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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01924

Material Information

Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 10-18-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01937

Related Items

Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01924

Material Information

Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 10-18-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01937

Related Items

Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comLast year three Lake City Police Department officers were shot and seriously wounded when they approached a home during a criminal investigation. In the hours following the shooting, law enforcement offi-cers from other county, state and federal agencies responded to the scene with radio equipment that was often incampatible, lim-iting communication efforts at the scene. Roughly 50 people representing a variety of local, state and federal agencies participated in the North and Northeast Florida Regional Domestic Security Task Force 2012 Interoperable Communication Exercise on Wednesday. The name of the event was Operation C.A.R.S. (Communicating Across Regions and States) and focused on build-ing efforts to continue improving agencies’ ability to respond to disaster events through interop-erable communications. “There was a lack of communications between the Florida Highway Patrol, Columbia County, some of the first respond-ers, SWAT teams and others agencies,” said Florida Highway Patrol Capt. Keith Gaston, as he spoke about the September 2011 shooting. “That’s why decided to have the training operation housed here to make sure that never happens again should you have an event of that nature. We always have to work together to make it work and that’s the reason we decided to come here today and make sure we’re able to communicate.” Approximately 25 people were stationed at Lake City Gateway Airport, up to 12 people at Ichetucknee Springs in Fort White and up to 12 others at an exercise operation site at the Baker County Fairgrounds. Contacts from the federal government including the U.S. Navy and Coast Guard also took part in the exercise, which was designed to test communication capabilities during a coordinated response to a regional terrorism incident involving multiple loca-tions. The scenario focused on coordination of public safety agency radio communications among agencies in North and Northeast Florida and southern Georgia. A simulated slow speed pursuit through multiple Florida and Georgia counties was included in the exercise. “The exercise was about communications — making sure we’re able to communicate from one law enforcement agency to another,” Gaston said. The training session, which lasted about six hours, had law enforcement agencies utilize several radio systems, antennae, Opinion ................ 4APeople.................. 2AObituaries .............. 5A Advice & Comics ......... 3B Puzzles ................. 4B TODAY IN PEOPLE Big Bird a Halloween hit. COMING FRIDAY Local news roundup. 85 61 Partly cloudy WEATHER, 2A Lake City ReporterTHURSDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2012 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | 75¢ LAKECITYREPORTER.COM CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 138, No. 187 1 Staying in touch Votespourin forNov. 6racesSo far, 1,286 absentee ballots have been cast for general election. By LAURA HAMPSONlhampson@lakecityreporter.comThe number of absentee ballots requested for the Nov. 6 gen-eral election is on track with past presidential elections, Columbia County Supervisor of Elections officials say. Voters still have time to make changes to their registration as officials gear up for early voting next week. As of Wednesday, 4,395 people had requested absentee bal-lots in the county, said Tomi Brown, assistant supervisor of elections. Between 80 to 100 requests for absentee ballots come in daily. So far, 1,286 ballots have been returned, she said. Brown said during a big presidential election, about 5,000 absentee ballots are request-ed and about 50 percent are returned. There were 35,526 active registered voters in Columbia County as of Wednesday. Voters can request an absentee ballot until Oct. 31 for any reason, she said. With such a large ballot this year, some voters may feel more comfortable having several days JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterBob Stamblesky, a communications director for the Navy Re search Southeast, reaches for a radio hooked up to a mob ile satellite radio interface system, which can extend existing radio networks to satell ites. More than 40 law enforcement agencies participated i n the Operation C.A.R.S. (Communicating Across Regions and States), which was ba sed at the Lake City Gateway Airport. Exercise helps emergency responders maintain communications in a crisis Radio incompatibilitywas an issue duringSept. 2011 shootout. VOTES continued on 6AMother, son jailed followingargumentFrom staff reportsAn argument involving a guest landed a Lake City mother and son in jail Tuesday. Katie T. Carter, 39, was charged with aggravated assault with a weapon and battery and held in lieu of $6,000 bond at the Columbia County Detention Facility, according to sheriff’s reports. Her son, Devonte L. Griffin, 19, was charged with battery and released on $1,000 bond. At about 5 p.m. Lake City Police Department officers responded to a fight in progress at 515 N.W. Gibson Lane. Carter and another woman got into an argument over a female guest and Griffin got involved, according to an LCPD arrest report. The argument got heated POLICE Carter Griffin JAILED continued on 6A EXERCISE continued on 6A JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High School band member Mikayla Luke (left) pours water on William Delisle to cool him off during band practice at the school earlier this week. A quick cool-down New rules coming forlocal parksBy TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comCounty officials intend to lay down more rules to keep the public from destroying and defacing property at county parks and commu-nity centers. During the Columbia County Commission meet-ing, scheduled for 7 p.m. tonightThursday at the Columbia County School Board Complex Auditorium, 372 W. Duval St., county offi-cials have been asked to set a date to schedule a public hearing before implement-ing the proposed new rules. COUNTY COMMISSION PARKS continued on 6A

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HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter NEW YORK C ant figure out how to dress as a binder full of women for Halloween? Theres always Big Bird, the other star of the presi dential debates. The Yellow One is flying off the shelves after Mitt Romneys threat to do away with government support for PBS. President Barack Obama kept the Halloween dream alive Tuesday night when be brought up the bird and PBS again during their second debate. At 6 feet, Angela Betancourt vol unteered for Big Bird duty among a group of friends riffing on Sesame Street for a couple of Halloween par ties and a meander along Lincoln Road in Miami Beach. Shell likely carry a suitcase as she passes out the popular kid char acters resume. I grew up on Sesame Street and I think that PBS deserves all the funds it can get, said Betancourt, 30. We all feel the same way. Halloweencostumes.com sold out of several takes on Big Bird almost overnight after Romneys remark during the first presidential debate Oct. 3, said a company spokesman, Marlon Heimerl. In the past this hasnt been a very popular costume, so when Big Bird flew the coop in such high numbers, it was definitely a big surprise, said Heimerl, who would not provide spe cific sales figures. Disguise Inc., Sesame Workshops official costume maker, said interest is up among the thousands of retail ers it services. Flavor Flav jailed on felony charges LAS VEGAS Police in Las Vegas said entertainer Flavor Flav was jailed on felony charges stemming from a domestic argument with his fiancee and threats to attack her teenage son with a knife. Officer Bill Cassell said no one was injured before the arrest around 3:30 a.m. Wednesday at a home in a residential neighbor hood several miles southwest of the Las Vegas Strip. The 53-year-old former rapper and reality television star, whose legal name is William Jonathan Drayton Jr., was being held on $23,000 bail at the Clark County jail, with an initial court appearance scheduled Thursday. It was unclear whether he had an attorney. Fans stand and cheer for author J.K. Rowling NEW YORK Just the mention of her name, J.K. Rowling, had the audience screaming and on its feet. The Harry Potter author spoke for just over an hour before a capac ity crowd Tuesday night at Manhattans Lincoln Center in her sole U.S. public appearance to promote her first novel for grown ups, The Casual Vacancy. Dressed in a dark skirt and dark sweater blouse, Rowling chatted on stage with fellow author Ann Patchett and read briefly from her new book. CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Thought for Today Celebrity Birthdays Rock-and-roll performer Chuck Berry is 86. Sportscaster Keith Jackson is 84. AROUND FLORIDA Horseman pleads not guilty BUNNELL A man has pleaded not guilty to riding his horse while intoxicated during a halfhour police chase through the streets of a north Florida city. The Daytona Beach News-Journa l reported 29year-old Charles Larkin Cowart initially seemed confused Tuesday about which plea to enter. But after consulting with his court-appointed lawyer, he pleaded not guilty to multiple charges stem ming from the Sept. 24 horse chase in Bunnell, about 60 miles south of Jacksonville. Police said Cowart told them he was on his way to his grandmothers house. He refused their request to get off the horse, and took off. Eventually, the horse became exhausted and Coward jumped off and ran. He was arrested a short time later. Pat Cowart told the newspaper her grandson just hit a little slump. Man punches officer, flees TAMPA Authorities said a man ran from his sentencing hearing in a Tampa courthouse and punched an officer in the face. The Tampa Bay Times reports 25-year-old Adam Manuel Le Raicies was in court Monday for his sen tencing hearing for giving false information to law enforcement. Hillsborough County Sheriffs deputies said Raicies became loud and belligerent when Circuit Judge Dick Grego gave him probation. When the judge threatened to have him arrested for contempt of court, Raicies took off. Deputies said bailiffs and two police officers chased him to the secondfloor elevator before three other officers stopped him. During a struggle, authori ties said, Raicies punched Officer Josh Baar in the face. Raicies went back before the judge and was charged with assault on an officer. Sheriff: Deputies to get training PALATKA A north Florida sheriff says his deputies will begin a train ing program to help them better handle situations involving the mentally ill. The announcement fol lows the fatal shooting in July of a man suffer ing from schizophrenia. Putnam County Sheriff Jeff Hardy said Tuesday he believes his deputies followed proper procedure after 35-year-old Alfred Dobson attacked them. But he said he believes providing the training is the right thing to do. Hardy said he reached out to Jacksonville Sheriff John Rutherford to learn about his program, which includes a 40-hour course led by mental health pro fessionals. The Florida TimesUnion reported the Jacksonville program is praised by mental health advocates. Dobson was struck twice with a stun gun dur ing a July 19 struggle that eventually led to the fatal shooting. Music promoter found dead NORTH MIAMI Authorities said a music promoter wanted in the New York shooting deaths of Jamaican dancehall art ist Captain Barkey and his companion has committed suicide after federal agents located him in Florida. U.S. Marshals spokes man Barry Golden told The Miami Herald that acquaintances led investi gators Tuesday to Joseph Kernizans North Miami apartment building. Kernizan was wanted in a shooting Saturday in a Bronx motel park ing lot. The victims were Tracy Bennett and Captain Barkey, whose real name was Wayne Hamilton. Bennett had two children with Kernizan. Golden says Kernizan locked himself in a ground floor apartment when he spotted police officers, and he shot himself min utes later. Police said they found multiple guns at the scene. Kernizan was a pro moter of the Haitian konpa band NuLook. Major dies during survival training PENSACOLA, An Air Force major died during a four-day survival course in Florida in how to live after parachuting into open water, the Air Force said Wednesday. Maj. Garrett Knowlan died Oct. 11 during the course at Pensacola Naval Air Station in Floridas Panhandle. Military officials said they could not immediately release other information such as what Knowlan was doing when he died or whether he was trans ported to a hospital before his death. The Air Force said that the training was a water survival course for mem bers who would be flying in parachute-equipped aircraft. The Air Force also said the course included medical aspects of water survival and life raft procedures. Knowlan was stationed at nearby Eglin Air Force Base. Slow down and enjoy life. Its not only the scenery you miss by going too fast you also miss the sense of where you are going and why. Eddie Cantor, American comedian-singer (1892-1964) Big Bird big hit for Halloween Wednes day: Afternoon: 4-6-6 Evening: N/A Wednes day: Afternoon: 7-8-0-7 Evening: N/A Tues day: 5-9-11-15-36 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAIL Y BRIEFING THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 2AWEATHER Daily Scripture The LORD confides in those who fear him; he makes his covenant known to them. My eyes are ever on the LORD, for only he will release my feet from the snare. Psalm 25:14-15 Flav Rowling ASSOCIATED PRESS Big Bird, of the childrens television show Sesame Street, has become one of the hottest costumes for Halloween after Republian presidential candidate Mitt Romneys remark during the first presidential debate about eliminating funding for the Public Broadcasting System, which airs Sesame Street. Associated Press Associated Press

PAGE 3

By BRENDAN FARRINGTONAP Political WriterDAVIE — The first and only debate between Democratic Sen. Bill Nelson and Republican challeng-er Rep. Connie Mack IV Wednesday came across almost like the old school-yard taunt, “I know you are, but what am I?” Both candidates accused each other of lying about the other’s records, both used the “there you go again” line made famous three decades ago by President Ronald Reagan and both strayed from the subject of questions to take shots at the other. The debate wasn’t so much a look at what the candidates will support if elected, but rather a lot of finger pointing about each other’s records to date. Mack, 45, began the debate by accusing Nelson of voting 150 times to raise taxes, voting to gut the mili-tary and being the deciding vote on President Barack Obama’s health care over-haul. Nelson, 70, immedi-ately balked, saying “I’m looking forward to point-ing out what the truth is because everything the congressman just said is not true.” And thus the stage was set for a bitter hour-long exchange. “Sen. Nelson cast the deciding vote to cut $700 bil-lion out of Medicare. What did Senator Nelson say before the vote? He said it is unconscionable to whack away Medicare Advantage from our seniors, but that’s exactly what he did,” Mack said. While Nelson did vote for the health care overhaul, Nebraska Sen. Ben Nelson, no relation, was the last Democrat to commit to the bill. Bill Nelson also pointed out that he negotiated a deal that protected Florida seniors already enrolled in Medicaid Advantage, a pri-vate plan for seniors paid for by the government. And he said the $700 billion was a savings, not a cut to beneficiaries. The law cuts Medicare spending for hos-pitals and other providers by more than $700 billion over a decade. “I’m not going to let you get away with this. The $716 billion was in fact savings that extended the life of Medicare for eight years. Medicare was going to run out in three years,” Nelson said. “He voted to cut Medicare by taking away the guaranteed ben-efit with a voucher that a senior citizen would have to negotiate with an insurance company.” The debate was held at Nova Southeastern University in Davie and organized by Leadership Florida and the Florida Press Association. Both sides made repeated assertions that already been debunked by fact checkers. Mack’s charge that Nelson has voted to raise taxes more than 150 times has been labeled “false” by Politifact Florida, which pointed out Mack is counting non-bind-ing budget resolutions and counted multiple votes on the same bill. Nelson, a member of the Senate budget committee, repeatedly denied Mack’s claim that the Senate hasn’t passed a budget in four years. Mack was correct, however. While the Senate has passed measures to keep the government going it has not passed a full bud-get resolution since 2009. They also clashed over the fact that Nelson receives an agricultural tax break on property because a small herd of cattle is kept on them. Nelson does receive the tax break, but argues that his family has used the property for agriculture since 1952. Mack repeated several lines over and over, includ-ing one saying Nelson says one thing in Florida and then votes differently in Washington — an effort to paint him as a liberal who supports Obama with nearly every vote while maintain-ing an image as a moderate back home. Nelson drew laughs when responding to one of the comments. “Is that the only line that you have memorized?” Nelson said. Nelson repeated some lines of his own, like accus-ing Mack of missing too many votes as a congress-man. “You haven’t talked about all of the tax cuts that I’ve voted for,” Nelson said. “Let’ talk about the votes you missed. When you show up, it’s even worse because you try to take out Medicare and Social Security.” Mack avoided a question about how to balance the budget without raising taxes or cutting Medicare, Social Security and the military by saying the solution is creating jobs, which would increase revenue. “We’re going to make sure that job creators are going to get back in the game. If you want more revenue to come into the federal government, you do it by putting people back to work,” he said. “The best economic engine we have is the American people.” Nelson answered the question by pointing to Medicare savings already enacted and by saying U.S. troops can be removed from European bases that were established in the Cold War. The pair was hampered by the one minute, 15 sec-ond limit they had to answer most questions, leaving little time for full and complete responses. The debate ended almost as bitterly as it began. Nelson accused Mack of voting for a bill that defines rape as “forcible rape” and of illegally claiming two property tax homestead exemptions. Mack’s wife, California Congresswoman Mary Bono Mack, has an exemption on her home while Mack has an exemp-tion on his Fort Myers condo. “Senator, you keep talking about my record,” Mack said. “I think you might have looked somebody else up when you’ve been doing your research because it’s not me.” “There you go again,” said Nelson, referring to earlier in the debate when Mack used a similar line. “Apparently I have to keep doing it again because you just don’t understand. And that’s the problem,” Mack said. Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2012 3A 3A Lake City 183 SW Bascom Norris Dr.G’ville E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunter’s Walk 5115 NW 43rd St. Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St. Shands at UF Room H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Alachua 14759 NW 157th Ln. Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E. Silver Springs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. Summer eld 17950 US Hwy. 441 Tallahassee 1511 Killearn Center Blvd. Apply online atcampuscu.comor call754-9088and press 4 today!Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Columbia a nd Suwannee counties!2APR Fixed1 1. Offer does not apply to existing CAMPUS loans. Offe r is for new loans only. Credit approval, sufficient income, adequate prope rty valuation (maximum LTV of 70%), and first mortg age position are required. Owner-occupied property only. Offer excludes mobile homes; certain other restrictions apply. Property i nsurance is required; an appraisal, flood and/or ti tle insurance may be required at an additional expe nse to the borrower. If loan is paid in full withi n the first 24 months, closing costs paid by CAMPUS will be added to the loan payoff amount. Example: a $105,000 loan at 3.25% for 120 months would require 119 monthly payments of $1,026.27 and one final payment of $1,0 22.09, total finance charge of $18,343.93; for a to tal of payments of $123,151.93. The amount financed is $104,808.00 the APR is 3.288%. APR=Annual Percentag e Rate. 2. Credit approval and initial deposit of $ 5 required. Mention this ad and we’ll waive the $15 new member fee. This credit union is federally insured by the Natio nal Credit Union Administration.% Other rates and terms also available! Bust out of your 30-year mortgage! Free ’n Clear IN10YEARS Q you have 30% or more equity in your home... Q you want to avoid high closing costs ...IFPay off your homein10 years!TOTAL CLOSING COSTS1(Loans of $200,000 or less)10-year FIXED APR1 First Mortgage(Please call for other rates & terms) Apply Now! Nelson, Mack meet in bitter debate ASSOCIATED PRESS Democratic candidate for Senate U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson (rig ht), D-Fla., gestures during a debate against Republican ca ndidate U.S. Rep. Connie Mack IV, R-Fla., on Wednesday in Davie. 3A 18 1 10/17/12 10:58:52 PM

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T uesday’s debate between President Barack Obama and GOP nominee Mitt Romney was a symbolic confrontation between the corporate boardroom, which operates under one set of rules, and the Oval Office, which operates under quite another. In the Denver debate, Romney was the hard-charg-ing CEO, ignoring moderator Jim Lehrer like some com-pany underling. He barraged Obama with facts and figures that showed the president failed to make good on his economic promises for his first term -still Romney’ s stron-gest talking point -and drew Obama into arcane discussions about calculating tax impacts of deficits that sounded good for Romney, since the average voter is unlikely to dig into the numbers. (Hint: They don’t add up.) It’s going too far to say that Obama acted like somebody who had just wandered into the debate, but he was curi-ously dispassionate -and, at times, almost disengaged as he ran through his rote talking points. Unfortunately for Romney, the real President Obama showed up Tuesday night, and whatever Romney thinks of Obama personally, Americans expect some deference to, and respect for, the person who holds that office. Romney made a clumsy attempt to exploit the murder of the U.S. ambassador and three other Americans in Benghazi, implying that the president was negligent or indifferent. Retorted the president: “I am ultimately responsible for what’s taking place there because these are my folks, and I’m the one who has to greet those coffins when they come home.” He added that any suggestion that his team “would play politics or mislead is offensive.” When Romney suggested that Obama waited two weeks to deem the attack an act of ter-ror, Obama said bluntly, “Check the transcript.” Moderator Candy Crowley confirmed that Obama had indeed come out the very next day and called it a terrorist attack. Crowley was a heroine of the evening for keeping two strong personalities in line. Romney didn’t treat her, as he did Lehrer, as just a member of the hired help. Romney may have felt that his extensive prepara-tion for the first debate was sufficient because, smarting from allegations about his Chinese investments, he began badgering Obama about the contents of the president’s own pension portfolio. Obama is required by law to make pub-lic his assets and tax returns — unlike Romney, who refuses to do so. In this battle, the Oval Office beat the boardroom and Candy Crowley deserved a medal. The rubber match on foreign policy is scheduled for Monday in Boca Raton. Obama evens debate score ONE OPINION A t the Aspen Security Forum this past sum-mer, Peter Bergen, CNN’s intrepid national security analyst and a director at the New America Foundation, gave a talk titled: “Time to Declare Victory: Al-Qaida is Defeated.” Since then, al-Qaida and/or its affiliates have launched lethal attacks on American diplomatic compounds in Libya and Yemen, hoisted an al-Qaida flag above the U.S. embassy in Cairo, resurged in Iraq, and put boots on the ground in Syria. They have bombed Christian churches in Nigeria and the mosques of Sufi Muslims in Mali. Within the last week, Taliban terrorists shot a 14-year-old Pakistani for the “crime” of advocating education for girls. In this light, it seems obvious to me that reports of al-Qaida’s demise are premature. And I’m not alone. “Obama was out say-ing, ‘Hey look, we have got al-Qaida back on its heels,’ “ inves-tigative reporter Bob Woodward said on Sunday. “Well, anyone in the intelligence committee knows that’s not true.” Bergen, however, is sticking to his story. And he is not alone. On Tuesday, he and retired Lt. Col. Thomas Lynch III, a distin-guished research fellow at the National Defense University, defended the al-Qaida-is-defeated thesis in a debate with Thomas Joscelyn and Bill Roggio, two of my Foundation for Defense of Democracies colleagues. Bergen and Lynch argued that al-Qaida’s offensive capabilities have been degraded and that without Osama bin Laden the organiza-tion lacks a “mythical mystique.” That’s true as far as it goes. But degraded is not defeated. And Bergen goes further: “Even terrorists influenced by al-Qaida-like ideas have only killed 17 people in the United States since 9/11. About the same number of Americans are killed every year by dogs. In other words, in the United States during the past decade, dogs have been around 10 times more deadly than jihad-ist terrorists. ... To win World War II, Roosevelt, Churchill and Stalin did not feel it necessary to kill every Nazi. We should not impose a higher standard in the battle against al-Qaida.” Here, in my view, is what that misses: Ideas matter. The Nazis had ideas -vile ideas, but ideas nonetheless. Not even the most rabid canines have that. Franklin Roosevelt and Winston Churchill -and Joseph Stalin, too, I suppose -were keenly aware that the Nazi threat was at least as much ideological as military. Indeed, in January 1943, at the end of the Casablanca Conference, Roosevelt announced that he and Churchill had decided to adopt a policy crucial to Allied victory and Axis defeat -a policy, Roosevelt said, that would “mean the destruc-tion of the philosophies in those countries which are based on conquest and the subjugation of other people.” The jihadi philosophy/ideology is, no less than Nazism, “based on conquest and the subjugation of other people.” The late Father Richard John Neuhaus aptly defined jihadism as a religiously inspired ideol-ogy built on the teaching “that it is the moral obligation of all Muslims to employ whatever means necessary in order to compel the world’s submission to Islam.” Most Western leaders refuse even to discuss jihadism openly -much less pledge to destroy it. Some are concerned that to do so will offend Muslims by the tens of millions. Others, I suspect, find it impossible to accept that, in the 21st century, there are still those who believe in divinely endorsed wars, and see conquest as the most vir-tuous of pursuits. “Ideology,” Hillary Clinton said not long after becoming secretary of state in 2009, “is so yesterday.” Those who see America as the “enemy of God” are not convinced. Proponents of the al-Qaida-isdefeated theory also ignore the fact that Saudi petro-princes con-tinue to spend billions to globally spread Wahhabism, a strain of Islam that disdains freedom and promotes hatred of infidels and apostates. It should be clear by now that the regime that rules Iran embraces a jihadi ideology. Iran’s rulers are Shia, a minority within the Muslim world, and that makes their aspiration to lead a pan-Islamic global revolution against the West challenging. But that is their goal. Is al-Qaida really defeated? Definitely not its ideology LETTERS TO THE EDITOR To the Editor:First, who will come to Columbia County for a conven-tion center, aka activities center? Do we have a pre-existing list (book of business) of current customers (conventions) that justify such a high-priced expan-sion for the Columbia County convention business? If not, who made the sales projections and what assumptions did they make to calculate that the site will be profitable by year three without such a list of current clients? Second, why would conventions come to Columbia County? What unique selling point does Columbia County have over its competition? Within a 90-mile radius of Columbia County are a dozen convention facilities (that have to be losing millions of dollars a year). Valdosta has a restored train station and a university. Tallahassee has FSU, museums, historical sites, excellent restaurants, and is the state capital. Gainesville has UF, museums, historical sites, good restaurants, etc. St. Augustine has many his-torical sites, beaches, Flagler College, etc. Jacksonville has the Prime Osborne Convention Center, beaches, river frontage, museums, and many excellent restaurants. Amelia Island and Fernandina Beach have ocean-front golf courses and beaches. Jekyll Island and St. Simons have beaches and historical sites. Third, who will benefit from the sale of the prime county property, why, and by how much? Fourth, some governmental pre-construction estimates seem to be plagued with high cost overruns. If it’s reported that it will cost $28,000,000 now, it might take twice that figure to actually complete the project. Even at the current $30,000,000 million price tag, that’s well over a million dollars a year in interest and payments for a 30-year bond. Who gets stuck with the payments and the negative oper-ating expenses for 30-years, the taxpayers? Say hello to sustained higher property taxes. Fifth, placing such a center so far removed from the city center means that few local businesses will benefit if the site actually generates traffic. Why spend taxpayer money for an economic expansion project if it does not generate increased sales for local businesses? Sixth, the Florida Sports Hall of Fame was before my time in this area. However, it seems to me that it was built on a strategy that did not work: “Build it and they will come.” Are taxpayers still paying for that building? Why would we want to repeat that failed strat-egy with $30,000,000? Rick Paul, Lake City Convention center questions Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding counties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, publisher Robert Bridges editor Sue Brannon, controller Dink NeSmith, president Tom Wood, chairman LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY E-MAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com T here are three important reasons why anyone con-cerned about the future of our country should not vote to re-elect President Obama: a failed economic policy, a nonexistent foreign policy and a failure to capitalize on a paradigm shift in world energy supply. Let’s accept for a moment the claim by Mr. Obama that the inherited economy was so bad no one could fix it in four years. OK, then he should explain to us why there are fewer jobs now than there were when Mr. Obama took office, why $6 tril-lion of new debt has not helped generate economic growth and why the country has operated without a budget for more than three years. Even though he had control of both branches of Congress for two years, Mr. Obama put forth no proposals to reform Social Security or Medicare. Will those programs go broke while the president contemplates his ideas for change? Almost four years ago, the president came to office promising to repair the damage done by that cowboy George W. Bush. What are the results of his so-called soft power? Our ambassador and three others were killed in Libya — and a month later, it is unclear what happened. We left Iraq in a mess, civil war seems imminent in the Middle East, and the influ-ence of Iran is hugely apparent. While Mr. Obama says we are on schedule to end the war in Afghanistan in 2014, the Taliban is back in full force there. But perhaps the president’s most grievous mistake is a fail-ure to take advantage of a para-digm change in world energy supply. While as-yet-undeveloped technology may create a future for solar and wind energy, new technology for harvesting oil and natural gas is available now. America needs change. Mr. Obama has proved he cannot deliver it. Obama failed on all fronts Q Scripps Howard News Service OPINION Thursday, October 18, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A4AOPINION Q Dale McFeatters is editorial writer for Scripps Howard News Service. Dale McFeattersmcfeattersd@shns.com Cliff May Q Clifford D. May is president of the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies, a policy institute focusing on terrorism.

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Oct. 18 Retired educators meet The Columbia County Retired Educators will meet Thursday, Oct. 18 at the school district adult center in room 120 at 1 p.m. For more information call 7522431. Any retired person interested in education is welcome to attend. Oct. 19 Dracula in High Springs High Springs Community Theater will present a new comedy thriller by Leroy Clark, adapted from Bram Stokers book Dracula. Opening Oct. 5 and running weekends for all of October, Dracula ends October 28. In this adap tation, Dr. Van Helsing is a medical specialist with Tourettes Syndrome, Renfield is a woman, Dr. Sewards Aunt Quincy is tipsy at times, and theres even a French maid. This actress is from Lake City. Continuing our new tradi tion of an opening night free reception, the Friday Oct. 5 performance will have doors opening at 7:15 p.m. so patrons can enjoy the reception before the 8 p.m. showtime. Adult tick ets are $11, children 12 and under, $8, and seniors on Sunday matinees are the special rate of $9. Tickets may be purchased at The Framery in downtown Lake City, 341 S. Marion Avenue, 386-754-2780. Online tick ets are available at high springscommunitytheater. com. Shows are Fridays and Saturdays, 8 p.m, and Sundays, 2 p.m. Quilt show The Stephen Foster Quilt Show is Oct, 19-21 at the Stephen Foster State Park in White Springs. Lady of the Lake Quilters get to share their finished quilts at the event. Please join us in celebration of all things quilting. There are many categories of quilts displayed and demonstra tions of quilting techniques will be held throughout the show. There is even a Boutique that is always a bargain basement for quilts and quilting items. See you at the Quilt Show. Fish dinner Our Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5056 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, pre pares fish dinners every Friday from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The dinner is $6 for two Alaskan Pollock filets, corn, baked beans, hush puppies, cole slaw and tart er sauce. Take out or eat in. Oct. 20 Howlin Halloween The public is invited to the Howlin Halloween Yappy Hour at the Pet Spot, 872 SW Main Blvd., Saturday, Oct. 20 from 2 to 5 p.m. For a $10 donation everyone will receive one 5x7 pet photo, activities, and Hors dOeuvres. Beer, Wine, soda and water will be available. Ask the Dog Trainer, therapy and obedi ence will be featured along with live music, vendors and raffle drawings. At some point during the evening a costume contest will take place. Everyone is encour aged to dress up with your pet to win prizes. Proceeds from the event will help support patients and fami lies with Hospice of the Nature Coast. Hospice of the Nature Coast, is a pro gram of Hospice of Citrus County, Inc., licensed in 1985. For additional infor mation regarding the Howlin Halloween Yappy Hour, call 386-755-7714. Grief support The Grief Share Support Group, a ministry of Orchard Community Church, meets every Saturday from 2 to 4 p.m. in room D at the Willowbrook Assisted Living center, 1580 S. Marion Ave. The group offers caring support for those who have lost a loved one, through videos, dis cussion time, and prayer. There are fees. For infor mation call 288-7429. Farmers market The Lake DeSoto Farmers Market hosts another Florida Gateway College Day at the mar ket this Saturday, Oct. 20 from 8 a.m. to noon. Representatives from the EMS program, the Welding program and the AC pro gram will be available for questions and demonstra tions. Admissions and col lege information about all the great programs at FGC will be available. In addi tion, local artist Sue Hall will make her first appear ance at the market. Sue, known for her local farm scenes and is a mem ber of the Art League of North Florida. Her paint ings can be seen at Haven Hospice and the College and Library Art Shows. For more information about the Lake DeSoto Farmer Market call 386-719-5766 or visit market.lcfla.com. Sample ballots Sample ballots are now available at the Columbia County Supervisor of Elections office, 971 W. Duval St., and public build ings. Signature updates by be received by the Supervisor of Elections office no later than the start of canvassing of absentee ballots, which begins Oct. 29. If your signature does not match what is on file your absentee or provision al ballot will not count. Oct. 22 Pet loss workshop An Educational Workshop titled Coping with the Loss of Your Pet will be held Thursday, Oct. 22 at 2 p.m. at the Wings Community Education Center located in the Lake City Plaza on Main Blvd. The facilitator for the workshop is Dr. Joy Dias Director, Client Counseling and Support Services, University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine. To register call Vicki Myers, at 386-7557714, Ext. 2411. Seating is limited. The workshop is provided as a public ser vice and free of charge. The Wings Education Center is a program of Hospice of Citrus County, Inc. Visit www.hospiceofcitrus.org for more information. Womens Club lunch The Womens Club of Lake City will host their October fundraiser Monday, Oct. 22 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Clubhouse, 257 SE Hernando Ave. The meal is $6 per plate, which includes baked ziti, salad, rolls and girdle busters. Eat at the clubhouse, take out or have it delivered. For information call 7550347. Aglow tea party Rev. Jesten Peters will be the keynote speaker at the Lake City Aglow Lighthouse 1920s Tea Party on 7 p.m. Monday, Oct. 22 at Olivet Missionary Baptist Church in Lake City. Jesten is a former Aglow president and was named 2205 Woman of the Year for Columbia County. If you or your church would like to reserve and decorate a table at the tea party, please call for details. Everyone is welcome and there will be plenty of space. Come joins us for a night of fun and inspiration with music, contests, tea and refresh ments. The culmination for the event will be Peters message, The bride is wearing combat boots. Oct. 23 Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for a free diag nosis or solutions to the Columbia County Extenstion Office, 164 Sw Mary Ethel Lane. For more information 752-5384. Oct. 24 Dine for crisis fund Dine to donate every Wednesday in October at Applebees in Lake City. The Tough Enough to Wear Pink Crisis Fund will receive 10 percent of the bill. Ask for a flier, by the Columbia County Fairgrounds Office or call 752-8822 to have one emailed to you. Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Wednesday from 1 to 4 p.m. to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for a free diagnosis or solutions to the Fort White Public Library on Route 47. For more information 7525384. Quilters meeting The Lady of the Lake Quilters Guild will meet on the morning of Oct. 24 at Teen Town, 533 NW Desoto St., two blocks north of US 90 off Lake Jeffery Rd. Social time is from 9 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. and the business meeting is at 10 a.m. The program this month will be the wrap-up of the Stephen Foster Quilt Show. Charming Strip Club for October is fall colors. The election of 2013 Guild officers will be held. Oct. 25 Military officers meet The Suwannee River Valley Chapter of the Military Officers Association of America (MOAA) will hold its monthly dinner meeting Thursday, Oct. 25 at the Lake City Elks Lodge, 259 NE Hernando Street, Lake City at 6:30 p.m. The din ner meeting is open to all active duty military officers, retired and former officers, members of the Reserve and National Guard, and their spouses. For informa tion and reservations call Susan Palmer at 697-6828 or Vernon Lloyd at 7524885. The Suwannee River Valley Chapter is one of over 400 MOAA chapters around the U.S. and over seas. The local chapter was founded in 1990. Landlords meeting All landlords and real tors are welcome to attend a landlords meeting Thursday, Oct. 25 at 5 p.m. at Cracker Barrel. The 6 p.m. program will feature fire marshall David Boozer. For information call 7550110. Willie Dunlap Willie Dunlap, age 67 resident of 300 S.W. Kicklighter Terr. Lake City, FL. died Wednesday, October 10, 2012 at Haven Hospice in Lake City, FL terminating an extended illness. Born in Quitman, Georgia he was the son of Mrs. Rosa and Mr. Emmit Dunlap. He received his education in the public school of Brooks County. He retired from the public School of Co lumbia County after serving for 32 years of employment. He was united in Holy Matrimony to Ms. Evelyn Freeman for 47 years. Survivors include his wife, Evelyn Freeman Dunlap; (1) son, proceeded him in death, Willie Dunlap, Jr.; children, Michael Dunlap, of Lake City, FL., and Tonya (Joseph) Walters, of Live Oak, FL.; (2) grandchildren, Willie Dunlap III, of Orlando, FL., and Kitara Dunlap, of Gainesville, FL.; (2) great grands; Mother-in-law, Catherine Kelly, of Lake City, FL.; Aunt, Mary Dix, of Lake City; a host of sister-in-laws, nieces, nephews, cousins other relatives and friends also survive. Funeral services for Willie Dunlap, will be 12:00 noon Saturday, October 20, 2012 at Cooper Funeral Home, Chapel with Minister Lynwood Jones, low in Hope Henry Cemetery. The family will receive friends Friday, Oct. 19, 2012 at Coo per Funeral Home, from 7:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. Arrangements entrusted to COOPER FUNERAL HOME 251 N.E. Washington Street; Lake City, FL Willis O. Cooper, L.F.D. Mary Gwendolyn Giebeig Norris Mary Gwendolyn Giebeig Nor ris, 84, of Lake City, FL passed away early Monday morning, October 15, 2012 at Haven Hospice in Lake City follow ing a brief illness. She was born in Deland, FL on January 3, 1928 to Paul Sparks Giebeig, Sr. and Ruth Duke Giebeig. In 1939, she moved with her family to Lake City, which re mained her home until her death. She attended Volusia and Colum bia County Schools, and Montreat College High School, Montreat, NC as a boarding student where she was a member of the school orchestra and graduated with the Class of 1946. She maintained lifelong friendships with several dear Montreat classmates there. Gwendolyn attended Limestone College, Gaffney, SC before re turning home to marry her be loved husband, William Bascom Norris, January 15, 1950. Their Lake City throughout their lives. To all who knew her, she was a person of great kindness, com passion and generosity. Her friends and family were val ued treasures and a huge part of her life. She was devoted to those she loved, a wonderful encourager and a great listener. She was a member of the First United Methodist Church, Lake City, the Edward Rutledge Chapter of the DAR, Gideons International Ladies Auxiliary, and the Columbia County Fair Association. She was also a past board member of the Gateway Girl Scout Council, a past mem ber of the Womens Club of Lake City, The Susanna Wesley Sun day School Class, Church Circle, and Various School Committees where she served as a tireless volunteer during her daughters school years. Gwendolyn was preceded in death by her much loved husband, William Bascom Norris; parents, Paul and Ruth Giebeig; brothers, Paul Jr., Earl, and Bill; nephew, Brad Giebeig, and Sisters In Law, Shirley M. Giebeig and Betty S. Giebeig. She is survived by her daughters, Laura Ruth Norris, Lake City, and Mary Anne Norris and SonIn-Law Jeff Norris, Alachua; special Granddaughters Ash ley Adams and Lucinda Ford; Sister-In-Law, Virginia Giebeig Kindberg; and special nephew Jamie Holman (Ann) and chil dren, Lucy, Mac, and Wells, Bir mingham; along with a host of dear nieces, nephews, and cous ins. She leaves a lasting legacy in the lives she encouraged, her friendships and acts of kindness. Funeral services will be conduct ed at 3:00 P.M. Friday, October 19, 2012 at First United Meth odist Church with Reverend will be private. The family will receive friends from 4:30 un til 6:30 Thursday, October 18, 2012 at GA TEWA Y-FOREST LAWN FUNERAL HOME 3596 S. HWY 441, Lake City, FL. (386) 752-1954. In lieu made to First United Method ist Church Worship Fund, 973 S. Marion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025, or Gideons Internation al, P.O. Box 1805, Lake City, FL 32056. Please leave words of comfort to the family at www.gatewayforestlawn.com Pamela Kathleen Pelt Ms. Pamela Kathleen Pelt, 42 of Lake City passed away on Tues day, October 16, 2012. Pam was born on Christmas Day in 1969 to Robert W. Pelt and Shir ley Ann Blanton Pelt. She was raised in Macclenny and was a graduate of Baker County High School class of 1990. She was a member of Eastside Baptist Church in Lake City and was preceded in death by her mother, Shir ley Ann Pelt, in 1994. Survivors include her parents, Robert W. Pelt (Mary), Gaines ville; one brother, Gary Pelt, Alachua; one sister, Sherri Mc Queen (Brian), Brunswick, GA; one nephew, John McQueen, Brunswick, GA; and numerous extended familly and friends. Memorial services will be held on Saturday, October 20, 2012 at 1:00 at Eastside Baptist Church donations may be made to East side Baptist Church in memory of Ms Pelt. Cremation arrange ments under the direction of GUERR Y FUNERAL HOME www.guerryfuneralhome.net LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2012 5A 5A statefarm.com With competitive rates and personal service, its no wonder more drivers trust State Farm Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there. CALL FOR A QUOTE 24/7. Ride with the #1 car insurer in 1001143.1 State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company State Farm Indemnity Company Bloomington, IL John Kasak, Agent 904 SW SR 247 Branford Hwy Lake City, FL 32025 Bus: 386-752-7521 johnkasak.com John Burns III, Agent 234 SW Main Boulevard Lake City, FL 32056 Bus: 386-752-5866 johnburnsinsurance.com FLORIDA. Charter Loans Services Pay outstanding bills, credit cards. Lowest compared rates. Personal loans. Business, debt loans. Auto Home Improvement Loans Bad Credit options. No apps. fees Call today: 1.877.359.5533 Charteracc@usa.com Obituaries are paid advertise ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporters classified depart ment at 752-1293. OBITUARIES COMMUNITY CALENDAR To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Laura Hampson at 754-0427 or by e-mail at lhampson@ lakecityreporter.com.

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6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2012 Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 6A Curry Land Service Complete Site Preparation and Landscape Services Bush Hogging Back Hoe Disking Bulldozer Work Seeding Sodding Leveling Mulching Mowing Pine Tree Planting Irrigation Installation and Repair and Much More Free Estimates Chris Curry God Bless America Tel: (386) 755-3890 Cell: (386) 623-3200 to review their ballot at home, Brown said. Absentee ballots must be received at the supervisor of elections office no later than 7 p.m. on election day. Early voting starts Saturday, Oct. 27 and runs through Saturday, Nov. 3 at the Lake City and Fort White offic es. Both locations will be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. daily during early vot ing, including Sunday, Oct. 28. Bobbie Clary, supervisor of elec tions registration coordinator, said people are often surprised that polls are open on a Sunday, but the extend ed times are helpful for those with inflexible work schedules. While it is too late to register to vote for the first time, there is still time to update information key to making your vote count. Clary said the office is encourag ing people to update their signatures by Oct. 29. Its very important that we do update our signatures every so often, Clary said. Signatures change as people age, she said. Senior citizens may begin holding a pen differently or tremble. Adults may change their signatures since the time they registered as teenagers. Signature updates are especially important for absentee voters, as the canvassing board must compare the signature of the ballot to the voters signature on file. An absentee ballot shall be con sidered illegal if it does not include the signature of the elector, as shown by registration records, according to 2012 state statutes. A name or address change can be done in advance or on election day, Clary said. Voters with an in-county address change can go to their new pre cinct on election day to update their address, she said. The old precinct also will be able to direct the voter to the new polling place. A precinct finder is also available on the supervi sor of elections office, www.voteco lumbia.com. Address changes from outside Columbia County must be done before election day, otherwise a voter must cast a provisional ballot, she said. County and address changes can be done over the phone, while name changes must be done in person at the supervisors office. The main supervisor of elections office, 971 W. Duval St., is open Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The Fort White branch, 17579 SW State Road 47, is open Wednesday and Thursday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. For more infor mation call the supervisor of elections offices at 758-1026 or 497-1293. VOTES: 1,200-plus absentee ballots cast here so far Continued From Page 1A between the mother and son and at some point Carter and the other woman slapped each other across the face, according to police. Griffin then grabbed a wooden stick about 14 inches long and swung it at his mother, but missed. Carter then went into the kitchen, grabbed a butcher knife and ran after Griffin and the other woman, the report says. Police also learned that Griffin struck the female guest in the face and grabbed her by the throat. Officer D.S. Miles saw redness on the victims face and a swollen cheek, reports said. JAILED: Mother, son arrested following altercation Continued From Page 1A Dale Williams, county manager, said there are parks that are not included in the countys ordinance and the ordinance needs to be amended to include all parks. The parks included in the ordinance will be parks where county ordinances govern the hours of operation, the use of alcohol and prohibit the use of handguns. The parks that will be included in the proposed ordi nance when it is adopted will be: Mason City Recreational Area, Paul S. Giebeig Recreational Park, Springville Community Center, Lulu Community Center, Southside Sports Complex, South Columbia Sports Complex, Winfield Community Center, Alligator Lake Public Recreation Area, Falling Creek Park, Bethlehem Park, Deep Creek Community Center and Westide Community Center (which is currently under construction). The ordinance will regulate natural vegetation, litter and pets at the park. Williams said people cutting dough nuts on the prop erties is the biggest problem at the parks. We spend a lot of time and a lot of money in this county doing corrective work for those types of things, he said. The ordinance will also regulate the consumption and possession of alcohol beverages on those properties. In other business, the commission: Will present a proclamation noting Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month will be observed in November; Will hold a public hearings on a small scale land use map amendment to the countys comprehensive plan for First Full Baptist and will hold another public hearing for a proposed zoning amendment change for Womble Holdings to change land development regulations propos ing a 1/2 acre parcel of property be changed from com mercial intensive to residential single family mobile home II designation; and Will discuss a proposal submitted by the Cordele Dawson Corporation requesting the county apply for a tax deed on certain county property where the county holds a tax certificate. PARKS: County plans to impose rules for parks Continued From Page 1A EXERCISE Continued From 1A mobile command posts and other communication tools. The tools from the differ ent agencies were not the same equipment, but were made compatible with other technology. In order to make all the tools work, we have tools called gateways, Gaston said. The most renowned is the Florida Interoperable Network (FIN) and were testing the connec tions between the various sheriffs offices, Florida Highway Patrol and other state law enforcement agen cies and partners. ABOVE: Ryan Lee (left), Alachua County Sheriffs Office Technical Services Division supervisor, gives instructions to communica tions team member George Diaz while operating a communications gateway system. The equipment is part of the emergency deployable interchangeable communications system. LEFT: Putnam County Sheriffs Office dispatchers Jeremy Davis (right) and Payton Bass adjust mobile radio equipment inside the St. Johns County Unified Command Center during Wednesdays communica tions exercise. Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City Reprter

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Sister: Earnhardt Jr. improving CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Dale Earnhardt Jr.’s sister said Wednesday that NASCAR’s most popular driver could be back racing next week at Martinsville Speedway in Virginia. Earnhardt will miss his second consecutive race Sunday at Kansas because of two concussions suffered in a six-week span. Kelley Earnhardt Miller wrote in a post Wednesday on JRNation.com that Earnhardt is on schedule to test a car early next week. If all goes well, she said he can race again Oct. 28 at Martinsville. “If all goes according to plan, and he continues to improve to 100 percent, he will test a race car early next week to be cleared for Martinsville,” she wrote. “This has definitely been an eye-opening experience and one that I hope we don’t revisit in his career.” Earnhardt Miller said her brother has been resting per doctor orders, but has been allowed to watch some tele-vision and play some video games as long as he doesn’t “stress” his brain, she wrote.NC officials: 61 fairgoers get E. coli RALEIGH, N.C. — Health officials in North Carolina say the number of E. coli cases linked to the Cleveland County Fair has climbed to 61. The state Department of Health and Human Services said Wednesday that 38 children and 23 adults have been affected by the outbreak. Eleven people have been hospitalized, and officials said there are three cases from South Carolina. A 2-year-old died of complications from the bacterial illness. The nine-day fair ended Oct. 7. Health officials say symptoms of E. coli infection could come up to 10 days after exposure and can include diarrhea, abdominal cramps, nausea and vomiting. Officials haven’t yet determined the source of the outbreak.Doctor ordered to pay $6 million FAYETTEVILLE, N.C. — A former Fayetteville surgeon has been ordered to pay more than $6 million in a malpractice lawsuit The Fayetteville Observer reported that the lawsuit said Geraldine Nicholson of Lumber Bridge died in October 2006 after spending nearly a year in the hospital with complications after surgery to remove cancerous tissue in her rectum and colon. According to the lawsuit, Dr. Arleen Kaye Thom left a surgical sponge in Nicholson’s abdomen that wasn’t discovered until 10 weeks after initial surgery. A family attorney said the 18-by-18-inch sponge caused infections and illness that prevented Nicholson from receiving can-cer treatments. A Robeson County jury on Oct. 10 ordered Thom to pay nearly $5.1 million to Nicholson’s estate and $750,000 to Nicholson’s husband. Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2012 7A7AHEALTH EMILY WAGSTER PETTUSAssociated PressJACKSON, Miss. — Mississippi has the nation’s highest infant mortality rate, and experts are trying to change that by teaching people about healthy pregnancies and proper sleep conditions for babies. It’s important for infants to sleep on their backs in cribs without blankets, pil-lows or stuffed animals, which can cause acciden-tal suffocation, said Dr. Yvonne Maddox, deputy director of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development at the National Institutes of Health. Maddox spoke Wednesday to more than 300 health care providers, social workers and others at a Jackson conference that focused on improv-ing babies’ health and reducing the infant mor-tality rate. The sudden infant death syndrome rate has been reduced by 50 percent since health offi-cials started the “back to sleep” public information campaign 14 years ago, Maddox said. “Many children are born every hour,” she said. “So we need to keep the mes-sage going.” In 2011, Mississippi had 9.4 deaths per 1,000 live births. The national rate was 6 deaths per 1,000 live births. The statistics are for children who die before reaching their first birth-day. “A lot of that is because we have high poverty lev-els, and infant mortality goes along with poverty,” said Dr. Mary Currier, Mississippi’s state health officer. The state Department of Health says the top causes of infant mortality are pre-mature birth or low birth weight, SIDS, birth defects, accidents or maternal diffi-culties. Dr. Michael C. Lu is associate administrator for the maternal and child health bureau for the Health Resources and Services Administration, part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. He said children can’t get a fair chance to succeed if they don’t get a healthy start on life. He also pointed out that the U.S. has higher infant mortal-ity rates for some racial and ethnic groups, such as African-Americans and Native Americans, and in some geographic regions, such as the Southeast. “Infant mortality is a measure of how much we fail the greatness of this nation,” Lu said. Dina Ray, Mississippi, director of the March of Dimes, said her organiza-tion tries to educate women and teenagers about the importance of healthy pregnancy for infant devel-opment. That includes tak-ing vitamins and folic acid and refraining from smok-ing and drinking alcohol. She said 20 percent of babies born to teenage mothers arrive premature-ly, and 14 of every 1,000 babies born to teenage mothers die before turn-ing 1. “One of the key problems with teen moms is that they don’t actually tell anybody they’re pregnant, many times, until they’ve been pregnant for about six months,” Ray said. “By that time, they’ve missed out on the best part of pre-natal care.” She said the lack of proper health care during pregnancy can become expensive. “A lot of people will not get any prenatal care and then they will end up tak-ing an ambulance three hours away, all the way into Jackson, to have a crisis taken care of,” Ray said. Cathy Files, executive director of the Mississippi SIDS Alliance, said many poor families in Mississippi can’t afford cribs, so babies end up sleeping with sib-lings, parents or grandpar-ents. She said she tells par-ents and grandparents that an infant is safest in a crib with a firm mattress and a fitted sheet. When it’s cold, the infant can be put in warm pajamas. She said it can be difficult to persuade some grandparents. “They’ll be like, ‘I raised 10 kids. They’re all fine. And so I’m not going to change my ways,’” Files said. “But they don’t understand that this is all based on research and that you never know which babies are going to be more susceptible.” Seniors learn more about HIV, AIDS By JESSICA GRESKOAssociated PressWASHINGTON — The seniors who live at the Edgewood apart-ment complex in northeast Washington have all the kinds of ailments common to older Americans. There’s high choles-terol. Diabetes. Alzheimer’s and dementia. Last month, though, the city’s health department sent two women to the high-rise complex to speak about a different illness. It’s a disease seniors sometimes dismiss as something only young people get: HIV and AIDS. “Older people ... they don’t worry as much about sexually transmitted diseases. They don’t see it as prevalent in their com-munity as the younger genera-tion does,” said Gibby Thomas, 55, one of the two facilitators who spoke to approximately two dozen seniors at Edgewood dur-ing a pre-lunch meeting. Numbers tell a different story. The District of Columbia has one of the highest HIV infection rates in the country, and nearly 40 per-cent of the people living with the disease are over age 50. Officials say about one in five newly diagnosed cases in Washington is a person 50 or older. And older people are often diagnosed later and sicker than others because they don’t think they’re at risk. Now city officials are trying to raise older residents’ aware-ness about the disease, which is spread through having unpro-tected sex or sharing needles and is treatable but has no cure. They plan to spend $150,000 a year over at least the next two years reaching out to seniors. But talk-ing to the baby boom generation about HIV and AIDS is different from talking to adolescents. Some seniors are less comfortable discussing sexually transmit-ted diseases, yet they’re engaging in the same risky behavior that adolescents do that lead to HIV infection, said Michael Kharfen, who oversees outreach for the Department of Health branch tasked with HIV and AIDS pro-grams. “They were young people with risky behaviors and now they’ve become older people with risky behaviors,” said Courtney Williams, a member of the D.C. Office on Aging and helped put together the city’s new outreach program. Seniors have drug addictions and engage in unprotected sex just as young people do, putting them at risk for contracting HIV. And any health classes senior citizens took when they were young wouldn’t have covered the disease. That’s why the city, which has more than 14,000 people living with HIV, has spent the last two years developing an approxi-mately hour-long talk specifical-ly geared for seniors. Speakers bring along condoms. They’ve also created accompanying bro-chures and posters with images of older people. City officials looked at one other HIV and AIDS program for seniors in New York that was created by a non-profit, but what they came up with is their own. For example, they wanted to ease into talking about HIV and AIDS, so the session is being advertised as a general talk about sexual health and relationships. The talk then moves on to stan-dard prevention topics — like condom and needle use — but in a different way. Presenters explain that just because a woman has hit meno-pause and can’t get pregnant doesn’t mean she should write off condoms, which protect against HIV. They warn participants that if they’re diabetic and inject themselves with insulin that they shouldn’t share needles, which can spread the disease. They also talk about Viagra and the effect it has had on senior communities. Facilitators say they’ve heard stories of men who have relationships with more than one woman in their senior apartment complex, increasing their and their partners’ risk for HIV. Facilitators also take questions and try to combat misconcep-tions. At Edgewood, for example, one man worried about taking an oral HIV test that facilitators encouraged. “If someone is over 50, what are the chances the test would cause an infection?” asked 69-year-old Albert Price, a diabetic who said his doctor has never offered him an HIV test. He was assured that the oral swab used for an HIV test does not actually contain any virus. Part of the message to seniors is also to nudge their kids and grandkids to be safe and get test-ed, a topic that doesn’t come up at sessions for younger people. Frances Prophet, 80, said after the session that she doesn’t gen-erally talk to her three children about sex. They’d think she’s crazy if she did, she said. But she might have some questions the next time she sees her son. “I’ll probably ask him about the test and everything,” she said. ABOVE: HIV class instructor Lynn Thomas-Browning (right) makes a point at the Edgewood Senior Apartment Building in Washington. Seniors in the nation’s capital are used to talking about a host of health issues, but now officials are asking them to think about a different disease — AIDS. RIGHT: Women participating in an HIV class raise their hands in response to questions. More older people contracting disease, surviving with it. ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS Health Briefs Experts seek to reduce highinfant mortality rate in Miss. ASSOCIATED PRESSDr. Michael C. Lu, associate administrator for the Maternal and Child Health Bureau of the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services, speaks abou t infant health issues during a gathering Wednesday in Jackson, Miss., to discuss ways to reduce the state’s infant mortality rate, which is the highest in the nation. Earnhardt N Associated Press

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8A LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 8AHealth Zero Monthly Plan Premium Blue A new generation of plans for your generation. Call today to attend a Medicare seminar near you. Holiday Inn Lake City 213 SW Commerce Dr. Lake City, FL 32024 H & F Restaurant Jasper 202 Hatley Street SE Jasper, FL 10/18 9:30 a.m. 10/23 2:00 p.m. 10/18 2:00 p.m. 11/14 2:00 p.m. You can reach customer service from 8 a.m. 9 p.m. ET, 7 days a week, at 1-855-601-9465; TTY users call 1-800-955-8771. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings, call 1-855-425-5985; TTY users call 1-855-955-8771. Priority Code: 5051000 Alliance & Associates 770 NW 15th Avenue Jasper, FL 32052 855-425-5985 9 a.m. 5 p.m. ET, Monday Friday to speak with a licensed agent. MARILYNN MARCHIONE AP Chief Medical Writer Americas favorite dietary sup plements, multivitamins, modest ly lowered the risk for cancer in healthy male doctors who took them for more than a decade, the first large study to test these pills has found. The result is a surprise because many studies of individual vita mins have found they dont help prevent chronic diseases and some even seemed to raise the risk of cancer. In the new study, multivita mins cut the chance of develop ing cancer by 8 percent. That is less effective than a good diet, exercise and not smoking, each of which can lower cancer risk by 20 percent to 30 percent, cancer experts say. Multivitamins also may have different results in women, younger men or people less healthy than those in this study. Its a very mild effect and personally Im not sure its sig nificant enough to recommend to anyone although it is promis ing, said Dr. Ernest Hawk, vice president of cancer prevention at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and formerly of the National Cancer Institute. At least this doesnt suggest a harm as some previous studies on single vitamins have, he said. Hawk reviewed the study for the American Association for Cancer Research, which is meet ing in Anaheim, Calif., where the study was to be presented on Wednesday. It also was pub lished online in the Journal of the American Medical Association. About one-third of U.S. adults and as many as half of those over 50 take multivitamins. They are marketed as a kind of insurance policy against bad eating. Yet no government agency recommends their routine use regardless of the quality of a persons diet, says a fact sheet from the federal Office of Dietary Supplements. Some fads, such as the anti oxidant craze over vitamins A and E and beta-carotene, backfired when studies found more health risk with those supplements, not less. Many of those were single vitamins in larger doses than the percent of daily value amounts that multivitamins typi cally contain. Science on vitamins has been skimpy. Most studies have been observational they look at groups of people who do and do not use vitamins, a method that cant give firm conclusions. Dr. J. Michael Gaziano, of Brigham and Womens Hospital and VA Boston, led a stronger test. Nearly 15,000 male doctors who were 50 or older and free of cancer when the study started were given monthly packets of Centrum Silver or fake multivi tamins without knowing which type they received. After about 11 years, there were 2,669 new cancers, and some people had cancer more than once. For every 1,000 men per year in the study, there were 17 cancers among multivitamin users and more than 18 among those taking the placebo pills. That worked out to an 8 percent lower risk of developing cancer in the vitamin group. Multivitamins made no differ ence in the risk of developing prostate cancer, which accounted for half of all cases. They lowered the risk of other cancers collec tively by about 12 percent. There also was a trend toward fewer cancer deaths among multivita min users, but the difference was so small it could have occurred by chance alone. Side effects were fairly similar except for more rashes among vitamin users. The National Institutes of Health paid for most of the study. Pfizer Inc. supplied the pills and other companies supplied the packaging. The main reason to take a mul tivitamin is to correct or prevent a deficiency, but there may be a modest benefit in reducing the risk of cancer in older men, Gaziano said. Cancer experts said the results need to be confirmed by another study before recommending mul tivitamins to the public. These participants were healthier only 4 percent smoked, for example. For people who do want to take multivitamins, doctors suggest: Be aware that they are dietary supplements, which do not get the strict testing required of prescription medicines. Vitamins may lower cancer risk ASSOCIATED PRESS A monthly calendar vitamin pack was used in a long-term study that found Americas favorite dietary supplements, multivitamins, modestly lowered the risk of developing cancer in healthy male doctors who took them daily for more than a decade. MIKE STOBBE AP Medical Writer NEW YORK Four more people have died in the national meningitis out break, bringing the death toll to 19, health officials said Wednesday. The deaths are among the 247 people in 15 states sickened in the outbreak. They all received shots of an apparently contaminated steroid medication made by a Massachusetts specialty pharmacy. Most of the patients con tracted a rare fungal form of meningitis, after getting the shots for back pain over the past few months. Two devel oped infections from joint injections. Of the latest deaths, two were in Tennessee and one each was reported in Florida and in Virginia, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Wednesday. That brings deaths to eight in Tennessee; three in Florida and Michigan, two in Indiana and Virginia, and one in Maryland. Test results so far show infections with three kinds of fungus, most of them a form of black mold, the CDC said. Of 42 patients, 40 were infected with Exserohilum fungus. The others were infected with Aspergillus or Cladosporium. All are treat ed with the same anti-fungal medications. Three lots of the suspect steroid were recalled last month by the New England Compounding Center of Framingham, Mass. All the illnesses have been traced to one of those lots. Food and Drug Administration officials last week said they found fun gus in 50 vials of the pre servative-free steroid called methylprednisolone acetate. However, they have not said what kind of fungus they detected. Meningitis deaths now 19

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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Thursday, October 18, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas? Contact Tim Kirby Sports Editor 754-0421 tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS Sunshine True Value Hardware OPEN OPEN FOR SALE Organize GaragesShops-Barns or Stores! Available from 3 ft. wide to 800 ft. Ask for one of our grocery size magic bags. Any items that you place in the bag will be discounted... Y ou Pay Only 60 on the Dollar! 40% O Original Price Includes: Tools, Plumbing, Paint, Housewares, Garden Supplies, Automotive, and Milwaukee Power Toold Many Larger Items Are Also 40% O LIMITED TIME OFFER For a limited time we are accepting PREPAID SPECIAL ORDERS for to go trays and commercial supplies at 20% OFF regular price. Bolt Bins & Part Boxes For Sale Contents 1/2 O when you buy everything in a bin or cabinet. *Free Admission Ticket To S&S Day At The Fair November 8 th With Quantity Purchase of Items. Check us out at www.scaffs.com or like us on Facebook.com/ScaffsInc LASSO THE FUN PRICES IN EFFECT OCT. 1 st NOV. 8 th *BLUE BELL ICE CREAM 4 / $ 5 49 or $1.39 ea. (Pint) MEAL DEAL * Great American Deli Cheese Burger Uncle Rays Potato Chips Reeses Regular Size Candy Bar 32 oz. Fountain Coca-Cola 4 / $ 5 00 NOT AVAILABLE AT SCAFFS MARKETS Last road block By BRANDON FINLEY bfinley@lakecityreporter.com For Columbia High, the magic number is one. One more road game and the Tigers are done with the travel for the regular season. The Tigers take to the streets today as they travel to take on the Broncos of Middleburg High at 7 p.m. in Middleburg. Columbia (5-1) looks to go 3-0 in District 3-6A play and put another notch on its belt toward a district championship. Middleburg (1-5) has struggled this season, but the Broncos do have a win in district play against Leon High. Columbia head coach Brian Allen said the Tigers are sitting where they want to be at this point in the sea son at the top of the district, but there is always room for improvement. In the passing game, were right around the same mark of 700 yards as we were last season, Allen said. Rushing, were light years ahead of where we were. Were going out with that mentality that were going to run the ball. People may criticize us for not having a lot of passing yards, but when you can rush for 1,500 yards, well take that all day. Allen said that the pass ing game is on track and with the continued suc cess of the rushing attack and three-headed monster Ronald Timmons, Braxton Stockton and Lonnie Underwood, that there will come times that Columbia can open up the vertical game. When theyre loading up to take that away, theres going to be some situations that it becomes like 7-on-7, Allen said. One area that Allen would like to see improvement in is the Tigers special team, which hasnt been as explo sive as it was last season. Its not up to par, but its getting better, Allen said. We havent had a kickoff return or a punt return and at this time last year we had a couple. And while the defense has played well for Columbia, as a defensive-minded coach, Allen will always look for improvement from his unit. This is the point last year where we had five games where we only allowed opponents to score nine points, Allen said. We want to pick things up to that standard that we set last year. Still, at 5-1, things arent too bad in the eyes of Allen. Were averaging nearly 40 points a game and have had a couple of shutouts, he said. Were not far behind where we were last year, if were not ahead. With Middleburg, Columbia has a chance to continue to move towards its season goal. Allen said the Broncos will run a lot of things sim ilar to what theyve seen with the Ridgeview. Theyre going to run a lot of things out of the Pistol, Allen said. Theyre not going to throw it a lot, but have a high amount of runs out of the shotgun style. Its not a Pro-offense, but it has a high percentage of zone and kick out plays. Defensively, the Broncos will base out of a 4-3. We have to be able to handle the blitz both inside and out, Allen said. We have to recognize where theyre coming from and execute on the ground like weve been doing all year. In the end, its all about taking care of business on this final road trip to set the Tigers up for a home run. The bye worked to our advantage, because we were already able to break down the film for this Thursday game, Allen said. With the potential of four home games, we have to handle this last hurdle on the road. We especially need to han dle this three-game stretch of district games against Middleburg, Orange Park and Leon. We take care of business and we could have a few in a row at home and we know our fans will be behind us because the com munity support has been outstanding. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Columbia Highs Ronald Timmons (23) breaks into open field against Ridgeview High in the Tigers District 3-6A win. Columbias final road game takes place at 7 p.m. today against Middleburg High in Middleburg. Tigers travel for final time this season tonight. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Seniors honored today Columbia Highs swim team will have Senior Night against Suwannee High at 4:30 p.m. today. Columbia seniors are (front row, from left) Aleena Fields, Sara Woodfield, Stephanie Silva, Joana Mata and Micheala Polhamus. (Back row, from left) are Joseph Picconi, Jordan Morrill and Jacob Finley.

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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today COLLEGE FOOTBALL 8 p.m. FSN — Houston at SMU 9 p.m. ESPN — Oregon at Arizona St. EXTREME SPORTS 11 p.m. NBCSN — Dew Tour, Toyota City Championships, at San Francisco GOLF 2 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, The McGladrey Classic, first round, at St. Simons Island, Ga. 5 p.m. TGC — Web.com Tour, Jacksonville Open, first round, at Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. (same-day tape) 1:30 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Perth International, second round, at Perth, Australia MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 4 p.m. TBS — ALCS, game 5, New York at Detroit (if necessary) 7:30 p.m. FOX — NLCS, game 4, San Francisco at St. Louis NBA BASKETBALL 8 p.m. TNT — Preseason, Boston at Brooklyn. NFL FOOTBALL 8 p.m. NFL — Seattle at San Francisco PREP FOOTBALL 8 p.m. ESPN2 — Deland (Fla.) at Sandalwood (Fla.)FOOTBALLNFL standings AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAN.Y. Jets 3 3 0 .500 133 141New England 3 3 0 .500 188 137Miami 3 3 0 .500 120 117Buffalo 3 3 0 .500 137 192 South W L T Pct PF PAHouston 5 1 0 .833 173 115Indianapolis 2 3 0 .400 100 145Tennessee 2 4 0 .333 114 204Jacksonville 1 4 0 .200 65 138 North W L T Pct PF PABaltimore 5 1 0 .833 161 118Cincinnati 3 3 0 .500 149 163Pittsburgh 2 3 0 .400 116 115Cleveland 1 5 0 .167 134 163 West W L T Pct PF PADenver 3 3 0 .500 170 138San Diego 3 3 0 .500 148 137Oakland 1 4 0 .200 87 148Kansas City 1 5 0 .167 104 183 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAN.Y. Giants 4 2 0 .667 178 114Philadelphia 3 3 0 .500 103 125Washington 3 3 0 .500 178 173Dallas 2 3 0 .400 94 119 South W L T Pct PF PAAtlanta 6 0 0 1.000 171 113 Tampa Bay 2 3 0 .400 120 101Carolina 1 4 0 .200 92 125New Orleans 1 4 0 .200 141 154 North W L T Pct PF PAChicago 4 1 0 .800 149 71Minnesota 4 2 0 .667 146 117Green Bay 3 3 0 .500 154 135Detroit 2 3 0 .400 126 137 West W L T Pct PF PAArizona 4 2 0 .667 110 97San Francisco 4 2 0 .667 152 94Seattle 4 2 0 .667 110 93St. Louis 3 3 0 .500 110 111 Monday’s Game Denver 35, San Diego 24 Today’s Game Seattle at San Francisco, 8:20 p.m. Sunday’s Games Arizona at Minnesota, 1 p.m.Green Bay at St. Louis, 1 p.m.Baltimore at Houston, 1 p.m.Washington at N.Y. Giants, 1 p.m.Dallas at Carolina, 1 p.m.New Orleans at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.Cleveland at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.Tennessee at Buffalo, 1 p.m.Jacksonville at Oakland, 4:25 p.m.N.Y. Jets at New England, 4:25 p.m.Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 8:20 p.m. Monday, Oct. 22 Detroit at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.Open: Atlanta, Denver, Kansas City, Miami, Philadelphia, San DiegoAP Top 25 games Today No. 2 Oregon at Arizona State, 9 p.m. Saturday No. 1 Alabama at Tennessee, 7 p.m.No. 3 Florida vs. No. 9 South Carolina, 3:30 p.m. No. 4 Kansas State at No. 17 West Virginia, 7 p.m. No. 5 Notre Dame vs. BYU, 3:30 p.m.No. 6 LSU at No. 20 Texas A&M, Noon No. 7 Ohio State vs. Purdue, NoonNo. 8 Oregon State vs. Utah, 10:30 p.m. No. 10 Oklahoma vs. Kansas, 7 p.m.No. 11 Southern Cal vs. Colorado, 6 p.m. No. 12 Florida State at Miami, 8 p.m. No. 13 Georgia at Kentucky, 7 p.m.No. 14 Clemson vs. Virginia Tech, Noon No. 15 Mississippi State vs. Middle Tennessee, 7 p.m. No. 16 Louisville vs. USF, 3:30 p.m. No. 18 Texas Tech at TCU, 3:30 p.m.No. 19 Rutgers at Temple, NoonNo. 21 Cincinnati at Toledo, 7 p.m.No. 22 Stanford at California, 3 p.m.No. 23 Michigan vs. Michigan State, 3:30 p.m. No. 24 Boise State vs. UNLV, 3:30 p.m.BASEBALLMLB playoffs LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES (Best-of-7) American League (All games televised by TBS) Detroit 3, New York 0 Detroit 6, New York 4, 12 inningsDetroit 3, New York 0 Tuesday Detroit 3, New York 2 Today New York (Sabathia 15-6) at Detroit (Scherzer 16-7), 8:07 p.m. ——— National League (All games televised by Fox) St. Louis 1, San Francisco 1 St. Louis 6, San Francisco 4 Monday San Francisco 7, St. Louis 1 Wednesay St. Louis 2, San Francisco 1 (delayed) Today San Francisco at St. Louis (Wainwright 14-13), 8:07 p.m.BASKETBALLNBA preseason Today’s Games New Orleans at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.Detroit at Miami, 7:30 p.m.Memphis vs. Milwaukee, 8 p.m.Boston at Brooklyn, 8 p.m. Friday’s Games New York vs. Toronto at Montreal, Quebec, 7 p.m. Indiana at Orlando, 7 p.m.Philadelphia at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.Minnesota at Chicago, 8 p.m.Phoenix vs. Oklahoma City at Tulsa, OK, 8 p.m. Sacramento vs. L.A. Lakers at Las Vegas, NV, 10 p.m. Golden State at Portland, 10 p.m. WNBA Finals Indiana 1, Minnesota 0 (Best of 5) Wednesday Indiana at Minnesota (n) Friday Minnesota at Indiana, 8 p.m. NCAA Top 25 USA Today/ESPN Top 25 Poll Record Pts Pvs 1. Indiana (21) 27-9 761 13 2. Louisville (5) 30-10 738 4 3. Kentucky (5) 38-2 718 1 4. Ohio State 31-8 617 3 5. Michigan 24-10 605 22 6. N.C. State 24-13 581 20 7. Kansas 32-7 563 2 8. Duke 27-7 516 14 9. Syracuse 34-3 502 5 10. Florida 26-11 422 9 11. Arizona 23-12 411 — 12. North Carolina 32-6 401 6 13. UCLA 19-14 396 — 14. Michigan State 29-8 391 7 15. Creighton 29-6 325 21 16. Memphis 26-9 307 — 17. Missouri 30-5 289 11 18. Baylor 30-8 266 8 19. UNLV 26-9 203 — 20. San Diego State 26-8 196 — 21. Wisconsin 26-10 191 12 22. Gonzaga 26-7 166 — 23. Notre Dame 22-12 122 — 24. Florida State 25-10 61 15 24. Texas 20-14 61 — Others receiving votes: Saint Louis 58, VCU 40, Cincinnati 33, Murray State 30, Kansas State 13, Saint Mary’s 11, New Mexico 10, Tennessee 10, Minnesota 9, Pittsburgh 9, Marquette 8, Stanford 7, Butler 6, Oklahoma State 6, Colorado State 4, Middle Tennessee 3, Drexel 2, Georgia 2, Miami 2, Saint Joseph’s 2, Marshall 1. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2012 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04202BAGATE THURSDAY EVENING OCTOBER 18, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Last Resort “Voluntold” (N) Grey’s Anatomy (N) (:02) Scandal “Hunting Season” (N) News at 11(:35) Nightline (N) 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) The Insider 5-PBS 5 -Journal Nightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Frontline “The Choice 2012” President Barack Obama and Mitt Romney. 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Food Mysteries at the Museum Mysteries at the Museum Mysteries at the Museum The Dead Files HGTV 47 112 229Property VirginsProperty VirginsHunters Int’lHouse HuntersBuying and Selling “Cristal and Scott” Extreme Homes (N) House Hunters (N) Hunters Int’lLiving Abroad (N) Hunters Int’l TLC 48 183 280Island MediumIsland MediumLittle Shop of Gypsies Say Yes: ATLSay Yes: ATLFour Weddings (N) Little Shop of Gypsies (N) Four Weddings HIST 49 120 269Fort Knox: Secrets Revealed The U.S. bullion depository. Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Lost Magic Decoded The most terrifying magic effects ever. (N) 10 Things About10 Things About ANPL 50 184 282Fatal Attractions “My Sister the Lion” The Blue Planet: Seas of Life The Blue Planet: Seas of Life River Monsters: Unhooked “Killer Cat sh” Jeremy searches for the goonch. The Blue Planet: Seas of Life FOOD 51 110 231ChoppedChopped First round includes snouts. Halloween WarsSweet Genius “Puzzled Genius” Sweet Genius “Cuckoo Genius” Chopped TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the Lord Always Good NewThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesJoel Osteen Joseph PrinceHillsong TVPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -Football PrevUFC InsiderBeing: LiverpoolNHL Hockey Game 2. From April 25th, 2012. Boys in the HallWorld Poker Tour: Season 10Football Prev SYFY 58 122 244(5:00) “Jeepers Creepers 2” (2003) “One Missed Call” (2008, Horror) Shannyn Sossamon, Ed Burns. “Thirteen Ghosts” (2001, Horror) Tony Shalhoub, Embeth Davidtz. “Ghost Voyage” (2008, Suspense) AMC 60 130 254 “Friday the 13th, Part VI: Jason Lives” (1986, Horror) Thom Mathews. “Friday the 13th Part VII -The New Blood” (1988) Lar Park Lincoln. “Friday the 13th Part VIII: Jason Takes Manhattan” (1989, Horror) COM 62 107 249South Park Tosh.0 The Colbert ReportDaily ShowChappelle’s ShowStand-Up Rev.Amy Schumer: Mostly Sex StuffStand-Up Rev.Tosh.0 Daily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327Reba Reba “Pilot” Reba Reba Reba Reba “8 Seconds” (1994) Luke Perry. An Oklahoma youth becomes rodeo champ in 1987. Pure Country NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer “Tale of Two Cesars” America’s Wild SpacesWorld’s Deadliest “Forest Killers” The Rise of Black WolfAmerican BeaverWorld’s Deadliest “Forest Killers” NGC 109 186 276Top SecretWild Justice “Thrill Killer” Taboo “Extreme Bodies” Taboo When collecting turns bizarre. Drugged “High on Alcohol” Taboo When collecting turns bizarre. SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeThey Do It?They Do It?How It’s MadeHow It’s Made ID 111 192 285On the Case With Paula Zahn Behind Mansion Walls Blood Relatives “The Deep End” The Will: Family Secrets RevealedVery Bad Men (N) Very Bad MenBlood Relatives “The Deep End” HBO 302 300 501(5:30) “Unstoppable” (2010) (:15) “Larry Crowne” (2011, Romance-Comedy) Tom Hanks. ‘PG-13’ “Ethel” (2012, Documentary) Premiere. ‘NR’ Adjustment BureauTaxicab Confessions: New York MAX 320 310 515(4:35) Arthur “In Time” (2011, Science Fiction) Justin Timberlake. ‘PG-13’ (:20) “Lake Placid” (1999) ‘R’ Hunted S1 Sneak “The Matrix” (1999, Science Fiction) Keanu Reeves. ‘R’ SHOW 340 318 545(:10) “Last Night” (2010, Drama) Keira Knightley. ‘R’ (:45) “I Don’t Know How She Does It” (2011) ‘PG-13’ (:15) “50/50” (2011, Comedy-Drama) Joseph Gordon-Levitt. ‘R’ Gigolos (N) Polyamory: Married JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFlorida quarterback Jeff Driskel (6) looks for an open receiver during a game against LSU on Oct. 8.Defense up for debateBy RALPH D. RUSSOAssociated PressNo. 20 Texas A&M has become a fascinating team.The Aggies are thrilled to be in the Southeastern Conference, but their approach is still very much Big 12. When Texas A&M hosts No. 6 LSU and the Tigers’ nasty defense Saturday, the Aggies will get a chance to prove what so many Big 12 fans have thought all along: Those big, bad SEC defenses wouldn’t look quite so tough if they had to face high-powered Big 12 offenses every week. The Aggies lead the SEC and are tied for sixth in the nation in total offense at 543 yards per game. They average 47 points. The Aggies lost 20-17 to open the season against No. 3 Florida, coached by for-mer defensive coordinator Will Muschamp. Chalk one up for old-school football. The picks: Today No. 2 Oregon (minus 9 12 ) at Arizona State Time to find out if Sun Devils are legit; Ducks have something to prove on road, too ... OREGON 31-20. Saturday No. 1 Alabama (minus 20 12 ) at Tennessee Tide has won five straight against Vols ... ALABAMA 42-17. No. 9 South Carolina (plus 3) at No. 3 Florida Third straight top-10 opponent for Gamecocks ... SOUTH CAROLINA 20-17. No. 4 Kansas State (plus 2 12 ) at No. 17 West Virginia The Big 12 race could be a mess — a fun mess, though ... WEST VIRGINIA 45-35. BYU (plus 13 12 ) at No. 5 Notre Dame First of six scheduled meetings between Cougars and Irish ... NOTRE DAME 24-13. No. 6 LSU (minus 3 12 ) at No. 20 Texas A&M Manziel for Heisman gets serious if Aggies beat Tigers ... LSU 38-24. Purdue (plus 19) at No. 7 Ohio State Boilermakers have been outscored 82-27 last two weeks by Wisconsin, Michigan. ... OHIO STATE 45-21. Utah (plus 10 12 ) at No. 8 Oregon State VAZ-tacular start for new Beavers QB Cody Vaz against BYU ... OREGON STATE 30-21. Kansas (plus 35) at No. 10 Oklahoma Sooners have won seven straight against Jayhawks, all by at least 14 ... OKLAHOMA 52-14. Colorado (plus 40 12 ) at No. 11 USC A Matt Barkley stat-padder ... USC 48-10. No. 12 Florida State (minus 20) at Miami ACC still waiting for this rivalry to be great again ... FLORIDA STATE 38-17. No. 13 Georgia (plus 27 12 ) at Kentucky Wildcats might want to end this one early, too ... GEORGIA 45-14. Virginia Tech (plus 8 12 ) at No. 14 Clemson ACC schedule makers did Hokies no favors with interdivisional games against Tigers and Florida State ... CLEMSON 35-31. Middle Tennessee (plus 19 12 ) at No. 15 Mississippi State Blue Raiders have already knocked off Georgia Tech ... MISSISSIPPI STATE 38-17. USF (plus 6 12 ) at No. 16 Louisville Bulls have been Big East’s most disappointing team ... LOUISVILLE 28-17. No. 18 Texas Tech (minus 2 12 ) at TCU New Horned Frogs QB Trevone Boykin threw four TD passes last week ... TCU 35-28. No. 19 Rutgers (minus 5 12 ) at Temple Surprising Owls have won first two games in return to Big East ... RUTGERS 17-13. No. 21 Cincinnati (minus 7) at Toledo Rockets’ only loss was in OT to Arizona ... TOLEDO 33-28 No. 22 Stanford (minus 2 12 ) at California The Big Game comes early for Cardinal and Bears ... STANFORD 28-20. Michigan State (plus 10) at No. 23 Michigan Spartans have won four straight in rivalry ... MICHIGAN 27-14. UNLV (plus 28) at No. 24 Boise State Broncos quietly rolling to another big season ... BOISE STATE 35-14. Last week’s record: 15-3 (straight); 11-6 (vs. points) Season record: 11623 (straight); 69-52 (vs. points) Barber tees off today From staff reportsLake City native Blayne Barber will tee off today in the Web.com Tour’s Winn-Dixie Jacksonville Open at Ponte Vedra’s TPC Sawgrass Dye’s Valley Course. Barber has won his last three starts on the National Golf Association Tour and finished 33rd in his only start on the Web.com Tour — the PGA’s minor league tour. Barber will tee off at 9:25 a.m. on the first hole. Playing along with Barber will be Donny Lee and Ryan Blaum. Barber earned his way in with a sponsor’s exemption.

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DEAR ABBY: This is in response to “Worried Mom in Gainesville, Fla.” (July 13), whose son was not allowed to re-enlist in the Marine Corps. I hate to say this, but that young man knew darned well when he got those tattoos he would not be able to re-enlist. The U.S. Navy (which the Marine Corps “technically” falls under) passed the New Enlistment Tattoo Policy in January 2003, with the Marine Corps adding its policy in April 2007. -SPOUSE OF RETIRED NAVY CPO DEAR SPOUSE: You are correct. Many read-ers wrote to say the Navy had passed new tattoo policies in 2003 and the Marine Corps followed suit in 2007. If re-enlisting is so important to “Worried Mom’s” son, all he needs to do is have his “tatts” removed. Read on: DEAR ABBY: The issue isn’t time served or his honorable discharge. The Marine Times recently published an article on Marine policy regarding tattoos. The Corps seeks to discourage full-sleeve tattoos and tattoos above the neck. They are regarded as unprofessional in appear-ance and may incorporate gang-related symbols. “Worried Mom’s” son like-ly knew the guidelines. The mother said her son is bored and lacks focus in college. This sug-gests he may have PTSD. His desire to enlist in the French Foreign Legion may have short-term gains, but it may also com-pound mental health prob-lems. -MARC IN SOUTH ORANGE, N.J. DEAR ABBY: The nonsense about joining the French Foreign Legion shows that the young man lacks maturity. He chose to get the tattoos; he can either have laser removal or live with his decision. He wants to be a Marine and is crying about a regulation he does not like? That is definitely not Marine quality! It appears he needs a serious dose of maturity. -CHRIS IN INDEPENDENCE, MO. DEAR ABBY: The French Foreign Legion is a rational choice for this bored veteran of two tours in Iraq. After three five-year enlistments, he will be eligible to retire. Plus, the legion will prepare him for a civilian occupation. He will be able to live in France after only one enlistment, which gives him the benefits of the French medical system. Many employers in Europe prefer to hire ex-legion-naires. The legion also has a history of teaching its recruits how to speak enough French to get along. How do I know this? My brother joined the FFL at age 35. Wish I had, too. -CHARLES IN FORT WORTH, TEXAS DEAR ABBY: Currently, the Australian forces are expanding and are unable to fill their ranks with their own citizens, so they are recruiting members from other nations. The mission of the Australian military is similar to the U.S. mili-tary. As a member of the Australian forces, he would be defending the same ide-als as the U.S. military. I retired from the U.S. Navy last year and seriously considered doing this, too. -RETIRED NAVY, REDMOND, ORE. DILBERT BABY BLUES HOROSCOPES DEAR ABBY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Look for a little excite-ment. Traveling in search of knowledge or meeting new people from different backgrounds will lead to an adventure. However, as much as you desire change, you must not make an impulsive deci-sion or move. +++++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Do whatever it takes to improve your personal life. Travel plans or social-izing with friends will lead to higher self-esteem and greater confidence. Use past experience to recog-nize an opportunity and leap into action. Love is in the stars. +++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): A straightforward approach to what you’ve been asked to do will be necessary if you don’t want to be criticized for your tardiness. Too much detail will be just as unaccept-able as too little. You must strive to balance whatever you do. +++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Follow through with your promises and enjoy the praise you deserve. Love is on the rise. Making a subtle change at home that will enhance your sur-roundings or setting the stage for romance will pay off, as well as boost your confidence. +++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You may have the energy and the passion to take on a challenge, but expect to face a very worthy opponent. Precision and knowledge coupled with quick wit and action will determine who wins. Join forces with someone who compliments your skills. +++++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): You will learn a great deal from the people you interact with. Don’t let an emotional connection you have with someone upset your plans. Consider what you can do to improve your outlook and your physical appearance. Professionalism will be required. ++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Talks will lead to infor-mation that will encourage you to expand some of your interests. What you have to offer will turn out to be a viable source of income in the future if you dedicate time and effort to honing your skills. ++++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Have fun. Show how creative, imaginative and spontaneous you can be. Romance is apparent, and plans to meet someone new or enhance your cur-rent relationship should be in the works. A personal change will lift your spirits. +++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Too much of any-thing will be your downfall. Don’t make promises you cannot keep or share infor-mation that is not verified. The changes you make at home will help encourage you to alter your lifestyle and enhance your well-being. +++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Determination and hard work will pay off. Take on responsibili-ties that allow you to show your attributes. You can secure your position by handling whatever arises without making a fuss or showing frustration. Expertise will count. Love, romance and commitment are highlighted. ++++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Take your time. Don’t feel pressured to make a hasty decision. Work at home and on self-improvement and enhanc-ing your personal relation-ships. A change in status or vocational direction will lead to bigger and better opportunities. ++++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Keep your emotions in check. Arguments will not solve problems, but finding solutions that suit everyone’s needs in a man-ner that is civil will make an impression on someone that may have overlooked your talents in the past. ++ CELEBRITY CIPHER Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com BLONDIE BEETLE BAILEY B.C. FRANK & ERNEST FOR BETTER OR WORSE ZITS HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH GARFIELD THE LAST WORD Eugenia Last Marine vet’s decision-making hints at a more serious issue Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. CLASSIC PEANUTS Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2012 3B

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTHURSDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2012 Classified Department: 755-5440 4B CLASSIFIED AD vantageTake ADvantage of the Reporter Classifieds!755-5440Lake City Reporter FIND IT SELL IT BUY IT $17504 lines 3 days Includes 2 Signs Each additional line $1.65 Garage Sale Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$10104 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.10One item per ad Under $500 Personal Merchandise Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$16754 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.15One item per ad Under $1,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$23704 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.45One item per ad Under $2,500 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $4,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$27404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.55One item per ad Under $4,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$30404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.65One item per ad Under $6,000 Placing An Ad Service Guide Limited to service type advertis-ing only.4 lines, one month....$92.00 $10.80 each additional lineIncludes an additional $2.00 per ad for each Wednesday insertion. DeadlinesBe Sure to Call Early You can call us at 755-5440 Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.Some people prefer to place their classified ads in person, and some ad categories will require prepay-ment. Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street.You can also fax or email your ad copy to the Reporter.FAX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the Classified Department.EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreporter.comAd is to Appear:TuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday Call by:Mon., 10:00 a.m.Mon., 10:00 a.m.Wed., 10:00 a.m.Thurs., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fax/Email by:Mon., 9:00 a.m.Mon., 9:00 a.m.Wed., 9:00 a.m.Thurs., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.These deadlines are subject to change without notice. Cancellations, Changes & Billing Questions Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject, or classify all advertisements under appropriate headings. Copy should be checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day of pub-lication. Credit for published errors will be allowed for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement which was incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be published, nor for any general, special or consequential damages. Advertising language must comply with Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition of discrimi-nation in employment, housing and public accommodations. Standard abbreviations are acceptable; how-ever, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated. Ad Errors-Please read your ad on the first day of publication. Weaccept responsibility for only the first incorrect insertion, and only the charge for the ad space in error. Please call 755-5440 immediately for prompt correc-tion and billing adjustments.CancellationsNormal advertising deadlines apply for cancellation.Billing InquiriesCall 755-5440. Should further information be required regarding payments or credit limits, your call will be trans-ferred to the accounting depart-ment. General Information In Print and Onlinewww.lakecityreporter.com Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$2504 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $.25One item per ad Under $100 CLASSIFIED AD vantageTake ADvantage of the Reporter Classifieds!755-5440Lake City Reporter FIND IT SELL IT BUY IT $17504 lines 3 days Includes 2 Signs Each additional line $1.65 Garage Sale Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$10104 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.10One item per ad Under $500 Personal Merchandise Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$16754 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.15One item per ad Under $1,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$23704 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.45One item per ad Under $2,500 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $4,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$27404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.55One item per ad Under $4,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$30404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.65One item per ad Under $6,000 Placing An Ad Service Guide Limited to service type advertis-ing only.4 lines, one month....$92.00 $10.80 each additional lineIncludes an additional $2.00 per ad for each Wednesday insertion. DeadlinesBe Sure to Call Early You can call us at 755-5440 Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.Some people prefer to place their classified ads in person, and some ad categories will require prepay-ment. Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street.You can also fax or email your ad copy to the Reporter.FAX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the Classified Department.EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreporter.comAd is to Appear:TuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday Call by:Mon., 10:00 a.m.Mon., 10:00 a.m.Wed., 10:00 a.m.Thurs., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fax/Email by:Mon., 9:00 a.m.Mon., 9:00 a.m.Wed., 9:00 a.m.Thurs., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.These deadlines are subject to change without notice. Cancellations, Changes & Billing Questions Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject, or classify all advertisements under appropriate headings. Copy should be checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day of pub-lication. Credit for published errors will be allowed for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement which was incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be published, nor for any general, special or consequential damages. Advertising language must comply with Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition of discrimi-nation in employment, housing and public accommodations. Standard abbreviations are acceptable; how-ever, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated. Ad Errors-Please read your ad on the first day of publication. Weaccept responsibility for only the first incorrect insertion, and only the charge for the ad space in error. Please call 755-5440 immediately for prompt correc-tion and billing adjustments.CancellationsNormal advertising deadlines apply for cancellation.Billing InquiriesCall 755-5440. Should further information be required regarding payments or credit limits, your call will be trans-ferred to the accounting depart-ment. General Information In Print and Onlinewww.lakecityreporter.com Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$2504 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $.25One item per ad Under $100 LegalCOLUMBIACOUNTYBOARD OF COUNTYCOMMISSIONERSPROJECTNUMBER 2012-8County Road 131 – NWFalling Creek RoadNOTICE TOCONTRACTORSNotice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received in the Columbia County Manager’s office until 11:00 A.M. on October 26, 2012, for Co-lumbia County Project No. 2012-8. This office is located on the second floor of the Courthouse Annex at 135 Hernando Avenue, Room 203 Lake City FL32055.The project consists of improving CR 131 from State Road 25 (US 441) to CR 246, for a distance of 4.8 miles.Scope of Work will include rework-ing limerock base with widening, as-phaltic concrete pavement (structural and surface), driveway paving, guardrail, pipes, and incidental items.The Scope of Work also includes the superstructure replacement of Bridge No. 290041. Work includes partial demolition of existing bridge and ap-proach slabs, substructure construc-tion, superstructure construction (beams, deck, and railings), approach slabs, and incidental items.The Bid Forms and Construction specifications may be obtained from the County’s web site at http://www .columbiacountyfla.com/ PurchasingBids.asp All bidders will supply the County with a bid bond for 5% of the total bid amount.The successful bidder will be re-quired to furnish the County Manag-er with a performance bond and gen-eral liability insurance prior to com-mencing work.The Columbia County Commission reserves the right to reject any or all bids and to add to the contract or de-lete from the contract to stay within their funding capabilities.Columbia County Board of County CommissionersScarlet Frisina, Chair05535244October 11, 18, 2012 COLUMBIACOUNTYBOARD OF COUNTYCOMMISSIONERSPROJECTNUMBER 2012-6Annual Asphalt Minor Pavement Repair ProgramNOTICE TO CONTRACTORSNotice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received in the Columbia County Manager’s office until 11:00 A.M. on October 29, 2012, for Co-lumbia County Project No. 2012-6. This office is located on the second floor of the Courthouse Annex at 135 Hernando Avenue, Room 203 Lake City FL32055.The work consists of repairing exist-ing asphalt pavement (including but not limited to; County roadways, County parking areas, and driveways located on County Right of Way) with asphalt pavement and limerock base. The work will be performed on an as-needed basis during Fiscal Year 2012/2013, which begins Octo-ber 1, 2012, and ends September 30, 2013.The Bid Forms and Construction specifications may be obtained from the County’s web site at http://www .columbiacountyfla.com/ PurchasingBids.asp The successful bidder will be re-quired to furnish the County Manag-er with liability insurance prior to commencing work.The Columbia County Commission reserves the right to reject any or all bids and to add to the contract or de-lete from the contract to stay within their funding capabilities.05535320October 18, 25, 2012 NOTICE OFPUBLIC SALE: AUTO EMPORIUM OF LAKE CITYINC. gives Notice of Foreclo-sure of Lien and intent to sell these vehicles on 11/06/2012, 10:00 am at 2832 SWMAIN BLVD, LAKE CITY, FL32025, pursuant to subsec-tion 713.78 of the Florida Statues. AUTO EMPORIUM OF LAKE CITYINC. reserves the right to ac-cept or reject any and/or all bids.1GKCS13W6R25119261994 GENERALMOTORS CORP1GNCS18X15K1010502005 CHEVROLET05535335October 18, 2012 020Lost & Found CATFOUND of Marion St. Female, Gray, Long bushy tail, Very friendly. Contact 438-8355 Female Black Lab Puppy Approx 4-6 mth old. Found on 10-12-12 Hwy 90, Noegel & Brown Roads. Call 386-867-1134 FOUND Cordless Electric Drill, in Lake City. Call to identify. and pay for cost of Ad. OWNER FOUND Found Set of Car/house keys on the left side of SR 47 Southbond, 2 miles past I-75 overpass. Contact 755-1922 100Job Opportunities2 DETAILERS Needed. Experienced only. Apply in person between 10a-4p at North Florida Auto Sales. Across from ABC liquor. No phone calls please. Established Ocala business is Looking to hire additional sales teams for our expanding product line.Earn $500.00/week, plus commission!If you’re upbeat, friendly and enjoy working with the public, then contact us for a confidential interview and start earning the income you deserve! Valid driver’s license, proof of insurance and overnight travel is required. Call us TODAYat 352-233-2818.Telecom Service Bureau, Inc. 100Job Opportunities05535311Consumer Loan Processor position available with First Federal Bank of Florida. The candidate will verify loan information and is responsible for preparing the necessary documents for closing and securing our loans. Disburse, prepare and verify documentation for funding on loans. Coordinate loan closings. Ensures the receipt of any guarantee and security agreement information. Ensures approval is obtained prior to closing. Cross sell financial institution products. 6+ months of working in an office environment. Good understanding of financial institution products and services. Full benefits package. Applications may be obtained from any First Federal Branch and submitted to Human Resources, P.O. Box 2029, Lake City, Fl 32056 or email T urbeville.j@f fsb.com Bilingual candidates encouraged to apply. Equal Employment Opportunity Employer. FULL-TIME CUSTODIAN Wanted. Primary duties include basic knowledge of boilers and HVAC system, cleaning sanctuary and Fellowship Hall, mowing, minor repairs, setup and taking down tables and chairs and general building maintenance.Must be able to lift 60 lbs. Criminal background check required. Please send resume and references to Staff Parish Relations, First United Methodist Church, Lake City, 973 S. Marion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025. Deadline is Oct. 19, 2012. MANAGEMENT OPPORTUNITIES McDonald's of Alachua has multiple positions available for qualified/experienced mgrs. $8-$16 hr /benefits/bonuses Apply on line @ www.mcstate.com/alachua Or Call 386-755-2475 SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 Small historic non-denominational church with a heart for children is seeking a pianist for Sunday services. Please contact 904-259-4194 if interested. Wanted-P/T Handi-Man, Exp. in Routine Maintenance such as plumbing, elect, painting & carpentry. Applications Available at Camp Weed & Cerveny Conference Center, 11057 Camp Weed Place, Live Oak. 120Medical Employment05535249Rehab Director/ PT Avalon Healthcare Center is currently accepting applications for the full time position of Rehab Director/PT Please apply at Avalon Healthcare and Rehabilitation Center. 1270 S.W. Main Blvd. Lake City, Florida 32025 or fax resume to 386-752-8556 EOE Medical Office Manager Experience in Medical Billing a plus. Fax resume to 386-752-6709 240Schools & Education05534919Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class12/24/2012• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-11/05/12• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies Blonde FemaleMini-Schnauzer, 18 lbs, fixed, house broken, good natured, Family friendly. $225 Contact 386-292-3927 PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 330Livestock & SuppliesDeep Creek Farms Barn kept Square or Net Wrapped Round Hay Bales For Sale Ronnie Hughes (386)365-1425 407Computers DELLComputer $100.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 430Garage Sales Fri 10/19 & Sat 10/20Potted Plants, fern, boxwood & more. Large and Small. 4219 S.E. Country Club Rd. S of 252. INDOORS VFWPost 2206, 343 Forest Lawn Way, Sat. 10/20, 8:30am-1pm, Lots to choose from and baked goods. 386-752-5001 PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. SAT. 10/20 7am-12:30pm, 282 SWWhitetail Cr. Clothes, books, shoes, etc.. Saturday 10/20 at 180 SWJustin Gln. Including clothes, toys, wooden swing set, and piano. Call if interested in piano. 813-727-5846 440Miscellaneous 32 inch TVGreat Picture, With Remote $100.00 Contact 386-292-3927 Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, Root Raking, Bush Hog, Seeding, Sod, Disking, site prep, ponds & irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200 FisherPrice baby swing butterfly Cradle -nSwing. Original price $165 asking $75. Perfect condition. Swivels 3 way, plays tunes & lights up. Contact 386-292-3013 Five (5) VSV Speakers, Glass TVtable, $400 OBO Contact 755-4059 Stanley# 45 Combination Plane Very Good Condition With Wood Box. $250. Contact 386-438-8214 630Mobile Homes forRent2 BR MH. $400 $450. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 2 BR/2BASW, Completly furnished, carport, shed, located on 41st Dr., $600 mo.,+ Util. $150 Dep. Avail 11/5 935-2461 2BR/1BA Located onCountyRoad 133, $450 mo. plus $450 dep. 954-258-8841 3BR/2BADWMH on 1 acre private lot, 1st+last+dep required located in Ellisville. No pets. Contact 352-870-5144 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. @752-5290 MLS #81960 Must be 55+ 2br/2ba Open Flrpln, Din/Liv off Kitchen, Carport, Enclosed screen porch,storage shed. 630Mobile Homes forRentEastside Village Realty, Inc. @752-5290 MLS #81959 Must be 55+, Site Built home 1 car garage, Scrren porch, lrg laundry, lots of upgrades. Check it out. Eastside Village Realty, Inc. @752-5290 MLS #81958 Must be 55+, 3br/2ba, Florida Room & Screen Porch, 2 car garage. Large Home Eastside Village Realty, Inc. @752-5290 MLS #81280 Must be 55+, 3br/2ba, Florida Room & Screen Porch, 2 car garage, vaulted ceilings, breakfast nook for 2. Eastside Village Realty, Inc. @752-5290 MLS #80737 Must be 55+, 3br/2.5ba, 2,735 sqft Beautiful updates, pole barn, garage/workshop, 7.48 acres, 640Mobile Homes forSale1 Bdrm $370/mth or 2 Bdrm $485/mth $300 Sec. + $50 Application Fee. Call 305-984-5511 or 386-344-0830 For Apt. 1993 PEACHSTATE 14x70 Newly renovated, 3/2, $9500.00. 1981 Destiny 24x52 good cond. 3/2, $16,500. Call 288-4688 3/2, 1800 sqft., CBC home, on corner lot, work shop. MLS# 79574 $74,900. REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 4BD/2BADWMH on 4 acres Owner Financing Available. 386-623-3404 or 386-623-3396 640Mobile Homes forSale4Br/2ba, in town, good investment, current rent set at $825 per mo. MLS # 74958. $74,900 Accredited Real Estate Mike Foster 288-3596 Accredited Real Estate Nice Home, kitchen redone fenced, backyard, 2br/1ba. MLS#81521, $52,000. Mike Foster 288-3596 Home in good condition, MH 3br/2ba. Good size kitchen. 4 plus acres. MLS #80235. $63,000 Accredited Real Estate Mike Foster 288-3596 Results Realty Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Affordable 4/2 on 10 acres in Bell. over 2,200 sqft. in country setting. $80,000 MLS# 76582 Palm Harbor Homes 4/2 From 499 Mo Loaded3/2 From 399 Mo Loaded $0 Down, Singlewides $299/Mo 800-622-2832 ext 210 650Mobile Home & Land2 OwnerFinanced Homes/ 1 RentalLake City, Mayo, Branford 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com Beautiful brick on 11.16 acres w/ DWfor family or renting. In ground pool. MLS 81203. $252,000. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 CLEAN NICE 2/2 SW,and 740sf. frame studio, 1 bath outbuilding, nice country ac 8 mi to VA. $39,000 Cash only 86.961.9181

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTHURSDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2012 5B Classified Department: 755-5440 SOLD IT FAST IN THE CLASSIFIEDSSelling your stuff is simple with a little help from the Lake City Reporter Classifieds. Let our sales team help you place an ad today, in print and online! Call 386-755-5440 or go to www.lakecityreporter.com 650Mobile Home & LandLots of sq ft, 4br/2ba approx 2618 sq ft, Newly remodeled kitchen, new roof. MLS 81733. $99,500. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 Nice 2br/2ba, 1996 DW, Energy Efficient, 3/4 frnshd, 3 yr old roof, 1/2 ac lot in Oak Wd subdv in Live Oak $39,900. Call 309-645-2659 Owner Fin.-Nice huge 4/2.5 on 3 ac, x-fenced, creek, lrg deck,Paved Rd. McAlpin area. Small down $950/mth 386-867-1833. For picswww.suwanneevalleyproperties.com What a great home, 3BR/2B, 1860 sqft. DWon 5 acres. MLS#80543 $125,000. REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05534938We’ve got it all!$89 Deposit Limited Avail. Call Today! Windsong Apts. *Free afterschool program386-758-8455 1BR APT. Downtown Location, Clean. New Carpet $450 mo, plus Security. NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456 1br Cottage with all utilities including cable & wireless internet. Close to the VA. (727)415-2207 2BR/1BAAPT. w/garage. West side of town. $650. mo. 386-961-9000 2BR/2BAw/garage 5 minutes from VAhospital and Timco. Call for details. 386-365-5150 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 COZYCOTTAGE 1 BRNew paint & carpet. 10 mins. South of LC, all util. & satellite incl. $550 mo. Pet ok, 386-758-2408 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Quant 2br/1ba Apt. Peaceful Location with Lake View CH/A$500. mo $500 dep. No pets. 386-344-2170 720Furnished Apts. ForRentRooms forRent Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent2/1 Brick house Lrg eat in kit. & closets, CH/A, 514 SE First Ave. Jasper. $550 mth 1st,last+sec. No pets. 772-285-1032 3BD/1.5BA CH/A, $725 mth & $725 dep. Contact 386-344-2170 Cozy 2bd / 1ba home. CH/A, $500 mth & $500 dep. Contact 386-344-2170 740Furnished Homes forRentEastside Village 55 or older. 2bd/2ba Fully furnished, carport, screened in porch, $1,100 mth/neg plus Dep. Contact 752-2243 750Business & Office RentalsFOR LEASE: Downtown Office Space. Convenient to Court house. Call 386-755-3456 ForRent orLease: Former Doctors office, Former professional office & Lg open space: avail on East Baya Ave. Competitive rates. Weekdays 386-984-0622 evenings/weekends 497-4762 PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 805Lots forSale 5 acre lot located in quiet setting River Rise s/d, Homes only, paved street. $65,000 MLS #76151 Results Realty, Brittany Stoeckert386-397-3473 6.45 Acres of River front property on Suwannee, Consist of 3 lots, MLS# 77414 $75,000. REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 Beautiful lot on Suwannee. Property features stairway to dock, picnic area. MLS# 78842, $35,000 Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Results Realty Lot close to Sante Fe, Suwannee & Ichetucknee MLS 80092 $15,000. REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 Nice vacant lot in Desirable river Community, MLS #73268 $15,000 Brittany Stoeckert386-397-3473 Results Realty, Small home on corner lot with 3br, Fenced yards. Needs TLC. MLS # 81204 $23,900 Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Results Realty Vacant land 5.91 acres, part cleared, few miles from Charles Springs & Suwannee $20,500. MLS 80961 REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 805Lots forSale PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 810Home forSale 3br/2ba 1677 sqft, close town, Hardy Board Construction Century 21Darby Rogers MLS 81841, $149,900. Call 752-6575 3br/2ba 400 sq.ft. extra enclosed carport, manicured property, huge palm trees. Century 21Darby Rogers MLS 81846 $99,500. Call 752-6575 3br/2ba, 2 car garage, LR w/ stove fire place, lg Master Br, New roof Century 21Darby Rogers MLS 81846, $99,500. Call 752-6575 Cute home, nice paint, great layout. 3br/2ba. MLS 81746 $112,300. Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 For Sale By Owner Beautiful 2005 Brick home. Well Cared For $158,800 417-396-2134 820Farms & Acreage10 acres with well/septic/pp (not guar); $300 dwn; $580 a mth. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com 40 acre Ranch, Brick 3/3 with 2000 sqft., new roof, kitchen remodeled, pole barn, MLS 81641 $349,5000. REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 950Cars forSale 2006 MAZADA MIATACONV. Automatic, leather, power. $14,500 ($1,000 below KBB value). Call 386-365-2046. 951Recreational Vehicles2002 JAYCO Legacy 5th wheel 38’3 slides fully loaded, gas-gen, queen bed, sleeps 4, shower $18,000 386-344-3362 180 East Duval St. Lake City, FLorida 32055Contact us at the paper.Mon.-Fri.: 8 a.m.5:00 p.m.CLASSIFIED ADS 386-755-5440 SUBSCRIPTION 386-755-5445 ALL OTHER DEPARTMENTS 386-752-1293 ELECTRONIC ADS SEND TOads@lakecityreporter.com THIS REPORTER WORKS FOR YOU! Lake City Reporter

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G. W. HUNTER, INC. 1130 US Hwy 90 W (386) 752-5890 WE NOW HAVE ETHANOL FREE PLUS GASOLINE ONLY AT INTENDED USES: BOATS & WATERCRAFTS COLLECTABLE VEHICLES OFF-ROAD VEHICLES MOTORCYCLES SMALL ENGINES Lake City Reporter Located at SHANDS Lake City, Live Oak & Starke Womens Center of Florida ALL MAJOR INSURANCES ACCEPTED INCLUDING MEDICAID & MEDICARE FREE Pregnancy Ultrasound WITH THIS AD* *Insurance billing may occur if necessary. Some Restrictions apply. OBSTRETRICS & GYNECOLOGY PRENATAL CARE & ULTRASOUNDS STDS & HPV TESTING BIRTH CONTROL & INFERTILITY MENOPAUSE & INCONTINENCE WEIGHT LOSS & 4D ULTRASOUNDS BOTOX & LASER HAIR REMOVAL NO INSURANCE VISITS ASK ABOUT OUR $ 50 CHANDLER MOHAN, MD EMAD ATTA, MD ANN MARIE FENN, CNM ELIZABETH BEARDSLEY, ARNP 386-466-1106 SERVICES: OB-GYN www.myobcare.com New Patient Exam and Necessary X-rays DO150, DO330 First-time patient Reg. $136 $ 29 SAVINGS OF $107 Expires October 31, 2012 ASPEN DENTAL GROUP T IMELESS M EMORIES 386-466-1888 Montgomery Collection Finished in a warm brown cherry. Queen Bed, Nightstand, Dresser & Mirror & Chest This bedroom collection has beautiful details and pleasing lines and straight edges of simple elegance. Felt-lined top drawers dovetail dawers English front & back. $ 1,499 00 6B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2012 6BSports Jump BREAST CANCER Tuesday October 23rd 4:00 pm 7:00 pm Massages and light refreshments will be provided. Pre-registration is encouraged by calling 1.888.681.6388 FREE BREAST SCREENINGS More details at www.cccnf.com 7000 NW 11th Place Gainesville 4520 W US Highway 90 Lake City THIS SCREENING INVOLVES A CLINICAL BREAST EXAM, NOT A MAMMOGRAM. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Columbia High senior Jessie Bates (2) delivers a serves while playing against Suwannee High on Oct. 2. Lady Tigers beat Oak Hall From staff reports Columbia High had to dig deep heading into the Dig Pink Tournament in Newberry this weekend. The Lady Tigers defeat ed Oak Hall School in five sets, 25-20, 18-25, 25-23, 19-25 and 15-8. Kelbie Ronsonet and Jara Courson led the team with 12 kills each. Jessie Bates had 30 assists to lead the team in that category and also had two aces, which also led the team. Annie Milton also had two aces. Were doing a great job of playing together as a team and are looking forward to the Dig Pink Tournament this weekend, Columbia High head coach Rebecca Golden said. Play begins on Friday.