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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01924

Material Information

Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 10-21-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01939

Related Items

Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01924

Material Information

Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 10-21-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01939

Related Items

Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

By LAURA HAMPSONlhampson@lakecityreporter.comClutching alligator heads and T-shirts, adults and children alike waited nervously Saturday to meet the stars of their favorite show, Swamp People. R.J. Molinere and Jay Paul Molinere signed pictures, shirts, hats and even posed in an arm wrestle for fans at the Kiwanis Big Boy Toys Expo. The expo continues today at 10 a.m. with outdoor lifestyle vendors, games, a car show and children’s activities, though the Molineres were only scheduled to appear on Saturday. In their first visit to Lake City, the father and son hunting team said they enjoy meeting fans across the county because each experience is different. “It’s a good thing. We meet some great people,” Jay Paul said. “We always look forward to it. We don’t get tired of it,” R.J. said. Fans ask all kinds of questions, but the most common is if they have ever been bitten by alligator, he said. CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Opinion ................ 4ABusiness ................ 5AObituaries .............. 6A Advice & Comics ......... 8B Puzzles ................. 2B TODAY IN PEOPLE Timberlake, Biel wed. COMING TUESDAY Local news roundup. 91 64 T-Storm Chance WEATHER, 2A Opinion ................ 4ABusiness ................ 1CObituaries .............. 5AAdvice.................. 5DPuzzles ................. 5B 80 52 Sunny WEATHER, 8A Lake City ReporterSUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 | YOUR COMMUNITY N EWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | $1.00 LAKECITYREPORTER.COM Gators sendSC packing in Swamp. 58th annualcounty fairon the way. SUNDAYEDITION Vol. 138, No. 189 1D 1B 1AEditor’s note: In last Sunday’s Lake City Reporter appeared an analysis of the first 6 of 11 proposed amendments to the state constitu-tion that will appear on the Nov. 6 ballot. An analysis of the remaining five amendments, including argu-ments by supporters and opponents of each, follows. Ballot summaries are from the Florida Division of Elections. In the case of particularly vague or complex amendments and/or ballot summaries, explanatory notes have been offered as well.AMENDMENT 7(This measure was struck from the ballot by the Florida Supreme Court due to vague wording. The amendment was then revised and added to the ballot as No. 8 )AMENDMENT 8RELIGIOUS FREEDOM Ballot summary:Proposing an amendment to the State Constitution providing that no individual or entity may be denied, on the basis of religious identity or belief, governmental benefits, funding or other sup-port, except as required by the AMENDMENTS continued on 6A4 charter changes on county ballotBy LAURA HAMPSONlhampson@lakecityreporter.comAfter making their pick for president and various local offi-cials, Columbia County voters will decide the fate of four pro-posed amendments to the county charter. The charter was adopted by voters in 2002 and operates like a constitution for the county, estab-lishing the structure, power and rules of the local government. The charter is reviewed every eight years by a commission appointed by the Columbia County Board of County Commissioners. The commission held 11 meetings and three public hearings to get input from the community. Early on the commission narrowed in on eight issues and decided to move forward with four proposed amendments, said Koby Adams, review commission chair. Adams said the committee will publish non-advocacy expla-nations of the proposed amend-ments by direct mail, radio spots and newspaper advertisements. AMENDMENT 1The first amendment would establish a Citizen Redistricting Advisory Committee to make recommendations to county com-missioners about redistricting, which must occur every 10 years under federal law. This amendment was prompted after commission hopeful Matt Vann’s home was redistricted out of county commission District 5 and into District 1 last November, Adams said. The amendment would creMeasures includecitizens’ committeefor redistricting. CHARTER continued on 6A FORUM continued on 7A TOYS continued on 7A CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS Ballotmeasurestouch onreligion,taxes‘Toys’ expo ‘Swamped’ Alleged sex offender stillfree on bail By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comA Lake City man facing sexual assault charges from an arrest this summer was given additional restrictions in court earlier this week. Wesley A. Jones, 41, 206 SW Satellite Lane, was arrested Aug. 2 and charged with sexual assault (sexual bat-tery upon a child under 12 years of age) and jailed. He was later Jones SUSPECT continued on 7ALAURA HAMPSON /Lake City ReporterTiesha Archer, 12, has her shirt autographed by Swamp P eople stars Jay Paul Molinere (left) and R.J. Molinere S aturday morning at the Kiwanis Big Boy Toys Expo at the Columbia County Fairgrounds. ‘Swamp People’ big draw at ‘Big Boy’ Father-son team delights local fans of History Channel’s hit show FGC Forum starts MondayBy LAURA HAMPSONlhampson@lakecityreporter.comIn time for early voting, twelve local candidates will be tested Monday and Tuesday dur-ing live broadcasts featuring more questions than previous primary election forums. The forums will be broadcast both nights at 7 p.m. on Florida Gateway College Television, which is Comcast channel eight, and on 106.5 WCJX radio. Following the forum there will RIGHT: Kerry Hagler, audio/visual specialist, poses for Mike McKee (left), Florida Gateway College’s executive director of media and pub-lic information, in preparation for the Candidate Forum. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter

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PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Author Ursula K. Le Guin is 83. Rock singer Manfred Mann is 72. Musician Steve Cropper (Booker T. & the MGs) is 71. TVs Judge Judy Sheindlin is 70. Musician Lee Loughnane (Chicago) is 66. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is 63. Musician Charlotte Caffey (The Go-Gos) is 59. Actress-author Carrie Fisher is 56. Actor Ken Watanabe is 53. Actress Melora Walters is 52. Rock musician Che Colovita Lemon is 42. Rock singer-musician Nick Oliveri (Mondo Generator) is 41. Christian rock musician Charlie Lowell (Jars of Clay) is 39. Reality TV star Kim Kardashian is 32. Daily Scripture Restore to me the joy of your salvation and grant me a willing spirit, to sustain me. Psalm 51:12 CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. AROUND FLORIDA Friday: 20-26-30-40 + 9 Friday: 3-10-14-29-32 Saturday: Afternoon: 4-7-2 Evening: N/A Saturday: Afternoon: 5-4-4-4 Evening: N/A Wed nes day: 2-9-16-18-34-46 x3 Assisted living residents forced to relocate TALLAHASSEE State health officials have ordered a Jacksonville assisted living facility to relocate its residents after fire marshal officials found multiple safety violations. The Agency for Health Care Administration made unannounced visits to nearly 40 assisted liv ing facilities in Duval, Clay, Nassau, St. John and Putnam counties this week. Officials said Friday the safety violations at the Tiki Stafford facility warranted emergency action. Fourteen residents were relocated, and the facility is not allowed to accept new residents until the problems are fixed. The facility had 19 violations, including non-working smoke alarms and locked fire escape doors. More than half of other the facilities were flagged for lax administrative over sight, some did not have current health assess ments for residents and some didnt have a log to see what services resi dents were receiving. Counties declared disaster areas WASHINGTON President Obama has declared 11 Florida coun ties a disaster area for damage sustained during Tropical Storm Isaac. The declaration signed Thursday makes federal funding available to state local governments. Isaac hit Florida in late August. The Tampa Bay Times reported the Federal Emergency Management Agency denied Gov. Rick Scotts request for funding in September. Scott appealed the deci sion. He said the damage was about $10 million worse than originally thought. Damage from Isaac is estimated at $36.6 million. The Times reported it was unclear why the deci sion was reversed. The following coun ties are now eligible for federal funding: Bay, Collier, Escambia, Franklin, Martin, Monroe, Okaloosa, Palm Beach, St. Lucie and Santa Rose counties. Marijuana found floating off Keys KEY WEST Law enforcement officials in the Florida Keys are ask ing boaters to keep a lookout for bales of marijuana floating in the Atlantic Ocean. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission said Friday that about 100 pounds of marijuana were pulled from the water over the past couple days. The bales were scat tered over a large area, and authorities said they suspect that there are more out there. The drugs were hidden in bales marked brown sugar from Jamaica. New pleas filed to stop execution TALLAHASSEE Lawyers for a convicted mass killer are trying to get a federal judge to block his pending execu tion. Attorneys for John Errol Ferguson on Friday filed an emergency motion in Miami federal court to stay Tuesdays execution. The 64-year-old Ferguson was convicted of killing eight people, includ ing six who died execu tion-style, in 1977 in Carol City, which at the time was the worst mass slaying in Miami-Dade County history. The state Supreme Court this week upheld findings by a team of psychiatrists appointed by Gov. Rick Scott that Ferguson is legally compe tent to be executed even though he suffers from paranoid schizophrenia. His lawyers say Ferguson lacks rational understanding and that he suffers from delusions that hes the prince of God. Lawyer: Teen will plead not guilty GAINESVILLE A pub lic defender said a teenager will plead not guilty to a first-degree murder charge in the death of University of Florida student Christian Aguilar. Court records show that the family of Pedro Bravo has requested a public defender to represent the 18-year-old. Public defend er Stacy Scott said Friday that her office planned to file the not-guilty plea on Bravos behalf. Aguilar was last seen in a Gainesville Best Buy with Bravo. Aguilars remains were found last week in rural Levy County. Police said Bravo origi nally told them that he beat Aguilar unconscious and left him in a parking lot. FAMU hazing cases closed TALLAHASSEE The Tallahassee Police Department is closing two hazing investigations involving organizations at Florida A&M University. The department said Friday it was asked to look into two hazing incidents by FAMU authorities. But investigators concluded that neither incident met legal definitions for crimi nal hazing. One case involved a busi ness fraternity accused of alleged verbal abuse of pro spective members. Police also said they investigated an incident where it was alleged mem bers of a step team held practices that resulted in sleep deprivation. University officials said Friday that the step team had been cleared. Archdiocese sues over mandate MIAMI The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Miami has joined other Catholic institutions nationwide in challenging the Obama administration over birth control. Archbishop Thomas Wenski said Friday that he had filed a lawsuit in Miami federal court on behalf of the archdiocese, Catholic Health Services and Catholic Hospice. LOS ANGELES A ctors Justin Timberlake and Jessica Biel tied the knot at a seaside resort in southern Italy. The Borgo Egnazia resort declined to comment Friday about the superstar nuptials. The couple released a statement to People magazine saying, Its great to be married, the ceremony was beautiful and it was so special to be surrounded by our family and friends. Representatives for the couple confirmed the report Friday. The 31-year-old Timberlake and 30-year-old Biel got engaged in December after dating for several years. Timberlake, who has been acting more than singing lately, stars in the Clint Eastwood baseball film, The Trouble with the Curve. Biel stars in the remake of Total Recall. She will next be seen in Hitchcock. Lawyer tells jurors about Spears life LOS ANGELES A lawyer for Britney Spears father told jurors Friday that the singers family went to heroic efforts to save her during a well-chronicled public meltdown that included shaving her head and other bizarre behavior. Spears father, Jamie, in par ticular went to great lengths, attorney Leon Gladstone said during opening state ments in the trial of a lawsuit Spears former manager Sam Lutfi has brought against Spears and her parents. Gladstone said Spears life began to spiral out of control after a painful breakup with childhood sweetheart Justin Timberlake. Jamie Spears worked tirelessly, Gladstone said, to rescue his daugh ter from drug addiction, mental ill ness and the hold that Lutfi had on her during that time. Gladstone added that when Jamie Spears went to court and asked for conservatorship of his daughter it was immediately granted and remains in effect. Lutfi never told Spears lawyers or her business manager that he was in charge of her affairs, never arranged any business deals for her, and now claims hes entitled to 15 percent of her gross income during his tenure as manager, Boxer said. Hanks lets obscenity slip on ABCs GMA NEW YORK ABC and Tom Hanks are apologizing after the actor let slip a swear word during a live appearance on Good Morning America. Hanks telegraphed his f-bomb during an interview Friday. Anchor Elizabeth Vargas had asked him to speak in his characters British accent in the movie Cloud Atlas. Hanks said that it was mostly swear words, but Vargas told him to go ahead anyway. He began speaking in a mumble but the obscenity was clearly audi ble. ABC removed it for subsequent feeds of the show in the Midwest and West. Vargas quickly said, We are so sorry, Good Morning America. Hanks also apologized and said hed probably have a seven-second delay next time hes on the show. Bling Ring member pleads no contest LOS ANGELES A 22-year-old woman pleaded no contest Friday to a burglary charge for stealing from the home of Lindsay Lohan as part of a group known as the Bling Ring. Diana Tamayo was sentenced to three years of probation. She could have faced six years in prison if con victed at a trial. Authorities say Tamayo was one of six people charged in thefts in which more than $3 million in clothes, jewelry and art was taken from the homes of stars such as Lohan, Paris Hilton and Megan Fox. Biel, Timberlake marry in Italy Wednes day: 1-7-10-23-42 + 35 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter 2A ASSOCIATED PRESS A Nike Hercules Missle returns home to Everglades National Park on Friday after being refurbished by students from George T. Baker Aviation School in Miami. The Nike Missile was delivered to the school in late August as part of the events surrounding the 50th anniversary of the Cuban Missile Crisis. The students sanded, repaired, and re-painted the piece of Cold War history, which will be displayed at the historic Nike Missile Site HM-69, listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Associated Press ASSOCIATED PRESS Jessica Biel and Justin Timberlake arrive at the Metropolitan Museum of Art Costume Institute gala in May in New York. The couple released a statement Friday confirming their wedding. Hanks Spears Associated Press

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Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & ST A TE SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 3A 3A SPECIALIZING IN: Non-Invasive Laparoscopic Gynecological Surgery Adolescent Gynecology High and Low Risk Obstetrics Contraception Delivering at Shands Lake Shore In-Ofce ultrasounds for our patients 3D/4D Entertainment Scans offering DaVinci Robotic Surgeries. New Patients Welcome Call today for a personal appointment: 386-755-0500 449 SE Baya Drive Lake City, Floraida 32025 www.dainagreenemd.com WE ARE WOMEN, WE ARE M OTHERS, WE UNDERST A ND Outstanding Leader of Inpatient Therapy Our therapy program is designed to rehabilitate individuals back to their highest level of independence and functioning. Our therapists and nurses work closely with the physician and resident in order to create a plan of treatment that will combine comprehensive care with the patients personal goals. Take a step towards your independence. Individualized Physical Occupational & Joint Replacement (Knee, Hip. etc) Stroke Cardiac Disease Fractures (Hip, Shoulder, Pelvic, etc) Arthritis Neck/Back Pain Balance Disturbances Dif culties Walking Generalized Weakness Impaired Abilities to Perform Activities (Bathing, Ambulating, Dressing, Eating and Transferring) Wound Care OUR SPECIALTIES INCLUDE: 560 SW McFarlane Ave. Lake City, FL 32025 386-758-4777 Call to pre-register or for a tour. Charter Loans Services Pay outstanding bills, credit cards. Lowest compared rates. Personal loans. Business, debt loans. Auto Home Improvement Loans Bad Credit options. No apps. fees Call today: 1.877.359.5533 Charteracc@usa.com Native crafts on display By LAURA HAMPSON lhampson@lakecityreporter.com Just off the banks of the Santa Fe River, nestled among the hardwood ham mocks, a man in a buck skin leggings and a loose, cloth shirt presses his lips to a conch shell, creating a loud, long trumpet-like sound. Somewhere in the dis tance his signal is answered by another conch shell note. Its our shell phone, said Jeremy DeBary, an 1830s Seminole re-enactor. Early tribes used the conch shells to send signals from village to village, he said to school children gathered around his tent. The Alligator Warrior Festival continues today at OLeno State Park in High Springs. The park opens at 8 a.m. and the 1836 Battle of San Felasco Hammock re-enactment begins at 2 p.m. Admission is $5 per vehicle holding two to eight people. The event celebrates the time when, from 1800 to 1859, Lake City was called Alligator, Fla. Seminole commander Alligator Warrior was its most famous resident. A signal from the conch shell was used to start and end the day or to reach people over long distances, such as men out fishing, DeBary, of Ocala, said. The conch shell played an important role in every day life, he said. With its unique curved shape, the shell was turned into cups, bowls, teapots and shovels. It was like a Swiss Army knife, he said. By the 1830s, Seminoles used the conch shell only for ceremonial purposes, but it still held significant meanings. The light-tan shell is used to this day to line Seminole graves. The shells were widely traded, he said. Florida shells have been found in the Great Lakes area, from which copper artifacts, often found in the South, originated, DeBary said. DeBary said he has been re-enacting for about 20 years. While sometimes re-enactors are paid, it is mostly volunteer work, he said. I have Muscogee ances try, he said. Its something I feel strongly about, keep ing the old ways alive. In the fall and spring, DeBary travels the state to re-enacting at Second Seminole War battle events. His parents are also reenactors. DeBary even met his wife, Emily, also a re-enactor, at a Georgia battle festival. Its hands-on. We have stuff out for the kids to touch and play with, he said. For participants, visiting the Seminole camp is like walking into a history book. It is almost surreal. Many people are unaware of the rich Native American history in North Florida. They were astronomers, mathematicians and engi neers, DeBary said. They were intelligent people. About 15 children from the North Florida Homeschool Support Group attended the festival Friday. Their parents said the festival, with hands-on learning experiences, was a a great field trip. Im learning how indi ans lived. I liked the bow and arrow, homeschooler Hannah Herndon said. PHOTOS BY JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City Reporter Jeremy DeBary, of Ocala, teaches Lake City resident Jessica Shipp how to make an elk-hide, pucker-toe-style moccasin at the Alligator Festival held at the OLeno and River Rise Preserve State Park Friday. DeBary said that the best way to make a moccasin is while it is on the persons foot. The hardest thing is trying to get the fit right, he said. It needs to be snug, but not too tight. Debate big job for small college MATT SEDENSKY Associated Press BOCA RATON Is the humidity in the hall just right? Are there enough hotel rooms nearby to hold the hordes of campaign staffers and journalists? Will the candidates dress ing rooms be big enough? Landing a presidential debate requires painstak ing adherence to a lengthy checklist, not to mention millions of dollars. Colleges and universities big and small have held the grand events over the years, and Lynn University is the lat est small liberal arts school to play host. Officials say what set them apart wasnt name recognition, but a willing ness to transform campus life to pull it off. The university has invested about $5 million in upgrades to prepare for the arrival of President Barack Obama and Mitt Romney on Monday. New entrances to campus have been built, and the computer network has been upgraded. Sports teams have been displaced, performances have been delayed, and d staff mem bers have been flooded with added responsibilities. But most on campus seem to relish the oppor tunity, and Lynn has added dozens of classes inspired by the debate, developed a debate curriculum being used by students from kin dergarten through high school around the country, and is hosting more elec tion-themed events than administrators can count. Everything from the books freshmen are assigned (First debate moderator Jim Lehrers Tension City is required reading) to the marketing campaign of the admissions office to the swag on sale in the book store has been affected. One of the things we found most appealing about Lynn is its willing ness to just dive in, said Peter Eyre, a senior advis er to the Commission on Presidential Debates. They have embraced this whole notion that the debate is a larger commitment to edu cation. To be considered as a debate host, schools must submit proposals detailing their adherence to countless criteria, from the humidity in the hall to the number of nearby hotel rooms to the size of the candidates dressing rooms. Ken Miller (left), pastor of Broken Lance Native American Church, shows Randy Moody an authentic evil spirit mask used by the Crow Indian tribe. Court upholds primary results TALLAHASSEE A Florida appeals court is upholding a narrow 17-vote win in a state Senate race in Palm Beach County. The 1st District Court of Appeal on Friday sided with State Rep. Jeff Clemens who edged fellow House member Mack Bernard in the August primary. Bernard challenged the county canvassing boards refusal to count 40 absentee ballots because they con tained voter signatures that did not match. Associated Press

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D oes the idea of hav-ing a jail in Lake City’s City Hall seem strange to you? Well, that was the case here some 45 years ago. In 1966, city officials moved into their beautifully renovated City Hall, the one recently demolished. A brochure hand-ed to the public at the grand opening listed all the offices contained therein. “The first floor contains the Mayor’s Office, City Clerk’s offices, and the City Treasurer’s offices. Also the Fire Department, the Police Department, and the new city jail.” That arrangement didn’t last long. The city and county jails were eventually consoli-dated into the Columbia County Detention Center, located just north of Lake City. The city officials in 1968 were Mayor-Commissioner James R. Tison and City Commissioners Dupree L. Moody, I.J. Godbold, David Williams, and Harold Brannon.NO-NAME PLAZAUsually when you have several stores grouped together, each under its own roof, it is called a plaza, e.g. The Lake City Plaza, home to Beef O’Brady’s, Dollar General, Plaza Barber Shop, et al. But one of Lake City’s fairly large plazas seems to have no name at all. That plaza, located on South Main, is filled with stores: Farmer’s Home Furniture, Smart Liquidation, Fresenius Medical Care (Lake City Dialysis), Ashley’s Pet Palace, Future Fitness, Hot Spot Tanning Spa and Hair Studio, CC’s Flower Villa, Sugar Custom Cakes and Confections, Phish Heads Restaurant, and Gold Diggers Sweepstakes. Yet, there is apparently no iden-tifying name for that plaza. Years ago there were some completely different stores there: Winn Dixie, Revco Pharmacy, and TG and Y, for example. Some say that plaza had a name back then but I do not know what it was. Do you?WANT AN ADABEE?Friend Charlotte James and I used to do some work together at the public library. Charlotte is one of the funniest and best people I know, and she is very smart. One day when we were traveling together I asked her what was her favorite make of car. She said an Adabee, a make I had never heard of so I asked her to repeat it. She turned to me and said very slowly, “An A to B. Any car that will get me from A to B dependably and cheaply.” That’s my favorite kind of car, too, and maybe yours, also. If you ever invent a practical car, you already have the name for it!LAUGH LINESArlene Leonard, the everhelpful First United Methodist Church secretary, has a humor-ous plaque on her desk facing the visitors: “OK. Hand over the chocolate and nobody gets hurt!”Sign on the tip jar at Elliano’s drive through coffee shop: “Thanks a latte.” A jail in City Hall OUR OPINION HIGHLIGHTS IN HISTORY Today is Sunday, Oct. 21, the 295th day of 2012. There are 71 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History:On Oct. 21, 1879, Thomas Edison perfected a workable electric light at his laboratory in Menlo Park, N.J. On this date: In 1797, the U.S. Navy frigate Constitution, also known as “Old Ironsides,” was christened in Boston’s harbor. In 1805, a British fleet commanded by Adm. Horatio Nelson defeated a French-Spanish fleet in the Battle of Trafalgar; Nelson, however, was killed. In 1917, members of the 1st Division of the U.S. Army training in Luneville (luhn-nayVEEL’), France, became the first Americans to see action on the front lines of World War I. In 1959, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, opened to the public in New York. In 1960, Democrat John F. Kennedy and Republican Richard M. Nixon clashed in their fourth and final presiden-tial debate in New York. Editor’s note: The following guest column, which appeared in last Sunday’s edition, contained numerous errors introduced dur-ing the production process at the Lake City Reporter. The original version, as submitted by the author, is reprinted below.W hat a wonderful blessing to be an American; however, with the blessing comes the responsibilities and expectations of our Lord Jesus Christ. This column is offered as a reality check concerning the present politics in America. Our federal government has become unbelievably cor-rupt! When the White House and Congress congregate, it is like the world’s largest liars convention. Do you recognize this? Is it upsetting you? Well, it should upset you very much. Our government is lying to us at every turn, and counting on us to believe it. Sadly, far too many people do. Our elected officials are using their positions to spread lies and deception to the people they are supposed to be repre-senting. People voted for these individuals because we thought we could trust them. Instead, elected officials are using their positions to spread lies and deception. Sen. Harry Reid (D-Nev.) repeatedly talks about Republican presidential candi-date Mitt Romney’s wealth. I think him being wealthy is a good thing; maybe he can do something about the irrespon-sible quagmire that Washington has drowned us in. Mr. Reid never bothers to tell people that he is one of the wealthiest individuals in Congress. Most of his wealth has been accumu-lated after becoming a member of Congress. I wonder how he did that. Certain members of Congress keep hammering the ideology that this election is primarily a racial issue. This is directed to the uninformed that has absolutely no idea what is going on in this country. This election is about the freedom and prosperity of the American people. Politicians should be talking about the issues. What have the incumbents done to help America move forward? What specifically they are planning to do to help restore America to the wealth and power it has demanded and held in the past? Unfortunately, the Democrats cannot run on their present record of the past four years. For example, Sen. Reid has not one time presented a federal budget for action by the Senate during this time. We should not tolerate incompetent, failed lead-ership from our government. Instead of President Barack Obama smiling into the TV cameras and peddling his package about prosperity in America when reality tells us differently, we want to know what he plans to do for the 23 million Americans that can-not find full-time employment, and gas prices that are soaring daily. The entire Middle East despises America, and our allies are questioning, and rightly so, if they can trust us. How about skipping the smiles, Mr. Obama, and tell us exactly how you plan to deal with the rapidly grow-ing list of problems that face America? Many of the problems we are facing are due to your leadership. Our president and members of Congress, in most cases, only care about power and how much of the taxpayers money they can pocket, and who will pay the highest price for their vote. Why are many members of Congress and people in the White House permitted to get away with not paying their taxes, yet these same individu-als have the audacity to raise our taxes? It is terrifying that we cannot expect any justice from Washington. The news media, in most cases, is nothing more than fiction directed at selling their viewpoint, and has as a prime directive to confuse and control the thinking of each of us. Both our government and the news media are counting on voters to be as stupid and/or misinformed about the truth as they are hop-ing for. Don’t be angry with me. Be angry with the people that are undermining you. Our free-doms and our rights are being assaulted almost daily. The election in November is, perhaps, the most important election of this century. Each and every one of us owes it to our children, our grandchildren and ourselves to go to the polls and cast a well-informed vote. Follow the voting of the current incumbents. Are they support-ing legislation that is directed at the destruction of our constitu-tional and religious freedoms? In numerous cases the answer is absolutely yes. To vote is our only recourse in determining our nation’s future. The Congressional Budget Office already has determined that health care beginning in 2013 will be increased by 19 percent as a result of the costly “Obamacare” that Sen. Bill Nelson (D-Fla.) supported. Are you considering what this is going to do to your wallet? Nelson supported the current administration in transferring over $700 billion away from Medicare, he has the audacity to tell the people of Florida that he and the present administration support Medicare. More of the same old politician lies. I am very disgusted and disappointed with President Obama’s treatment of our military. They are treated with no respect and shown no real concern for their safety. He is using every-thing, including the Pentagon, to prevent our troops overseas from being permitted to vote. Anyone that has served in the military or currently has a loved one serving overseas should be mad as all heck. We expect men and women to put their lives in danger, but fight to keep them from participating in the politi-cal process. Shame on you, Mr. President. Am I mad? You better believe I am. I’m mad, disappointed and disgusted with politicians that are dumping 230 years of freedom, prosperity and dreams down the toilet. Everyone, please exercise your right to vote in this elec-tion. Consider long and hard the direction our country is moving. Freedom is priceless. Fight to save it. Voters need to change direction of Washington Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding counties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, publisher Robert Bridges, editor Sue Brannon, controller Dink NeSmith, president Tom Wood, chairman LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY E-MAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com EDWARD HUNTER Q Edward Hunter was director of student activities at Florida Gateway College from 1969 to 1999. T he city council’s Monday night deci-sion to shutter the Southside Recreation Center was tough to take for local kids who frequent-ed the place after school. It was equally hard for their parents, especially those who work out-side the home, who wonder now where these children will go for after-school activities and enter-tainment. Nonetheless, City Manager Wendell Johnson insisted the city shouldn’t be in the daycare busi-ness. However you phrase it, the real problem is, Southside just isn’t safe. Kids may have plenty of fun hanging out there, but there’s no real supervision to ensure their safety. To us it sounded like a tragedy just waiting to happen. Still, where will all those kids go? The city says it’s pursuing development of a boys’ program, perhaps to complement the local girls’ club. It may not be the best solution but it’s a start, at least. Let’s pursue this program, see where it goes, and make sure it doesn’t get lost in the bureau-cratic shuffle.A N O T H E R V I E W‘Not optimal’C omedian Jon Stewart has found a way to get conservatives to care about the “Daily Show” — have Barack Obama insult American victims of terror-ism. On Wednesday’s program, Mr. Stewart asked the president whether his administration was trying to fix the alleged com-munications disconnects that the White House claims muddled the response to the violent events in Benghazi, Libya and elsewhere on Sept. 11. “Even you would admit,” Mr. Stewart said, “it was not the optimal response, at least to the American people, as far as all of us being on the same page.” Mr. Obama responded, “Here’s what I’ll say. If four Americans get killed, it’s not optimal.” “Not optimal”? Clearly the president has mastered the art of understatement as insult. So long,Southside OPINION Sunday, October 21, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A4AEDIT Morris WilliamsPhone: (386) 755-8183williams_h2@firn.edu372 W. Duval St.Lake City, FL 32055 Q Morris Williams is a local historian and long-time Columbia County resident. Q The Washington Times

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Oct. 22 Pet loss workshop An Educational Workshop titled Coping with the Loss of Your Pet will be held Thursday, Oct. 22 at 2 p.m. at the Wings Community Education Center located in the Lake City Plaza on Main Blvd. The facilitator for the workshop is Dr. Joy Dias Director, Client Counseling and Support Services, University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine. To register call Vicki Myers, at 386-7557714, Ext. 2411. Seating is limited. The workshop is provided as a public ser vice and free of charge. The Wings Education Center is a program of Hospice of Citrus County, Inc. Visit www.hospiceofcitrus.org for more information. Womens Club lunch The Womens Club of Lake City will host their October fundraiser Monday, Oct. 22 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Clubhouse, 257 SE Hernando Ave. The meal is $6 per plate, which includes baked ziti, salad, rolls and girdle busters. Eat at the clubhouse, take out or have it delivered. For information call 7550347. Aglow tea party Rev. Jesten Peters will be the keynote speaker at the Lake City Aglow Lighthouse 1920s Tea Party on 7 p.m. Monday, Oct. 22 at Olivet Missionary Baptist Church in Lake City. Jesten is a former Aglow president and was named 2205 Woman of the Year for Columbia County. If you or your church would like to reserve and decorate a table at the tea party, please call for details. Everyone is welcome and there will be plenty of space. Come joins us for a night of fun and inspiration with music, contests, tea and refresh ments. The culmination for the event will be Peters message, The bride is wearing combat boots. Ballroom classes Ballroom Dancing class es are offered at Richardson Community Center every Monday night starting at 5:30 p.m. Cost is $5 per class, come try your first class free. For more infor mation call 386-365-3909. County fair entires The 58th Annual Columbia County Fair Contests are free to enter. Any County resident may compete in the following contests: Baked Goods, Canned Goods, Quilting, Sewing, Crafts, Needle point, Woodworking, Scrap Booking, Art, Photography, Red Hat and King Author Baking Contest. For rules visit www.columbiacounty fair.org. All highest placing entries will receive mon etary awards & all receive ribbons. Deadline for Baking Goods is Thursday, November 1 from 2-6 at the Extension Office and all others will be October 22 October 26 from 3-5 p.m. in the fair office and Sat. October 27 from 9 a.m. -12 noon at the Banquet hall. For more information call 752-8822. Oct. 23 Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for a free diagnosis or solutions to the Columbia County Extenstion Office, 164 Sw Mary Ethel Lane. For more information 7525384. Zumba classes Zumba Classes being offered at the Richardson Community Center every Tuesday and Thursday night from 5:30-6:30 p.m. Classes are $5 each or sign up at the beginning of the month for just $20 a month. Classes taught by a certi fied Zumba instructor, for more information call 386466-7747. Oct. 24 Dine for crisis fund Dine to donate every Wednesday in October at Applebees in Lake City. The Tough Enough to Wear Pink Crisis Fund will receive 10 percent of the bill. Ask for a flier, by the Columbia County Fairgrounds Office or call 752-8822 to have one emailed to you. Quilters meeting The Lady of the Lake Quilters Guild will meet on the morning of Oct. 24 at Teen Town, 533 NW Desoto St., two blocks north of US 90 off Lake Jeffery Rd. Social time is from 9 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. and the business meeting is at 10 a.m. The program this month will be the wrap-up of the Stephen Foster Quilt Show. Charming Strip Club for October is fall colors. The election of 2013 Guild officers will be held. Oct. 25 Military officers meet The Suwannee River Valley Chapter of the Military Officers Association of America (MOAA) will hold its monthly dinner meeting Thursday, Oct. 25 at the Lake City Elks Lodge, 259 NE Hernando Street, Lake City at 6:30 p.m. The din ner meeting is open to all active duty military officers, retired and former officers, members of the Reserve and National Guard, and their spouses. For informa tion and reservations call Susan Palmer at 697-6828 or Vernon Lloyd at 7524885. The Suwannee River Valley Chapter is one of over 400 MOAA chapters around the U.S. and over seas. The local chapter was founded in 1990. Hospice teleconference The Hospice Foundation of America teleconference titled: Artificial Nutrition and Hydration, will be held Thursday, Oct. 25 from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the Hospice of the Nature Coast Wings Community Education Center in the Lake City Plaza on SW Main Street. There is no cost to attend and lunch will be provided. The teleconfer ence will examine ethical issues and dilemmas that emerge at the end-of-life and the effects of these deci sions on healthcare staff and families, using a case study approach. Healthcare Professionals, Educators, Social Workers, Funeral Directors, Counselors, Clergy, Spiritual Care Volunteers should contact Vicki Myers at 386-7557714 Ext. 2411 for reserva tions. Seating is limited. Landlords meeting All landlords and real tors are welcome to attend a landlords meeting Thursday, Oct. 25 at 5 p.m. at Cracker Barrel. The 6 p.m. program will feature fire marshall David Boozer. For information call 7550110. Oct. 26 Fair poultry show The Columbia County Fair Poultry forms for the Open and Youth Poultry Show are due to the Fair office by Oct. 26 at 5 p.m. Forms are available in the Fair Office or on line at www.columbiacountyfair. org. or call 752-8822 for more information. Oct. 27 Fall Safety Bash The White Springs Fire Department will host its 3rd Annual Fall Safety Bash Oct. 27 from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Ogburn Ball Field in White Springs. There will be food, games, bounce houses, a giant slide, a huge obstacle course and more. Kids can get free flashing necklaces, reflec tive trick-or-treat bags, pen cils, safety information and candy. Grief support The Grief Share Support Group, a ministry of Orchard Community Church, meets every Saturday from 2 to 4 p.m. in room D at the Willowbrook Assisted Living center, 1580 S. Marion Ave. The group offers caring support for those who have lost a loved one, through videos, dis cussion time, and prayer. There are fees. For infor mation call 288-7429. Family fall festival The Columbia County Recreation Department will be hosting its annual Family Fall Festival at the Richardson Community Center on Saturday Oct. 27 from 3-5 p.m. There will be games, treats and fun galore! This is a safe, fun and free event for the whole family. For more information contact Nicole Smith at 386-754-7095. County fair entires The 58th Annual Columbia County Fair Contests are free to enter. Any County resident may compete in the following contests: Baked Goods, Canned Goods, Quilting, Sewing, Crafts, Needle point, Woodworking, Scrap Booking, Art, Photography, Red Hat and King Author Baking Contest. For rules visit www.columbiacounty fair.org. All highest placing entries will receive mon etary awards & all receive ribbons. Deadline for Baking Goods is Thursday, November 1 from 2-6 at the Extension Office and all others will be October 22 October 26 from 3-5 p.m. in the fair office and Sat. October 27 from 9 a.m. -12 noon at the Banquet hall. For more information call 752-8822. Oct. 29 Ballroom classes Ballroom Dancing class es are offered at Richardson Community Center every Monday night starting at 5:30 p.m. Cost is $5 per class, come try your first class free. For more infor mation call 386-365-3909. Oct. 30 Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for a free diagnosis or solutions to the Columbia County Extenstion Office, 164 Sw Mary Ethel Lane. For more information 7525384. Zumba classes Zumba Classes being offered at the Richardson Community Center every Tuesday and Thursday night from 5:30-6:30 p.m. Classes are $5 each or sign up at the beginning of the month for just $20 a month. Classes taught by a certi fied Zumba instructor, for more information call 386466-7747. Oct. 31 Olustee meeting The Blue-Grey Army will meet at 5:30 p.m. Oct. 31 to plan the Olustee Battle Festival. The meeting will be at the school district central building room 153, 409 SW St. Johns St. Dine for crisis fund Dine to donate every Wednesday in October at Applebees in Lake City. The Tough Enough to Wear Pink Crisis Fund will receive 10 percent of the bill. Ask for a flier, by the Columbia County Fairgrounds Office or call 752-8822 to have one emailed to you. Nov. 1 Fair weigh-ins The Columbia County Fair mandatory End WeighIns for Steer, Swine, Beef Heifer and Meat Goat is Thursday, Nov. 1 from 3 to 8 p.m and the Record Book Deadline is one hour following close of scales. The Youth Swine and Steer Show is scheduled for Thursday, Nov. 8 at 7 p.m. For more information call 752-8822. Nov. 3 Bberry breakfast, more The Wellborn Community Assoc. Fall Yard Sale and Blueberry Breakfast is Sat., Nov. 3. Vendor spaces $5.00. Start getting your unused good ies together to make extra xmas money! The flea mar ket in Lake City is closed that day so come on out! The Bloodmobile will be there also.call 386-984-5749 if more info needed. Heavenly cooking day The 8th annual Heavenly Cooking Community Day will be Saturday, Nov. 3 at the Richardson Community Center, 255 Coach Anders Lane. The event provides meals to sick and shut-in community members in memory of Levi Sheppard Sr. There will be a variety of food available and activities for seniors and children at the center. For information call 365-0013. Family Gaming Day Columbia County Public Library will have a Family Gaming Day on Saturday, Nov. 3 from 2 til 4:30 p.m. There will be video games, board games, snacks and an afternoon of family fun! For more information, please call 386-758-2101. The Library is located at 308 NW Columbia Ave. Breast cancer benefit A Zumbathon will ben efit Suwannee River Breast Cancer Awareness Inc. Saturday, Nov. 3 from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at Sepulveda ATA, behind Winn Dixie. Admission is $10 in advance or $15 at the door. Dont forget to wear pink. Call 466-7747 for information. Nov. 10 Race Against Wrights The Race Against the Wright Brothers 5k run/walk will begin at 8 a.m. Nov. 10 at 205 N. Marion Ave. in Lake City. Participants can register online at Active.com or in person at Carquest Auto Parts on Pinemount Road. Proceeds benefit Disabled American Veterans at Lake City VA Medical Center. Contact Michelle Richards at (386) 438-5830 for more information. Nov. 12 12-step group A 12-step addiction recov ery group meets every Friday evening at 6 p.m. at the Community Revival Center, 244 NE Patterson Ave. in Lake City. For infor mation call 867-6288. Nov. 13 March of Dimes event The March of Dimes is presenting Signature Chefs Auction at 5:30 p.m. Nov. 13 at the spacious Rountreee Moore toyota showroom, US 90 West in Lake City. This date is a change from the earlier publicized date. There will be live and silent auctions, a selection of spe cialty foos presented by over 20 area restaurants and caterers and compli mentary wine tasting. For more information contact Kathy McCallister at 7550507 or Maureen Lloyd at 397-0598. Put this event on your calendar as we work together to give every baby a healthy start. Photo club Lake City Photo Club meets every 2nd Tuesday of each month from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Lifestyle Enrichment Center at Baya Ave. Share your photos and ideas with the group. Newcomers are welcome! Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 5A 5A HALLELUJAH FESTIVAL Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012 3 p.m. 6 p.m. Olustee Park-Downtown Lake City Sponsored By Grace Harbor Ministries Across From Courthouse FREE Games, Prizes, Food & Live Music EVERYTHING IS FREE WILSONS OUTFITTERS 1291 SE Baya Dr, Lake City (386) 755-7060 WilsonsOutfitters@comcast.net Check Out Our Boots Camo is Here Shirts, Pants, Coveralls, Hats, Gloves Claire E. Hitaffer Mrs. Claire E. Hitaffer, 80, of the Ellisville Community, passed away on Thursday, October 18, 2012. She was born in West Newberry, Mass. in 1931 to the late Joseph Marchand and Rita Marie Marceau Marchand. Mrs. Hitaffer had lived in Ellisville since 1981 having moved here from Miami. Her hobbies in cluded gardening, doing cross word and jigsaw puzzles, cro cheting and cooking. She was a member of Epiphany Catholic Church and was preceded in death by her husband, James H. Hitaffer, in 2000 and two broth ers, Paul and Robert Marchand. Survivors include two sons, Wil liam L. Hucks (Carla) and Elliott W. Hucks both of Lake City; three daughters, Anita M. Mitch ell, Lake City, Andrea C. De Maio (Joseph), Moncure, N.C. and Debra A. Pitt (Steven), Palm Harbor, FL; one brother, Rich ard Marchand, West Newberry, Mass.; two sisters, Lorraine Sa las, Monroe, GA and Leonette Andrukaitis, West Newberry, Mass; 20 grandchildren; 31 great grandchildren; 2 great-greatgrandchildren; and numerous nieces and nephews also survive. A funeral mass will be con ducted on Tuesday, October 23, 2012 at 11:00 am at Epiphany Catholic Church with Father Interment will follow at Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens Cem etery. Visitation with the family will be Monday evening from 6-8:00 pm at the funeral home. be made to Haven Hospice at 6037 W US Hwy 90, Lake City, FL 32055. Arrangements are under the direction of GUERRY FUNERAL HOME Lake City. guerryfuneralhome.net Doris Eloise Yeoman Mrs. Doris Eloise Yeoman, 89, of Lake City, passed away on Wednesday, October 17, 2012 at the North Florida Regional Medical Center in Gainesville. She was born in Montgom ery, Alabama to the late Ira D. Odom and Lula Beatrice Mor rison Odom. She married James V. Yeoman in 1940 and he pre ceded her in death in 1987. Mrs. Yeoman attended Berea Baptist Church and had lived in Lake City for the past 20 years hav ing moved here from Miami. Survivors include one son, James Yeoman (Carol), Fayette ville, GA; one sister, Agatha Durham (Thomas), Lake City; one nephew, Richard Stallworth, Gainesville; one niece, Sandy L. Durham-Sallot, Gainesville; and extended family and friends. Graveside funeral services will be conducted on Wednesday, October 24, 2012 at 11:00 AM at Miami Memorial Park in Miami. Interment will follow. Visitation with the family will be Monday, October 22, 2012 from 6-8:00 pm at the funeral home. Arrangements are un der direction of GUERRY FU NERAL HOME Lake City. guerryfuneralhome.net Phillip Deral Horne Phillip Deral Horne, 83, of Lake City, passed away Saturday, Oc tober 20, 2012 at Still Waters West after an extended illness. The full obituary will be in Tues day, October 23, 2012 edition. Arrangements are under the di rection of GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN FUNERAL HOME, (386) 752-1954, 3596 S U.S. Hwy 441, Lake City, FL. 32025 Obituaries are paid advertise ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporters classified depart ment at 752-1293. OBITUARIES COMMUNITY CALENDAR To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Laura Hampson at 754-0427 or by e-mail at lhampson@ lakecityreporter.com.

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6A LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-04286AFirst Amendment to the United States Constitution, and deleting the prohibition against using rev-enues from the public treasury directly or indirectly in aid of any church, sect, or religious denomi-nation or in aid of any sectarian institution. Florida Tax Watch explains:“Amendment 8 would repeal a constitutional provision that cur-rently limits the power of state and local governments to fund religious institutions. It removes the following language: ‘No rev-enue of the state or any politi-cal subdivision or agency thereof shall ever be taken from the pub-lic treasury directly or indirectly in aid of any church, sect, or religious denomination or in aid of any sectarian institution.’ That language would be replaced with ‘Except to the extent required by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution, nei-ther the government nor any agent of the government may deny to any individual or entity the benefits of any program, fund-ing, or other support on the basis of religious identity or belief.’ This amendment renews the debate over what the cur-rent language—known as the no-aid provision or the Blaine Amendment—actually does. The 126-year old Blaine Amendment was enacted in Florida and many states as a way to prohibit the funding of proliferating Catholic schools. While perhaps origi-nally rooted in bigotry, many feel it now protects the separa-tion of church and state. While both the Florida and United State Constitution have similar lan-guage protecting the establish-ment and practice of religion, the U.S. Constitution does not contain a no-aid provision. The current language has not yet stopped state funding of religious organizations for non-sectarian social services. Florida currently gives millions of dol-lars to these organizations for services such as substance abuse programs, hospice care, hous-ing assistance, food programs for the poor, and faith-based prison programs, as well as religious hospitals and clinics that provide Medicaid services.” PRO: “Supporters say this amendment is needed to pro-tect state funding of those types of services,” the Florida Tax Watch analysis continues. “They point to a lawsuit brought against the Florida Department of Corrections challenging the use of state funds to support faith-based substance abuse tran-sitional housing programs. Sup-porters say that all funding for non-sectarian services provided by religious organizations is at risk without the amendment. CON: Again, from Florida Tax Watch: “Opponents say the amendment would actually less-en religious freedom, allow direct subsidies of houses of worship and is actually an attempt to open the door for a school voucher program that includes religious schools. One such program, the Opportunity Scholarship Program (OSP), was ruled unconstitu-tional by the Florida Supreme Court. However, while a lower court ruled that the OSP violated the no-aid provision, the Supreme Court found it unconstitutional because it violated another part of the Constitution--the free public school system provision in Article IX, Section 1. The Court found ‘it unnecessary to address whether the OSP is a violation of the ‘no aid’ provision...’ Since Amendment 8 does not address the free public school provision, it is questionable as to whether the amendment would allow such a voucher program.”AMENDMENT 9HOMESTEAD PROPERTY TAX EXEMPTION FOR SURVIVING SPOUSE OF MILITARY VETERAN OR FIRST RESPONDER Ballot summary:Proposing an amendment to the State Constitution to authorize the Legislature to provide by gen-eral law ad valorem homestead property tax relief to the surviv-ing spouse of a military veteran who died from serviceconnect-ed causes while on active duty or to the surviving spouse of a first responder who died in the line of duty. The amendment authorizes the Legislature to totally exempt or partially exempt such surviv-ing spouse’s homestead prop-erty from ad valorem taxation. The amendment defines a first responder as a law enforcement officer, a correctional officer, a firefighter, an emergency medi-cal technician, or a paramedic. This amendment shall take effect January 1, 2013. PRO: Amendment 9 would allow the Legislature to reduce or eliminate property taxes on the homesteads of surviving spouses of veterans or some emergency workers, provided they died in the line of duty. It’s the least we can do for those who have given so much. Besides, the total cost statewide would be less than $1 million -a tiny fraction of a $70 billion budget. CON: As with Amendment 2, many questions would arise in the wake of its passage. “Voters can’t be sure exactly what the new law would say,” the Tampa Tribune observed in nonetheless calling for passage of this amendment. “What if a spouse remarries? Should there be a limit on the value of the property? What about the spouses of first-responders killed in other states — can they relocate to Florida with a lifetime exemption on taxes? Can voters expect more amendments later to include other public servants killed while doing their duty?”AMENDMENT 10TANGIBLE PERSONAL PROPERTY TAX EXEMPTION Ballot summary:Proposing an amendment to the State Constitution to: (1) Provide an exemption from ad valorem taxes levied by counties, municipalities, school districts, and other local governments on tangible personal property if the assessed value of an owner’s tan-gible personal property is great-er than $25,000 but less than $50,000. This new exemption, if approved by the voters, will take effect on January 1, 2013, and apply to the 2013 tax roll and sub-sequent tax rolls. (2) Authorize a county or municipality for the purpose of its respective levy, and as provided by general law, to provide tangible personal proper-ty tax exemptions by ordinance. This is in addition to other state-wide tangible personal property tax exemptions provided by the Constitution and this amend-ment. PRO: From the James Madison Institute, which called for passage of this amendment: “Of all the constitutional amend-ments tinkering with Florida’s tax structure, this is the one most likely to result in collateral eco-nomic benets for persons other than the direct recipients of this tax break.Small businesses are the most important generators of jobs in the U.S. economy. At pres-ent, businesses must pay a prop-erty tax on their tangible prop-erty, down to and including items such as of ce furniture, comput-ers, and copiers, with only the rst $25,000 of value tax exempt. Amendment 10 would exempt the value of tangible property up to $50,000. Not only would this spare businesses — especially small ones — a cost, but also the major has-sle involved in calculating the val-ues of ordinary business equip-ment, which tends to be subject to depreciation and other factors making such calculations much more complex than, say, calcu-lating the value of real estate, where appraisers can more easily examine the prices paid for com-parable properties.” CON: The James Madison Institute also offered possible arguments against Amendment 10: “To paraphrase the late Sen. Everett Dirksen, “a million here, a million there, and pretty soon you’re talking about real money.” This exemption, along with oth-ers pending or already enacted, will cost local governments hundreds of millions of dollars at a time when Florida’s cash-strapped state government has been dumping more responsibili-ties on those local governments. The inevitable result will be either a reduction in the services provided by those local levels of government or else a shift of the tax burden to others in order to make up for the forgone reve-nue. Moreover, even though this amendment has been touted as a stimulus for job creation, there is no persuasive evidence that small businesses now worrying about the daunting new costs imposed by the Affordable Care Act will use these modest tax savings to hire more workers.”AMENDMENT 11ADDITIONAL HOMESTEAD EXEMPTION; LOW-INCOME SENIORS Ballot summary:Proposing an amendment to the State Constitution to autho-rize the Legislature, by general law and subject to conditions set forth in the general law, to allow counties and municipalities to grant an additional homestead tax exemption equal to the assessed value of homestead property if the property has a just value less than $250,000 to an owner who has maintained permanent residency on the property for not less than 25 years, who has attained age 65, and who has a low household income as defined by general law. PRO: The James Madison Institute, which did not take a position on Amendment 11, none-theless offered possible argu-ments in favor of the proposal: Some low-income seniors, many of whom survive on a modest pension or other form of fixed income, are at risk of being taxed out of the homes where they have lived and raised a family. This problem has been particularly acute in areas where enclaves of low-income retirees are close to trendy areas such as Key West or South Beach, where international fame caused real estate prices to boom even beyond the levels other locales experienced during the real estate bubble. Despite the “Save Our Homes” amendment’s limiting of the annual increases for a homestead property’s assessed value to 3 percent or the rate of inflation, whichever is less, a home that was on the tax rolls valued at $100,000 in 1995 would likely be assessed today at more than $150,000 and rising. Moreover, the amount on which taxes would be due — the assessed valuation minus home-stead exemption — would have more than doubled. Rather than tax elderly low-income Floridians out of their homes and force them into renting or moving into an assisted livingfacility or a nurs-ing home, a prudent tax policy would encourage them to remain as long as possible in the familiar surroundings of the homes they own.” CON: “The main problem with this amendment is the unfairness of the long residency requirement,” according to the Tampa Tribune, which nonethe-less endorsed it. “Some of the neediest homeowners have been forced to move or downsize. And the law considers annual income, not total assets. It would cre-ate an incentive to keep house-hold income below $20,000. It could also create a disincentive to move.” The James Madison Institute also offered possible arge-ments against Amendment 11: “Amendment 11 is yet another example of politicians offering tax relief to a group likely to receive public sympathy and, incidentally, to vote in large num-bers. Together with the other tax breaks in this year’s batch of amendments, Amendment 11 will either add to the loss of revenue that Florida’s local governments are facing at a time of signifi cant fiscal challenges involving pen-sions, public safety, and other issues, or else it will exacerbate the shifting of the tax burden to those residents who have not yet managed to qualify for a tax break.”AMENDMENT 12APPOINTMENT OF STUDENT BODY PRESIDENT TO BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF STATE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM Ballot summary:Proposing an amendment to the State Constitution to replace the president of the Florida Student Association with the chair of the council of state university student body presidents as the stu-dent member of the Board of Governors of the State University System and to require that the Board of Governors organize such council of state university student body presidents. Florida Tax Watch explains:“In short, Amendment 12 is about whether or not the Student Body President of Florida State University should have the opportunity to serve as the stu-dent member of the Board of Governors (BOG). The BOG is a 17-member board that, along with the legislature, is the governing body for the State University System (SUS). The BOG’s duties include: Accounting for the expenditure of state funds; Submitting a legislative budget request for each SUS institu-tion; Adopting strategic plans; Approving, reviewing, and terminating degree programs; Governing admissions to SUS institutions; and Complying with and enforcing all applicable local, state, and federal laws. The BOG is made up of 14 Governor appointees, the Commissioner of Education, the chair of the Advisory Council of Faculty Senates, and the Florida Student Association (FSA) president. Florida State University is the only one of the state’s 11 universities that is not a member of the FSA. Amendment 12 would remove the FSA President from the BOG membership and replace it with the chair of the council of stu-dent body presidents, which the amendment requires the BOG to organize. The council would consist of all the student body presidents of the SUS. The amendment contains nothing about the duties or activities of the council.” PRO: From the James Madison Institute, which did not take a posi-tion on Amendment 12, comes a possible supporting argument: “This seemingly inconsquential amendment wouldn’t likely be on the ballot were it not for the fact that the state Constitution’s provision creating the Board of Governors (BOG) to oversee the state’s university system stipulated that one of the seats on the BOG should be filled by the President of the Florida Student Association (FSA). The reform provided in Amendment 12 is desirable because it makes the representation more broadly inclusive. That is because every state university has a student body president, democratically elected, whereas not every state university chooses to participate in the FSA, an organization that has experienced funding contro-versies sufficient to cause some major universities to withdraw from membership. CON: Again, from the James Madison Institute, a possible counterargument: “The Florida Student Association argues that just because one or more uni-versities might choose to with-draw from the FSA is not a good reason to tinker with the state constitution and a well-thought-out method of providing student representation on the Board of Governors.” -From staff reports AMENDMENTS: Florida voters will decide fate of 11 proposed meas uresContinued From Page 1A ate an independent citizen advisory committee that would make recommenda-tions to commissioners for their approval or rejection. “To the extent allowed by law, the proposed amendment shifts the responsibility for redis-tricting away from the County Commission to an independent body, while recognizing that the final authority and responsibil-ity for redistricting rests with the Board of County Commissioners,” accord-ing to the final report. If commissioners reject the recommendation, they would have to explain why in writing. The committee would then submit another recommendation, which the commissioners could accept, reject or modify. The committee’s recommendation is non-binding, but it should prevent redis-tricting issues that occurred last year from happening again, Adams said. “It should help, but we will have to wait eight years to find out,” he said. AMENDMENT 2The second proposed charter amendment would provide an additional meth-od for commissioners to fire the county manager. Currently, commissioners can terminate the manager by a majority vote during two regularly-scheduled, consecutive meetings. The amendment would add the ability to fire a county manager with a majority-plus-one vote dur-ing one regular or special meeting. The review commission considered allowing a sim-ple majority vote during a single meeting, but reject-ed the idea. If adopted, a super-majority vote of the entire county commission could fire the county manager during a single meeting. AMENDMENT 3Approval of the third amendment would remove a department head’s option to appeal his or her termi-nation to commissioners. Department heads are senior-level staff who report directly to the coun-ty manager. The manager appoints, supervises and terminates, with or with-out cause, all department heads. Currently, the charter allows fired department heads to appeal their deci-sion to the county commis-sion, which can overturn it. “Provisions such as this are very unusual in Florida charter counties,” accord-ing to the final report. The charter review committee also discussed if it would be preferred if commissioners approved newly-appointed depart-ment heads, but decided against it. The committee found that a key feature of allow-ing a county manager to build a management team is the ability to fire or hire department heads with-out excessive influence by commissioners. AMENDMENT 4Voting in favor of amendment 4 would replace the an elected county attorney with an attorney appoint-ed or terminated by the commission, based on job performance and qualifica-tions. Columbia County is the only county in the state with an elected county attorney. In other counties, attorneys are retained based on quali-fications and performance, and are employed by the county commission. The current system does not allow the client, the county commission, to hire or fire its primary legal advisor. “It creates a situa-tion where the office holder (the county attorney) has no direct duties or specific responsibilities to the pub-lic the entity who selected the office holder,” accord-ing to the final report. The amendment would eliminate the elected sta-tus after current County Attorney Marlin Feagle’s term is over. The amendment would leave the decision to hire an attorney full-time or on a part-time contractual basis up to commissioners. CHARTER: Four proposed changes to the county charter on Nov. 6 ballot Continued From Page 1A

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Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY OCTOBER 21, 2012 7A 7A *See Players Club for complete details. Must be at least 21 years old and a Seminole Players Club member to participate. Valid ID required. Management reserves all rights. Offers are non-negotiable, non-transferable and must be redeemed in person at the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel and Casino Tampa. Offer is for the slot and gaming machine of your choice, not valid for live Poker or Table Games. No cash value. Persons who have been trespassed or banned by the Seminole Tribe of Florida or those who have opted into the self-exclusion program are not eligible. If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, please call 1-888-ADMIT-IT. 2011 Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino. All rights reserved. 4 813.627 SEMINOLE HARD ROCK HOTEL & CASINO TAMPA YOU PAY: $ 40 00 PACKAGE INCLUDES: $ 35 00 FREE PLAY Plus $ 5 Meal Voucher & Roundtrip Transportation OVER 4,100 OF THE HOTTEST SLOT MACHINES, 90 TABLE GAMES AND 50 LIVE POKER TABLES. MORE WAYS TO WIN. Service from Valdosta/Lake City/Gainesville PICK-UP LOCATIONS & TIMES NEW SERVICE! For group charter information, please call the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino 877.529.7653 For more information call FABULOUS COACH LINES at 1.866.352.7295 or visit their website at fabulouscoach.com HOP ON THE BUS GUS YOU PAY: $ 35 00 From Valdosta From Lake City & Gainesville TUESDAYS & SATURDAYS VALDOSTA MALL VALDOSTA, GA 1700 Norman Drive LAKE CITY MALL LAKE CITY 2469 West US Hwy. 90 OAKS MALL GAINESVILLE 6419 Newberry Road 8:15 AM 7:00 AM 9:00 AM released on a $100,000 bond. On Monday Jones appeared in a pretrial hearing before Circuit Judge Paul S. Bryan, where the state attempted to have Jones bond revoked. Jones was represented by Kimberly Kay Mears of the Third Circuit Public Defenders office. John Durrett, assistant state attorney, was the prosecuting attor ney. Bryan denied the states motion to revoke Jones bond. Durrett said the state attempted to have Jones bond revoked after allegations were made that Jones tried to have contact, via Facebook, with an underage female. According to court documents, Bryan then issued an order mandating that Jones have no contact on social media websites. Durrett said the restrictions prohibiting Jones from using social media will remain in place until further order of the court, but the order does not prohibit Jones from using the Internet. The judge ordered that he (Jones) was allowed to utilize the Internet for work purposes, Durrett said. However, he has to be cautious in terms of interacting with individuals on the Internet, via e-mail or other communication methods, to ensure it was a person of age. He can utilize the Internet for limited purposes. Jones attorney filed a motion of con tinuance, which was granted, and Jones is scheduled to have another pre-trial hear ing at 9 a.m. on Dec. 3. According to Columbia County Sheriffs Office reports, on July 26 deputy Eric Wilson was contacted in reference to a sexual molestation case that allegedly took place at Jones home. The victim reportedly told her mother that while watching a movie at Jones home, he touched her inappropriately on at least two occasions. The Department of Children and Families were notified and responded to the scene as well as local authorities. When the deputy arrived at the scene, he reported that Jones was lying on the steps of the home and appeared to be in medical distress. A witness told the deputy and others that the alleged victims uncle came to the home, confronted Jones about the sexual assault allegations and punched and kicked Jones. Jones also told authori ties he thought he was having a heart attack and he was taken to a local hospital. However, he requested charges not be filed against the attacker. Authorities continued their investigation and over the next week interviewed the alleged victim, witnesses and Jones. Jones was arrested Aug. 2. SUSPECT: Remains free on bail Continued From Page 1A R.J. said he was once nicked on the finger by an alligator, splitting his finger wide open. Through 36 years of alligator hunting, he has never been bitten. Thank God, he said. R.J. said he often tells people that an alligator is like a motorcycle: if you dont respect it, itll bite you. The father and son team just wrapped up the September season of alligator hunting and filming. Jay Paul said he is ready for the break from hunting, but they arent slowing down. We are on the road every week in a different state, he said. Jay Paul said this years season was the worst and the best, but they werent allowed to reveal too much. It was good for us, he said. R.J. said the team had to dig deep to fill their alloted tags. A rookie hunter wouldnt have been able to do it, he said. Houma Native Americans, R.J. and Jay Paul said its a blessing to be able to share their culture with the world. Skills to live off the land, like alligator hunting, have been passed down for generations in the Houma Nation. A lot of people dont even know we still do this, Jay Paul said. R.J. said it was good that the History Channel decid ed to do a story on the Houma to show the world that alligator hunting still exists today. There are 18,000 of us left on the coast, he said. Donald Hollingsworth Sr. said he took his grandsons, who are huge fans of the show, to meet the stars as a way to support the good work Kiwanis does for local children. I thought it was like, really cool, said Donald Hollingsworth III, after meeting the stars. Several fans said they liked R.J. and Jay Paul for their hardworking, down-to-earth personality. Cathy Nipper and her daughter Jamie Lacy said they are both huge fans of the show, so they were excited to meet R.J. and Jay Paul. Its our Thursday night thing takeout and Swamp People, Nipper said. Kiwanis member Steve Briscoe said expo organizers wanted to take the expo to the next step in its second year. I think all Kiwanis are proud that we could make this happen, he said about hosting the television stars. The expo itself is larger, with 80 vendors this year, double that of last year. Briscoe said he hopes the expo will generate $40,000 in profits this year to help local children. We are really proud of what the Big Boy Toys Expo is turning into, he said. TOYS: Local Kiwanis Club hopes to raise $40,000 at expo to help children Continued From Page 1A be a program on the 11 proposed amend ments to the state constitution, which are also on the Nov. 6 ballot. Starting at 7 p.m. Monday, Columbia County School Board District 5 candidates Stephanie Finnell and Bill Gootee will face off. School district superintendent candidates Terry Huddleston and Glenn Hunter will follow at 7:30 p.m. and state attorney candidates Bill Brannon and Jeff Siegmeister will be live at 8 p.m. On Tuesday at 7 p.m. county commis sion District 1 candidates Oni Allen and Ron Williams will answer questions on local issues. District 3 candidates Michael Gordon and Bucky Nash will go on at 7:30 p.m. and District 5 candidates Scarlet Frisina and Tim Murphy will round out the forums at 8 p.m. With fewer candidates than the primary election, there will be more time for candi dates to answer questions on local issues, said Mike McKee, forum moderator and director of media and public information at FGC, which co-sponsors the event with the Lake City Reporter and the Lake CityColumbia County Chamber of Commerce. Itll be different with just two candidates facing off against each other, he said. Each candidate will have two minutes for opening and closing statements. Lake City Reporter Editor Robert Bridges will ask each candidate about 10 questions throughout the segment. Look for some tough, pointed ques tions, Bridges said. Voters want to know these individuals are qualified for the posi tions they seek. Candidates will have two minutes to answer, but are not allowed additional time to rebut the other candidates comments. Candidates can use their two-minute answer period to rebut each others com ments and viewers can judge if that time was better spent answering the question. Questions on local issues will be dif ferent from the forum in August, McKee said. The event is especially exciting for FGC as it will be the first live broadcast from studios inside the new Wilson S. Rivers Library and Media Center, McKee said. FGC has produced a candidate forum since 1986 and radio broadcast the inter views before that, he said. The forums will be rebroadcast at vari ous times until the election, McKee said. Many county residents rely on the forum to help finalize their decisions. Its a fair way to look at things, he said. FORUM: Set for Monday, Tuesday Continued From Page 1A ABOVE: Donald Hollingsworth Sr. brought grandsons Donald Hollingsworth III (left) and Matthew Hollingsworth to meet Swamp People stars Jay Paul Molinere (far left) and R.J. Molinere. LEFT: Curtis Haynes (right) poses with R.J. Molinere, alligtor hunter on the History Channels Swamp People and world champion arm wrestler. Photos by LAURA HAMPSON /Lake City Reporter

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8A LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04248AWEATHER Sometimes “ no” makes you say Call 754-9088 and press 7 or apply online at campuscu.com today!Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Columbia a nd Suwannee counties! 21. Offer is for new loans only. Existing CAMPUS loans not eligible. Rate based on the September 15th rate sheet and is subject to change daily. Please call 800-367-6440 and press 7 for the most accurate rate information. Must mention offer at time of loan application. No closing cost offer is available only when obtaining a CAMPUS mortgage and only in the State of Florida. Offer applies only to standard buyer’s closing costs as itemized in the CAMPUS Good Faith Estimate and does not apply if seller pays buyer’s closing costs. Offer subject to credit approval, sufficient income, adequate property valuation, and maximum $417,000 loan amount. CAMPUS will pay up to $5,000 of closing costs. Owner-occupied property only. Offer excludes mobile homes, new construction, FHA and VA loans. Prepaid interest,initial escrow deposit and fees for rate buy down, if any, must be paid by borrower. Property, Flood and Mortgage insurance may be required at an additional expense to the borrower. If loan is paid in full within the first 24 months, closing costs paid by CAMPUS will be added to the loan payoff amount. For example, a $150,000 loan with a 20% down payment of $37,500 and prepaid interest of $215.70 at a 3.5% rate for 180 months would require 179 payments of $1072.33 and a final payment of $1,070.82; finance charge of $44,719.59 for a total of payments of $193,017.89. The amount financed is $148,298.30, the APR is 3.67%. APR=Annual Percentage Rate. Certain other restrictions apply. 2. Credit approval and initial $5 deposit required. Mention this ad and we’ll waive the $15 new member fee. Typical Closing Costs on a $150,000 Mortgage$3,428 CAMPUS Closing Costs on a $150,000 Mortgage No Cost! vs. NO -Closing-Cost Mortgage1from CAMPUS. “YES!” 3.6 7% APR1As low as FIXED RATE No points Purchase or refinance As little as 5% down Ask about discounted closing costs on construction loans Lake City 183 SW Bascom Norris Dr.G’ville E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunter’s Walk 5115 NW 43rd St. Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St. Shands at UF Room H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Alachua 14759 NW 157th Ln. Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E. Silver Springs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. Summer eld 17950 US Hwy. 441 Tallahassee 1511 Killearn Center Blvd. This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration.

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By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comGAINESVILLE — The seventh-ranked South Carolina Gamecocks stumbled and the second-ranked Florida Gators made them pay early and often in a 44-11 victory at Ben Hill Griffin Stadium on Saturday. It wasn’t pretty in the first half as Florida ran 26 plays for only 29 yards, but South Carolina self-destructed and allowed the Gators to score 21 points in the half off turnovers on their way to a 21-6 lead. “The key to the game was turnovers,” Florida head coach Will Muschamp said. From the very first play, Florida’s defense played lights-out and the Gamecocks fal-tered. Loucheiz Purifoy came off the edge unblocked on a cornerback blitz to force a fum-ble on a sack of quarterback Connor Shaw and Lerentee McCray recovered the ball to set the Gators up on the 2. “I think he’s playing very well. I think he’s played very good football for the entire year. I don’t know where he’s struggled much,” Muschamp said of Purifoy. “He’s by far our most physical corner.” Jeff Driskel threw the first of four touchdown passes on the day on the Gators’ third play when he hit Jordan Reed for a three-yard score. Two 15-yard penalties set up South Carolina’s Adam Yates for one of two first-half field goals on the Gamecocks’ fol-lowing drive to cut the score on 7-3. South Carolina’s meltdown continued in the second quar-ter when Ace Sanders fumbled a punt and Trey Burton recov-ered to give Florida the ball at the 29-yard line. Six-plays later, Driskel hit Quinton Dunbar, who then broke a tackle and went 13 yards for the score to put Florida up 14-3. Damiere Byrd then fumbled on the following kickoff with Chris Thompson recovering for the Gators to put Florida in position to score its third touchdown of the half despite struggling offensively. Driskel threw his third touchdown pass of the night to Reed on Lake City Reporter SPORTS Sunday, October 21, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS BRIEFS GATORS continued on 5B Gators put a 44-11 hurting on USC, ‘Old Ball Coach.’ INDIANS continued on 5B Indians knock off Fernandina Beach, 31-14. Monday Q Fort White High volleyball vs. Bradford High in District 5-4A tournament at Santa Fe High, 5 p.m. Tuesday Q Columbia High’s Gillian Norris, Brooke Russell in Region 1-2A girls golf tournament at Golf Club at Summerbrooke in Tallahassee, 8 a.m. Q Columbia High’s Dean Soucinek in Region 1-2A boys golf tournament at Seminole Golf Course in Tallahassee, 9 a.m. Q Fort White High cross country at Bradford Meet in Starke Wednesday Q Columbia High, Fort White High bowling in five-team match at Splitz Bowling Alley in Gainesville, 4 p.m. Q Columbia High volleyball vs. Atlantic Coast High/Lee High winner in District 4-6A tournament at St. Augustine, 5:30 p.m. Thursday Q Richardson Middle School football vs. Lake City Middle School in Commanders Bowl, 7 p.m. Friday Q Columbia High swimming in District 2-2A meet at Cecil Aquatic Complex in Jacksonville, 9 a.m. Q Fort White High football at Rickards High, 7 p.m. Q Columbia High football vs. Orange Park High, 7:30 p.m. GAMES OUTDOORS Hunter safety course offered Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is offering a hunter safety Internet-completion course for Columbia County from 6-9 p.m. Thursday and 8 a.m. to noon Saturday. Firearms, ammunition are provided. Call the regional office at 758-0525 or go to www. myfwc.com /HunterSafety. Ladies fishing seminar offered Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and the Sports Fish Restoration Program are offering a “Ladies, Let’s Go Fishing” seminar at the Elks Lodge in Tavernier on Nov. 9-11. For details, visit ladies letsgofishing.com or call (904) 475-9068. CHS FOOTBALL Q-back Club meets Monday The Columbia County Quarterback Club meets at 7 p.m. Monday in the Jones Fieldhouse. For details, call Joe Martino at 984-0452. FORT WHITE FOOTBALL Q-back Club meeting Monday The Fort White Quarterback Club will meet at 7 p.m. Monday in school’s faculty lounge. For details, call Harold Bundy at 365-5731.Q From staff reports Happy homecoming JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Michael Mulberry (4) tackles Fernandin a Beach High quarterback Cole Willis (10) on Friday. BRENT KUYKENDALL /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Shaq Johnson runs for a touchdown dur ing the Tigers’ 58-0 win against Middleburg High on Thursday.Allen doing things his wayBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comThere’s no doubt at this point that Columbia High has bought into Brian Allen’s coaching. It was seen on the scoreboard after a 58-0 win against Middleburg High on Thursday. It’s seen in the record as the Tigers stand at 6-1 and can clinch the District 3-6A title next week. It’s seen in the stands as there were more Columbia faithful than Broncos dur-ing the Tigers’ away game. And everything starts with the head coach and how he handles business. He’s taught the Tigers that it doesn’t matter what the state has them ranked. It’s about finishing the mis-sion, winning the next game and staying humble. “We come to play hard no matter who we’re playing,” defensive back Roc Battle said. “We stay humble and Tigers move to 6-1 on season after Middleburg. CHS continued on 2B By TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comFORT WHITE — Fort White High’s football team did its share to make it a happy homecoming with a 31-14 win over Fernandina Beach High on Friday. “We had to do our part to make it complete,” Indians head coach Demetric Jackson said. “In the midst of homecoming and all the festivities, you can get side-tracked. Our guys came out and got the victory.” With the defense looking strong and the offense clicking, it looked like Fort White (5-2) was off to a rout similar to when the teams played last year. The Indians took the opening kickoff 39 yards for a 22-yard field goal by Nathan Escalante at 8:02 of the first quarter. Fort White’s defense forced three consecutive punts and the offense added two more touchdowns. Both came on the arm of quarter-back Andrew Baker.Game-clocked JASON MATTHEW WALKE R/Lake City ReporterFlorida tight end Omarius Hines (20) scores on six-yar d run at Ben Hill Griffin Stadium in Gainesville on Saturday. Florida beat South Carolina 44-11.

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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today AUTO RACING 2 p.m. ESPN — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Hollywood Casino 400, at Kansas City, Kan. 11 p.m. SPEED — FIA World Rally, at Sardinia (same-day tape) EXTREME SPORTS 2 p.m. NBC — Dew Tour, Toyota City Championships, at San Francisco 11 p.m. NBCSN — Dew Tour, Toyota City Championships, at San Francisco (same-day tape) GOLF 2 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, The McGladrey Classic, final round, at St. Simons Island, Ga. 5 p.m. TGC — Web.com Tour, Jacksonville Open, final round, at Ponte Vedra Beach (same-day tape) 7:30 p.m. TGC — LPGA, HanaBank Championship, final round, at Incheon, South Korea (same-day tape) MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 7:30 p.m. FOX — NLCS, game 6, St. Louis at San Francisco MOTORSPORTS 4:30 p.m. SPEED — MotoGP Moto2, Malaysian Grand Prix, at Sepang, Malaysia (same-day tape) NFL FOOTBALL 1 p.m. CBS — Regional coverageFOX — Regional coverage 4 p.m. FOX — Regional coverageCBS — Doubleheader game 8:20 p.m. NBC — Pittsburgh at Cincinnati SOCCER 9 p.m. ESPN — MLS, Dallas at Seattle WNBA BASKETBALL 8 p.m. ESPN2 — Playoffs, finals, game 4, Minnesota at Indiana WOMEN’S COLLEGE VOLLEYBALL 3 p.m. ESPN2 — Nebraska at Illinois ——— Monday MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 7:30 p.m. FOX — Playoffs, National League Championship Series, game 7, St. Louis at San Francisco (if necessary) NFL FOOTBALL 8:30 p.m. ESPN — Detroit at ChicagoFOOTBALLNFL standings AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAN.Y. Jets 3 3 0 .500 133 141New England 3 3 0 .500 188 137Miami 3 3 0 .500 120 117Buffalo 3 3 0 .500 137 192 South W L T Pct PF PAHouston 5 1 0 .833 173 115Indianapolis 2 3 0 .400 100 145Tennessee 2 4 0 .333 114 204Jacksonville 1 4 0 .200 65 138 North W L T Pct PF PABaltimore 5 1 0 .833 161 118Cincinnati 3 3 0 .500 149 163Pittsburgh 2 3 0 .400 116 115Cleveland 1 5 0 .167 134 163 West W L T Pct PF PADenver 3 3 0 .500 170 138San Diego 3 3 0 .500 148 137Oakland 1 4 0 .200 87 148Kansas City 1 5 0 .167 104 183 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAN.Y. Giants 4 2 0 .667 178 114Philadelphia 3 3 0 .500 103 125Washington 3 3 0 .500 178 173Dallas 2 3 0 .400 94 119 South W L T Pct PF PAAtlanta 6 0 0 1.000 171 113Tampa Bay 2 3 0 .400 120 101Carolina 1 4 0 .200 92 125New Orleans 1 4 0 .200 141 154 North W L T Pct PF PAChicago 4 1 0 .800 149 71Minnesota 4 2 0 .667 146 117Green Bay 3 3 0 .500 154 135Detroit 2 3 0 .400 126 137 West W L T Pct PF PASan Francisco 5 2 0 .714 165 100Arizona 4 2 0 .667 110 97Seattle 4 3 0 .571 116 106St. Louis 3 3 0 .500 110 111 Thursday’s Game San Francisco 13, Seattle 6 Today’s Games Arizona at Minnesota, 1 p.m.Green Bay at St. Louis, 1 p.m.Baltimore at Houston, 1 p.m.Washington at N.Y. Giants, 1 p.m.Dallas at Carolina, 1 p.m.New Orleans at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.Cleveland at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.Tennessee at Buffalo, 1 p.m.Jacksonville at Oakland, 4:25 p.m.N.Y. Jets at New England, 4:25 p.m.Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 8:20 p.m. Monday’s Game Detroit at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.Open: Atlanta, Denver, Kansas City, Miami, Philadelphia, San Diego Thursday, Oct. 25 Tampa Bay at Minnesota, 8:20 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 28 Jacksonville at Green Bay, 1 p.m.Indianapolis at Tennessee, 1 p.m.Carolina at Chicago, 1 p.m.Miami at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m.San Diego at Cleveland, 1 p.m.Atlanta at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.Seattle at Detroit, 1 p.m.Washington at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.New England vs. St. Louis at London, 1 p.m. Oakland at Kansas City, 4:05 p.m.N.Y. Giants at Dallas, 4:25 p.m.New Orleans at Denver, 8:20 p.m. Monday, Oct. 29 San Francisco at Arizona, 8:30 p.m.Open: Baltimore, Buffalo, Cincinnati, HoustonBASEBALLMLB playoffs LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES National League (All games televised by Fox) St. Louis 3, San Francisco 2 St. Louis 6, San Francisco 4San Francisco 7, St. Louis 1St. Louis 3, San Francisco 1 Thursday St. Louis 8, San Francisco 3 Friday San Francisco 5, St. Louis 0 Today St. Louis (Carpenter 0-2) at San Francisco (Vogelsong 14-9), 7:45 p.m. Monday St. Louis at San Francisco, 8:07 p.m. (if necessary) ——— WORLD SERIES (Best-of-7) (All games televised by Fox) Wednesday Detroit at National League (n) Thursday Detroit at National League (n) Saturday National League at Detroit (n) Sunday National League at Detroit (n)BASKETBALLNBA preseason Saturday’s Games Miami 104, San Antonio 101Atlanta 110, Dallas 94Indiana 83, Memphis 80Boston 109, New York 98Detroit 85, Charlotte 80Washington at Milwaukee (n)L.A. Clippers at Utah (n) Today’s Games San Antonio at Orlando, 6 p.m.Philadelphia at Boston, 7:30 p.m.Denver at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.Sacramento at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m. Monday’s Games Milwaukee at Toronto, 7 p.m.New York vs. Philadelphia at Syracuse, N.Y., 7 p.m. New Orleans at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.Sacramento at Phoenix, 10 p.m.Utah at Portland, 10 p.m.Golden State at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.WNBA Finals Indiana 2, Minnesota 1 (Best of 5) Indiana 76, Minnesota 70Minnesota 83, Indiana 71 Friday Indiana 76, Minnesota 59 Today Minnesota at Indiana, 8 p.m. Wednesday Indiana at Minnesota, 8 p.m. (if necessary) 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04202BSPORTS CHS: Allen keeping Tigers humble Continued From Page 1B within ourselves. We have a goal to make and are going out trying to make sure it works out that way.” Those are words that could have come straight from the coach. When starters violated a team rule, Allen didn’t scuff over it and let his stars get away with it. He has a next-man-up philosophy and is about holding his players accountable. “We had five starters we had to replace,” Allen said. “We wanted to see how the next guys would step up and they did. “Malachi Jean, Charles Combs, Bryan Williams and Dugan Dotson all played great games. That’s why we coach these kids so hard, so that when we need to call on them there’s no drop-off. Tonight, they had a stellar performance.” With the 58-0 win, Allen said it wasn’t about impress-ing pollsters. He believes that everything will play itself out in the state play-offs. For Allen, it was more about getting the Tigers to play four complete quar-ters of football. “We can’t allow ourselves to get caught in a trap,” Allen said. “We have to keep sharpening our blade. We want it to be as sharp as it can be in the playoffs and firing on all cylinders.” And Allen said there’s no edge being played with due to a lack of respect. “I never mention polls to our kids,” Allen said. “Our edge comes from our next opponent and the opportu-nity to play another game on Friday night. We have to stay humble and grounded. Our kids are doing that. We’re a disciplined group that will play through pain. We earn our respect each week and the rest will come.” But Allen didn’t back off when asked about where he feels the Tigers stack up in the state. “I was told by a guy before the game that he voted us No. 3,” Allen said. “I don’t care where they rank us. I can guarantee you if they come watch us prac-tice and play week in and week out, that there aren’t many teams to rank ahead of us. I know how hard our players are working. I know how hard our coaching staff is working and I don’t think there’s anyone working harder than us. I’ll take this team over anyone and see if they can match.” Barber bounces back against MiddleburgBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comOver the last two weeks, Columbia High quarter-back Jayce Barber said film study hasn’t been fun on Monday. Barber was the first to admit that his play hasn’t been up to the team’s or his standards over the last two weeks, despite the Tigers winning the game. “It’s being said that he’s not playing well,” Columbia head coach Brian Allen said. “It’s not nearly as bad as it looks. I know what caliber of kid he is.” The season hasn’t been bad for Barber, even though it has been suggested by some. He’s ahead of where he was at this time last year and, after Friday’s perfor-mance against Middleburg High in a 58-0 win, Barber looked to be in top form. “I felt it in pre-game,” Barber said. “My arm felt great, like I had a lot of juice on my passes. Coming off the bye, I felt like that was the prettiest I’ve thrown the ball. My receivers were making big catches like Alex (Weber) and my line was blocking great.” Barber finished with 161 yards and two touchdowns on 7-of-9 passing. He could have gone for 300 on the night, but the Tigers didn’t need to throw the ball much after jump-ing out to a 34-0 lead in a first quarter when Barber did most of his damage. He threw for 131 yards in the quarter including the touchdown pass to Weber. “He put the ball in the right spot and I just focused on it and did my thing,” Weber said. “We played like we practiced all week.” Barber said the best part of the game is that it’s the most complete performance from the Tigers this season. “The best part is we never let off the gas,” he said. “Even when we got up so big after the first quarter, we just kept things going.” After the performance, Barber said he’s got his mojo back and is look-ing forward to a matchup against Orange Park High on Friday when the Tigers have a chance to clinch the District 3-6A championship title. “Tonight gave us good confidence and I think we’ll be able to keep it going next week,” Barber said. BRENT KUYKENDALL /Lake City ReporterColumbia High quarterback Jayce Barber launches a pa ss. Columbia has a quarter for the agesBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comIt’s hard to imagine a better quarter in the history of Columbia High football. That’s how close to perfect the Tigers were out of the gate on Thursday. The Tigers stormed out, held Middleburg High to a three and out on its first series and then scored on their first offensive play with a 38-yard run from Ronald Timmons. By the time the quarter was over, Columbia had raced out to a 34-0 lead with the lone blemish being a missed extra point. Twice Columbia scored on the first play of a series. The second time it came to close the quarter when quarterback Jayce Barber hit Shaq Johnson on a 40-yard touchdown strike. In between, the Tigers did just about everything right. They forced turnovers with Roc Battle pick-ing off Rick Lassiter on Middleburg’s second pos-session. They had sacks with Dugan Dotson and Terry Calloway. They forced three and outs on three separate occasions. Offensively, things were rolling just as smoothly. Timmons continued to run like a wild man, like he has over the past two games and went over the century mark before the quarter was over. Barber was hit-ting passes and receivers were making plays. It was the perfect storm of a quarter and just the kind of game that the Tigers expected. It’s also the kind of game that the Tigers need from here out. Not only did it show what Columbia is capable of, but it also gave a chance for the Tigers to develop young players in the second half. Many of the junior varsity players called up this week saw playing time. Reserves were able to make tackles and catches. It’s only going to benefit Columbia down the road to continue to win games like this. And it showed a killer instinct as the Tigers delivered a knockout blow on the way to the 58-0 victory. Barber falls off the paceFrom staff reportsBlayne Barber shot himself out of contention in the Web.com Jacksonville Open with a third-round 74. Barber began Saturday two shots off the lead at the TPC Sawgrass Dye’s Valley Course, following opening rounds of 67-69 on the par 70 course. B.J. Staten leads by one shot at 202. Barber is grouped with John Reigger and Andy Winings, all at 210, for today’s final round. They tee off at 9:31 a.m. The Golf Channel has a delayed broadcast at 5 p.m.

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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 3B3BSPORTSIndians sink Pirates JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Kellen Snider (7) glides through the a ir after being tripped up during a kickoff return in the Indians’ 31-14 win over Fernandina Beach High on Frida y. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Trey Phillips (5) catches an Andrew B aker pass over the head of Tripp Mitchel (2) during the game against Fernandina Be ach High on Friday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterTavaris Williams (2) escapes a tackle attempt made by Fe rnandina Beach High’s Tripp Mitchel (2) for a 12-yard gain. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Andrew Baker (12) runs the ball on a quarterback keeper against Fernandina Beach High on Friday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterMichael Mulberry (4) spins away from Fernandina Beach High’s Calvin Logan (1) in an attempt to gain yardage in Friday’s game.

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4B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04204BSportsCHS busts Broncos BRENT KUYKENDALL /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Braxton Stockton finds open running spa ce during the Tigers’ 58-0 win against Middleburg Hig h on Thursday. BRENT KUYKENDALL /Lake City ReporterColumbia’s Ronald Timmons breaks free on a run again st Middleburg High on Thursday. BRENT KUYKENDALL /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Malachi Jean (53) and Solomon Bell (30) combine for a tackle during the Tigers’ 58-0 win against Middleburg High. BRENT KUYKENDALL /Lake City ReporterColumbia’s Charles Combs (54) is tackled after picking off a Middleburg High pass during the first half of the Tigers’ 58-0 win on Thursday. BRENT KUYKENDALL /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Zedrick Woods (2) and Antonio Pelham (10) combine on a tackle during a kickoff against Middleburg High. BRENT KUYKENDALL /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Darren Burch falls forward for extra ya rdage in the Tigers’ 58-0 win against Middleburg High.

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Call for directions or more info: (888)602-3704. _____________________________ Schools & Instruction _____________________________ MEDICAL BILLING TRAINING! Train for Medical Billing Careers at SCTrain.edu No Experience Needed! Job placement assistance after training! HS/GED/PC Needed (888)872-4677 Week of October 15, 2012 GATORS: 4 TD passes for Driskel Continued From Page 1B INDIANS: Enjoy ‘payday’ with victory Continued From Page 1BThe first came at 1:47 of the first quarter and was a strike to Michael Mulberry on a sideline streak from 43 yards out. The second came on a more conventional drive, as the Indians went 69 yards in nine plays. Fort White converted two third downs, one on a nine-yard run by Tavaris Williams and one on a 19-yard pass from Baker to Melton Sanders. Williams ran for another 14 yards and Fort White got relief from an intercep-tion when pass interfer-ence was flagged in the end zone. Baker then lofted a pass from seven yards out and Trey Phillips leaped to snatch it away from the defender for a touchdown. Escalante booted the second of his four PATs for a 17-0 lead with 7:22 left in the half. Fernandina Beach (2-6) put together a scoring drive of 74 yards in nine plays. Tony Franklin ran five times from the Pirates’ 26 to get the ball to midfield. On third-and-8 Will Mitchell took a pitch around the right side for 44 yards to the Indians’ 4. Franklin scored on the next play and Devon Lendry kicked the extra point. Fort White led 17-7 at 3:06 of the second quarter. Kellen Snider made his second kickoff return on a short kick and ran 19 yards to the Fort White 45. Baker hit Phillips for 19 yards and scrambled for another 10 yards. An interception on a tipped pass stopped the drive at the Pirates’ 12. Fernandina’s tortoiseand-hare approach appeared to have a chance after intermission. The Pirates rolled out 18 plays and used up 10 min-utes of the clock. A fake punt and, later, a keeper by quarterback Cole Willis converted two fourth downs. Fernandina only made it to the Fort White 26 and ended up punting. Williams ran for 15 yards, but the Indians faced fourth-and-4 at their 44 on the next series. Jackson went for it and Williams responded with seven yards. “If we punt, we may not get the ball back,” Jackson said. “I wasn’t going to do that.” Fort White rolled up another first down and, on second-and-17, Baker and Mulberry worked a throw-back screen and Mulberry ran through several tackles for a 38-yard touchdown. The lead was safer at 24-7 with 9:19 left in the game. Mulberry made it no doubt, as he gathered in the next Pirates’ punt and returned it 63 yards for a touchdown and a 31-7 lead. With Fort White playing everybody, Franklin broke a 45-yard touchdown run late in the game. Jackson wanted his players to join the homecoming celebration. “I like when our guys are having fun and playing for each other,” Jackson said. “I hate to see the guys work as hard as they do and not enjoy it. The game is what we call payday and we want them to enjoy payday.” Fernandina 0 7 0 7 — 14 Fort White 10 7 0 14 — 31 First Quarter FW—Escalante 22 FG, 8:02FW—Mulberry 43 pass from Baker (Esclante kick), 1:47 Second Quarter FW—Phillips 7 pass from Baker (Esclante kick), 7:22 FB—Franklin 4 run (Lendry kick), 3:06 Fourth Quarter FW—Mulberry 43 pass from Baker (Esclante kick), 9:19 FW—Mulberry 63 punt return (Esclante kick), 5:16 FB—Franklin 45 run (Lendry kick), 2:40 ——— Fort White Fernandina First downs 13 10Rushes-yards 27-141 48-254Passing 165 0Comp-Att-Int 8-14-1 0-1-0Punts-Avg. 1-37 5-32Fumbles-Lost 1-0 0-0 Penalties-Yards 4-40 6-42 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Fort White, T. Williams 18-103, Baker 3-29, R. Williams 1-4, Garrison 1-3, Levy 1-2. Bryant 3-0. Fernandina, Franklin 27-145, Mitchell 11-70, Willis 6-25, Walker 1-5, Logan 2-5, Moses 1-4. PASSING—Fort White, Baker 8-14165-1. Fernandina, Willis 0-1-0-0 RECEIVING—Fort White, Phillips 354, Mulberry 2-81, Sanders 2-27, Levy 1-3. Fort White’s offense fires on all cylindersBy TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comFORT WHITE — Fernandina Beach High did its best to keep Fort White High’s offense off the field on Friday, but the Indians had enough firepower for a 31-14 win. The Pirates threw one pass in the game and had drives of 10 and 18 plays. By the time Fernandina got around to crowding the clock, Fort White had built a 17-0 lead. Andrew Baker was 8-of14 passing for 165 yards and had his second game of the season with three TDs. Michael Mulberry was the recipient of two of the touchdown passes and also scored on a punt return. Trey Phillips led with three receptions and caught the other touchdown pass. “They played hard and tackled better than last year,” Jackson said of the Pirates. “We had some of our plays that could have gone for touchdowns.” Jackson said Fernandina was keying on running Tavaris Williams, but he still gained 103 yards on 18 carries. “They did a good job on not letting Tavaris beat them,” Jackson said. “That put Michael and Trey on an island and we got to them a little bit.” Both of Mulberry’s catches were long scoring plays. Late in the first quarter he blitzed down the home sideline and Baker hit him in stride for a 43-yard TD. “It was a 91X Go,” Mulberry said. “We worked on it all week in practice. I told Andrew to put it out there where I could go and get it.” Mulberry’s second touchdown reception came early in the fourth quarter and broke the game open. It was a throwback screen, a favorite play for him and Baker. This time, Mulberry ran through several defend-ers for 38 yards. “Caley (Brason) blocked and Devontae (Levy) was blocking downfield,” Mulberry said. “They were arm-tackling, so I tried to keep my legs under me.” Mulberry’s punt return score went for 63 yards. It was his second this season. “I had good blocking by the return players and Trey (Phillips) threw a block to get me in the end zone,” Mulberry said. Mulberry leads Fort White with seven touch-downs and 42 points. “It feels good because this is my last homecoming game,” Mulberry said. “We worked hard at it.” JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Tavaris Williams (2) applies a stiff-a rm to Fernandina Beach High’s Ben Venerdi (22) in the game on Friday. a one-yard play to give Florida the 21-3 edge. Florida’s offense found life to begin the third quar-ter. The Gators drove 59 yards in nine plays on a drive capped by Omarius Hines on a six-yard wide receiver sweep. Caleb Sturgis added a 42-yard field goal to put Florida up 30-8 with 4:51 left in the third quarter. “The third quarter was critical,” Muschamp said. “They had zero first downs and we had 133 yards.” Driskel’s career-high four-touchdown game was capped off when he hit Frankie Hammond on a six-yard pass. Matt Jones added a TD run late in the game.

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6B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421 6BSPORTS Same Day Service Includes Saturday Lake City Lake City Commons Center (Publix Shopping) 752-3733 Carrying Vera Bradley CONTACTS EYE EXAMS by Independent Optometrist 2 Complete Pair Eyeglasses 2 Complete Pair 2 Complete Pair $ 119 Includes Lenses & Frames Some Restrictions Apply. COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES OCT. 31, 2012 NOW FREE GLASSES FREE PAIR OF GLASSES Buy one complete pair of glasses at regular price & receive a Some Restrictions Apply. COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES OCT. 31, 2012 $ 99 1 Pair Eyeglasses I ncludes lenses & frames. Some Restrictions Apply. COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES OCT. 31, 2012 NOW Where you get the Best for Less Ask about Care Credit Lake City residents now have access to quality joint replacement surgery, close to home. Under the medical direction of Dr. Jeffrey Glenn, Lake City Bone and Joint offers many surgical options to the community from hip and knee replacement to partial knee replacement. Dr. Glenn is a board-certied orthopedic surgeon fellowship trained in adult reconstructive surgery. To schedule an appointment, call 386-755-9720. 3140 NW Medical Center Lane, Suite 130, Lake City, FL 32055 Dr. Jeffrey Glenn is Lake Citys only board-certied Orthopedic Surgeon who is fellowship-trained in joint replacement surgery. www.LCBoneandJoint.com Excellence. I B... J. Excellence. I B... J. LCM-3109 Physician Ads 5.25x10_L7.indd 2 8/15/12 11:53:31 AM Indians defense passing test By TIM KIRBY tkirby@lakecityreporter.com FORT WHITE For the third time this season, Fort White Highs defense faced a team that produced no passing yardage. That means the opponent is pounding the middle of the line and Fernandina Beach Highs Tony Franklin is a big back. Franklin ran 27 times for 145 yards, but 54 of those yards came late in the game after Fort Whites starters were on the sidelines plan ning their homecoming cel ebration in a 31-14 win. I thought we played good in the first half, Indians defensive coordina tor Ken Snider said. We were rotating people in and out and we got a lot of play ers in the game. It was a crazy week for them. There was something scheduled every day. The Pirates were threeand-punt on their first three possessions., as Fort White built a 17-0 lead. Fernandina Beach had two long drives, but the Indians forced another punt after an 18-play drive to open the second half. Defensive lineman Michael Blackmon and linebacker Kellen Snider were among those taking on Franklin and the 48 run ning plays by the Pirates. I wasnt worried about the way they played, Blackmon said. It was noth ing we couldnt handle when he lowered his head. In addition to clogging the middle, Snider went to a full-out sprint to catch the Pirates Will Mitchell on his 44-yard run late in the first half. Snider caught him at the Indians 4. We had a great week of practice, Snider said. You couldnt ask for a better time. Coach Snider said with all the activities during the week players were on their own to watch film. Blackmon and Snider admitted they snoozed through the ses sion, but only because they were already focused. From here on out it was full speed ahead, Snider said. We say every team is the best team we will face and handle it like that. Nobody was lollygag ging at practice, Blackmon said. We came out to win this homecoming game and keep it going. If anybody gets in our way, they will get run over. Fort White travels to Rickards High this week, then has the District 3-3A showdown with Trinity Catholic High at home on Nov. 2. By TIM KIRBY tkirby@lakecityreporter.com Columbia Highs volley ball team won the Varsity Pink Panther tournament with four straight wins at Newberry High on Friday and Saturday. The Lady Tigers lost one set, beating The Rock School 26-16, 25-8, Newberry 25-15, 25-8, Fort White High 25-12, 25-12, and Bell High 25-14, 20-25, 15-8. Columbia (19-4) plays in the District 4-6A tournament at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday against the winner of the Atlantic Coast High/Lee High game. St. Augustine High is hosting the tournament. Columbia cross country Led by freshman Emma Tucker, Columbias girls cross country team won the Amelia Island Invitational at the Fernandina Beach Golf Club on Saturday. Tucker was individual winner in the 5K with a time of 19:52.90. Columbia was followed by Pensacola Catholic High and Eastside High in the 10-team field. Other Lady Tiger run ners with place and time were: Samantha Ziegaus, 5th-20:19.14; Ashley Jones, 16th-21:15.00; Sydni Jones, 24th-21:37.07; Michaelle Charlotin, 25th-21:47.48; Abby Williams, 34th22:05.74; Ashlyn Martin, 41st-22:41.86. Bishop Kenny High won the boys, paced by individual winner David Yarborough in 16:17.76. Tim Pierce (17:46.42) and Noah Henderson (19:12.48) ran for the Tigers. Fort White volleyball Fort Whites volley ball team drew the No. 4 seed in the District 5-4A tournament and will play No. 5 Bradford High in the opening round at 5 p.m. Monday. Santa Fe High is the top seed and tournament host. The Raiders will play the Fort White/Bradford win ner at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday. No. 3 Williston High plays No. 6 Interlachen High at 6:30 p.m. Monday. The winner will play No. 2 seed Keystone Heights High at 5 p.m. Tuesday. The championship final is 7 p.m. Thursday. Fort White swept the season series against Bradford, winning at home on Oct. 2 and in Starke on Oct. 11. The Lady Indians were 4-6 in district play. We have a good chance of being in the final if we work hard and put every thing together, coach Tiffany Bratcher said. Nobody has defeated Santa Fe yet, but that would be a nice win. Columbia bowling Columbias bowling team went head to head with Suwannee High at Thunder Alley in Live Oak on Wednesday. The Lady Tigers won both traditional matches 782-543 and 752-558. Courtney Schmitt (176), Christine Peters (166) and Tori Wise (153) were the top three CHS bowlers in the opening match. Peters rolled a 200 in the second match. Linden Barney had a 148 and Lauren Snipes had a 145. Hannah Schaffer bowled a career best 131. Suwannee led by two pins going into the 10th frame of the Baker scoring match. The Lady Bulldogs left the frame open and Peters nailed them with two strikes in the 10th as Columbia won 138-120. Columbia will join Fort White, Gainesville High, Suwannee and North Marion High in a 4 p.m. match Wednesday at Splitz Bowling Alley in Gainesville. Volleyball district week Associated Press MIAMI EJ Manuel threw for 229 yards, Devonta Freeman ran for a pair of fourth-quarter touchdowns and No. 12 Florida State overcame a shaky start to beat Miami 33-20 on Saturday night, the Seminoles third straight win over their archrival. Manuel completed 21 of 31 passes for Florida State (7-1, 4-1 ACC), which won despite 12 penalties and five fumbles, two of them lost. Dustin Hopkins kicked four field goals for the Seminoles, and James Wilder added a touchdown run. No. 1 Alabama 44, Tennessee 13 KNOXVILLE, Tenn. A.J. McCarron tossed four touchdown passes and threw for a career-high 306 yards as the top-ranked Crimson Tide trounced Tennessee at Neyland Stadium. Freshman receiver Amari Cooper caught seven passes for 162 yards and two touchdowns, while freshman running back T.J. Yeldon ran for 129 yards and two scores. No. 4 Kansas State 55, No. 17 W. Virginia 14 MORGANTOWN, W.Va. Collin Klein ran for four touchdowns and threw three TD passes as Kansas State got little resistance from West Virginia. Klein was 19 of 21 for a career-high 323 yards and added 41 yards rushing for the Wildcats (7-0, 4-0 Big 12), the only unbeaten team in the conference. No. 5 Notre Dame 17, Brigham Young 14 SOUTH BEND, Ind. Theo Riddick pounded his way for a career-high 143 yards and Cierre Wood added 114 yards. Riddick had runs of 55 and 27, the two lon gest rushes of his career, to pace Notre Dame (7-0), which is off to its best start in a decade and has a big game ahead against No. 10 Oklahoma next week. No. 6 LSU 24, No. 20 Texas A&M 19 COLLEGE STATION, Texas Jeremy Hill rushed for a career-high 127 yards and a touch down, and the sixth-ranked Tigers rallied from an early deficit. Michael Ford also had a touchdown run and Zach Mettenberger threw a TD pass to Kadron Boone for the Tigers (7-1, 3-1 SEC), who scored 21 points off four A&M turnovers. A&M (5-2, 2-2) outplayed the Tigers for much of the first half and led 12-0. Johnny Manziel, A&Ms dual-threat redshirt fresh man quarterback, com pleted 29 of 56 passes for 276 yards, but threw three interceptions. No. 7 Ohio State 29, Purdue 22, OT COLUMBUS, Ohio Backup Kenny Guiton came off the bench in relief of injured Braxton Miller to lead touchdown drives in the final minute of reg ulation and Carlos Hyde scored on a 1-yard run in in overtime. Hyde scored on a short plunge for Ohio State (8-0, 4-0) before Purdues Caleb TerBush, who had two TD passes, misfired on four passes in the overtime. No. 14 Clemson 38, Virginia Tech 17 CLEMSON, S.C. Tajh Boyd ran for two touch downs and passed for another and Jonathan Meeks had a 74-yard inter ception return score and the Tigers beat the Hokies for the third straight time. Andre Ellington had a 12-yard touchdown run and 96 yards for the Tigers (6-1, 3-1 ACC). Clemson finished with three interceptions and twice stopped fourth downs to end drives by the Hokies (4-4, 2-2). Boyd was 12 of 21 for 160 yards, 131 fewer than he averaged coming in. No. 16 Louisville 27, South Florida 25 LOUISVILLE, Ky. Louisvilles perfect start appeared to be over before Teddy Bridgewater came up with one more big play. Bridgewater threw an 11-yard touchdown pass to Eli Rogers with 1:35 left. Louisville (7-0, 2-0 Big East) rallied after yielding 15 straight points to South Florida (2-5, 0-3) and a season-high 197 yards rushing. B.J. Daniels threw three TD passes in the second half. No. 19 Rutgers 35, Temple 10 PHILADELPHIA Gary Nova threw four touchdown passes in the second half to keep Rutgers undefeated. Jawan Jamison had 114 yards rushing and 81 receiving, Nova threw for 232 yards. No. 23 Michigan 12, Michigan State 10 ANN ARBOR, Mich. Brendan Gibbons made a 38-yard field goal with 5 seconds left, helping the Wolverines (5-2, 3-0 Big Ten) beat the Spartans (44, 1-3). Seminoles beat Canes

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1CBIZ FRONT ON BUSINESS Jerry Osteryoung (850) 644-3372 jostery@comcast.net Even if small, focus on sales Lake City Reporter 1CBIZ FRONT Week of October 21-27, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section C Columbia, Inc. Your marketplace source for Lake City and Columbia County 1CColumbia Inc. Accepting New Patients Specializing in adult medical care including: Medicare, Blue Cross and most insurance plans accepted. Primary Care High Blood Pressure Heart Disease Lung Disease Gastrointestinal High Cholesterol Diabetes Womens Health Arthritis Allergy testing & Treatment Full Dizziness, vertigo and balance diagnosis and treatment Optifast Weight Loss System is pleased to announce the addition of Stefanie Jackson ARNP to our Practice. S O U TH ER N I NT ER NAL ME DICIN E Stefanie Jackson, A R NP Located in the Lake City Mediplex Building 404 N.W. Hall of Fame Drive, Lake City, FL 386-719-2540 BREAST CANCER Tuesday October 23rd 4:00 pm 7:00 pm Massages and light refreshments will be provided. Pre-registration is encouraged by calling 1.888.681.6388 FREE BREAST SCREENINGS More details at www.cccnf.com 7000 NW 11th Place Gainesville 4520 W US Highway 90 Lake City THIS SCREENING INVOLVES A CLINICAL BREAST EXAM, NOT A MAMMOGRAM. There is no com parison between that which is lost by not succeeding and that which is lost by not trying. ~Francis Bacon I went to a luncheon event recently and sat next to a delightful man. As you might expect given what I do, I asked how his busi ness was doing. His reply was that it was okay. Not knowing what he meant by okay, I asked a few more ques tions to get a better idea. He revealed that his sales were flat, and I asked why he thought that was. He replied that he did not feel comfortable selling and he was the firms one and only employee. Another solo entrepre neur I knew was complain ing about shrinking sales. She said that her sales used to be very good, but now they were falling. When I asked her what she had done when her sales were up, she said she used to network and go see former clients something that she was no longer doing. Now that sales were dropping precipitously, she had become really con cerned. Being an entrepreneur mandates that you also become a sales person in so many ways. You are always having to sell your self and your business to a whole range of people, not just customers. You have to get creditors to supply you with goods, to convince a bank to give you a loan and so much more. In both of these cases, the entrepreneurs knew they needed to do more SALES continued on 2C By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com The Columbia County unemployment rate contin ues to drop and dropped by two-tenths of a percent age point from August, set tling in at 8 percent for September, better than the unemployment rate for the state which is 8.7 percent. The National unemploy ment rate for September was 7.8 percent. The information was released Friday by the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity. Floridas 8.7 percent unemployment rate indi cated there were 3,500 new private sector jobs created in the state in September. The states September 2012 unemployment rate was 1.7 percent points lower than the year-ago rate of 10.4 percent. In August 2012 the states unemployment rate was 8.8 percent. Columbia County has a labor force consisting of approximately 31,858 peo ple. In September, 29,308 were employed, leaving approximately 2,550 people jobless, roughly 8 percent. In August the Columbia County labor force was listed as having 31,561 peo ple, with 28,965 residents listed as having jobs. An estimated 2,596, roughly 8.2 percent, were listed as jobless. In September 2011 the Columbia County labor for consisted of an esti mated 32,170 people and 28,986 were employed. The September 2011 unemploy ment rate was listed at 9.9 percent, with approximate ly 3,184 Columbia County residents without jobs. Department of Economic Opportunity data indicates since December 2010, the states unemployment rate has dropped 2.4 percent age points and 156,800 pri vate sector jobs have been created. The report also said Florida saw a decrease in the size of government with a decline of 2,700 total jobs over the month. In September, the states 24 Regional Workforce Boards reported a record of more than 52,983 Floridians placed in jobs. Floridas unemployment rate has declined for 22 consecutive months. The number of avail able online job open ings in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) -related fields in Florida is up sharp ly over the previous year, with more than 64,000 post ings in September. Over-the-year job post ings are up almost 9 percent compared to September 2011. Local unemployment falls to 8% ASSOCIATED PRESS In this Friday Sept. 28 photo, a group of veterans listen as a representative from White Rose Foods (foreground right) talks about their agency during a job fair introducing veterans to careers in the security and private investigations industry at Yankee Stadium in the Bronx borough of New York. Weekly applications for U.S. unemployment benefits jumped 46,000 in the week ending on Thursday, Oct.18 to a seasonally adjusted 388,000, the highest in four months. The increase represents a rebound from the previous weeks sharp drop. Both swings were largely due to technical factors. By EILEEN SULLIVAN and JACK GILLUM Associated Press WASHINGTON Tennessee lawyer Brian Manookian says he never considered himself a gun enthusiast. He owns just one handgun and was raised in a gun-free home. But the firearms industry has proven so successful in recent years that he decid ed to give up practicing law and make guns his liveli hood. Its a decision thats put Manookian on track to earn four times what he made as a corporate health care attorney, a job that earned him six figures right out of law school, he said. And hes far from alone. An analysis by The Associated Press of data tracking the health of the gun industry shows that President Barack Obama has presided over a heyday for guns. Sales are on the rise, so much that some manufac turers cannot make enough fast enough. Major gun company stock prices are up. The number of feder ally licensed, retail gun dealers is increasing for the first time in nearly 20 years. The U.S. gun lobby is bursting with cash and political clout. Washington has expressed little interest in passing new gun laws, despite renewed calls to do so after recent deadly shootings in Colorado and Wisconsin. Four years ago the gun lobby predicted Obama Gun industry is thriving in US GUNS continued on 3C

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2C LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF OCTOBER 21, 2012 2CBIZ/MOTLEY WE UNDERSTANDCOMMITMENT. For decades, Edward Jones has been committed to providing nancial solutions and personalized service to individual investors.You can rely on us for:\ Convenience Locations in the community and face-to-face meetings at your convenience\ A Quality-focused Investment Philosophy A long-term approach that focuses on quality investments and diversification\ Highly Personal Service Investment guidance tailored to your individual needs Name That Company=fle[\[`e(/,0Xe[_\X[hlXi$ k\i\[`eF_`f#@dXnfic[c\X[\i `ej\c]$j\im`Z\\hl`gd\ekXe[j\Zl$ i`kpjpjk\dj%PfldXpbefnd\]ifddpmfk`e^dXZ_`e\j#YlkXjf] )''0#@ddfjkcpflkf]k_XkYlj`e\jj% DpjX]\jdX[\`kk_ifl^_k_\>i\Xk :_`ZX^f=`i\f](/.(%@nXjXg`fe\\i`e [i`m\$lgYXeb`e^Xe[8KDjXe[_Xm\jfc[ ge\ldXk`ZklY\[\c`m\ipjpjk\dj%@\m\e [\m\cfg\[k\Xi$^Xj[\]\ej\jpjk\dj]fi YXebj%@eNfic[NXi@@#@Xidfi$gcXk\[d`c`kXip X`iZiX]k%Dpk\Z_efcf^p`jgifk\Zk`e^k_\?fg\ ;`Xdfe[Xkk_\Jd`k_jfe`Xekf[Xp%@iXb\`e XYflk*Y`cc`feXeelXccp%N_fXd@6Know the answer? Send it to us with Foolish Trivia on the top and you’ll be entered into a drawing for a nifty prize! and income statements reflect a period of time, such as a quarter or year. Net assets are found on the company’s balance sheets, which reflect the state of the company at one moment in time. For 2011, Boeing reported $4 billion in net income. To get its total assets during that period, we’ll have to average its total assets as of the end of 2010 and 2011. Those numbers are $68.6 billion and $80 billion, respectively. Their average is $74.3 billion. So dividing $4 by $74.3, we get .054, or 5.4 percent. This shows that Boeing creates 5.4 cents of earnings from each dollar of assets. The higher the ROA the better, of course. Once you have a firm’s ROA, you can compare it with others in the same industry. It’s also help-ful to track how a company’s ROA changes over time, to see if it’s becoming more efficient at wringing value from assets or less so. Boeing’s ROA has generally been rising lately. You can often find a company’s ROA (both current and past num-bers) ready for you at websites featuring stock data, such as caps.fool.com or morningstar.com K_\Dfkc\p=ffcKXb\ Deere SeasonThe agriculture industry isn’t likely to disappear anytime soon, and that’s a plus for Deere (NYSE: DE), the world’s largest manufac-turer of agricultural machinery. Deere commands a 50 percent market share in the United States and generates more revenue than most of its competitors combined. While it gets 60 percent of its sales from the U.S. and Canada, its latest annual report details plans to build factories in faster-growing China, Brazil and India. Morningstar gives Deere a healthy “A” credit rating, but equipment manufacturing is a very capital-intensive business, and Deere’s debt-to-equity ratio is a rather high 4.2. The United Nations estimates that farmers will need to double food production by 2050 to keep up with the demands of a swelling popula-tion. Tractors can go a long way toward solving that problem, as they greatly increase a farm’s efficiency. The United States is a huge market, and its farmers need to replace or upgrade their equipment periodi-cally. But the real opportunity is in the developing world, where tractor use is still relatively rare. While Deere’s international sales are growing, it’s still mainly focused on the U.S., leaving the door open for its smaller and more nimble rival AGCO, which does much more of its business internationally. Deere’s dividend yield was recently 2.3 percent. Take a closer look under the tractor’s hood, if you’re interested. TheMotley Fool To Educate, Amuse & Enrich 8jbk_\=ffc Dp;ldY\jk@em\jkd\ek Big, Dangerous DividendI bought a huge position in Alaska Communications Systems back in September 2011, as it was offering a massive double-digit dividend yield. I didn’t follow it closely, though, and in November I realized that the stock had fallen sharply on news that the company was con-sidering a dividend cut. It fell more in December, when the payout was cut by 77 percent. I had been thinking Verizon would buy the company and send the shares up. At least I did sell half my shares and moved that money into a stock that grew. — P.C., Woodbridge, Conn. The Fool Responds: Verizon didn’t buy Alaska Communications, and actually ended up moving into its territory to compete more. Alaska is still around, though, and recently offered an 8.8 percent yield — but that’s largely because the stock price has fallen so much. You were smart to move some of your remaining money into a stock that inspired more confidence. It’s always best to keep our money in our best ideas, and it’s silly to wait to recover losses in companies where we’ve lost faith.Do you have an embarrassing lesson learned the hard way? Boil it down to 100 words (or less) and send it to The Motley Fool c/o My Dumbest Investment. Got one that worked? Submit to My Smartest Investment. If we print yours, you’ll win a Fool’s cap! C8JKN<
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LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 3C would be the “most anti-gun president in American history.” Yet it is hard to find a single aspect of the gun world that isn’t thriv-ing. “The driver is President Obama. He is the best thing that ever happened to the firearm industry,” said Jim Barrett, an industry analyst at C.L. King & Associates Inc. in New York. Obama has made no pledges to push for new gun control legislation and does not have the support in Congress or among voters even if he did. During this week’s presidential debate, he did suggest renewing a U.S. ban on assault weap-ons and coming up with an overall strategy to reduce violence. But both Obama and Republican presiden-tial nominee Mitt Romney said the real need is for the government to enforce gun laws already on the books. Meanwhile, sales are brisk. Since opening a $5 million armory in Nashville last month, Manookian and his business partner have outdone their own expec-tations, selling inventory three to four times faster than they expected. The facility has high ceilings and granite fixtures in the bathroom and provides instructional courses and a shooting range in addition to firearms for sale. “It is a very strong investment,” Manookian said. Others agree.For the first time since 1993, the number of feder-ally licensed retail gun deal-ers in the U.S. increased slightly in 2010 and 2011. The country added 1,167 licensed retail gun deal-ers, according to Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives records. After the assault weapons ban of 1994 — now expired — the number of gun deal-erships dropped annually until 2010. As of October 2012, there were 50,812 retail gun dealers — 3,303 more than in 2009. “Business has been very good,” said Frederick Prehn, who a year ago opened a small gun store above his dentistry practice in Wausau, Wis. In the past year, Prehn has relocated twice to larger spaces and gone from one employee to eight. Some gun store owners can’t keep shelves stocked, said Brian Jones, owner of Bullseye Shooter’s supply in Painted Post, N.Y. Jones said he opened his gun store in November 2010. In his first year, he said he sold between 600 and 700 guns. A little more than halfway through his sec-ond year, he’s already sold 700. For the first time in the company’s history, Sturm Ruger & Co. Inc. stopped taking orders for a couple of months this year. Ruger, one of the nation’s larg-est gun manufacturers, has since resumed taking orders, though gun-sellers say demand is still outpac-ing production. Dan Wesson Arms, Inc., a small gun manufacturer that sells to a niche market, stopped taking orders this spring because the compa-ny had sold out the entire year’s production, spokes-man Jason Morton said. The company has stopped taking orders before, but never so early on the entire line, he said. “Wouldn’t you want to be in a business where customers are just beg-ging to hand you money?” said Bill Bernstein, owner of East Side Gun Shop in Nashville. Obama is not yet through his first term, but the feder-al government already has conducted about as many background checks for gun owners and prospec-tive buyers on his watch as it did during the first six years of George W. Bush’s presidency. In the first 3 1/2 years of the Bush administration, the FBI conducted about 28 mil-lion background checks. During the same period of the Obama administration, the FBI conducted more than 50 million. The gun industry uses the num-ber of background checks as a reliable indicator of demand. Ruger and Smith & Wesson represent near-ly 30 percent of the U.S. gun manufacturing indus-try and lead the market in production of pistols and revolvers, according to government statistics. The two companies have been running production lines around the clock, hir-ing workers and operating at maximum capacity, said Barrett, an industry ana-lyst who also owns Ruger stock. Ruger’s sales have increased 86 percent since Obama took office, and Smith & Wesson’s sales have gone up nearly 44 percent, compared with 18 percent for overall national retail sales. And the companies have big expectations for the industry’s future, as they’re spending more money on research and development than ever before. The NRA itself has done well, too. The lobbying organization has had more cash on hand during the Obama years than it had since 2004, finishing 2010 with more than $24 mil-lion, according to the most recent figures available. “Which makes it incredibly ironic that the gun lobby is opposing Obama,” said Dan Gross, president of the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence. Gross said Obama, who ini-tially campaigned to rein-state the assault weapons ban that expired under Bush, has done what he said was “disappointingly little” on gun control. But the gun lobby says the success of the indus-try does not indicate that Obama is good for Second Amendment rights. “This is the most dangerous election in our life-times,” NRA chief execu-tive officer Wayne LaPierre said in February, a point he’s made regularly dur-ing the NRA’s campaign to defeat Obama. The gun lobby stands by its 2008 predictions that Obama would be anti-gun. NRA spokesman Andrew Arulanandam noted Obama’s appointment of two Supreme Court justices whom the NRA considers anti-gun, plus Obama’s sup-port of a United Nations arms trade treaty and the botched operation called Fast and Furious, which the NRA says was concocted as part of a plan to enforce new gun restrictions. “Gun owners and hunters fear that a second Obama administration with no future political campaigns to worry about will try to destroy this great American freedom,” Arulanandam said. Fears of a Democratic president taking office and issuing stricter gun control laws led to an initial spike in gun sales in 2008, giving dealers some of the high-est profit margins they’d ever seen. But even after it became clear Obama was not going to make gun con-trol a priority as president, the industry has continued to do well. Fear of crime may be driving some sales. The number of violent crimes rose by 18 percent in the U.S. in 2011, according to Justice Department fig-ures released this week. It was the first year-to-year increase for violent crime since 1993, marking the end of a long string of declines. Firearm sales typically increase during poor eco-nomic times, said Steve Sanetti, chief executive officer and president of the National Shooting Sports Foundation, a trade associ-ation for the industry. More Americans are hunting and shooting for recreation as well, he said. Sanetti attri-butes that to military ser-vicemen and women with firearms experience return-ing to civilian life and want-ing to keep up with shoot-ing as a pastime. He also said recreational shooting is a relatively cheap and accessible hobby, drawing in new buyers. Voters have made clear that gun control isn’t a pri-ority. A recent AP-National Constitution Center poll found that 49 percent of adults felt laws limiting gun ownership infringe on the public’s right to bear arms, while 43 percent said such laws do not infringe on those rights. After the recent mass shootings in Colorado and Wisconsin, 52 members of Congress sponsored a bill to track bulk sales of ammunition, but the legislation went nowhere. The firearms industry entrepreneur Manookian said it is clear that guns are a priority for Americans. People around the coun-try are waiting in lines at shooting ranges, he said, cash registers at gun stores are ringing with $1,000 pur-chases and his brand new armory in Nashville is in the black two weeks after it opened. Q Associated Press writers Matt Apuzzo and Pete Yost, AP News Survey Specialist Dennis Junius, and researcher Rhonda Shafner in New York contributed to this report.ASSOCIATED PRESSThis photo taken Aug. 22 shows Central Wisconsin Firearms owner Frederick Prehn in his store in Wausau, Wis. He says he’s had to expand his bu siness to the new location last summer because of increased gun sales. He attributes the spi ke to Wisconsin’s new concealed carry law as well as the uncertainty about the upcoming election. President Barack Obama is presiding over a heyday for the gun industry despite pr edictions he would be the most antigun president in history. GUNS: Despite predictions, gun industry booming during Ob ama years Continued From Page 1C By JERRY SCHWARTZAssociated PressNEW YORK — There was a time when the news-weeklies set the agenda for the nation’s conversation — when Time and Newsweek would digest the events of the week and Americans would wait by their mail-boxes to see what was on the covers. Those days have passed, and come the end of the year, the print edition of Newsweek will pass, too. Cause of death: The march of time. “The tempo of the news and the Web have com-pletely overtaken the news magazines,” said Stephen G. Smith, editor of the Washington Examiner and the holder of an unprec-edented newsweekly triple crown — nation editor at Time, editor of U.S. News and World Report, and exec-utive editor of Newsweek from 1986 to 1991. Where once readers were content to sit back and wait for tempered accounts of domestic and foreign events, they now can find much of what they need almost instantaneously, on their smartphones and tablet computers. Where once advertisers had lim-ited places to spend their dollars to reach national audiences, they now have seemingly unlimited alter-natives. So on Thursday, when Newsweek’s current own-ers announced they intend-ed to halt print publication and expand the magazine’s Web presence, there was little surprise. But there was a good deal of nostalgia for what Smith called “the shared conversation that the nation used to have,” when the networks, the newsweeklies and a few national newspapers reigned. Before Newsweek, there was Time — the brainchild of Henry Luce and Briton Hadden. The first issue of the first newsweekly came out in 1923, and the for-mula, from the first, was to wrap up the week’s news and tie it with a bow, telling it with a singular voice. Newsweek — or as it was originally called, News-week — came along in 1933. The founding edi-tor was Thomas Martyn. The first foreign editor of Time, he was British-born and had a single leg, having lost the other in World War I. His magazine sold for 10 cents and was advertised as “an indispensable com-plement to newspaper read-ing, because it explains, expounds, clarifies.” The magazine struggled for four years, until it merged with another magazine, Today, lost the hyphen, and emerged under the ownership of Averill Harriman and Vincent Astor, two of the country’s wealthiest men. The modern era at Newsweek began in 1961, when it was purchased by the Washington Post Co. Benjamin Bradlee, who was Newsweek’s Washington bureau chief at the time and later executive editor of the Post, helped negoti-ate the sale. Edward Kosner, who worked at Newsweek from 1963 to 1979, ending as executive editor, recalled the time as a kind of golden age of the newsweeklies. “It’s a lost world,” he said. “It’s like talking about the 19th century. “Everybody cared about what was on the cover Monday morning. People took the magazines very, very seriously. They were important. They were influ-ential.” Richard M. Smith joined Newsweek for a two-week writing tryout in 1970 and stayed until 2007, rising to executive editor before retiring as president and chief executive officer. Newsweek was always the scrappy competi-tor to Time, which grew to a corporate behemoth with numerous magazines and media properties and had the larger circulation; Smith said he and his col-leagues preferred to think of themselves as “the noble guerrilla band, fighting the ‘panzer division on Sixth Avenue.’ We took pride in our speed and flexibility and occasional irreverence.” He recalled with pride Newsweek’s coverage of civil rights in the 1960s, the end of the Vietnam War and economic issues in the 1970s, the AIDS epidemic in the 1980s. Perhaps because of Time’s Luceian origins — he and his wife, Clare Boothe Luce, were major Republican figures — Newsweek was often per-ceived as a more liberal counterweight. Its readers loved the weekly Periscope section, with its edito-rial cartoons and hot-off-the-presses news blurbs. Where Time only later started providing bylines Going out of print, Newsweek ends an eraASSOCIATED PRESSIn this Jan. 27, 1992, file photo, Republican presidential h opeful Patrick Buchanan, accompanied by his wife Shelley, smiles while holding up a Newsweek cover of himself. Newsweek announced Thursday, Oct. 18 that it will end its print publi cation after 80 years and shift to an all-digital format in early 2013. Its last U.S. print edition will be its Dec. 31 issue. for its stories, Newsweek offered star columnists like George Will, Eleanor Clift and Anna Quindlen. Life in the newsweeklies, Stephen Smith recalls, was nothing like today’s fre-netic media sprint. At the start of each week, report-ers would come into work for a couple of days and think about story ideas and how to pitch them. The cor-respondents were far flung; the editing and fact-check-ing were meticulous. “That world doesn’t exist anymore,” he said. The magazines have tried to adjust. They do not rehash the week’s events as they once did. They offer more opinion, more analysis. Newsweek often struggled over the years, and the Post sold it to stereo equipment magnate Sidney Harman in 2010 for $1. He died the next year, but not before the magazine was joined to The Daily Beast Web operation. The cost of maintaining a network of correspon-dents has risen dramati-cally, along with the costs of printing and postage. Meanwhile, Newsweek’s circulation dropped from 3.14 million in 2000 to 1.5 million in 2012. Time, too, has dropped, but not as precipitously, from 4.2 mil-lion in 1997 to 3.38 million now. Other newsweeklies have done better: The Economist, with its upscale readership, went from less than 1 million in 2000 to 1.5 million in 2012, and The Week also has made gains. Regardless, it is clear that the golden age of news-weeklies will not return. Kosner recalled a time when there might be a presidential debate on a Tuesday night, and his readers would eagerly await the arrival of the next issue of Newsweek — five days later — to find out the story behind the story, to hear what the newsmaga-zine had to say about what had happened. Now, he says, they merely go to CNN, or log on to Slate. “Time marches on,” he said. But for how long?

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDSUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 Classified Department: 755-5440 4C CLASSIFIED AD vantageTake ADvantage of the Reporter Classifieds!755-5440Lake City Reporter FIND IT SELL IT BUY IT ACADEMIC ADVISOR POSITION #: P99993Assist students with the selection of a major; assist students in career development; track students’ progression toward a degree; develop and implement retention strategies for high risk students. Requires Master’s Degree in Student Development, Counseling, Psychology, Education, or related fields, plus two years experience in advising, counseling, teaching, or related area. Knowledge of human growth and development theory; career counseling and advising theory; multicultural differences and needs; differences in personalities and learning styles and interpretation of achievement tests. Skill in communication, written and verbal; able to use computer for work – Microsoft Word, Excel, and programs necessary for advising and tracking students. Ability to work well with others in a team approach; to work with a diverse population of students; to work with faculty and outside community leaders; and to plan, organize, and attend to details on all paperwork. Desirable Qualifications: Experience with community college or non-traditional students, academic advisement, and career counseling. Experience with Florida’s state rules and regulations – such as Gordon Rule and Bright Futures Salary: $37,500 annually, plus benefits Application Deadline: 11/2/12 College employment application required. Position details and applications available on web at: www.fgc.edu Human Resources Florida Gateway College 149 S.E. College Place Lake City, FL 32025-2007 Phone (386) 754-4314 Fax (386) 754-4814 E-Mail: humanr@fgc.eduFGC is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. VP/ADA/EA/EO College in Education and Employment ADJUNCT INSTRUCTORS SPRING TERM 2013COMPUTER SCIENCE Energetic, outgoing, and detail oriented candidates needed to fill adjunct Computer Science Instructor position. Must be able to TEACH ON CAMPUS during the day. Master’s Degree in Computer Science or related educational/instructional technology field required. Email resume/ transcripts to Pamela. carswell@fgc.edu ENGLISH English adjunct needed to teach during the day. Master’s in English required or 18 graduate hours in English plus master’s in related area. Contact Tim Moses at tim.moses@ fgc.edu HISTORY History adjunct needed to teach during the day. Master’s in History required or 18 graduate hours in History plus master’s in related area. Contact Tim Moses at tim.moses@fgc.edu NURSING CLINICAL BSN Required. Master’s degree in nursing preferred. At least two years of recent clinical experience required. Contact Mattie Jones at 386-754-4368 or mattie.jones@fgc.edu. DEVELOPMENTAL MATHEMATICS Bachelor’s degree in mathematics, engineering, secondary mathematics education, or other related field. Requirements include morning and/or early afternoon availability for on-campus courses. Contact Carrie Rodesiler at 386.754.4413 or carrie.rodesiler@fgc.edu for more information.College application and copies of transcripts required. All foreign transcripts must be submitted with a translation and evaluation. Application available at www.fgc.eduFGC is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools VP/ADA/EA/EO College in Education & Employment 020Lost & Found CATFOUND on Marion St. Female, Gray, Long bushy tail, Very friendly. Contact 438-8355 Female Black Lab Puppy Approx 4-6 mth old. Found on 10-12-12 Hwy 90, Noegel & Brown Roads. Call 386-867-1134 Found Set of Car/house keys on the left side of SR 47 Southbond, 2 miles past I-75 overpass. Contact 755-1922 060Services Bankruptcy/Divorce/Resumes Other Court Forms Assistance 18 years Exp./ Reasonable 386-961-5896 8 a.m.8 p.m. 100Job Opportunities05535290Northeast Florida Telephone Co is currently seeking an individual for our Engineering Department. The individual will help with day-to-day task of keeping our mapping system and records updated; projects budgeted and completed, and help to create staking sheets. Job requires outdoor work. Qualifications: A2Year Degree in ITor Engineering Technology, a working knowledge of MS Access, GIS mapping and CAD. The preferred candidate will have knowledge of how to create and use shape files in a mapping system, VBA programming and MS SQL. Excellent benefits package. Drug screening, physical and background check is required. Resume can be emailed to employment@nefcom.net 05535311Consumer Loan Processor position available with First Federal Bank of Florida. The candidate will verify loan information and is responsible for preparing the necessary documents for closing and securing our loans. Disburse, prepare and verify documentation for funding on loans. Coordinate loan closings. Ensures the receipt of any guarantee and security agreement information. Ensures approval is obtained prior to closing. Cross sell financial institution products. 6+ months of working in an office environment. Good understanding of financial institution products and services. Full benefits package. Applications may be obtained from any First Federal Branch and submitted to Human Resources, P.O. Box 2029, Lake City, Fl 32056 or email T urbeville.j@f fsb.com Bilingual candidates encouraged to apply. Equal Employment Opportunity Employer. 2 DETAILERS Needed. Experienced only. Apply in person between 10a-4p at North Florida Auto Sales. Across from ABC liquor. No phone calls please. 100Job OpportunitiesATTENTIONLocal Co. has positions avail in our C.S Dept. No exp needed, Co. training provided. Must be HS grad & able to start immed. All positions are permanent w/ rapid advmnt. Position starts @ $600/wk + bonuses. For Interv. Call 386-438-5534 Before 8 pm. Drivers: All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-ACDLFlatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down CALL: 888-880-5916 Established Ocala business is Looking to hire additional sales teams for our expanding product line.Earn $500.00/week, plus commission!If you’re upbeat, friendly and enjoy working with the public, then contact us for a confidential interview and start earning the income you deserve! Valid driver’s license, proof of insurance and overnight travel is required. Call us TODAYat 352-233-2818.Telecom Service Bureau, Inc. FULL-TIME CUSTODIAN Wanted. Primary duties include basic knowledge of boilers and HVAC system, cleaning sanctuary and Fellowship Hall, mowing, minor repairs, setup and taking down tables and chairs and general building maintenance.Must be able to lift 60 lbs. Criminal background check required. Please send resume and references to Staff Parish Relations, First United Methodist Church, Lake City, 973 S. Marion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025. Deadline is Oct. 19, 2012. MANAGEMENT OPPORTUNITIES McDonald's of Alachua has multiple positions available for qualified/experienced mgrs. $8-$16 hr /benefits/bonuses Apply on line @ www.mcstate.com/alachua Or Call 386-755-2475 P/THousekeeper Needed. Occasional Nights And Weekends. Fax Resume to 386-487-1232. 05535338T eachers Join our team of over 100 professional teachers! Want to make a difference in the lives of children? Infant/T oddler 10 Mo FTTeacher/Floater (Lake City/Jennings/Jasper) Child Development Associate (CDA) or equivalent credential (FCCPC, or ECPC) required. Three years experience with birth to 3 preferred. High School Diploma/GED Required. Must be able to pass DCF background screenings. Excellent Benefits, Paid Holidays, Sick/Annual Leave, Health/Dental Insurance, and more. Apply at 236 SWColumbia Ave, Lake City, FLor Send resume to: employment@sv4cs.or g Fax (386) 754-2220 or Call 754-2225 EOE 100Job OpportunitiesSALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 SATELLITE INTERNET INSTALLATION TECH Must have truck/van & basic tools. Will train. Send resume. floridatotalcom@verizon.net Small historic non-denominational church with a heart for children is seeking a pianist for Sunday services. Please contact 904-259-4194 if interested. Wanted-P/T Handi-Man, Exp. in Routine Maintenance such as plumbing, elect, painting & carpentry. Applications Available at Camp Weed & Cerveny Conference Center, 11057 Camp Weed Place, Live Oak. 120Medical EmploymentMedical Office Manager Experience in Medical Billing a plus. Fax resume to 386-752-6709 North Florida Pediatrics 1859 SWNewland Way, Lake City, FL32025We are a leading health clinic offering an opportunity for a pediatrician or ARNPposition. We provide competitive pay and excellent benefits package. Ability to speak Spanish is a plus. Submit resume/CV: hr@nflpediatrics.com Resource Management Specialist (Shipping and Receiving Coordinator) LifeSouth Community Blood Centers, Inc. is seeking an efficient and task-oriented individual as a Resource Management Specialist. This position is responsible for issues relating to the shipment and delivery of blood and blood components. Responsibilities include, but are not limited to: inspect and evaluate blood products to make sure they are safe, pure, and potent; receive and handle blood orders from hospitals and other customers; review shipping notices, orders, and other records to determine priorities and shipping methods required to meet scheduled deadlines. High school diploma or GED required. Valid driver’s license required. Must meet and maintain LifeSouth driver’s eligibility requirements. Some evenings and weekends required. To apply go to: www.lifesouth.org Background check and drug test required. Starting salary range $9.00 $10.00 per hour. Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer/DFWP/Tobacco Free 240Schools & Education05534919Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class12/24/2012• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-11/05/12• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies Blonde FemaleMini-Schnauzer, 18 lbs, fixed, house broken, good natured, Family friendly. $225 Contact 386-292-3927 PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 330Livestock & SuppliesDeep Creek Farms Barn kept Square or Net Wrapped Round Hay Bales For Sale Ronnie Hughes (386)365-1425 407Computers DELLComputer $100.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 430Garage Sales PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 440Miscellaneous 32 inch TVGreat Picture, With Remote $100.00 Contact 386-292-3927 Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, Root Raking, Bush Hog, Seeding, Sod, Disking, site prep, ponds & irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200 FisherPrice baby swing butterfly Cradle -nSwing. Original price $165 asking $75. Perfect condition. Swivels 3 way, plays tunes & lights up. Contact 386-292-3013 Five (5) VSV Speakers, Glass TVtable, $400 OBO Contact 755-4059 Stanley# 45 Combination Plane Very Good Condition With Wood Box. $250. Contact 386-438-8214 Table and (4) padded chairs Med/Dark Wood. In great shape $100 Contact 386-292-3927 Whirlpool Dryer White, Runs great! $100.00 Contact 386-292-3927 630Mobile Homes forRent1 Bd $370/mth or 2 Bd $485/mth $300 Sec. + $50 App.Fee. Located in the heart of LC. Call 305-9845511 or 386-344-0830 For Apt. 2 BR MH. $400 $450. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 2 BR/2BASW, Completly furnished, carport, shed, located on 41st Dr., $600 mo.,+ Util. $150 Dep. Avail 11/5 935-2461 3BR/2BADWMH on 1 acre private lot, 1st+last+dep required located in Ellisville. No pets. Contact 352-870-5144 640Mobile Homes forSale1993 PEACHSTATE 14x70 Newly renovated, 3/2, $9500.00. 1981 Destiny 24x52 good cond. 3/2, $16,500. Call 288-4688 4BD/2BADWMH on 4 acres Owner Financing Available. 386-623-3404 or 386-623-3396 575 Credit Score=10% Down on your choice of select New 3/2 or 4/2 Double. Limited time offer for Challenged Credit. North Pointe Homes, 352-872-5566 NEW3/2JACOBSEN HOMES Starting at $43,995. Painted WAlls-Del-Set-AC-Skirting-and Steps. North Pointe Homes Hwy 441 N, Gainesville, FL 352-872-5566 NEWJacobsen Model Homes Sale! 13 Left with up to $25,000 off. Don’t buy until you shop North Pointe Homes 4545 NW 13th St Gainesville 352-872-5566 Own YourProperty? No Money Down with good credit. Great Rates Available. North Pointe Homes 352-872-5566 Several Bank Repos and Used Homes in stock At North Pointe in Gainesville 352-872-5566 Palm Harbor Homes 4/2 From 499 Mo Loaded3/2 From 399 Mo Loaded $0 Down, Singlewides $299/Mo 800-622-2832 ext 210 650Mobile Home & Land2 OwnerFinanced Homes/ 1 RentalLake City, Mayo, Branford 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com CLEAN NICE 2/2 SW,and 740sf. frame studio, 1 bath outbuilding, nice country ac 8 mi to VA. $39,000 Cash only 86.961.9181 Nice 2br/2ba, 1996 DW, Energy Efficient, 3/4 frnshd, 3 yr old roof, 1/2 ac lot in Oak Wd subdv in Live Oak $39,900. Call 309-645-2659 Owner Fin.-Nice huge 4/2.5 on 3 ac, x-fenced, creek, lrg deck,Paved Rd. McAlpin area. Small down $950/mth 386-867-1833. For picswww.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05534938We’ve got it all!$89 Deposit Limited Avail. Call Today! Windsong Apts. *Free afterschool program386-758-8455 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent1BR APT. Downtown Location, Clean. New Carpet $450 mo, plus Security. NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456 1br Cottage with all utilities including cable & wireless internet. Close to the VA. (727)415-2207 2BR/1BAAPT. w/garage. West side of town. $650. mo. 386-961-9000 2BR/2BAw/garage 5 minutes from VAhospital and Timco. Call for details. 386-365-5150 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 COZYCOTTAGE 1 BRNew paint & carpet. 10 mins. South of LC, all util. & satellite incl. $550 mo. Pet ok, 386-758-2408 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Quant 2br/1ba Apt. Peaceful Location with Lake View CH/A$500. mo $500 dep. No pets. 386-344-2170 REDUCED 2/1 1300 sqft, duplex w/ gargage. refurbished,W/D hook up, CH/A, $650 mth Lease Req. 386-965-2407 or 386-758-5881 720Furnished Apts. ForRentRooms forRent Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent2/1 Brick house Lrg eat in kit. & closets, CH/A, 514 SE First Ave. Jasper. $550 mth 1st,last+sec. No pets. 772-285-1032 3BD/1.5BA CH/A, $725 mth & $725 dep. Contact 386-344-2170 3br/1.5ba. Very clean, Block great area. CH/A& indoor laundry. Carport & Fenced (privacy) back yard. $750. mo $750. dep. (941)920-4535 Cozy 2bd / 1ba home. CH/A, $500 mth & $500 dep. Contact 386-344-2170 740Furnished Homes forRentEastside Village 55 or older. 2bd/2ba Fully furnished, carport, screened in porch, $1,100 mth/neg plus Dep. Contact 752-2243 750Business & Office RentalsFOR LEASE: Downtown Office Space. Convenient to Court house. Call 386-755-3456 ForRent orLease: Former Doctors office, Former professional office & Lg open space: avail on East Baya Ave. Competitive rates. Weekdays 386-984-0622 evenings/weekends 497-4762 PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 805Lots forSale PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 810Home forSale For Sale By Owner Beautiful 2005 Brick home. Well Cared For $158,800 417-396-2134 820Farms & Acreage10 acres with well/septic/pp (not guar); $300 dwn; $580 a mth. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 950Cars forSale 2006 MAZADA MIATACONV. Automatic, leather, power. $14,500 ($1,000 below KBB value). Call 386-365-2046. 951Recreational Vehicles2002 JAYCO Legacy 5th wheel 38’3 slides fully loaded, gas-gen, queen bed, sleeps 4, shower $18,000 386-344-3362 PublishedMonthlybythe Lake City Reporter

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LIFE Sunday, October 21, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section D C an you imagine driving down a small two lane road through Indiana, the glove box open with a fresh loaf of homemade wheat bread sitting on it? The bread was so fresh it was still warm. We (Sue Towns and I) also had a jar of homemade peanut butter to go with it. Only problem was the loaf of bread was not sliced and all we could find was a cheap steak knife to slice it with. “Slice” might be the wrong word to use. It was more like cut and mangle. And spread-ing peanut butter with a serrated knife on the soft, warm bread only caused it to tear more. But, oh, it was so tasty. The aromas alone were enough to have us salivating. We picked these items up at a pit stop in Montgomery, Ind., at Gasthof Amish Village and made sandwiches in the car this way for three con-secutive days on our road trip along Highway 50, aka “The Loneliest Road in America.” Road Rations--Car Cuisine--Snack Bag--Take Out--Byway Beverages! Call it what you like, but these are all definite neces-sities on a road trip. And driving across country is a perfect way to sample the many different tastes of America. But it can also present some challenges. Most recently, in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, we saw a sign advertising “Pasties.” We both laughed and thought, what the heck are pasties? Shortly after, I received a text from a friend who said his dad was from the U.P. area and if we got a chance we had to get a “Pastie,” that they were so good and a real treat for them when they were younger. At our first pit stop, I asked about the “pasties.” I pronounced this the way you are all reading it — PAY-stees. The girl at the counter chuckled then told me I’d get laughed at if I ordered one like that, because “PAY-stees are what you put on your nipples; PASS-tees (the correct pronunciation) are what you eat.” So of course we laughed even harder and thanked her for the tip. Who knew we would get a vocabulary lesson on a Michigan U.P. food tradition. So in Escanaba, Mich., we found Dobber’s and bought a pastie for lunch. One was big enough for us to share; we got the original beef flavored one. It was baked dough filled with beef, potatoes, ruta-baga, onions and tasted very, very good. We got it to go and ate in the car. I fork fed Sue from the passenger seat as she was driving. As good as this Dining on the move Story ideas?ContactRobert BridgesEditor754-0428rbridges@lakecityreporter.com Lake City Reporter1DLIFEIt’s time for the fairBy LAURA HAMPSONlhampson@lakecityreporter.comFans can expect more rides, new attractions and returning crowd favorites at this year’s Columbia County Fair. The 58th annual fair returns Nov. 2 through Nov. 10 at the Columbia County Fairgrounds, just off State Road 27 in Lake City. This year’s theme is “Lasso the Fun,” said Steve Briscoe, fair board president. Thrill lovers can expect three or four new rides on the midway, he said. For the last several years, organizers have been increasing the quality of the rides, Briscoe said. New this year is the Great American Frontier Show, featuring several shows in a huge display of animals and American his-tory, Briscoe said. The Wild West Show focuses on how America was built, showcasing the roles of oxen, horses, the Pony Express and his-torical figures. The show includes shootouts, horse demonstrations, comedy and trick riding, accord-ing to the Frontier Show’s website. During the Wolves of the World Show, fair-goers can see the traits of wolf packs and learn how res-cued wolves are raised in captivity. After seeing the mystical wolves perform, crowds can visit the animals’ habi-tat and watch the wolves being fed. There will also be horse and camel rides, Briscoe said. “It’s gonna be a really great show,” he said. Also new this year is the Procrastinators Strolling Act, musicians who walk the fairgrounds drumming everything except drums, Briscoe said. The performers use pans, barstools, water bot-tles and other objects as unusual instruments dur-ing the fast-paced show. Briscoe said organizers worked for some time trying to book the act in the past, but are excited to offer it at this year’s fair. Hypnotist Ron Diamond will return, after thrilling crowds for several years, Briscoe said. Also returning this year is the fan-favorite kids pedal tractor pull. Elementary school-age children can compete to pull weights connected to petal tractors. For the first time there will be a Columbia County Fair Talent Contest with a $700 first-place prize. The second-place prize is $200 and third will receive $100. The competition is open to any talent, not just sing-ing, he said. The top six contestants from prelimi-naries on Nov. 6 and Nov. 7 will move on to the finals round Thursday, Nov. 8. The deadline to register is Oct. 31 on a first come, first serve basis. Applications can be found at www.columbiacountyfair.org. The livestock displays and shows are also a promi-nent fair feature, he said. Visitors can get up close to the cows, chickens, rabbits and other animals area chil-dren have raised since just after last year’s fair. The Youth Swine and Steer Sale is scheduled for Thursday, Nov. 8, with Livestock Judging on Saturday, Nov. 3. County residents can also enter a number of fair contests for free. Winners in each category receive cash awards and ribbons. The contests include Q Sandy Kishton is a freelance travel writer who lives in Lake City. OPEN ROAD Sandy Kishton TRAVEL continued on 2D 150 years of land-grant universities, USDAT he year 1862 marks the founding of two types of institu-tions that touch the lives of people across the United States and the world every single day. These two institutions that are celebrating their 150 year anniversaries are public universities and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). The Morrill Act, signed by President Abraham Lincoln during the Civil War, created the land-grant university system. Public land-grant institu-tions made higher educa-tion more accessible to common people in all the states. Up until that time, higher education was only possible for the wealthy, leisure class. Land-grant institutions were started with money from the sale of federal land that was given to each state. The new institutions promoted agricultural sci-ence and the mechanical arts. Today, the land-grant system includes 107 institu-tions in all 50 states and several U.S. territories. The University of Florida, originally located in Lake City, is a land-grant univer-sity, with its main campus in Gainesville. The Cooperative Extension Service, created through the Smith—Lever Act of 1914, is a non-formal educational program based at land-grant universi-ties. It is designed to help people use research-based knowledge to improve their lives. Educational programs include the areas of agricul-ture and food, health care, sustainable living, commu-nity revitalization, and education. Research-based information is available to every Florida resident through their own county Extension Office, The Columbia County Extension employs UF county faculty members to provide information and educational opportunities to residents. Our mission is to respond to local con-cerns and needs through customized education and training in cooperation with the Columbia County Board of Commissioners. Water concerns are a priority to Columbia County residents. We love the natu-ral beauty of our springs and rivers. Plants and animals, including people, need water to grow and thrive. We depend on water for drinking and home use, food production, recreation, industrial uses, and power generation. Water affects every facet of our lives, and what we do daily impacts the future of a safe, sustain-able water supply. University of Florida scientists are finding solutions to global challenges of water quality, quantity, and access. UF scientists work with farmers to discover ways to produce food with less water and to understand water quality issues. They also partner with industry to develop methods for reducing water consumption in our homes, yards, and com-munities. This information is free and available to all residents through pro-grams and publications at the Cooperative Extension Service. For more infor-mation, visit ifas.ufl.edu. FILEThis shot, taken from the top of a Ferris wheel, shows the mid way of the Columbia County Fair last year. Q D. Nichelle Demorest is a horticulture agent with the Columbia County Extension of the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. GARDEN TALK Nichelle Demorestdndemorest@ufl.edu FILETeens are swung side to side as they enjoy one of the r ides last year at the Columbia County Fair. 58th annual event offers more attractions FAIR continued on 2D

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Associated Press NEW YORK Hey mom and dad: Halloweens not really all that scary except when it comes to traffic safety. Despite warnings about tainted candy, candle fires and even child abductions, real Halloween headlines are rarely about any of those things. Instead, tragedies related to the holiday typi cally involve trick-or-treat ers hit by cars. Fortunately even those accidents are relatively few in number. And heres something that might surprise you. A study published in 2010 in the Journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics found that the most emer gency room visits involving children around Halloween are related to sports. The report stated nearly 18 percent of injuries on Halloween were to the fin ger and hand, and a third of those were lacerations, with some likely resulting from pumpkin-carving. But the report added that a much higher proportion of injuries that occurred on Halloween were associated with sports, including football and bas ketball, than with knives. Which is not to say par ents should spend Oct. 31 relaxing. (Are parents ever allowed to relax?) Obviously, you need to know where kids are, monitor candy hauls, and make sure they can see out of their masks and wont trip on their cos tumes. But here are some statistics to provide a reality check on whats really scary about Halloween. Tainted candy Of course you should examine goodies and make sure kids avoid treats that arent sealed. But know this: There isnt any case of a child killed or injured from a con taminated treat picked up in the course of trick or treat ing, according to Joel Best, a professor at the University of Delaware who has exten sively researched the sub ject. Best says there have been more than 100 reports of tainted treats going back to 1958, but they include a father who poisoned his child to collect insurance money, incidents where someone gave out boobytrapped goodies but nobody was injured, and cases where kids had food allergies. Car accidents According to statistics from the U.S. Department of Transportation, in four out of six years between 2006 and 2010, more pedes trians under the age of 21 were killed by cars on Oct. 31 than on Oct. 30 or Nov. 1. The numbers are small: A total of 16 deaths took place on Oct. 31 during those five years, compared to 11 on Oct. 30 and 10 on Nov. 1. But a quick survey of news stories from 2011 suggests that traffic safety on Halloween is one area where parental vigilance is warranted. Last year, chil dren and teenagers trickor-treating or heading to Halloween parties were injured or killed in Salt Lake City, Las Vegas, Egg Harbor Township, N.J., Port Bolivar, Texas, Lower Allen Township, Pa., and Colorado Springs, Colo. Most cases involved pedestrians hit while crossing streets or walking along roads; one case resulted in a drunk driving arrest. In another case, parents were injured along with their child. One way to increase vis ibility on Halloween: Have kids carry a flashlight or glowstick, or add glow-inthe-dark necklaces or reflec tive tape to costumes. Lost children Statistically its rare for children to be kidnapped by strangers, but it seems like theres always a case in the news. In the last few weeks, a girl was found murdered in Colorado and another child was abducted, then found, in Wyoming. So its understandable that Halloween makes parents nervous, with kids out after dark, sometimes unaccom panied by parents, often approaching strangers to ask for candy. Obviously parents should keep track of kids, stay in touch by cell phone with teens, and make sure younger children have adult supervision. But perhaps youll find this reassuring: There is no data to suggest an increase in reports of missing chil dren on Halloween, accord ing to the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children. By ULA ILNYTZKY Associated Press NEW YORK A new exhibi tion is hailing the fashion sense of Katharine Hepburn, whose trademark khakis and open-collar shirts were decidedly unconven tional in the 1930s and 40s, when girdles and stockings were the order of the day. The fiercely independent Hepburn famously once said: Anytime I hear a man say he pre fers a woman in a skirt, I say, Try one. Try a skirt. But skirts and dresses abound in Katharine Hepburn: Dressed for Stage and Screen at the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, which opens Thursday. Hepburn, who died in 2003 at age 96, saved almost all the costumes from her long career that included four Oscars and such memorable films as The Philadelphia Story, The African Queen, Guess Whos Coming to Dinner and On Golden Pond. Forty are on view at the exhibi tion, which runs through Jan. 12. One of the first things visi tors will notice is how slender Hepburn was she had a 20-inch waist and a grouping of seven khaki pants artfully arranged on a pair of mannequin legs. The fact that she wore slacks and wanted to be comfortable influenced womens ready-towear in the United States, said Jean Druesedow, director of the Kent State University Museum, which was given 700 items from Hepburns estate. Kent State was selected because its one of the countrys only museums of per formance clothes. That image said to the American woman Look you dont have to be in your girdle and stockings and tight dress. You can be comfortable. That was prob ably the first aspect of becoming a fashion icon, said Druesedow, a co-curator of the exhibition. The strong-willed actress known for taking charge of her career worked closely with all her designers to decide her perform ing wardrobe. They understood what would help her characters, what she would feel comfortable wearing ... how it would support the story, Druesedow said. Margaret Furse, an English designer who created Hepburns wardrobes for The Lion in Winter, A Delicate Balance and Love Among the Ruins, went shopping with the star and talked extensively about what kinds of things would set the scene. Among the highlights is a stun ning satin and lace wedding gown created by Howard Greer for her role as Stella Surrege in The Lake. The 1933 production was her first major Broadway role and also a huge flop. Writer and wit Dorothy Parker described her performance as running the gamut of emotion from A to B. The experience taught Hepburn to have a bigger say in what roles she accepted, said Barbara CohenStratyner, curator of exhibitions at the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts. When she really liked a cos tume she had copies made for her self, sometimes in a different color or fabric. A silk dress and coat by Norman Hartnell from Suddenly, Last Summer and a green raw silk jumpsuit by Valentina from The Philadelphia Story were among the pieces she had copied. Comfort was paramount to Hepburn being able to throw her leg over a chair or sit on the floor. She always wore her uni form khakis and a shirt to rehearsals and pant ensembles to publicity appearances. A companion book, Katharine Hepburn: Rebel Chic, describes how RKO executives hid Hepburns trousers in an effort to persuade her to abandon them. Her response was to threaten to walk around the lot naked. Though she only stripped down as far as her silk underwear before stepping out of her dress ing room, she made her point and she got her trousers back, fashion writer Nancy MacDonell wrote in an essay for the book. But comfort didnt mean sacri ficing style and she certainly knew how to be glamorous espe cially when a role called for it. In her private life, she shopped at the major cutting-edge New York couturiers and worked with the best costume shops of the period, including Muriel King and Valentina, said Cohen-Stratyner. She really appreciated good fabric and good construction, she said. Even her trousers are couture. The exhibition is supplemented by film clips, movie posters, and archival photographs of Hepburn wearing the very costumes worn by the mannequins. Her false eye lashes, makeup trays and sensible shoes are also on display. baked goods, canned goods, quilting, sewing, crafts, needlepoint, woodworking, scrap booking, art, photog raphy, Red Hat and King Author baking. Deadline for baked goods is Thursday, Nov. 1 from 2-6 p.m. at the Extension Office. The deadline for other contests will be Oct 22 26 from 3-5 p.m. in the fair office and Saturday, Oct. 27 from 9 a.m. noon at the fairgrounds banquet hall. Last year more than 30,000 people attended the fair, Briscoe said. A lot of people are looking forward to it this year, he said. The fair is a once-yearly chance to ride the tradi tional carnival rides, sample golden-fried fair food and socialize. You cant get a really good corndog anywhere but at the fair, he said. Its a great social time as well as a source of entertainment. Look for the official Fair Guide in the Sunday, Oct. 28 edition of the Lake City Reporter for midway spe cials, schedules and ticket pricing. 2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 2DLIFE Stop by the Lake City Reporter for your complimentary engagement package. Aisle Style Complimentary Engagement Package Camp Weed Cerveny Conference Center 386-364-5250 GeGees Studio 758-2088 Holiday Inn 754-1411, ext. 106 Sweetwater Branch Inn 800-595-7760 Wards Jewelry & Gifts 752-5470 Fair: This years theme, Lasso the fun Continued From Page 1D TRAVEL: Road rations Continued From 1D new treat was; it caused us a bigger problem down the road. While I had my eyes focused in my lap cutting up food and Sue kept look ing at me for her next bite, we missed our turn off and went at least 50 miles out of our way. What were we to do? Shrug it off and keep going, but with our bellies full. Elijah Michael Glover Philip and Katie Glover of Vero Beach announce the birth of their son, Elijah Michael on Sept. 14 at Indian River Medical Center. He weighed 7 pounds, 12 ounces and measured 20.25 inches. He joins sibling Joel, age 3. Grandparents are Mike and Terri Millikin, and Bill and Sandy Glover. Great-grand parents are Milner and Jan Osborne, and Bill and Gayle Cannon. Birth ABOVE: Three designs by Motley, from the 1962 film Long Days Journey Into Night, are shown as part of the Katharine Hepburn: Dressed for Stage and Screen exhibit in the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts at Lincoln Center on Tuesday. RIGHT: Hepburn strolls down a country lane on location near London during the filming of the made-for-TV movie, The Corn Is Green, in 1979. The fact that she wore slacks and wanted to be comfortable influenced womens readyto-wear (fashions) in the United States, said Jean Druesedow, director of the Kent State University Museum, which was given 700 items from Hepburns estate. Exhibition: Katharine Hepburn as fashion icon ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS Halloween risks: Cars, sports (not tainted candy)

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Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 3D3DLIFEBy BILL STEVENSThe Tampa Bay TimesCLEARWATER — James Steffens sat alone in his police cruiser. He had patrolled this rough area of Clearwater many times, but never had he felt his heart beat like this as he summoned the courage to knock on her door. Barely a day went by that police didn’t move her and the other drunks along from park benches and bus stops. She cursed and fought them and landed in jail. She represented every-thing Steffens, a rising star in the Clearwater Police Department, detested. Yet now, as he sat with the motor running and stared beyond the wind-shield, he wondered, “Will she reject me?” He knew it didn’t make sense, but some feelings live so deep they never come out. Slowly he opened the car door and made his way up the stairs. He knocked. No answer. He knocked again. “Patty’s not here,” a neighbor said. “She moved.” In a way, Steffens felt relief. He had tried. He tucked his secret away. 30-year journeyAlmost 30 years earlier, on Jan. 11, 1968, differ-ent police officers came to Patty Nichols’ door in south St. Petersburg. She was bleeding from several abrasions. She told them she had gone drinking with three men and that two of them raped her in the back seat of a blue Ford Mustang. Police found some of her belongings in the aban-doned parking lot where she said the attack took place. But they never made an arrest. Nichols made a poor witness. At age 14 she had been committed to the Florida School for Girls because she was considered incorri-gible. Now 22, she already had a lengthy arrest record for being drunk and disor-derly. She provided vague details about the suspects, identified in the police report as “colored men.” Nine months later, she delivered a mixed-race baby boy. He weighed 5 pounds, 13 ounces and was 19 inches long. Nichols checked herself out of the hospital but left the baby there for nine days before returning. She said she couldn’t handle the respon-sibility. She gave the baby up for adoption. Foster care to familyThe foster family in St. Petersburg called him Neddy. They had him for 3 1/2 years before a social worker delivered him to a Dunedin couple, Ann and Hank Steffens, who had three of their own children and two adopted South Korean girls. This boy arrived with a huge appetite and a big smile. His new mother called him a “real charmer.” They called him by his given name, James. By 1981, the Steffenses had adopted 12 children, Asian and black. Hank, a math teacher at Dunedin High School, traveled to the Philippines to pick up three children whose father, a police officer, had been killed on duty. “Team Steffens” was featured in a Times story headlined “A United Nations in one fam-ily.” James stood out as one of only a few children of color in his schools, includ-ing Clearwater Central Catholic High, where he became a state tennis cham-pion. With his Afro, “every-body thought I was the next Arthur Ashe,” he said. They asked him a question that would follow him throughout his life: “What are you?” “American,” he’d respond. “Some people thought I might be Hispanic. They’d ask me to translate stuff.” He learned to play violin. He served as an altar boy at Light of Christ Catholic Church in Clearwater, which is how he came to notice Mary Ventura. “I sat up near the priest so I could survey the congregation. I couldn’t take my eyes off her.” Soon their romance would bloom, along with an unin-tended pregnancy as Mary started her junior year at Pinellas Park High School. She endured embarrass-ment and ridicule as she walked the hallways with a bulging belly. James dropped out of St. Petersburg Junior College. His parents reacted angrily. The young couple moved in with her family. What had been such a carefree life grew complicated, but never did Mary consider abortion. They had a baby girl. At 19, James entered training to become a cop. Meanwhile, Hank Steffens fell ill with cancer and then a massive stroke. James, saddened that his relationship with his parents had been damaged, longed to make peace. On the eve-ning of May 17, 1988, he drove to the house. “The family gave me some space,” he recalled, “and I went into his bed-room. He recognized I was there. I told him I loved him.” Moments later, Hank Steffens, 61, died. James summoned his mother. On that day, he said, “the healing began.” Search beginsWith a new baby, Mary wondered about genetics. She pushed James, now a rookie officer at the Clearwater Police Department, to learn more about his biological par-ents. A caseworker who had helped with the adoption gave him a report. James had never cared to know about his origins. But now he sat with Mary and opened an envelope with four typed pages, single-space. They read slowly as the report intro-duced Patricia Gail, born in Boston. Patty had been neglected as a child. Her hard-drink-ing father left his timid wife seven times in Patty’s first four years. Then he left for good. Patty fought with her mother, got arrested for pos-session of alcohol and other misdemeanors, dropped out of school in the ninth grade. At 20, she gave birth to a mixed-race baby she named Theresa Ann before giving her up for adoption. James stopped reading. “I have a sister?” As he got to the bottom of the first page, he came to a paragraph titled “Birth Father.” His eyes widened as he read about the rape. “It seemed surreal.” He felt like he was reading somebody else’s story. Mary, the good Catholic and one of 14 children in her family, thought about God. “You shouldn’t be here, but you are,” she said. “God has a plan.” She looked at Stephanie, their baby girl. “This beau-ty,” she said, “came from something horrible.” James devoured the rest of the report, learned more about Patty’s psychotic behavior and alcoholism. He contacted the St. Petersburg Police Department and got copies of the reported rape. He stared into Patty’s vacant eyes in jail mug shots. Mary wanted James to find her. Maybe he could help turn her around. Maybe he could just thank her for not having had an abortion. Years go byOver the years, James excelled at the Clearwater Police Department, first as a patrol officer and then detective, rising to the rank of lieutenant. He became commander of the police dog and SWAT teams. Four times the Fraternal Order of Police honored him as supervisor of the year. He never stopped thinking about Patty but didn’t feel comfortable sharing what he called his “concep-tion story.” In 2002, Steffens hired a private investigator to keep him up to date on Patty. He found her in an apart-ment in New Port Richey, no more than 10 minutes away. “This time we were going to meet her,” Mary said. “I told James, you’ve got to find this woman. You turned out to be such a great human being, maybe you could inspire her to change.” As they planned their visit, the private investiga-tor called. Bad news, he said. Patricia Nichols, 62, had died a month earlier, on Sept. 27, 2007, two days after James’ 39th birthday. She spent her final days in hospice care. The Tampa Tribune carried a two-line obituary. “No known survivors,” it said. No closureIn 2009, Steffens retired. He became an adjunct pro-fessor at St. Petersburg College and was select-ed along with other law enforcement veterans to teach community polic-ing in San Salvador. On the flight down, he asked Tony Rolon, a retired St. Petersburg police officer, if he had ever come across a woman named Patricia Nichols. “Patty?” Rolon exclaimed. “Patty!? She’s crazy, but we loved her.” The story gave Steffens chills. He responded by reflex: “That’s my mom.” “Tony just fell back in his seat.” Steffens felt relief. It was out. Maybe now he would tell somebody else. A burden liftedIn May 2011, he accepted a position as a lieutenant at the New Port Richey Police Department. Five months later, Chief Jeff Harrington accepted a command posi-tion in the much larger Pasco County Sheriff’s Office and Steffens stepped in as care-taker. In December, City Council members raved about Steffens as they made him chief. The two years away from law enforcement had been miserable, but now Steffens was reinvigorat-ed — “reborn, you might say.” He finally shared his story with his mother, Ann Steffens, who at 84 still practices law in Palm Harbor. “We had no idea,” she said. “We knew his birth mother had prob-lems. It’s good to know the rest of the story.” Just two weeks ago, James and Mary sat down with their daughters. “It felt good to share with them,” he said. “Their eyebrows went up a few times.” He has given up trying to understand why Patty Nichols carried him to term. “I’m grateful, obviously, that Patty Nichols decided to have me.” He hopes his story will spark discussions, maybe encourage more adoptions. And “somewhere out there,” he says, “I have a half sister. Maybe she’ll read this.”Top cop conducts the biggest search of his lifeEDWARD COLIMOREThe Philadelphia InquirerLAKEHURST, N.J. — At 178 feet long and 56 feet high, the mas-sive airship dwarfed members of the ground crew Thursday as they strained to hold on to tether-ing lines like so many Lilliputians trying to control Gulliver. Inside the gondola of the Navy’s MZ-3A, pilots Mark Kynett and Larry Chambers made the final checks, and then — with two powerful engines roaring at their back — aimed the blimp at a sharp angle into the sky and took off from Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst in Burlington County. The ship’s flight near historic Hangar 1 at the Naval Air Engineering Station conjured up images of Germany’s ill-fated Hindenburg and its fiery destruc-tion there 75 years earlier. A post marks the spot where the diri-gible crashed. But this airship, which flew about 1,000 feet over Toms River and Seaside Heights on Thursday, is quite different from its much larger cousin, both in design and mission. Filled with helium, not hydrogen, the craft serves as a fly-ing test laboratory for high-tech sensors and was deployed to Alabama in 2010 to monitor the Gulf oil spill from the Deepwater Horizon. “We’re like the tortoise that never stops,” Kynett said. The airship “stays in the air a long time, lifts a lot of weight, and sips very little fuel,” said Bert Race, flight representative for the Airship Systems Engineering Team, part of Naval Air Warfare Center in Patuxent River, Md. Thursday’s 30-minute trip was intended to demonstrate the blimp’s capabilities and inform the public — through the media — about the program. “We’re testing (intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance) sensors and can fly all day long,” burning little fuel compared with helicopters and fixed-wing air-craft, said Doug Abbotts, spokesman for the Aircraft Division of the Naval Air Warfare Center. The Navy also wanted to clear up some of the public’s questions about the blimp’s flybys. “We’ve gotten calls,” Abbotts said. “This will help people know more about what we’re doing.” The MZ-3A has been part of the military’s renewed interest in airships over the last several years. Its occasional flights over the Philadelphia area and Jersey Shore have drawn stares from onlookers not used to seeing lighter-than-air ships. In the gondola Thursday, the pilots went over a checklist before takeoff. “Instruments,” Kynett said.“Green,” Chambers replied.“Helium pressure.”“Green.”“Radio set.”“Green.”Moments later, the airship — with media representatives aboard — ascended and leveled off. To your right is the exact spot where the Hindenburg went down, said Tom Worsdale, a spokesman at the Naval Air Engineering Station, as he point-ed out a post marking the place where the airborne luxury liner, pride of Adolf Hitler’s Germany, was destroyed when its flamma-ble hydrogen gas ignited during a landing in May 1937. Thirty-six people perished. Americans used nonflammable helium for their blimps. In the skies over the Pine Barrens in Ocean County, Chambers, of Lighthouse Point, Fla., compared the airship’s han-dling and turning to an ocean liner. “Getting on the ground takes a lot more technique,” added Kynett, of Akron, Ohio. Because it’s lighter than air, the blimp can hover over an area for many hours without wasting fuel like a helicopter. “You can bring back the engines” to an idle, he said. “The capabilities are phenomenal.” “This gives you an observation platform,” Chambers added. Kynett was one of the pilots who flew Coast Guard members over the gulf in 2010 to locate the oil spill and call in ships to clean it up. The blimp can ascend thousands of feet and cruise at 45 knots while carrying up to 10 people, including the pilot. “We took eight-hour flights and were sometimes out (from land) 20 miles or more,” he said. Oil-spill observers found the aircraft’s low speed particularly well-suited to the mission. The blimp is capable of staying air-borne for more than 12 hours. “You can fly in a lot of weather,” Chambers said. “But thunder-storms are not the airship’s best friend. “You can’t fly over rain and fog. And ice and snow are a no-no since they build up” on the ship. The Navy blimp now is used for sensor testing at the Army’s Aberdeen Proving Ground in Maryland and will return there before eventually heading to Florida by December, Race said. At the same time, the Army has been evaluating a much larger lighter-than-air craft at Lakehurst’s Hangar 6. About the length of a football field, the Army demonstrator is known as the LEMV (Long Endurance Multi-Intelligence Vehicle) and can be manned or unmanned. It’s being assessed for use as a reconnaissance and intelli-gence-gathering tool for military activities, as well as for border control and antidrug operations. The ship can provide continuous coverage for up to 21 days and rise to up to 20,000 feet above sea level. An unmanned 370-foot-long Air Force airship project called the Blue Devil, considered for use in Afghanistan, was canceled this year because of technical chal-lenges and higher-than-expect-ed costs. The surveillance and reconnaissance craft was ordered dismantled in June at its hangar in Elizabeth City, N.C. Blimp operations continue, though, at the joint base in New Jersey. The MZ-3A was flown for the first time in 2007 and received its throwback Navy markings and colors in October 2011 to cel-ebrate the centennial of Naval aviation. The nearby Army airship, meanwhile, was assembled and flown for the first time in August. Both are small compared with their 1930s predecessors, including the 800-foot-long Hindenburg. There has not been a Navy airship in Hangar 1 since 1962, when Cold War-era blimps were decommissioned, officials said. The Navy’s lighter-than-air pro-gram began there in 1921. “This is one of the few places in the country that has hangars this size,” Race said of the massive structures at Lakehurst. “We’re here for maintenance once a year.” The MZ-3A is committed to Army testing through the end of March and is now looking for “other customers,” Race said.Smaller, safer blimp at Hindenburg site ASSOCIATED PRESSGround crew members prepare the U.S. Navy blimp MZ-3A fo r take-off in Lakehurst, N.J., ON Thursday. The Navy’s only airship, the MZ-3A provides a slow-moving, vibration-free and low-cost platform for testing sensitive sensors and other research. A common sight for residents of Monmouth and Ocean counties, the airship was also deployed to Gulf Shores, Ala., to assist in the Deepwa ter Horizon oil spill recovery operation.

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4D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 4DLIFE SUNDAY EVENING OCTOBER 21, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsAmerica’s Funniest Home Videos (N) Once Upon a Time “The Crocodile” (N) Revenge “Intuition” (N) (:01) 666 Park Avenue “Hero Complex” News at 11Inside Edition 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsThe Insider (N) Love-RaymondBig Bang TheoryCSI: Miami “And They’re Offed” Criminal Minds “Sense Memory” NewsSports ZoneChann 4 NewsBig Bang Theory 5-PBS 5 -Keeping UpAs Time Goes ByNOVA “Forensics on Trial” (PA) Call the Midwife (N) Masterpiece Classic (N) Broadway: The American MusicalMI-5 Racist member of Parliament. 7-CBS 7 47 47e NFL Football Jacksonville Jaguars at Oakland Raiders. (N) 60 Minutes (N) The Amazing Race “Funky Monkey” The Good Wife “Don’t Haze Me, Bro” The Mentalist “Blood Feud” (N) Action Sports 360 9-CW 9 17 17Yourjax MusicAccording to JimYourJax MusicVoid TVLaw & Order “Blood Libel” Local HauntsLocal HauntsTMZ (N) The Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30a MLB Baseball St. Louis Cardinals at San Francisco Giants. Cleveland ShowThe Simpsons (N) Bob’s Burgers (N) Family Guy (N) American Dad (N) NewsAction Sports 360Leverage “The Stork Job” 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsFootball Night in America (N) (Live) e(:20) NFL Football Pittsburgh Steelers at Cincinnati Bengals. (N) News CSPAN 14 210 350NewsmakersWashington This Week Q & APrime MinisterRoad to the White House Q & A WGN-A 16 239 307Funny VideosBloopers!Bloopers!How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine(:40) Instant Replay30 Rock30 Rock TVLAND 17 106 304M*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*H “Heroes” Love-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Our America With Lisa LingOur America With Lisa LingOur America With Lisa LingOprah’s Next Chapter “Fergie” (N) Oprah’s Next Chapter Usher Raymond. Our America With Lisa Ling A&E 19 118 265ExterminatorExterminatorStorage-TexasStorage-TexasStorage-TexasStorage-TexasStorage-TexasStorage-TexasStorage-TexasStorage-TexasStorage-TexasStorage-T exas HALL 20 185 312(5:00)“Your Love Never Fails”“Straight From the Heart” (2003) Teri Polo, Andrew McCarthy. “I Married Who?” (2012, Romance-Comedy) Kellie Martin, Ethan Erickson. FrasierFrasier “Bad Dog” FX 22 136 248“Easy A” (2010, Comedy) Emma Stone, Penn Badgley, Amanda Bynes.“The Social Network” (2010, Drama) Jesse Eisenberg, Andrew Gar eld, Justin Timberlake.“The Social Network” (2010) Jesse Eisenberg. CNN 24 200 202CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) GPS Roadmap to Powering AmericaPiers Morgan TonightCNN Newsroom (N) GPS Roadmap to Powering America TNT 25 138 245“Failure to Launch” (2006, Romance-Comedy) Matthew McConaughey. “Ghosts of Girlfriends Past” (2009) Matthew McConaughey. Premiere.“Ghosts of Girlfriends Past” (2009) Matthew McConaughey. (DVS) NIK 26 170 299VictoriousVictoriousVictoriousSpongeBobSee Dad Run (N)“Stand by Me” (1986) Wil Wheaton, River Phoenix. Premiere. The NannyFriendsFriends SPIKE 28 168 241World’s Wildest Police VideosWorld’s Wildest Police Videos“Bad Boys II” (2003) Martin Lawrence. Premiere. Two detectives battle a drug kingpin in Miami.“Bad Boys II” (2003) Martin Lawrence, Will Smith. MY-TV 29 32 -Car 54, Where...The Ri emanM*A*S*HM*A*S*H “O.R.” Columbo “By Dawn’s Early Light” Thriller “Waxworks” The Twilight ZoneThe Twilight Zone DISN 31 172 290Make Your Mark: Shake It Up Dance-Off 2012Austin & AllyMake Your Mark: Shake It Up ResultShake It Up!JessieJessieGood Luck CharlieA.N.T. FarmMy Babysitter LIFE 32 108 252(5:00) “A Nanny’s Revenge” (2012) “Last Hours in Suburbia” (2012) Kelcie Stranahan, Maiara Walsh. “A Mother’s Nightmare” (2012) Annabeth Gish, Jessica Lowndes. (:01) “Last Hours in Suburbia” (2012) USA 33 105 242Law & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims Unit BET 34 124 329“Barbershop 2: Back in Business” (2004, Comedy) Ice Cube, Cedric the Entertainer. “Funny Valentines” (1999, Drama) Alfre Woodard, Loretta Devine, CCH Pounder. Sec.America2012 Election ESPN 35 140 206(5:30) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) BCS Countdownf MLS Soccer FC Dallas at Seattle Sounders FC. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209 World/Poker 2012 World Series of PokerBaseball Tonightd WNBA Basketball Minnesota Lynx at Indiana Fever. (N) NASCAR Now (N) Thrills & Spills SUNSP 37 -Fishing the FlatsSport FishingSportsman’s Adv. College Football Florida State at Miami. (Taped) SeminoleSaltwater Exp.Into the Blue DISCV 38 182 278MythBusters “Titanic Survival” MythBusters “Trench Torpedo” MythBusters “Hail Hijinx” (N) I Was Mummi ed (N) America’s Most Secret: Structures (N) MythBusters “Hail Hijinx” TBS 39 139 247(5:30)“Con Air” (1997) Nicolas Cage. Vicious convicts hijack their ight.a MLB Baseball Detroit Tigers at New York Yankees. (N)“Shooter” (2007) Mark Wahlberg. (DVS) HLN 40 202 204Murder by the BookDominick Dunne: Power, PrivilegeDominick Dunne: Power, PrivilegeMurder by the BookMurder by the BookDominick Dunne: Power, Privilege FNC 41 205 360FOX News Sunday With Chris WallaceFOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) FOX News Sunday With Chris WallaceGeraldo at Large (N) Huckabee E! 45 114 236Keeping Up With the KardashiansKeeping Up With the KardashiansKeeping Up With the KardashiansKeeping Up With the KardashiansMarried to JonasThe SoupMarried to JonasThe Soup TRAVEL 46 196 277Scariest Halloween AttractionsHalloween CrazierMaking Monsters (N) Making Monsters (N) Halloween’s Most ExtremeDestination FearDestination Fear HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lMillion Dollar RoomsHome Strange HomeProperty BrothersHouse Hunters Renovation (N) House Hunters Renovation TLC 48 183 280Extreme CouponExtreme CouponBreaking Amish “Good vs. Evil” Island MediumIsland MediumIsland MediumIsland MediumBreaking Amish “Final Days” (N) Island MediumIsland Medium HIST 49 120 269American Pickers “Pickin’ Perry-dise” American Pickers “Where’s Aldo?” American Pickers “Boys’ Toys” American Pickers (N) Outback Hunters “Man Eaters” (:02) American Pickers “Odd Fellas” ANPL 50 184 282Finding BigfootCall-WildmanCall-WildmanCall-WildmanCall-WildmanFinding Bigfoot: Further Evidence (N) Finding Bigfoot: Further Evidence (N) Finding Bigfoot: Further Evidence FOOD 51 110 231Diners, Drive$24 in 24Halloween WarsCupcake Wars “Cody Simpson” (N) Halloween Wars (N) Iron Chef AmericaRestaurant Stakeout TBN 52 260 372T.D. JakesJoyce MeyerLeading the WayThe Blessed LifeJoel OsteenKerry ShookBelieverVoiceCre o DollarDavid A man tells of surviving three internments. FSN-FL 56 -d NBA Preseason Basketball San Antonio Spurs at Orlando Magic. (N Subject to Blackout) Magic PreseasUFC Unleashed (N) Being: Liverpool (N) World Poker Tour: Season 10 SYFY 58 122 244“Underworld: Rise of the Lycans”“Queen of the Damned” (2002, Horror) Stuart Townsend, Aaliyah.“Blade II” (2002) Wesley Snipes. A vampire hunter unites with his prey against a new threat.Stigmata AMC 60 130 254“Land of the Dead” (2005) Simon Baker, John Leguizamo. Premiere. The Walking Dead “Seed” The Walking Dead “Sick” (N) (:01) The Walking Dead “Sick” Talking Dead (N) Comic Book Men COM 62 107 249(5:00)“Of ce Space” (1999) Tosh.0Tosh.0Night of Too Many Stars: America Comes Together for Autism Programs (N) Night of Too Many Stars: America Comes Together for Autism Programs CMT 63 166 327RebaReba“Sweet Home Alabama” (2002, Romance-Comedy) Reese Witherspoon, Josh Lucas.“Home for the Holidays” (2005, Drama) Sean Young, Perry King, Lucia Walters. NGWILD 108 190 283Caught in the ActReturn of the Clouded LeopardsSecrets of Wild IndiaSecrets of Wild India “Desert Lions” Secrets of Wild India “Tiger Jungles” Secrets of Wild India NGC 109 186 276Drugs, Inc. “Ecstasy” Cocaine Wars “Airport Sting” Cocaine Wars “Drug Speedboats” (N) Drugs, Inc. “High Stakes Vegas” Alaska State Troopers (N) Alaska State Troopers SCIENCE 110 193 284Through Wormhole-FreemanInto the UniverseInto the UniverseInto the Universe With Stephen Hawking The universe, from it’s beginning. Into the Universe ID 111 192 285Dateline on ID “Deadly Triangle” Final Witness “Vixen’s Elixir” 48 Hours on ID (N) Sins & Secrets “Iaeger” (N) Unusual Suspects (N) 48 Hours on ID HBO 302 300 501(5:10) The Girl(:45)“X-Men: First Class” (2011, Action) James McAvoy, Michael Fassbender. ‘PG-13’ Boardwalk Empire “Ging Gang Goolie” Treme (N) Boardwalk Empire “Ging Gang Goolie” MAX 320 310 515(5:35)“Resident Evil: Apocalypse”(:15) “The Change-Up” (2011, Comedy) Ryan Reynolds. ‘NR’ (:15)“Elektra” (2005, Action) Jennifer Garner, Terence Stamp. ‘PG-13’ Hunted Sam Hunter returns to work. SHOW 340 318 545(5:30)“Apollo 18” (2011) ‘PG-13’ Dexter “Buck the System” Homeland “State of Independence” Dexter “Run” (N) Homeland “New Car Smell” (N) Dexter “Run” MONDAY EVENING OCTOBER 22, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Dancing With the Stars: All-Stars (N) Presidential Debate At Lynn University in Boca Raton, Fla. (N) (Live) News at 11(:35) Nightline (N) 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementPresidential Debate At Lynn University in Boca Raton, Fla. NewsChann 4 News(:35) The Insider 5-PBS 5 -JournalNightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Antiques RoadshowPresidential Debate At Lynn University in Boca Raton, Fla. (N) (Live) BBC World NewsTavis Smiley (N) 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJaguars AccessTwo and Half MenHow I Met/MotherPartnersPresidential Debate At Lynn University in Boca Raton, Fla. (N) (Live) Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneTMZ (N) 90210 “It’s All Fun and Games” (N) Gossip Girl Chuck investigates a clue. Vote America 2012Access HollywoodThe Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family GuyFamily Guya MLB Baseball St. Louis Cardinals at San Francisco Giants. (N) Action News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) The Voice “The Battles Continue” (N) Presidential Debate At Lynn University in Boca Raton, Fla. (N) (Live) NewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(5:00) Public AffairsDebate Preview (N) (Live) Presidential Debate At Lynn University in Boca Raton, Fla. Call-In for Debate Reaction (N) (Live) Presidential WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosWGN News at Nine (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304M*A*S*H “Heroes” M*A*S*HM*A*S*HThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Personal Justice Murder cases. Personal Justice Doctor slain. Undercover Boss “Baja Fresh” Undercover Boss Lynne Zappone. Undercover Boss “American Seafoods” Undercover Boss “Baja Fresh” A&E 19 118 265The First 48Hoarders “Mike; Bonnie” Hoarders “Shanna & Lynda” Hoarders “Manuel & Carla” (N) Intervention “Cher” (N) (:01) Intervention “Ryan” HALL 20 185 312Little House on the PrairieLittle House on the PrairieNUMB3RS “Dirty Bomb” Hijackers. NUMB3RS “Sacri ce” FrasierFrasierFrasierFrasier FX 22 136 248How I Met/MotherTwo and Half MenTwo and Half Men“Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer” (2007, Science Fiction) Ioan Gruffudd, Jessica Alba.“Easy A” (2010, Comedy) Emma Stone, Penn Badgley, Amanda Bynes. CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Presidential Debate At Lynn University in Boca Raton, Fla. (N) (Live) Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245The Mentalist (Part 1 of 2) The Mentalist (Part 2 of 2) The Mentalist “Scarlet Ribbons” The Mentalist “Red Rover, Red Rover” The Mentalist “The Crimson Hat” CSI: NY “Love Run Cold” NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobFigure It Out (N) Drake & JoshFull HouseFull HouseFull HouseFull HouseThe NannyThe NannyFriends(:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241CSI: Crime Scene Investigation“Star Wars: Episode I -The Phantom Menace” (1999, Science Fiction) Liam Neeson, Ewan McGregor.“Star Wars: Episode I -The Phantom Menace” (1999) Liam Neeson. MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*HM*A*S*HLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitSeinfeldFrasierThe Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Make-MarkGood Luck CharlieJessieGood Luck CharlieGravity Falls“Girl vs. Monster” (2012) Olivia Holt, Brendan Meyer. (:10) JessiePhineas and FerbA.N.T. FarmMy Babysitter LIFE 32 108 252“Uptown Girls” (2003, Comedy) Brittany Murphy, Dakota Fanning. “Two Weeks Notice” (2002) Sandra Bullock, Hugh Grant, Alicia Witt. “Mean Girls” (2004, Comedy) Lindsay Lohan, Rachel McAdams. USA 33 105 242NCIS An ambulance explodes in transit. NCIS: Los Angeles “Special Delivery” WWE Monday Night RAW (N) (:05) CSI: Crime Scene Investigation BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Top 10 Countdown” (N) “Baby Boy” (2001, Drama) Tyrese Gibson. A man juggles womanizing with ghting his mother’s boyfriend. Don’t Sleep!The Game ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) Monday Night Countdown (N) (Live) e NFL Football Detroit Lions at Chicago Bears. (N Subject to Blackout) SportsCenter (N) ESPN2 36 144 209NFL32 (N) SportsCenter (N) Around the HornInterruptionE:60 (8:50) 30 for 30Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) Coll. Football Live SUNSP 37 -Sail sh Pro SeriesSport FishingShip Shape TVFlorida SportsmanFishing the FlatsSport FishingSportsman’s Adv.Reel AnimalsSaltwater Exp.Into the BlueBoxing DISCV 38 182 278I (Almost) Got Away With ItAmerican ChopperAmerican ChopperAmerican ChopperAmerican ChopperAmerican Chopper TBS 39 139 247King of QueensKing of QueensSeinfeldSeinfeldFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyConan Azis Ansari; Chuck Lorre. (N) HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) Dr. Drew (N) Nancy GraceShowbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Presidential Debate At Lynn University in Boca Raton, Fla. (N) (Live) The O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236Fashion PoliceE! News (N) The SoupThe SoupMarried to JonasMarried to JonasMarried to JonasMarried to JonasChelsea Lately (N) E! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. FoodMan v. FoodAnthony Bourdain: No ReservationsAnthony Bourdain: No Reservations (N)Anthony Bourdain: No ReservationsAirport 24/7: MiamiAirport 24/7: Miami HGTV 47 112 229Income PropertyIncome PropertyLove It or List It Jim and Connie. Love It or List It “Ramos” Love It or List It “The Pliskat Family” House Hunters (N) Hunters Int’lLove It or List It TLC 48 183 280Island MediumIsland MediumSecret Princes “The Princely Paupers” Breaking Amish: Extended Episodes(:12) Breaking Amish: Extended Episodes (N) Breaking Amish: Extended EpisodesBreaking Amish: HIST 49 120 269American Pickers “8th Grade Humor” American Pickers “When Horses Fly” Pawn StarsPawn StarsAmerican Pickers “Driving Miss Dani” Pawn Stars(:31) Pawn Stars(:02) Outback Hunters “Man Eaters” ANPL 50 184 282Fatal AttractionsThe Blue Planet: Seas of LifeThe Blue Planet: Seas of LifeGreat Barrier ReefThe Blue Planet: Seas of Life FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, Drive$24 in 24 (N) Mystery DinersDiners, Drive TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the LordMax LucadoThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesLiving EdgeKingdom Conn.Jesse DuplantisPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -World Poker Tour: Season 10 College Football Stanford at California. World Poker Tour: Season 10Being: Liverpool SYFY 58 122 244(5:30)“Hannibal” (2001, Suspense) Anthony Hopkins, Julianne Moore. Alphas Dani starts hallucinating.“From Dusk Till Dawn 2: Texas Blood Money” (1999) Bruce Campbell. Alphas Dani starts hallucinating. AMC 60 130 254(5:30)“Eight Legged Freaks” (2002) David Arquette, Kari Wuhrer. “Halloween” (1978, Horror) Donald Pleasence, Jamie Lee Curtis. “Halloween 4: The Return of Michael Myers” (1988) Donald Pleasence. COM 62 107 249It’s Always SunnyTosh.0The Colbert ReportDaily ShowFuturamaFuturamaSouth ParkSouth ParkBrickleberrySouth ParkDaily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327RebaRebaRebaRebaRebaRebaDallas Cowboys CheerleadersDallas Cowboys CheerleadersDallas Cowboys Cheerleaders NGWILD 108 190 283Dog WhispererThe Crocs That Turned to RubberKing CobraUltimate CrocodileCrocodile KingKing Cobra NGC 109 186 276Drugs, Inc. The Cannabis industry. Wild Justice “Pig Stalkers” Alaska State TroopersTo Catch a Smuggler “Hidden Heroin” Drugged A crack addict debates rehab. To Catch a Smuggler “Hidden Heroin” SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeUnearthing Ancient SecretsUnearthing Ancient SecretsI Was Mummi edUnearthing Ancient SecretsUnearthing Ancient Secrets ID 111 192 285On the Case With Paula ZahnBlood, Lies & AlibisBlood, Lies & Alibis “Candy Man” Blood, Lies & Alibis (N) Final Witness “A Mother’s Revenge” Blood, Lies & Alibis “Candy Man” HBO 302 300 501“One Day” (2011, Romance) Anne Hathaway, Jim Sturgess. ‘PG-13’ Real Time With Bill Maher“Cowboys & Aliens” (2011, Science Fiction) Daniel Craig. ‘PG-13’ “Hall Pass” (2011) Owen Wilson. MAX 320 310 515Matrix Revol.(:20) “Anacondas: The Hunt for the Blood Orchid”“Hanna” (2011, Action) Saoirse Ronan, Eric Bana. ‘PG-13’ “Contraband” (2012, Action) Mark Wahlberg, Kate Beckinsale. ‘R’ SHOW 340 318 545(4:00)Evita(:20) “A Better Life” (2011) Demin Bichir. ‘PG-13’ Dexter “Run” Homeland “New Car Smell” Dexter “Run” Homeland “New Car Smell” WEEKDAY AFTERNOON Comcast Dish DirecTV 12 PM12:301 PM1:302 PM2:303 PM3:304 PM4:305 PM5:30 3-ABC 3 -NewsBe a MillionaireThe ChewGeneral HospitalMauryDr. PhilBe a MillionaireNews 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsPaid ProgramVaried ProgramsAndy Grif th ShowThe Jeff Probst ShowSteve HarveyThe Dr. Oz ShowChann 4 NewsChann 4 News 5-PBS 5 -WordWorldBarney & FriendsCaillouDaniel TigerSuper Why!Dinosaur TrainCat in the HatCurious GeorgeWild KrattsElectric Comp.WUFT NewsWorld News 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxThe Young and the RestlessBold/BeautifulThe TalkLet’s Make a DealJudge Joe BrownJudge JudyAction News JaxAction News Jax 9-CW 9 17 17Trisha GoddardLaw & Order: Criminal IntentJudge MathisThe Bill Cunningham ShowMauryThe People’s Court 10-FOX 10 30 30Jerry SpringerThe Jeremy Kyle ShowJudge Joe BrownWe the PeopleThe DoctorsDr. PhilFamily FeudFamily Feud 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsBe a MillionaireDays of our LivesFirst Coast LivingKatie The Ellen DeGeneres ShowNewsNews CSPAN 14 210 350(9:00) Public AffairsPublic AffairsVaried Programs Public Affairs WGN-A 16 239 307In the Heat of the NightWGN Midday NewsWalker, Texas RangerWalker, Texas RangerWalker, Texas RangerLaw & Order: Criminal Intent TVLAND 17 106 304Andy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowGunsmokeGunsmokeBonanzaBonanzaBonanza OWN 18 189 279Dr. PhilDr. PhilVaried Programs A&E 19 118 265CSI: MiamiVaried ProgramsCriminal MindsVaried ProgramsCriminal MindsVaried ProgramsThe First 48Varied ProgramsThe First 48Varied ProgramsThe First 48Varied Programs HALL 20 185 312Marie FrasierFrasierFrasierFrasierThe Golden GirlsThe Golden GirlsHome & FamilyVaried Programs FX 22 136 248(11:00) MovieVaried Programs How I Met/Mother CNN 24 200 202CNN Newsroom CNN Newsroom The Situation Room TNT 25 138 245Varied Programs NIK 26 170 299Max & RubyMax & RubyDora the ExplorerDora the ExplorerSpongeBobSpongeBobRobot and MonsterOdd ParentsVictoriousVictoriousSpongeBobSpongeBob SPIKE 28 168 241Varied Programs MY-TV 29 32 -Hawaii Five-0GunsmokeBonanzaThe Big ValleyThe Wild, Wild WestEmergency! DISN 31 172 290Mickey MouseLittle EinsteinsVaried ProgramsGaspard & LisaPhineas and FerbVaried Programs Good Luck CharlieVaried Programs LIFE 32 108 252Old ChristineOld ChristineGrey’s AnatomyGrey’s AnatomyGrey’s AnatomyVaried ProgramsHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherVaried Programs USA 33 105 242Varied Programs BET 34 124 329The ParkersThe ParkersMovie My Wife and KidsJamie Foxx ShowJamie Foxx ShowThe ParkersThe Parkers ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenterSportsCenterSportsCenterOutside the LinesColl. Football LiveNFL LiveAround the HornInterruption ESPN2 36 144 209First Take Varied ProgramsNASCAR NowVaried ProgramsNumbers Never LieDan Le BatardSportsNation SUNSP 37 -Varied Programs DISCV 38 182 278Varied Programs TBS 39 139 247Fresh PrinceAmerican DadAmerican DadLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondSeinfeldFriendsFriendsFriendsFriends HLN 40 202 204News Now Making It in AmericaEvening Express FNC 41 205 360(11:00) Happening NowAmerica Live Studio B With Shepard SmithYour World With Neil CavutoThe Five E! 45 114 236E! NewsSex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CityVaried Programs TRAVEL 46 196 277Varied Programs No ReservationVaried ProgramsBizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. FoodMan v. FoodAnthony Bourdain: No Reservations HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lVaried Programs TLC 48 183 280What Not to WearA Baby StoryA Baby StoryToddlers & TiarasVaried ProgramsWhat Not to WearVaried ProgramsSay Yes, DressSay Yes, DressFour WeddingsVaried Programs HIST 49 120 269Varied Programs ANPL 50 184 282Animal Cops HoustonAnimal Cops HoustonAnimal Cops HoustonPit Bulls and ParoleesThe HauntedMonsters Inside Me FOOD 51 110 231Best DishesBarefoot ContessaVaried Programs10 Dollar DinnersSecrets/Restaurant30-Minute MealsGiada at HomeGiada at HomeBarefoot ContessaBarefoot ContessaBest DishesPaula’s Cooking TBN 52 260 372Varied ProgramsBehind the ScenesVaried ProgramsJames RobisonTodayThe 700 ClubJohn Hagee TodayVaried ProgramsPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -Varied Programs Boat Racing SYFY 58 122 244Varied Programs AMC 60 130 254(11:30) Movie Varied ProgramsMovie Varied ProgramsMovie Varied Programs COM 62 107 249Varied Programs Movie Comedy Central(:28) Futurama(4:59) FuturamaIt’s Always Sunny CMT 63 166 327Strictest ParentsVaried ProgramsStrictest ParentsVaried ProgramsYes, DearYes, DearYes, DearYes, DearRoseanneRoseanneRoseanneRoseanne NGWILD 108 190 283Dog WhispererVaried Programs NGC 109 186 276Alaska State TroopersBorder WarsTabooWild JusticeVaried Programs SCIENCE 110 193 284Varied Programs Time WarpMythBustersThey Do It?They Do It? ID 111 192 285Dateline on IDFBI: Criminal PursuitMarried-MobsterMarried-MobsterVaried Programs48 Hours on ID48 Hours on ID HBO 302 300 501(:15) MovieVaried ProgramsMovieVaried Programs MAX 320 310 515(11:30) MovieVaried Programs(:20) MovieVaried Programs SHOW 340 318 545(11:00) Movie(:45) Movie Varied Programs

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DEAR ABBY: I am 24 and graduated from col-lege with a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice. I am currently living with my parents. They are a bit controlling and hate resistance from me. I grew up doing everything they told me with no personal opinions of my own, until I met my fiance a year ago. He has helped me gain the strength to speak up and let my thoughts be known. We’re trying to save enough money to live together. Mom has made it clear that she doesn’t like that idea because we’re not married yet. She and Dad are also unhappy that I no longer want to work in the field my degree is in. (I worked for a sheriff’s office for a couple of months and was treated horribly, then I was fired.) I have told my parents repeatedly that this is my life, but it seems to do no good. Do you have any suggestions on what I should say to them about these issues? -GROWN-UP GIRL IN ALABAMA DEAR GROWN-UP GIRL: You appear to be a bright young woman who was raised to be submis-sive and compliant. That may be the reason work-ing at the sheriff’s office didn’t work out for you. Rather than turn your back on the profession you trained for, you need to learn to be more asser-tive. That way you won’t be dependent on anyone else for the strength to voice your opinions, or live your life according to the stan-dards you set for yourself. P.S. Return to the college from which you grad-uated and talk to a coun-selor there about the vari-ous other career options in your field for someone with your degree. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: It’s a second marriage for my husband and me. Our children are all adults, and we all try to get along. My stepdaugh-ter, “Sharon,” has invited us for Thanksgiving week-end and insists that we be her houseguests. As sweet as she is, she and her family live in a borderline “hoarder” home. I’d rather get a motel room and take them out to dinner. How can I address the subject of needing clean sheets and being able to cook a meal, and getting to the (dirty) bath-room during the night? -HAVING NIGHTMARES IN TENNESSEE DEAR HAVING NIGHTMARES: I sympa-thize with your husband’s desire not to cause hurt feelings, but the invitation for you to be houseguests under these circumstances is not practical. Sharon should be told that you are a very private person and you would not feel comfortable getting up in the middle of the night and flushing a toilet; there-fore you would be more at ease in a motel. If her kitchen and eating areas are “filthy” (your husband’s word), you should not eat in her house, either. Your husband should cheer-fully assert his role as the patriarch and insist on taking the family out for Thanksgiving dinner. How can she argue? After all, “Father knows best!” DEAR ABBY HOROSCOPES ARIES (March 21-April 19): Size up your situation and prepare to fight for what you want. An emo-tional matter with someone you are dealing with per-sonally or professionally must not be allowed to interfere with your plans. Put your needs first. ++ TAURUS (April 20May 20): Consider your choices. Make sure there isn’t something that needs changing before you make a commitment. Love and partnerships are in the stars, but equality must be maintained if you are going to develop a long-lasting relationship. +++++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Set a solid strategy in place and make your move. A partnership must not restrict you from going after your goals. +++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Discuss money mat-ters and you will clear up problems that are caus-ing emotional stress. You don’t have to make impul-sive moves if you take a moment to consider the options available to you. Nothing is as difficult as it seems. Love conquers all. +++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Address the changes you must make at home in order to feel good about you and your future. You cannot live in a negative space without feeling stifled. +++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Make your point clear. Push for what you want, but not at the expense of infringing on your reputa-tion, position or future status. Prepare your rea-soning with facts, figures, suggestions and solutions. +++++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Get out, indulge in new experiences, meet new people and discover new lifestyles. Knowledge is key when it comes to getting your way. ++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Do your very best and you will receive the best in return. Socializing and net-working will pay off. Share your creative plans for the future and you will get the backing and support you need to turn your dream into a reality. ++++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Tell the truth and work through any problems you face with class, poise and compas-sion. Alterations to the way you live, who you live with or where you live can be made. +++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Don’t jump to conclusions. Look over your personal papers and investments and size up your long-term situation with regard to any partner-ships you are involved with personally or profession-ally. +++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Don’t share your personal secrets. You can learn a lot by studying how others react under pres-sure. Put more effort into personal gains, your assets and your home environ-ment. +++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Keep moving in a direction that will bring you greater prosperity. A commitment can be made that will ensure greater security for years to come. Excess is the enemy and moderation the key to your success. ++++ Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com THE LAST WORD Eugenia Word SUNDAY CROSSWORD Across 1 Yoga posture6 Mideast strongman0HQVVXLW specification 15 Bread dispensers19 Common belief20 Complete, in informal writing 'LHVBBB22 Slow leak23 Special attention/LRQHVVVODFN27 Behind$JDLQVWRQHVZLOO30 Salon worker31 Island west of Maui'LGQWFRPHULJKW out and say 33 Word with Army or ant 34 Lapful, maybe37 Tantrum, colloquially 38 General headquarters? 41 Farm wagon42 Some baby sitters44 Soap discontinued in 2011 6SHDNHDV\V distilling locale 54 Buzzer55 Buzzes56 Repeated phrase in +RW+RW+RW 58 Ikea store, to some 59 Something with a Blue Book value 61 1937 hit with the O\ULF
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6D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2012 6DLIFE Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 By KATE SPINNERSarasota Herald-TribuneSARASOTA — The battle to save the Florida panther from extinction is poised to shift from south to cen-tral Florida, where a clash between private landown-ers, developers and regula-tors could determine the future range of the unique cats. Efforts to expand the panthers’ population across Florida’s southern tip have been so successful that wildlife experts now believe they are reaching the habitat limits there. An increase in panthers killed in territorial battles and collisions with vehi-cles, as well as more cows and other animals killed by panthers, point to a rise in numbers. As a result, state and federal officials are discussing moving some female pan-thers farther north to give them more room, rather than waiting for them to spread there on their own. But the idea is controversial because of concerns that there is not enough vacant land, raising the specter of conflicts between subdivisions, livestock farmers and the panthers over territory. At least one Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission official doubts whether available land north of the Caloosahatchee River — including parts of Sarasota County — can support panthers in the numbers that federal offi-cials contemplate. “You have no large pieces of property north of the Caloosahatchee that comes close to what you have in South Florida,” said FWC Commissioner Liesa Priddy, referring to the federal government’s panther plan. Priddy, appointed in January by Gov. Rick Scott, raises cattle in South Florida where roughly one-third of her calves have been attacked by panthers. She said the federal government should develop a plan to compensate live-stock growers for loss of their animals as the pan-ther population expands. Wildlife officials overcame significant controver-sies in the 1990s, as plans proceeded to introduce genetic variability into the panther population. But the question is whether that success can be replicated as the ani-mals’ range expands. A new clash between people and the panthers in anoth-er part of Florida could be inevitable. Even if officials decide not to move any panthers, a female is likely to move north on her own eventu-ally, they contend. “Sooner or later it’s going to happen,” said Kipp Frolich, endangered species section leader for the FWC. The Florida panther is a critically endangered sub-species unique to the state that is slowly recovering from a brush with extinc-tion 15 years ago. The pop-ulation remains under con-tinuous threat, with three panthers dying in recent weeks on Collier County roads and 19 dead so far this year. As many as 160 of the animals at or near breeding age are in the wild today — mostly in South Florida, according to the latest state estimates. While that is a vast improvement from 1994, when the panther population hovered around 30 animals, it is far from stable. Panthers need to form at least three separate popula-tions of about 240 individu-als to escape the danger of extinction.Expanding rangeSeveral male Florida panthers have ventured north of the Caloosahatchee River in South Florida since 1998, but no females have been documented there. While state wildlife managers hope a female already is prowling farther north, they are discussing with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service whether to inter-vene to make sure they expand their range. Federal officials would have to issue permits to move a panther from South Florida. No timetable has been set for introducing panthers farther north. “The commission has asked us to discuss with them options for moving females north of the river and efforts to try to grow the population north of the river,” said Larry Williams, field supervisor for the federal Fish and Wildlife Service office in Vero Beach. Panthers have occasionally been spotted in Sarasota County. A state scientist saw one near Myakka River State Park two years ago. A plaster cast of a paw print confirmed its identity. The recovery plan identifies scattered large patches of land considered suitable for panther habitat north of the Caloosahatchee. Most of it is agricultural or conservation land, such as state parks, including prop-erties in the eastern por-tions Charlotte, Sarasota and Manatee counties.ASSOCIATED PRESSAmy Vigilante, director of University Galleries, touches a painted crape myrtle tree near the Reitz Union on the University of Florida campus in Gaine sville on Wednesday. Blue Trees is an artist exhibit by Konstantin Dimopolous, of Australia, wh o takes natural trees and paints them with an environmentally safe blue pigmented water. Florida panthers push north, causing conflicts Art project has UF seeing blueBy CHRISTIAN BOONEThe Atlanta Journal-ConstitutionATLANTA — For retired high school drama teacher Sharon Huey, the ques-tion is no longer why the operator of the Tri-State Crematory failed to proper-ly dispose of her mother’s body — one of 334 discov-ered in tiny Noble, Ga., a little more than 10 years ago. Instead, she wonders “did anyone know” about the grisly tragedy before it made international head-lines. That mystery figures prominently in the plot of “Sahkanaga,” written and directed by Huey’s for-mer student, John Henry Summerour. The feature film, which starts a one-week run in Chattanooga this month — about 20 miles from where authorities discovered the gruesome remains of bod-ies hidden in the woods, dumped in holes and stacked in vaults — has attracted considerable buzz, but when Huey was sent a draft of Summerour’s first film script she discour-aged him from pursuing it further. “I wrote him back something really nasty,” said Huey, a retired Walker County drama teacher. She had no interest in re-living the story that cast a dark shadow over this small northwest Georgia com-munity. But eventually, she was assured that Summerour’s intent was restorative, not sensational. “A lot of people are still dealing with the hurt and shame that came out of this,” Huey said, referring to the actions of Tommy Ray Brent Marsh, who ran the crematory for his father. Marsh, indicted on 787 felony charges, pleaded guilty in November 2004 and was sentenced to 12 years in prison. According to the Georgia Department of Corrections, the Long State Prison inmate is scheduled to be released no later than June 2016. Marsh, who came from a respected family with deep ties in Walker County, has never offered an explana-tion for his actions, and Summerour said his film doesn’t speculate. “We don’t know why it happened, and that’s real life, which isn’t as black and white as we make it seem,” said Summerour, who grew up in Chickamauga, a town of little more than 2,000 residents in Walker County. “There’s still a lot of unresolved feelings, a lot of people who are still struggling with what hap-pened.” “Sahkanaga,” a Cherokee word that can be trans-lated as “Great Blue Hills of God,” tells the story from the perspective of a teenage boy who discov-ers a body in the woods. The movie was filmed on location in Walker County using local actors such as Huey, who plays Lovey, a TV talk show host whose husband’s body is among those not disposed of by the celluloid crematory. “I wanted to give ownership of the story back to the community,” said Summerour, whose dad was a Methodist minister in Chickamauga. The 35-year-old director raised money and maxed out his credit cards to produce the movie, which he shot over 21 days at a cost of roughly $100,000. It has been screened to considerable acclaim at festivals across the coun-try but the showing at Chattanooga’s Carmike Majestic 12 has Huey feel-ing a bit anxious. “I do have misgivings about it,” said Huey, who plans to bring some rela-tives who have yet to see the movie. “It’s going to be emotional for them. It’s going to remind people of things they may not want to remember.” Summerour said he’s never experienced the blowback he initially antici-pated over a film he says is about “hope and forgive-ness.” “My ultimate goal was to bring this movie home, and I’m very excited that’s hap-pening,” he said. “Sahkanaga” is expected to be available on iTunes and Netflix early next year, said Summerour. Crematory mystery inspires filmmaker Restaurant cellphone distractions still irritateBy MICHAEL HILLAssociated PressALBANY, N.Y. — The digital divide is wider than ever between diners who talk, tweet and snap pictures mid-meal and those who wish they’d just shut up, shut down and be present. Caught at the center of the discord are restaurant owners and chefs, who must walk the careful line of good customer service for both those who dine under the influence of smart phones, and those who won’t. But asv the devices have morphed into an unrelenting appendage for texting, photography and games, more restau-rateurs are challenged to keep the peace. Owners who once relied mostly on “no cell phones, please” signs, increasingly are experimenting with everything from penalties for using phones, discounts for not and outright bans on photography. “There’s no place to get away from the chatter,” said Julie Liberty of Miami, who started the Facebook page “Ban Cell Phones From Restaurants” earlier this year. “Everything has a soundtrack, including when you go into the ladies room. That’s just not right.” It’s a touchy issue. Consider the crush of news coverage Eva Restaurant in Los Angeles generated when it began offering patrons a 5 per-cent discount if they leave their phone at the door. Online comments ranged from cheers of “YES!” to others who said their phones would have to be pried from their cold, dead hands. The policy is working, though. Eva’s Rom Toulon said about 40 percent of our customers will leave their cell phones at the door. “After a few cocktails and glasses of wine, it can be challenging to remem-ber that you left the phone behind,” he said. The burst of headlines for Eva came after a Burlington, Vt., deli took on cyber-folk hero status for posting a sign inform-ing customers that $3 will be added to their bill “if you fail to get off your phone while at the coun-ter. It’s rude.” Disgusted diners are doing their part too with games like “phone stack,” in which everyone places their phones in a stack in the middle of the table. The first person who reaches for their phone pays the bill for all. These are more creative approaches to the no cell-phone signs now common in restaurants ranging from highbrow to quick-eats. The landmark Boston restaurant Locke-Ober asks diners — in language appropriate for a place with a dress code — to “kindly refrain from using cellular phones.” In Albany, N.Y., the Hamilton Street Cafe has a more direct, hand-drawn “No cell phones at the counter” sign with a phone with a red “X” through it. Owner Sue Dayton said the sign by the counter helps keep the lunch line moving.