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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01924

Material Information

Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 11-02-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01948

Related Items

Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01924

Material Information

Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 11-02-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01948

Related Items

Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

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By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com The crime rate in Columbia County fell more than 7 percent in the first half of the year, compared to the same period in 2011, state officials said Thursday. The information was released in the Florida Department of Law Enforcements 2012 SemiAnnual Uniform Crime Report, which details the crime rate from Jan. 1 June 30. The Columbia County crime rate is down 7.4 percent. In the unincor porated areas of the county the crime rate is down 10.4 percent, while crime in the City of Lake City is down 3.8 percent. The states crime rate is down an estimated 3.8 percent. Opinion ............... 4A People ................. 2A Obituaries ............. 5A Advice & Comics ....... 6-7B Puzzles ............... 6-7B TODAY IN PEOPLE Failing the test of live TV. COMING SUNDAY Local news roundup. 79 50 Mostly sunny WEATHER, 2A Lake City ReporterFRIDAY & SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2 & 3, 2012 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | 75LAKECITYREPORTER COM WEEKEND EDITION CALL US: (386) 752-1293 SUBSCRIBE TO THE REPORTER: Voice: 755-5445 Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 138, No 198 1A Haunted house Lake City Shrine Clubs annual haunted house will remain open through Saturday from 6 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. each night. Admission is $5. All proceeds benifit the Shrine Club and are not tax deductible. Heavenly Cooking The eighth annu al Heavenly Cooking Community Day will be held Saturday at the Richardson Community Center, 255 Coach Anders Lane. The event provides meals to sick and shut-in commu nity members in memory of Levi Sheppard Sr. There will be a variety of food available and activities for seniors and children at the center. For information, call 365-0013. Family Gaming Day Columbia County Public Library will have a Family Gaming Day from 2 to 4:30 p.m. Saturday. There will be video games, board games, snacks and an afternoon of family fun. For more infor mation, call (386) 758-2101. The library is at 308 NW Columbia Ave. Cancer benefit A Zumbathon to ben efit Suwannee River Breast Cancer Awareness Inc. will be held from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Saturday at Sepulveda ATA, behind Winn Dixie. Admission is $10 in advance or $15 at the door. Dont for get to wear pink. Call 4667747 for information. Yard sale Wellborn Community Associations Fall Yard Sale and Blueberry Breakfast will be held Saturday. Vendor spaces are available for $5. Start getting your unused goodies together to make extra Christmas money. The flea market in Lake City is closed that day, so come on out. The Bloodmobile will be there, too. Call (386) 984-5749 if more information. Genealogy class A free genealogy work shop sponsored by the United Daughters of the Confederacy Olustee Chapter will be held at the downtown Lake City Library on Sunday, Nov. 4 from 2-4 p.m. Please RSVP to Linda Williams 352-2158776 or ilovemyancestors@ windstream.net. Sweet Pea Pageant The Sweet Pea Beauty Pageant will be Nov. 4 at 2 p.m. at the Lake City Mall. Boys to age 35 months. Girls to age 15 years. Registration 1-2 p.m. Pill mill doc gets 2 years Crime rate drops by 7% From staff reports Former Lake City physician Yong Am Park, 68, has been sen tenced to two years in prison for Medicaid fraud and prescription drug-related charges. The state attorney generals Medicaid Fraud Control Unit part nered with the Columbia County Sheriffs Office, the Lake City Police Department and the Florida Department of Law Enforcement to investigate the Lake City pill mill doctor, the last defendant sentenced in a case involving now-defunct Trinity Community Hospital in Jasper. Park was convicted of three counts of Medicaid fraud, five counts of prescrip tion fraud, two counts of unau thorized posses sion of a prescription form, one count of scheme to defraud, and one count of selling a controlled substance. Investigators conducted a series of undercover visits and were pre scribed controlled substances, Hunter CRIME continued on 3A Its Fair time JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City Reporter William Gray wipes down a roller coaster car Thursday on the Wacky Worm ride in preparation for the Columbia County Fair, which opens tonight at 5 p.m. The fair continues through Saturday, Nov. 10. Gilmore Park Septic tank checks are out By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com Columbia County officials will not participate in a state program that requires local septic tanks be checked once every five years. Thursday night county officials unanimously voted to opt out of a state law that deals with septic tank evaluations. The opt-out provision is part of House Bill 1263, which covers a variety of public health procedures and requirements. In early 2012 the Florida Legislature passed the law, which allows counties to exempt their residents from existing require ments that they have their septic tanks inspected every five years. The intent is admirable and I think the Board (of Columbia County Commissioners) indicated that, but the problem is in the way the law is enforced, said Dale Williams, county manager. The law only applies to a select few people. The law itself exempted a number of people. The law was not going to reach everyone like you may like, only a few people and that was an issue and a concern. Williams said the law also con tained no provision for low income residents who could face financial hardships in by having their septic systems check under the guide lines of the program. Commissioner Rusty DePratter noted that 13 counties out of 19 Lt. Governor visits TONY BRITT/ Lake City Reporter Lieutenant Governor Jennifer Carroll listens to Lewis Covin of Macclenny, left, discuss proposed amendments to Floridas constitution Thursday in Lake City. Carroll, along with Commissioner of Agriculture Adam Putnam, attended a rally at the headquarters of the Republican Party of Columbia County. County drops out of NFBA Commission votes 5-0 to withdraw. By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com Allegations of waste, mis appropriation and potential liability associated with the North Florida Broadband Authority proved to be too much for county commis sioners, who voted unani mously Thursday to with draw from the NFBA. The move came after Commissioner Stephen Bailey read a resolution he authored urging fellow commis sioners to vote to withdraw. The reso lution, which cited waste, misappropriation and potential liability, did not offer specific evidence to back the claims, nor did it include a date when it would take effect. The boards decision to leave the NFBA comes less than a month after NFBA officials requested space on county communication towers as part of in-kind services pledged by the county, and county officials requested information from the agency before making its decision. I was not satisfied with any of the answers I received, Bailey said. Weve yet to get anything back from NFBA about the information we requested ... I do not feel its in the best interest of Columbia County or the citizens of Columbia County to be in the NFBA. County officials request Time to fall back Daylight Saving Time ends Sunday at 2 a.m. Be sure to set your clocks back an hour before going to bed Saturday. DOCTOR continued on 3A County opts out of state requirement for inspections. NFBA continued on 5A SEPTIC continued on 5A Bailey

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I pray that the eyes of your heart may be enlightened in order that you may know the hope to which he has called you, the riches of his glorious inheritance in his holy people. Ephesians 1:18 CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Thought for Today Celebrity Birthdays Rhythm-and-blues singer Earl Speedo Carroll (The Cadillacs; The Coasters) is 75. Singer Jay Black (Jay and the Americans) is 74. AROUND FLORIDA DUI death gets man 10 years MIAMI A judge ordered a 72-year-old Miami man to serve 10 years in prison for a 2009 hit-and-run crash that killed a businessman. The Miami Herald reported Charles Bible will also serve 10 years of pro bation in the death of 36year-old Rudy Garmendia. Garmendias family agreed to Wednesdays plea deal to spare his family of the gruesome details of his death. Authorities said Garmendia was changing a flat tire on the Dolphin Expressway when he was hit by Bibles truck. Bible fled after striking Garmendia but the Florida Highway Patrol found his truck within an hour. The Herald reported Bible was shaking and struggling to speak in court as he apologized to the family. Outspoken judge in ethics probe TALLAHASSEE A state investigative panel is questioning the impartial ity of an outspoken Palm Beach County judge who frequently criticizes what he sees as racial bias in state laws, prosecutors and law enforcement. The Judicial Qualifications Commission panel filed formal charges with the Florida Supreme Court on Wednesday, alleging that Judge Barry M. Cohen has abused his position by using it as a bully pulpit and under mined his impartiality through his comments. The panel cited Cohens comments from the bench, in written orders and at public forums. Cohen has been accused of saying, among other things, that minorities are disproportionally arrested and jailed for drug traf ficking, law enforcement officers may be motivated by the race or status of suspects and blacks do not feel free to exercise their constitutional rights in the county. The judges lawyers linked the allegations against Cohen to recent attacks on the judiciary they said are threatening its independence. Judge Cohen will vig orously defend himself against allegations which infringe on the ability of judges to perform their duties in an independent manner, wrote attorneys Scott Richardson and Donnie Murrell. Cohen can contest the allegations in writing and through a hearing. The commission then can clear him or recommend a penalty ranging from a reprimand to removal from office to the Supreme Court, which has final authority. 4 stabbed leaving Halloween party MIAMI Police said four people were stabbed while leaving a Halloween party in Miamis Coconut Grove neighborhood. Miami police said four men were taken to a Jackson Memorial Hospital early Thursday morning. Miami television station WPLG reported one man was in extremely critical condition, two were in stable condition and the fourth suffered minor injuries. According to WPLG, wit nesses helped police track down the suspect, who was in custody Thursday morning. Miami police spokes woman Kenia Reyes said they dont know what caused the argument that led to the stabbing. Guard trainee arrested in death PENSACOLA A Panhandle man training to become a corrections officer has been arrested in the 2007 murder of an Arizona woman. The U.S. Marshals Service said 32-year-old Jack Bates Rider III was arrested Tuesday night while leaving a training class to become a correc tions officer. Rider is in the Escambia County Jail on a warrant of being a fugitive from justice. He faces charges in the strangulation death of Krystal Wilson in Yavapai County, Ariz. Jail officials said Rider does not yet have an attor ney listed in their records. State Chamber has new chairman TALLAHASSEE Orlando hospital execu tive Lars Houmann is the Florida Chamber of Commerces new chair man. The business group announced Houmanns election on Wednesday as board chairman for 201213. He succeeded Anthony Connelly, senior vice presi dent of Walt Disney Parks & Resorts, on Thursday, and will serve a one-year term. Houmann is president and chief executive officer of Florida Hospital and the Florida Division of Adventist Health System, which has 23 hospitals in the state. He also currently serves as board chairman of the Metro Orlando Economic Development Commission and is a board member with the Florida Hospital Association. Spears, Odom face test of live TV LOS ANGELES B ritney Spears was coolly composed on the first live episode of The X Factor. The same cant be said for new host Khloe Kardashian Odom and her microphone. Odom, adding to her reality TV credentials, was paired with Mario Lopez to emcee X Factor as the sing ing contest shifted Wednesday from taped to live broad casts. Lopez, host of Extra, performed like the pro he is. Odom came across like the novice she is, shouting her lines despite the mic clutched in her hand and making awk ward small talk with contestants and judge and executive producer Simon Cowell. When Lopez teased 13-year-old singer Diamond White about having a boyfriend, the girl replied, No, were friends. My mom would kill me. Dont let your mom kill you, exclaimed Odom, drawing a con fused smile from White. At another point, Odom sounded like an oddly flirtatious schoolgirl as she introduced Cowell as Mr. Sexy. Foster earns lifetime achievement honor LOS ANGELES Jodie Foster is adding a new trophy to her collec tion a lifetime-achievement honor at the Golden Globes. The Hollywood Foreign Press Association announced Thursday that Foster will receive the groups Cecil B. DeMille Award at the 70th annual Globes cer emony on Jan. 13. Foster, 49, is a two-time Globes and Academy Award winner. She was hon ored with leading actress trophies at both ceremonies for 1991s The Silence of the Lambs and 1988s The Accused, which she won in a three-way tie at the Globes with Sigourney Weaver for Gorillas in the Mist and Shirley MacLaine for Madame Sousatzka. DeMille Award winners are cho sen by the board of directors for the foreign press group. It includes about 90 reporters who cover Hollywood for overseas outlets. Jodie is a multifaceted woman that has achieved immeasurable amounts of success and will continue to do so in her career, said HFPA president Aida Takla-OReilly. Her ambition, exuberance and grace have helped pave the way for bud ding artists in this business. Shes truly one of a kind. Foster has appeared in more than 40 films. She began her career at 3 years old, starring in a Coppertone commercial, and went on to act in such movies as Alice Doesnt Live Here Anymore, Taxi Driver, Nell, The Brave One and Carnage. She also directed the films Little Man Tate, Home for the Holidays and The Beaver. Police: Hackman knew homeless man he hit SANTA FE, N.M. Actor Gene Hackman had given clothes, money and rides to a homeless man whom he slapped this week after the man became aggressive toward the Oscar-winning actor and his wife, according to a police report detailing the incident in Santa Fe, N.M. Police say Hackman acted in self-defense and no charges have been filed. Hackman told officers he had helped Bruce Becker, 63, for several years, and Becker told a similar story. But their versions of the actual physical confrontation diverge, with Hackman saying his slapped the man once and Becker saying he was hit 10 to 12 times by the tough-guy actor. The report released by Santa Fe police said both agreed the incident began when Becker approached Hackman and his wife, Betsy, on a street early Tuesday afternoon and asked for money. Becker told police Hackman called him a worthless bum and told him to get a job. Hackman said he told Becker to get a job and tried to walk away but Becker kept following him and his wife asking for money and calling them by a derogatory name. Becker said he told Hackman, Gene, you are just another Clint Eastwood, you are nothing but an empty chair, an apparent reference to Eastwoods Republican National Convention appearance this summer. He said thats when Hackman went ballistic and began pummeling him, he told officers. Hackman, 82, told police Becker became angry when he refused to give him money, called him a name and moved in close in a threatening manner. The actor told officers thats when he slapped Becker. T hursd ay: Afternoon: 8-7-7 Evening: N/A Thurs day: Afternoon: 6-4-1-7 Evening: N/A Wednes day: 2-11-12-19-27 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAIL Y BRIEFING FRIDAY & SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2-3, 2012 HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter 2A Daily Scripture Drop the question what tomorrow may bring, and count as profit every day that Fate allows you. Horace, Roman poet (65 B.C.-8 B.C.) Associated Press Associated Press Spears Odom Hackman Foster

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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY & SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2-3, 2012 3A 3A charity A morning of special savings to benet local charities and schools Were grateful for the support our communities give us. So we give it right back. 4 hours only! 6-10am Saturday, Nov. 3 20-75 % off RA R ELY DI S COU N TE D B R A NDS Not valid by phone or on Belk.com. Excludes Everyday Values. throughout the store Saturday, November 3 Earn Double Points with your Belk Rewards or Premier Card. Triple Points with your Elite Card. Excludes all gift cards, non-merchandise & leased depts. Double Points T riple Points earn $ off Saturday, Nov. 3, 6-10am when you present your Charity Sale ticket. No cash back. Tickets for sale at the door. VERY LIMITED EXCLUSIONS *See below for details. *$5 Ticket valid on your rst regular, sale or clearance purchase, including Cosmetics & Fragrances. Excludes Brighton, Ugg and Under Armour. Not valid on phone orders or on belk.com. No cash back. Contact your store for a list of charities. All ticket proceeds benet your favorite participating local charities. All unclaimed money from the sale of Charity Sale tickets will be donated to a charity of Belks choice after 90 days. Limit one $5 discount per customer. ***100 Belk gift cards per store valued anywhere from $5 to $1000 will be given away. One lucky person per Belk Division (for a total of 3 winners) will walk away with a gift card worth $1000. No purchase necessary. One per adult customer, while supplies last. See a sales associate for details. RED DOT: **Limited exclusions in Brighton, St. John, Eileen Fisher, Lilly Pulitzer, Resort, Bridge Collection, Levis, Coach, designer handbags and junior denim. Juniors total savings are 55-75% off. Fashion Accessories, Handbags, Small Leather Goods, Hosiery, Home Store and Mens Tailored Clothing total savings are 45-65%. COUPONS NOT VALID ON RED DOT FR EE gift card up to $1,000 value to rst 100 customers in each store Saturday!*** 100 Belk gift cards per store valued anywhere from $5 to $1000 will be given away. One lucky person per Belk Division (for a total of 3 winners) will walk away with a gift card worth $1000. H ELP US MA K E T H IS YEAR EVEN BI GG ER OVER $ 10.6 MILLION raised for local charities, schools & nonprots during our Fall 2011 Charity Sale event Connect with us for special offers and promotions at Belk.com/getconnected r e d d o t 65 % & more 30 % o ff the current ticketed price** when you take an e x tra save **See below CRIME: Rate drops here Continued From Page 1A such as oxycodone and hydrocodone, outside the course of Parks profession al practice. Investigators discovered that the Florida Medicaid program was pay ing for many of these illegal prescriptions. Park has relinquished his medical license. The case was prosecuted by the Attorney Generals Office and the State Attorneys Office for the Third Judicial Circuit. Park was sentenced by Circuit Judge Leandra Johnson. DOCTOR: Sentenced Continued From Page 1A County property tax notices mailed By DEREK GILLIAM dgilliam@lakecityreporter Check your mailbox. Columbia County property tax bills for 2012 were mailed Oct. 31 and are now payable. Ronnie Brannon, Columbia County tax collector, said tax revenues this year are $51,888,781, down about three percent from last year. Payments dont have to be paid in one lump sum, but dont expect to set up a par tial payment plan in March -all taxes are due before April 1, Brannon said. All unpaid tax bills are considered delinquent on April 1, 2013, he said. At which time, a three percent statutory pen alty will be charged. Payments can be made in person, by mail or on the Columbia County tax collec tors website. Property taxes can be paid in person at the main lobby or through the drive-thru. The drivethru hours are 7:30 a.m to 5:30 p.m., and the lobby hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. There is an office in Fort White. The office is open on Wednesdays from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The average property tax bill for a single family home in Columbia County is about $1,240, Brannon said. Because of Tropical Storm Debbie, property values of damaged homes or businesses may have decreased. Property values are one component used to deter mine the amount of taxes owed to the tax ing authorities. Brannon said, so far, those bills havent been adjusted. The taxing authorities are the city, the Board of County Commissioners, the school board, the Swannee River Water Management District and the Lake Shore Hospital Authority. Elizabeth Porter, Florida state represen tative for District 11, said she has asked the governor, the Florida Senate president and the Florida Speaker of the House to call a special session of the Florida legisla ture to address this problem. Were just in the waiting stages, she said. If a special session isnt called, the regular session doesnt start until March. Property taxes are due before April 1. My recommendation is, pay the tax bill and hope for an adjustment at a later date, Brannon said. In the state of Florida, if a taxpayer pays the tax bill early they receive a discount. The earlier the bill is paid the larger the discount. The discount for paying in November is four percent, with a three percent discount for December, a two percent discount for January and a one percent discount for February. There is no discount for paying in March. Over the past three years, tax rolls have decreased a total of eight percent. The money brought in from ad valorem prop erty taxes are down 10 percent. Ad valorem is the actual taxes assesed to the property, not including Brannon said their are a couple of rea sons for the tax rolls being down. The first is the millage rates are down. The other is property values could also be down. Brannon In addition, the crimessolved rate (number of case cleared) for the county is also improved compared to 2011, but didnt improve in the city. The overall clear ance rate is 35.0 percent, up from 28.6 percent last year. In the first six months of the year there was 1,940 total arrests by local law enforcement agencies com pared with 1,593 for the first six months of 2011. The Columbia County Sheriffs Office reported 1,311 arrests; the Lake City Police Department reported 311 arrests; the Department of Environmental Protection Division of Law Enforcement reported one arrest; the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission reported 79 arrests and the Florida Highway Patrol reported 238 arrests. According to the Columbia County Sheriffs Office, in the unincorpo rated areas of the county, there was a decrease in the crime rate during the first six months of the year as well as an increase in the crimes solved rate (percent age of cases solved). The overall crime rate, based on the number of murders, forcible sex offenses, robberies, aggra vated assaults, burglaries, larceny and motor vehicle thefts, declined 10.4 per cent in the county, while the crimes-solved rate increased to 49.3 percent. The crimes solved rate in the first half of 2011 was 37.1 percent. The state average for crimes solved rate is 24.6 percent. Sheriffs office offi cials said numerous fac tors can be attributed to the decrease in the crime rate and the increase in the crimes-solved rate and said they were proud that citizens have continued to partner with the sheriffs office to not only report crime but to be proactive in the solving of crimes. I am very proud of all of the employees of the Sheriffs Office, Columbia County Sheriff Mark Hunter said in a prepared state ment. They have worked extremely hard over the last year and their commit ment to our community has had a positive result. In the city, the crime rate fell 3.8 percent, but the crimes-solved rate decreased to 16.9 percent. In the first half of 2011 the citys crimes solved rate was 17.1 percent. Police officials said one of the ongoing challenges for the LCPD is property crimes. Both vehicle and resident Police representatives urge everyone to take a moment to make sure valu ables are out of sight and doors and windows are secured. They also suggest residents utilize outside lighting during nighttime hours. Police officials indicate they have a concern over domestic violence type crimes, which decreased from 96 offenses at midyear in 2011 to 84 offens es in the first half of this year. Authorities continue to urge victims to report domestic violence and seek assistance from law enforce ment as soon as possible. This years report iden tifies areas within our com munity where our officers have made an impact part nering with the citizens of Lake City, LCPD Chief Argatha Gilmore said in a prepared statement. We are continuing to take pro active steps by working special details to identify and apprehend those per sons who are committing these types of crimes. We are encouraging our citi zens to be vigilant in report ing suspicious persons or incidents in their neigh borhoods and businesses, either by calling 911, our department at 752-4343 or using the TIP line at 719-2068. Additionally, our crime prevention officer is available to work with neighborhood and commu nity groups to educate them on how not to be a victim of a crime of opportunity. Family Fall Fest JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Lori Koon stands still as Teppi Hardin (center) and Christina Curtis (right) adjusts her wings before delivering a perfor mance in the Heaven room at Christ Central Ministries ninth annual Family Fall Fest on Wednesday.

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W hat a dreary, dispiriting elec-tion conversa-tion this has been. I hoped for serious discussions of how to pay for Social Security and Medicare. I want-ed real talk about rebuilding America’s infrastructure and improving public education. I wanted ideas for restoring the middle class and motivating young people to realize their stake in the country’s future. Mitt Romney has been a disappointing candidate. He brought a brilliant resume to the race — governor of Massachusetts, successful businessman, savior of the Salt Lake City Olympic Games. But he campaigned as someone completely different. Desperate for the Republican nomination, he made ridiculous statements during the prima-ries (such as vowing to dis-mantle the Federal Emergency Management Agency). Romney’s campaign put out outright lies, such as repeat-edly insisting Jeep plans to take Toledo, Ohio, jobs to China, forcing car-company executives to denounce Romney’s ads as untrue. Romney said nothing as GOP operatives tried to disenfran-chise minority voters, raising the specter of nonexistent wide-spread voter fraud while ram-ming through state laws aimed at making voting more difficult. Romney allied himself with buffoons such as Donald Trump, who repeatedly, without any merit, accused President Barack Obama of not having a legitimate birth certifi-cate and of being named editor of the Harvard Law Review without credentials. Romney never admonished people in his audiences who said vile things about Obama, unlike John McCain, who in 2008 firmly told a woman that Obama was no evil traitor but a fine man with whom he dis-agreed politically. Romney failed to give us one new idea on creating jobs. As for students struggling to pay soaring college tuition? Let them borrow from their parents. Romney promised to reduce the deficit but refused to say how, except that he’d get rid of Big Bird. Romney dismissed as irrelevant 47 percent of Americans who don’t make enough to pay federal income taxes, are exempted while in combat or are elderly. Yet he said it’s fair that, despite his vast wealth, he pays a far lower rate — effec-tively, 14.1 percent in 2011 — than most middle-income Americans. He let the conversation focus on such absurd distractions as contraception. It was up to Romney, the challenger, to give us reason-able, workable alternatives to Obama’s policies and phi-losophy of government. But Romney could not do that because he forfeited his back-bone to win the nomination. As a result, we have no idea what Romney really believes or what he would do as president or even why he wants to be president except that it is next on his to-do list. Why Romney shouldn’t be elected ANOHER VIEW I n this society where so often we’re around people nearly our own age, I believe it’s good to have the opportunity to have meaningful contact and commu-nication with people of all ages. Diversity is vital. I think common sense agrees with me: “Everybody has something to offer; something we can learn from.” Students in my developmental psychology class learn about the psychology of all age groups. Psychology is the study of mental processes — thinking, feeling, and behaving. It turns out that each age group, from birth to death, has a psychology of its own. Each age group goes through stages, and at each stage, life presents situations. Some situations we all face: starting school, gradu-ation, family, career, retirement and growing old. In the class, we learn about life’s mile-stones, problems, challenges, opportunities and strategies for succeeding at each stage of life and preparing for the next. An underlying theme is meet-ing challenges positively, and building strategies for achieving happy satisfying lifestyle devel-opment. Research shows that students learn more when given oppor-tunities to participate actively. They can learn lifestyle develop-ment by developing their own research plans, and carrying out face-to-face research with real people in each age group. Ninety-nine percent of the students think that research is just looking up articles in the library and putting those ideas into a term paper. My goal is to help them learn how to do basic research of their own. I introduce them to research by handing out a research work-sheet to follow. It begins with a question to be answered. They then need to choose a research method to best answer the ques-tion. Some of the basic research methods include observation, testing, surveying, case stud-ies, correlation studies and experiments. We break up into small groups of three or four students, who choose among issues or research questions, then develop basic research to find answers. They usually go one step farther: They come up with ideas to help that age group meet life’s problems and challenges and to help them advance suc-cessfully to the next stage of their lives. After each group has developed its own research plan, they report their plan to the class. I’m always pleasantly surprised with their creativity and thoughtful planning of the research. When we studied infants, one group studied results of physi-cal contact, holding babies and helping them learn satisfying attachment and bonding, and prepared a brief professional-looking brochure explaining the importance of physical contact to offer new moms. About a third of my classes are preparing to become teach-ers. One group studied the importance of time spent reading to preschoolers and dis-cussing what was read, to help kids learn reading comprehension. A group that studied teenagers studied bullying and aggres-sion, and came up with some workable solutions that could be used in our schools. Another group studied teens’ knowledge about suicide and how to rec-ognize danger signs, and devel-oped a handout for high school teachers or other teens to use. A group studying why kids hang out in malls found loneli-ness, feelings of rejection, a need to belong to a group, to meet the opposite sex or even to get in trouble of one sort or another. By studying the reasons, community programs could be explored to meet those needs in a positive way and help kids stay out of trouble. One of my favorite studies was whether pet ownership helps people live better, health-ier and longer lives. The stu-dents developed a plan to work with nursing homes who would agree to let them volunteer to bring in a dog once a week for each elderly person who expressed an interest, and get staff to help evaluate the results. That could put some smiles on some lonely patients. Some of the research plans develop into helpful community service projects. I’m always impressed with how the students go beyond what the original assignment was. It’s rewarding to see them as they develop into educated, successful, capable and respon-sible citizens. Therein lies hope for our country and for our world. Making research human W hoever triumphs in Tuesday’s presidential election — Barack Obama or Mitt Romney — the one sure winner in my estimation is New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie. The rotund, irrepressibly charismatic Republican, who often resembles a Mack truck both in size and the way he crashes through the usual roadblocks other potential national candi-dates avoid, has put the welfare of those who elected him above partisan considerations. It’s a rare act of political courage. Faced with the horrendous task of putting his state back together again after the dev-astation of superstorm Sandy, Christie came out singing the praises of his Republican Party’s chief nemesis. The president, he let the world know, has been of paramount help in the dark days of the perfect storm, the brunt of which was taken by Christie’s beloved Jersey Shore. Forget the election, Christie announced. At this stage, he couldn’t care less. The only thing that mattered to him, he said, was the quick response of the Oval Office’s current occu-pant, who, at least for the time being, has become his new best friend. Christie walked through the wreckage almost arm in arm with the nation’s chief executive, both of them offering solace to victims. Who can blame him? That remains to be seen. Christie burst on the scene as a bigger-than-life, free-wheel-ing moderate who many saw at one time as the best hope of defeating Obama but who made it clear he wasn’t interested in running, at least this time. He resisted totally the siren call of bigger things, supporting Romney and bringing humor and good will to the presidential campaign. His possible aspira-tions for a prolonged stay on Pennsylvania Avenue were put on hold, perhaps as soon as 2016, if Romney loses. There are those in GOP circles who are likely to reflect on Christie’s ebullience over Obama’s contribution to New Jersey’s welfare and find it over the top, just a little too passion-ate even for the irrepressible Christie. That will be a near certainty if Romney falls short on Tuesday. Politicians have long memories, and what might be regard-ed as an act of statesmanship by Christie could develop into its own storm for him during what would be an all-out scramble for the GOP nomination four years from now. That is, if he’s interested. Chris Christie for president Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding counties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, publisher Robert Bridges, editor Sue Brannon, controller Dink NeSmith, president Tom Wood, chairman LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY E-MAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com W henever there is a major natural disaster in the United States, most people affected look to the U.S. government and the Federal Emergency Management Agency to provide help in its aftermath. That was true here after the devastating 2011 tornadoes. It was true follow-ing Hurricane Katrina’s 2005 rampage. It is no doubt true now that Hurricane Sandy and a related superstorm continue to batter a goodly portion of the United States. FEMA’s response isn’t always up to speed and there often are questions about policy and rules (there were some here after the tornadoes). Usually, though, FEMA does an adequate job providing large-scale disaster aid and assistance in instances where any other agency or the private sector would be hard-pressed to meet staggering need. Not many, then, question the federal agency’s overall mis-sion, much less its existence. Mitt Romney, however, does. He’s on record — in a 2011 GOP primary debate — as say-ing that it was “immoral” for the federal government to be spend-ing money on disaster relief, when it should be focused on deficit reduction. He went on to say that states, not the federal government, should deal with natural disasters. ... Romney knows he can’t take back his original statement about FEMA, so over the week-end he issued an extremely vague press release indicating that he now supports some federal involvement in disaster relief. ... FEMA provides services that no other agency can afford or arrange on such a vast scale over multiple state borders ... One might debate about how FEMA does its work, but those like Romney who say its job should be eliminated or trun-cated have no understanding of the role it does play. ... Romney is wrong about FEMA N Chattanooga (Tenn.) Times OPINION Friday & Saturday, November 2-3, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A4AOPINION Robert DennyBob.Denny8@gmail.com Q Contact Robert Denny at (386) 454-4950. Ann McFeattersamcfeatters@nationalpress.com Q Scripps Howard columnist Ann McFeatters has covered the White House and national politics since 1986. Dan K. Thomasson Q Dan K. Thomasson is former editor of Scripps Howard News Service. This to

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Harold F. Barnett Harold Barnett, 81 of Lake City, Florida, died October 31, 2012 at Avalon Healthcare & Rehabili tation Center in Lake City. He moved from Minnesota in 1969 and made his home in Lake City for the past 40+ years. An avid woodworker, he made wooden toys and participated many years as an exhibitor at the Olustee Festival and other craft fairs throughout the Southeast. He is the son of the late Harold F. and Clara Barnett of Winter, Wis consin. He is preceded in death by his wife Harriette, mother in law, Elizabeth Schoenhals, one brother, Joseph Barnett of Chicago, IL, and one sister, Myrtle Vierling of Maxville, FL, and grandson Cory Tapp. He is survived by his two daugh ters, Rosemary Gottschalk & Lynda (Bill) Ward both of Lake City, FL; grandchildren, Wesley Tapp of Deltona, FL, Jim (Jessica) Ward of Eastpoint, FL, Greg (Mi chelle) Ward of Lake City, FL; 7 great grandchildren and a host of nieces and nephews also survive. Private services for Mr. Bar nett will be held at a later date in Memorial Cemetery. Ar rangements are under the direc tion of GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN FUNERAL HOME 3596 South U.S. Hwy 441, Lake City, FL, 32025 (386) 752-1954W alter Nolan Kirby Walter Nolan Kirby, age 79, died on October 30, 2012 after a long battle with melanoma. Mr. Kirby was a veteran of both the U. S. Army and the U. S. Air Force. He served in the Korean and Vietnam wars and retired as a Master Sergeant in 1973. He served in Korea, Japan, Germa ny, Italy, Paki stan, Okinawa, Vietnam, and again in Ger many. He retired from Nuclear Fuel Service on Jan uary 1, 1992. Walter was the son of George W. and Betty Kirby. He was born October 11, 1933 at home near Colum bia City, Florida. He graduated from Columbia High School in 1951 and from Park College, Parkville, Missouri in 1969. Walter was a member of Betha ny Presbyterian Church and had served on the Session for many years and as Clerk of Session for several terms. He served as Moderator of Holston Presbytery for a term and as a member of the Presbytery Committee on Minis try for 6 years, as well as several other Presbytery committees. He served on the board of Co lonial Heights Meals on Wheels and delivered meals for 20 years, served on Contact Concern, the Literacy Council of Kingsport and worked with Habitat for Humanity for several years. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by his stepfather, William Jackson Kirby and three brothers, Rene tus (Jack), Thomas, George W. Jr. and a grandson, Joshua. Walter is survived by his lov ing wife of 30 years, Pat Swift Kirby; three daughters, Teri Middleton, Rita (Chuck) Stone and Beth (Scott) Toberman; 9 grandchildren, Cody Blevins (Mallary), Alexandra Middleton, Jessica, Kirby, Eugene (Buck) and Charlie Stone, and Spencer, Barclay and Harper Grace To berman, and a step-great-grand daughter, Lillie LeBaron. Other survivors include a brother, Paul (Karen) ; sisters-in-law, Helen Kirby, Shirley Swift and Helen Lewis and several nephews, nieces and many cousins and friends, who he dearly loved and loved to see at the annual Kirby reunion held at Ichetuck nee Springs for the past 78 years. Visitation will be held on Friday, November 2, 2012 from 5:00 PM until 7:00 PM at Bethany Presbyterian Church. Funeral services will follow with Pas Entombment services will be held on Saturday, November 3, 2012 at 3:00 PM at Oak Hill Memorial Park. Full military honors will be rendered by the Honor Guard from Shaw Air Force Base in Sumter, SC. Memorial contributions in Walters honor may be made to Bethany Presbyterian Church, 5825 Fort Henry Drive, King sport, TN 37663 or to the American Cancer Society. The staff of Oak Hill is honored to serve the fam ily of Walter Nolan Kirby. An online guest registry may be signed at http://www. oakhillmemorialpark.comAlfred McIntosh Mr. Alfred McIntosh was born in Louisville of Suwannee county, FL on January 25, 1929 to the late Ms. Lela Bush. He was reared by his grandparents John and Mattie Jacob Bush. Alfred passed away Thursday, Oc tober 25, 2012 at Haven Hospice. He received his early education at the Grooms School of Suwan nee County, FL and later at the Springville Rosenwald School in Columbia County, FL. He completed his high school education at Edward Waters High School of Jacksonville, FL. He served in the United States Army from 1950-1952. Upon completion of his tour of duty he entered Tuskegee Insti tute of Tuskegee, Alabama in 1952. He received his Bachelors Degree in Building and Con struction and Masonry in 1956. and S, Combs Elks Lodge #1599, American Legion #322, Springville Pallbearers Lodge #50, and Springville Sunday Morning Bank #9. He served as President of the Springville Community Center from 19832008. He was responsible for Springville Community Center. Alfred leaves to cherish his memories two sons Alfred Bailey (Malaysisa) of Bowdon, GA., and William Clifford (Mel ba) of Cape Coral, FL., a grand daughter Sadie of Bowdon, GA., aunt Geraldine Bush of Dade City, FL., a devoted cousin Betty Slater of Daytona Beach, a host of cousins and other sor rowing friends. A devoted friend, Gloria McIntosh, Lake City, FL. Funeral services for Mr. Alfred McIntosh, will be at 1:00 p.m. Saturday, November 3, 2012 at Mt. Pleasant Baptist church, Rev. ment will follow in the Spring ville Community Cemetery. the family will receive friends on Friday, November 2, 2012 at Cooper Funeral Home, Chapel from 7:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. Arrangements entrust to COOPER FUNERAL HOME 251 N.E. Washing ton Street; Lake City, FL. Willis O. Cooper, L.F.D.. Dave Pollard Dave Pollard 66 passed away Saturday October 27 2012 following a long illness Mr. Pollard was born Sagi naw Michigan and moved to the OBrien, FL area 4 years ago from Pinellas Park, FL ., He was a retired construction contractor with Dave Pol lard Interprises, Inc., of Pinel las Park a US Air Force Vet eran of the Vietnam Con He enjoyed classic cars with the Moonlight Cruisers of Lake City, FL., and is predeceased by one son Duane Pollard. He is survived by his wife, Janie Pollard of OBrien, FL., a step son, Frank Wynn, Jr., of Col bert, OK., two sisters Donna Reeves of Saginaw, MI .,Carol Pinet of Little Rock, AR, A step daughter, Rebekah Carty of Hugo, OK., an uncle Larry and Ruth Pollard & family. Several nieces and nephews and 8 grandchildren also survive. Memorial services will be con ducted Saturday November 3, 2012 at 12 noon in Daniels Me morial Chapel,408 NW Suwan nee Ave., Branford, FL 32008 John Small John Small, age 83, resident of Jacksonville, FL. passed away Wednesday, October 24, 2012 at St. Vincent Hospital terminat ing an extended illness. Born in Vero Beach, FL he was the son of Rosa Lee Small and Albert Clem mon Small. Survivors in clude sons, John Small, Jr. (Marie), Na thaniel Small (Debra), Michael Small (Nicole), Eddie Jones (Barbara) and Johnny White; daughters, Nettie Mae Small, Marian Small, Carrie White and Clara White; 30 grand children, 55 great grands and 6 great great grands also survive. Funeral Services for Mr. John Small will be 11 a.m. Satur day, November 3, 2012 at Za rephath Tabernacle Church on Friday from 5:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. Interment will follow the service Saturday at Geth semany Memorial Gardens. Arrangements entrusted to COOPER FUNERAL HOME 251 N.E. Washington Street, Lake City, FL. Willis O. Cooper, L.F.D. 386-752-3566 Obituaries are paid advertise ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporters classified depart ment at 752-1293. OBITUARIES Nov. 2 Haunted house open Lake City Shrine Club will hold its annual Haunted House thruough Saturday from 6 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. each night. Admission is $5. All proceeds benifit the Shrine Club and are not tax deductible. Fish dinner Our Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5056 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, pre pares fish dinners every Friday from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The dinner is $6.00 for two Alaskan pollock filets, corn, baked beans, hush puppies, cole slaw and tart er sauce. Take out or eat in. Nov. 3 Heavenly cooking day The eighth annu al Heavenly Cooking Community Day will be at the Richardson Community Center, 255 Coach Anders Lane. The event provides meals to sick and shut-in community members in memory of Levi Sheppard Sr. There will be a variety of food available and activities for seniors and children at the center. For information, call 365-0013. Family Gaming Day Columbia County Public Library will have a Family Gaming Day from 2 to 4:30 p.m. There will be video games, board games, snacks and an afternoon of family fun. For more infor mation, call (386) 758-2101. The library is at 308 NW Columbia Ave. Breast cancer benefit A Zumbathon to benefit Suwannee River Breast Cancer Awareness Inc. will be held from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at Sepulveda ATA, behind Winn Dixie. Admission is $10 in advance or $15 at the door. Dont forget to wear pink. Call 466-7747 for information. Commuity yard sale Wellborn Community Associations Fall Yard Sale and Blueberry Breakfast will be held. Vendor spaces are available for $5. Start getting your unused good ies together to make extra Christmas money. The flea market in Lake City is closed that day, so come on out. The Bloodmobile will be there, too. Call (386) 984-5749 if more informa tion. Prayer breakfast Gold Standard Lodge No. 167 will hold a mens prayer breakfast at 8:30 a.m. at Shiloh MBC on Aberdeen Street. Come out and enjoy the fellowship and fun. For more information, contact Brotehr Chris Mirra (386) 623-3611 or the Rev. Tyron White (386) 365-5797. LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY & SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2-3, 2012 5A 5A Community Concerts of Lake City Live Arts Series 2012-2013 AT LEVY PERFORMING ARTS CENTERFLORIDA GATEWAY COLLEGE Contact: Community Concerts of Lake City, Inc for further information (386) 466-8999 www.communityconcerts.info THE RALEIGH RINGERS Premier Handbell Ensemble The Raleigh Ringers perform dazzling interpretations of sacred, secular and popular music, including famous rock n roll tunes arranged just for handbells. They perform on one of the most extensive collections of bells and bell-like instruments owned by any handbell ensemble in the world, and have commissioned more than 100 compositions and arrangements for handbells. Voter Guide for Amendments & Florida Supreme Court Justices (A straw poll was taken at our October 18 th meeting and these are our recommendations based on that poll) Amendment #1 YES Amendment #2 YES Amendment #3 NO Amendment #4 NO Amendment #5 YES Amendment #6 NO Amendment #8 NO Amendment #9 NO Amendment #10 NO Amendment #11 NO Amendment #12 NO Justices of the Florida Supreme Court: R. Fred Lewis, Barbara J. Pariente, & Peggy A. Quince VOTE: DO NOT RETAIN! NFBA: County votes unanimously to drop out of broadband agency Continued From Page 1A SEPTIC: County opts out of program Continued From Page 1A COMMUNITY CALENDAR To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Jim Barr at 754-0424 or by email at jbarr@lakecityreporter.com. ed information about NFBA salaries, employees, advertisements for posi tions and a current count of the number of employ ees, but they said NFBA never replied to their pub lic records requests for the information. I think ample time was given for them to get us the information, especially seeing the grant expires January 31, said Bailey, the commissions vice chair man. Were two months away and they dont even have their core network, much less people to keep them sustainable. The grant said they would have customers and be sustain able and its not. Bailey said withdraw als from NFBA by other North Florida counties and municipalities impacted his decision. When the others start ed withdrawing I felt like Im not the only one think ing, lets look at this, he said. We tried to get them here to answer some ques tions, but they never would come, so this is the result. The NFBA was award ed $30,142,676 in federal stimulus funds to develop a network to serve North Floridians who were unserved or underserved in regards to high-speed Internet services. Federal rules mandated that the project be com pleted within three years. The broadband project was initially designed to increase broadband access to 22 North Florida govern ments North Florida counties, and eight North Florida cities. Several counties and cit ies have pulled out of the broadband authority since its inception. I feel like this is a trag edy of money that could have went to a good cause, Commissioner Rusty DePratter said. County Manager Dale Williams said he is unaware of any financial penalty that may apply to the county for severing ties with the agency. affected by the original law have opted out of the program. Only areas with firstmagnitude freshwater springs are covered by the bill. The Florida Department of Health already has rules and regulations dealing with septic tanks and septic tanks inspec tions and those rules are still in effect, Williams said. In other business, the commission: Voted in favor of coming up with a written job description for the assistant county manager position; Denied accepting a low bid on a tract of land designated as county surplus; Approved the construction contract for the final phase of the Bascom-Norris connector road project; and Approved the low bid of $1.8 million for construction work on Falling Creek Road.

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FAITH & VALUES Friday & Saturday, November 2-3, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 6A6AF&V Angels in the apocalyptic vision God’s creation more powerful than humansW e closed last week with the translation of the church from earth to heaven. This week we will briefly see the angelic role in the book of Revelation after the rapture. The first record is found in Revelation 5:11: “Then I (John) looked, and I heard the voices of many angels around the throne, the living creatures, and the elders; and the number of them was ten thousand times ten thousand, and thousands of thousands saying with a loud voice: worthy is the Lamb who was slain”. This is the angels’ song of adoration; for they had witnessed the great condescension and suf-fering; they saw the Lamb slain. Therefore, they now rejoice for He is on His throne. Revelation 8:3-6 before the trumpets of the judgment are blown, another angel is seen with a golden censer. The angel offers up the incense to be offered with the prayers of all the saints. The angels are given the task of The Seven Trumpet Judgment and the pouring out of The Seven Bowls of Judgment on the earth and lost humanity. As you study the 14 judgments, they should be taken literally. Praise God we the saints are in heaven before this great and ter-rible “Day of the Lord”. Then in Revelation 14:8 “Another angel announces the Fall of Babylon. This announce-ment is fulfilled in Chapter 17. In Revelation 14:6 we have an angel with the Everlasting Gospel taking it to all the people of the world who have previously not heard the gospel. This is the ful-filling of the prophesy by Jesus as recorded in Matthew 24:14. In Revelation 14:9-11 we have an angel announcing the Wrath of God upon all those who receive the mark of Satan. In bringing to a conclusion our all-too-brief study of Angels — the innumerable hosts of spirit-beings, both holy and evil, of whom the Scriptures bear such abundant testimony – we cannot but realize the tremen-dous importance of the much neglected subject, if we are to have a clearer and more appre-ciative understanding of their direct but invisible relation to the affairs of this present world, and their ministry to serve and to succor “the heirs of salvation” during their earth pilgrimage. We have attempted to depict a cross-section, as it were, of the many and varied aspects of Angelic activity. There are many specifically recorded occasions both of the ministrations of Holy Angels and the onslaughts of fallen, evil angels that, obviously, could not be included. But it is my prayer that a new interest in the unseen realm, which is in reality the Christian’s battleground (Ephesians 6:12), might arouse us all to put on “…the whole armour of God, that ye may be able to withstand in the evil day, and having done all, to stand” (Ephesians 6:13-18). “Now unto Him that is able to keep you from falling, and to present you faultless before the presence of His glory with exceeding joy, To the only wise God our Saviour, be glory and majesty, dominion and power, both now and ever. Amen” (Jude 24-25). We chose not to deal with the hosts of unholy angels at this time. We only wrote about the heavenly hosts; but be sure the un-heavenly hosts are out there. T ed Anthony, a national writer for The Associated Press, reported New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg as saying, “Nature is an awful lot more powerful than we are” (Lake City Reporter, October 31, 2012, p. 3A). I would like to say “AMEN!” in reference to the mayor’s statement concern-ing “Superstorm Sandy.” Her power is seen in the damage she has inflicted upon trees, buildings and land where she came ashore and beyond. Instead of saying “nature” as the respected mayor said, I would like to call it God’s creation. When we think of all that goes into such a “superstorm,” His power is demonstrated and our weakness is highlighted. The news media, especially the Weather Channel, had been predicting for several days that this storm was going to hit the northeast. The exact “land fall” was not known until “the last min-ute” but the general area predic-tion was right on target. Having all of this information beforehand, humans could not stop the storm nor change the direction of the storm. We could only prepare for it to “hit.” The meteorologist on the Weather Channel kept telling their viewers that this storm was growing. I remember hearing one report which said that if you took an airplane ride across the diam-eter of the storm, it would take approximately 2.5 hours. That is a huge storm. After the storm came ashore I saw a report that showed the storm was approximately 1500 miles across the center; that is a little farther than from Miami, Florida to Boston, Massachusetts. That is not a huge storm that is a humongous storm! Not being a meteorologist, I do not have the expertise nor is it within the scope of this article, to give all the details of what it took to make this storm happen, but rather the scope is to point out how powerful God’s creation really is. What Paul said to the Romans (1:20) is so true. “For since the creation of the world His invisible attributes, His eternal power and divine nature, have been clearly seen, being understood through what has been made, so that they [and we] are without excuse.” One of the things on which we must all agree when we look at this massive storm is that there must be someone more powerful than we are that created the ele-ments which made up this storm. It is not my belief that God created this specific storm. However, it is my belief that because of what He created in times past, all the elements were present for Sandy to occur. It is my belief that the dynamics of meteorology, which He put in place, gave birth to this storm. Based upon the evidence of this storm, one must conclude that there must be a being which is superior to mankind not only in power but intelligence to “think up” all of this stuff. Based upon this evidence should we not con-clude that we need to know more about this “intelligent being”? Should we not want to find out more about this being? More could be said about the power of God’s creation but my hope is that what has been writ-ten here is enough to interest you to the point that you will spend some time meditating upon the power of God’s creation which shows His power. The Bible gives us a lot more information about this God and His power! May we read it like so many did Ted Anthony’s article. Q Hugh Sherrill is an ordained minister and Bible teacher at Eastside Baptist Church. Hugh Sherrillems-hugh43@comcast.net BIBLE STUDIES BIBLICAL MEDITATION Carlton McPeakcarlton_mc@msn.com Q Carlton G. McPeak is an evangelist working in the Lake City area. All Scriptural quotations are from the New American Standard Bible, Holman Bible Publishers, unless otherwise noted.

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Nov. 2Fish dinnerOur Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5056 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, pre-pares fish dinners every Friday from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The dinner is $6 for two Alaskan Pollock filets, corn, baked beans, hush puppies, cole slaw and tart-er sauce. Take out or eat in.Nov. 3Cornerstone MinistryJoin Cornerstone Outreach Ministry, Pastor Willie Brown and Pastor Richard Marshall for a banquet for potential mem-bers, donors and sponsors Nov. 3 at the Super Motel, 3954 Highway 47. The min-istry wants to take back neighborhoods, homes and schools by getting their hands dirty. Tickets are $15 and all proceeds go to the ministry. For informa-tion call 288-1363. Wellborn book saleOne of the largest used book sales in the Suwannee Valley will be held on Saturday, Nov. 3 at the Wellborn community library. The huge book and bake sale will feature thou-sands of books available on many subjects. The book sale will be from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., and you are encour-aged to visit the Wellborn community blueberry pan-cake breakfast just down the road, then come to the book sale. It will be held in the fellowship hall of the Wellborn United Methodist Church, on CR 137 just north of the post office and railroad tracks in downtown Wellborn. All books will be available by donation, and browsers are encouraged to fill a bag or box and make a dona-tion. If you have books to donate and would like to have them picked up, call Rev. Dr. Everett Parker at 386-754-8524. Proceeds from the book and bake sale will benefit the library and the Wellborn United Methodist Church and its outreach programs.Church celebrationJoin minister Derrick McAlister and the Anointed Voices of Praise at their 2012 anniversary cel-ebration Saturday, Nov. 3 at 7 p.m. at Glad Tiding Assembly of God Church, formerly First Assembly of God, on 1571 E. Duval St. Special guest include Elder J.D. Harris and Worship Company of Tallahassee, Fully Committed of Gainesville and University of North Florida Gospel Choir and more. For infor-mation call 758-2964. Church yard saleOur Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5056 SW State Road 47, will have their annu-al yard sale on Saturday, Nov. 3 from 8 a.m. to noon. Proceeds will fo to support the Wasmunds, our mis-sionary family in Korea adn the Fisher House in Gainesville, which helps military families.Prayer breakfastGold Standard Lodge No. 167 will hold a men’s prayer breakfast at 8:30 a.m. at Shiloh Missionary Baptist Church on Aberdeen Street. For more informa-tion, contact Brother Chris Mirra at (386) 623-3611 or the Rev. Tyron White at (386) 365-5797. Nov. 7Fall meetingSalem Primitive Baptist Church announces the Fall Meeting with Elder Ronald Lawrence of Nashville will begin Tuesday, Nov. 6 at 6:30 p.m. We will continue Nov. 7 at 6:30 p.m. and end on Nov. 8. Please plan to attend. Church is located 9 miles NW of Lake City on Lake Jeffrey Road. For information call 752-4198. Nov. 10Gospel concertAngel Ministries of Lake City Incl will hold a 20th anniversary elebration for gospel promoter Pastor Minnie Williams Gomes at 6 p.m. at New Day Spring Missionary Baptist Church, 709 Nw Long St. The donation event will feature music by interna-tional recording artists Doc McKenzie and the Hi-Lites of Paterson, N.J.; Wayne Norwood and the Children of God of Rochester, N.Y.; Febe and the Chosen Ones of Tallahassee; and Tony Vicks of Tallahassee; The service also will feature local artist Elder Robert Jackson and the New Spirit Travelers; Nu Testament of Jacksonville; the Anointed Straughter Sisters; the Johnson Two of Valdosta, Ga.; the Anointed Powell Sisters; and the Gospel Harmoneers of Lake City. Tickets are available a loca-tions throughout Lake City. Contact Pastor Gomes at (386) 758-1886 for more information.Nov. 11Devotional servicesThe American Legion Rider Chapter 57, South Highway 47, hosts Sunday Morning Devotional Services the second Sunday of every month at 9 a.m. There is also a con-tinental breakfast from 8 to 9 a.m. Services are held by the Christian motorcycle Association. Everyone is welcome to join in the fel-lowship, breakfast and spir-itually uplifting morning. Missionary programSt. Paul Missionary Baptist Church, 222 Oosterhoudt Lane, will celebrate its Mission ad Matron program at 11 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. The morning speaker will be Sister Lawalla Mae Dixon, mission president of the church. Afternoon speak-er will be Sister Makeba Murphy of Philadelphia Missionary Baptist Church of Lake City.Church homecomingDeep Creek Advent Christian Church will cel-ebrat Homecoming 2012 at 11 a.m., with a Southern gospel music concert fea-turing Billy Sanders and grandson Adam Sanders, of Nashville, Tenn., along with Earl Green of Lake City. A covered-dish dinner will follow.Dec. 9 Devotional servicesThe American Legion Rider Chapter 57, South Highway 47, hosts Sunday Morning Devotional Services the second Sunday of every month from 8:30 to 9 a.m. There is also a conti-nental breakfast from 8 to 8:30 a.m. Services are held by the Christian motorcy-cle Association. Everyone is welcome to join in the fellowship, breakfast and spiritually uplifting morn-ing. OngoingFish dinnerOur Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5056 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, pre-pares fish dinners every Friday from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The dinner is $6 for two Alaskan Pollock filets, corn, baked beans, hush puppies, cole slaw and tart-er sauce. Take out or eat in. Devotional servicesThe American Legion Rider Chapter 57, South Highway 47, hosts Sunday Morning Devotional Services the second Sunday of every month at 9 a.m. There is also a con-tinental breakfast from 8 to 9 a.m. Services are held by the Christian motorcycle Association. Everyone is welcome to join in the fel-lowship, breakfast and spir-itually uplifting morning. Christian motorcyclistsChristian Motorcyclist Association Iron Shepherds Chapter 826 meets the first Thursday of the month at Ray’s Deli & Grill, Highway 247 across from the fair-grounds, at 6:30 p.m. LAKE CITY REPORTER FAITH & VALUES FRIDAY & SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2-3, 2012 7A 7AReligion Consider values when you cast your voteThere is no substitute for victoryV oting is a privilege that millions of people in other parts of the world can only dream about. On election day Tuesday, we have the opportunity for our voices to be heard con-cerning the future of our country. Seeing it as more than a privi-lege, America’s founding fathers encouraged their generation and the ones to come to think of it as a duty — a solemn responsibility that comes with the sacred trust of being a citizen of the United States. As Christians, our faith in God should influence our values in life, and that includes the political arena. We shouldn’t be bashful about holding up the Bible’s stan-dards of right and wrong. God’s standards are essential to a free society such as ours, to prevent it from sliding into chaos where everyone does what they see fit (Judges 21:25). People of faith, grounded in moral truth, must be prepared to determine those candidates best able to uphold God’s moral standard. As Christ’s representatives on earth, we are to be “salt and light” in our culture (Matthew 5:13-16). Focus on the Family’s founder, Dr. James Dobson wrote, “We live in a representative form of govern-ment where we are its leaders. It means that every citizen has a responsibility to participate in the decisions that are made and that includes people of faith [using] his or her influence for what is moral and just.” A recent study by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life shows that nearly two-thirds of Americans say their faith has little to do with their voting deci-sions. In fact, many believers fail to consider their biblical values when voting, often choosing candidates whose positions are at odds with their own beliefs, con-victions, and values. But Charles Colson, founder of the Prison Fellowship ministry, highlighted the need for something more than voting the party line when he wrote: “Societies are tragically vulnerable when the men and women who compose them lack char-acter. A nation or a culture can-not endure for long unless it is under-girded by common values such as valor, public-spiritedness, respect for others and for the law; it cannot stand unless it is populated by people who will act on motives superior to their own immediate interest. “Keeping the law, respecting human life and property, loving one’s family, fighting to defend national goals, helping the unfor-tunate, paying taxes — all these depend on the individual virtues of courage, loyalty, charity, com-passion, civility and duty. “Acting on motives superior to their own immediate interests” means that where a candidate stands on issues like abortion and protecting God’s definition of marriage and family should be more of a decision maker on who to vote for than what financial relief they are promising on the campaign trail. In Proverbs 29:2, the Bible is clear: “When the righteous rule, the people rejoice; when the wicked rule, the people groan.” As believers, lets choose to vote next Tuesday, and lets use our voice to uphold God’s standard by voting values … because the hearts of this generation and the next … they really do matter! (To see where your candidate stands on the issues, go to the Christian Coalition of Florida’s website at www.ccsfla.org. and download your free voter’s guide.) Blessings, Angie I was in the shed just clean-ing up. I had the radio on for company. The news was announced “a tower in New York City has been hit by an airplane.” I went into the house and turned on the television, and I was shocked. Then another plane, and another tower was hit. People were looking, pointing at the fatally wounded towers. I was just one of millions, stunned and shocked by the actions of a few “religious” fanatics. I was angry that people would do this. Who were they? Why did they do this? What do they want? America has helped so many people around the world … now this?!!! People were jumping from the towers. Hearts were breaking, Tears were flowing. Time passed, but just as I thought things were bad, they got worse, as one tower crumbled and fell, and then the second came down. People were screaming, crying, running, fall-ing, covered in dust. There were people trying to save people that had died. New York was hit, America was hurt. Where once two tall towers proudly stood and marked the skyline, now an empty space, and smoke. President Bush stood, represent-ing a hurt, angry. determined America, and promised, “Soon those who did this will be brought to justice.” Here it is 2012, we have been at war with Islamic terrorists for 11 long years. Battles have been and are still being fought, and we have not won the victory, not yet! Now, 9/11 is once again marked by death of Americans. This is not the time to pretend the victory is won, for it is not. This is not the time to get tired of the fight … but it is time to remember what this has been about, and renew our determina-tion to win. There is no substi-tute for victory. Christians are “at war” with Satan and all he stands for. Jesus came and beat him when he died on the cross, (Hebrews 2:14). Yet we still have to fight. The Christian must be prepared, and wear the armor necessary to do battle, (Ephesians 6:10-18). The devil may hit us and knock us down and discourage us, but through Jesus, we are not defeated. One person said, “I have read te end of the book, and, guess what ... we win.” Until then we must not forget, there is no substitute for victory. We cannot make peace with this enemy … nor can we make a truce or time-out. Satan wants our total defeat. Just like those represented on 9/11. There can be no truce, nor peace, for that is not what they want. They want us to give in and give up. Not America! Not Christians! We will fight on, and win! If you are one who is discouraged, or just tired of the fight, remember, enduring and persevering will be worth it. Renew your heart in prayer and study of scriptures and get with a good brother or sister and let them encourage you as well. Attend the assembly of the saints, and drink in the love and fellowship that God has added us all to. Winston Churchill was invited to speak one time at a university. He approached the podium slow-ly, but resolutely. He was silent for a minute or so, the students waiting for words from the war-worn prime minister. He cleared his throat, and looked out at the student body and said, “Never ... never ... never ... give up!” Then he returned to his seat. That’s all they and we need to hear … and do. HEART MATTERS Angie Landangieland3@windstream.net Q Heart Matters is a weekly column written by Angie Land, direc tor of the Family Life Ministries of the Lafayette Baptist Association, where she teaches bible studies, leads marriage and family confer ences, and offers biblical counsel ing to individuals, couples and families. Jack Exum Jr.jackexumjr@yahoo.com Q Jack Exum Jr. Is a freelance writer who lives in Lake City, CHURCH CALENDAR Q Submit Church Calendar announcements by mail or drop off at the Reporter office located at 180 E. Duval St., via fax to (386) 752-9400 or email jbarr@ lakecityreporter.com. Southern Baptist leader wants more diversity in con ventionBy HOLBROOK MOHRAssociated PressJACKSON, Miss. — Southern Baptist Convention President Fred Luter said Wednesday that he wants more diversity in the 16-million-member organization. Luter, the first black president of the convention, was in Jackson for the 177th gathering of the Mississippi Baptist Convention. After delivering a sermon at First Baptist Church of Jackson, Luter told report-ers his selection as presi-dent shows a commitment to increasing diversity, but he said there’s more to be done. “For years this convention has been talking about how they want other ethnic groups in the con-vention. This year, June 19 in New Orleans, La., we stopped talking about it and we put our money where our mouth’s at and they voted me as president, the first African-American president of the Southern Baptist Convention,” Luter said. “However, it cannot stop with me. We’ve got to recruit other African-Americans, Hispanics, Asians, we’ve got to have more diversity in the con-vention.” The message of Luter’s sermon during the last day of the gath-ering on Wednesday was that only God can solve the problems facing the United States.

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8A LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT FRIDAY & SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2-3, 2012 8A YES NO YES YES YES YES YES YES NO NO NO NO NO NO The most On Demand TV shows and movies on TV, streaming online and on your tablet or smartphone with the XFINITY TV app The most HD choices AnyRoom On Demand, so you can start an XFINITY On Demand show in one room and nish it in another The most live sports WatchESPN app so you can watch your favorite live ESPN content anywhere on your smartphone or tablet More Internet protection included at no additional cost with Norton Security Suite, IDENTITY GUARD and Comcast Secure Backup & Share The Internet provider more people choose over any other in the nation YES NO Advanced home phone calling features like Readable Voicemail and Text Messaging at no extra cost YES NO Skype video calling on your TV with HD-quality video Offer ends 12/31/12, and is limited to new residential customers. XFINITY service not available in all areas. Requires subscription to Economy Plus Internet service. After promotional period, or if any service is cancelled or downgraded, regular rates apply. Comcasts current monthly service charge for Economy Plus Internet is $39.95, or $29.95 with subscription to XFINITY TV and/or XFINITY Voice, depending on area. Not all services available with all XFINITY packages. Service limited to a single outlet. Equipment, installation, taxes, and franchise fees extra. May not be combined with other offers. TV: Basic service subscription required to receive other levels of service. On Demand selections subject to charge indicated at time of purchase. Not all programming available in all areas. Internet: Actual speeds vary and are not guaranteed. Not all features compatible with Macintosh systems. Voice: $29.99 activation fee applies. Service (including 911/emergency services) may not function after an extended power outage. HD programming limited to programming provided to Comcast in HD format. Comparisons include HD channel lineup and HD programming available On Demand. Most Live Sports available with Digital Preferred TV and WatchESPN. Text messaging from laptop or PC requires XFINITY Internet subscription. Standard data charges may apply. Check with your carrier. Universal Caller ID requires subscription to XFINITY Digital TV and Internet Service. WatchESPN: Programming and scheduling subject to change and not available in all areas. Requires subscription to Digital Starter TV (or above). Skype: Restrictions apply. Not available in all areas. Limited to residential customers. Requires subscription to Digital Starter TV (or above) with HD service, Performance Internet (or above) and Unlimited Voice service. High-speed Internet connectivity required. Actual call clarity may vary. Skype to Skype calls require participants to have Skype accounts. All trademarks are the property of their respective owners. Money-Back Guarantee applies to one month recurring charge and standard installation up to $500. Call for restrictions and complete details. Norton is a registered mark of Symantec Corporation. Constant Guard and associated logos are trademarks or federally registered trademarks of Comcast Corporation. Not all features, including Constant Guard Protection Suite, are available with Macintosh systems. For details about Constant Guard for MAC, visit xnity.com/CGMAC. 2012 Comcast. All rights reserved. NPA103942-0171 82025_NPA103942-0171 Yes-No U-verse 10.62x21.indd 1 9/28/12 12:37 PM

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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Friday & Saturday, November 2-3, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B CHEAP SEATS Tim KirbyPhone: (386) 754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS Solid fall for Lady TigersC olumbia High’s female athletes had a standout year in 2011-12, and this fall is producing more of the same. Columbia’s bowling team defended its district championship and will make its third straight trip to the state tournament. Columbia’s volleyball team made the state playoffs for the first time since 1999, and only the third time in school history. The Lady Tigers have already won a playoff game, the first since Columbia’s district winning team in 1997. Hannah Burns, Lindsay Lee, Stephanie Silva and Micheala Polhamus advanced to region in swimming. Burns is a repeat district champion in the 200 IM and the 100 breaststroke. She is defending state champion in the latter. Lee qualified for region in the 50 freestyle and 100 backstroke. Lee made region last year in the 50 free. Silva and Polhamus are going as members of both the 200 medley and 400 freestyle relay teams. The Lady Tigers golf team came up short of returning to region, but Gillian Norris and Brooke Russell qualified for region as individuals. Columbia’s girls cross country team could not field five runners for an official entry in the 2011 district meet. This year, the Lady Tigers have won events in Titusville and Fernandina Beach and will have an impact at district. All teams but golf are still competing and there could be more accolades to come. The federal government had a major role in female sports with the passing of Title IX legislation 40 years ago. We have that to thank for many of the opportunities given our girls to play sports in high school and college. Q Tim Kirby is sports editor of the Lake City Reporter JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Braxton Stockton breaks free around the edge during the Tigers’ 21-0 win against Orange Park High on Friday. The Tigers host Leon High for homecoming at 7:30 p.m. tonight. Playoff positioning JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White’s Trey Phillips (5) runs the ball in a game against Fernandina Beach on Oct. 18. Fort White, Trinity Catholic playing for district title By TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comFORT WHITE — It is a showdown with an aster-isk. Fort White High hosts Trinity Catholic High today in a game to decide District 3-3A. Kickoff is 7:30 p.m. Fort White and Trinity Catholic are the only teams in the district, so both have been in the playoffs since the spring. Still, there is plenty to play for — the winner gets home field advantage in the playoffs. That would be a first for Fort White, which has had to travel for all seven of its previous playoff games. “We look at the fact we can make history in the playoffs,” Fort White head coach Demetric Jackson said. “To be at home in the playoffs is really big. It makes the road easier for us. We’re going to give everything we’ve got to win the game.” Fort White and Trinity Catholic come into the game with 5-3 records on the field. Trinity Catholic is officially 6-2 after its first-game loss to North Marion High was reversed on a for-feit. Both teams have tough schedules in preparation for today and the playoffs to come. Fort White has played Wakulla High, which is undefeated and moved up to No. 1 in Class 5A last week. The Indians also INDIANS continued on 2BOh, my: Lions, Tigers and homecomingBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High has its homecoming game tonight against a familiar opponent for head coach Brian Allen. Leon High comes into Tiger Stadium led by former Florida State and Suwannee High player Bill Ragans. Allen and Ragans know each other due to the Seminole brotherhood and have spoke this week. “I talked to him just a little while ago,” Allen said. “We’re good friends. I love that brother from Florida State. He comes from the same coaching tree as I do.” Ragans has coached for 16 years at the college and high school levels, but this year hasn’t been the year he would have hoped for out of the Lions. Leon (2-6, 1-3 District 3-6A) only had one win in the district after defeating Orange Park High, 31-29. Although it’s been a tough season for the Lions, Allen believes that Ragans will have Leon fired up to spoil the Tigers homecoming. But Allen doesn’t expect there to be any extra moti-vational advantage going up against an old Bulldog and Seminole. “He’s been a rival growing up in Suwannee,” Allen said. “I’m not going to play into adding anything into the game.” Despite the Lions record, Allen knows that Leon can still compete. “I hate that this year has been down, but that’s some-thing we all go through in coaching,” he said. “You have to look to the next year and hope that it can be better. I can guarantee that they’ll be ready to play and spoil our homecoming. That’s always the case if Columbia High completes district schedule tonight. CHS continued on 2B

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League resultsLake City Bowl league play: GOLDEN ROLLERS Team standings: 1. Gamblers; 2. Quirky Quad; 3. Knock em Down. Team high handicap game: 1. Quirky Quad 851; 2. You’re Up 850; 3. Gamblers 810. Team high handicap series: 1. 2 Plus 2 2,457; 2. Bubba & his Bubetts 2,427; 3. Jo’s Crew 2,330. High scratch game: 1. Betty Brown 192; 2. Debi Evert 163; 3. Joanne Denton 162. 1. George Walters 213; 2. Ric Yates 192; 3. Ross Meyers 180. High scratch series: 1. Joyce Hooper 491; 2. Louise Atwood 442; 3. Barbara Griner 439. 1. Bill Dolly 599; 2. Wayne Johns 556; 3. Lee McKinney 512. High handicap game: 1. Judy Johnson 238; 2. Vy Ritter 226; 3. (tie) Amy Musselwhite, Debbie Walters 214. 1. Dan Ritter 249; 2. Winton Brewer 236; 3. Ray Denton 220. High handicap series: 1. Doreen Waters 631; 2. Joan Carman 620; 3. Betty Carmichael 604 1. David Duncan 712; 2. Sandy Sanders 644; 3. Tom Young 615. High average: 1. Judy Johnson 156.85; 2. Betty Brown 151.2; 3. Joyce Hooper 150.53. 1. Bill Dolly 184.97; 2. David Duncan 184.76; 3. Lee McKinney 182.94.(results from Oct. 25) HIT & MISS Team standings: 1. All Mrs’s (27-13); 2. Legal Ladies (23.5-16.5); 3. Silver Ladies (23-13). Team high handicap game: 1. Sandbaggers 830; 2. All Mrs’s 816; 3. Git Up & Bowl 758. Team high handicap series: 1. Legal Ladies 2,401; 2. Oddballs 2,290; 3. Silver Ladies 2,282. High handicap game: 1. (tie) Cythe Shiver, Joan Carman 245; 3. Judy Daniels 225. High handicap series: 1. Sandra Peterson 696; 2. Pat Warne 630; 3. Rose Brown 627.(results from Oct. 23) WATERGUARD LEAGUE Team high handicap game: 1. All In The Family 867; 2. Wolf Pack 833; 3. We Don’t Care 817. Team high handicap series: 1. Who Gives A Split 2,445; 2. 10 In The Pitt 2,424; 3. Canam 2,416. High scratch game: 1. Mary Lobaugh 212; 2. Mary Lobaugh 205; 3. Lorrie Geiger 193. 1. Jim Lobaugh 245; 2. George Mulligan 223; 3. Michael McInally 214. High scratch series: 1. Mary Lobaugh 585; 2. Lorrie Geiger 532; 3. Chrissy Fancy 494. 1. Steve Fancy 621; 2. Jim Lobaugh 605; 3. Bill Dolly 588. High handicap game: 1. Brandy Watson 229; 2. Pat Fennell 224; 3. Chrissy Fancy 223. 1. Jim Lobaugh 270; 2. Ben Nyssen 263; 3. George Mulligan 253. High handicap series: 1. Mary Lobaugh 666; 2. Lorrie Geiger 607; 3. Susie Camacho 603. 1. Steve Fancy 684; 2. Michael McInally 673; 3. Dess Fennell 649. High average: Mary Lobagh 178; James Price 200.(results from Oct. 30) MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS Team standings: 1. Ronsonet Buick-GMC Truck (163.5-106.5); 2. Ronsonet Service (156.5-113.5); 3. Bencor (155.5-114.5). High scratch game: 1. Dale Coleman 269; 2. Dan Adel 257; 3. Bill Duncan 248. High scratch series: 1. Dale Coleman 714; 2. Bill Duncan 682; 3. Dave Duncan 640. High handicap game: 1. Bryan King 274; 2. John Smith 273; 3. (tie) Dale Coleman, Dan Adel 271. High handicap series: 1. Dan Trimble 747; 2. Bryan King 734; 2. John Smith 721. High average: 1. Dale Coleman 220; 2. Wally Howard 211.58; 3. Bill Duncan 210.7.(results from Oct. 22) SEXY SENIORS Team standings: 1. Outcasts (56-24, 23,669 pins); 2. Jo’s Crew (56-24, 23,549 pins); 3. Handicappers (54-26). Team high handicap game: 1. Outcasts 864; 2. Pin Droppers 819. Team high handicap series: 1. Keglers 2,463; 2. Pin Busters 2,412; 3. Double Up 2,282. High scratch game: 1. Betty Carmichael 154; Sandra Johns 147; 3. Diane Madsen 141. 1. Dan Ritter 209; 2. Edward Smith 195; 3. Ross Meyers 172. High scratch series: 1. Yvonne Finley 442; 2. Louise Atwood 404; 3. Joanne Denton 396. 1. Mike Helvey 579; 2. Wayne Johns 552; 3. Ric Yates 470. High handicap game: 1. Shirley Yates 225; 2. Joyce Crandall 213; 3. Aggie Mumbauer 209. 1. Ron Grey 246; 2. Vernon Black 235; 3. Bill Nash 220. High handicap series: 1. Barbara Croft 607; 2. Ellie DeRosa 587; 3. Janet Nash 586. 1. Earl Hayward 694; 2. Ray Denton 657; 3. Johnnie Croft 616.(results from Oct. 16) SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today AUTO RACING 9 a.m. SPEED — Formula One, practice for Grand Prix of Abu Dhabi, at Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates 12:30 p.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, practice for AAA Texas 500, at Fort Worth, Texas 2 p.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, practice for O’Reilly Auto Parts Challenge, at Fort Worth, Texas 3 p.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Truck Series, pole qualifying for WinStar World Casino 350, at Fort Worth, Texas 4:30 p.m. ESPN2 — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, pole qualifying for AAA Texas 500, at Fort Worth, Texas 6 p.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, final practice for O’Reilly Auto Parts Challenge, at Fort Worth, Texas 8 p.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Truck Series, WinStar World Casino 350, at Fort Worth, Texas CFL FOOTBALL 12 midnight NBCSN — Calgary at Edmonton COLLEGE FOOTBALL 9 p.m. ESPN2 — Washington at California GOLF 4:30 p.m. TGC — Champions Tour, Charles Schwab Cup Championship, second round, at Scottsdale, Ariz. 11 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour-WGC, HSBC Champions, third round, at Guangdong, China 4 a.m. ESPN2 — Asia-Pacific Amateur Championship, third round, at Chonburi, Thailand HORSE RACING 4 p.m. NBCSN — NTRA, Breeders’ Cup World Championships, at Arcadia, Calif. MEN’S COLLEGE SOCCER 8 p.m. FSN — SMU at Memphis NBA BASKETBALL 8 p.m. ESPN — Miami at New York 10:30 p.m. ESPN — L.A. Clippers at L.A. Lakers PREP FOOTBALL 10:30 p.m. FSN — Teams TBA SOCCER 10 p.m. NBCSN — MLS, playoffs, conference semifinals, leg 1, Real Salt Lake at Seattle ——— Saturday AUTO RACING 9 a.m. SPEED — Formula One, qualifying for Grand Prix of Abu Dhabi, at Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates 3 p.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, practice for AAA Texas 500, at Fort Worth, Texas 4 p.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, pole qualifying for O’Reilly Auto Parts Challenge, at Fort Worth, Texas 5:30 p.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, “Happy Hour Series,” final practice for AAA Texas 500, at Fort Worth, Texas 7:30 p.m. ESPN — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, O’Reilly Auto Parts Challenge, at Fort Worth, Texas 8 p.m. SPEED — World Of Outlaws, at Concord, N.C. COLLEGE FOOTBALL Noon ABC — Regional coverage, teams TBA ESPN — Teams TBAESPN2 — Teams TBAFSN — Houston at East CarolinaNBCSN — Towson at Delaware 2 p.m. FX — Stanford at Colorado 3 p.m. FOX — Teams TBA 3:30 p.m. ABC — Regional coverage, teams TBA CBS — Teams TBAESPN — Teams TBAESPN2 — Regional coverage, teams TBA FSN — Kansas at BaylorNBC — Pittsburgh at Notre Dame 7 p.m. FOX — Oregon at Southern CalESPN2 — Clemson at Duke 8 p.m. CBS — Alabama at LSU 8:07 p.m. ABC — Teams TBA GOLF 4:30 p.m. TGC — Champions Tour, Charles Schwab Cup Championship, third round, at Scottsdale, Ariz. 11 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour-WGC, HSBC Champions, final round, at Guangdong, China 4 a.m. ESPN2 — Asia-Pacific Amateur Championship, final round, at Chonburi, Thailand HORSE RACING 3:30 p.m. NBCSN — NTRA, Breeders’ Cup World Championships, at Arcadia, Calif. 8 p.m. NBC — NTRA, Breeders’ Cup Classic, at Arcadia, Calif. SOCCER 8:30 a.m. ESPN2 — Premier League, Arsenal at Manchester United 8 p.m. NBCSN — MLS, playoffs, conference semifinals, leg 1, New York at D.C. UnitedFOOTBALLNFL standings AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PANew England 5 3 0 .625 262 170Miami 4 3 0 .571 150 126Buffalo 3 4 0 .429 171 227N.Y. Jets 3 5 0 .375 168 200 South W L T Pct PF PAHouston 6 1 0 .857 216 128Indianapolis 4 3 0 .571 136 171Tennessee 3 5 0 .375 162 257Jacksonville 1 6 0 .143 103 188 North W L T Pct PF PABaltimore 5 2 0 .714 174 161Pittsburgh 4 3 0 .571 167 144Cincinnati 3 4 0 .429 166 187Cleveland 2 6 0 .250 154 186 West W L T Pct PF PADenver 4 3 0 .571 204 152San Diego 3 4 0 .429 154 144Oakland 3 4 0 .429 139 187Kansas City 1 6 0 .143 120 209 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAN.Y. Giants 6 2 0 .750 234 161Philadelphia 3 4 0 .429 120 155Dallas 3 4 0 .429 137 162Washington 3 5 0 .375 213 227 South W L T Pct PF PAAtlanta 7 0 0 1.000 201 130Tampa Bay 3 4 0 .429 184 153New Orleans 2 5 0 .286 190 216Carolina 1 6 0 .143 128 167 North W L T Pct PF PAChicago 6 1 0 .857 185 100Minnesota 5 3 0 .625 184 167Green Bay 5 3 0 .625 208 170Detroit 3 4 0 .429 161 174 West W L T Pct PF PASan Francisco 6 2 0 .750 189 103Arizona 4 4 0 .500 127 142Seattle 4 4 0 .500 140 134St. Louis 3 5 0 .375 137 186 Thursday’s Game Kansas City at San Diego (n) Sunday’s Games Arizona at Green Bay, 1 p.m.Chicago at Tennessee, 1 p.m.Buffalo at Houston, 1 p.m.Carolina at Washington, 1 p.m.Detroit at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.Denver at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.Baltimore at Cleveland, 1 p.m.Miami at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.Minnesota at Seattle, 4:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.Pittsburgh at N.Y. Giants, 4:25 p.m.Dallas at Atlanta, 8:20 p.m. Monday’s Game Philadelphia at New Orleans, 8:30 p.m. Open: N.Y. Jets, New England, San Francisco, St. LouisAP Top 25 schedule Saturday No. 1 Alabama at No. 5 LSU, 8 p.m.No. 2 Oregon at No. 18 Southern Cal, 7 p.m. No. 3 Kansas State vs. Oklahoma State, 8 p.m. No. 4 Notre Dame vs. Pittsburgh, 3:30 p.m. No. 6 Ohio State vs. Illinois, 3:30 p.m.No. 7 Georgia vs. Mississippi, 3:30 p.m. No. 8 Florida vs. Missouri, NoonNo. 10 Clemson at Duke, 7 p.m.No. 12 Louisville vs. Temple, NoonNo. 13 Oregon State at Arizona State, 10:30 p.m. No. 14 Oklahoma at Iowa State, Noon No. 15 Stanford at Colorado, 2 p.m.No. 16 Texas A&M at No. 17 Mississippi State, Noon No. 19 Boise State vs. San Diego State, 10:30 p.m. No. 20 Texas Tech vs. Texas, 3:30 p.m.No. 21 Nebraska at Michigan State, 3:30 p.m. No. 22 Louisiana Tech vs. UTSA, 4 p.m. No. 23 West Virginia vs. TCU, 3 p.m.No. 24 Arizona at No. 25 UCLA, 10:30 p.m.BASKETBALLNBA schedule Today’s Games Indiana at Charlotte, 7 p.m.Denver at Orlando, 7 p.m.Milwaukee at Boston, 7:30 p.m.Houston at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.Chicago at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.Sacramento at Minnesota, 8 p.m.Utah at New Orleans, 8 p.m.Portland at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.Miami at New York, 8 p.m.Detroit at Phoenix, 10 p.m.Memphis at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.L.A. Clippers at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m. Saturday’s Games Sacramento at Indiana, 7 p.m.Boston at Washington, 7 p.m.Toronto at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.Denver at Miami, 7:30 p.m.New Orleans at Chicago, 8 p.m.Portland at Houston, 8 p.m.Charlotte at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.Utah at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.Cleveland at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.Golden State at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.SOCCERMLS playoffs WILD CARDS Wednesday Houston 2, Chicago 1, Houston advances Thursday Vancouver at Los Angeles (n) EASTERN CONFERENCE Semifinals D.C. United vs. New York Saturday New York at D.C. United, 8 p.m. Wednesday D.C. United at New York Kansas City vs. Houston Sunday Kansas City at Houston Wednesday Houston at Kansas City WESTERN CONFERENCE Semifinals San Jose vs. Vancouver/Los Angeles Sunday San Jose at Los Angeles/Vancouver winner Wednesday Vancouver/Los Angeles winner at San Jose Seattle vs. Real Salt Lake Today Real Salt Lake at Seattle, 10 p.m. Thursday Seattle at Real Salt Lake 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2-3, 20122BSPORTS BOWLING BRIEFS CHS: Looking to close season strong Continued From Page 1B INDIANS: Have chance to claim title Continued From Page 1B MEMORIAL BOWL Midget games set for Saturday Lake City Recreation Department’s Memorial Bowl continues this week with Midget team play. Games are at Memorial Stadium. Saturday’s games are: Lake City Wildcats vs. Madison Steelers at 9 a.m.; Lake City Eagles vs. Madison Cowboys at 10:15 a.m.; Lake City Lions vs. Madison Lions at 11:30 a.m. For details, call Heyward Christie at 754-3607. FORT WHITE BASEBALL Women’s Expo in Providence The Fort White High baseball program is participating in the Women’s Expo in Providence from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. Fort White will be selling jewelry, magnets, lanyards and hand-made craft items at Providence Village Baptist Church in Lake Butler. For details, call club president Jeanne Howell at 288-5537. RUNNING Wright Brothers 5K for veterans The Race Against the Wright Brothers 5K is 8 a.m. Nov. 10 at Olustee Park in Lake City. Proceeds go to Volunteer Service Programs for Disabled American Veterans at the Lake City VA Medical Center. School and cross country teams are welcome. Registration is at www. stepfitnessonline.com or at Carquest. For details, call Michelle Richards at 208-2447.Chomp Cancer Foundation 5K Chomp Cancer Foundation has its second Chomp Cancer 5K Run/ Walk planned for 8 a.m. Dec. 15 in Fort White. UF Shands Cancer Center is the beneficiary. Sponsorships at several levels are available. For details, call Lauren Valentine at (321) 501-9526. CHS FOOTBALL Quarterback Club meeting Monday The Columbia County Quarterback Club meets at 7 p.m. Monday in the Jones Fieldhouse. For details, call Joe Martino at 984-0452. FORT WHITE FOOTBALL Quarterback Club meets Monday The Fort White Quarterback Club will meet at 7 p.m. Monday in the faculty lounge at the high school. For details, call Harold Bundy at 365-5731.Q From staff reports JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterStriking pinsLake City Bowl youth leagues had a pin decorating conte st during the Halloween season and the entries are gathered for a picture. have faced Union County High, No. 1 in Class 1A and Newberry High, No. 4 in Class 1A. Fort White had three 5A and two 4A teams on its schedule. Trinity Catholic has played Gainesville High, the No. 1 team in Class 6A, East Lake High, which received votes in Class 8A, and a district champion in Eastside High. “Both of us have been battle-tested,” Jackson said. “I think our schedule was a little tougher.” Trinity Catholic was the dominant team in the two meetings last year, but it is a new roster for 2012. “I talked with Coach (John) Brantley and he said they are not as good as last year, but are still pretty sound,” Jackson said. “They lost nine guys on defense, but they return some guys who can play, and they have picked it up the last couple of weeks. They will come in with a good squad.” Jackson said a win will take few mistakes on the part of the Indians and tak-ing advantage of miscues by the Celtics. “If they give us opportunities to capitalize, we have to do our part,” Jackson said. “We need to take what they give us and take care of the ball. We can’t be pas-sive and we can’t run the ball over. We are going all out to win.” JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Nate Ayers falls over an Orange Park High defender during the Tigers 21-0 win. scheduled for homecom-ing. You want to make them pay.” Allen said it’ll be a good test for the Tigers second-ary as the Lions look to air it out. “They’re a shotgun team,” Allen said. “They’ll try to throw the ball and that’s how they had some success on Orange Park. They were able to get up throwing the football.” Allen said he doesn’t expect any surprises for the offense at this point in the season and the Tigers simply must execute. “Defensively they’re a 4-3 look,” Allen said. “They move the safety around and do some things with him. We’ve seen it all at this point — blitzing, man and zone. It’s a matter of exe-cuting our assignments.”

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LAKE CITY REPORTER FOOTBALL FRIDAY & SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2-3, 2012 3B3BSportsSEC could be left out of BCSBy RALPH D. RUSSOAssociated PressA BCS championship game without a Southeastern Conference team? It could happen, and LSU could be the cause. The fifth-ranked Tigers host No. 1 Alabama on Saturday, another huge game in a rivalry that has become the biggest event in college football. “It’s obvious when you walk into the room that cer-tainly we’re playing a differ-ent team,” LSU coach Les Miles said this week. “It’s a little fuller, and there’s a little more attention to detail. That’s the way it’s supposed to be. The SEC has won the last six BCS championships, and the Crimson Tide has been rolling toward a third BCS title game in four sea-sons. Last season, losing 9-6 in overtime to LSU at home didn’t keep Alabama out of the championship game, which it won 21-0 in an all-SEC rematch with the Tigers. But last year, Alabama got a break when LSU was the only unbeaten team in major college football. Matched against other one-loss teams, specifically Oklahoma State, the Tide got the nod. Right now, a second chance doesn’t seem likely. There are three undefeated teams right behind the Tide in the BCS standings. Alabama is the only remaining unbeaten team in the SEC. A loss to LSU — or any loss for that mat-ter, though this is the big-gest hurdle — would likely drop the Tide behind the other highly ranked unbeat-en teams. That is assum-ing Kansas State, Oregon and Notre Dame all stay unbeaten. Even more potentially problematic for Alabama, a loss to LSU puts the Tide behind the Tigers in the SEC West race. With a vic-tory, LSU would become the SEC team best posi-tioned to play in the nation-al title game. Georgia and Florida would also be in the mix if either could win the SEC championship with only one overall loss. But with one loss, the SEC champion is going to need help in the form of losses by at least two of the other big three. This might seem like heresy to SEC fans, but in some ways it would be fitting. Only the SEC can keep the SEC from win-ning a national title. It’s this scenario that made SEC Commissioner Mike Slive push for a playoff. As for the other three unbeatens, this weekend is a mixed bag. No. 2 Oregon (fourth in the BCS standings), plays at No. 18 Southern California. Even with the Trojans (6-2) not living up to their advanced billing, this will be the Ducks’ toughest challenge yet. No. 3 Kansas State (second in the BCS) is home to face Oklahoma State (6-2). Using two freshmen quar-terbacks hasn’t stopped the Cowboys from being one of the best offenses in the country. They lead the nation in yards per game at 586, and figure to be a good test for a tough Wildcats defense. No. 4 Notre Dame (third in the BCS) has what looks to be the easiest game, with Pittsburgh (4-4) coming to South Bend, Ind. But the Fighting Irish have played close games all season, and the Panthers seem to be making progress under first-year coach Paul Chryst. The picks: SATURDAY No. 1 Alabama (minus 9 12 ) at No. 5 LSU One question: Can Tigers score? ... ALABAMA 21-7 No. 2 Oregon (minus 7 12 ) at No. 18 Southern California Trojans can salvage their season, maybe Matt Barkley’s Heisman run ... OREGON 45-31. Oklahoma State (plus 9 12 ) at No. 3 Kansas State Cowboys won 52-45 last year. Could be another wild one ... KANSAS STATE 52-38. Pittsburgh (plus 16 12 ) at No. 4 Notre Dame Last four meetings (2-2) decided by average of four points ... NOTRE DAME 28-13. Illinois (plus 27 12 ) at No. 6 Ohio State Another good day for Braxton Miller’s Heisman campaign ... OHIO STATE 45-10. BEST BET Mississippi (plus 14) at No. 7 Georgia Bulldogs have won nine straight meetings ... GEORGIA 41-24. Missouri (plus 16 12 ) at No. 8 Florida Tigers and Gators have met only once before, in 1965 Sugar Bowl ... FLORIDA 28-10. No. 10 Clemson (minus 13) at Duke Blue Devils have lost three straight to Tigers, none close ... CLEMSON 45-24. Temple (plus 15) at No. 12 Louisville Cardinals rarely do things the easy way ... LOUISVILLE 31-21. Arizona State (plus 4 12 ) at No. 13 Oregon State Beavers switch back to Cody Vaz at QB after first loss ... OREGON STATE 28-21. No. 14 Oklahoma (minus 11) at Iowa State Sooners have won 20 straight in Ames ... OKLAHOMA 28-20. No. 15 Stanford (minus 28) at Colorado Hapless Buffs working through brutal portion of schedule ... STANFORD 48-10. No. 16 Texas A&M (minus 6 12 ) at No. 17 Mississippi State First meeting since 2000 “Snow Bowl” in Shreveport, La. ... TEXAS A&M 34-31. UPSET SPECIAL San Diego State (plus 14) at No. 19 Boise State New Mountain West rivals will head to Big East next year ... SAN DIEGO STATE 24-21. Texas (plus 7 12 ) at No. 20 Texas Tech Lubbock can be a tough place to turn around a season for Longhorns ... TEXAS TECH 42-38. No. 21 Nebraska (minus 1 12 ) at Michigan State Spartans victory muddles makes Big Ten race ... NEBRASKA 21-17. USTA (plus 32) at No. 22 Louisiana Tech Can Bulldogs reach 80? How about 90? ... LOUISIANA TECH 72-24. TCU (plus 6 12 ) at No. 23 West Virginia Geno Smith and Mountaineers try to get their mojo back ... WEST VIRGINIA 48-38. No. 24 Arizona (plus 3 12 ) at No. 25 UCLA Wildcats are Pac-12 version of West Virginia: All offense, not much D ... UCLA 38-31. Last week’s record : 12-7 (straight); 6-13 (vs. points) Season record : 14633 (straight); 83-78 (vs. points) Best bets : 3-6. Upset specials : 5-4. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFlorida tight end Jordan Reed (11) watches as the ball i s knocked out of his grasp by Georgia’s Jarvis Jones (29) during a game on Saturday. ASSOCIATED PRESSAlabama quarterback AJ McCarron (10) signals a play at the line of scrimmage during the first half against Mississippi State at Bryant-Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Ala on Saturday.Quarterback key in Alabama-LSU matchupBy JOHN ZENORAssociated PressTUSCALOOSA, Ala. — A quarterback described as a game manager can often be perceived as someone who’s mostly responsible for supervising plays and not making them. Unless the QB is AJ McCarron and he plays for Nick Saban. The coach of top-ranked Alabama considers it the highest praise. No. 5 LSU (7-1, 3-1 Southeastern Conference) would love to get a McCarron-like, efficient performance from Zach Mettenberger Saturday night in Baton Rouge where both passers will be supported by pun-ishing tailbacks and terrific defenses. McCarron has been the consummate game manag-er even with 18 touchdown passes. “I don’t think it’s fair to AJ that because I said he’s a really good game man-ager for us that it’s like that means he doesn’t do anything,” Saban said. “He does everything. I don’t think you can be a good quarterback unless you’re a really good game manager. That’s the ultimate compli-ment, to me.” McCarron has been the nation’s most efficient passer with a quarterback rating of 182.4 for Alabama (8-0, 5-0). He’s thrown 262 passes without an intercep-tion dating back to last sea-son, second-longest in SEC history behind the 325-pass streak by Kentucky’s Andre’ Woodson. McCarron wants to clear up what being a game man-ager means in his eyes. “What I think and then what the media tries to make a game manager out to be is two totally different things,” he said. “I probably think more along the lines of coach Saban. A game manager can be anything. I mean, he can throw nine touchdowns in one game but he still managed the game. He could hand the ball off 47 times but still manage the game. “I think coach, in that aspect, is saying he’s taking what the defense is giving him and he’s not making any real bonehead mistakes. And that’s the biggest thing. People nowadays love to see the ball being slung around and everything but that’s not our style of play. So I’m going to, like what coach always, take what the defense gives me and ... eventually they’ll give you the game.” The strong-armed Mettenberger might still be finding his way toward the game manager role in his first year as starter. He hasn’t completed 50 per-cent of his passes in any of the last three games — all against ranked SEC teams — and has one touchdown pass, two interceptions and a modest 403 passing yards during that stretch. Mettenberger has been intercepted a modest four times through eight games. Running back Michael Ford and his teammates are standing by their quarterback. “He throws a little bad ball and everybody jumps on his back,” Ford said. “We’ve just got to go out there and give him confidence.” It’s Mettenberger’s first time playing in an Alabama-LSU confrontation. He knows the big-game drill, though. “You have to be levelheaded,” Mettenberger said. “You can’t get too jacked up or you will start throwing balls in the stands. You can’t play with your tail tucked between legs or you’ll play too timid. It’s a fine line, between looking too relaxed and being too jacked up. A quarterback has to do a good job keep-ing your emotions in check during the game.

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4B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2-3, 20124BSPORTSGators must fight predictabilityBy MARK LONGAssociated PressGAINESVILLE — There are plenty of adjectives to describe Florida’s offense, which ranks 100th in the nation and managed just three field goals in a costly loss to rival Georgia last week. The best one might be predictable. The eighth-ranked Gators are running the ball on 78.1 percent of their first downs, the highest of any team in a Bowl Championship Series conference. Army, New Mexico, Air Force and Navy — teams that run option schemes — are the only programs in the entire Football Bowl Subdivision that run the ball more than Florida on first down. “Probably a little predictable,” Gators offensive coordinator Brent Pease admitted this week. “Now, we’re never going to get it back to balanced because the numbers are so skewed at this time in the season, but we kind of go on a game-to-game basis.” The Gators (7-1, 6-1 Southeastern Conference) get a chance to be more balanced Saturday against Missouri (4-4, 1-4). Then again, facing the Tigers’ tal-ented defensive front might prompt the Gators to be even more cautious. Florida’s run-pass ratio has been tilted even more over the past four games, with the Gators running the ball 81 percent of the time on first down. They ran 23 of 24 times on first down against South Carolina and 19 of 27 against Georgia. “Obviously, we haven’t made that many plays in the passing game,” quar-terback Jeff Driskel said. “But we have confidence that when we get one-on-one matchups we’re going to be able to beat them. We have good receivers and we have good playmakers, and we’re just going to have to start hitting some big plays.” Florida’s predictability seemed like a fluke early in the season, especially since the offense was moving the ball pretty well behind running back Mike Gillislee. The senior led the Southeastern Conference in rushing for much of the year, but he has tailed off over the last three weeks. Gillislee has averaged just 60 yards rushing against Vanderbilt, South Carolina and Georgia. It has become clear that defenses are focused on stopping Gillislee, but that hasn’t stopped Pease from calling his number on first down. Gillislee has accounted for more than half of Florida’s first-down runs (56.4 percent). That num-ber increases to 64.4 per-cent over Florida’s last four games. It’s fine when the Gators are getting significant chunks on first down. But when they’re not, it leaves them in secondand third-and-long situations. And Florida is hardly equipped to handle those. Driskel holds the ball too long at times, struggling to make quick decisions. The offensive line has been shaky all season in pass protection, giving up 26 sacks. Running backs and tight ends need to be better at picking up blitzes. And the receiving corps has to get more separation, run more precise routes and not drop balls. And force feeding Florida’s best option, tight end Jordan Reed, comes with problems, too. “There’s coverage on him,” Pease said. “We had a couple in the (Georgia) game where we were going to him, but they had him sniffed out. You’ve got to go to your alternatives. You can’t just do things where it’s one guy because then what are you going to do? They’ve got an idea that he’s kind of built into the game plan. It’s there, but sometimes it isn’t there, you know?” When asked about the first-down numbers, coach Will Muschamp tried to blame them on certain situ-ations. But when reminded that eight games is a pretty significant sample size, he relented. “That’s something we’re aware of,” he said. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFlorida kicker Caleb Sturgis (19) trips up Georgia’s M alcolm Mitchell (26) as he runs the ball up the field a fter catching a punt on Saturday at EverBank Field in Jacksonville. ASSOCIATED PRESSSouth Carolina running back Marcus Lattimore grabs his right knee after getting hit by Tennessee’s Eric Gordon during the first half of an NCAA college football game at Williams-Br ice Stadium in Columbia, S.C.Gamecocks moving on without LattimoreBy PETE IACOBELLIAssociated PressCOLUMBIA, S.C. — South Carolina running back Kenny Miles sees the same desire, the same drive and the same focus from the Gamecocks, even with tailback Marcus Lattimore on the sidelines. The Gamecocks (7-2, 5-2 Southeastern Conference) have a much-needed week off before closing out league play at home against Arkansas on Nov. 10. Miles, a senior, will start in place of Lattimore, South Carolina’s star tailback who was lost for the season after a gruesome knee injury last week against Tennessee. Lattimore dislocated his right knee and had severe ligament damage, an injury coach Steve Spurrier said would likely need more than one surgery to repair. Losing a leader and team captain like Lattimore is a blow, Miles said. But the Gamecocks have made it through this storm before, going 5-1 after Lattimore tore a ligament in his left knee midway through the 2011 season. “It’s definitely a tough situation,” said Miles, the team’s leading rusher in 2009 the season before Lattimore arrived. “But we’ve still got the pieces, still got the people, still got the coaches. We’re focused and ready to go.” Lattimore, though, remains in the Gamecocks’ thoughts. Tight end Justice Cunningham has worn Lattimore’s No. 21 at prac-tice this week as a trib-ute, the way he’s done with other injured teammates this year. “Just to love for the boys,” Cunningham said. Lattimore is the team’s leading rusher with 662 yards and 11 touchdowns. His two primary backups this season, Miles and freshman Mike Davis, have 306 yards and two touch-downs combined. Defensive coordinator Lorenzo Ward said it was important for the players not to dwell on Lattimore’s absence during the team’s workouts during the bye week. He says the focus has been on what went wrong on the field in the 38-35 victory over Tennessee and not about who won’t be with them the rest of the way. “I think the kids came out focused,” Ward said. “We’ve watched the game tape and showed them the mistakes we made and showed them the places we can get bet-ter. I think they came out with a great mentality.” It’s hard to erase the memory of Lattimore’s gruesome injury for any-one who watched it hap-pen or saw him sobbing in pain and disappointment last Saturday. Several play-ers, including Miles, took part in an unprecedented rally of support on campus for Lattimore this past Monday, the tailback’s 21st birthday. The support has stretched across the SEC, from Tennessee’s players walking out to wish him well as Lattimore lay hurt on the turf to players like Auburn’ running back Tre Mason and LSU defensive end Sam Montgomery ded-icating their performances to the South Carolina run-ner. That’s no surprise, said Auburn coach Gene Chizik, who befriended Lattimore in the recruiting process and made the player’s final two schools. Chizik found a well-rounded, level-headed person who cared about the right things — people, academics, faith and foot-ball. “He’s a different guy,” Chizik said. “I think that he’s not only a tremendous football player on the field, he’s probably a better per-son off the field.” ASSOCIATED PRESSKansas State quarterback Collin Klein (7) runs for a touchdown during the second half against Texas Tech in Manhattan, Kan on Saturday.Jets’ Tebow, K-State’s Klein lead parallel livesBy DAVE SKRETTAAssociated PressMANHATTAN, Kan. — They’ve never met, never even talked, but they’d probably be best of friends. Both of them were home schooled, both are rooted deeply in their Christian faith. Both were standout prep players who overcame funky throwing motions to develop into bruising, run-first quarter-backs for two of college football’s most accom-plished coaches. All that Collin Klein needs to do now is lead No. 3 Kansas State to a nation-al championship, stop by the Best Buy Theater in New York to accept the Heisman Trophy along the way, and the comparisons to former Florida star and current Jets backup Tim Tebow may never end. “I’ve never met him and I’ve barely ever heard him speak, but watching him, you can see his team believes in him,” Tebow said in an interview with The Associated Press. “He has great leadership, great poise, awesome competi-tive excellence and he’s a winner. At the end of games and in big situa-tions in games, he always comes through. That’s an awesome trait.” It’s one of the traits that defined Tebow’s career with the Gators. Just like Klein, who has developed under the sage-ly wisdom of Bill Snyder, Tebow leaned on the guid-ance of Urban Meyer to become one of the sports’ most dynamic players. Tebow threw for 3,286 yards, completed 66.9 per-cent of his passes, and had 32 touchdown passes with only six interceptions. But it was on the ground where he truly set himself apart, running for 895 yards and 23 touchdowns with the kind of power usually found in a fullback. He wound up taking home the Heisman Trophy. Looking back, Tebow recognizes the similarities between the 2007 season he put together — and the two after that — with the senior season that Klein is having in the Flint Hills. He’s on pace to throw for 2,649 yards with 20 touchdowns and just three interceptions this season, and would finish with 1,030 yards and 26 touch-downs on the ground. Numbers quite similar to Tebow’s Heisman season.

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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2-3, 2012 5B5B Woods says getting back to No. 1 will take timeAssociated PressSINGAPORE — On the two-year anniversary of los-ing his No. 1 ranking, Tiger Woods said Thursday that winning was the best way for him to get back to the top. And that could take some time. Four players have been No. 1 over the last two years. The current top ranking belongs to Rory McIlroy, who has widened his lead by winning the U.S. PGA Championship and consec-utive tournaments during the FedEx Cup playoffs. McIlroy was runner-up last week against a strong field in Shanghai. “Rory is playing a lot of events, and so am I, toward the beginning of the year,” Woods said in Singapore, where he staged a youth clinic on putting. “It’s about winning golf tourna-ments. That’s how I got to No. 1, that’s how Rory got to No. 1. You’ve got to win golf tournaments, and when you don’t, you’ve got to be con-sistent and finish high. I’m looking forward to that.” Woods won three times this year on the U.S. tour, though it took time for his trademark consistency to develop. He did not have back-to-back finishes in the top 10 until the British Open (tie for third) and the Bridgestone Invitational (tie for eighth). He hasn’t fin-ished out of the top 10 since The Barclays in August, a streak of four tournaments. Woods ends his 2012 sea-son at his World Challenge in California in the last week of November. “Things are progressing nicely,” Woods said. “Last year I was 127th on the money list, this year I was second. So I think that’s a pretty good improvement in a year. And given that I’m healthy, I’m really looking forward to next year.” He decided not to play the HSBC Champions this week in China, saying he was too tired to prepare properly. Woods will have played 24 tournaments this year, his most since 2005, which includes an unofficial event in Turkey and the Ryder Cup. Woods confirmed he will not play in January at the Tournament of Champions in Hawaii, where he last competed in 2005. That will give him six full weeks off after his World Challenge. “Doing these things are easy,” Woods said of the clinic at Marina Bay Sands. “Competing and getting ready for another golf tour-nament ... I just didn’t want to do that. I’ve got four more rounds, which is my tourna-ment in LA, and I’m done until Abu Dhabi next year, so I’m looking forward to having this extended break. This is like my offseason now, and I’m really looking forward to just getting away from it. “Competing and playing golf tournaments — the playoffs, the Ryder Cup and a lot of other tournaments — it’s been a lot.” McIlroy also is skipping the World Golf Championship this week, though he will finish his season in Singapore, Hong Kong and Dubai as he tries to match Luke Donald’s feat of winning money titles on the U.S. PGA Tour and European Tour in the same season. Of all the legitimate rivals for Woods over the years, McIlroy is the first player who is younger — by more than 13 years. Woods said it would take time to deter-mine whether the 23-year-old from Northern Ireland is the best he has ever faced. McIlroy beat Woods in an 18-hole exhibition in China on Monday. ASSOCIATED PRESSTiger Woods hits a ball out of the bunker on the 18th hol e during his 18-hole medal match against Rory McIlroy at the Lake Jinsha Golf Club in Zhengzhou, China, on Monday.

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6B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & PUZZLES FRIDAY & SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2-3, 2012 DEAR ABBY: We recently learned that our son-in-law, “Mike,” was fired from his job as a community service officer with the county. He committed second-degree criminal sexual assault on two women inmates he was supervising and is now in the process of going to court. We hope he’ll be convicted and sent away so our daughter can put her life together. This has torn our family apart. We don’t know how to get through to her that she deserves so much bet-ter than this. She refuses to divorce him even though this was happening during their marriage and her pregnancy, She claims she’s not being abused, but we have seen how controlling Mike has been throughout their courtship and marriage. How can we help her realize that life without him would be so much bet-ter and that sex offenders are never really “cured”? They tell us they are “constantly praying” and that “God has already forgiven” him for what he has done. Any advice you can offer would be greatly appreciated. -WORRIED PARENTS DEAR WORRIED PARENTS: Your son-in-law’s abuse of his authority is appalling. But as long as he’s still around and “con-stantly praying” (probably more for a sympathetic jury than forgiveness for what he did to those women), you won’t get through to your daughter. Fortunately, the justice system has sentencing guidelines for men who abuse their power the way Mike has, and he may be going away for a long, long time. Once he’s gone, start talking to your daughter about counseling to deal with the trauma she has been through, and let a mental health professional shed some light on this. If the message comes from a person with no bias, it stands a better chance of getting through. P.S. I wholeheartedly agree she would be better off without him. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: I live in Arizona where the temper-ature can hit 100 degrees and we get 300-plus days of sunshine every year. I always have my 5-month-old son wear his sunglasses when he goes outside, and I get the most asinine comments from total strangers! Everything from “Can I have his auto-graph?” to “Does he think he’s cool?” How can they be so dumb? People, tiny eyes need protection too! -A NEW MOMMY DEAR NEW MOMMY: The individuals you describe aren’t “dumb”; they are making a failed attempt at humor. However, I showed your letter to Beverly Hills oph-thalmologist Peter Cornell, M.D., who told me: “It’s ideal for everyone -regardless of age -to protect their eyes from ultraviolet light. And it’s advisable for babies to be protected when they’re outside. But it is NOT as ‘crucial’ with children as it is for older individuals, because their bodies are better able to repair oxida-tive damage. That said, ultraviolet light is not the friend of anyone’s eyes.” ** ** **DEAR ABBY: I was married recently but kept my maiden name. As wedding gifts, we received two sets of towels monogrammed with my husband’s last initial, and a plaque for the front of the house -“House of (his last name), Established 2012.” While we appreciate this generosity, I’m sure we will not put the items to use. (The plaque was from a close family member on my husband’s side who knew I would be keeping my name.) How do we handle this? -PERPLEXED NEWLYWED IN CLEVELAND DEAR PERPLEXED: Here’s how: Consign the plaque to your husband’s man-cave (or toss it), use the towels for something other than display, and write a gracious thank-you to the family members who gave them to you for their thoughtfulness. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: I’m 14 and my dad is in the military, so he’s away from home most of the time. I try to help Mom out as best I can, knowing she’s stressed with Dad gone. Whenever she gets mad at me, she calls me a “brat,” “selfish” or a “jerk.” She even told me once or twice that if she was my age, she wouldn’t want to be my friend because of the way I act. Abby, please help me. I have always tried my hard-est to do what’s right. How do I handle this without crying myself to sleep? -FEELS LIKE A FAILURE DEAR FEELS LIKE A FAILURE: Sometimes when people are under stress, as your mother is right now, they say things they don’t mean. And sometimes when teens are under stress, they can act out in other ways. A way to handle this would be to wait until your mother has calmed down and talk to her about the effect that her name-calling is having on you. Explain that you’re trying the hardest you can in a difficult situation, and then both of you should apolo-gize to each other. The bruises that unkind words can leave sometimes out-last those that are physical. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: My best friend, “Kathie,” has betrayed me. This may sound silly, but my hus-band and I have a sort of “coat of arms.” Ever since we started writing letters and notes back and forth, he has always drawn a character on them, and it turned into “our” symbol. Kathie is in the armed forces and I made her my maid of honor. But when she showed up, she had that same character tat-tooed on her back! My husband was upset she chose something so inti-mate of ours as a tattoo, and a few people have noticed it as well. I don’t know how to handle this. It feels like a slap in the face. -ROBBED IN FLORIDA DEAR ROBBED: It isn’t a slap in the face -it’s actually the ultimate com-pliment to your husband’s artistry and creativity. And while it would have been nice if Kathie had first asked permission, unless the symbol was trademarked she was free to use it, as is anyone else who sees it on her and admires it. Because her tattoo is offensive to you, ask her to keep it covered when she’s with you. What’s done is done. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: I’m a 38year-old wife and mother who has been happily married for 16 years. My young son recently had a medical emergency in his class at school, and his teacher, “Tom,” stepped in and saved him. Since then I can’t stop thinking about Tom. I love my husband and I don’t plan on seeing or contact-ing Tom in any way other than as my son’s teacher. How do I stop thinking about him? Please help. -GOING CRAZY IN TENNESSEE DEAR GOING CRAZY: First of all, you’re NOT going crazy. You are grate-ful to the “hero” who saved your son. The more you try to smother your thoughts about Tom, the more they will happen. The most effective way I know of to deal with this would be to talk out your thoughts with someone. If this would be too uncom-fortable to discuss with your husband, then do it with a trusted female friend. Over time it should subside. HOROSCOPES DEAR ABBY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Lighten up. All work and no play will lead to emotional upset. Put everything aside and you will enhance your relation-ships and feel good about your future. Don’t be a poor sport. You’ll get bet-ter responses if you are fun to be with. ++++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Nurture a relation-ship and you will benefit. A trip to visit someone you have a concern with will help you resolve issues. Strengthen your position and protect what you have worked so hard to achieve. Creative solutions will be recognized. +++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Face controversy head-on, refusing to back down from anyone trying to take over your terri-tory. Pull in favors that will allow you to surpass any competition you face. Love is highlighted, and a late-night celebration should be planned. +++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Connect with people who have something to offer. A change in the way you handle your money, people and the projects you want to pursue will help you excel. Added dis-cipline will help you recog-nize what’s required of you in order to prosper. +++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Truth rules and will be beneficial in the end. Problems at home and with family will keep you busy. Do your best to find workable solutions that don’t cost too much. Hands-on help coupled with enthusiasm and good ideas will pay off. ++++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Learn from observa-tion and listening to how others perceive what’s unfolding. Troubles at home due to disagree-ments should be avoided at all costs. It’s best to ride out the storm and make adjustments later. Keep your life simple and mod-erate. ++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): You’ve got what it takes to excel. Don’t hesitate to take over and do your thing. Your abil-ity to adapt to whatever changes happen around you will give you the edge and should lead to greater respect and a higher posi-tion. Love is highlighted. +++++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Enforce an idea you have. Fear of failure must not be your demise. Own mistakes and learn from them. An emotional rela-tionship with someone you trust will give you the courage you need to press forward. Don’t be afraid to be a little different. +++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Buy yourself time regarding matters that have to deal with you parting with your cash. Focus more on relation-ships and what others have to offer you. Make changes at home that will encourage your love life to be enhanced. Collect debts. +++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Put your expertise to work without gloating. It’s in your best interest to remain humble and generous to those you encounter personally and professionally. Don’t allow jealousy to create dissatis-faction. +++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Stick close to home and focus on improvements that will cut your overhead, ease your stress and make important relationships better. The more you do to fix up your place or to build a strong home base, the less oppo-sition you will face. +++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Put time and effort into financial, medical and legal settlements that are pending. You can push oth-ers to resolve issues that will help you move for-ward with other dreams, hopes and wishes for the future. Avoid excess or overindulgent people. ++ THE LAST WORD Eugenia Last Steer daughter to counseling after son-in-law is in jail Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com Puzzle Solutions on the next page.

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FRIDAY & SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2-3, 2012 PUZZLES & COMICS LAKE CITY REPORTER 7B DILBERT BABY BLUES BLONDIE BEETLE BAILEY B.C. FRANK & ERNEST FOR BETTER OR WORSE ZITS HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH GARFIELD CELEBRITY CIPHER CLASSIC PEANUTS PUZZLE ANSWERS

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8B LAKE CITY REPORTER NASCAR FRIDAY & SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2-3, 20128BNASCAR NOTEBOOK Martinsville rattles Truck SeriesIn both the Sprint Cup and Camping World Truck Series,the late-season races at TalladegaSuperspeedway and Martinsville Speedway areregarded as championships “wild cards”because ofthe possibility of wrecks that can shuffle thestandings. So it wasn’t too surprising when Ty Dillon,the points leader by one marker entering the Kroger200 at Martinsville,blew a tire and hit the wallwith 50 laps to go,leaving him with a 28th-placefinish and dropping him to second in the stand-ings,21 points behind James Buescher. The new points leader had problems of his own early in the race,falling a lap down,but hebounced back to finish sixth. “Everybody thought Talladega would be the big shakeup race,”Buescher told reporters after therace.“I was more worried about Talladega than Iwas this one,but I guess I was wrong.” Dillon said he isn’t giving up,even with just three races left to run. “We’ll keep digging in Texas next weekend and make up some ground,”he said. Timothy Peters,who started on the pole at Martinsville and finished seventh,remains in thetitle hunt as he’s 25 points out of the lead.Peters ’ Red Horse Racing teammate Parker Kligerman,who finished ninth at Martinsville,is fourth in thestandings,36 back. Denny Hamlin won the Kroger 200.Earnhardt learns from injury Dale Earnhardt Jr.told reporters at Martinsville Speedway last week that he learned a lot during the two weeks he was outof his No.88 Chevrolet because of concussionssuffered in a crash during testing at Kansasand in a wreck in a race at Talladega. “I’ve learned a ton,just about what I’ve gone through,”he said.“I feel like I’m a lot smarter,alot more prepared,and understand the situationa lot better now than I did beforehand … “It’s been a good experience.It’s something I’d rather not have gone through;I learned a lotfrom it.” He said that because of his recent experience, he’ll be quicker to seek medical help in thefuture if he believes he’s had a concussion. “It changes the way I feel about it to where if I know I’ve suffered another concussion,or if Ihave symptoms after an accident,I’m definitelygoing to be a lot more responsible about it,”hesaid.“I can understand people’s opinions thatthey would try to push through it,or they would ignore it to stay in the car because I did thesame thing in the past … “Some concussions are really bad,and I don’t care how tough you think you are,and yourmind is not working the way it is supposed to,itscares the [expletive] out of you. “You are not going to think about race cars. You aren’t going to think about trophies.You arenot going to think about your job.You’re goingto be thinking about what do I got to do to getmy brain working the way it was before.That’sgoing to jump right to the top of the priority list I promise you.” Earnhardt showed no signs of his injury at Martinsville,where he raced among the leadersuntil a late-race shuffle dropped him to 21st atthe finish.Aric Almirola: ‘We can do this’For the second straight week,Aric Almirola had a strong run in the No.43 Ford for Richard PettyMotorsports.A week after qualifying fifth andleading 69 laps at Kansas Speedway before acrash took him out,he finished a season-bestfourth at Martinsville Speedway.His Martinsvillefinish tied his career-best Cup finish fromHomestead-Miami Speedway in 2010. He gave his crew chief much of the credit for his strong performances of the past two weeks. “This just goes to prove that we can do this,” Almirola said.“Five weeks ago they switched crewchiefs and gave me Todd Parrott and from thatpoint forward I’ve been having the most fun I’veever had at a race track. “We’ve been running so good.[At Martinsville] we made chicken salad out of you know what,andthat’s the kind of stuff that Todd Parrott can doand all these guys on his team.” By RICK MINTER / Universal Uclick By RICK MINTER / Universal Uclick Legendary team owner Roush marks 3,000th Cup startTeam owner Jack Roush talks with crew chief Matt Puccia and Greg Biffle ,driver of the No.16 Ford,on the grid prior to the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Sylvania 300 at New Hampshire Motor Speedway on September 23.(NA SCAR photo) NEXTUP... Race: O’Reillys Auto Parts Challenge Where: Texas Motor Speedway When: Saturday, 7:00 p.m. (ET) TV: ESPN 2011 Winner: Trevor Bayne SPRINT CUP CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS NATIONWIDE SERIES Race: WinStar World Casino 350 Where: Texas Motor Speedway When: Friday, 7:30 p.m. (ET) TV: SPEED 2011 Winner: Kevin Harvick Race: AAA Texas 500 Where: Texas Motor Speedway When: Sunday, 2:00p.m. (ET) TV: ESPN 2011 Winner: Tony Stewart (right) NUMERICALLYSPEAKING Laps led by GregBiffle in the past 15 Sprint Cup races at TexasMotor Speedway,the most ofany driver Laps led by KevinHarvick in the past 15 Cup races at Texas,thefewest of any driver in theChase for the Sprint Cup Career Sprint Cupvictories for Jimmie Johnson,who is eighth onthe all-time list Sprint Cup victoriesat Martinsville by Hendrick Motorsports andPetty Enterprises,more thanall other race teams3 732 19 59 The house that Jack built 2012 CHASE CONTENDERS Chase Chart Following the Tums Fast Relief 500 at Martinsville Speedway 1.Jimmie Johnson 2,291 (finished first) The five-time champion turned up the heat at one of his best tracks and took the points lead.“Inorder to be the champion,the tracks you know youcan win at,you have to win at,”he said.“We didthat.”2.Brad Keselowski -2 (finished sixth) Although he lost the points lead,he recovered from a poor,32nd-place qualifying effort to remainin good shape,points-wise.In that respect,it wasalmost like a win.“This championship is going tocome down to Homestead [the season finale],”hesaid.“We have to do what we need to do to be incontention at Homestead.”3.Clint Bowyer -26 (finished fifth) Another solid finish keeps him in the race for the championship with three races to go.4.Kasey Kahne -29 (finished third) Like Bowyer,he’s close enough to the leaders to be considered a legitimate title contender,especial ly if Keselowski and Johnson have trouble over thefinal three races.“We definitely still have a shot,but we’re a ways out,”he said.“I wish we werewithin 20 or 15 [points].I think we’d be a lot morelegit at that point.”5.Denny Hamlin -49 (finished 33rd) He overcame two penalties for speeding on pit road,but an electrical issue sent him to the garageand likely took him out of the running for thechampionship.“One of these days it’s going to beour time,”he said.“It’s just not right now.”6.Jeff Gordon -54 (finished seventh) He had one of the fastest cars at Martinsville but got shuffled back at the end.“The last thing wewanted was to be on the outside on those last tworestarts,and we were and it cost us,”he said.7.Martin Truex Jr.-63 (finished 23rd) A week after posting his best Chase-race finish, a second at Kansas,he had his worst atMartinsville.His Kansas finish is his only top-fivein the Chase.8.Matt Kenseth -65 (finished 14th) He finished OK at a track that’s not one of his best,but he still can’t overcome his early Chasewoes despite two Chase-race victories.9.Greg Biffle -69 (finished 10th) Like Kenseth,he’s struggled at Martinsville over the years,but was heartened by his perform-ance on Sunday.“We’re not quite there,but I thinkwe’re definitely gaining on it,”he said.10.Tony Stewart -71 (finished 27th) The defending Cup champion hasn’t shown the speed he usually does late in the season.He hasjust one top-five finish in the Chase,a fifth atKansas,and has finished 13th or worse in four ofthe past five races.11.Kevin Harvick -88 (finished 32nd) A blown engine left him with his worst finish in the Chase,but the good ones haven’t been thatgreat either,with no top 10s in the Chase.“Justhasn’t been a great year,”he said.“If it isn’t onething,it’s another.”12.Dale Earnhardt Jr.-140 (finished 21st) Although the two races he missed because of concussions knocked him out of the championship,he ran strong in his comeback,only to be spun inthe closing stages.“We didn’t have a really goodcar and fought some issues all day long,”he said.“Just made some poor choices at the end that gotus run over.”When the green flag dropped onSunday at Martinsville Speedway,veteran team owner Jack Roush saw one of his cars start a Sprint Cup racefor the 3,000th time. Since his first start in the 1988 Daytona 500,Roush has won 130 Cup races and twochampionships,but his first start gave littleindication of the future success,as he point-ed out to reporters at Martinsville. After fielding numerous entries in road racing,Roush made his first Cup race with MarkMartin driving his No.6 Ford,and RobinPemberton,now NASCAR’s vice president forcompetition and racing development,as thecrew chief.At that time,Roush was aNASCAR outsider,literally and figuratively. “We didn’t have a garage to start with, and then they finally gave us one down atthe very end when somebody who had morestanding didn’t come,”he said.“We’veclimbed the ladder.” In that first start,Roush’s Ford dropped out after 19 laps because of an overheatingengine,long before Bobby Allison beat hisson Davey to the checkered flag in one ofthe more memorable Daytona 500 finishesof all time. Throughout their first season together, Roush and Martin did provide glimpses of their future success,but they were few andfar between.They got their first top-10 fin-ish with a sixth-place run at Darlington inthe fifth race of the season and their firsttop-five was a runner-up at Bristol the nextrace.But their average finish was 19.1,andthey did not finish 10 races. Even for most of the 1989,that first win continued to elude them. “I wasn’t sure we were going to win in the second year until the fall race atRockingham when Mark won,”Roush said.“The sponsors I had were teetering,but thatwin gave them the green to go forward withus another year.All of the sponsors I had tostart with were one-year programs,so thatcemented a relationship with Folgers,andthen Valvoline quickly wanted in,so wewere on our way.” In 1990,Martin won three races,the first year for multiple wins for Roush,and in1992,Roush fielded multiple entries for thefirst time,with Wally Dallenbach Jr.joiningthe team to drive the No.16 Ford.Now,theteam fields cars for Greg Biffle,CarlEdwards,Matt Kenseth and occasionallyRicky Stenhouse Jr.and is a regular con-tender for victory. Roush also has 131 wins in the Nationwide Series and 50 more in the Camping World Truck Series. “Little by little we gained the experience, and I had enough good people around tomake the important judgments that led usto becoming a viable multiple-car team,”Roush said.“It was really a blessing for thetotal number of victories we’ve got.If youinclude our road racing wins and otherNASCAR series,we’re at about 450 victoriesnow,so running the trucks,Nationwide andCup – all three – and having the successwe’ve had has done a lot to bolster our con-fidence to help us cement,bring along spon-sors,and form the basis for the successwe’ve had.” And it’s been a success not only as far as trophies are concerned,but on the businessside,too.In addition to preparing cars forhis own team,Roush provided cars andtechnology to other teams including RichardPetty Motorsports and Wood BrothersRacing. “We’ve had to look at a series,look at a race car and the rules,and then considerthe opportunity to make a viable businessout of it by selling the technology and sell-ing the success to other people who wouldlike to bask in it,”he said.“So the fact we’vebeen able to survive for 25 years in Cup rac-ing is more important to me than 300 wins.” Dale Earnhardt Jr. (NASCAR photo)

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FRIDAY& SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2-3, 2012 CLASSIFIEDLAKE CITYREPORTER 9B CLASSIFIED AD vantageTake ADvantage of the Reporter Classifieds!755-5440Lake City Reporter FIND IT SELL IT BUY IT $17504 lines 3 days Includes 2 Signs Each additional line $1.65 Garage Sale Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$10104 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.10One item per ad Under $500 Personal Merchandise Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$16754 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.15One item per ad Under $1,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less. Each item must include a price. 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General Information In Print and Onlinewww.lakecityreporter.com Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$2504 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $.25One item per ad Under $100 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE 3RD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILDIVISIONCASE NO. 12-2012-CA-000048WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR CARRINGTON MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, SER-IES 2007-RFCI, ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATESPlaintiff,vs.LESLIE D. GLASS; LYDIAA. GLASS; JOHN H. STANFORD; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POS-SESSION OF THE SUBJECTPROPERTY;Defendants.NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to a Final Judgment of Foreclo-sure dated 10/18/2012, and entered in Case No. 12-2012-CA-000048, of the Circuit Court of the 3rd Judicial Circuit in and for COLUMBIACounty, Florida. WELLS FAR-GO BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR CARRINGTON MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, SERIES 2007-RFCI, ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES is Plaintiff and LESLIE D. GLASS; LYDIAA. GLASS; JOHN H. STANFORD; UNKNOWN PER-SONS(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECTPROPERTY; are defend-ants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ON THE THIRD FLOOR OF THE COLUM-BIACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE AT173 N.E. HERNANDO AVENUE, LAKE CITY, FLORIDA, at 11:00 a.m., on the 28th day of Nov., 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit:LOT9, BLOCK B, OF BELLAIRE SUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO THE PLATTHEREOF, AS RE-CORDED IN PLATBOOK 3, PAGE 66, OF THE PUBLIC RE-CORDS OF COLUMBIACOUN-TY, FLORIDAAperson claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.Dated this 18th day of Oct., 2012.P. DEWITTCASONAs Clerk of said CourtBy /s/ B. ScippioAs Deputy ClerkSEALIf you are a person with a disability who requires accommodations in or-der to participate in a court proceed-ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of certain assis-tance. Individuals with disability who require special accommodations in order to participate in a court pro-ceeding should contact the ADAco-ordinator, 173 NE Hernando Ave-nue, Room 408, Lake City, FL32055. (386) 719-7428, within two (2) business days of receipt of notice to appear. Individuals who are hear-ing impaired should call (800) 955-8771. Individuals who are voice im-paired should call (800) 955-8770.05535542November 2, 9, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURTFOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAPROBATE DIVISIONFile Number: 12-250-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF SALLIE MAE DEESE,Deceased.NOTICE TO CREDITORSThe administration of the estate of SALLIE MAE DEESE, deceased, whose date of death was May 17, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Columbia County, Florida, Pro-bate Division under probate file # 12-250-CP, the address of which is 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055. the names and addresses of the personal representa-tive and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below.All creditors of the decedent and oth-er persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this courtWITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICA-TION OF THIS NOTICE.ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITH-IN THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED.NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.The date of first publication of this notice is November 2, 2012/s/ Sally Diane Deese WaltonPersonal RepresentativeSally Diane Deese Walton177 Nursery RoadMonticello, Florida 32344/s/ Paula M. Sparkman, Esq.Attorney for Personal RepresentativePaula M. Sparkman, Esq.P.O. Box 247Monticello, Florida 32345(850) 997-350305535591November 2, 9, 2012 020Lost & Found Lost dog Walker mix. Brown w/white chest, paws & white strip on snout. wearing blue collar. Last seen 10/19/12 S LC. 386-292-9115 020Lost & Found LOST on 10/30 in Downtown LC Reddish Lab, Chipped w/ no collar. Family dog. Please call 386-288-4713 Reward Offered 100Job Opportunities05535631HOLIDAYINN & SUITESLake City’s only full service hotel is seeking the following : Line Cook P/TMust have Experience Apply in person Mon-Fri 12-5pm 213 SWCommerce Dr. EOE/DFWP. CDLClass A Truck Driver Flatbed exp. for F/TSE area. 3 years exp or more. Medical benefits offered. Contact Melissa or Sandy@ 386-935-2773 Dental Hygienist: Golden Opportunity! Full time, Part time, Fill in, we have a great opportunity waiting for you! An immediate opening has just come up! That’s great news in this job market! If you have a friendly can-do attitude, a gentle touch, a great work ethic, you are orgainized, and self motivated with a god sense of humor, then you should apply. Call 888-486-2408 to hear a message with more details about the position and instructions on how to apply for this position in Madison, FL. Great benefits! Established Ocala business is Looking to hire additional sales teams for our expanding product line.Earn $500.00/week, plus commission!If you’re upbeat, friendly and enjoy working with the public, then contact us for a confidential interview and start earning the income you deserve! Valid driver’s license, proof of insurance and overnight travel is required. Call us TODAYat 352-233-2818.Telecom Service Bureau, Inc. P/THousekeeper Needed. Occasional Nights And Weekends. Fax Resume to 386-487-1232. SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 120Medical Employment05535460Gainesville Women’s Center ForRadiology Arlene Weinshelbaum, M.D. EXP. MAMMOGRAPHY TECH wanted full time or part time,for private Radiology office. AART& Mammography certification req. Fax resume to: Tracy: (352)331-2044 05535529Medical/Clerical Immediate opening for Energetic Individual with strong computer skills. Up to $15/hr depending on experience. Benefits Package after three (3) months. Contact the Human Resources Dept. 866-675-3614 05535562Medical Assistant Full time medical assistant with several years experience required.Salary based on experience.Email resume in confidence to mafaisal05@yahoo.com or fax to 386-758-5987. 05535577RN OncologyFast paced Oncology Hematology practice currently seeking a permanent, full time ONCOLOGYINFUSION RN to work in outpatient chemotherapy at their Lake City location. Work schedule M-F, 8am-5pm. Please send resume with salary req. to jsmith@ccofnf.com. Resumes without salary req. will not be considered. F/T Entry Level position in busy Medical Practice. M-F, Benefits Avail. Fax resume to 386-487-1232. 240Schools & Education05535484Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class12/24/2012• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-11/05/12• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies MINI SCHNAUZER Female puppy, CKC, Shots, HC, $350.00 755-3547 or 466-6709 MINI SCHNOODLE Male Puppy, CKC, Shots, HC $300.00 755-3547 or 466-6709 PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 330Livestock & SuppliesDeep Creek Farms Barn kept Square or Net Wrapped Round Hay Bales For Sale Ronnie Hughes (386)365-1425 407Computers DELLComputer $100.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 413Musical MerchandiseSpinet type piano. $900 OBO Must Sell Contact 386-842-5548 430Garage Sales 2540 166th Terr Fri-Sun,8-5 Multi Fam Too much to mention, Very Cheap! Take Pinemount 6mi. West turn left on 27th Rd go 1mi. 2ND ANNUAL 2 MILE YARD SALE, Sat. 11/3, 8-4, SR 47 at the blinking light in Columbia City West on 240 2 miles, Come See What You Can Find 6 family -Sat. 8-?41 S. turn left on 133C, Follow the signs. HH items, Cpt bed, 2-25” Tv’s, TVwall mount. Something for everyone. BIG RUMMAGE, Sat. 11/3, 8-4 pm., 7170 SWCR 240, West 1.2 mi. on 240 from intersection of 240 & 47 Columbia City, Intern. “A” tractor parts, table saw, welder & rods, lots of mens stuff, some tools, air board, sander, backpack leaf blower, router & stand, womens sweaters, lots of misc. Estate/Garage Sale Sat & Sun ‘til 2pm. Follow Signs. 552 SW Long Leaf Dr. Forest Cntry. Antique toys, furn., clothes, general. Fri, Nov 2nd & Sat, Nov 3rd Pleasant Grove Methodist Church, 8am-2pm, Bake Sale, and must see items, too much to mention. HUGE ESTATE/YARDSALE SAT., 11/3 LOTS of items. Antiques, glassware, furniture, dishes, clothing, kids clothes, toys, Christmas & Fall decorations. 319 SE Andrews Dr. off of Price Creek Rd (CR 245) Info: 623-5181 MOVING SALE Sat., 11/3 8 am to Noon Charleston Ct off Brandview Furniture and furnishings MULTI FAMILY SAT& SUN 8AM-? May items from baby on up. 1640 SE CR 245A, LC Multi family Sat 8am-2pm furniture, baby items, toys, clothes, a little bit of everything. 159 NE Red Dawn Ct., LC, FL PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. SAT11/3 7am-2pm 165 SWStory Pl., LC. Furniture, Home decor, Books, Games, Workout Equipment. SAT. 11/3 Inside and Outside Two familes. Come early for best selections! 7:00 am-? 923 SE Teakwood Terrace, Lake City, FL SAT. 11/3, 8-2, 124 SWRandall Terr., off 242 W., Big Barbie Doll House, toys, clothes, glass things, close out on Metal Art Work. 440Miscellaneous 180 gallon Aquarium stand & lights filter. No leaks, too big for the house. Avail. for pickup on/after Nov. 1. Tank is 6' long, 2 tall & 2' wide, stand is 34" tall. $500 Serious inquiries only please. 386438-8516, let ring, slow to answer. All Children are artists! Ages 2-10 Fall Session Receive $10 off tuition October 22nd Nov. 16th Phone: (386) 438-8060 Noahs-art.com *located across the highway from Honda Bowflex Ultimate 2, Complete with instructions and DVD’s showing 164 exercises. $350 extra set of power rods. 386-758-6782 PRO-FORM ELLIPTICAL $200 Like New, Built in fan 386-758-6782 RCA32" LCD 1080PHD TV. Less than 1 yr old. Excellent Condition $200.00 386-754-4094 Recumbence Bike by NordicTrak (Step through) $200 Like New Contact 758-6782 440Miscellaneous Sports Craft Air Hockey Table Like New $200 OBO 386-365-5269 or 386-697-5563 450Good Things to EatThe Nut Cracker Robert Taylor Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans 2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024 Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville 386-963-4138 or 961-1420 460Firewood Cord+ of split Firewood Ready to burn $150.00 386-243-8325 630Mobile Homes forRent14 x70 MH.Real clean,2br/2ba garden tub,Water furn.,Good Location $575 mo. $300 dep. No Pets 386-755-0064 or (904) 771-5924 2 & 3 BR MH. $400 $450. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 2 BR/2BASW, Completly furnished, carport, shed, located on 41st Dr., $600 mo.,+ Util. $150 Dep. 935-2461 2/1 SW US 90 W, LC,Remodeled, lg yard, porch, quiet area. 1st mth $575 & $500 dep. No pets. 386752-1941 or 965-0932 2/2 Screened porch, Lg. lot, in very nice, clean, well maintained, safe, small park, credit/background check, no pets, really nice place to live, with long term tenants, $485 mo., $485 sec. dep. 386-719-9169 or 386-965-3737. 2BR/1BA Located onCountyRoad 133, $500 mo. plus $5000 dep. 954-258-8841 3BD/2BAMH on 1 ac of land. $850 mth with Deposit. Contact 386-438-0599 or 386-752-2765 3BR/2BADWMH on 1 acre private lot, 1st+last+dep required located in Ellisville. No pets. Contact 352-870-5144 Mobile Homes for rent in White Springs & Ft. White. Contact 386-623-3404 Move-in Special 1st mth Free, 1, 2 or 3bdrm $350/mth. $450 to m/i. Call today m/i tomorrow. 305-984-5511 or 386-344-0830 Newer2/2. Super clean on 1 ac North by distribution center. Perfect for Target employee. $550. mo Call for details. 386-867-9231 Quiet Country Park 3br/2ba $525. Very clean NO PETS! References & Deposit required 386-758-2280 640Mobile Homes forSale2013 DOUBLEWIDE $33,995 inc. set-up, trim-out & A/C Call 386-288-8379. 3/2, 1800 sqft., CBC home, on corner lot, work shop. MLS# 79574 $74,900. REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 3BR/2BA28X64 in a great location, a lot of upgrades, fireplace. Only $2,500 down $399 a month. Call Paula at 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com 4Br/2ba, in town, good investment, current rent set at $825 per mo. MLS # 74958. $74,900 Accredited Real Estate Mike Foster 288-3596 5 LIKENew Mobile Homes!!! For under $30,000. MUSTSEE Call John T. 386-752-1452 575 Credit Score=10% Down on your choice of select New 3/2 or 4/2 Double. Limited time offer for Challenged Credit. North Pointe Homes, 352-872-5566 Accredited Real Estate Nice Home, kitchen redone fenced, backyard, 2br/1ba. MLS#81521, $52,000. Mike Foster 288-3596 BANK REPO 3BR/2BADoublewide ’09 Excellent condition. Only $999 down $377 a month. Call Paula 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #75661 Must be 55+, Manufacture home, 1 ac, fireplace, laundry, open & bright $79,900. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Home in good condition, MH 3br/2ba. Good size kitchen. 4 plus acres. MLS #80235. $63,000 Accredited Real Estate Mike Foster 288-3596 MUSTSEE 2013 2x6 walls, R30 insulation, OSB wrap, house wrap, real wood cabinets, and thermal pain windows. Payment $399 per month call John T386-752-1452. NEW3/2JACOBSEN HOMES Starting at $43,995. Painted WAlls-Del-Set-AC-Skirting-and Steps. North Pointe Homes Hwy 441 N, Gainesville, FL 352-872-5566 NEWJacobsen Model Homes Sale! 13 Left with up to $25,000 off. Don’t buy until you shop North Pointe Homes 4545 NW 13th St Gainesville 352-872-5566 640Mobile Homes forSaleOwn YourProperty? No Money Down with good credit. Great Rates Available. North Pointe Homes 352-872-5566 Palm Harbor Homes New Homes at $39,900 $5k for your used mobile home 3 New models, 1,100-2,400 SQ FT 800-622-2832 ext 210 Results Realty Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Affordable 4/2 on 10 acres in Bell. over 2,200 sqft. in country setting. $80,000 MLS# 76582 Several Bank Repos and Used Homes in stock At North Pointe in Gainesville 352-872-5566 WANTED…CASH PAID for your Mobile Home, Singlewide or Doublewide flood homes welcome. Call 386-288-8379 650Mobile Home & LandBeautiful brick on 11.16 acres w/ DWfor family or renting. In ground pool. MLS 81203. $252,000. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 Lots of sq ft, 4br/2ba approx 2618 sq ft, Newly remodeled kitchen, new roof. MLS 81733. $99,900. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 Owner Fin.-Nice huge 4/2.5 on 3 ac, x-fenced, creek, lrg deck,Paved Rd. McAlpin area. Small down $950/mth 386-867-1833. For picswww.suwanneevalleyproperties.com What a great home, 3BR/2B, 1860 sqft. DWon 5 acres. MLS#80543 $125,000. REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 705Rooms forRent Room for Rent. Microwave, fridge, laundry, internet, private entrance. Convenient. Contact 386-965-3477 for info. 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05535481We’ve got it all!$89 Deposit Limited Avail. Call Today! Windsong Apts. *Free afterschool program386-758-8455 1BR APT. Downtown Location, Clean. New Carpet $450 mo, plus Security. NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456 2br/1ba Apt. Quiet Lake View CH/A$500. mo $500 dep. No pets. 386-344-2170 2BR/2BAw/garage 5 minutes from VAhospital and Timco. Call for details. 386-365-5150 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421REPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Linewww.lakecityreporter.com

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10B LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDFRIDAY& SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2-3, 2012 1 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRentAmberwood Hills Apts. Private Patio area. Beautiful yard. Washer/dryer hkup. Free water & sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special. 386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2 mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet Friendly. Pool laundry & balcony. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com COZYCOTTAGE 1 BRNew paint & carpet. 10 mins. South of LC, all util. & satellite incl. $550 mo. Pet ok, 386-758-2408 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Greentree Townhouse Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free water & sewer. Balcony & patio. Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com REDUCED 2/1 1300 sqft, duplex w/ gargage. refurbished,W/D hook up, CH/A, $650 mth Lease Req. 386-965-2407 or 386-758-5881 Redwine Apartments Pets welcome. with 5 complexes, we have a home for you. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com Updated Apt, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 Wayne ManorApts. Spacious 2bedroom washer/dryer. Behind Kens off Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 www .myflapts.com WindsorArms Apartments. Move in! 2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free 200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com 720Furnished Apts. ForRentRooms forRent Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRentBeautiful Yard, Close to shopping Lots of natural light. 3BD/1.5BA CH/A, $700 mth & $700 dep. Contact 386-344-2170 Warm, Cozy, Just in time for Christmas 2bd / 1ba home. CH/A, $500 mth & $500 dep. Contact 386-344-2170 750Business & Office RentalsFOR LEASE: Downtown Office Space. Convenient to Court house. Call 386-755-3456 ForRent orLease: Former Doctors office, Former professional office & Lg open space: avail on East Baya Ave. Competitive rates. Weekdays 386-984-0622 evenings/weekends 497-4762 PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 805Lots forSale 5 acre lot located in quiet setting River Rise s/d, Homes only, paved street. $65,000 MLS #76151 Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert386-397-3473 6.45 Acres of River front property on Suwannee, Consist of 3 lots, MLS# 77414 $75,000. REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 Beautiful lot on Suwannee. Property features stairway to dock, picnic area. MLS# 78842, $35,000 Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Results Realty Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #80401 $60,000. Must be 55+ 130x750 right on Suwannee, Beautiful lot, minutes from Royal Springs, Denise Bose 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #76668 $32,000 Must be 55+, Buildable lot for site built homes only. In Forest Country. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Lot close to Sante Fe, Suwannee & Ichetucknee MLS 80092 $15,000. REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 Nice vacant lot in Desirable river Community, MLS #73268 $15,000 Brittany Stoeckert386-397-3473 Results Realty, PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Small home on corner lot with 3br, Fenced yards. Needs TLC. MLS # 81204 $23,900 Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Results Realty Vacant land 5.91 acres, part cleared, few miles from Charles Springs & Suwannee $20,500. MLS 80961 REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 810Home forSale 2 OwnerFinanced Homes/ 1 RentalLake City, Mayo, Branford 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 3br/2ba 1677 sqft, close town, Hardy Board Construction Century 21Darby Rogers MLS 81841, $149,900. Call 752-6575 3br/2ba, 2 car garage, LR w/ stove fire place, lg Master Br, New roof Century 21Darby Rogers MLS 81846, $99,500. Call 752-6575 3br/2ba, extra enclosed carport, Manicured property, huge palm trees. Century 21 Darby Rogers MLS 81753, $84,500. Call 752-6575 Access Realty Gorgeous views 3bd/3ba on Lake Montgomery. Elevator, fishing dock & jacuzzi. MLS 81438 $249,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access RealtySpacious 4 bd/3ba Cypress Lake w/ 3643 sqft 1.25 acres on lake. Vaulted ceilings. MLS 81314 $279,900. Patti Taylor386-623-6896 Access RealtyTwo story 1895 Victorian house w/ electrical upgrades throughout. double -deck porches, MLS 71594 $149,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty MLS # 80175 2 story colonial, 4 br, 2b/2.5b, in ground pool, 3 fireplaces, patio, $315,000. Mary Brown Whitehurst 965-0887 Country home on 4 ac, 3br/2.5ba, formal living room, fireplace, MLS 81775 Coldwell Banker Bishop Realty $179,900 Elaine Tolar 755-6488 Cute home, nice paint, great layout. 3br/2ba. MLS 81746 $112,300. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. Must be 55+, 3br/3ba on 7.48 acres, country living, spacious, heated front porch, brick workshop, Call for appt. 752-5290. Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81958-, $115,000. Must be 55+, 3br/2ba, Site Built w/ lots of room, split plan mstr suite, FL. Rm. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81959 Must be 55+, 2br/2ba, $79,900. Site Built Home w/eat in kitchen, laundry rm, scrn porch. Denise Bose @ 752-5290 Location is the key, 3br/2ba, new a/c compressor split floor plan, MLS 81614 Coldwell Banker Bishop Realty $129,900 Sherry Ratliff 365-8414 Looks brand new 3br/2ba split plan spacious L.room, dinning area & breakfast nook. MLS #81426, Coldwell BankerBishop Agency Elaine Tolar 755-6488$149,900 820Farms & Acreage10 acres with well/septic/pp (not guar); $300 dwn; $580 a mth. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com 40 acre Ranch, Brick 3/3 with 2000 sqft., new roof, kitchen remodeled, pole barn, MLS 81641 $349,5000. REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 Access Realty10 acre square tract, High & Dry, OF Avail. w/ 25% down. Convenient Location MLS 81258$39,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access Realty43.64 acres wooded acreage in N.Columbia County. Scenic & Private. MLS 74429 $89,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Coldwell BankerBishop Agency MLS 79650, Elaine Tolar 755-6488. 10 ac w/ 3br/2.5ba, large master ste, lg porch, barn w/ workshop, $280,900. 830Commercial PropertyHigh profile location, multiple office spaces, Call Neil & Hansel Holton 984-5791 at Coldwell BankerBishop Realty MLS# 81848, $102,500 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 880Duplexes QUAILHEIGHTS Golf Course Community. 2br/1ba W/D hock up. Private, safe, secluded. $725 mo $500 sec. 386-243-8235 951Recreational Vehicles2006 HONDA Foreman 500 ATV $2,750.00 OBO Contact 386-623-4372 Gas Gulf Cart Lift Kit Street Legal $2500 386-243-8325