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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01924

Material Information

Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 10-17-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01936

Related Items

Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01924

Material Information

Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 10-17-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01936

Related Items

Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

By DAVID ESPO andSTEVE PEOPLESAssociated PressHEMPSTEAD, N.Y. — An aggressive President Barack Obama accused challenger Mitt Romney of favoring a “one-point plan” to help the rich and leveling offensive criticism about the recent deadly ter-rorist attack in Libya Tuesday night in a debate crackling with energy and emotion just three weeks before the election. Romney pushed back hard, saying the middle class “has been crushed over the last four years,” that 23 million Americans are struggling to find work and that the death of the U.S. ambassador to Libya was part of an unraveling of the administration’s foreign policy. The president was feistier from the outset than he had been in their initial encounter two weeks ago, when he turned in a listless performance that sent shudders through his sup-porters and helped fuel a rise by Romney in opinion polls nationally and in some battle-ground states. Obama challenged Romney on economics and energy pol-icy, accusing him of switching positions and declaring that his economic plan was a “sketchy deal” that the public should reject. Romney gave as good as he got. “You’ll get your chance in a moment. I’m still speaking,” the former Massachusetts gov-ernor said at one point while Obama was mid-sentence. He said the president’s poli-cies had failed to jumpstart the economy and crimped energy production. The open-stage format left the two men free to stroll freely across a red-carpeted stage, and they did. Their clashes crackled with energy and ten-sion, and the crowd watched raptly as the two sparred while struggling to appear calm and affable before a national televi-sion audience. The rivals disagreed about taxes, measures to reduce the deficit, energy, pay equity for women and health care issues. Immigration prompted yet another clash, Romney saying Opinion ................ 4APeople.................. 2AObituaries .............. 5A Advice & Comics ......... 8B Puzzles ................. 2B TODAY IN PEOPLE Beyonce set for Super Bowl. 80 56 Partly cloudy WEATHER, 2A Lake City ReporterWEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2012 | YOUR COMMUNIT Y NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | 75¢ LAKECITYREPORTER.COM CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 138, No. 186 1A COMING THURSDAY Local news roundup. By LAURA HAMPSONlhampson@lakecityreporter.comA three-car collision sent six people to the hospital Tuesday afternoon. A Honda Passport left Pizza Hut on West U.S. 90, crossed the westbound lanes and stopped in the median, said Lake City Police Department Sgt. Marshall Sova. The driver of the Honda attempted to cross the eastbound lanes but was side-struck by a Nissan car traveling east, Sova said. The Nissan then bumped a Kia Rio exiting the Gas-N-Go station on the south side of U.S. 90. The Nissan bumped a gas pump rail during the collision, but the pump was not dam-aged and fuel was not spilled, he said. Two people in the Honda were taken to Shands Lake Shore Regional Medical Center, he said. Three people in the Nissan were taken to Lake City Medical Center and the driver was transported to a Gainesville hospital LAURA HAMPSON /Lake City ReporterLake City Fire Department and Lifeguard Ambulance person nel take an injured person to an awaiting ambulance Tuesday afternoon as officials attend to an other injured person on the ground outside the Gas-N-Go station. A three-car accident on West U.S. 90 s ent six people to the hospital. A raucous Round 2 3-car crash sends 6 to hospital CRASH continued on 5A Sharp exchanges mark 2nd debate Obama aggressive, but Romney gave as good as he got. Catalystsite hasa newnameBy TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comPlum Creek representatives hosted a stakeholder meeting Tuesday morning and unveiled a new logo and name for the RACEC/Catalyst site. The new name: The North Florida Intermodal Park. Plum Creek representatives gave out free shirts are part of the cam-paign to spread the word about the new title. “The project now has an identity,” said Allison Megrath, a Plum Creek real estate manager. “Up until this point the project had either been referred to as the Plum Creek property, Inland Port, the Catalyst site and its had a num-ber of different names. Collectively we want to give the project one name and an identity where when people see the logo they know we’re taking about the 2,622-acre industrial project on the southside of U.S. Highway 90 on the eastside of town.” The stakeholder meeting took place at the Florida Gateway College Wilson S. Rivers Library and Media Center The meeting was the quarterly stakeholder meet-ing for the North Central Florida Rural Area of Critical Economic INTERMODAL continued on 5A Now known as North FloridaIntermodal Park.Citizens PoliceAcademy to launch By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comThe Lake City Police Department is launching a Citizens Police Academy and taking applications until Dec. 15. There is no cost to apply. The CPA is like the academy used to train police officers. Participants will learn a variety of law enforce-ment topics and are “armed” after graduation with knowledge that can be used to assist the com-munity in becoming a safer and a better place to live. Graduates will be honored at a ceremony at the completion of the program and will also be eligible to join the CPA Alumni Association. Citizens from all works of life will be introduced to a wide variety of functions performed in daily police operations. The Lake City Police Department believes it is impor-tant to have citizen-police interac-tion and cooperation in the com-munity. Police Department officials say one way to achieve the goal is through an exchange of ideas and education, and the Citizens Police Academy is an excellent tool in accomplishing this. The CPA is a 12-week course offered twice a year to the citizens of Columbia County. The sessions are free and open to all who wish to participate and who pass the appli-cation and background screening process. The first session is sched-uled to begin Thursday, Jan. 11, 2013. Classes will be held from 6-9 ACADEMY continued on 5A DEBATE continued on 5AASSOCIATED PRESSPresident Barack Obama greets Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney at the start of the second presidential debate at Hofstra University Tuesday in Hempstead, N.Y

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CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Actress Julie Adams is 86. Newspaper columnist Jimmy Breslin is 82. Country singer Earl Thomas Conley is 71. Singer Jim Seals (Seals & Crofts) is 70. Singer Gary Puckett is 70. Actress Margot Kidder is 64. Actor George Wendt is 64. Actor Grant Shaud is 52. AROUND FLORIDA Body identified as that of student GAINESVILLE Authorities have identified human remains discovered in Levy County last week as being those of a missing 18-year-old University of Florida student. Gainesville police reported Monday that dental records were used to positively identify the remains as Christian Aguilar. A statement from police said Aguilars family had been notified. Aguilar was last seen in Gainesville with his friend, Pedro Bravo, who has been charged with firstdegree murder. Police said Bravo told them he beat Aguilar unconscious and left him in a parking lot. Both Bravo and Aguilar are from Miami. Search continues for kayaker SUWANNEE The search continues in Suwannee for a kayaker last seen two days ago. The Coast Guard is helping the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission in searching for 46-year-old James F. McDonald. He was report ed overdue in a 14-foot kayak Sunday. His family said he left for a camping and kayaking trip Oct. 9 and had not returned. A helicopter searched the area Monday morning. 2 more diagnosed with meningitis TALLAHASSEE Two more Floridians have been diagnosed with fungal meningitis after receiving contaminated steroid injections. The Department of Health said Tuesday that a 74-year-old woman who was treated in Marion County and a 79-year-old woman who received the injection in Escambia County are the latest cases. So far, 12 people in Florida have contracted fungal meningitis. Two of them have died. The outbreak of fungal meningitis has been linked to steroid shots for back pain. The medication, made by a specialty phar macy in Massachusetts, has been recalled. People in 15 states have been affected. Federal health officials said there have been 212 cases of fungal meningitis, includ ing 15 deaths. Coach charged for decking ref FORT LAUDERDALE A youth football coach faces assault charges after authorities say he hit a referee so hard it knocked him to the ground. The Broward Sheriffs Office arrested 43-year-old Dion Robinson Monday, two days after he was accused of hitting the referee during a game between the West Park Saints and the Miramar Patriots. The incident was captured on video by a Miramar coach who was filming the game. The South Florida SunSentinel reported referee Andrew Keigans called an unsportsmanlike conduct penalty on West Park just before Robinson barged the field and con fronted the referee. The teams head coach was try ing to hold him back. On Monday, Sheriff Al Lamberti said Robinson has an extensive criminal record and questioned why hes coaching chil dren. West Park officials said theyre investigating. Thought for Today The thinking of a genius does not proceed logically. It leaps with great ellipses. It pulls knowledge from God knows where. Dorothy Thompson, American journalist (189401961) Beyonce set for Super Bowl halftime NEW YORK A ll the single ladies will be watching the upcoming Super Bowl along with football lovers. Thats because Beyonce is the halftime show performer. A source familiar with the Super Bowl told The Associated Press the Grammy-winning diva will take the stage at the halftime show on Feb. 3 at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome in New Orleans. The source spoke on condition of anonymity because that person wasnt authorized to publicly reveal the information. The official announcement is expected Wednesday, the source said. Beyonce, whose pop and R&B hits include Crazy in Love, Irreplaceable and Single Ladies (Put a Ring on It), has won 16 Grammy Awards. The 31-year-old sang the national anthem at the 2004 Super Bowl in her hometown of Houston when the New England Patriots defeated the Carolina Panthers. Madonna performed at halftime at this years Super Bowl in February with guests CeeLo Green, Nicki Minaj, LMFAO and M.I.A. The New York Giants beat the New England Patriots in a thrilling rematch of the contest four years earlier. Her performance was seen by 114 mil lion people, a higher average than the game itself, which was seen by an estimated 111.3 million people, according to the Nielsen Co. Elton John remembers Ryan White at AIDS gala NEW YORK On the red carpet of his annual AIDS foundation ben efit Monday night, Sir Elton John remembered AIDS sufferer Ryan White. The 65-year-old musician said dealing with the teenagers death was a major turning point in his life, which at the time was out of whack. Six months after Ryan died, I decided that was it, John said. And with in a year of becom ing sober, he begin thinking about start ing a foundation and giving something back and making up for lost time. White contracted AIDS in 1984 after a blood transfusion for his hemophilia. Once diagnosed, he was expelled from middle school and became a poster child for young people afflicted with the disease. John was with the boy and his family when he died in 1990. While great strides are being made in research and behavior, John said we have a long way to go. The stigma involved in people coming out and saying theyre HIVpositive is still an underground thing, its still a shame-based thing until we can get everybody tested and people to come out and be role models to people who have HIV, then were still battling against this disease, John said. Johnny Depp starting book publishing house NEW YORK Johnny Depp is bringing a dash of cool to the book world. Depp will help run a publishing imprint with the same name as his production com pany, Infinitum Nihil, meaning Nothing is forever. Already on the list of books is The Unraveled Tales of Bob Dylan, which aims to set the record straight on the songwriters enigmatic life and career and will be based in part on interviews with Dylan by bestselling historian Douglas Brinkley. The imprint will be part of HarperCollins Publishers, which announced Monday that Depp will seek authentic, outspoken and visionary ideas and voices. I pledge, on behalf of Infinitum Nihil, that we will do our best to deliver publications worthy of peoples time, of peoples concern, publications that might ordinarily never have breached the parapet, Depp said in a statement released by HarperCollins. For this dream realized, we would like to salute HarperCollins for their faith in us and look forward to a long and fruit ful relationship together. T ues day: Afternoon: 3-4-6 Evening: N/A T ues day: Afternoon: 4-0-1-3 Evening: N/A Mon day: 9-14-16-23-26 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAIL Y BRIEFING WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 17, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter 2AWEATHER Daily Scripture May these words of my mouth and this meditation of my heart be pleas ing in your sight, Lord, my rock and my redeemer. Psalm 19:14 ASSOCIATED PRESS Carlos Aguilar and Claudia Aguilar thank people from the community for their help in the search for their son, Christian, during a memorial service for 18-year-old University of Florida student at the St. Augustine Church in Gainesville on Monday. Gainesville police reported Monday that dental records were used to positively identify the remains as Christian Aguilar, who went missing last month. Associated Press ASSOCIATED PRESS Singer Beyonce will perform during halftime at the Super Bowl on Feb. 3, a source told the Associated Press. Depp John Associated Press

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By GARY FINEOUT Associated Press TALLAHASSEE Floridas two incoming legislative leaders vow to make sweeping changes to the states much-maligned eth ics laws. Both Sen. Don Gaetz and Rep. Will Weatherford said on Tuesday that they are ready to make a string of changes to laws govern ing everything from conflict of interests to campaign accounts used by legislators. The two men are scheduled to become Senate president and House speaker in November. Gaetz said he wants to toughen conflict-of-interest rules for legis lators and make it easier for the public to see financial disclosure forms by placing them online. He also wants to bar elected officials from taking jobs that rely on government funding and look at banning legislators from opening up separate campaign accounts that have few limits on how the money is spent. I think that we ought to raise the standards of ethical conduct in the Legislature and among public officials in general, Gaetz said. Weatherford, R-Wesley Chapel, issued a statement in which he agreed that the changes would be a priority for the House. Its good news for Florida that House and Senate leadership are in agreement that there is a need for meaningful campaign finance and ethics reform, he stated. A statewide grand jury in December 2010 issued a blistering report on corruption, citing exam ples where prosecutions could not go forward because of loopholes in existing laws, or because no one was taking action. The grand jury also faulted legislators for fail ing to enact previous recommen dations, including suggestions from a task force put together by former Gov. Jeb Bush. Yet attempts to make changes earlier this year ran into fierce opposition from veteran leg islators who say some of the reforms are overreaching and assume legislators are engaged in wrongdoing. An ethics bill that sought to ban Florida legislators from working at colleges and univer sities was shot down by a state Senate panel. The proposal was made in response to a scandal involv ing former House Speaker Ray Sansom, who was hired for a sixfigure job at Northwest Florida State College on the same day he became speaker back in 2008. Gaetz said he has not yet fleshed out a concrete proposal but he wants to prevent a legisla tor who has control over budget issues to get a job with a school or college after they are already in the Legislature. He said he doesnt want to prevent a school teacher from being able to run for office. Legislative leaders also said that the GOP-controlled Legislature may overhaul cam paign finance laws by banning, or restricting, the use of special campaign accounts that legisla tors now use. These accounts known as committees of continuous existence can accept unlim ited donations and there are few restraints on the use of the money. They are separate from accounts that legislators use to pay for their own personal cam paigns. Legislators have used these committees to give money to other campaigns or to help secure a leadership position. But some legislators have used these accounts for a long list of expens es, including travel and meals. I think there has been in the past some abuse of CCEs in terms of people not using them for direct political purposes, Gaetz said. Gaetz, however, added that the possible end of these committees should coincide with an increase in the donation limit to person al campaigns. Florida law caps donations to campaign accounts at $500. Gaetz also says he is willing to consider proposals being pushed by the Florida Commission on Ethics. The panel wants to make it easier for the commission to launch investigations into unethi cal conduct. Currently, the com mission cannot launch an inves tigation unless someone files a formal complaint. Page Editor: JIm Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER STATE WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 17, 2012 3A 3A Charter Loans Services Pay outstanding bills, credit cards. Lowest compared rates. Personal loans. Business, debt loans. Auto Home Improvement Loans Bad Credit options. No apps. fees Call today: 1.877.359.5533 Charteracc@usa.com 386-755-4911 Discover How Much Better Your World Can Sound Call (386) 755 4 9 11 By BRENDAN FARRINGTON AP Political Writer BOCA RATON President Barack Obamas Florida campaign argued Tuesday that it has a ground game advantage over Republican Mitt Romney, who seems to be benefiting from a shift in polls in this crucial state in the race for the White House. The memo from Obama Florida Director Ashley Walker points to a closing of a gap in absentee voting and gains made in voter registration since Obama beat Republican nominee John McCain in 2008. In 2008, Republicans built up a huge advan tage in vote-by-mail which Democrats obliterated dur ing in-person early vote to win the state by 3 per centage points. In 2012, Republicans have a much more difficult task ahead since they have already ceded two-thirds of the vote-by-mail advantage they started with four years ago, Walker wrote. While more Republicans are requesting and returning absentee bal lots, Walker noted that the margin is far smaller than it was four years ago. This year, just more than 900,000 Republicans have requested absentee ballots, compared to nearly 834,000 Democrats, or a difference of more than 61,000. But at the same point before the 2008 election, the dif ference in requested bal lots favored Republicans by about 250,000. Still, Obama won in-per son early voting by a large margin. This year, how ever, the Republican-led Legislature and Gov. Rick Scott shortened early voting from 14 days to eight days, which puts more pressure on the Obama campaign to emphasize absentee voting. Its doing so by encourag ing supporters to request absentee ballots in person and fill them out and turn them in on the spot. Florida has 29 electoral votes, the most of any state thats considered a tos sup. Republicans acknowl edge that without Florida, Romney has little chance of winning the presidency. Walkers memo also highlighted voter registra tion efforts, saying that the campaign never left Florida after the 2008 eight win and has trained 20,000 people to register voters. She pointed to increases in black and Hispanic voters, noting that Hispanics have been reg istering as Democrats in far larger numbers than as Republicans. The Romney campaign pointed out that theres only one number that matters, and thats the difference in overall voter registration from 2008. There are almost 89,000 more Republicans now than there were four years ago, while the num ber of Florida Democrats has dropped by more than 94,000. Overall, Florida has almost 4.2 million Republicans and more than 4.6 million Democrats. The numbers dont lie. So they can talk about hustling and we can talk about hustling and the fact is that theres one number that matters, Doster said, pointing to the difference in overall voter registration. Were still ahead. Doster said that when he ran President George W. Bushs Florida re-elec tion campaign, it set the standard for voter outreach efforts. He acknowledged that Obama built on the Bush model in 2008 and surpassed it by making better use of new technol ogy. But he said Romneys efforts this year are just as strong and Obama has a disadvantage. Legislative leaders vow ethics reforms Senator, House member agree time changes be made. Florida News Teen stabs girl outside school ORLANDO Authorities say a central Florida teen stabbed his girlfriend in the neck at school. Orlando police said the 17-year-old boy attacked his 17-year-old girlfriend with a pocket knife in a park ing lot at Dr. Phillips High School Tuesday morning. Police said the couple was arguing when the boy stabbed his girlfriend and then stabbed himself. The Orlando Sentinel reported that both teens were taken to a nearby hospital, where they were expected to recover. The boy is facing charg es of attempted murder and aggravated battery with a weapon under the dating violence statute. Man sentenced in fatal shooting GAINESVILLE A north Florida man has been sentenced to 15 years in prison for his part in a fatal shooting. An Alachua County judge sentenced 20year-old Simeon Demps Tuesday. He pleaded guilty earlier this month to acces sory to murder after the fact. Authorities say Demps drove the getaway car after 18-year-old Dontavious Copeland fatally shot 15year-old Jearicka Mack outside a party in May 2011. A jury found Copeland guilty of first-degree mur der on Oct. 5, and his sen tencing is scheduled for next week. Achievement gap unacceptable TALLAHASSEE Gov. Rick Scott says an achieve ment gap in Floridas strategic plan for public schools is unacceptable. The governor on Tuesday issued a state ment calling for the State Board of Education to more completely recog nize the states goal is to completely close the gap between minority and white students. Board chairman Gary Chartrand also released a statement saying he asked the Department of Education to include a footnote in the plan. It will say the states overall goal is 100 percent proficiency for all students. But Chartrand noted the board had to acknowledge in the five-year plan that each ethnic group has a different starting point. The plan calls for nar rowing but not completely closing that gap for black and Hispanic students by the 2017-18 school year. I think that we ought to raise the standards of ethical conduct in the Legislature and among public officials in general. State Sen. Don Gaetz ASSOCIATED PRESS Family members wave flags and cheer as a chartered jetliner returning a Florida Army Reserve unit from Afghanistan taxis across to the terminal at St. Petersburg/Clearwater International Airport on Tuesday. About 120 members of the F/5-159th Air Medivac unit, nicknamed Devil Ray Dustoff, were return ing from a year-long tour in the war-torn Asian nation. Another unit home from war zone Obama campaign claims ground game Associated Press

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S uccessive generations of White House staffs and newspaper edi-tors relearn the same hard lesson: Don’t get ahead of the facts. The initial White House reaction to the attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, which cost the lives of our ambassador and three others, was that it was a spontane-ous response to an amateur-ish video made in the United States that purportedly ridi-culed Islam. The U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, Susan Rice, amplified that explanation five days later in a round of talk shows. But Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., said the White House knew within 24 hours that it was an orchestrated attack by a terrorist militia, one possibly affiliated with al-Qaida. If it was a deliberate misrepresentation, as Graham charg-es, it was a dumb idea -not that dumb ideas are unknown in Washington — because the details were bound to leak out over time. The White House may have been afraid of losing con-trol of what is now called in Washington-speak “the narra-tive” and, with the FBI unable to get to the ruined consulate for three weeks, unwilling to wait for all the facts to begin emerging. Unfortunately for the truth and possibility of preventing a recurrence, this controversy comes at a time when politics colors everything. To put the worst possible face on it, the GOP may have been trying to take down Rice, a rising star in the Obama administration and a rumored successor to Hillary Clinton, and to tarnish an Obama suc-cess, the overthrow of Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi. Republicans derided the plan until the day Gadhafi was finally killed. Republicans blamed the White House for ignor-ing clear warnings of an imminent attack; the White House responded that the Republicans had cut $300 million in diplomatic security funding. None of this sparring is at all helpful. It is the responsibility of the host country to protect foreign diplomats and embas-sies, but that’s difficult in the extreme in countries that have no governments or, in the case of Libya, not much of one. As a practical matter, the U.S. cannot retreat into for-tress-like embassies; that defeats the whole purpose of having wingtips on the ground, so to speak — the attaches, the specialists and, yes, the spooks who are eyes and ears in for-eign countries. Unfortunately, a certain amount of risk comes with being a foreign service offi-cer in unsettled parts of the world, risks that the diplomats, like their military counter-parts, know going in. Those four Americans who died in Benghazi, and especially Ambassador Chris Stevens, were heroes. Benghazi facts get in the way of politics ANOTHER VIEW HIGHLIGHTS IN HISTORY On this date:In 1610, French King Louis XIII, age nine, was crowned at Reims, five months after the assassination of his father, Henry IV. In 1711, Jupiter Hammon, the first black poet to have his work published in America, was born on Long Island, N.Y., into a life-time of slavery. In 1807, Britain declared it would continue to reclaim British-born sailors from American ships and ports regardless of whether they held U.S. citizenship. In 1912, Pope John Paul I was born Albino Luciani at Forno di Canale, Italy. In 1931, mobster Al Capone was convicted of income tax evasion. (Sentenced to 11 years in prison, Capone was released in 1939.) In 1933, Albert Einstein arrived in the United States as a refugee from Nazi Germany. In 1973, Arab oil-producing nations announced they would begin cutting back oil exports. F irst Lady Michelle Obama said the other day that America is in a “huge recovery” because of what her husband has done, and what I’d advise is that she get a pair of binoculars and look out a White House window. She just might observe more of the desperately poor wan-dering around than she’s seen before, and that would not be by accident. A Washington Post story reports that family homeless-ness in Washington, D.C., is up by 18 percent since last year. The recession ended in late 2009. The recovery, mugged by a pork-ridden stimulus and a malicious gang of other miscon-ceived policies, is limping along more weakly than any recovery since World War II. The result is suffering in almost every direc-tion you look. Those hurt the most are often those who had the least to begin with. Some 46.2 million Americans are now below the poverty line. And, it might be noted by Democrats claiming a Republican war on women, the poverty rate among them is a very scary 16.3 percent. The middle class has also taken a crippling hit — a medi-an income drop from $54,983 when President Barack Obama took office to $50,964 this year. As others have written, the median has decreased more during the Obama recovery than it did during the recession the president has blamed on his predecessor. Welfare has meanwhile been going up, with expenditure increases of something like $193 billion a year under Obama. The crying need is for something that would make the welfare less necessary: jobs. Some 14.7 percent of Americans are looking for jobs but can’t find them or have settled for part-time jobs when they want full-time employment. The $831 billion stimulus was supposed to help fix this, but the tons of money produced maybe an ounce of temporary relief while contributing to employment-impeding debt. The stimulus came up in the vice presidential debate when Republican candidate Paul Ryan pointed to “$90 billion in green pork to campaign contributors and special interest groups.” An Associated Press fact checker concurred that $528 million went to the Solyndra solar-panel firm that was “politically con-nected” and went bankrupt. The reporter went on to say, however, that there was also energy stimulus help for such things as making homes “more energy efficient” and to “public entities constructing high-speed rail lines.” Excuse me, but more recipients of grants and loans than just Solyndra had political con-nections and went under, and inspectors said the program to weatherize homes was poorly executed in many instances, even to the point of endanger-ing lives. High-speed rail is pork to states and has nothing to do with stimulating the economy in the here and now. According to an article in the New Yorker magazine, these projects were pushed by Obama because he was “looking for something bold and iconic — his version of the Hoover Dam.” Looking ahead to solutions, the Obama administration is counting on what it has sometimes called a tax on mil-lionaires, which turns out to be a raised tax on incomes of $250,000 and more for married couples. That could be a teacher and a cop in high-pay places like New York City, writes Michael Tanner of Cato Institute. The tax would produce about two-thirds less revenue than what’s needed to meet Obama’s planned spending hikes next year, he writes. I like the first lady, and I don’t blame her for applauding her husband, but for a less partial view, check in with someone like Mortimer Zuckerman, a media owner and real estate whiz of the kind who produces jobs. He was for Obama in 2008, thinks he has done more popu-list pandering than leading as president, and rates the recov-ery as something we have to recover from. The recovery that wasn’t LETTERS TO THE EDITOR To the Editor:Once again I am troubled by the blatant disregard train operators have for the people who have to put up with con-tinuous horn blasts at all hours of the night. I have contacted CSX over seven times, as well as City Code Enforcement with less than favorable results. Basically, the City’s hands are tied and CSX has final say on all maters concerning their inter-nal affairs. The first two times I called, CSX responded with official letters. The first letter states that the Federal Railroad Administration train horn rule requires four whistles at all crossings; two long, one short and one long. If the train operators followed this code then the horns at the intersections would not be a problem. Very few operators follow the code and often signal excessively at random. The other issue is the continuous sounding of train horns when the train has already passed through the intersection. On several occasions I have even heard train horns sound-ing all the way through town where no intersections exist. The time of day, from 11 p.m. to 7 a.m. when people are sleeping, is the major problem. Overall the real issue here is the lack of respect that CSX train operators have for the people of Lake City. Over 75 percent of the town lives less than a mile of a rail road crossing. I am appealing to the people of Lake City once again. Please call: 1-877-TellCSX (1-877-835-5279), At the menu, press 8 to complain about train horns. The more people that call the more CSX will take this matter seri-ously. Several people responded to my last article and wrote sim-ilar letters. So far CSX has been uncooperative, and the citizens of Lake City continue to suffer sleepless nights caused by indis-criminate train operators’ lack of training and protocol. James E. Snowberger Lake City More train troubles in Lake City Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding counties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, publisher Robert Bridges, editor Sue Brannon, controller Dink NeSmith, president Tom Wood, chairman LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com P retending to be green is expensive. Californians have set the pace for adopting the trendy lifestyle choice but recently have cried out for relief when confronted with the true cost of saving the planet from “global warm-ing.” As new evidence emerges about extraterrestrial forces that shape Earth’s climate, Americans from coast to coast may come to a similar realiza-tion of the futility of trying to bring down temperatures before their bank accounts dry up. Golden State residents bear some of the nation’s highest energy prices, and for a simple reason. Sacramento bureau-crats force refiners to produce gasoline according to a special California-specific recipe that enables the left-coasters to claim they’re far greener than their neighbors. When a fire took out a key oil refinery, sup-ply dried up and prices soared to near $6 a gallon because other states couldn’t ship their surplus petrol to meet the rising demand. Public anger forced Gov. Jerry Brown to relent and allow remaining California refineries to make an early switch from boutique summer blends to an easier-to-produce winter mix. As a result, the fuel supply has eased and pump prices have peaked, though they still average around $4.57 a gallon — a full dollar more than Texans pay. A new theory adds to the growing body of science indi-cating that Earth’s temperature patterns are governed by forces far greater than the impact of the combustion of gas in motor vehicles and the burning of other fossil fuels to power mod-ern civilization. Not surprising-ly, also crucial to climate is that white-hot orb in the sky, the sun. Research indicates cyclical sunspot activity produces fluc-tuations in radiation intensity, which cause Earth’s tempera-tures to rise and fall. Politicsdo not control climate Q Associated Press OPINION Wednesday, October 17, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A4AOPINION Q Jay Ambrose, formerly Washington director of editorial policy for Scripps Howard news-papers and the editor of dailies in El Paso, Texas, and Denver, is a columnist living in Colorado. Jay AmbroseSpeaktoJay@aol.com Q Dale McFeatters is editorial writer for Scripps Howard News Service. Dale McFeattersmcfeattersd@shns.com Q The Washington Times

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Obama had failed to pursue the comprehensive legis-lation he promised at the dawn of his administration, and the president saying Republican obstinacy made a deal impossible. Under the format agreed to in advance, members of an audience of 82 uncom-mitted voters posed questions to the president and his challenger. Nearly all of them concerned domestic policy until one raised the sub-ject of the recent death of the U.S. ambassador to Libya in a terrorist attack at an American post in Benghazi. Romney said it took Obama a long time to admit the episode had been a ter-rorist attack, but Obama said he had said so the day after in an appearance in the Rose Garden outside the White House. When moderator Candy Crowley of CNN said the president had in fact done so, Obama, prompted, “Say that a little louder, Candy.” Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has taken respon-sibility for the death of Ambassador L. Christopher Stevens and three other Americans, but Obama said bluntly, “I’m the president and I’m always responsi-ble. Romney said it was “troubling” that Obama contin-ued with a campaign event in Las Vegas on the day after the attack in Libya, an event he said had “sym-bolic significance and per-haps even material signifi-cance.” Obama seemed to bristle. He said it was offensive for anyone to allege that he or anyone in his adminis-tration had used the inci-dent for political purposes. “That’s not what I do.” Mary Gwedolyn Giebeig NorrisMary Gwendolyn Giebeig Nor-ris, 84, of Lake City, FL passed away early Monday morning, October 15, 2012 at Haven Hospice in Lake City follow-ing a brief illness. She was born in Deland, FL on January 3, 1928 to Paul Sparks Giebeig, Sr. and Ruth Duke Giebeig. In 1939, she moved with her family to Lake City, which re-mained her home until her death. She attended Volusia and Colum-bia County Schools, and Montreat College High School, Montreat, NC as a boarding student where she was a member of the school orchestra and graduated with the Class of 1946. She maintained lifelong friendships with several dear Montreat classmates there. Gwendolyn attended Limestone College, Gaffney, SC before re-turning home to marry her be-loved husband, William Bascom Norris, January 15, 1950. Their URRWVZHUHUPO\SODQWHGLQLake City throughout their lives. To all who knew her, she was a person of great kindness, com-passion and generosity. Her friends and family were val-ued treasures and a huge part of her life. She was devoted to those she loved, a wonderful encourager and a great listener. She was a member of the First United Methodist Church, Lake City, the Edward Rutledge Chap-ter of the DAR, Gideons Interna-tional Ladies Auxiliary, and the Columbia County Fair Associa-tion. She was also a past board member of the Gateway Girl Scout Council, a past member of the Women’s Club of Lake City, The Susanna Wesley Sunday School Class, Church Circle, and Various School Committees where she served as a tireless volunteer during her daughters school years. Gwendolyn was preceded in death by her much loved husband, William Bascom Norris; parents, Paul and Ruth Giebeig; brothers, Paul Jr., Earl, and Bill; nephew, Brad Giebeig, and Sisters In Law, Shirley M. Giebeig and Betty S. Giebeig. She is survived by her daughters, Laura Ruth Norris, Lake City, and Mary Anne Norris and Son-In-Law Jeff Norris, Alachua; special “Granddaughters” Ash-ley Adams and Lucinda Ford; Sister-In-Law, Virginia Giebeig Kindberg; and special nephew Jamie Holman (Ann) and chil-dren, Lucy, Mac, and Wells, Bir-mingham; along with a host of dear nieces, nephews, and cous-ins. She leaves a lasting legacy in the lives she encouraged, her friendships and acts of kindness. Funeral services will be conduct-ed at 3:00 P.M. Friday, October 19, 2012 at First United Meth-odist Church with Reverend -HII7DWHRIFLDWLQJ,QWHUPHQWwill be private. The family will receive friends from 4:30 until 6:30 Thursday, October 18, 2012 atGateway-Forest Lawn Funeral Home, 3596 S. HWY 441, Lake City, FL. (386) 752-1954. In OLHXRIRZHUVGRQDWLRQVPD\be made to First United Meth-odist Church Worship Fund, 973 S. Marion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025, or Gideons Inter-national, P.O. Box 1805, Lake City, FL 32056. Please leave words of comfort to the family at www.gatewayforestlawn.comObituaries are paid advertise-ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporter’s classified department at 752-1293. OBITUARIES Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2012 5A5A IS YOUR G5978D READY FORTHE HOLIDAYS!!J.T.Cooper, M.D.Can help you with safe, supervisedG5978D
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By GARY FINEOUT Associated Press TALLAHASSEE Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi is refusing to back down in her feud with the GOP-controlled Legislature when it comes to $300 million intended to help homeowners. Bondi this week turned in her 2013 budget request to state legislators. She asked for various items including money for a new telephone system and money to hire more appeals attorneys. But she did not ask leg islators to give her spend ing approval for the states share of a national $25 bil lion settlement with five of the nations largest mort gage lenders. The move means that the fate of the money remains in limbo with no clear sign of when the state will begin spending it. Floridas share of the landmark settlement is separate from an estimated $8 billion that is expected to go to help homeown ers and borrowers in the state. The settlement was finalized in early April. But since that time, Bondi has not announced any plans on how the states share of the money would be spent. Bondi has asserted that her office can spend the money without legislative approval. Legislative lead ers, however, continue to insist that the Legislature has the power to make spending decisions. Bondi has insisted that she just wants the money to go to help those impacted by the foreclosure crisis. Hopefully we will able to have a resolution soon because homeowners need that relief, she said earlier this month. Im working Im hard as I can. This money needs to go to hom eowners. Thats where it was meant to go and thats where it should go. Rep. Denise Grimsley, RLake Wales and top budget writer in the House, said in a statement that she was hopeful an agreement will be reached soon. We believe the Legislature has a role to play and we expect to have more details as soon as an agreement is reached, said Grimsley. State agencies were required this week to turn in their 2013 spending requests as well as a list of potential cuts to leg islators. The requests will be the framework used by both Gov. Rick Scott and the Legislature when drawing up a final budget next spring. 6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 17, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 6A SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE Firday & Saturday, October 26 & 27 7pm 11pm Live Oak, FL www. MusicLivesHere .com 386-364-1683 Haunted House Be Prepared to be Spooked! Firday & Saturday, October 26 & 27 Firday & Saturday, October 26 & 27 Be Prepared to be Spooked! Be Prepared to be Spooked! Be Prepared to be Spooked! $ 3 00 00 00 Admission Adult Costume Contest 11:00pm In The Music Hall SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE SPIRITS ON THE SUWANNEE Haunted Haunted Haunted Haunted If the Ghosts dont get you, The Spirits will! CARC holds awards dinner From staff reports The Annual Membership Celebration of CARCAdvocates for Citizens with Disabilities Inc. was held recently at the First United Methodist Church. Elected as officers for the new year were David Brewer as president, Cedric Davis as vice presi dent, Betsy Pottle as sec retary and Judy Lewis as treasurer. The night was a big success, with songs from the Group Home Singers and a fashion show put on by clients and residents dressed in clothes from the CARC retail store, Valeries Boutique. Dinner was catered by Sonnys, thanks to the sponsorship of Anderson Columbia, Baya Pharmacy and Columbia Bank. CCs Flower Villa donated the table arrange ments, and First United Methodist Church provided the facility. Client/employee awards Employee service awards: 5 years of Service Peggy Dukes, Rosetta McClellan, Judie McCray, Elizabeth Osman, Sara Perez, Beverly Tarver and Natalyn White 10 years of service Sterling Cray 15 years of service Kasmir Pawelkiewicz 20 years of service Ginger Dye Employee Above & Beyond Award Jimmy Burnett, Sterling Cray, Kenda Daniels, Albert Dye, Carla Hawkins, Raymond Turner, Terri Watson and Natalyn White Outstanding Employment Achievement Kerri Hull Sunshine Enterprises Outstanding Worker Gordon Jackson Sunshine Enterprises Most Improved Work Attitude William Gorski Sunshine Enterprises Motivation and Determination Kendra Kitchen Sunshine Enterprises Most Thoughtful Attitude Calvin Griffin Sunshine Enterprises Achievement Shanna Yates Sunshine Enterprises Cheerfulness Joey Davie Sunshine Enterprises Independence Achievement Kelly Hambleton Socialization Most Improved Wayne Perry Group Home Most Improved Attitude Barbara Freeman Group Home Outstanding Resident Alex Hynes Community Support awards: Outstanding Community Support Mary Parker Charles and Mildred Fite, Jr. Award for Volunteerism Debbie Zurek CARC Family Support Person Carolyn Baker CARC Group Home Family Support Person Connie and Billy Bivins Board of directors Appreciation for ded icated service Kerri Hull, Sandy Kishton, Mike McKee and Kris Robinson. COURTESY Sveta Zhavoronkova, (left) CARC executive director, presents Mary Parker the award for Outstanding Community Support during the CARC annual membership celebration. By KELLI KENNEDY Associated Press MIAMI Floridas Republican-led Legislature put Amendment 1 on the upcoming ballot as a mora torium on President Barack Obamas health care plan, but it will have little legal impact. Still, its backers say its passage would send a strong political message that the people of Florida dont like the plan they call Obamacare. The proposal would pro hibit state laws compelling any person or employer to purchase, obtain or other wise provide health care coverage. It was drafted by conservative state Republicans before the U.S. Supreme Court ruling last June that upheld the Affordable Care Act and it has received little attention or funding. Like all amend ments on the Nov. 6 bal lot, it requires a 60 percent favorable vote to pass. Conservatives say it would put the state on record as opposed to the presidents plan and pre vent the state from imple menting a Massachusettslike health care law in the future, but liberals allege its nothing more than a tac tic using a hot-button issue to drive Republican turnout for a lackluster presidential candidate. Similar propos als are cropping up in a handful of other states. I think its a misguided attempt to scare people and its purpose is to mobilize anti-Obama supporters to go to the polls, said Ethan Rome, executive director of Health Care for America Now, a liberal advocacy group. He said similar ini tiatives have been proposed in Alabama, Wyoming and Montana. Supporters say it would send a message that Congress overstepped its authority when passing the Affordable Care Act in 2010, which allows the IRS to fine those who cannot show they are covered by an employer, government program or their own poli cy starting in 2014. Republican Senate President Mike Haridopolos, who intro duced the proposal, said when the amendment passed that its about free dom. The measure would ensure that individuals are allowed to choose the kind of health care coverage they want, not what the fed eral government mandates, he said. Lawmakers tried to get a similar measure on the bal lot in 2010, but their efforts were squashed when the Florida Supreme Court ruled its summary was inaccurate, misleading and might confuse voters. Gov. Rick Scott, Attorney General Pam Bondi and other Republican lawmak ers fueled a new effort after they were elected two years ago. Scott has fre quently spoken out against the health care law and has forbid state agencies from accepting federal money tied to the law. Bondi made fighting the federal health law the centerpiece of her election campaign. Haridopolos said the lan guage that the high court found unacceptable has been removed from the new ballot summary. The Sunshine State has not fostered a friendly cli mate for the federal health law. Former Florida Republican Attorney General Bill McCollum filed a lawsuit declaring the federal health law unconsti tutional just minutes after Obama signed the 10-year, $938 billion health care bill into law. He chose a court in Pensacola, one of Floridas most conservative cities. More than two dozen other states also joined the suit. Experts say its unlikely the amendment will get 60 percent. Proposed health care amendment has no teeth Critics say it is anti-Obama political ploy. AG Bondi not budging on settlement fund use Teen accused of school plot pleads TAMPA A Tampa Bay area teen has pleaded no contest to plotting to blow up his high school last year. Jared Cano, 18, pleaded no contest Tuesday to charges of threatening to discharge a destructive device and attempting to discharge a destructive device with intention to harm. His sentencing is scheduled for Dec. 5. Associated Press Associated Press MIAMI A federal appeals court wont quick ly review a challenge to Floridas plan to purge almost 200 voters from the rolls because they are noncitizens. The 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals decision Tuesday will leave the legal fight for after the Nov. 6 election. Two Florida fed eral judges have ruled that the planned purge of 198 non-citizens can go forward despite claims it violates a federal law against remov ing voters within 90 days of an election. The judges decided the 90-day doesnt apply to noncitizens. Most supervisors of elections have said the removal process would run past Election Day anyway. The state originally sought to purge some 2,600 names but encoun tered inaccuracies. The revised list of 198 names of possible non-citizens was produced through a Homeland Security Department citizenship database. No quick review of voter purge case

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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Wednesday, October 17, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com %632576 BRIEFS Columbia travels to Middleburg on Thursday. CHS continued on 2B Today Q Columbia High volleyball at Oak Hall School, 6 p.m. (JV-5) Thursday Q Columbia High swimming Senior Night vs. Suwannee High, 4:30 a.m. Q Columbia High football at Middleburg High, 7 p.m. Friday Q Columbia High volleyball vs. host Newberry High, The Rock School in Varsity Pink Panther tournament, 6 p.m., 7 p.m. Q Fort White High football vs. Fernandina Beach High, 7:30 p.m. Saturday Q Columbia High cross country in Amelia Island Invitational at Fernandina Beach, boys-8 a.m., girls-8:35 a.m. Q Fort White High volleyball vs. Bell High, The Rock School, host Newberry High in Varsity Pink Panther tournament, 9 a.m., 1 p.m., 3 p.m. Q Columbia High volleyball vs. Fort White High, Bell High in Varsity Pink Panther tourney at Newberry High, 11 a.m., 2 p.m. GAMES YOUTH SOCCER Winter sign-up through Nov. 29 Columbia Youth Soccer Association’s 2013 Winter Recreational Soccer Season registration for ages 3-16 is 6-7 p.m. Thursdays and 1-2:30 p.m. Saturdays through Nov. 29 (not Thanksgiving week). All teams will be gender specific. Fee of $65 includes uniform and year-end trophy. Get a sponsor for your child’s team and your child plays free. For details, go to columbiayouthsoccer association.com or call 288-2504. RUNNING Wright Brothers 5K for veterans The Race Against the Wright Brothers 5K is 8 a.m. Nov. 10 at Olustee Park in downtown Lake City. Proceeds go to Volunteer Service Programs for Disabled American Veterans at the Lake City VA Medical Center. School and cross country teams are welcome. Registration is at www. stepfitnessonline.com or at Carquest on Pinemount Road. For details, call Michelle Richards at 208-2447.Chomp Cancer Foundation 5K Chomp Cancer Foundation has its second Chomp Cancer 5K Run/Walk planned for 8 a.m. Dec. 15 in Fort White. UF Shands Cancer Center is the beneficiary. There will be music, post-race snacks, an awards ceremony and a silent auction/raffle. Sponsorships at several levels are available. The race will be chip timed by Half Mile Timing. For details, call Lauren Valentine at (321) 501-9526.Q From staff reports JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Tavaris Williams kicks up dirt as he looks at open field against Williston High on Friday. Homecoming for IndiansBy TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comFORT WHITE — Fort White High has Fernandina Beach High coming to town for homecoming this week. The football game is 7:30 p.m. Friday. There will be festivities all week, but the job of the football team is to put up a victory. “If we win the game, it’s a good homecoming,” Indians head coach Demetric Jackson said following Fort White’s win over Williston High last week. Running back Tavaris Williams was equally blunt. “We have got to win,” Williams said. “It will leave a bitter taste if we lose homecoming.” Fernandina Beach experienced that feeling last year when Fort White shredded homecoming for the Pirates, 65-30, in the first meeting between the teams. The Indians did the celebrating with everybody getting into the act. Fort White to host Fernandina Beach on Friday. INDIANS continued on 2B Back from bye JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Ronald Timmons breaks into open field against Ridgeview High. The Tigers return to the field in District 3-6A play against Middleburg High at 7 p.m. on Thursday. By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High looks to take another leg up in the District 3-6A race after rest-ing its legs on a bye week. The Tigers will return to action at 7 p.m. against Middleburg High in Middleburg on Thursday. Nothing has changed for coach Brian Allen or the Tigers coming out of the bye as Columbia looks to improve on its 5-1 record. “We have to continue to take it one game at a time,” Allen said. “The big thing is that we can’t bye into the hype of being a playoff team or winning nine games. We have to continue to do the same things.” Allen said the big thing for Columbia is to not fall into a trap. “We can’t be caught in the trap game,” Allen said. “You see it every week with a team everyone feels should win being caught in the trap. Teams have potential to have success against the team’s that are supposed to win if they can get everyone playing on the same page and it bites a team every JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Jara Courson (5) looks to spike the b all against Suwannee in a match played on Oct. 2. CHS digs into Fort WhiteBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High held its annual ‘Dig Pink’ volley-ball game against county rival Fort White High on Tuesday. The event helped to raise money for Breast Cancer awareness and also raised a few eyebrows about the tal-ent of the Lady Tigers. Columbia blew past Fort White in three sets with the Lady Tigers winning 25-19, 25-10 and 25-12. “The girls are playing well,” Columbia head coach Rebecca Golden said. “They’re playing together and it takes all 11 of them to win a match. I’m excited about the teamwork.” Golden was also excited about the fundraiser. “We’d like to thank all that came out to support,” she said. “We appreciate everyone that donated to the cause.” The Lady Tigers were led by Kelbie Ronsonet with 12 kills and five blocks in the match. Jessie Bates led the team in assists and aces with 30 and six respectively. Ashley Bridges had six kills and Jara Courson had four aces. For the Lady Indians, Leah Johnson led with five kills, three blocks and two aces. ‘Dig Pink’ event deemed a success in Lake City. TIGERS continued on 2B

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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today GOLF 1:30 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Perth International, first round, at Perth, Australia MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 3:30 p.m. FOX — NLCS, game 3, San Francisco at St. Louis 8 p.m. TBS — ALCS, game 4, Detroit vs. New York SOCCER 10 p.m. NBCSN — MLS, Salt Lake at Seattle WNBA BASKETBALL 8 p.m. ESPN — Playoffs, finals, game 2, Indiana at Minnesota WOMEN’S COLLEGE VOLLEYBALL 8 p.m. FSN — Iowa St. at TexasFOOTBALLNFL standings AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAN.Y. Jets 3 3 0 .500 133 141New England 3 3 0 .500 188 137Miami 3 3 0 .500 120 117Buffalo 3 3 0 .500 137 192 South W L T Pct PF PAHouston 5 1 0 .833 173 115Indianapolis 2 3 0 .400 100 145Tennessee 2 4 0 .333 114 204Jacksonville 1 4 0 .200 65 138 North W L T Pct PF PABaltimore 5 1 0 .833 161 118Cincinnati 3 3 0 .500 149 163Pittsburgh 2 3 0 .400 116 115Cleveland 1 5 0 .167 134 163 West W L T Pct PF PADenver 3 3 0 .500 170 138San Diego 3 3 0 .500 148 137Oakland 1 4 0 .200 87 148Kansas City 1 5 0 .167 104 183 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAN.Y. Giants 4 2 0 .667 178 114Philadelphia 3 3 0 .500 103 125Washington 3 3 0 .500 178 173Dallas 2 3 0 .400 94 119 South W L T Pct PF PAAtlanta 6 0 0 1.000 171 113Tampa Bay 2 3 0 .400 120 101Carolina 1 4 0 .200 92 125New Orleans 1 4 0 .200 141 154 North W L T Pct PF PAChicago 4 1 0 .800 149 71Minnesota 4 2 0 .667 146 117Green Bay 3 3 0 .500 154 135Detroit 2 3 0 .400 126 137 West W L T Pct PF PAArizona 4 2 0 .667 110 97San Francisco 4 2 0 .667 152 94Seattle 4 2 0 .667 110 93St. Louis 3 3 0 .500 110 111 Monday’s Game Denver 35, San Diego 24 Thursday’s Game Seattle at San Francisco, 8:20 p.m. Sunday’s Games Arizona at Minnesota, 1 p.m.Green Bay at St. Louis, 1 p.m.Baltimore at Houston, 1 p.m.Washington at N.Y. Giants, 1 p.m.Dallas at Carolina, 1 p.m.New Orleans at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.Cleveland at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.Tennessee at Buffalo, 1 p.m.Jacksonville at Oakland, 4:25 p.m.N.Y. Jets at New England, 4:25 p.m.Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 8:20 p.m. Monday, Oct. 22 Detroit at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.Open: Atlanta, Denver, Kansas City, Miami, Philadelphia, San DiegoAP Top 25 games Thursday No. 2 Oregon at Arizona State, 9 p.m. Saturday No. 1 Alabama at Tennessee, 7 p.m.No. 3 Florida vs. No. 9 South Carolina, 3:30 p.m. No. 4 Kansas State at No. 17 West Virginia, 7 p.m. No. 5 Notre Dame vs. BYU, 3:30 p.m.No. 6 LSU at No. 20 Texas A&M, Noon No. 7 Ohio State vs. Purdue, NoonNo. 8 Oregon State vs. Utah, 10:30 p.m. No. 10 Oklahoma vs. Kansas, 7 p.m.No. 11 Southern Cal vs. Colorado, 6 p.m. No. 12 Florida State at Miami, 8 p.m. No. 13 Georgia at Kentucky, 7 p.m.No. 14 Clemson vs. Virginia Tech, Noon No. 15 Mississippi State vs. Middle Tennessee, 7 p.m. No. 16 Louisville vs. USF, 3:30 p.m. No. 18 Texas Tech at TCU, 3:30 p.m.No. 19 Rutgers at Temple, NoonNo. 21 Cincinnati at Toledo, 7 p.m.No. 22 Stanford at California, 3 p.m.No. 23 Michigan vs. Michigan State, 3:30 p.m. No. 24 Boise State vs. UNLV, 3:30 p.m.BASEBALLMLB playoffs LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES (Best-of-7) American League (All games televised by TBS) Detroit 2, New York 0 Detroit 6, New York 4, 12 inningsDetroit 3, New York 0 Tuesday New York at Detroit (n) Today New York (Sabathia 15-6) at Detroit (Scherzer 16-7), 8:07 p.m. ——— National League (All games televised by Fox) St. Louis 1, San Francisco 1 St. Louis 6, San Francisco 4 Monday San Francisco 7, St. Louis 1 Today San Francisco (Cain 16-5) at St. Louis (Lohse 16-3), 4:07 p.m. Thursday San Francisco at St. Louis (Wainwright 14-13), 8:07 p.m.BASKETBALLNBA preseason Today’s Games Washington at Toronto, 7 p.m.Cleveland at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.Memphis at Houston, 8 p.m.Phoenix at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.Golden State at Sacramento, 10 p.m.Denver at Portland, 10 p.m.Utah at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. Thursday’s Games New Orleans at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.Detroit at Miami, 7:30 p.m.Memphis vs. Milwaukee, 8 p.m.Boston at Brooklyn, 8 p.m. WNBA Finals Indiana 1, Minnesota 0 (Best of 5) Today Indiana at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Friday Minnesota at Indiana, 8 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2012 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04202BSPORTS AGATE TIGERS: Volleyball defeats Indians Continued From Page 1B INDIANS: Face two-win Pirates Continued From Page 1B CHS: Tigers look to roll out of bye Continued From Page 1B Williams had a breakout game, rushing for 107 yards on six carries. He scored on an 80-yard touchdown run. Melton Sanders spent much of the night at quar-terback and carried four times for 90 yards. He had touchdown runs of 30 and 57 yards. Andrew Baker was 4-of-5 passing for 94 yards and touchdowns to A.J. Legree and Soron Williams. Linebacker Kellen Snider played some fullback and caught a 20-yard pass. Baker and Zach Cormier had rushing touchdowns and Soron Williams had two, as the Indians gained 457 yards on the ground. Fernandina Beach scored four touchdowns, two apiece by seniors Jordan Holland and Tai Dunwood. The Pirates are 2-5 this season. They opened with a 19-0 loss to Union County High, which beat Fort White 28-21. The Tigers are the only common opponent. Fernandina Beach’s two wins have come against Eagle’s View Academy (27-12) and Hilliard Middle-Senior High (36-27). The Pirates have lost to Keystone Heights High (14-0), Cocoa Beach High (31-21), Yulee High (35-0 in a District 2-4A game) and Matanzas High (35-25) last week. In the win over Eagle’s View, quarterback Cole Willis — who started against Fort White — scored three touchdowns. Against Matanzas, Willis threw touchdown passes of 52 and 29 yards to Will Mitchell. Fernandina Beach has made three trips to the state playoffs — 1970, 1995 and 2007. The Pirates are 0-3 in their playoff games. single week.” Because of that, Allen said the Tigers have pre-pared for Middleburg like it is the best team Columbia will face all season. “We’re keeping the pads on during practice,” Allen said. “Last year, we cut down the reps at this point during weightlifting in the mornings. We’re not doing that yet. We’re watching their bodies and making an assessment about where we are. Right now, we’re going to continue the grind. We just have to be where we need to be mentally to finish.” Right now, Allen feels the Tigers are at a good posi-tion with their mental focus, but that the key is keep-ing it there throughout the remainder of the grind. “The good thing is that we are coming off a bye week and we were grinding throughout until the bye,” Allen said. “We were totally away from the game and hopefully that helped with their mental stimulation. Now, we have to prepare for this possible nine-game grind.” Allen has the Tigers believing in a possible run at the playoffs, but the next three games will play a big role in where Columbia plays its playoff games. After Middleburg the Tigers will have games against Orange Park and Leon high schools looking to close out the district race. “We’re gearing up for a big push that could go to the big dance,” Allen said. “The big thing is we don’t want to overwhelm these 16-, 17and 18-year-old kids. You look and we can play more games than a college team. We have to keep it where it doesn’t feel too militaristic.” That’s why Allen felt it was key to give the Tigers off two days last week. But he still feels the team is ahead of the game due to planning during the bye week. “The advantage of the bye week is we’ve already broke down the film,” Allen said. Hallie Stringellow had 32 assists to lead the team in assists. She also had two kills. Arianna House had two kills. “Passing killed us in all three matches,” Fort White head coach Tiffany Bratcher. “Leah had the best game all the way around. Her and Hallie tried to keep everyone positive.” Fort White fell to 5-13 on the season and will play in the Newberry High tourna-ment beginning at 9 a.m. on Saturday. Columbia is 14-4 on the season and travels to Oak Hall at 6 p.m. today. In the junior varsity game, Columbia defeat-ed Fort White 25-12 and 25-18. Hayes Fulford led the Lady Tigers JV with six aces and three kills. Lacey King had four kills. Columbia’s junior varsity is 11-1.Tigers golfColumbia High’s season came to an end in the district tournament as the Tigers finished sixth out of seven teams. Lynn Haven Mosely High won the tournament with a 297, while the Tigers shot a respectable 322. Columbia will send one player on to the regional tournament at Seminole Country Club in Tallahassee on Tuesday, however, as Dean Soucinek advanced after shooting a 76. It wasn’t easy for Soucinek, however, as he had to go through five playoff holes to advance. “Dean is my only senior and he’s had playoff experi-ence in the last two matches with Buchholz,” Columbia head coach Steve Smithy said. “I think it really ben-efitted him. As my only senior, I’m happy to see him advance to regionals.” Nick Jones and Luke Soucinek both carded 81s for the Tigers. Tim Bagley and Dillan VanVleck round-ed out the scoring with 84 and 85, respectively. Jeremy Senterfitt carded a 3-under 69 to win the tournament’s medalist honors. TIM KIRBY /Lake City ReporterFort White Middle School’s Taylor DuBose and Richard M iddle School’s Kaitlen Williams shake hands as the only girls on either team.Wolves win score-festBy TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comFORT WHITE — Richardson Middle School and Fort White Middle School combined for a score-fest at Arrowhead Stadium on Tuesday. The Wolves won, 60-22.Richardson (2-5) blitzed out to four-TD lead. Jovares Thomas got the Wolves on the board with a five-yard run. Kamario Bell soon scored on a 19-yard run. Richardson went to the air with a 52-yard touch-down from Ronnie Collins to Kenny Stewart. Laterian Jones then scored the first of his three touchdowns. Fort White (2-5) answered with a 69-yard touchdown run by C.J. McCoy. The Indians then went to the varsity playbook for a hook-and-ladder and scored from 80 yards as time ran off the clock in the second quarter. Demetric Jackson threw to Jordan Perkins who pitched off to Jabari Rivers to finish the final 72 yards. Jackson threw to Carlous Bartee for the PAT to cut the lead to 32-14 at the half. The Wolves got right back to it after intermission with a 22-yard touchdown pass from Collins to Thomas. Bell added the PAT. Sam Aymond scored on a nine-yard run for the Wolves at 1:37 of the third quarter for a 46-14 lead. On the first series of the fourth quarter, Fort White’s Marquez Graves picked off a pass and returned it 47 yards for a touchdown. Jackson connected with McCoy for the conversion. After an interception by D’angelo Perry, Jones scored on a three-yard run. Jones scored from 11 yards out and Collins ran in the PAT to produce the final score.

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The Children’s Miracle Network Tournament, hosted by Walmart Distribution Center No. 6099 was Friday. Winners of the tournament with a score of 57 was the team of Dustin Rowe, Jarrell Rogers, Mason Sweat and Bradley Stone. In second place with a score of 58 was the team of Bobby Owen, Gator Griffis, Casey Clements and David Tipton. A special thanks to Tonya Morgan and all the volunteers from Walmart that made this year’s tour-nament a success with the true winners being the children helped with the funds donated to Children’s Miracle Network. Wallace Christie led the way in Wednesday’s Blitz, scoring a +9 and picking up a skin on Ponds No. 7. Christie finished two points ahead of a solid +7 scored by Gerald Smithy. Third place went to Jack Tuggle at +1. Skin winners in addition to Wallace were Todd Carter (3), Randy Heavrin, Keith Hudson and Jim Munns (2). The pot continued to roll over as Ponds No. 1 was the hole drawn and no birdies were scored on the hole. The Top Of The Hill ended in a tie between Gerald Smithy and Tim Tortorice at +7, with third place going to Jack Tuggle at +2. Sunday’s scramble will return with a three-week rollover on the pot. Sign up by 3 pm. Match play in the elimination bracket continues this week as Joe Herring defeated Todd Carter. Herring awaits the winner of the elimination semi-final of Pete Sapienza and Chet Carter. The Rountree tournament featured two-man teams in a 36-hole event, followed by a one hole shoot-out among winners to award additional payoffs. Gross score flight winners were: Q First Flight — champions, Steve Thomas and Dennis Crawford; second place, Mike McCranie and Donald Roberts; Q Second Flight — champions, Maurice Perkins and Todd Carter; second place, Buddy Slay and Wayne Cole; Q Third Flight — champions, Dustin Walker and James Parker; second place, Paul Meyer and Eli Witt. Net score flight winners were: Q First Flight — champions, Cory DePratter and Bob Chapman; second place, Bruce Gibson and Dave Mehl; Q Second Flight — champions, Mike Jacobs and Dan Stewart; second place, Ron Mullis and Barry Woodward; Q Third Flight — champions, Cory Bannister and Vic Fundora; second place, Tim Blackwell and Codey Blackwell. Two teams from the third flight tied in the shootout then moved to the putting green for a chip-off. Walker and Parker handled the short game better than Bannister and Fundora to take the victory. Gillian Norris is in the news again. Two weeks ago, the CHS Lady Tiger golfer scored her first career eagle. Last week, the sophomore logged her first hole-in-one when she aced the third hole during a practice round. Pretty good day of practice. Keith Shaw knocked in three birdies en route to a +7 and first place in the A flight of Wednesday’s blitz. Donald Roberts and Jonathan Allen were a stroke behind in second. Robbie Kerby (+3) was in fourth. Emerson Darst (+8), barely escaped George Burnham (+7) for the B flight win. Pete Skantos (+5) and Bob Wheary (+4) finished third and fourth. Steve Patterson, Mike Gough and Shelton Keen shared the skins pot with DePratter, Shaw and Allen. Burnham picked up a modest pot hole win with a birdie on No. 16. The maxed-out pot hole carried over. The LGA did battle in a blitz format. Scoring proved tough, as Natalie Bryant and Katrina Counts tied for first with -1. Nicole Ste-Marie was a stroke back, followed by Caroline Stevens in fourth. Cathy Steen claimed the chip-in pot. The team of Ed Snow, Jim McGriff, Ed McKnight and Dave Cannon kicked off a week of close action in Good Old Boys play with a 5-4 win over the team of Jim Bell, Rhea Hart, Paul Davis and Howard Whitaker. Match 2 was a 5-3 win for the team of Monty Montgomery, Bob McGraw, Bill Rogers and Dan Stephens over the team of Barney Hart, Tony Branch, Joe Persons and Hugh Sherrill. The week’s final action was another two-point win, this time for the team of Stan Woolbert, Emerson Darst, Rob Brown and Jeff Mayne, 7-5, over the team of Marc Risk, Bobby Simmons, Nick Whitehurst and Merle Hibbard. The spate of good individual scoring continued. Montgomery topped the list with a 38-36-74. Risk was two back with a 37-39-76. Other contenders were Hart and Snow, both with 77, Woolbert and Stephens with 78 and McKnight with 79. Darst shot 37 on the front to take nine hole honors. Whitaker was second with a 38, followed by Bell and Branch both with 39. Moon Golf is Friday night and Mixed Team event Sunday. Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2012 3B%632576 WEDNESDAY EVENING OCTOBER 17, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) The Middle (N) The Neighbors (N) Modern Family (N) (:31) SuburgatoryNashville (N) (DVS) News at 11(:35) Nightline (N) 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) The Insider 5-PBS 5 -Journal Nightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Nature (DVS) NOVA “Forensics on Trial” (N) (PA) Nova scienceNOW (N) (DVS) BBC World NewsTavis Smiley (N) 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge Judy Two and Half MenSurvivor: Philippines (N) Criminal Minds (N) (DVS) CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (N) Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneTMZ (N) Arrow Oliver runs into Laurel. 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Bella nds herself drawn into the world of werewolves. American Horror Story: AsylumAmerican Horror Story: Asylum CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245The Mentalist “Ruddy Cheeks” The Mentalist Castle “A Death in the Family” Castle “Deep in Death” Major Crimes “Long Shot” Perception “86’d” NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobFigure It Out (N) Drake & JoshFull House Full House Full House Full House The Nanny The Nanny Friends (:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241(5:00) “The Transporter 2” (2005) “The Punisher” (2004) Thomas Jane. An FBI agent seeks revenge for the murder of his family. “The Transporter 2” (2005, Action) Jason Statham, Amber Valletta. The Punisher MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*H M*A*S*H NUMB3RS Don’s team reopens a case. NUMB3RS “Contenders” Seinfeld Frasier The Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Phineas and FerbGood Luck CharlieA.N.T. Farm Shake It Up! Austin & Ally “Phineas and Ferb: The Movie: Across 2nd Dimension”Good Luck CharliePhineas and FerbA.N.T. Farm My Babysitter LIFE 32 108 252(4:30) “Selena” (1997) “Abducted: The Carlina White Story” (2012) Aunjanue Ellis, Keke Palmer. Remembering Whitney (N) My Life Is a Lifetime Movie “Abducted: The Carlina White Story” USA 33 105 242NCIS “Mind Games” NCIS A missing staff sergeant. NCIS A survivalist is wanted. NCIS “Corporal Punishment” NCIS Muslim Marine found dead. Covert Affairs “Rock ’n’ Roll Suicide” BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Wild Out Wednesday” Top 10 Countdown. (N) BET Hip Hop Awards 2012 Celebrating hip-hop history and culture. The Game The Game Don’t Sleep!The Game ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) NFL Live d WNBA Basketball Finals, Game 2: Teams TBA. 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The Blue Planet: Seas of Life The Blue Planet: Seas of Life Wild Paci c Diversity of life. FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveRestaurant: Impossible “Whistle Stop” Restaurant: ImpossibleRestaurant: Impossible (N) Restaurant Stakeout (N) Restaurant: Impossible “Valley Inn” TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the Lord Billy Graham CrusadeBehind the ScenesTurning PointJoseph PrinceEnd of the AgePraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -ACC All-AccessUFC InsiderBeing: Liverpool Women’s College Volleyball Iowa State at Texas. (N) UFC InsiderFootball Prev World Poker Tour (Taped) SYFY 58 122 244Paranormal Witness “The Abduction” Paranormal WitnessGhost Hunters “Paranormal Politics” Ghost Hunters “Curtain Call” (N) Paranormal Witness (N) Ghost Hunters “Curtain Call” AMC 60 130 254 “Friday the 13th: The Final Chapter” (1984) Kimberly Beck, Peter Barton. “Friday the 13th -A New Beginning” (1985, Horror) John Shepard. “Friday the 13th, Part VI: Jason Lives” (1986, Horror) Thom Mathews. COM 62 107 249South Park Tosh.0 The Colbert ReportDaily ShowChappelle’s ShowKey & PeeleSouth Park South Park South Park (N) Key & Peele (N) Daily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327Reba Reba Reba Reba Reba Reba CMT Music Awards 2012 The 11th anniversary of the awards show. 8 Seconds NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer “Canine 9-1-1, Part 2” World’s Weirdest “Almost Human” Freaks & CreepsFreaks & Creeps “Devil Island” Freaks & CreepsFreaks & Creeps NGC 109 186 276Gold Rush Ghost ShipsWild Justice Nocturnal poachers. Psychic Gold HuntBid & Destroy (N) Bid & Destroy (N) Bid & DestroyBid & DestroyBid & DestroyBid & Destroy SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeMantracker “Pete and Cam” Mantracker “Wes and Jamie” Mantracker “Margreit and Warren” Mantracker Justin and his cousin Kyle. Mantracker “Wes and Jamie” ID 111 192 285On the Case With Paula Zahn Unusual Suspects A little girl murdered. Dateline on ID “Deadly Triangle” Who the BleepWho the BleepDevil-KnowDevil-KnowDateline on ID “Deadly Triangle” HBO 302 300 501(:15) “A Thousand Words” (2012, Comedy) Eddie Murphy. ‘PG-13’ “Cowboys & Aliens” (2011, Science Fiction) Daniel Craig. ‘PG-13’ Boardwalk Empire Real Time With Bill Maher MAX 320 310 515 “Hanna” (2011, Action) Saoirse Ronan, Eric Bana. ‘PG-13’ Strike Back (:45) “The Matrix Revolutions” (2003, Science Fiction) Keanu Reeves. ‘R’ “Shame” (2011) ‘NC-17’ SHOW 340 318 545(:15) “A Better Life” (2011, Drama) Demin Bichir, Jos Julin. ‘PG-13’ Homeland “State of Independence” Inside the NFL (N) Inside NASCAR (N) Inside ComedyInside the NFL QUAIL HEIGHTS COUNTRY CLUB Chet Carter COUNTRY CLUB at LAKE CITY Ed Goff GOLF REPORTS COURTESY PHOTOThe Rountree tournament shoot-out winners were the team of J ames Parker and Dustin Walker (from left); runners-up were Vic Fundora and Core y Bannister. Parker/Walker win Rountree Children’s Mircle Network Tournament a success Lattimore back at practice for USCAssociated PressCOLUMBIA, S.C. — South Carolina coach Steve Spurrier says Marcus Lattimore hasn’t missed any practice time and expects the tailback to play despite his bruised hip. The coach had said Lattimore would miss a cou-ple of practices this week after being hurt in the Gamecocks’ 23-21 loss at LSU last Saturday. However, Spurrier said Tuesday Lattimore ran during Monday’s practice. The ninth-ranked Gamecocks (6-1, 4-1 SEC) play at No. 3 Florida (6-0, 5-0) Saturday. South Carolina has won 12 straight games over SEC Eastern Division opponents, including the past two against Florida. Lattimore rushed for 212 yards and three touch-downs in South Carolina’s victory at The Swamp two years ago. No. 3 Florida winning with one-dimensional offenseBy MARK LONGAssociated PressGAINESVILLE — No. 3 Florida is making balanced offense seem overrated. The Gators are last in the Southeastern Conference in passing, averaging a mere 145 yards a game at a time when throwing the football is as fashionable as alternate uniforms. And it’s not because they’re run-ning the triple option or the Wing T. Nope, the Gators are simply sticking with what works best — getting the most out of a shifty run-ning back, a fleet-footed quarterback and a physical offensive line that tends to get better the longer it’s on the field. Although the close-tothe-vest, grind-it-out style has carried Florida to its highest ranking in three years, it also has created a perception that the Gators (6-0, 5-0) are vulnerable heading into Saturday’s game against No. 9 South Carolina (6-1, 4-1). What if the Gamecocks, who rank fourth in the league in rushing defense, shut down Florida’s seem-ingly one-dimensional attack? What if Florida gets behind early? Could the Gators survive costly turnovers? “I didn’t realize we were last in passing, but we’re first in the East,” quarterback Jeff Driskel said. “That’s all that mat-ters. We’re undefeated. We haven’t dropped a game yet. If you’re win-ning, everything’s all right. Obviously we got to get better in the passing game, but we’re winning games. That’s all that matters.” The Gators have used stingy defense and stellar second-half performances to climb up the polls. They have trailed in five of six games this season, been down at halftime in three and never really looked like one of the best teams in the country. It’s clear that Florida has become exactly what Muschamp promised from Day 1 — a tough, physi-cal team that outworks its opponents and does what-ever it takes to win games. Call them the orange and blue-collared Gators. It should be no surprise that the Bowl Championship Series computers — unbi-ased machines that rank teams based on compli-cated algorithms and don’t see a single down — love Florida. Others have their doubts, believing it’s dif-ficult to maintain success in this day and age while completing just 13 passes a game. Offensive coordinator Brent Pease, who came to Gainesville after six sea-sons at Boise State, wants to be more balanced. But he also makes it clear that if his offense continues giv-ing opponents fits on the ground, he’s going to stick with it. “When we go in and hit 10 explosive plays, the bottom line is run them again,” Pease said. “Run them again, OK. Let’s not get greedy here as a coach and say, ‘I don’t like that. I’m throwing the ball because that’s what we all love to do.”’ Mike Gillislee ranks second in the SEC in rushing, averaging 102 yards a game. Sophomore Jeff Driskel has just four touchdown passes, but he’s completing nearly 67 percent of his passes and has just two turnovers. He also has 326 yards rushing and four scores, including a school-record 177 yards and three TDs on the ground last week at Vanderbilt. And the offen-sive line, which raised eye-brows when coaches called it the strength of the team, has held its own against some formidable fronts. Throw in Florida’s stout defense and two of the best specialists in the nation — punter Kyle Christy and place-kicker Caleb Sturgis — and it’s hard to argue when Muschamp and Pease pass on passing. “If Jeff Driskel can carry the ball 70 yards and out-run everybody, he’s getting the ball,” Pease said. “If Mike Gillislee can get the ball and outrun everybody, he’s getting the ball. And if our O-line blocks like they block, we’re giving them the ball. I’m not going to be stubborn as far as playing off numbers every week. I’m going to do what’s best for this team.”

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DEAR ABBY: My 15year-old stepson, “Justin,” doesn’t drink or do drugs. For the most part, he stays out of trouble. The prob-lem is, he has been caught for the third time having unprotected sex. My anger isn’t at Justin so much as at his parents, obviously his father. Justin has lied repeatedly about this. His father lets him get away with many things, for the most part minor. But this is different. A 15-year-old boy can’t take care of a baby, and having sex with multiple partners means exposing everyone involved to STDs. My husband is a smart man, but for some reason he seems to think this will end well. I worry about his son becoming a father too soon and missing out on his full potential. My husband and his ex have dealt with this by trying to ignore it, and for the most part I haven’t involved myself. But the more I think about it, the more I see the danger of Justin’s life being changed forever because his parents don’t want to make him unhappy for a minute. I love my husband and stepson. Allowing this to continue isn’t the right path for anyone. Am I overreacting? If not, what can I do that won’t cause a huge blowup with my husband? -ALARMED IN CHICAGO DEAR ALARMED: You’re not overreacting. Your husband is doing his son no favors by enabling his irresponsible behavior instead of asserting him-self and acting like a par-ent. Justin may think that fathering a child will make him a “real man.” But unless your husband can get through to him that REAL men take care of themselves and their part-ners, and REAL men don’t risk bringing children into the world they can’t take care of, then face it: He’s letting his son play baby roulette, and it’s only a matter of time until he’ll be a grandpa. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: My son has a wonderful girlfriend, “Michelle.” They live with my ex-husband and visit my husband, “Daryl,” and me twice a month and on special occasions. Michelle is sweet, caring, smart and funny. The problem is, she doesn’t wear a bra. Ever. Relatives have commented about it to us at family gatherings because she’s not flat-chested. We already know. It’s obvious. Daryl thinks I should buy Michelle a bra as a “subtle hint.” I don’t think that’s wise, and I don’t want to offend her. Because it doesn’t seem to matter to my son, should we continue to keep our opinions to ourselves? -SEES A NEED FOR SUPPORT IN FLORIDA DEAR SEES A NEED: Because people are talking, it would be a kindness to say some-thing to Michelle -but DELICATELY, so she doesn’t think you are criticizing her. If you have a good relationship with her, invite her to join you for lunch, then mention that some of the relatives noticed her bralessness. Then tell her that you need to go lingerie shopping and invite her along. Ask her to help you pick out a few things for yourself, and then offer to treat her to some things she likes. She just may take you up on it. DILBERT BABY BLUES HOROSCOPES DEAR ABBY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Ulterior motives must be considered before you make a move. Rethink your strategy and revise any plans you have that are not directly linked to what you want and need to accomplish. Avoid any-one who is inconsistent or impulsive. +++ TAURUS (April 20May 20): Partnerships will make a difference to how you proceed. Realize what you must do to reach your destination with the least amount of opposi-tion. Your goal must be to maximize your time and increase benefits. Love and romance are on the rise. +++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Chug along, but don’t push others to do as you do. You will be met with resistance if you are pushy. Put your time and effort into self-improvement instead of trying to change others. A lack of trust will develop if you are inconsis-tent. +++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Utilize your time wise-ly, and strive to boost your ego by doing things that make you look and feel good about who you are and what you accomplish. Socialize or spend quality time with someone special. Love will enhance your life. +++++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Listen carefully to what others want before mak-ing changes that will meet with disapproval. A finan-cial situation will develop if you have overspent or miscalculated the cost of something. Travel may beckon you, but if you can-not afford the trip, take a pass. ++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Caution at home will help protect you from a mishap. Using tools or equipment that you are unfamiliar with will pose a problem. Discuss your plans with someone you respect and you’ll gather some great ideas that will help you be successful. ++++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Your professional goals must take top prior-ity. If you aren’t serious about what you are doing, you may want to recon-sider your past dreams, hopes and wishes. Being true to you and what you want to do will lead to suc-cess. +++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23Nov. 21): Call the shots and make things happen your way. Being unique will attract followers and onlookers. Invest in some-thing you enjoy doing. Personal and professional relationships are looking good. Make a deal, a prom-ise or a vow. +++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Don’t divulge information you’ve been asked to keep secret. Your reputation will suffer if you are not diplomatic about what you know or see. Concentrate on your per-sonal life. +++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You’re on the move. Your ability to outmaneuver the competi-tion is outstanding. Speak from the heart and you will encourage others to join your cause. Check references before you put trust in someone who is questionable. Love is high-lighted. ++++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Avoid critical people. Take precautions when discussing touchy subjects. Put greater emphasis on home, fam-ily and the ones you love. Change is upon you, and acceptance will be key to staying calm and allowing the best outcome. ++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Don’t waste time try-ing to convince skeptics. Focus on the people you can influence and who will help you reach your goals. Love is in the stars and setting a romantic scene will help you improve your personal life. Make travel plans. +++++ CELEBRITY CIPHER Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com BLONDIE BEETLE BAILEY B.C. FRANK & ERNEST FOR BETTER OR WORSE ZITS HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH GARFIELD THE LAST WORD Eugenia Last Teen having unprotected sex causes concern for stepmom Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. CLASSIC PEANUTS Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2012 4B

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDWEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2012 5B Classified Department: 755-5440 CLASSIFIED AD vantageTake ADvantage of the Reporter Classifieds!755-5440Lake City Reporter FIND IT SELL IT BUY IT $17504 lines 3 days Includes 2 Signs Each additional line $1.65 Garage Sale Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$10104 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.10One item per ad Under $500 Personal Merchandise Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$16754 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.15One item per ad Under $1,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$23704 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.45One item per ad Under $2,500 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $4,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$27404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.55One item per ad Under $4,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$30404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.65One item per ad Under $6,000 Placing An Ad Service Guide Limited to service type advertis-ing only.4 lines, one month....$92.00 $10.80 each additional lineIncludes an additional $2.00 per ad for each Wednesday insertion. DeadlinesBe Sure to Call Early You can call us at 755-5440 Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.Some people prefer to place their classified ads in person, and some ad categories will require prepay-ment. Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street.You can also fax or email your ad copy to the Reporter.FAX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the Classified Department.EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreporter.comAd is to Appear:TuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday Call by:Mon., 10:00 a.m.Mon., 10:00 a.m.Wed., 10:00 a.m.Thurs., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fax/Email by:Mon., 9:00 a.m.Mon., 9:00 a.m.Wed., 9:00 a.m.Thurs., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.These deadlines are subject to change without notice. Cancellations, Changes & Billing Questions Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject, or classify all advertisements under appropriate headings. Copy should be checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day of pub-lication. Credit for published errors will be allowed for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement which was incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be published, nor for any general, special or consequential damages. Advertising language must comply with Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition of discrimi-nation in employment, housing and public accommodations. Standard abbreviations are acceptable; how-ever, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated. Ad Errors-Please read your ad on the first day of publication. Weaccept responsibility for only the first incorrect insertion, and only the charge for the ad space in error. Please call 755-5440 immediately for prompt correc-tion and billing adjustments.CancellationsNormal advertising deadlines apply for cancellation.Billing InquiriesCall 755-5440. Should further information be required regarding payments or credit limits, your call will be trans-ferred to the accounting depart-ment. General Information In Print and Onlinewww.lakecityreporter.com Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$2504 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $.25One item per ad Under $100 LegalNOTICE OFAPPLICATION FOR TAX DEEDSec. 197.241.F.S.Notice is hereby given that the Ger-man American Capital Corp of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a Tax Deed to be is-sued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and name in which it was assessed is as follows:Certificate Number: 38Year of Issuance: 2010Description of Property: SEC 25 TWN 3S RNG 15 PARCELNUM-BER 00211-001COMM NWCOR OF SEC 25 & RUN E ALONG N LINE 60 FTTO POB, CONTE 627 FT, S 1442.20 FTTO PTON N’THERELYR/WLINE OF US HWY90, NWALONG N R/WLINE OF US HWY90, 683.33 FT, THENCE N 1348.35 FTTO POB. TRSTEE DEED 1016-1498, WD 1016-1501.Name in which assessed: WILLIAM & CANDACE ALDRIDGEAll of said property being in the County of Columbia, State of Flori-da. Unless said certificate shall be re-deemed according to law, the proper-ty described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse on Monday the 29th of October at 11:00 A.M.P. DEWITTCASONCLERK OF COURTSAMERICANS WITH DISABILI-TIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accom-modation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Carrina Cooper, Court Administra-tion at 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Room 408, Lake City, Florida 32055, 386-758-2163 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appear-ance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice im-paired, call 711.05534977September 26, 2012October 3, 10, 17, 2012 NOTICE OFAPPLICATION FOR TAX DEEDSec. 197.241.F.S.Notice is hereby given that the Wells Fargo Bank of the following certifi-cate has filed said certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issu-ance, the description of the property and name in which it was assessed is as follows:Certificate Number: 2834Year of Issuance: 2010Description of Property: SEC 18 TWN 4S RNG 17 PARCELNUM-BER 08480-001COMM SE COR, RUN N 1417.87 FT, W577 FT, N 503.50 FT, W1744.17 FTFOR POB, CONTW180 FTTO E R/WSR-47, N ALONG R/W216 FT, E 155 FT, S 215 FTTO POB. (AKAUNITS 1,2,3,4 & 5 COUNTRYVILLACONDOMINIUM.) ORB 564-443, 709-291, 750-1854, 915-2081, 916-1495, 969-2691, WD 1056-1885.Name in which assessed: BELLA-MYINVESTMENTS III LLCAll of said property being in the County of Columbia, State of Flori-da. Unless said certificate shall be re-deemed according to law, the proper-ty described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse on Monday the 29th of October at 11:00 A.M.P. DEWITTCASONCLERK OF COURTSAMERICANS WITH DISABILI-TIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accom-modation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Carrina Cooper, Court Administra-tion at 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Room 408, Lake City, Florida 32055, 386-758-2163 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appear-ance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice im-paired, call 711.05534984September 26, 2012October 3, 10, 17, 2012 IN THECOUNTYCOURT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.CASE NO. 12-640-CCLENVILH. DICKS, Trustee OFLENVILH. DICKS LIVING TRUST,Plaintiff,vs.CLARAW. ROBERTS,Defendant.NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALENotice is hereby given that the fol-lowing described real property:Lot 12, Block B. Pine Hills Addition, a subdivision as recorded in Plat Book 6, pages 36-36A, Columbia County, Florida.shall be sold by the Clerk of this Court, at public sale, pursuant to the Final Judgment in the above styled action dated October 11, 2012, at the Columbia County Courthouse in Lake City, Columbia County, Flori-da, at 11:00 A.M., on Wednesday, November 7, 2012, to the best and highest bidder for cash. Any person claiming an interest in any surplus from the sale, other than the property owner as of the date of this notice of lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.WITNESS my hand and official seal in the State and County aforesaid this 11th day of October, 2012.P. DEWITTCASON,Clerk of CourtBy /s/ S. SandsDeputy Clerk05535308October 17, 24, 2012 LegalNOTICE OFAPPLICATION FOR TAX DEEDSec. 197.241.F.S.Notice is hereby given that the Ger-man American Capital Corp of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a Tax Deed to be is-sued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and name in which it was assessed is as follows:Certificate Number: 1781Year of Issuance: 2010Description of Property: SEC 11 TWN 6S RNG 16 PARCELNUM-BER 03815-159LOT59 CARDINALFARMS UN-REC; COMM ATTHE SE COR, RUN W5311.34 FTTO THE SWCOR OF SEC. THENCE N 1995.16 FT. W60.18 FT, N 1780.79 FTTO POB CONTN 500.08 FT, N 77 DEG E 33.05 FT, TO APOINTON THE WLINE OF SEC 11, CONTN 77 DEG E 854.46 FT, S 500.08 FT, S 77 DEG W854.22 FTTO APOINTON THE E LINE OF SEC 10, CONTS 77 DEG W33.29 FTTOPOB. AG 1035-1789, WD 1059-2239.Name in which assessed: ANTHO-NY& ROSALIE GONZALESAll of said property being in the County of Columbia, State of Flori-da. Unless said certificate shall be re-deemed according to law, the proper-ty described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse on Monday the 29th of October at 11:00 A.M.P. DEWITTCASONCLERK OF COURTSAMERICANS WITH DISABILI-TIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accom-modation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Carrina Cooper, Court Administra-tion at 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Room 408, Lake City, Florida 32055, 386-758-2163 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appear-ance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice im-paired, call 711.05534980September 26, 2012October 3, 10, 17, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURTFOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAPROBATE DIVISIONFile No. 11-140-CPIN RE: ESTATE OF STEPHEN CHARLES PUCKETTA/K/ASTE-PHEN PUCKETTDeceasedNOTICE TO CREDITORSThe administration of the estate of Stephen Charles Puckett a/k/a Ste-phen Puckett, deceased, whose date of death was April 7, 2011, is pend-ing in the Circuit Court for Columbia County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 173 NE Her-nando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against dece-dent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the de-cedent and other persons having claims or demands against dece-dent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITH-IN THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.The date of first publication of this notice is October 17, 2012.Personal Representative:/s/ Garnet PuckettGarnet PUCKETT10928 150th StreetMcAlpin, Florida 32062Attorney for Co-Personal Represen-tative:/s/ John. J. KendronJohn J. KendronAttorney for Garnet PuckettFlorida Bar Number: 0306850Robinson, Kennon & Kendron, P.A.PO Box 1178Lake City, FL32056-1178Telephone: (386) 755-1334Fax: (386) 755-1336E-Mail:jjk@rkkattorneys.comSecondary E-Mail: mad@rkkattor-neys.comPersonal Representative:/s/ ArainaLawryAraina Lawry1057 Beloit AveJanesville, WI 53546Attorney for Co-Personal Represen-tative:/s/ Lloyd E. PetersonLloyd E. PetersonAttorney for Araina LawryFlorida Bar Number: 798797905 SWBaya DriveLake City, FL32025Telephone: (386) 961-9959Fax: (386) 961-9956E-Mail: lloydpeterson@hotmail.com05535307October 17, 24, 2012 Public AuctionWill be held by Gainey Automotive, Inc, in Columbia County at 3468 S.W. CR 138, Fort White, Fl. 32038Date 10/30/2012Time: 8:00 A.M.2004 KiaVin # KNAFE12184505878805535329October 17, 2012 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITOF FLORIDAIN AND FOR COLUM-BIACOUNTYCIVILACTIONCASE NO. 2012-000358 CAUNITED STATES OF AMERICA, acting through the United States De-partment of Agriculture, Rural De-velopment, f/k/a Farmers Home Ad-ministration, a/k/a Rural Housing ServicePlaintiff,vs.ROSE CRUDUP, et al.,DefendantNOTICE OF ACTIONSTATE OF FLORIDACOUNTYOF COLUMBIATO: Any and all unknown minors, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, trustees, or other claimants claiming by, through, under or against the Es-tate of LOIS C. MAYS a/k/a LOIS MAYS, DeceasedYOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage regarding the following property in COLUMBIACounty, Florida:Begin at a point of the South boun-dary of St. Johns Street, 630 feet East of the NE corner of Lot or Block No. 276 in the Eastern Divi-sion of the City of Lake City, Flori-da, and run South 105 feet; thence West 60 feet; thence North 105 feet; thence East 60 feet to the POINTOF BEGINNING, same being a part of Lot or Block Number 297has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on: FREDERICK J. MURPHY, JR., Es-quire, Attorney for Plaintiff, Boswell & Dunlap LLP, 245 South Central Avenue, Post Office Drawer 30, Bar-tow, FL33831, within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice Of Action, and file the origi-nal with the Clerk of this Court ei-ther before service on Plaintiff’s at-torney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or Petition.DATED on this 1st day of October, 2012.P. DeWITTCASONClerk of Circuit CourtP.O. Box 2069Lake City, FL32056BY: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkFrederick J. Murphy, Jr., EsquireBoswell & Dunlap LLPPost Office Drawer 30Bartow, FL33831Attorneys for Plaintiff(863) 533-7117Fax (863) 533-725505535201October 10, 17, 2012 NOTICE OFSHERIFF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN THATPURSUANTTO a Writ of Execution issued out of the Circuit Court of Columbia County, Florida, on the 5th day of April 2012 case Number 11-45-CAin the matter ofNorth Central Florida Title, LLC, a Florida limited liability company as plaintiffand William L. Johnson; and Michael K. Montgomery and his wife, Connye A. Montgomery, as de-fendant (s),I Mark Hunter, As Sher-iff of Columbia County, Florida, have this day levied upon all the right, title and interest of the defend-ants Michael K. Montgomery and Connye A. Montgomery entered in this cause, on the following descri-bedReal Property T o-W it: Commence at the NWcorner of the SE 1/4 of Section 19, Township 6 South, Range 17 East, Columbia County, Florida, and run S 0001'49" W,along the West line of said SE 1/4, 30.00 feet to the South right-of-way line of Cumorah Hill Road; thence S 8957'38" E, along said South right-of-way line, 1087.56 feet to the POINTOF BEGINNING; thence continue S 8957'38" E still along said right-of-way line, 287.47 feet; thence S 0001'49" W, 631.64 feet; thence N 8959'53" W, 287.47 feet; thence N 0001'49" E, 631.83 feet to the POINTOF BEGINNING. Tax Parcel No.: 19-6S-17-09698-030 And on October 30, 2012, at 10:00 am., or as soon thereafter as circum-stances permit at173 NE Hernando Ave. Lake City, State of Florida 32055, I will offer the above descri-bed property of the defendants, Mi-chael K. Montgomery and Connye A. Montgomery for sale at public auction and sell the same, subject to ALLprior liens if any, taxes, encum-brances, and judgments if any, to the highest and best bidder for CASH IN HAND, the proceeds to be applied as far as may be to the payment of costs and satisfaction of the above descri-bed execution. Mark Hunter, As Sheriff Of Columbia County, Florida By: Sgt. Michael Sweat Deputy Sheriff In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons need-ing special accommodation to partic-ipate in this proceeding should con-tact the individual or agency sending notice no later than seven days prior to the proceedings at Columbia County Sheriff Office Civil Division located at 173 N.E. Hernando Ave-nue, Lake City, Florida 32055. Phone (386) 758-1109. 05534975September 26, 2012October 3, 10, 17, 2012 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILDIVISIONCASE NO.: 122010CA000576CAXXXCITIMORTGAGE, INC.Plaintiff,vs.S. TERRYDOUGLAS, et alDefendants.NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to a Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated October 3, 2012, and entered in Case No. 122010CA000576CAXXXX of the Circuit Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit in and for COLUMBIACOUNTY, Florida, wherein CITI-MORTGAGE, INC., is Plaintiff, and S. TERRYDOUGLAS, et al are De-fendants, the clerk will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, be-ginning at December 5, 2012 at CO-LUMBIACounty Courthouse, 173 NE Hernando Avenue, 3rd Floor, Lake City, FL32055, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, on the $saleDay day of $saleMonth, $saleYear, the following described property as set forth in said Summa-ry Final Judgment, to wit:LOTS 7, 8 AND 9, BLOCK D OF OSCEOLAESTATES, ACCORD-ING TO THE PLATTHEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 3, PAGE 67, OF THE PUBLIC RE-CORDS OF COLUMBIACOUN-TY, FLORIDAAND ASTRIPOF LAND 4.59 FEETWIDE FROM FORESTBOUNDARYNORTH 119’31” WESTTO OSCEOLASUBDIVISION SOUTHWESTCORNER AS SHOWN ON SUBDI-VISION MAPBYL.L. LEE & AS-SOC., INC., DATED JAN. 11, 1974. STRIPRUNS EASTOF OSCEOLAFORESTCORNER NORTH 8806’’10” EAST360 FEET. LAND IS SOUTH OF LOTS 7, 8 AND 9 IN OSCEOLAESTATES, BLOCK D, PLATBOOK 3, PAGE 67.and all fixtures and personal property located therein or thereon, which are included as security in Plaintiff’s mortgage.Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.Dated at Lake City, COLUMBIACOUNTY, Florida, this 3 day of Oc-tober, 2012.P. Dewitt CasonClerk of said Circuit CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioAs Deputy ClerkCITIMORTGAGE, INC.c/o Phelan Hallinan PLCAttorneys for Plaintiff2727 West Cypress Creek RoadFt. Lauderdale, FL33309954-462-7000AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-TIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who requires accommo-dations in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of cer-tain assistance. Individuals with a disability who require special accom-modations in order to participate in a court proceeding should contact the 7428, within two (2) business days of receipt of notice to appear. Indi-viduals who are hearing impaired should call (800) 955-8771. Individ-uals who are voice impaired should call (800) 955-8770.02500394October 17, 24, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURT, THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.CASE NO. 12-462-CAWESTRIDGE, INC., a Florida Cor-poration,Plaintiff,vs.ENVER SAKIRI, IF LIVING, AND IF DEAD, HIS UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, LEGATEES, GRANTEES, AS-SIGNEES, LIENORS, CRED-ITORS, OR TRUSTEESDefendantsNOTICE OF ACTIONTO: ENVER SAKIRI,LASTKNOWN ADDRESS6950 Phillips HighwayJacksonville, Florida 32216AND to all unknown Defendants listed in the caption above, whose identities and whereabouts are un-known.YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose on Mortgage on the fol-lowing described property:Lot 23, Hills of Huntsville, a subdi-vision according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 8, pages 126-129, public records of COLUMBIACounty,has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Ed-die M. Anderson, Plaintiff’s attor-ney, whose address is Post Office Box 1179, Lake City, Florida 32056-1179, no later than thirty (30) days after the first publication of this no-tice, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or im-mediately thereafter; otherwise, a de-fault will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. There may be money owed to you after a foreclosure sale. You may contact the clerk of the court at (386) 496-3711 for information on what you need to do to get the money. LegalYou do not need t o hire an attorney or other representative to get this money.DATED ON October 10, 2012.P. DEWITTCASON,Clerk of CourtBy /s/ B. ScippioAs Deputy Clerk05535309October 17, 24, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURT, THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO.: 08-785-CAFIRSTFEDERALBANK OF FLORIDA, f/k/a FIRSTFEDERALSAVINGS BANK OF FLORIDAPlaintiff,vs.TIMI THOMAS SMITH a/k/a TIMI THOMAS, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TIMI THOMAS SMITH a/k/a TIMI THOMAS IF ANY, DANIELT. SMITH, ETAL,Defendants.NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALENOTICE is hereby given that P. DEWITTCASON, Clerk of the Cir-cuit Court of Columbia County, Flor-ida, will on the 7th day of Novem-ber, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. at the Co-lumbia County Courthouse, Court-room 1, 173 N.E. Hernando Avenue, in the city of Lake City, Florida 32055 offer for sale and sell at pubic outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following described property situated in Columbia Coun-ty, Florida, to-wit:Lot 8, Block B, College Manor, Unit 1, a subdivision, according to the plat Thereof recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 55, public records of Columbia County, Florida.Pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in a case pend-ing in said Court, the style of which is as set out above, and the docket number of which is 08-785-CA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.WITNESS my hand and the official seal of said Court, this 5 day of Oc-tober, 2012./s/ P. DEWITTCASONClerk of the Circuit CourtColumbia County, Florida/s/ B. ScippioBy: Deputy ClerkFIRSTFEDERALBANK OF FLORIDAc/o: PAULV. SMITH, ESQ.P.O. Box 20294705 U.S. Highway 90 WestLake City, FL32056Email: smithp@ffsb.com05535291October 17, 24, 2012 NOTICE OFAPPLICATION FOR TAX DEEDSec. 197.241.F.S.Notice is hereby given that the Wells Fargo Bank of the following certifi-cate has filed said certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issu-ance, the description of the property and name in which it was assessed is as follows:Certificate Number: 2700Year of Issuance: 2010Description of Property: SEC 06 TWN 4S RNG 17 PARCELNUM-BER 08018-255LOT5 BLOCK B GRANDVIEWVILLAGE UNIT2. ORB 584-080, WD 1019-789, WD 1035-450.Name in which assessed: TIMOTEA& JEREMIAS PATRICIOAll of said property being in the County of Columbia, State of Flori-da. Unless said certificate shall be re-deemed according to law, the proper-ty described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse on Monday the 29th of October at 11:00 A.M.P. DEWITTCASONCLERK OF COURTSAMERICANS WITH DISABILI-TIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accom-modation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Carrina Cooper, Court Administra-tion at 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Room 408, Lake City, Florida 32055, 386-758-2163 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appear-ance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice im-paired, call 711.05534982September 26, 2012October 3, 10, 17, 2012 NOTICE OFAPPLICATION FOR TAX DEEDSec. 197.241.F.S.Notice is hereby given that the Wells Fargo Bank of the following certifi-cate has filed said certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issu-ance, the description of the property and name in which it was assessed is as follows:Certificate Number: 2687Year of Issuance: 2010Description of Property: SEC 05 TWN 4S RNG 17 PARCELNUM-BER 07840-000LOT8 BLOCK 9 LAKEWOOD S/D. ORB 908-2268, TR DEED 1152-477Name in which assessed: STEPHEN PUCKET 755-5440Toplace your classified ad call

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDWEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2012 Classified Department: 755-5440 6B COORDINATOR LAW ENFORCEMENT/CORRECTIONS TRAINING POSITION #: P99975 Coordinates, supports, schedules and provides instruction and curriculum maintenance for all basic and advanced law enforcement and correctional training programs offered by Florida Gateway College. Represents the college and law enforcement/corrections programs in various public forums. Requires: Bachelors degree in appropriate area plus three years experience with Law Enforcement or Corrections Programs. Knowledge of law enforcement programs and experience in law enforcement or corrections training. Computer literate in word processing, spreadsheets, and databases. Desirable Qualifications: Certified FDLE instructor. Three years experience in a full-time, sworn law enforcement or correctional position. Familiar with the FDLE A.T.M.S. database. Salary: $37,500 annually, plus benefits Application Deadline: 10/25/12 College employment application required. Position details and applications available on web at: www.fgc.edu Human Resources Florida Gateway College 149 S.E. College Place Lake City, FL 32025-2007 Phone (386) 754-4314 Fax (386) 754-4814 E-Mail: humanr@fgc.eduFGC is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. VP/ADA/EA/EO College in Education and Employment LegalAll of said property being in the County of Columbia, State of Flori-da. Unless said certificate shall be re-deemed according to law, the proper-ty described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse on Monday the 29th of October at 11:00 A.M.P. DEWITTCASONCLERK OF COURTSAMERICANS WITH DISABILI-TIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accom-modation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Carrina Cooper, Court Administra-tion at 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Room 408, Lake City, Florida 32055, 386-758-2163 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appear-ance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice im-paired, call 711.05534981September 26, 2012October 3, 10, 17, 2012 020Lost & Found CATFOUND of Marion St. Female, Gray, Long bushy tail, Very friendly. Contact 438-8355 FOUND Cordless Electric Drill, in Lake City. Call to identify. and pay for cost of Ad. Contact 386-397-9070 Found Set of Car/house keys on the left side of SR 47 Southbond, 2 miles past I-75 overpass. Contact 755-1922 060Services Bankruptcy/Divorce/Resumes Other Court Forms Assistance 18 years Exp./ Reasonable 386-961-5896 8 a.m.8 p.m. 100Job Opportunities05535290Northeast Florida Telephone Co is currently seeking an individual for our Engineering Department. The individual will help with day-to-day task of keeping our mapping system and records updated; projects budgeted and completed, and help to create staking sheets. Job requires outdoor work. Qualifications: A2Year Degree in ITor Engineering Technology, a working knowledge of MS Access, GIS mapping and CAD. The preferred candidate will have knowledge of how to create and use shape files in a mapping system, VBA programming and MS SQL. Excellent benefits package. Drug screening, physical and background check is required. Resume can be emailed to employment@nefcom.net The City of Lake City has openings for the following positions: Girls Club Leader P/T Recreation Collection Technician I Utilities Collection Technician I Waste Water WWTPOperator "C" Waste Water Temp WWTPOperator "C" Waste Water Obtain detailed job descriptions and applications by visiting 1st floor receptionist in City Hall 205 N Marion Avenue, Lake City, FL32055 or visit our web site at www.lcfla.com The City of Lake City is an EEO/AA/ADA/VPemployer. 2 DETAILERS Needed. Experienced only. Apply in person between 10a-4p at North Florida Auto Sales. Across from ABC liquor. No phone calls please. 100Job Opportunities05535302EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COLUMBIACOUNTY Columbia County is accepting applications for a Solid Waste Director. This is a highly skilled administrative position responsible for the environmentally safe operation of the Solid Waste and Mosquito Control Departments. Employee in this position works closely with regulatory agencies, outside contractors, and other governmental agencies to prepare plans, budgets, and compliance reports for review by the Operations Manager. Knowledge of all Federal, State and Local Laws and Regulations pertaining to the operation of a Sanitary Landfill Operation and Mosquito Control program required. Minimum training/experience: High School Education or G.E.D. required and (3) three years experience in Landfill operations at the supervisory level, or a graduate of four (4) year college or university with a degree in the basic sciences or engineering, or an equivalent combination of training and experience. Possession of a certificate as a Certified Sanitary Landfill Operator preferred or ability to obtain certification within the first twelve (12) months of employment. Must also meet the requirements for a Director I Mosquito Control Director, including High school graduate with a minimum of three (3) years of training and field experience in control of mosquitoes or three (3) years experience in managing a comparable program, or a graduate of a four (4) year college or university with a degree in the basic sciences or engineering. Possession of a Public Health Pest Control License or ability to obtain within (6) months of employment. Applicants applying for the Director I Mosquito Control Program Director must hold a valid Director’s Certification prior to appointment or obtain the Director’s Certification with six (6) months of employment. In order to obtain this certification the applicant must pass the Director’s Certification examination by scoring a 70% or better. Applicants must hold a valid Public Health Pest Control license in order to take the Director’s Certification Exam. The Director’s Certification expires when the holder’s Public health Pest Control license expires. The Director’s Exam shall be taken only once within any four (4) month period. Persons employed as Directors when they apply for a Director’s position in another Florida approved program are exempt from paragraph 5E-13.032(5) (a), F.A.C. Possession of a valid Florida driver’s license required. Columbia County residency required within six months of date of employment. Salary: $57,678 & excellent benefits package. Successful applicant must pass a preemployment physical, drug screening and criminal history check. Applications may be obtained at the Human Resources Office, Board of County Commissioners, 135 NE Hernando, Suite 203, Lake City, FL 32055-1529, (386)719-2025, TDD (386)758-2139 or at www.columbiacountyfla.com Open until filled. AA/EEO/ADA/VPEmployer. 05535311Consumer Loan Processor position available with First Federal Bank of Florida. The candidate will verify loan information and is responsible for preparing the necessary documents for closing and securing our loans. Disburse, prepare and verify documentation for funding on loans. Coordinate loan closings. Ensures the receipt of any guarantee and security agreement information. Ensures approval is obtained prior to closing. Cross sell financial institution products. 6+ months of working in an office environment. Good understanding of financial institution products and services. Full benefits package. Applications may be obtained from any First Federal Branch and submitted to Human Resources, P.O. Box 2029, Lake City, Fl 32056 or email T urbeville.j@f fsb.com Bilingual candidates encouraged to apply. Equal Employment Opportunity Employer. Established Ocala business is Looking to hire additional sales teams for our expanding product line.Earn $500.00/week, plus commission!If you’re upbeat, friendly and enjoy working with the public, then contact us for a confidential interview and start earning the income you deserve! Valid driver’s license, proof of insurance and overnight travel is required. Call us TODAYat 352-233-2818.Telecom Service Bureau, Inc. FULL-TIME CUSTODIAN Wanted. Primary duties include basic knowledge of boilers and HVAC system, cleaning sanctuary and Fellowship Hall, mowing, minor repairs, setup and taking down tables and chairs and general building maintenance.Must be able to lift 60 lbs. Criminal background check required. Please send resume and references to Staff Parish Relations, First United Methodist Church, Lake City, 973 S. Marion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025. Deadline is Oct. 19, 2012. SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 100Job OpportunitiesMANAGEMENT OPPORTUNITIES McDonald's of Alachua has multiple positions available for qualified/experienced mgrs. $8-$16 hr /benefits/bonuses Apply on line @ www.mcstate.com/alachua Or Call 386-755-2475 Small historic non-denominational church with a heart for children is seeking a pianist for Sunday services. Please contact 904-259-4194 if interested. Wanted-P/T Handi-Man, Exp. in Routine Maintenance such as plumbing, elect, painting & carpentry. Applications Available at Camp Weed & Cerveny Conference Center, 11057 Camp Weed Place, Live Oak. 120Medical Employment05535249Rehab Director/ PT Avalon Healthcare Center is currently accepting applications for the full time position of Rehab Director/PT Please apply at Avalon Healthcare and Rehabilitation Center. 1270 S.W. Main Blvd. Lake City, Florida 32025 or fax resume to 386-752-8556 EOE Occupational Therapist Needed for national based healthcare provider for employment in Lake City, Florida. Position requires Bachelor's degree in Occupational Therapy, FLOT licensure (or immediately eligible) and at least five years of experience. Send resume to: Cambridge Healthcare, LLC; c/o Brian LaHart, 3290 North Ridge Road, Suite 290, Ellicott City, MD 21043. 240Schools & Education05534919Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class12/24/2012• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-11/05/12• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies Blonde FemaleMini-Schnauzer, 18 lbs, fixed, house broken, good natured, Family friendly. $225 Contact 386-292-3927 PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 330Livestock & SuppliesDeep Creek Farms Barn kept Square or Net Wrapped Round Hay Bales For Sale Ronnie Hughes (386)365-1425 407Computers DELLComputer $100.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 430Garage Sales Fri 10/19 & Sat 10/20Potted Plants, fern, boxwood & more. Large and Small. 4219 S.E. Country Club Rd. S of 252. INDOORS VFWPost 2206, 343 Forest Lawn Way, Sat. 10/20, 8:30am-1pm, Lots to choose from and baked goods. 386-752-5001 PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. Saturday 11/20 at 180 SWJustin Gln. Including clothes, toys, wooden swing set, and piano. Call if interested in piano. 813-727-5846 440Miscellaneous 32 inch TVGreat Picture, With Remote $100.00 Contact 386-292-3927 Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, Root Raking, Bush Hog, Seeding, Sod, Disking, site prep, ponds & irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200 FisherPrice baby swing butterfly Cradle -nSwing. Original price $165 asking $75. Perfect condition. Swivels 3 way, plays tunes & lights up. Contact 386-292-3013 Stanley# 45 Combination Plane Very Good Condition With Wood Box. $250. Contact 386-438-8214 630Mobile Homes forRent2 BR MH. $400 $450. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 2BR/1BA Located onCountyRoad 133, $450 mo. plus $450 dep. 954-258-8841 630Mobile Homes forRent3BR/2BADWMH on 1 acre private lot, 1st+last+dep required located in Ellisville. No pets. Contact 352-870-5144 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. @752-5290 MLS #81960 Must be 55+ 2br/2ba Open Flrpln, Din/Liv off Kitchen, Carport, Enclosed screen porch,storage shed. Eastside Village Realty, Inc. @752-5290 MLS #81959 Must be 55+, Site Built home 1 car garage, Scrren porch, lrg laundry, lots of upgrades. Check it out. Eastside Village Realty, Inc. @752-5290 MLS #81958 Must be 55+, 3br/2ba, Florida Room & Screen Porch, 2 car garage. Large Home Eastside Village Realty, Inc. @752-5290 MLS #81280 Must be 55+, 3br/2ba, Florida Room & Screen Porch, 2 car garage, vaulted ceilings, breakfast nook for 2. Eastside Village Realty, Inc. @752-5290 MLS #80737 Must be 55+, 3br/2.5ba, 2,735 sqft Beautiful updates, pole barn, garage/workshop, 7.48 acres, LARGE CLEAN 2 & 3 bdms CH/A5 Points Area. Also 3 bdrm Westside. 1st + Deposit Required. No Pets. 961-1482 640Mobile Homes forSale1 Bdrm $370/mth or 2 Bdrm $485/mth $300 Sec. + $50 Application Fee. Call 305-984-5511 or 386-344-0830 For Apt. 4BD/2BADWMH on 4 acres Owner Financing Available. 386-623-3404 or 386-623-3396 Palm Harbor Homes 4/2 From 499 Mo Loaded3/2 From 399 Mo Loaded $0 Down, Singlewides $299/Mo 800-622-2832 ext 210 650Mobile Home & Land2 OwnerFinanced Homes/ 1 RentalLake City, Mayo, Branford 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com CLEAN NICE 2/2 SW,and 740sf. frame studio, 1 bath outbuilding, nice country ac 8 mi to VA. $39,000 Cash only 86.961.9181 Owner Fin.-Nice huge 4/2.5 on 3 ac, x-fenced, creek, lrg deck,Paved Rd. McAlpin area. Small down $950/mth 386-867-1833. For picswww.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05534938We’ve got it all!$89 Deposit Limited Avail. Call Today! Windsong Apts. *Free afterschool program386-758-8455 1BR APT. Downtown Location, Clean. New Carpet $450 mo, plus Security. NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456 1br Cottage with all utilities including cable & wireless internet. Close to the VA. (727)415-2207 2/1 1300 sqft, duplex w/ gargage. totally refurbished,W/D hook up, CH/A, $650 mth Lease Req. 386-965-2407 or 386-758-5881 2BR/1BAAPT. w/garage. West side of town. $650. mo. 386-961-9000 2BR/2BAw/garage 5 minutes from VAhospital and Timco. Call for details. 386-365-5150 COZYCOTTAGE 1 BRNew paint & carpet. 10 mins. South of LC, all util. & satellite incl. $550 mo. Pet ok, 386-758-2408 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Quant 2br/1ba Apt. Peaceful Location with Lake View CH/A$500. mo $500 dep. No pets. 386-344-2170 720Furnished Apts. ForRentRooms forRent Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent2/1 Brick house Lrg eat in kit. & closets, CH/A, 514 SE First Ave. Jasper. $550 mth 1st,last+sec. No pets. 772-285-1032 3BD/1.5BA CH/A, $725 mth & $725 dep. Contact 386-344-2170 Cozy 2bd / 1ba home. CH/A, $500 mth & $500 dep. Contact 386-344-2170 730Unfurnished Home ForRent05535236LAKE CITY 4BR/2BA 1248 SF $650 2 AVAILABLEJUSTREDUCED $45/MONTH3BR/2BA 1496 SF $695JUSTREDUCED3BR/2BA 1200 SF $725 3BR/2BA 980 SF $575 2BR/1BA M/HOME $475 BRANFORD 4BR/3BA 2108 SF $800 JUSTREDUCEDMADISON 2BR/1BA JUSTREMODELED $450 1 AVAILABLE 3BR/1.5BA REMODELED $550 Visit our website: www .NorthFloridahomeandland.com Mike Foster386-288-3596 Mitchell Lee 386-867-1155Accredited Real Estate Services 1688 SE Baya Dr., Suite 105 Lake City, FL32025 Accredited Real Estate Services is a Full Service Real Estate Office. We do: Rentals ~ Property Management ~ Property Sales. 750Business & Office RentalsCk out this Awesome DealFort White, Newly Remodled. Multi use Comm Prop. Approx 850sqft. Elec & water incl. Free WFI & yard Maint. High Traffic Area $725 mth 941-924-5183. FOR LEASE: Downtown Office Space. Convenient to Court house. Call 386-755-3456 ForRent orLease: Former Doctors office, Former professional office & Lg open space: avail on East Baya Ave. Competitive rates. Weekdays 386-984-0622 evenings/weekends 497-4762 PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 805Lots forSale PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 810Home forSale For Sale By Owner Beautiful 2005 Brick home. Well Cared For $158,800 417-396-2134 820Farms & Acreage10 acres with well/septic/pp (not guar); $300 dwn; $580 a mth. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 950Cars forSale 2006 MAZADA MIATACONV. Automatic, leather, power. $14,500 ($1,000 below KBB value). Call 386-365-2046. nr 5 a week days Lake City ReporterREPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Linewww.lakecityreporter.com

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By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com R ecipes for everything from possum stew to quail seasoning, from tips on making sauce for hot-dogs to a recipe for marriage one local cookbook contains volumes of Columbia Countys secret family recipes. Over the years, local fami lies have developed and passed down recipes from one genera tion to another, and now those recipes have been collected for a local cookbook. The cook book, Cooking With Seniors is a collection of local family reci pes complied by the Columbia County Senior Services staff at the Lifestyle Enrichment Center. Debbie Freeman, Senior Services executive director, said the women who contributed the recipes are wonderful cooks. The cookbook is a celebration of our 40th anniversary of service in Columbia County, she said. The staff and clients at the Lifestyle Enrichment Center decided to make a cookbook with family favorite recipes to celebrate the anniversary. We didnt want anybody to go off the shelf and pull a cook book out, tear a page out and say, Heres a recipe, said David Rountree, enrichment center facility manager. These are prov en family home recipes. Recipes were collected from staff members, clients, ven dors and even local legislators. Cookbook organizers also solic ited a recipe from the White House. We eventually did receive a recipe from the White House (Michelle Obama), but it did not get here in time to make the pub lishing date, Rountree said. U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, Columbia County Supervisor of Elections Liz Horne, former First Lady Rosalynn Carter and Gov. Rick Scott contributed recipes to the cookbook. There are an estimated 211 recipes in the cookbook from 60 to 70 contributors. Rountree also said that Norma Pierce and Claudette Mears were two mem bers of the cookbook team who helped make the project a suc cess. The cookbooks categories are: Appetizers and Beverages, Soups and Salads, Vegetables and Side Dishes, Main Dishes, Breads and Rolls, Desserts, Cookies and Candies and This and That. The books title was selected after a book naming contest was won by Darnel Schauer, a client who attends the facility. The cookbooks, which sell for $20 each, went on sale in late August. Only 500 were printed. The cookbooks can be purchased at the Lifestyle Enrichment Center and CC Flowers Villa. Oleatha Harris, 80, a senior ambassador, submitted a collard greens and pound cake recipe. This was a family recipe, she said. I feel real good about con tributing the recipes because now it doesnt matter about my reci pes. Earlier, I had certain recipes that I didnt share with anybody, but with being the age I am now, it doesnt matter. Bernice Brown, who is also a senior ambassador, submitted a recipe for Crazy Cake, which is made with vinegar as one of its ingredients. My daughter lives in Chicago, Ill., and when I went to visit her and her husband, she would make the cake for me, Brown said. She said, Mama, this is what they call a Crazy Cake, and she gave the recipe to me and I tried it and it is so delicious. I dont know who made it, her husband or her, but both of them can cook. Every time I go up there, they make that cake for me. I wanted to put that recipe in the cookbook because it was an exciting cake to me. Marjie Wozniak, a senior ambassador at the LEC, contrib uted nine recipes for the cook book. Wozniak, 70, said shes cooked so much that contribut ing nine recipes was not a prob lem for her since the proceeds would help local programs. I thought it was great to have nine recipes in the cookbook because we all had good recipes, she said, noting it was her first time contributing to a cookbook. I thought we would never get through it. The day we named the cookbook it was exciting because we had to vote on the name. Rountree said proceeds raised from the sale of the cookbooks will be used to fund transporta tion and home delivered meals for center clients. We deliver about 35,000 to 40,000 meals a year, he said. That exercise of transporting those meals individually to cli ents at their home address, with the price of gas, is a very expen sive process. Wednesday, October 17, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 1C Redcoats rise again in battle re-enactment, Page 4C 1CACT2 1CACT2 1CACT2 Secret recipies revealed TONY BRITT/ Lake City Reporter Members of the Columbia County Senior Services cookbook team (from left) Bernice Brown, Oleatha Harris and Marjie Wozniak, helped compile recipes for the Cooking With Seniors Cookbook, which is on sale at the Lifestyle Enrichment Center and CC Flowers Villa for $20 each. Local seniors collaborate on cookbook Social Security benefits to go up by 1.7 percent By STEPHEN OHLEMACHER Associated Press WASHINGTON More than 56 million Social Security recipients will see their monthly payments go up by 1.7 percent next year. The increase, which starts in January, is tied to a measure of inflation released Tuesday. It shows that inflation has been rel atively low over the past year, resulting in one of the smallest increases in Social Security payments since automatic adjustments were adopted in 1975. This year, Social Security recipients received a 3.6 percent increase in benefits after getting none the pre vious two years. About 8 million people who receive Supplemental Security Income will also receive the cost-of-liv ing adjustment, or COLA, meaning the announce ment will affect about 1 in 5 U.S. residents. Social Security payments for retired workers average $1,237 a month, or about $14,800 a year. A 1.7 per cent increase will amount to about $21 a month, or $252 a year, on average. Social Security also pro vides benefits to millions of disabled workers, spouses, widows, widowers and chil dren. The amount of wages subjected to Social Security taxes is going up, too. Social Security is support ed by a 12.4 percent tax on wages up to $110,100. That threshold will increase to $113,700 next year, result ing in higher taxes for near ly 10 million workers and their employers, accord ing to the Social Security Administration. Half the tax is paid by workers and the other half is paid by employers. Congress and President Barack Obama reduced the share paid by workers from 6.2 percent to 4.2 per cent for 2011 and 2012. The temporary cut, however, is due to expire at the end of the year. Some of next years COLA could be wiped out by higher Medicare premi ums, which are deducted from Social Security pay ments. The Medicare Part B premium, which covers doctor visits, is expected to rise by about $7 per month for 2013, according to gov ernment projections. The premium is cur rently $99.90 a month for most seniors. Medicare is expected to announce the premium for 2013 in the coming weeks. If seniors are getting a low COLA, much of their increase will go to pay off their Medicare Part B pre mium, said Mary Johnson, ASSOCIATED PRESS Blank Social Security checks run through printers at the U.S. Treasurys Financial Management services facility in Philadelphia. Social Security recipients shouldnt expect a big increase in monthly benefits come January. Preliminary figures show the annual benefit boost will be between 1 percent and 2 percent, which would be among the lowest since automatic adjustments were adopted in 1975. COLA continued on 2C

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2C LAKE CITY REPORTER ACT2 WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-04242CACT2 2CACT2 2CACT2 Steve Jones, CFPFinancial Advisor2929 West U S Highway 90Suite 114Lake City, FL 32055386-752-3847 a policy analyst at The Senior Citizens League. By law, the increase in benefits is based on the Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers, or CPI-W, a broad measure of consumer prices generated by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. It measures price changes for food, housing, cloth-ing, transportation, energy, medical care, recreation and education. The Social Security Administration compares the price index in the third quarter of each year — the months of July, August and September — with the same three months in the previous year. If consumer prices increase from year to year, Social Security recipients automatically get higher payments, starting the fol-lowing January. If prices drop, the payments stay the same, as they did in 2010 and 2011. Since 1975, the annual COLA has averaged 4.2 percent. Only five times has it been below 2 percent, including the two times it was zero. Before 1975, it took an act of Congress to increase Social Security payments. The COLA has played an important role in keep-ing older Americans out of poverty, said David Certner, AARP’s legislative policy director. Most older Americans rely on Social Security for a majority of their incomes, according to the Social Security Administration. Over the past decade, the COLA has helped increase incomes for seniors, even as incomes have dropped for younger workers. From 2001 to 2011, the median income for all U.S. households fell by 6.6 per-cent, when inflation was taken into account, accord-ing to census data. But the median income for house-holds headed by some-one 65 or older rose by 13 percent. COLA: 56 million people will get small increase Continued From Page 1C CDC scientists fightmeningitis outbreakBy KATE BRUMBACKAssociated PressATLANTA — Scattered across the carefully land-scaped main campus of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are the staff on the front lines fighting a rare outbreak of fungal meningitis: A scien-tist in a white lab coat peers through a microscope at fungi on a glass slide. In another room, another researcher uses what looks like a long, pointed eye dropper to suck up DNA samples that will be tested for the suspect fungus. Not far away in another building is the emergency operations center, which is essentially the war room. There’s a low hum of voices as employees work the phones, talking to health officials, doctors and patients who received potentially contaminated pain injections believed to be at the root of the out-break. Workers sit at rows of computers, gathering data, advising doctors and reaching out to thousands of people who may have been exposed. Overall, doz-ens of people are working day and night to bring the outbreak under control. More than 200 people in 14 states have been sick-ened, including 15 who have died. There is a sense of urgency — people are dying, and lives could be saved if those who are sickened get treated in time. But it’s not a race against a fast-spreading illness like avian flu or SARS — or even the fictional virus the CDC fails to unravel in the popular TV series “The Walking Dead.” Unlike those out-breaks, this strain of men-ingitis isn’t contagious and doesn’t spread between people. It is likely isolated to the contaminated ste-roid, produced by the New England Compounding Center in Framingham, Mass. “This is a very unusual infection,” said Dr. John Jernigan, a CDC medical epidemiologist who is lead-ing the clinical investiga-tion team for the outbreak response. “So, treatment recommendations, diag-nostic recommendations are all going to be new, and we’re learning as we go on this one.” Meningitis, an inflammation of the membranes sur-rounding the brain and spi-nal cord, is not uncommon. But it is usually caused by bacteria, and it is very unusual to see it in patients with normal immune sys-tems, Jernigan said. This strain is caused by a fungus that is common in dirt and grasses — people routinely come into contact with it without getting sick — but it has never before been identified as the cause of meningitis. By Friday morning, officials believed they had reached about 90 percent of those who were poten-tially affected, Jernigan said. They planned to con-tinue trying to reach every person to see if they’ve had problems and to warn them to be on the lookout for symptoms, which can include severe headache, nausea, dizziness and fever. The CDC says many of the cases have been mild, but some people had strokes. A meeting is held each morning to review over-night developments and plot a course of action for the day, and another at the end of the day summarizes the day’s developments and looks ahead to the next day. Maps on big screens in the front of the emergency operations center track the states where the tainted medications were sent and the tally of cases reported in affected states. A few steps away in the joint information center, another team works to keep the information about the outbreak on the CDC’s website up to date and dis-seminate information via the media and other out-lets. In another building on the campus tucked away in the northeast corner of Atlanta, in a part of the CDC that specializes in fungal infections, about 15 scientists in the reference and research labs are log-ging 12 hours or more a day and working through weekends to test samples coming in from around the country. Because the lab scientists had never worked with this particular fun-gus in cerebrospinal fluid before, they had to quickly develop new tests to detect it before they could start analyzing the hundreds of samples — cerebrospinal fluid samples, cultures and bits of tissue — sent in from around the country, research lab team leader Ana Litvintseva said. Dressed in a white coat Friday, Shawn Lockhart, the fungal reference lab team leader, peered through a microscope as images of what looked like red pea pods appeared on a computer screen next to him. Many other closely related fungi look similar, but a tiny dot at the end of a pod told him he was looking at the fungus believed to be at the root of the outbreak. Normally, the reference lab works on difficult samples sent in from state health departments, while the research lab works on research projects. But the scale of this outbreak means those projects are mostly being shelved at the moment. “The scale is much, much bigger than we would normally work with,” said research lab team leader Ana Litvintseva said. “We are working every week-end and people are here 12 to 13 hours at a time and we’re testing samples nonstop.” ASSOCIATED PRESSShawn Lockhart looks at the meningitis-causing fungus Ex serohilum rostratum at the mycotic lab at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. The staff and technicians have been working around the clock to confirm cases an d inform the public regarding the multi-state meningitis outbreak that has resulted in 14 dea ths. The fungal outbreak is believed to have started at New England Compounding Center where a steroid injection shipment was contaminated with the fungus.ASSOCIATED PRESSA dog named Lucy reaches for a homemade cake on a stove in Norman, Okla. Pets cause about 510 house fires every year in this country, the majority involving a stov e or oven, lamp or light fixture, a candle, embers or ashes fro m an ashtray or fireplace, or a space heater.By SUE MANNINGAssociated PressLOS ANGELES — A beloved pet dressed in a Halloween costume, posed next to a lit jack-o-lantern, sounds like a great photo opportunity — but it’s also a fire haz-ard. Pets and other animals inadvertently set about 510 house fires every year in this country. From 2006 to 2010, such fires caused an average of $8.7 million in property damage and injured eight humans a year, said John R. Hall Jr., division director for fire analysis and research for the National Fire Protection Association. Animals — including wild ones or pests like rats or insects — are capable of starting a fire any time, but the major-ity involve a heat source, like a stove, light fixture, candle, embers, or a space heater, Hall said. And over colder holidays like Thanksgiving and Christmas, there’s often more activity around those sources than usual. On Feb. 4, a Vancouver, Wash., family left a new puppy home alone for the first time — and also food on the stove. The dog turned on the igniter trying to get to it, said fire department Capt. David James. The dog died, and the family’s rental house was destroyed. “It was insured and can be rebuilt, but people and pets can’t be replaced,” James said. A dog and a stove nearly set afire Kay Wardlow’s home in Norman, Okla., three years ago. Lucy, a Labrador retriever-basset hound mix with a pen-chant for chocolate, tried to get a cake off the stove while the family was out, Wardlow said. They were alerted to smoke in the house when their home security com-pany called to say their alarm had gone off. Lucy had hit the knobs on the gas stove, moving the auto-matic igniter just enough so it kept tripping and try-ing to light, she said. “The heat melted the plastic on top of the cake pan and that’s what filled the house with smoke,” she said. Firefighters told her if the alarm company hadn’t notified them, it would have flamed over and set the house on fire. “You could smell the smoke from the street,” with the smoke so thick that she couldn’t see across a room, Wardlow said. When they opened the door, Lucy bounded out, wagging her tail and glad to see everyone. “It’s hard to look at her and be mad at her.” Pets especially need monitoring around holi-days, when owners may be cooking or baking treats more often or when potentially flammable dec-orations are out. A dog or cat wearing a homemade Halloween costume, espe-cially one with a cape, might get too close to a jack-o-lantern with an open flame. “If you dress your own dog, the fabric probably isn’t fire-retardant,” said Lisa Peterson, a spokes-woman for the American Kennel Club. “So you need to be vigilant.” Christmas trees, in particular, can topple when cats and dogs try to explore or climb them. Some decorations and overloaded electrical out-lets can be dangerous. Wardlow made preventative changes after Lucy’s near-catastrophe. The dog now stays out-side when the family isn’t home and if she has to remain indoors, Wardlow removes the stove knobs. She said she never imagined that her home security system, which she had set up for protec-tion from burglars, would instead save her house “from a fire my dog nearly started.” Pets cause many home fires each year It’s hard, taking a parent’s car keysBy ELLYN COUVILLIONThe AdvocateBATON ROUGE, La. — Whether it’s due to dementia or other age-related health conditions, elderly people at some point often find they must give up driving. It might be something they realize on their own, or others might have to take the lead on the issue, but the road to that decision is anything but clearly marked. And it’s one that many people have to take. “People don’t realize we spend about seven to eight years (in old age) without the ability to drive a car. How can we plan for that?” asked speaker Dr. David Carr at a recent public forum on dementia, presented by the Institute for Dementia Research and Prevention at Pennington Biomedical Research Center. It focused on driv-ing. While it’s often imperative for the safety of the driver and others on the road, losing the ability to drive is one of the biggest blows to an elderly person’s independence, he said. “Private cars account for over 90 percent of trips made by seniors,” said Carr, a geriatrician and a profes-sor at Washington University in St. Louis. The ability to drive gives people autonomy, identity and social con-nectedness, which correlates with psychological and physical health, he said. Other speakers on a panel of experts at the public forum included Jeff Keller, Ph.D., director of the Institute for Dementia Research and Prevention; Barbara Auten, execu-tive director of Alzheimer’s Services of the Capital Area; and Dr. Patrick Gahan, a Baton Rouge geriatrician. The risk for being in a car crash climbs steadily after the age of 65, although it’s still not as high as the risk for teenage drivers, Carr said. The number of elderly people is growing, and chronic diseases that accompany those years can cause problems driving, he said. Dementia adds another difficulty, because sufferers may not recog-nize the need to stop driving. Family members often hand the decision to physicians or others.

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Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER ACT2 WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2012 3C3CACT2 3CACT2 3CACT2 FloridaPainandRehabilitationCenter PatientSafetyAnnouncementRecentlytherehasbeenanationaloutbreakoffungalmeningitisandstrokesasthe resultof injectionswithonekindofspecificsteroid methylprednisoloneacetatepreparedbyaNew EnglandCompoundingCenter,locatedinFramingham,MA .Asaresult,theCDCandFDA haverecommendedthathealthcareprofessionalsceaseuseof any productproducedbythe NewEnglandCompoundingCenter.Themanufacturer A sequipmentforcompoundingthe medicationmayhavebeencontaminatedwithfungi.AtFloridaPainandRehabilitationCenter,wealwaysputpatientsafetyand qualityfirst.We haveNEVERusedanykindofcheap,lowquality(generic)compoundedsteroids,includingmethylprednisoloneacetatepreparedbyNewEnglandCompoundingCenter,locatedin Framingham,MA !! Wehavebeenusingabrandnamemedication,Kenalog,manufacturedbyBristolMyersSquibb,aninternationallyrenownedcompany,forthelasteightyearswithgreatsucc ess. Thishasprovidedpainreliefforthousandsandthousandsofpatients.Wehaveneverhadanykindoffungalmeningitisorstrokerelatedtoepiduralsteroidinjections.Ifyouha vebeen treatedinourfacility,youshouldbesafeandfine.However,pleasefeelfreetocontactus,ifyouhaveanyconcernaboutthesteroidi njectionor ifyouhavereceivedanysteroidinjectionrecently.Thankyouverymuch. 440SWPerimeterGlen LakeCity ,FL32025 Phone:(386)719-9663 Fax:(386)719-9662 1910SW18thCourt Ocala ,FL34471 Phone:(352)629-7011 Fax:(352)629-7924 6830NW11thPlace,SuiteA Gainesville ,FL32605 Phone:(352)331-0909 Fax:(352)331-0970 201WGuavaSt,Suite205 LadyLake ,FL32159 Phone:(352)751-6582 Fax(352)751-6585 MethylprednisoloneAcetate(Steroid)InjectionsandFungalMeningit is WEHAVENEVERUSEDTHISPRODUCT We Can Help You In Georgia, the guest is godBy MARIA DANILOVAAssociated PressBATUMI, Georgia — Georgia’s Black Sea resort of Batumi was once a bleak site: Roads were cratered with potholes, the city was pitch dark at night, running water was scarce and the city’s best hotel was infested with rats. Today Batumi glitters with neon lights and luxury high-rise hotels dot its skyline; soon the city will even boast a fountain flowing with Georgian grape vodka. The transformation of the ancient city of 180,000 near the border with Turkey is a vivid example of Georgia’s drive to capitalize on its tourism poten-tial, boosting the economy of an ex-Soviet nation where rough-ly one person in five lives in poverty. The government has attracted top foreign investors, such as U.S. real estate magnate Donald Trump, to build hotels and develop and renovate tour-ist sites. And it has aggressively marketed Georgia as a tourism hot spot. The project capitalizes not only on Georgia’s geographical riches — the Black Sea, the soar-ing Caucasus mountains and its ancient cities — but also on the very essence of the Georgian culture: hospitality itself. Here, refusing to come into one’s home and sitting down at a food-laden table can result in deep personal insult, while declining to toast with traditional Georgian wine can prompt reprimands like, “Don’t you respect me?” “Unfortunately, Georgia is not a country that has a lot of natu-ral resources, there is no oil, no gas and so what helps the country grow economically is intellect and tourism,” Batumi mayor Robert Chkhaidze told The Associated Press in an inter-view. “For us, a guest is some-thing precious. For a Georgian, each guest is like God.” Since coming to power in the peaceful 2003 Rose Revolution, the pro-Western President Mikhail Saakashvili has turned the tourism industry into a key sector of the Georgian economy, now comprising 7.1 percent of the Georgian GDP, compared to 3.4 percent in 2004. In 2001, Georgia’s Black Sea towns, the ski resorts of Gudauri and Bakuriani, the winemaking region of Kakheti and other tour-ist attractions have drawn 2.8 million or nearly 8 times more than in 2004 and tourism rev-enues have jumped from $176 million to $938 million, accord-ing to tourism officials. It remains to be seen whether Saakashvili’s rival, billionaire Bidzina Ivanishvili, who appears poised to become the next prime minister, will continue develop-ing the tourism sector or focus on something else. But the effects of the tourism campaign are plain to see in the transformation of this resort, dubbed the “Batumi Miracle.” Today, the center of Batumi could easily be mistaken for a western European seaside town with neat cobblestone streets, graced by vine grapes descend-ing onto the pavement, bustling cafes and noisy fountains. The city skyline is dotted by interna-tionally renowned hotels like the Sheraton and the Hilton; scores of others including a 47-story Trump Tower are being built. At night, Batumi is bright with lights and even the pineapple-shaped palm trees, which line the embankment, are illuminated. Batumi now boasts its own piazza, dominated by a soaring clock-tower, which is modeled after central city squares in Italian cities. Work is also under way to erect a fountain flow-ing with chacha, Georgian grape vodka, available for free, though in small amounts. There are scores of fashion boutiques and even a plastic surgery clinic. The new hotels have created several thousand jobs for the graduates of a recently opened tourism college, a heartening change in a country where the unemployment rate is 16 per-cent. Restaurants and cafes have sprung up like mushrooms, offering the traditional Georgian dish called of Khachapuri, crusty boat-shaped bread in which an egg yolk floats in melted cheese and butter. And while some skeptics say that the official tourism figures may be inflated, there is no doubt that tourism is booming, with beaches and restaurants busy with visitors. Most tourists come from other ex-Soviet nations like Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, Armenia and Azerbaijan, but English, French and other lan-guages are also heard on the streets. Oksana Dovrenova, 40, came to Batumi with her daughter Damira Rakhmanova, 15, from the Central Asian nation of Kazakhstan. It was their first time at the sea and they were pleasantly surprised to discover that sea water is indeed salty. “The people are very friendly, very welcoming, they are always happy to see you. Good job,” Dovrenova said, as she sunbathed at the pebble stone beach. Shi Tang, 29, from China who works as a sales manager at a radio station in nearby Turkey, said he will return to Batumi, which he called a “European city,” with his friends. “This is a good place: good sea, good beach and there are so many churches,” Shi said. Locals call Batumi “the city of love” and authorities have erected numerous monuments to make the point — like the figure of a man kneeling down before a woman, offering her a red heart. They’ve even opened a round-the-clock marriage reg-istry, where anyone can tie the knot day and night. “A lot of families have been created after the tourist sea-son in Batumi,” Chkhaidze, the mayor, said with a smile. But a lot remains to be done. Step a few blocks away from the city center, and you may stumble into a pothole, see crumbling buildings and underwear flap-ping in the wind on balconies. Locals complain that water short-ages still persist in residential areas and the average monthly salary in the city is just $300. “People are still struggling, but the city is getting better and better,” said Marina Soselia, a 57-year-old doctor in Batumi. Despite the difficulties, officials say, tourists are sure to get a warm welcome in Georgia. One recent afternoon, a taxi driver pulled up to entrance of the Batumi and told his passen-gers, a young couple, that the next time they come here, “I will show you such places, that you wouldn’t want to leave.” The couple smiled with gratitude, but a colleague of the driver who stood nearby admonished him, “Why didn’t you show them these places this time around? If you had, they wouldn’t be leaving now!” ASSOCIATED PRESSTourists swim and sunbathe in the Black Sea resort town of Batumi in Georgia. The transformation of Batumi, an ancient city of 180,000 near the border with Turkey, is a vivid example of Georgia’s drive to capitalize on its to urism potential in a bid to boost the economy in this strugg ling ex-Soviet nation, where nearly 1/5 of the population lives in poverty, according to conservative estimates. The government has attracted top foreign investors, such By JOHN SEEWERAssociated PressTOLEDO, Ohio — Long before smartphones turned so many of us into amateur photographers and revolu-tionized how we depict each other through social media, there were the works of French Impressionist Edouard Manet. Known for portraits of friends and celebrities of his era, the painter often called “the first modern art-ist” came of age during the mid-1800s when photogra-phy first became available to the public. He even kept his own collection of photos of the subjects he painted. Manet’s portraits and how they were influenced by photography are the focus of “Manet: Portraying Life” at the Toledo Museum of Art, the only U.S. muse-um to host the exhibition before it moves to The Royal Academy of Arts in London next winter. The show that opened this month and runs through the end of the year features 40 paintings from public and private collections, includ-ing some of his best-known works. Instead of assembling a retrospective of Manet’s works, the two museums chose portraits that would open the discussion of what impact photography had on Manet’s paintings. “We’re not suggesting an exact reliance on photog-raphy, but this was a new medium in the era that he’s painting and it was very important,” said co-curator Lawrence Nichols. It is the first time a Manet (1832-1883) exhibit has looked solely at his portraits, said Nichols, the museum’s curator of European and American painting and sculpture before 1900. The museum’s own collection includes Manet’s portrait of a childhood friend who wrote extensively about the artist. The works include straight forward portraits of men in top hats and women in flow-ing dresses. There are oth-ers that illustrate the change in around his home in Paris, revealing social unrest and the Industrial Revolution. Sprinkled throughout the exhibition are photos of his subjects — some are origi-nal and others are digitized from an album Manet kept — to give insight into how he interpreted them the people he painted. In one photo, the tie and beard of a man bears a noticeable similarity to one of his paint-ings. “He had images in his life beyond the paintings he made,” Nichols said. About half of Manet’s entire works, which rank among the greatest of the Impressionist movement, were portraits or scenes from everyday life. Some of the portraits in the show evoke the pho-tos that we see today on social networking sites like Facebook — they’re small and straightforward yet reveal something personal about each subject. And they reveal how we record and connect with each other. Before Facebook, there was Manet, painting friends

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4C LAKE CITY REPORTER ACT2 WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 17, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 4CACT2 4CACT2 4CACT2 Dr. Robert J. Harvey Dr. Rameek McNair 752-2336 Open 6 Days A Week Mon. Sat. Evening Appointments Available www.theaspendentalgroup.com 1788 S.W. Barnett WayHwy. 47 South We strive to see you today or tomorrow! Ask About CareCredit and other financing available (wac) A Special Welcoming Gift For You We Are Offering: (ADA-00110) (ADA-00330) (if needed) COUPON #008 $ 29 00 For Only The policy of our office is that the patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment, or be reimbursed for payment for any service, examination, or treatment if performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee, examination or treatment. Same Day Service Open Saturday See Now Pay Later with financing available through Lake City Lake City Commons Center (Publix Shopping) 752-3733 BUY 1 Pair Eyeglasses I ncludes lenses & frames. Some Restrictions Apply. COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES OC T O B ER 31, 2012 Where you get the Best for Less Credit approval required. See store for details. GET 1 Pair FREE E YE EXAM S by Independent Optometrist By TIM EVANS The Indianapolis Star MARION, Ind. Smoke from campfires wafts among the sycamores lining the banks of the Mississinewa River as the sounds of gun fire, drums and war-whoops echo through the woods. In a clearing, ragtag bands of settlers and more polished soldiers armed with muskets clash with American Indians. The fighting leaves the ground littered with bodies. It is a gruesome yet oddly engaging scene that takes visitors back to the Battle of Mississinewa, a pivotal turning point in the War of 1812 and in the history of the territory that soon would become Indiana. The historic battle site about seven miles north of Marion is bustling this weekend with more than 1,000 re-enactors and arti sans and an estimated 30,000 more who come to take in the sights and soak up the colors and flavors of a bygone era. The annual three-day event that continues through Sunday features Americas largest War of 1812 battle re-enactment. The Mississinewa event part battle spectacle, part living history fair is also one of the most visible and enduring reminders of just how little many Hoosiers know about a nearly forgot ten war that helped shape the state. Even the well-honed reenactment, now in its 25th year, misses the mark his torically on at least a couple of counts, as organizers readily admit. First, the actual battle was waged in December, not October. And second, no British troops were involved in the fighting despite their par ticipation in the daily battle re-enactments. Still, re-enactors and his torians agree, the obser vance is a good introduc tion to the escalating con flict between Indians and settlers two centuries ago in what then was the Old Northwest. For many, the war can be boiled down to two or three touchstones. Probably bestknown are the British burn ing of the White House; the attack on Fort McHenry, which inspired Francis Scott Key to pen the poem that would later be set to music and become The Star-Spangled Banner; and the Battle of New Orleans, which actually occurred after the war ended. David Nichols, associate professor at Indiana State University, said the War of 1812 is much harder to define than the two others wars fought on U.S. soil the American Revolution and Civil War. The War of 1812, he explained, was fought on several fronts and for dif ferent reasons. There was no clear set of principles, Nichols explained, nor obvi ous good and bad guys. There were no large-scale battles. And, probably most significantly, there was no real winner at least in terms of gaining land or power. But there was a clear loser, particularly in Indiana: the Indian tribes that gave the state its name. To the extent that the U.S. won, it did so through imperial aggres sion, Nichols told The Indianapolis Star. The war decisively broke the Native Americans in Indiana. That victory fueled a rapid expansion of settlement that set the stage for state hood in 1816, when Indiana passed the benchmark of 60,000 free inhabitants and became the 19th state. Territorial Governor William Henry Harrison believed the only way to induce settlement was to offer free land, Nichols said. To procure that land, it had to be taken from the Indians. Many Hoosiers may not know details of the bloody and sometimes morally dis turbing battles fought on Indiana soil between U.S. troops and Indians who opposed the encroachment of white settlers, yet remind ers abound. The war helped propel Harrison to national promi nence and the presidency. In fact, his classic campaign slogan Tippecanoe and Tyler, too is a refer ence to Harrisons success in the Battle of Tippecanoe, which is often considered the first conflict of the war, even though it occurred in 1811. Other military leaders who fought or lost their lives on the wars western front became namesakes for more than a half-dozen counties across the state, including Bartholomew, Daviess, Owen, Spencer, Warrick and Wells. Even some of the key Indian leaders, most notably Shawnee chief Tecumseh a savvy warrior who aligned with the British and led an effort to establish a pan-Indian confederacy to fight for an independent Native American state have been memorialized by Hoosiers. Tributes to Tecumseh include a small, unincorporated commu nity north of Terre Haute named in his honor and schools bearing his name in Tippecanoe and Warrick counties. Tecumsehs younger brother, Tenskwatawa, a spiritual leader known as The Prophet, also has been the subject of long-lasting tributes. In 1994, the state established Prophetstown State Park near Lafayette. There also is the Prophets Rock memorial, erected in 1929 at a site along Prophet Rock Road near Battle Ground, marking the spot where Tenskwatawa sat and sang to encourage the Indians during the Nov. 7, 1811, Battle of Tippecanoe. The frontier conflict with Indians had little to do with the United States entering the War of 1812. That was spurred by conflicts with Britain over issues related to maritime activity and trade. But the Indians were supported by the British, and that gave settlers and the territorial government a rationale to merge their fight into the broader con flict with Britain. Tensions had escalated between the settlers and Indians following the sign ing of the Treaty of Fort Wayne, negotiated in 1809 by Harrison. The treaty vehemently opposed by Tecumseh added nearly 3 million acres of former Indian land to U.S. holdings. Fearing an Indian upris ing, Harrison led troops in an attack on Prophetstown in November 1811, sack ing the village along the Tippecanoe River where Indians backing Tecumseh had begun to muster. The fighting is often con sidered to be the first salvo of the war on the western front. At least a half-dozen more significant battles would fol low over the next year the most fighting on Indiana soil in any conflict before or since. In the wake of Tippecanoe, and for much of 1812, the Indians held the upper hand. That changed in December 2012, when U.S. troops and militiamen launched a surprise attack on several Indian villages along the Mississinewa River. The fighting marked the first clear victory for U.S. forces in the land war. Mississinewa did a lot to turn the tide of the war, said Roger Laybourn, Loogootee, a historical interpreter and docent at Grouseland, the Harrison mansion in Vincennes. It would be the last major conflict on Indiana soil, but it would be decades before most of the remain ing Indians were removed some forcibly from the new state of Indiana. War or not, however, the removal of Indians from the territory was inevitable, said Dawn G. Marsh, a Purdue University professor who teaches Native American history. ABOVE : Smoke fills the air as a re-enactor playing the role of an American frontiers man fires a flintlock musket during the River Rogue Battle at the Mississinewa 1812 living history event near Marion, Ind. RIGHT: Reenactors dressed as British troops pass time before bat tle during the Mississinewa 1812 living history event. Festival re-enacts historic Indiana battle ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS Social Security measures proposed The Associated Press NEW YORK U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer says scammers are steal ing thousands of senior citi zens Social Security pay ments, often with just one phone call. The New York Democrat on Sunday urged the federal Social Security Administration to take safe ty measures to curb the fraud. As of August, the sena tor says, there have been more than 19,000 reports of attempted identify thefts. Thats about 50 each day. The payments are direct ly deposited into private bank accounts. Scammers divert pay ments by obtaining account information, then making a phone call to reroute the money to their own accounts. It shouldnt take just one phone call and a scrap of information for a thief to reroute Social Security payments to a fake bank account, Schumer said. Social Security is a life line to seniors, and a thief shouldnt be able to sever that line with a snap of their finger. To foil scammers, Schumer wants beneficia ries to be notified immedi ately about any attempted changes to bank account information via email, text, letters and automated phone calls.