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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01924

Material Information

Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 10-14-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01934

Related Items

Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01924

Material Information

Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 10-14-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01934

Related Items

Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

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By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comOLUSTEE — The sound of 100 rifle shots and cannon fire briefly echoed through the woods at the Olustee Battlefield Historic State Park on Saturday. The shots were not fired on the battlefield, but instead near the Olustee Battlefield Monument. The small-arms and artillery fire was a way of paying homage to Confederate troops who fought in the battle during a monument rededication ceremony at Florida’s first state park. On Oct. 23, 1912, 48 years after the Feb. 20, 1864, battle, mem-bers of the United Daughters of the Confederacy unveiled a mon-ument in honor of Confederate troops who fought in the Battle of Olustee, and Saturday, nearly 500 people returned to the site to rededicate the monument. A rededication stone was unveiled and it will be set at the monu-ment’s base at a later date. The ceremony, held at the base of the 40-foot granite tower, lasted close to two hours and served as an event where Southern heritage, courage and integrity were honored — in many cases by direct descen-dants of the battle’s participants. Units that fought in the battle also were recognized during the ceremony. Dr. Sean McMahon, a Florida Gateway College history profes-sor who served as the event’s master of ceremonies, said the event went well. “There was a lot of passion and hard work that went behind event as well as planning and organization of it and ultimate-ly everything went smoothly,” McMahon said. “I think it was CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Opinion ................ 4ABusiness ................ 5AObituaries .............. 6A Advice & Comics ......... 8B Puzzles ................. 2B TODAY IN PEOPLE The Boss to stump for Obama. COMING TUESDAY City council coverage. 91 64 T-Storm Chance WEATHER, 2A Opinion ................ 4ABusiness ................ 1CLife .................... 1DAdvice.................. 5DPuzzles ................. 5B 87 63 Partly cloudy WEATHER, 8A Lake City ReporterSUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012 | YOUR COMMUNITY N EWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | $1.00 LAKECITYREPORTER.COM New water districtunit will monitor area rivers, lakes. With fall comes flu season. SUNDAYEDITION Vol. 138, No. 184 1D 1C 1A JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterSkyler Colley, a seventh-grader at Richardson Middle S chool, receives a kiss on the cheek by Avalon resident Phyllis Read after giving her gifts. Skyler dona ted his birthday presents to residents at Avalon Healthcare and Rehabilitation Center on Friday. By LAURA HAMPSONlhampson@lakecityreporter.comF or his 13th birthday, Skyler Colley asked for socks, toys, slip-pers and a fuzzy robe. But they weren’t for himself. Skyler, a seventh-grader at Richardson Middle School, donated his birthday presents to residents at Avalon Healthcare and Rehabilitation Center Friday afternoon. He and his parents also took a box of toys to young patients at Shands Lake Shore Regional Medical Center. When Skyler invited friends to a party on Sept. 22, he asked them to bring gifts for the young and old patients, instead of presents for a new teenager. “I thought, I already have enough stuff,” he said. The children at the hospital are suffering and some people in Editor’s note: In addition to federal, state and local candidates, Florida voters will decide the fate of 11 proposed amendments to the state constitution on Nov. 6. What follows is a fairly detailed rundown of the first six of these amendments, includ-ing arguments by supporters and opponents of each. Ballot summaries are from the Florida Division of Elections. In the case of particularly vague or complex amendments and/or ballot summaries, explanatory notes have been offered as well. See next Sunday’s paper for a look at amendments 8-12. (No.7 has been struck from the ballot.)AMENDMENT 1 HEALTH CARE SERVICESBallot summary:Proposing an amendment to the State Constitution to prohibit laws or rules from compelling any person or employer to purchase, obtain, or otherwise provide for health care coverage; permit a per-son or an employer to purchase lawful health care services direct-ly from a health care provider; permit a health care provider to BALLOT continued on 3A Ballot rundown: The first 6 CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS A monumental day City todecidefate ofcenter BIRTHDAY continued on 7A 13-year-old Skyler Colley takes presents to health care facility.TONY BRITT/ Lake City ReporterSons of Confederate Veterans troops fire their rifles in a 100-round salute during the 100th anniversary rededica tion ceremony for the Confederate Monument at the Olustee Battlefield Historic State Park on Sa turday. Olustee battlefield marker turns 100 Crowd of nearly500 turns out forceremony. OLUSTEE continued on 7A His birthday wish? Bring joy to others By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comCity officials are scheduled to discuss and possibly vote on the fate of the Southside Community Center during Monday night’s council meet-ing, where it has been rec-ommended by Wendell Johnson, city manager, that the center be declared sur-plus, closed to children and the building be used to house the city’s water, sewer and gas depart-ments. Officials are also slated to discuss alternatives to closing the facility. The meeting will take place 7 p.m. Monday in City Council Chambers at City Hall, 205 N. Marion Ave. The issue of potentially closing the Southside Community Center was initially discussed during the July 2012 budget workshop and Southside facility has effectively become adaycare, says Johnson. Johnson SOUTHSIDE continued on 6A

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TALLAHASSEE F loridas workers compensation insurance rates have climbed from 40th to 29th most expensive in the nation over the last two years. That 11-point increase was reported in a study released this week by the Oregon Department of Consumer & Business Services. It issues a com parison of rates in the 50 states on Jan. 1 of each even-numbered year. The Florida Office of Insurance Regulation noted in a news release Friday that the Sunshine States rate of $1.82 per $100 of payroll is still below the national median of $1.88. Businesses and other employers buy workers compensation insurance to cover on-the-job injuries. Florida Insurance Commissioner Kevin McCarty said the study shows that the state needs to be proactive in consider ing legislation to keep its rates nationally competi tive. Man found guilty in fatal shooting JACKSONVILLE A Jacksonville man will spend the rest of his life in prison for killing a bystander while trying to shoot the car of a rival drug dealer. A Duval County jury found 24-year-old Taurice Brown guilty Thursday of first-degree murder, which carries an automatic life sentence. Authorities said Brown was trying to shoot Anthony Duane Wiggins, but he missed and hit Analiza Gobaton, a 41-yearold mother of three. According to the Florida Times-Union, Browns attorney argued that Wiggins fired at Brown first, and Brown was defending himself. Stone crab season to open MARATHON Floridas commercial fish ermen are hoping winter visitors will flock to the Sunshine State for stone crab season. Gary Graves is vice president of Keys Fisheries, the largest pro cessor of the crabs tasty claws in the Florida Keys. He said a strong winter tourism season for the state normally translates into higher fiscal yields for the commercial fishing industry. Graves said some 75 percent of all claws har vested by Floridas com mercial fishermen remain in Florida and are mostly consumed by visitors. He adds that consumers should expect slightly higher season-opening prices, due to fuel cost increases for fishermen. He expects retail seafood market prices to be around $10 per pound for medium claws, $16 for large and $21 for jumbos. The stone crab season runs Monday through May 15. Body may be of missing student CEDAR KEY The father of a missing University of Florida stu dent is helping investiga tors determine whether a body found in rural Levy County is that of his son. Gainesville Police say they are assisting the Levy County Sheriffs Office after a body was found Friday in Cedar Key, but no further information has been released. The Miami Herald repored that Carlos Aguilar travelled from Miami to meet with investi gators after being told the body matched the descrip tion of his son, 18-year-old Christian Aguilar. He was last seen in Gainesville with his friend, 18-yearold Pedro Bravo, who has been charged with firstdegree murder. Police said Bravo told them he beat Aguilar unconscious and left him in a parking lot. Aguilars family posted on Facebook that forensics wont confirm any informa tion until Tuesday. 10th meningitis case confirmed TALLAHASSEE Florida now has ten confirmed cases of fungal meningitis. The Florida Department of Health confirmed Saturday that Escambia County has its case of fun gal meningitis associated with contaminated steroid injections from the New England Compounding Center. A-47-year old man who received treatment from Pain Consultants of West Florida in Pensacola was injected with one of the tainted shots. Six facilities in Florida have received and used the contaminated injec tions. Florida Surgeon General and Secretary of Health Dr. John Armstrong said they do not anticipate more patients will be affected as the investigation con tinues. Federal health officials said the number of cases nationwide have sickened at least 184 people, includ ing 14 deaths across 12 states. Red tide lingering off Lee County CAPTIVA Red tide has been found lingering off Captiva and Lee County beaches. The Fort Myers News-Press reported a Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation map found red tide in water quality samples, with a dense con centration about six miles off Captiva. According to scientists, the bloom started about a month ago off Sarasota and has been slowly mov ing south. The algae bloom is deadly for fish, marine mammals, sea turtles and other sea life. The toxins also can become airborne and cause breathing problems for people with asthma or other types of respiratory diseases. Police to reopen 4-year-old case BRADENTON Bradenton Beach police have agreed to reopen the 4-year-old investigation into the death of Sheena Morris, which was ruled a suicide in 2009. Police chief Sam Speciale told the Sarasota Herald-Tribune Friday that the department will fol low recommendations of a panel of police experts that was convened by the Florida Department of Law Enforcement. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Former Surgeon General C. Everett Koop is 96. Actor Roger Moore is 85. Former White House coun sel John W. Dean III is 74. Fashion designer Ralph Lauren is 73. Singer Sir Cliff Richard is 72. Singer-musician Justin Hayward (The Moody Blues) is 66. Actor Harry Anderson is 60. TV personality Arleen Sorkin is 57. MLB manager Joe Girardi is 48. Country singer Natalie Maines (The Dixie Chicks) is 38. Singer Usher is 34. Daily Scripture For I know the plans I have for you, declares the Lord, plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future. Jeremiah 29:11 CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading. AROUND FLORIDA Friday: 22-23-26-28 3 Friday: 11-22-28-30-35 Saturday: Afternoon: 8-7-9 Evening: N/A Saturday: Afternoon: 4-4-8-6 Evening: N/A Tues day: 11-19-29-31-37-50 x4 Fla. worker comp rates climb in cost WASHINGTON B ruce Springsteen will be back campaigning for President Barack Obama. The musician will join former President Bill Clinton at a Thursday rally in Parma, Ohio, two days after the second presidential debate. Obama will not attend the rally. Springsteen also will appear at a campaign event Thursday in Ames, Iowa. Springsteen campaigned for Obama in 2008, but these will be his first political appearances of the 2012 cycle. Clinton is a prominent cam paigner for Obama. Clinton and Springsteens joint appearance in Ohio underscores the importance of the key swing state. Polls show Obama with a slight lead there over Mitt Romney, but the Republican presidential candidate is spending an increasing amount of time and resources in the state ahead of Election Day. Flock of stars honors Whitney Houston LOS ANGELES Jennifer Hudson embodied the look of one of her idols, Whitney Houston, during a tribute to the late singer put on by Grammy organizers. Rocking a pompadour and glit tery jacket reminiscent of Houstons stage costumes from the 1980s, Hudson belted out a medley of Houstons hits Thursday at the Nokia Theatre for We Will Always Love You: A Grammy Salute to Whitney Houston, which will air as a TV special next month. She has been a huge part of my life musically, Hudson said. Shes just been like this outline, this blue print for myself. Britney Spears, LL Cool J, Halle Berry, Taraji P. Henson, Usher, CeCe Winans and Yolanda Adams also par ticipated in the musical tribute. Spears said shes always been a huge fan of Houstons. I think shes amazing, Spears said. And I think that her voice is better than God. I just, I love her. Houston died at 48 the night before the Grammy Awards in February from accidental drowning complicated by drug use and heart disease. Elvis Beverly Hills estate up for sale MEMPHIS, Tenn. The former Beverly Hills home of the late Elvis Presley and his wife Priscilla is now on the market for sale for a cool $12.9 million. Real estate website operator Trulia said the home hit the market Wednesday. Like Elvis home in Memphis, known as Graceland, Elvis fans have for years flocked to visit the prop erty. According to the listing, the four bedroom, five bathroom French Regency estate sits on a 1.18-acre promontory overlooking Los Angeles. According to Elvis Presley Enterprises, Presley first rented the house before the couple bought it in 1967. It was sold in 1973, the same year Elvis and Priscilla divorced. The estate formerly was available to lease for $25,000 per month. No neglect charges against Octomom SANTA ANA, Calif. Prosecutors wont file charges against Nadya Suleman after a caregiver last month reported allegations of child neglect at the Octomoms home. Orange County District Attorney Chief of Staff Susan Kang Schroeder says theres not enough evidence to move forward with the case. The Boss to campaign for Obama Tues day: 18-26-29-35-43 28 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter 2A ASSOCIATED PRESS Commercial fishermen at Keys Fisheries in Marathon load stone crab traps aboard their boat friday to deploy them at points off the Florida Keys. The 2012-13 stone crab claw harvest season opens Monday. Waters off the Keys and lower southwest Florida produce more than half of all claws harvested in the state. Associated Press ASSOCIATED PRESS Rocker Bruce Springsteen is hitting the campaign trail again on President Barack Obamas behalf. He will be joined this time by former President Bill Clinton at a Associated Press

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accept direct payment from a person or an employer for lawful health care ser vices; exempt persons, employers, and health care providers from penal ties and taxes for paying directly or accepting direct payment for lawful health care services; and prohibit laws or rules from abol ishing the private market for health care coverage of any lawful health care service. Specifies that the amendment does not affect which health care services a health care provider is required to perform or pro vide; affect which health care services are permit ted by law; prohibit care provided pursuant to gen eral law relating to work ers compensation; affect laws or rules in effect as of March 1, 2010; affect the terms or conditions of any health care system to the extent that those terms and conditions do not have the effect of punishing a person or an employer for paying directly for lawful health care services or a health care provider for accept ing direct payment from a person or an employer for lawful health care services; or affect any general law passed by two-thirds vote of the membership of each house of the Legislature, passed after the effective date of the amendment, provided such law states with specificity the pub lic necessity justifying the exceptions from the provi sions of the amendment. The amendment expressly provides that it may not be construed to prohibit nego tiated provisions in insur ance contracts, network agreements, or other pro vider agreements contrac tually limiting copayments, coinsurance, deductibles, or other patient charges. PRO: With the passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), otherwise known as Obamacare, the federal government overstepped its bounds, say proponents of this measure. Passing this amendment would, in theory, prevent imple mentation of the ACAs individual mandate, which requires that individuals be forced to purchase health insurance. As opponents of this amendment note, this measure was placed on the ballot before the U.S. Supreme Court ruled the ACA constitutional, making it moot under the Supremacy Clause of the U.S. Constitution. However, some support ers believe support of this amendment will send a message to washington that Florida viters are unhappy with ACA. Also, should the ACA be repealed or modi fied by Congress, passage of Amendment 1 would stop state lawmakers from enacting a similar program in Florida. CON: With the Supreme Court ruling upholding the ACA, this amendment is legally meaningless, as federal law trumps state law in cases such as these. This proposed amendment therefore amount to little more than political games manship. AMENDMENT 2 VETERANS DISABLED DUE TO COMBAT INJURY; HOMESTEAD PROPERTY TAX DISCOUNT Ballot summary: Proposing an amend ment to Section 6 of Article VII and the creation of Section 32 of Article XII of the State Constitution to expand the availability of the property discount on the homesteads of veter ans who became disabled as the result of a combat injury to include those who were not Florida residents when they entered the military and schedule the amendment to take effect January 1, 2013. PRO: Amendment 2 rectifies an inequity in a 2006 amendment to the state constitution that gave property tax breaks to veterans disabled in combat who are now 65 or older and who lived in Florida when they entered the military. The unfair ness of this is evident. If one wounded veteran who owns a Florida home deserves tax help, they all do, the Tampa Tribune noted in opposing the orig inal amendment. Under Amendment 2, all disabled veterans who call Florida home will now be on the same footing. CON: In advocating pas sage of Amendment 2, the Tribune also noted some of the arguments against the measure: If this amend ment passes, more ques tions will follow. What about the surviving spouse of a combat-injured vet eran? What about injuries that happened just outside of combat? What about dis abled heroes who own a vacation home? Voters tired of the increasing complexity of tax laws and the steady expansion of the constitu tion can justify voting no, even though they honor the sacrifice of wounded veterans. AMENDMENT 3 STATE GOVERNMENT REVENUE LIMITATION Ballot summary: This proposed amendment to the State Constitution replaces the existing state revenue limitation based on Florida personal income growth with a new state revenue limitation based on inflation and population changes. Under the amend ment, state revenues, as defined in the amendment, collected in excess of the revenue limitation must be deposited into the budget stabilization fund until the fund reaches its maximum balance, and thereafter shall be used for the sup port and maintenance of public schools by reduc ing the minimum finan cial effort required from school districts for par ticipation in a state-funded education finance program, or, if the minimum finan cial effort is no longer required, returned to the taxpayers. The Legislature may increase the state rev enue limitation through a bill approved by a super majority vote of each house of the Legislature. The Legislature may also submit a proposed increase in the state revenue limi tation to the voters. The Legislature must imple ment this proposed amend ment by general law. The amendment will take effect upon approval by the elec tors and will first apply to the 2014-2015 state fiscal year. PRO: Government spending has been grow ing too fast for many years, often outstripping the rate of growth in the economys private sector, whose taxes support the government, wrote the James Madison Institute in endorsing this amendment. Proponents of limiting the rate of growth in the cost of state government thought they had found a useful limit years ago: a cap on state spending linked to the rate of growth in Floridians personal income. However, this limitation, which vot ers enacted in 1994, has turned out to be ineffec tive in limiting the rapid growth in state spend ing, which the amend ments supporters note has continued regardless of which political party controlledthe governor ship and the Legislature. Therefore, Amendment 3 proposes a different for mula in which the rate of growth in the state govern ments spending would be capped based on the rate of infl ation and population growth. Proponents argue that this would provide sufficient funding for thes tate government to keep pace with growth and with any increases in the cost of goods and services. CON: The Naples News opined that limiting the money that state govern ment can spend sounds attractive. We all have to live with such limits, right? We ought to make Tallahassee join the club, right? Actually, state government already has revenue limits and is required to have a balanced budget. We cannot see an exist ing problem that rises to the level of a constitutional amendment. We prefer flexibility that allows for worst-case scenarios, such as hurricane repairs, and holding elected officials accountable. AMENDMENT 4 PROPERTY TAX LIMITATIONS; PROPERTY VALUE DECLINE; REDUCTION FOR NONHOMESTEAD ASSESSMENT INCREASES; DELAY OF SCHEDULED REPEAL Ballot summary: (1) This would amend Florida Constitution Article VII, Section 4 (Taxation; assessments) and Section 6 (Homestead exemp tions). It also would amend Article XII, Section 27, and add Sections 32 and 33, relating to the Schedule for the amendments. (2) In certain circumstances, the law requires the assessed value of homestead and specified nonhomestead property to increase when the just value of the prop erty decreases. Therefore, this amendment provides that the Legislature may, by general law, provide that the assessment of homestead and specified nonhomestead property may not increase if the just value of that property is less than the just value of the property on the pre ceding January 1, subject to any adjustment in the assessed value due to changes, additions, reduc tions, or improvements to such property which are assessed as provided for by general law. This amend ment takes effect upon approval by the voters. If approved at a special elec tion held on the date of the 2012 presidential prefer ence primary, it shall oper ate retroactively to January 1, 2012, or, if approved at the 2012 general election, shall take effect January 1, 2013. (3) This amendment reduces from 10 percent to 5 percent the limitation on annual changes in assess ments of nonhomestead real property. This amend ment takes effect upon approval of the voters. If approved at a special elec tion held on the date of the 2012 presidential prefer ence primary, it shall oper ate retroactively to January 1, 2012, or, if approved at the 2012 general election, takes effect January 1, 2013. (4) This amendment also authorizes general law to provide, subject to condi tions specified in such law, an additional homestead exemption to every person who establishes the right to receive the homestead exemption provided in the Florida Constitution within 1 year after purchasing the homestead property and who has not owned prop erty in the previous 3 cal endar years to which the Florida homestead exemp tion applied. The additional homestead exemption shall apply to all levies except school district levies. The additional exemption is an amount equal to 50 percent of the homestead proper tys just value on January 1 of the year the homestead is established. The addi tional homestead exemp tion may not exceed an amount equal to the median just value of all homestead property within the county where the property at issue is located for the calendar year immediately preced ing January 1 of the year the homestead is established. The additional exemption shall apply for the shorter of 5 years or the year of sale of the property. The amount of the additional exemption shall be reduced in each subsequent year by an amount equal to 20 percent of the amount of the additional exemption received in the year the homestead was established or by an amount equal to the difference between the just value of the property and the assessed value of the property determined under Article VII, Section 4(d), whichever is greater. Not more than one such Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER AMENDMENTS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012 3A 3A SPECIALIZING IN: Non-Invasive Laparoscopic Gynecological Surgery Adolescent Gynecology High and Low Risk Obstetrics Contraception Delivering at Shands Lake Shore In-Ofce ultrasounds for our patients 3D/4D Entertainment Scans offering DaVinci Robotic Surgeries. New Patients Welcome Call today for a personal appointment: 386-755-0500 449 SE Baya Drive Lake City, Floraida 32025 www.dainagreenemd.com WE ARE WOMEN, WE ARE M OTHERS, WE UNDERST A ND Outstanding Leader of Inpatient Therapy Our therapy program is designed to rehabilitate individuals back to their highest level of independence and functioning. Our therapists and nurses work closely with the physician and resident in order to create a plan of treatment that will combine comprehensive care with the patients personal goals. Take a step towards your independence. Individualized Physical Occupational & Joint Replacement (Knee, Hip. etc) Stroke Cardiac Disease Fractures (Hip, Shoulder, Pelvic, etc) Arthritis Neck/Back Pain Balance Disturbances Dif culties Walking Generalized Weakness Impaired Abilities to Perform Activities (Bathing, Ambulating, Dressing, Eating and Transferring) Wound Care OUR SPECIALTIES INCLUDE: 560 SW McFarlane Ave. Lake City, FL 32025 386-758-4777 Call to pre-register or for a tour. Charter Loans Services Pay outstanding bills, credit cards. Lowest compared rates. Personal loans. Business, debt loans. Auto Home Improvement Loans Bad Credit options. No apps. fees Call today: 1.877.359.5533 Charteracc@usa.com BALLOT: Florida voters will have 11 constitutional amendments before them Continued From Page 1A VOTERS continued on 6A

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S ome 30 years ago Lake City had a very popular eatery named Sambo’s Restaurant. It was located in front of the Cinema 90, about where the TD (Toronto Dominion) Bank is now located. Sambo’s was a breakfastanytime restaurant and always had a lot of customers. It was a clean, well-run restaurant and served consistently delicious food. Then one day it abruptly closed. Why? One reason you heard was it was a victim of its own name, Sambo’s. Some perceived the name to be con-nected with a childhood story called “Little Black Sambo”, a name some connected to southern racism. The name Sambo’s was actually taken from portions of the names of the California co-founders, Sam (Sam Battistone) and Bo (Newell BOhnett--capitals mine). Nonetheless, the racist per-ceptions became set in place. The original children’s story was titled “The Story of Little Black Sambo,” by Helen Bannerman, a Scottish woman living in India and it was published in 1899. It had nothing to do with racism. The storyline involved a young dark skinned boy in India who loved to wear colorful clothing. One day he encountered four tigers that were envious of his colorful clothes so they took them away from him. Then the vain tigers became envious of each other, each tiger wanting all the colorful clothing for himself. So, they started chasing each other around a tree, each one trying to take the next one’s colorful clothing. They went round and round so fast and so long that all four turned into butter. Sambo took this special butter home and his mother made pancakes and syrup, using the special butter. Everyone agreed they were the most delicious pancakes they had ever eaten, thanks to that spe-cial butter. Over time the story circulated far beyond India and eventually came to the United States and was a favorite among southern children. To be fair, some racism did creep into the reference and an occasional white person would refer condescendingly to a black male as “a Sambo.” For whatever the reason, over 1,000 Sambo’s Restaurants eventually closed nationwide and now the only one left is the original one in Santa Barbara, Calif.What sex?A little boy and a little girl were playing in the forest when they came upon a nudist colony with a huge stockade fence around it. The curious little boy found a hole in the fence and took a peek. The little girl said, “What do you see?” The boy said, “People.” The girl said, “Are they boys or girls?” The boy said, “I can’t tell. They aren’t wearing any clothes!” Sambo’s long gone for wrongreason OUR OPINION HIGHLIGHTS IN HISTORY In 1066, Normans under William the Conqueror defeated the English at the Battle of Hastings. In 1586, Mary, Queen of Scots, went on trial in England, accused of committing trea-son against Queen Elizabeth I. (Mary was beheaded in February 1587.) In 1890, Dwight D. Eisenhower, 34th president of the United States, was born in Denison, Texas. In 1908, the E.M. Forster novel “A Room With a View” was first published by Edward Arnold of London. In 1939, a German U-boat torpedoed and sank the HMS Royal Oak, a British battle-ship anchored at Scapa Flow in Scotland’s Orkney Islands; 833 of the more than 1,200 men aboard were killed. In 1944, German Field Marshal Erwin Rommel com-mitted suicide rather than face execution for allegedly conspir-ing against Adolf Hitler. In 1947, Air Force test pilot Charles E. (“Chuck”) Yeager broke the sound barrier. W hat a wonderful blessing to be an American; however, with the blessing comes the responsibilities and expectations of our Lord, Jesus Christ. This column is offered as a reality check concerning the present politics in America. Our federal government has become unbelievably cor-rupt. When the White House and Congress congregate, it is like the world’s largest liars convention. Do you recognize this? Is it upsetting you? Well, it should upset you very much. Our government is lying to us at every turn, and counting on us to believe it. Sadly, far too many people do. Our elected officials are using their positions to spread lies and deception to the people they are supposed to be repre-senting. People voted for these individuals because we thought we could trust them. Instead, elected officials are using their positions to spread lies and deception. Sen. Harry Reid [D-Ariz.] repeatedly talks about [Republican presidential can-didate Mitt] Romney’s wealth. I thin him being wealthy is a good thing; maybe he can do something about the irrespon-sible quagmire that Washington has drowned us in. Mr. Reid never bothers to tell people that he is one of the wealthiest individuals in Congress. Most of his wealth has been accumu-lated after becoming a member of Congress. I wonder how he did that. Certain members of Congress keep hammering the ideology that this election is primarily a racial issue. This is directed to the uninformed that has absolutely no idea what is going on in this country. This election is about the freedom and prosperity of the American people. Politicians shouls be talking about the issues. What have the incumbents done to help America move forward? What specifically they are planning to do to help restore America to the wealth and power it has demanded and held in the past? Unfortunately, the Democrats cannot run on their present record of the past four years. For example, Sen. Reid has not one time presented a federal budget for action by the Senate during this time. We should not tolerate incompetent, failed lead-ership from our goernment. Instead of President [Baracl] Obama smiling into the TV cameras and peddling his package about prosperity in America when reality tells us differently, we want to know what he plans to do for the 23 million Americans that can-not find full-time employment, and gas prices that are soaring daily. The entire Middle East despises America, and out allies are questioning — and rightly so — if they an trust us. How about skipping the smiles, Mr. Obama, and tell us exactly how you plan to deal with the rapidly growing list of problems that face America? Many of the prob-lems we are facing are due to your leadership. Our president and members of Congress, in most cases, only care about power and how much of the taxpayers money they can pocket, and wo will pay the highest price for their vote. Why are many members of Congress and people in the White House permitted to get away with not paying their taxes, yet these same individu-als have the audacity to raise our taxes? It is terrifying that we cannot expect any justice from Washington. The news media, in most cases, is nothing more than fiction directed at selling their viewpoint, and has as a prime directive to confuse and control the thinking of each of us. Both our government and the news media are counting on voters to be as stupid and/or misinformed about the truth as they are hop-ing for. Don’t be angry with me. Be angry with the people that [are] undermining you. Our free-doms and our rights are being assaulted almost daily. The election in November is, perhaps, the most important election of this century. Each and every one of us owes it to our children, our grandchildren and ourselves to go to th epolls and case a well-informed vote. Follow the voting of the current incumbents. Are they support-ing legislation that is directed at the destruction of our constitu-tional and religious freedoms? In numerous cases the answer is absolutely yes. To vote is our only recourse in determining our nation’s future. The Congressional Budget Office already has determined that health care beginning in 2013 will be increased by 19 percent as a result of the costly “Obamacare” that [Sen. Bill] Nelson [D-Fla.] supported. Areyou considering what this is going to do to your wallet? While Sen. Bill Nelson sup-ported the current administra-tion in transferring over $700 bilion away from Medicare, he has the audacity to tell the people of Florida that he and the present administration support Medicare. More of the same old politican lies. I am very disgusted and disappointed with President Obama’s treatment of our military. They are treated with no respect and shown no real concern for their safety. He is using every-thing, including the Pentagon, to prevent our troops overseas from being permitted to vote. Anyone that has served in the military or currently has a loved one serving overseas should be mad as all heck. We expect men and women to put their lives in danger, but fight to keep them from participating in the politi-cal process. Shame on you, Mr. President. Am I mad? You better believe I am. I’m mad, disappointed and disgusted with politicians that are dumping 230 years of freedom, prosperity and dreams down the toilet. Everyone, please exercise your right to vote in this elec-tion. Consider long and hard the direction our country is moving. Freedom is priceless. Fight to save it. Voters need to change direction of Washington Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding counties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, publisher Robert Bridges, editor Sue Brannon, controller Dink NeSmith, president Tom Wood, chairman LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY E-MAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com EDWARD HUNTER Q Edward Hunter was director of student activities at Florida Gateway College from 1969 to 1999. If you haven’t yet read today’s Page 1A story on Skyler Colley, please take a few moments to do so before proceeding. Skyler, as reporter Laura Hampson informs us, is a 13-year-old seventh-grader at Richardson Middle School. And instead of a new smart phone, he asked for socks, slippers, toys and a fuzzy robe for his birthday last month. Odd choices all.But it was no joke.After convincing his friends he was serious, they obliged him, bringing all sorts of seemingly age-inap-propriate gifts to his Sept. 22 party. That’s just what he wanted: gifts for the very young and the not-so-young. Skyler, who helped care for his grandparents before they passed, wanted to bring some joy to the lives of resi-dents of Avalon Healthcare and Rehabilitation Center. And while he was at it, he would brighten the day of youngsters hospitalized at Shands Lake Shore Regional Medical Center. So he did just that, taking those presents to the folks at Avalon – folks who don’t always get a lot of visitors or a lot of presents – and to young patients at Shands Lake Shore Regional Medical Center. What prompted such kindness? It was the right thing to do, he said. And as our story noted, it’s not as if he already had every gadget and toy in the world and just got bored with them. Thanks, Skyler, not just for the joy you brought to the residents of Avalon and the youngsters at Shands Lake Shore, but for the smiles you brought to all our faces. You didn’t restore our faith in the next generation – we never lost it – but you made our day almost as much as you did all those youngsters and seniors. What anexample OPINION Sunday, October 14, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A4AEDIT Morris WilliamsPhone: (386) 755-8183williams_h2@firn.edu372 W. Duval St.Lake City, FL 32055 Q Morris Williams is a local historian and long-time Columbia County resident.

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Oct. 14 Ed is 90 The family of Ed Bedenbaugh invites fam ily and friends to join us to celebrate his 90th birthday at Bethel United Methodist Church, U.S. 441 South. We will be serving chicken perlo in the fellowship hall at 12:30 p.m.. Dicks family reunion The 51st annual Joseph Dicks Family Reunion will begin at 12:45 p.m. at Hopeful Baptist Church in the Life Center. Friends and family welcome. Bring a covered dish. Santa Fe River contest The third annual Our Santa Fe River Singing and Song-writing Contest will be from 4 to 7 p.m. at the Boat House Patio at the Great Outdoors Restaurant. Performances will begin at 4 p.m. There will be no reserved seating on the patio during that time. So come early and get a good seat for listening to music singing praises of our communitys most valuable asset, the Santa Fe River. Sample ballots out Sample ballots are now available at the Columbia County Supervisor of Elections office, 971 W. Duval St., and at pub lic buildings. Signature updates must be received by the Supervisor of Elections office no later than the start of canvassing of absentee ballots, Oct. 29. If your signature does not match what is on file, your absentee or provisional bal lot will not count. Oct. 15 DoC meeting Dr. Sean McMahon, pro fessor of history at Florida Gateway College, will be the United Daughters of the Confederacy, Olustee Chapter, guest speaker. The monthly meeting will be 5:15 p.m. at the China Buffet, 345 W. Duval St. McMahon will speak about popular culture during the Civil War. Buffet will be served after the meeting. Cost is $9. Reservations are not required. For more information, call Linda Williams at 352-215-8776. Oct. 16 Art league meeting The Art League of North Florida will meet at 6:30 p.m. at the First Presbyterian Church Education Building. There will be refreshments, fel lowship, a short meeting and a speaker. Duffy Soto with give a presentation on Using Your Computer To Compose Your Art. Before you wet a brush, start with your computer to combine elements from different sources, including photos, scale models and video frames, to get the look and feel you want for the fin ished painting. Sea level presentation Nonprofit Save Our Suwannee will host a pre sentation on the impacts of sea level rise at 7 p.m. at Unity Church of Gainesville, 8801 NW 39th Ave. Whitney Gray, sea level rise outreach coordi nator with FWC, will give the presentation. Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon to answer ques tions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions to the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane. For more information, call 752-5384. Oct. 17 Reading enhancement Its About My Efforts is offering a reading enhancement program for all ages. Classes will be at Antioch Baptist Church on Wednesdays from 5 to 6 p.m. starting today. Registration is $25. For information, call 867-1601. United Way luncheon United Way of Suwannee Valley will have its October community fundraising campaign report luncheon at the Camp Weed and Cerveny Center, in the Varn Dining Hall, at noon. The cost of the luncheon is $12 per person. During each month of annual campaign, the United Way conducts a campaign report luncheon to provide campaign team volunteers, community citi zens, business representa tives and agency person nel opportunities to learn more about partner agency services, United Way initia tives and businesses sup porting our communitys well-being through their support of the United Way. Dine to donate Dine to donate every Wednesday in October at Applebees in Lake City. The Tough Enough to Wear Pink Crisis Fund will receive 10 percent of the bill. Ask for a flier by the Columbia County Fairgrounds Office or call 752-8822 to have one emailed to you. Grief workshop Good Grief, An Overview of Grief and Loss will be offered to the public at 10 a.m. at the Wings Education Center, 857 SW Main Blvd. The workshop, facilitated by Jerry Tyre, will offer an overview of grief and sug gest ways of coping with a recent loss. There is no cost. For information or to register, contact Vicki Myers at 755-7714 ext. 2411 or (866) 642-0962. The Wings Education Center is a program of Hospice of Citrus County. Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Wednesday from 1 to 4 p.m. to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions to the Fort White Public Library on Route 47. For more information, call 752-5384. Oct. 19 Dracula in High Springs High Springs Community Theater will present a new comedy thriller by Leroy Clark, adapted from Bram Stokers book Dracula. weekends through Oct. 28. In this adaptation, Dr. Van Helsing is a medical specialist with Tourettes syndrome, Renfield is a woman, Dr. Sewards Aunt Quincy is tipsy at times, and theres even a French maid. Adult tickets are $11; children 12 and younger, $8, and for Sunday matinees, seniors pay $9. Tickets may be purchased at The Framery, 341 S. Marion Ave. in Lake City. Call (386) 754-2780. Online tickets are avail able at highspringscommu nitytheater.com. Shows are Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m, and Sundays at 2 p.m. Oct. 20 Howlin Halloween The public is invited to the Howlin Halloween Yappy Hour at the Pet Spot, 872 SW Main Blvd., from 2 to 5 p.m. For a $10 donation, everyone will receive one 5-by-7-inch pet photo, activities and hors doeuvres. Beer, wine, soda and water will be avail able. Ask the Dog Trainer, therapy and obedience will be featured, along with live music, vendors and raffles. A costume contest will take place. Everyone is encouraged to dress up with your pet to win prizes. Proceeds from the event will help support patients and families with Hospice of the Nature Coast. The hospice is a program of Hospice of Citrus County Inc. For additional informa tion regarding the Howlin Halloween Yappy Hour, call (386) 755-7714. Grief support The Grief Share Support Group, a ministry of Orchard Community Church, meets every Saturday from 2 to 4 p.m. in room D at the Willowbrook Assisted Living Center, 1580 S. Marion Ave. The group offers support for those who have lost loved ones, through videos, dis cussion time and prayer. There are fees. For infor mation, call 288-7429. Oct. 22 Pet loss workshop An educational work shop, titled Coping with the Loss of Your Pet, will be held at 2 p.m. at the Wings Community Education Center, in the Lake City Plaza on Main Boulevard. The facilitator is Dr. Joy Dias director of client coun seling and support servic es, University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine. To register, call Vicki Myers, at (386) 7557714, ext. 2411. Seating is limited. The workshop is provided as a public ser vice and free of charge. The Wings Education Center is a program of Hospice of Citrus County Inc. Visit www.hospiceofcitrus.org for more information. Womens Club lunch The Womens Club of Lake City will have its October fundraiser from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Clubhouse, 257 SE Hernando Ave. The meal is $6 per plate, which includes baked ziti, salad, rolls and girdle busters. Eat at the clubhouse, take out or have it deliv ered. For information, call 755-0347. Oct. 23 Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon to answer ques tions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions to the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane. For more information, call 752-5384. Oct. 24 Dine to donate Dine to donate every Wednesday in October at Applebees in Lake City. The Tough Enough to Wear Pink Crisis Fund will receive 10 percent of the bill. Ask for a flier by the Columbia County Fairgrounds Office or call 752-8822 to have one emailed to you. Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Wednesday from 1 to 4 p.m. to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions to the Fort White Public Library on Route 47. For more information, call 752-5384. Oct. 25 Officers group meeting The Suwannee River Valley Chapter of the Military Officers Association of America will hold its monthly din ner meeting at the Lake City Elks Lodge, 259 NE Hernando St., at 6:30 p.m. The meeting is open to all active-duty military officers, retired and former officers, members of the Reserve and National Guard and their spouses. For infor mation and reservations, call Susan Palmer at 6976828 or Vernon Lloyd at 752-4885. End-of-life program The Hospice Foundation of America teleconference titled Artificial Nutrition and Hydration will be held from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the Hospice of the Nature Coast Wings Community Education Center in the Lake City Plaza on SW Main Street. There is no cost to attend, and lunch will be provided. The teleconference will examine ethical issues and dilemmas that emerge at the end-of-life and the effects of these decisions on health care staff and families, using a casestudy approach. Interested health care professionals, educators, social workers, funeral directors, counsel ors, clergy, spiritual care volunteers should contact Vicki Myers at (386) 7557714 ext. 2411 for reserva tions. Seating is limited. LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012 5A 5A N O T I C E O F M E E T I N G A D V I S O R Y U T I L I T Y C O M M I T T E E C I T Y O F L A K E C I T Y N O T I C E I S H E R E B Y G I V E N t ha t t he A dvi s or y U t i l i t y C om m i t t e e f or t he C i t y of L a ke C i t y F l or i da w i l l hol d a m e e t i ng on M onda y, O c t obe r 1 5, 2012 a t 5 : 30 P M i n t he C ounc i l C ha m be r s l oc a t e d on t he s e c ond f l oor of C i t y H a l l a t 205 N or t h M a r i on A ve nue L a ke C i t y F l or i da A l l i nt e r e s t e d pe r s ons a r e i nvi t e d t o a t t e nd A U D R E Y E S I K E S M M C C i t y C l e r k C I T Y C O U N C I L M E E T I N G T H E C I T Y C O U N C I L O F T H E C I T Y O F L A K E C I T Y F L O R I D A WI L L M E E T O N M O N D A Y O C T O B E R 15, 2 012 A T 7 : 00 P M I N T H E C O U N C I L C H A M B E R S L O C A T E D O N T H E S E C O N D F L O O R O F C I T Y H A L L A T 205 N O R T H M A R I O N A V E N U E L A K E C I T Y F L O R I D A A l l i nt e r e s t e d pe r s ons a r e i nvi t e d t o a t t e nd S P E C I A L R E Q U I R E M E N T S : I f yo u r e qui r e s pe c i a l a i d or s e r vi c e s f or a ny of t he m e e t i ngs i de nt i f i e d a bove a s a ddr e s s e d i n t he A m e r i c a n D i s a bi l i t i e s A c t pl e a s e c ont a c t t he C i t y M a na ge r s O f f i c e a t ( 386 ) 719 5768. A U D R E Y E S I K E S M M C C i t y C l e r k THE RACE FO R U.S. SENA T E Florida voters have key decisions to make in the race for U.S. Senate. Read continuing coverage in this newspaper and tune-in to the statewide debates to learn more about the candidates and where they stand on the issues that matter the most to you. For a list of tv stations carrying the live debates visit BeforeYouVote.org Wed., Oct.17, 2012 7:00 8:00 pm ET Broadcast live from Nova Southeastern University Mack ( R ) Nelson ( D ) D E B A T E Sponsors : Florida Blue, Credit Unions of Florida, AARP and The Claude Pepper Foundation Debate Partners H ost COMMUNITY CALENDAR To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Laura Hampson at 754-0427 or by e-mail at lhampson@ lakecityreporter.com.

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exemption shall be allowed per homestead property at one time. The additional exemption applies to prop-erty purchased on or after January 1, 2011, if approved by the voters at a special election held on the date of the 2012 presidential pref-erence primary, or to prop-erty purchased on or after January 1, 2012, if approved by the voters at the 2012 general election. The addi-tional exemption is not available in the sixth and subsequent years after it is first received. The amend-ment shall take effect upon approval by the voters. If approved at a special elec-tion held on the date of the 2012 presidential prefer-ence primary, it shall oper-ate retroactively to January 1, 2012, or, if approved at the 2012 general election, takes effect January 1, 2013. (5) This amendment also delays until 2023, the repeal, currently scheduled to take effect in 2019, of constitutional amendments adopted in 2008 which limit annual assessment increas-es for specified nonhome-stead real property. This amendment delays until 2022 the submission of an amendment proposing the abrogation of such repeal to the voters. Florida Tax Watch explains: “Amendment 4 would take effect on January 1, 2013, and proposes: an additional homestead exemption for new homeowners or those who have not owned property for at least three years, equal to 50 percent of the just value of a property up to the median just value of a homestead property in that county, which phases out over five years by reducing 20 percent per year. The exemption does not apply to school levies; a reduction in the annual cap on assessed value increases for nonhome-stead properties from the current ten percent on non-school levies to a new level of five percent and an extension of this cap through the 2022 tax year and; providing legislative authority to eliminate the Save Our Homes ‘Recapture Rule.’ This rule currently provides that the assess-ment value of homestead property will increase by the Save Our Homes cap (three percent or inflation, whichever is less), even if the just (market) value of the property declines, as long as the assessed value is still less than the just value.”PRO: According to Florida Tax Watch, “the amendment will likely have a positive economic impact, at least in the short term. A June 2012 Florida TaxWatch report ... found that it would create jobs, grow Gross Domestic Product (GDP), and increase per-sonal income. Using the best available data and an advanced econometric analysis, Florida TaxWatch estimated that the passage of Amendment 4 would result in the creation of 19,483 private, non-farm jobs over the 10-year period of the analysis (2013-2022), that Florida GDP would increase by approximately $1.1 billion, and personal income would increase by more than $5.3 billion. The analysis also estimated that between 319,861 and 383,810 additional home sales would occur over ten years.” CON: “However, like any new property tax exemp-tion or assessment cap, these changes can have unintended consequences,” the Florida Tax Watch anal-ysis continued. “Property tax cuts that reduce taxable value tend to shift taxes to other taxpayer populations. This certainly happened under Save Our Homes and the increased homestead exemption passed in 2008, as businesses and other non-homestead property have had billions of dol-lars of tax burden shifted to them. Moreover, to the extent that millage rates are higher than they would have otherwise been, the taxpayers to which the exemption or cap were tar-geted do not receive all of the tax relief they might expect.”AMENDMENT 5 STATE COURTS Ballot summary:Proposing a revision of Article V of the State Constitution relating to the judiciary. The State Constitution authorizes the Supreme Court to adopt rules for the practice and procedure in all courts. The constitution further provides that a rule of court may be repealed by a general law enacted by a two-thirds vote of the mem-bership of each house of the Legislature. This pro-posed constitutional revi-sion eliminates the require-ment that a general law repealing a court rule pass by a two-thirds vote of each house, thereby providing that the Legislature may repeal a rule of court by a general law approved by a majority vote of each house of the Legislature that expresses the policy behind the repeal. The court could readopt the rule in conformity with the public policy expressed by the Legislature, but if the Legislature determines that a rule has been readopted and repeals the readopted rule, this proposed revision prohibits the court from further readopting the repealed rule without the Legislature’s prior approval. Under current law, rules of the judicial nomi-nating commissions and the Judicial Qualifications Commission may be repealed by general law enacted by a majority vote of the membership of each house of the Legislature. Under this proposed revi-sion, a vote to repeal those rules is changed to repeal by general law enacted by a majority vote of the legisla-tors present. Under current law, the Governor appoints a justice of the Supreme Court from a list of nomi-nees provided by a judicial nominating commission, and appointments by the Governor are not subject to confirmation. This revi-sion requires Senate con-firmation of a justice of the Supreme Court before the appointee can take office. If the Senate votes not to con-firm the appointment, the judicial nominating com-mission must reconvene and may not renominate any person whose prior appointment to fill the same vacancy was not confirmed by the Senate. For the pur-pose of confirmation, the Senate may meet at any time. If the Senate fails to vote on the appointment of a justice within 90 days, the justice will be deemed con-firmed and will take office. The Judicial Qualifications Commission is an indepen-dent commission created by the State Constitution to investigate and pros-ecute before the Florida Supreme Court alleged misconduct by a justice or judge. Currently under the constitution, commission proceedings are confiden-tial until formal charges are filed by the investigative panel of the commission. Once formal charges are filed, the formal charges and all further proceedings of the commission are pub-lic. Currently, the constitu-tion authorizes the House of Representatives to impeach a justice or judge. Further, the Speaker of the House of Representatives may request, and the Judicial Qualifications Commission must make available, all information in the com-mission’s possession for use in deciding whether to impeach a justice or judge. This proposed revision requires the commission to make all of its files available to the Speaker of the House of Representatives but pro-vides that such files would remain confidential during any investigation by the House of Representatives and until such information is used in the pursuit of an impeachment of a justice or judge. This revision also removes the power of the Governor to request files of the Judicial Qualifications Commission to conform to a prior constitutional change. This revision also makes technical and clarify-ing additions and deletions relating to the selection of chief judges of a circuit and relating to the Judicial Qualifications Commission, and makes other nonsub-stantive conforming and technical changes in the judicial article of the con-stitution. Florida Tax Watch explains: “Amendment 5 would make a number of chang-es designed to increase the Legislative Branch’s authority and oversight of the Judicial Branch. It would: Require Senate confirmation of a justice of the Supreme Court before the appointee can take office. Currently, the Governor appoints justices from a list of nominees pro-vided by a judicial nominat-ing commission, and these appointments are not sub-ject to confirmation. Make it easier for the legislature to repeal a court rule by eliminating the current super majority vote requirement, thereby requiring only a simple majority vote of each cham-ber. It would also limit the re-adoption of repealed court rules. Make it easier for the legislature to repeal a rule of the Judicial Nominating Commissions and the Judicial Qualifications Commission by requiring a majority vote of the legisla-tors present instead of the current requirement of a majority vote of the mem-bership of each chamber. Give the Speaker of the Florida House of Representatives expanded access to confidential files involving judges accused of misconduct. This amendment would take power from both the judicial branch and the governor and increase the power of the legislature.” PRO: Proponents say this provides another check and balance for court deci-sions and should make the court more efficient. CON: Opponents say this is a move to politicize the courts or even to penal-ize them for decisions that have been unpopular with legislators.AMENDMENT 6 PROHIBITION ON PUBLIC FUNDING OF ABORTIONS; CONSTRUCTION OF ABORTION RIGHTS Ballot summary:This proposed amendment provides that public funds may not be expend-ed for any abortion or for health-benefits coverage that includes coverage of abortion. This prohibi-tion does not apply to an expenditure required by federal law, a case in which a woman suffers from a physical disorder, physical injury, or physical illness that would place her in dan-ger of death unless an abor-tion is performed, or a case of rape or incest. This pro-posed amendment provides that the State Constitution may not be interpreted to create broader rights to an abortion than those con-tained in the United States Constitution. With respect to abortion, this proposed amendment overrules court decisions which con-clude that the right of priva-cy under Article I, Section 23 of the State Constitution is broader in scope than that of the United States Constitution. Florida Tax Watch explains: “Amendment 6 would prohibit the spending of public funds for any abor-tion or for health benefits coverage that includes abortion. The prohibition does not apply to: expen-ditures required by federal law; when a woman suffers from a physical disorder, physical injury or illness, caused by or arising from the pregnancy itself, which would place the woman in danger of death unless an abortion is performed; or an abortion due to a preg-nancy resulting from rape or incest. Federal and state law already prohibit spending for abortions unless they’re needed to save the life of the woman or to end preg-nancies caused by rape or incest, but this amendment would protect that prohibi-tion in the Constitution. The amendment also provides that the State Constitution may not be interpreted to create broad-er rights to an abortion than those contained in the United States Constitution. The effect of this provision is that, if passed, the amend-ment would supersede court decisions which have concluded that the right of privacy under Article I, Section 23, of the Florida Constitution is broader in scope than that of the U.S. Constitution. The Florida Supreme Court has ruled that the right of privacy con-tained in Article I, Section 23 of the Florida Constitution confers broader abortion rights than the United States Constitution. The Court also ruled that all abortion regulations are ‘presumptively unconstitu-tional’ and subject to ‘strict scrutiny.’ If Amendment 6 is adopted, abortion regu-lations would no longer be presumptively unconstitu-tional or subject to strict scrutiny. This means that legislation such as a paren-tal consent law, which has been ruled unconstitutional in Florida, would likely no longer be unconstitutional. It should be mentioned that while the amendment provides that abortion rights in Florida cannot be broader than under the U.S. Constitution, it does not preclude courts from interpreting Florida to have narrower abortion rights.” PRO: Proponents say that the amendment puts Florida’s abortion rights at the same level as federal law. CON: Opponents say it opens the door for more restrictive abortion rights. 6A LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012 Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-04286A 7731 W. Newberry Rd., Suite 1-A • Gainesville, Florida 32606 Supporting Individuals, Enhancing Lives. Strengthening RelationshipsPre-service training is required. Please contact: FLORIDA MENTOR 1-352-332-8600 Become A Mentor THERAPEUTIC FOSTER PARENT For teens and school aged children in Columbia, Alachua, Putnam, Levy Suwannee, Madison, Dixie, and Gilchrist Counties. HALLELUJAH FESTIVALWednesday, Oct. 31, 2012 3 p.m. 6 p.m. Olustee Park-Downtown Lake City Sponsored By Grace Harbor Ministries Across From Courthouse FREE Games, Prizes, Food & Live MusicEVERYTHING IS FREE WILSON’S OUTFITTERS1291 SE Baya Dr, Lake City • (386) 755-7060WilsonsOutfitters@comcast.net “Camo Gear”has arrived. T-ShirtsNew Designs Check Out Our Boots Memorial Service Moose Lodge Lake City, FL October 15, 2012 Time: 1:00 p.m. Rev. James Grennen May 7, 1943 September 28, 2012 Happy Birthday Juanita Wilson Jones We Love You! Sequeta & Kids VOTERS: Will decide the fate of 11 proposed constitutional amendments Continued From 3A subsequently considered during the regu-lar council meeting on Aug. 6. Council tabled the issue and reconsidered again during a council workshop on Oct. 1, where city council members reached a consensus and decided the item should be placed on an agenda for consid-eration during Monday’s meeting. According to reports from city officials, the only “structured” Southside Community Center recreation service for children is the Summer Camp Program. “Otherwise, the center is open throughout the school year and a large number of children remain at the center after school until picked up by their parents or guardians,” the report said. “This activity appears only as a daycare service.” “The children, during the school year, leave Summers Elementary School and go sign in at Southside Community Center and wait for their parents,” Johnson said in a meeting earlier in the month. “We’ve determined that’s not a safe environment. There’s been nothing happen thus far, but it’s where they really are not adequately supervised. It just creates a concern on my part and that’s one of the reasons it was brought up to begin with. The children sign in, they go and play outside and then they leave. I feel it’s not effective or effi-cient nor the best use for that facility.” The city’s cost to operate and maintain the facility is approximately $190,000 annually. The city’s fiscal year 2013 budget contains funding for almost $200,000 for utility department upgrades at the Gum Swamp Road compound. At the compound, a number of antiquated structures are cur-rently being used for utility department purposes. Johnson suggested that a plausible use for the Southside Center is to house the City Utility’s Department. An alternative to closing the Southside Community Center to after-school use proposal suggests modifying services as a structured “after school” recreation pro-gram, which complies with regulatory standards of the Department of Children and Family Services. The additional costs to make that a reality has been estimated at $75,000 and the money could come from the city’s general and enterprise funds. SOUTHSIDE: Has become little more than daycare center, city ma nager says Continued From 1A

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nursing homes dont get many visitors, he said. Used to a party being all about the birthday boy, Skyler said his friends kind of wondered why I did it. Skyler said he helped take care of his grandpar ents before they passed away, a loss that is still tender. At Avalon, patients smiled and thanked Skyler, surprised with a gift out of the blue. Friends Eduardo Florez, 8, and Camille Florez, 13, came along to help pass out the presents. Its an awesome thing, said Monich Culbreath, Avalon activities director. Volunteers with presents come to the nursing home around Christmas time, but not during the rest of the year, she said. Several people at the nursing home dont have family, she said, so the five-minute visit just means the world to them. You dont know if its the last time theyll have someone visit, she said. I liked to see their happy faces, Skyler said. It makes me feel really good. Chris Colley, Skylers father, said he is proud of his sons kind, thoughtful project. Youd be surprised at how many people dont have anybody, said Skylers mother, Helen Colley. The project isnt because Skyler has more toys and gadgets than he knows what to do with, she said. I always tell him he inspires me, she said. Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SUNDAY OCTOBER 14, 2012 7A 7A COUPON REQUIRED ...Do you have the over-priced, slow-speed Internet Blues? Get FAST High-Speed Internet Today! Now Available Everywhere! Call your N. Central & N. Florida Authorized Dealer Today at 386-269-0984 1-800-787-8041 $ 39. 95 to $ 59.99 /Mo. Because CABLE is so last century! 21st Century Communications, LLC Digital TV Service & UNLIMITED phone service, too! Ask About 2X5 Advertisement for Dr. J. T. Cooper for placement in the Sunday paper Sunday 14 October 2012 HATE YOUR WEIGHT? J.T.Cooper, M.D. Can help you with safe, supervised Weight Loss. Dr. Cooper will be in his Lake Park, GA office on Wednesday, Oct. 17 Thursday, Oct. 18 Friday, Oct. 19 Saturday, Oct. 20 Sunday, Oct. 21 Monday, Oct. 22 (In the outlet mall) 229-559-2011 www.dietDrTom.com St. Jude Novena May the Sacred Heart of Jesus be adorned, glori ed, loved and preserved throughout the world now and forever. Sacred Heart of Jesus pray for us, St. Jude worker of miracles, pray for us St. Jude helper of the hopeless, pray for us. Say this prayer 9 times a day for 9 days. Your prayer will be answered, it has never been known to fail. Publication must be promised. Thank you, St. Jude 866-314-3769 AIRLINES ARE HIRING good to take time to remem ber this 100-year-old monu ment and the sacrifices that went on on the battlefield. Kelly Barrow, nation al Sons of Confederate Veterans lieutenant com mander-in-chief, was the events keynote speaker. During his address, he spoke about having two ancestors who participated in the Battle of Olustee, including Lt. Col. James Barrow, who died in the battle. His address included several quotes and com ments collected from his toric sources from when the monument was first dedicated 100 years earlier. One such comment was quoted from G.H. Dorman, who fought at the Battle of Olustee but returned to the site years later when the monument was unveiled. Heres where the heroes of our land fell as victims fighting for mother, sister and home sweet home, Barrow said, quoting Dorman. Following the ceremony, Barrow continued to show his enthusiasm and excite ment about the event. Its an awesome thing to be the keynote speaker, he said. I never thought that I would be here. The more I started to do research, the more I just felt that this is just an incredible moment. Words cant describe it. Here I am on the battle field where my ancestor died and Im dedicating a monument thats 100 years old, and I cant think of a greater honor. I hope I did the men and my ancestors justice here. He said he would hope another ceremony is held 100 years from now by his descendants. Its important to remem ber our heritage, Barrow said. Its important to remember our heritage and be worthy of it. Our heritage is what makes us. Everybody needs to know their heritage and be a part of it so they can pass it on to their kids. If you dont remember your heritage, then you become a ship without a rudder and anchor youre just adrift. Nancy Markham Miller, a member of the Martha Reid Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, performed in two dances during the monument rededication ceremony. Miller had an ancestor who was a casualty of the war, Henry Mann, who fought with the Appling Grays from Georgia. She said she was proud to represent her fam ily in the ceremony. To stand on this ground where he actually fought and gave that sacrifice is profoundly important, and its humbling to be able to honor him in that way, she said. Miller said the event brought together people who already shared a com mon bond. We all have a common heritage, she said. We all love the south. We all love this ground; we all love our ancestors and we all love preserving the history. Larry Rosenblatt, 16th Brigade commander of the Sons of Confederate Veterans and a member of the Capt. Winston Stephens SCV camp in Baker County, helped organize the event. I think the event turned out to be fantastic, he said. It was a lot longer than I wanted it to be, but there wasnt a thing said or done that shouldnt have been included. OLUSTEE: Nearly 500 gather Saturday to rededicate battlefield monument Continued From Page 3A TONY BRITT/ Lake City Reporter Calvin Hart (left), a member of the Kirby-Smith Camp of the Sons of Confederate Veterans, and Larry Rosenblatt, 16th Brigade commander of the Sons of Confederate Veterans and a member of the Capt. Winston Stephens SCV camp in Baker County, fold the Florida flag, unveiling a rededication marker that will be added to the Olustee Battlefield Monument. TONY BRITT/ Lake City Reporter The rededication marker that will be added to the Olustee Battlefield Monument reads, In commemoration of the 100th anniversary ceremony of this hallowed monument, done this day, October 13, 2012. BIRTHDAY: Gifts for others Continued From Page 1A TONY BRITT/ Lake City Reporter Among others, the ceremonies drew numerous descendants of Battle of Olustee participants.

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By TERESA M. WALKERAssociated PressNASHVILLE, Tenn. — The fourth-ranked Florida Gators remain perfect thanks to quarter-back Jeff Driskel running the ball better than even Tim Tebow. Driskel ran for 177 yards and three touch-downs, and the Gators beat Vanderbilt 31-17 on Saturday night to remain undefeated going into their big showdown with No. 3 South Carolina. The quarterback threw for only 77 yards and ran only 11 times. But the sophomore set the Florida record for yards rushing by a quarterback, topping Tebow’s 166 yards against Mississippi in 2007 on 27 carries. The Gators (6-0, 5-0 SEC) finished off their last SEC road trip out-side of the state of Florida with their 22nd straight win over Vanderbilt. The Gators scored 21 straight points. The Gators also had three sacks, forced a turnover, blocked a field goal and used a fake punt to put away Vanderbilt. By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comTALLAHASSEE — If Florida State was still thinking about last week, it certainly didn’t show as the 12th-ranked Seminoles rebounded from their first loss of the year with a 51-7 win against Boston College. “You could sense it,” Florida State head coach Jimbo Fisher said. “They had a chip on their shoulder.” EJ Manuel led the charge early and often as the senior threw for a career high 439 yards and four touchdowns on 27-of-34 passing. Manuel hit nine different receivers, and threw two interceptions. Manuel’s first touchdown pass came on a 99-yard drive after the Seminoles held Boston College on the one-inch line. Manuel hit Kenny Shaw for 77 yards for the score. Shaw finished with 125 yards receiving on only two receptions. Lonnie Pryor put the Seminoles up 14-0 with a short touchdown run from the 2-yard line to round out the first-quarter scoring. The Seminoles would add two more touchdowns before Boston College Lake City Reporter SPORTS Sunday, October 14, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS BRIEFS FSU continued on 6B Driskel runs for 177 yards, three TDs in victory. Manuel lights up Boston College with 4 TD passes. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Shayne Newman (82) and Kellen Snider (7) combine for a tackle against Williston High on Friday. Pesky DevilsBy TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comWILLISTON — Fort White High’s football team stared down a potential upset with 20 points in the second half to beat Williston High, 23-14, at Booster Stadium in Williston on Friday. Tavaris Williams led the comeback with 207 yards rushing and two touch-downs. Williams ran for 152 yards and both touchdowns in the second half While both teams were coming off bye weeks, it was Fort White that looked slow in the first half as the Indians fell behind 14-3. Fort White’s only points came on a 23-yard field goal by Nathan Escalante with 4:05 left in the half. “It is hard to put it on the layoff because we had such a good week of prac-tice,” Fort White head coach Demetric Jackson said. “One guy, and it was different people, would make a mistake and slow us down.” Williston (2-4) received the kickoff and scored in three plays. Stephen Cochlin took a pitch for 41 yards and quarterback David Heinkle threw to Damien Strange for 33 yards and a touchdown. Strange tacked on a Fort White comes back for 23-14 win at Williston. INDIANS continued on 5B JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Ronald Timmons was the breakout star o f the Tigers’ first half of the season. Allen, Tigers geared up for second half By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comThere’s no better way to go into a bye week than winning the biggest game of the season. From here out, they are all big for Columbia High as the Tigers look to claim the District 3-6A crown. Columbia will return to the field at Middleburg High on Thursday looking to do the same things that made it a successful 5-1 in the first half of the season. The Tigers biggest asset has been their running game. The team has car-ried the ball 212 times for 1,521 yards. Columbia has a three-headed monster at running back with Ronald Timmons leading the way. Timmons has carried 91 times for 716 yards this sea-son, but he’s also had help. Braxton Stockton has 334 rushing yards and Lonnie Underwood has rushed for 330 yards. “The running game has been working extremely well,” Columbia head coach Columbia returns to the field at Middleburg High. CHS continued on 6B Monday Q Columbia High girls golf in District 2-2A tournament at Quail Heights County Club, 9 a.m. Tuesday Q Columbia High boys golf in District 2-2A tournament at Panama County Club, 9 a.m. Q Columbia High volleyball Dig Pink match vs. Fort White High, 6 p.m. (JV-5) Wednesday Q Columbia High volleyball at Oak Hall School, 6 p.m. (JV-5) Thursday Q Columbia High swimming Senior Night vs. Suwannee High, 4:30 a.m. Q Columbia High football at Middleburg High, 7 p.m. Friday Q Columbia High volleyball vs. host Newberry High, The Rock School in Varsity Pink Panther tournament, 6 p.m., 7 p.m. Q Fort White High football vs. Fernandina Beach High, 7:30 p.m. Saturday Q Columbia High cross country in Amelia Island Invitational at Fernandina Beach, boys-8 a.m., girls-8:35 a.m. Q Fort White High volleyball vs. Bell High, The Rock School, host Newberry High in Varsity Pink Panther tournament, 9 a.m., 1 p.m., 3 p.m. Q Columbia High volleyball vs. Fort White High, Bell High in Varsity Pink Panther tourney at Newberry High, 11 a.m., 2 p.m. GAMES RUNNING Wright Brothers 5K for veterans The Race Against the Wright Brothers 5K is 8 a.m. Nov. 10 at Olustee Park in downtown Lake City. Proceeds go to Volunteer Service Programs for Disabled American Veterans at the Lake City VA Medical Center. School and cross country teams are welcome. Registration is at www. stepfitnessonline.com or at Carquest on Pinemount Road. For details, call Michelle Richards at 208-2447. FORT WHITE BASEBALL Yard, craft sale events planned The Fort White High baseball program is hosting a large multi-family/tenant yard and craft sale from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Nov. 1 at the office complex located at 4051 NW 43rd Street in Gainesville. Cost to purchase a space is $25. All donations except clothing will be accepted. The program also is participating in the Women’s Expo in Providence from 9 a.m. to noon on Nov. 3. Fort White will be selling jewelry, magnets, lanyards and hand-made craft items at Providence Village Baptist Church, 4504 W. State Road 238, Lake Butler. For details, call Fort White Dugout Club president Jeanne Howell at 288-5537.Q From staff reports ASSOCIATED PRESSFlorida State fullback Lonnie Pryor celebrates after scori ng a touchdown against Boston College in Tallahassee on Saturday. Eagles grounded Gators defeat Vandy

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From staff reportsColumbia High and Fort White High runners com-peted in the 12th Annual Bobcat Cross Country Classic Invitational on Saturday. Buchholz High was the host team for the 5K at Santa Fe College. Oak Hall School won the girls’ run, followed by Eastside High and Columbia. Fort White placed 11th in the 15-team field. Grace Blair of Oak Hall won the individual in 19:18.2. Lady Tiger runners with place and time were: Emma Tucker, 3rd-20:11.8; Samantha Ziegaus, 6th-20:46.7; Ashley Jones, 12th-21:29.7; Michaelle Charlotin, 29th-22:35.0; Hayley Lewis, 33rd-22:42.5; Abby Williams, 36th-22:49.2; Ashlyn Martin, 38th-22:59.0; Sydni Jones, 23:11.8; Nicole Morse, 23:53.8. Lady Indian runners were: Carolee Morrow, 48th-24:05.1; Seaira Fletcher, 58th-24:59.7; Sitia Martinez, 60th-25:13.5; Sheridan Plasencia, 65th-25:46.9; Katrina Patillo, 100th-32:09.6; Issabelle Hair, 101st-32:24.3. Lyman High, Buchholz and Lincoln High were the top three for the boys. Garrett Westlake of P.K. Yonge School won individ-ual in 16:19.1. Columbia’s boys were: Timothy Pierce, 28th-18:24.4; Shaykheim Griffin, 49th-19:18.1; Shawn Ziegaus, 50th-19:19.3; Noah Henderson, 67th-20:18.2; Tim Jewett, 72nd-20:35.6; Zachary Peterson, 79th-21:26.9; Wyatt Snook, 84th-21:51.9. Jeremie Thompson of Fort White ran 23:43.4. Columbia will run in the Amelia Island Invitational at Fernandina Beach this Saturday. SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today GOLF 9 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Portugal Masters, final round, at Vilamoura, Portugal 1:30 p.m. TGC — Champions Tour, Greater Hickory Classic, final round, at Conover, N.C. 4 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Frys.com Open, final round, at San Martin, Calif. 7:30 p.m. TGC — Web.com Tour, Miccosukee Championship, final round, at Miami (same-day tape) 9:30 p.m. TGC — LPGA Malaysia, final round, at Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (same-day tape) MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 4 p.m. TBS— Playoffs, American League Championship Series, game 2, Detroit at New York 8 p.m. FOX — Playoffs, National League Championship Series, game 1, San Francisco vs. St. Louis MOTORSPORTS 6 p.m. SPEED — MotoGP World Championship, at Motegi, Japan (same-day tape) NFL FOOTBALL 1 p.m. CBS — Regional coverageFOX — Regional coverage 4 p.m. CBS — Regional coverage 4:25 p.m. FOX — Doubleheader game 8:20 p.m. NBC — Green Bay at Houston PRO HOCKEY 5 p.m. ESPN2 — Kontinental Hockey LeagueRussia, Amur at Dynamo Moscow WNBA BASKETBALL 8 p.m. ESPN2 — Playoffs, finals, game 1, Indiana at Minnesota WOMEN’S COLLEGE VOLLEYBALL 3 p.m. ESPN2 — Minnesota at Nebraska ——— Monday MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 7:30 p.m. FOX — NLCS, game 2, San Francisco vs. Washington or St. Louis NFL FOOTBALL 8:30 p.m. ESPN — Denver at San DiegoBASEBALLMLB playoffs DIVISION SERIES American League Detroit 3, Oakland 2 Detroit 3, Oakland 1Detroit 5, Oakland 4Oakland 2, Detroit 0Oakland 4, Detroit 3Detroit 6, Oakland 0 New York 3, Baltimore 2 New York 7, Baltimore 2Baltimore 3, New York 2New York 3, Baltimore 2, 12 inningsBaltimore 2, New York 1, 13 innings Friday Baltimore at New York ——— National League San Francisco 3, Cincinnati 2 Cincinnati 5, San Francisco 2Cincinnati 9, San Francisco 0San Francisco 2, Cincinnati 1, 10 innings San Francisco 8, Cincinnati 3San Francisco 6, Cincinnati 4 St. Louis 3, Washington 2 Washington 3, St. Louis 2St. Louis 12, Washington 4St. Louis 8, Washington 0Washington 2, St. Louis 1 Friday St. Louis 9, Washington 7 LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES (Best-of-7) American League (All games televised by TBS) Saturday Detroit at New York (n) Today Detroit (Sanchez 4-6) at New York (Kuroda 16-11) 4:07 p.m. ——— National League (All games televised by Fox) Today St. Louis (Lynn 18-7) at San Francisco (Bumgarner 16-11), 8:15 p.m. Monday St. Louis at San Francisco (Vogelsong 14-9), 8:07 p.m.FOOTBALLNFL standings AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PANew England 3 2 0 .600 165 113N.Y. Jets 2 3 0 .400 98 132Miami 2 3 0 .400 103 103Buffalo 2 3 0 .400 118 176 South W L T Pct PF PAHouston 5 0 0 1.000 149 73Indianapolis 2 2 0 .500 91 110Tennessee 2 4 0 .333 114 204Jacksonville 1 4 0 .200 65 138 North W L T Pct PF PABaltimore 4 1 0 .800 130 89Cincinnati 3 2 0 .600 125 129Pittsburgh 2 3 0 .400 116 115Cleveland 0 5 0 .000 100 139 West W L T Pct PF PASan Diego 3 2 0 .600 124 102Denver 2 3 0 .400 135 114Oakland 1 3 0 .250 67 125Kansas City 1 4 0 .200 94 145 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAPhiladelphia 3 2 0 .600 80 99N.Y. Giants 3 2 0 .600 152 111Dallas 2 2 0 .500 65 88Washington 2 3 0 .400 140 147 South W L T Pct PF PAAtlanta 5 0 0 1.000 148 93Tampa Bay 1 3 0 .250 82 91Carolina 1 4 0 .200 92 125New Orleans 1 4 0 .200 141 154 North W L T Pct PF PAMinnesota 4 1 0 .800 120 79Chicago 4 1 0 .800 149 71Green Bay 2 3 0 .400 112 111Detroit 1 3 0 .250 100 114 West W L T Pct PF PAArizona 4 1 0 .800 94 78San Francisco 4 1 0 .800 149 68St. Louis 3 2 0 .600 96 94Seattle 3 2 0 .600 86 70 Thursday’s Game Tennessee 26, Pittsburgh 23 Today’s Games Oakland at Atlanta, 1 p.m.Kansas City at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.Indianapolis at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m.Cincinnati at Cleveland, 1 p.m.Detroit at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.St. Louis at Miami, 1 p.m.Dallas at Baltimore, 1 p.m.Buffalo at Arizona, 4:05 p.m.New England at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.N.Y. Giants at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.Minnesota at Washington, 4:25 p.m.Green Bay at Houston, 8:20 p.m. Monday’s Game Denver at San Diego, 8:30 p.m.Open: Carolina, Chicago, Jacksonville, New OrleansBASKETBALLNBA preseason Saturday’s Games Brooklyn 108, Philadelphia 105, OTNew York 98, Boston 95, OTWashington 99, Cleveland 95Minnesota 82, Chicago 75Milwaukee 108, Detroit 91Utah at L.A. Lakers (n) Today’s Games L.A. Clippers vs. Miami at Shanghai, China, 12:30 a.m. San Antonio at Houston, 2 p.m.Atlanta at Memphis, 6 p.m. Monday’s Games Boston at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.Orlando vs. Cleveland at Cincinnati, Ohio, 7 p.m. Washington at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.Houston at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.Golden State at Denver, 9 p.m.Portland at Sacramento, 10 p.m. WNBA Finals Minnesota vs. Indiana (Best of 5) Today Indiana at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Wednesday Indiana at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Friday Minnesota at Indiana, 8 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-04212BSPORTS COURTESY PHOTOLady Falcons volleyballLake City Middle School’s volleyball team qualified for the conference championship. The Lady Falcons play in the semifinal round at Baker Co unty Middle School on Tuesday. The winner advances to the final against host Madison Cou nty Central School on Thursday. Team members are (front row, from left) Hanna Hamilton, Mad die Kennon, Kamdyn Kvistad, Kyrsten Giebieg, Kaylin Ronsonet and Lynsey Sutton. Back row (from left) are coach Leigh Ann Kennon, Destiny Murray, Rachel Blanton, Ahsilas Gray, Alaina Perry, Lillie Sims, Rilie Rittman, Madison Plyn, Megan Zahnle an d coach Bill Griffin. District tournament week for CHS golf teamsBy TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High’s golf teams play in District 2-2A tournaments this week and one is here at home. The Lady Tigers are host to the district field at Quail Heights Country Club on Monday. Teams will tee off with a shotgun start at 9 a.m. The top three teams advance to region play, and the top three individuals not on one of those teams also advance. District 2-2A includes Chiles, Leon and Lincoln high schools from Tallahassee, Buchholz High and Gainesville High from Gainesville and Mosley High from Lynn Haven. Buchholz is the defending champion for the girls and CHS head coach Todd Carter said the Bobcats are a shoo-in this year. Carter expects Chiles to be sec-ond, adding “it is real close between Columbia and Leon for third.” “The district being at Quail Heights can really come into play with our girls,” Carter said. “We pos-sibly could take out Chiles, but third place will move us on to regionals.” Gillian Norris and Brooke Russell, both sophomores, played in the district tour-nament at Haile Plantation last year. Norris leads the Lady Tigers this year with a 41 average. “Gillian has really put in the time and effort,” Carter said. “She shouldn’t have a problem advancing as an individual.” Russell’s average is 46 for the CHS 1-2 punch. “Brooke really has the game,” Carter said. “I am ready for her to get in some low scores.” Sophomore Abby Blizzard (56 average) is in her first year and Madison Stalvey (59 average) came on late when two players quit the team. “Abby is a beginning golfer and excelling well,” Carter said. “Madison has only been playing a couple of weeks and needs to stick with it. I am proud of the girls. We need to keep it going.” Carter expressed thanks to Quail Heights and The Country Club at Lake City for allowing the golf teams to host matches. Columbia’s boys will play at Panama Country Club on Tuesday. Tee times begin at 9 a.m. CDT. The Tigers go in sporting a gaudy 17-5-1 record. Columbia stumbled to a fifth-place finish last year at Killearn Country Club. Last year, the top 3 were Chiles-Leon-Buchholz. Columbia tied with Buchholz in the Alachua County Tournament on Thursday, and has split with Chiles this season. “We have been in this district five years and Chiles and Leon have accounted for all the district titles,” CHS head coach Steve Smithy said. “They are both really good and really deep. We have pretty much been in every match we played this year.” The CHS contingent is Nick Jones (39.8 average), Dean Soucinek (40.8), Tim Bagley (40.8) Dillan VanVleck (41.4) and Luke Soucinek (41.4). All except Luke Soucinek competed in the district tournament last year. “Nick and Dean played in a regional tournament there two years ago,” Smithy said. “It is a Donald Ross design, right on the bay. It is a good chance for our players. We have a practice round Monday. We will do our homework and get a game plan.” COURTESY PHOTOColumbia High’s cross country team at the UF Mountain Dew Invitational in Gainesville. CHS girls third at Bobcat XC

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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012 3B3BSPORTS Second-half success JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Michael Mulberry (4) tries to elude two Williston High defenders during the Indians’ 23-14 win on Friday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Trey Phillips snags a ball out of the a ir against Williston High on Friday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High defenders close in on Williston High qua rterback David Heinkle in the Indians’ 23-14 win JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Michael Mulberry (4) and Cameron Whi te (32) chase down Williston High’s Fred Burns (8) on Friday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Kellen Snider (7) and Blair Chapman (22) take down Williston High quarterback David Heinkle. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Tavaris Williams runs against Willisto n High on Friday.

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4B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04204BSportsTigers geared up for Part II JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Alex Weber (15) brings in a touchdow n pass during the Tigers’ 52-17 District 3-6A victory a gainst Ridgeview High on Oct. 5. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Roc Battle returns a kick in a 16-14 l oss against Gainesville High on Sept. 6. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High quarterback Jayce Barber looks for an o pen receiver against Ridgeview High. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Terry Calloway runs back an intercep tion in the Tigers’ 50-0 win against Baker County High in the first game of the season. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High running back Lonnie Underwood breaks free in the Tigers win against Santa Fe High in the kickoff classic. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Ben Kuykendall (11) and Kenny Paul (25) make a play in the secondary on the Santa Fe High Raiders in the kickoff classic.

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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012 5B 5BSports one-yard touchdown run in the second quarter, as the Red Devils took advantage of a Fort White fumble and a roughing-the-passer pen alty to drive 59 yards. Fort White got on track with its first possession in the third quarter. The Indians drove 56 yards in 10 plays for a touchdown at 6:44. The big play in the march was when quarterback Andrew Baker hit Melton Sanders for 29 yards. The touchdown came on a five-yard pass from Baker to Trey Phillips. A bad snap on the PAT led to an incompletion and a 14-9 Williston lead. We told then at halftime we worked harder at prac tice than they did in the first half, receivers coach Isiah Phillips said. You have got to play with emotion. Williston, which had gained 194 yards in the first half, answered with three first downs before the Indians defense forced a punt and David Heinkle kicked it out of bounds at the Fort White 8. Williams started hitting his stride with a 22-yard run on first down. Baker threw to Phillips for 18 yards and a first down at the Indians 44. On the next play, Williams broke a draw for 56 yards and a touchdown and Fort White went ahead for good. Escalante kicked the PAT for a 16-14 Fort White lead at 11:33 of the fourth quarter. I was worried in the sec ond half when I looked at that clock, Jackson said. If they get a good drive and eat up the clock and we make a mistake, we could be in trouble. Our guys came through and made plays when they needed to. Fort Whites defense continued to take control and forced a punt to the Indians 20. After a holding call, Baker hit Shayne Newman twice for 19 yards and a first down. A pass interference pen alty put the ball near mid field and Williams reeled off 44 yards on four carries. The final 12 yards went for a touchdown and Escalantes PAT produced the final score with 5:46 to play. Devontae Levy ended Willistons final chance with an interception in the end zone, and the Indians ran out the clock. It was great for us, Jackson said. We had some adversity and that will benefit you in the long run. Fort White (4-2) hosts Fernandina Beach High for homecoming at 7:30 p.m. this Friday. The Pirates lost to Mantanzas High, 35-25. Williston 7 7 0 0 14 Fort White 0 3 6 14 23 First Quarter WStrange 33 pass from Heinkle (Deciderio kick), 10:54 Second Quarter WStrange 1 run (Deciderio kick), 7:18 FWEscalante 23 FG, 4:05 Third Quarter FWPhillips 5 pass from Baker (pass failed), 6:44 Fourth Quarter FWT.Williams 56 run (Esclante kick), 11:33 FWT.Williams 12 run (Esclante kick), 5:46 Fort White Williston First downs 17 14 Rushes-yards 40-291 38-217 Passing 121 105 Comp-Att-Int 9-16-1 8-13-1 Punts-Avg. 0-0 4-35 Fumbles-Lost 2-1 0-0 Penalties-Yards 6-65 11-110 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGFort White, T. Williams 21-207, Phillips 11-50, R. Williams 3-14, Levy 1-14, Baker 3-6, Garrison 1-0. Williston, Heinkle 15-98, Cochlin 3-42, Strange 4-21, Donald 6-21, Neal 6-19, Burns 4-16. PASSINGFort White, Baker 9-16121-1. Williston, Heinkle 8-12-105-0, Cochlim 0-1-0-1 RECEIVINGFort White, Phillips 3-48, Mulberry 2-23, Newman 2-99, Sanders 1-29, T. Williams 1-2. Williston, Strange 5-78, Washburn 2-22, Burns 1-5 INDIANS: Homecoming week on tap Continued From Page 1B Williams runs wild at Williston By TIM KIRBY tkirby@lakecityreporter.com WILLISTON Fort White High running back and cornerback Tavaris Williams was nowhere to be found on the first few series in Fridays game against Williston High. Williams made up for lost time with 21 carries for 207 yards and two touchdowns. It was the first 200-plus yard game for a Fort White run ning back since the 2010 season. I was really mad I didnt start the game, said Williams, who admitted to missing two days of practice during the last two weeks that included an open date. The entire team was slow getting started, but regrouped at halftime. Everybody was out of it, even me, and that was odd, Williams said. I knew we could come back. We just came out sluggish. We should have beat them worse than we did. Williams saved 152 yards and touchdowns of 56 and 12 yards for after intermission. While Fort Whites defense was doing its part to keep Williston off the board in the second half, the offense rolled up 265 yards 194 on the ground. We did one of those Florida numbers, Jackson said We controlled the line of scrimmage in the second half. Williams wasnt the only one who benefited. Quarterback Andrew Baker was 4-of-10 passing for 50 yards in the first half with one interception. After inter mission he was 5 of 6 for 71 yards and a touchdown. Bakers pick came on the final drive in the second quarter. The quarterback gave Jackson a lets-getthem pat on the back at halftime. That interception was on me, Jackson said. We were trying to run some two-minute stuff and we sig naled the same thing to two receivers. Andrew just told me at halftime he was feel ing good and it was going to be all right. Fort White took the lead for good on Williams 56yard touchdown run on the second play of the fourth quarter. It was a 32 draw for ward, Williams said. It wasnt clear; I had to make some moves. Much of the second half was clear, courtesy of the offensive line. Our last two games were rough up front, line coach Danny Marsee said. They have taken a beat ing in practice and I think they were glad to see a game. We knew coming in we would have to win the game up front. Tavaris ran the ball hard. If it wasnt there, he made something out of it. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Fort White Highs Tavaris Williams tries to break free of a defensive player from Williston High in the Indians 23-14 win. JV wraps up season By TIM KIRBY tkirby@lakecityreporter.com FORT WHITE Fort White Highs junior varsity football team ended its season this week. The Indians were sched uled to play Santa Fe High Wednesday of homecom ing week, but the Raiders canceled. Fort White was winless in five games, but gener ated some excitement at Dixie County High on Thursday before losing 36-29. It was the first game where we scored, coach Wayne Exum Sr. said. We had to go out on a high note and that was it. Quarterback Elijah Bryant threw three touchdown passes. Isaiah Simpson was the recipient of the passes and also ran for a touchdown. Bryant connected with J.T. Byrne and Sampson for two-point conversions, and Byrne kicked a PAT. It looked like more of the same for Fort White. The Indians connected on a long pass on their first play to the Bears 14, but could not score. Dixie County answered with a touchdown drive. On Fort Whites next possession, a wide-open receiver dropped the potential touchdown pass. The Bears again came back with a touchdown for a 14-0 lead. Fort White scored a touchdown late in the sec ond quarter. The Bears had a 65-yard touchdown run in the third quarter. Fort White matched it to cut the lead to 22-14. Dixie Countys final score came on an interception return. With five minutes left in the game, Fort Whites Cody Smith recovered a fumble and returned it to the Bears 8. Bryant hit Sampson on a fade route for a touchdown. The Indians added a TD late. We went to the shotgun and threw the ball a lot, JV head coach Charles Moore said. We dont have stats, but Elijah threw for close to 300 yards. We had our chances. We had three possible touchdown passes dropped. Fort White began with 16 junior varsity players. We had some young kids and not too many of them, Moore said. The kids improved week to week and thats what junior varsity is about.

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Associated PressWest Virginia came into Saturday’s game at Texas Tech in the drivers’ seat for the Big 12 title, undefeated and eyeing a shot at the BCS champsionship and with quarterback Geno Smith acclaimed as a Heisman Trophy front-runner. The No. 5 Mountaineers left with none of it following a 49-14 loss to the Red Raiders that was the most lopsided Texas Tech victory over a team ranked in the top five. Texas Tech’s defense consistently stymied West Virginia’s offense. Heisman Trophy hopeful Smith completed 29 of 55 passes for 275 yards, well off his season averages of nearly 400 yards and and 81 percent completion rate. The Red Raiders offense had no trouble moving the ball as quarterback Seth Doege threw TD passes of 39, 19, 16, 2, 29 and 7 yards. He completed 32 of 42 passes and the six touchdowns matched his career-high. Darrin Moore caught three touchdown passes. Earlier, Oklahoma clobbered Texas 63-21 to get a leg up in the Big 12 race.No. 1 Alabama 42, Missouri 10ST. LOUIS — Eddie Lacy and T.J. Yeldon gave top-ranked Alabama a pair of 100-yard rush-ers in the same game for the first time this season and the duo com-bined for five scores in a soggy, weather-delayed game. The defending national champion Crimson Tide (6-0, 3-0 SEC) led 21-0 late in the first quarter en route to their 10th straight vic-tory, all by 19 or more points.No. 6 Kansas State 27, Iowa State 21AMES, Iowa — Quarterback Collin Klein ran for 105 yards and three touchdowns to help K-State hold off the Cyclones and beat them for the fifth straight time. Klein also threw for 187 yards for the Wildcats (6-0, 3-0 Big 12), who remain unbeaten heading into next week’s showdown with West Virginia. Kansas State held the Cyclones (4-2, 1-2) to just 231 yards of offense. Iowa State still had a chance for the game-winning drive from its own 3-yard line with 2:17 left, but the Wildcats stopped the Cyclones on downs. Jared Barnett threw for 166 yards and two TDs for Iowa State.No. 7 Notre Dame 20, No. 17 Stanford 13, OTSOUTH BEND, Ind. — TJ Jones made a reaching 7-yard touchdown catch in overtime and No. 7 Notre Dame stopped Stanford inches from the goal line. After Jones and Tommy Rees gave the Fighting Irish (6-0) a seven-point lead in OT, Stanford (4-2) drove to a first-and-goal at the 4. Stepfan Taylor ran for 1 on first, 2 on second and inches on third down. That left one play from inside the 1 and the Notre Dame defense, led by Carlos Calabrese, stood up Taylor and pushed him back. Taylor kept reaching and turning, and ended up reaching the ball across the goal line, but the officials ruled it was too late.No. 10 Oregon State 42, BYU 24PROVO, Utah — Cody Vaz passed for 332 yards and three touchdowns in his first start since high school. Vaz was filling in for Sean Mannion, who is out indefinitely with a left knee injury. Oregon State is 5-0 for the first time since 1939. Markus Wheaton caught two first-quarter TD passes, and scored on a 12-yard reverse in the fourth, while cornerback Jordan Poyer returned an interception 49 yards to seal the victory against BYU (4-3). Vaz started 5 of 5 for 75 yards and finished 20 of 32 against BYU’s fifth-rated defense. BYU quarterback Riley Nelson completed 28 of 51 passes for 305 yards and a touchdown, but was intercepted three times. Brandin Cooks caught eight passes for 173 yards for the Beavers.No. 13 Oklahoma 63, No. 15 Texas 21DALLAS — Damien Williams broke off a 95-yard touchdown run for the longest rush in Red River Rivalry history, Blake Bell powered his way in for four TDs and Oklahoma got its second straight blowout of Texas. Landry Jones threw for 321 yards and two touchdowns, and fullback Trey Millard had a career-best 119 yards receiving as the Sooners (4-1, 2-1 Big 12) added another rout to Bob Stoops’ impressive rivalry resume. Stoops is now 9-5 against Mack Brown and responsible for three of Oklahoma’s five most lopsided wins over Texas. The Longhorns (3-2, 1-2) couldn’t get a stop and never got their offense going.No. 20 Rutgers 23, Syracuse 15PISCATAWAY, N.J. — Duron Harmon scooped up a blocked field goal attempt and ran 75 yard for a tie-breaking touchdown early in the third quarter and Rutgers rode its defense and spe-cial teams to 6-0. Big East Conference defensive player of the year Khaseem Greene forced three fumbles and intercepted a pass as Rutgers (3-0) became bowl eligible for the seventh time in eight seasons. Jawan Jamison scored on a 1-yard touchdown run, Gary Nova threw a 12-yard touch-down to Tyler Kroft and walk-on placekicker Nick Borgese had a 25-yard field goal filling in for the injured Kyle Federico as the Scarlet Knights went 6-0 for only the third time since 1976.No. 18 Lousiville 45, Pittsburgh 35PITTSBURGH — Senorise Perry rushed for 101 yards and a career-high four touchdowns. Teddy Bridgewater passed for 304 yards for the Cardinals (6-0, 1-0 Big East), including a 75-yard score to Devante Parker on the first play of the second half as Louisville continued its best start since 2006. Parker’s score came in the middle of a 24-point burst by Louisville spanning the second and third quarters that turned a seven-point deficit into a 38-21 lead. Tino Sunseri passed for 287 yards and two touchdowns but Pitt (2-4, 0-3) couldn’t complete a late rally.No. 24 Boise St. 20, Fresno St. 10BOISE, Idaho — D.J. Harper rushed for 122 yards and a touch-down and Joe Southwick threw for another score. Harper was the leader of a Boise State (5-1, 2-0 Mountain West) rushing attack that chewed up 215 yards on the ground and propelled the Broncos to their fifth consecutive win and seventh straight over the Bulldogs. The Broncos held Fresno State (4-3, 2-1) scoreless in the first half.No. 25 Michigan 45, Illinois 0ANN ARBOR, Mich. — Denard Robinson threw two touchdown passes and ran for two scores. The Wolverines (4-2, 2-0 Big Ten) got a scare when Robinson left the game late in the first quar-ter. He missed just one-plus pos-sessions, though, and returned to score on a 6-yard run to put Michigan up 17-0 late in the half. Robinson, who wouldn’t elaborate on the injury after the game, ran for a 49-yard score — giv-ing him 10,000-plus career yards of offense — on the Wolverines’ first drive of the second half and tossed an 8-yard TD pass to Devin Funchess on their next posses-sion to make it 31-0. The Fighting Illini (2-5, 0-3) lost their starting quarterback, Nathan Scheelhaase, because of an injury in the second quarter. 6B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421 6BSPORTS FSU: Hopkins sets scoring record Continued From Page 1B CHS: Looking sharp at 5-1 on year Continued From Page 1BBrian Allen said. “I thought that the offense line and run game has been up to par. I set goals, even when I inter-viewed, of what I wanted to see accomplished. A year ago it was 2,000 yards rush-ing. This year, we set the bar even highers. At this point we are at 1,500 yards rush-ing in six games. We want to be at 3,000 when it’s over.” Allen noted that it helped to have three backs of the Tigers’ caliber. “They’ve got it done and done it well as a group,” Allen said. “You don’t have enough footballs to get to them all all night. They’ve done a good job of being selfless. That’s a big part of having a successful group. No matter if there’s a ton of receivers or backs, them not being selfish and going out with the team-first mindset and saying when I get my opportunity I’ll take care of it, and we’ll win makes things much better.” Allen said it’s not just the running backs that are doing their job. “Those stats steadily accumulated,” he said. “The backs have got the bulk of the credit, but you have to look at the guys in front of them. Starting with Laremy Tunsil, Milla Chastain, John Holmes, Deonte Crumitie and John Sweat. Then Shaq Johnson, they’ve continued to get better each week and understanding the game. With all the different defen-sive schemes, you have to be a step up on the game to identify fronts and go out and execute.” Although the passing game isn’t quite where the Tigers want it to be at this point, it has been effective when its needed. Jayce Barber has six touchdowns this season and only one interception on 706 passing yards. But it all feeds from the run. “We have to establish the run to open up the passing game,” Allen said. “We just have to be able to connect. When an opportunity to catch the ball comes, we’ve got to catch it.” But it’s not just about how well the offense has been playing. Defensively, the Tigers are only giving up 13.5 points per game. “Take away a couple of explosive plays and we’re playing pretty good foot-ball,” Allen said. “We have to eliminate teams getting explosive plays. It’s allowed teams to be in games. You’re never going to play a flawless game, but at six games you don’t want to be perfect either. You want to be eliminating bad plays.” Allen said it all starts with his linebacking crew. “There’s been some outstanding efforts from new kids like Terry Calloway,” Allen said. “He’s had 57 tackles, a pass breakup and an interception. He’s play-ing extremely well at times. He’s made some minor mis-takes for explosive plays. Felix Woods is sitting at 43 tackles, two forced fumbles and a breakup. He’s playing very good and has an opportunity to be at the 100 mark at the end of the year. Soloman Bell is right there at 30 tackles.” The secondary has broke in new starters throughout, but they haven’t played young. It begins with junior Trey Marshall. “Trey Marshall has 30 tackles and that’s missing two games,” Allen said. “Roger Cray has 10 pass breakups, a pick and a fum-ble. He’s played beyond his years as a freshman. The sky is the limit if he contin-ues to work hard.” The Tigers had to replace Dequan Ivery on the defen-sive line, but Allen said it hasn’t been a drop off at the position. “Brett Newcomb has been a pleasant surprise in the middle getting doubleteamed every snap,” Allen said. “There’s techniques he can use to get away from it and he’s had a ton of suc-cess leading the team in tackles for losses with four. He’s going out and playing very good for us at this point. Those guys are get-ting it done.” But even at 5-1, Allen knows this team must continue to get better in order to win a state championship. “We can find something even on touchdowns or interceptions that some-one didn’t do well,” Allen said. “We want to get those things corrected. That’s part of the bye week — fix-ing those things.” Mountaineers topped ASSOCIATED PRESSWest Virginia quarterback Geno Smith throws under press ure from Texas Tech’s Kerry Hyder during the game in Lubbock, Texas, on Saturday. finally got on the board late in the second quar-ter when Chase Rettig hit Bobby Swigert for an 18-yard score. Before the Eagles hit the scoreboard, James Wilder Jr. caught a seven-yard touchdown pass and Kelvin Benjamin scored from the 6-yard line. Both came on passes from Manuel. Dustin Hopkins kicked a 51-yard field goal to round out the quarter and became the ACC’s all-time scoring leader and finished the game with 402 points all-time. Hopkins had 15 points in the contest with three field goals and six extra points. Pryor added his second touchdown of the evening on a three-yard score in the third quarter and Hopkins connected on a second field goal to put the Seminoles up 41-7. With the game already out of hand, Manuel fin-ished his night off with his fourth touchdown pass to start the fourth quarter. This time he hit Wilder Jr., who scored his second touchdown on the 12-yard play. Hopkins’ third field goal of the night rounded out the scoring at 51-7 with 6:53 remaining in the fourth quarter. And while Florida State piled up the scoring late, it wasn’t about proving that the Seminoles are still one of the nation’s top teams. Fisher already knows that. “I’m not interested in trying to send a message,” Fisher said. “I’m interested in trying to win a football game.” LSU knocks off South CarolinaAssociated PressBATON ROUGE, La. — LSU freshman Jeremy Hill highlighted a breakout 124-yard, two-touchdown performance with a 50-yard scoring run, and the ninth-ranked Tigers handed No. 3 South Carolina its first loss of the season, 23-21 on Saturday night. LSU (6-1, 2-1 SEC) substantially outgained South Carolina (6-1, 4-1) 406 yards to 211, but struggled to find the end zone. Three times, LSU settled for field goals after driving at least as far as the Gamecocks 5-yard line, and another drive to the South Carolina 15 stalled on a missed field goal. But Hill’s long score with 5:03 left gave LSU a nine-point lead that proved too much to overcome. Connor Shaw drove South Carolina for a late TD on a pass to Bruce Ellington with 1:41 left.Arkansas 49, Kentucky 7FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. — Tyler Wilson and Arkansas took out a sea-son’s worth of frustration against Kentucky. Wilson was 23 of 31 passing for 372 yards and a career-high five touch-downs to lead Arkansas to a 49-7 win over the Wildcats in a game shortened by severe weather. Wilson threw a 74-yard touchdown pass to running back Jonathan Williams on the opening play for the Razorbacks, who had 533 yards of total offense before the game was called in the third quarter because of lightning.

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By LAURA HAMPSON lhampson@lakecityreporter.com The Suwannee River Water Management District has created a new water resources division, charged with gathering and evaluating data to monitor the health of area waters. Dr. Erich Marzolf was hired this month to lead a staff of 18 as the new water resources director. Marzolf said the division will evalu ate the biology and chem istry of area springs, lakes and rivers. You could have enough water, but it may be poor qual ity, he said. Marzolf, of Gainesville, will oversee water resource evaluations including water quality; monitoring and data acquisition; and data management and analysis operations. The employees were previously spread among different departments, he said. The district has put a lot of effort into studying minimum flows and levels for potentially impaired waters, Marzolf said. Another set of impair ment evaluations is look ing at water chemistry and biology to evaluate water quality, he said. Thats something we hope to do more of, Marzolf said. Evaluating the water supply is the first process in improving water quality. Thats step one, to evalu ate and identify some sort of impairment, he said. Marzolf has nearly 30 years of experience in the field of environmen tal sciences. He previously served at the St. Johns River Water Management District, working in vari ous environmental scien tist and supervisory posi tions since 1994. During that time, he focused on hydrologic and nutrient restoration for lakes, rivers, springs, and wetlands. Im excited to come to the Suwannee district and continue that work with a different set of springs, he said. A key accomplishment at the St. Johns district was his management of a 760-acre treatment wetland designed to remove phos phorus from Lake Apopka, according to a Suwannee district press release. Marzolf obtained his M.S. and Ph.D. in aquatic ecology from the University of California Davis. He earned his B.A. in biol ogy from the Colorado College. The Suwannee district has long been a place for my familys fishing, pad dling, and recreation. I look forward to working with the staff to preserve, protect, and improve the districts special aquatic resources, Marzolf said. The district welcomes Erich Marzolf to our team, said District Executive Director Ann Shortelle. With Erichs leadership, experience, and dedication to North Floridas water resources, I know he will be a valuable asset in our efforts to protect our springs, rivers, and lakes, she said. 1CBIZ FRONT ON BUSINESS Jerry Osteryoung (850) 644-3372 jostery@comcast.net Remember, people will judge you by your actions, not your intentions. You may have a heart of gold but so does a hard-boiled egg. Anonymous S o often, busi ness owners and managers have problems that they are not address ing because they are either unable or unwilling to deal with them. Many times these entrepreneurs tell me that they do not have the time to deal with these No action is an action Lake City Reporter 1CBIZ FRONT Week of October 14-20, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section C Columbia, Inc. Your marketplace source for Lake City and Columbia County 1CColumbia Inc. Plus sales tax. Delivery Extra. Limited time offer. Plus sales tax. Delivery Extra. Limited time offer. $ 12 $ 10 PIZZA & WINGS PICK TWO Medium 1-Topping Pizza, Small Oven Baked Sub, 8 Piece Wings, Any Medium Salad or Baked Pasta FT. WHITE 7905 S.W. Hwy 27 corner of Hwy. 27 & Hwy. 47 inside the B&B Food Store 497-1484 CARRY-OUT ONLY LAKE CITY 5735 SW State Rd. 247 corner of SR 242 & SR 247 inside the B&B Food Store 752-3111 CARRY-OUT ONLY LAKE BUTLER 280 West Main St. next to Mercantile Bank 496-2878 CARRY-OUT ONLY LIVE OAK 6852 Suwanee Plaza Ln. In Walmart Plaza 330-0331 CARRYOUT ONLY LAKE CITY 857 Southwest Main Blvd. in Lake City Plaza 755-7050 WE DELIVER! Plus sales tax. Delivery extra. Limited time offer. 21464 _LCReporter_10/17/12 Plus sales tax. Limited time offer LARGE PIZZA $ 5 95 $ 10 Cheese or Pepperoni Any Specialty Carry-out Veggie, Howie Maui, Meat Eaters or Works Additional toppings available Two Medium 2-topping Pizzas, an order of our NEW Flavored Howie Bread, one Free Dipping Sauce and a 2-Liter! Two for or 59 each N EW DIPPI N G SAUC ES Jalapeno Cheese, Garlic Butter, Bleu Cheese, Ranch, BBQ & Pizza Sauce $ 1 FLAVOR ED BR E A DS : Garlic Herb $ 15 $ 15 October is Breast Cancer Awareness month and for every Large Pizza purchased, Hungry Howies will make a donation to the National Breast Cancer Foundation. Their programs help save lives through breast cancer awareness campaigns, early detection methods and cancer research. Thru Love, Hope & Pizza, you can help the cause. Together, we can make a difference. At Participating Locations Plus Sales Tax. Delivery Extra. Large 1-Topping Pizza PLUS 8 Wings, Cajun Bread and Dipping Sauce ACTION continued on 2C New unit to assess water health Suwannee River district monitors rivers and lakes FILE Two people canoe down the Ichetucknee River. The Suwannee River Water Management District recently reorganized and created a water resources division to evaluate the quality of area lakes, rivers and springs. Marzlolf

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problems because there are more pressing issues requiring their immediate attention. Other times, they are just unsure how to fix it, and it is easier to simply ignore it. What these entrepreneurs are forgetting, however, is that problems do not remain static when ignored. Rather, they esca-late over time, and in the end, that unresolved prob-lem can cost them dearly. Most often, I see entrepreneurs neglecting issues that involve problem employees. The reason is obvious. Having to disci-pline an employee — or worst-case scenario, let them go — is unpleasant and painful. To avoid having to deal with these unpleas-ant situations, managers frequently pretend not to see the problems. But not only does this affect the morale of the entire office but it also undermines the manager’s authority. The rest of the staff eventually will lose respect for the leader because failing to take action against bad behavior is tantamount to accepting it. I was working with a restaurant that had been in operation for a reason-able length of time but was still not making adequate profits. The owner was not losing money, but he was barely making enough to keep his head above water. A rough rule of thumb in the restaurant industry is that food costs should be about 32 percent or less of total revenue. Though the owner had been to enough seminars and schools to know how to manage a restaurant, his food costs were hovering above that mark, around 38 percent. When I con-fronted him about this, he simply said that he did not know how to fix this issue as he felt his prices were already pretty high. He was acting as though the problem would either go away or resolve itself if he just did nothing about it. Of course, that did not happen, and now his economic well-being was being threatened. He also did not realize that by tak-ing no action, he was mak-ing a deliberate choice and not just passively delaying the decision. After talking with him, I came to see that he was just unsure of how to fix the problem and lacked confidence in his instincts. When I began tossing out some suggestions, he shared that many were things he had already thought of. He just needed validation from me that these were the right calls. However, until we talked, he was unwilling to act. When you are faced with a problem that you do not know how to address, you must first identify the underlying cause. Second, you need to come up with at least three possible solu-tions. And finally, you must pick the solution you feel is best for your business. Ignoring the problem just allows it to grow. Now go out and see if you have been delaying decisions on problems you need to be addressing. Just remember to gather all the relevant facts before mak-ing any critical decisions. 2C LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF OCTOBER 14, 2012 2CBIZ/MOTLEY NO TIME LIKE THE PRESENT TO KEEP YOUR FUTURE ON TRACK. Lots of times, changes in life also affect your investments. That’s why there’s never been a better time to schedule your free portfolio review. We’ll talk about the changes in your life, and help you decide whether it makes sense to revise your investments because of them. Name That Company9Xj\[`eE\nPfib:`kp#@dXkfg ^cfYXcd\[`XXe[\ek\ikX`ed\ek ZfdgXep%DpYiXe[j`eZcl[\?9F# :`e\dXo#KEK#K9J#:EE#E\nC`e\ :`e\dX#:XikffeE\knfib#8[lckJn`d# G\fgc\#Jgfikj@ccljkiXk\[#:ffb`e^C`^_k# @eJkpc\#I\XcJ`dgc\#=fikle\Xe[Dfe\p%@ i\XZ_dfi\k_Xe(*/d`cc`feL%J%Zfejld\ij dfek_cp`egi`ek#fec`e\Xe[m`XdfY`c\[\m`Z\j% @m\gif[lZ\[dfi\k_Xe,'KMj_fnj]fik_\ lgZfd`e^j\Xjfe%PfldXpbefnd\]fidp Yljpd\i^\i_`jkfip%DpeXd\i\]c\ZkjXY`^(00' d\i^\i#Xe[`e)'''8FCYfl^_kd\%@jglef]] 8FC`e)''0% N_fXd@6Know the answer? Send it to us with Foolish Trivia on the top and you’ll be entered into a drawing for a nifty prize! company can undo the effects of a subsequent decade of favorable business developments.” sh4HEWORSTOFTHESE (arguments for selling a stock) is perhaps, ‘You can’t go broke taking a profit.’ Can you imagine a CEO using this line to urge his board to sell a star subsidiary?” sh/NLYTHOSEWHOWILLBE sellers of (stocks) in the near future should be happy at seeing stocks rise. Prospective purchasers should much prefer sinking prices.” sh!TRULYGREATBUSINESS must have an enduring ‘moat’ that protects excellent returns. … Com-PETITORSWILLREPEATEDLYASSAULTANYbusiness ‘castle’ that is earning high returns. Therefore a formidable bar-rier such as a company’s being the LOWrCOSTPRODUCERxORPOSSESSINGAPOWERFULWORLDWIDEBRANDxISessential for sustained success.” sh-ONEYWILLALWAYSFLOW TOWARDOPPORTUNITYANDTHEREISANABUNDANCEOFTHATIN!MERICACommentators today often talk of ‘great uncertainty.’ But think back, FOREXAMPLETO$EC/CTAND3EPT.OMATTERHOWSERENETODAYMAYBETOMORROWISALWAYSUNCERTAINv K_\Dfkc\p=ffcKXb\ 'ENERAL-ILLS$OES Generally Well7HILEMANYPEOPLEMAYKNOW 'ENERAL-ILLS.93%')3FORits variety of delicious consumer goods products (Cheerios, Yoplait, Haagen-Dazs and Nature Valley, to NAMEAFEWMANYFAILTOTHINKOFITas a profitable stock. But after good NEWSINITSLATESTEARNINGSREPORTmore people may be paying attention to this often-overlooked company. The company’s earnings rose an IMPRESSIVEPERCENTOVERYEARrAGOLEVELSWHILEREVENUEADVANCEDpercent, largely due to higher vol-UME3ALESATTHECOMPANYSINTERrNATIONALSEGMENTGREWPERCENTTOBILLIONWHICHCREATEDANIMPRESSIVEPERCENTBOOMINTHATdivision’s operating profit. 'ENERAL-ILLSISONEOFMANYIN the food industry that are strug-GLINGWITHTHEGLOBALMARKET/None hand, consumers are still very budget-conscious and are focused on getting the most bang for their buck WITHCHEAPBULKFOODSTUFFS"UTTHEDROUGHTINTHE-IDWESTANDRISINGRAWrMATERIALCOSTSARESLASHINGPROFITmargins and forcing companies to cut back as much as possible. That’s ONEREASON'ENERAL-ILLSPLANSTOCUTABOUTPERCENTOFITSWORKFORCEin the near future. 'ENERAL-ILLSHASBETTERREVENUE GROWTHANDALARGEROPERATINGMARrgin than many of its competitors, not to mention a solid dividend yield RECENTLYNEARPERCENT#OMBINEDWITHADECENT0%RATIOITLOOKSLIKEa solid long-term investment. TheMotley Fool To Educate, Amuse & Enrich 8jbk_\=ffc Dp;ldY\jk@em\jkd\ek 9EARS9OUNG3OMETIMEAGOMYMONEYIN a managed brokerage account WASNTDOINGTOOBADLY7HEN)GOTDIVORCEDTHOUGH)TAPPEDSOMEOFITTOLIVEONFORAWHILEAND)BEGANWORRYINGABOUTTHEaccount’s hefty annual fee. !NOLDFRIENDINTRODUCEDme to her boss at a broker-AGEWHOSAIDTHATATAGE)SHOULDSELLEVERYTHINGand buy investments such as annuities to preserve my assets. )AGREEDBUTSOONREALIZEDTHATMYMONEYWASLOCKEDUPAND)COULDWITHDRAWONLYACERTAINAMOUNTANNUALLY!LSO)SUDrDENLYOWEDALOTINCAPITALGAINSTAXES4HEREWASTIMETOUNDOMYDECISIONSO)DID%VENAT)WASFIRINGUPMYCAREERˆH.H., via email The Fool Responds: 3OME annuities can serve some folks VERYWELLBUTLEARNALOTABOUTthem and any other investments before buying. Look closely at fees, restrictions, penalties and LIMITATIONSONHOWWELLTHEYCANREWARDYOU!TYOUMAYHAVETOMOREWORKINGYEARSANDit’s reasonable to still keep some money in solid stocks.Do you have an embarrassing lesson learned the hard way? Boil it down to 100 words (or less) and send it to The Motley Fool c/o My Dumbest Investment. Got one that worked? Submit to My Smartest Investment. If we print yours, you’ll win a Fool’s cap! C8JKN<
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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDSUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012 3C Classified Department: 755-5440 CLASSIFIED AD vantageTake ADvantage of the Reporter Classifieds!755-5440Lake City Reporter FIND IT SELL IT BUY IT $17504 lines 3 days Includes 2 Signs Each additional line $1.65 Garage Sale Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$10104 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.10One item per ad Under $500 Personal Merchandise Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$16754 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.15One item per ad Under $1,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$23704 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.45One item per ad Under $2,500 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $4,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$27404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.55One item per ad Under $4,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$30404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.65One item per ad Under $6,000 Placing An Ad Service Guide Limited to service type advertis-ing only.4 lines, one month....$92.00 $10.80 each additional lineIncludes an additional $2.00 per ad for each Wednesday insertion. DeadlinesBe Sure to Call Early You can call us at 755-5440 Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.Some people prefer to place their classified ads in person, and some ad categories will require prepay-ment. Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street.You can also fax or email your ad copy to the Reporter.FAX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the Classified Department.EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreporter.comAd is to Appear:TuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday Call by:Mon., 10:00 a.m.Mon., 10:00 a.m.Wed., 10:00 a.m.Thurs., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fax/Email by:Mon., 9:00 a.m.Mon., 9:00 a.m.Wed., 9:00 a.m.Thurs., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.These deadlines are subject to change without notice. Cancellations, Changes & Billing Questions Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject, or classify all advertisements under appropriate headings. Copy should be checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day of pub-lication. Credit for published errors will be allowed for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement which was incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be published, nor for any general, special or consequential damages. Advertising language must comply with Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition of discrimi-nation in employment, housing and public accommodations. Standard abbreviations are acceptable; how-ever, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated. Ad Errors-Please read your ad on the first day of publication. Weaccept responsibility for only the first incorrect insertion, and only the charge for the ad space in error. Please call 755-5440 immediately for prompt correc-tion and billing adjustments.CancellationsNormal advertising deadlines apply for cancellation.Billing InquiriesCall 755-5440. Should further information be required regarding payments or credit limits, your call will be trans-ferred to the accounting depart-ment. General Information In Print and Onlinewww.lakecityreporter.com Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$2504 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $.25One item per ad Under $100 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, LOGISTICS AND SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT 164 Duty Days-POSITION # F99918 RE-ADVERTISED Teach courses in logistics and supply chain management such as Principles of Quality Management, Operations Management, Transportation & Distribution, Purchasing & Inventory Management, Introduction to Supply Chain Management, and Warehouse Management. Requires Master’s degree in logistics or similar or Master’s in Business Administration with some emphasis in Supply Chain Management or with a minimum of 3 years of experience in logistics or supply chain. SALARY: Based on degree and experience. APPLICATION DEADLINE: 10/22/12 Persons interested should provide College application, vita, and photocopies of transcripts. All foreign transcripts must be submitted with official translation and evaluation. Position details and applications available on web at: www.fgc.edu Human Resources Florida Gateway College 149 S.E. College Place Lake City, FL 32025-2007 Phone (386) 754-4314 Fax (386) 754-4814 E-Mail: humanr@fgc.eduFGC is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. VP/ADA/EA/EO College in Education and Employment COORDINATOR LAW ENFORCEMENT/CORRECTIONS TRAINING POSITION #: P99975 Coordinates, supports, schedules and provides instruction and curriculum maintenance for all basic and advanced law enforcement and correctional training programs offered by Florida Gateway College. Represents the college and law enforcement/corrections programs in various public forums. Requires: Bachelors degree in appropriate area plus three years experience with Law Enforcement or Corrections Programs. Knowledge of law enforcement programs and experience in law enforcement or corrections training. Computer literate in word processing, spreadsheets, and databases. Desirable Qualifications: Certified FDLE instructor. Three years experience in a full-time, sworn law enforcement or correctional position. Familiar with the FDLE A.T.M.S. database. Salary: $37,500 annually, plus benefits Application Deadline: 10/25/12 College employment application required. Position details and applications available on web at: www.fgc.edu Human Resources Florida Gateway College 149 S.E. College Place Lake City, FL 32025-2007 Phone (386) 754-4314 Fax (386) 754-4814 E-Mail: humanr@fgc.eduFGC is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. VP/ADA/EA/EO College in Education and Employment rn nr LegalPUBLIC NOTICEONINVITATION TO BIDITB-001-2013Sealed bids will be accepted by the City of Lake City, Florida, 205 N Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055 until Thursday, November 15, 2012 at 11:00 A.M. All bids will be opened and read aloud at 11:15 A.M. in the City Council Chambers locat-ed on the 2nd floor of City Hall, 205 N Marion Avenue, Lake City,Florida.US HIGHWAY90 LANDSCAPE & MAINTENANCE – ANNUALCONTRACTDocuments may be viewed on the City website at procurement.lcfla.com or at De-mandStar.com. Contact the Procure-ment Department at (386) 719-5816 or (386) 719-5818 for more informa-tion.05535286October 14, 2012 020Lost & Found FOUND Cordless Electric Drill, in Lake City. Call to identify. and pay for cost of Ad. Contact 386-397-9070 100Job Opportunities05535253Experienced Housekeeper Needed. Professional References and background check required. Contact Susan 365-8807 FULL-TIME CUSTODIAN Wanted. Primary duties include basic knowledge of boilers and HVAC system, cleaning sanctuary and Fellowship Hall, mowing, minor repairs, setup and taking down tables and chairs and general building maintenance.Must be able to lift 60 lbs. Criminal background check required. Please send resume and references to Staff Parish Relations, First United Methodist Church, Lake City, 973 S. Marion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025. Deadline is Oct. 19, 2012. 100Job Opportunities05535290Northeast Florida Telephone Co is currently seeking an individual for our Engineering Department. The individual will help with day-to-day task of keeping our mapping system and records updated; projects budgeted and completed, and help to create staking sheets. Job requires outdoor work. Qualifications: A2Year Degree in ITor Engineering Technology, a working knowledge of MS Access, GIS mapping and CAD. The preferred candidate will have knowledge of how to create and use shape files in a mapping system, VBA programming and MS SQL. Excellent benefits package. Drug screening, physical and background check is required. Resume can be emailed to employment@nefcom.net Drivers: All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-ACDLFlatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down CALL: 866-823-0323 Established Ocala business is Looking to hire additional sales teams for our expanding product line.Earn $500.00/week, plus commission!If you’re upbeat, friendly and enjoy working with the public, then contact us for a confidential interview and start earning the income you deserve! Valid driver’s license, proof of insurance and overnight travel is required. Call us TODAYat 352-233-2818.Telecom Service Bureau, Inc. KNUCKLE BOOMOPERATOR CLASS AREQUIRED, Operate knuckle boom truck, truck maintenance minor repairs truck Send reply to Box 05097, C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056 100Job OpportunitiesLand Survey Help Wanted 386-755-6166 140 NWRidgewood Avenue Lake City, FL32055 MANAGEMENT OPPORTUNITIES McDonald's of Alachua has multiple positions available for qualified/experienced mgrs. $8-$16 hr /benefits/bonuses Apply on line @ www.mcstate.com/alachua Or Call 386-755-2475 MILLWRIGHT Welding, Machining, Hydraulics, Gear Ratios, Fabricating, Problem Solving, Repair, Maintenance, Dismantle, Reassemble – Send reply to Box 05096, C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056 SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 Small historic non-denominational church with a heart for children is seeking a pianist for Sunday services. Please contact 904-259-4194 if interested. The City of Lake City has openings for the following positions: Girls Club Leader P/T Recreation Collection Technician I Utilities Collection Technician I Waste Water WWTPOperator "C" Waste Water Temp WWTPOperator "C" Waste Water Obtain detailed job descriptions and applications by visiting 1st floor receptionist in City Hall 205 N Marion Avenue, Lake City, FL32055 or visit our web site at www.lcfla.com The City of Lake City is an EEO/AA/ADA/VPemployer. Wanted-P/T Handi-Man, Exp. in Routine Maintenance such as plumbing, elect, painting & carpentry. Applications Available at Camp Weed & Cerveny Conference Center, 11057 Camp Weed Place, Live Oak. WELDER NEEDED Must have experience, the ability to measure in .010 and fit a must. Machine shop experience helpful. Apply in person, Grizzly Mfg., 174 NE Cortez Terrace, Lake City, FL32055, or Email: guy@qiagroup.com: NO CALLS Whack A-Do now hiring Stylist. Full time/Part time Hourly pay + commission. No Clientel needed Full Service or Just Hair Cuts. Contact Darlene. 386-984-6738 120Medical EmploymentMedical practice needs Ophthalmic Technician FTor PT. Experience preferred. Fax resume 386-755-7561. 120Medical Employment05535111Advent Christian VillageCurrent JOBS Line Advertisement call 658-5627 orvisit www.acvillage.net 24 hrs/day, 7 days/week Be your BEST, Among the BEST! FTLicensed Physician Assistant (PA-C) FTposition to deliver primary care in HPSAdesignated, established rural clinic with on site board certified physician. On-call rotation with two other practitioners for evenings / weekends and medical support for 161-bed skilled nursing facility required. Experience preferred but not required. Unrestricted FLlicense required. Experience in electronic medical records and geriatrics a plus. RN Quality of Care Leader Unrestricted Florida RN license, excellent clinical nursing / assessment skills, current CPR certification, verifiable IVskill (start, regulate, maintain, discontinue IV’s) required. Good communication, organization, and computer skills required; must work as part of interdisciplinary team to assure outstanding quality of life / quality of care for LTC residents. On-call rotation required. Management / supervisory experience and knowledge of LTC regs desired. FTpositions include health, dental, life, disability, supplemental insurance; 403b retirement account; paid time off, access to on site day care and fitness facilities. Apply in person at Personnel Office, Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m., or fax resume/credentials to (386) 658-5160. EOE / Drug Free Workplace/Criminal background checks required. 05535249Rehab Director/ PT Avalon Healthcare Center is currently accepting applications for the full time position of Rehab Director/PT Please apply at Avalon Healthcare and Rehabilitation Center. 1270 S.W. Main Blvd. Lake City, Florida 32025 or fax resume to 386-752-8556 EOE 05535288Medical Assistant Full time medical assistant with several years experience required.Salary based on experience.Email resume in confidence to mafaisal05@yahoo.com or fax to 386-758-5987. 120Medical Employment05535301RN, Unit Supervisor Weekends Baya Pointe Nursing & Rehab Center now hiring RN's with experience in Long Term Care and Supervisory Skills. 12 hour shifts, weekends only. CNA Full time and Part time positions available. All Shifts Please apply 587 SE Ermine Ave., Lake City, Fl 32025 or fax resume to 386-752-7337. EOE/DFWP 140Work Wanted Experience Dental Hygienist Looking for a Full, Part time or Substitute Position, Excellent References. Call 386-288-8321 240Schools & Education05534919Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class12/24/2012• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-11/05/12• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies BLACK & WHITE MERLE Austrian Shepherd dog, male, 19 mos. old, purebred, $250 or OBO. Good with children. Call 386-365-2900 Free to good home Beautiful, Female American Bulldog, 1yr 8mths, Needs room to run, Good With people and other animals. 386-752-8317 PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 330Livestock & SuppliesDeep Creek Farms Barn kept Square or Net Wrapped Round Hay Bales For Sale Ronnie Hughes (386)365-1425 413Musical MerchandiseBACH Trumpet TR300, Silver color. Excellent Condition With hard case. $400. 386-623-3149 755-5440Toplace your classified ad call REPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Linewww.lakecityreporter.com

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDSUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012 Classified Department: 755-5440 4C 1986 CorvetteWell maintained, runs great. 95,000 miles.$8,500 obo 386-344-2107 _____________________________ Announcements _____________________________ Turn your art into cash! FREE ART APPRAISALS FOR POSSIBLE CONSIGNMENT* Oct 13 & 14. Noon to 10pm at Baterbys Art Gallery. 9101 International Drive, Ste. 1008, Orlando, FL 32819. Call 1-866-537-1013 or visit www.Baterbys.com for more information. *Verbal appraisals & consignments taken based on consideration. _____________________________ Financial Services _____________________________ CASH NOW!! RECEIVING PAYMENTS from Mortgage Notes, Structured Settlements, Contest annuity or Cell Tower Lease? SELL PAYMENTS NOW! NYAC (800)338-5815 _____________________________ For Sale _____________________________ LEATHER LIVING ROOM SET. In original plastic, never used. Orig price $3000, Sacrice $975. Can deliver. Call Bill (813)298-0221 _____________________________ CHERRY BEDROOM SET. Solid Wood, never used, brand new in factory boxes. Original cost $4500. Sell for $795. Can deliver. Call Tom (407)574-3067 _____________________________ Help Wanted _____________________________ Freight Up = More $ Need CDL Class A Driving Exp (877)258-8782 www.drive4melton.com _____________________________ Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualieddrivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.com EOE _____________________________ DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for Stevens Transport! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 _____________________________ Miscellaneous _____________________________ AIRLINES ARE HIRING T rain for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualied Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 _____________________________ NURSING CAREERS BEGIN HERE – GET TRAINED IN MONTHS, NOT YEARS. FINANCIAL AID IF QUALIFIED. HOUSING AVAILABLE. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. CALL CENTURA INSTITUTE (877) 206-6559 _____________________________ AIRLINE CAREERS Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualied Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 _____________________________ MEDICAL CAREERS begin here -Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualied.SCHEV authorized. Call 888-203-3179 www.CenturaOnline.com _____________________________ SURROGATE MOMS NEEDED! Most generous compensation and benets programs offered anywhere, starting at $25,000. Healthy, non-smoking, 21-39, prior birth without complications, no criminal background. Condential, compassionate services. Reasonable expenses will be paid. OpenArmsConsultants.com _____________________________ OTR Drivers Wanted _____________________________ Drivers/ Class A Flatbed. GET HOME WEEKENDS! Up to 39/mi, Late model equipment & Big Miles! 1yr OTR Flatbed experience, (800)572-5489 x227, SunBelt Transport _____________________________ TIRED OF LIVING PAYCHECK TO PAYCHECK? There’s great earning potential as a Professional Truck Driver! The average Professional Truck Driver earns over $700/wk*! 16-Day CDL Training @ NFCC/Roadmaster! Approved for Veterans Training. CALL TODAY! (866)467-0060 *DOL/BLS 2012 _____________________________ Drivers 100% Owner Operator Co. Pay increase / Home weekly, Regional & Dedicated, Class A C.D.L. 1 yr. exp. In last 3 Call (800)695-9643 or www.driveforwatkins.com _____________________________ Schools & Instruction _____________________________ MEDICAL BILLING TRAINING! Train for Medical Billing Careers at SCTrain.edu No Experience Needed! Job placement assistance after training! HS/GED/PC Needed (888)872-4677 Week of October 8, 2012 430Garage Sales PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 440Miscellaneous Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, Root Raking, Bush Hog, Seeding, Sod, Disking, site prep, ponds & irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200 Stanley# 45 Combination Plane Very Good Condition With Wood Box. $250. Contact 386-438-8214 630Mobile Homes forRent2 BR MH. $400 $450. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 2BR/1BA Located onCountyRoad 133, $450 mo. plus $450 dep. 954-258-8841 3BR/2BADWMH on 1 acre private lot, 1st+last+dep required located in Ellisville. No pets. Contact 352-870-5144 4bd/2ba -5 ac,Conv. to LC & G’ville, new energy efficient AC, lrg deck, 10x20 shed Sale or Lease $950 mth.1st + dept. 867-4586 Country Setting, 14 x70 MH. 2BR/2BA,large master tub, CH/A $575 mo. $300 dep. No Pets 386-755-0064 or (904) 771-5924 LARGE CLEAN 2 & 3 bdms CH/A5 Points Area. Also 3 bdrm Westside. 1st + Deposit Required. No Pets. 961-1482 640Mobile Homes forSale(1) Only New Jacobsen Triplewide 42x64 Only $99,995 Del & Set with Air. Beautiful Home. North Pointe of Gainesville. 352-872-5566 4BD/2BADWMH on 4 acres Owner Financing Available. 386-623-3404 or 386-623-3396 575 CREDITSCORE? New 3/2 or 4/2 doubles. Your Approved with 10% down. Call for details. North Pointe 352-872-5566 BIGGESTSALEEVER 13 Jacobsen Display Models reduced for Fast Sale! North Pointe Homes, 352-872-5566 LAND ANDHOME Attention land owners with good credit. No Money Down and Low Fixed Rates and Low Fees. Let’s Deal! North Pointe Homes, Gainesville 352-872-5566 Palm Harbor Homes 4/2 From 499 Mo Loaded3/2 From 399 Mo Loaded $0 Down, Singlewides $299/Mo 800-622-2832 ext 210 650Mobile Home & Land2 OwnerFinanced Homes/ 1 RentalLake City, Mayo, Branford 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com CLEAN NICE 2/2 SW,and 740sf. frame studio, 1 bath outbuilding, nice country ac 8 mi to VA. $39,000 Cash only 86.961.9181 Nice 2br/2ba, 1996 DW, Energy Efficient, 3/4 frnshd, 3 yr old roof, 1/2 ac lot in Oak Wd subdv in Live Oak $39,900. Call 309-645-2659 Owner Fin.-Nice huge 4/2.5 on 3 ac, x-fenced, creek, lrg deck,Paved Rd. McAlpin area. Small down $950/mth 386-867-1833. For picswww.suwanneevalleyproperties.com OwnerFinance 3/2 on 2.5 ac Mayo Area. $675 mth Small Down 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05534938We’ve got it all!$89 Deposit Limited Avail. Call Today! Windsong Apts. *Free afterschool program386-758-8455 1BR APT. Downtown Location, Clean. New Carpet $450 mo, plus Security. NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456 2/1 1300 sqft, duplex w/ gargage. totally refurbished,W/D hook up, CH/A, $650 mth Lease Req. 386-965-2407 or 386-758-5881 2BR/1BAAPT. w/garage. West side of town. $650. mo. 386-961-9000 2BR/2BAw/garage 5 minutes from VAhospital and Timco. Call for details. 386-365-5150 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Ck out this Awesome Dea l 2/1, in Fort White, Lg.Ft & bporch, Lg Liv/Kit/Din, Fenced byard, elec, trash, mowingincl No pets. Free WFI $695 mth. 941-924-5183 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRentCOZYCOTTAGE 1 BRNew paint & carpet. 10 mins. South of LC, all util. & satellite incl. $550 mo. Pet ok, 386-758-2408 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Quant 2br/1ba Apt. Peaceful Location with Lake View CH/A$500. mo $500 dep. No pets. 386-344-2170 720Furnished Apts. ForRentRooms forRent Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent05535236LAKE CITY 4BR/2BA 1248 SF $650 2 AVAILABLEJUSTREDUCED $45/MONTH3BR/2BA 1496 SF $695JUSTREDUCED3BR/2BA 1200 SF $725 3BR/2BA 980 SF $575 2BR/1BA M/HOME $475 BRANFORD 4BR/3BA 2108 SF $800 JUSTREDUCEDMADISON 2BR/1BA JUSTREMODELED $450 1 AVAILABLE 3BR/1.5BA REMODELED $550 Visit our website: www .NorthFloridahomeandland.com Mike Foster386-288-3596 Mitchell Lee 386-867-1155Accredited Real Estate Services 1688 SE Baya Dr., Suite 105 Lake City, FL32025 Accredited Real Estate Services is a Full Service Real Estate Office. We do: Rentals ~ Property Management ~ Property Sales. 2/1 Brick house Lrg eat in kit. & closets, CH/A, 514 SE First Ave. Jasper. $550 mth 1st,last+sec. No pets. 772-285-1032 3BD/1.5BAOn Leslie Gln CH/A, $725 mth & $725 dep. Contact 386-344-2170 3br/2ba DWon Tranquil Gln. Completely renovated. backyard fenced. $700/mo + $400 security. 386-938-5637 750Business & Office RentalsCk out this Awesome DealFort White, Newly Remodled. Multi use Comm Prop. Approx 850sqft. Elec & water incl. Free WFI & yard Maint. High Traffic Area $725 mth 941-924-5183. FOR LEASE: Downtown Office Space. Convenient to Court house. Call 386-755-3456 ForRent orLease: Former Doctors office, Former professional office & Lg open space: avail on East Baya Ave. Competitive rates. Weekdays 386-984-0622 evenings/weekends 497-4762 PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 805Lots forSale PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 820Farms & Acreage10 acres with well/septic/pp (not guar); $300 dwn; $580 a mth. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 940Trucks 1992 FORD Ranger 4.0, 4x4, 5 speed transmission. Great Mud truck. $1800 OBO. Contact 386.758.3238 950Cars forSale 2006 MAZADA MIATACONV. Automatic, leather, power. $14,500 ($1,000 below KBB value). Call 386-365-2046. nr 5 a week days Lake City Reporter

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4D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012 4DLIFE SUNDAY EVENING OCTOBER 14, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsAmerica’s Funniest Home Videos (N) Once Upon a Time “Lady of the Lake” Revenge “Con dence” (N) (:01) 666 Park Avenue (N) News at 11Inside Edition 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsThe Insider (N) Love-RaymondBig Bang TheoryCSI: Miami “Tipping Point” Criminal Minds “Corazon” NewsSports ZoneChann 4 NewsBig Bang Theory 5-PBS 5 -Keeping UpAs Time Goes ByNOVA “Secrets of the Viking Sword” Call the Midwife (N) Masterpiece Classic (N) Broadway: The American MusicalMI-5 The team must nd a mole. 7-CBS 7 47 47CBS Evening NewsAction News Jax60 Minutes (N) The Amazing Race (N) The Good Wife “Two Girls, One Code” The Mentalist “Not One Red Cent” (N) Action Sports 360Two and Half Men 9-CW 9 17 17My Baby’s DaddyAccording to JimYourJax MusicVoid TVLaw & Order “Humiliation” Local HauntsLocal HauntsTMZ (N) The Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30e NFL Football New York Giants at San Francisco 49ers. (N) The OT (N) a MLB Baseball National League Championship Series, Game 1: Teams TBA. (N) NewsAction Sports 360 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsFootball Night in America (N) (Live) e(:20) NFL Football Green Bay Packers at Houston Texans. (N) News CSPAN 14 210 350NewsmakersWashington This Week Q & APrime MinisterRoad to the White House Q & A WGN-A 16 239 307Law & Order: Criminal IntentBloopers!How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine(:40) Instant Replay30 Rock30 Rock TVLAND 17 106 304M*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*H “Letters” M*A*S*HLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Oprah: Where Are They Now?Oprah: Where Are They Now?Building a Dream: Oprah WinfreyThe First Graduating Class: Oprah Winfrey’s Leadership Academy for Girls (N) Building a Dream: Oprah Winfrey A&E 19 118 265Beyond Scared StraightStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsShipping War sShipping Wars HALL 20 185 312(5:00)“Family Plan” (2005) “Puppy Love” (2012, Romance) Candace Cameron Bure, Victor Webster. “Audrey’s Rain” (2003, Drama) Jean Smart, Carol Kane. FrasierFrasier FX 22 136 248(5:30)“What Happens in Vegas” (2008) Cameron Diaz, Ashton Kutcher.“Grown Ups” (2010, Comedy) Adam Sandler, Kevin James, Chris Rock.“Easy A” (2010, Comedy) Emma Stone, Penn Badgley, Amanda Bynes. CNN 24 200 202CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN PresentsPiers Morgan TonightCNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents TNT 25 138 245(5:30)“Ocean’s Eleven” (2001) George Clooney, Matt Damon. (DVS)“Sherlock Holmes” (2009, Action) Robert Downey Jr., Jude Law. (DVS)“Sherlock Holmes” (2009, Action) Robert Downey Jr. NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobBig Time RushSpongeBobSee Dad Run (N)“RV” (2006) Robin Williams. A dysfunctional family goes on vacation. The NannyFriendsFriends SPIKE 28 168 241(5:00)“Walking Tall” (2004, Action) Countdown to Bound for Glory (N)“The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift” (2006) Lucas Black, Zachery Ty Bryan. Premiere.“The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift” (2006) MY-TV 29 32 -Ironside Dog helps solve murder. M*A*S*HM*A*S*HColumbo “A Friend in Deed” Thriller “An Attractive Family” The Twilight ZoneThe Twilight Zone DISN 31 172 290Austin & AllyShake It Up!Good Luck CharlieDog With a BlogGood Luck CharlieAustin & Ally (N) Shake It Up! (N) JessieAustin & AllyA.N.T. FarmA.N.T. FarmMy Babysitter LIFE 32 108 252(5:00)“Bride Wars” (2009) “Made of Honor” (2008) Patrick Dempsey, Michelle Monaghan. “Mean Girls” (2004) Lindsay Lohan, Rachel McAdams. Premiere. (:01)“Made of Honor” (2008) USA 33 105 242Law & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims Unit“Resident Evil: Afterlife” (2010) BET 34 124 329(3:30)“The Women of Brewster Place” (1989) Oprah Winfrey, Robin Givens. Premiere. “Michael Jackson’s This Is It” (2009, Documentary) Michael Jackson, Orianthi. Premiere. Don’t Sleep!Don’t Sleep! ESPN 35 140 206 2012 World Series of PokerSportsCenter (N) (Live) BCS Countdown30 for 30 SportsNation (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209CrossFit GamesCrossFit GamesCrossFit GamesBaseball Tonightd WNBA Basketball Finals, Game 1: Teams TBA. (N) World/Poker 2012 World Series of Poker SUNSP 37 -Fishing the FlatsSport FishingSportsman’s Adv. College Football Boston College at Florida State. (Taped) DrivenSaltwater Exp.Into the Blue DISCV 38 182 278MythBusters “Bubble Pack Plunge” MythBusters “Titanic Survival” MythBusters “Trench Torpedo” (N) The Devil’s Triangle (N) Secrets of Secret Societies (N) MythBusters “Trench Torpedo” TBS 39 139 247a MLB Baseball Inside MLB (N)“2 Fast 2 Furious” (2003, Action) Paul Walker, Tyrese, Eva Mendes. (:15)“The Fast and the Furious” (2001) Vin Diesel, Paul Walker. HLN 40 202 204Murder by the Book Murder case. Dominick Dunne: Power, PrivilegeDominick Dunne: Power, PrivilegeMurder by the Book Couple killed. Murder by the Book Murder case. Dominick Dunne: Power, Privilege FNC 41 205 360FOX News Sunday With Chris WallaceFOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) FOX News Sunday With Chris WallaceGeraldo at Large (N) Huckabee E! 45 114 236Keeping Up With the KardashiansKeeping Up With the KardashiansKeeping Up With the KardashiansKeeping Up With the KardashiansMarried to JonasKeeping Up With the KardashiansMarried to Jonas TRAVEL 46 196 277America’s Scariest Halloween Attr.Halloween CrazyMaking Monsters “Evil Tiki” (N) Making Monsters (N) Toy HunterToy HunterDestination FearDestination Fear HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lMillion Dollar RoomsExtreme HomesBuying and Selling “Cristal and Scott” Property BrothersHouse Hunters Renovation (N) TLC 48 183 280Breaking Amish “New Beginnings” Breaking AmishLong Island Medium: On the RoadIsland MediumIsland MediumBreaking Amish “Good vs. Evil” (N) Island MediumIsland Medium HIST 49 120 269American Pickers “Fairlane Fever” American PickersAmerican Pickers “Mama Knows Best” American PickersAmerican Pickers “You Betcha” (:02) American Pickers ANPL 50 184 282Swamp Wars “Killer Bees Attack” Call-WildmanCall-WildmanEating Giants: ElephantGreat Barrier ReefGreat Barrier Reef FOOD 51 110 231Diners, Drive$24 in 24Halloween Wars “Evil Clowns” Cupcake Wars “Mary Poppins” (N) Halloween Wars (N) Iron Chef America (N) Restaurant Stakeout TBN 52 260 372T.D. JakesJoyce MeyerLeading the WayThe Blessed LifeJoel OsteenKerry ShookBelieverVoiceCre o Dollar“The Hiding Place” (1975, Docudrama) Julie Harris, Eileen Heckart. FSN-FL 56 -(5:00) Ball Up Streetball (N) Boys in the HallThe Game 365World Poker Tour: Season 10 (Taped) UFC Unleashed (N) Being: Liverpool (N) World Poker Tour: Season 10 SYFY 58 122 244(4:00)“The Devil’s Advocate”“Jeepers Creepers 2” (2003, Horror) Ray Wise, Jonathan Breck. “The Mist” (2007, Horror) Thomas Jane. A deadly fog engulfs terri ed townspeople. Mothman (2010) AMC 60 130 254(5:50) The Walking Dead(6:57) The Walking Dead(7:59) The Walking DeadThe Walking Dead “Seed” (:01) The Walking Dead “Seed” Talking DeadComic Book Men COM 62 107 249(4:30)“Dumb & Dumber” (1994)“Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story” (2004, Comedy) Vince Vaughn. “Hot Tub Time Machine” (2010, Comedy) John Cusack, Rob Corddry. (:15) Tosh.0(:45) Brickleberry CMT 63 166 327(5:30)“Home for the Holidays” (2005, Drama) Sean Young. Premiere. “Elizabethtown” (2005) Orlando Bloom, Kirsten Dunst. A ight attendant helps a man get back on track. (:15)“Home for the Holidays” NGWILD 108 190 283World’s Weirdest “Freaks on Land” Icy Killers: Alaska’s Salmon SharkWild Alaska (N) Untamed Americas “Mountains” Untamed Americas “Deserts” Wild Alaska NGC 109 186 276Alaska State Troopers “Knife Fight” Drugged The science behind cannabis. Drugged “High on Alcohol” (N) Drugged A crack addict debates rehab. Alaska State Troopers (N) Alaska State Troopers SCIENCE 110 193 284How the Universe Works “Comets” Through Wormhole-FreemanDeep Space Marvels “Life” Deep Space Marvels “Survival” Deep Space Marvels “Destiny” Deep Space Marvels “Life” ID 111 192 285Behind Mansion WallsFinal Witness “The Kids Aren’t Alright” 48 Hours on ID (N) Sins & Secrets “Hilo” (N) Unusual Suspects (N) 48 Hours on ID HBO 302 300 501(5:15)“Red Riding Hood” (2011) (:10)“Hall Pass” (2011, Comedy) Owen Wilson, Jason Sudeikis. ‘R’ Boardwalk Empire (N) Treme Antoine does a good deed. (N) Boardwalk Empire MAX 320 310 515(4:20) Die Hard 2“Titanic” (1997) Leonardo DiCaprio, Billy Zane. A woman falls for an artist aboard the ill-fated ship. ‘PG-13’ Hunted S1 Sneak“In Time” (2011, Science Fiction) Justin Timberlake. ‘PG-13’ SHOW 340 318 545(5:00)“Fright Night” (2011) ‘R’ Dexter “Sunshine and Frosty Swirl” Homeland “Beirut Is Back” Dexter “Buck the System” (N) Homeland “State of Independence” (N) Dexter “Buck the System” MONDAY EVENING OCTOBER 15, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Dancing With the Stars: All-Stars Guest judge Paula Abdul. (N) (Live) (:01) Castle “Murder, He Wrote” (N) News at 11(:35) Nightline (N) 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) The Insider 5-PBS 5 -JournalNightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Antiques RoadshowMarket Warriors Mission Oak furniture. Standing Bear’s Footsteps (N) BBC World NewsTavis Smiley (N) 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJaguars AccessTwo and Half MenHow I Met/MotherPartners (N) 2 Broke Girls (N) Mike & Molly (N) Hawaii Five-0 McGarrett’s mom visits. Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneTMZ (N) 90210 “The Sea Change” (N) Gossip Girl Serena hosts a big gala. (N) Vote America 2012Access HollywoodThe Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family GuyFamily Guya MLB Baseball National League Championship Series, Game 2: Teams TBA. (N) NewsAction News JaxTwo and Half Men 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) The Voice “The Battles Continue” The vocalists perform for the coaches. (N) (:01) Revolution “Soul Train” (N) NewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(5:00) U.S. House of Representatives Politics & Public Policy Today WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosWGN News at Nine (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304M*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Dallas DNA “Lost Time” Dallas DNA A murder and rape case. Undercover Boss “UniFirst” Undercover Boss “GSI Commerce” Undercover BossUndercover Boss “UniFirst” A&E 19 118 265The First 48 Man shot in his home. Hoarders “Wilma; Nora” Hoarders “Charles & Alvin” Hoarders “Joni & Millie” (N) Intervention “Ryan” (N) (:01) Intervention “Susie & Miriam” HALL 20 185 312Little House on the PrairieLittle House on the PrairieNUMB3RS “Identity Crisis” NUMB3RS “Sniper Zero” FrasierFrasierFrasierFrasier “The Club” FX 22 136 248How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherTwo and Half MenTwo and Half Men“Hellboy” (2004, Fantasy) Ron Perlman, John Hurt, Selma Blair. The son of the devil ghts paranormal creatures.“Hellboy” (2004) Ron Perlman. CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245The Mentalist “My Bloody Valentine” The Mentalist “Red Is the New Black” Major CrimesMajor Crimes “Long Shot” (N) The Mentalist “The Red Mile” Major Crimes “Long Shot” NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobFigure It Out (N) Drake & JoshNews W/LindaFull HouseFull HouseFull HouseThe NannyThe NannyFriends The six friends say goodbye. SPIKE 28 168 241CSI: Crime Scene Investigation“Star Wars VI: Return of the Jedi” (1983) Mark Hamill. Luke and his allies have a confrontation with Darth Vader.“Star Wars VI: Return of the Jedi” (1983) Mark Hamill, Harrison Ford. MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*HM*A*S*HLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitSeinfeldFrasierThe Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Phineas and FerbGood Luck CharlieA.N.T. FarmShake It Up!Austin & Ally“Twitches” (2005) Tia Mowry, Tamera Mowry. (:10) Shake It Up!Phineas and FerbA.N.T. FarmMy Babysitter LIFE 32 108 252My Ghost Story “Screamville” My Ghost Story: Caught on Camera“Mean Girls” (2004, Comedy) Lindsay Lohan, Rachel McAdams. “Made of Honor” (2008) Patrick Dempsey, Michelle Monaghan. USA 33 105 242NCIS The murder of a Marine. NCIS: Los Angeles “Borderline” WWE Monday Night RAW (N) (:05)“Mr. Deeds” (2002) BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Top 10 Countdown” (N) The Game“Coming to America” (1988, Comedy) Eddie Murphy, Arsenio Hall, John Amos. Don’t Sleep!The Game ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) Monday Night Countdown (N) (Live) e NFL Football Denver Broncos at San Diego Chargers. (N Subject to Blackout) SportsCenter (N) ESPN2 36 144 209NFL32 (N) SportsCenter (N) E:60 CrossFit GamesCrossFit GamesCrossFit GamesCrossFit Games2012 CrossFit Games (N) SportsCenter (N) Coll. Football Live SUNSP 37 -Sail sh Pro SeriesSport FishingShip Shape TVFlorida SportsmanFishing the FlatsSport FishingSportsman’s Adv.Reel AnimalsSaltwater Exp.Into the BlueFight Sports: In 60 DISCV 38 182 278I (Almost) Got Away With ItAmerican ChopperOverhaulin’ “1967 Camaro” (N) American Chopper “New Venture” (N) American ChopperAmerican Chopper “New Venture” TBS 39 139 247King of QueensKing of QueensSeinfeldSeinfeldFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyConan Cheryl Hines; Michael Kiwanuka. HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) Dr. Drew (N) Nancy GraceShowbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236Fashion PoliceE! News (N) Keeping Up With the KardashiansKeeping Up With the KardashiansMarried to JonasMarried to JonasChelsea Lately (N) E! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. FoodMan v. FoodAnthony Bourdain: No ReservationsAnthony Bourdain: No Reservations (N)Anthony Bourdain: No ReservationsAirport 24/7: MiamiAirport 24/7: Miami HGTV 47 112 229Hunters Int’lHunters Int’lLove It or List It “Kasia and Patrick” Love It or List It “The Singh Family” Love It or List It Victoria and Scott. (N) House Hunters (N) Hunters Int’lLove It or List It “The Wood Family” TLC 48 183 280Island MediumIsland MediumHere Comes HoneyHere Comes HoneyHere Comes HoneyHere Comes HoneyHere Comes Honey Boo BooDown South DanceHere Comes Honey Boo Boo HIST 49 120 269American Pickers “Trading Up” American Pickers “Fast Eddie” Pawn StarsPawn StarsAmerican PickersPawn Stars(:31) Pawn Stars(:02) American Pickers ANPL 50 184 282Fatal AttractionsPolar Bear: Spy on the IceFrozen PlanetYellowstone: Battle for Life Animals living in Yellowstone. Frozen Planet FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, Drive$24 in 24 “Boston” Diners, DriveDiners, Drive TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the LordMax LucadoThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesLiving EdgeKingdom Conn.Jesse DuplantisPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -World Poker Tour: Season 10 College Football USC at Washington. The Dan Patrick ShowBeing: Liverpool SYFY 58 122 244(5:30)“The Mist” (2007, Horror) Thomas Jane, Marcia Gay Harden. Alphas “Need to Know” (N) Haven “Over My Head” Alphas “Need to Know”“Blade II” (2002) Wesley Snipes. AMC 60 130 254“House on Haunted Hill” (1999) Geoffrey Rush, Famke Janssen. “Friday the 13th” (1980, Horror) Betsy Palmer, Adrienne King. (:15)“Friday the 13th, Part 2” (1981, Horror) Amy Steel, John Furey. COM 62 107 249It’s Always SunnyTosh.0The Colbert ReportDaily ShowFuturamaFuturamaSouth ParkSouth ParkBrickleberrySouth ParkDaily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327RebaRebaReba “Red Alert” RebaRebaRebaDallas Cowboys CheerleadersDallas Cowboys CheerleadersCheer “Greatness Is Built on the Fight” NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer “Dueling Pit Bulls” Clash at Croc RiverCroc GanglandsUltimate CrocodileCrocodile KingCroc Ganglands NGC 109 186 276Cocaine Wars “Airport Sting” Wild Justice “Born to Kill” Alaska State TroopersTo Catch a Smuggler “Cavity Courier” Drugs, Inc. The Cannabis industry. To Catch a Smuggler “Cavity Courier” SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeRadioactive ParadiseGreat Lakes ShipwrecksDevil’s Triangle (N) Dive to the Bottom of the WorldGreat Lakes Shipwrecks ID 111 192 285On the Case With Paula ZahnBlood, Lies & AlibisBlood, Lies & AlibisBlood, Lies & Alibis (N) Final Witness “Vixen’s Elixir” (N) Blood, Lies & Alibis HBO 302 300 501Weight Nation(:45) The Weight of the Nation “Part 2: Choices” Real Time With Bill Maher“A Very Harold & Kumar 3D Christmas” (2011) ‘R’ George Lopez: It’s Not Me, It’s You Boxing MAX 320 310 515Vampires Suck“My Cousin Vinny” (1992, Comedy) Joe Pesci, Marisa Tomei. ‘R’ “Beyond” (2011, Suspense) Jon Voight. ‘PG-13’ “Troy” (2004) Brad Pitt. Achilles leads Greek forces in the Trojan War. ‘R’ SHOW 340 318 545(:15)“50/50” (2011, Comedy-Drama) Joseph Gordon-Levitt. ‘R’ Dexter “Buck the System” Homeland “State of Independence” Dexter “Buck the System” Homeland “State of Independence” WEEKDAY AFTERNOON Comcast Dish DirecTV 12 PM12:301 PM1:302 PM2:303 PM3:304 PM4:305 PM5:30 3-ABC 3 -NewsBe a MillionaireThe ChewGeneral HospitalMauryDr. PhilBe a MillionaireNews 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsPaid ProgramVaried ProgramsAndy Grif th ShowThe Jeff Probst ShowSteve HarveyThe Dr. Oz ShowChann 4 NewsChann 4 News 5-PBS 5 -WordWorldBarney & FriendsCaillouDaniel TigerSuper Why!Dinosaur TrainCat in the HatCurious GeorgeWild KrattsElectric Comp.WUFT NewsWorld News 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxThe Young and the RestlessBold/BeautifulThe TalkLet’s Make a DealJudge Joe BrownJudge JudyAction News JaxAction News Jax 9-CW 9 17 17Trisha GoddardLaw & Order: Criminal IntentJudge MathisThe Bill Cunningham ShowMauryThe People’s Court 10-FOX 10 30 30Jerry SpringerThe Jeremy Kyle ShowJudge Joe BrownWe the PeopleThe DoctorsVaried ProgramsDr. PhilFamily FeudFamily Feud 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsBe a MillionaireDays of our LivesFirst Coast LivingKatie The Ellen DeGeneres ShowNewsNews CSPAN 14 210 350(9:00) U.S. House of RepresentativesU.S. House of RepresentativesVaried Programs U.S. House of Representatives WGN-A 16 239 307In the Heat of the NightWGN Midday NewsWalker, Texas RangerWalker, Texas RangerWalker, Texas RangerLaw & Order: Criminal Intent TVLAND 17 106 304Andy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th ShowGunsmoke(1:49) GunsmokeBonanzaBonanzaBonanza OWN 18 189 279Dr. PhilDr. PhilVaried Programs A&E 19 118 265CSI: MiamiCriminal MindsCriminal MindsThe First 48The First 48The First 48 HALL 20 185 312Marie Home & Family The WaltonsThe WaltonsThe Waltons FX 22 136 248MovieVaried Programs MovieVaried Programs MovieVaried Programs CNN 24 200 202CNN Newsroom CNN Newsroom The Situation Room TNT 25 138 245Varied Programs NIK 26 170 299Max & RubyMax & RubyDora the ExplorerDora the ExplorerSpongeBobSpongeBobRobot and MonsterOdd ParentsVictoriousVictoriousSpongeBobSpongeBob SPIKE 28 168 241Varied Programs MY-TV 29 32 -Hawaii Five-0GunsmokeBonanzaThe Big ValleyThe Wild, Wild WestEmergency! DISN 31 172 290Mickey MouseLittle EinsteinsVaried ProgramsGaspard & LisaPhineas and FerbMovieVaried ProgramsGood Luck CharlieVaried Programs LIFE 32 108 252Old ChristineOld ChristineVaried ProgramsGrey’s AnatomyGrey’s AnatomyHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherVaried Programs USA 33 105 242Varied Programs NCIS NCIS NCIS BET 34 124 329The ParkersThe ParkersMovie Varied ProgramsMy Wife and KidsJamie Foxx ShowJamie Foxx ShowThe ParkersThe Parkers ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenterSportsCenterSportsCenterOutside the LinesColl. Football LiveNFL LiveAround the HornInterruption ESPN2 36 144 209(1:05) First TakeVaried ProgramsMike and MikeVaried ProgramsNASCAR NowVaried ProgramsNumbers Never LieDan Le BatardSportsNationVaried Programs SUNSP 37 -Varied Programs DISCV 38 182 278The New DetectivesVaried Programs TBS 39 139 247Fresh PrinceAmerican DadAmerican DadLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondVaried ProgramsSeinfeldVaried Programs HLN 40 202 204News Now Making It in AmericaEvening Express FNC 41 205 360(11:00) Happening NowAmerica Live Studio B With Shepard SmithYour World With Neil CavutoThe Five E! 45 114 236E! NewsSex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CityVaried Programs KardashianVaried Programs TRAVEL 46 196 277Varied Programs Anthony Bourdain: No ReservationsBizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. FoodMan v. 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DEAR ABBY: Several salespersons recently have ended our transaction by saying, “Have a blessed day.” The last two times it happened, I stopped and asked, “What do you mean by that?” Both of them stammered and didn’t know what to say. One said, “I’m sort of religious.” I replied that I’m atheist. I don’t think these folks realize what they’re saying. The next time it happens, I plan to respond by asking Zeus to bestow blessings upon them as well. Why do people feel they have a right to force their religious beliefs on customers? -ANNOYED ATHEIST IN TEXAS DEAR ANNOYED ATHEIST: I seriously doubt they are trying to proselytize. The expres-sion may be regional. Or the person may feel that “blessed” is synonymous with “good,” “happy” or “safe.” If you wish to invoke the blessings of Zeus upon them, feel free to do so. But don’t be sur-prised if you have a heck of a time getting waited on the next time you visit the establishment. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: I have been in a relationship with “Ward” for two years. I love him and everything is great except for one thing. He refuses to compromise when it comes to his fam-ily functions. He’s very close to his extended family, and every time there’s an event like a recent graduation party for a cousin, he never wants to leave. We were there for 10 hours, and I spent more than half of it either alone or talking to someone I didn’t know well because Ward had ditched me. I have spoken to him about this, but he’s unwill-ing to compromise. He says his family knows him as “the social guy” and expects him to stay late and be the life of the party. We have had big fights over this. I’m not sure what to do. This has caused a rift in our relationship. -FAMILY-FUNCTIONED OUT IN MINNESOTA DEAR FAMILYFUNCTIONED OUT: When the next family function rolls around, go in separate cars. That way you can leave when you get tired, and Ward can stay as long as he wants. No harm, no foul, no fights. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: I married my high school sweetheart at the age of 24. Five years later we divorced. My cur-rent husband, “Gil,” had a similar short first mar-riage. Although Gil and I have chosen not to divulge any information to our two children about our previ-ous marriages, my sister thinks we should tell them everything because they may find out later in life and be disappointed they didn’t hear it from us. Your advice is badly needed. -LIVES IN THE PRESENT DEAR LIVES IN THE PRESENT: I see no rea-son to make a “grand announcement” to your children, but with the rate at which marriages fail in this country, I also see no reason to keep this a deep, dark secret. DEAR ABBY HOROSCOPES ARIES (March 21-April 19): Don’t get emotional, get moving. Enjoy what life has to offer. Interact with new people and unfamiliar places. Embrace whatever interests you passionately, and plan to expand your future personally, profes-sionally and financially. Instigate and make change happen. +++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): A disciplined approach may be difficult and some-what depressing, but it will bring results. Traveling, visiting friends, socializ-ing and concentrating on love and self-improvement should be your intent. +++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Don’t become anxious if things don’t go your way. Get out and interact with people trying to do something worthwhile. Protecting the environ-ment or indulging in a spir-itual quest will help you see your personal situation differently. +++++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Get involved in some-thing you find creative and stress relieving. You will do better than you antici-pate if you get involved in a challenge that requires your mental and physical agility. ++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): A problem with someone who depends on you can be expected. A change of scenery will do you good. Get involved in a physical challenge that will take your mind off your worries and help build your confi-dence. ++++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Vocalize your opinion and set your game plan in motion. Taking action will pay off and help you move in a direction that will assist you in achieving your personal goals. +++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Discuss plans for the future. You will find out what the pitfalls might be from those who have a critical and practical view of your situation. Don’t get angry when you should be using any information you receive to avoid making a mistake. +++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You have what it takes to be great. Stop procrasti-nating and start to believe in your ability. Expand your creative interests and take control of your per-sonal situation. +++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Brag and you will be offered an opportunity to show off. A partner-ship will be enhanced by the changes you make at home. Don’t take on too much or take a risk that has the potential to result in injury or physical mis-hap. ++++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Have a well-for-mulated plan in mind and speak concisely about your intentions. You will get the support you need. Love is in the stars. ++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Don’t allow anyone to mislead you or put you in an awkward position. Use your intuition in order to avoid making a poor financial choice. Plans to improve your sur-roundings or environment should be geared toward your comfort and well-being. +++++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Use your creative imagination to come up with a plan that ensures you get more for less. A moneymaking endeavor can pay off if you don’t overspend initially. +++ Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com THE LAST WORD Eugenia Word SUNDAY CROSSWORD Across 1 Downer, for short6 Big break12 Something to seek in court 19 ___ pork (Asian dish) 20 Did ordinary writing21 Renowned22 Namibia neighbor23 Old AMC car that came fully loaded? 25 Belgian river to the North Sea 0LQQHVRWD)DWVV SOD\HULQ7KH+XVWOHU 28 Writer Ernie29 Before, in brief30 Good locale for adoptions? 32 Play to ___33 Mysterious figure34 Windy City trains35 Berlin article36 Scrape37 Highlanders7ULP$PPRWKDWVVWLOORQ the store shelf? 43 ___ Khan (villain in 7KH-XQJOH%RRN 45 Getting on the board 46 Root word?47 Pitchers48 Nuts'LUHFWRU-HDQBBB Godard 50 Orch. section53 Some bleating?55 Little victory celebration 57 Dying words, in Shakespeare 3XWBBBRQLW59 It may be drawn at night 60 For fear that61 Salsa ingredient63 Excitement over some presidentialselections? 67 Gumshoe68 Gold units: Abbr.0DQ\EDQGHG displays? 70 Have a loan from6KDOORZBBB-DFN Black film) +HPDQVQLFNQDPH73 Bind tightly74 Avoid a scalping?78 Sackcloth material*UHDVHVLQJHU80 1998 Sarah McLachlan hit 81 Alone, as a female on stage 82 A/C meas.85 Fort ___, Ontario86 Feds 87 ID for a certain band member? 91 Go out for a while?92 Show, quickly-XPSRQWKHLFHBBB&KLOG (Margaret Atwoodpoem) 95 Earth, in ,QGHSHQGHQFH'D\" 98 ___ hours100 Kind of exercise,QIDQWVVKRH102 One rummaging7DNHDIUHVKORRN at %DE\2QH 0RUH7LPHVLQJHU 105 Lock Down 1 Lump in the throat2 Dancer Ginger3 Of ___ (somewhat)4 People wear masks in this: Abbr. 5 Sticking point?6 Field7 Kick the bucket8 Basketball shooting game 9 Playground retort10 Caught11 Summer hrs. in Denver 12 Challenging13 Sufficient 5XQQHUVXQLW*RRG:KHHOEX\ IRU:+(5(67+(BEEF 16 Refined17 Authorize18 Salon worker7KLUGRIWKUHH choices 24 Going (for)3HQQ\BBB31 Last ride?32 Actor Claude of /RER 33 Alma mater of presidents #41, 42and 43 36 Moundsman Dave37 Deep ravine38 Get excited39 Shrew40 College in New Rochelle, N.Y. %DUEHUVMRE42 Accepted as true43 Wrap up44 Rushed45 1992 Liv Ullmann film 47 Be constructive?48 Hangs out49 Some Millers50 Strainers7HOOLHV52 Like wide belts, fashionwise 54 Rat55 Brand name on a waistband 7RRNRIIDVDELUG 59 Bathroom fixture62 Striped safari sight63 Brutus abettor64 Move up, as an eyebrow &KULVWLDQRI7KH 'DUN.QLJKW5LVHV 66 Providing of questions foranswers on-HRSDUG\HJ 69 Vladimir of Russia71 Fit72 Comprising73 Use a futuristic mode of transit 74 Golf round result75 Frozen food brand,OOXVWUDWRUV shortcut *RRGSODFHWR Across BBBP\WKXPE81 Lights up82 Some herbs83 Remnants84 Something to milk for all its worth? 86 Be admitted+HDGBBB88 Rodeo rope 89 Bad feeling in the SLWRIRQHVstomach? 90 ___ latte92 Actress Mazar93 Sports car option96 Eastern drama7KLQJVXVHGGXULQJ crunch time? 99 Christmas purchase No. 1007 5(/($6('$7( SPACE INVASION By Zoe Wheeler / Edited by Will Shor tz For any three answers,FDOOIURPDWRXFKWRQHSKRQH$1.49 each minute; or,ZLWKDFUHGLWFDUG 123456789101112131415161718 19 20 21 22 2324 252627 2829 3031 3233 3435 3637 3839404142 434445 46 4748 49505152 5354 5556 5758 5960 616263646566676869 70 7172 73 74757677 78 7980 81828384 858687888990919293 94 959697 9899 100 101 102 103 104 105 Blessings from salesclerks rub customer wrong way BARACKTHEGAPACEPOS ADESTEHOMAGELACTOSE CRUISECONTROLERRATICKIPLAMESREARBUMPER PAPMSGBAGITEIRE ANEMOENOTESDEMAREST YODUDEIBAREDEL DEVGIZMOSNINER HEADLIGHTLEOSSALAD ENTTOTSELENATEVYE AUTOMATICTRANSMISSION TRIBETEHEESCOORNS HERODASIACRANKCASE DELISADWAREINA CUBAELEECARPET INSPIRITBIDENSCLIPS NAPEGAYERECKLIE TURNSIGNALEDGARIST ASININEHOODORNAMENTS CENSORSONAGERGOOGLE TAGNETOGRESSSENSES Answers to last Sunday’s Crossword. Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. CELEBRITY CIPHER Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012 5D