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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01924

Material Information

Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 10-25-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01942

Related Items

Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01924

Material Information

Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 10-25-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01942

Related Items

Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

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By DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comI f it weren’t for a phone call from a neighbor early on the morning that Tropical Storm Debbie dumped buckets of rain across North Central Florida, Michael “Whitey” Norris said he probably would have drowned. Norris was left paralyzed from the chest down after a crash on an all-terrain vehicle 20 years ago. He remembers a call at 7:30 a.m. from a friend who was worried because the water was rising. When he looked out onto his lawn all he saw was water. “It looked like I was on an island,” he said. The water continued to rise, and Norris called for help. When help arrived the water was already waist high. Norris’s friends grabbed him and two Walmart bags full of clothes and headed for higher ground. “I lost everything,” he said. “I had no time to get nothing out.” His Cypress Lake Road home was built in 1997, and retrofitted in 2001 with $50,000 of specialized equipment so he could live alone with only minimal assis-tance. All that is now destroyed. Tod Pauley, general manager of the Super 8 in Lake City, said he is a life-long friend of Norris. He has helped set up a fundraiser to help Norris replace some of the things destroyed. Pauley said that Norris is working to get a new home built. Norris’s father has donated land. A local timber company, K & H timber, cleared the land of trees and donated the money from the timber to Norris. Norris’s brother pulled the stumps and leveled the land. “It’s not like we’re helping somebody who’s not helping themselves,” Pauley said. Norris said that the United States Department of Agriculture forgave the $40,000 mortgage still left on the house and allowed Norris to keep the land. By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comColumbia County can expect breezy and windy conditions from Hurricane Sandy as it skirts the Atlantic Coast later today. “We’re going to be seeing some winds from Hurricane Sandy for the next couple of days,” said Shayne Morgan, Columbia County Emergency Management director. Morgan said predictions are that Columbia County will experience sustained winds of 15-20 mph. “Gusts could get up to around 25 mph,” he said. According to information from the National Weather Service National Hurricane Center on Wednesday after-noon, Hurricane Sandy had maximum sustained winds of 80 mph as its eye made landfall on the southeastern coast of Jamaica. A hurricane warning has been issued for the central and northwestern Bahamas and a tropical storm warning has been issued for a portion of the east coast of the Florida Peninsula. The uncertainty of the storm’s long range course remains high and forecasters said it’s too early to determine specific impacts for the east coast north of Florida. Opinion ................ 4APeople.................. 2AObituaries .............. 5A Advice & Comics ......... 3B Puzzles ................. 4B TODAY IN PEOPLE Cruise sues for $50 million. COMING FRIDAY Editorial board endorsements. 86 64 Mostly sunny WEATHER, 2A Lake City ReporterTHURSDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2012 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | 75¢ LAKECITYREPORTER.COM CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 138, No. 192 1Sandy will bring breeze, little else Hurricane expectedto skirt East Coast,head out to sea. The projected path of Hurricane Sandy through Sunday afternoon. SANDY continued on 5ANOAA600 friends help ood victim FILEABOVE: This aerial photograph shows the home of Columbia Coun ty resident Michael ‘Whitey’ Norris almost completely su bmerged after heavy rains from Tropical Storm Debby flooded the area. BELOW: Norris poses for a photo with his service dog, Tebow. Facebook is focal point of relief effort Obama,Romneysprint tothe finish President talks second term; Romney zeroes in on the economy. By BEN FELLER andDAVID ESPOAssociated PressDAVENPORT, Iowa — President Barack Obama is confidently predict-ing speedy second-term agreement with Republicans to reduce federal deficits and overhaul immigration laws, com-menting before setting out Wednesday on a 40-hour campaign marathon through battleground states that could decide whether he’ll get the chance. Republican Mitt Romney looked to the Midwest for a breakthrough in a close race shadowed by a weak economy. Romney declared, “We’re going to get this economy cooking again,” address-ing a boisterous crowd in Reno, Nev., before flying back eastward to tend to his prospects in Ohio and Iowa. Romney urged audience members to consider their personal circumstances, and he said the outcome of the Nov. 6 election “will make a difference for the nation, will make a difference for the families of the nation and will make a difference for your family, individually and specifi-cally.” With 13 days until Election Day, opinion polls depicted a close race nationally. Romney’s campaign claims momentum as well as the lead in Florida and North Carolina, two battleground states with POLICE SPRINT continued on 5A Debby nearly cost him his life; now he’s getting a chance to rebuild. FLOOD continued on 5A ARREST continued on 5A Man charged:Assault with deadly weapon By DEREK GILLIAMdgilliam@lakecityreporter.comA Lake City man was arrested Wednesday at 12:27 a.m. by the Lake City Police Department and faces felony charges of assault with a deadly weap-on and misdemeanor battery, accord-ing to a report from the Lake City Police Department. Ronald Franklin Jones, 33, came home late and started argu-ing with a woman in his home, according to the arrest report. Jones unplugged the television and told the woman that the television was his and she could not use it, reports said. The woman then took all the cords from the other televisions and computers so that Jones could not use them. Jones

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HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter Daily Scripture The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom, and knowledge of the Holy One is understanding. Proverbs 9:10 CORRECTION Due to an editing error, the arrest of John William Sherwood reported in Wednesdays paper was mistakenly attributed to the Columbia County Sheriffs Office. The Lake City Police Department handled the arrest. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Thought for Today Celebrity Birthdays Basketball Hall of Famer Bobby Knight is 72 Rock singer Jon Anderson (Yes) is 68. Political strategist James Carville is 68. AROUND FLORIDA Monkey caught after two years ST. PETERSBURG The wild monkey that was on the lam in St. Petersburg for two years finally has been captured. Animal trapper Vernan Yates said the monkey was caught Wednesday on a low branch in a tree. He was hired by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservative Commission to catch the monkey. Yates said earlier that instead of luring the rhesus macaque with a female, he would use Doc, a 1-year-old male that would sit inside a customdesigned trap and snack on fruit. The goal was to entice the mystery mon key with companionship and food. The monkey bit a woman earlier this month, and its not exactly clear where the monkey came from. FBI joins probe of bogus letters TAMPA The FBI is joining an investigation into bogus letters sent to many Florida voters that raise questions about their eligibility to cast ballots. Tampa FBI chief Steven E. Ibison said Wednesday the FBI will focus on let ters received by voters in 18 counties in central and southwest Florida. State authorities have received reports of letters in at least 23 counties. The letters claim to be from county supervisors of elections but were all postmarked from Seattle. They raise questions about the voters citizenship and appear intended to intimi date people. Ibison said voters who get a letter should first contact their local election supervisor to see if its authentic. If not, voters should keep the letter and contact the FBI. The Florida Department of Law Enforcement has also opened an investiga tion. More meningitis cases confirmed TALLAHASSEE Florida health officials have confirmed three more cases of meningitis, bringing the total number in the state to 22 cases. The Florida Department of Health announced Wednesday the additional cases of fungal meningitis from a tainted steroid shot. The cases include a 60-year-old man and a 36-year-old woman from Escambia County and a 50-year-old man in Marion County. The nationwide out break of this rare disease is linked to patients seek ing pain relief received contaminated steroid injections. The injections all came from contaminated lots of steroids made by the New England Compounding Center in Massachusetts. An investigation of how the medicine became tainted is under way. Three people in Florida have died from fungal meningitis after receiving the shots. Nationwide, 308 people have contracted meningitis in 17 states. County bans sale of synthetic drugs FORT LAUDERDALE The Broward County Commission has banned stores from selling or advertising synthetic drugs. Commissioner approved the ordinance Tuesday. Officials in Palm Beach County will consider a similar law next week. The South Florida SunSentinel reported the law is a code violation rath er than a criminal offence. Offenders could be fined $500 and/or 60 days in jail. The ban is countywide, but in cities that have adopted stricter laws, those laws will prevail. Sheriff Al Lamberti said his deputies will warn shopkeepers. Hes said they want voluntary com pliance Snthetic marijuana, herbal incense and bath salts mimic actual drugs. Theyve been sold over the counter in gas stations and convenience stores. You can tell the size of a man by the size of the thing that makes him mad. Adlai E. Stevenson II, American statesman Cruise sues publisher for $50M LOS ANGELES A n attorney for Tom Cruise said he filed a $50 mil lion defamation lawsuit Wednesday against the publishers of Life & Style magazine for articles that said the actor has abandoned his 6-year-old daughter, Suri. Cruises attorney, Bert Fields said to falsely claim the actor deserted his daughter is a vicious lie. Tom is a caring father who dearly loves Suri. Shes a vital part of his life and always will be, Fields said. To say it in lurid headlines with a tearful picture of Suri is reprehensible. The lawsuit was filed in a Los Angeles federal court. An email message left for a spokes woman for Bauer Publishing, which produces Life & Style, was not imme diately returned. Cruise and Suris mother, Katie Holmes, were divorced earlier this year. They had been married for six years. The breakup has been tabloid fodder, and Suri often appears in entertainment magazines. Cruise doesnt like to file lawsuits but felt it was appropriate because sleaze peddlers are trying to make money about the actors relationship with his daughter, Fields said. These serial defamers are foreign-owned companies with their global headquarters in Hamburg, Fields said. They take money from unsuspecting Americans by selling their malicious garbage. Having to pay a libel judgment may slow them down. If Cruise prevails, Fields said, his client will give the money to charity. Bobby Brown arrested on suspicion of DUI LOS ANGELES Bobby Brown has been arrested on suspicion of drunken driving for the second time this year. Los Angeles police spokes woman Venus Hall says the singer was stopped in his car in the Topanga area at around 1 a.m. Wednesday. Police say he was booked on suspicion of driving under the influence at the Van Nuys jail but was later released. A representative for Brown could not immediately be contacted. The 43-year-old pleaded no contest to DUI earlier this year following a March arrest in Los Angeles. Under a plea agreement, Brown checked himself into a rehabilitation center in August. Browns first album in 14 years came out this summer. Swift, Minaj to perform at music awards event LOS ANGELES Itll be a little bit country and a little bit rock n roll onstage at next months American Music Awards. Organizers announced Wednesday that Taylor Swift, Nicki Minaj and Linkin Park will perform at the 40th annual ceremony on Nov. 18. All are also up for awards. Minaj is the nights leading nomi nee, along with Rihanna, with four bids each. Swift is nominated for favorite female country artist and Linkin Park is in the running for alternative artist. Fans can pick the winners by vot ing online. Christina Aguilera will also per form at the ceremony at the Nokia Theatre in Los Angeles, where it will be broadcast live on ABC. Christian sister trio calling it quits NASHVILLE, Tenn. Christian sister trio Barlowgirl is retiring after nearly a decade of chart-topping suc cess. Alyssa, Lauren and Rebecca Barlow are releasing their final song, Hope Will Lead Us On, on Oct. 30. They will hold an online chat with fans Oct. 29 on Ustream, where they will take questions and perform acoustically. No reason was given for the deci sion to retire. A spokesman said sim ply, Theyre ready for a new season. In a statement, the sisters call their music career one of the most incredible adventures. They thanked fans for sharing their dream. Wednes day: Afternoon: 4-2-3 Evening: N/A Wednes day: Afternoon: 9-1-8-0 Evening: N/A Tues day: 4-10-24-28-33 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAIL Y BRIEFING THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 2AWEATHER ASSOCIATED PRESS Tom Cruise filed a $50 million defama tion lawsuit Wednesday against the publishers of Life & Style magazine. ASSOCIATED PRESS Death penalty opponents keep watch across from Florida State Prison in Raiford on Tuesday as time neared for the execution of John Errol Ferguson. The 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals blocked the execution just hours before it was to take place. State officials immediately asked the U.S. Supreme Court to lift the stay. Brown Associated Press Associated Press

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Page Editor: JIm Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & ST A TE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2012 3A 3A Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Columbia and Suwannee counties! 2 Lake City 183 SW Bascom Norris Dr. Gville E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunters Walk 5115 NW 43rd St. Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St. Shands at UF Room H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Alachua 14759 NW 157th Ln. Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E. Silver Springs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. Summer eld 17950 US Hwy. 441 Tallahassee 1511 Killearn Center Blvd. OFFER NOT AVAILABLE ON EXISTING CAMPUS LOANS. OFFER IS FOR NEW LOANS ONLY. MAY NOT BE COMBINED WITH ANY OTHER OFFER. 1. Credit approval required. Your rate may be higher based on creditworthiness, vehicle and term of loan. For example, a $39,000.00 loan with no money down at 2.14% for 48 months would require 47 monthly payments of $854.12 and a nal payment of $833.58, nance charge of $1,839.67, for a total of payments of $40,977.22. The amount nanced is $39,237.55, the APR is 2.26%. APR = Annual Percentage Rate. 2. Credit approval and initial deposit of $5 required. Mention this ad and well waive the $15 new member fee. 3. Interest will accrue from date of purchase. Choosing this option will increase the total amount of interest you pay. For a limited time only. These o ers may expire without notice. This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration. Choice Rates for Choosy Shoppers. APPLY NOW! Accelerate your approval when you apply online at www.campuscu.com or call us at 754-9088 and press 4. YOU CHOOSE THE CAR: NEW OR NEW-to-YOU (2008 or newer) YOU CHOOSE THE TERM: 36, 48 OR 60 months Rates as low as APR 1 EITHER WAY: Plus, no payments for 90 days 3 Community leaders learn about springs TODD WILSON/ Lake City Reporter TOP: More than 50 business and government leaders in Columbia County toured the Ichetucknee Springs Trace Tuesday morning as part of a Chamber of Commerce/The Ichetucknee Partnership-sponsored tour to help educate decision makers about how our surface behavior is linked to our groundwater. The bus tour began in Lake City and made several stops at Clayhole Sink, Rose Sink and ended at the Ichetucknee spring head in southern Columbia County. ABOVE: Jim Stevenson, of Tallahassee, retired chairman of the Ichetucknee Springs Working Group, came out of retirement to lead the tour and explain how surface runoff affects the health of the Ichetucknee Springs and river. Panel upholds ethics charges against Rivera By BILL KACZOR Associated Press TALLAHASSEE The Florida Ethics Commission on Wednesday found prob able cause that Rep. David Rivera, who is in a tight re-election race, commit ted 11 violations of ethics laws while he was a state legislator. Accusations against the Miami Republican include receiving income from Southwest Florida Enterprises Inc., a com pany involved with Flagler Dog Track in Miami, that he knew or should have known was given to influ ence his vote or official action and using campaign funds for non-campaign expenses. Rivera also is alleged to have had a $1 million con tract through Millennium Marketing, Inc., with Southwest Florida Enterprises that created a frequent conflict between his private interests and public duties. Millennium, a company founded by Riveras mother, signed the 2006 contract to man age a successful campaign to expand slot machine gambling in Miami-Dade County through a refer endum. Rivera issued a state ment vehemently denying wrongdoing and accusing the bipartisan commission of choosing to play poli tics by injecting itself into the middle of an election through previously inves tigated complaints filed by his political opponents. These allegations are false and will be dis missed shortly, Rivera said. Respectfully, shame on the Florida Ethics Commission. I look for ward once again to dis proving these false allega tions and demonstrating the frivolous nature of these complaints. Ethical questions have lingered over Rivera since he was elected to Congress two years ago, and they have overshadowed his rematch with Democratic challenger Joe Garcia, a former Obama admin istration official in the Department of Energy. Garcias campaign issued a statement calling the charges embarrass ing to our entire commu nity and saying voters will have a chance on Nov. 6 to turn the page on Mr. Riveras scandals. The congressman also remains under federal investigation for potential tax violations. A related Florida Department of Law Enforcement investigation cleared him of criminal allegations in April, but the Ethics Commission relied heavily on infor mation gathered by the FDLE. Rivera can seek a hear ing to dispute the allega tions or a settlement with the commission. The panel is powerless to penalize him, but the Florida House could take action based on its findings. Rivera personally tried to get the ethics com mission to delay its prob able cause hearing, held behind closed doors on Friday, which would have pushed it past the elec tion, according to records released Wednesday. His lawyers also pressed for a delay, saying it would be extremely prejudicial to have it decided so close to the election.

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Riding out the end time in Costco ANOTHER VIEW HIGHLIGHTS IN HISTORY On this date:In 1812, the frigate USS United States, commanded by Stephen Decatur, cap-tured the British vessel HMS Macedonian during the War of 1812. In 1854, the “Charge of the Light Brigade” took place dur-ing the Crimean War as an English brigade of more than 600 men charged the Russian army, suffering heavy losses. I t is good to have a pet peeve, because peeves don’t require much feed-ing and you can take them on vacation with you. My pet peeve is people who can’t make up their minds on life’s various issues, including the political. It is easy to imagine them right now: Should we continue to read this column or brush our teeth? Should we wear our hair up or down? Or, concerning those with hair like mine, should we comb it over or use our scalps as solar panels, the better to power our political thoughts? Both men and women are prone to being of two minds. In the delicate matter of family politics, husbands will ask them-selves: Should I have a nap on the sofa now or later? For their part, women have been indecisive since before the invention of sofas. Why, some of the finest men in the archeology business believe that the first cavewoman asked the first caveman the clas-sic question: Does this saber-tooth tiger skin make me look fat? Or not? Speaking of people who live in caves, I think this is the only charitable explanation for the existence of undecided voters, who every four years come out of their dark seclusion before presidential elections to make life a vexation for the rest of us. Make a choice, for goodness sake, and stop using your brains as a pendulum. The rest of us have made a choice while you undecided people have been wandering around in circles looking con-fused. For me, this vacillation ranks on the irritation meter some-where between very and astronomical. My intolerance is rooted in the many years I have worked in the newspaper industry, where making snap decisions on deadline is essential to pro-duction. A seasoned journalist such as myself cannot sit around pondering what stale cliche to use or what absurd metaphor to employ. Considerations of fairness, ethics and national security loom over my every sentence, demanding urgent answers to such vital questions as: Should I finish this column now or go to the tavern for lunch? Even before lunch, a part of me says the cave habitation theory of election confusion is totally implausible. Even caves have Wi-Fi service now, and it would be impossible to remain completely unknowing for months on end, not with great fountains of information and misinformation gushing from spigots right and left. Undecided voters, what do the politicians have to do to wake you from your civic swoon? Would it help if I explained the issues? Soon our long national nightmare of ridiculous TV advertising will be over. Decide already, so that honest reporters can ignore you and go back to sitting in taverns. Of course, it’s not for me to suggest whom you should decide to vote for — it is enough that you stop your indecisive nonsense. The choice is simple. You can vote for the challenger who has changed his views so much that he doesn’t appear to believe anything, or the incumbent who believes things not to your taste if you make more than $250,000 a year. You can vote for the president who has presided over a poor economy or the challenger rep-resenting the party on whose watch the economic disaster began and which has done its best to keep it disastrous at least until this election. Do you want to vote for the president who gave millions of people the chance of health insurance coverage or the challenger who thinks those malingerers should be sick without bothering the rest of us (although the rest of us end up paying for them)? If you like, you can vote for the one whose stimulus spend-ing swelled the deficit in a con-ventional attempt to revive the economy. Or you can vote for the one who plans to cut taxes but leave the bloated defense budget off limits to cutting — a scheme that will guaran-tee a bigger deficit, unless you believe that the Deficit Fairy will come with her magic wand and make the arithmetic add up. Just make up your darn mind. What’s that you say? You have made up your mind, but you just like all the media attention? I knew it. Look, when the rest of us see you being interviewed on TV as an alleged undecided voter, or making up the crowd of same at the second presiden-tial debate, we can see the tiger skin of false pretenses covering your nakedness. This doesn’t make you look fat — just ridiculous. Undecided voters are clearly in the wrong LETTERS TO THE EDITOR To the Editor:To quote Charlie Brown: “I can’t stand it, I just can’t STAND it!!” Who is Kenny Merriken, or more appropriately, who does Kenny Merriken THINK he is? Being on a first-name basis with “Mitt” and having posted a personal invitation for him to come to Lake City and explain what God means to him, Mr. Merriken is baffled that he was “sidestepped”? You were IGNORED, Mr. Merriken, just as you should have been. Feeling sure that you are also on a first name basis with “Barack,” why don’t you post the same invitation to him and see if you get a more favorable response? Interesting and informative opinions of others are always received well regardless of their content, but egocentric pretens-es of omnipotence are not. Heed your own scripture and discontinue your pontificating lest you discover just how unim-portant you really are. Marian Lewis Lake City The left may have a surprise coming To the Editor:Mr. Merriken and Mr. Beames seem to be two left-wing liberals cut from the same OBAMAFANTASIA cloth. They care for only there left-wing LAMESTREAM media view of Mr. Romney, and, yes, he is definitely a Mormon, as was JFK a Catholic who also caught you know what when he ran for president! These people just seem to spew hate and misinformation every time they open their mouths. There will be more before this is over, but the facts still remain — you two guys just may be in for a big surprise come November election time if the law can keep the left from padding the vote! Oh, yeah, I am a veteran also Mr. Merriken, and I don’t know too many military or veterans who are going to give Obama a second try at destroying what this country stands for by voting for him this time around! Have a nice conservative day! Manuel Enos, Lake City Heed your own scripture, writer Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding counties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, publisher Robert Bridges, editor Sue Brannon, controller Dink NeSmith, president Tom Wood, chairman LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY E-MAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com T he real perversion of the Boy Scouts of America’s so-called perversion files — compiled to blacklist accused sexual predators — is that they did more to protect the reputation of the organiza-tion than to safeguard young, vulnerable boys. By quietly pushing volunteer scout leaders to resign in lieu of reporting accusations of sexual abuse to the police and other authorities, the Boy Scouts failed boys and their families, denying them an opportunity to seek justice. National President Wayne Perry admits that the orga-nization handled these cases incorrectly and has changed its practices. Yet it now refuses to release files compiled since 1985. If the Scouts leadership is as contrite and as serious about protecting youngsters as it claims, it will open those files. A bunker mentality won’t help children. The Roman Catholic Church suffered legal, financial and moral fallout after its own scandal came to light, but has attempted to redeem itself by adopting far more open prac-tices. Many of the Scouts’ longsecret files — for 1965 to 1985 — were released recently as a result of an Oregon lawsuit. The files are a trove of tragedy. Scoutsshouldrelease its files Q The (Cleveland) Plain Dealer OPINION Thursday, October 25, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A4AOPINION Q Dale McFeatters is editorial writer for Scripps Howard News Service. Dale McFeattersmcfeattersd@shns.com Reg Henryrhenry@post-gazette.com Q Reg Henry is a columnist for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. F ace it, according to a widely accepted school of contempo-rary thought: We’re doomed. Most likely this December. For some reason, the ancient Mayans have become the accepted experts on Doomsday, but I suspect few of us have had an opportunity to sit down with an ancient Mayan to go over the data. We don’t know how, but the Mayans have a date in mind: the 21st of December. If you live on the seashore, you may be driven out by a tsunami. If you live high and dry on a mountaintop, you may be blown into the sky by a volcano, and the little black particles that were once your body will block out the sun and contribute to a new Ice Age. Or there may be a massive earthquake. Most of the country has been calmly con-templating the “Big One” that will see California slide into the Pacific, but a small earth-quake in placid, rural Mineral, Va., shook confidence in the Mid-Atlantic, an area generally considered safe except for rav-ening bands of politicians. There may be an electromagnetic magnetic pulse, or EMP, that will wipe out your TV, radio, landlines, Internet and Wi-Fi. Moreover, your car won’t start. Many parents may think this may not be all bad but, really, it would be terribly inconvenient. There could be a nuclear war, which would be bad all the way around except for those who own property in North Korea and Iran like, say, the few North Koreans and Iranians left around. There could be another hurricane like Katrina, a natural phenomenon that Republicans seem uniquely ill-equipped to deal with. You might want to factor that into your vote for Mitt Romney. Surprisingly, the supply depot for apocalyptic survival — a movement dubbed the “preppers” — turns out to be Costco, an immense discount warehouse store for which I’ve had a fond spot since they sold me several carloads of premium liquor at their store in Oahu even though I didn’t have a Costco card. Who knew? If there’s blinding flash in the sky or a tidal wave or a volcanic resurgence when I’m in Oahu, I’m making a beeline for Costco — and this time, I’ll get a card, I promise. Like Y2K, merchants are quick to see profit in impend-ing doom. Costco is offering canned food with a shelf life of 25 years. It also offers 6,671 serv-ings of gluten-free vegetarian food for $1,799, among other tasteless-sounding products with the shelf life of pizza in the refrigerator of a college dorm. If nothing happens on Dec. 21, there will be only three shopping days left until Christmas. For the swain who shows up on the doorstep of his abandoned girlfriend with a sheepish smile on his face and a 433-serving bucket of brown ice in his hand, Dec. 25 could well be the end of the world. first title was Colley

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a combined 44 of the 270 electoral votes needed to win. Obama’s aides insist the president is ahead or tied with his rival in both of those states and in the other seven decisive battlegrounds. Not even Obama, in an interview with radio host Tom Joyner, predicted that fellow Democrats would win control of the House from Republicans, who are looking to renew a majority they won two years ago in a landslide triggered by the tea party. The Democrats and Republicans are struggling uncertainly for control of the Senate. And for the second time, a hard-fought Senate campaign was jolted by a dispute over abortion, in this case a state-ment by Republican Richard Mourdock of Indiana that when a woman becomes pregnant by rape, “that’s something God intended” and there should be no abor-tion allowed. Romney said he disagreed with the remarks. However, unlike an earlier abor-tion-related controversy involving Rep. Todd Akin of Missouri, Romney did not disavow his support for Mourdock, who is locked in a close race with Rep. Joe Donnelly, his Democratic opponent. The president’s major focus was his coast-to-coast-and-back again tour. “We’re going to pull an all-nighter. No sleep,” the president said shortly after Air Force One touched down in Iowa, first stop of a swing that included Colorado, California, Nevada, Ohio, Virginia and Florida, with a quick stop in Illinois to cast an early ballot, before he returns to the White House on Thursday evening. On his second stop of the long day, Obama told a crowd of about 16,000 peo-ple at Denver’s City Park that he as “fired up” — though temperatures dropped near 50 degrees. It was in Denver that Obama had his lackluster first debate per-formance early in the month. He didn’t mention that on Wednesday. “This may not be the last time you’ll see me,” Obama told the crowd. Colorado is considered one of the toughest of the battleground states for him to hang onto in this election. LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2012 5A5A statefarm.comWith competitive rates and personal service, it’s n o wonder more drivers trust State Farm. Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there.CALL FOR A QUOTE 24/7. Ride with the #1 car insurer in 1001143.1State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company State Farm Indemnity Company Bloomington, IL John Kasak, Agent 904 SW SR 247 Branford Hwy Lake City, FL 32025 Bus: 386-752-7521 johnkasak.com John Burns III, Agent 234 SW Main Boulevard Lake City, FL 32056 Bus: 386-752-5866 johnburnsinsurance.com FLORIDA. SANDYContinued From 1A SPRINT: Election Day nears Continued From Page 1AMorgan participated in conference calls with state emergency management officials Wednesday morn-ing and afternoon, where potential storm impact was discussed. Predictions from state emergency manage-ment officials indicate the winds will start impacting Columbia County this after-noon. As the day gets hotter the winds are expected to increase. The winds are expected to impact the area Friday and possibly Saturday. “We’re mainly looking at the winds being here Thursday and Friday, but it could carry over into Saturday,” Morgan said, noting forecasters do not predict any rains from the storm to fall in the county. With 15-20 mph winds expected to impact the area, Morgan suggested outside items that are loose, be secured and buckled down, in anticipation of the winds. “We don’t want the winds picking up debris and gar-bage cans throwing them into the roadway making it hazardous for people driv-ing around,” he said. By Wednesday evening the storm’s eye had crossed Jamaica and emerged off its northern coast near the town of Port Antonio, meteo-rologists said, but rains and winds continued to pound the Caribbean island. It was the first direct hit by the eye of a hurricane on Jamaica since Hurricane Gilbert 24 years ago, and fearful authorities closed the island’s international airports and police ordered 48-hour curfews in major towns to keep people off the streets and deter loot-ing. Cruise ships changed their itineraries to avoid the storm, which made landfall five miles east of Kingston. Flash floods and mudslides were a threat for this debt-shackled tropical island of roughly 2.7 mil-lion inhabitants, which has a crumbling infrastructure and shantytowns built on embankments and in gul-lies. The Associated Press contributed to this story. James JenkinsMr. James Jenkins, age 76 resident of 924 N.W. Dixie St. Lake City, Fl. passed away Friday, October 19, 2012 at the Shands Hospital in Live Oak, Fl. terminating an extended ill-ness. Born in Lake City, Fl. he was the son of the late Oliver Jenkins, and Mary Jane Harrell Jenkins. He attended the public schools of Columbia County.Survivors include (1) daughter, Beaulah Rice; 3 sisters, Daisy Jenkins, Alma Jenkins and Josie Lovett; Brother-in-law, Rev. Samuel Lovett; a host of nieces, nephews, cousins and friends also survive.Funeral services for Mr. James Jenkins, will be 11:00 a.m. Saturday, October 27, 2012 at Shilo Missionary Baptist Church with Rev. Kenneth Troupe, of-FLDWLQJ5HY'ZLJKW3ROOLFN3DVWRU,QWHUPHQWZLOOIROORZLQthe Garden of Rest Cemetery.Arrangements entrusted to COOPER FUNERAL HOME 251 N.E. Washington Street, Lake City, Fl. Willis O. Cooper, L.F.DJ. D. Payne-'3D\QHRI/DNH&LW\FL, died Tuesday, October 23, 2012, at Haven Hospice Suwan-nee Valley Care Center, Lake City, FL, following an extended illness. A native of Maple Val-OH\0LFKLJDQ0U3D\QHKDGlived in Lake City since 1969. He had worked as a service manager at Champion Mobile Homes and loved farming and animals. He was a devoted husband, father and grandfather. He was preceded in death: by his SDUHQWV)OR\G3D\QH6UDQG%HVVLH+LOOPDQ3D\QHKLVloving wife of 55 years, Do-ULV(3D\QHLQDQGa daughter, Debra Chaney. 0U3D\QHLVVXUYLYHGE\RQHVRQ-HUUL3D\QH3DXOD/DNHCity, FL; one daughter: Judy 'DYLGVRQ5D\,QYHUQHVV)/RQHEURWKHU&OLII3D\QH'H ORULV0HWDPRUD0,VLVWHULQODZ-DQHWWH3D\QH/DNH&LW\FL; eight grandchildren, 9 great grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews. )XQHUDOVHUYLFHVIRU0U3D\QHZLOOEHFRQGXFWHGDW30Friday, October 26, 2012, in the Gateway-Forest Lawn Memo-rial Chapel with Rev. Lynwood :DOWHUVRIFLDWLQJ,QWHUPHQWwill follow in the Siloam Cem-etery, Lake City, Florida. Visi-tation with the family will be one hour prior to the service (1 30WR30,QOLHXRIRZ ers, donations may be made to Haven Hospice Suwannee Valley Care Center, 6037 W. US Hwy 90, Lake City, FL 32055. Arrangements are under the direction of GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN FUNERAL HOME 3596 S. US Hwy 441, Lake4 City, FL 32025 3OHDVHVHQGwords of comfort to the family at www.gatewayforestlawn.com. Amy Wyche $P\3HDFKHV:\FKHDJHUHVLGHQWRI1(5RVH7HUULake City, died Saturday, Oct. 20, 2012 at Avalon Health Care termi-nating an extended ill-ness. Born in Gainesville, Fl she was the daughter of the late Loureno Butler and Amos Wyche. She attended the public schools of Columbia &RXQW\3UHFHGLQJKHULQGHDWKZDVKHUVLVWHU(UQD&RRNLHLaster, maternal grandpar-ents, Cecil and Masry Butler, Raymond and Nealie Wyche.Survivors include her father, Amos (Louvenia) Wyche, Lake City; (3) sons, Antonio (Mo-nique), Xavier, and Michael R. Wyche; sister, Lease (Jef-fery) Reed; (6) brothers, Dar-rell Butler, Michael B. Wyche, Amos Wyche, Joseph (Mary) Johnson, Tommy (Rosa) Ali-Holiday, Alfredo; Devoted Aunt, Bertha Wyche; a devoted friend & sister in Christ, Estralita /H/H7D\ORU5RQDOG3DUNHUSpecial Friends, Rosetta Man-ning, Vonnie Jones and Loretta McSwain and a host of Aunts, Uncles, nieces, nephews, cous-ins, other relatives and friends.Funeral services for Amy 3HDFKHV:\FKHZLOOEHp.m. Saturday, October 27, 2012 DW0W3LVJDK$0(&KXUFKwith Rev. Joy Gallmon, pas-WRURIFLDWLQJ,QWHUPHQWZLOOfollow in the Springville Cem-etery. The family will receive friends Friday, Oct. 26, 2012 at Cooper Funeral Home Chapel from 6:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m.Arrangements entrusted to COOPER FUNERAL HOME 251 N.E. Washington Street, Lake City, FL. Willis O. Cooper, L.F.D..Obituaries are paid advertise-ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporter’s classified department at 752-1293. OBITUARIES Norris’s friends have set up a Facebook page, “The Friends of Whitey,” to coordinate the effort. The page has more than 600 people who are members. This Saturday the group will host a silent auction, while also watching the Florida-Georgia game on a 12-foot screen at the Super 8 on State Road 47. Pizza and barbecue will be avaliable. Others who provided support and donations to Norris and the fund raiser were: Lake City Bowling Center, CC’s Flowers, Hair Graphics and PJ, Lake City Glass, Super 8, Little Ceasar’s Pizza, Walmart and Community Self Storage. People are encouraged to show up at noon to bid at the silent auction. The items that will be auctioned range from a twice-used mink coat to an autographed football signed by Ricky Nattiel and Neil Anderson. The group will also raffle off a iPad and a Ruger rifle. The tickets for the raffle cost $5. To purchase raffle tickets or to donate an item contact Tod Pauley at 386-872-1914. FLOOD: Friends, neighbors help local man Continued From Page 1A A day at the park JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterBryce Wyatt (top), 3, crawls through a piece of play equip ment to meet his 1-year-old brother, Nondas Powell, while playing at Youngs Park on Wednesday. The argument became heated and Jones armed himself with an alumi-num bat, according to the woman. Jones allegedly chased the woman with the bat and was calling people telling them that she was chasing him with a knife. According to the report, Jones confirmed the fight started when he unplugged the television, but he told police that the alleged victim was the first one to arm herself. He then armed himself with an aluminum bat. The officer spoke with children present at the house. The children told the officer that the alleged victim didn’t have a knife and that Jones pushed the her out of the house while she was naked. Jones then locked the door. According to the report, the alleged vic-tim remained outside until one of the children unlocked the door. This is the second incident in less then a month involving a fight with weapons that resulted in the police being called to the residence, according to the report. ARREST: Man charged Continued From 1A

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Oct. 25 Officers group to meet The Suwannee River Valley Chapter of the Military Officers Association of America will hold its monthly dinner meeting at 6:30 p.m. at the Lake City Elks Lodge, 259 NE Hernando St. The meet ing is open to all active-duty military officers, retired and former officers, mem bers of the Reserve and National Guard and their spouses. For informa tion and reservations, call Susan Palmer at 697-6828 or Vernon Lloyd at 7524885. The chapter is one of more than 400 MOAA chap ters around the U.S. and overseas. The local chapter was founded in 1990. End-of-life seminar A Hospice Foundation of America teleconference titled Artificial Nutrition and Hydration will be from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the Hospice of the Nature Coast Wings Community Education Center in the Lake City Plaza on SW Main Street. There is no cost to attend, and lunch will be provided. The tele conference will examine ethical issues and dilemmas that emerge at the end of life and the effects of those decisions on health care staff and families, using a case-study approach. Health care professionals, educa tors, social workers, funeral directors, counselors, clergy and spiritual care volunteers should contact Vicki Myers at (386) 755-7714 ext. 2411 for reservations. Seating is limited. Landlords meeting All landlords and real tors are welcome to attend a meeting at 5 p.m. at Cracker Barrel. The 6 p.m. program will feature fire marshall David Boozer. For information, call 755-0110. Candidates debate The North Central Florida Tea Party will host a debate at 7 p.m. at the Taylor Building, 128 SW Birley Ave. in Lake City. The debate will feature Phil Dodds, J.R. Gaillot and Ted Yoho, the three candidates for the newly formed U.S. House of Representatives District 3 seat. Bill Madden from WJTK, 96.5 radio will moderate the debate. The debate will last approxi mately an hour. It will be a great opportunity to learn more about these candi dates. For more informa tion, call John at (386) 935-1705. Zumba classes Zumba Classes are being offered at the Richardson Community Center every Tuesdays and Thursdays from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Classes are $5 each, or sign up at the beginning of the month for just $20 a month. Classes are taught by a certified Zumba instructor. For more information, call 386-466-7747. Oct. 26 Fair poultry show Forms for the Open and Youth poultry show at the Columbia County Fair are due to the fair office by 5 p.m. Forms are available in the fair office or online at www.columbiacounty fair.org/ Call 752-8822 for more information. Fish dinner Our Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5056 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, pre pares fish dinners every Friday from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The dinner is $6 for two Alaskan pollock filets, corn, baked beans, hush puppies, cole slaw and tarter sauce. Take out or eat in. Recovery group to meet A 12-step addiction recovery group meets every Friday at 6 p.m. at the Community Revival Center, 244 NE Patterson Ave. in Lake City. For information, call 867-6288. Oct. 27 Fall Safety Bash The White Springs Fire Department will have its third annual Fall Safety Bash from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Ogburn Ball Field in White Springs. There will be food, games, bounce houses, a giant slide, a huge obstacle course and more. Kids can get free flashing necklac es, reflective trick-or-treat bags, pencils, safety infor mation and candy. Grief support The Grief Share Support Group, a ministry of Orchard Community Church, meets every Saturday from 2 to 4 p.m. in room D at the Willowbrook Assisted Living center, 1580 S. Marion Ave. The group offers support for those who have lost loved ones through videos, discussion time and prayer. There are fees. For information, call 288-7429. Family fall festival The Columbia County Recreation Department will hold its annual Family Fall Festival at the Richardson Community Center from 3 to 5 p.m. There will be games, treats and fun galore. This is a safe, fun and free event for the whole family. For more informa tion, contact Nicole Smith at (386) 754-7095. County fair entires The 58th annual Columbia County Fair contests are free to enter. Any county resident may compete in the following contests: Baked Goods, Canned Goods, Quilting, Sewing, Crafts, Needlepoint, Woodworking, Scrap Booking, Art, Photography, Red Hat and King Author Baking Contest. For rules, visit www. columbia countyfair.org. All highestplacing entries will receive monetary awards, and all receive ribbons. Deadline for baked goods entries is Thursday, Nov. 1, from 2 to 6 p.m. at the Extension Office. All others will be Oct. 22 to 26 from 3 to 5 p.m. at the fair office and Oct. 27 from 9 a.m. to noon at the banquet hall. For more information, call 752-8822. FACS Fundraiser The Filipino American Cultural Society of Lake City will have its FACS Family Pre-used Items Sale at the Columbia Bank parking lot, corner of U.S. 90 and Turner Road, from 9 a.m. to noon. Stop by and help support this fundraiser. Farmers market Ted Wright will per form at the Lake DeSoto Farmers Market. The cal endar of events for fall is filling up quickly, and the weather is beautiful. So get out and enjoy. New vendors are welcome. The market is open every Saturday from 8 a.m. to noon in Wilson Park, along Lake DeSoto between the Columbia County Court House and Shands Lakeshore Hospital in downtown Lake City. The market is a regional favorite among shoppers looking for healthy, local foods and creative, locally made gift items. For more information about the mar ket, call (386) 719-5766 or visit market.lcfla.com. Local author fair The Columbia County Library is having a special program from 2 to 4 p.m. Its a Local Author Fair that will showcase local authors and their published works. Featured authors include Luisa Alonso (Secretos de Cocina), Sherri Warner Byrd (Among the Broken), Bob Dekle (The Last Murder: The Investigation, Prosecution, and Execution of Ted Bundy), Janet Horton (Me, Myself and I Surviving), Richard Russell Reichenbach III (Gull), Martha Ann Ronsonet (Gardening in the Deep South: And Other Hot Pursuits), Alesha Waller (The Spotted Zebra), Mandi Williams (Mortimers Sweet Retreat) and Shantina Wilson (Think Before You React). The authors will be available to chat about their writing and will have their books for sale. For more information, call (386) 7582101. The program is free and open to the public. Charity auction After Tropical Storm Debby flooded Lake City resident Whitey Norriss wheelchair-friendly home, friends are helping raise money to rebuild. Friends have organized a huge auction, which will start at noon at the Super 8 Lodge on Highway 47. Admission is free. Watch the Florida/ Georgia game on a huge screen and participate in live and silent auctions. To donate items, call Tod Pauly at 872-1914. Also search for Friends of Whitey on Facebook. Oct. 28 Induction ceremony set The North Florida Center of Excellence fall induction will be held at 3 p.m. in the Columbia High School auditorium. Minority students in Columbia, Suwannee and Hamilton counties are selected based on their academic achieve ments. Students from third through 11th grade receive invitations to become a part of this group based upon scholastic achievements and teacher recommenda tions. The induction is open to the public. Following the induction, there will be a meeting of the Parent Alliance group. All achiev ers will meet to take care of district business. Come out and find out more about this organization. Oct. 29 Ballroom dancing Ballroom dancing classes are offered at Richardson Community Center every Monday starting at 5:30 p.m. Cost is $5 per class. Come try your first class free. For more information, call (386) 365-3909. Oct. 30 Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon at the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. Zumba classes Zumba classes are offered at the Richardson Community Center every Tuesday and Thursday from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Classes are $5 each, or sign up at the beginning of the month for just $20. Classes are taught by a certified a Zumba instruc tor. For more information, call (386) 466-7747. Oct. 31 Olustee battle meeting The Blue-Grey Army will meet at 5:30 p.m. to plan the Olustee Battle Festival. The meeting will be at the school district central building, room 153, 409 SW St. Johns St. Dine to donate Dine to donate at Applebees in Lake City. The Tough Enough to Wear Pink Crisis Fund will receive 10 percent of the bill. Ask for a flier by the Columbia County Fairgrounds Office or call 752-8822 to have one emailed to you. LCPD Halloween Bash The Lake City Police Department will have a Halloween Safety Bash from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Lake City Public Safety Building, 225 NW Main Blvd. Join local officers for a safe night of games, food, bounce houses, fun and candy. Admission is free. The event is held in a safe location to allow everyone to have a fun night while staying safe. Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Wednesday from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Fort White Public Library on Route 47 to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions. For more information, call 752-5384. Nov. 1 Fair weigh-ins The Columbia County Fair mandatory end weighins for steer, swine, beef heifer and meat goat will be from 3 to 8 p.m. The record book deadline is one hour following close of scales. The Youth Swine and Steer Show is scheduled for Thursday, Nov. 8, at 7 p.m. For more information, call 752-8822. Nov. 3 Heavenly cooking day The eighth annu al Heavenly Cooking Community Day will be at the Richardson Community Center, 255 Coach Anders Lane. The event provides meals to sick and shut-in community members in memory of Levi Sheppard Sr. There will be a variety of food available and activities for seniors and children at the center. For information, call 365-0013. Family Gaming Day Columbia County Public Library will have a Family Gaming Day from 2 to 4:30 p.m. There will be video games, board games, snacks and an afternoon of family fun. For more infor mation, call (386) 758-2101. The library is at 308 NW Columbia Ave. Breast cancer benefit A Zumbathon to benefit Suwannee River Breast Cancer Awareness Inc. will be held from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at Sepulveda ATA, behind Winn Dixie. Admission is $10 in advance or $15 at the door. Dont forget to wear pink. Call 466-7747 for information. Commuity yard sale Wellborn Community Association will hold its Fall Yard Sale and Blueberry Breakfast. Vendor spaces are available for $5. Start getting your unneeded goodies together to make extra Christmas money. The flea market in Lake City is closed that day, so come on out. The Bloodmobile will be there, too. Call (386) 984-5749 more information. Nov. 4 Genealogy class A free genealogy work shop sponsored by the United Daughters of the Confederacy Olustee Chapter will be held at the downtown Lake City Library from 2 to 4 p.m. For reservations or information, call Linda Williams (352) 215-8776 or email ilovemyancestors@ windstream.net. Nov. 6 Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon at the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane, to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions to For more information, call 752-5384. Nov. 7 Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are avail able from 1 to 4 p.m. the Fort White Public Library. 6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & ST A TE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 6A Curry Land Service Complete Site Preparation and Landscape Services Bush Hogging Back Hoe Disking Bulldozer Work Seeding Sodding Leveling Mulching Mowing Pine Tree Planting Irrigation Installation and Repair and Much More Free Estimates Chris Curry God Bless America Tel: (386) 755-3890 Cell: (386) 623-3200 Value Adjustment Board Hearings The Columbia County Value Adjustment Board hearings will be held Tuesday, October 30, 2012, in the Columbia County Courthouse located at 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, FL. The hearings will begin at 9:00 a.m. in Courtroom 4. All children are artists! Ages 2-10 Fall Session Receive $10 off tuition October 22nd Nov. 16th Phone: (386) 438-8060 Noahs-art.com *located across the highway from Honda LAURA HAMPSON/ Lake City Reporter Landowner Plum Creek presented its second installment of a three-year, $30,000 grant to the Columbia High School Global Logistics Academy Tuesday night at the Columbia County School Board meeting. Plum Creek representative Allison McGrath said the success of the North Florida Intermodal Park depends on the availability of a skilled workforce. Everybody is doing everything they possibily can to move this project forward, she said. Pictured (from left) are school district Superintendent Michael Millikin, school board Chairman Steve Nelson, CHS 11th-grader Danielle Lang, McGrath and CHS Principal Terry Huddleston. COMMUNITY CALENDAR To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Laura Hampson at 754-0427 or by e-mail at lhampson@ lakecityreporter.com. Logistics academy grant

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Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2012 7A7AHEALTH Doctors call for cheerleading safety rulesBy LINDSEY TANNERAP Medical WriterCHICAGO — Cheerleading isn’t just jumping and waving pompoms — it has become as athletic and potentially as dan-gerous as a sport and should be designated one to improve safety, the nation’s leading group of pediatricians says. The number of cheerleaders injured each year has climbed dramatically in the last two decades. Common stunts that pose risks include tossing and flipping cheerleaders in the air and creating human pyramids that reach 15 feet high or more. In a new policy statement released online Monday in the journal Pediatrics, the American Academy of Pediatrics says school sports associations should desig-nate cheerleading as a sport, and make it subject to safety rules and better supervision. That would include on-site athletic trainers, limits on practice time and better qualified coaches, the academy says. Just like other athletes, cheerleaders should be required to do conditioning exercises and undergo physical exams before joining the squad, the new policy says. “Not everyone is fully aware of how cheerleading has evolved over the last couple of decades. It used to be just standing on the sidelines and doing cheers and maybe a few jumps,” said Dr. Cynthia LaBella, a sports medi-cine specialist at Chicago’s Lurie Children’s Hospital and an author of the new policy. But she said cheerleading often results in injuries that include severe sprains, broken arms and legs, neck injuries and concus-sions. Last year, there were almost 37,000 emergency room visits for cheerleading injuries among girls aged 6 to 22, according to data from the Consumer Product Safety Commission. That’s more than four times higher than in 1980, when cheerleading was tamer. While there are still traditional cheerleading squads that support schools’ athletic teams, some schools and private clubs have separate cheerleading teams that compete against other teams. Kali Wald of Elburn, Ill., suffered a serious concussion last year during an acrobatic routine with her high school’s competi-tive team; teammates tossed her in the air but she landed wrong twice, first on her upper back and neck, then on her head. She blacked out for several minutes. Her father, Dave Wald, said her coaches didn’t realize she was seriously injured and never called an ambulance. She still has short-term memory loss and can’t attend school full-time because of dizziness, headaches and other concussion symptoms. Kali, 18, said she believes that cheerleading should be consid-ered a sport and made safer. Her father agreed and said there needs to be better awareness about the rigors of cheer-leading and the potential risks. Injuries have increased as cheerleading has become more popular. Data suggest there are more than 3 million cheerlead-ers nationwide aged 6 and older, mostly girls. That includes about 400,000 in high school, according to data cited in the new policy. While the overall injury rate in high school cheerleading is lower than in other girls sports, includ-ing gymnastics, soccer and field hockey, the rate of catastrophic injuries like skull fractures and paralyzing spine injuries is high-er, the academy noted. Kasey Bronstein, 14, and her sister Kori, 17, of Mahwah, N.J., both tore a knee tendon while cheerleading for a private com-petitive team run by their parents. They twisted their knees doing acrobatic moves while standing on the raised-up hands of their teammates. They had knee sur-gery last November, followed by extensive physical therapy, and have returned to cheerleading. Both said it should be considered a sport but they also think it’s already pretty safe. “They’re kind of making it too safe, taking out skills that are very exciting to do,” Kori said. That includes a double flip stunt no longer allowed on her team. Some schools and state high school sports associations already consider cheerleading a sport and require the kind of safety oversight that the acad-emy is recommending. But many do not, said Jim Lord, execu-tive director of the American Association of Cheerleading Coaches & Administrators. Some don’t consider it a sport because not all cheerleading squads are involved in their own competi-tions, he said. Lord said the academy’s policy mirrors many of his group’s safety recommendations for high schools and colleges. That includes limiting the height of human pyramids in high school cheerleading to just two people. The academy also says routines that include pyramids, tumbling or tosses should not be performed on hard surfaces. Lisa Kluchorosky, a sports medicine specialist who works with the academy and the National Athletic Trainers Association, said the new policy will help erase misconceptions that cheer-leading is not very athletic. “The statistics are compelling and you can’t turn your head from that,” she said. Pediatricians poo-hoo organic foods By LINDSEY TANNERAP Medical WriterCHICAGO — Parents who want to reduce their kids’ exposure to pesticides may seek out organic fruits and vegetables, but they aren’t necessarily safer or more nutritious than con-ventional foods, the nation’s leading pediatricians group says in its first advice on organics. Science hasn’t proven that eating pesticide-free food makes people any healthier, the American Academy of Pediatrics said. “Theoretically there could be negative effects, especially in young chil-dren with growing brains,” but rigorous scientific evidence is lacking, said Dr. Janet Silverstein, a co-author of the academy’s new report and a pediat-ric endocrinologist at the University of Florida in Gainesville. “We just can’t say for certain that organics is bet-ter without long-term con-trolled studies,” she said. The report was published online Monday in Pediatrics and echoes a Stanford University study released last month. That research concluded that while eating organic fruits and vegetables can reduce pesticide exposure, the amount measured in con-ventionally grown produce was within safety limits. Since organic foods tend to be costlier, a good strat-egy for penny-pinching parents concerned about pesticides is to buy only organic versions of foods with the most pesticide res-idue — including apples, peaches, strawberries and celery, Silverstein said. But the pediatricians group says higher prices on organic foods might lead some parents to buy fewer fruits and vegetables — not a good strategy since both have health benefits including reducing risks for obesity, heart disease and some cancers. Parents should aim to provide their families a diet rich in fruits and veg-etables, whether organic or not, along with plenty of whole grains and low-fat or fat-free dairy products, the report says.ASSOCIATED PRESSAspirin, one of the world’s oldest and cheapest drugs, ha s shown remarkable promise in treating colon cancer in people with certain genetic mutations that often play a role in the disease, according to a study reported Thursday in the Ne w England Journal of Medicine. By MARILYNN MARCHIONEAP Chief Medical WriterNEW YORK — Aspirin, one of the world’s oldest and cheapest drugs, has shown remarkable promise in treating colon cancer in people with mutations in a gene that’s thought to play a role in the disease. Among patients with the mutations, those who regu-larly took aspirin lived lon-ger than those who didn’t, a major study found. Five years after their cancers were diagnosed, 97 per-cent of the aspirin users were still alive versus 74 percent of those not taking the drug. Aspirin seemed to make no difference in patients who did not have the muta-tions. This sort of study can’t prove that aspirin caused the better survival, and doctors say more research must confirm the findings before aspirin can be rec-ommended more widely. The study wasn’t designed to test aspirin; people were taking it on their own for various reasons. Still, the results suggest that this simple medicine might be the cheapest gene-targeting therapy ever found for cancer. About one-sixth of all colon cancer patients have the mutated gene and might be helped by aspirin. And aspirin costs just pennies a day. “It’s exciting to think that something that’s already in the medicine cabinet may really have an important effect” beyond relieving pain and helping to prevent heart attacks, said Dr. Andrew Chan of Massachusetts General Hospital. He and others from Harvard Medical School led the study, which appears in Thursday’s New England Journal of Medicine. Cancers of the colon or rectum are a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. More than 140,000 new cases and 51,000 deaths from them are expected this year in the United States. Several studies suggest that aspirin may help fight cancer, especially colorec-tal tumors. It is often rec-ommended for people who have colon cancer and oth-ers at high risk of develop-ing it. But it’s not advised for wider use, or for cancer prevention, because it can cause serious bleeding in ASSOCIATED PRESSPark director Zach Shields (right) and his crew look fo r produce such as tomatoes to harvest from the organic garden at Partnership Park in Deca tur, Ill. In its first advice on organics, the American Academy of Pediatrics published a rep ort Monday that concluded pesticide-free foods aren’t necessarily safer or more nu tritious for children. ASSOCIATED PRESSCheerleaders practice their stunts before a game in Namp a, Idaho. In a new policy statement released online Monda in the journal Pediatrics, the American Academy o f Pediatrics says school sports associations should designate cheerleading as a sport, and make it subject to safety rules and better supervision. By RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVARAssociated PressWASHINGTON — Thousands of Medicare patients with severe chronic illnesses such as Alzheimer’s would get continuing access to rehab and other services under a change agreed to by the Obama administration, advocates said Tuesday. The proposed agreement in a national class action suit would allow Medicare patients to keep receiving physical and occupational therapy and other skilled services at home or in a nursing home so they can remain stable, said Gill Deford, a lawyer with the Center for Medicare Advocacy. That’s been a problem for some because of a long-standing Medicare policy that says patients must show improvement to keep getting rehab. Deford’s group and other organiza-tions representing patients challenged it. “If you have a chronic condition, by definition you are not improving,” said Deford, the lead attorney on the case. “Our view is that Medicare regulations were intended to allow people to maintain their health status. They don’t have to show they are get-ting any better. The point is to allow them not to get any worse, if possible.” The agreement was filed with Chief Judge Christina Reiss of the U.S. District Court in Vermont. It is expected to affect tens of thousands — maybe hundreds of thousands — of patients nationally. Those who stand to ben-efit include not only people with intractable conditions like Alzheimer’s, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s and chronic lung disease. Those who are growing weaker because of advanc-ing age, placing them at greater risk of falls and other problems, could also be helped. The impact on Medicare’s budget is unclear, partly because program rules are not always rigidly enforced. Even with a requirement that patients must contin-ue to show improvement, billing contractors some-times defer to the clini-cal judgment of doctors and therapists. A patient’s underlying disease may be advancing, but therapy might help them keep up strength up and do more to take care of themselves. Still, that’s no guarantee that Medicare will pay. “That’s what the point of this case is,” said Deford, adding that his center has represented many people repeatedly denied cover-age for rehabilitation ser-vices. “This will allow them to have access.” Advocates Medicare change to help disabled Increasing injuries spur pediatricians’ policy statement. Study: Aspirin may help treat colon cancers ASPIRIN continued on 8A CHANGE continued on 8A

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say Medicare could break even financially, if patients dont have to go to the hos pital. In court papers, Medicare denied that it imposes an inflexible standard that patients must continue to improve to keep receiving rehab services. Indeed, there is no such require ment in law. Medicare said other factors come into play, such as the patients medi cal condition and whether treatment is reasonable and necessary. Government lawyers called the policy change a clarification. This settlement clarifies existing Medicare policy, said Erin Shields Britt, a spokeswoman for the fed eral Health and Human Services department. We expect no changes in access to services or costs. Nonetheless, the Medicare policy manual will be changed to spell out that coverage of rehabilita tion services does not turn on the presence or absence of a beneficiarys poten tial for improvement from the therapy, but rather on the beneficiarys need for skilled care, according to the proposed settlement. Deford said it could be several months before the settlement is finalized in court, and perhaps anoth er year before Medicare formally completes the policy change. But patients may start seeing a change sooner. Im hoping the new cov erage rules will de facto take effect before they are formally revised, said Deford. Most of the immediate beneficiaries will be the parents of the baby boom generation and younger disabled people, who are also entitled to Medicare coverage. But the change could have its greatest significance for the boom ers, many of whom are expected to try to live inde pendently into their 80s and 90s. 8A LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 8AHealth Offer expires: October 31, 2012 Dr. Robert J. Harvey Dr. Rameek McNair 752-2336 Open 6 Days A Week Mon. Sat. Evening Appointments Available www.theaspendentalgroup.com 1788 S.W. Barnett WayHwy. 47 South We strive to see you today or tomorrow! Ask About CareCredit and other financing available (wac) A Special Welcoming Gift For You We Are Offering: (ADA-00110) (ADA-00330) (if needed) COUPON #008 $ 29 00 For Only The policy of our office is that the patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment, or be reimbursed for payment for any service, examination, or treatment if performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee, examination or treatment. Zero Monthly Plan Premium Blue A new generation of plans for your generation. Call today to attend a Medicare seminar near you. Holiday Inn Lake City 213 SW Commerce Dr. Lake City, FL 32024 H & F Restaurant Jasper 202 Hatley Street SE Jasper, FL 10/18 9:30 a.m. 10/23 2:00 p.m. 10/18 2:00 p.m. 11/14 2:00 p.m. You can reach customer service from 8 a.m. 9 p.m. ET, 7 days a week, at 1-855-601-9465; TTY users call 1-800-955-8771. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings, call 1-855-425-5985; TTY users call 1-855-955-8771. Priority Code: 5051000 Alliance & Associates 770 NW 15th Avenue Jasper, FL 32052 855-425-5985 9 a.m. 5 p.m. ET, Monday Friday to speak with a licensed agent. Sunshine True Value Hardware OPEN OPEN Shelving For Sale! Organize Garages,Shops, Barns or Stores! Available from 3 ft. wide to 800 ft. Includes: Bolt Bins & Part Boxes For Sale Contents 1/2 O when you buy everything in a bin or cabinet. SAVE 50% FOR SALE Also Report: Most women need fewer Paps The Associated Press Most women can wait three to five years between checks for cervical cancer, depending on their age and test choice, say guidelines issued Monday. Many medical groups have long recommended a Pap test every three years for most women. The new advice from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists says thats true for women ages 21 to 29 whose Paps show no sign of trouble. But for healthy women ages 30 to 65, the preferred check is a Pap plus a test for the cancer-causing HPV virus, the group concluded. If both show everythings fine, they can wait five years for further screening. The guidelines from the nations largest OBGYN organization agree with advice issued earlier this year by a government panel, the American Cancer Society and other medical groups. The positions show grow ing consensus that its safe for the right women to wait longer between Paps. Cervical cancer grows so slowly that regular Pap smears, which examine cells scraped from the cer vix, can find signs early enough to treat before a tumor even forms. the stomach and gut. What has been lacking, doctors say, is a good way to tell which people might benefit the most, so aspi rins risks would be justi fied. Chans study suggests a way to do that. It involved 964 people diagnosed with various stages of colon cancer who were among nearly 175,000 participants in two health studies based at Harvard that began in the 1980s. Every two years, they filled out surveys on their health habits, including aspirin use. Most had surgery for their cancer, and many also had chemotherapy. They gave tumor tissue samples that could be tested for gene activity. Researchers focused on one gene, PIK3CA, that is involved in a key pathway that fuels cancers growth and spread. Aspirin seems to blunt that pathway, so the scientists looked at its use in relation to the gene. ASPIRIN: Another benefit of old drug Continued From Page 7A CHANGE: Settlement favors patients Continued From Page 7A

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By TIM KIRBY tkirby@lakecityreporter.com FORT WHITE Despite being a Class 5A school, Rickards High was suspect enough in 2011 to serve as the homecoming oppo nent for Fort White High. Indeed, the Raiders finished 1-9 last year including that 31-7 loss to the Indians. Fort White travels to Tallahassee on Friday for a rematch with the Raiders. Kickoff is 7 p.m. at Gene Cox Stadium. In the game last year, Indians quarterback Andrew Baker was 13-of-18 passing for 136 yards with two touchdowns to A.J. Legree. Soron Williams rushed for 134 yards and scored on a 24-yard run. George Fulton also scored a touchdown. Fort Whites defense held Rickards to 14 yards and Melton Sanders had an interception. Amion Carridine threw the touchdown pass for Rickards. This year he has moved from quar terback to running back. Charlie Kelly, who caught two passes last year, is the Raiders quarterback. Rickards (3-4) has wins over Chiles High, Florida High and FAMU School. The losses have come against East Gadsden, Lincoln, Wakulla and Godby high schools. In the win over Chiles, Kelly was 10 of 17 for 232 yards with two touchdown passes, including a 67-yarder to Travon Holmes. Kelly had a 19-yard touchdown run. Holmes caught four passes for 98 yards and scored on a 98-yard kickoff return. Joe Butler had a 28-yard touchdown run. By BRANDON FINLEY bfinley@lakecityreporter.com Despite the fact that Columbia High has a chance to wrap up the District 4-6A championship this week, the Tigers arent approach ing the game with that attitude. Columbia has bigger goals than the district championship it can achieve by defeating Orange Park High at 7:30 p.m. Friday in Lake City. Were not looking at it as the district championship, Columbia head coach Brian Allen said. Were looking at it as another opportunity to go out and get better. Ive talked to the team about that this week. If we can get two percent better each practice over the course of this 10-game season, then well be at 100 percent by the time the play offs get here. Were ready to go out and com pete against an opponent in a dis trict game and continue to polish our edge. And despite the Tigers going up against their old coach, Allen said it wont give any boost to the matchup. None of the current Tigers played under Orange Park head coach Danny Green, but many of them grew up watching Green coach Columbia. We mentioned it to them, but its not a big deal, Allen said. I dont make a big deal out of things like that unless another coach or player calls us out and we get a hold of it. Then, well have a little chalk talk to try to gain a little extra edge. I know our staff still has a bitter taste from the last time they came into our house and won, so were Lake City Reporter SPORTS Thursday, October 25, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas? Contact Tim Kirby Sports Editor 754-0421 tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS Premier Paper & Janitorial Supples, Inc. Premier Paper & Janitorial Supples, Inc. Party Items Wedding Supplies Family Reunion Supplies Janitorial Supplies Restaurant Supplies October Special /Owner (386) 758-5847 (Front of Lake City Middle School) (sleeve 100 ct.) $ 9 99 *Free Admission Ticket To S&S Day At The Fair November 8 th With Quantity Purchase of Items. Check us out at www.scaffs.com or like us on Facebook.com/ScaffsInc LASSO THE FUN PRICES IN EFFECT OCT. 1 st NOV. 8 th *BLUE BELL ICE CREAM 4 / $ 5 49 or $1.39 ea. (Pint) MEAL DEAL * Great American Deli Cheese Burger Uncle Rays Potato Chips Reeses Regular Size Candy Bar 32 oz. Fountain Coca-Cola 4 / $ 5 00 NOT AVAILABLE AT SCAFFS MARKETS CHS continued on 2B Columbia can close out District 4-6A, but goal is to improve. INDIANS continued on 2B Fort White to take on Rickards at Gene Cox Stadium in Tallahassee. GAMES Today Richardson Middle School football vs. Lake City Middle School in Commanders Bowl at Columbia High Stadium, 7 p.m. Friday Columbia High swimming in District 2-2A meet at Cecil Aquatic Complex in Jacksonville, 9 a.m. Columbia High volleyball vs. host St. Augustine High/Stanton Prep winner in District 4-6A tournament final, 7 p.m. Fort White High football at Rickards High, 7 p.m. Columbia High football vs. Orange Park High, 7:30 p.m. Saturday Fort White High cross country in Last Chance Invitational at Santa Fe College in Gainesville, boys-8:30 a.m.; girls9:10 a.m. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Commanders Cup on the line Richardson and Lake City middle school football players gathered at the VA Medical Center on Wednesday for inspirational talks and to visit with veterans. The teams are playing in the 13th annual Commanders Bowl at 7 p.m. today at Columbia High Stadium. Representing the teams are Wolves head coach Joey ONeal (from left) and players John Baker, Robert White, Dylan Thomas, Ronnie Collins, Jovares Thomas and Kamario Bell, Disabled American Veterans Chapter 20 past district commander Willie Merrell, and Falcons Derontae Jordan, Ben Givens, Don Robinson, Davin Schuck, Hunter Sweet, Garrett Finnell and head coach Richard Keen. FILE Columbia Highs Braxton Stockton (22) runs the ball in a game against Ridgeview High on Oct. 5. JASON MATTHEW WALKE R/Lake City Reporter Fort Whites Michael Mulberry (4) tosses the ball to the official after scoring a touchdown in Fridays game against Fernandina Beach High. Playoff potential Hostile territory Sandovals dingers do in Detroit By RONALD BLUM Associated Press SAN FRANCISCO Pablo Sandoval became just the fourth player to hit three home runs in a World Series game, connecting twice against Justin Verlander and once off Al Alburquerque to lead the San Francisco Giants over the Detroit Tigers 8-3 in Wednesday nights opener. Sandoval hit a solo home run to right-cen ter in the first, a two-run, opposite-field drive to left in the third and another bases-empty shot into the center-field batters eye in the fifth. He joined Babe Ruth (1926, 1928), Reggie Jackson (1977) and Albert Pujols (2011) as the only players with three-homer games in the Series. Barry Zito, who like Sandoval watched the 2010 Series opener from the dugout, won by allow ing one run and six hits in 5 2 3 innings. Sandoval went 4 for 4 with four RBIs, also singling in the seventh against Jose Valverde. He became the first Giants player with a three-homer game at home since Barry Bonds in August 1994 at Candlestick Park. Verlander was chased after allowing five runs and six hits in four innings, his shortest start this year. He threw 98 pitches.

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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today AUTO RACING 4:30 a.m. SPEED — Formula One, practice for Grand Prix of India, at Greater Noida, India COLLEGE FOOTBALL 7:30 p.m. ESPN — Clemson at Wake Forest GOLF 9 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, BMW Masters, first round, at Shanghai (same-day tape) 1 p.m. TGC — LPGA, Taiwan Championship, first round, at Yang Mei Taoyuan, Taiwan (same-day tape) 3:30 p.m. TGC — Web.com Tour Championship, first round, at McKinney, Texas 12 Midnight TGC — PGA Tour, CIMB Classic, second round, at Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 7:30 p.m. FOX — World Series, game 2, Detroit at San Francisco NBA 10 p.m. TNT — Preseason, L.A. Clippers at Denver NFL 8 p.m. NFL — Tampa Bay at MinnesotaFOOTBALLNFL standings AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PANew England 4 3 0 .571 217 163Miami 3 3 0 .500 120 117N.Y. Jets 3 4 0 .429 159 170Buffalo 3 4 0 .429 171 227 South W L T Pct PF PAHouston 6 1 0 .857 216 128Indianapolis 3 3 0 .500 117 158Tennessee 3 4 0 .429 149 238Jacksonville 1 5 0 .167 88 164 North W L T Pct PF PABaltimore 5 2 0 .714 174 161Pittsburgh 3 3 0 .500 140 132Cincinnati 3 4 0 .429 166 187Cleveland 1 6 0 .143 147 180 West W L T Pct PF PADenver 3 3 0 .500 170 138San Diego 3 3 0 .500 148 137Oakland 2 4 0 .333 113 171Kansas City 1 5 0 .167 104 183 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAN.Y. Giants 5 2 0 .714 205 137Philadelphia 3 3 0 .500 103 125Dallas 3 3 0 .500 113 133Washington 3 4 0 .429 201 200 South W L T Pct PF PAAtlanta 6 0 0 1.000 171 113New Orleans 2 4 0 .333 176 182Tampa Bay 2 4 0 .333 148 136Carolina 1 5 0 .167 106 144 North W L T Pct PF PAChicago 5 1 0 .833 162 78Minnesota 5 2 0 .714 167 131Green Bay 4 3 0 .571 184 155Detroit 2 4 0 .333 133 150 West W L T Pct PF PASan Francisco 5 2 0 .714 165 100Arizona 4 3 0 .571 124 118Seattle 4 3 0 .571 116 106St. Louis 3 4 0 .429 130 141 Today’s Game Tampa Bay at Minnesota, 8:20 p.m. Sunday’s Games Jacksonville at Green Bay, 1 p.m.Indianapolis at Tennessee, 1 p.m.Carolina at Chicago, 1 p.m.Miami at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m.San Diego at Cleveland, 1 p.m.Atlanta at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.Seattle at Detroit, 1 p.m.Washington at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.New England vs. St. Louis at London, 1 p.m. Oakland at Kansas City, 4:05 p.m.N.Y. Giants at Dallas, 4:25 p.m.New Orleans at Denver, 8:20 p.m. Monday’s Game San Francisco at Arizona, 8:30 p.m.Open: Baltimore, Buffalo, Cincinnati, HoustonTop 25 games Today No. 14 Clemson at Wake Forest, 7:30 p.m. Friday No. 16 Louisville vs. Cincinnati, 8 p.m.BASEBALLWorld Series Detroit vs. San Francisco Wednesday Detroit at San Francisco (n) Today Detroit (Fister 10-10) at San Francisco (Bumgarner 16-11), 8:07 p.m. (Fox) Saturday San Francisco (Vogelsong 14-9) at Detroit (Sanchez 4-6), 8:07 p.m. Sunday San Francisco (Cain 16-5) at Detroit (Scherzer 16-7), 8:15 p.m.BASKETBALLNBA preseason Today’s Games Milwaukee at Charlotte, 11 a.m.Portland at Utah, 9 p.m.Sacramento vs. L.A. Lakers, 10 p.m.L.A. Clippers at Denver, 10 p.m. Friday’s Games Houston at Orlando, 7 p.m.Indiana vs. Chicago, 7 p.m.Atlanta at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.Minnesota vs. Milwaukee, 8 p.m.Toronto at Memphis, 8 p.m.New Orleans at Miami, 8 p.m.Charlotte at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.Washington at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.Denver at Phoenix, 10:30 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2012 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-04212BAGATE THURSDAY EVENING OCTOBER 25, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Last Resort “Skeleton Crew” (N) Grey’s Anatomy (N) (:02) Scandal “Beltway Unbuckled” (N) News at 11(:35) Nightline (N) 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) The Bark vs. The Rules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) The Insider 5-PBS 5 -Journal Nightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) The This Old House Hour (N) Frontline “Climate of Doubt” POV Chile’s remote Atacama Desert. (N Subtitled) Tavis Smiley (N) 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge Judy (N) Two and Half MenBig Bang TheoryTwo and Half Men(:01) Person of Interest “Triggerman” (:01) Elementary “The Rat Race” (N) Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneTMZ (N) The Vampire Diaries “The Rager” (N) Beauty and the Beast “All In” (N) Vote America 2012Access HollywoodThe Of ce The Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family Guy Family Guy a 2012 World Series Game 2: Teams TBA. (N) NewsAction News JaxTwo and Half Men 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) 30 Rock (N) Up All Night (N) The Of ce (N) Parks/Recreat(:01) Rock Center With Brian WilliamsNewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(5:00) Public Affairs Capitol Hill Hearings WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at NineStories of HopeAmerica’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304(5:11) Bonanza(:22) M*A*S*HM*A*S*H The Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Hardcover Mysteries “Harlan Coben” Hardcover Mysteries “Lisa Scottoline” 48 Hours: Hard Evidence 48 Hours: Hard Evidence 48 Hours: Hard Evidence “Caged Kids” 48 Hours: Hard Evidence A&E 19 118 265The First 48 “Division; Loose Ends” The First 48 “Caught in the Middle” The First 48 After the First 48 (N) Beyond Scared Straight (N) (:01) Beyond Scared Straight HALL 20 185 312Little House on the Prairie Little House on the Prairie Little House on the Prairie “Four Eyes” Little House on the Prairie Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier FX 22 136 248How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherTwo and Half MenTwo and Half Men “Zombieland” (2009, Comedy) Woody Harrelson, Jesse Eisenberg. It’s Always SunnyThe League (N) BrandX WithTotally Biased CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245The Mentalist “Red Tide” The Mentalist “Ladies in Red” The Mentalist “Bloodshot” The Mentalist “Carnelian Inc” d NBA Preseason Basketball Los Angeles Clippers at Denver Nuggets. (N) NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobFigure It Out (N) Drake & JoshTeenage Mut.You Gotta SeeFull House Full House The Nanny The Nanny Friends (:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241Jail Jail Jail Jail (N) iMPACT Wrestling (N) Ink Master “Tattoo Her What?” MMA Uncensored1,000 Ways to Die MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*H M*A*S*H White Collar “All In” White Collar “Free Fall” Seinfeld Frasier The Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Phineas and FerbGood Luck CharlieJessieMy BabysitterGravity Falls “The Little Vampire” (2000) Jonathan Lipnicki. Phineas and FerbPhineas and FerbA.N.T. Farm My Babysitter LIFE 32 108 252Project Runway All Stars Project Runway All Stars Project Runway All Stars Project Runway All Stars Abby’s Ultimate Dance CompetitionProject Runway All Stars USA 33 105 242NCIS “Once a Hero” NCIS “Twisted Sister” NCIS A Marine on life support. NCIS “Patriot Down” NCIS “Rule Fifty-One” Burn Notice “Desperate Times” BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Top 10 Countdown” (N) The Game “Battle eld America” (2012, Drama) Marques Houston, Mekia Cox. Don’t Sleep!The Game ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) Coll. Football Livee College Football Clemson at Wake Forest. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209NFL32 (N) (Live) Audibles (N) (Live) 2012 World Series of Poker 2012 World Series of Poker 2012 World Series of Poker 2012 World Series of Poker SUNSP 37 -f Women’s College Soccer Florida at South Carolina. (N) DrivenTo Be Announced DISCV 38 182 278Auction KingsAuction KingsProperty Wars Property Wars Auction KingsAuction KingsTexas Car Wars Auction KingsAuction Kings TBS 39 139 247King of QueensKing of QueensSeinfeld Seinfeld Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryConan Simon Baker; Kaitlin Olson. (N) HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) Dr. Drew (N) Nancy GraceShowbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236Married to JonasMarried to JonasE! News (N) The SoupKardashianKardashianKardashianKeeping Up With the KardashiansChelsea Lately (N) E! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. Food Man v. Food Mysteries at the Museum Mysteries at the Museum Mysteries at the Museum The Dead Files HGTV 47 112 229Selling New YorkSelling New YorkHunters Int’lHouse HuntersBuying and Selling “Robert and Marie” Extreme Homes (N) House Hunters (N) Hunters Int’lYou Live in What? TLC 48 183 280Island MediumIsland MediumLittle Shop of Gypsies Say Yes: ATLSay Yes: ATLFour Weddings “...and a Contortionist” Little Shop of Gypsies “Lycra or Bust” Four Weddings “...and a Contortionist” HIST 49 120 269The Universe “UFO: The Real Deal” Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars What’s the Earth Worth? Putting a price tag on planet Earth. (N) (:02) America’s Book of Secrets ANPL 50 184 282Fatal Attractions The Blue Planet: Seas of Life The Blue Planet: Seas of Life Madagascar Madagascar was left untouched by man. The Blue Planet: Seas of Life FOOD 51 110 231Chopped “Nopales, No Problem” Chopped Spaghetti in a can; tile sh. Halloween WarsSweet Genius “Glowing Genius” Sweet Genius A chocolate dessert. (N) Chopped “Duck for Dinner” TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the Lord Always Good NewThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesJoel Osteen Joseph PrinceHillsong TVPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -Football PrevUFC InsiderThe Game 365Drivenf Women’s College Soccer Missouri at Texas A&M. (N) Football PrevUFC InsiderUFC Unleashed SYFY 58 122 244“Nightmare on Elm Street 2: Freddy” “A Nightmare on Elm Street 5: The Dream Child” (1989) Robert Englund. “The Mist” (2007, Horror) Thomas Jane. A deadly fog engulfs terri ed townspeople. Real-Movies AMC 60 130 254 “House on Haunted Hill” (1999) Geoffrey Rush, Famke Janssen. “From Dusk Till Dawn” (1996, Horror) Harvey Keitel, George Clooney. (:15) “From Dusk Till Dawn 2: Texas Blood Money” (1999, Horror) COM 62 107 249South Park Tosh.0 The Colbert ReportDaily ShowChappelle’s ShowStand-Up Rev.Daniel Tosh: Happy Thoughts Stand-Up Rev.Tosh.0 Daily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327Reba “Switch” Reba Reba Reba Reba Reba “Sweet Home Alabama” (2002, Romance-Comedy) Reese Witherspoon, Josh Lucas. Home-Holiday NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer “The Paper Hoarder” Elephants: The Dark SideSecrets of Wild IndiaSecrets of Wild India “Tiger Jungles” Secrets of Wild India “Desert Lions” Secrets of Wild India NGC 109 186 276Drugged “High on Heroin” Wild Justice “Poacher Compound” Taboo “Old Enough?” Taboo “Teen Sex” Drugs, Inc. “High Stakes Vegas” Taboo “Teen Sex” SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s Made (N) How It’s MadeThey Do It?They Do It?How It’s MadeHow It’s Made ID 111 192 285On the Case With Paula Zahn Behind Mansion Walls Blood Relatives “Blood is Thicker” The Will: Family Secrets Revealed (N) Very Bad Men (N) Very Bad MenBlood Relatives “Blood is Thicker” HBO 302 300 501(5:15) “50 First Dates” (2004) “Big Mommas: Like Father, Like Son” (2011) Martin Lawrence. ‘PG-13’ “Life as We Know It” (2010) Katherine Heigl, Josh Duhamel. ‘PG-13’ Hookers & Johns: Trick or Treat MAX 320 310 515(:15) “Transit” (2012) Jim Caviezel. ‘R’ (:45) “Bridesmaids” (2011, Comedy) Kristen Wiig, Maya Rudolph, Rose Byrne. ‘NR’ “Die Hard 2” (1990, Action) Bruce Willis, Bonnie Bedelia. ‘R’ SHOW 340 318 545(5:30) “The Extra Man” (2010) Kevin Kline. ‘R’ “I Am Number Four” (2011, Action) Alex Pettyfer. ‘PG-13’ “Apollo 18” (2011) Lloyd Owen. ‘PG-13’ Gigolos (N) Polyamory: Married CHS: First goal can be achieved Continued From Page 1B INDIANS: Wakulla whipped Rickards Continued From Page 1B going to try to get a victory against them and close this thing out.” While the Tigers’ biggest goal is getting better, they’re not ignoring the fact that they can win the dis-trict either. “First, it’s an opportunity to get better,” Allen said. “But this was one of our goals coming into the season. Our first goal was to win the district champi-onship, because it was the first one we could achieve. The second one was to go 10-0, but we’re going to fall a little short. Going 9-1 can still be pretty dang good. We’re shooting for that one. If we can take care of the district, and stay focused, we’ll have an opportunity to go out and achieve our third goal.” Allen said the Tigers have the right focus right now to make the third goal a reality and that’s to win a state title. “They’re making it easy as coaches,” Allen said. “The guys are coming out here and having fun. I give them a day off and they’re still coming around. We have to run them off and I hope they keep that mentality.” Against East Gadsden, Kelly was 18 of 34 for 323 yards with three touchdown passes and three intercep-tions. Stephen Denmark, Vosean Crumbie and Holmes caught the TD passes. Kelly also rushed for a touchdown. Marvin Seabrook scored on a punt return. Rickards lost to Wakulla, 35-7, a team that beat Fort White 37-26. Stephen Denmark scored the Raiders’ touchdown on a 75-yard kickoff return. In Rickards’ 41-0 blasting of FAMU, Kelly threw for 95 yards and scored two touchdowns on the ground. Backup Jalen Ashby ran for a touchdown. Both also caught passes, as did Kalin Riles, Malcom Penny, Seabrook, Holmes and Stephen Denmark. Leading tacklers for the Raiders are Malik Slater, James Barkley, Michael Winter and Brian Denmark. Barkley and Denmark are the sack specialists. Rickards has made nine playoff appearances, with the latest coming in 2004. Its 1967 team was knocked out of the playoffs by the Columbia High team that won state. Rickards next returned to the playoffs in 1984, then became a semi-regular for 10 years beginning in 1995. The Raiders made it in 1995-96-99-2000-01-02-04. JASON MATTHEW WALKE R/Lake City ReporterFlorida’s Jordan Reed (11) attempts a one-handed catch i n a game against South Carolina on Saturday.Ranked teams to clashBy RALPH D. RUSSOAssociated PressThis is a big week for Oregon’s BCS title hopes. No, not because the second-ranked Ducks play hapless Colorado. That’ll be a breeze. The teams directly ahead of Oregon in the BCS stand-ings (Alabama, Florida and Kansas State), and the one right behind (Notre Dame), are all playing ranked foes Saturday. So the Ducks could get some of the help they need to move up — or they could slip further back in the race to the national champion-ship game. You can whittle it down to four serious contenders for a spot in the BCS title game in Miami. Out of the top five teams, Oregon seems to be the most likely to get left out if more than two teams finish unbeaten. Oregon’s opponents so far just haven’t been partic-ularly good, and it’s weigh-ing the Ducks down in the computer ratings. Oregon is second in both polls that are used in the BCS standings, but sixth in the computer rankings. The picks: Today No. 14 Clemson (minus 12) at Wake Forest Tigers can’t afford another ACC slip ... CLEMSON 31-17. Friday Cincinnati (plus 3 12 ) at No. 16 Louisville Battle for the Keg of Nails ... LOUISVILLE 28-24. Saturday No. 13 Mississippi State (plus 24) at No. 1 Alabama As line shows, Bulldogs have plenty of doubters ... ALABAMA 38-17. Colorado (plus 45 12 ) at No. 2 Oregon Ducks have outscored opponents 199-49 in first half ... OREGON 50-14. No. 3 Florida (plus 6 12 ) vs. No. 12 Georgia at Jacksonville. What happened to Bulldogs’ defense? Last three opponents have averaged 211 per game on ground ... FLORIDA 31-23. No. 15 Texas Tech (plus 7) at No. 4 Kansas State Seth Doege for Heisman? ... KANSAS STATE 41-31. No. 5 Notre Dame (plus 10) at No. 8 Oklahoma Best offense Fighting Irish have faced, but also best defense Sooners have faced ... OKLAHOMA 28-17. No. 7 Oregon State (minus 4 12 ) at Washington QB Sean Mannion (knee) returns for Beavers ... WASHINGTON 31-28. No. 9 Ohio State (pick’em) at Penn State Most interesting game in the Big Ten so far has no championship implications ... PENN STATE 35-31. No. 10 Southern California (minus 6 12 ) at Arizona Matt Barkley’s Heisman campaign resets ... USC 42-28. Duke (plus 27 12 ) at No. 11 Florida State ACC title game preview? Hard to say it with a straight face ... FLORIDA STATE 45-14. Tennessee (plus 14) at No. 17 South Carolina Two straight losses have derailed Gamecocks’ cham-pionship hopes ... SOUTH CAROLINA 35-24. Kent State (plus 13 12 ) at No. 18 Rutgers Beware the MAC ... RUTGERS 31-14. Washington State (plus 24 12 ) at No. 19 Stanford First season at Wazzu has been forgettable for Mike Leach ... STANFORD 43-14. No. 20 Michigan (plus 2 12 ) at Nebraska Denard Robinson tends not to play well against good defenses. Not a problem this week ... MICHIGAN 33-27. No. 21 Boise State (minus 16 12 ) at Wyoming Defense carrying the Broncos ... BOISE STATE 28-14. No. 22 Texas A&M (minus 15) at Auburn Coach Gene Chizik and Tigers desperately need a victory ... TEXAS A&M 35-24. No. 23 Ohio (minus 7) at Miami, Ohio Bobcats are unbeaten, but have been living dan-gerously ... OHIO 37-33. No. 24 Louisiana Tech (minus 30 12 ) at New Mexico State Bulldogs hit 70 last week. Two straight? ... LOUISIANA TECH 66-24.

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DEAR ABBY: My wife and I have had many dis-cussions regarding tattoos. She would say she wanted one; I’d disagree. Well, just before her birthday she had her best friend, a tattoo artist, give her a small tattoo of a dragonfly with dots repre-senting our four children. I didn’t know about it for about six weeks, until I walked up behind her at her computer desk and noticed it on her upper shoulder. Our kids knew and hadn’t said anything. I got really mad and left the house for a while. When I returned and began arguing with her, she would say only that it was her body, and she would do whatever she wanted. I have gotten over the tattoo part, but I haven’t forgotten about not know-ing and how I finally found out. I am hurt that she didn’t tell me. She doesn’t think it’s worth apologiz-ing for. It seems like every-thing she does now is one big secret. Please advise. -HURT TO THE BONE IN KENTUCKY DEAR HURT TO THE BONE: Your wife didn’t tell you because she wanted to avoid the argument that she knew would fol-low. Your children didn’t say anything because they were protecting their mother. It appears that you and your wife have significant communication prob-lems. Counseling might help, and I recommend it because secrets can cause marriages to crumble. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: When I was a young woman, I was a single parent. I did it all -the cooking, the cleaning and working. My friends would laugh at how often I’d say, “I need a wife!” I didn’t mean it in a sexual way; I simply hated house-work and cooking. When I started dating my husband, my daughter told him, “Mom will never marry you. Men are just more wash and messes.” He told her he would do the housework. Stupidly, I believed him. The economy tanked, I lost my job and I have become a housewife. I feel like I’m serving a life sentence in a prison of my own making. I tried to convince my husband to move so I could find a job and hire a maid. No luck. He decided that since we didn’t need as much money, he would work less. Now he works part-time, and I want out. -LIVING IN HELL IN NEW JERSEY DEAR LIVING IN HELL: Tell your husband that you didn’t sign up for the role he has assigned to you. I’m sure he already knows you’re not happy with the situation. If he is unwilling to resume work-ing full-time, then it will be up to you to find some kind of job that will enable you to save enough money to leave. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: Election Day will soon be here, when we go to the polls and elect a Democrat or Republican to the White House. Afterward, why not stop at your local animal shelter and elect a DemoCAT or a RePUPlican to YOUR house? No matter whom you choose for the White House, you can’t go wrong with a furry friend. They can’t reduce the deficit or improve the economy, but what they can do is give uncondition-al love. -INDEPENDENT ANIMAL ADVOCATE DILBERT BABY BLUES HOROSCOPES DEAR ABBY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Your intuition will not let you down when deal-ing with partners. Asking questions and using diplo-macy will help you get the answers you are looking for so you can make deci-sions and move forward with your life. +++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Collaborating with someone with experience will help you in many ways. What you can do when you put your mind to it will help to set your goals higher. Romance is in the stars and will enhance a relationship that’s important to you. ++++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Don’t let confu-sion cost you. Use your imagination and you’ll gain instead of lose. Staying power will be the determining factor when it comes to your success. Ask for a favor if it will help you complete a task. ++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Past experience, an excellent memory and preparation will help you reach your goal. Love is highlighted, and social-izing with someone special to celebrate what you have accomplished will enhance your relationship. +++++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Be careful how you deal with friends and relatives. Not everyone will share your thoughts. Listen care-fully and follow practical suggestions that will help you stabilize your personal position. Do what you can to help a good cause. +++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Get involved in a worthwhile organization, but don’t offer more than you can afford to part with financially. More time spent with family, fixing up your home or repairing a relationship that needs a little tender loving care is your best bet. +++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The element of sur-prise will make what you do more inviting to some-one you want to entice to join you. Love is in the stars, and getting together with someone from your past will change your out-look and get you back on track. +++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Assess your situation at home. Personal changes can be made that will boost your confidence and help you move in a direction you find more suitable. Let your intuition guide you when dealing with older relatives or someone you must answer to. +++++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Expect the unex-pected when dealing with friends, relatives or people in your community. Not everyone will be honest, which can send you down the wrong path. Focus more on your home and the changes that will help improve your lifestyle. ++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Take a walk down memory lane and remem-ber some of the people you have known who may be able to contribute to your current situation. You have plenty to gain if you attend a reunion or call up an old friend. ++++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Consider your options. Take note of the costs involved before you take on a new contract, lease or payment. You don’t want to limit your freedom to do the things you enjoy most. Alterations to your living space will improve your situation. +++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Show off; what you do to impress people will help you win a contract or position that can alter your future. Love and romance are in a high cycle, and plans to celebrate with someone you care for will improve your relationship. +++ CELEBRITY CIPHER Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com BLONDIE BEETLE BAILEY B.C. FRANK & ERNEST FOR BETTER OR WORSE ZITS HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH GARFIELD THE LAST WORD Eugenia Last Discovery of wife’s tattoo shatters husband’s trust Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. CLASSIC PEANUTS Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2012 3B

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTHURSDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2012 Classified Department: 755-5440 4B CLASSIFIED AD vantageTake ADvantage of the Reporter Classifieds!755-5440Lake City Reporter FIND IT SELL IT BUY IT $17504 lines 3 days Includes 2 Signs Each additional line $1.65 Garage Sale Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$10104 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.10One item per ad Under $500 Personal Merchandise Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$16754 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.15One item per ad Under $1,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$23704 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.45One item per ad Under $2,500 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $4,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$27404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.55One item per ad Under $4,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$30404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.65One item per ad Under $6,000 Placing An Ad Service Guide Limited to service type advertis-ing only.4 lines, one month....$92.00 $10.80 each additional lineIncludes an additional $2.00 per ad for each Wednesday insertion. DeadlinesBe Sure to Call Early You can call us at 755-5440 Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.Some people prefer to place their classified ads in person, and some ad categories will require prepay-ment. Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street.You can also fax or email your ad copy to the Reporter.FAX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the Classified Department.EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreporter.comAd is to Appear:TuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday Call by:Mon., 10:00 a.m.Mon., 10:00 a.m.Wed., 10:00 a.m.Thurs., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fax/Email by:Mon., 9:00 a.m.Mon., 9:00 a.m.Wed., 9:00 a.m.Thurs., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.These deadlines are subject to change without notice. Cancellations, Changes & Billing Questions Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject, or classify all advertisements under appropriate headings. Copy should be checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day of pub-lication. Credit for published errors will be allowed for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement which was incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be published, nor for any general, special or consequential damages. Advertising language must comply with Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition of discrimi-nation in employment, housing and public accommodations. Standard abbreviations are acceptable; how-ever, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated. Ad Errors-Please read your ad on the first day of publication. Weaccept responsibility for only the first incorrect insertion, and only the charge for the ad space in error. Please call 755-5440 immediately for prompt correc-tion and billing adjustments.CancellationsNormal advertising deadlines apply for cancellation.Billing InquiriesCall 755-5440. Should further information be required regarding payments or credit limits, your call will be trans-ferred to the accounting depart-ment. General Information In Print and Onlinewww.lakecityreporter.com Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$2504 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $.25One item per ad Under $100 CLASSIFIED AD vantageTake ADvantage of the Reporter Classifieds!755-5440Lake City Reporter FIND IT SELL IT BUY IT $17504 lines 3 days Includes 2 Signs Each additional line $1.65 Garage Sale Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$10104 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.10One item per ad Under $500 Personal Merchandise Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$16754 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.15One item per ad Under $1,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$23704 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.45One item per ad Under $2,500 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $4,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$27404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.55One item per ad Under $4,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$30404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.65One item per ad Under $6,000 Placing An Ad Service Guide Limited to service type advertis-ing only.4 lines, one month....$92.00 $10.80 each additional lineIncludes an additional $2.00 per ad for each Wednesday insertion. DeadlinesBe Sure to Call Early You can call us at 755-5440 Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.Some people prefer to place their classified ads in person, and some ad categories will require prepay-ment. Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street.You can also fax or email your ad copy to the Reporter.FAX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the Classified Department.EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreporter.comAd is to Appear:TuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday Call by:Mon., 10:00 a.m.Mon., 10:00 a.m.Wed., 10:00 a.m.Thurs., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fax/Email by:Mon., 9:00 a.m.Mon., 9:00 a.m.Wed., 9:00 a.m.Thurs., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.These deadlines are subject to change without notice. Cancellations, Changes & Billing Questions Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject, or classify all advertisements under appropriate headings. Copy should be checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day of pub-lication. Credit for published errors will be allowed for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement which was incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be published, nor for any general, special or consequential damages. Advertising language must comply with Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition of discrimi-nation in employment, housing and public accommodations. Standard abbreviations are acceptable; how-ever, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated. Ad Errors-Please read your ad on the first day of publication. Weaccept responsibility for only the first incorrect insertion, and only the charge for the ad space in error. Please call 755-5440 immediately for prompt correc-tion and billing adjustments.CancellationsNormal advertising deadlines apply for cancellation.Billing InquiriesCall 755-5440. Should further information be required regarding payments or credit limits, your call will be trans-ferred to the accounting depart-ment. General Information In Print and Onlinewww.lakecityreporter.com Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$2504 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $.25One item per ad Under $100 LegalCOLUMBIACOUNTYBOARD OF COUNTYCOMMISSIONERSPROJECTNUMBER 2012-6Annual Asphalt Minor Pavement Repair ProgramNOTICE TO CONTRACTORSNotice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received in the Columbia County Manager’s office until 11:00 A.M. on October 29, 2012, for Co-lumbia County Project No. 2012-6. This office is located on the second floor of the Courthouse Annex at 135 Hernando Avenue, Room 203 Lake City FL32055.The work consists of repairing exist-ing asphalt pavement (including but not limited to; County roadways, County parking areas, and driveways located on County Right of Way) with asphalt pavement and limerock base. The work will be performed on an as-needed basis during Fiscal Year 2012/2013, which begins Octo-ber 1, 2012, and ends September 30, 2013.The Bid Forms and Construction specifications may be obtained from the County’s web site at http://www .columbiacountyfla.com/ PurchasingBids.asp The successful bidder will be re-quired to furnish the County Manag-er with liability insurance prior to commencing work.The Columbia County Commission reserves the right to reject any or all bids and to add to the contract or de-lete from the contract to stay within their funding capabilities.05535320October 18, 25, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURTIN THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO.: 12-228-CADIVISION:JAX FEDERALCREDITUNION,Plaintiff,vs.MARIO GRANDA, JR., a Single Person, Deceased, by and through any and all Unknown Heirs, Benefi-ciaries, Devisees, Assignees, Lie-nors, Creditors, Trustees and all oth-ers who may claim an interest in the Estate of MARIO GRANDA, JR., a Single Person, Deceased; UN-KNOWN SPOUSE OF MARIO GRANDA, JR, a Single Person; and UNKNOWN TENANTIN POSSES-SION,Defendants.NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that, pur-suant to the Order of Summary Judg-ment of Foreclosure in this cause, in the Circuit Court of Columbia Coun-ty, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Columbia County, Florida described as:COMMENCE ATTHE NWCOR-NER OF THE SW1/4 OF THE SW1/4, SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP2 SOUTH, RANGE 15 EAST, CO-LUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND RUN THENCE N 8835’19’’E, ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SW1/4 OF SW1/4, 356.35 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGIN-NING; THENCE CONTINUE N 88 35’19’’E, ALONG SAID NORTH LINE, 303.65 FEET; THENCE S 0 53’41’’E, 660.00 FEET; THENCE S 8835’19’’W, 279.28 FEET; THENCE N 300’36’’W, 660.23 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGIN-NING. LESS AND EXCEPTTHE NORTH 50 FEETOF SAID LANDS BEING THE RIGHTOF WAYFOR LOWER SPRINGS ROAD.And which postal address is:2330 Lower Springs N.W., Lake City, FL32055.at Public Sale, to the highest bidder, for cash, on the third floor of the Co-lumbia County Courthouse at 173 N.E. Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida, beginning at 11:00 a.m. on the 21st day of November, 2012.ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN IN-TERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THIS LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceed-ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assis-tance. Please contact ADACoordi-nator, 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Room 408, Lake City, FL32055, (386) 719-7428 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this no-tification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice im-paired, call 711.WITNESS my hand and the Seal of this Court this 15th day of October, 2012.Clerk of the Circuit Court/s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkRolfe & Lobello, P.A.P.O. Box 40546Jacksonville, FL32203Phone (904) 358-1666Fax (904) 356-051605535464October 25, 2012November 1, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO. 11-532-CACOLUMBIABANK, a Florida banking corporation,Plaintiff,vs.ACTION IRRIGATION & LAND-SCAPING CONTRACTORS, INC., a Florida corporation, R. LAWTON UNRAU, STEVEN L. KAMPMEY-ER, MELISSAKAMPMEYER and ELIZABETH A. UNRAU,Defendants.CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE UN-DER F.S. CHAPTER 45NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accord-ance with the Summary Final Judg-ment of Foreclosure dated October 15, 2012, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bid-der for cash at the Columbia County Courthouse, Courtroom 1, 173 Northeast Hernando Avenue, Lake City, FL32055 at 11:00 a.m. on Legal2/20/13, the following described property:COMMENCE ATTHE SOUTH-WESTCORNER OF THE NW1/4 OF THE SW1/4 OF SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP3 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND RUN N 001’00”E ALONG THE WESTLINE OF THE NW1/4 OF THE SW1/4 ADIS-TANCE OF 609.90 FEET; THENCE S 8959’00”E ADISTANCE OF 351.00 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING; THENCE N 001’00”E 179.78 FEET; THENCE S 8959’00”E 82.52 FEET; THENCE N 4249’30”E 53.34 FEET; THENCE S 5824’28”E, 36.15 FEET; THENCE S 6703’00”E 164.68 FEETTO ACONCRETE MONUMENTON THE WESTLINE OF RIDGE-WOOD DRIVE; THENCE S 052’00”WALONG SAID WESTLINE, 137.43 FEET; THENCE N 8959’00”W302.52 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING.ALSO:COMMENCE ATTHE SOUTH-WESTCORNER OF THE NW1/4 OF THE SW1/4 OF SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP3 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND RUN N 0001’00”E ALONG THE WESTLINE OF SAID NW1/4 OF SW1/4 ADISTANCE OF 609.90 FEET; THENCE S 8959’00”E 369.74 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGIN-NING; THENCE N 0012’55”E 199.62 FEET; THENCE S 8959’18”E 82.63 FEET; THENCE N 4343’12”E 26.47 FEETTO THE POINTON THE SOUTHERLYLINE OF APRIVATE ROAD EASEMENT; THENCE S 6242’13”E ALONG SAID SOUTH-ERLYLINE 36.18 FEET; THENCE S 6648’16”E STILLALONG SAID SOUTHERLYLINE 164.74 FEETTOAPOINTON THE WESTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE OF RIDGEWOOD DRIVE; THENCE S 0056'42”WALONG SAID WEST-ERLYRIGHT-OF WAYLINE 137.39 FEETTO APOINTON THE SOUTH LINE OF A30 FOOTROAD AND UTILITIES EASE-MENT; THENCE N 8959’00”WALONG SAID SOUTH LINE 282.99 FEETTOTHE POINTOF BEGINNING.LESS AND EXCEPTTHE FOL-LOWING TWO PARCELS OF RE-ALESTATE PROPERTYDESCRI-BED AS PARCELAAND PAR-CELB:PARCELA: COMMENCE ATTHE SOUTHWESTCORNER OF THE NW1/4 OF THE SW1/4 OF SEC-TION 31, TOWNSHIP3 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND RUN N 0001’00”E ALONG THE WESTLINE OF SAID NW1/4 OF THE SW1/4 DISTANCE OF 609.90 FEET; THENCE S 8959’00”E 351.00 FEETTO THE SOUTH-WESTCORNER OF APARCELOF LAND DESCRIBED BYADEED RECORDED IN BOOK 387, PAGE 147 OF THE OFFICIALRE-CORDS OF COLUMBIACOUN-TY, FLORIDAAND THE POINTOF BEGINNING; THENCE N 0008'19”E ALONG THE WESTLINE OF SAID PARCELOF LAND 150.00 FEETTO THE NORTH LINE OF APARCELOF LAND DESCRIBED BYADEED RECORDED IN BOOK 459, PAGE 218 OF THE OFFICIALRECORDS OF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLOR-IDA; THENCE S 8959’00”E ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID PARCELOF LAND 18.94 FEETTO THE NORTHEASTCOR-NER OF SAID PARCELOF LAND; THENCE S 0012’55”WALONG THE EASTLINE OF SAID PARCELOF LAND 150 FEETTO THE SOUTHEASTCOR-NER OF SAID PARCELOF LAND; THENCE N 8959'00”WALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID PARCELOF LAND 18.74 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGIN-NING. SUBJECTTO AN EASE-MENTFOR ROAD AND UTILITYPURPOSES ALONG THE SOUTH 30 FEETTHEREOF.PARCELB: COMMENCE ATTHE SOUTHWESTCORNER OF THE NW1/4 OF THE SW1/4 OF SEC-TION 31, TOWNSHIP3 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND RUN N 0001'00”E ALONG THE WESTLINE OF SAID NW1/4 OF THE SW1/4 ADISTANCE OF 609.90 FEET; THENCE S 8959’00”E 351.00 FEETTO THE SOUTH-WESTCORNER OF APARCELOF LAND DESCRIBED BYADEED RECORDED IN BOOK 387, PAGE 147 OF THE OFFICIALRE-CORDS OF COLUMBIACOUN-TY, FLORIDA; THENCE N 0008’19”EALONG THE WESTLINE OF SAID PARCELOF LAND 150.00 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE N 0008'19”E STILLALONG THE WESTLINE OF SAID PARCELOF LAND 29.91 FEET; THENCE S 8946'38”E ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF APARCELOF LAND DESCRIBED BYADEED RECORDED IN BOOK 448, PAGE 316 OF SAID OFFICIALRECORDS; THENCE S 0012'55”WALONG SAID EASTLINE 29.84 FEET; THENCE N 8959'00”WALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID PARCELOF LAND (BEING ALSO THE NORTH LINE OF APARCELOR LAND DESCRIBED BYADEED RECORDED IN BOOK 459, PAGE 218) ADISTANCE OF 18.94 FEETTOTHE POINTOF BEGINNING.SAID PROPERTYBEING ALSO DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:PARCEL2: COMMENCE ATTHE SOUTHWESTCORNER OF THE NW1/4 OF THE SW1/4 OF SEC-TION 31, TOWNSHIP3 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND RUN N 0001'00”E ALONG THE WESTLINE OF SAID NW1/4 OF THE SW1/4 ADISTANCE OF 609.90 FEET; THENCE S 8959’00”E 369.74 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING; THENCE N 0012'55”E 199.62 FEET; THENCE S 8959’18”E 82.63 FEET; THENCE N 4343’12”E 26.47 LegalFEETTO THE POINTON THE SOUTHERLYLINE OF APRI-VATE ROAD EASEMENT; THENCE S 6242'13”E ALONG SAID SOUTHERLYLINE 36.18 FEET; THENCE S 6648’16”E STILLALONG SAID SOUTHER-LYLINE 164.74 FEETTO APOINTON THE WESTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE OF RIDGEWOOD DRIVE; THENCE S 0056'42”WALONG SAID WEST-ERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE 137.39 FEETTO APOINTON THE SOUTH LINE OF A30 FOOTROAD AND UTILITIES EASE-MENT; THENCE N 8959'00”WALONG SAID SOUTH LINE 282.99 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING.ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN IN-TERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.Dated: 10/16/12P. DeWitt CasonClerk of CourtBy: /s/ B.ScippioDeputy Clerk05535444October 25, 2012November 1, 2012 020Lost & Found Female Black Lab Puppy Approx 4-6 mth old. Found on 10-12-12 Hwy 90, Noegel & Brown Roads. Call 386-867-1134 100Job Opportunities05535485HOLIDAYINN & SUITESLake City’s only full service hotel is seeking the following : Line Cook P/TMust have Experience Apply in person Mon-Fri 12-5pm 213 SWCommerce Dr. EOE/DFWP. Accepting Applications for:•P/TFront Desk Night Shift • P/TMaintenance Apply in person at Cabot Lodge. CDLClass A Truck Driver Flatbed exp. for F/TSE area. 3 years exp or more. Medical benefits offered. Contact Melissa or Sandy@ 386-935-2773 Childrens art studio needs PT instructor. Great fun! Must be great with kids & follow instructions. Call 288-0954. Construction Superintendent Needed. Email Resume To: resume9481@yahoo.com SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 100Job OpportunitiesEstablished Ocala business is Looking to hire additional sales teams for our expanding product line.Earn $500.00/week, plus commission!If you’re upbeat, friendly and enjoy working with the public, then contact us for a confidential interview and start earning the income you deserve! Valid driver’s license, proof of insurance and overnight travel is required. Call us TODAYat 352-233-2818.Telecom Service Bureau, Inc. FULL-TIME CUSTODIAN Wanted. Primary duties include basic knowledge of boilers and HVAC system, cleaning sanctuary and Fellowship Hall, mowing, minor repairs, setup and taking down tables and chairs and general building maintenance.Must be able to lift 60 lbs. Criminal background check required. Please send resume and references to Staff Parish Relations, First United Methodist Church, Lake City, 973 S. Marion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025. Deadline is Oct. 19, 2012. P/THousekeeper Needed. Occasional Nights And Weekends. Fax Resume to 386-487-1232. Person for general building repair and maintenance Contact 755-6481 120Medical EmploymentDietar y Manager Needed CDM, Chef, LTC, 2 years experience preferred Must be able to manage large staff and oversee daily food preparation for a 180 bed SNF. Full time with excellent benefits. E-mail resume to Greg Roberts groberts@gulfcoasthealthcare.com or fax to: (386)362-4417. Live Oak, FLEOE/V/D/M/F Medical Assistant to work in a medical office. Applicants must be fluent in English & Spanish. Please fax resume and references to 866-861-1727 Medical Office Manager Experience in Medical Billing a plus. Fax resume to 386-752-6709 Resource Management Specialist (Shipping and Receiving Coordinator) LifeSouth Community Blood Centers, Inc. is seeking an efficient and task-oriented individual as a Resource Management Specialist. This position is responsible for issues relating to the shipment and delivery of blood and blood components. Responsibilities include, but are not limited to: inspect and evaluate blood products to make sure they are safe, pure, and potent; receive and handle blood orders from hospitals and other customers; review shipping notices, orders, and other records to determine priorities and shipping methods required to meet scheduled deadlines. High school diploma or GED required. Valid driver’s license required. Must meet and maintain LifeSouthREPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Linewww.lakecityreporter.com

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTHURSDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2012 5B Classified Department: 755-5440 120Medical Employmentdriver’s eligibility requirements. Some evenings and weekends required. To apply go to: www.lifesouth.org Background check and drug test required. Starting salary range $9.00 $10.00 per hour. Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer/DFWP/Tobacco Free 240Schools & Education05534919Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class12/24/2012• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-11/05/12• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies Blonde FemaleMini-Schnauzer, 18 lbs, fixed, house broken, good natured, Family friendly. $225 Contact 386-292-3927 PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 330Livestock & SuppliesDeep Creek Farms Barn kept Square or Net Wrapped Round Hay Bales For Sale Ronnie Hughes (386)365-1425 407Computers DELLComputer $100.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 408Furniture Bassett round table 6 covered chairs, 3 leaves, pads. $150.00 Ethan Allen 2 pc hutch-excellent $500.00 754-1734. 413Musical MerchandiseSpinet type piano. $900 OBO Must Sell Contact 386-842-5548 430Garage Sales Multi Family! Fri/Sat 8-till In Rolling Meadows off Branford Hwy, 3 mi. S. of Hwy 90, Follow signs, furn., bedding, kids/adult clothes, collectibles, tools, & so much more. MUSTSEE PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 440Miscellaneous 32 inch TVGreat Picture, With Remote $100.00 Contact 386-292-3927 Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, Root Raking, Bush Hog, Seeding, Sod, Disking, site prep, ponds & irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200 Five (5) VSV Speakers, Glass TVtable, $400 OBO Contact 755-4059 GE REFRIGERATOR, white, frost free, $175.00 OBO Contact 386-292-3927 Table and (4) padded chairs Med/Dark Wood. In great shape $100 Contact 386-292-3927 Whirlpool Dryer White, Runs great! $100.00 Contact 386-292-3927 450Good Things to EatThe Nut Cracker Robert Taylor Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans 2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024 Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville 386-963-4138 or 961-1420 630Mobile Homes forRent1 Bd $370/mth or 2 Bd $485/mth $300 Sec. + $50 App.Fee. Located in the heart of LC. Call 305-9845511 or 386-344-0830 For Apt. 14 x70 MH.Real clean,2br/2ba garden tub,Water furn.,Good Location $575 mo. $300 dep. No Pets 386-755-0064 or (904) 771-5924 2 BR MH. $400 $450. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 2 BR/2BASW, Completly furnished, carport, shed, located on 41st Dr., $600 mo.,+ Util. $150 Dep. Avail 11/5 935-2461 3BR/2BADWMH on 1 acre private lot, 1st+last+dep required located in Ellisville. No pets. Contact 352-870-5144 Clean 2br/1ba partially furnished Lots of trees on Turner Rd. Leave message if no answer. 386-752-6269 630Mobile Homes forRentMobile Homes for rent in White Springs & Ft. White. Contact 386-623-3404 Newer2/2. Super clean on 1 ac North by distribution center. Perfect for Target employee. $550. mo Call for details. 386-867-9231 640Mobile Homes forSale1993 PEACHSTATE 14x70 Newly renovated, 3/2, $9500.00. 1981 Destiny 24x52 good cond. 3/2, $16,500. Call 288-4688 2013 DOUBLEWIDE $33,995 inc. set-up, trim-out & A/C Call 386-288-8379. 3/2, 1800 sqft., CBC home, on corner lot, work shop. MLS# 79574 $74,900. REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 3BR/2BA28X64 in a great location, a lot of upgrades, fireplace. Only $2,500 down $399 a month. Call Paula at 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com 4Br/2ba, in town, good investment, current rent set at $825 per mo. MLS # 74958. $74,900 Accredited Real Estate Mike Foster 288-3596 5 LIKENew Mobile Homes!!! For under $30,000. MUSTSEE Call John T. 386-752-1452 575 Credit Score=10% Down on your choice of select New 3/2 or 4/2 Double. Limited time offer for Challenged Credit. North Pointe Homes, 352-872-5566 Accredited Real Estate Nice Home, kitchen redone fenced, backyard, 2br/1ba. MLS#81521, $52,000. Mike Foster 288-3596 BANK REPO 3BR/2BADoublewide ’09 Excellent condition. Only $999 down $377 a month. Call Paula 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #75661 Must be 55+, Manufacture home, 1 ac, fireplace, laundry, open & bright $79,900. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Home in good condition, MH 3br/2ba. Good size kitchen. 4 plus acres. MLS #80235. $63,000 Accredited Real Estate Mike Foster 288-3596 MUSTSEE 2013 2x6 walls, R30 insulation, OSB wrap, house wrap, real wood cabinets, and thermal pain windows. Payment $399 per month call John T386-752-1452. NEW3/2JACOBSEN HOMES Starting at $43,995. Painted WAlls-Del-Set-AC-Skirting-and Steps. North Pointe Homes Hwy 441 N, Gainesville, FL 352-872-5566 NEWJacobsen Model Homes Sale! 13 Left with up to $25,000 off. Don’t buy until you shop North Pointe Homes 4545 NW 13th St Gainesville 352-872-5566 Own YourProperty? No Money Down with good credit. Great Rates Available. North Pointe Homes 352-872-5566 Palm Harbor Homes Red Tag Sale Over 10 Stock Units Must Go New Homes Start at $39,900 800-622-2832 ext 210 Results Realty Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Affordable 4/2 on 10 acres in Bell. over 2,200 sqft. in country setting. $80,000 MLS# 76582 Several Bank Repos and Used Homes in stock At North Pointe in Gainesville 352-872-5566 WANTED…CASH PAID for your Mobile Home, Singlewide or Doublewide flood homes welcome. Call 386-288-8379 650Mobile Home & Land2 acres w/ single wide renovated 3bd/2ba, living room and den, 3 part garage/ storage shed, two septics. Contact 386-623-6164 Beautiful brick on 11.16 acres w/ DWfor family or renting. In ground pool. MLS 81203. $252,000. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 CLEAN NICE 2/2 SW,and 740sf. frame studio, 1 bath outbuilding, nice country ac 8 mi to VA. $39,000 Cash only 86.961.9181 Lots of sq ft, 4br/2ba approx 2618 sq ft, Newly remodeled kitchen, new roof. MLS 81733. $99,900. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 Nice 2br/2ba, 1996 DW, Energy Efficient, 3/4 frnshd, 3 yr old roof, 1/2 ac lot in Oak Wd subdv in Live Oak $39,900. Call 309-645-2659 Owner Fin.-Nice huge 4/2.5 on 3 ac, x-fenced, creek, lrg deck,Paved Rd. McAlpin area. Small down $950/mth 386-867-1833. For picswww.suwanneevalleyproperties.com What a great home, 3BR/2B, 1860 sqft. DWon 5 acres. MLS#80543 $125,000. REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05535481We’ve got it all!$89 Deposit Limited Avail. Call Today! Windsong Apts. *Free afterschool program386-758-8455 1BR APT. Downtown Location, Clean. New Carpet $450 mo, plus Security. NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456 2BR/1BAAPT. w/garage. West side of town. $650. mo. 386-961-9000 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent2BR/2BAw/garage 5 minutes from VAhospital and Timco. Call for details. 386-365-5150 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Amberwood Hills Apts. Private Patio area. Beautiful yard. Washer/dryer hkup. Free water & sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special. 386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2 mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet Friendly. Pool laundry & balcony. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com COZYCOTTAGE 1 BRNew paint & carpet. 10 mins. South of LC, all util. & satellite incl. $550 mo. Pet ok, 386-758-2408 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Greentree Townhouse Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free water & sewer. Balcony & patio. Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com Quant 2br/1ba Apt. Peaceful Location with Lake View CH/A$500. mo $500 dep. No pets. 386-344-2170 REDUCED 2/1 1300 sqft, duplex w/ gargage. refurbished,W/D hook up, CH/A, $650 mth Lease Req. 386-965-2407 or 386-758-5881 Redwine Apartments Pets welcome. with 5 complexes, we have a home for you. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com Updated Apt, w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great area. 386-752-9626 Wayne ManorApts. Spacious 2bedroom washer/dryer. Behind Kens off Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 www .myflapts.com WindsorArms Apartments. Move in! 2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free 200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com 720Furnished Apts. ForRentRooms forRent Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent2/1 Brick house Lrg eat in kit. & closets, CH/A, 514 SE First Ave. Jasper. $550 mth 1st,last+sec. No pets. 772-285-1032 3BD/1.5BA CH/A, $725 mth & $725 dep. Contact 386-344-2170 Attractive brick 3/2, near Willowbrook, CH/A, Hard wood floors, Wood blinds, fireplace, lg yard, & storage builing. $950/mth, 1st & last. Call 965-0763 or 758-1864 Cozy 2bd / 1ba home. CH/A, $500 mth & $500 dep. Contact 386-344-2170 LAKE CITY, FL 2/1 CH/A, large yard & in town. $550. mo + dep. 386-961-3031 or 386-752-3444 750Business & Office RentalsFOR LEASE: Downtown Office Space. Convenient to Court house. Call 386-755-3456 ForRent orLease: Former Doctors office, Former professional office & Lg open space: avail on East Baya Ave. Competitive rates. Weekdays 386-984-0622 evenings/weekends 497-4762 PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 805Lots forSale 5 acre lot located in quiet setting River Rise s/d, Homes only, paved street. $65,000 MLS #76151 Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert386-397-3473 6.45 Acres of River front property on Suwannee, Consist of 3 lots, MLS# 77414 $75,000. REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 Beautiful lot on Suwannee. Property features stairway to dock, picnic area. MLS# 78842, $35,000 Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Results Realty Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #80401 $60,000. Must be 55+ 130x750 right on Suwannee, Beautiful lot, minutes from Royal Springs, Denise Bose 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #76668 $32,000 Must be 55+, Buildable lot for site built homes only. In Forest Country. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Lot close to Sante Fe, Suwannee & Ichetucknee MLS 80092 $15,000. REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 Nice vacant lot in Desirable river Community, MLS #73268 $15,000 Brittany Stoeckert386-397-3473 Results Realty, Small home on corner lot with 3br, Fenced yards. Needs TLC. MLS # 81204 $23,900 Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Results Realty Vacant land 5.91 acres, part cleared, few miles from Charles Springs & Suwannee $20,500. MLS 80961 REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 805Lots forSale PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 810Home forSale 2 OwnerFinanced Homes/ 1 RentalLake City, Mayo, Branford 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 3br/2ba 1677 sqft, close town, Hardy Board Construction Century 21Darby Rogers MLS 81841, $149,900. Call 752-6575 3br/2ba, 2 car garage, LR w/ stove fire place, lg Master Br, New roof Century 21Darby Rogers MLS 81846, $99,500. Call 752-6575 3br/2ba, extra enclosed carport, Manicured property, huge palm trees. Century 21 Darby Rogers MLS 81753, $84,500. Call 752-6575 Access Realty Gorgeous views 3bd/3ba on Lake Montgomery. Elevator, fishing dock & jacuzzi. MLS 81438 $249,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access RealtySpacious 4 bd/3ba Cypress Lake w/ 3643 sqft 1.25 acres on lake. Vaulted ceilings. MLS 81314 $279,900. Patti Taylor386-623-6896 Access RealtyTwo story 1895 Victorian house w/ electrical upgrades throughout. double -deck porches, MLS 71594 $149,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty MLS # 80175 2 story colonial, 4 br, 2b/2.5b, in ground pool, 3 fireplaces, patio, $315,000. Mary Brown Whitehurst 965-0887 Country home on 4 ac, 3br/2.5ba, formal living room, fireplace, MLS 81775 Coldwell Banker Bishop Realty $179,900 Elaine Tolar 755-6488 Cute home, nice paint, great layout. 3br/2ba. MLS 81746 $112,300. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. Must be 55+, 3br/3ba on 7.48 acres, country living, spacious, heated front porch, brick workshop, Call for appt. 752-5290. Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81958-, $115,000. Must be 55+, 3br/2ba, Site Built w/ lots of room, split plan mstr suite, FL. Rm. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81959 Must be 55+, 2br/2ba, $79,900. Site Built Home w/eat in kitchen, laundry rm, scrn porch. Denise Bose @ 752-5290 Location is the key, 3br/2ba, new a/c compressor split floor plan, MLS 81614 Coldwell Banker Bishop Realty $129,900 Sherry Ratliff 365-8414 Looks brand new 3br/2ba split plan spacious L.room, dinning area & breakfast nook. MLS #81426, Coldwell BankerBishop Agency Elaine Tolar 755-6488$149,900 820Farms & Acreage10 acres with well/septic/pp (not guar); $300 dwn; $580 a mth. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com 40 acre Ranch, Brick 3/3 with 2000 sqft., new roof, kitchen remodeled, pole barn, MLS 81641 $349,5000. REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 Access Realty10 acre square tract, High & Dry, OF Avail. w/ 25% down. Convenient Location MLS 81258$39,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access Realty43.64 acres wooded acreage in N.Columbia County. Scenic & Private. MLS 74429 $89,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Coldwell BankerBishop Agency MLS 79650, Elaine Tolar 755-6488. 10 ac w/ 3br/2.5ba, large master ste, lg porch, barn w/ workshop, $280,900. 830Commercial PropertyHigh profile location, multiple office spaces, Call Neil & Hansel Holton 984-5791 at Coldwell BankerBishop Realty MLS# 81848, $102,500 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 RECYCLE YOUR PAPER We’re on target! days a weekSubscribe Today 386-755-5445 755-5440Toplace your classified ad call

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By TIM KIRBY tkirby@lakecityreporter.com Columbia Highs swim team will hit the pool at Cecil Aquatic Complex in Jacksonville for the District 2-2A meet on Friday. Preliminaries begins at 9 a.m. Columbias district stretches from Tallahassee to Duval and Clay counties and has 13 schools. Chiles High swept the competition last year. The Lady Tigers placed fifth and Columbias boys placed ninth. Chiles is always the strong team, Columbia High head coach Mary Kay Mathis said. They have talent and numbers. At district is where we see the year-round swimmers shine, and some really tal ented swimmers. One of those is Columbia sophomore Hannah Burns, who won both her events at district last year and went on to win the first state championship for CHS swimming. Lindsay Lee and Micheala Polhamus are the other returnees who qualified for region by placing in the top four in individual or relays. I see Hannah winning her two events again and Lindsay going back to region in her two events, Mathis said. I am hoping to take a girls relay to region either the 200 medley or 400 free or both. Sara Woodfield, Sydney Morse, Joseph Piccioni and Jacob Finley qualified for the finals at last years district. Columbia will be taking several young swim mers to the meet. My new swimmers are going to be nervous, Mathis said. We are going to have to want it bad and give 100 percent. This group might surprise me. Columbia golf Chiles won the Region 1-2A boys golf tournament at Seminole Golf Course in Tallahassee on Tuesday. Gulf Breeze High came in second. Columbias Dean Soucinek qualified as an individual and shot a 74, which tied him for eighth overall. 6B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2012 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421 6BSports Jump G. W. HUNTER, INC. 1130 US Hwy 90 W (386) 752-5890 WE NOW HAVE ETHANOL FREE PLUS GASOLINE ONLY AT INTENDED USES: BOATS & WATERCRAFTS COLLECTABLE VEHICLES OFF-ROAD VEHICLES MOTORCYCLES SMALL ENGINES Lake City Reporter New Patient Exam and Necessary X-rays DO150, DO330 First-time patient Reg. $136 $ 29 SAVINGS OF $107 Expires October 31, 2012 ASPEN DENTAL GROUP T IMELESS M EMORIES 386-466-1888 Iron Bed This bed will bring a timeless classic look to a warm room. In a brushed antique gold nish. $ 299 Located at SHANDS Lake City, Live Oak & Starke Womens Center of Florida ALL MAJOR INSURANCES ACCEPTED INCLUDING MEDICAID & MEDICARE FREE Pregnancy Ultrasound WITH THIS AD* *Insurance billing may occur if necessary. Some Restrictions apply. OBSTRETRICS & GYNECOLOGY PRENATAL CARE & ULTRASOUNDS STDS & HPV TESTING BIRTH CONTROL & INFERTILITY MENOPAUSE & INCONTINENCE WEIGHT LOSS & 4D ULTRASOUNDS BOTOX & LASER HAIR REMOVAL NO INSURANCE VISITS ASK ABOUT OUR $ 50 CHANDLER MOHAN, MD EMAD ATTA, MD NOW HIRING MID-LEVEL PROVIDERS 386-466-1106 SERVICES: OB-GYN www.myobcare.com By BRANDON FINLEY bfinley@lakecityreporter.com ST. AUGUSTINE Columbia High saved its best match for when it needed it most. The Lady Tigers defeat ed Atlantic Coast High in the District 4-6A semifinals in St. Augustine on Wednesday. Columbia won in straight sets, 25-21, 25-16 and 25-19. In the first game, Columbia led the entire way. The Lady Tigers went up 24-15 before Atlantic Coast made a 6-0 run to close the gap to 24-21. Columbia held on to win 25-21. Columbia jumped out to an 8-1 lead in the second game behind six straight service points from Jara Courson, before Atlantic Coast took a time out. Atlantic Coast closed the gap to 8-3 before Columbia won back serve and Kelbie Ronsonet scored five ser vice points to extend the lead to 14-3. Columbia never trailed in the first two games. The Lady Tigers fell behind for the first time in the final set. Atlantic Coast jumped out to a 5-3 lead before Columbia took the lead for good at 6-5. Jessie Bates closed out the game with a kill at 25-19. That was close to the best we have played all year, Columbia head coach Rebecca Golden said We were very focused and that showed. We played as a team and we were the first to five in every game except the last. Courson led the team with nine kills. Ronsonet and Annie Milton each had seven kills and three blocks. Hanna Baker had five kills. Bates lead with 32 assists and also added three kills. Columbia will travel back to St. Augustine for the final at 7 p.m. Friday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Columbia Highs Hanna Baker (14) reacts after a point against Suwannee High on Oct. 2. CHS volleyball wins Columbia swim team set for district meet JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Columbia High junior Lindsay Lee swims in the 200 medley relay against Suwannee High on Oct. 18. CHS will swim in the District 2-2A meet on Friday.