<%BANNER%>

The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01924

Material Information

Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 10-19-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01938

Related Items

Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01924

Material Information

Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 10-19-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01938

Related Items

Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

Opinion ............... 4A People ................. 2A Obituaries ............. 5A Advice & Comics ....... 6-7B Puzzles ............... 6-7B TODAY IN PEOPLE Aldean to play at Fenway. COMING SUNDAY Fla. constitutional amendments 8-12. 82 53 T-Storm Chance WEATHER, 2A Lake City ReporterFRIDAY & SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19 & 20, 2012 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | 75LAKECITYREPORTER COM WEEKEND EDITION CALL US: (386) 752-1293 SUBSCRIBE TO THE REPORTER: Voice: 755-5445 Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 138, No 188 1A Oct. 19 Alligator Warrior Fest Alligator Warrior Festival, an annual non-profit event at OLeno State Park in High Springs runs Friday, Oct. 19 to Sunday, Oct. 21 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. The Alligator Warrior Festival celebrates the history of Florida as it made the transition from Spanish colony to the 27th state. It also commemo rates the years between 1800 and 1859, when Lake City was still called Alligator, and in memory of its most famous resident, the Seminole commander, Alligator Warrior. The reen actment the 1836 Battle of San Felasco Hammock will be at 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. In addition to the reenactment, the event is a festival that celebrates native American and immi grant American cultures with music and dancing, living-history camps, dem onstrators of historic skills, traders, craftspeople, and food vendors. Admission is $5 per vehicle holding 2 to 8 people. Quilt show The Stephen Foster Quilt Show is Oct, 19-21 at the Stephen Foster State Park in White Springs. Lady of the Lake Quilters get to share their finished quilts at the event. Please join us in celebration of all things quilting. There are many categories of quilts displayed and demonstra tions of quilting techniques will be held throughout the show. There is even a Boutique that is always a bargain basement for quilts and quilting items. Oct. 20 Big Boy Toy Expo The Kiwanis Big Boys Toys Expo starts 9 a.m. Saturday and 10 a.m. Sunday at the Columbia County Fairgrounds. The event features everything for the outdoorsman as well as activities and contests for the entire family. Meet RJ and Jay Paul from the History Channels Swamp People at 12:30 p.m. Tickets are $8, which includes admission for both days Farmers market The Lake DeSoto Farmers Market hosts another Florida Gateway College Day at the mar ket this Saturday, Oct. 20 from 8 a.m. to noon. Representatives from the EMS program, the Welding program and the AC pro gram will be available for questions and demonstra tions. Admissions and col lege information about all the great programs at FGC will be available. In addi tion, local artist Sue Hall will make her first appearance at the market. Sue, known for her local farm scenes and is a member of the Art League of North Florida. Her paint ings can be seen at Haven Hospice and the College and Library Art Shows. For more information about the Lake DeSoto Farmer Market call 386-719-5766 or visit market.lcfla.com. By LAURA HAMPSON lhampson@lakecityreporter.com T he second annual Kiwanis Big Boy Toys Expo is back with nationally known entertainment and more activities for the entire family. The expo starts 9 a.m. Saturday and 10 a.m. Sunday at the Columbia County Fairgrounds in Lake City. Admission is $8 for both days. R.J. Molinere and Jay Paul Molinere, stars of the History Channels hit show Swamp People, will meet fans on a first come, first served basis starting at 12:30 p.m. on Saturday only. Only 50 tickets are left for the VIP breakfast with the father and son alligator hunting team, said Norbie Ronsonet, Kiwanis co-chair. The tickets are $50 and include a guaranteed meet and greet with R.J. and Jay Paul, a picture, souvenir lanyard and continental breakfast. With increased entertainment, organizers are expecting nearly double the turnout from last year, when about 5,000 attended. Swamp People is going to bring us a regional draw, Ronsonet said. With vendors and exhibitors, the expo also features food, games, a motorcycle and classic car show, a dunking booth, an RV and boat show, kids building activities, a kids shooting range and bounce houses. It is everything for the out doorsman, but it is very family Westside center gets budget boost By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com County officials increased the budget for the Westside Community Center by more than 25 percent Thursday night by approving change orders for an additional $127,458 for services and materials. The additional funding was unanimously approved by commissioners. Commissioner Rusty DePratter did not attend the meeting. The decision to allow the change order was made following a presentation by Dale Williams, county manager, who addressed the board and gave a line item review of each of the new budgeted items which totaled $127,458. County staff recommended the change orders be adopted and they were added to the meet ings agenda as a late addendum. Is Florida ready for a replay of 2000? Both parties prep for possible nightmare election scenarios. By CHARLES BABINGTON Associated Press WEST PALM BEACH Here in a county that knows a thing or two about Election Day melt downs, both parties are fretting over what might go seriously wrong before, during or just after the Nov. 6 presidential election. More than 50 percent of the provisional ballots are thrown in the trash in this state, Florida state Rep. Mark Pafford told about 80 retirees who gathered for last weeks meeting of the Golden Lakes Democratic Club. Thats only a slight exaggera tion 48 percent of the provi sional ballots cast in Florida in 2008 were rejected. And Paffords warning underscores anxiety in Florida and other states about legal challenges, ballot problems or bizarre outcomes that could bedevil a race that seems likely to be close conceivably as close as the 2000 contest that people still quarrel about. Merely the mention of that election unsettles people in Palm Beach County. The countys poorly designed butterfly ballot confused thousands of voters, arguably costing Democrat Al Gore the state, and thereby the presidency. Gore won the national popu lar vote by more than a halfmillion ballots. But George W. Bush became president after the Supreme Court decided, 5-4, to halt further Florida recounts, more than a month after Election Day. Bush carried the state by 537 votes, enough for an Electoral College edge. Pregnant chad entered the political lexicon. And Americans got a jolting reminder of the Founding Fathers complex rec ipe for indirectly electing presi dents. Even if everything goes smoothly, its conceivable the nation will awaken to a major shock in three weeks: an Electoral College tie between President Barack Obama and Republican Mitt Romney. That would throw the decision to the House of Representatives, currently con trolled by Republicans but up for grabs in this election. A 269-269 Electoral College tie is unlikely but far from impossi ble. It could result, for instance, if Romney wins all the competitive states except Ohio, Wisconsin and New Hampshire. Four U.S. elections, including 2000, saw the presidency go to the person who finished second in the popular vote. There has never been an Electoral College tie. However, the U.S. House handed the 1824 election to John Quincy Adams after he finished second in both the popular vote and the Electoral College 2000 continued on 5A Big Boy Toys is back JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Roger Parish (left), outgoing Kiwanis Club of Lake City president, assists Kiwanis co-chair Norbie Ronsonet with placing signs along U.S. 90 to help promote the second annual Kiwanis Big Boy Toys Expo. The event will be held at the Columbia County Fairgrounds starting at 9 a.m. Saturday and 10 a.m. Sunday. Swamp People stars headline expo Organizers hope to draw 10,000 visitors this year. TOYS continued on 5A CENTER continued on 5A COURTESY Re-enactor Hawkwood works near the Seminole Camp at the 2011 Alligator Warrior Festival. Alligator Warrior fest starts today By LAURA HAMPSON lhampson@lakecityreporter.com Seminole warriors, craftspeople and sol diers of Old Florida will come alive again this weekend during the annual Alligator Warrior Festival in High Springs. The festival runs from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. today, Saturday and Sunday at OLeno State Park. The reenactment of the Second Seminole War Battle of San Felasco Hammock, which took place in 1836 near Alachua, is scheduled for 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. The event, first held in downtown Lake City in 1995, celebrates the history of Florida as it made the transition from a Spanish colony to the 27th state in the Union. It really is about community-build ing, said Paul Rowley, secretary of the nonprofit Alligator Festival. ALLIGATOR continued on 5A

PAGE 2

CORRECTION Due to inaccurate information from the Lake City Police Department, Wednesdays paper contained an error regarding the departments Citizen Academy. The academy will hold its first session from 6 to 9 p.m. on Jan. 10. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Former U.S. ambassador to Russia Robert S. Strauss is 94. Author John le Carre is 81. Artist Peter Max is 75. Actor John Lithgow is 67. Feminist activist Patricia Ireland is 67. Singer Jeannie C. Riley is 67. Rock singer-musician Patrick Simmons (The Doobie Brothers) is 64. Former Republican National Committee Chairman Michael Steele is 54. Boxer Evander Holyfield is 50. AROUND FLORIDA Court vacates death sentence TALLAHASSEE The Florida Supreme Court has vacated the death sen tence of a man convicted of killing a woman in Lake County. The justices unanimous ly upheld Eric Simmons first-degree murder convic tion on Thursday for the 2001 slaying but ordered a new sentencing hearing by a 5-2 vote. The majority ruled Simmons lawyers failed to fully investigate and pres ent mitigating evidence. That includes his low intelligence, a brain injury suffered as a child and substance abuse. Simmons also received two life sentences for kidnapping and sexual bat tery. Deborah Tressler was beaten and stabbed. Her body was found in a wood ed area in Sorrento. Justices Charles Canady and Ricky Polston dissent ed on the sentencing issue. They noted Simmons and his family asked lawyers not present anything embarrassing or bad about him. Sign wavers could disappear ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. The days of Lady Liberty waving a torch or chickens clucking at pass ing cars could come to an end soon on St. Petersburg streets. The Tampa Bay Times reported that the city council on Thursday will discuss amending rules for signs and flags along roadways. The proposed law would require human billboards to stand still while hawking tax servic es, pizza joints and pawn shops. No more spinning, twirl ing and swinging. Sign wavers also could no lon ger boogie on risers, stilts, podiums, vehicles or roofs. City staffers believe sign wavers create safety issues for drivers, but proponents say they provide inexpen sive advertising and jobs paying up to $15 an hour. The St. Petersburg Area Chamber of Commerce opposes the proposal. Prescribed burn planned at park HOBE SOUND Visitors to a state park in Hobe Sound likely will see smoke from a prescribed burn this week. The Florida Department of Environmental Protection reports that Jonathan Dickinson State Park will conduct a pre scribed burn today and Saturday, weather permit ting. Less than 10 acres of pine flatwoods will be burned. State fire officials said prescribed burns mimic natural fire cycles to restore healthy forests and natural communities, reduce undergrowth that accumulates over time and decreases the potential for wildfire. Burned lands experience an increase in native wildflowers, birds and other wildlife. Boy, 2, dies in septic tank STARKE Deputies in Bradford County say a 2year-old boy apparently fell through the broken lid of a septic tank and died. News accounts said the boy was found dead inside the tank after going miss ing from his Starke home Wednesday evening. Sheriffs Capt. Carol Starling said family mem bers called 911 after searching for Aiden Wyatt Howard on their own for about an hour. Officials said the boy must have slipped through a hole in the concrete cov ering the septic tank. Officer resigns after DUI arrest PINELLAS PARK Officials said a Pinellas Park police office has resigned days after he was accused of rear-end ing a vehicle while driving drunk. The Tampa Bay Times reported St. Petersburg police arrested Matthew Patsch Oct. 11 on misde meanor DUI charges. Pinellas Park police spokesman Brian Unmisig said Patsch resigned Monday. After the arrest, Patsch was placed on administrative leave with pay pending an investiga tion. St. Petersburg police said a motorist told them he was stopped at a light when a vehicle driven by Patsch hit his Toyota Tundra. Police said Patsch told everyone at the scene he was a police officer but denied that hed been drinking. Police reports show Patschs blood-alcohol level was measured at 0.189 percent and 0.192 more than twice the legal limit in Florida. Gov. troubled by firings at insurer TALLAHASSEE Florida Gov. Rick Scott says its troubling that Floridas largest property insurer recently fired four employees responsible for investigating wrongdoing. Scott on Thursday wrote a letter to the presi dent of Citizens Property Insurance raising ques tions about the decision to terminate the employees working in the Office of Corporate Integrity. Thought for Today To become aware of the possi bility of the search is to be onto something. Walker Percy, American author (1916-1990) Aldean to play at Fenway Park BOSTON C ountry music star Jason Aldean will be making history at one of base balls most historic sites. Aldean will be the first country music star to play a concert at Fenway Park, the iconic home of the Boston Red Sox. The July 13 appearance will be the initial stop on his first stadium tour. Aldean made the announcement Thursday in the shadow of the Green Monster with an assist from Red Sox President/ CEO Larry Lucchino and members of the team who made a celebratory clip for the singer that played on Fenways video board. Being the first country music art ist to ever come here and headline a show is amazing, Aldean said. Its going to be a fun night. Over the last several years, my career, especially the touring side of that, has been pretty amazing. Its been growing. So thank you guys for having us. The Georgia native released his fifth album, Night Train, this week. That title is an apt metaphor for his career, which has been steaming along on a steep trajectory. About the only thing he hadnt attained yet was a stadium tour, and hes cross ing that goal off the list. Williams campaigns for medical marijuana LITTLE ROCK, Ark. Talk show host Montel Williams says opponents of an Arkansas ballot measure to legalize medical marijuana are resorting to rac ist imagery with a television ad featuring an AfricanAmerican actor portraying a drug dealer. Williams appeared Thursday at the state Capitol alongside members of Arkansans for Compassionate Care, which is campaigning for the legalization measure on the November ballot. He criticized an ad aired by a coalition of conservative groups that opposes the proposal. Williams, who lives in New York, suffers from multiple sclerosis. He says he uses medical marijuana to treat symptoms of his condition. The Arkansas measure would allow patients with qualifying condi tions to buy marijuana from nonprof it dispensaries with a doctors recom mendation. If approved, Arkansas would become the first Southern state to legalize medical marijuana. Springsteen explains his support for Obama NEW YORK After vowing not to get involved in this years presi dential election, Bruce Springsteen is supporting Barack Obama again, saying he believes Obama is the best person to lead America. The Boss posted a message on his website Wednesday night endors ing Obamas re-election, saying he had been getting asked a lot about where I stand. Springsteen is making his debut on the 2012 campaign trail Thursday at events in Cleveland and Ames, Iowa, with former President Bill Clinton. Springsteen sup ported Obama in 2008. In his letter, he called Obamas four years in office a really rough ride because of the economic chaos from President George W. Bushs administration. Thurs day: Afternoon: 4-7-4 Evening: N/A Thurs day: Afternoon: 3-1-3-7 Evening: N/A Wednes day: 2-9-11-29-35 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAIL Y BRIEFING FRIDAY & SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19-20, 2012 HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter 2A Daily Scripture Wait for the Lord; be strong and take heart and wait for the Lord. Psalm 27:14 ASSOCIATED PRESS Country singer Jason Aldean will play a concert at Fenway Park, the iconic home of the Boston Red Sox, on July 13, 2013. He will be the first country music star to play a concert at the famous ballpark. Associated Press Associated Press Williams Springsteen

PAGE 3

LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE FRIDAY & SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19-20, 2012 3A 3A Charter Loans Services Pay outstanding bills, credit cards. Lowest compared rates. Personal loans. Business, debt loans. Auto Home Improvement Loans Bad Credit options. No apps. fees Call today: 1.877.359.5533 Charteracc@usa.com Tough Enough to Wear Pink Golf Tournament Thank you to all our supporters With your contribution and support the Tough Enough to Wear Pink Golf Tournament raised and contributed over $11,500 to the Tough Enough to Wear Pink Crisis Fund. This fund was established by Columbia County Resources (Columbia County Fair) to assist those with medical related needs in the Suwannee Valley region. Thanks to all the golfers. And please take time to visit and say thank you to: Hole Sponsors County Commissioner Scarlet Frisina Glenn Hunter Chastain Jewelers/Joyes Gems & Things The Buck Stove First Federal Bank of Florida Gateway Judicial Services Healthcore Physical Therapy A&B Management -Bucky Nash RT Insulation Tim Murphy The Money Man Roundtree Moore Auto Group Vern & Maureen Lloyd Haven Hospice Action Signs & Graphics Metalcoat Interstate Supply State Farm -John Kasak Terry Huddleston Florida Power & Light Rafes Farmers Furniture CCs Flower Villa Lake City Industries Kilgores Repair Shop Ring Power Wholesale Furniture Wards Jewelers Hairs Mower Parts & Repair American Pawn Brokers Firehouse Subs G.W. Hunter Cutting Attractions Michelle Cox Jamie Albritton Smittys Western Store Wilson Outtters Suwannee River Breast Cancer Association/ Jamie Albritton Everett Phillips Badcocks of Lake City Home Depot Etheridge Furniture Burger King Carlene Kennedy Southern Exposure Belks Morrells Home Furnishings Tim Boyd Goody Bags T.D. Bank Vystar Sponsors/Donations for Ad Anne Little C.A. Boone Construction, Inc. Local man passes Marine training camp From staff reports Pvt. Devin T. Frazier, a 2011 Columbia High School graduate, recently gradu ated from Marine Corps recruit training. Frazier graduated at the Marine Corps Recruit Depot in Parris Island, S.C. He will soon go through combat training in North Carolina. Frazier is the son of Jamie Edward Frazier of Lake City and the nephew of Rebecca Faith Frazier. COURTESY Pvt. Devin T. Frazier Bethune-Cookman University alumni happenings COURTESY Linda V. Thomas, of Lake City, was crowned Miss Columbia County Bethune-Cookman University Alumni at an event at the Lake City Holiday Inn. Thomas, a 1971 graduate of B-CU, is a substance abuse counselor at Lake City Correctional Facility. She has a daughter, Anita Rivers and two grandsons, David and Devaun. COURTESY Minister Jan Harrison (right), president of the Columbia County Bethune-Cookman University Chapter, congratulates Linda V. Thomas after her selections as Miss Gold of the B-CU alumni queens court. Thomas will represent the university by participating in homecoming in Daytona Beach and at the Florida Classic in Orlando. COURTESY Linda V. Thomas, of Lake City, poses for a formal portrait after being selected as Miss Gold of National Queens Court of the Bethune-Cookman University Alumni Chapter for 2012-13. COURTESY Linda V. Thomas (second from left), of Lake City, poses (from left) A. Ray Brinson, national president of the Bethune-Cookman University Alumni; Raquel Watson, Miss BethuneCookman Alumni; Margaret Davis Hill, Miss Maroon; and Dr. Edison Jackson, president of the university, during the 44th annual National Alumni Convention held at Daytona Beach Resort in June. Florida man charged dinosaur fossils case Gunman kills 3, self in salon shooting SUZETTE LABOY Associated Press MIAMI A Florida man was charged Wednesday with smuggling dinosaur fossils into the United States, including a nearly complete Tyrannosaurus Bataar skeleton from Mongolia, federal pros ecutors said. Eric Prokopi, a selfdescribed commercial paleontologist who buys and sells whole and par tial dinosaur skeletons, was arrested at his home in Gainesville, according to a complaint unsealed by prosecutors. He was charged with smuggling goods into the U.S. and interstate sale and receipt of stolen goods. He also faces one count of conspiracy to smuggle illegal goods, possess sto len property and make false statements. If con victed on all of the charg es, he could face up to 35 years in prison. Prokopi made an appear ance Wednesday in federal court in Gainesville, where U.S. District Judge Gary R. Jones ordered him to be held on $100,000 bond. Prokopi must also surren der his passport and be kept under home deten tion. He did not enter a plea. The arrest was handled by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcements Homeland Security Investigations. Manhattan U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara said the investigation uncovered a one-man black market in prehistoric fossils. The U.S. government seized the Tyrannosaurus skel eton earlier this year after it was sold by an auction house for $1.05 million. Prokopi did not imme diately respond to a phone call, but his attorney has said he did nothing wrong. Prokopi has been involved in a lawsuit in New York over the auction because the Mongolian government has said it may belong to that country. By KYLE HIGHTOWER and SUZETTE LABOY Associated Press CASSELBERRY A gunman opened fire at a central Florida beauty salon Thursday, killing three women and wound ing the manager, who had asked for a restraining order against him, police said. After the rampage, the gunman went to a friends house and killed himself. Authorities said the shoot ing was part of a domestic dispute, but did not elabo rate. The gunman, identi fied by police as Bradford Baumet, was served with a domestic violence injunc tion Oct. 9 and scheduled to be in court Thursday for a hearing with the salons manager, Marcia Santiago. Their relationship was not immediately clear. About two hours before the hearing, Baumet, 36, entered Las Dominicanas M & M Salon in Casselberry and started shooting, police spokeswoman Sara Brady said. Two women hid inside a bathroom and one ran outside through a back door. Santiago, 44, was in seri ous condition at a hospital. She was shot five times, according to her ex-hus band, William Ayala, who spoke to her sister. Ayala said he had a daughter with Santiago and the girl lived with him. I heard he was violent and had a criminal record, he told the AP. Records in Florida and Rhode Island show Baumet has been previously arrest ed for domestic assault, felony assault, stalking, bur glary and drug possession. Police identified two other victims as 52-year-old Gladys Cabrera, a custom er and 29-year-old Noelia Gonzalez-Brito, a salon employee. Authorities did not immediately identify the fourth woman who died. Shortly after the shoot ing, about two dozen mourners gathered near the salon, located in a strip mall. Police taped off the parking lot and officers stood guard outside the business. Yellow paper covered up some of the glass windows. A Dominican Republic flag hung in the storefront along with a neon sign that read: Hair Cut. Color. Perm. Calls to the salons owner also went unanswered.

PAGE 4

D o you smell the desperation? The polls show the race between Mitt Romney and Barack Obama has narrowed so tightly there is suddenly talk of a 269-269 tie in the Electoral College. With 270 needed to win, that means the GOP-dominated House could decide the elec-tion. That would definitely outdo the 2000 election, when George W. Bush lost the popu-lar vote but won the election by the Supreme Court voting 5-4 along partisan lines. Not the best scenario for democracy. The problem, of course, is not really with the candidates. The problem is us. We are so divided that there is no majority party and little likelihood there will be one. We saw in the town-hall debate that Romney and Obama can’t stand each other. It was jarring to see Romney talk over the president in a shocking lack of politeness. It was also discon-certing to see Obama’s eye-roll-ing disdain for his opponent. That debate was a mirror for us all. Most of us can’t talk civilly about our political differences. The two men don’t agree on how to fund government, what government should do, what the tax rates should be, what rights government should guarantee for women, gays and lesbians and children, what role the United States should play abroad, or what the future of this country should look like. In the two-and-a-half weeks before Election Day, Romney’s strategy is to convince voters that because he made millions buying and selling businesses he knows what is best for the national economy and to convince them that although Obama inherited a bad econ-omy, his efforts to improve it were wrong. Obama’s strategy is to convince voters that Romney’s economic plan would cut taxes for the rich, raise them for the middle class, cut the social safety net, raise military spend-ing, reduce regulations on businesses and bring back what Democrats think got the nation into the worst recession since the Great Depression. Romney’s big problem is that he can’t or won’t explain the math behind his proposals. Obama’s big problem is that he can’t or won’t explain what he would do differently in a second term, if anything. Many voters feel trapped between a rock and a hard place. The good news for Romney is that while his social views anger millions of women, the econo-my is dominant, and many are willing to take a chance because he is not Obama. Romney’s best argument is that if you’re unhappy with your economic condition, take a chance he’ll be better than Obama. The good news for Obama is that the economy slowly is improving and he seems more consistent than the multi-tiered Romney. Thus, many of us will vote our gut instincts — deciding whom we trust more. If it’s a tie, we’ll all lose. As polls narrow, tensions increase ANOTHER VIEW HIGHLIGHTS IN HISTORY On this date:In 1765, the Stamp Act Congress, meeting in New York, drew up a declaration of rights and liberties. In 1781, British troops under Gen. Lord Cornwallis surren-dered at Yorktown, Va., as the American Revolution neared its end. In 1812, French forces under Napoleon Bonaparte began their retreat from Moscow. Kicked in the teeth? B efore we argue over whether Mitt Romney misspoke about Libya in Tuesday’s debate, we need to parse the meaning of what President Barack Obama said immediately after the Sept. 11 incident that claimed the lives of ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans. Romney said the administration waited nearly two weeks to acknowledge that terrorists, not demonstrators, carried out the assault on the U.S. embassy in Benghazi. He was corrected by the president, and by debate moderator Candy Crowley, who said the president stated almost immediately during a Rose Garden appearance that it was “an act of terror.” Technically, that is true. But an examination of Obama’s words reveal that it was a general state-ment based on the belief that any such incident -including one resulting from a protest that spontaneously turned violent -is such an act. What the president apparently did not know at the time, nor did his administration concede for days, was that there was no demonstration against an anti-Muslim video. This was, in fact, a carefully planned operation by al-Qaida terrorists. Why did it take so long for the administration to change its story? Who knows and who cares? Where Obama, and more specifically the State Department, are vulnerable is the lax security that resulted in a tragedy -one that cost the lives of four Americans, including a highly praised diplomat whose popularity in Libya was extensive. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was quick to realize this, and claim responsibility. The situation was made worse by the fact that department security officers testifying before Congress have said they had asked for beefed up forces to ward off just such an assault and were refused. It clearly was an incident that might have turned out differently. The president said he immediately ordered improved security for all embas-sies, a move that can only be described as the usual closing of the barn door after the horse has fled -a philosophy that seems to permeate most of what happens here these days, from Capitol Hill to the White House. One need only look at the history of the elite Bureau of Diplomatic Security, part of the State Department, to understand that the attitude among the striped-pants set toward DS -professionalized since the 1980s -far too often has been disdain. Though the department recruit-ed bright young people and gave them extensive training in secu-rity and protective services, the efforts were frequently impeded by the Foreign Service hierarchy. The department initially insisted on filling key oversight positions -from the director down to those in charge of onsite embassy security -with career diplomats who had little or no security experience. DS agents, trained alongside Secret Service and other law enforcement agents, were often armed with considerably less than what was necessary to hold off an attack by assailants. My son was in DS in the 1980s and was assigned to protect the Israeli ambassador to the United States. He confided that he’d told the ambassador, in case of an incident, to “run like hell” while he would try to hold back any attackers with what seemed insufficient firepower. The ambassador, shaken by the revelation, was instrumental in having the weapons upgraded. Embassy attack was terrorism Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding counties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, publisher Robert Bridges, editor Sue Brannon, controller Dink NeSmith, president Tom Wood, chairman LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY E-MAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com I n 2008, John Edwards pulled the rug out from under the supporters who had backed his run for the presidency when the scandal about a mistress and illegitimate child hit the news. We’re sure those die-hard supporters had no idea that while his wife was suffering from the breast cancer that would eventually kill her, he was fathering a child with another woman. They also probably didn’t know they were giving unquali-fied support to a man who had persuaded a campaign aide to claim he had fathered the child. My, how messy politics can get when you link your name to an unknown quantity. That lesson hit even closer to home this fall when a Missouri candidate for U.S. Senate made an outlandish remark about women being immune from pregnancy in cases of “legiti-mate rape” If you check websites for campaign donations, you’ll see the names of people and orga-nizations that donated to their campaigns, people and orga-nizations that probably right about now are wondering how well spent that money was. The question we all have to ask before unequivocally sup-porting a candidate or making a donation is: Do we know where each candidate really stands? Do we really know them? N Harrison (Ark.) Daily Times OPINION Friday & Saturday, October 19-20, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A4AOPINION D o you feel like life has “kicked you in the teeth?” That’s a feeling many of us can relate to. Good news reports bring us stories of hardships and successes every day. Is your marriage one of the 50% that ends in divorce? Or, has someone closest to you died? Are you a disabled American veteran? Are there irreconcilable differences with your boss? Are you recovering from a devastating heart attack or stroke? Were you paralyzed in an accident? Were you con-victed of a felony, learned your lesson, and still unemployable or feeling social rejection? Have you recently gone through a bankruptcy, or lost your home in the terrible recession? Are you struggling while trying to survive battling cancer? Well, it’s not always easy. But, it’s still possible to look for the good side; to find some-thing positive that comes out of anything that life throws at us. As it turns out, if you’re an optimist, your chances for successful recovery are good. If you’re a pessimist, consider becoming an optimist. It’s a choice that you can make, because your attitude and your outlook are things you can do something about. It may help to recognize and to appreciate the “re-“ words—restore, reha-bilitate, recover, rebuild, and renew yourself. Here are some positive thoughts and attitudes that could be beneficial for you to develop: Build hope. Don’t let fear of failure stop you, even when the odds are against you. Rekindle a dream. Explore the possibilities. What have you always wanted to do, in your wildest dreams? Don’t shoot down your dreams, allow yourself to reach for the sky. Focus on what you can do, and on your capabilities, rather than what you can’t do. Reach up. Dig deep. Put effort into what you do. Stretch and exercise your body, mind, and social muscles. Try hard. All successes feel good. “When life gives you lemons, make lemonade.” Learn to find the good side of everything that happens to you. Decide that along with the hit you’re blindsided with, life is offering you an opportunity to learn and grow. “If it doesn’t kill you, it will make you stron-ger.” You may have those around you who actually want you to fail, for their own reasons. Rather than allowing your self to blame anyone, to be angry with anyone, or hold onto resentments, let it go. You don’t need their negativity in your life. The best way to deal with those who would hurt you is to succeed and build a great happy life for yourself. “Bust a move!” Get up and take action. Begin that first small step that will build you into that great person you are supposed to be. As a side benefit, psychological research indicates that opti-mists live several years longer than pessimists. Several years after the Mount Saint Helens violent explosion and eruption, and miles and miles of devasta-tion of all living things, wildflow-ers and seedlings rise out of the ashes. It’s not an ending; it’s a new beginning. Bob Denny Bob.Denny8@gmail.com Q Bob Denny is a licensed mental health therapist and teaches psychology at Florida Gateway College. Ann McFeattersamcfeatters@nationalpress.com Q Scripps Howard columnist Ann McFeatters has covered the White House and national politics since 1986. Dan K. Thomasson Q Dan K. Thomasson is former editor of Scripps Howard News Service.

PAGE 5

LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY & SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19-20, 2012 5A5A COMMUNITY CALENDAR Q To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Laura Hampson at 754-0427 or by e-mail at lhampson@ lakecityreporter.com.Oct. 19Dracula on stageHigh Springs Community Theater will present a new comedy thriller by Leroy Clark, adapted from Bram Stoker’s book Dracula. Opening Oct. 5 and running weekends for all of October. In this adap-tation, Dr. Van Helsing is a medical specialist with Tourette’s Syndrome, Renfield is a woman, Dr. Seward’s Aunt Quincy is tipsy at times, and there’s even a French maid. Adult tickets are $11, children 12 and under, $8, and seniors on Sunday matinees are the special rate of $9. Tickets may be purchased at The Framery in downtown Lake City, 341 S. Marion Avenue, 386-754-2780. Online tick-ets are available at high-springscommunitytheater.com. Shows are Fridays and Saturdays, 8 p.m, and Sundays, 2 p.m. Quilt showThe Stephen Foster Quilt Show is Oct, 19-21 at the Stephen Foster State Park in White Springs. Lady of the Lake Quilters get to share their finished quilts at the event. Please join us in celebration of all things quilting. There are many categories of quilts displayed and demonstra-tions of quilting techniques will be held throughout the show. There is even a Boutique that is always a bargain basement for quilts and quilting items. See you at the Quilt Show.Fish dinnerOur Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5056 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, pre-pares fish dinners every Friday from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The dinner is $6 for two Alaskan Pollock filets, corn, baked beans, hush puppies, cole slaw and tart-er sauce. Take out or eat in.Oct. 20Howlin’ HalloweenThe public is invited to the Howlin’ Halloween Yappy Hour at the Pet Spot, 872 SW Main Blvd., Saturday, Oct. 20 from 2 to 5 p.m. For a $10 donation everyone will receive one 5x7 pet photo, activities, and Hors d’Oeuvres. Beer, Wine, soda and water will be available. Ask the Dog Trainer, therapy and obedi-ence will be featured along with live music, vendors and raffle drawings. At some point during the evening a costume contest will take place. Everyone is encour-aged to dress up with your pet to win prizes. Proceeds from the event will help support patients and fami-lies with Hospice of the Nature Coast. Hospice of the Nature Coast, is a pro-gram of Hospice of Citrus County, Inc., licensed in 1985. For additional information regarding the Howlin’ Halloween Yappy Hour, call 386-755-7714.Grief supportThe Grief Share Support Group, a ministry of Orchard Community Church, meets every Saturday from 2 to 4 p.m. in room D at the Willowbrook Assisted Living center, 1580 S. Marion Ave. The group offers caring support for those who have lost a loved one, through videos, dis-cussion time, and prayer. There are fees. For infor-mation call 288-7429. Judith Ann ClayJudith Ann Clay of Wellborn, FL born on May 5, 1945 in Columbia, Ohio went to be with the Lord on October 7, 2102. Survived by her loving husband Benny of 50 years.Daughters Annette (Rodney) Rinehart, Desire (Rob) Butz, son Ben (Cindy) Clay, sisters, Karen (Doug) Jones, Darlene (Chuck) Bragg, Donna (Larry) McAdow. 13 Grandchildren, 5 Great Grand-children, many nieces, neph-ews, and very special friends.She was proceeded in death by her mother, father, and brother. VKHKDGDORYHRIRZ ers & nature, gardening & being with her family.William Alfred Cobb IIIWilliam Alfred Cobb III age 82 of Lake City Florida died quietly at home on Wednesday October 17th, 2012 af-ter a battle of Alzheimer’s disease. He was surround-ed by his lov-ing family.William Al-fred Cobb III (Bill) was born on January 29, 1930 in Lake Butler Fl to Wil-liam A Cobb Sr and Elizabeth Williams Cobb. Bill is the grandson of the late Joe Hill Williams of Lake Butler Fl. Bill attended Union County High School where he met his high school sweetheart Mil-dred (Micki) Bridges and they married on May 4, 1947. Bill and Micki moved to West Palm Beach where they raised their family. After moving back to Lake City in 1993 he joined the Florida Department of Transpor-tation and retired in 2007. Bill was in the United States Navy from 1952 to 1954 and served in the Korean War. He also served in the Navy Reserve for six years. Bill was a proud Ameri-can throughout his life. He was an avid NASCAR fan and enjoyed spending his time with his family. Bill attended church at North Lake City Church of God.Bill is survived by Micki Cobb and their children William (Bill) A Cobb IV, Richard D. Cobb, Romaine Cobb Thormodson (Craig), and Charles Cobb. Other special loved ones include Beth Smith and Thea Cobb. He is also survived by six Grand-children Gina Cobb Watson (Jimmy), William A Cobb V (Carissa), Alysa Thormodson, Sarah Taylor (Bobby), Zach-ary Cobb, and Ryan Cobb and eight GreatGrand Children.The family will receive friends at Archer Funeral Home in Lake Butler Friday October 19, 2012 from 6:00pm8:00 pm. Funeral Services will be held at Archer Funeral Home on Saturday October 20, 2012 at DPDQGRIFLDWHGE\5HYBarney Hurst. Burial will fol-low at Dekle Cemetery in Lake Butler, Florida. ARCHER FUNERAL HOME is in charge of the arrangements. 386-496-2008 Jennifer L. MarshallJennifer L. Marshall, 36, passed away unexpectedly, Wednes-day, October 17, 2012 at Lake City Medical Center. She was born in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida to Tony and Penny (DeCamp) Falotico and was a resident of Lake City for the past 22 years. She was a graduate of Columbia High School (class of 94) and earned an Associate of Science degree in Veterinary Technol-ogy from St. Petersburg Col-lege. Jennifer was a loving wife and mother with a huge heart for her family. She also had a special love for animals and previously worked for the Co-lumbia County Animal Shelter. She is survived by her caring hus-band of 10 years, Marc Marshall; daughters, Sabrina, Taylor, Jor-dyn & Reagan Marshall; parents, Tony and Penny Falotico; sister, Lisa (Bobby) Garbett; brother, Rocco (Kimberly) Falotico; all of Lake City, FL; father-in-law, Alfred (Laurie) Marshall of Hayesville, NC; mother-inlaw, Coleen Holcombe (Garry) Brady of Clearwater, FL and nu-merous other family and friends. Memorial services will be held at 2:00 p.m., on Saturday, October 20, 2012 in the Chapel of Gate-way-Forest Lawn Funeral Home ZLWK3DVWRU5RGQH\%DNHURIFL ating. For those who wish, in lieu RIRZHUVWKHIDPLO\DVNVWKDWdonations be made towards the children’s college fund. Send to Marc Marshall, 155 SW Thrash-er Lane, Lake City, FL 32024. GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN FUNERAL HOME 3596 South U.S. Hwy 441, Lake City, Florida 32025, (386) 752-1954 is in charge of arrangements. Claude L. Rodgers Claude L. Rodgers, 83, passed away Wednesday, October 17, 2012 in the Lake City VA Medi-cal Center, Lake City, FL follow-ing a long illness.Mr. Rodgers was born in Suwannee County, FL., and resided in the Suwan-nee Ranchettes Community. He was a retired auto mechanic and had worked with several auto dealerships in the Lake City area. A US Army veteran of the .RUHDQFRQLFWDQGPHPEHUof Mt. Beulah Baptist Church.Survivors include, his Son and Daughter in Law, Ken-ny & Mary Rodgers of Lake City, FL., 4 Grandchildren and 9 Great Grandchildren.Funeral Services will be conduct-ed Saturday October 20, 2012 at 2:00 pm in the Chapel of Daniels Funeral Home with Rev. Lewis *RRFK2IFLDWLQJ,QWHUPHQWwill follow in Evergreen Baptist Church Cemetery. Visitation will be held one hour prior to services.DANIELS FUNERAL HOMES & CREMATORY, INC. of Branford in charge of arrangements. Obituaries are paid advertise-ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporter’s classified department at 752-1293. OBITUARIES CENTER: Gets a budget boost Continued From Page 1AThe updated costs include funding for furniture, playground equipment, electric service, an upgrades septic system, stand-ing seam roof, paved entry and parking lot, interior work and a two-inch water meter. The original project bid and budget for the Westside Community Center was listed as $491,000. Through previously approved change orders totaling $69,867 and the $127,458 change order from Thursday’s meeting, the cost of the project is now listed as $688,325. The Westside Community Center, which is still under construction, will be located off of Birley Road. County officials also reviewed a rough draft listing the criteria the North Florida Broadband Authority has to meet for the county to consider letting the agency use space on county communication towers. The rough draft will be given to the county attorney for review before its sent to NFBA officials. Earlier in the month the board unanimously voted in favor of hav-ing county staff develop a list of criteria the NFBA has to meet, including a business plan, and then county officials will decide whether or not they would lease space to the NFBA on the four county towers. Officials from the NFBA have not present-ed the plan to county officials yet. The commission also selected the Nov. 15 meeting as the public hearing date to introduce new ordinances governing local parks; In addition, a resident addressed the board saying he was not reimbursed for impact fees he paid when he con-structed his home and he singled out Commissioner Ron Williams as the cause. Williams told the resident that the move to cut of reimbursements after a certain date was adopted by the entire board of commissioners, not just a single commis-sioner. Dale Williams explained and gave the resident the official cut-off dates. orientated,” he said. There will also be several tournaments throughout the weekend, like the National Wild Turkey Federation sanctioned calling contest, a shooting contest and an archery tournament. “It’s kinda like going to Bass Pro Shops for the day,” Ronsonet said. The Guns-N-Hoses Challenge will pit local firefighters against police officers in a tug-o-war on Saturday afternoon. Roger Parish, outgoing Kiwanis president, said the expo is designed to be an entertaining family event to raise money for local children, the group’s mission. Kiwanis members are asking businesses to put expo information on their marquees this weekend. “It think it brings the big-city show to Lake City,” Ronsonet said. For more information visit www. kiwanisbigboytoysexpo.com. TOYS: Kiwanis event starts Saturday Continued From Page 1ANewcomers and even natives to the area can learn about and celebrate North Florida’s unique history, he said. When Florida was just a territory, U.S. settlers formed Alligator Town, close to the Seminole community of Alligator Village. Interactions were peaceful, he said. African Americans escaping slavery lived among the Seminoles, so North Florida was a multi-cultural society early on, Rowley said. Since 2010, the festival has offered a full-scale battle reenactment. “It’s the only event like it in North Florida,” he said. “It’s a living history camp,” Rowley said, so families can interact with reenactors in the camps. The festival also includes a drum arbor and dance circle for veterans, fancy and inter-tribal dances, demon-strators of traditional Native American and pioneer skills, and a variety of food vendors. Daily fund-raising auc-tion to support the event after the battle on Saturday and Sunday. There will be local food vendors, trade demonstrations and hands-on historical games for children. The documentary “Unconquered Seminoles” will play continuously at the park’s recreation hall. Rowley said organizers expect between 2,400 and 3,000 visitors this weekend. “We put the whole event on for about $4,000,” he said. Sponsors and volunteers make the event work. State Park admission is $5 per vehicle holding between 2 to 8 peo-ple. Single occupancy is $4. Folding chairs are recommended for watch-ing the battle. The park is located at 410 S.E. Oleno Park Road in High Springs. For more information visit alligator-fest.org. ALLIGATOR: Full-scale battle re-enactment Continued From Page 1A 2000: Parties prepped Continued From Page 1Avote — in a four-man race in which no one won a majority in either count. An Electoral College tie isn’t the only nightmare scenario that could raise doubts about the election’s fairness and worsen partisan bitterness, which already divides Americans and makes compromise in Congress so difficult. Since 2000, “we’ve had an amazing group of dedicated lawyers that have been on the ground for 12 years,” said Charles Lichtman, a Fort Lauderdale-based attor-ney helping oversee the Democrats’ effort. “So there’s nothing they can throw at us that we haven’t seen or that we’re not ready for.” Other states are doing the same. A single memo seeking lawyers and law students to help safeguard Obama’s voter turnout efforts netted nearly 4,000 responses, a campaign official said.

PAGE 6

FAITH & VALUES Friday & Saturday, October 19-20, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 6A6AF&V A s one reads the Gospel of Mark, he must be impressed with the number of times the word “immediately” is used in the text. According to my concordance, it is used approximately 40 dif-ferent times. Mark is trying to show that Jesus is a man of action, something that would impress Roman citizens, suppos-edly his intended readers. Jesus did something “immediately” after he was baptized (1:10). “Immediately the Spirit impelled Him to go out into the wilderness” (1:12). Peter and Andrew, James and John imme-diately left their nets after they were asked by Jesus, “Follow me” (1:18, 20). After Jesus cast out an “unclean spirit,” it is said that “immediately the news about Him spread everywhere” (1:28). When a leper was brought to Jesus to be healed and Jesus agreed to heal the man, the text says, “immediately the leprosy left him and he was cleansed” (1:42). After telling a paralytic man “get up, pick up your pal-let and go home” the text says, “and he got up and immediately picked up the pallet and went out in the sight of everyone” (2:11, 12). When Jesus healed a woman with a blood issue, Mark says, “Immediately the flow of her blood was dried up” (5:29). After speaking to the dead daughter of the synagogue offi-cial, the text reads, “Immediately the girl got up and began to walk” (5:42). There are many other times in the book of Mark where the term “immediately” is used. The Pharisees went out “immediately” and teamed up with the Herodians as to how they could “destroy” Jesus (3:6). In the parable of the sower, the word “immediately” is used to describe how fast the seed sprang up after being sowed on the ground (4:5ff). Other exam-ples can be seen throughout the remainder of the book. The question for us to think about is why did Mark use this word to describe the actions of not only Jesus, but other people in the book? Because it would have appealed to his readers. It is said that the Romans were people who wanted to see action. Mark portrays Jesus as a man of action. It did not take Jesus a long time to do something, something the Roman citizen would greatly appreciate. We may not be people who appreciate “immediate” action, but are we willing to do things “immediately”? Thinking about something has its place, but can we do things on the spur of the moment? For some of us it would come naturally, but for others, it would be very hard. Mark concludes his book by recording the commission Jesus gives to his apostles about going “into all the world and [preach-ing] the gospel to all creation” (16:15). Within a few short days of receiving this commission, the apostles were standing in front of the Jews on the day of Pentecost and telling them about this man of action (Acts 2). On that day there were some people who were baptized “immediately” after hearing the preaching of Peter and the other apostles. The question for us is what do we do “immediately” after hear-ing a message from the word of God? Do we forget it? Ponder it, and then obey it? Or do we take “immediate” action? Whether it is immediate or in the near future, let’s take action! A s we continue our study on angels this week, let us look at just some of their work in the New Testament. Angels are spoken of almost 300 times in the Bible, so it would be wise to see some of their work and ministry. Acts 8:26-40 records the account of Philip, the evangelist, as he was wit-nessing in Samaria when an angel spoke to him and directed him to go to the desert. Philip was given no explanation; he was just told to go. We, the church, all too often need to see the end results, even before we begin a work. It is so important for us to listen for the call to a work; then do the work. By faith is how the church should respond to ministries. Hebrews 11:1 says “Now faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen”. So it is by faith we walk. Angels are not employed to preach the gospel; they bring direc-tions and encouragement to God’s ambassadors. The angel directed Philip but it was the Holy Spirit through Philip that unfolded the gospel to the eunuch. So it is today that every preacher of the gospel is to be lead by the Holy Spirit of God. When we are led by the Holy Spirit we will all speak the same message. As angels were present when God gave the law to Israel, so an angel par-ticipated in the giving of the gospel to the Gentiles (Acts 10). Cornelius, a devout man, a Gentile, had received instructions, brought by an Angel of God, to send for Peter; of whom he may have never even heard of. But Cornelius, a Gentile, was a stranger and a foreigner to Israel and God. In the law the Israelites were forbidden to have any association with the Gentiles. Peter now a Christian, still was preju-diced toward the Gentiles. It was hard for him, a Jewish convert, to under-stand the bringing of the Gospel to the Gentiles. This kind of reminds us of Jonah, doesn’t it? It is extremely hard for even the church of Jesus Christ to overcome prejudice and bigotry. Here God sent an angel from heaven to bring the two together. The meet-ing, presided over by the Holy Spirit, was the channel God used to get the Gospel of the Lord Jesus Christ to the whole world. Peter, under the leadership of the Holy Spirit, declared “in truth I perceive that God shows no partiality. But in every nation whoever fears Him and works righteousness is accepted by Him” (Acts 10:34-35). If God shows no partiality, then as long as people want to worship God according to God’s word, we also should not show partiality. Acts 12 records how Herod, after killing James, the brother of John, seized Peter and bound him and put him in prison, an “Angel of the Lord” came and loosed Peter from the prison where he was kept. I wonder how many times an “Angel from the Lord” is sent to protect His people and to keep us for the ministry. Angels are ministering Spirits that God gives us to assist us along the way. They are never to be wor-shipped. Worship God! Q Hugh Sherrill is an ordained minister and Bible Teacher at Eastside Baptist Church. BIBLICAL MEDITATION Carlton McPeakcarlton_mc@msn.com Q Carlton G. McPeak is an evangelist working in the Lake City area. All Scriptural quotations are from the New American Standard Bible, Holman Bible Publishers, unless otherwise noted. Immediate action by Jesus The Church and Angels —Part 2 Hugh Sherrillems-hugh43@comcast.net BIBLE STUDIES

PAGE 7

Oct. 19Gospel performanceThe Lumbar River Quartet will present a con-cert of gospel music at the Lulu Advent Christian Church at 7 p.m. The group is a well-known Southern gospel music group that performs across the U.S. and Canada. Fish dinnerOur Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5056 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, pre-pares fish dinners every Friday from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The dinner is $6 for two Alaskan pollock filets, corn, baked beans, hush-puppies, cole slaw and tart-er sauce..Oct. 20 Church fundraiserThe annual fish fry to raise funds to maintain the historical Corinth Church and cemetery will be held from 4 to 7 p.m. The church is on Corinth Road, five miles north of Interstate 10, on U.S. 441 North. Catfish/mullet, grits, coleslaw, baked beans, hushpup-pies, dessert and tea will be included for $8. All funds raised will be used to maintain the cemetery and restore the church, which was organized in 1887. Gospel singWatertown Congregational Methodist Church will have a gospel sing at 7 p.m. featur-ing The Delivereds. There will be refreshments. Call 752-1329 for information. Oct. 21HomecomingLake City Church of the Nazarene, on Highway 47, will have its annual home-coming service, beginning at 10 a.m. The service will include Guest speaker Dr. Orville Jenkins, North Florida District super-intendent, and special music. The service will conclude with a covered-dish luncheon in the fellow-ship hall. Nursery will be provided for the morning service. Lulu homecomingLulu Baptist Church will have its homecoming today. The Rev. Hugh Dampler, interim pastor, will deliv-er the 11 a.m. message. a covered-dish meal will be served after the services. The evening service is can-celed. HomecomingBethel United Methodist Church will have its home-coming service at 10:30 a.m., followed by a covered-dish lunch. For informa-tion, call 755-1353. Friends & family dayNew Mount Salem Community Church will have a family and friends day appreciation service at 3:30 p.m. Keynote speaker will be the Rev. Michael Perry of Old Shiloh Missionary Baptist Church in Alachua. For informa-tion, call 754-8923. Pastor celebrationThe congregation of Glad Tiding Assembly invites the community to join us at 10:30 a.m. to celebrate Pastor Lowell and Margie Van Vleck’s 18th anniversary at the church with a pastor appre-ciation service. The Rev. Michael Baldree will be ministering. Glad Tidings Assembly is now at 1571 E. Duval St. in Lake City. Dinner will be served. For more information, con-tact Mrs. Truluck at (386) 752-9851.Pastor appreciationThe members of New Mount Zion AME Church will have an appreciation service for their pastor, Rev. Charles Young, at 11 a.m. The speaker fwill be the Rev. Leroy Young of Jacksonville. Dinner will be served after the service. For information, call 752-4306. Pastor appreciationNew Beginning Church will celebrate its pastor, the Rev. Ulis Taylor, with a pastor appreciation day, starting at 11 a.m. A lunch will follow in the fellowship hall. Friends and family are invited to bring a covered dish and join them. Oct. 26Spaghetti dinner Wellborn United Methodist Church, 12005 County Road 137 in Wellborn, will be holding a spaghetti dinner fundrais-er with all the trimmings, beginning at 6 p.m. in the fellowship hall. While there is no charge for the dinner, donations will be accept-ed at the door. All money collected will be given to nonprofit, Christian orga-nization Love Inc. to help its 2013 annual operating budget. The dinner will feature a unique, home-made sauce, spaghetti, salad, Italian bread, dessert and beverage. For more information about Love Inc., contact Executive Director Lisa Kriehn at (386) 330-2671. For more information about the spa-ghetti dinner, contact Rev. Dr. Everett L. Parker at (386) 754-8524.Gospel extravaganzaFirst Trinity United Methodist Church will have a gospel extravaganza Oct. 26 and 27 at 7 p.m. at the church, 248 NE Martin Luther King St. in Lake City. Proceeds will go towards the building fund. We invite the community to celebrate our Lord through song and dance. Fish dinnerOur Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5056 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, pre-pares fish dinners every Friday from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The dinner is $6 for two Alaskan Pollock filets, corn, baked beans, hush puppies, cole slaw and tarter sauce. Take out or eat in. Oct. 28Pastor appreciationPastor appreciation day at the Voice of Deliverance Church for Pastor Loretta Cagle’s 27 years of service will be at 2 p.m. on East Washington Street by the old school bus barn. Lunch will be served at 12:30 p.m. For more information, call 344-8570.Oct. 31Trunk or treatLantern Park Baptist Church, 239 SE Llewellyn Ave., will have a trunk or treat event from 5 to 6:30 p.m. in the church parking lot. Nov. 1 Christian motorcyclistsChristian Motorcyclist Association, Iron Shepherds Chapter 826, meets the first Thursday of each month at Ray’s Deli & Grill on Highway 247 across from the fairgrounds at 6:30 p.m. We are a Christian motor-cyclist group sharing and showing the love of Jesus Christ to motorcyclists. For more information email Ironshepherds826@gmail.com.Nov. 3Cornerstone MinistryJoin Cornerstone Outreach Ministry, Pastor Willie Brown and Pastor Richard Marshall for a ban-quet for potential members, donors and sponsors at the Super Motel, 3954 Highway 47. The ministry wants to take back neighborhoods, homes and schools by getting their hands dirty. Tickets are $15, and all proceeds go to the minis-try. For information, call 288-1363. Nov. 7Fall meetingSalem Primitive Baptist Church announces the Fall Meeting with Elder Ronald Lawrence of Nashville will begin at 6:30 p.m. We will continue Nov. 7 at 6:30 p.m. and end on Nov. 8. The church is nine miles north-west of Lake City on Lake Jeffrey Road. For informa-tion, call 752-4198. Nov. 11Devotional servicesThe American Legion, Rider Chapter 57, South Highway 47, hosts Sunday morning devotional ser-vices the second Sunday of every month at 9 a.m. There is also a continen-tal breakfast from 8 to 9 a.m. Services are held by the Christian Motorcycle Association. Everyone is welcome to join in the fellowship, breakfast and spiritually uplifting morn-ing services. LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE FRIDAY & SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19-20, 2012 7A7AReligion I doubt if anyone has ever been through a difficult time without asking or at least thinking: “How in the world did I get here?” Sometimes we realize we have no control over the situation we are in, and yet, other times we have to face the reality that we alone are responsible. Whatever the case, we can conclude that our struggles are not without purpose. They provide an oppor-tunity to grow, learn, mature and prepare for what lies ahead. Therefore, it is wise to deter-mine, if possible, why we are “here” and perhaps more impor-tant, what we need to know in order to leave! At the end of Deuteronomy, Chapter One, Moses recounts the reason behind Israel’s 40-year stint in the wilderness. In summary, spies were chosen from each of the 12 tribes to report on the best strategy for acquiring the land God had promised. Instead, 10 of the 12 returned terrified and spread the news that it was an impos-sible task, and like wildfire, fear spread to the point that not going into the Promised Land was the preferable choice. At this point, God displayed His anger, and after destroying the ten who spread a bad report, pronounced the verdict: Not one over the age of 20 would enter the land, but would die in the wilderness … all except Caleb and Joshua who remained faith-ful. Those under 20 years old would remain in the desert for forty years … one year for each of the 40 days the spies explored the land. Therefore, God told Moses to have the Israelites turn around and head back into the desert. (See Numbers 14:20-35) Instead of accepting God’s judgment, what the Israelites do next is something we need to pay close attention to, because we have the same tendency: Numbers 14:39-40 records: “When Moses reported this to all the Israelites, they mourned bitterly. Early the next morning they went up toward the high hill country. “We have sinned,” they said. “We will go up to the place the Lord promised.” I suppose in light of dying in the desert or spending an extra forty years wandering around, going into the land God has promised doesn’t seem so scary all of the sudden. Does this sound like a teenager who offers to clean her room AFTER you take the car keys … or the employee who promises to show up on time AFTER they are fired … or the spouse who agrees to counseling, AFTER you threaten to leave? The Israelites tried it anyway and were “attacked and beaten down.” God was not fooled by this gesture of remorse, because He knew it was not true repen-tance. I can’t help but wonder what would have happened at this point if the Israelites had truly repented over their lack of faith. “Godly sorrow brings repentance that leads to salva-tion and leaves no regret, but worldly sorrow brings death.” (1 Corinthians 7:10) Worldly sorrow is only sorry that it was caught and now faces con-sequences. However, if those consequences can be avoided, everything will go back like before … no change will occur. Godly sorrow involves remorse over causing pain to another, especially God. Godly sorrow causes us to confess in order to restore the relationship, and makes us willing to face con-sequences in order to pay our debt. Repentance is critical to our relationship with God and oth-ers, especially as we travel through the difficult seasons of life. Let’s admit that fixing things our way just creates a bigger mess, and practice real repentance … because every heart matters! Blessings, Angie CHURCH CALENDAR Q To submit your free Church Calendar item, contact Jim Barr by email at jbarr@lakecityreporter.com, drop off at the Reporter office, 180 E. Duval St., or fax to (386) 752-9400.Out of the mouths of children Repentance is a difficult lesson HEART MATTERS Angie Landangieland3@windstream.net Q Heart Matters is a weekly column written by Angie Land, director of the Family Life Ministries of the Lafayette Baptist Association, where she teaches Bible studies, leads marriage and family conferences and offers biblical counseling to individu als, couples and families. V eterinarians are a special breed of people who not only care for animals, but spend much time and money in learning how to take that care to a higher level. It always amazes me how they can be so gentle in the most difficult situa-tions. True story: “Some of the most poignant moments I spend as a veterinarian are those spent with clients assist-ing the transition of the animal patients from this world to the next. When living becomes a burden, whether from pain or loss of normal functions, I can help a family by ensuring that their beloved pet has an easy passing. Making this final decision is pain-ful, and I have often felt powerless to comfort the grieving owners. That was before I met Shane. “I had been called to examine a 10-year-old blue heeler named Belker who had a serious health problem. The dog’s owner, Ron, his wife and their little boy, Shane, were all attached to Belker and were hoping for a miracle. I examined Belker and found he was dying of cancer. “I told the family that there were no miracles left of Belker, and offered to perform the euthanasia procedure for the old dog in their home. As we made arrangements, Ron and Lisa told me they thought it would be good for their 4-year-old son Shane to observe the procedure. They felt Shane could learn something from the experience. “The next day, I felt the familiar catch in my throat as Belker’s family surrounded him. Shane seemed so calm, petting the old dog for the last time, and I wondered if he understood what was going on. “Within a few minutes, Belker slipped peace-fully away. The little boy seemed to accept Belker’s transition without any dif-ficulty or confusion. We sat together for a while after Belker’s death, wondering about the sad fact that ani-mal lives are shorter that human lives. “Shane, who had been listening, quietly piped up, ‘I know why.’ Startled, we all turned to him. What came out of his mouth next stunned me. I’d never heard a more comforting explanation. “He said, ‘Everybody is born so that they can learn to live a good life — like loving everybody and being nice, right?’ The 4-year-old continued. ‘Well, animals already know how to do that, so they don’t have to stay as long.’” Jack Exum Jr.jackexumjr@yahoo.com Q Jack Exum Jr. Is a freelance writer who lives in Lake City. Cheerleaders’ Bible banner approvedAssociated PressAUSTIN, Texas — A judge ruled Thursday that cheerleaders at an East Texas high school can dis-play banners with Bible verses at football games, saying the school district’s ban on the practice appears to violate the students’ free speech rights. District Judge Steve Thomas granted an injunction requested by the Kountze High School cheerleaders allowing them to continue display-ing religious-themed ban-ners pending the outcome of a lawsuit, which is set to go to trial next June, Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott said. School officials barred the cheerleaders from dis-playing banners with reli-gious messages such as, “If God is for us, who can be against us.”

PAGE 8

8A LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT FRIDAY & SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19-20, 2012 8A YES NO YES YES YES YES YES YES NO NO NO NO NO NO The most On Demand TV shows and movies on TV, streaming online and on your tablet or smartphone with the XFINITY TV app The most HD choices AnyRoom On Demand, so you can start an XFINITY On Demand show in one room and nish it in another The most live sports WatchESPN app so you can watch your favorite live ESPN content anywhere on your smartphone or tablet More Internet protection included at no additional cost with Norton Security Suite, IDENTITY GUARD and Comcast Secure Backup & Share The Internet provider more people choose over any other in the nation YES NO Advanced home phone calling features like Readable Voicemail and Text Messaging at no extra cost YES NO Skype video calling on your TV with HD-quality video Offer ends 12/31/12, and is limited to new residential customers. XFINITY service not available in all areas. Requires subscription to Economy Plus Internet service. After promotional period, or if any service is cancelled or downgraded, regular rates apply. Comcasts current monthly service charge for Economy Plus Internet is $39.95, or $29.95 with subscription to XFINITY TV and/or XFINITY Voice, depending on area. Not all services available with all XFINITY packages. Service limited to a single outlet. Equipment, installation, taxes, and franchise fees extra. May not be combined with other offers. TV: Basic service subscription required to receive other levels of service. On Demand selections subject to charge indicated at time of purchase. Not all programming available in all areas. Internet: Actual speeds vary and are not guaranteed. Not all features compatible with Macintosh systems. Voice: $29.99 activation fee applies. Service (including 911/emergency services) may not function after an extended power outage. HD programming limited to programming provided to Comcast in HD format. Comparisons include HD channel lineup and HD programming available On Demand. Most Live Sports available with Digital Preferred TV and WatchESPN. Text messaging from laptop or PC requires XFINITY Internet subscription. Standard data charges may apply. Check with your carrier. Universal Caller ID requires subscription to XFINITY Digital TV and Internet Service. WatchESPN: Programming and scheduling subject to change and not available in all areas. Requires subscription to Digital Starter TV (or above). Skype: Restrictions apply. Not available in all areas. Limited to residential customers. Requires subscription to Digital Starter TV (or above) with HD service, Performance Internet (or above) and Unlimited Voice service. High-speed Internet connectivity required. Actual call clarity may vary. Skype to Skype calls require participants to have Skype accounts. All trademarks are the property of their respective owners. Money-Back Guarantee applies to one month recurring charge and standard installation up to $500. Call for restrictions and complete details. Norton is a registered mark of Symantec Corporation. Constant Guard and associated logos are trademarks or federally registered trademarks of Comcast Corporation. Not all features, including Constant Guard Protection Suite, are available with Macintosh systems. For details about Constant Guard for MAC, visit xnity.com/CGMAC. 2012 Comcast. All rights reserved. NPA103942-0171 82025_NPA103942-0171 Yes-No U-verse 10.62x21.indd 1 9/28/12 12:37 PM

PAGE 9

By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comMIDDLEBURG — Lightning struck quickly for Columbia High and it kept on striking as the Tigers gave a Bronco butt-whipping to Middleburg High in a 58-0 win on Thursday. The Tigers held Middleburg to a three and out on its first series, thanks in part to a sack from Terry Calloway on third down. On Columbia’s first offensive play, Ronald Timmons went the distance for a 38-yard touchdown and the rout was on. Roc Battle picked off a Rick Lassiter pass on the second play of the next series and the Tigers went back to work. This time, it was a methodical approach as Jayce Barber led the Tigers on a six-play, 51-yard scor-ing drive. The drive was capped off with an Alex Weber touchdown on a 28-yard pass from Barber. Barber hit Shaq Johnson after another turnover on From staff reportsColumbia High’s swim team hosted Suwannee High for Senior Night on Thursday. The Lady Tigers won, 122-48, while the boys ended up in an 80-80 tie. Double winners for Columbia’s girls were Hannah Burns in the 200 free and 100 fly, and Lindsey Lee in the 200 IM and 500 free. Stephanie Silva won the 100 free and was third in the 100 fly. Sydney Morse won the 100 breast and was third in the 200 free. Micheala Polhamus won the 50 free and was fourth in the 100 breast. Courtney Britt won the 100 back. Sara Woodfield was second in the 200 free and 50 free. Aleena Fields was sec-ond in the 100 breast and fourth in the 50 free. Brianna Pope was third in the 200 IM and fourth in the 100 fly. Elyssa Svanberg was third in the 100 free and fourth in the 500 free. Reilly Morse was third in the 500 free. Caitlin Greene was fourth in the 200 IM. Joana Mata was fifth in the 100 back. Burns, Silva, Lee and Polhamus won the 200 free relay, but were disqualified in the 200 medley relay, which was won by Breland Phelps, Greene, Britt and Reilly Morse. Fields, Britt, Pope and Woodfield won the 400 free relay. Reilly Morse, Kathleen Lake City Reporter SPORTS Friday & Saturday, October 19-20, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B CHEAP SEATS Tim KirbyPhone: (386) 754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS TIGERS continued on 3B Columbia cruises to a 58-0 win in a district contest. CHS continued on 2B Columbia’s boys and Bulldogs tie on Senior Night. Q Tim Kirby is sports editor of the Lake City Reporter JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High quarterback Andrew Baker (12) takes a sn ap while Trey Phillips comes in motion in a game earlier this season. Foe from the beachBy TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comFORT WHITE — With skits and bonfires, courts and queens, field day and fun during homecoming week, football seems to take a back seat. Fort White High is celebrating homecoming this week, and the football team will take on Fernandina Beach High at 7:30 p.m. today. The Indians are 4-2, while the Class 4A Pirates are 2-5. Fort White spoiled Fernandina Beach’s home-coming last year, 65-30. “Homecoming is really for the alumni and we wel-come them back,” Indians head coach Demetric Jackson said. “We like for former students to come back and enjoy the festivi-ties. We want our seniors to enjoy it, but our part is to play hard and win the game.” To that end, the Indians put in a little “extra work” at practice on Tuesday. “They are preparing Fort White hosts Fernandina for homecoming. INDIANS continued on 3BWisdom of young womenW hen Fort White High’s middle school team hosted Richardson Middle School in a football game on Tuesday, there was an unusual circumstance. Both teams had a girl on their roster — Katlen Williams for the Wolves and Taylor DuBose for the Indians. There have been other female football players in Columbia County, some at the varsity level, but it remains rare and especially with a girl on both teams. Williams and Dubose met at midfield before the game for a picture and talked about their shared experience. They showed tenacity and a respect for, and from, their coaches and fellow players. “I like the way they don’t treat me like a girl,” Williams said. “They treat me like a brother or a teammate.” “The drills are fun, trying to tackle each other,” DuBose said. “I enjoy it. Last year, a lot of girls signed up, but it was only me. They were just talk.” Both players are receivers and got in the game. DuBose was even one of the deep guys on a kickoff return. Williams was the intended receiver on a PAT attempt, but the ball was underthrown. As an eight-grader, Williams knows she may be at the end of the line. “I will be in high school next year and I am trying to go to a girls’ league,” Williams said. A big dream remains alive for seventh-grader DuBose. “Next year I would like to be quarterback,” DuBose said. Football seemed suited for both girls. “It is the best sport ever, if you don’t get along with girls,” said Williams, whose brother played at Richardson. “I like playing football with the boys. It has been awesome.” “The first couple of practices were awkward because I didn’t know anybody,” DuBose said. “If you like being aggressive, you can take out your anger on the players. That is 100 times better.” Another recent profound statement of a female athlete came from Columbia High golfer Abby Blizzard. In the district tournament on Monday, there were no “gimme” putts. “You have to play until you get it in the hole, and that is hard to do,” Blizzard said. From hacker to pro, every golfer can relate. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Hannah Burns is on her way to victory in the girls 200 freestyle against Suwannee High at the Columbia Aquatic Complex on Thursd ay. Bronco blowoutLady Tigers swim past Suwannee BRENT KUYKENDALL /Lake City ReporterColumbia High running back Braxton Stockton (22) looks for an opening behind the blocking of Deontae’ Crumitie (57) in the Tigers’ 58-0 win at Middleburg High on Thursday.

PAGE 10

SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today AUTO RACING 12:30 p.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, practice for Hollywood Casino 400, at Kansas City, Kan. 2 p.m. ESPN2 — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, practice for Kansas Lottery 300, at Kansas City, Kan. 3:30 p.m. ESPN2 — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, final practice for Kansas Lottery 300, at Kansas City, Kan. 5 p.m. ESPN2 — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, pole qualifying for Hollywood Casino 400, at Kansas City, Kan. 8:30 p.m. SPEED — ARCA, Kansas Lottery 98.9, at Kansas City, Kan. CANADIAN FOOTBALL LEAGUE 10 p.m. NBCSN — Edmonton at British Columbia COLLEGE FOOTBALL 8 p.m. ESPN — UConn at Syracuse EXTREME SPORTS 7:30 p.m. NBCSN — Dew Tour, Toyota City Championships, at San Francisco GOLF 2 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, The McGladrey Classic, second round, at St. Simons Island, Ga. 5 p.m. TGC — Web.com Tour, Jacksonville Open, second round, at Ponte Vedra Beach (same-day tape) 7:30 p.m. TGC — LPGA, HanaBank Championship, first round, at Incheon, South Korea (same-day tape) 1:30 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Perth International, third round, at Perth, Australia MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 8 p.m. FOX — NLCS, game 5, San Francisco at St. Louis PREP FOOTBALL 10:30 p.m. FSN — Mission Viejo (Calif.) at Tesoro (Calif.) WNBA BASKETBALL 8 p.m. ESPN2 — Playoffs, finals, game 3, Minnesota at Indiana ——— Saturday, Oct. 20 AUTO RACING 11 a.m. ESPN2 — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, practice for Hollywood Casino 400, at Kansas City, Kan. Noon SPEED — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, pole qualifying for Kansas Lottery 300, at Kansas City, Kan. 1:30 p.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, “Happy Hour Series,” final practice for Hollywood Casino 400, at Kansas City, Kan. 3:30 p.m. ESPN — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, Kansas Lottery 300, at Kansas City, Kan. BOXING 8 p.m. SHO — Champion Hassan N’Dam (27-0-0) vs. Peter Quillin (27-0-0), for WBO middleweight title; champion Randall Bailey (43-7-0) vs. Devon Alexander (23-1-0), for IBF welterweight world title; champion Paul Malignaggi (31-4-0) vs. Pablo Cesar Cano (25-1-1), for WBA welterweight title; champion Danny Garcia (24-0-0) vs. Erik Morales (52-8-0), for WBC/WBA super light-weight title, at New York COLLEGE FOOTBALL Noon ABC — Split national coverage, Virginia Tech at Clemson or teams TBA ESPN — Teams TBAESPN2 — Regional coverage, Virginia Tech at Clemson or teams TBA FX — Texas Tech at TCU or Iowa St. at Oklahoma St. NBCSN — Penn at Yale 3 p.m. FOX — Stanford at California 3:30 p.m. ABC — Regional coverage, South Florida at Louisville or teams TBA CBS — Teams TBAESPN2 — Teams TBA FSN — Rice at TulsaNBC — BYU at Notre DameNBCSN — UNLV at Boise St. 7 p.m. ESPN — Teams TBAFOX — Kansas St. at West VirginiaFSN — Kansas at Oklahoma 7:45 p.m. ESPN2 — Teams TBA 8:07 p.m. ABC — Split national coverage, Florida St. at Miami or teams TBA EXTREME SPORTS 1:30 p.m. NBC — Dew Tour, Toyota City Championships, at San Francisco 11 p.m. NBCSN — Dew Tour, Toyota City Championships, at San Francisco (same-day tape) GOLF 2 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, The McGladrey Classic, third round, at St. Simons Island, Ga. 5 p.m. TGC — Web.com Tour, Jacksonville Open, third round, at Ponte Vedra Beach (same-day tape) 7:30 p.m. TGC — LPGA, HanaBank Championship, second round, at Incheon, South Korea (same-day tape) 1:30 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Perth International, final round, at Perth, Australia MOTORSPORTS 10 p.m. SPEED — Monster Energy Cup, at Las Vegas 4 a.m. SPEED — MotoGP World Championship, Malaysian Grand Prix, at Sepang, Malaysia SOCCER 7:30 a.m. ESPN2 — Premier League, Chelsea at Tottenham 7:30 p.m. NBCSN — MLS, Philadelphia at HoustonBASEBALLMLB playoffs LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES American League Detroit 4, New York 0 Detroit 6, New York 4, 12 inningsDetroit 3, New York 0Detroit 2, New York 1 Wednesday New York at Detroit, ppd., rain Thursday Detroit 8, New York 1 ——— National League (All games televised by Fox) St. Louis 2, San Francisco 1 St. Louis 6, San Francisco 4San Francisco 7, St. Louis 1 Wednesday St. Louis 3, San Francisco 1 Thursday San Francisco at St. Louis (n) Today San Francisco (Zito 15-8) at St. Louis (Lynn 18-7), 8:07 p.m.FOOTBALLNFL standings AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAN.Y. Jets 3 3 0 .500 133 141New England 3 3 0 .500 188 137Miami 3 3 0 .500 120 117Buffalo 3 3 0 .500 137 192 South W L T Pct PF PAHouston 5 1 0 .833 173 115Indianapolis 2 3 0 .400 100 145Tennessee 2 4 0 .333 114 204Jacksonville 1 4 0 .200 65 138 North W L T Pct PF PABaltimore 5 1 0 .833 161 118Cincinnati 3 3 0 .500 149 163Pittsburgh 2 3 0 .400 116 115Cleveland 1 5 0 .167 134 163 West W L T Pct PF PADenver 3 3 0 .500 170 138San Diego 3 3 0 .500 148 137Oakland 1 4 0 .200 87 148Kansas City 1 5 0 .167 104 183 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PA N.Y. Giants 4 2 0 .667 178 114Philadelphia 3 3 0 .500 103 125Washington 3 3 0 .500 178 173Dallas 2 3 0 .400 94 119 South W L T Pct PF PAAtlanta 6 0 0 1.000 171 113Tampa Bay 2 3 0 .400 120 101Carolina 1 4 0 .200 92 125New Orleans 1 4 0 .200 141 154 North W L T Pct PF PAChicago 4 1 0 .800 149 71Minnesota 4 2 0 .667 146 117Green Bay 3 3 0 .500 154 135Detroit 2 3 0 .400 126 137 West W L T Pct PF PAArizona 4 2 0 .667 110 97San Francisco 4 2 0 .667 152 94Seattle 4 2 0 .667 110 93St. Louis 3 3 0 .500 110 111 Thursday’s Game Seattle at San Francisco (n) Sunday’s Games Arizona at Minnesota, 1 p.m.Green Bay at St. Louis, 1 p.m.Baltimore at Houston, 1 p.m.Washington at N.Y. Giants, 1 p.m.Dallas at Carolina, 1 p.m.New Orleans at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.Cleveland at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.Tennessee at Buffalo, 1 p.m.Jacksonville at Oakland, 4:25 p.m.N.Y. Jets at New England, 4:25 p.m.Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 8:20 p.m. Monday’s Game Detroit at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.Open: Atlanta, Denver, Kansas City, Miami, Philadelphia, San DiegoAP Top 25 games Saturday No. 1 Alabama at Tennessee, 7 p.m.No. 3 Florida vs. No. 9 South Carolina, 3:30 p.m. No. 4 Kansas State at No. 17 West Virginia, 7 p.m. No. 5 Notre Dame vs. BYU, 3:30 p.m.No. 6 LSU at No. 20 Texas A&M, Noon No. 7 Ohio State vs. Purdue, NoonNo. 8 Oregon State vs. Utah, 10:30 p.m. No. 10 Oklahoma vs. Kansas, 7 p.m.No. 11 Southern Cal vs. Colorado, 6 p.m. No. 12 Florida State at Miami, 8 p.m. No. 13 Georgia at Kentucky, 7 p.m.No. 14 Clemson vs. Virginia Tech, Noon No. 15 Mississippi State vs. Middle Tennessee, 7 p.m. No. 16 Louisville vs. USF, 3:30 p.m. No. 18 Texas Tech at TCU, 3:30 p.m.No. 19 Rutgers at Temple, NoonNo. 21 Cincinnati at Toledo, 7 p.m.No. 22 Stanford at California, 3 p.m.No. 23 Michigan vs. Michigan State, 3:30 p.m. No. 24 Boise State vs. UNLV, 3:30 p.m.BASKETBALLNBA preseason Today’s Games New York vs. Toronto at Montreal, Quebec, 7 p.m. Indiana at Orlando, 7 p.m.Philadelphia at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.Minnesota at Chicago, 8 p.m.Phoenix vs. Oklahoma City at Tulsa, Okla., 8 p.m. Sacramento vs. L.A. Lakers at Las Vegas, Nev., 10 p.m. Golden State at Portland, 10 p.m. Saturday’s Games San Antonio at Miami, 3:30 p.m.Dallas at Atlanta, 7 p.m.Memphis at Indiana, 7 p.m.New York vs. Boston at Albany, N.Y., 7:30 p.m. Charlotte at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.Washington at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.L.A. Clippers at Utah, 9 p.m. WNBA Finals Indiana 1, Minnesota 1 (Best of 5) Wednesday Minnesota 83, Indiana 7 Today Minnesota at Indiana, 8 p.m. Sunday Minnesota at Indiana, 8 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 24 Indiana at Minnesota, 8 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19-20, 20122BSPORTS BOWLING CHS: District meet in Orange Park Continued From Page 1B BRIEFS Tigers JV at Bobcat XC ClassicFrom staff reportsColumbia High’s junior varsity teams ran in the 12th Annual Bobcat Cross Country Classic Invitational on Saturday at Santa Fe College in Gainesville. Host Buchholz High won both the girls’ and boys’ competition in a five-team field. The Lady Tigers placed second: Dimple Desai, 2nd-23:54; Cori Calyniuk, 6th-25:21; Jordan Gompers, 16th-28:02; Kaitlyn Daniel, 18th-28:11; Danielle Mathis, 22nd-19:16; Caroline Cribbs, 31st-30:57; Myriah Furber, 32nd-31:02. Columbia’s boys placed third: Dominique Cason, 11th-21:23; Chris Sellers, 14th-21:39; Dillan Beckelheimer, 15th-21:46; David King, 16th-21:54; Kelly Varnell, 17th-22:00; Lee Peterson, 28th-24:40; Kevin Lauder, 29th-25:16. RUNNING Wright Brothers 5K for veterans The Race Against the Wright Brothers 5K is 8 a.m. Nov. 10 at Olustee Park in downtown Lake City. Proceeds go to Volunteer Service Programs for Disabled American Veterans at the Lake City VA Medical Center. Registration is at www. stepfitnessonline.com or at Carquest. For details, call Michelle Richards at 208-2447. OUTDOORS Hunter safety course offered Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is offering a hunter safety Internet-completion course for Columbia County from 6-9 p.m. Oct. 25 and 8 a.m. to noon Oct. 27. Students who have taken the online course and wish to complete the classroom portion must bring the online-completion report. Firearms, ammunition and materials are provided. An adult must accompany children younger than 16. Class locations will be given to those who register in advance. Call the regional office at 758-0525 or go to www. myfwc.com /HunterSafety. Q From staff reports League resultsLake City Bowl league play: GOLDEN ROLLERS Team standings: 1. Gamblers; 2. Knock em Down; 3. Quirky Quad. Team high handicap game: 1. 2 Plus 2 906; 2. (tie) Gamblers, Knock em Down 869. Team high handicap series: 1. 2 Girls & 2 Guys 2,558; 2. Jo’s Crew 2,434; 3. Wild Things 2,427. High scratch game: 1. Betty Brown 194; 2. Yvonne Finley 170; 3. Doreen Waters 160. 1. George Mulligan 243; 2. Lee McKinney 226; 3. Bill Price 200. High scratch series: 1. Joyce Hooper 470; 2. Louise Atwood 469; 3. Judy Johnson 447. 1. David Duncan 614; 2. Earl Hayward 567; 3. Bill Dolly 527. High handicap game: 1. Elaine Nemeth 277; 2. Betty Carmichael 229; 3. Vy Ritter 210. 1. Jim Burnett 273; 2. Vernon Black 243; 3. Winton Brewer 227 High handicap series: 1. June Pat Klock 726; 2. Joan Carman 642; 3. Joanne Denton 617. 1. Wayne Johns 698; 2. Ray Denton 675; 3. Sal Annello 624. High average: 1. Elaine Nemeth 156.33; 2. Judy Hohnson 153.21; 3. Doreen Waters 147.29. 1. Lee McKinney 186.92; 2. Wayne Johns 184.75; 3. Bill Dolly 183.48.(results from Oct. 4) HIT & MISS Team standings: 1. All Mrs’s (21-11, 535 team average); 2. Spare Us (21-11, 533 team average); 3. Legal Ladies (19.5-12.5). Team high handicap game: 1. Spare Us 796; 2. Oddballs 776; 3. Legal Ladies 743. Team high handicap series: 1. All Mrs’s 2,376; 2. Sandbaggers 2,255; 3. Silver Ladies 2,234. High handicap game: 1. Elsie Huddleston 230; 2. Carol Tonietto 227; 3. (tie) Karen Gardner, Pat Warne 219. High handicap series: 1. Judy Daniels 639; 2. Joanne Knutsen 606; 3. Sandy Black 605.(results from Oct. 9) WATERGUARD LEAGUE Team high handicap game: 1. Dominators 936; 2. 10 In The Pitt 892; 3. Wolf Pack 860. Team high handicap series: 1. We Don’t Care 2,591; 2. Split/House 2,545; 3. O 2 Cool 2,543. High scratch game: 1. Mary Lobaugh 234; 2. Lorrie Geiger 232; 3. Chrissy Fancy 196. 1. James Price 274; 2. Bobby Robinson 225; 3. Bill Dolly 222. High scratch series: 1. Lorrie Geiger 561; 2. Mary Lobaugh 558; 3. Chrissy Fancy 529. 1. James Price 620; 2. Bill Dolly 589; 3. Bobby Robinson 550. High handicap game: 1. Mary Lobaugh 263; 2. Lorrie Geiger 259; 3. Carla Nyssen 252. 1. James Price 280; 2. Blake Lunden 253; 3,. Chris Camacho 252 High handicap series: 1. Samantha Lovell 689; 2. Linda Oliver 656; 3. Julie Bell 638. 1. Bobby Robinson 673; 2. Jesus Camacho 666; 3. Tony Harper 650. High average: Lorrie Geiger 176; James Price 202.(results from Oct. 16) MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS Team standings: 1. Ronsonet Buick-GMC (127-83); 2. Team 10 (121-89); 3. PLoA (117.5-92.5). High scratch game: 1. Dan Adel 279; 2. Patrick Markham 266; 3. Bill Duncan 238. High scratch series: 1. Dan Adel 665; 2. Wally Howard 654; 3. Zech Strohl 638. High handicap game: 1. Dan Adel 297; 2. Patrick Markham 293; 3. Bryan King 285. High handicap series: 1. Luis Riviera 760; 2. Mike Rogosienski 747; 3. Tim Carson 746. High average: 1. Zech Strohl 216.24; 2. Wally Howard 213.78; 3. Dale Coleman 213.28.(results from Oct. 8) TGIF Team standings: 1. Gutter Dusters (20.5-7.5); 2. The Bowling Stones (19-9, 18,389 pins); 3. Oh Split! (19-9, 18,310 pins); 4. The Incredi-Bowls (19-9, 18,137 pins) Team high handicap game: 1. Waterbury Builders 975; 2. The Bowling Stones 939; 3. Oh Split! 928. Team high handicap series: 1. The Bowling Stones 2,794; 2. Waterbury Builders 2,660; 3. Splits & Misses 2,633. High scratch game: 1. Carol Younger 209; 2. Desiree Stemp 203; 3. Karen Coleman 202. 1. Bill Duncan 279; 2. Zech Strohl 236; 3. Walt Sherrod 235. High scratch series: 1. Desiree Stemp 541; 2. Shannon Howard 539; 3. Karen Coleman 516. 1. Bill Duncan 750; 2. David Adel 606; 3. Zech Strohl 603. High handicap game: 1. Carol Younger 279; 2. (tie) Chris Pauwels, Desiree Stemp 260. 1. Bill Duncan 297; 2. Blake Landen 278; 3. Walt Sherrod 273. High handicap series: 1. Donna Duncan 716; 2. Desiree Stemp 712; 3. Samantha Jolliff 708. 1. Bill Duncan 804; 2. Blake Landen 718; 3. Jim Pauwels Jr. 713. (results from Oct. 5)Youth leaguesMAJORS SCRATCH Team standings: 1. Ten in the Pit (72-40); 2. Ninja Bowling Inc. (59-53, 10,856 pins); 3. The CBC (59-53, 10,626 pins). High scratch game: 1. Courtney Schmitt 231; 2. Courtney Schmitt 215; 3. Sara Sykes 193. 1. Josh Fancy 259; 2. Colin Madden 249; 3. Brandon Shrum 236. High scratch series: 1. Courtney Schmitt 633; 2. Sara Sykes 526; 3. Victoria Wise 493. 1. Josh Fancy 630; 2. Cody Howard 585; 3. Brandon Shrum 573. MAJORS Team standings: 1. Team 5 (19-9); 2. Team Ace (16.5-11.5, 12,466 pins); 3. Team 3 (16.5-11.5, 12,139 pins). Team high handicap game: 1. The Destructors 621; 2. Team Ace 615; 3. Holy Splitz 595. Team high handicap series: 1. The Destructors 1,807; 2. Team Ace 1,739; 3. Team 3 1,728. High handicap game: 1. Sara Johns 223; 2. Tiffany Ritch 195; 3. Amanda Schmitt 192. 1. (tie) David Senokossoff, Elliott Steiskal 223; 3. Caleb Moulton 222. High handicap series: 1. Sara Johns 647; 2. Tiffany Ritch 578; 3. Amanda Schmitt 564. 1. Caleb Moulton 622; 2. Chris Barker 620; 3. Elliott Steiskal 614. JUNIORS Team standings: 1. Black Ops Dominators (17-11); 2. Dynamite (16.5-11.5); 3. 3G’s (16-12). Team high handicap game: 1. Bearded Dragons 588; 2. Masters of Disaster 573; 3. (tie) 3G’s, Team 8 552. Team high handicap series: 1. Bearded Dragons 1,665; 2. 3G’s 1,610; 3. Masters of Disaster 1,600. High handicap game: 1. Mickie Steiskal 208; 2. Elaina Silcox 202; 3. Emily McAuliffe 201. 1. Drew Greene 209; 2. David Becker 205; 3. Juan Perez 195. High handicap series: 1. Elaina Silcox 566; 2. Taiya Driggers 562; 3. Beth Saylor 555. 1. David Becker 585; 2. (tie) Aaron Rouse 562, Drew Greene 562. BANTAMS High handicap game: 1. Daphne Greene 166; 2. Allison Presnell 159; 3. Amber Rouse 158. 1. Austin Bailey 172; 2. Jacob Hartman 148. High handicap series: 1. Daphne Greene 474; 2. Allison Presnell 446; 3. Amber Rouse 420. 1. Austin Bailey 445; 2. Jacob Hartman 424. (results from Oct. 6)Revoir, Phelps and Kelcey Mclean were third in the 200 free relay. Revoir, Mclean, Sydney Morse and Svanberg were third in the 400 free relay. Joseph Piccioni (50 free, 100 free) and Cody Smith (500 free, 100 back) were double winners for Columbia’s boys. Cale Shaw won the 100 breast and was second in the 200 IM. Andrew Fortier was second in the 200 free and third in the 100 fly. Randall Soltis was second in the 100 fly and third in the 50 free. Jordan Morrill was second in the 100 breast and fourth in the 100 free. Jacob Finley was third in the 100 free and 500 free. Columbia’s 200 free relay team of Fortier, Smith, Piccioni and Soltis won. Smith, Piccioni, Shaw and Soltis placed second in the 200 medley relay, as did Morrill, Shaw, Finley and Fortier in the 400 free relay. Q Columbia competed in a four-team meet at Fernandina Beach High on Saturday. Columbia’s girls lost to the host team, 664-580, as did the boys, 427-274. The Lady Tigers beat West Nassau High, 643-182, and Yulee High, 614-388. Columbia’s boys beat West Nassau, 301-113, and Yulee, 304-0. Lady Tiger winners were Polhamus (200 free), Lee (50 free), Burns (100 fly, 500 free) and Sydney Morse (100 breast). Lee placed second in the 100 back. Silva (200 IM) and Britt (100 free) also placed second. Woodfield placed third in the 200 free. Polhamus placed fourth in the 100 fly. Placing fifth were Mata (200 IM), Silva (100 fly) and Reilly Morse (100 free, 100 breast). Placing sixth were Pope (200 IM), Svanberg (500 free) and Britt (100 back). Placing seventh were Phelps (200 free), Fields (50 free), Mclean (500 free), Mata (100 back) and Revoir (100 breast). Greene was ninth in the 100 free and Pope was 11th in the 50 free. Lee, Burns, Silva and Polhamus won the 200 medley relay. Britt, Sydney Morse, Pope and Woodfield placed seventh. Lee, Burns, Polhamus and Britt won the 200 free relay. Akira Gwinn, Mclean, Svanberg and Phelps placed fourth. Woodfield, Fields, Mata and Pope placed third in the 400 free relay. Svanberg, Sydney Morse, Reilly Morse and Mclean placed fifth. Finley won the 200 free and 500 free. Smith won the 100 breast and placed second in the 200 IM. Piccioni placed second in the 50 free and 100 free. Shaw placed second in the 200 free and 100 back. Soltis placed third in the 100 breast and fourth in the 50 free. Morrill placed fifth in the 500 free and sixth in the 100 breast. Columbia’s boys placed second in both the 200 medley relay and 200 free relay. Barber fires opening 67From staff reportsLake City’s Blayne Barber fired a 3 under 67 in the opening round of the Web.com Jacksonville Open. Barber was two shots back of Doug LaBelle II. There were three golfers at 66 and nine tied with Barber. The first round at the TPC Sawgrass Dye’s Vally Course was suspended because of darkness with eight golfers still on the course. Barber is grouped with Ryan Blaum and Donny Lee. The threesome will tee off at 2:10 p.m. today from the 10th tee. The Golf Channel is airing a tape delayed broad-cast of the Jacksonville Open, beginning at 5 p.m. Yankees put out of miseryAssociated PressDETROIT — Max Scherzer capped a stupen-dous stretch for Detroit’s starting rotation, and the Tigers advanced to the World Series for the sec-ond time in seven years by beating the New York Yankees 8-1 Thursday for a four-game sweep of the AL championship series. Miguel Cabrera and Jhonny Peralta hit two-run homers in a four-run fourth inning against CC Sabathia. “Yeah, we did it,” Cabrera said. “It’s an unbelievable feeling. ... Four more wins, guys. Four more wins.” Scherzer took a no-hit bid into the sixth inning. Detroit won its 11th American League pennant and first since 2006. After scoring in just three of 39 innings during the series, New York heads home to face unpleasant questions about its future. The Yankees hit .188 in the postseason and .157 in the LCS. Detroit outhit New York 16-2 in the finale.

PAGE 11

LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19-20, 2012 3B3BSports ADULT SOFTBALL LEAGUE TIGERS: Orange Park coming Oct. 26 Continued From Page 1B INDIANS: Preparing for Wing-T Continued From Page 1B COURTESY PHOTOThe Winfield Wildcats won the Columbia County Adult Softbal l’s Women’s League for the summer of 2012. Team members are (front row, from left) Nyr eka Smith, Cassandra Smith, Tammy Young, Ashley Lucas and Kelsey Curls. Second ro w (from left) are coach Clayton Thomas, Denise Griffis, Altimeka Pressley, Karen H arper, ‘Poochie’ Blocker and Debra Perry. Back row (from left) are coach Tyrone Bone s, coach Mike Felton, coach Pat Davis and Mia Carter. COURTESY PHOTOCheyenne Escort Lady Bandits were runner-up in the Col umbia County Adult Softball’s Women’s League for the summer of 2012. Team members are (front row, from left) Kaytlin Sealy, Heather Jenkins and Nichole Hayes. Back row (from left) are Traci Pace, Ashley Pearce, Kristy Harris, Meranda Stephens, Kim Gask ins, Amanda Albritton and Barbie Kight. Tee Ford also is on the team. Third place wa s a tie between Life is Good and Red Hots. Spradley Concrete was runner-up in the Columbia County Adult Softball’s Men’s League for the summer of 2012. Team members are (front row, from left) Branden Suggs, Erik Smith, Moe Albritton, Jerimy Thompson and James Hannah. Back row (from left) are J.D. Strickland, Bubba Langford, Rick Cothran, Joe Parrish and Josh Borris, plus Trey Mccrae, Clint Black and Billy Black. The Tommy Demas team won first place.COURTESY PHOTO COURTESY PHOTOSoftball Mafia was third place in the Columbia County Adu lt Softball’s Men’s League for the summer of 2012. Team members are (front row, from left) T.C. Harper, Richard Petty and David Rhodes. Back row (from left) are Wes Cothran, Corey Thomas, Codey Blackwell, Jake Beach, Aaron Summers, Neal Alford II and Bryson. COURTESY PHOTOThe Rountree Raptors won the Columbia County Adult Softball ’s Church Co-ed League for the summer of 2012. Team members are (front row, from left) Corey Thomas, Corey Sistrunk, Melissa Kennedy and Pam Hart. Back row (from left) are Mitchell Summerlin, Codey Blackwell, Kyle Hunter, Tim Bl ackwell and Trey Vandevoren. Christ Central was runner-up and 1st South Insurance won third place. well,” Jackson said. “We are trying to figure out how to motivate them and pick up the tempo a little bit.” Fernandina Beach is coached by Travis Hodge, a Bolles graduate who spent several years at Madison County High with the Cowboys’ well-known ground game. “They run the Wing-T and they have some big linemen,” Jackson said. “On defense they run a 3-4. They are playing a lot better than last year. They play hard, but they tend to make a lot of mistakes. We can’t make mistakes and let them stay in the game.” A football win would cap off perfectly the week-long festivities and celebration. “We want the alumni to come back and enjoy it,” Jackson said. Fort White travels to play Rickards High next week, while the Pirates have the week off. Q Fort White dedicated its football fieldhouse this year to long-time varsity and middle school head football coach Mike Hunter. Hunter, known as the “Father of Fort White Football,” toiled for Columbia High back in the day, before the new Fort White High was built and before there was Indians middle school football. In his senior season, Columbia played Fernandina Beach for homecoming on Oct. 24, 1969, and Hunter had his own field day. The Tigers’ 44-14 win was perhaps Hunter’s best high school performance. Hunter ran the ball 12 times for 173 yards and scored four touchdowns. Hunter’s touchdown runs were 26, 8, 11 and 4 yards, the last one set up by his fumble recovery on defense. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFlorida quarterback Jeff Driskel is toppled over on his head after attempting to gain yardage on a quarterback keeper against LSU on Oct. 6.Gators may not see Lattimore in the starting lineup for USCBy PETE IACOBELLIAssociated PressCOLUMBIA, S.C. — South Carolina running back Marcus Lattimore did not practice Wednesday because of a bruised hip and coach Steve Spurrier said his junior star might not start Saturday against No. 3 Florida. Spurrier had said Lattimore was running well earlier in the week, but the injury kept him out of Wednesday’s workout. Lattimore arrived at prac-tice let and watched from the sidelines. If Lattimore can’t go, Spurrier says backup Kenny Miles and freshman Mike Davis would handle the load at tailback when the ninth-ranked Gamecocks (6-1, 4-1 Southeastern Conference) go against the Gators (6-0, 5-0). “We’re sort of banged up all of a sudden,” Spurrier said. Spurrier said an injury like Lattimore’s generally takes a week or two to heal. Lattimore had a touchdown, but gained just 35 yards on 13 carries in ninth-ranked South Carolina’s 23-21 loss to the Tigers. Spurrier has gone backand-forth on Lattimore’s condition since Sunday. At first, he expected Lattimore to miss a couple of work-outs, but said Tuesday that Lattimore had looked OK during Monday’s session and expected him to play at The Swamp on Saturday. Then came Wednesday’s twist. Lattimore is sixth among SEC rushers with 584 yards. He’s tied with Texas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel for the SEC lead with 10 rushing TDs. “It’s not surgery type things,” Spurrier said of Lattimore’s condition. “It appears it’s something that’ll be fine in a week or so.” Lattimore tore ligaments in his left knee while block-ing against Mississippi State last year, an injury that cost him South Carolina’s final six games in 2011. He had offseason surgery and has looked strong this fall. Spurrier detailed several other key players dealing with injuries and illnesses. He said sophomore defensive end standout Jadeveon Clowney had a foot problem that has limited what he can do at practice. Defensive tackle Kelcy Quarles had his arm in a sling because of a shoulder injury and is doubtful to play against the Gators. Defensive linemen Byron Jerideau and J.T. Surratt are also hampered by injuries, although both are expected to play. And then there’s the flu bug, which Spurrier said has kept some Gamecocks from working out this week. Punt returner and starting receiver Ace Sanders missed practice Tuesday while receiver Bruce Ellington was out on Wednesday. Spurrier was hopeful all players hit by the flu could play on Saturday. downs by the Broncos and Johnson rumbled to the five. Braxton Stockton did the rest and put the Tigers up 21-0 with 6:03 remaining in the first quarter. Dugan Dotson sacked Lassiter on the Broncos’ next possession and the Tigers returned to Timmons and the ground game on offense. Timmons smashed forward 28 yards and Barber hit fullback Darren Burch for 29 yards before giving back off to Timmons for a two-yard touchdown run. Another three and out by the Broncos gave Columbia the ball with 55 seconds remaining in the first quarter. The Tigers would end the quarter the same way they started it — with a one play touchdown drive. This time it was Johnson going in from 40 yards away for a 34-0 lead at the end of the first quarter. Columbia didn’t let up in the second half as Charles Combs picked off a pass on the Broncos’ first pos-session of the quarter and the Tigers went back to the quick-strike attack. Again, it was one play as Timmons took the ball on a handoff and went 23 yards for a score to put Columbia up 41-0 in the second quarter. Columbia took over again with 7:54 remaining in the second quarter and added seven more points after a seven-play, 78-yard scoring drive. The drive was capped after Stockton rushed 32 yards for a score. He also had a 27-yard run on the drive. Up 48-0, the officials brought out the running clock. The Tigers picked up where they left off in the second half and added a field goal to the score when Brayden Thomas connected on a 31-yard try to put Columbia up 51-0. Wyndell Wallace recovered the following kickoff at the Broncos’ 7 and Columbia would hand it off to Lonnie Underwood on consecutive plays. Underwood scored from four yards out for the final of 58-0. “It was an absolutely outstanding effort all night,” Columbia High head coach Brian Allen told the team after the game. Columbia (6-1, 3-0 District 3-6A) can clinch the district championship with a win against Orange Park High at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 26 in Lake City. “It was an absolutely outstanding effort all night.”—Brian Allen, Columbia High head coach

PAGE 12

4B LAKE CITY REPORTER NASCAR FRIDAY & SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19-20, 20124BNascar NOTEBOOK Smith drives Earnhardt’s No. 88Dale Earnhardt’s concussion opened the door for Regan Smith,displaced from the No.78 FurnitureRow Chevrolet,to get in Earnhardt’s No.88Chevrolet,and Smith made the most of it whilethe car was running. He qualified a disappointing 26th,but was second fastest in the Happy Hour practice session.Then in the race he was steadily marching towardthe front when a blown engine sent him to thegarage at Lap 61. “I think the important part is that we had a really fast race car,”he said.“We had a good firstadjustment there,went just a little too far with itand got a little too free.Needed one more stop andI think we would have had it dialed in. “I’m looking forward to next week.We get three days to test when we get there to Kansas and wewill see if we can get the AMP Energy/NationalGuard Chevrolet up front there. “I feel confident we will have the same speed we had here.” Smith had planned to drive James Finch’s No. 51 Chevrolet at Charlotte,but his move to the No.88 opened the door for A.J.Allmendinger to makehis return to NASCAR after being suspended backin July for failing a drug test.He responded with a24th-place run despite a late-race penalty on pitroad.He’s expected to drive the car again thisweek at Kansas. Kurt Busch,who had been driving the No.51, made his first start in the No.78 Chevrolet thathad been driven by Smith.He finished 21st. “As a competitive racer you always want to go out there and be a contender,but on the otherhand when you’re starting something new you need to focus on the big picture,and that big pic-ture is to get primed and ready for the start of th e 2013 season,”Busch said.“Finishing 21st mightnot appear that we made progress,but the fact ofthe matter is that we did in our first three daystogether at the track. “But we’re also realistic,knowing that there will be more kinks along the way to work out in thefinal five races of the season.”Tests set for repaved speedwaySprint Cup drivers and teams will arrive at Kansas Speedway a day early this week.NASCARis allowing an extra day of testing because thetrack has been repaved and slightly reconfiguredsince the last time the circuit raced there. Kasey Kahne said he’s looking forward to the extra laps to fine tune his No.5 Chevrolet. “We don’t get a lot of testing these days.So it’s nice to go to a race track that you race on,andhave the tire that you are using,”he said,addingthat some of the knowledge gained could apply toother tracks the circuit races on this season. “You can learn some things for Texas and Homestead,and maybe even a little bit of stuff forPhoenix.So,I think it’s a nice test for all theteams to just be a little bit better preparedthroughout the rest of the season.” His Hendrick Motorsports teammate Jimmie Johnson agreed that the test will be helpful forthis week and for the future. “I would imagine the Chase guys will really just be focused on this year’s stuff and what we need todo there,”he said.“It’s nice to have data files,aswe all know,for our simulations programs and 7-Post machines and all the stuff that we use backat the shop.So,that’s good.I really feel more thananything,it’s just a safe move and it makes totalsense to do it for our sport.” He said that if there is a problem with the tires or the track,it’ll come out in time to make a fixbefore Sunday’s race. “We all get acclimated with the new surface and re-design,”he said.“I guess there are some smalllittle changes and things;and validate the tire andvalidate the track and get everything right so thatwhen we show up Friday,we can put on the showthat we need to.”Concussions in the sports world havepretty much been a football story,until last week when NASCAR’s biggest star,Dale Earnhardt Jr.,had to getout of his car. Earnhardt’s problems began with a violent wreck during a tire test at Kansas Speedwayin August.But he kept it quiet until a seem-ingly minor impact on the last lap atTalladega Superspeedway triggered moresymptoms and led to his seeking medical helpfor concussions suffered in both incidents. Missing Saturday’s Bank of America 500 at Charlotte Motor Speedway pretty muchended any hope Earnhardt had of winningthe Sprint Cup championship,but the driverand those around him all said the mostimportant thing at this point is the driver’shealth. And most around him were praising him for having the courage to come forward andadmit he was suffering.Earnhardt,through-out his career,has been known for telling thetruth no matter the consequences. “I think that’s one thing everybody admires about Dale is how honest and upfront he is,”Earnhardt’s car owner RickHendrick said in a press conference atCharlotte.“He cares a lot about the team,his fans,and the sport in general. “But when he knew that there was something not right,he went to see Dr.[Jerry]Petty,and I admire him.I think a lot of guyswould try to play hurt,but when the doctortells you if you get hit again like right away,it could be catastrophic.” Petty,who has worked for years with NASCAR and its drivers,said the verynature of concussions requires honestanswers on the driver’s part to get a correctdiagnosis. “Ninety percent of a concussion probably depends on individual information,”Pettysaid.“People around you might notice thatyou’re different.By and large,the historythat the patient gives is the thing that tellsyou that they’ve had a concussion. “A concussion can be seeing stars.A concussion can be just being addled for aminute.Any time the brain is not doingwhat it’s supposed to be doing after an accel-eration or deceleration,that’s a concussion.” But despite the possible consequences of concussions after concussions,drivers tend totry to keep their symptoms from keepingthem out of their race cars,especially whenthere are big trophies to be had. Earnhardt’s teammate Jeff Gordon said he probably wouldn’t take the steps Earnhardttook if there was a championship on the line. “Honestly,I hate to say this,but no,I wouldn’t,”he said.“That’s why I say we allplay a part in this.If I have a thought atthe championship,there’s two races to go,my head is hurting,and I just camethrough a wreck,and I am feeling signs ofit,but I’m still leading the points,or sec-ond in the points,I’m not going to say any-thing. “That’s the competitor in me,and probably many other guys.And,that’s to a fault.That’s not the way it should be.It is some-thing that most of us,I think,would do.Ithink that is what gets a lot of us in trou-ble.” But Earnhardt’s comments reveal that there’s a lot at stake,career-wise and other-wise,when a driver has literally rattled hisbrain in a crash.And sometimes the bestdecision is the one that seems so hard tomake at the time. “I want to live a healthy life,so I’m going to make sure that I’m doing the right thing,and that’s all I felt like I was doing here,”Earnhardt said.“I think if I give myself timeto get healed up,I can race for as long as Iwant to race,and that’s my objective.” By RICK MINTER / Universal Uclick By RICK MINTER / Universal Uclick Earnhardt talks about concussion, ‘playing hurt’Dale Earnhardt Jr. (right) with team owner Rick Hendrick speaks to the media at Charlotte Motor Speedway on Thursday.Earnhardt will miss two races after suffer ing a concussion from a wreck in Talladega.(NASCAR photo) NEXTUP... Race: Kansas Lottery 300 Where: Kansas Speedway When: Saturday, 3:00 p.m. (ET) TV: ESPN 2011 Winner: Brad Keselowski SPRINT CUP CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS NATIONWIDE SERIES Race: Kroger 200 Where: Martinsville Speedway When: Oct. 27, 1:30 p.m. (ET) TV: SPEED 2011 Winner: Denny Hamlin Race: Hollywood Casino 400 Where: Kansas Speedway When: Sunday, 1:00p.m. (ET) TV: ESPN 2011 Winner: Jimmie Johnson (right) NUMERICALLYSPEAKING Laps led by JimmieJohnson in the past nine Sprint Cup races at KansasSpeedway,most among drivers Laps led by Sprint Cuppoints leader Brad Keselowski in his five Cup startsat Kansas Speedway Laps led by KyleBusch in the past seven Nationwide Series races atKansas,top among all drivers Points separating third-place Austin Dillon from Nationwide Series points leaderElliott Sadler (defending champi-on Ricky Stenhouse Jr.is second,13back,while fourth-place Sam Hornish Jr.is 93 points out of thelead) 17 483 29 275 To fight another day 2012 CHASE CONTENDERS Chase Chart Following the Bank of America 500 at Charlotte Motor Speedway 1.Brad Keselowski 2,214 (finished 11th) Fuel-mileage racing,which had been one of his strong suits throughout his career,worked againsthim at Charlotte as he had to stop for gas while hi s closest Chase competitors stretched theirs to thefinish.“It’s like playing blackjack,”he said ofmileage racing.“Sometimes you’re going to get agood deal,but you’re not going to win ’em all.”2.Jimmie Johnson -7 (finished third) With four finishes of fourth or better in the five Chase races to date,he’s making a strong bid fora sixth Cup title.“We’re still not the best car outthere at it,but we’re making it work week-in andweek-out,”he said.3.Denny Hamlin -15 (finished second) The five-time winner this year played it conservatively in the closing laps at Charlotte,stretch-ing a tank of fuel to the finish,and now he’s head-ed to four of his best race tracks.“It’s finally go od to have a fuel mileage race somewhat go our way,”he said.“You’ve got to be prepared for thesebecause they seem happy more often than not.”4.Clint Bowyer -28 (finished first) He made gas-mileage racing work for him again and remains in the hunt for the championship inhis first year at Michael Waltrip Racing.And itwas a milestone victory.“It is my first mile-and-a-half race track win,and it’s Charlotte,my worstrace track,”he said.5.Kasey Kahne -35 (finished eighth) Many figured he’d be battling for the win at Charlotte,where he has three points-paying Cupvictories,but he wasn’t.Still,he’s not completelyout of the running for the title.6.Greg Biffle -43 (finished fourth) After setting a track record in qualifying on the pole,he led the race early,but wasn’t fast enoughto win at the end.“It was too loose all night,”hesaid.“I just didn’t want to take big enough swingsat it.And then fuel mileage;we are just not in thatgame to go as far as those cars were going.”7.Martin Truex Jr.-49 (finished 10th) He salvaged a top-10 finish after struggling mid-race.“We started out really strong,but lostsome track position,and it was so hard to get itback when we were in traffic.”8.Tony Stewart -50 (finished 13th) He battled back from as low as 36th after an early race incident damaged the nose of his car.“Iwas following the 2 car [Brad Keselowski] there,and he had to check up,big time,for whatever wasgoing on in front of him,”Stewart said.9.Jeff Gordon -50 (finished 18th) His chances for a fifth Cup title dwindled after he lost a lap due to a penalty for speeding on pitroad.10.Kevin Harvick -56 (finished 16th) Handling problems throughout the 500 led to his worst Chase finish so far,and he doesn’t haveany top-10s to offset it.11.Matt Kenseth -67 (finished 14th) The Talladega winner spun early at Charlotte and never really recovered.“It took us so long toget that lap back,and we never had any cautionsto really get caught up,”he said.12.Dale Earnhardt Jr.-86 (did not compete) His decision to seek medical help for concussions led to his not being able to compete,and hischances for even a top-10 Chase finish at this poin t are slim to none. The No.88 Chevrolet driven by Regan Smith is pushed into the garage area during Saturday’s Sprint Cup Series Bank of America 500 at Charlotte Motor Speedway.Smith stepp ed in to drive the No.88 following driver Dale Earnhardt Jr.’s concussion.(NASCAR photo)

PAGE 13

LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19-20, 2012 5B5B FRIDAY EVENING OCTOBER 19, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Shark Tank (N) (DVS) (:01) Primetime: What Would You Do?20/20 News at 11(:35) Nightline (N) 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryNewsFootball FridayChann 4 News(:35) The Insider 5-PBS 5 -Journal Nightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Washington WeekNeed to Know (N) Race 2012 VOCES on PBS “Lemon” (N) BBC World NewsTavis Smiley (N) 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge Judy Two and Half MenHawaii Five-0 “Kalele” CSI: NY The team pursues a shooter. Blue Bloods “Scorched Earth” (N) Friday Night BlitzLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneTMZ (N) America’s Next Top Model (N) Nikita “3.0” (Season Premiere) (N) Vote America 2012Access HollywoodThe Of ce The Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family Guy Family Guy a MLB Baseball San Francisco Giants at St. Louis Cardinals. National League Championship Series, Game 5. (N) NewsFriday Night BlitzTwo and Half Men 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) Grimm Monroe lls in for Rosalee. Grimm “The Other Side” (N) Dateline NBC (N) NewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(2:00) Politics & Public Policy Today Politics & Public Policy Today Politics & Public Policy Today WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H The Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Police Women of Memphis Police Women of Memphis Police Women of Memphis Police Women of Memphis Police Women of Memphis Police Women of Memphis A&E 19 118 265Criminal Minds “Corazon” Criminal Minds Criminal Minds “Epilogue” Criminal Minds “25 to Life” Criminal Minds “True Genius” (:01) Criminal Minds HALL 20 185 312Little House on the Prairie Little House on the Prairie “Honeymoon for One” (2011) Nicollette Sheridan, Greg Wise. Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier FX 22 136 248Two and Half MenTwo and Half Men “The Twilight Saga: New Moon” (2009) Kristen Stewart. Bella nds herself drawn into the world of werewolves. The Ultimate Fighter (N) “Underworld: Evolution” (2006) CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245The Mentalist “Little Red Book” The Mentalist “Pretty Red Balloon” “Drumline” (2002) Nick Cannon. Rivalry between two drummers threatens a college band. “Stomp the Yard” (2007) Columbus Short. NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobFigure It Out (N) Drake & JoshVictorious Victorious Full House Full House The Nanny The Nanny Friends Friends SPIKE 28 168 241Gangland “You Rat, You Die” Gangland “Most Notorious” “From Paris With Love” (2010) John Travolta, Jonathan Rhys Meyers. “Sword sh” (2001, Suspense) John Travolta, Hugh Jackman, Halle Berry. MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*H M*A*S*H Monk Monk Monk helps Natalie’s daughter. Seinfeld Frasier The Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Phineas and FerbGood Luck CharlieA.N.T. Farm Dog With a BlogMake Your Mark: Shake It Up Dance-Off 2012 (N) Shake It Up! A.N.T. Farm Gravity Falls Jessie Jessie LIFE 32 108 252Prank My MomPrank My MomPrank My MomPrank My MomPrank My MomPrank My MomPrank My MomPrank My MomMy Life Is a Lifetime Movie Project Runway “Finale, Part I” USA 33 105 242Law & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitCSI: Crime Scene Investigation BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Top 10 Countdown” Freestyle Friday battle. (N) Family FirstThe Soul ManSec.America2012 Election “The Longshots” (2008, Docudrama) Ice Cube, Keke Palmer. ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) Coll. Football Livee College Football Connecticut at Syracuse. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209h NASCAR RacingNFL32 (N) NFL Kickoff (N) (Live) d WNBA Basketball Minnesota Lynx at Indiana Fever. (N) NFL Kickoff SportsNation (N) SUNSP 37 -Drivenf College Soccer Virginia Tech at Virginia. (N) Women’s College Volleyball Florida State at Georgia Tech. (N) Fight Sports: In 60Fight Sports: In 60 DISCV 38 182 278Yukon Men “Wheel of Misfortune” Gold Rush “Revelations” Gold Rush “The Long Road” (N) Yukon Men “Last Chance” Villagers rush to stock up on salmon. Yukon Men “Last Chance” TBS 39 139 247King of QueensKing of QueensSeinfeld Seinfeld Better WorseBetter WorseBetter WorseBetter Worse “Tyler Perry’s Madea Goes to Jail” (2009, Comedy) Tyler Perry. (DVS) HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace Mysteries (N) Jane Velez-MitchellNancy Grace MysteriesShowbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236True HollywoodThe SoupE! News (N) “(500) Days of Summer” (2009) Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Zooey Deschanel. Fashion Police (N) Chelsea LatelyE! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernParanormalParanormalGhost Adventures Ghost Adventures (N) Dead Files Revisted (N) The Dead Files HGTV 47 112 229Hunters Int’lHunters Int’lHunters Int’lHunters Int’lBillion Dollar BlockBillion Dollar BlockHome Strange Home (N) House Hunters (N) Hunters Int’lHunters Int’lHunters Int’l TLC 48 183 280Say Yes: ATLSay Yes: ATLSay Yes: ATLSay Yes: ATLSay Yes: ATLSay Yes: ATLSay Yes: ATLSay Yes: ATLSecret Princes “Happily Ever After?” Say Yes: ATLSay Yes: ATL HIST 49 120 269Swamp People “Cold-Blooded” Swamp People “King of the Swamp” Swamp People “Man Down” Swamp People “Fight to the Finish” Swamp People “Endgame” How the StatesHow the States ANPL 50 184 282Fatal Attractions “Snakes in a Trailer!” Infested! “Night Terrors” Monsters Inside Me (N) Monsters Inside Me Infested! A family battles cockroaches. Monsters Inside Me FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, Drive$24 in 24Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveMystery Diners (N) Mystery DinersDiners, DriveDiners, Drive TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the Lord Sid Roth It’s SuThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesHal Lindsey The HarvestPerry StonePraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -UEFA MagazineBaseball’s Golden AgeFootball Prev UFC: Johnson vs. McCall From Fort Lauderdale, Fla. (Taped) UFC Insider High School Football Mission Viejo at Tesoro. (N) SYFY 58 122 244 “From Dusk Till Dawn 3: The Hangman’s Daughter” (2000) Ara Celi. WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) Haven “Double Jeopardy” (N) Alphas “Need to Know” AMC 60 130 254(5:45) “Friday the 13th Part VIII: Jason Takes Manhattan” (1989) “Jason Goes to Hell: The Final Friday” (1993, Horror) Jon D. LeMay. The Walking Dead “Seed” Comic Book Men Scary Movie COM 62 107 249South Park Tosh.0 The Colbert ReportDaily ShowTosh.0 Tosh.0 Key & Peele Tosh.0 South Park Brickleberry Stand-Up Rev.Mash Up CMT 63 166 327Reba Reba Reba Reba Reba Reba Dallas Cowboys CheerleadersDallas Cowboys CheerleadersDallas Cowboys Cheerleaders NGWILD 108 190 283Dog WhispererThe World’s Deadliest AnimalsWorld’s Deadliest “Fangs” (N) World’s Deadliest “Underwater Killers” World’s Deadliest Arachnid nightmares. World’s Deadliest “Fangs” NGC 109 186 276Access 360 “Taj Mahal” (N) Wild Justice “Piranha Crackdown” Family Guns “One Shot, One Kill” (N) Bid & DestroyBid & DestroyWicked Tuna “Size Matters” Bid & DestroyBid & Destroy SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeDark Matters: Twisted but True Dark Matters: Twisted but True Everything and Nothing (N) Everything and Nothing (N) Dark Matters: Twisted but True ID 111 192 285On the Case With Paula Zahn Deadly Women “Twisted Thrills” Deadly Women “Matriarchs of Murder” Deadly Affairs “Deadly Obsession” Deadly Women (N) Deadly Women “Matriarchs of Murder” HBO 302 300 501 “Antitrust” (2001, Suspense) Ryan Phillippe, Claire Forlani. ‘PG-13’ “The Adjustment Bureau” (2011, Suspense) Matt Damon. ‘PG-13’ Real Time With Bill Maher (N) Real Time With Bill Maher MAX 320 310 515(5:00) Transit(:25) “The Hangover Part II” (2011) Bradley Cooper. ‘R’ (:10) “Contraband” (2012, Action) Mark Wahlberg. Premiere. ‘R’ Hunted Sam Hunter returns to work. Hunted Sam Hunter returns to work. SHOW 340 318 545Dr. T & the Women(:35) That Guy... Who Was in That Thing “Our Idiot Brother” (2011) Paul Rudd. ‘R’ “Apollo 18” (2011) Lloyd Owen. ‘PG-13’ Inside the NFL SATURDAY EVENING OCTOBER 20, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -e College Football Regional Coverage. Entertainment Tonight (N) e College Football Regional Coverage. Florida State at Miami or Baylor at Texas. (N) News at 11 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsPaid Program30 Rock 30 Rock Rules/EngagementRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryNewsInside EditionChann 4 NewsFirst Baptist 5-PBS 5 -The Lawrence Welk Show Andy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th Show “The Searchers” (1956, Western) John Wayne, Jeffrey Hunter. Austin City Limits (N) Front Row Center “Cheap Trick” 7-CBS 7 47 47e(3:30) College Football Teams TBA. (N)Action News at 7:00pm on CBS47 (N) CSI: Crime Scene InvestigationPerson of Interest “Matsya Nyaya” 48 Hours The death of an actress. (N) Action Sports 360Two and Half Men 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneFantasy FootballLike, LoveDaryl’s HouseYourjax MusicYourJax MusicJacksonvilleI Know JaxLocal Haunts 10-FOX 10 30 30e College FootballFOX Collegee College Football Kansas State at West Virginia. (N Subject to Blackout) NewsTouch Martin and Abigail join forces. 12-NBC 12 12 12e College Football BYU at Notre Dame. Wheel of FortuneJeopardy! Fut. EducationRevolution Chicago Fire “Mon Amour” Law & Order: Special Victims UnitNewsSat. Night Live CSPAN 14 210 350Washington This CommunicatorsWashington This Week WGN-A 16 239 307Law & Order: Criminal Intent “Ill-Bred” America’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosWGN News at Nine (N) Bones Federal prosecutor’s remains. TVLAND 17 106 304The Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Welcome to Sweetie Pie’s Welcome to Sweetie Pie’s Welcome to Sweetie Pie’s Welcome to Sweetie Pie’s (N) Iyanla, Fix My Life (N) Welcome to Sweetie Pie’s A&E 19 118 265Parking WarsParking WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsParking Wars (N) Parking Wars (N) ExterminatorExterminatorExterminatorExterminator HALL 20 185 312(5:00) “Always and Forever” (2009) “A Crush on You” (2011) Brigid Brannagh, Sean Patrick Flanery. “I Married Who?” (2012) Kellie Martin, Ethan Erickson. Premiere. “I Married Who?” (2012) Kellie Martin. FX 22 136 248(5:00) “The Karate Kid” (2010, Drama) Jaden Smith, Jackie Chan. “Grown Ups” (2010, Comedy) Adam Sandler, Kevin James, Chris Rock. “Easy A” (2010, Comedy) Emma Stone, Penn Badgley, Amanda Bynes. CNN 24 200 202The Situation RoomCNN Newsroom (N) Voters in America: Who CountsPiers Morgan TonightCNN Newsroom (N) Voters in America: Who Counts TNT 25 138 245(4:30) “Why Did I Get Married?” “Hitch” (2005) Will Smith. A smooth-talker helps a shy accountant woo an heiress. (DVS) “Hitch” (2005) Will Smith. A smooth-talker helps a shy accountant woo an heiress. (DVS) NIK 26 170 299Victorious Victorious Victorious Victorious iCarly (N) Victorious (N) Big Time Rush (N) How to Rock (N) The Nanny The Nanny Friends Friends SPIKE 28 168 241(5:30) Bar RescueBar Rescue “On the Rocks” Bar RescueBar Rescue “Murphy’s Mess” Bar Rescue “Owner Ousted” Bar Rescue “Bottomless Pit” Bar Rescue MY-TV 29 32 -Hogan’s HeroesHogan’s HeroesBatmanBatmanLost in Space “The Mechanical Men” Star Trek “The Paradise Syndrome” “This Island Earth” (1955, Science Fiction) Jeff Morrow, Faith Domergue. DISN 31 172 290Austin & Ally Shake It Up! A.N.T. FarmA.N.T. Farm Gravity Falls Gravity Falls Gravity FallsGravity Falls Make Your Mark: Shake It Up Result Show (N) My Babysitter LIFE 32 108 252“My Nanny’s Secret” (2009, Suspense) Haylie Duff, Jessica Steen. “A Nanny’s Revenge” (2012) Jodi Lyn O’Keefe, Victoria Pratt. Premiere. “The Wife He Met Online” (2012) Cameron Mathison, Barbara Niven. USA 33 105 242(5:30) “Couples Retreat” (2009) Vince Vaughn, Jason Bateman. “Eat Pray Love” (2010) Julia Roberts. Premiere. A divorcee embarks on a global quest to change her life. “Mr. Deeds” (2002) Adam Sandler. BET 34 124 329(5:00) “The Longshots” (2008) “The Best Man” (1999, Comedy-Drama) Taye Diggs, Nia Long. “Barbershop 2: Back in Business” (2004) Ice Cube. A barbershop owner considers selling his establishment. ESPN 35 140 206h NASCAR RacingCollege Footballe College Football Alabama at Tennessee. (N) College Footballe College Football Teams TBA. (N) ESPN2 36 144 209e College FootballCollege FootballCollege Footballe(:45) College Football Middle Tennessee State at Mississippi State. (N) (:45) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SUNSP 37 -e College FootballFitness Truth (N)e College Football Kansas at Oklahoma. (N) College Football Boston College at Georgia Tech. DISCV 38 182 278Gold Rush: Alaska “Never Say Die” Alaska: The Last Frontier Alaska: The Last Frontier Alaska: The Last Frontier Gold Rush “The Long Road” Alaska: The Last Frontier TBS 39 139 247King of QueensBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryMLB on Deck (N)a MLB Baseball Detroit Tigers at New York Yankees. American League Championship Series, Game 6. (If necessary). (N) Inside MLB (N) HLN 40 202 204The InvestigatorsBody of EvidenceBody of EvidenceThe InvestigatorsBody of EvidenceBody of EvidenceThe InvestigatorsBody of EvidenceBody of Evidence FNC 41 205 360America’s News Headquarters (N) FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Justice With Judge Jeanine (N) StosselJournal EditorialFOX News Watch E! 45 114 236E! NewsFashion Police “Pride & Prejudice” (2005, Drama) Keira Knightley, Matthew MacFadyen, Judi Dench. The SoupKeeping Up With the Kardashians TRAVEL 46 196 277America’s Scariest Halloween Attr.Legends Of Alaska (N) Ghost Adventures “The Riviera Hotel” Ghost Adventures Tombstone, Ariz. Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures HGTV 47 112 229High Low Proj.Hunters Int’lHouse Hunters Renovation Love It or List It Helen loves her house. Love It or List It “Pinnock” House HuntersHunters Int’lHouse HuntersHunters Int’l TLC 48 183 280Dateline: Real Life Mysteries Dateline: Real Life Mysteries Dateline: Real Life Mysteries Dateline: Real Life Mysteries (N) Dateline: Real Life Mysteries (N) Dateline: Real Life Mysteries HIST 49 120 269Cajun Pawn StarsCajun Pawn StarsCajun Pawn StarsCajun Pawn StarsPawn Stars Pawn Stars The Men Who Built America The U.S. rebuilds after the Civil War. (:02) Pawn Stars(:32) Pawn Stars ANPL 50 184 282Bad Dog! Lazy bulldog; larcenous cat. My Cat From Hell Too Cute! (N) Too Cute! Pit Bulls and Parolees (N) Addicts and Animals (N) FOOD 51 110 231Halloween WarsDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveIron Chef America TBN 52 260 372Between the WallsGods At WarGaither: Precious MemoriesIn Touch With Dr. Charles StanleyHour of Power Billy Graham Classic CrusadesNot a FanTravel the Road FSN-FL 56 -e College FootballDrivene College Football Georgia at Kentucky. (N) The Game 365 College Football Iowa State at Oklahoma State. SYFY 58 122 244(5:00) “Stake Land” (2010) “Daybreakers” (2009, Horror) Ethan Hawke, Willem Dafoe. “Underworld: Rise of the Lycans” (2009) Michael Sheen, Bill Nighy. “Stake Land” (2010) Nick Damici. AMC 60 130 254 “Jason Goes to Hell: The Final Friday” (1993, Horror) Jon D. LeMay. “Jason X” (2002, Horror) Lexa Doig, Lisa Ryder. Premiere. (:15) “Eight Legged Freaks” (2002) David Arquette. Premiere. COM 62 107 249National-Van “Joe Dirt” (2001, Comedy) David Spade, Dennis Miller, Brittany Daniel. Jeff Dunham: Minding the MonstersKey & Peele Jeff Dunham: Minding the MonstersBrickleberry Of ce Space CMT 63 166 327Reba Reba Reba “Red Alert” Reba Reba Reba Bayou BillionairesBayou BillionairesRedneck Rehab (N) Bayou BillionairesBayou Billionaires NGWILD 108 190 283Prehistoric Predators “Monster Shark” Dog Whisperer A golden retriever mix. Dog Whisperer “Bull-Whipped” Fish Tank Kings “Extreme Tankover” Fish Tank Kings “Pimp My Tank” Dog Whisperer “Bull-Whipped” NGC 109 186 276Being: LiverpoolDrugs, Inc. “Meth” Alaska State TroopersAlaska State TroopersDoomsday Preppers Bugged Out (N) Alaska State Troopers SCIENCE 110 193 284Survivorman “Australian Outback” An Idiot Abroad: The Bucket List An Idiot Abroad: The Bucket List An Idiot Abroad: The Bucket List An Idiot Abroad: The Bucket List An Idiot Abroad: The Bucket List ID 111 192 285Deadly Women Nightmare Next Door Dates From HellDates From HellDates From HellDates From HellDeadly Affairs “Killer Ambition” (N) Dates From HellDates From Hell HBO 302 300 501(5:00) “Cowboys & Aliens” (2011) “Life as We Know It” (2010) Katherine Heigl, Josh Duhamel. ‘PG-13’ “The Girl” (2012, Docudrama) Toby Jones. Premiere. (:35) Boardwalk Empire (:35) The Girl MAX 320 310 515“Anchorman: Legend of Ron”(:15) “The Running Man” (1987) Arnold Schwarzenegger. ‘R’ Hunted Sam Hunter returns to work. “Contraband” (2012, Action) Mark Wahlberg, Kate Beckinsale. ‘R’ SHOW 340 318 545Homeland “State of Independence” Jay Mohr: Funny for a Girl s Boxing Danny Garcia vs. Erik Morales. Garcia vs. Morales, WBA Super World light welterweight title and WBC light welterweight title. (N) Next group up plays wellBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High’s junior varsity team wrapped up its season on Wednesday and the future looks bright for the Tigers. The JV finished the season at 6-2 by closing out North Marion High, 26-6, at home. “We’ve had a good group of kids that played a lot better than I thought we would at the beginning,” junior varsity head coach John Brown said. “We had our work cut out for us with a lot of ninth-graders, but we matured as a program and played pretty good.” Brown said if he had to name one MVP for the season it would be Akeem Williams, who eventually got the call to take part with the varsity. “If it had to be one, it’d be Akeem,” he said. “He played wide receiver for us and started out with three touchdowns against Baker County in a game we won 29-6. He came back against Madison and scored two more touchdowns in a game we won 28-12. He scored a couple more against Dunnellon and we won 32-10. They pulled him up during the week we played Gainesville and we lost 14-28, but we got him back for Lake Weir and he had a couple of crucial catches for us including a touchdown in a game we won 20-18.” Williams didn’t play in the season finale on Wednesday, but the JV still had a host of kids that will suit up for the varsity for the rest of the season including Juicy Woods, who had two inter-ceptions and a touchdown. “Our entire defense has been tremendous this sea-son,” Brown said. “We gave up 100 points total, but we outscored our opponents 166-100. We won at least two games due to key plays by our defense.” Brown also singled out quarterback Nathan Taylor and Tim Mallard of the defense as having tremen-dous seasons. As a whole, Brown feels this group of JV players are ready to make an impact on the varsity in the upcoming years. “They’re pretty equipped,” Brown said. “We always work together with the varsity. We run the same plays and our drills are the same. The rest is just execution. I feel like the success we had as a team will be used by the kids to motivate them at the varsity level. Of the 51 players we had, we’re mov-ing 21 up to the varsity. The majority of that will come from our defense.” BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterColumbia High junior varsity quarterback Nathan Taylor checks the blitz at the line in a win against North Mari on High on Wednesday. The Tigers finished the season 6-2.

PAGE 14

6B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & PUZZLES FRIDAY & SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19-20, 2012 DEAR ABBY: I have recently developed what I consider to be a very healthy lifestyle. I exer-cise, eat lots of fruits and vegetables and mostly whole foods. My problem is I think I may be becoming obsessed. It has become harder and harder to eat away from home. I con-stantly plan what I’m going to eat next. I’m still happy, but too much of my time is being spent on this. Apparently, there’s a disorder similar to anorexia known as orthorexia. It’s the psychological obses-sion with eating healthy. I don’t think I could be classified as an extreme case, but what should I do before I become one? -OBSESSED IN BOSTON DEAR OBSESSED: As with any obsessive disor-der, the first step is realiz-ing and admitting you may have one. Then discuss it with your physician and ask for a referral to a psy-chologist who specializes in eating disorders. This is not to say that you have a disorder -but because more and more of your time is being devoted to thoughts of food, it would be a good idea to check. Too much of a good thing can be harmful if it is taken too far. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: I am 23 and have one child. I have been married for three years, and my husband has recently become physically abusive. He was prosecuted for his actions and pleaded guilty, but he still blames me entirely for the scenario and refuses to accept any responsibility. I fear for the safety of myself and my daughter every day, and I want to leave him for good. Many of the shelters I have called require that I quit my job, which is something I feel is coun-terintuitive to establish-ing a life on my own, so I refuse. That said, I don’t make much money, and the money I do make goes toward paying the fine my husband incurred for harming me. Am I aiming too high? I feel the only way to break free from him entirely is to quit my job, but I don’t want to have to resort to this. What would you advise? -CONFLICTED OUT WEST DEAR CONFLICTED: I would advise you to take your child and get out of there before the next epi-sode of domestic violence. And, if you truly want to break free entirely from your abuser, that you fol-low TO THE LETTER the instructions you receive from the people at the domestic violence shelter. And one more thing: Let the person who incurred the fine pay it himself! ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: I have a question about office microwave etiquette. I work in a building with one kitchen for 40 people. Often there is a wait to use the microwave around lunchtime. Recently I needed to use it and found a warm packaged meal in there, and no owner around. I waited five min-utes and came back. It was still there as if it had been forgotten. I decided to place it on the counter with a napkin covering it so I could use the microwave. When I was finished, no one appeared to claim it, so I put it back in and went on my way. Did I do the right thing? There was no way to know whose meal it was. What’s proper in this situation? Should I have just waited? -HUNGRY IN ITHACA, N.Y. DEAR HUNGRY: You handled the situation appropriately. However, had it been me, I would have left the item on the counter so it wouldn’t be touched by the other 38 hungry people in your office who also needed to use the microwave. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: I’m 13, and a few weeks ago I met a guy online, got his num-ber and we texted -a lot. Before I knew it, we were flirting up a storm. He lives in Tennessee and I’m in Texas. He’s the same age as I am, so I don’t see anything wrong with liking him, even if he’s so far away. We have decided not to date until we have a chance to meet each other in person. The problem is, I feel like I love him. He doesn’t call me “hot,” he calls me “gorgeous.” He doesn’t call me “Babe,” he calls me “Angel.” He listens to me when I have a problem and gives me sweet advice. Yes, I know I’m young and love is supposed to come later in life. Yes, it seems shady that I met him online and we have never talked face-to-face. I know I might be mistaking love for infatuation -I’ve heard all this before. But I trust this boy to be faithful and supportive of me. How can I tell if I love him or not? Should I cut off contact with him? Is it OK to feel the way I do? -TEENAGE GIRL IN A DREAM DEAR TEENAGE GIRL: I’m all for young love, but before plunging in, I think both parties should know with whom they are having the pleasure. Has it occurred to you that because you met this per-son online and have never spoken face-to-face that he might NOT be who he says he is? The person you have described may not be a teenage boy in Tennessee. He could be an adult man (or woman) ANYWHERE. He doesn’t communicate in the language most teens of today use. He doesn’t call you “hot,” he doesn’t call you “Babe.” He is using terms that someone much older would use. Personally, I think you should take a giant step backward until you AND a more experienced adult in your life learn more about him. Adults who carry on online romances with 13-year-old girls are called predators for good reason. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: My boyfriend of four years, “Taylor,” and I are oppo-sites in that I like to be on time and he is generally late. We usually work this out by leaving for an event I choose at the time I want, and leave for his friends’ gatherings when he wants. My problem is leaving for the airport when we travel together. We use public transportation, which takes 45 minutes, but things can go wrong and make it longer. Taylor would like to leave so we arrive at the airport 45 minutes before our flights. This causes me a lot of stress because security lines can be long and I’m afraid of missing our plane. We have had to run through airports in order to avoid being left behind. I’d like to be at the airport an hour and a half before flight time to be safe. Taylor hates wait-ing in the terminal when security is light and thinks we could be doing other things with our time. Please save me from our next argument and tell us who is right. -FRAZZLED TRAVELER IN SAN FRANCISCO DEAR FRAZZLED: You are. Better to be safe than sorry, especially when you have nonrefundable tickets. I have been on flights when seats were given to standby passen-gers because the ticketed passenger was held up for some reason. There are worse things than having to kill a half-hour at the airport. Missing your flight is one of them. ** ** ** Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. HOROSCOPES DEAR ABBY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Play to win. Talks will lead to solutions and your hands-on approach to whatever comes your way will be rewarded. You will find yourself in a position to make significant and triumphant improvements. Seize the moment and the opportunity. +++++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): A problem with a relationship must be dealt with practically. Do not let your emotions cause you to make a costly mistake, leaving you in a vulnerable position. Love, romance and socializing should be welcomed and given top priority. +++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Generosity and excess will be your downfall. Do your best to focus on honing your skills or looking for a better posi-tion. Striving to get ahead instead of overindulging or taking on projects that won’t pay the bills will be a must. +++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Make plans to social-ize or network with people who may be able to help you improve your posi-tion. Love is in the stars and building a stronger relationship with someone who contributes to your goals will help secure a better future. +++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Take action. Talking about what you want to do will solve nothing. You must be willing to go the distance if you want to gain credibil-ity. Let your heart lead the way. Sincerity will be key when dealing with rela-tives, peers or your lover. +++++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Speak your mind, but avoid getting into an emotional argument that leads to a no-win situation. Focus on being dedicated and loyal. Avoid impulsive purchases or decisions that can contractually bind you. Practicality will be required. ++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Avoid making last-minute changes because of what someone else does. Stick to your game plan and rely on your experi-ence and past friends, col-leagues or partners to fill in whatever gap is missing. Your resilience will leave a good impression. ++++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Keep your feet planted firmly on the ground, and protect what you have worked so hard to acquire. Innovative ideas will come to you that will help turn a situation that appears grim into a positive turn of events. +++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Don’t let pas-sion and emotional matters hold you back. Put your energy into building a better domestic life by spend-ing time with the people you feel can contribute the most to your future achievements and happi-ness. +++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Keep your com-munication with friends, relatives and superiors cor-dial if you want to get your way. Positive changes to your position will develop if you show dedication and are willing to adapt quickly to what’s offered. +++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Strive for perfec-tion and pick up skills that will help you advance. Showing greater enthusi-asm and helping without being asked will make a difference to the outcome of a new venture. Greater demands will also bring you greater pleasure. ++++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): If possible, close a deal, settlement or pend-ing legal matter without getting into a scuffle. You will be forced to compro-mise, but in the end, it will benefit you. Love is within reach, but demands will make you revise your plans. ++ THE LAST WORD Eugenia Last Woman’s healthy eating habits may have taken unheathly turn Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com Puzzle Solutions on the next page.

PAGE 15

FRIDAY & SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19-20, 2012 PUZZLES & COMICS LAKE CITY REPORTER 7B DILBERT BABY BLUES BLONDIE BEETLE BAILEY B.C. FRANK & ERNEST FOR BETTER OR WORSE ZITS HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH GARFIELD CELEBRITY CIPHER CLASSIC PEANUTS PUZZLE ANSWERS

PAGE 16

8B LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDFRIDAY& SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19-20, 2012 CLASSIFIED AD vantageTake ADvantage of the Reporter Classifieds!755-5440Lake City Reporter FIND IT SELL IT BUY IT $17504 lines 3 days Includes 2 Signs Each additional line $1.65 Garage Sale Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$10104 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.10One item per ad Under $500 Personal Merchandise Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$16754 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.15One item per ad Under $1,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$23704 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.45One item per ad Under $2,500 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $4,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$27404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.55One item per ad Under $4,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$30404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.65One item per ad Under $6,000 Placing An Ad Service Guide Limited to service type advertis-ing only.4 lines, one month....$92.00 $10.80 each additional lineIncludes an additional $2.00 per ad for each Wednesday insertion. DeadlinesBe Sure to Call Early You can call us at 755-5440 Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.Some people prefer to place their classified ads in person, and some ad categories will require prepay-ment. Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street.You can also fax or email your ad copy to the Reporter.FAX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the Classified Department.EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreporter.comAd is to Appear:TuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday Call by:Mon., 10:00 a.m.Mon., 10:00 a.m.Wed., 10:00 a.m.Thurs., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fax/Email by:Mon., 9:00 a.m.Mon., 9:00 a.m.Wed., 9:00 a.m.Thurs., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.These deadlines are subject to change without notice. Cancellations, Changes & Billing Questions Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject, or classify all advertisements under appropriate headings. Copy should be checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day of pub-lication. Credit for published errors will be allowed for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement which was incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be published, nor for any general, special or consequential damages. Advertising language must comply with Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition of discrimi-nation in employment, housing and public accommodations. Standard abbreviations are acceptable; how-ever, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated. Ad Errors-Please read your ad on the first day of publication. Weaccept responsibility for only the first incorrect insertion, and only the charge for the ad space in error. Please call 755-5440 immediately for prompt correc-tion and billing adjustments.CancellationsNormal advertising deadlines apply for cancellation.Billing InquiriesCall 755-5440. Should further information be required regarding payments or credit limits, your call will be trans-ferred to the accounting depart-ment. General Information In Print and Onlinewww.lakecityreporter.com Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$2504 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $.25One item per ad Under $100 CLASSIFIED AD vantageTake ADvantage of the Reporter Classifieds!755-5440Lake City Reporter FIND IT SELL IT BUY IT $17504 lines 3 days Includes 2 Signs Each additional line $1.65 Garage Sale Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$10104 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.10One item per ad Under $500 Personal Merchandise Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$16754 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.15One item per ad Under $1,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$23704 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.45One item per ad Under $2,500 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $4,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$27404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.55One item per ad Under $4,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$30404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.65One item per ad Under $6,000 Placing An Ad Service Guide Limited to service type advertis-ing only.4 lines, one month....$92.00 $10.80 each additional lineIncludes an additional $2.00 per ad for each Wednesday insertion. DeadlinesBe Sure to Call Early You can call us at 755-5440 Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.Some people prefer to place their classified ads in person, and some ad categories will require prepay-ment. Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street.You can also fax or email your ad copy to the Reporter.FAX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the Classified Department.EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreporter.comAd is to Appear:TuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday Call by:Mon., 10:00 a.m.Mon., 10:00 a.m.Wed., 10:00 a.m.Thurs., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fax/Email by:Mon., 9:00 a.m.Mon., 9:00 a.m.Wed., 9:00 a.m.Thurs., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.These deadlines are subject to change without notice. Cancellations, Changes & Billing Questions Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject, or classify all advertisements under appropriate headings. Copy should be checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day of pub-lication. Credit for published errors will be allowed for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement which was incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be published, nor for any general, special or consequential damages. Advertising language must comply with Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition of discrimi-nation in employment, housing and public accommodations. Standard abbreviations are acceptable; how-ever, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated. Ad Errors-Please read your ad on the first day of publication. Weaccept responsibility for only the first incorrect insertion, and only the charge for the ad space in error. Please call 755-5440 immediately for prompt correc-tion and billing adjustments.CancellationsNormal advertising deadlines apply for cancellation.Billing InquiriesCall 755-5440. Should further information be required regarding payments or credit limits, your call will be trans-ferred to the accounting depart-ment. General Information In Print and Onlinewww.lakecityreporter.com Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$2504 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $.25One item per ad Under $100 LegalDISTRICTCOURTCLARK COUNTY, NEVADACase No. A-12-660969-CWYNN LAS VEGAS, LLC d/b/a WYNN LAS VEGAS, a Nevada lim-ited liability company,Plaintiff,v.CHARLES MIDDLETON KEL-LEY, JR., an individual,Defendant.NOTICE! YOU HAVE BEEN SU-ED. THE COURTMAYDECIDE AGAINSTYOU WITHOUTYOUR BEING HEARD UNLESS YOU RESPOND WITHIN 20 DAYS. READ THE INFORMATION BE-LOW.TOTHE DEFENDANT: Acivil Complaint has been filed by the Plaintiff’s against you for the relief set forth in the ComplaintCHARLES MIDDLETON KEL-LEY, JR.1. If you intend to defend this law-suit, within 20 days after this sum-mons is served on your exclusive of the day of service, you must do the following:a. File with the Clerk of this Court, whose address is shown below, a for-mal written response to the Com-plaint in accordance with the rules of the court, with the appropriate filing fee.b. Serve a copy of your response upon the attorney whose name and address is shown below.2. Unless you respond, your default will be entered upon application of the Plaintiff and this Court may enter a judgment against you for the relief demanded n the Complaint which could result in the taking of money or property or relief requested in the Complaint.3. If you intend to seek the advice of an attorney in this matter, you should do so promptly so that your response may be filed on time.4. The object of this action is brought to recover a judgment for failure to repay debts associated with credit in-struments.5. The State of Nevada, its political subdivision, agencies, officers, em-ployees, board members and legisla-tors, each have 45 days after service of this summons within which to file an answer or other responsive plead-ing to the Complaint.STEVEN GRIERSON, CLERK OF COURTBy: /s/ Kristie M. GormanDeputy ClerkDate May 10, 2012County Courthouse200 Lewis AvenueLas Vegas, Nevada 89155Issued at the request of:/s/ Stacie MichaelsNevada Bar No. 97053131 Las Vegas Boulevard SouthLas Vegas, Nevada 89109(702) 770-2112Attorney for Plaintiff05535005September 28, 2012October 5, 12, 19, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURTFOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAPROBATE DIVISIONFile No. 12-231-CPIN RE: ESTATE OF DOROTHYPUESCHELGUYNN A/K/ADOROTHYP. GUYNNDeceased.NOTICE TO CREDITORSThe administration of the estate of Dorothy Pueschel Guynn a/k/a Doro-thy P. Guynn, deceased, whose date of death was July 17, 2012, is pend-ing in the Circuit Court for Columbia County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 173 NE Her-nando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055. The names and addresses of the personal representatives and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims in or demands against dece-dent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the de-cedent and other persons having claims or demands against dece-dent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITH-IN THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2 ) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publi-cation of this notice is October 12, 2012.Personal Representative:Iris Jeanette Pueschel303 NWIrma AvenueLake City, Florida 32055Attorney for Personal Representa-tive:/s/ John J. KendronJohn J. KendronAttorney for Iris Jeanette PueschelFlorida Bar Number: 0306850Robinson, Kennon & Kendron, P.A.PO Box 1178Lake City, FL32056-1178Telephone: (386) 755-1334Email: jjk@rkkattorneys.com05535262October 12, 19, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUN-TY, FLORIDACIVILDIVISIONCase #: 2009-CA-000432BAC Home Loans Servicing, LPPlaintiff,-vs-Patricia J. Flannigan; Unknown Par-ties in Possession #1; If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant (s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants LegalDefendant(s)NOTICE OF SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to an Order rescheduling fore-closure sale dated 10/11/12 entered in Civil Case No. 2009-CA-000432 of the Circuit Court of the 3rd Judi-cial Circuit in and for Columbia County, Florida, wherein BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP, Plaintiff and Patricia J. Flannigan are defend-ant(s), I, will sell to the highest and best bidder for case ATTHE COURTROOM ONE OF THE CO-LUMBIACOUNTYCOURT-HOUSE, LOCATED AT173 NE HERNANDO AVENUE, LAKE CITY, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AT11:00 A.M. on 12/5/12, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit:BEGIN ATTHE INTERSECTION OF THE WESTRIGHTOF WAYOF SE PRICE CREEK ROAD AND THE NORTH LINE OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP5 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND RUN THENCE N 89 DEGREES 07’00”W, ALONG SAID NORTH LINE, 435.00 FEET; THENCE S 00 DEGREES 53’00” W,101.00 FEET; THENCE S 89 DEGREES 07’00” E, PARALLELWITH SAID NORTH LINE, 448.79 FEETTO SAID WESTRIGHTOF WAYAND TO APOINTON ACURVE; THENCE RUN NORTH-ERLYALONG SAID WESTRIGHTOF WAYALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE CONCAVE TOTHE WESTHAVING ARADI-US OF 2814.79 FEET, ACEN-TRALANGLE OF 02 DEGREES 04’30”, ACHORD BEARING AND DISTANCE O N 06 DEGREES 53’28” W, 101.94 FEET, AN ARC LENGTH OF 101.94 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING, COLUM-BIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.TOGETHER WITH THATCER-TAIN YEAR: 2007, MAKE: FLEETWOD,VIN#:GAFL634A80014SM21 AND VIN#: GAFL634B80014SM21, MANUFACTURED HOME, WHICH IS PERMANENTLYAF-FIXED TO THE ABOVE DESCRI-BED LANDS. AS SUCH ITIS DEEMED TO BE AFIXTURE AND APARTOF THE REALES-TATE.ANYPERSON CLAIMING N IN-TERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNERS AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceed-ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assis-tance. Please contact the ADACoor-dinator; 173 Northeast Hernando Street, Room 408, Lake City, Flori-da 32056; (386) 719-7576 at least 7 days before your scheduled court ap-pearance, or immediately upon re-ceiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711.P. DEWITTCASONCLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURTColumbia County Florida/s/ B. ScippioDEPUTYCLERK OF COURTSubmitted by: ATTORNEYFOR PLAINTIFF:SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACH, LLP2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360Boca Raton, Florida 33431(561) 998-6700(561) 998-670705535330October 19, 26, 2012 ToWhom It May Concern:You are hereby notified that the fol-lowing described livestock, a brown and white calf found October 17, 2012 at 3990 SWElim Church Road, is now impounded at an authorized Columbia County Sheriff’s Office livestock facility and the amount due by reason of such impounding is $183.90 plus $5.00 per day for care and custody of said livestock. The above described livestock will, un-less redeemed within 3 days from date hereof, be offered for sale at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash.Mark Hunter, SheriffColumbia County, Florida05535413October 19, 2012 020Lost & Found CATFOUND on Marion St. Female, Gray, Long bushy tail, Very friendly. Contact 438-8355 Female Black Lab Puppy Approx 4-6 mth old. Found on 10-12-12 Hwy 90, Noegel & Brown Roads. Call 386-867-1134 Found Set of Car/house keys on the left side of SR 47 Southbond, 2 miles past I-75 overpass. Contact 755-1922 100Job Opportunities2 DETAILERS Needed. Experienced only. Apply in person between 10a-4p at North Florida Auto Sales. Across from ABC liquor. No phone calls please. Established Ocala business is Looking to hire additional sales teams for our expanding product line.Earn $500.00/week, plus commission!If you’re upbeat, friendly and enjoy working with the public, then contact us for a confidential interview and start earning the income you deserve! Valid driver’s license, proof of insurance and overnight travel is required. Call us TODAYat 352-233-2818.Telecom Service Bureau, Inc. 100Job Opportunities05535311Consumer Loan Processor position available with First Federal Bank of Florida. The candidate will verify loan information and is responsible for preparing the necessary documents for closing and securing our loans. Disburse, prepare and verify documentation for funding on loans. Coordinate loan closings. Ensures the receipt of any guarantee and security agreement information. Ensures approval is obtained prior to closing. Cross sell financial institution products. 6+ months of working in an office environment. Good understanding of financial institution products and services. Full benefits package. Applications may be obtained from any First Federal Branch and submitted to Human Resources, P.O. Box 2029, Lake City, Fl 32056 or email T urbeville.j@f fsb.com Bilingual candidates encouraged to apply. Equal Employment Opportunity Employer. FULL-TIME CUSTODIAN Wanted. Primary duties include basic knowledge of boilers and HVAC system, cleaning sanctuary and Fellowship Hall, mowing, minor repairs, setup and taking down tables and chairs and general building maintenance.Must be able to lift 60 lbs. Criminal background check required. Please send resume and references to Staff Parish Relations, First United Methodist Church, Lake City, 973 S. Marion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025. Deadline is Oct. 19, 2012. MANAGEMENT OPPORTUNITIES McDonald's of Alachua has multiple positions available for qualified/experienced mgrs. $8-$16 hr /benefits/bonuses Apply on line @ www.mcstate.com/alachua Or Call 386-755-2475 P/THousekeeper Needed. Occasional Nights And Weekends. Fax Resume to 386-487-1232. SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 Small historic non-denominational church with a heart for children is seeking a pianist for Sunday services. Please contact 904-259-4194 if interested. Wanted-P/T Handi-Man, Exp. in Routine Maintenance such as plumbing, elect, painting & carpentry. Applications Available at Camp Weed & Cerveny Conference Center, 11057 Camp Weed Place, Live Oak. 120Medical EmploymentMedical Office Manager Experience in Medical Billing a plus. Fax resume to 386-752-6709 North Florida Pediatrics 1859 SWNewland Way, Lake City, FL32025We are a leading health clinic offering an opportunity for a pediatrician or ARNPposition. We provide competitive pay and excellent benefits package. Ability to speak Spanish is a plus. Submit resume/CV: hr@nflpediatrics.com 240Schools & Education05534919Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class12/24/2012• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-11/05/12• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies Blonde FemaleMini-Schnauzer, 18 lbs, fixed, house broken, good natured, Family friendly. $225 Contact 386-292-3927 PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 330Livestock & SuppliesDeep Creek Farms Barn kept Square or Net Wrapped Round Hay Bales For Sale Ronnie Hughes (386)365-1425 407Computers DELLComputer $100.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 430Garage Sales Fri 10/19 & Sat 10/20Potted Plants, fern, boxwood & more. Large and Small. 4219 S.E. Country Club Rd. S of 252. INDOORS VFWPost 2206, 343 Forest Lawn Way, Sat. 10/20, 8:30am-1pm, Lots to choose from and baked goods. 386-752-5001 PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. SAT. 10/20 7am-12:30pm, 282 SWWhitetail Cr. Clothes, books, shoes, etc.. Saturday 10/20 at 180 SWJustin Gln. Including clothes, toys, wooden swing set, and piano. Call if interested in piano. 813-727-5846 440Miscellaneous 32 inch TVGreat Picture, With Remote $100.00 Contact 386-292-3927 Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, Root Raking, Bush Hog, Seeding, Sod, Disking, site prep, ponds & irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200 FisherPrice baby swing butterfly Cradle -nSwing. Original price $165 asking $75. Perfect condition. Swivels 3 way, plays tunes & lights up. Contact 386-292-3013 Five (5) VSV Speakers, Glass TVtable, $400 OBO Contact 755-4059 Stanley# 45 Combination Plane Very Good Condition With Wood Box. $250. Contact 386-438-8214 Table and (4) padded chairs Med/Dark Wood. In great shape $100 Contact 386-292-3927 Whirlpool Dryer White, Runs great! $100.00 Contact 386-292-3927 630Mobile Homes forRent1 Bd $370/mth or 2 Bd $485/mth $300 Sec. + $50 App.Fee. Located in the heart of LC. Call 305-9845511 or 386-344-0830 For Apt. 2 BR MH. $400 $450. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 2 BR/2BASW, Completly furnished, carport, shed, located on 41st Dr., $600 mo.,+ Util. $150 Dep. Avail 11/5 935-2461 2BR/1BA Located onCountyRoad 133, $450 mo. plus $450 dep. 954-258-8841 640Mobile Homes forSale1993 PEACHSTATE 14x70 Newly renovated, 3/2, $9500.00. 1981 Destiny 24x52 good cond. 3/2, $16,500. Call 288-4688 2013 DOUBLEWIDE $33,995 inc. set-up, trim-out & A/C Call 386-288-8379. 3/2, 1800 sqft., CBC home, on corner lot, work shop. MLS# 79574 $74,900. REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 3BR/2BA28X64 in a great location, a lot of upgrades, fireplace. Only $2,500 down $399 a month. Call Paula at 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com 4BD/2BADWMH on 4 acres Owner Financing Available. 386-623-3404 or 386-623-3396 4Br/2ba, in town, good investment, current rent set at $825 per mo. MLS # 74958. $74,900 Accredited Real Estate Mike Foster 288-3596 5 LIKENew Mobile Homes!!! For under $30,000. MUSTSEE Call John T. 386-752-1452 Accredited Real Estate Nice Home, kitchen redone fenced, backyard, 2br/1ba. MLS#81521, $52,000. Mike Foster 288-3596 BANK REPO 3BR/2BADoublewide ’09 Excellent condition. Only $999 down $377 a month. Call Paula 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #75661 Must be 55+, Manufacture home, 1 ac, fireplace, laundry, open & bright $79,900. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Home in good condition, MH 3br/2ba. Good size kitchen. 4 plus acres. MLS #80235. $63,000 Accredited Real Estate Mike Foster 288-3596 MUSTSEE 2013 2x6 walls, R30 insulation, OSB wrap, house wrap, real wood cabinets, and thermal pain windows. Payment $399 per month call John T386-752-1452. Results Realty Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Affordable 4/2 on 10 acres in Bell. over 2,200 sqft. in country setting. $80,000 MLS# 76582 640Mobile Homes forSaleWANTED…CASH PAID for your Mobile Home, Singlewide or Doublewide flood homes welcome. Call 386-288-8379 Palm Harbor Homes 4/2 From 499 Mo Loaded3/2 From 399 Mo Loaded $0 Down, Singlewides $299/Mo 800-622-2832 ext 210 650Mobile Home & Land2 OwnerFinanced Homes/ 1 RentalLake City, Mayo, Branford 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com Beautiful brick on 11.16 acres w/ DWfor family or renting. In ground pool. MLS 81203. $252,000. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 CLEAN NICE 2/2 SW,and 740sf. frame studio, 1 bath outbuilding, nice country ac 8 mi to VA. $39,000 Cash only 86.961.9181 Lots of sq ft, 4br/2ba approx 2618 sq ft, Newly remodeled kitchen, new roof. MLS 81733. $99,900. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 Nice 2br/2ba, 1996 DW, Energy Efficient, 3/4 frnshd, 3 yr old roof, 1/2 ac lot in Oak Wd subdv in Live Oak $39,900. Call 309-645-2659 Owner Fin.-Nice huge 4/2.5 on 3 ac, x-fenced, creek, lrg deck,Paved Rd. McAlpin area. Small down $950/mth 386-867-1833. For picswww.suwanneevalleyproperties.com What a great home, 3BR/2B, 1860 sqft. DWon 5 acres. MLS#80543 $125,000. REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05534938We’ve got it all!$89 Deposit Limited Avail. Call Today! Windsong Apts. *Free afterschool program386-758-8455 1BR APT. Downtown Location, Clean. New Carpet $450 mo, plus Security. NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456 1br Cottage with all utilities including cable & wireless internet. Close to the VA. (727)415-2207 2BR/1BAAPT. w/garage. West side of town. $650. mo. 386-961-9000 2BR/2BAw/garage 5 minutes from VAhospital and Timco. Call for details. 386-365-5150 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Amberwood Hills Apts. Private Patio area. Beautiful yard. Washer/dryer hkup. Free water & sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special. 386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2 mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet Friendly. Pool laundry & balcony. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com COZYCOTTAGE 1 BRNew paint & carpet. 10 mins. South of LC, all util. & satellite incl. $550 mo. Pet ok, 386-758-2408 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Greentree Townhouse Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free water & sewer. Balcony & patio. Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com Quant 2br/1ba Apt. Peaceful Location with Lake View CH/A$500. mo $500 dep. No pets. 386-344-2170 REDUCED 2/1 1300 sqft, duplex w/ gargage. refurbished,W/D hook up, CH/A, $650 mth Lease Req. 386-965-2407 or 386-758-5881 Redwine Apartments Pets welcome. with 5 complexes, we have a home for you. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com Wayne ManorApts. Spacious 2bedroom washer/dryer. Behind Kens off Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 www .myflapts.com WindsorArms Apartments. Move in! 2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free 200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com 720Furnished Apts. ForRentRooms forRent Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent2/1 Brick house Lrg eat in kit. & closets, CH/A, 514 SE First Ave. Jasper. $550 mth 1st,last+sec. No pets. 772-285-1032 3BD/1.5BA CH/A, $725 mth & $725 dep. Contact 386-344-2170

PAGE 17

FRIDAY& SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19-20, 2012 CLASSIFIEDLAKE CITYREPORTER 9B 730Unfurnished Home ForRentCozy 2bd / 1ba home. CH/A, $500 mth & $500 dep. Contact 386-344-2170 740Furnished Homes forRentEastside Village 55 or older. 2bd/2ba Fully furnished, carport, screened in porch, $1,100 mth/neg plus Dep. Contact 752-2243 750Business & Office RentalsCk out this Awesome DealFort White, Newly Remodled. Multi use Comm Prop. Approx 850sqft. Elec & water incl. Free WFI & yard Maint. High Traffic Area $725 mth 941-924-5183. FOR LEASE: Downtown Office Space. Convenient to Court house. Call 386-755-3456 ForRent orLease: Former Doctors office, Former professional office & Lg open space: avail on East Baya Ave. Competitive rates. Weekdays 386-984-0622 evenings/weekends 497-4762 PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 805Lots forSale 5 acre lot located in quiet setting River Rise s/d, Homes only, paved street. $65,000 MLS #76151 Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert386-397-3473 6.45 Acres of River front property on Suwannee, Consist of 3 lots, MLS# 77414 $75,000. REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 Beautiful lot on Suwannee. Property features stairway to dock, picnic area. MLS# 78842, $35,000 Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Results Realty Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #80401 $60,000. Must be 55+ 130x750 right on Suwannee, Beautiful lot, minutes from Royal Springs, Denise Bose 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #76668 $32,000 Must be 55+, Buildable lot for site built homes only. In Forest Country. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Lot close to Sante Fe, Suwannee & Ichetucknee MLS 80092 $15,000. REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 Nice vacant lot in Desirable river Community, MLS #73268 $15,000 Brittany Stoeckert386-397-3473 Results Realty, PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Small home on corner lot with 3br, Fenced yards. Needs TLC. MLS # 81204 $23,900 Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Results Realty Vacant land 5.91 acres, part cleared, few miles from Charles Springs & Suwannee $20,500. MLS 80961 REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 810Home forSale 3br/2ba 1677 sqft, close town, Hardy Board Construction Century 21Darby Rogers MLS 81841, $149,900. Call 752-6575 3br/2ba, 2 car garage, LR w/ stove fire place, lg Master Br, New roof Century 21Darby Rogers MLS 81846, $99,500. Call 752-6575 3br/2ba, extra enclosed carport, Manicured property, huge palm trees. Century 21 Darby Rogers MLS 81753, $84,500. Call 752-6575 Access Realty Gorgeous views 3bd/3ba on Lake Montgomery. Elevator, fishing dock & jacuzzi. MLS 81438 $249,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access RealtySpacious 4 bd/3ba Cypress Lake w/ 3643 sqft 1.25 acres on lake. Vaulted ceilings. MLS 81314 $279,900. Patti Taylor386-623-6896 Access RealtyTwo story 1895 Victorian house w/ electrical upgrades throughout. double -deck porches, MLS 71594 $149,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty MLS # 80175 2 story colonial, 4 br, 2b/2.5b, in ground pool, 3 fireplaces, patio, $315,000. Mary Brown Whitehurst 965-0887 Country home on 4 ac, 3br/2.5ba, formal living room, fireplace, MLS 81775 Coldwell Banker Bishop Realty $179,900 Elaine Tolar 755-6488 Cute home, nice paint, great layout. 3br/2ba. MLS 81746 $112,300. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 810Home forSale Eastside Village Realty, Inc. Must be 55+, 3br/3ba on 7.48 acres, country living, spacious, heated front porch, brick workshop, Call for appt. 752-5290. Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81958-, $115,000. Must be 55+, 3br/2ba, Site Built w/ lots of room, split plan mstr suite, FL. Rm. Call Denise Bose 752-5290 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. MLS #81959 Must be 55+, 2br/2ba, $79,900. Site Built Home w/eat in kitchen, laundry rm, scrn porch. Denise Bose @ 752-5290 For Sale By Owner Beautiful 2005 Brick home. Well Cared For $158,800 417-396-2134 Location is the key, 3br/2ba, new a/c compressor split floor plan, MLS 81614 Coldwell Banker Bishop Realty $129,900 Sherry Ratliff 365-8414 Looks brand new 3br/2ba split plan spacious L.room, dinning area & breakfast nook. MLS #81426, Coldwell BankerBishop Agency Elaine Tolar 755-6488$149,900 820Farms & Acreage10 acres with well/septic/pp (not guar); $300 dwn; $580 a mth. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com 40 acre Ranch, Brick 3/3 with 2000 sqft., new roof, kitchen remodeled, pole barn, MLS 81641 $349,5000. REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 Access Realty10 acre square tract, High & Dry, OF Avail. w/ 25% down. Convenient Location MLS 81258$39,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Access Realty43.64 acres wooded acreage in N.Columbia County. Scenic & Private. MLS 74429 $89,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 Coldwell BankerBishop Agency MLS 79650, Elaine Tolar 755-6488. 10 ac w/ 3br/2.5ba, large master ste, lg porch, barn w/ workshop, $280,900. 830Commercial PropertyHigh profile location, multiple office spaces, Call Neil & Hansel Holton 984-5791 at Coldwell BankerBishop Realty MLS# 81848, $102,500 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 950Cars forSale 2006 MAZADA MIATACONV. Automatic, leather, power. $14,500 ($1,000 below KBB value). Call 386-365-2046. 951Recreational Vehicles2002 JAYCO Legacy 5th wheel 38’3 slides fully loaded, gas-gen, queen bed, sleeps 4, shower $18,000 386-344-3362 755-5440Toplace your classified ad call We’re on target! days a weekSubscribe Today 386-755-5445 RECYCLE YOUR Lake City Reporter REPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Linewww.lakecityreporter.com

PAGE 18

10B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19-20, 2012 10BSports Jump T he Ear Expe r ts L a k e C i t y 1 8 3 N W V e t er a n s S t L i v e O a k 2 0 5 H ou s t on A v e N W D o w l i n g P a r k ww w H e a r i n g S o l uti o nI n c c o m T O P I C S WILL INCLUDE: Enhancing c ommunic a tion and lis t ening s k ills Understanding c ommon hearing issues W h a t t o look f or in a hearing ca r e p r o f essional T he truth about hearing t echnology c osts R e vi e w of the l a t est ad v an c eme n ts in hearing t echnology y o u r e i n v i t ed t o ou r f r e e ED U C A TIONA L HEA R IN G S EMINA R 1 1:30am:30pm Holiday In n H o t e l & Su i t e s 213 SW C omme r c e D r i v e L a ke C i t y FL 3202 5 THU R SDAY, OCTOBER 25 T H C O M PLIM E N T A R Y L UN C H WIL L B E S E R V E D Call today to RSVP! 386.269.1778 Accepting New Patients Specializing in adult medical care including: Medicare, Blue Cross and most insurance plans accepted, worker compensation Primary Care High Blood Pressure Heart Disease Lung Disease Gastrointestinal High Cholesterol Diabetes Womens Health Arthritis Low Back Pain Full Dizziness, vertigo and balance diagnosis and treatment Optifast Weight Loss System is pleased to announce the addition of Stefanie Jackson, MSN ARNP to our Practice. S O UT H ER N I N TER NAL ME DICIN E Stefanie Jackson, MSN A R NP Located in the Lake City Mediplex Building 404 N.W. Hall of Fame Drive, Lake City, FL 386-719-2540 ASSOCIATED PRESS Miami quarterback Stephen Morris (17) hands off during the first half the game against North Carolina in Miami on Saturday. Miami waiting to see if Morris can play By TIM REYNOLDS Associated Press CORAL GABLES Miami is willing to wait and see if Stephen Morris sprained left ankle improves before the Hurricanes choose a quar terback to start on Saturday night against No. 12 Florida State. Ryan Williams prac ticed Tuesday as Miamis presumptive starter, with Preston Dewey as his back up, while Morris spent the day in and out of treatment and unable to do anything on the field. And while plen ty of signs point to Williams getting the call in the annu al rivalry game with the Seminoles, Miami coach Al Golden said hes still giving Morris a chance. Weve got a long way to go, Golden said. I would have to classify him as a game-time (decision) right now. ... So well see. Ryan did a great job today, threw the ball well, practiced real ly well, made all the throws so were excited about him. We dont have really two separate game plans going in. And if Stephens healthy, well give it a shot. Golden said the earliest he expected Morris would have any chance of being on the practice field was Thursday, and if he makes it out there then, hed likely be limited to 7-on-7 work. Miami is obviously concerned, and obviously doesnt know if Morris will be ready, as proven by Golden sending a 5:30 a.m. text message to ask how his quarterback was feeling. Small problem: Golden sent that text to the wrong Morris he sent it to Jim Morris, Miamis longtime baseball coach. Im feeling fine, Jim Morris said. Either way, Florida State is ready for either Williams or Morris. Seminoles coach Jimbo Fisher said his staff might even study some tape of Williams games at Memphis in 2010. You have to prepare for both, Fisher said. And when you say prepare for both, though, how drastic are they going to change? I mean, in two or three days of practice, you could change your offense and do some different things, but the foundation is still going to be the same. Ones a little more mobile, ones a little bigger and stronger, but theyre both very good quarterbacks. Fishers offense has no such who-will-start dilemma. The Seminoles boast perhaps the ACCs hottest quarterback right now in EJ Manuel, who led Florida State past Miami last sea son and is coming off a career-best 439-yard, fourtouchdown showing last weekend against Boston College.