a mile ahead that was backing up traffic. Parker was driving a Dodge pickup and wearing his seat belt. He was transported to Lake City Medical Facility. The wreck that slowed traffic involved a 2004 Jeep Liberty, and happened just four min-utes before the 3:19 p.m. crash involving Parker. Rainer Nicole Kersch, 23, Deerfield Beach, had swerved due to another vehicle coming into her lane, according to the report. Kersch was able to avoid the crash with the other vehi-cle, but the Jeep’s drive shaft broke off, causing the vehicle to overturn. Jordan Clark, 19, Worcester, Mass., was a pas-senger. Both were wearing seat belts and both suffered minor injures. Douglas Miller, 52, Orlando, crashed into the slowing semi. Miller’s injuries were listed as serious, and he was transport-ed to Shands at the University of Florida. He was wearing his seat belt. John Moran, 57, Melbourne, was a passenger in the semi. He wasn’t wearing his seat belt, and had minor inju-ries, according to the report. The driver of the lead semi, Steven Banken, 37, Chokio, Minn., was unhurt, according to FHP. Trauma One seeks new home By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comThe service provider who will operate the region’s medical air transport system as Trauma One is looking for a home. Brian Burrell, Med-Trans regional business director, addressed county officials during Thursday’s commission meeting, seeking space to house the air medical transport. Trauma One choose Med-Trans as its aviation services provider and Med-Trans is attempting to lease a portion of the county owned property at the Columbia County Fairgrounds that cur-rently houses some LifeGuard Ambulance Services operations in the old Fire Station 40 loca-tion. Burrell said Med-Trans wants to lease a portion of the building, for up to five years, and build a helipad at the location. “That’s our initial term because our contract with Trauma One is for five years, so it would only make sense that we would want to house the crews there for five years,” he said. “We’re open to negotiations for terms.” He said the plan to lease a portion of the old fire station became the priority after negotiations to lease the old terminal building at Lake City Gateway Airport fell through. County officials authorized county staff to start the process for advertising and look into the possibility of offering a lease agreement to Med-Trans. Burrell said the Trauma One medical air transport will have a new look, location and service provider next year. He said the University of Florida at Shands Jacksonville, which has been providing Trauma One for the region for the last 12 years, made a Request For Proposal to find the best options to provide its aviation services with helicopters, pilots and mechanics. Air Methods was the former service provider with Trauma One, but Shands Jacksonville put the service out to the RFP and choose Med-Trans to be the service provider for aviation services, helicopters, pilots and mechanics. “It will be a brand new helicopter, new paint scheme and Trauma One all the way down the line,” Burrell said. The contract with Air Methods is slated to expire and Med-Trans looks to takeover as the Trauma One provider in January. “The citizens in the region, Columbia County and the sur-rounding counties, are getting the same service, medical crews, medical direction and even some of the same pilots that they have for the last several years, it’s just going to be with our helicopter which is going to be brand new and state of the art,” Burrell said. “We will start those services beginning Jan. 3. We’re going to continue Trauma One services that the residents have had for the last 12 years with a new heli-copter provider and aviation ser-vices.”

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T hree more days. Get through today, plus two more, then no more elec-tion talk. No more hollow maneuvers. No more pleading for votes. No more politics.I wish.The talk won’t end, especially on the national level. The talking heads will evaluate, assess, explain and try to jus-tify the count from the national races. Either explanation will be ugly and bitter. No matter who wins, give your ears a break and turn off the television. Nothing good can come from watching it. Locally, a couple of the political races have taken a pointed turn. You knew this season had the potential to be in a downward spiral in the final days of the race and it has. Some of the rhetoric between the candidates in a few races has been unnecessary, but not unexpected. I’ll be glad when Tuesday comes and goes. On the positive, on Wednesday morning, we can move forward. There will be new leadership elected to at least a couple very important positions locally and with the final ballots counted and certi-fied, it always brings a certain excitement to see what chang-es are in store as new public officials ready themselves for the oath of office. I’m looking forward to see who gets elected so we know who we have the pleasure of working with in each of the respective offices. The winning candidates may think they will get a break after election day, but the public may have other ideas. Citizens have showed great passion toward the local races this year, unlike previous election seasons. I’m sure the tightness of the presidential election has raised the anxiety of many voters, but the weight of the local races has been street talk everywhere in Columbia County. Those elected will be asked for their specific plans of action pretty quickly. The public will demand it, based on the pre-election discussions. It’s time to back up the campaign speeches and all the state-ments of hard work and expe-rience. The voting public wants forward motion. Beyond the call for action, I wonder if everyone else can move past the results and return our community to some sense of normalcy. I hope we can pull together. Regardless of the outcome, we all hope to remain friends and neighbors. We’re all going to live here, run into each other at the grocery store, the river and at church. It’s a large undertaking to run for office. It takes drive, thick skin and a lot of courage. It’s expensive. All of the candi-dates who threw their prover-bial hat in the ring locally are good-hearted people who set out to make a difference in the office they chose to seek. They stepped forward with the intent of making a positive difference. They stuck their neck out. Remember that, and, win or lose, show them all respect. Show them all respect ANOTHER VIEW T he Lake City Plaza opened in 1961 in grand style and friend Ronnie Brannon, Tax Collector, was there as a young kid. Here are some of his remembrances: “I remember the opening of The Lake City Plaza in 1961. “They brought in a helicopter, which dropped ping-pong balls and some of them contained gift certificates redeemable at stores in the Plaza. People scrambled all over to collect them but the swirling helicopter blades blew some of them on to the store roofs. “Some of the stores there back then were Purser’s Pharmacy, a Lovely Shop out-let, Neisner’s, and Winn Dixie. There was also a Bookcase store that had a “slot car track” where you could buy model car kits and parts to build your own car, then rent lane time on the track. A lot of us kids had a big time there on Saturdays. “They also brought in James Bond’s Aston Martin and you could see the ‘red button’ that activated the ejector seat in the Goldfinger movie. That was pretty cool stuff for a kid.” Thanks to Ronnie for his recollection of the Grand Opening of the Lake City Plaza over 50 years ago — and that plaza is still going strong today.South Town SquareIn a recent column I asked if any readers could remem-ber the name of the Farmers’ Furniture/Phish Heads plaza way back when the Winn Dixie and TG and Y were the anchor stores there. Two readers came to the rescue. Both Robert Bowen (CHS 1982) and former county commissioner Zimmie Petty recalled that plaza being named The South Town Square. Thanks to you both.Rolling Store revisitReaders also wrote or called responding to my column about the Rolling Stores. Hamilton County School Board Member Johnny Bullard wrote, “I remember when there were two rolling stores on the Woodpecker Route out of White Springs. Mr. J.O. Hall and Mr. Levin, both from Jasper, were the operators. “I remember Clyde Hunter’s mother, Mrs. Ruby Ann Hunter, buying butter rum lifesavers for me and her grandchildren. I also remember folks trading eggs and buckets of blueberries and blackberries for items from the rolling store.” Friend Zimmie Petty also called with his vivid memories of the rolling store. Likewise, high school classmate, Iris Pueschel, called with her account of her brother-in-law, Johnny Guynn, driving a rolling store. Also, a friend I talked to at the Corinth fish fry told me her dad drove a rolling store until the beginning of World War II when the gasoline shortage stopped his business. Thanks to you all.Ichetucknee lamentJohn Moran, a superb nature photographer, has specialized in photographing the Ichetucknee Springs over the years and the spring’s ongoing deterioration prompted him to write these words. “I have stood on the banks of the Ichetucknee and I have grieved for my loss—our loss—as I consider with each passing year that my collection of springs photographs seems less a reflection of the real Florida than a catalog of what once was.”Name of a lakeOver time there has been some conversation over wheth-er ‘Alligator Lake’ was originally known as Big Lake, Alligator Lake, or Big Alligator Lake. Friend Elwood Tyre even had a picture post card calling the lake Lake Hiawatha. For what it’s worth, a 1954 map of Lake City shows the name to be Big Alligator Lake. By the way, the local sponsors of the printing of that map were Brown Realty and Abstract Company, Granger Lumber Co., and State Exchange Bank, three of Lake City’s strongest businesses in 1954. None off the three exists today.Same cat The teacher told little Johnny that his essay on his pet cat was word for word the same as his brother’s. Johnny replied, “It should be. It’s the same cat!” Plaza’s grand opening, 1961 A s far as economic statistics go, President Barack Obama is home free after Friday’s jobless numbers came out. If he loses, it will not be because of the October unemployment rate. Good politicians tend to be lucky and Obama lucked out with the latest report: unem-ployment at 7.9 percent, a slight rise from last month’s report of 7.8 percent, but still below the potentially lethal 8 percent line and easily explained away by Obama partisans as more heretofore discouraged workers coming off the sidelines to re-enter the workforce. Obama’s small break came as Republican Mitt Romney was trying to explain his way out of an erroneous claim that Chrysler was shipping produc-tion of its Jeeps from battle-ground state Ohio to China. The claim was denounced as false by the heads of both Jeep and par-ent company Chrysler, which in fact is planning a major plant expansion in Toledo. American employers added 171,000 jobs in October, and the jobs figures for August and September were revised upward. While these numbers show the economy growing, at any other time they would be regarded as mediocre, even cause for worry. But as the old blues song goes, “Been down so long it looks like up to me.” The employment gains were spread across the economy — health care, retail, professional services, hospitality — with two traditionally volatile sectors, manufacturing and construction, adding 13,000 and 17,000, jobs, respectively. The only weakness was public employment, which dropped 13,000 jobs. Romney complained: “For four years, President Obama has told us that things are get-ting better and we’re making real progress.” In fact, they are and we are; this is the 25th straight month the economy has added jobs. For those willing to burrow into the Bureau of Labor Statistics report, not all was sunshine and roses. Average hourly pay is still stagnant at around $23.58 an hour, a gain of only 1.1 percent over the past year — the smallest annual gain in nearly 50 years. Maybe Romney could twist the arms of his fellow CEOs to raise their workers’ pay in increments consistent with their own raises instead of denouncing half the workforce as slackers. Latest jobless report isn’t bad Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding counties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, publisher Robert Bridges, editor Sue Brannon, controller Dink NeSmith, president Tom Wood, chairman LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY E-MAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com T he Labor Department updated its employment figures just in time for the election. The official jobless tally on Friday ticked up to 7.9 percent. The broadest measure of unemploy-ment, known as U-6, stayed about the same, at an alarm-ingly high 14.6 percent. The numbers affirm what everyone instinctively knows: The admin-istration’s economic policies over the past four years have been a bust. At the start of his term, Mr. Obama insisted the country borrow $833 billion for stimulus spending. He guaranteed this bold move was going to bring the unemployment rate down to 5 percent. Instead, job growth stalled, and millions have sim-ply given up looking for a job. Just a year ago, 64.1 percent of the working-age population enjoyed a regular paycheck. Last month, the number dipped further to 63.8 percent. In a healthy economy, the labor participation rate is supposed to be between 66 and 67 percent of the population. The gap in the participation rate is the equivalent of almost 5 million people giving up hope — a tre-mendous loss to the economy and society, as those affected become dependent on welfare programs to get by. Neither the quantity nor the quality of jobs being created in the present “recovery” are reason for optimism. Too many of the jobs created in the last two months have been either part-time, or positions to fill the needs of the holiday retail season. Part-time jobs rarely lift a household out of poverty, and poverty rates are already at the highest rate in decades. Holiday retail jobs are by their nature temporary, and when they end the official unemploy-ment number will climb once more. The last official assessment of the jobs situation before the election confirms four years of the administration’s borrow-and-spend tactics have failed to deliver. That’s bad news for Mr. Obama, who is currently cam-paigning on an economic plat-form that promises more of the same. America needs a change of direction before a true recov-ery can take hold. 7.9% Q The Washington Times OPINION Sunday, November 4, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A4AEDIT Morris WilliamsPhone: (386) 755-8183williams_h2@firn.edu372 W. Duval St.Lake City, FL 32055 Q Morris Williams is a local historian and long-time Columbia County resident. Todd Wilsontwilson@lakecityreporter.com Q Todd Wilson is publisher of the Lake City Reporter. Q Dale McFeatters is editorial writer for Scripps Howard News Service. Dale McFeattersmcfeattersd@shns.com

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Nov. 4 Genealogy class A free genealogy work shop sponsored by the United Daughters of the Confederacy Olustee Chapter will be held at the downtown Lake City Library from 2 to 4 p.m. for reservations, contact Linda Williams at (352) 2158776 or ilovemyancestors @windstream.net. Sweet Pea pageant The Sweet Pea Beauty Pageant will be at 2 p.m. at the Lake City Mall. Boys to age 35 months and girls to age 15 years are eligible to partici pate. Registration is from 1 to 2 p.m. Nov. 5 Sitel job fair Florida Crown will have a job fair for Sitel from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Lake City Mall. There will be 300 job openings, both fulland part-time, tempo rary and long term Nov. 6 Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon at the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane, to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. Nov. 7 Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Wednesday from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Fort White Public Library on Route 47 to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. Nov. 8 Garden Club to meet The Lake City Garden Club will meet at the club house, 257 SE Hernando St. Social time will start at 9:30 a.m., and the business meeting will be at 10. The program this month will be Water, Water Everywhere (Where Is It Going?) by Loye Barnhard. Clubhouse open house Lake City Garden Club and Lake City Womans Club will hold an open house and ribbon-cutting to celebrate renovations to the clubhouse, 257 SE Hernando St. The event will be from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Refreshments will be served. Walter Nolan Kirby Walter Nolan Kirby, age 79, died on October 30, 2012 after a long battle with melanoma. Mr. Kirby was a veteran of both the U. S. Army and the U. S. Air Force. He served in the Korean and Vietnam wars and retired as a Master Sergeant in 1973. He served in Korea, Japan, Ger many, Italy, Pakistan, Okinawa, Vietnam, and again in Germany. He retired from Nuclear Fuel Service on January 1, 1992. Walter was the son of George W. and Betty Kirby. He was born October 11, 1933 at home near Columbia City, Florida. He graduated from Columbia High School in 1951 and from Park College, Parkville, Mis souri in 1969. Walter was a member of Beth any Presbyterian Church and had served on the Session for many years and as Clerk of Session for several terms. He served as Moderator of Holston Presbytery for a term and as a member of the Presbytery Committee on Minis try for 6 years, as well as several other Presbytery committees. He served on the board of Colonial Heights Meals on Wheels and delivered meals for 20 years, served on Contact Concern, the Literacy Council of King sport and worked with Habitat for Humanity for several years. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by his stepfather, William Jackson Kirby and three brothers, Rene tus (Jack), Thomas, George W. Jr. and a grandson, Joshua. Walter is survived by his lov ing wife of 30 years, Pat Swift Kirby; three daughters, Teri Middleton, Rita (Chuck) Stone and Beth (Scott) Toberman; 9 grandchildren, Cody Blevins (Mallary), Alexandra Middleton, Jessica, Kirby, Eugene (Buck) and Charlie Stone, and Spencer, Barclay and Harper Grace To berman, and a step-great-grand daughter, Lillie LeBaron. Other survivors include a brother, Paul (Karen) ; sisters-in-law, Helen Kirby, Shirley Swift and Helen Lewis and several nephews, nieces and many cousins and friends, who he dearly loved and loved to see at the annual Kirby reunion held at Ichetuck nee Springs for the past 78 years. Visitation will be held on Friday, November 2, 2012 from 5:00 PM until 7:00 PM at Bethany Presbyterian Church. Funeral services will follow with Pas Entombment services will be held on Saturday, November 3, 2012 at 3:00 PM at Oak Hill Memorial Park. Full military honors will be rendered by the Honor Guard from Shaw Air Force Base in Sumter, SC. Memorial contributions in Walters honor may be made to Bethany Presbyterian Church, 5825 Fort Henry Drive, King sport, TN 37663 or to the American Cancer Society. The staff of Oak Hill is honored to serve the fam ily of Walter Nolan Kirby. An online guest registry may be signed at http://www. oakhillmemorialpark.com Earl Julian North Sr. Mr. Earl Julian Buck North, Sr., 86, of Lake City, passed away on Thursday, November 1, 2012 at the Veterans Affairs Medi cal Center in Gainesville. He was born in Columbia County, Florida as the only child to the and Elsie Ola Green North. Mr. North was a lifelong resident of Columbia County and a Captain for the Columbia High Tigers Football Team. He was a World War II veteran of the United States Army having served in the Battle of the Bulge in the European Theatre. During the war, he received 2 Bronze Ser vice Stars and one Purple Heart for his service. Mr. North was the owner and operator of Buck North Mobile Home Moving in Lake City for many years and and Santa Fe Rivers. He was pre ceded in death by his wife of 61 years, Betty Jean North, in 2009. Survivors include his two sons, Rusty North, Lake City and Tim North (Monica), Orlando; three daughters, Debbie Eadie (Renny), Nancy Smith (Rickey) and Kim North all of Lake City; seven grandchildren, Chris Cox, Mela nie Fasold (Brad), Jeremy Cox, Amie Smith, Blake Smith, Jacob North and Benjamin North: and three great grandchildren, Ethan Peiker, Austin Nash and Leah Cox. Graveside funeral services will be conducted on Tuesday, No vember 6, 2012 at 11:00 AM at Memorial Cemetery with Rev. ment will follow with military honors. Visitation with the fam ily will be from 6-8:00 PM Mon day evening at the funeral home. Arrangements are under direction of Guerry Funeral Home, Lake City. guerryfuneralhome.net LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012 5A 5A Proposed Charter Amendments Amendment #1 (Citizens Redistricting Advisory Committee) Redistricting of the County Commission occurs every 10 years. It is the process by which district boundaries are adjusted so that they are as nearly equal in population to one another as is possible. The proposed amendment creates an independent Citizen Redistrict ing Advisory Committee composed of electors of the County. The Committee will redraw the district boundaries and provide the Board of County Commissioners with a recommendation for their review consistent with state and federal law. Amendment #2 (Procedure for Termination of the County Manager) Columbia County operates under the CommissionManage r for m o f government,wher e responsibilit y fo r polic y makin g rest s wit h th e Boar d o f County Commissioners and responsibility for the administration of the County is vested in the County Manager. The Charter currently provides that the County Commission may terminate the Manager by a simple majority vote occurring during two consecutive regular meetings typically at least two weeks apart. The proposed amendment adds a second method: By a majority plus-one vote that may occur during a single regular or special meeting of the County Commission. Amendment #3 (Department Heads) Department heads in Columbia County are senior-level staff who are employees at will that report exclusively to the County Manager. They are appointed supervised and terminated by the Manager. The proposed amendment claries and reinforces the separation of powers policy between the County Manager and the Board of County Commissioners by providing that the County Manager has the authority to terminate a department head without a formal review by the County Commission. Amendment #4 (Procedure for Selection of the County Attorney) Columbia County is the only local govern ment in Florida where the attorneys position is an elected ofce. In all other counties (charter and non-char ter alike) the County Attorney is employed and terminated by the Board of County Commissioners based on qualications and job performance. The proposed amendment retains the positions elected status until the completion of the current term of ofce in January of 2015. Thereafter the position of County Attorney will be one that is employed by the County Commission based on training education and job performance just like the County Manager. WILSONS O UTFITTERS 1291 SE Baya Dr, Lake City (386) 755-7060 WilsonsOutfitters@comcast.net Realtree Outtter T-Shirts Camo is Here Shirts, Pants, Coveralls, Hats, Gloves Yeti Coolers Special Guy Harvey Koozies Seminoles Gators Obituaries are paid advertise ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporters classified depart ment at 752-1293. COMMUNITY CALENDAR To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr@lakecityreporter.com. DEREK GILLIAM/ LAKE CITY REPORTER Carlin Coleman, 11, and Kelsyn Coleman, 10, take a spin on the Rok-n-Rol ride on the midway at the Columbia County Fair on Saturday. The sisters were all smiles after. The fair continues through Nov. 10. OBITUARIES Rok-n-Rol

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6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY NOVEMBER 4, 2012 Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 6A BELK.COM 30-40 % off ENTIRE STOCK LifeStride shoes. Orig. 50.00-69.00 Sale 30.00-48.30 40-50 % off ENTIRE STOCK Mens pants by Izod, Savane, Chaps, Haggar, Saddlebred, Braggi and Louis Raphael Orig. 58.00 75.00, Sale 29.00 45.00 49 9 9 queen 350 thread count wrinkle free sheet sets by Home Accents. Cotton rich sateen construction provides softness & durability. Solids & stripes in full, queen or king Orig. 70.00 90.00, Sale 39.99 59.99 2540 % off Kitchen electrics from Keurig, Cuisinart, KitchenAid & more A. New! Keurig Elite 40 brewer with 6 oz., 8 oz. and 10 oz. brew sizes Orig. 179.99, Sale 119.99 B. Cuisinart toaster oven Orig. 109.99, Sale 79.99 C. KitchenAid handmixer Orig. 69.99, Sale 39.99 LIMITED EXCLUSIONS: Only excludes Red Dot, Clearance, Earlybirds, Night Owls, Doorbusters, Bonus Buys, Everyday Values, Alegria, Ben Sherman, Brighton, b.temptd; Designer, Bridge and Contemporary Sportswear and Dresses; Casio, Coach, Cosmetics/Fragrances, Dansko; Fine Jewelry watches, trunk shows and service plans; Gameday, Gear For Sports, Hanky Panky, Herend, Keen, Lacoste, Levis, Lilly Pulitzer, Lucchese, Minnetonka Moccasin, Miss Me, Munro, Original Penguin, Roberto Coin, Spanx, Stuart Weitzman, Thomas Dean, Ugg, Under Armour, Vineyard Vines, Wacoal, non merchandise depts., lease depts. and Belk gift cards. Frye excluded online. Not valid on prior purchases, phone, special orders or on belk.com. Cannot be redeemed for cash, credit or refund, used in combination with any other discount or coupon offer. Valid November 6, 2012 30-50 % off Career sportswear from Kim Rogers, Alfred Dunner, Ruby Rd. & Choices For misses, petites & todays woman Orig. 26.00 74.00 Sale 13.00 51.80 40 % off Kim Rogers sweaters for misses and petites. Orig. 40.00 48.00 Sale 24.00 28.80 Also in todays woman sizes at slightly higher prices 60 % off ENTIRE STOCK Belk Silverworks jewelry Orig. 26.00 180.00, Sale 10.40 72.00 50 % off ENTIRE STOCK* kids outerwear from OshKosh, London Fog, Jou Jou, Pacic Trail & more Orig. 44.00 90.00, Sale 22.00 45.00 *Excludes Columbia enjoy the sweet life senior Tuesday, Nov. 6 % OFF EXTRA 20 senior DAY with limited exclusions 1 5 % o ff LIMITED EXCLUSIONS Plus, Election Day savings for the family & home B C A Prayer to the Blessed Virgin (Never Known to Fail) O, Most beautiful ower of Mt. Carmel, fruitful vine, splendor of Heaven, Blessed Mother of the Son of God, Immaculate Virgin, assist me in my necessity. Oh, Star of the Sea, help me herein and show me here you are my Mother. O, Holy Mary, Mother of God, Queen of Heaven and Earth, I humbly beseech you from the bottom of my heart to secure me in my necessity. (make request) There are none that can withstand your power. O Mary, conceived without sin, pray for us who have recourse (three times). O Holy Mary, I place this cause in your hands (three times). Say this prayer for three consecutive days and then you must publish it and it will be granted to you. Thank you for answering my prayer. FFA students get lesson in water resources COURTESY Front row from left: Melissa Balmer, Fort White High School; Danielle Wooley, Fort White High School; Joshua Thomas, Columbia High School; Logan Townsend, Columbia High School; and David Carey, Columbia High School. Back row from left: Kevin Wright, SRWMD; Steve Dicks, board member of Columbia County Farm Bureau; Charlie Thornton, Columbia High FFA advisor; Ann Shortelle, SRWMD; Hugh Thomas, Suwannee River Partnership; and Joel Love, Suwannee River Partnership. From staff reports LIVE OAK FFA stu dents from Columbia and Fort White high schools visited the Suwannee River Water Management District recently to learn about what the district does to protect water resources and about water resourcesand agri culture-related careers. The event was part of the Columbia County Farm Bureau FFA Leadership Academy. A partnership between the Columbia County FFA Chapters and the Columbia County Farm Bureau, the leadership academy provides students an opportunity to develop leadership skills by con necting with various lead ers and members of their community. At the district, students learned about programs and projects the District implements to support the agencys core mission of water supply, water qual ity, flood protection, and natural systems. They also learned about the impor tance of jobs in the water resources and agricultural fields. District staff explained the process of establishing minimum flows and levels (MFLs), discussed how MFLs are used to deter mine the amount of water that can be removed from the natural system without causing significant harm to the resources and the ecology, and explained the districts data collection efforts for tracking rain fall, groundwater and sur face water levels and their importance in water supply planning, water use per mitting, and other District decisions. Also, district staff reviewed the process of planning for future water supplies and discussed how MFLs, groundwater levels, and other data are used to identify areas that may be short of water over the long-term and how the dis trict develops plans to meet those water supply needs. The districts newly developed agricultural team explained how the Districts water use permit ting program regulates the water use of large users to allow for the balance of sus tainable economic develop ment and natural resource protection. They also discussed how the district and other agen cies and partners work with the agricultural communi ty by using a voluntarily, non-regulatory approach to assist farmers in conserv ing water and protecting water quality. Staff explained that in addition to these programs, the District acquires envi ronmentally sensitive lands for flood control, water qual ity protection, and natural resource conservation. District Executive Director Ann Shortelle explained that the District works under the direction of a nine member govern ing board appointed by the governor to set policies and priorities and approve expenditures for the man agement of ground and sur face waters. The students learned the importance of conserving our precious water resourc es and that the Districts efforts to manage and pro tect our water are a valu able asset to our communi ty, said Charlie Thornton, Columbia High School FFA advisor. We appreciate the time they took to speak to our students. The district was happy to participate in the lead ership academy to share our water resource knowl edge, Shortelle said. For distinguished service COURTESY PHOTOS Two local men were recently honored for their long-term support of the Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranch. Sheriff Mark Hunter presented Lester Scaff (top photo) and Robin Green with Distinguished Service Awards from the Florida Sheriffs Association in recognition of 25 years of Honorary Membership. The Columbia County Sheriffs Office and the Florida Sheriffs Association offered thanks to Scaff and Green for their many years of support for the Youth Ranches.

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LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012 7A7A TUES. NOV 6BIBLICALVALUES VOTEBIBLICAL VALUES TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6 The legacy we leave behind for our children, grandchildren,and this great nation is crucial. AsI approach my 94th birthday, I realize this election could be my last. I believe it is vitally important that we cast our ballots for candidates who base their decisions on biblical principles and support the nation of Israel. I urge you to vote for those who protect the sanctity of life and support the biblical denition of marriage between a man and a woman. Vote for biblical values thisNovember 6, and pray with me that America will remain one nation under God.Billy GrahamMONTREAT, N.C. PAID ADVERTISEMENT BY THE BILLY GRAHAM EVANGELISTI C ASSOCIATION

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By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com City officials plan to make several upgrades at Lake City Gateway Airport in the future and included several of the proposed projects on the councils upcoming meeting agenda. The city council meeting will take place at 7 p.m. Monday at City Hall, 205 N. Marion Avenue, in city council chambers. According to city council reports, council members will decide whether to sign a contract authorizing the city to get into a public transportation joint par ticipation agreement with the Florida Department of Transportation for the design only of a taxiway A expansion at the air port. The DOT and the city have agreed to joint fund ing for the project and the DOT portion of funding will be 100 percent or the DOTs maximum participa tion, including contingen cies, in the project amount of $161,125. The project is being funded as a Rural Economic Development Initiative (REDI) project by the DOT at 100 percent department funding. The council is also con sidering entering a contract for consulting services with Passero Associates to pro vide engineering services for the engineering design and bidding for airfield drainage improvements. The council is also con sidering entering a lease agreement with Rocky Mountain Holdings to allow Rocky Mountain Holdings to lease the former airport terminal building and adja cent property. In other business, the council: Is scheduled to have an employee recognition ceremony for Jackie Kite; Will consider grant ing VFW Post 2206 a per mit application to hold the Veterans Parade from 1011 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 10; and Will present a procla mation naming November 2012 as National Hospice Care Month in Lake City. 8A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY NOVEMBER 4, 2012 Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 8A VOTE AND ELECT A Man Who Cares Leadership You Can Trust I Will Adamantly Support: The Fire Department and Law Enforcement The Youth of Columbia County Our Senior Citizens Services The Economic Growth of Columbia County My Goal: Is to identify the issues and needs of our community; set goals and determine strategies, set priorities, accomplish the work and evaluate the results. I believe that communication is the key to success in this position and I want you to know those lines will be open to you. (386) 623-2244 VoteBuckyNash@gmail.com www.buckynash.com NASH Bucky Columbia County CommissionerDistrict 3 Paid political advertisement. Paid for and approved by Bucky Nash for County Commissioner-District 3 I am ready to face the challenges ahead and I promise to provide a new voice for the future of our community. JOB FAIR Your community call center Is Now Hiring Monday, November 5 th 8:30AM:00PM Lake City Mall F/T, P/T and temporary positions available No collections, no telemarketing just GREAT opportunities. www.sitel.com In some ways, Ansleigh Summers is like any other 13-year-old girl. Shes excited for the county fair and wants to try everything out. On Thursday, the Summers family was waiting near the animal stalls to weigh Bubbles. Ansleigh kept pointing at one ride, then the other. She said she wanted to ride now, but the fair didnt start until Friday. Which ride didnt matter, Ansleigh wishes to try them all. This isnt her first time raising animals for the fair. First she raised a goat. Then, two years ago, she raised a pig. When they brought the pig to be weighed, they were disqualified because the hair was too short. She was devastated, Janice Summers said. Despite the disqualification of the first Bubbles her grandmother said Ansleigh must think Bubbles is a good name for a pig the Summers family had the grand champion of the swine show. They also had four first place finishes and a second, Janice Summers said. The disqualification was a good thing for Bubbles 1. Bubbles 1 still lives on the Summers farm. Rick Summers said he wasnt surprised that his daughter wanted to donate the money. Its a family thing. he said. We were raised to share and help others. The Youth Swine Show is Tuesday at 7 p.m., with the Youth Swine and Steer Sale scheduled for Thursday at 7 p.m. Both events will be held at the Columbia County Fair, which runs through Nov. 10. WARRIORS: Businesses raise $8,200 Continued From Page 1A ANSLEIGH: Will donate proceeds Continued From Page 1A Sinkhole causing fire station problems By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com FORT WHITE A sinkhole causing structural damage to a Fort White fire sta tion will be remedied soon, according to county officials. A recent geotechnical investigation was performed at Columbia County Fire Station 46, 495 SW Dortch St., Fort White, which determined the building was experiencing damage consistent with a sinkhole. The countys insurance provider for the building, Preferred Governmental Insurance Trust, had additional testing performed by EFI Global, which conclud ed a sinkhole was causing the problem. Representatives from EFI Global deter mined the sinkhole activity could be reme diated by Portland cement grout pressure injection. The county received three bids to have the work done and it will be performed by Foundation Professionals of Florida with an estimated cost of $71,250 $93,750. EFI Global will oversee the Portland cement grout monitoring service and review the work for $20,400 $25,200. The sinkhole is nothing really sig nificant and I found out its really not that uncommon, said Columbia County interim fire chief David Boozer. What were planning on doing is injecting some Portland concrete underneath the station. They put some pipes down and pump it in there. He said the building is not in that bad a condition, but a perimeter has been setup around the foundation to reinforce the buildings slab. Boozer, said he is uncertain when the mitigation work will begin, but noted the sinkhole is probably under one of the stations bays, where the stations firefight ers have seen the biggest issue. The guys are not in any danger and the station is still operational, so were in good order there, he said, noting they first noticed the problem in the early portion of the year. The cost to repair the damage and miti gate the sinkhole is estimated in the range of $91,650 $118,950. The countys insurance company, Preferred Governmental Insurance Trust will pay the lions share of the bill while the county will only have to pay $5,000 for its deductible. County officials approved the project earlier in the week. Airport upgrades on city council agenda DEREK GILLIAM /Lake City Reporter From left: Brayden Summers, Janice Summers, Rick Summers and Ansleigh Summers. The Summers family poses for a picture while waiting for Ansleighs hog to be weighed. organize the tournament. Itss been a lot of work and a lot headaches, Cervantes said. But its turned out to be very success ful. The tournament was held at Southside Recreation Complex. The Health Care Institute was a Field Sponsor and donated $750. The winner of the 16-team tour nament was Magnolia Pediatrics. They beat IT Happens, a team composed of First Federal Bank of Florida information technology employees. Magnolia Pediatrics and IT Happens were unbeaten going into the championship game. First Federal Bank, Magnolia Pediatrics and TIMCO were spons ers of the event. We couldnt have done this with out the communtiy businesses, Cervantes said. Stalvey said that many of the teams talked about setting up a rec reation league for kickball. DEREK GILLIAM/ Lake City Reporter Hal Courson, a staff sergeant in the U.S. Army and a member of the Lake City Army Recruiting kickball team, is out at first base Saturday.

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LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SUNDAY NOVEMBER 4, 2012 9A 9A

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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Sunday, November 4, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS BRIEFS Tigers fire on all cylinders in 54-3 win over Lions. CHS continued on 2B Homecoming blowout JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Brett Newcomb (99) trips up Leon High quarterback Sam Williams during the Tigers’ 54-3 home coming win on Friday. By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High head coach Brian Allen said last week that he wanted the Tigers firing on all cylin-ders going into the 6A play-offs. If Friday night’s 54-3 win against Leon High was any indication, the coach has exactly what he wants. The Tigers came out firing on their first posses-sion with an 11-play, 80-yard drive to take a 7-0 lead. Jayce Barber hit Darren Birch for 24 yards to highlight the drive and Braxton Stockton had a five-yard run to cap off the possession. Brant Nelson added the extra point with 8:42 remaining in the first quarter. After Felix Woods sacked Sam Williams on third down, Leon punted on its first possession. The Tigers wouldn’t even need to send the offense back out to JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Andrew Baker (15) is brought down on a quarterback keeper in the game against Trinity Catholic High on Friday. Indians come up short in title gameBy TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comFORT WHITE — With the District 3-3A title on the line, Fort White High up came up two points short in a 21-19 home loss to Trinity Catholic High on Friday. Coach Demetric Jackson promised earlier in the week the Indians would go all out to win their first dis-trict and the team backed him up. Fort White scored its 19 points in the final 18 minutes of the game — 12 of them coming on two spec-tacular plays by Michael Mulberry — and needed only a two-point conversion to force a tie. “Our guys fought,” Jackson said. “I told them I was proud of their effort, proud of them for not giv-ing up and proud of them for fighting to the very end. We were close to a district championship.” Fort White falls 21-19 at home to Trinity Catholic. INDIANS continued on 5B GAMES Monday Q Fort White High soccer at Hamilton County High, 7 p.m. (girls-5 p.m.) Tuesday Q Fort White boys soccer vs. Santa Fe High, 4 p.m. Q Columbia High volleyball at St. Augustine High in regional semifinal, 7 p.m. Q Columbia High boys soccer vs. Suwannee High at CYSA field, 7 p.m. Wednesday Q Columbia High bowling in state tournament at Boardwalk Bowl in Orlando Q Fort White soccer vs. Newberry High, 7 p.m. (boys-5 p.m.) Thursday Q Columbia High’s Hannah Burns, Lindsay Lee in state swim meet at Central Florida YMCA Aquatic Complex in Orlando, 9 a.m. Q Columbia High bowling in state tournament at Boardwalk Bowl in Orlando Q Fort White High football at Santa Fe High, 7:30 p.m. Friday Q Columbia High football vs. Suwannee High, 7:30 p.m. Saturday Q Columbia High girls cross country in Region 1-3A meet at Sunny Hills Farms in Tallahassee, 8 a.m. MEMORIAL BOWL Junior Midget games Monday Lake City Recreation Department’s Memorial Bowl has Junior Midget team play at Memorial Stadium. Monday’s games are: Lake City Panthers vs. Lake City Gators at 6 p.m.; Lake City Hurricanes vs. Madison Saints at 7:15 p.m. For details, call Heyward Christie at 754-3607. RUNNING Wright Brothers 5K for veterans The Race Against the Wright Brothers 5K is 8 a.m. Saturday at Olustee Park in downtown Lake City. Proceeds go to Volunteer Service Programs for Disabled American Veterans at the Lake City VA Medical Center. School and cross country teams are welcome. Registration is at www. stepfitnessonline.com or at Carquest on Pinemount Road. For details, call Michelle Richards at 208-2447.Q From staff reports JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterA pair of Missouri defenders fail to stop Florida tight end Omarius Hines (20) from running in a touchdown during a game on Saturday at the Ben Hill G riffin Stadium in Gainesville. Florida survivesBy TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comGAINESVILLE — After not getting into the end zone last week, Florida’s offense figured two touch-downs was enough against Missouri. Turns out it was in the Gator’s 14-7 win over the Tigers in the Swamp on Saturday, but only because of a giant effort by the defense. Florida (8-1) completed SEC play at 7-1 and at worse will be tied with Georgia for the East Division. The Bulldogs own the head-tohead tiebreaker. Missouri (4-5) fell to 1-5 in league play. Florida’s defense spent 86 plays on the field and finally sealed the victory with its fourth interception. This pick by Josh Evans came in the end zone with :05 left in the game. The defense had four sacks and 10 tackles-for-loss. Loucheiz Purifoy also blocked a chip-shot field goal at 4:35 of the third quarter to keep the game tied at 7-7. Coach Will Muschamp said any win is fine with him. “We have to continue to improve offensively and Gators rally from 7-0 halftime deficit to win. GATORS continued on 6B

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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today AUTO RACING 7:30 a.m. SPEED — Formula One, Grand Prix of Abu Dhabi, at Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates 3 p.m. ESPN — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, AAA Texas 500, at Fort Worth, Texas GOLF 3:30 p.m. TGC — Champions Tour, Charles Schwab Cup Championship, final round, at Scottsdale, Ariz. NFL 1 p.m. CBS — Regional coverageFOX — Regional coverage 4 p.m. FOX — Regional coverage 4:25 p.m. CBS — Doubleheader game 8:20 p.m. NBC — Dallas at Atlanta RUNNING 9 a.m. ESPN2 — New York City Marathon 4 p.m. ABC — New York City Marathon (same-day tape) SOCCER 2 p.m. FOX — Premier League, Newcastle at Liverpool (same-day tape) 3:30 p.m. NBC — MLS, playoffs, conference semifinals, leg 1, Kansas City at Houston 9 or 10:30 p.m. ESPN — MLS, playoffs, conference semifinals, leg 1, San Jose at Los Angeles WOMEN’S COLLEGE SOCCER 2 p.m. FSN — Big 12 Conference, championship game WOMEN’S COLLEGE VOLLEYBALL 2 p.m. ESPN2 — Wisconsin at Penn St. ——— Monday NFL FOOTBALL 8:30 p.m. ESPN — Philadelphia at New Orleans SOCCER 2:55 p.m. ESPN2 — Premier League, Southampton at West BromwichFOOTBALLNFL standings AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PANew England 5 3 0 .625 262 170Miami 4 3 0 .571 150 126Buffalo 3 4 0 .429 171 227 N.Y. Jets 3 5 0 .375 168 200 South W L T Pct PF PAHouston 6 1 0 .857 216 128Indianapolis 4 3 0 .571 136 171Tennessee 3 5 0 .375 162 257Jacksonville 1 6 0 .143 103 188 North W L T Pct PF PABaltimore 5 2 0 .714 174 161Pittsburgh 4 3 0 .571 167 144Cincinnati 3 4 0 .429 166 187Cleveland 2 6 0 .250 154 186 West W L T Pct PF PADenver 4 3 0 .571 204 152San Diego 4 4 0 .500 185 157Oakland 3 4 0 .429 139 187Kansas City 1 7 0 .125 133 240 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAN.Y. Giants 6 2 0 .750 234 161Philadelphia 3 4 0 .429 120 155Dallas 3 4 0 .429 137 162Washington 3 5 0 .375 213 227 South W L T Pct PF PAAtlanta 7 0 0 1.000 201 130Tampa Bay 3 4 0 .429 184 153New Orleans 2 5 0 .286 190 216Carolina 1 6 0 .143 128 167 North W L T Pct PF PAChicago 6 1 0 .857 185 100Minnesota 5 3 0 .625 184 167Green Bay 5 3 0 .625 208 170Detroit 3 4 0 .429 161 174 West W L T Pct PF PASan Francisco 6 2 0 .750 189 103Arizona 4 4 0 .500 127 142Seattle 4 4 0 .500 140 134St. Louis 3 5 0 .375 137 186 Thursday’s Game San Diego 31, Kansas City 13 Sunday’s Games Arizona at Green Bay, 1 p.m.Chicago at Tennessee, 1 p.m.Buffalo at Houston, 1 p.m.Carolina at Washington, 1 p.m.Detroit at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.Denver at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.Baltimore at Cleveland, 1 p.m.Miami at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.Minnesota at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.Tampa Bay at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.Pittsburgh at N.Y. Giants, 4:25 p.m.Dallas at Atlanta, 8:20 p.m. Monday’s Game Philadelphia at New Orleans, 8:30 p.m. Open: N.Y. Jets, New England, San Francisco, St. Louis Thursday, Nov. 8 Indianapolis at Jacksonville, 8:20 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 11 Atlanta at New Orleans, 1 p.m.Detroit at Minnesota, 1 p.m.Denver at Carolina, 1 p.m.San Diego at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.Tennessee at Miami, 1 p.m.Buffalo at New England, 1 p.m.Oakland at Baltimore, 1 p.m.N.Y. Giants at Cincinnati, 1 p.m. N.Y. Jets at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.St. Louis at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.Dallas at Philadelphia, 4:25 p.m.Houston at Chicago, 8:20 p.m. Monday, Nov. 12 Kansas City at Pittsburgh, 8:30 p.m.Open: Arizona, Cleveland, Green Bay, WashingtonBASKETBALLNBA schedule Today’s Games Philadelphia at New York, 12 p.m.Phoenix at Orlando, 6 p.m.Minnesota at Toronto, 6 p.m.Atlanta at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.Detroit at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m. Monday’s Games New York at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.Minnesota at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.Phoenix at Miami, 7:30 p.m.Utah at Memphis, 8 p.m.Portland at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.Indiana at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.Golden State at Sacramento, 10 p.m.Cleveland at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.BASEBALLMLB calendar Wednesday-Friday — General managers meetings, Indian Wells, Calif. Friday — Deadline for free agents to accept qualifying offers, 5 p.m. Nov. 14-15 — Owners meetings, Chicago. Dec. 2 — Last day for teams to offer 2013 contracts to unsigned players.SOCCERMLS playoffs WILD CARDS Houston 2, Chicago 1Los Angeles 2, Vancouver 1 EASTERN CONFERENCE Semifinals D.C. United vs. New York Saturday D.C. United vs. New York (n) Wednesday New York vs. D.C. United, 8 p.m. Kansas City vs. Houston Today Houston vs. Kansas City, 3:30 p.m. Wednesday Kansas City vs. Houston,9 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE Semifinals San Jose vs. Los Angeles Today Los Angeles vs. San Jose,9 p.m. Wednesday San Jose vs. Los Angeles, 11 p.m.Seattle vs. Real Salt Lake Friday Seattle 0, Real Salt Lake 0 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04202BSPORTS CHS: Nearly perfect in 54-3 victory Continued From Page 1B add the next score. Lonnie Underwood field a punt at the 19-yard line and scam-pered 81 yards for a touch-down. The extra point was blocked with 6:45 remain-ing in the first quarter and the Tigers had a 13-0 lead. Another three-and-out followed for the Lions and the Tigers responded with another quick scor-ing drive. Barber hit Nate Ayers on the first play of the drive for 47 yards and a 20-0 lead with 4:54 remaining in the first quarter. Columbia went on a seven play, 84-yard drive that finished with a 42-yard run from Ronald Timmons with 10:54 remaining in the second quarter to take a 26-0 lead, after a missed extra point. The Tigers’ defense forced another three-and-out and the Columbia offense continued to exe-cute at a high level with a seven play, 55-yard drive to take a 33-0 win. Underwood capped off the drive with a five-yard run. Leon picked up only its second first down of the first half on its next drive but failed on a fourth-down attempt when Drew Clark came up with a sack. The Tigers came back with another seven play drive, also resulting in a touch-down. This time, Barber rushed it in from two yards out. Columbia added its second touchdown on a punt return in the first half with Roger Cray taking back a 62-yarder to close out the first half with the Tigers up 47-0. The second half began with a running clock and Columbia ate up 6:52 to take the game into the fourth quarter before add-ing its final touchdown. The drive came with much of the first unit on the side-line. Backup quarterback Jake Thomas snuck in a one-yard score to make the lead 54-0. Ryan Feeley added a 32-yard field goal against the second unit with 2:35 remaining to account for the 54-3 final. “We played outstanding in comparison to last week,” Allen said. “I thought we totally responded.” Defense shines again for CHSBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comIt was another banner night for the Columbia High defense, as the first unit pitched a shutout before giving up three points with the second unit on the field with 2:35 remaining in a 54-3 win against Leon High in Lake City on Friday. “It’s hard to point out one guy that’s playing well, because guys are playing in each segment of the defense,” co-defensive coor-dinator Dennis Dotson said. “I think we came out and played the best game we have played all year. We gave up three points late in the second half, but the first group played really well.” Columbia’s defense only gave up six first downs through the duration of the game and only two in the first half on the way to a 47-0 lead before the second group took over for much of the second half. “It could have been our fourth shutout of the year,” Columbia head coach Brian Allen said. “We allowed them to spit outside on a big Iso, but if you take that away we’re talking about a goose egg.” The first half was especially impressive as Columbia held Leon to only 54 yards of offense including four yards on the ground. Lions quarterback Sam Williams completed his first pass of the game for 30 yards and then went on to miss his next eight before finishing the half 3-of-11 for 50 yards. Despite playing a nearflawless half, Allen knows that the Tigers will con-tinue to look for room for improvement on Monday during the film session. “We’re going to continue to work for ways to get bet-ter,” Allen said. “I can guar-antee you that there are a couple of plays where one guy went the wrong way or played the wrong assign-ment. We’re one explosive play away. The guys are out there playing selflessly and their responsibility.” JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Roger Cray (9) runs for a touchdown a gainst Leon High on Friday. Special delivery for Tigers By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High had four special teams scores last season. Tigers’ head coach Brian Allen noted that Columbia was looking to break through on the third unit this season and he knew that the potential was there. In Columbia’s 54-3 win against Leon High, the Tigers finally broke through on special teams and they did it twice. Lonnie Underwood had an 81-yard punt return for a score during the first quar-ter and Roger Cray closed a 47-0 first half with a 62-yard return for a score. “It was definitely an outstanding job,” Allen said. “Those are scores that you can’t account for. Usually when a team finds a way to score on special teams, they come up with the win. It was a pleasure to get back in the groove.” For Underwood, it wasn’t anything to it but waiting for the play to develop. “I waited for my blocks to set up for me, and they came up,” he said. “We iden-tified some weaknesses this week and we were able to take advantage.” Co-defensive coordinator Dennis Dotson coaches the punt return unit and said it was something that the Tigers have been waiting for all season. “Usually the kick return game is a big unit for us, but with the defense play-ing as well as it has over the last few games we’ve only had one kick return a game,” Dotson said. The Tigers have pitched two shutouts and only gave up three points against Leon, resulting in four kick-off return opportunities in the last three games. But Dotson also felt like this could be the Tigers week to make an impact in the return game. “I knew if the guys could hold their blocks up front, that we had a great opportunity,” Dotson said. “Lonnie is a great athlete and he did what he does. My hat’s off to them. We saw that Lonnie was a great athlete in the spring against Dunnellon. He has a bright future and is going to be the next guy for us. He did an outstanding job.” Cray was the surprise of the night when given the opportunity. “He had one a couple of weeks ago that he almost broke,” Dotson said. “We had the opportunity to get a young guy a few more reps and he capitalized.” Burns, Lee advance to state; CHS girls X-C makes regionFrom staff reportsColumbia High’s Hannah Burns and Lindsay Lee advanced to state in the Region 1-2A meet at the University of West Florida on Friday. Burns won region in the 200 IM and placed second in the 100 breaststroke. Lee placed fifth in the 100 backstroke and sixth in the 50 freestyle. The two combined with Micheala Polhamus and Stephanie Silva for a sixth-place finish in the 400 free-style relay. The team could qualify for state after region times are compared. The 200 medley relay of Courtney Britt, Sydney Morse, Silva and Polhamus placed 15th. Joseph Piccioni placed 24th in the 50 free.Columbia cross countryThe Lady Tigers cross country team placed third in the District 2-3A meet at Apalachee Regional Park in Tallahassee on Saturday and will advance to the region meet. Emma Tucker placed second, while Ashley Jones placed 11th and Abby Williams placed 17th.

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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012 3B3BSPORTS Tigers knock off Lions 54-3 JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Jayce Barber scrambles while on a q uarterback keeper during the Tigers’ 54-3 win against Leon High on Friday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Braxton Stockton is taken down during a game against Leon High on Friday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High kicker Brayden Thomas (14) makes an ex tra point following a touchdown against Leon High. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High Braxton Stockton drives down the field for extra yardage Friday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterA Leon High defender drags Columbia High’s Lonnie Un derwood down as he runs the ball. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Ronald Timmons (23) escapes a tackle for extra yards against Leon High on Friday.

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4B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04204BSports Valiant effort from Indians JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Devontae Levy (1) sacks Trinity Catholi c High quarterback Reid Carlton during the Indians’ 2119 loss in Fort White on Friday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Michael Mulberry (4) covers a Trinity Catholic High receiver as the pass is just out of his reach during Friday’s game. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High defenders combine to bring down Trinity C atholic High’s Demonta Blunt. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s A.J. Kluess (70) provides protection for quarterback Andrew Baker (12) as he looks for a recie ver.Trinity 7 7 7 0 — 21 Fort White 0 0 7 12 — 19 First Quarter TC—Guyton 16 pass from Carlton (Vargas kick), 3:47 Second Quarter TC—J. Jones 43 pass from Carlton (Vargas kick), :13 Third Quarter TC—Sandstrom 34 pass from Carlton (Vargas kick), 7:32 FW—Phillips 17 pass from Baker (Escalante kick), 6:26 Fourth Quarter FW—Mulberry 85 punt return (kick blocked), 4:39 FW—Mulberry 96 pass from Baker (pass failed), 2:32 —— Fort White TrinityFirst downs 6 19Rushes-yards 22-123 49-206Passing 188 181Comp-Att-Int 8-15-2 13-24-1Punts-Avg. 5-37 5-40Fumbles-Lost 2-2 2-2 Penalties-Yards 5-40 7-54 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Fort White, R. Williams 3-71. T.Williams 12-47, Phillips 2-10, Baker 5-(-5). Trinity, Blunt 20-96, Sandstron 9-59, Reed 12-49, Carlton 8-2. PASSING—Fort White, Baker 8-15188-2. Trinity, Carlton 13-24-181-1. RECEIVING—Fort White, Phillips 4-73, Mulberry 3-116, T. Williams 1-(-1). Trinity, Ru.Outer 3-35, Reed 3-10, J. Jones 2-52, Denicola 2-34, Sandstrom 1-34, Guyton 1-16, Blunt 1-0.Fort White box

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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012 5B5BSports INDIANS: Miss two-point attempt Continued From Page 1BTrinity Catholic built its 21-0 lead on touchdown passes from Reid Carlton to Camerhon Guyton, Jamonte Jones and Joe Sandstrom. Fort White cut the deficit to 21-7 with a quick-strike drive after Trinity Catholic scored on its first posses-sion of the second half. Andrew Baker threw to Trey Phillips for 49 yards and, two plays later, hit him in the end zone from 17 yards out. Nathan Escalante added the extra point. The Celtics started grinding out yardage, racking up first downs and eating into the clock. Fort White’s Chris Waites and Cameron White recovered fumbles to halt drives, both in Fort White territory, with the second one coming at the Indians 5. Reginald Williams got Fort White out of the hole on an option pitch from Baker that he carried for 62 yards. It went for noth-ing when Marquis Hendrix intercepted a pass in the end zone and ran it out to the Celtics 29. The defense forced a punt and Mulberry made his first strike. Trinity had punted out of bounds the first three times, but made the mistake of letting Mulberry field this one. He took it right, then cut back and raced 85 yards for a touchdown with 4:39 left in the game. The PAT snap was high and the little lapse in time allowed the Celtics to block the kick. Fort White forced another three-and-out with Trinity trying to milk the clock. Richie Denicola pinned Fort White inside its 10 with 2:50 left on the clock. The Indians went back further after a penalty for illegal participation. Not to worry. Baker threw to Mulberry, who was cutting behind the line on the right side, and this time Mulberry went 96 yards for a touchdown. Fort White needed two points to tie the game. The Indians tried a spread formation to get the points. “We set it up the swinging gate against Fernandina Beach,” Jackson said. “It is a quarterback option to pitch or pass.” Baker’s throw into the end zone was caught by the wrong team. Trinity recovered a second onside kick and was able to run out the final 2 12 minutes. By TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comFORT WHITE — It was Senior Night at the Fort White High football game on Friday and Michael Mulberry led a show of offensive fireworks by those probably playing their final game at Arrowhead Stadium. Mulberry put Fort White back in the game with an 85-yard punt return for a touchdown. It was his third punt return TD of the season. Trinity Catholic High had punted the ball out of bounds on the previous kicks. “I thought it would come to me eventually,” Mulberry said. When it did, the speedster knew what to do. “I caught the ball and all I saw was a big old hole and I hit it as hard as I could,” Mulberry said. Trailing 21-13, Fort White still had work to do with only a few minutes remain-ing in the game. Mulberry gave the Indians a shot at a tie when he cut across from his wide receiver spot, caught the pass from Andrew Baker and ran 96 yards for a touchdown. “It is called an 86X jailbreak,” Mulberry said. “I come in behind the linemen and there was a big opening and I just took off.” On both of the plays Mulberry was chased by Celtics for several yards on the way to the end zone. “I am too fast for them to catch me,” he said. Fort White got another couple of big plays from seniors after trailing 21-0. Trey Phillips caught a 49-yard bomb and followed it up with a twirling catch in the end zone from 17 yards out for Fort White’s first touchdown. Reginald Williams broke a 62-yard run on an option pitch that resulted in a first-and-goal for the Indians. “We started off slow, but we got our connection together and started to play football,” said Mulberry, who also had a interception on defense.Mulberry shows out JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Michael Mulberry (4) runs the ball ag ainst Trinity Catholic High on Friday. By TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comFORT WHITE — Trinity Catholic High head coach John Brantley III and Fort White High head coach Demetric Jackson are both former University of Florida football players. In three meetings to date between their high school teams, there has developed a solid respect. “We made it tough on ourselves, but that’s what happens when you play against a well-coached foot-ball team,” said Brantley, whose Celtics lost a pair of fumbles in Fort White territory that prevented them from putting the game away after leading 21-0. The teams played twice in 2011, once for the dis-trict championship and again in the second round of the playoffs. “This will help us both in the playoffs and hope-fully we will see each other down the road,” Brantley said. “They feel like they can win and we feel like we can win. It makes for good high school football.” Jackson would like that second meeting. “I hope we play them again because it means we are in the second round of the playoffs,” Jackson said. “It makes you sick when you lose 21-19.” Brantley got three touchdown passes from his quarterback, Reid Carlton, while Andrew Baker threw two for Fort White. The Celtics’ three scores went for 16, 43 and 34 yards to three different receivers. “There were a lot of athletes on the field,” Brantley said. “In big games you have big playmakers who make plays and both teams did it.” Like last year, if the District 3-3A rematch becomes a reality it will be played in Ocala. Brantley comes out on top in battle of former Gators Yeldon TD leads No. 1 Alabama past LSU 21-17Associated PressBATON ROUGE, La. — T.J. Yeldon took a swing pass from A.J. McCarron and went 28 yards for a touchdown with 51 sec-onds remaining, giving top-ranked Alabama a stunning 21-17 victory over No. 5 LSU on a raucous Saturday night in Death Valley. The Crimson Tide (9-0, 6-0 Southeastern Conference) showed it could come from behind after Zach Mettenberger rallied the Tigers (7-2, 3-2) from a 14-3 halftime defi-cit. LSU had a chance to put the game away in the clos-ing minutes, driving into Alabama territory and forc-ing the Tide to use its time-outs. But Drew Alleman missed a field goal, and McCarron took over. He completed three straight passes before reading an LSU blitz, flipping a pass to Yeldon. The freshman broke one tackle and faked out another defender for the winning TD.No. 3 Notre Dame 29, Pitt 26 3OTIt looked as if Pittsburgh was going to help sort out the national championship race, until Notre Dame made a huge comeback. The fourth-ranked Fighting Irish rallied from a two-touchdown deficit on the fourth quarter, and beat Pitt 29-26 in three overtimes Saturday. Everett Golson scored on a quarterback sneak in the third overtime to end it. Notre Dame (9-0) is off to its best start since 1993. Pitt (4-5) missed a potential game-winning field goal in overtime. The Fighting Irish were among four unbeaten teams atop the BCS stand-ings coming into the week-end. Notre Dame was sup-posed to have the easiest game of the three. No. 2 Oregon stayed undefeated with a wild 62-51 victory at No. 18 Southern California. No. 1 Alabama was at No. 5 LSU later Saturday and No. 3 Kansas State was home against Oklahoma State.No. 2 OREGON 62, No. 18 USC 51LOS ANGELES — Kenjon Barner rushed for a school-record 321 yards and five touch-downs, Marcus Mariota threw four TD passes, and Oregon produced another landmark offensive perfor-mance against USC. Josh Huff caught two touchdowns, and De’Anthony Thomas and Daryl Hawkins also caught scoring passes for the Ducks (9-0, 6-0 Pac-12), who outlasted USC in a back-and-forth second half to extend their winning streak to 12 games. Oregon’s 730 yards and 62 points were the most ever allowed by USC, which began playing foot-ball in 1888. Barner set a rushing record for a USC opponent by the third quarter, top-ping Curtis Enis’ 241 yards for Penn State in 1996, and smashed the school record shortly afterward as the Ducks gradually pulled away in their closest game of the year. Matt Barkley passed for 484 yards and four touchdowns while hit-ting Marqise Lee with 12 passes for 157 yards and two touchdowns for the Trojans (6-3, 3-3), who have lost two straight after a 6-1 start. No. 6 OHIO ST. 52, ILLINOIS 22COLUMBUS, Ohio — Carlos Hyde rushed for 137 yards and three touch-downs, and Braxton Miller passed for two scores and ran for another to lead Ohio State past Illinois.

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1CBIZ FRONT Lake City Reporter 1CBIZ FRONT Week of Nov. 4 Nov. 10, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section C Columbia, Inc. Your marketplace source for Lake City and Columbia County 1CColumbia Inc. Every breath counts. NOVEMBER IS LUNG CANCER AWARENESS MONTH COUNTY TOURISM Harvey Campbell 386-758-1397 New board member for TDC T he Columbia County Tourist Development Council (TDC) is pleased to welcome incoming Lake City Councilman Zack Paulk as the new city rep resentative on our board. Mr. Paulk replaces former City Council Member Jake Hill who served on the TDC board for the past four years. In addition, Ms. Suzanne Moses, who was the former General Manager at the Lake City Super 8 Motel, has resigned. The board posi tion filled by Ms. Moses is restricted to a collector of the Local Option Tourist Development Tax (bed tax) and applications are currently being solicited TOURISM continued on 2C 911 manager there when needed By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com Bennie Coleman, Columbia County 911 Communications Center manager, isnt an employee who abuses his sick leave. In more than three decades, Coleman has only used two sick leave days. Coleman, 50, has been the coun tys 911 Communications Center manager for a little more than a week. The Columbia County 911 Communications Center dis patches all of the emergency ser vice first responders in Columbia County with the exception of the Lake City Police Department. So far this is a challenging position, he said. Im learning a lot and Ive got a lot more to learn. This is a very involved agency and 911 is a very serious endeavor. Im looking forward to being a part of it, its something really different for me. For the past 5 and a half years, Coleman worked for the Columbia County Sheriffs Office and for the last four years he was the jail administrator at the Columbia County Detention Facility. Prior to working for the sheriffs office, Coleman worked for the Florida Department of Corrections, where he retired as an assistant warden. Coleman said his goals as the new county 911 communications center manager is to enhance the agency to the best of his abil ity, make it better and to have cohesion among the agencies and departments the center supports. Coleman has accumulated more than 600 hours of sick leave time while working with the sheriffs office. According to county docu ments, Coleman has accrued 614.65 hours of leave time from the sheriffs office and county offi cials, Thursday night, allowed his leave time to be transferred to his new position. He said he doesnt consider the 600 hours to be a lot of time, noted he never used any sick leave while he worked at the sheriffs office. Ive called in sick twice in 31 years between the Department of Corrections and the sheriffs office, Coleman said, noting when he left the Department of Corrections, he had accrued more than 4,000 hours of sick leave that he received no compensation for. Im fortunate that Ive never been one to be a sickly type of person. I never use a whole lot of sick leave. I work a lot of hours and Im not New Communications Center manager has quite a work ethic. TONY BRITT /Lake City Reporter Bennie Coleman, the new Columbia County 911 Communications Center manager, at work at the Columbia County Emergency Operations Center. COLEMAN continued on 2C

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for that spot on the TDC board. Applications will be accepted until 5:00 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 20th. Applications can be obtained by calling the TDC office at 758-1312 or requesting an application by e-mail to: Harvey_ campbell@columbiacoun tyfla.com Lake City Reporter printing new Suwannee River Valley Vacation Guide The Suwannee River Valley Marketing Group is proud to announce the Lake City Reporter has been awarded the print ing and graphics project associated with the upcom ing fourth edition of the Suwannee River Valley Vacation Guide. Editorial content is currently being finished for the new publi cation, along with proofing of information grids and photography. Advertising representatives of the Lake City Reporter are currently approaching area business es about participation in the magazine. During the current year, 60,000 of the 52-page, full-color guides were produced and distrib uted. Of that total, more than 10,000 were mailed out in response to readers of various publications in which we had advertised. The 2013 Vacation Guide is expected to be in hand by the end of December as the Suwannee River Valley Marketing Group begins exhibiting at several tour ism trade shows, including a recreational vehicle show in Tampa and a consumer show at The Villages in Central Florida. Its Fair Time again in Columbia County Now that Halloween is behind us, its time again for the 58th Annual Columbia County Fair, through Nov. 10. If you havent attended in a while, youre missing a real showcase event which features outstanding work by our FFA youth in the livestock division, lots of love and care with crafts and food products, along with the entertainment of the midway. Another important element of the fair is the many local busi nesses who showcase their goods and services for the thousands of attendees of the fair. The Columbia County Board of County Commissioners will have a booth again in spaces #1 & #2 in the first exhibi tion hall. The booth will include comprehensive information on the inner workings of Columbia County government, along with photographs of many of the new and on-going projects in our area. Sports continues to play an important role for local economy Two sports tournaments remain on the schedule for the 2012 calendar year. A USSSA baseball tourna ment is planned for the Southside Sports Complex during the weekend of Nov. 10-11 and another USSSA baseball event is scheduled for the weekend of Dec. 1-2. Our department will be compiling an economic impact study and return on investment (ROI) report by the end of December. An additional important issue facing the Southside Sports Complex deals with plans to spend upwards of $2.5 million to upgrade lights for the eight-field girls softball complex, pur chase new ADA compliant bleachers, safety netting and three new combina tion restroom/concession building, along with other improvements. As cur rently proposed, the costs for the improvements would be split between the TDC and Board of County Commissioners with the TDC portion financed by a 1 percent increase in the Local Option Tourist Development Tax (bed tax). 2C LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF NOVEMBER 4, 2012 2CBIZ/MOTLEY Harvey Campbell is the executive director of the Columbia County Tourist Development Council. He can be reached at 386-7581397. Big Boy Toys winner MANDY BROWN /Lake City Reporter Lake City Reporter Publisher Todd Wilson (right) presents a chainsaw to Lake City resident Robert Angelo on Wednesday. Angelo won the chainsaw in the Big Boy Toys Expo drawing on Oct. 20. one to take a lot of time off. He said there really isnt much of a secret behind him not using a lot of sick leave and noted when he began working at the Department of Corrections when he was 18 years old, he learned a lesson that stuck with him throughout his career. I learned from people to work, do your job, dont lay out and youll prosper, he said. I brought that to the sheriffs office and I brought that here already. Coleman, a Columbia County native and Columbia High School graduate, said his habit of using virtually no sick leave time will be an advantage for him in his new position. It will allow me to be more involved, because there is a lot to this job, he said. I dont want to be tied down to the office. I want to be involved and be in there with the dispatchers and learn dispatching and all of the other intricacies of the position. COLEMAN: There when hes needed Continued From Page 1C TOURISM: Its Fair time in county Continued From Page 1C

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDSUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012 3C Classified Department: 755-5440 CLASSIFIED AD vantageTake ADvantage of the Reporter Classifieds!755-5440Lake City Reporter FIND IT SELL IT BUY IT $17504 lines 3 days Includes 2 Signs Each additional line $1.65 Garage Sale Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$10104 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.10One item per ad Under $500 Personal Merchandise Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$16754 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.15One item per ad Under $1,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$23704 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.45One item per ad Under $2,500 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $4,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$27404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.55One item per ad Under $4,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$30404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.65One item per ad Under $6,000 Placing An Ad Service Guide Limited to service type advertis-ing only.4 lines, one month....$92.00 $10.80 each additional lineIncludes an additional $2.00 per ad for each Wednesday insertion. DeadlinesBe Sure to Call Early You can call us at 755-5440 Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.Some people prefer to place their classified ads in person, and some ad categories will require prepay-ment. Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street.You can also fax or email your ad copy to the Reporter.FAX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the Classified Department.EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreporter.comAd is to Appear:TuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday Call by:Mon., 10:00 a.m.Mon., 10:00 a.m.Wed., 10:00 a.m.Thurs., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fax/Email by:Mon., 9:00 a.m.Mon., 9:00 a.m.Wed., 9:00 a.m.Thurs., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.These deadlines are subject to change without notice. Cancellations, Changes & Billing Questions Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject, or classify all advertisements under appropriate headings. Copy should be checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day of pub-lication. Credit for published errors will be allowed for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement which was incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be published, nor for any general, special or consequential damages. Advertising language must comply with Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition of discrimi-nation in employment, housing and public accommodations. Standard abbreviations are acceptable; how-ever, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated. Ad Errors-Please read your ad on the first day of publication. Weaccept responsibility for only the first incorrect insertion, and only the charge for the ad space in error. Please call 755-5440 immediately for prompt correc-tion and billing adjustments.CancellationsNormal advertising deadlines apply for cancellation.Billing InquiriesCall 755-5440. Should further information be required regarding payments or credit limits, your call will be trans-ferred to the accounting depart-ment. General Information In Print and Onlinewww.lakecityreporter.com Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$2504 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $.25One item per ad Under $100 ADJUNCT INSTRUCTORS SPRING TERM 2013COMPUTER SCIENCE Energetic, outgoing, and detail oriented candidates needed to fill adjunct Computer Science Instructor position. Must be able to TEACH ON CAMPUS during the day. Master’s Degree in Computer Science or related educational/instructional technology field required. Email resume/ transcripts to Pamela. carswell@fgc.edu ENGLISH English adjunct needed to teach during the day. Master’s in English required or 18 graduate hours in English plus master’s in related area. Contact Tim Moses at tim.moses@ fgc.edu HISTORY History adjunct needed to teach during the day. Master’s in History required or 18 graduate hours in History plus master’s in related area. Contact Tim Moses at tim.moses@fgc.edu NURSING CLINICAL BSN Required. Master’s degree in nursing preferred. At least two years of recent clinical experience required. Contact Mattie Jones at 386-754-4368 or mattie.jones@fgc.edu. DEVELOPMENTAL MATHEMATICS Bachelor’s degree in mathematics, engineering, secondary mathematics education, or other related field. Requirements include morning and/or early afternoon availability for on-campus courses. Contact Carrie Rodesiler at 386.754.4413 or carrie.rodesiler@fgc.edu for more information.College application and copies of transcripts required. All foreign transcripts must be submitted with a translation and evaluation. Application available at www.fgc.eduFGC is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools VP/ADA/EA/EO College in Education & Employment COORDINATOR OF GRANT MANAGEMENT (Grant Funded) Design and implement participant tracking measures. Monitor grant program evaluation and compliance with funding regulations. Help produce program reports for College administrators and funding organizations. Requires Bachelor’s degree or higher plus three years of experience in program management. Grant management; data collection, analysis, and reporting; program assessment; word processing and spreadsheet software usage. Experience managing grant funded programs within institutes of higher education desired. SALARY: $37,500 annually, plus benefits APPLICATION DEADLINE: 11/14/12 Persons interested should provide College application, vita, and photocopies of transcripts. All foreign transcripts must be submitted with official translation and evaluation. Position details and applications available on web at: www.fgc.edu Human Resources Florida Gateway College 149 S.E. College Place Lake City Fl 32025-2007 Phone (386) 754-4314 Fax (386) 754-4814 E-Mail: humanr@fgc.eduFGC is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. VP/ADA/EA/EO College in Education and Employment 020Lost & Found Lost dog Walker mix. Brown w/white chest, paws & white strip on snout. wearing blue collar. Last seen 10/19/12 S LC. 386-292-9115 100Job Opportunities05534241NOWHIRING Cashiers & Baggers forHigh Springs fruit & gift stores. Benefits avail: health, dental, & vacation. Apply in person: Florida Citrus Center(Chevron) 18603 NWCR 236, High Springs (exit 404 & I-75) 05535631HOLIDAYINN & SUITESLake City’s only full service hotel is seeking the following : Line Cook P/TMust have Experience Apply in person Mon-Fri 12-5pm 213 SWCommerce Dr. EOE/DFWP. CDLClass A Truck Driver Flatbed exp. for F/TSE area. 3 years exp or more. Medical benefits offered. Contact Melissa or Sandy@ 386-935-2773 SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 100Job OpportunitiesDental Hygienist: Golden Opportunity! Full time, Part time, Fill in, we have a great opportunity waiting for you! An immediate opening has just come up! That’s great news in this job market! If you have a friendly can-do attitude, a gentle touch, a great work ethic, you are orgainized, and self motivated with a god sense of humor, then you should apply. Call 888-486-2408 to hear a message with more details about the position and instructions on how to apply for this position in Madison, FL. Great benefits! INTERVIEWING FOR TEMPORARYPOSITION With Suwannee Lights. Gate Personnel Must have great personality, smile on your face, people skills. Able to work 5pm-11pm. Call Steve Briscoe, 386-758-0959. P/THousekeeper Needed. Occasional Nights And Weekends. Fax Resume to 386-487-1232. Person to cut nylon material in plant. And person to attend gun shows and sales. Hafners. Contact 755-6481 Drivers: All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-ACDLFlatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down CALL: 866-823-0323 120Medical Employment05535427LAKE BUTLER HOSPITAL PRN Position ER Clerk Days, Nights & Weekends Exp. Required OR/RN Circulator For further information, please visit our website: www.lakebutlerhospital.com (386) 496-2323 EXT9258, FAX (386) 496-9399 Equal Employment Opportunity / Drug & Tobacco Free Workplace 05535460Gainesville Women’s Center ForRadiology Arlene Weinshelbaum, M.D. EXP. MAMMOGRAPHY TECH wanted full time or part time,for private Radiology office. AART& Mammography certification req. Fax resume to: Tracy: (352)331-2044 05535562Medical Assistant Full time medical assistant with several years experience required.Salary based on experience.Email resume in confidence to mafaisal05@yahoo.com or fax to 386-758-5987. 05535577RN OncologyFast paced Oncology Hematology practice currently seeking a permanent, full time ONCOLOGYINFUSION RN to work in outpatient chemotherapy at their Lake City location. Work schedule M-F, 8am-5pm. Please send resume with salary req. to jsmith@ccofnf.com. Resumes without salary req. will not be considered. 05535629LAKE BUTLER HOSPITAL F/T ADON/RN Must be Florida Licensed Management Experience Preferred. PHYSICALTHERAPIST Will be required to evaluate and treat a variety of diagnoses/post surgical conditions in a hospital/swing-bed and out patient setting. Hand experience preferred /not required. Serious inquiries only. For further information, please visit our website: www.lakebutlerhospital.com (386) 496-2323 EXT9258, FAX (386) 496-9399 Equal Employment Opportunity / Drug & Tobacco Free Workplace F/T Entry Level position in busy Medical Practice. M-F, Benefits Avail. Fax resume to 386-487-1232. 120Medical EmploymentATTENTION NURSESNortheast Florida State Hospital is currently hiring new and experi-enced registered nurses for perma-nent and temporary positions. •Evening and Night shifts available with shift differential pay•Leave accrual, full time, 8 hrs every 2 weeks•Excellent benefits•Deferred comp available •Salary based on years of experience•100% vested in state retirement after 6 years•Free CEUs available at worksite•Campus –like facility•Located 28 miles west of Jacksonville on I-10•State of Florida Dept. of Education – eligible site for Nursing Loan Forgiveness Program. In-quire for further details.Applications must be submitted online at http://peoplefirst.myflorida.com or call Dwana Prevatt at (904) 259-6211 x 1114 or x 1754 for further information. 240Schools & Education05535484Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class12/24/2012• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-11/05/12• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 05535592Interested in a Security Officer Career? North Florida Firearms Training Center Lic# DS8900001 Offers•Instruction for Class “D” Security Officer License in Lake City, 40 hr course.•Security Officer Class “D” License Training Certification $120.00. Fees incl. application instructions, books, supplies, exam, next class 11/6/12. Call 386-984-5530 310Pets & Supplies MINI SCHNAUZER Female puppy, CKC, Shots, HC, $350.00 755-3547 or 466-6709 MINI SCHNOODLE Male Puppy, CKC, Shots, HC $300.00 755-3547 or 466-6709 PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 330Livestock & SuppliesDeep Creek Farms Barn kept Square or Net Wrapped Round Hay Bales For Sale Ronnie Hughes (386)365-1425 407Computers DELLComputer $100.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 413Musical MerchandiseSpinet type piano. $900 OBO Must Sell Contact 386-842-5548 430Garage Sales PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 440Miscellaneous 180 gallon Aquarium stand & lights filter. No leaks, too big for the house. Avail. for pickup on/after Nov. 1. Tank is 6' long, 2 tall & 2' wide, stand is 34" tall. $500 Serious inquiries only please. 386438-8516, let ring, slow to answer. 440Miscellaneous All Children are artists! Ages 2-10 Fall Session Receive $10 off tuition October 22nd Nov. 16th Phone: (386) 438-8060 Noahs-art.com *located across the highway from Honda ANYONE WANTING AMeat: Chicken or Duck, around 7 or 8 lbs ready now for Thanksgiving. We will dress chicken, Quail, or Pheasants. For Hunters have good flying Pheasant. RSVPfor 1st Sat. of Dec. for Pheasant shooting call for tickets available 754-9127 Bowflex Ultimate 2, Complete with instructions and DVD’s showing 164 exercises. $350 extra set of power rods. 386-758-6782 PRO-FORM ELLIPTICAL $200 Like New, Built in fan 386-758-6782 RCA32" LCD 1080PHD TV. Less than 1 yr old. Excellent Condition $200.00 386-754-4094 Recumbence Bike by NordicTrak (Step through) $200 Like New Contact 758-6782 450Good Things to EatThe Nut Cracker Robert Taylor Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans 2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024 Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville 386-963-4138 or 961-1420 460Firewood Cord+ of split Firewood Ready to burn $150.00 386-243-8325 630Mobile Homes forRent14 x70 MH.Real clean,2br/2ba garden tub,Water furn.,Good Location $575 mo. $300 dep. No Pets 386-755-0064 or (904) 771-5924 2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $450. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 2/1 Furnished S/WMH washer/dryer, Dep & referrences Incl: cable, water, elect. & garb. For more info. 386-965-3477 2/1 SW US 90 W, LC,Remodeled, lg yard, porch, quiet area. 1st mth $575 & $500 dep. No pets. 386752-1941 or 965-0932 2/2 Screened porch, Lg. lot, in very nice, clean, well maintained, safe, small park, credit/background check, no pets, really nice place to live, with long term tenants, $485 mo., $485 sec. dep. 386-719-9169 or 386-965-3737. 2BR/1BA Located onCountyRoad 133, $500 mo. plus $5000 dep. 954-258-8841 3BD/2BAMH on 1 ac of land. $850 mth with Deposit. Contact 386-438-0599 or 386-752-2765 Mobile Homes for rent in White Springs & Ft. White. Contact 386-623-3404 Move-in Special 1st mth Free, 1, 2 or 3bdrm $350/mth. $450 to m/i. Call today m/i tomorrow. 305-984-5511 or 386-344-0830 Newer2/2. Super clean on 1 ac North by distribution center. Perfect for Target employee. $550. mo Call for details. 386-867-9231 Quiet Country Park 3br/2ba $525. Very clean NO PETS! References & Deposit required 386-758-2280 640Mobile Homes forSale575 Credit Score=10% Down on your choice of select New 3/2 or 4/2 Double. Limited time offer for Challenged Credit. North Pointe Homes, 352-872-5566 NEW3/2JACOBSEN HOMES Starting at $43,995. Painted WAlls-Del-Set-AC-Skirting-and Steps. North Pointe Homes Hwy 441 N, Gainesville, FL 352-872-5566 NEWJacobsen Model Homes Sale! 13 Left with up to $25,000 off. Don’t buy until you shop North Pointe Homes 4545 NW 13th St Gainesville 352-872-5566 Own YourProperty? No Money Down with good credit. Great Rates Available. North Pointe Homes 352-872-5566 Palm Harbor Homes New Homes at $39,900 $5k for your used mobile home 3 New models, 1,100-2,400 SQ FT 800-622-2832 ext 210 640Mobile Homes forSaleSeveral Bank Repos and Used Homes in stock At North Pointe in Gainesville 352-872-5566 650Mobile Home & LandOwner Fin.-Nice huge 4/2.5 on 3 ac, x-fenced, creek, lrg deck,Paved Rd. McAlpin area. Small down $950/mth 386-867-1833. For picswww.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05535481We’ve got it all!$89 Deposit Limited Avail. Call Today! Windsong Apts. *Free afterschool program386-758-8455 1BR APT. Downtown Location, Clean. New Carpet $450 mo, plus Security. NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456 2br/1ba Apt. Quiet Lake View CH/A$500. mo $500 dep. No pets. 386-344-2170 2BR/2BAw/garage 5 minutes from VAhospital and Timco. Call for details. 386-365-5150 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Brandywine Apartments Now Renting 1, 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-752-3033 W. Grandview Ave. Equal Housing Opportunity TDD Number 1-800-955-8771 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 REDUCED 2/1 1300 sqft, duplex w/ gargage. refurbished,W/D hook up, CH/A, $650 mth Lease Req. 386-965-2407 or 386-758-5881 Updated Apt, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 720Furnished Apts. ForRentRooms forRent Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent2BD /1.5BA Country, South of Lake City, private river access. w/boat ramp, 2 garages, clean, $625 mo. + sec. 386-590-0642 Beautiful Yard, Close to shopping Lots of natural light. 3BD/1.5BA CH/A, $700 mth & $700 dep. Contact 386-344-2170 Warm, Cozy, Just in time for Christmas 2bd / 1ba home. CH/A, $500 mth & $500 dep. Contact 386-344-2170 750Business & Office RentalsFOR LEASE: Downtown Office Space. Convenient to Court house. Call 386-755-3456 ForRent orLease: Former Doctors office, Former professional office & Lg open space: avail on East Baya Ave. Competitive rates. Weekdays 386-984-0622 evenings/weekends 497-4762 PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 805Lots forSale PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 810Home forSale 2 OwnerFinanced Homes/ 1 RentalLake City, Mayo, Branford 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 3BR/1.5BA Eat in Kitchen Elec. Appl., &W/D Utility Room, Porch, Carport, Lg lot, Close to VA& shopping. $68,000 386-288-5240 or 386-984-0207 PublishedMonthlybythe Lake City Reporter

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012 Classified Department: 755-5440 4C Same Day Service Includes Saturday Lake City Lake City Commons Center (Publix Shopping) 752-3733 C arrying Vera Bradley CONTACTS EYE EXAMS by Independent Optometrist 2 Complete Pair Eyeglasses $ 119 Includes Lenses & Frames Some Restrictions Apply. COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES NOV. 30, 2012 NOW FREE GLASSES FREE PA IR OF GLASSES Buy one complete pair of glasses at regular price & receive a Some Restrictions Apply. COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES NOV. 30, 2012 $ 99 1 Pair Eyeglasses Includes lenses & frames. Some Restrictions Apply. COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES NOV. 30, 2012 NOW Where you get the Best for Less Ask about Care Credit 820 Farms & Acreage 10 acres with well/septic/pp (not guar); $300 dwn; $580 a mth. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com 860 Investment Property 2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870 Real Estate W anted I Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 880 Duplexes QUAILHEIGHTS Golf Course Community. 2br/1ba W/D hock up. Private, safe, secluded. $725 mo $500 sec. 386-243-8235 951 Recreational Ve hicles Gas Gulf Cart Lift Kit Street Legal $2500 386-243-8325 5 a week days Lake City Reporter LAKE CITY REPORTER This Reporter Works For You! 755-5440 Classifieds 755-5445 Circulation BEST WAY ...to never miss a days worth of all the Lake City Reporter has to offer: Home delivery To subscribe call 755-5445

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LIFE Sunday, November 4, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section D S tar gazing can be part of any road trip. Not sitting in your back porch rocking chair staring at the night sky. The other star gazing. I’m talk-ing Big Apple style — sit-ting in a restaurant on 44th Street in Times Square in Manhattan on a Saturday evening before a Broadway show and gazing across the room only to find one of the biggest stars in the “celebrity sky,”namely Al Pacino! Yep, it happened to us. Susan Eagle, Sonja Meads and I were eating dinner at Sardi’s Restaurant in New York City last Saturday. While sipping wine, Susan gazed across ‘Star’ gazingas you travel Story ideas?ContactRobert BridgesEditor754-0428rbridges@lakecityreporter.com Lake City Reporter 1DLIFE TRAVEL TALES Sandy Kishton Trying to rise from the ashesBy DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreportWhile Tommy Clary was filling up his Ford Ranger, he received a frantic call from his wife Nancy. “The house is gone. Tthe house is gone,” she said over and over. He tried to prepare himself, but when he rounded the corner of his driveway in Fort White, it was still a shock to see the fire engines and police cars. Nothing was left except blackened metal and some smoldering debris. “What they were doing was hosing down the ashes,” Nancy Clary said. “Don’t get me wrong, the fire department was absolutely fantas-tic. They did what they could.” Tommy and Nancy Clary help raise their 7-year-old granddaugh-ter, Emma. She stays with her grandparents while her father, who works construction, goes wherever the work takes him. Theeir three-bedroom, 24-by-48foot mobile home, built in 1984, wasn’t insured. Tommy Clary said he tried to get insurance on the trailer in 2001 when the fam-ily moved to Fort White, but no insurance company would provide coverage. Nancy Clary, 53, and a life-long renter, said this was the first place she ever lived in that she could call her own. The fire occurred on Sept. 30 while Nancy Clary was at work. Tommy Clary was on his way home from a Marine reunion in North Carolina. He said he feels partially responsible because he should have been there. He feels he could have pre-vented the fire from spreading thoughtout the house — maybe saved something. The Clarys were told the fire most likely started as an electri-cal fire in the walls. While the fire stole their home and belongings, it also took the Nancy Clary’s two Chihuahuas, Dingo and Minnie. “They were like my children,” she said. Tommy Clary, a 65-year-old combat veteran who served with the Marine Corps in Vietnam, is no stranger to tragedy. In Vietnam, he said, he was shot in the head. The bullet went through his helmet, into his forehead and lodged inside his skull. He’s 100 percent combat disabled and also suffers from Agent Orange contamination, he said. He said God has a plan, even though he doesn’t know where the fire fits. “A deal like this, all you can do is put it in the hands of God,” he said. The Clarys have done more then put it in the hands of God. They’ve contacted charities across the area. They asked the bank for a loan on the property. Also, they bought a travel trailer and JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterThomas Clary consoles his wife, Nancy, after talking about their three-bedroom, two-bath mobile home that burned down Sept. 30. They are living with their granddaughter, Em ma, 7, in a camper next to the charred remains of their home — a painful, constant reminder of all they’ve lost. Fort White couple work to recover from devastating fire loss. CLARYS continued on 3D TRAVEL continued on 2D

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the restaurant and said she thought that might be Al Pacino sitting in a booth across the restaurant. She told one of us to get up, go to the bathroom and check it out. So after a couple more glances from her, I decided to investigate. I made my way across the floor trying not to make it entirely obvious that I was staring at him. But sure enough, it was Al. I arrived back at the table with two thumbs up and confirmed it. I thought Susan was going to pass out. She let out a loud gasp, covered her mouth and got right down teary eyed with excitement. Next, Sonja made the trek across the room to take a peek. Susan then joked that she could go over there and fall into his lap. At a minimum, she wanted his picture. I nixed the idea saying that we had to respect his privacy. She said, Well, if I saw you in a restaurant, Id go speak to you. YES, but you know me, I said. Sandy, Ive known him all of my life because Ive watched him in so many movies. What a great line that was as we both laughed out loud. It was a classic line, one Ill never forget. After watching him get up to leave and making some private remarks about his appearance, Susan still had some regrets thinking she missed an opportunity. The next day as the sun was just thinking about set ting, we caught a glimpse of yet another star, per haps a little star, but one with Big Pop Culture. GUY FIERI from Diners, Drive Ins and Dives. He just opened a restaurant in Times Square a month ago called Guys American Kitchen and Bar. We were grabbing a late bite and some libations before catching our plane back home, when I heard a loud scream from the bar and followed the action only to find Guy walking out from the back of the restaurant to a waiting car and said, Oh wow, its HIM! Sonja thought someone was choking or dying and Susan was a lot quicker with the camera this time. She followed him and his entourage outside where she caught him on film in the car as he was signing a few autographs. All in all, it made for an exciting trip to New York City one of many for me, a second trip for Susan, but especially for first timer, Sonja. So as relaxing as gaz ing into the night sky here at home is, star gazing Big Apple style is much more exciting. Sandy Kishton is a freelance travel writer who lives in Lake City. Contact her at skishton@comcast. net From staff reports Bear Creek Music and Art Festival will bring thou sands of music fans to the Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park in Live Oak, Fla this weekend, Nov. 8 to 11, for four days of music from some of the best bands and groups in the U.S. Among the headlin ers scheduled to perform are Humphreys McGee, George Porter Jr. & Runnin Pardners, Grant Green Jr. & Friends, Headtronics, Atlanta Funk Society Horns, Eric Krasno & Chapter 2, Savi Fernandez Band, Sharon Jones & The Dap Kings, Florida State Blues Band, Ivan Nevilles Dumpstaphunk, Lettuce and Lotus. Other acts include Atlanta Funk Society Horns, Beebs & Her Money Makers, Billy Martin & Wil Blades Duo, Bobby Rush, Break Science, Bright Light Social Hour, Cadillac Jones, Catfish Alliance, Charles Bradley & His Extraordinaires, Como Mamas, Digital Tape Machine, Dr. Klaw, Earphunk, Eric Krasno & Chapter 2, Flannel Church, George Porter Jr. & Runnin Pardners, Grant Green Jr. & Friends, Headtronics, Steve Molitz, DJ Logic & Freekbass, Ike Stubblefield & Friends, Ivan Nevilles Dumpstaphunk, Jonathan Scales Fourchestra, Kaleigh Baker Band, Kris Royal & Dark Matter, Kung Fu, Lettuce, Lotus, Marchfourth Marching Band, Moon Taxi, Perpetual Groove, Savi Fernandez Band, Sharon Jones & The Dap Kings, Soulive, Strange Arrangement, The Budos Band, The Dead Kenny Gs, The Dynamites featur ing Charles Walker, The Heavy Pets, The Mantras, The Mike Dillon Band, The New Mastersounds, The Sugarman3, The Werks, Thomas Wynn & The Believers, Humphreys McGee, Vagabound Swing, Voodoo Town, Wyllys & The NY Hustler Ensemble, Zach Deputy, Florida State Blues Band and also Zoogma. Artists at large include Alecia Chakour, Alan Evans Trio, Freekbass, Jennifer Hartswick, Michelle Sarah, Natalie Cressman, Robert Walter, Roosevelt Collier, Will Bernard, Billy Iuso and Pee Wee Ellis. Weekend passes include music, primitive camping and all fees and taxes. Kids 12 and under are free. Day tickets are only available at the gate and do not include camping. Taxes and fees are included in the price. Military honored Bear Creek will honor all active and retired military in observance of Veterans Day. All veterans and active military who purchase a three-day festival pass will be upgraded to a four-day weekend pass (includes Thursday through Sunday night) at no additional cost. In order to receive this upgrade, you must show a valid military ID at the gate. To buy tickets or make reservations for RV park ing, cabins, primitive camp ing or camper parking for the SOSMP, call (386) 3641683, email spirit@musi cliveshere.com or go to www.musicliveshere.com. Other activities Get out your best cos tumes for Friday and Saturday night because costume themes are back. Friday night its a Party Animal theme. Saturday night, will again be Warm & Fuzzy. Artist Zach Deputy will host a charitable disc golf tournament on the fantastic 18-hole Magnolia Disc Golf Course on Nov. 10, at 10 a.m. Proceeds will benefit victims of Tropical Storm Debby through the work of Love INC. in Live Oak. Bear Creek and The Suwannee Music Foundation are proud to host the annual food drive to support Love INC. in Live Oak. Bring five or more cans or nonperish able food items to the food drive tent and receive a commemorative 2012 Christian Jaxtheimer festi val poster. A gentle yoga class, suitable for all levels of experience, will be offered Saturday and Sunday morn ing in the Meadow at 10 a.m. A fun and interactive kids class will take place Saturday at 2 p.m. at the Kids Tent. The Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park is located at 3076 95th Drive, 4.5 miles north of Live Oak off U.S. 129. The park is 4.5 miles south of Interstate 75 and 4.5 miles north of Interstate 10 off US 129. 2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 2DLIFE Stop by the Lake City Reporter for your complimentary engagement package. Aisle Style Complimentary Engagement Package Sweetwater Branch Inn 800-595-7760 Wards Jewelry & Gifts 752-5470 Camp Weed Cerveny Conference Center 386-364-5250 GeGees Studio 758-2088 Holiday Inn 754-1411, ext. 106 Another star-studded festival set at Suwannee COURTESY PHOTOS Blues artist Bobby Rush and the Gospel/blues trio Como Mamas from Como, Miss., are among an array of musical talent scheduled to perform at the Bear Creek Music and Art Festival, being held Nov. 8 through 11 at the Suwannee Music Park in Live Oak. Organizers expect several thousand visitors for the event. Monument honors military service dogs By SUE MANNING Associated Press LOS ANGELES The act of Congress is in the books, the bills are paid, the sculptures are being cast, and one of the biggest parades in the world will start a glory tour and countdown to dedication. The first national monument to pay tribute to military dogs will be unveiled in California in just two months. The U.S. Working Dog Teams National Monument will honor every dog that has served in combat since World War II. Some cities, cemeteries and military bases across the country already have such memorials. But none has been elevated to national monument level, where it will be in the company of the Statue of Liberty, Yosemite National Park and Mount Rushmore National Memorial. In 2000, John Burnam, a 65year-old veteran military dog han dler, wrote a book called Dog Tags of Courage. A year later, he got an email from a reader won dering why there were no national monuments to the dogs of war. In Dog Tags and a 2008 book, A Soldiers Best Friend, Burnam wrote about his time with the Armys 44th Scout Dog Platoon when he was in Vietnam in 1967 and 1968. His first dog, Timber, was injured in an ambush a few months after they teamed up, so he spent most of his tour with a German shepherd named Clipper. He saved my life and saved the lives of others by alerting on ambushes, snipers and booby traps. I wanted to give something back to these animals that have done so much and asked for so little, except for food and water and the love of their handlers, said Burnam, who received the Legion of Merit, Bronze Star and Purple Heart. Back then, handlers were not able to adopt their dogs when they were retired. I always worried about them but I know they died over there and they died as heroes, he said. In 2004, Burnam and two other dog handler veterans pursued the idea in earnest, forming the John Burnam Monument Foundation Inc. But it took two more years, until he met Rep. Walter B. Jones, R-N.C., that the monument project started to take shape. In 2007, Jones introduced leg islation authorizing establish ment of the monument. Passed unanimously by Congress, it was signed the next year by President George W. Bush, then amended and signed by President Barack Obama. Burnam designed the monu ment, which depicts the modern military handler and four dogs a Doberman, German shepherd, Labrador retriever and Belgian Malinois, all breeds used in wars. The silicon bronze handler stands more than 9 feet tall and weighs 1,500 pounds. Each dog is about 5 feet tall and weighs 550 pounds. Burnam called them hero-sized. The figures will stand on a ped estal, in front of a large granite wall. One side of the wall will have photos etched in black marble veneer showing dog teams in com bat from the different wars. The other side will have an inscription written by Burnam. The sculptor, Paula Slater, said it was the largest and most com plex monument she had ever done. She worked for thousands of hours, saying that finishing a project of that size is like giving birth to a baby five of them. ASSOCIATED PRESS This undated publicity photo provided by John Burnam Monument Foundation, Inc., shows a conceptual drawing of the U.S. Military Working Dog Teams National Monument. It is the first national monument ever to pay tribute to dogs and honors every dog that has served in combat since World War II. TRAVEL: Celebrities exciting to see. Continued From Page 1D

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parked it on their property, near the burned-out remains of their former home. “We’re running over each other, but at least it’s a roof over our heads,” Nancy Clary said. She said this isn’t the first time she’s had to start over because of a fire. In 1987, a house she was renting in Ohio caught fire the day she moved in. “I hadn’t even unpacked the boxes,” she said. When Tommy Clary asked his bank about taking a loan out on his property, the bank manager said since the recession the bank isn’t providing loans on property. “That just doesn’t make sense,” he said. “My daddy always said, ‘They build houses every day, but they’re not building any more land.’” While some of the possessions are replaceable, some items are lost forever. One item sticks out in Tommy Clary’s mind. His mother restored antiques, and he remembers when he was 15 going to auctions with her. At one of these auctions, his mother bid on a yellow, five-legged, oak table. He said he ques-tioned her about the purchase. She gave him a stern look and he went quiet. His mother stripped the paint and refinished the table. Later, she gave it to him. “The table must have been 150 years old,” he said. He talked about all the times his family would sit and talk or play games at the table. The table must have been one of the last things to burn. As the floor around the solid-oak table weakened the table fell through. Still, the fire consumed the table, just like everything else in the trailer. Now it’s just a memory. He said every day something knew he lost comes to mind. He wants the remains removed. “It’s enough to drive you crazy,” he said. “It’s like living next to a dead body.” Charles “Red” Williams said he heard about the fire a month ago, and has been organizing an auc-tion to benefit the family. Williams runs an auction house and will host the auction at 25961 W US 27 on Nov. 16. To donate items for the auction, contact Williams at (386) 454-4991. With the recent disasters in the area, Tropical Storm Debbie first and foremost, local charities don’t have much left to give, Tommy Clary said. When the fire happened a month ago, the family received donations of clothes and furniture. The Clarys said they have enough clothes and furniture, but need money to help with a down payment for a new trailer. “I feel like a beggar,” Tommy Clary said. “It’s tough for an old Marine to swallow his pride.” A friend of Tommy Clary reminded him about how every week he would create care packages for troops in Iraq and Afghanistan. She asked him why he did that. “It made my heart feel good,” he said. “She then told me, ‘The next time someone offers you help, don’t deny them that feel-ing.’” Anyone who wants to help the Clary family, can drop off dona-tions at TD Bank in Fort White, or mail to 7075 SW US Highway 27 Fort White, FL 32038. A founda-tion has been created. If sending a check, the bank asks that donorw write 5847 on the memo line and address the check to Thomas and Nancy Clary. Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012 3D3DLIFE ***FORCHRISTIANSONLY***How Will You Vote? Like a Christian? Or Like the World?God sWordtellsusHeknittedustogetherinourmother swomb. Willyouvoteforcandidatesthatwilluseyourmoneyforaborti ons? HowwillyouexplainthatvotetoGod? God sWordpromisesusHewilltakecareofHischildren. Willyouvoteforcandidatesbecausetheypromisethegovernme ntwillprovideforyou? HowwillyouexplainthatvotetoGod? God sWordisclearaboutmarriageandthefamily. Willyouvoteforcandidatesthatdonotsharethatview? HowwillyouexplainthatvotetoGod? Godtellsustousediscernment GodtellsustoopposeevilPlease,VoteLikeAChristian***FORCHRISTIANSONLY***PaidAd M y son, now in his mid-20s, reached over and stole a tomato wedge from my plate just last week. I didn’t think anything of it until he said, “Bet you never thought you’d see me do that.” Oh, my good-ness, he ate a raw tomato right before my eyes. This kid wouldn’t even touch my chili or vegetable soup if the tomatoes hadn’t cooked down enough to be unrec-ognizable. Our tastes can change as we go through life. It doesn’t hurt to revisit foods like tomatoes, spinach, okra or beets that didn’t appeal to you when you were younger. Take beets, for instance. If you are not a fan of beets, maybe your earlier experience was only with canned beets. Fresh beets from the garden are great prepared many ways such as in soups and salads, pickled and creamed. Beets don’t take much space, so if you have some room in the garden or a small area to prepare a new bed, try a few this year. Beets are grown as a cool weather crop in North Florida. Seeds should be sown September through early March in well-pre-pared planting beds located in full sun. Fertilize accord-ing to package directions, weed by hand around plants, and keep the soil from drying out (fluctua-tion in soil moisture will cause beet roots to crack). Seeds are produced by this biennial plant during the second year of life if the beet is not harvested. Beet “seeds” are actually the dried fruit. Each “seed” contains several true seeds that will germinate and appear as a clump of seed-lings. Even if you space your “seeds” several inches apart, you’ll still need to thin these seedlings. Use a small pair of scissors to trim out excess seedlings to avoid damaging the roots. The thinned-out seedlings are a treat in fresh salads. Several heirloom varieties that are recommended for North Florida include Early Wonder, Detroit Dark Red, Cylindra, Red Ace and Yellow Detroit. Depending on the variety, these may be harvested from 50 to 80 days after planting. They vary in flesh color from red to yellow to red and white striped. They are tolerant of moderate frosts and freezes, but it is best to cover young plants during cold snaps. Larger beets tend to be “woody” so har-vest beets when they are the size of a golf ball. Tastes change, so try something new, or old — especially if it’s good for you and it’s easy to grow. For more information on fall gardening, contact the UF Master Gardeners at 752-5384 and read the Florida Vegetable Gardening Guide on the website edis.ifas.ufl.edu/vh021. JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterThomas and Nancy Clary survey the charred remains of th eir Fort White home, which was destroyed by flames Sept. 30. ‘God looks out for me, there’s no questions about that,’ Thomas Clary said. Clary recalled when he was shot in the head while serving with the Marines in Vietn am and when, years later, he nearly died during an exp losion. ‘It knocked me down, but it didn’t knock me out’ he s aid. ‘I have some of the best support a guy can have, and it’s from my fellow Marines.’ CLARYS: Disabled ex-Marine says God has a plan. Continued From Page 1D Q D. Nichelle Demorest is a horticulture agent with the Columbia County Extension of the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. GARDEN TALK Nichelle Demorestdndemorest@ufl.eduTastes change as wemature

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4D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012 4DLIFE SUNDAY EVENING NOVEMBER 4, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsAmerica’s Funniest Home Videos (N) Once Upon a Time “Tallahassee” (N) Revenge “Illusion” (N) (:01) 666 Park Avenue “Diabolic” (N) News at 11Inside Edition 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsStraight Talk from the CandidatesBig Bang TheoryCSI: Miami Shocking discovery. Criminal Minds “Lauren” (DVS) NewsSports ZoneChann 4 NewsBig Bang Theory 5-PBS 5 -(5:30) Superstars of Seventies Soul Live (My Music)Call the Midwife (Series Finale) (N) Masterpiece Classic (N) Broadway: The American MusicalMI-5 Book about British intelligence. 7-CBS 7 47 47e NFL Football: Steelers at Giants 60 Minutes (N) The Amazing Race (N) The Good Wife “The Art of War” (N) The Mentalist “Cherry Picked” (N) Action Sports 360Two and Half Men 9-CW 9 17 17(4:00) Training DayAccording to JimYourJax MusicVoid TVLaw & Order “Charm City” Local HauntsLocal HauntsTMZ (N) The Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30 EPL SoccerAre We There Yet?The SimpsonsCleveland ShowThe X Factor The vocalists perform. (N) (Live) NewsAction Sports 360Leverage Evidence is on a plane. 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsFootball Night in America (N) (Live) e(:20) NFL Football Dallas Cowboys at Atlanta Falcons. (N) News CSPAN 14 210 350NewsmakersWashington This Week Q & APrime MinisterRoad to the White House Q & A WGN-A 16 239 307Funny VideosBloopers!Bloopers!How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine(:40) Instant Replay30 Rock30 Rock TVLAND 17 106 304M*A*S*HM*A*S*H “Kim” M*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Oprah’s Next ChapterOprah’s Next Chapter Usher Raymond. Oprah’s Next Chapter Rihanna. Oprah’s LifeclassOprah’s LifeclassOprah’s Next Chapter Rihanna. A&E 19 118 265Beyond Scared StraightStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsShipping War sShipping Wars HALL 20 185 312“Mistletoe Over Manhattan” (2011, Drama) Tricia Helfer, Greg Bryk. “Love at the Thanksgiving Day Parade” (2012) Autumn Reeser. Premiere. “A Holiday Engagement” (2011) Jordan Bridges, Bonnie Somerville. FX 22 136 248(5:00)“Armageddon” (1998) Bruce Willis, Billy Bob Thornton, Liv Tyler.“Salt” (2010, Action) Angelina Jolie, Liev Schreiber, Chiwetel Ejiofor.“Salt” (2010, Action) Angelina Jolie, Liev Schreiber, Chiwetel Ejiofor. CNN 24 200 202CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN PresentsPiers Morgan TonightCNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents TNT 25 138 245(5:45)“Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines” (2003) Premiere. “Clash of the Titans” (2010) Sam Worthington, Liam Neeson. (DVS) (:15)“Clash of the Titans” (2010, Fantasy) Sam Worthington. (DVS) NIK 26 170 299VictoriousVictoriousVictoriousiCarlySee Dad Run (N)“Legally Blonde” (2001, Comedy) Reese Witherspoon, Luke Wilson. The NannyFriends(:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241(5:30)“Kick-Ass” (2010, Action) Aaron Johnson, Christopher Mintz-Plasse.“The Punisher” (2004) Thomas Jane. An FBI agent seeks revenge for the murder of his family.“The Punisher” (2004) Thomas Jane, John Travolta. MY-TV 29 32 -Car 54, Where...Car 54, Where...M*A*S*HM*A*S*HColumbo “Troubled Waters” On a cruise, auto exec kills lover. Thriller A man reanimates corpses. The Twilight ZoneThe Twilight Zone DISN 31 172 290Austin & AllyShake It Up!Dog With a BlogGood Luck CharlieDog With a BlogAustin & Ally (N) Shake It Up! (N) JessieGood Luck CharlieShake It Up!Austin & AllyPhineas and Ferb LIFE 32 108 252(5:00) “Fatal Honeymoon” (2012) “The Eleventh Victim” (2012, Suspense) Jennie Garth, Colin Cunningham. “Left to Die” (2012) Rachael Leigh Cook, Barbara Hershey. Premiere. (:01) “The Eleventh Victim” (2012) USA 33 105 242Law & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims Unit“Casino Royale” (2006) BET 34 124 329(4:30) “Diary of a Mad Black Woman”Black Girls Rock 2012Family FirstFamily FirstFamily FirstFamily FirstDon’t Sleep!Don’t Sleep! ESPN 35 140 206h NASCAR RacingSportsCenter (N) (Live) BCS Countdownf MLS Soccer Conference Semi nal, Game 1: Teams TBA. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209 2012 World Series of Poker 2012 World Series of Poker 2012 World Series of Poker Final Table. From Las Vegas. NASCAR Now (N) 30 for 30 SUNSP 37 -Fishing the FlatsSport FishingSportsman’s Adv. College Football Clemson at Florida State. TaylorMade: Outside the RopesFitness Truth DISCV 38 182 278MythBusters “Wheel of Mythfortune” MythBusters “Square Wheels” MythBusters Viewer requested myths. Battle eld Cell (N) America’s Doomsday Plan (N) MythBusters Viewer requested myths. TBS 39 139 247“Yes Man” (2008, Comedy) Jim Carrey, Zooey Deschanel. “The Hangover” (2009, Comedy) Bradley Cooper, Ed Helms. (DVS) (:15)“Yes Man” (2008, Comedy) Jim Carrey, Zooey Deschanel. HLN 40 202 204Murder by the BookDominick Dunne: Power, PrivilegeDominick Dunne: Power, PrivilegeMurder by the BookMurder by the BookDominick Dunne: Power, Privilege FNC 41 205 360FOX News Sunday With Chris WallaceFOX Report (N) America’s Election Headquarters (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenAmerica’s Election Headquarters E! 45 114 236Keeping Up With the KardashiansMarried to JonasIce Loves Coco“Mr. Deeds” (2002, Comedy) Adam Sandler, Winona Ryder, Peter Gallagher. Ice Loves Coco (N) Nicki Minaj: My Chelsea LatelyThe Soup TRAVEL 46 196 277Anthony Bourdain: No ReservationsAnthony Bourdain: No ReservationsExtreme Houseboats (N) Extreme Houseboats (N) Extreme Houseboats (N) I Bet My Life (N) People Like HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lMillion Dollar RoomsHome Strange HomeProperty Brothers “Morgan & Kristin” House Hunters Renovation (N) House Hunters Renovation TLC 48 183 280Island MediumIsland MediumIsland MediumIsland MediumLong Island Medium: Behind the ReadIsland MediumIsland MediumBreaking Amish “Party Time” (N) Island MediumIsland Medium HIST 49 120 269American Pickers “Mike’s Holy Grail” American PickersPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsOutback Hunters “Revenge” (N) (:02) American Pickers ANPL 50 184 282Finding Bigfoot: Further EvidenceCall-WildmanCall-WildmanCall-WildmanCall-WildmanFinding Bigfoot: Further EvidenceFinding Bigfoot: Further Evidence (N) Finding Bigfoot: Further Evidence FOOD 51 110 231Diners, Drive$24 in 24Halloween Wars “Zombie Wedding” Cupcake Wars (N) The Next Iron Chef “Resourcefulness” The Next Iron Chef “Resourcefulness” TBN 52 260 372T.D. JakesJoyce MeyerLeading the WayThe Blessed LifeJoel OsteenKerry ShookBelieverVoiceCre o DollarSt. Paul of Tarsus FSN-FL 56 -d NBA Basketball Phoenix Suns at Orlando Magic. From Amway Center in Orlando, Fla. Magic Live! (Live) UFC Unleashed (N) Being: Liverpool (N) World Poker Tour: Season 10 SYFY 58 122 244(5:00) “Sand Sharks” (2011) “Swamp Shark” (2011, Suspense) “2 Headed Shark Attack” (2012) Carmen Electra, Charlie O’Connell. A monster shark sinks an educational ship. “Shark Zone” (2003) Dean Cochran. AMC 60 130 254(5:30)“Constantine” (2005, Fantasy) Keanu Reeves, Rachel Weisz. The Walking Dead “Walk With Me” The Walking Dead “Killer Within” (N) (:01) The Walking Dead “Killer Within” Talking Dead (N) Comic Book Men COM 62 107 249(5:30)“Harold & Kumar Escape From Guantanamo Bay” (2008) Kal Penn. (7:46)“Hot Tub Time Machine” (2010) John Cusack, Rob Corddry. (:02) Tosh.0(:33) Brickleberry(:03) South Park(:33) Key & Peele CMT 63 166 327RebaRebaRebaRebaKitchen Nightmares “Olde Stone Mill” Kitchen Nightmares “J. Willy’s” Kitchen Nightmares Lack of clientele. Kitchen Nightmares “Giuseppe’s” NGWILD 108 190 283The Pack “Wild Dogs” Prehistoric Predators “Sabertooth” Waking the Baby Mammoth Prehistoric Predators “Terror Bird” Waking the Baby Mammoth NGC 109 186 276Inside 9/11: Zero Hour Terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. “SEAL Team Six: The Raid on Osama bin Laden” (2012) Cam Gigandet. Doomsday Preppers (N) “SEAL Team Six: Osama bin Laden” SCIENCE 110 193 284Wonders of the UniverseHow the Universe WorksHow the Universe WorksHow the Universe WorksHow the Universe WorksHow the Universe Works ID 111 192 285Homicide Hunter: Lt. Joe KendaFinal Witness “Graveyard Love” 48 Hours on ID “Grave Injustice” (N) Sins & Secrets “Boone” (N) Unusual Suspects48 Hours on ID “Grave Injustice” HBO 302 300 501(5:00)“We Bought a Zoo” (2011) (:10)“The Hangover Part II” (2011, Comedy) Bradley Cooper. ‘R’ Boardwalk Empire “The Pony” (N) Treme “Promised Land” (N) (:15) Boardwalk Empire “The Pony” MAX 320 310 515(5:00)Paul(:45) “Transit” (2012) Jim Caviezel. ‘R’ (:15)“Horrible Bosses” (2011, Comedy) Jason Bateman. ‘NR’ “This Means War” (2012) Reese Witherspoon. ‘PG-13’ (:40) Voyeur’s Web SHOW 340 318 545Larry Wilmore’s Race Religion & SexDexter “Swim Deep” Homeland “Q&A” Dexter “Do the Wrong Thing” (N) Homeland “A Gettysburg Address” (N) Dexter “Do the Wrong Thing” MONDAY EVENING NOVEMBER 5, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Dancing With the Stars: All-Stars (N) (Live) (:01) Castle “The Final Frontier” (N) News at 11(:35) Nightline (N) 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Election SpecialBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) The Insider 5-PBS 5 -JournalNightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Antiques Roadshow (N) Market Warriors (N) (Part 2 of 2) Independent Lens “Solar Mamas” (N) BBC World NewsTavis Smiley (N) 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJaguars AccessTwo and Half MenHow I Met/MotherPartners (N) 2 Broke Girls (N) Mike & Molly (N) Hawaii Five-0 “Mohai” (N) Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneTMZ (N) 90210 “Hate 2 Love” (N) Gossip Girl “Monstrous Ball” (N) Vote America 2012Access HollywoodThe Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family GuyElection 2012The SimpsonsBones “The Method in the Madness” The Mob Doctor “Legacy” (N) NewsAction News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsFirst Coast NewsJeopardy! (N) The Voice “The Live Playoffs, Part 1” The top 20 hopefuls perform. (N) (:01) Revolution (N) NewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(5:00) Public Affairs Politics & Public Policy Today WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosWGN News at Nine (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304M*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Breaking Down the BarsBreaking Down the BarsDateline on OWNDateline on OWNDateline on OWN “As Darkness Fell” Dateline on OWN A&E 19 118 265Beyond Scared StraightBeyond Scared StraightBeyond Scared Straight “Chowchilla” Beyond Scared StraightBeyond Scared Straight(:01) Beyond Scared Straight HALL 20 185 312Little House on the PrairieLittle House on the PrairieNUMB3RS “Judgment Call” NUMB3RS “In Plain Sight” FrasierFrasierFrasierFrasier FX 22 136 248Two and Half MenTwo and Half MenTwo and Half MenTwo and Half Men“The Incredible Hulk” (2008) Edward Norton, Liv Tyler. Bruce Banner faces an enemy known as The Abomination.“The Incredible Hulk” (2008) CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245The Mentalist “Paint It Red” The Mentalist “Crimson Casanova” The Mentalist “Redemption” The Mentalist “The Scarlet Letter” The Mentalist “Red Badge” CSI: NY “Murder Sings the Blues” NIK 26 170 299SpongeBob SquarePantsDora the Explorer (N) (DVS) SpongeBobSee Dad RunFull HouseFull HouseThe NannyThe NannyFriends(:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241(5:00)“Star Wars: Episode III -Revenge of the Sith” (2005)“Star Wars: Episode III -Revenge of the Sith” (2005, Science Fiction) Ewan McGregor, Natalie Portman, Hayden Christensen. Tattoo Nightmares MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*HM*A*S*HLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitSeinfeldFrasierThe Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Phineas and FerbGood Luck CharlieWizards-PlaceJessieGood Luck CharlieDog With a BlogAustin & AllyShake It Up!A.N.T. FarmPhineas and FerbGood Luck CharlieAustin & Ally LIFE 32 108 252“Rumor Has It...” (2005, Comedy) Jennifer Aniston, Kevin Costner. “Two Weeks Notice” (2002) Sandra Bullock, Hugh Grant, Alicia Witt. “Miss Congeniality 2: Armed and Fabulous” (2005) Sandra Bullock. USA 33 105 242NCIS A survivalist is wanted. NCIS: Los Angeles “Standoff” WWE Monday Night RAW (N) (:05) CSI: Crime Scene Investigation BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Top 10 Countdown” (N) New York Undercover “Internal Affairs” New York Undercover “Deep Cover” New York UndercoverDon’t Sleep!The Game ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) Monday Night Countdown (N) (Live) e NFL Football Philadelphia Eagles at New Orleans Saints. From the Mercedes-Benz Superdome in New Orleans. SportsCenter (N) ESPN2 36 144 209NFL32 (N) SportsCenter (N) E:60 30 for 30 2012 World Series of Poker 2012 World Series of PokerSportsCenter (N) NASCAR Now (N) SUNSP 37 -Sport FishingInside the Heat3 Wide LifeWildcatd College Basketball Transylvania at Kentucky. Exhibition game. (N) how to Do oridaInside the HeatFishing the Flats DISCV 38 182 278I (Almost) Got Away With ItAmerican ChopperAmerican ChopperAmerican Chopper (N) Jesse James: Outlaw Garage (N) American Chopper TBS 39 139 247King of QueensKing of QueensSeinfeldSeinfeldFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyConan (Season Premiere) (N) HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) Dr. Drew on Call (N) Nancy GraceShowbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236Fashion PoliceE! News (N) Studio E! (N) Nicki Minaj: My Married to JonasMarried to JonasIce Loves CocoIce Loves CocoChelsea Lately (N) E! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Anthony Bourdain: No ReservationsAnthony Bourdain: No ReservationsAnthony Bourdain: No ReservationsAnthony Bourdain: No ReservationsDangerous Grounds “Haiti” Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations HGTV 47 112 229My First PlaceMy First PlaceLove It or List It “Mark & Alana” Love It or List It “Cira Bagnato” Love It or List It (N) House HuntersHunters Int’lLove It or List It “The Roedger Family” TLC 48 183 280Breaking AmishBreaking Amish “Good vs. Evil” Extreme Chea.Extreme Chea.Extreme Chea.Extreme Chea.Extreme Chea.Extreme Chea.Extreme Chea.Extreme Chea. HIST 49 120 269Pawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsAmerican Pickers “Sturgis or Bust” (N) Pawn Stars (N) (:31) Pawn Stars(:02) Invention USA(:32) Pawn Stars ANPL 50 184 282North Woods Law: On the HuntRattlesnake RepublicFinding Bigfoot: Further EvidenceFinding Bigfoot: Further EvidenceFinding Bigfoot: Further EvidenceFinding Bigfoot: Further Evidence FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, Drive$24 in 24Mystery DinersBlind Dinner Party TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the LordMax LucadoThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesLiving EdgeKingdom Conn.Jesse DuplantisPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -World Poker Tour: Season 10 College Football Oregon at USC. World Poker Tour: Season 10Being: Liverpool SYFY 58 122 244(5:30)“The Village” (2004) Bryce Dallas Howard, Joaquin Phoenix. “Shutter Island” (2010) Leonardo DiCaprio, Mark Ruffalo. A 1950s lawman hunts an escaped murderess. “Shutter Island” (2010) AMC 60 130 254“Rambo: First Blood Part II” (1985) Sylvester Stallone, Richard Crenna. “Four Brothers” (2005, Crime Drama) Mark Wahlberg, Tyrese Gibson, Andr Benjamin. “Crimson Tide” (1995) Denzel Washington. COM 62 107 249It’s Always Sunny(:29) Tosh.0The Colbert ReportDaily Show(7:59) FuturamaFuturamaSouth ParkSouth ParkBrickleberrySouth ParkDaily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327RebaRebaRebaRebaRebaRebaDallas Cowboys CheerleadersDallas Cowboys CheerleadersDallas Cowboys Cheerleaders NGWILD 108 190 283Dog WhispererWild Justice Nocturnal poachers. Snakes That FlyThe Whale That ExplodedSquid vs. WhaleSnakes That Fly NGC 109 186 276Cocaine Wars “Drug Speedboats” Inside the Green BeretsInside the Afghanistan War Trajectory of the war in Afghanistan. (N) To Catch a Smuggler (N) Inside the Afghanistan War SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeUnlocking the UniverseUnlocking the UniverseThe Cell (N) Unlocking the UniverseUnlocking the Universe ID 111 192 28548 Hours on IDDateline on IDBlood, Lies & AlibisBlood, Lies & Alibis “The Laser Man” Final Witness “What the Boy Saw” (N) Blood, Lies & Alibis HBO 302 300 501(5:30)“Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban” (2004) Daniel Radcliffe. Real Time With Bill MaherWitness (N) “Game Change” (2012, Docudrama) Julianne Moore, Ed Harris. Final Destination 5 MAX 320 310 515(5:50)“Something Borrowed” (2011) Ginnifer Goodwin. (:45)“Bridesmaids” (2011, Comedy) Kristen Wiig, Maya Rudolph, Rose Byrne. ‘NR’ “The Day After Tomorrow” (2004, Action) Dennis Quaid. ‘PG-13’ SHOW 340 318 545(5:45)“The Twilight Saga: Eclipse” (2010) Kristen Stewart. ‘PG-13’ Dexter “Do the Wrong Thing” Homeland “A Gettysburg Address” Dexter “Do the Wrong Thing” Homeland “A Gettysburg Address” WEEKDAY AFTERNOON Comcast Dish DirecTV 12 PM12:301 PM1:302 PM2:303 PM3:304 PM4:305 PM5:30 3-ABC 3 -NewsBe a MillionaireThe ChewGeneral HospitalMauryDr. PhilBe a MillionaireNews 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsVaried Programs The Jeff Probst ShowSteve HarveyThe Dr. Oz ShowChann 4 NewsChann 4 News 5-PBS 5 -WordWorldBarney & FriendsCaillouDaniel TigerSuper Why!Dinosaur TrainCat in the HatCurious GeorgeWild KrattsElectric Comp.WUFT NewsWorld News 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxThe Young and the RestlessBold/BeautifulThe TalkLet’s Make a DealJudge Joe BrownJudge JudyAction News JaxAction News Jax 9-CW 9 17 17Trisha GoddardLaw & Order: Criminal IntentJudge MathisThe Bill Cunningham ShowMauryThe People’s Court 10-FOX 10 30 30Jerry SpringerThe Jeremy Kyle ShowJudge Joe BrownWe the PeopleThe DoctorsDr. PhilFamily FeudFamily Feud 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsBe a MillionaireDays of our LivesFirst Coast LivingKatie The Ellen DeGeneres ShowNewsNews CSPAN 14 210 350(10:00) Public AffairsPublic AffairsVaried Programs Public Affairs WGN-A 16 239 307In the Heat of the NightWGN Midday NewsWalker, Texas RangerWalker, Texas RangerWalker, Texas RangerLaw & Order: Criminal Intent TVLAND 17 106 304Andy Grif th Show(:38) Gunsmoke (1:49) GunsmokeBonanzaBonanzaBonanza OWN 18 189 279Dr. PhilDr. PhilVaried Programs A&E 19 118 265CSI: MiamiVaried ProgramsCriminal MindsVaried ProgramsCriminal MindsVaried ProgramsThe First 48Varied ProgramsThe First 48Varied ProgramsThe First 48Varied Programs HALL 20 185 312Marie Home & FamilyVaried Programs The WaltonsVaried ProgramsThe WaltonsThe Waltons FX 22 136 248(10:30) MovieMovieVaried Programs How I Met/MotherHow I Met/Mother CNN 24 200 202CNN Newsroom CNN Newsroom The Situation Room TNT 25 138 245Varied Programs NIK 26 170 299Max & RubyTeam UmizoomiDora the ExplorerGo, Diego, Go!SpongeBobSpongeBobOdd ParentsOdd ParentsOdd ParentsSpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBob SPIKE 28 168 241CSI: Crime SceneVaried ProgramsCSI: Crime SceneVaried ProgramsCSI: Crime SceneVaried Programs MY-TV 29 32 -Hawaii Five-0GunsmokeBonanzaThe Big ValleyThe Wild, Wild WestEmergency! DISN 31 172 290Mickey MouseLittle EinsteinsVaried ProgramsGaspard & LisaPhineas and FerbMovieVaried ProgramsGood Luck CharlieVaried Programs LIFE 32 108 252Old ChristineOld ChristineGrey’s AnatomyGrey’s AnatomyGrey’s AnatomyHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWife Swap USA 33 105 242Varied Programs NCIS NCIS NCIS BET 34 124 329The ParkersThe ParkersMy Wife and KidsMy Wife and KidsJamie Foxx ShowJamie Foxx ShowThe ParkersMovie ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenterSportsCenterSportsCenterVaried ProgramsColl. Football LiveNFL LiveAround the HornInterruption ESPN2 36 144 209First Take Varied Programs Numbers Never LieDan Le BatardSportsNation SUNSP 37 -Varied Programs DISCV 38 182 278Varied Programs TBS 39 139 247Fresh PrinceAmerican DadAmerican DadLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondSeinfeldFriendsFriendsFriendsFriends HLN 40 202 204News Now Making It in AmericaEvening Express FNC 41 205 360America’s Election HeadquartersAmerica’s Election Headquarters Studio B With Shepard SmithYour World With Neil CavutoThe Five E! 45 114 236E! NewsSex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CityVaried Programs The E! True Hollywood Story TRAVEL 46 196 277Varied Programs Anthony Bourdain: No ReservationsBizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. FoodMan v. FoodAnthony Bourdain: No Reservations HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lVaried Programs TLC 48 183 280What Not to WearA Baby StoryA Baby StoryVaried Programs HIST 49 120 269Varied Programs ANPL 50 184 282Animal Cops PhoenixAnimal Cops PhoenixAnimal Cops PhoenixAnimal Cops PhoenixThe HauntedMonsters Inside Me FOOD 51 110 231Best DishesBarefoot ContessaVaried Programs10 Dollar DinnersSecrets/Restaurant30-Minute MealsGiada at HomeGiada at HomeBarefoot ContessaBarefoot ContessaBest DishesPaula’s Cooking TBN 52 260 372Varied ProgramsBehind the ScenesVaried ProgramsJames RobisonTodayThe 700 ClubJohn Hagee TodayVaried ProgramsPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -NBA BasketballVaried Programs Boat RacingVaried Programs SYFY 58 122 244MovieVaried Programs AMC 60 130 254(9:00) MovieVaried Programs COM 62 107 249Varied Programs MovieVaried Programs Comedy Central(:26) Futurama(4:57) FuturamaIt’s Always Sunny CMT 63 166 327Varied Programs Yes, DearYes, DearYes, DearYes, DearRoseanneRoseanneRoseanneRoseanne NGWILD 108 190 283Dog WhispererVaried Programs NGC 109 186 276Alaska State TroopersBorder WarsTabooBorder WarsVaried Programs SCIENCE 110 193 284Varied Programs Factory MadeFactory MadeMythBustersThey Do It?They Do It? ID 111 192 285Dateline on IDVaried Programs On the Case With Paula Zahn HBO 302 300 501MovieVaried Programs (:15) MovieVaried ProgramsMovieVaried Programs MAX 320 310 515(11:00) MovieVaried Programs SHOW 340 318 545(10:45) MovieVaried Programs MovieVaried Programs

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DEAR ABBY: I have a friend, “Dick,” who wears veteran hats -“Vietnam Vet,” “Proud to Be a Marine,” etc. -that imply he was in the service. The problem is, Dick was never in any branch of the mili-tary at any time. Dick claims he’s “honoring” them by wearing the hats. But when he goes into a restaurant or other place that offers military discounts, he always inquires about them. And he has never refused the offer of one or admitted he wears the slogans only to honor others and was never actually in the ser-vice himself. I come in contact with REAL military service people who deserve to wear these hats. I asked a couple of them about what to do with Dick, but you can’t print their responses. Abby, what’s your take? -VALUES HONESTY IN OHIO DEAR VALUES HONESTY: The fact that I can’t print the reaction of legitimate veterans to what Dick is doing indicates how offensive and wrong it is. It appears your friend is a small-time, chiseling con man who takes advantage of people’s patriotism. Why you would call someone like this a “friend” is puz-zling, because you seem to have a well-developed sense of right and wrong. A word of advice: Sooner or later, people like Dick are discovered. When that happens, it would be bet-ter if you weren’t around, because people are judged by the company they keep. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: I am dating a wonderful man, “Andrew,” who has two sons, ages 10 and 12. Both of them have horrible table manners. Eating with them is like watching pigs at a trough. I have discussed this with Andrew, who agrees but has done noth-ing to correct them. I don’t know how to instill proper eating man-ners in the boys without coming across as though I’m better than they are. Do you have any suggestions? -THE NAPKIN GOES ON THE LAP DEAR NAPKIN: You can’t blame the boys for not knowing something they were never taught. However, lecturing them at this point would be coun-terproductive and could cause a rift between you and your boyfriend. Enlist Andrew’s help and discuss with his sons the difference between “casual” table manners and those that are expected when people dine in public or at a friend’s house. You and Andrew should also “mention” how good the food is at some of the local restaurants. This will give the boys an incentive when you both offer to take them IF they learn what’s expected in public. Tell them you’re willing to teach them, explain the rules, model the behavior and help them practice. Then reward them by tak-ing them to the restaurants and praising them if they do well. DEAR ABBY HOROSCOPES ARIES (March 21-April 19): Travel, take on new projects, update your image and interact with others. The more you do, the more you will gain. There are opportunities waiting for you to discover and with a little enthusi-asm and positive motiva-tion, you will find happi-ness and satisfaction. ++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You’ve got plenty going for you, but you have to get past negativ-ity that you harbor due to partnerships or the company you are keeping. ++++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): If you feel inspired, perfect your ideas until you feel you can introduce what you’ve got to some-one who may be interested in what you have to offer. +++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Do what you can to help someone you care about. Your assistance will be appreciated and reward-ed. Don’t let an unpredict-able individual ruin your plans. Force is not the way to get what you want, nor is it something you should give in to. +++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Bide your time. If you don’t get support from the people you deal with regu-larly, go outside your com-munity to those who think like you do. +++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): You can master your skills and utilize them to accomplish something that will impress your friends or the community in which you live. Let your creativity flourish and your percep-tive intuition guide you. ++++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Emotional spending will be your downfall. Put your money into learn-ing or developing greater interest in your plans and your future. Idle chatter and talk about what you want to do will get you nowhere. Take action. ++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Discipline will pay off. Keep your emotions intact, and strive to reach the goals you set regarding your personal life and the way you live. +++++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Change is head-ing your way, but you must refrain from jumping into something that has the propensity to be risky. It’s what you’ve done in the past and the connections you have made that will help you get ahead now. +++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): You will get con-structive feedback if you ask questions and share your findings. It’s what you share with others that will give you the expertise and confidence required to fin-ish what you start. Don’t let an unexpected change ruin your plans. +++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): You’ll be pulled in different directions. Look at what’s going on around you and size up your personal situation and how you can benefit from what you encounter. Protect your heart, your belongings and your repu-tation. +++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): You can focus on the positive or get sucked into the negative. Back away from unpredictable people who are disagreeable. It’s in your best interest to protect what you have and to spend time with those sympathetic to your needs. +++++ Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com THE LAST WORD Eugenia Word SUNDAY CROSSWORD Across 1 Auckland native5 Surmounting9 Dude ranch handle13 Sign of sensitivity?19 Setting for the 2012 ILOP$UJR 7LWOHSDUWQHURIWKH 6ZDQLQD
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6D LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2012 6DLIFE