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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01924

Material Information

Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 10-12-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01933

Related Items

Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01924

Material Information

Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 10-12-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01933

Related Items

Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

By DAVID ESPO and MATTHEW DALY Associated Press DANVILLE, Ky. At odds early and often, Joe Biden and Republican Paul Ryan squabbled over the economy, taxes, Medicare and more Thursday night in a con tentious, interruptionfilled debate. That is a bunch of malarkey, the vice president retorted after a particularly tough Ryan attack on the admin istrations foreign policy. I know youre under a lot of duress to make up for lost ground, but I think people would be better served if we dont interrupt each other, Ryan said later to his rival, referring to Democratic pressure on Biden to make up for President Barack Obamas list less performance in last weeks debate with Mitt Romney. There was nothing list less this time as the 69year-old Biden sat next to the 42-year old Wisconsin congressman on a stage at Centre College in Kentucky. Ninety minutes after the initial disagreement over foreign policy, the two men clashed sharply over steps to reduce fed eral deficits. The president likes to say he has a plan, Ryan said, but in fact he gave a speech and never backed it up with details. Biden conceded Republicans indeed have a plan, but he said if it were enacted, it would have eviscerated all the things the middle class Opinion ............... 4A People ................. 2A Obituaries ............. 5A Advice & Comics ....... 6-7B Puzzles ............... 6-7B TODAY IN PEOPLE Hanks to debut on Broadway. COMING SUNDAY Local news roundup. 85 59 Sunny WEATHER, 2A Lake City ReporterFRIDAY & SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12 & 13, 2012 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | 75LAKECITYREPORTER COM WEEKEND EDITION CALL US: (386) 752-1293 SUBSCRIBE TO THE REPORTER: Voice: 755-5445 Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 138, No 183 1A Oct. 12 Classic car parade On Friday, Oct. 12 from 6 to 9 p.m. American Hometown Veteran Assist Inc. will host a cruise in and classic car parade at Hardees on U.S. 90. All of the proceeds benefit local veterans. Oct. 13 Monument rededication Please join the Sons of Confederate Veterans and the United Daughters of the Confederacy on Saturday, Oct. 13 at 11 a.m. for the Rededication of the Confederate Monument, which was originally dedi cated 100 years ago. Zumba charity Zumba to benefit local breast cancer awareness Oct. 13 from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at the Teen Town Recreation Building, 533 NW Desoto St. The Zumbathon Charity Event will benefit the Suwannee River Breast Cancer Awareness Assn. and all proceeds will be used locally. There is a $10 donation. For information call Sarah Sandlin at 7580009. Car show American Hometown Veteran Assist Inc. will host a Car Show Saturday, Oct. 13 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Columbia County Fairgrounds. All of the pro ceeds will benefit local vet erans. There will be street rods, classics, antiques, muscle cars and customs. Safety patrol fundraiser Come support Eastside Elementarys safety patrols Saturday, Oct. 13 at Village Square. Near Moes Southwest Grill there will be a car wash from 8:30 a.m. to noon. Mochi will donate 10 percent of proceeds to the safety patrols from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Firehouse Subs and GameStop donated gift cards for drawings. Each chance to win is $1. Farmers market The Alligator Community Theatre takes over the Lake DeSoto Farmers Market on Saturday, Oct. 13 as they present short scenes from their upcoming play, Love, Sex, and the I.R.S., a full length comedy for all ages by Billy Van Zandt and Jane Milmore. This is a clas sic farce that has been lik ened to a cross between I Love Lucy and Some Like it Hot! Tickets for the play will be available for sale and cast members will be pres ent to talk about the orga nization and recruit inter ested parties who may want to be involved. Live music will also be featured with a performance by David Herringer Project. The Lake DeSoto Farmers Market is open from 8 a.m. to noon in Wilson Park between the Columbia County Courthouse and Shands Lakeshore Hospital. A lot of pink JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Lake City resident Marcelle Bedenbaugh is in the market for a pink flamingo after attending the Standing up to Breast Cancer luncheon Thursday. Ive had breast cancer two times. I enjoyed the chemo the first time I said what the heck, Ill do it again, Bedenbaugh joked. 300 stand up to breast cancer at annual Lunch and Learn By LAURA HAMPSON lhampson@lakecityreporter.com W ith a history of breast cancer in her husbands family, Myrtle Principato of Wellborn was concerned for her daughter. Principato and about 300 other women attended the 6th annual Standing Up to Breast Cancer Lunch and Learn at the Columbia County Fairgrounds banquet hall Thursday. A joint effort by the Lake City Medical Center and the Columbia County Resources Tough Enough to Wear Pink Crisis Fund, the lun cheon is designed to raise aware ness and remind women to have regular mammograms. I love it. Its educational, said Principato, who attended for the third year. Guest speaker and radiologist Manish Jani said most women asked questions about their loved ones risk of cancer. Genetics can only be linked to five to 10 percent of breast can cer, Jani said. Most women with breast cancer dont have a strong family history. One in 9 women will develop breast cancer in their lifetime, he said. Of those who develop the cancer, 8 percent do not have a family history, 13 percent have one member with the cancer and 20 percent have two relatives who have had breast cancer. Possible Ellisville location prompts questions. Radiologist presents latest data on fight against the disease. Biden, Ryan spar over the economy, taxes, more. DEBATE continued on 8A LEARN continued on 8A WATER continued on 8A CENTER continued on 8A Econ board wants more info EVENTS CENTER PROPOSAL By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com The Columbia County Economic Development Department board of direc tors is interested in the countys proposed events center, but wants more informa tion such as where the facility would be located. Thursday afternoon, the board reconvened its meeting from last week and unanimously voted in favor of having Jesse Quillen, executive director, and Joel Foreman, legal coun sel, draft a letter of sup port to the Board of County Commissioners, requesting more information and that additional studies be con ducted. Its just a general let ter of support encouraging the board of county com Quillen Watersaving program will aid farmers LIVE OAK The Suwannee River Water Management District is pro viding $1.5 million in costshare funds to assist farm ers in conserving water and protecting water quality. The funds will pay for proj ects that increase irrigation efficiency and water conserva tion and assist with nutrient manage ment technology. Interested parties may apply online from the Districts Agriculture web page at www.mysuwan neeriver.com/agriculture or apply in person at District Headquarters, 9225 CR 49, Live Oak FL 32060. The deadline to receive applica tions is Nov. 2. Shortelle ASSOCIATED PRESS Vice President Joe Biden and Republican vice presidential nominee Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin participate in the vice presidential debate at Centre College, Thursday in Danville, Ky. VP hopefuls go head-to-head

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CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Thought for Today Celebrity Birthdays Comedian-activist Dick Gregory is 80. Broadcast journalist Chris Wallace is 65. Actress-singer Susan Anton is 62. Rock singer-musician Pat DiNizio is 57. Actor Carlos Bernard is 50. Jazz musician Chris Botti is 50. Rhythm-and-blues singer Claude McKnight (Take 6) is 50. AROUND FLORIDA Third collapse victim dies MIAMI A third vic tim of a massive parking garage collapse at a Miami college died Thursday morning, just hours after rescuers pulled him from beneath piles of twisted steel and crumbled con crete, police said. Samuel Perez, 53, had been trapped in the collapse Wednesday at Miami Dade College. He was beneath the rubble for about 13 hours, com municating with rescuers before he was taken to a hospital. He was first discovered after workers heard his cries, and crews were saddened to hear he had died, said MiamiDade Police Lt. Rosanna Cordero-Stutz. Authorities said they no longer expected to find anyone else alive and expected to pull a fourth person from what remained of the five-story structure that had been under construction. One worker was still missing, Miami-Dade Fire-Rescue Assistant Chief David Downey said. Steve Budhoo said his brother Robert was still missing in the rubble. Authorities would not con firm Budhoo was among the missing, but his broth er said his family feared the news that would come. We break down and we console each other. We are just going through the motions, said a visibly shaken Budhoo. Reporter wanted by prosecutors TALLAHASSEE Florida prosecutors want to question a newspaper reporter about the tangled criminal case involving a former aide to Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll. But the Florida TimesUnion is fighting the request and on Thursday asked a judge to block a subpoena of reporter Matt Dixon. Ex-aide Carletha Cole is charged with breaking state law, accused of giving Dixon a copy of a secret audio recording of her talking to Carrolls chief of staff. Leon County Circuit Judge Frank Sheffield declined to rule on the newspapers request, which comes at the same time prosecutors and attor neys for Cole are at odds over what evidence should be allowed in the nearly year-old case. Dog owner sues over pets death ST. PETERSBURG The owner of a 12-yearold golden retriever that was shot to death by St. Petersburg police in 2011 is suing the city. The Tampa Bay Times reported the lawsuit out lines an argument for why pets should be viewed under the law less like property and more like people. The suit was filed by Roy Glass, who is a lawyer and the dogs owner. Boomer was shot by an officer after a report of his snapping at a neighbor hood woman walking her dog. Police said Boomer charged at two officers with teeth bared and growling. Under Florida law, pets are considered property. Though there is little prec edent in Florida, a Texas court ruled last year that dog owners should be awarded damages based on sentimental value of a dog. Boys chickens win reprieve DEBARY A familys small but technically illegal flock of chickens that help the familys autistic son won a 60-day reprieve from the citys code enforce ment board. The Daytona Beach News-Journal reports that 2-year-old J.J. Hart has become attached to his familys chickens since his parents got them earlier this year. The boy has autism spectrum disorder, J.J. talks to the chickens something he didnt do much with anyone before. Hanks to make Broadway debut NEW YORK T om Hanks will play a gutsy New York City newspaper columnist when he makes his debut on Broadway in the spring. Producers of Nora Ephrons play Lucky Guy announced Thursday that Hanks will play Mike McAlary in the stage biography. Hanks, a two-time Oscar winner, had been in negotiations for the role when Ephron died this summer. Previews begin March 1 at the Broadhurst Theatre and an opening night is set for April 1. McAlary, the citys one-time dominant tabloid reporter, got the first interview with Abner Louima, a Haitian immigrant who was sod omized and beaten by white police officers at a station house in 1997. McAlary would win the Pulitzer Prize the next year but would die of cancer a few months later at age 41. The director of Lucky Guy will be George C. Wolfe. In June, lead producer Colin Callender said his team could think of no more fitting tribute to her extraordinary writing and remark able body of work than to proceed with plans to produce Ephrons play. Hanks is the star of such films as Splash, Forrest Gump, Philadelphia, Sleepless in Seattle, Apollo 13 and Saving Private Ryan. Ephron, who died June 26 at age 71, gained recognition as the writer of films such as When Harry Met Sally and Sleepless in Seattle, both starring Hanks. McAlary, who worked at both the New York Daily News and The New York Post, has already been the subject of a play Dan Klores The Wood, which opened off-Broadway at the Rattlestick Playwrights Theatre last year. He was said to be the inspiration for the charac ter played by Randy Quaid in Ron Howards The Paper. ABCs Robin Roberts home from hospital NEW YORK ABCs Robin Roberts has come home from the hos pital three weeks after undergoing a bone marrow trans plant. After thanking her doctors and nurses and singing Amen, the Good Morning America host began the next stage of recovery from MDS, a blood and bone mar row disease. Her sister was the donor for her bone marrow. While leaving the hospital after a month is a big first step. Roberts doctor explained that it still will take time for the patient to gather strength and build up her immune system. Good Morning America, now the top-rated network morning show, aired a story about Wednesdays homecoming. The show has brought in occasional celebrity guest hosts such as Stephen Colbert to fill in for Roberts. Glenn Becks empty SUV crashes down NY hill LODI, N.Y. Radio talk show host Glenn Becks family had a close call when their sport utility vehicle rolled down a steep hill in New Yorks Finger Lakes region just after they got out. In an account of the mishap posted on Becks website, TheBlaze.com, he says he was hugging his newly mar ried daughter as his wife got their young son out of the vehicle. They had just arrived at the cottage rented for the daughters wedding recep tion last weekend in Lodi, on Seneca Lake. Beck says the SUV slid down the hill and overturned, coming to rest near the shoreline. Photos on the website show the SUV with broken windows and dam age to its passenger side. The Seneca County Sheriffs Office says the accident wasnt reported to police in the county. Wednesday: Afternoon: 6-5-9 Evening: N/A Wednes day: Afternoon: 0-9-5-6 Evening: N/A Tuesday: 2-10-24-29-34 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAIL Y BRIEFING FRIDAY & SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12-13, 2012 HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter 2A Daily Scripture To know ones self is wisdom, but not to know ones neigh bors is genius. Minna Antrim, American writer (1861-1950) For the director of music. For Jeduthun. A psalm of David. Truly my soul finds rest in God; my salvation comes from him. Psalm 62:1 ASSOCIATED PRESS Actor Tom Hanks will make his Broadway debut next spring, playing a newspaper columnist in Nora Ephrons play Lucky Guy. ASSOCIATED PRESS Bill Byrne, president and CEO of Ajax construction company, gives a statement to the press Thursday in front of the col lapsed garage his company was building at Miami Dade College in Miami. Part of the building fell Wednesday and killed at least three construction workers. Beck Roberts Associated Press Associated Press

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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE FRIDAY & SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12-13, 2012 3A 3A Whos Who scholarship winner COURTESY Florida Gateway College student Victor Muniz, pictured, has been awarded the Pettys H. Randall scholarship from Whos Who Among Universities and Colleges. This is one of only three scholarships given annually by the organization. Muniz, 30, is in his second semester at FGC. The scholarship is worth $2,000. Amendment 5 would give state more power over Supreme Court By CURT ANDERSON AP Legal Affairs Writer MIAMI The Florida Legislature would gain greater authority over the state Supreme Court and the rules governing state courts if voters approve constitutional Amendment 5 in the Nov. 6 election. The proposal, pushed through the Legislature by outgoing Republican Speaker Dean Cannon, is seen by the GOP and several conservative groups as crucial to making the court more accountable. Opponents, including The Florida Bar and trial lawyers groups, contend its a power grab and a blatant threat to the judicial independence. If approved, Amendment 5 would take sole authority to appoint Supreme Court justices away from the governor and subject them to confirmation by the state Senate. It would also allow both houses of the Florida Legislature to repeal court rules with a simple majority vote, rather than the two-thirds vote now required. Lastly, the amendment would open to the House speaker now-confiden tial Judicial Qualification Commission files regarding investigations into allegations of misconduct by judges. In Florida, the House is responsible for impeachment proceedings against judges. Like all proposed constitutional amendments, it must be approved by at least 60 percent of voters to pass. Republicans have been highly criti cal of the Supreme Court for the past two years and are also leading a separate campaign urging voters to oust three justices Barbara Pariente, Peggy Quince and Fred Lewis who were appointed or coappointed by former Democratic Gov. Lawton Chiles. Among other things, Republicans were angered when the court in 2010 struck from the ballot three proposed constitutional amendments pushed through the GOP-led Legislature, including a property tax reduction measure. It is important for the judiciary to remain independent and impartial, but in order for that to happen citi zens must be knowledgeable about the courts decisions and voice their concerns when the court oversteps their authority, said Slade OBrien, state director of the conservative group Americans for Prosperity. Carroll may be forced to testify By GARY FINEOUT Associated Press TALLAHASSEE Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll could be forced to testify in a sensational criminal case that has widened from allegations of ille gal taping to improper relationships within her office. A circuit court judge on Thursday rejected a request by the administra tion of Gov. Rick Scott to shield Carroll from being questioned in the case involving one of her for mer aides. Judge Frank Sheffield told Scotts general coun sel that ex-aide Carletha Cole is entitled in a crimi nal case to defend herself. The ex-aide was arrested in 2011, accused of giving a reporter a secret record ing containing a conver sation between Cole and Carrolls chief of staff. Theres not a person on the face of this earth that cant be a witness in some case if they have relevant information, Sheffield said. But Sheffield made it clear that hes not to going to allow Carroll or other top employees in the governors office to be questioned until Coles lawyers put in writ ing why their testimony is relevant. Im not going to let people hide behind their office if they are involved in the case; on the other hand, just because shes the lieutenant governor, Im not going to let him depose her if its just a fishing expedition, he said. Cole, who was fired last year, is charged with a third-degree felony and could face up to five years in prison. This summer her law yers filed court documents in which Cole claimed to have found Carroll in a compromising position with travel aide Beatriz Ramos insides Carrolls office.

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F or a while Wednesday, the International Space Station was an ice cream stand serving chocolate-vanilla swirl. The frozen treat came as a surprise, flown up aboard the unmanned Dragon spacecraft, built by the private Space Exploration Technologies Corp., or SpaceX, based in Hawthorne. The 10-year-old company was founded by Elon Musk, who also founded PayPal. According to an MSNBC report, Space Station Commander Sunita Williams said, “Looks like we’ve tamed the Dragon. We’re happy she’s onboard with us. Thanks to everyone at SpaceX and NASA for bringing her to us ... and the ice cream.” The Dragon was launched from NASA’s Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. According to MSNBC, the mission “is the first of 12 resupply flights SpaceX will fly for NASA under a $1.6 billion deal.” “This is the first operational private space flight,” Rand Simberg told us; the adjunct scholar at the Competitive Enterprise Institute is an expert on space technology and policy. “Eventually, there will be commercial flights,” within two or three years. Mr. Simberg said the Russians fly private passengers into space for $50 million, but SpaceX soon will do it for $20 million. On the same day as the Dragon docking, soprano Sarah Brightman said she soon will be zooming into space with the Russians and might do a “space concert.” “This is the future of space exploration,” Mr. Simberg said. This, indeed, is the passing of the torch of space explora-tion. Much of the technology for the original space program was built in Orange County, Calif. by Boeing and such predecessors as McDonnell Douglas. Neil Armstrong, who in 1969 became the first man on the moon, died Aug. 25. And on Sept. 21, the last space shuttle, Endeavour, landed in Los Angeles, bolted to a NASA 747, after a farewell flight over Orange County and other California space landmarks. This week Endeavour is being hauled to the California Science Center museum in Los Angeles. Although SpaceX launched the Dragon from NASA’s Cape Canaveral facility, Mr. Simberg said launching rock-ets soon will be privatized as well. “By getting NASA out of the business of getting into space, it can concentrate on going beyond orbit.” Some of these projects include the Mars Scout program in 2013, to study the Red Planet’s atmosphere, and the James Webb telescope, named after NASA’s administrator during the Apollo program days, a successor to the Hubble Space Telescope. Mr. Simberg said the private efforts by SpaceX and other companies will drive down prices, allowing such projects as the Bigelow Commercial Space Station, planned by Bigelow Aerospace of Las Vegas. According to the company’s website, “We anticipate construction of our first space station to begin with a Sundancer [habitat module] launched in early 2014, and that by 2015 the station will be available for client use.” Maybe they’ll serve ice cream for dessert. A spacepioneer named Dragon ONE OPINION T his could be the most important elec-tion in your lifetime. Our country is in the throes of some serious problems. The housing market peaked and crashed, and banks had their bad days, too. We have serious problems competing with nations that are either developing or have a lower standard of living, with less human rights, and less reg-ulation and less corporate taxes. To succeed, so many compa-nies relocate their operations overseas. This is one factor that caused probably the greatest unemployment since the great depression. Unemployed people have less money to spend, and business suffers a second blow. To make things more difficult, our legal/judicial system has redefined corporations, now treating them as individu-als. Individuals are allowed to support political campaigns, and can contribute financially to influence elections. Since they aren’t directly related to candidates, they can produce infomercials using negativity and distortion of facts. Even the television news media is cor-porate, and can slant their news toward their favored candidate. What can we do? I believe the best thing going for us is our right to vote. This country has the longest lasting success-ful democratic government the world has ever seen. Rare in the rest of the world, citizens of our United States have the awe-some power to make choices that determine what kind of world we will live in today and in the future. It would be a terrible waste to not make the most of that opportunity. We can continue to be a leading world power that builds a better world, or we can neglect this opportunity and lose leader-ship to those who are often motivated by greed, power, self-interest, and show less interest in principles like freedom and human rights. To responsibly continue as a world leader, we have a responsibility to be aware, to be educated, and to use our vote to make choices based on good moral principles rather than out of fear, anger, greed, or ignorance. What are some worthy principles to guide us? I have faith that our people love our coun-try, and want to do what’s right for it and for our citizens. The Constitution says it best—and I paraphrase—“a government of the people, by the people, and for the people…to ensure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defense, and promote the general welfare for all…” We should have some understanding of the national budget. Where’s our money going? Is it doing what we think it should? Like a family, shouldn’t we try to live within our means instead of borrowing from other countries, printing extra paper money, and running up the biggest deficit and debt the world has ever seen? As the Constitution stipulates, can’t we promote freedom of religion, and stop allowing the state to ban religion from much of our lives? Shouldn’t we support freedom of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, as long as it’s not harming someone else’s freedoms or harming them? For moral principles: Isn’t it better to light a candle than to curse the darkness? Let’s have an ideal vision of the country we want it to be, and vote accord-ingly. We can be pulled by our hopes and dreams, not pushed by fear or anger, or by negative campaigning. The best thing we’ve got going for ourselves is hope. Please inform yourself, and go vote. We don’t ever want to say “You don’t know what you’ve got until you lose it.” Sick of politics yet? L ance Armstrong turns out to be a world-class cyclist, but a world-class doper as well. And he was also, it appears, a world-class master at concealing his doping. U.S Anti-Doping Agency chief executive Travis Tygart said that Armstrong and his fellow cyclists, many of whom he is said to have bullied into doping along with him, were part of “the most sophisticated, profes-sionalized and successful dop-ing program that sport has ever seen.” That Armstrong and other cyclists -especially riders from countries where doping isn’t considered quite the heinous crime it is in America -got away with it this long suggests that previous anti-doping crack-downs were ineffective and so slow in coming that they all but telegraphed the “random” tests. Armstrong, pending further and likely unsuccessful appeals, has been banned for life from the sport he long dominated and stripped of his seven Tour de France titles. Even with the dope, that was an astounding feat in a brutal sport. Armstrong, his proponents never tire of pointing out, never failed a drug test -by one count, 500 to 600 of them -he took in his long career. It is incumbent on the USADA to explain how this could be so, how the hormone EPO, testos-terone and heavily oxygenated blood could go undetected. Despite heated and repeated denials by Armstrong and his camp, the USADA released a detailed 202-page report, con-taining 26 affidavits, 15 of them from riders, including 11 former teammates, who testified against him. But that has to be seen against the casual ethos of a sport where it seemed a given that if you don’t dope, you don’t win. And one would have had to be truly oblivious not to notice the Damon Runyonesque army of doping doctors, smugglers, runners and other enablers that followed the tour. The USADA is harsh and personal in its condemnation of Armstrong, perhaps in retribu-tion for the long and no-holds-barred fight he put up against the agency. And that fight appar-ently isn’t over. Armstrong’s attorney dismissed the report as a “a one-sided hatchet job -a taxpayer-funded tabloid piece rehashing old, disproved, unreliable allega-tions based largely on ax-grind-ers, serial perjurers, coerced testimony, sweetheart deals and threat-induced stories.” Don’t look for Armstrong at the team Christmas party. Armstrong has a path of redemption denied to most disgraced athletes. A cancer survivor, he founded the can-cer-fighting Lance Armstrong Foundation that has raised mil-lions and helped millions. He’s now free to concentrate on that work without the distraction of pedaling up and down the Alps. Anti-dopers finally get their man Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding counties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, publisher Robert Bridges, editor Sue Brannon, controller Dink NeSmith, president Tom Wood, chairman LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY E-MAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com Bob Denny Bob.Denny8@gmail.com Q Bob Denny is a licensed mental health therapist and teaches psychology at Florida Gateway College. T he U.S. has sent a small military force to Jordan to help that ally if the violence from the Syrian civil war threatens to spread, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta told a NATO con-ference Wednesday in Brussels. The Pentagon chief’s words could be taken as a broad hint that the major NATO nations -of which Turkey is a member -should take a more active role in at least logistically support-ing the Syrian rebels. The Obama administration has been under attack from Mitt Romney for not arming the Syrian rebels. But, which particular group of rebels? Romney, with his painfully thin Mideast experience, can’t seem to answer that question. It is not as simple as it sounds on the campaign trail. Some of the rebels belong to anti-U.S., radical Islamic groups with ties to various al-Qaida offshoots. An estimated 2,000 Jordanians are fighting in Syria to overthrow Bashar al-Assad. In reprisal for a similar situation in Turkey, which has provided sanctuary to the rebels, the Turks engaged in cross-border shelling, which in Jordan may cause the U.S. to cross the line into active military logistical support for the Jordanians, among the closest U.S. allies in the region. The White House and Pentagon have brushed off any suggestion of direct military intervention in the Syrian con-flict -with one major exception. Syria has substantial stocks of chemical weapons, and U.S. intelligence says Assad has taken steps to move and secure the weapons. The dispatch of a handful of troops may seem like a small gesture, but it is an intensely symbolic one -and perhaps the first incremental step in our involvement in that war. U.S. edging toward war in Syria Q Scripps Howard News Service Q Orange County Register OPINION Friday & Saturday, October 12-13, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A4AOPINION Q Dale McFeatters is editorial writer for Scripps Howard News Service. Dale McFeattersmcfeattersd@shns.com ANOTHER VIEW

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Henry Hall Henry Hall of Halls Salvage passed Wednesday, October 10th in Tipton, GA. after a long ill ness. He was born Sept. 3, 1932 in Wilacoochee, GA. He leaves behind wife Mildred, one daugh ter Rhonda, three sons: Jim, Ronald, and Henry, Jr., many grand & great grand children. Henry owned and operated Halls Salvage for 30 years. He was a good man and helped many people out. Viewing will be at Bob Lovin Funeral Home in Nashville, GA. Friday 6 til 8:30 p.m. The funer al will be on Sat. at 2pm. Elaine De Mondragon Wilson Elaine De Mondragon Wil son, 84 of Lake City passed away on Wednesday October 3rd 2012 in the Haven Hospice Care Center in Lake City FL. She was born in New York City, New York, to the late Nellie Bowers and Ignacio De Mon dragon. She had no siblings and spent her childhood attending grade school and high school in New York City. Elaine was married several times and relo cated to Miami, FL in the early 1950s. Elaine worked in the retail industry for many years in various areas including dis tributing childrens clothing to large department store buyers. She also worked for a number of years in a bookkeeping ca pacity for various businesses including automotive service and salvage. After several years in the south Florida area, she settled in Lake City in 1988. Elaine loved meeting people and was an integral part of Nearly New Consignment, in Lake City for over 19 years. She leaves behind a multitude of friends whose lives she touched in a special way. Her hobbys in cluded collecting Dolls of all kinds and she was a creative and talented jewelry designer. She is survived by a daughter, Ra mona Richman and son William (Debbie) French of Lake City. She also leaves grandchildren Michael (Jessica) French, Jason (Alana) French, of Vero Beach; Quincy (Mindy) Shindelbower, of Woodstock, GA; And Garri son Shindelbower, Gainesville FL. Great Grandchildren Mi chael French Jr, Jazmine French, Jason French Jr, And Karma Star French all of Vero Beach. A Memorial service for Elaine will be held at 2:00PM Sunday, October 14, 2012 at the Haven Hospice Chapel, with Pastor Lou in her memory to Haven Hospice of the Suwanee Valley, 6037 US Hwy 90 West, Lake City Ar rangements are under the direc tion of GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN FUNERAL HOME (386) 752-1954, 3596 S U.S. HWY 441, Lake City, Fl. 32025. LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY & SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12-13, 2012 5A 5A Charter Loans Services Pay outstanding bills, credit cards. Lowest compared rates. Personal loans. Business, debt loans. Auto Home Improvement Loans Bad Credit options. No apps. fees Call today: 1.877.359.5533 Charteracc@usa.com Value Adjustment Board Hearings The Columbia County Value Adjustment Board hearings will be held Wednesday, October 17th & Tuesday, October 30th, 2012 at 9:00 a.m. The hearings will be held at the Columbia County School Board Administration Building located at 372 West Duval Street, Lake City, Florida. Obituaries are paid advertise ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporters classified depart ment at 752-1293. OBITUARIES COMMUNITY CALENDAR To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Laura Hampson at 754-0427 or by e-mail at lhampson@ lakecityreporter.com. Oct. 12 Class of 1962 The Columbia High School class of 1962 will be celebrating it 50th class reunion today and Saturday. Contact Linda Hurst Greene at (386) 7520561 for information. Classic car parade American Hometown Veteran Assist Inc. will host a cruise-in and clas sic car parade from 6 to 9 p.m. at Hardees on U.S. 90. All proceeds benefit local veterans. Oct. 13 Monument rededication Join the Sons of Confederate Veterans and the United Daughters of the Confederacy at the Olustee Battlefield at 11 a.m. for the rededication of the Confederate Monument, which originally was dedi cated 100 years ago. Zumbathon charity A Zumbathon to benefit local breast cancer aware ness will be from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at the Teen Town Recreation Building, 533 NW Desoto St. The event will benefit the Suwannee River Breast Cancer Awareness Association and all proceeds will be used locally. There is a $10 dona tion. For information, call Sarah Sandlin at 758-0009. Grief support The Grief Share Support Group, a ministry of Orchard Community Church, meets every Saturday from 2 to 4 p.m. in room D at the Willowbrook Assisted Living center, 1580 S. Marion Ave. The group offers support for those who have lost loved ones through videos, discussion time and prayer. There are fees. For information, call 288-7429. Car show American Hometown Veteran Assist Inc. will host a car show from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Columbia County Fairgrounds. All proceeds will benefit local veterans. There will be street rods, classics, antiques, muscle cars and customs. Benefit yard sale A yard sale to raise money for B.J. Heltons recovery after a heart and lung trans plant will run 8 a.m. to 2 p.m at Busch Urology, 4601 U.S. 90 All proceeds will go to Heltons recovery fund. Safety patrol fundraiser Eastside Elementarys safety patrols will have a car wash at Village Square, near Moes Southwest Grill, from 8:30 a.m. to noon. Mochi will donate 10 percent of proceeds to the safety patrols from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Firehouse Subs and GameStop donated gift cards for drawings. Each chance to win is $1. Farmers market The Alligator Community Theatre will take over the Lake DeSoto Farmers Market, as they present short scenes from their upcoming play, Love, Sex, and the I.R.S., a full-length comedy for all ages by Billy Van Zandt and Jane Milmore. Tickets for the play will be for sale, and cast members will be present to talk about the organiza tion and recruit people who may want to be involved. Live music also will be featured, with a perfor mance by David Herringer Project. The farmers mar ket is open every Saturday from 8 a.m. to noon in Wilson Park between the Columbia County Courthouse and Shand Lakeshore Hospital in downtown Lake City. Car wash fundraiser The Filipino American Cultural Society of Lake City will have a car wash fundraiser from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. at 4601 U.S. 90, which is a medical office parking lot, across the street from Harveys Food Market. Costs are $5 for cars, $10 for trucks, vans and SUVs. Oct. 14 Dicks family reunion The 51st annual Joseph Dicks Family Reunion will begin at 12:45 p.m. at Hopeful Baptist Church in the Life Center. Friends and family are welcome. Bring a covered dish. Santa Fe River contest The third annual Our Santa Fe River Singing and Song-writing Contest will be from 4 to 7 p.m. at the Boat House Patio at the Great Outdoors Restaurant. Performances will begin at 4 p.m. There are no reserved seating on the patio during that time. So come early and get a good seat. Plan for a funfilled afternoon listening to lyrics praising our commu nitys most valuable asset, the Santa Fe River. Sample ballots Sample ballots are now available at the Columbia County Supervisor of Elections office, 971 W. Duval St., and other public buildings. Signature updates will be accepted by the Supervisor of Elections office no later than the start of canvassing of absentee ballots, which begins Oct. 29. If your signature does not match what is on file, your absentee or provision al ballot will not count. Oct. 15 DoC meeting Dr. Sean McMahon, pro fessor of history at Florida Gateway College, will be the United Daughters of the Confederacy, Olustee Chapter, guest speaker at the monthly meeting at 5:15 p.m. at the China Buffet, 345 W. Duval St. McMahon will speak about popular culture during the Civil War. Buffet will be served after the meeting. Cost is $9. Reservations are not required. For more information, call Linda Williams at 352-215-8776. Oct. 16 Art League The Art League of North Florida will hold its month ly meeting on at 6:30 p.m. at the First Presbyterian Church Education Building. The community is invited. There will be refreshments, fellowship, a short meeting and a speaker. Duffy Soto with give a presentation on Using Your Computer To Compose Your Art. Before you wet a brush, start with your computer to combine elements from different sources, including photos, scale models and video frames to get the look and feel for the painting you want to create. Sea level presentation Nonprofit Save Our Suwannee will host a pre sentation on the impacts of sea level rise at 7 p.m. at Unity Church of Gainesville, 8801 NW 39th Ave. Whitney Gray, sea level rise outreach coordi nator with FWC, will give the presentation. Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are avail able every Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon to answer questions about lawns and plants at the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane. For more information, call 752-5384. Oct. 17 Reading enhancement Its About My Efforts is offering a reading enhancement program for all ages. Classes will be at Antioch Baptist Church on Wednesdays from 5 to 6 p.m. starting today. Registration is $25. For information call 867-1601. United Way luncheon The United Way of Suwannee Valley will have its October commu nity fundraising campaign report luncheon at the Camp Weed and Cerveny Center, in the Varn Dining Hall, at noon. The cost of the luncheon is $12 per person. For information, the United Way office at 386-752-5604 ext. 102. Each month of United Ways annual campaign, the United Way conducts a campaign report luncheon to provide an opportunity for campaign team volun teers, citizens, business representatives and agency personnel to learn more about the partner agency services, United Way com munity impact initiatives and businesses support ing our communitys wellbeing through the United Way. Dine to donate Dine to donate every Wednesday in October at Applebees in Lake City. The Tough Enough to Wear Pink Crisis Fund will receive 10 percent of the bill. Ask for a flier by the Columbia County Fairgrounds Office or call 752-8822 to have one emailed to you. Grief workshop Good Grief, An Overview of Grief and Loss will be offered at 10 a.m. at the Wings Education Center, 857 SW Main Blvd. The workshop, facilitated by Jerry Tyre, will offer an overview of grief and sug gest ways of coping with a recent loss. There is no cost. For information or to register, contact Vicki Myers at 755-7714 ext. 2411 or (866) 642-0962. The Wings Education Center is a program of Hospice of Citrus County. Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Wednesday from 1 to 4 p.m. to answer questions about lawns and plants at the Fort White Public Library on Route 47. For more information, call 752-5384. Oct. 19 Dracula in High Springs High Springs Community Theater will present a new comedy thriller by Leroy Clark, adapted from Bram Stokers book Dracula on weekends in October, ending Oct. 28. In this adaptation, Dr. Van Helsing is a medical specialist with Tourettes Syndrome, Renfield is a woman, Dr. Sewards Aunt Quincy is tipsy at times, and theres even a French maid. Adult tickets are $11; children 12 and younger, $8; and for seniors, theSunday matinee is $9. Tickets may be pur chased at The Framery, 341 S. Marion Avenue, in Lake City. Or call (386) 754-2780. Online tickets are avail able at highspringscommu nitytheater.com. Shows are Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m, and Sundays at 2 p.m. Oct. 20 Howlin Halloween The public is invited to the Howlin Halloween Yappy Hour at the Pet Spot, 872 SW Main Blvd., from 2 to 5 p.m. For a $10 dona tion, each participant will receive one 5-by-7-inch pet photo, activities and hors doeuvres. Beer, wine, soda and water will be avail able. Ask the Dog Trainer therapy and obedience will be featured, along with live music, vendors and raffles. A costume contest will take place. Everyone is encour aged to dress up with their pets to win prizes. Proceeds will help support patients and families with Hospice of the Nature Coast. The hospice is a program of Hospice of Citrus County Inc. For additional informa tion, call (386) 755-7714. Grief support The Grief Share Support Group, a ministry of Orchard Community Church, meets every Saturday from 2 to 4 p.m. in room D at the Willowbrook Assisted Living center, 1580 S. Marion Ave. The group offers caring support for those who have lost loved ones through videos, dis cussion time and prayer. There are fees. For infor mation, call 288-7429. Oct. 22 Pet loss workshop An educational workshop, Coping with the Loss of Your Pet, will be held at 2 p.m. at the Wings Community Education Center in the Lake City Plaza on Main Boulevard. The facilitator is Dr. Joy Dias director of client counseling and sup port services, University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine. To register call Vicki Myers, at (386) 755-7714 ext. 2411. Seating is limited. The workshop is provided as a public service and free of charge. The Wings Education Center is a pro gram of Hospice of Citrus County, Inc. Visit www. hospiceofcitrus.org for more information. Womens Club lunch The Womens Club of Lake City will have its October fundraiser from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Clubhouse, 257 SE Hernando Ave. The meal is $6 per plate, which includes baked ziti, salad, rolls and girdle busters. Eat at the clubhouse, take out or have it delivered. For informa tion call 755-0347. Oct. 23 Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon to answer ques tions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions to the Columbia County Extenstion Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane. For more information, call 752-5384. Oct. 24 Dine to donate Dine to donate every Wednesday in October at Applebees in Lake City. The Tough Enough to Wear Pink Crisis Fund will receive 10 percent of the bill. Ask for a flier by the Columbia County Fairgrounds Office, or call 752-8822 to have one emailed to you. Plant clinic University of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Wednesday from 1 to 4 p.m. to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions to the Fort White Public Library on Route 47. For more information, call 752-5384. Oct. 25 Officers group to meet The Suwannee River Valley Chapter of the Military Officers Association of America (MOAA) will hold its monthly dinner meet ing at the Lake City Elks Lodge, 259 NE Hernando St., Lake City, at 6:30 p.m. The dinner meeting is open to all active duty military officers, retired and former officers.

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A s much as we would like to think that there are no evil people in the world, hon-esty says that we must admit that there are. As much as we try to convince ourselves as well as others that everyone is a good person, truth is, it is just not so. How we react to such people has a lot to do with whether or not we want to react like God wants us to or not. To the Christians in Rome, Paul suggests several ways to react, in a godly way, to those who have done evil to them. In the first chapter of Paul’s application section of the book of Romans (chapter 12) he deals with how the individual must react in given situations. At the end of the chapter, he gives five reactions to those who do evil to us. The first reaction is “never pay back evil for evil to anyone” (12:17). We are always going to “respect what is right in the sight of all men.” To “pay back evil for evil” is not the way that God would handle things. When God “retali-ated” for an evil done to Him, it was always in the form of a punish-ment. It is not within God’s charac-ter to do something which is evil. The second reaction is “if possible, so far as it depends on you, be at peace with all men” (12:18). Possibly the reason someone did “evil” to you in the first place is because they were not at peace with you. However, this passage is not talking about them. It is talk-ing about you and me. We need to exert a lot of effort to “be at peace with all men.” It is agreed that with some people there cannot be any peace, but we should not be one of those people. The third reaction is “never take your own revenge” (12:19). Let the Lord issue out the wrath upon these types of people. Let the Lord “repay” the vengeance that you would like to see come upon these types of people. The fourth reaction is to do good to our enemies (12:20). If he is hungry we need to feed him. If he is thirsty we need to give him something to drink. Paul says that we will “heap burning coals on his head.” This means that our good-ness will make him feel bad. It will embarrass him maybe to the point that he will not do it again. We humans cannot stand for someone to do something good for us when we have done evil to them. The fifth reaction is that we are not to “be overcome by evil, but [we are to] overcome evil with good” (12:21). In other words we are not to let evil influence us but rather we are to let our goodness influence those that will do evil to us. Implementing these different reactions may be hard, especially when we are trying to do things God’s way. If we have never reacted to evil like this before, then it may be rather difficult. However, God says it is the best way for us to react to people when they are evil to us. The book of Romans is all about our believing God and Him giving us “credit” for being righteous. The question that we have with regard to reacting to the evil that is done to us is do we “believe God.” If we do not, then where will we be eter-nally? If we do believe God then He will “credit” us as being righteous and living with Him forever. Let’s react to evil in a Godly manner! T he Dispensation of the Holy Spirit began on the day of Pentecost, often referred to as “the Birthday of the Church”. This constitutes God’s program for this present age; the Church, of which Christ is the living Head. During the Church Age believers are indwelt with the Holy /Spirit and are subject to His direct leading, comforted by His abiding presence and strength-ened through the Spirit, in the inner man. Angels, however, are the unseen messengers cooperating in the Holy Spirit’s minis-try. This truth is clearly revealed in the affirmative question, “Are they (angels) not all minister-ing spirits…for them who shall be heirs of salvation” (Hebrews 1:14). The most comforting revelation to the true believer concerning angels is the fact of their watchful care and particular ministry to the Redeemed on earth. To be conscious of and to acknowledge the truth that multitudes of the heavenly hosts are enlisted to minis-ter to the heirs of salvation. When Peter spoke of the “things the angels desire to look into” (I Peter 1:9-12), he was referring to the Gospel of Divine Grace, the outworking of Redemption. The Church, and the grace bestowed upon it, is to Angels a revelation of “the manifold wisdom of God” (Ephesians 3:10). The Scriptures disclose the truth that Angels are progressively gaining spiri-tual knowledge as “specta-tors” of the outworking of redeeming grace. The exhortation to Christian decorum is charged not only for Christ’s sake but “because of the angels” (I Timothy 521; I Corinthians 11:10). Angels are present at the death of the saints. Luke 16:22 asserts that angels transported the soul of Lazarus to Paradise, and, in the dying words of Stephen, “Lord Jesus, receive my spirit” (Acts 7:59). It is intimated that angels were present at the martyr’s death. At our time of our passing from this life to the next we might see an “angel escort” waiting to conduct our redeemed spirit to its home in glory. It was Lazarus immortal Spirit that the angels took to the paradise of God. This is the tender ministry of angels; they are minister-ing spirits to the journey’s end. Acts 5:12-16 records the account of an angel delivering the apostles from prison. It is a con-vincing record of the power and progress of the Early Church. Seeing the undeniable evidence of the Apostles’ ministry among the people, the enraged “religionists” seized them and put them in the com-mon prison. This scene is from the record of the infant Church, but the pat-tern is as old as human history. In these verses the malice of Satan and the grace of God are in conflict about them. The same opposition to Truth must be anticipated throughout the history of the church while on earth, as Jesus forewarned His followers (John 15:18-10), but we have the assurance that God will never desert His witnesses. God sent His angels to release the faithful mes-sengers from their prison, and immediately they renewed their witness-ing until the authority was forced to admit “you have filled Jerusalem with your doctrine” (Acts 5:17-28). (Note: Angels are always spoken of as masculine never feminine. We have been deceived in believing that angels are little babies, or beauti-ful women, with wings. Angels are created beings to assist in ministries.)FAITH & VALUES Friday & Saturday, October 12-13, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 6A6AF&V Q Hugh Sherrill is an ordained minister and Bible Teacher at Eastside Baptist Church. BIBLICAL MEDITATION Carlton McPeakcarlton_mc@msn.com Q Carlton G. McPeak is an evangelist working in the Lake City area. All Scriptural quotations are from the New American Standard Bible, Holman Bible Publishers, unless otherwise noted. Godly reaction to evil The church and angels — Part 1 Hugh Sherrillems-hugh43@comcast.net BIBLE STUDIES

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A nyone still thinking on the $1,440 dol-lars we talked about last week? Or, more importantly, how about the gift of those 1,440 min-utes we receive each day? Recall with me that time is the ulti-mate non-renewable resource, because no matter how we try, once time has passed we simply cannot get it back. Last week we discussed the importance of making a list of our priorities, as well as setting goals for accomplishing what is important to us. I hope you have taken a few minutes this week to think on these things. It matters that we do this every so often because the seasons of our lives change and so do our circum-stances. In this season of my life, finding time to spend with my family is often a challenge because we are all busy going in different directions. With one son married and a family of his own, another newly graduated from college and pursuing a career in another city, a daugh-ter in high school and another in middle school, we have to be intentional about spending time together. Because it is often difficult, we have to make it a priority! Reminding yourself regularly of what is important will help you find time in the midst of busy days. Next, we need to create a flexible, yet realistic schedule. We often complain, “I just don’t have enough hours in the day!” Perhaps our problem is not that we don’t have enough time, but that our time is not being used effectively. As you consider your schedule, consider the amount of time spent on your daily com-mitments. Are there too many obligations for you to accomplish them all well? Are there some activities that need to be recon-sidered or dropped completely? Next, evaluate the amount of time that can be dedicated to your priority list. Relationships and recreation are important aspects of life that we may need to write into our schedule if we don’t seem to find enough time. Above all, a realistic schedule must be flexible because we never know what a day may bring, and if our schedule is too rigid we will get discouraged and give up trying to have a plan. Finally, resist the urge to procrastinate. According to Webster’s dictionary, the word procrastinate means “to put off; delay.” It is a natural tendency to avoid things that we don’t enjoy. However, delaying tasks only cause them to multiply as other ones add to the list. Then, we find ourselves with way too many things to do and not nearly enough time to complete them. Moreover, if all we are able to do is “get them done” some tasks probably do not reflect our best efforts. Being reminded of your priorities and creating a work-able schedule can help you curb the temptation to procrastinate. One suggestion if you know procrastinating is a problem for you is to give yourself deadlines that are considerably earlier than the actual deadline. This can help put the pressure on to complete a task and have a little extra time if absolutely neces-sary. Another idea is to recog-nize there are times that you just are not in the mood to tackle certain tasks. However, you can still stay on track if you use that time to accomplish another goal on your list that would clear some time later…this will keep your schedule flexible…and you will perform your tasks well. Because most of us live at a pretty busy pace, making the most of every moment ensures that we can do all the things we have to do. More importantly, it also allows us the time to spend on what is important … those things that we want to do. So … what will you do with your gift of 1440 minutes today? Because Every Heart Matters,Angie LAKE CITY REPORTER FAITH & VALUES FRIDAY & SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12-13, 2012 7A7AReligionI don’t like snakes, and I don’t like elec-tric fences. Put them both together and you have a bad day… at least for me. It was 1978 and I was working as an apprentice at building custom cabinets. However, one day I decided to go fishing. I knew someone who said he had a small farm, with some private ponds with cat fish. So, I gathered the necessary equipment, and dug some nice worms, and drove out to the farm. I parked along the fence on the dirt road and got everything out and ready to go fishing. I raised one of the barbed wires, held the lower with my foot and went through, stood up and wham! The fence had an electric wire I had not noticed. It was enough electricity to dis-courage cows and careless people for sure. Anyway, I recovered and trudged on, murmuring (not so) under my breath about the man who put the fence there. I arrived at the ‘pond of dreams’ examined all the fishing spots, trying to locate the right spot. Then I found it, and set my tackle box on the ground, and started to put my fish-ing pole on the ground. I was about to put my pole on what I thought was a rock, when I saw that the ‘rock’ was a snake coiled up. It was black is all I know, and my face flushed, hot sweats broke out. That was it… my fishing day was done, and I got out of there as fast as I could. Life is really about learning from the mistakes of others as well as our own mistakes. William Penn Adair “Will” Rogers is known for his wisdom and quick witted ‘one-liners’… here are a few. “Lettin’ the cat outta the bag is a whole lot easier than puttin’ it back in.” “Never kick a cow chip on a hot day.” “There’s two theories to arguing with a woman. Neither one works.” “If you find yourself in a hole, the first thing to do is stop dig-ging.” “The quickest way to double your money is to fold it over and put it back in your pocket.” “It doesn’t take a genius to spot a goat in a flock of sheep.” “Don’t squat with your spurs still on.” “Good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment.” Solomon is also known for his wisdom which he recorded in the book of Proverbs. “The fear of the Lord is the begin-ning of knowledge, but fools despise wisdom and discipline” (Proverbs 1:7). “My son, if sinners entice you, do not give in to them” Proverbs 1:10. “Put away perversity from your mouth; keep corrupt talk far from your lips. (Dealing with temptation he says) Let your eyes look straight ahead, fix your gaze directly before you” Proverbs 4:24-25. “When pride comes, then comes disgrace but with humility comes wis-dom” Proverbs 11:2. “A wife of noble character is her husband’s crown, but a disgraceful wife is like decay to the bones” Proverbs 12:4. “An evil man is trapped by his sin-ful talk, but a righteous man escapes trouble” Proverbs 12:13. “A prudent man keeps his knowledge to himself, but the heart of the fool blurts out folly” Proverbs 12:23 “There is a way that seems right to a man, but in the end it leads to death” Proverbs 14:12. Why make the same mistakes and reap the same results as others? Seek wisdom, and when you find it…. use it. James says, “If anyone lacks wisdom, he should ask God, who gives generously without finding fault, and it will be given to him.” Jack Exum Jr.jackexumjr@yahoo.com Q Jack Exum Jr. Is a freelance writer who lives in Lake City. CHURCH CALENDAR Q To submit your free Church Calendar item, contact Laura Hampson by email at lhampson@lakecityreporter.com, drop off at the Reporter office, 180 E. Duval St., or fax to (386) 752-9400.The snake and the electric fence Remember what is importantOct. 12Pastor’s anniversarySalvation Holiness Church will celebrate its pastor’s 24th anniversary at 7:30 p.m. Bishop C. Kenneth Pastor also will be celebrated Saturday at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday at 11:30 a.m. Oct. 13Spaghetti dinnerSpirit of Christ Church, at U.S. 90 West and Sweetbreeze Drive, will have its annual spaghetti dinner in the church’s social hall. Dinner will be served from 5 to 6:30 p.m., followed by entertainment. We are asking for a free-will offering to cover the cost. Please be generous, as this event helps fund our outreach programs. Cook off and saleTrinity United Methodist Church, 248 NE Martin Luther King St,, will have its second annual Cook-Off and Bazaar Sale, starting at 10 a.m. Enjoy delicious foods, treats and specialties on sale from members at this extravagant event. For information, call 752-3701. Oct. 14 Devotional servicesThe American Legion Rider Chapter 57, South Highway 47, hosts Sunday morning devotional ser-vices the second Sunday of every month at 9 a.m. There is also a continen-tal breakfast from 8 to 9 a.m. Services are held by the Christian Motorcycle Association. HomecomingThe homecoming service at Pleasant Grove United Methodist Church will start at 10:30 a.m. with special music. Pastor Dusty Bailey will be the speaker.A lunch will follow.HomecomingFirst Baptist Church in White Springs will cel-ebrate its 112th homecom-ing. Dr. Fritz Fountain will preach at 10:30 a.m. and special music will be pro-vided by Bullard Brothers and Friends. A covered-dish lunch will follow in the fellowship hall. Pastor’s appreciationThe Philadelphia MB Church family will honor Pastor I.L. Williams and his wife, Betty. Our 11 a.m. speaker will be Minister Lynward Jones of St. Paul M.B. Church, Winfield. Pastor Videll Williams and the Faith Bible Church of Sanderson will be in charge of the 3 p.m. ser-vice. Please share with us in this blessed celebration.Pastor appreciationUnion AME Church family invites you to our pastor Rev. Gary DeSue’s appre-ciation services. Sister Vanessa DeSue will speak at 11 a.m., and Rev. Tyron White of Deep Creek MB Church will speak at 3 p.m. Oct. 18Church anniversary The Olivet MB Church of Lake City, Ronald V. Walters, pastor, will be cel-ebrating its 110th anniver-sary Oct. 18 and 21. On Oct 18 at 7 p.m., the guest speaker will be Minister Lantz Mills, pastor of New Day Springs. At 11 a.m. Oct. 21, Pastor Walters will be the speaker, and at 4 p.m., Pastor Alvin Baker and The New Bethel MB Church will provide the ser-vice. Contact Willa Cooley (386) 755-4963 or Margaret Denson (386) 754-1821.Oct. 19Gospel performanceThe Lumbar River Quartet will present a con-cert of gospel music at the Lulu Advent Christian Church at 7 p.m. Oct. 20 Church fundraiserThe annual fish fry to raise funds to maintain the historical Corinth Church and cemetery will be held from 4 to 7 p.m. The church is on Corinth Road, five miles north of Interstate 10, on U.S. 441 North. Catfish and mullet, grits, cole slaw, baked beans, hush-puppies, dessert and tea will be included for $8. All funds raised will be used to maintain the cemetery and restore the church, which was organized in 1887. Gospel singWatertown Congregational Methodist Church will have a gos-pel sing at 7 p.m. featuring The Delivereds. There will be refreshments. Call 752-1329 for information. Oct. 21HomecomingLake City Church of the Nazarene, on Highway 47, will be celebrating its annual homecoming service, beginning at 10 a.m. and will include guest speaker Dr. Orville Jenkins, North Florida District superinten-dent, and special music. A covered-dish luncheon will be in the fellowship hall. Lulu homecomingLulu Baptist Church will have its homecoming cel-ebration. The Rev. Hugh Dampler, interim pastor, will deliver the 11 a.m. message. A covered-dish meal swill follow services. The evening service is canceled. HomecomingBethel United Methodist Church will have its home-coming service. The ser-vice will begin at 10:30 a.m., followed by a covered-dish lunch. For information, call 755-1353. Friends and family dayNew Mount Salem Community Church will have a family and friends day appreciation service at 3:30 p.m. Our keynote speaker will be the Rev. Michael Perry of Old Shiloh Missionary Baptist Church in Alachua. For information, call 754-8923. Pastor celebrationThe congregation of Glad Tidings Assembly invites the community to join us at 10:30 a.m. to celebrate Pastor Lowell and Margie Van Vleck’s 18th anniversary at Glad Tidings Assembly. Rev. Michael Baldree will be ministering. The church is now located at 1571 E. Duval St. in Lake City. All friends and family are welcome to join this cel-ebration. Dinner will be served. For more informa-tion, contact Mrs. Truluck at (386) 752-9851. Oct. 26Spaghetti dinner Wellborn United Methodist Church, 12005 CR 137 in Wellborn, will have a spaghetti dinner with all the trimmings, beginning at 6 p.m., in the fellowship hall. While there is no charge for the dinner, donations will be accepted. All money collected will be given to the nonprofit, Christian organization Love Inc. to help its 2013 budget. The dinner will feature a unique, homemade sauce, spaghetti, salad, Italian bread, dessert and bever-age. For more information about Love Inc., contact Executive Director Lisa Kriehn at (386) 330-2671. For more information about the dinner, contact the Rev. Dr. Everett L. Parker at (386) 754-8524.Gospel extravaganzaFirst Trinity United Methodist Church will have a gospel extravaganza Oct. 26 and 27 at 7 p.m. at the church, 248 NE Martin Luther King St. in Lake City. Proceeds will go toward the building fund. Oct. 31Trunk or treatLantern Park Baptist Church, 239 SE Llewellyn Ave., will have a trunk or treat event Oct. 31 from 5 to 6:30 p.m. in the church parking lot. Nov. 3Cornerstone MinistryJoin Cornerstone Outreach Ministry, Pastor Willie Brown and Pastor Richard Marshall for a ban-quet for potential members, donors and sponsors at the Super Motel, 3954 Highway 47. The ministry wants to take back neighborhoods, homes and schools by getting their hands dirty. Tickets are $15, and all proceeds go to the min-istry. For information call 288-1363. Nov. 6Fall meetingSalem Primitive Baptist Church announces the fall meeting with Elder Ronald Lawrence of Nashville will begin at 6:30 p.m. It will continue Nov. 7 at 6:30 p.m. and end on Nov. 8. Please plan to attend. Church is nine miles northwest of Lake City on Lake Jeffrey Road. For information, call 752-4198. Nov. 11Devotional servicesAmerican Legion Rider Chapter 57, South Highway 47, hosts Sunday morning devotional ser-vices the second Sunday of every month at 9 a.m. There is also a continen-tal breakfast from 8 to 9 a.m. Services are held by the Christian Motorcycle Association. OngoingFish dinnerOur Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5056 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, pre-pares fish dinners every Friday from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The dinner is $6 take out or eat in. HEART MATTERS Angie Landangieland3@windstream.net Q Heart Matters is a weekly column written by Angie Land, director of the Family Life Ministries of the Lafayette Baptist Association, where she teaches Bible studies, leads marriage and family conferences and offers biblical counseling to individu als, couples and families.

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missioners to continue to investigate the viability, feasibility and wisdom of the project, Foreman said. The board also asked to continue to be advised and apprised of whats going on with the project. Its not definitive as much as its a vote of confidence. The motion came after board members spent more than 40 minutes discussing the events center proposal that was presented by a fact-finding committee ear lier in the week. John ONeal, a member of the fact-finding commit tee, answered questions from the board which dealt with a variety of informa tion contained in the initial proposal. Most questions centered around possible locations for the proposed center, economics, water treat ment options, employment opportunities and other data, as board members attempted to get some insight into the numbers provided. Several questions were asked about how Ellisville was chosen as a potential location for the site, which were followed by ques tions about the reliability of the numbers presented for annual subsidy, opera tion costs and the need for a wastewater plant in Ellisville to provide sewer services. Wendell Johnson, city manager, said he hopes the city would be included in the discussion, since the Kicklighter Street wastewa ter plant could potentially provide sewer services in Ellisville. When discussing Ellisville as a location, ONeal said a request for proposal that was adver tised in the local newspa per only had two respons es. Both were from the Ellisville area. ONeal said he doesnt believe the project should be tied to the two proposed sites in Ellisville and sever al board members offered words of agreement. Board member Glen Owens suggested the board continue to investi gate the project. I think there is plenty of evidence to justify pursuing this, he said, as he sug gested getting additional information. Personally, I dont see how there can be a question of how its going to be a positive economic impact. Terry Dicks said he thinks the idea should move forward and addition al information obtained to make educated decisions. Were not saying spend the money, but court the customer, he said. Lets see where potentially this can go before spending the money. Following the meeting, Quillen spoke about the boards decision to request more information about the events center proposal. Were excited about something that could have significant impact to not just the county but the entire region, he said. Hopefully, this will be a building block for us to do some great things for the community in the future. Quillen suggested a cautious, conservative approach with heavy pub lic involvement in the pro cess. The resolution form ing the (economic devel opment) board charges us with the responsibility of vetting and making rec ommendations on various projects, so within those guidelines hopefully well have a voice in making sure there is credible data, sufficient public buy-in and ultimately making a recom mendation to the board (of county commissioners), he said. The key is early detec tion, Jani said. The earlier cancer is detected, the greater the life expectancy, he said. Advances in tech nology mean doctors can find smaller tumors than before. Jani described the routine for a typical mam mogram, an X-ray of the breast, drawing chuckles from the audience when he said each breast would be slightly flattened. Jani said radiologists look for masses, tumors, calcifications and abnor mal structures, such as distorted tissue. Although some women may be concerned with the radiation involved with a mammogram, Jani said it is much less than the natu ral-occurring radiation we are exposed to daily. You would have to get 20 to 30 mammograms to get the same radiation that happens in one day, he said. Womans imaging is particularly close to me because I have a lot of women in the house. I have a lot of pink, he said. Jani said he and his wife have a young daughter and one on the way. After door prizes were raffled off, 30 women were selected to receive a free mammogram, paid for by the Tough Enough to Wear Pink Crisis Fund. Over six years, 180 women without insur ance have received free mammograms, said Linda Dowling, Columbia County Resources manager. Early detection is extremely important, said Linda Dowling, Columbia County Resources man ager. Participants could also buy tiara and boa-clad yard flamingos, with proceeds going to the crisis fund and the American Cancer Society. Shirley Rasmussen of Lake City said although she has been to the lunch and learn before, she still learned new informa tion. The event was also a fun way to socialize, she said. I wouldnt miss it, Rasmussen said. 8A LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12-13, 2012 8A ED IS 90 The family of Ed Bedenbaugh invites family and friends to join us to celebrate his 90th birthday at Bethel United Methodist Church (U.S. 441 South) We will be serving Chicken Perlo in the fellowship hall at 12:30. LEARN Continued From 1A WATER Continued From 1A CENTER: Economic Development board asks for specifics on project Continued From Page 1A DEBATE: VP candidates spar over everything in Kentucky Continued From Page 1A JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City Reporter Dr. Manish Jani, a radiologist at the Lake City Medical Center, fields questions from Lake City resident Stephanie Bennett (left), 63, a cancer survivor. You have to always have hope that theres a procedure or medication available to take care of (the cancer), said Bennett, who was diagnosed with stage five can cer in 1994. I had a good surgeon. You have to always stay confident. Pictured are Bennett (from left), Jani, Kim Nicholson, and her mother, Colleen Bennett. Funding will be awarded through a ranking process based on various cri teria, including the effectiveness of the proposed project to protect, conserve, or restore water resources. Priority will be given to producers whose operations are located within a water resource caution area, and those who have or are in the process of enrolling in the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Best Management Practices Program. Applicants also must have an active water use permit and volunteer for the Districts Water Use Monitoring Program. The initiative is one of two costshare programs for which the District has budgeted $3 million for Fiscal Year 2012-13 to assist agriculture producers and public water suppliers in the pro tection of water resources. The District is pleased to partner with area farmers to reduce ground water use and reduce nutrient load ing to water resources, said District Executive Director Ann Shortelle. care about. The debate took place a little more than a week after Obama and Romney met in the first of their three debates an encounter that has fueled a Republican comeback in opinion polls. With Democrats eager for Biden to show the spark the president lacked, he did so. Unprompted, he brought up the video in which Romney had said 47 percent of Americans pay no federal income tax, view themselves as victims and do not take responsibility for their own lives. Its about time they take responsibility instead of signing pledges to avoid raising taxes, Biden said of Romney, Ryan and the Republicans. The serial disagreements started imme diately after the smiles and handshakes of the opening. Ryan said in the debates opening moments that U.S. Ambassador Chris Stevens had been denied sufficient securi ty by administration officials. Stevens died in a terrorist attack on the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi on Sept. 11. Not a single thing he said is accurate, Democrat Biden shot back. Republicans and Democrats alike have said in recent days the presidential race now approximates the competitive situa tion in place before the two political con ventions. The two men are generally sepa rated by a point or two in national public opinion polls and in several battleground states, with Obama holding a slender lead in Ohio and Wisconsin. Both the president and Romney cam paigned in battleground states during the day before ceding the spotlight to their political partners for the evening. In Kentucky, Biden and Ryan seemed primed for a showdown from their open ing moments on stage, and neither seemed willing to let the other have the final word. They interrupted each other repeatedly and moderator Martha Raddatz of ABC as well. With Democrats eager for Biden to show the spark the president lacked, he did so. Unprompted, he brought up the video in which Romney had said 47 percent of Americans pay no federal income tax, view themselves as victims and do not take responsibility for their own lives. Its about time they take responsibility instead of signing pledges to avoid raising taxes, Biden said of Romney, Ryan and the Republicans. But Ryan quickly turned to dreary eco nomic statistics 23 million are strug gling to work, he said, and 15 percent of the country is living in poverty. This is not what a real recovery looks like. Medicare was a flashpoint, as well. Ryan said Obamas health care plan had diverted $716 billion from the program for seniors and created a new board that could deny care to patients who need it. Democrats havent put a credible solu tion on the table, he said. Theyll tell you about vouchers. Theyll say all these things to try to scare people. Biden quickly said that Ryan had authored not one but two proposals in which seniors would be given government payments that might not cover the entirety of their care. Otherwise, he said, the Romney-Ryan approach wouldnt achieve the savings they claimed.

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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Friday & Saturday, October 12-13, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com %632576 Date with the Devils JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Hanna Baker (14) returns a serve aga inst Suwannee High on Oct. 2. Fort White football plays Williston today By TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comFORT WHITE — After an open week, Fort White High’s football team is rest-ed and ready to get back to the business of winning dis-trict and advancing in the state playoffs. The second-half quest begins with a 7:30 p.m. game today at Williston High. Fort White is 3-2, while the Red Devils are 2-3 and both teams had last week off. “We are ready to get back started,” Indians head coach Demetric Jackson said. “I thought it (open week) was productive. We took a couple of days off for mental and physical rest. It was something our guys needed. It helped us heal up a little bit and get our minds back into it.” Fort White is healthy except for defensive line-man Drew Gaylard, who is nursing a high ankle sprain. After consecutive weeks playing running teams, Fort White will face a Williston squad that will mix up its offense a little more. Williston coach Jamie Baker’s team has dual quar-terbacks in David Heinkel and Stephen Cochlin. Receiver Damien Strange caught 40 passes for 790 yards and 12 touchdowns last year. On defense he had three interceptions and 70 tackles. Keith Neal dou-bles at running back and linebacker. “They run an open set on offense with three wides,” Jackson said. “Everything is out of the shotgun. Their quarterback runs a lot and they switch quarterback and tailback. Strange can cause you problems. “ Jackson said the Indians’ offense will have to take what is offered. “They have the most difficult defense we will face because you don’t know how they will line up,” Jackson said. “They run a 6-2 with a Cover 2, or they may line up in a 4-3 or 4-4. It presents problems. We have just got to run through it and find out what we can do against them. We hope to keep them off-balance.” Three of Fort White’s five opponents in the first half combined for 16 pass attempts, and the last two — top 3 teams Union County High and Wakulla High — rushed for close to 300 yards each. Jackson said that was a point of emphasis over the break. “We have got to get off the field against those teams,” Jackson said. “The advantage of being one-dimensional is they slow the game down and eat up the clock. That takes snaps away from our offense. It hurts us if the teams keep the chains going.” The other areas of concern was special teams and the Indians’ 15 turnovers. “We have got to make the other teams go 80 yards to score and not give them a short field,” Jackson said. Fort White is guaranteed a playoff spot and the countdown to determining a district champion begins today. “We need to get some momentum and confidence before the district game,” Jackson said. “We are doing our part from a coaches’ standpoint to shore up mistakes. We take it seriously. The Nov. 2 game is critical for us.” Directions : Take U.S. 27 south to Williston; turn right at red light (State Road 121) and go four blocks to the school and football field on the left. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Devontae Levy (1) runs the ball in an attempt to earn a first down in a game against Union County High on Sept. 28. PREP ROUNDUP CHS takes down Atlantic Coast for second timeFrom staff reportsColumbia High gave a good preview of the District 3-6A tournament with its second win against Atlantic Coast High on Thursday. The Lady Tigers battled back after going down in the first two sets to win in five, 22-25, 24-26, 25-10, 25-17 and 16-14. “It took all 11 girls tonight,” Columbia head coach Rebecca Golden said. “The girls really played together as a team.” Kelbie Ronsonet led the team with 14 kills and five blocks. Jara Courson added nine kills. Jessie Bates led the team with 30 assists and four aces. Annie Milton had the most blocks with six in the match. The Lady Tigers improved to 13-4 overall with the win. Columbia hosts Fort White High in the annual “Dig Pink” game at 6 p.m. on Tuesday in Lake City.Tigers golfColumbia High’s boys golf team finished in a tie with Buchholz High in the eight-team County Championship held at Gainesville Country Club on Thursday. The Tigers shot 330 to tie with the Bobcats and play went into extra holes. Each team was represented by its top-four golfers with Nick Jones, Tim Bagley, Dillan VanVleck and Dean Soucinek representing the Tigers. VanVleck and Bagley went off first for the Tigers and finished with a combined 10 after the first hole, while Buchholz finished with an eight. With the match on the line, the Tigers needed to make up two shots between Jones and Soucinek. After Jones tapped in his par, Soucinek made a five-foot birdie to give the group a seven on the hole. It was good enough to tie Buchholz in the playoff. Due to darkness, the match was then suspended with the teams split-ting the County Championship. “I was real proud of them after losing to Buchholz on Tuesday in a playoff,” Columbia head coach Steve Smithy said. “I told them it’s not over until it’s over and we have to finish. Being two down with one group to play, I think it was a strong showing in the biggest tournament in this area.” Jones led the Tigers with thirdplace finish shooting a 79 in the match. Bag ley and VanVleck each shot 83s on the day and Soucinek finished with an 85. Columbia improved to 17-5-1 with the win.Lady Tigers golfColumbia High finished with a 458 to finish third in the County Championship at Haile Plantation in Gainesville on Thursday. Oak Hall Academy took home the County Championship, although it was a strong showing from the Lady Tigers. Gillian Norris led the way with a third-place finish at 81. “She had an excellent round,” Columbia head coach Todd Carter said. “She had a couple of rough holes, Tigers finish in tie with Buchholz for County Championship in golf. PREP continued on 5B

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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today AUTO RACING 4 p.m. ESPN2 — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, pole qualifying for Dollar General 300, at Concord, N.C. 5:30 p.m. ESPN2 — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, “Happy Hour Series,” final practice for Bank of America 500, at Concord, N.C. 7:30 p.m. ESPN — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, Dollar General 300, at Concord, N.C. 1 a.m. SPEED — Formula One, qualifying for Grand Prix of Korea, at Yeongam, South Korea BOXING 10 p.m. SHO — Middleweights, Jonathan Cepeda (12-0-0) vs. Lamar Russ (10-0-0); lightweights, Jose Pedraza (10-0-0) vs. Allan Benitez (6-1-0), at St. Louis COLLEGE FOOTBALL 8 p.m. ESPN2 — Navy at Central Michigan GOLF 9 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Portugal Masters, second round, at Vilamoura, Portugal 1:30 p.m. TGC — Champions Tour, Greater Hickory Classic, first round, at Conover, N.C. 4 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Frys.com Open, second round, at San Martin, Calif. 7:30 p.m. TGC — Web.com Tour, Miccosukee Championship, second round, at Miami (same-day tape) 9:30 p.m. TGC — LPGA Malaysia, second round, at Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (same-day tape) MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 5 p.m. TBS — Playoffs, ALDS, game 5, Baltimore at New York (if necessary) 8:30 p.m. TBS — Playoffs, NLDS, game 5, St. Louis at Washington (if necessary) MEN’S COLLEGE HOCKEY 7 p.m. NBCSN — Ice Breaker Tournament, first round, Notre Dame vs. Maine, at Kansas City, Mo. 1 a.m. NBCSN — Ice Breaker Tournament, first round, Army vs. Nebraska-Omaha, at Kansas City, Mo. (delayed tape) SOCCER 10:55 a.m. ESPN2 — Men’s national teams, World Cup qualifier, Russia vs. Portugal, at Moscow ——— Saturday AUTO RACING 7:30 p.m. ABC — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Bank of America 500, at Concord, N.C. 1:30 a.m. SPEED — Formula One, Grand Prix of Korea, at Yeongam, South Korea BOXING 10 p.m. HBO — Junior welterweights, Brandon Rios (30-0-1) vs. Mike Alvarado (33-0-0); champion Nonito Donaire (29-1-0) vs. Toshiaki Nishioka (39-4-3), for IBF/WBO junior featherweight title, at Carson, Calif. COLLEGE FOOTBALL Noon ABC — Texas vs. Oklahoma, at DallasESPN — Iowa at Michigan St. or Northwestern at Minnesota ESPN2 — Northwestern at Minnesota or Iowa at Michigan St. FSN — UAB at HoustonFX — Kansas St. at Iowa St.NBCSN — Brown at Princeton 3 p.m. FOX — Utah at UCLA 3:30 p.m. ABC — Regional coverage, West Virginia at Texas Tech, Illinois at Michigan, or Oregon St. at BYU CBS — Alabama at MissouriESPN — Teams TBA or Oregon St at BYU FSN — Oklahoma St. at KansasNBC — Stanford at Notre DameNBCSN — Fresno St. at Boise St. 5:30 p.m. ESPN2 — Boston College at Florida St. 7 p.m. FOX — Southern Cal at WashingtonFSN — TCU at Baylor 8 p.m. ESPN — South Carolina at LSU 9 p.m. ESPN2 — Tennessee at Mississippi St. GOLF 9 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Portugal Masters, third round, at Vilamoura, Portugal 1:30 p.m. TGC — Champions Tour, Greater Hickory Classic, second round, at Conover, N.C. 4 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Frys.com Open, third round, at San Martin, Calif. 7:30 p.m. TGC — Web.com Tour, Miccosukee Championship, third round, at Miami (same-day tape) 9:30 p.m. TGC — LPGA Malaysia, third round, at Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (same-day tape) MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL TBA FOX — Playoffs, American League Championship Series, game 1 MEN’S COLLEGE HOCKEY 7:30 p.m. NBCSN — Ice Breaker Tournament, championship game, at Kansas City, Mo. NBA BASKETBALL 8 p.m. WGN — Preseason, Chicago at MinnesotaBASEBALLMLB playoffs DIVISION SERIES American League Detroit 2, Oakland 2 Detroit 3, Oakland 1Detroit 5, Oakland 4Oakland 2, Detroit 0Oakland 4, Detroit 3 Thursday Detroit at Oakland (n) New York 2, Baltimore 1 New York 7, Baltimore 2Baltimore 3, New York 2New York 3, Baltimore 2, 12 innings Thursday Baltimore at New York (n) Today Baltimore at New York, 5:07 p.m., if necessary (TBS) ——— National League San Francisco 3, Cincinnati 2 Cincinnati 5, San Francisco 2Cincinnati 9, San Francisco 0San Francisco 2, Cincinnati 1, 10 innings San Francisco 8, Cincinnati 3 Thursday San Francisco 6, Cincinnati 4 St. Louis 2, Washington 2 Washington 3, St. Louis 2St. Louis 12, Washington 4St. Louis 8, Washington 0 Thursday Washington 2, St. Louis 1 Today St. Louis at Washington, 8:37 p.m., if necessary (TBS) LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES (Best-of-7) American League Saturday Oakland-Detroit winner at New York OR Baltimore at Oakland-Detroit winner, TBA (TBS) ——— National League Sunday San Francisco at St. Louis/Washington winner TBA (FOX)FOOTBALLAP Top 25 games Saturday No. 1 Alabama at Missouri, 3:30 p.m.No. 3 South Carolina at No. 9 LSU, 8 p.m. No. 4 Florida at Vanderbilt, 6 p.m. No. 5 West Virginia at Texas Tech, 3:30 p.m. No. 6 Kansas State at Iowa State, Noon No. 7 Notre Dame vs. No. 17 Stanford, 3:30 p.m. No. 8 Ohio State at Indiana, 8 p.m.No. 10 Oregon State at BYU, 3:30 p.m. No. 11 Southern Cal at Washington, 7 p.m. No. 12 Florida State vs. Boston College, 5:30 p.m. No. 13 Oklahoma vs. No. 15 Texas, Noon No. 18 Louisville at Pittsburgh, NoonNo. 19 Mississippi State vs. Tennessee, 9 p.m. No. 20 Rutgers vs. Syracuse, NoonNo. 21 Cincinnati vs. Fordham, 7 p.m.No. 22 Texas A&M at No. 23 Louisiana Tech, 9:15 p.m. No. 24 Boise St. vs. Fresno State, 3:30 p.m. No. 25 Michigan vs. Illinois, 3:30 p.m. NFL schedule Sunday’s Games Oakland at Atlanta, 1 p.m.Kansas City at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.Indianapolis at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m.Cincinnati at Cleveland, 1 p.m.Detroit at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.St. Louis at Miami, 1 p.m.Dallas at Baltimore, 1 p.m.Buffalo at Arizona, 4:05 p.m.New England at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.N.Y. Giants at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.Minnesota at Washington, 4:25 p.m.Green Bay at Houston, 8:20 p.m. Monday’s Game Denver at San Diego, 8:30 p.m.Open: Carolina, Chicago, Jacksonville, New OrleansBASKETBALLNBA preseason Today’s Games Detroit at Toronto, 7 p.m.Minnesota at Indiana, 7 p.m.Cleveland vs. Chicago, 8 p.m.New Orleans at Houston, 8 p.m.Denver at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.Oklahoma City at Utah, 9 p.m.Portland at Phoenix, 10 p.m. Saturday’s Games Brooklyn vs. Philadelphia, 7 p.m.New York vs. Boston, 7:30 p.m.Washington at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.Chicago at Minnesota, 8 p.m.Detroit at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.Utah at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12-13, 2012%632576 BOWLING JV, MIDDLE SCHOOL ROUNDUP BRIEFS League resultsLake City Bowl league play: GOLDEN ROLLERS Team standings: 1. Gamblers; 2. Quirky Quad; 3. Knock em Down. Team high handicap game: 1. 2 Plus 2 841; 2. Jo’s Crew 830; 3. Stripers 817. Team high handicap series: 1. Ups & Downs 2,394; 2. 2 Girls & 2 Guys 2,378; 3. Knock em Down 2,377. High scratch game: 1. Diane Madsen 177; 2. Joanne Denton 167; 3. Elaine Nemeth 158. 1. Earl Hayward 229; 2. Ric Yates 213; 3. Bill Price 183. High scratch series: 1. Judy Johnson 494; 2. Doreen Waters 467; 3. Joyce Hooper 448. 1. Bill Dolly 586; 2. George Walters 537; 3. George Mulligan 505. High handicap series: 1. Betty Brown 683; 2. June Pat Klock 635; 3. Pat Hale 614. 1. Lee McKinney 684; 2. Winton Brewer 628; 3. Ray Denton 613.(results from Sept. 27) HIT & MISS Team standings: 1. Spare Us (20-8); 2. All Mrs’s (17-11); 3. Silver Ladies (17-7). Team high handicap game: 1. All Mrs’s 843; 2. High Five 756; 3. Git Up & Bowl 753. Team high handicap series: 1. Legal Ladies 2,309; 2. Silver Ladies 2,239; 3. Spare Us 2,229. High handicap game: 1. Judy Daniels 251; 2. Donna Schneiders 226; 3. Cathy Pelley 221. High handicap series: 1. Iva “Jean” Dukes 645; 2. Linda Herndon 632; 3. Sandra Peterson 620.(results from Oct. 2) WATERGUARD LEAGUE Team high handicap game: 1. All In 916; 2. All in the Family 879; 3. Canam 863. Team high handicap series: 1. We Don’t Care 2,553; 2. O 2 Cool 2,533; 3. Split/House 2,455. High scratch game: 1. Chrissy Fancy 192; 2. Joyce Hooper 184; 3. (tie) Pat Fennell, Lorrie Geiger 179. 1. Bill Dolly 277; 2. James Price 245; 3. Dess Fennell 233. High scratch series: 1. Chrissy Fancy 505; 2. Lorrie Geiger 479; 3. Joyce Hooper 459. 1. Bill Dolly 683; 2. James Price 644; 3. Michael McInally 606. High handicap game: 1. Samantha Lovell 247; 2. Joyce Hooper 235; 3. Carla Nyssen 229. 1. Dess Fennell 271; 2. James Price 253; 3. Bobby Robinson 251. High handicap series: 1. Julie Bell 642; 2. (tie) Susie Camacho, Pat Fennell 613; 4. Cathey Creel 609. 1. Bill Dolly 743; 2. Michael McInally 717; 3. Ken Watson 676. High average: Lorrie Geiger 176; James Price 202.(results from Oct. 9) MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS Team standings: 1. Team 10 (10971); 2. PLoA (108.5-71.5); 3. Ronsonet Buick-GMC (106-74). High scratch game: 1. Ted Wooley 258; 2. Robert Strickland 256; 3. Dave Duncan 254. High scratch series: 1. Ted Wooley 704; 2. Robert Stone 681; 3. Dave Duncan 669. High handicap game: 1. Robert Strickland 315; 2. Ted Wooley 294; 3. Boogie Johns 283. High handicap series: 1. Ted Wooley 812; 2. Michael Pringle 769; 3. Robert Strickland 753. High average: 1. Zech Strohl 216.83; 2. Dale Coleman 215.27; 3. Brian Meek 212.94. (results from Oct. 1)Youth leaguesMAJORS Team standings: 1. Team 5 (17-7); 2. Team Ace (14.5-9.5); 3. Holy Splitz (13-11). Team high handicap game: 1. 1st Place Team 658; 2. Team Ace 636; 3. The Ballers 617. Team high handicap series: 1. Team Ace 1,839; 2. N7 1,815; 3. Team 3 1,781. High handicap game: 1. Sara Johns 235; 2. Crystal Campbell 221; 3. Marie Johnson 212. 1. Chase Williams 235; 2. Blake Lyons 230; 3. Robert Martin 227. High handicap series: 1. Sara Johns 651; 2. Marie Johnson 614; 3. Crystal Campbell 591. 1. Chase Williams 649; 2. Robert Martin 626; 3. Christian Shepard 612. JUNIORS Team standings: 1. The Emergency Exits (15-9); 2. Dynamite (13.5-10.5); 3. Black Ops Dominators (13-11). Team high handicap game: 1. Bearded Dragons 552; 2. Dynamite 551; 3. The Emergency Exits 550. Team high handicap series: 1. The Emergency Exits 1,598; 2. Bearded Dragons 1,583; 3.Black Ops Dominators 1,573. High handicap game: 1. (tie) Beth Saylor, Bryannah Billingsley 203; 3. Taiya Driggers 202. 1. Ian Beckman 207; 2. Josh Johnson 202; 3. Juan Perez 194. High handicap series: 1. Taiya Driggers 589; 2. Callie Pierce 558; 3. Beth Saylor 545. 1. Juan Perez 557; 2. Josh Johnson 556; 3. Drew Greene 545.(results from Sept. 29) Walker wins Street Stocks at North Florida SpeedwaySpecial to the ReporterDevin Walker started third and took the lead on the last lap to win the Street Stocks at North Florida Speedway on Saturday. With the Stock Car championship at NFS his main goal, Walker will hop back into the Turner/Fear Sportsman car on Saturday. “I think we can get a win in that car,” Walker said. “I love driving that car and I really want to get a win for this team. I appreciate them letting me race for them.” Lady Tigers at FSU InvitationalFrom staff reportsColumbia High’s girls junior varsity cross coun-try team ran in the FSU Invitational in Tallahassee on Saturday. Columbia placed 14th out of 16 teams in the competi-tion won by Bishop Kenny High. Lady Tiger runners were: Dimple Desai, 55th place-25:42 5K time; Cori Calyniuk, 62nd-26:05; Jordan Gompers, 86th-27:49; Kaitlyn Daniel, 94th-29:50; Rachel Umstead, 96th-30:23; Myriah Furber, 99th-32:53; Caroline Cribbs, 100th-33:04. COURTESY PHOTOEye of the Tiger runners with their Mickey Mouse Trophy are (front row, from left) Tori Napolitano, Brandy Wacha, Kassady McLean, Cassie P ierron and Bridget Morse. Back row (from left) are Grace Kolovitz, Bernita Brown, Re agan Morse, Jillian Morse and Christen Odum. Assistant coach Ed Morse is in back.Eye of the Tiger brings home ‘mouse’From staff reportsLake City Middle School runners, competing under the Eye of the Tiger ban-ner, won at the Walt Disney World Cross Country Classic on Saturday. It was the fourth consecutive time, and fifth time overall, Lady Falcons have returned home with the Mickey Mouse Trophy. Lake City runners with place and time for the 3,200-meter event were: Bridget Morse, 1st-12:50; Cassie Pieron, 2nd-13:08; Jillian Morse, 4th-13:49; Grace Kolovitz, 8th-14:37; Bernita Brown, 10th-15:08; Brandy Wacha, 11th-15:43; Christen Odum, 12th-15:53; Kassady McLean, 18:47; Victoria Napolitano, 19:02; Reagan Morse, 23:23. Seth Ziegaus (13:08) and Zach Morse (19:45) also ran for the Eye of the Tiger team. ZUMBA Pink Party charity event Saturday A Zumbathon Pink Party to benefit the Suwannee Valley Breast Cancer Awareness Association is 5:30-7 p.m. Saturday at Teen Town Recreation Center. Donation is $10 with all proceeds to be used locally. Don’t forget to wear pink. For details, call Sarah Sandlin at 758-0009.Classes offered at Teen Town The Lake City Recreation Department offers Zumba classes from 5:30-6:30 p.m. Sundays, Tuesdays and Thursdays at Teen Town. Cost is $5 per class. For details, call Heyward Christie at 754-3607. CHEERLEADING Southern Charm Cheer Starz Southern Charm Cheer Starz competitive all-star cheerleading team has a clinic from 5-7 p.m. today and tryouts starting at 10 a.m. Saturday. For details, call Megan Small at 365-6230.Columbia Cheer hosts Cheer Fest Columbia Cheer Association is sponsoring a Cheer Fest from 3-6 p.m. Saturday at Richardson Community Center. Admission is $2 for students through high school and $3 for adults. For details, call Wilda Drawdy at 965-1377. FORT WHITE BASEBALL Donations at Walmart Saturday Members of the Fort White High baseball program will be collecting donations at Walmart from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. For details, call Fort White Dugout Club president Jeanne Howell at 288-5537. OUTDOORS Hunter safety courses offered Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is offering hunter safety Internet-completion courses for Columbia County from 6-9 p.m. today and 8 a.m. to noon Saturday. A second class will be Oct. 25 and Oct. 27. Students who have taken the online course and wish to complete the classroom portion must bring the online-completion report. Firearms, ammunition and materials are provided. Students should bring pen and paper. An adult must accompany children younger than 16. Class locations will be given to those who register in advance. Call the regional office at 758-0525 or go to www. myfwc.com/HunterSafety. YOUTH SOCCER Winter sign-up through Nov. 29 Columbia Youth Soccer Association’s 2013 Winter Recreational Soccer Season registration for ages 3-16 is 6-7 p.m. Thursdays and 1-2:30 p.m. Saturdays through Nov. 29 (not Thanksgiving week). All teams will be gender specific. Fee of $65 includes uniform and year-end trophy. Get a sponsor for your child’s team and your child plays free. For details, go to columbiayouthsoccerassoci ation.com or call 288-2504. RUNNING Wright Brothers 5K for veterans The Race Against the Wright Brothers 5K is 8 a.m. Nov. 10 at Olustee Park in downtown Lake City. Proceeds go to Volunteer Service Programs for Disabled American Veterans at the Lake City VA Medical Center. School and cross country teams are welcome and may qualify form a discount rate. Registration is at www.stepfitnessonline.com or at Carquest on Pinemount Road. For details, call Michelle Richards at 208-2447.Chomp Cancer Foundation 5K Chomp Cancer Foundation has its second Chomp Cancer 5K Run/Walk planned for 8 a.m. Dec. 15 in Fort White. UF Shands Cancer Center is the beneficiary. There will be music, post-race snacks, an award ceremony and a silent auction/raffle. Sponsorships at several levels are available. The race will be chip timed by Half Mile Timing. For details, call Lauren Valentine at (321) 501-9526. CHS FOOTBALL Q-back Club meeting Monday The Columbia County Quarterback Club meets at 7 p.m. Monday in the Jones Fieldhouse. For details, call club president Joe Martino at 984-0452. FORT WHITE FOOTBALL Q-back Club meets Monday The Fort White Quarterback Club will meet at 7 p.m. Monday in the faculty lounge at the high school. For details, call club president Harold Bundy at 365-5731.Q From staff reports

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LAKE CITY REPORTER FOOTBALL FRIDAY & SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12-13, 2012 3B%6SRUWV JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFlorida’s Mike Gillislee (23) fights off LSU’s Eric Rei d (1) as he runs in for a touchdown in Saturday’s 14-6 win.Breaking down Florida-VandyAssociated PressNo. 4 Florida (5-0, 4-0) vs. Vanderbilt (2-3, 1-2), 6 p.m. (ESPNU) Line : Florida by 9. Series Record : Florida leads 34-9-2. What’s at stake : Florida wraps up its last road game outside the Sunshine State and can turn its attention to consecutive Eastern Division showdowns with No. 3 South Carolina on Oct. 20 at the Swamp followed by Georgia in Jacksonville. Vanderbilt has not beaten a ranked opponent since 2008. Key matchup : Florida RB Mike Gillislee versus the Vanderbilt defensive line. Gillislee leads the SEC averaging 109.6 yards rush-ing per game and had a career-high 146 yards in last week’s win over LSU. The Commodores are giv-ing up 179 yard rushing per game. Players to watch : Florida — QB Jeff Driskel. The sophomore has taken over the job at quarterback and helped the Gators win three games after trailing at halftime. He is complet-ing 69.2 percent of his passes and has thrown for 759 yards with four touch-downs with only one inter-ception. He’s also a threat to run, averaging 29.8 yards a game. Vanderbilt — QB Jordan Rodgers. The senior benched against Presbyterian seems to have won back the starting job the last two games. He ranks seventh in the SEC averaging 216.8 yards total offense per game. Facts and figures : The Gators have won 21 straight in this series. ... Florida is the only FBS team that has not allowed a point in the fourth quarter and is out-scoring opponents 41-0 in the final 15 minutes. ... The Gators also have not given up a TD in two straight games. ... This is the high-est ranking for Florida since the 2010 preseason poll. ... The Gators have rallied to win three times in four SEC games. ... Florida has allowed 17 sacks but is averaging 35 minutes, 19 seconds possession each game. ... Vanderbilt is com-ing off its first SEC road win since 2010. ... Florida is the third top-10 team Vanderbilt has played in the first six games. ... Vanderbilt WR Jordan Matthews leads the SEC averaging seven catches per game and is second in the league with 97.2 yards receiving per game. ... Matthews and Chris Boyd are the SEC’s top receiving duo averag-ing 170.8 yards per game. ... The Commodores have started 10 players all five games. ... Vandy RB Zac Stacy ran a career-high 29 times against Missouri and also completed a 24-yard pass in that game. Pass defense key in SEC race By STEVE MEGARGEEAssociated PressPass defense quietly has played a major role in who wins the national title. During the Southeastern Conference’s run of six consecutive champion-ships, five of those cham-pions ranked among the top two teams in the con-ference and the top four teams nationwide in pass efficiency defense. The run-first SEC isn’t known for throwing the ball all over the field, though that is changing. But SEC quarterbacks are effective when they do throw. South Carolina’s Connor Shaw and Alabama’s A.J. McCarron are two of the nation’s most efficient pass-ers, and they could end up meeting in the SEC champi-onship game. Who wins the matchup — or even the chances of such a matchup occurring — likely depends on how well their respective teams defend the pass. “I’ve always said I thought the thing that’s different about this league was the pass rushers and the cover guys,” Alabama coach Nick Saban said. “The combina-tion of those things was a little better than other plac-es. Everybody’s got good receivers. Everybody’s got good runners. There are lots of good quarterbacks. But I thought those two things were something that was a little better in this league.” There’s no doubt SEC quarterback play has improved this year. McCarron, Texas A&M’s Johnny Manziel and Georgia’s Aaron Murray all rank among the nation’s top 16 quarterbacks in passing efficiency. Shaw would rank second nationally in that category, but he’s one pass attempt shy of qualifying. Even so, the conference race often comes down to which team has the best pass defense. Of the last six national champions that all came from the SEC, the only one that didn’t finish among the nation’s top four teams in pass efficien-cy defense was the Cam Newton-led 2010 Auburn squad that ranked ninth in the SEC and 76th nationally in that category. That trend is unlikely to change this year. Alabama topped the nation in pass efficiency defense while winning the national title last year and leads that category again this season. Just behind Alabama are Florida and LSU. Last year, the SEC had the nation’s top four teams in pass efficiency defense: Alabama, South Carolina, LSU and Georgia. Part of the reason for that dominance is because the SEC annually features some of the nation’s top pass rushers. Even the SEC’s own defensive backs are quick to credit their linemen. “They do a great job of pressuring the passer, which makes the quarter-back make quicker deci-sions than he wants to (and) maybe throws a bad ball every once in a while,” LSU safety Eric Reid said. “I’ve caught a couple picks that seemed like punt returns just because of the quarter-back trying to get the ball off (under duress). So a lot of the credit most of it can probably go to the d-line.” But the SEC also has produced plenty of NFL defensive backs during this dynasty. The SEC had each of the last three winners of the Jim Thorpe Award given annually to the nation’s top defensive back: Tennessee’s Eric Berry in 2009, LSU’s Patrick Peterson in 2010 and LSU’s Morris Claiborne in 2011. Eight defensive backs from the SEC the most of any conference have been drafted in the first round over the last three years. “Everybody in the SEC has athletes especially in the secondary,” Mississippi State cornerback Johnthan Banks said. “All the teams are so athletic on offense, you’ve got to have guys who can match up, guys who can play anywhere on the field. That’s what you’ve got to have in this league so you can be ready for anything.” In the most recent draft, Claiborne, Alabama safety Mark Barron, South Carolina corner-back Stephon Gilmore and Alabama cornerback Dre Kirkpatrick were selected among the first 17 over-all picks. LSU had to replace cornerback Tyrann Mathieu, a 2011 Heisman Trophy finalist removed from the Tigers’ 2012 ros-ter for a violation of team rules. Even after losing all those stars, the SEC still boasts some of the nation’s best defensive backs. Alabama cornerback Dee Milliner, Reid and Banks are regard-ed as potential first-round draft picks. “I really think you’re going to get a lot of bigger, stronger, quicker DBs in the SEC,” Georgia lineback-er Christian Robinson said. “Not that there’s not guys like that in the other con-ferences, but there’s going to be bigger numbers in the SEC. I think the type of receivers you go against on your own team is a factor. We had A.J. Green here pushing guys like (former star cornerback Brandon) Boykin.” The connection between pass efficiency defense and SEC championships might seem odd for what’s gener-ally a run-oriented league. Of the 14 teams in the SEC this year, only Arkansas, Kentucky and Tennessee have attempted more pass-es than carries. Overall, 30 percent of the Football Bowl Subdivision teams throw the ball more than they run it. Although most SEC teams prefer to run the ball, this league does feature plenty of quality quarter-backs. The SEC has come a long way since last year, when the league didn’t have anyone ranked among the nation’s 20 most effi-cient passers. Tennessee coach Derek Dooley calls it “probably as experienced and talented a group as they’ve had in the league in a while.” ASSOCIATED PRESSLSU quarterback Zach Mettenberger looks for a receiver a s he is chased by Florida linebacker Lerentee McCray (34) during the first half of an NCAA college football game Saturday in Gainesville. ESPN college football guru Beano Cook dead at 81Associated PressPITTSBURGH — Beano Cook, the college football commentator with an ency-clopedic knowledge of the sport he dearly loved, has died. The 81-year-old Boston native had worked for ESPN since 1986 and was the sports information direc-tor at his alma mater, the University of Pittsburgh, from 1956 to 1966. The school announced Thursday that Cook had died in his sleep. “He was one of a kind,” ESPN executive chair-man George Bodenheimer said. “There never was and never will be another Beano. His combination of humor, passion, love of college football and his engaging personality left an indelible mark on the sport and touched anyone who knew him.” Born Carroll H. Cook, he grew up in Pittsburgh before graduating from the university in 1954, and was known for his love of the college game and, in particular, championing the cause of northeast-ern teams including Penn State and Pitt before either school was a nationally known power. “Beano Cook was an American original. His pas-sion, depth and breadth of knowledge, and humor were unique,” ESPN host Chris Fowler said. “He was an invaluable early mentor to me and friend. His imprint can still be seen on GameDay each week.” Cook, like many in the business, fell in love with simply being around the competition. With a career that took him so many places, it was hard not to get wrapped up in it. “Getting to know the athletes really provided me with my fondest mem-ories,” Cook once said. “That was the most fun.” He said his favorites from his time working at Pitt were Mike Ditka, who went on to become a Pro Football Hall of Famer, and basketball star Don Hennon. His wealth of knowledge about college football and memory for details made him an irresistible story-teller, as well a passionate pundit. He wasn’t always right, but he wasn’t afraid to make bold pronounce-ments, such as when he predicted Notre Dame freshman quarterback Ron Powlus would win at least two Heisman trophies. Powlus never even won one, but Cook’s prediction made him famous forever. In recent years he was a frequent contributor on ESPN Radio and did a weekly podcast with ESPN college football writer Ivan Maisel. He was an unapologetic defender of college football, while recogniz-ing its warts, and wasn’t shy about touting its superiority to the pro game. “On Sundays they play for money,” he once said. “On Saturdays they play for passion, for the love of the game. I think that’s why it’s our greatest sport.” ASSOCIATED PRESSIn this photo taken in 2001 and provided by ESPN, colleg e football commentator Carroll “Beano” Cook is shown. Cook died in his sleep Thursday, the University of Pittsburgh announced.

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4B LAKE CITY REPORTER NASCAR FRIDAY & SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12-13, 2012%632576Earnhardt out two racesBy JENNA FRYERAssociated PressCONCORD, N.C. — Dale Earnhardt Jr. knew he had suffered a concussion in an August crash so jolting that other drivers tweeted about it immediately after the impact. Earnhardt was too stubborn to see a doctor about it. He was too wor-ried he would be yanked from his car, derailing his long-suffering Sprint Cup Championship hopes. So he kept it a secret until a 25-car accident on the last lap Sunday at Talladega left him with a lingering head-ache. NASCAR’s most popular driver sought medical attention from a neurosur-geon, who found Earnhardt had indeed suffered two concussions in six weeks and could not be medically cleared to race. Earnhardt said Thursday he will sit out the next two weeks, at Charlotte and Kansas, ending his championship chances. “I would love to race this weekend, and I feel perfectly normal and feel like I could compete if I were allowed to compete,” Earnhardt said. “But I think that the basis of this whole deal is that I’ve had two concussions in the last (six) weeks, and you can’t layer concussions. It gets extremely dangerous.” A decade ago, it was Earnhardt who helped spur changes in how NASCAR handled drivers showing signs of a concussion. He self-diagnosed a concussion from an accident at California, but didn’t tell anyone about it until reveal-ing in an interview weeks later that he’d been hav-ing difficulty focusing and communicating with his crew chief. Within days of his admission, NASCAR strengthened its commit-ment to keeping drivers with concussions off the track. NASCAR ruled that drivers unable to drive their car back to the garage after an accident had to make a mandatory trip to the infield care center. The attending physician could then refer a driver to a neurosurgeon for a CT scan or MRI if they suspected a concussion. Clearance to race after suffering a concussion is not given until after a driver obtains a medical release. “I think we’ve got a pretty good history of sending drivers to the care center and then also to a neurolo-gist if we think there may be any cause to do so,” said NASCAR senior vice president Steve O’Donnell, who added that only nine drivers from NASCAR’s three national series have suffered concussions in the last five years. Of course, Earnhardt proved Thursday that NASCAR isn’t always in the know. Earnhardt’s first concussion this season came in an Aug. 29 wreck during a tire test at Kansas. His crash into the wall when his right front tire failed was so hard that Brad Keselowski immediately tweeted about. Earnhardt was seen after the accident in the back of an ambulance, but was not treated in the infield care center and did not seek further examination else-where. He attended a Washington Redskins exhibition game later that night, but admit-ted Thursday he knew he suffered a concussion. “You know your body, and you know how your mind works, and I knew something was just not quite right,” he said. “But I decided to just try to push through and work through it. I’d had concussions before and knew exactly kind of what I was dealing with.” Kansas Speedway president Pat Warren said Thursday the speedway was well-staffed with medi-cal personnel for the August tire test, and that Earnhardt was assessed in the ambu-lance by a paramedic who has worked for 12 years at the track. “She went up and assessed Dale with the questions they ask when they are worried about a head injury — he answered them all correctly,” Warren said. Warren said he also spoke to Earnhardt after he was back in the garage and already changed out of his firesuit, and the driver said he felt fine. The fire chief on staff at the track that day also asked Earnhardt in the garage the same set of ques-tions intended to determine head injuries and checked for dilated pupils, Warren said. Earnhardt said he regrets not seeing anyone about that concussion, but admit-ted to crew chief Steve Letarte what had happened and said he would not have raced at Atlanta the next weekend if he’d not felt well. “With the Chase coming up, I didn’t know how dif-ficult — if I was to volunteer myself to get medical attention and be removed from the car, I didn’t know how difficult it would be to get back in,” he said. “But I was honest with Steve and told Steve, ‘When we get to Atlanta and if I don’t feel good, I’m going to be hon-est with you and tell you that we need to have some-thing as a backup plan for me to get out of the car.”’ He didn’t give himself the same leeway this week, when he suffered a lingering headache following the last lap accident at Talladega. Although Earnhardt said the impact was half as hard as the Kansas hit, “I knew as soon as it happened that I had reinjured myself.” Earnhardt didn’t have to make the mandatory trip to the care center on Sunday because he was able to drive his car away from the acci-dent — teammate Jimmie Johnson even caught a lift on the window back to the garage. He sought out personal physician Dr. Jerry Petty, a neurosurgeon who con-sults with NASCAR and the NFL’s Carolina Panthers, on Tuesday and underwent an MRI on Wednesday, his 38th birthday. The MRI showed no damage, but Petty said Earnhardt was candid about his symptoms that last six weeks and he diagnosed a pair of concus-sions. “His eyes did what they were supposed to do, his balance tests and so forth are perfect,” Petty said. “The one test, the one symp-tom that is more important than all the tests is head-ache, and as long as there’s any headache, the brain is not healed.” Petty said Earnhardt will not be cleared to race again until he’s gone at least four days headache-free, and goes through a test in which Petty tries to pro-voke a headache. “If we can’t, we’ll let him go out and drive a lap or two and see how that goes, and if that goes well, we’ll probably clear him to race,” Petty said. Hendrick Motorsports tabbed Regan Smith to replace Earnhardt in the No. 88 Chevrolet the next two races. Smith had been scheduled to drive the No. 51 for Phoenix Racing in Saturday night’s race at Charlotte Motor Speedway, and AJ Allmendinger will now drive that car in his first start since his July 7 suspension for failing a ran-dom drug test. This weekend’s race will be the first since Sept. 3, 1979, that will not include an Earnhardt in the field. Earnhardt’s father, seven-time NASCAR champion Dale Earnhardt, was killed on the last lap of the 2001 Daytona 500. Earnhardt, who snapped a 143-race winless streak this season that dated to 2008, opened the Chase as a strong contender to win his first Sprint Cup title. This injury ends his chanc-es, which were a long-shot anyway because of a mediocre start to the Chase. ASSOCIATED PRESSDale Earnhardt Jr talks about missing the next two races with his second concussion in the past six weeks durin g a news conference prior to practice for Saturday’s NASCAR Bank of America 500 NASCAR Sprint Cup series auto race in C oncord, N.C., Thursday. Gordon slowly moving up in Chase standingsBy JENNA FRYERAssociated PressCHARLOTTE, N.C. — If nothing else this season, Jeff Gordon has proved to be a man of his word. He promised to grow back the cheesy mustache he sported at the start of his career if he made the Chase for the Sprint Cup championship, and made good on it after squeaking past Kyle Busch to get into the 12-driver field. Now, he’s promised to breakdance in Victory Lane if he wins this weekend’s race at Charlotte Motor Speedway. He hasn’t won at Charlotte since 2007. But don’t rule out seeing the 41-year-old Gordon bust out a windmill or the worm on Saturday night. Gordon is on an absolute tear of late, notching six top-three finishes in the last seven races. The lone blem-ish is a big one, though: A stuck throttle in the Chase opener at Chicago caused a crash and a 35th-place finish. He followed that with a third-place at New Hampshire and runner-up finishes at Dover and Talladega. But he is still just sixth in the Chase stand-ings and trails leader Brad Keselowski by 42 points. Gordon admitted after Sunday’s finish at Talladega that he is frustrated at how hard it’s been to climb through the standings. He remains confident his No. 24 Hendrick Motorsports team can get back in the title hunt. “We can sit there and really get mad about what happened in Chicago, but the reality of it is all we can do is go each and every week and keep trying to put ourselves in position to win and get top-fives,” he said. “It is certainly not over yet. So we’ll see what happens. If we keep doing this, I really think we might have a shot at it.” Charlotte is a good track for Gordon to potentially make up some ground. He’s a five-time winner at Charlotte, the “home track” for Hendrick Motorsports and the place Gordon’s team owner considers a high priority. The 1.5-mile track has been good to the four-time NASCAR champion, and was the site of his first career pole in 1993 and his first Cup victory the follow-ing year. Gordon suffered a long drought at Charlotte from 2000 to 2007, when he won the Chase race that fall to stay even with team-mate Jimmie Johnson in the championship battle. Gordon suffered through a mini-slump with three consecutive finishes in the 20s, but snapped it in May with a strong run in the Coca-Cola 600. He started 23rd, worked his way into the top 10, then fell back to 25th around the halfway point because of a caution. Gordon then ral-lied over the second half of the race to finish seventh as Hendrick teammate Kasey Kahne picked up the win. ASSOCIATED PRESSIn this Sept. 14 file photo, driver Jeff Gordon watches prac tice for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series auto race at Chicagolan d Speedway in Joliet, Ill. Allmendinger gets 1st start after drug suspensionBy JENNA FRYERAssociated PressCONCORD, N.C. — AJ Allmendinger returned from an early morning workout to find a slew of missed calls and text mes-sages on his phone. “I thought this is either something good, or some-thing really, really bad,” Allmendinger said. It was really good news for Allmendinger. Phoenix Racing has grabbed Allmendinger to drive the No. 51 Chevrolet this weekend as part of the domino effect from Dale Earnhardt Jr.’s con-cussion. It’s the first time Allmendinger has been in a car since his July 7 suspension for failing a random drug test, and comes a week after he spoke briefly with Phoenix owner James Finch at Talladega in Allmendinger’s first trip to a NASCAR race. “I talked to Finch for about three minutes this morning,” Allmendinger said Thursday. “He started to tell me what the deal was and I was like, ‘Man, it’s all good. I’ll come drive this weekend, and if you like me, you like me. And if not, it’s OK.’ It’s all about taking it as it comes right now.” Kurt Busch had been driving for Phoenix this season, but left the team this week to get an early start on next year’s part-nership with Furniture Row Racing. That dis-placed Regan Smith in the Furniture Row ride, and Finch planned on using Smith for at least Saturday night’s race at Charlotte Motor Speedway. Then a doctor decided Earnhardt should not race the next two weeks because of a concussion he suffered in the 25-car wreck at Talladega on Sunday. Team owner Rick Hendrick called Finch late Wednesday and asked for Smith, who is a candidate to run for the Nationwide championship next season at JR Motorsports. Smith received a text message at 7 a.m. on Thursday morning from Earnhardt crew chief Steve Letarte, who informed Smith he’d be driving the car of NASCAR’s most popular driver the next two weekends. Once he accepted, Phoenix Racing scrambled to find Allmendinger.

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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12-13, 2012 5B% FRIDAY EVENING OCTOBER 12, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Shark Tank (N) (DVS) (:01) Primetime: What Would You Do?20/20 (N) News at 11(:35) Nightline (N) 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryNewsFootball FridayChann 4 News(:35) The Insider 5-PBS 5 -Journal Nightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Washington WeekNeed to Know (N) American Masters VOCES on PBS “Un nished Spaces” BBC World NewsTavis Smiley (N) 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge Judy Two and Half MenCSI: NY Mac and Jo go to California. Made in Jersey “Wingman” (N) Blue Bloods Erin faces off with her ex. Friday Night BlitzLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneTMZ (N) Arrow “Pilot” Beauty and the Beast “Pilot” Vote America 2012Access HollywoodThe Of ce The Of ce “PDA” 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family Guy Family Guy The SimpsonsThe X Factor “Judge’s House No. 2” Fringe “The Recordist” (N) (PA) NewsFriday Night BlitzTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) Grimm “Over My Dead Body” Grimm Monroe lls in for Rosalee. (N) Dateline NBC (N) NewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(2:00) Politics & Public Policy Today Politics & Public Policy Today Politics & Public Policy Today WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine (N) 30 Rock 30 Rock TVLAND 17 106 304M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H The Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Police Women of Maricopa CountyPolice Women of Maricopa CountyPolice Women of Maricopa CountyPolice Women of Maricopa CountyPolice Women of Maricopa CountyPolice Women of Maricopa County A&E 19 118 265Criminal Minds “Devil’s Night” Criminal Minds “Today I Do” Criminal Minds “Proof” Criminal Minds “Re ection of Desire” Criminal Minds (:01) Criminal Minds HALL 20 185 312Little House on the Prairie Little House on the Prairie “How to Fall in Love” (2012, Romance) Eric Mabius, Brooke D’Orsay. Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier FX 22 136 248Two and Half MenTwo and Half MenTwo and Half MenTwo and Half Men “Easy A” (2010, Comedy) Emma Stone, Penn Badgley, Amanda Bynes. The Ultimate Fighter (N) “The Happening” (2008) CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245The Mentalist “Pink Tops” The Mentalist “Always Bet on Red” “Catch Me if You Can” (2002) Leonardo DiCaprio. A teenage scam artist poses as a pilot, surgeon and lawyer. “Disturbia” (2007) Shia LaBeouf. NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobDrake & JoshDrake & JoshiCarly “iShock America” Full House Full House The Nanny The Nanny Friends Friends SPIKE 28 168 241Gangland The Hells Angels biker gang. Gangland California’s Fresno Bulldogs. “Gridiron Gang” (2006, Drama) The Rock, Xzibit. Premiere. A counselor turns juvenile criminals into football players. Ink Master “Tattooing the Dead” MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*H M*A*S*H Monk Adrian’s biggest fan. Monk A rapper accused of murder. Seinfeld Frasier The Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Phineas and FerbJessie Austin & Ally A.N.T. Farm “Girl vs. Monster” (2012) Olivia Holt. Premiere. Dog With a Blog(:05) A.N.T. FarmGood Luck CharlieAustin & Ally Austin & Ally LIFE 32 108 252Hoarders “Barbara G.; Fred and Mary” Hoarders “Dee; Jan” America’s Most Wanted America’s Most Wanted (N) America’s Most Wanted (N) America’s Most Wanted USA 33 105 242Law & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitCSI: Crime Scene Investigation BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Top 10 Countdown” Freestyle Friday. (N) Family FirstThe Soul Man “Baby Boy” (2001, Drama) Tyrese Gibson. A man juggles womanizing with ghting his mother’s boyfriend. ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) Countdownh NASCAR Racing Nationwide Series: Dollar General 300. From Charlotte Motor Speedway in Concord, N.C. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209h NASCAR RacingInterruptionColl. Football Livee College Football Navy at Central Michigan. (N) NFL Kickoff (N) SUNSP 37 Women’s College Soccerf Women’s College Soccer Missouri at Florida. (N) Boxing Judah vs. Mabuza, vacant IBF light welterweight title. Driven DISCV 38 182 278Yukon Men “On Thin Ice” Yukon Men “Tragic Spring” Yukon Men Joey is ready to venture out on his own. (N) Yukon Men “Wheel of Misfortune” (N) Yukon Men TBS 39 139 247a(5:00) MLB Baseball Baltimore Orioles at New York Yankees. (N)a MLB Baseball St. Louis Cardinals at Washington Nationals. (N) Inside MLB (N) HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace Mysteries (N) Jane Velez-MitchellNancy Grace MysteriesShowbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236Married to JonasThe SoupE! News (N) “Must Love Dogs” (2005, Romance-Comedy) Diane Lane, John Cusack. Fashion PoliceChelsea Lately (N) E! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernParanormalParanormalGhost Adventures Ghost Adventures (N) Dead Files Revisted (N) The Dead Files “Deadly Attraction” HGTV 47 112 229Selling LA Selling LA Hunters Int’lHunters Int’lHalloween Tricked Out (N) Flea Market FlipFlea Market FlipHouse Hunters (N) Hunters Int’lHunters Int’lHunters Int’l TLC 48 183 280Four Weddings Four Weddings Say Yes: ATLSay Yes: ATLSay Yes: ATLSay Yes: ATLSecret Princes “The Royal Invitation” Say Yes: ATLSay Yes: ATL HIST 49 120 269RestorationRestorationRestorationRestorationRestorationRestorationRestorationRestorationRestorationRestorationHow the StatesHow the States ANPL 50 184 282Infested! “The Nastiest Battles” Infested! “The Most Horrifying” Monsters Inside Me (N) Monsters Inside Me Fatal Attractions “Tigers Unleashed!” Monsters Inside Me FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, Drive$24 in 24Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, Drive TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the Lord It’s Supernatural!The Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesHal Lindsey The Harvest Perry StonePraise the Lord (Live). FSN-FL 56 -UEFA MagazineBaseball’s Goldenf College Soccer Maryland at Duke. (N) Boxing Golden Boy: Beibut Shumenov vs. Enrique Ornelas. Action Sports World Tour SYFY 58 122 244(5:00) “Shutter Island” (2010) Leonardo DiCaprio, Mark Ruffalo. WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) Haven “Over My Head” (N) Alphas “If Memory Serves” AMC 60 130 254 “Cujo” (1983, Horror) Dee Wallace, Danny Pintauro. “Christine” (1983, Horror) Keith Gordon, John Stockwell. “Pet Sematary” (1989, Horror) Dale Midkiff, Fred Gwynne. COM 62 107 249South Park Tosh.0 The Colbert ReportDaily ShowTosh.0 Tosh.0 Key & PeeleSouth Park Tosh.0 Brickleberry Mash Up Stand-Up Rev. CMT 63 166 327Reba Reba Reba “Red Alert” Reba Reba Reba Dallas Cowboys CheerleadersCheer “Greatness Is Built on the Fight” Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer “Fear of Dogs” Hippos: The Dark SideSpiders: The Dark SideDolphins: The Dark SideBig Cats: The Dark SideSpiders: The Dark Side NGC 109 186 276Forecast: DisasterOn Board Marine OneAmerican Mansion: Rockefeller EstateBid & DestroyBid & DestroyWicked Tuna “Weekend Warriors” Bid & DestroyBid & Destroy SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeThrough Wormhole-FreemanThrough Wormhole-FreemanNASA’s Unexplained Files Professor WeirdSci Fi Science:Through Wormhole-Freeman ID 111 192 285On the Case With Paula Zahn Deadly Women “Kill Their Own” Deadly Women “Insatiable Greed” Deadly Affairs “Lethal Acquisition” Deadly Women “Teen Terror” (N) Deadly Women “Insatiable Greed” HBO 302 300 501Rise of Apes “Big Mommas: Like Father, Like Son” (2011) Martin Lawrence. ‘PG-13’ “The Sitter” (2011, Comedy) Jonah Hill. ‘R’ Real Time With Bill Maher (N) Real Time With Bill Maher MAX 320 310 515(:05) “Bridesmaids” (2011, Comedy) Kristen Wiig, Maya Rudolph, Rose Byrne. ‘NR’ (:20) “Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy”Strike Back (Season Finale) (N) Skin to the MaxStrike Back SHOW 340 318 545(:15) “50/50” (2011, Comedy-Drama) Joseph Gordon-Levitt. ‘R’ Dexter “Sunshine and Frosty Swirl” Homeland “Beirut Is Back” s Boxing Jose Pedraza vs. Allan Benitez. (N) SATURDAY EVENING OCTOBER 13, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -e College Football Regional Coverage. NASCAR Sprint h NASCAR Racing Sprint Cup: Bank of America 500. From Charlotte Motor Speedway in Charlotte, N.C. (N) Crook & Chase 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsStop Memory Loss30 Rock 30 Rock Rules/EngagementRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryNewsInside EditionChann 4 NewsFirst Baptist 5-PBS 5 -The Lawrence Welk Show Andy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th Show “Dark Victory” (1939, Drama) Bette Davis, George Brent. Austin City Limits “Bon Iver” (N) Front Row Center 7-CBS 7 47 47e College Football Alabama at Missouri. Action News at 7:00pm on CBS47 (N) NCIS: Los Angeles “Honor” Hawaii Five-0 “Pahele” 48 Hours “Collision Course” (N) Action Sports 360Two and Half Men 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneFantasy FootballLike, LoveDaryl’s HouseYourjax MusicYourJax MusicJacksonvilleI Know JaxLocal Haunts 10-FOX 10 30 30e College FootballFOX Collegee College Football USC at Washington. (N Subject to Blackout) NewsTouch Martin and Abigail join forces. 12-NBC 12 12 12e College FootballWheel of FortuneNBC Nightly NewsRevolution “The Plague Dogs” Chicago Fire “Pilot” (DVS) Law & Order: Special Victims UnitNewsSat. Night Live CSPAN 14 210 350Washington This CommunicatorsWashington This Week WGN-A 16 239 307Law & Order: Criminal Intent Funny VideosBullseye d NBA Preseason Basketball Chicago Bulls at Minnesota Timberwolves. (N) WGN News at NineBones Young beauty queen’s remains. TVLAND 17 106 304The Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Disappeared “Lost Trust” Disappeared “Vanishing Bride” Welcome to Sweetie Pie’s Welcome to Sweetie Pie’s (N) Iyanla, Fix My Life (N) Welcome to Sweetie Pie’s A&E 19 118 265(4:00) “The Shawshank Redemption”Storage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsParking Wars (N) Parking Wars (N) ExterminatorExterminatorExterminatorExterminator HALL 20 185 312(5:00) “Three Weeks, Three Kids” “Meet My Mom” (2010, Romance) Lori Loughlin, Johnny Messner. “A Taste of Romance” (2011, Romance) Teri Polo, Bailee Madison. “Puppy Love” (2012, Romance) FX 22 136 248(5:00) “Iron Man” (2008, Action) Robert Downey Jr., Terrence Howard. UFC 153: Silva vs. Bonnar Prelims From Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (N) “What Happens in Vegas” (2008) Cameron Diaz, Ashton Kutcher. CNN 24 200 202The Situation RoomCNN Newsroom (N) Latino in AmericaPiers Morgan TonightCNN Newsroom (N) Latino in America TNT 25 138 245(4:00) “Catch Me if You Can” “Ocean’s Eleven” (2001, Comedy-Drama) George Clooney, Matt Damon. (DVS) “G.I. Jane” (1997) Demi Moore. A female Navy SEALs recruit completes rigorous training. NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobBig Time RushVictorious iCarly (N) Victorious (N) Big Time Rush (N) How to Rock (N) The Nanny The Nanny Friends Friends SPIKE 28 168 241 “Gridiron Gang” (2006, Drama) The Rock, Xzibit. A counselor turns juvenile criminals into football players. “Walking Tall” (2004, Action) The Rock, Johnny Knoxville, Neal McDonough. “Enter the Dragon” (1973) MY-TV 29 32 -Hogan’s HeroesHogan’s HeroesBatmanBatmanLost in Space “The Phantom Family” Star Trek “The Enterprise Incident” “Batman” (1966, Action) Adam West, Burt Ward, Cesar Romero. DISN 31 172 290Austin & Ally Shake It Up! Shake It Up! Shake It Up! Good Luck CharlieJessie A.N.T. Farm Austin & Ally Gravity Falls My BabysitterGood Luck CharlieGood Luck Charlie LIFE 32 108 252Movie “Steel Magnolias” (2012, Comedy-Drama) Queen Latifah, Phylicia Rashad. “Abducted: The Carlina White Story” (2012) Aunjanue Ellis, Keke Palmer. USA 33 105 242NCIS “Blowback” NCIS A young sailor’s body is found. NCIS “Angel of Death” (DVS) NCIS A showdown with an arms dealer. NCIS Ziva’s cover may be blown. NCIS “Toxic” BET 34 124 329(5:00) “Baby Boy” (2001, Drama) Tyrese Gibson, Omar Gooding. “Streets” (2011) Meek Mill. A teen must adjust to life in Philadelphia. BET Hip Hop Awards 2012 Celebrating hip-hop history and culture. ESPN 35 140 206e College FootballCollege FootballCollege Football Scoreboard (N) e College Football South Carolina at LSU. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209e(5:30) College Football Boston College at Florida State. (N) College Footballe College Football Tennessee at Mississippi State. (N) SUNSP 37 -e College FootballGatorZonee College Football Kentucky at Arkansas. (N) Halls of FameSeminole SportsFuture Phenoms3 Wide Life DISCV 38 182 278Dual Survival “Up the River” Alaska: The Last Frontier Alaska: The Last Frontier Alaska: The Last Frontier Alaska: The Last Frontier Alaska: The Last Frontier TBS 39 139 247Family Guy Big Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryMLB on Decka MLB Baseball American League Championship Series, Game 1: Teams TBA. (N) Inside MLB HLN 40 202 204The Investigators “Burning Secret” Body of EvidenceBody of EvidenceThe InvestigatorsBody of EvidenceBody of EvidenceThe InvestigatorsBody of EvidenceBody of Evidence FNC 41 205 360America’s News Headquarters (N) FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Justice With Judge Jeanine (N) StosselJournal EditorialFOX News Watch E! 45 114 236Keeping Up With the KardashiansE! News “Knocked Up” (2007) Seth Rogen. A one-night stand has an unforeseen consequence. The SoupChelsea LatelyMarried to Jonas TRAVEL 46 196 277The Dead Files A portal to evil spirits. Legends Of Alcatraz (N) Ghost Adventures “La Purisima” Ghost Adventures “Old Fort Erie” Ghost Adventures “Pico House Hotel” Ghost Adventures “Prospect Place” HGTV 47 112 229High Low Proj.Hunters Int’lHouse Hunters Renovation Love It or List It “Renton” Love It or List It “McPherson” House HuntersHunters Int’lHouse HuntersHunters Int’l TLC 48 183 28048 Hours: Hard Evidence 48 Hours: Hard Evidence 48 Hours: Hard Evidence 48 Hours: Hard Evidence (N) 48 Hours: Hard Evidence (N) 48 Hours: Hard Evidence HIST 49 120 269Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars (:31) Pawn Stars(:02) Pawn Stars(:32) Pawn Stars ANPL 50 184 282Too Cute! Three litters of young kittens. Too Cute! “Pool Puppies” Too Cute! (Season Premiere) (N) Pit Bulls and Parolees Pit Bulls and Parolees “Face Off” (N) Pit Bulls and Parolees FOOD 51 110 231Halloween Wars “Evil Clowns” Restaurant: Impossible “Pastori’s” Restaurant: Impossible “Frankie’s” Restaurant: ImpossibleRestaurant: ImpossibleIron Chef America TBN 52 260 372A Dog of FlandersGods At WarGaither: Precious MemoriesIn Touch With Dr. Charles StanleyHour of Power Billy Graham Classic CrusadesNot a Fan Travel the Road FSN-FL 56 -e College Footballe College Football Texas Christian at Baylor. (N) College Football Kansas State at Iowa State. SYFY 58 122 244(5:00) “Haunted High” (2012) “House of Bones” (2010, Horror) Charisma Carpenter, Corin Nemec. “American Horror House” (2012, Horror) Morgan Fairchild. Premiere. “The Amityville Horror” (1979) AMC 60 130 254The Walking Dead(:22) The Walking Dead “Bloodletting” (:29) The Walking Dead (:29) The Walking Dead (:29) The Walking Dead “Chupacabra” (:34) The Walking Dead “Secrets” The Walking Dead COM 62 107 249Austin Powers “Dumb & Dumber” (1994, Comedy) Jim Carrey, Jeff Daniels, Lauren Holly. “Hot Tub Time Machine” (2010, Comedy) John Cusack. Premiere. “Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story” CMT 63 166 327Reba Reba Reba Reba Reba “Go Far” Reba Bayou BillionairesBayou BillionairesRedneck Rehab (N) Bayou BillionairesBayou Billionaires NGWILD 108 190 283Dangerous Encounters: BackyardDog Whisperer “Saving Ryan” Dog Whisperer Wolf-dog hybrids. Fish Tank Kings “Fish Upon a Star” Fish Tank Kings Two tight turnarounds. Dog Whisperer Wolf-dog hybrids. NGC 109 186 276Being: LiverpoolAlaska State TroopersAlaska State Troopers “Extreme Justice” An Intoxicated miner blocks a road. Alaska State Troopers “Knife Fight” Alaska State Troopers SCIENCE 110 193 284Dark Matters: Twisted but True Oddities Oddities Oddities Oddities Oddities Oddities Oddities Oddities Oddities Oddities ID 111 192 285Deadly Affairs “Lethal Acquisition” Nightmare Next Door Wicked Attraction “Love Me Tender” Wicked Attraction Deadly Affairs “Deadly Obsession” (N) Wicked Attraction “Love Me Tender” HBO 302 300 501 “The Adjustment Bureau” (2011, Suspense) Matt Damon. ‘PG-13’ “The Descendants” (2011, Drama) George Clooney. Premiere. ‘R’ s Boxing Nonito Donaire vs. Toshiaki Nishioka, Junior Featherweights. (N) MAX 320 310 515(5:15) “Mobsters” (1991) ‘R’ “The Hangover Part II” (2011) Bradley Cooper. ‘R’ Hunted S1 SneakStrike Back “Transit” (2012) Jim Caviezel. Premiere. ‘R’ Strike Back SHOW 340 318 545Dexter “Sunshine and Frosty Swirl” Homeland “Beirut Is Back” “Apollo 18” (2011) Lloyd Owen. Premiere. ‘PG-13’ “I Am Number Four” (2011, Action) Alex Pettyfer. ‘PG-13’ Homeland Falcons take down Hamilton By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comLake City Middle School used an impressive first half to cruise to victory over Hamilton County Middle School during homecom-ing on Thursday. The Falcons got up early with a 24-0 first-half lead and played their young guys in the second half on the way to a win by the same score. “We were able to dominate on the offensive line and with our skill-position players in the first half,” Lake City head coach Richard Keen said. “It was nice to give some of the young guys a taste of foot-ball on homecoming week-end in the second half.” The Falcons improved to 2-3 with the win. Hunter Sweet scored first for the Falcons after Donald Robinson’s 20-yard run set up Sweet from the one. Brock Edge added an extra point for a 7-0 lead with 2:14 remaining in the first quarter. Derontae Jordan had a 20-yard run and a 31-yard touchdown run on the next drive with Hunter Houston adding the extra point for a 14-0 lead with 7:46 remain-ing in the half. Houston added a 21-yard field goal on the next drive for a 17-0 lead. After a fake punt by Hamilton, Lake City took over at the 30-yard line with 24 seconds left in the half. Robinson added his second touchdown from one yard for a 24-0 lead. BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterLake City Middle School’s Donald Robinson breaks a ta ckle on a touchdown run in the Falcons’ 24-0 win against Ham ilton County Middle School. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Brooke Russell lines up a putt earlie r this year. PREP: Lady Tigers finish third Continued From Page 1Bbut battled through it for a solid score. We expect to have an even lower team score at our home course (Quail Heights Country Club) in the district championship on Monday. We’re going to find it.” Taylor Tomlinson of Oak Hall finished as the overall medalist with a score of 6-under 66. Brooke Russell finished with a 101, Abbie Blizzard carded a 136 and Madison Stalvey had a 140 to round out the Lady Tigers’ scores.Lady Indians volleyballFort White High finished with a four-set vic-tory at Bradford High on Thursday. The Lady Indians downed the Tornadoes with a 25-19, 14-25, 25-15 and 25-22 win. The win improved Fort White to 5-12 on the season after falling to Williston High on Tuesday. Lync Stalnaker led the team with seven kills and seven aces.

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6B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & PUZZLES FRIDAY & SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12-13, 2012 DEAR ABBY: I’m 17 and go to a high school with drug addicts and girls who are lucky they aren’t pregnant. (Some are.) My father thinks I’m like them even though I have proven time and again that I’m not. I have a 4.0 GPA and have never done drugs or had sex. I’m not allowed to drive anywhere without my mother accompanying me. If I want to go on a date with my boyfriend, my parents must be present. I have lost friends who are tired of having to hang with my parents and me. I have tried telling my dad this, but he claims I’m being ridiculous and then picks a fight with me. I suggested family counsel-ing, but Dad refused. He says we don’t have the money. What do I do? I just want to be a normal teenager who can hang out without my parents following me everywhere. -TIRED TEEN IN WYOMING DEAR TIRED TEEN: You have my sympathy. You have caring and conscientious parents, who appear to have gone overboard in trying to shelter you. By age 17 -and with a 4.0 GPA -you should have been allowed to socialize without a con-stant chaperone. That’s how teens learn to develop relationships and make mature decisions. In another year you will be 18 and an adult. If there is an adult relative in whom you can confide, ask that person to please speak to your parents on your behalf. You should be experiencing more free-dom than you have been allowed. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: I have known my boyfriend, “Kyle,” for eight years. We have been dating more than two years and living together for seven months. We have an amazing rela-tionship. We love to laugh and make each other laugh. That’s a “quirk” we share. This morning, Kyle woke up, went straight to his dad’s house without saying why and returned with his hair cut, beard trimmed and looking well-groomed. He seemed kind of “off,” though -almost nervous. He then went to his mom’s to help with some yard work and when he came home, he snuck up behind me and slipped a ring on my finger. I got a little teary-eyed and asked where it came from. He said from his mom. He acted shy, wouldn’t say much or look right at me. Then, after a moment, he shouted, “Just kidding! I wanted to make you laugh and freak you out a little.” I don’t think there was malicious intent on his part. He’s a sweetheart, but I don’t know how to tell him how badly he hurt me emotionally. I thought he was propos-ing. What should I do? -UNENGAGED IN NEW HAMPSHIRE DEAR UNENGAGED: Sit Kyle down and tell him the effect his “joke” had on you. After a couple has started living together, a proposal of marriage is no laughing matter unless both partners are in on the joke. P.S. If you talk to him in all seriousness, you may find that he DID propose, but then got cold feet. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: I’m in my early 60s and have no plans to retire. I raised a child on my own and wasn’t able to save much for retirement, and my office retirement plan dis-appeared during the reces-sion in 2008. Because of my age, people young and old often ask when I plan to retire. I don’t feel I owe anyone an explanation as to why I continue to work, and I plan on working as long as I can. I usually say I can’t afford to retire, but then I get a response like, “I sure hope I’M not working at your age,” or “You can get Social Security,” etc. Any idea how I should respond to let these people know it’s none of their business? -MIFFED IN MENLO PARK DEAR MIFFED: All you have to do is smile and say, “Retire? I’m just get-ting started!” ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: Two men have left their wives for me. The relationship I had with the first one ended very badly (his choice). The second started shortly thereafter, and I am still with him. When the first man found out, he tried to resume seeing me and became verbally abusive and harassed me when I wouldn’t. He hasn’t returned to his wife and has tried twice to commit suicide. Both of these men are now divorced, and their ex-wives and children are understandably bitter. Even though they made the decision to leave with-out me asking them to -or even being aware that they were going to -I feel guilty having a hand in ending two marriages. I’m sure the last thing either the wives or the children would want from me is an apology or any contact at all. What else can I do to come to terms with and accept what happened? -THE OTHER WOMAN DEAR OTHER WOMAN: You appear to be carrying a large bur-den of guilt. And that’s a GOOD thing. There is nothing you can do to make amends to the fami-lies you have helped ruin because you can’t change the past. All you can do is vow that in the future you won’t fool around with any more married men. And then STICK to it. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: When I was 9, my mother knitted me a small blanket, about the size of a baby’s. I lost her to cancer a year later, when I was 10. Since then, I have carried it with me everywhere. I am 26 now and married. I still have the blan-ket and carry it with me in my purse. Recently, I men-tioned it to my husband and some friends. They were not supportive like I thought they would be. They made fun of me and called me “immature.” I got defensive and told them it was a reminder of my mother. My husband said I should keep a pic-ture of her instead and throw the blanket away. Abby, now I feel insecure and childish. Is a security blanket normal for someone my age, or should I just listen to my friends? -MRS. LINUS IN TEXAS DEAR MRS. LINUS: Your question is not as unusual as you may think. It has appeared in my col-umn before. Considering the story behind the blanket, I understand why you are so attached to it. Lack of maturity has nothing to do with this. The connec-tion to the mother you lost at such a tender age has everything to do with it. Your husband and friends appear to have hides of “pure Corinthian leather.” Do whatever makes you comfortable and do not apologize for it. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: My mother-in-law goes through my mail and any items on my desk at home. She used to do it in secret and would stop when she got caught. Now she does it in front of me, but never when my husband is around. I don’t care why she’s doing it; I just want her to stop. How do I relay that to her without offending her? -FRUSTRATED SOMEWHERE IN THE USA DEAR FRUSTRATED: Because you can’t bring yourself to tell your moth-er-in-law plainly that what she’s doing is rude and nosy, when you know she’s coming over, put your papers out of sight. HOROSCOPES DEAR ABBY ARIES (March 21-April 19): You don’t have to spend to make an impres-sion. Put more detail into the way you look or what you do and you will get the recognition you’ve been waiting for. An interesting business arrangement will lead to greater profits and opportunities. +++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Find ways to market what you have to offer. A small business ven-ture on the side will help subsidize the extras you want to indulge in. Love and romance are on the rise. Socializing, travel-ing and participation will enhance your personal life. +++++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Emotional upset will lead to disagreements or loss. You are best to focus on self-improvements and helping others. Criticism will get blown out of pro-portion. Overindulgence in any way will cause prob-lems with family, friends or your lover. ++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Your help will be appreciated. Take unusual measures in order to come up with solutions that will help you veer in a more enjoyable direction. A chance to share your ideas will lead to positive change. Love is highlight-ed. ++++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Count your pennies and refrain from overspending on something you don’t need. Impulse purchases will lead to financial stress. Put your time and energy into making the necessary changes or learning skills that will help you advance. Don’t live in the past. +++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Emotions will surface. Make love, not war. You will bypass making a hor-rible mistake that can lead to isolation. Compromising and being fun to be with will ensure that you keep the peace and will stabilize your personal life. +++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Don’t procrastinate when there is so much to accomplish. Make changes that lead to greater effi-ciency at work and at home. Helping others is fine, but not at the expense of what needs to be done in order for you to main-tain your lifestyle. +++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Spread information to the people you feel can be of help to you. Offer your insight to those who have helped you in the past. Let your creative imagination flow in both your personal and professional dealings. ++++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Back away from anyone who is indulgent, pushy or trying to confine you from following your own path. Concentrate on business and making changes to your domestic environment. Less stress will be required if you plan to get ahead. ++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Look, see and do. Your ability to use what you have to offer to get what you want will lead to victory. Love, contracts and self-improvements should all be on your to-do list. Money can be made if you invest creatively. +++++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Don’t let anger cause you to miss out on an opportunity. Responsibilities may seem daunting, but you mustn’t forgo doing something you’ve been looking for-ward to when organization is all that’s required to fit everything into your day. Money is heading your way. +++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Getting along with others should be your prime concern. Too much stress and impulsive action will slow you down and ruin your chance to get ahead. A financial situation or contract shows great potential for future suc-cess. +++ THE LAST WORD Eugenia Last Teen on a short leash wants more freedom from parents Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com Puzzle Solutions on the next page.

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FRIDAY & SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12-13, 2012 PUZZLES & COMICS LAKE CITY REPORTER 7B DILBERT BABY BLUES BLONDIE BEETLE BAILEY B.C. FRANK & ERNEST FOR BETTER OR WORSE ZITS HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH GARFIELD CELEBRITY CIPHER CLASSIC PEANUTS PUZZLE ANSWERS

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8B LAKE CITY REPORTER NASCAR FRIDAY & SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12-13, 20128BNASCAR NOTEBOOK Busch makes last race in No. 51 Kurt Busch had an interesting ending to his time driving the No.51 Chevrolet owned by JamesFinch.Busch ran with the leaders most of the day,and was out front when he ran out of fuel and wasknocked off the track.Then he was parked byNASCAR for driving off with a safety worker’sequipment on the back of his battered car. “I got out of the car and surveyed the damage, saw that it could still roll,so I jumped back in,”Busch said.“I remembered with these enginesthey will run at 20 percent of fuel pressure to getit back to the garage.So I tried like heck.” He said the incident doesn’t surprise him.“This is the way my life works,”he said.“I am leading,I wreck,I run out of gas,I’m still thatcompetitive guy that tried to get back in the race,and now NASCAR is yelling at me because I don’thave my helmet on and I’m trying to get it to thegarage so the guys can work on it … “This is my life.I’m not complaining I put myself in a lot of these situations,but it’s on togood things now moving forward.I got all the badluck out of the way.This year has been a greatyear to test me in every way.” Busch takes over the No.78 Furniture Row Chevrolet this week at Charlotte,N.C.,while itscurrent driver,Regan Smith,gets into the No.51vacated by Busch.Sponsorship deals announced Two top-tier Sprint Cup drivers had announcements on the sponsorship front last week. Tony Stewart revealed that Bass Pro Shops will join Mobil 1 as the primary co-sponsor of his No.14 Chevrolet beginning next season.Bass Pro Shopswill be the main sponsor for 18 races,while Mobil 1will be on the hood for 11 races,leaving nine raceswithout primary sponsorship at this point. Stewart has had a relationship with Bass Pro Shops since 2001,beginning with his dirt LateModel car and branching out to his World ofOutlaws sprint car team.He’s also had Bass Proshops as an associate sponsor of his Cup teamsince 2009. Bass Pro Shops has been the primary sponsor of the No.1 Chevrolet driven by Jamie McMurray forcar owner Chip Ganassi. Also last week,AARP announced that it has extended its sponsorship of Jeff Gordon’s No.24Chevrolet at Hendrick Motorsports through the2014 season.For the past two seasons,AARP hasused its NASCAR involvement to promote its“Drive to End Hunger”program. The AARP says the program has led to the donation of 13 million meals for hungry olderAmericans and has raised more than $17 million. “It’s been a privilege to work with them and learn about such an important cause and the factthat they are really making an impact,”Gordonsaid.“I think from the beginning of this relation-ship,we knew it’s not going to happen in one yearor even two years … “I think this is a great sign that momentum is still building and they know they need to continueto further that work.I love the fact that they’vechosen our team and Hendrick to do that.”Busch apologizes to ToyotaKyle Busch issued an apology to the engine builders at Toyota Racing Development in theaftermath of his scathing criticism of the enginecrew after he ran short of fuel and finished seventh after leading 302 of 400 laps at DoverInternational Speedway. Toyota officials expressed displeasure at Busch’s remarks.His crew members explained that theychose to tune their car for speed instead of fuelefficiency,and the way the race played out wentagainst their strategy. “I made some remarks out of frustration on my radio at the end of last weekend’s race in Doverthat were very misguided,”Busch said in his state-ment.“I owe my friends at Toyota and TRD anapology.We have a great partnership with TRD,and they built me a motor that helped me leadover 300 laps and nearly lap the field. “It’s just frustrating that the caution fell where it did and suddenly it became a fuel mileage raceand we were set up for maximum horsepower.”Kligerman: Long road to victoryCamping World Truck Series driver Parker Kligerman has made the most of a mid-seasonteam switch.He was released by Brad KeselowskiRacing after 11 races,then signed on with RedHorse Racing and owner Tom DeLoach.Since thenhe has responded with two fourth-place finishes,two runner-up runs and now his first majorNASCAR victory,at Talladega last Saturday. “As you know,it’s been a long road to get to this victory,”Kligerman said in his winner’s interview.“Two different teams and a lot of adversity,but Iwas put with some of the best people I’ve everworked with and some of the best people I’ve everraced with.And,it starts at the top with TomDeLoach (team owner) and this whole Red HorseRacing team.” His race-winning truck was a proven one,the same one that John King drove to victory atDaytona back in February.The 24-car “Big One”crash on the lastturn of the last lap at TalladegaSuperspeedway on Sunday ramped up the debate about the kind of racing that goeson at the giant track these days. Despite NASCAR rules changes intended to eliminate it,drivers routinely push eachother,since that’s the fastest way around.That often leads to major melees,such as theone triggered Sunday when Tony Stewart,running at the front of the pack,cut in frontof Michael Waltrip,who was fast closing witha push from the cars behind him. The two cars collided and Stewart ended up in the air,bouncing off oncoming cars,while Matt Kenseth sped away to victory. Jeff Gordon,who emerged from the mess to finish second,said fans should love theslam-bang style of racing,and he doesn’tunderstand why there still are plenty ofempty seats at Talladega.The official atten-dance estimate was 88,000,the lowest inyears. “From an entertainment standpoint,they should be lined up out to the highway outthere,”Gordon said.“That makes no sense tome.” He said that if he was a fan,he’d like to see a race like the one Sunday at Talladega. “I want to see guys shoving one another,” he said.“I want to see the Big One at theend of the race,because guys are being soaggressive,and knowing that is not some-thing that as a fan you could ever imagineputting yourself into and sort of defying dan-ger.” As a driver,he’s on the other side of the fence. “I remember when coming to Talladega was fun,”Gordon said.“I really do,and Ihaven’t experienced that in a long,long time. I don’t like coming here.I don’t like the typeof racing that I have to do.” He said balancing the desires of fans and drivers puts NASCAR in a tough spot,buthe does long for the earlier style of restrictor-plate racing. “I don’t have to be happy and be all excited about coming to Talladega ...but I doremember times when the draft,and thethought that you had to put into it,the strat-egy working the draft and the cars in thelines,was fun,”he said. Instead he described the racing of the present as “bumper cars at almost 200 milesper hour.” “I don’t know anybody that likes that,”he said. His Hendrick Motorsports teammate Dale Earnhardt Jr.indicated he doesn’t. “If this is how we raced every week,I would find another job,”he said.“That is what the package is doing.It’s really not rac-ing.” Kenseth had to recover from a mid-race incident in which he was knocked off thetrack to even be in contention at the end.Hesaid there’s no way for drivers to avoid bigwrecks. “As you saw today and you’ve seen a lot of times,there is no safe place,”he said. His car owner Jack Roush said he expects to lose lots of equipment when the circuitvisits Talladega and Daytona,the two trackswhere restrictor plates are used to slowspeeds but also lead to the kind of tacticsthat drivers generally loathe. “This car’s a write-off when you load it up in the truck to bring it to one of these restric-tor-plate races,”Roush said. The wrecks like those at Talladega also have a way of scrambling the points stand-ings because drivers who wreck out earlyend up far behind in the points standings. For instance,Gordon,despite finishes of second,third and second in the past threeraces,is still 42 points out of the leadbecause of a crash in the Chase opener atChicagoland.In the past three weeks,he’sonly gained five points on leader BradKeselowski. Still,he’s not giving up on his bid for a fifth Cup title. “Our team is doing a great job,”he said. “We’ve been performing really,really well.We can sit there and really get mad aboutwhat happened in Chicago,but the reality ofit is all we can do is go each and every weekand keep trying to put ourselves in positionto win and get top fives. “It is certainly not over yet,”he said.“If we keep doing this,I really think we might havea shot at it.” By RICK MINTER / Universal Uclick By RICK MINTER / Universal Uclick Talladega becomes‘bumper cars at almost 200 mph’Sunday’s big crash in the final lap of Sunday’s rac e at Talladega Superspeedway.(NASCAR photo) NEXTUP... Race: Dollar General 300 Where: Charlotte Motor Speedway When: Friday, 7 p.m. (ET) TV: ESPN 2011 Winner: Carl Edwards SPRINT CUP CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS NATIONWIDE SERIES Race: Kroger 200 Where: Martinsville Speedway When: Oct. 27, 1:30 p.m. (ET) TV: SPEED 2011 Winner: Denny Hamlin Race: Bank of America 500 Where: Charlotte Motor Speedway When: Saturday, 7 p.m. (ET) TV: ABC 2011 Winner: Matt Kenseth (right) NUMERICALLYSPEAKING Laps led by KyleBusch in the past 15 Sprint Cup races at Charlotte,tops among drivers Fastest laps run byJimmie Johnson in the past 15 Cup races atCharlotte,the most of any driver Points separating thetop four drivers in the Truck Series standings: Ty Dillonleads; James Buescher -1;Timothy Peters -26; Talladega win-ner Parker Kligerman -34 Chase drivers involved inSunday’s crash at Talladega (Dale Earnhardt Jr.,Kevin Harvick,Denny Hamlin,Jimmie Johnson,Kasey Kahne,Brad Keselowski,Martin Truex Jr.,Clint Bowyer andGreg Biffle)488 793 9 34 The‘Big One’ The‘Big One’ 2012 CHASE CONTENDERS Chase Chart Following the Good Sam 500 at Talladega Superspeedway 1.Brad Keselowski 2,179 (finished seventh) He steered left and clear of the last-lap melee in Turn Four and added nine points to his lead oversecond-place in the standings.“I just feel lucky tosurvive Talladega,”he said.2.Jimmie Johnson -14 (finished 17th) Despite crashing hard on the last lap,he didn’t fare too poorly since so many other drivers alsowrecked.“Fortunately my car I could still drive tothe finish so I passed a couple of guys that weresitting there on the bottom trying to get goingthemselves,”he said.3.Denny Hamlin -23 (finished 14th) His strategy of laying back in an attempt to avoid the Big One almost backfired because hewas still in the back as the field was within a mil e of making it to the checkered flag without a majorwreck.But he came out OK and is still strong,points-wise.“We got a good finish based off of thewreck,but still it was a good solid day,and that’sall we could ask for is to not lose a bunch ofground,”he said.6.Kasey Kahne -36 (finished 12th) He and Jeff Gordon were lined up to draft to the front,but the Big One wreck cost Kahne at theend.“You can feel it coming,you can see it coming,”he said of the crash.5.Clint Bowyer -40 (finished 23rd) He had himself in position to win his third straight fall race at Talladega,but after leading o n the restart with two laps to go,he was involved inthe Big One.“I got myself in the right situationwhere I wanted to be,just didn’t win,”he said.“I’mnot going to let it get us down.”6.Jeff Gordon -42 (finished second) He said he doesn’t like racing at Daytona and Talladega,but Sunday’s race at Talladega allowedhim to move up four spots in the standings,eventhough he only gained five points on the leader.7.Tony Stewart -46 (finished 22nd) His move to block the fast-closing Michael Waltrip put him up in the air and took out 19 otherdrivers.“It was a mistake on my part,”he said.8.Martin Truex Jr.-48 (finished 13th) He almost survived the Big One,but still fared better than some of his Chase competitors.“Wealmost made it through,”he said.“I got all the waythrough and the very last car came up off theapron spinning and just hit me in the door andspun me,and I had to get spun around and keepgoing.”9.Greg Biffle -49 (finished sixth) He’s been on a points slide since ending the 26race regular season as the points leader,but hereversed that at Talladega and moved up twospots.10.Kevin Harvick -49 (finished 11th) After running among the leaders for most of the race,he ran out of gas and wound up 11th at theend,which was consistent with his previous Chasefinishes of 12th,11th and 13th.His season aver-age is 12th.11.Dale Earnhardt Jr.-51 (finished 20th) He was fast at Talladega as usual,but also involved in the Big One at the end.That droppedhim four spots in the standings and puts him morethan a race behind the leader.12.Matt Kenseth -62 (finished first) Despite winning at Talladega he’s still at a great disadvantage points-wise because of mechanicalfailures in two previous Chase races. Kurt Busch spins out in the No.51 Toyota during theGood Sam Roadside Assistance 500 at TalladegaSuperspeedway on Sunday.(NASCAR photo)

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General Information In Print and Onlinewww.lakecityreporter.com Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$2504 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $.25One item per ad Under $100 LegalDISTRICTCOURTCLARK COUNTY, NEVADACase No. A-12-660969-CWYNN LAS VEGAS, LLC d/b/a WYNN LAS VEGAS, a Nevada lim-ited liability company,Plaintiff,v.CHARLES MIDDLETON KEL-LEY, JR., an individual,Defendant.NOTICE! YOU HAVE BEEN SU-ED. THE COURTMAYDECIDE AGAINSTYOU WITHOUTYOUR BEING HEARD UNLESS YOU RESPOND WITHIN 20 DAYS. READ THE INFORMATION BE-LOW.TOTHE DEFENDANT: Acivil Complaint has been filed by the Plaintiff’s against you for the relief set forth in the ComplaintCHARLES MIDDLETON KEL-LEY, JR.1. If you intend to defend this law-suit, within 20 days after this sum-mons is served on your exclusive of the day of service, you must do the following:a. File with the Clerk of this Court, whose address is shown below, a for-mal written response to the Com-plaint in accordance with the rules of the court, with the appropriate filing fee.b. Serve a copy of your response upon the attorney whose name and address is shown below.2. Unless you respond, your default will be entered upon application of the Plaintiff and this Court may enter a judgment against you for the relief demanded n the Complaint which could result in the taking of money or property or relief requested in the Complaint.3. If you intend to seek the advice of an attorney in this matter, you should do so promptly so that your response may be filed on time.4. The object of this action is brought to recover a judgment for failure to repay debts associated with credit in-struments.5. The State of Nevada, its political subdivision, agencies, officers, em-ployees, board members and legisla-tors, each have 45 days after service of this summons within which to file an answer or other responsive plead-ing to the Complaint.STEVEN GRIERSON, CLERK OF COURTBy: /s/ Kristie M. GormanDeputy ClerkDate May 10, 2012County Courthouse200 Lewis AvenueLas Vegas, Nevada 89155Issued at the request of:/s/ Stacie MichaelsNevada Bar No. 97053131 Las Vegas Boulevard SouthLas Vegas, Nevada 89109(702) 770-2112Attorney for Plaintiff05535005September 28, 2012October 5, 12, 19, 2012 Elizabeth "Liz: P. HorneColumbia County, FLSupervisor of Elections(386) 758-1026For the November 6, 2012 General Election, the Columbia County Can-vassing Board will conduct a Logic and Accuracy (L&A) test of the tab-ulating equipment on 10/17/2012 at 7:00 am. Canvassing of absentee ballots will begin on 10/29/2012 at 8:00am then each weekday at 1:00pm til 11/6/2012 when canvass-ing will be at 1:00pm & 5:00pm until done. Provisional ballots will be canvassed 11/8/2012 at 5:00pm. Canvassing functions are held at the Supervisor of Elections, 971 W. Duval St, Lake City, FL. 05535019October 12, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURT, THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO. 12-169-CAJOHN MICHAELLEE, as Trustee of JCM LAND TRUSTAGREE-MENT,Plaintiff,vs.TONYTAYLOR, IF LIVING, ND IF DEAD, HIS RESPECTIVE UN-KNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVI-SEES, LEGATEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CRED-ITORS, OR TRUSTEES; AND ANYAND ALLUNKNOWN TEN-ANT(S),Defendants.NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALENotice is hereby given that the fol-lowing described real property:Begin at the POINTOF INTERSEC-TION of the East line of Ermine Street and the South line of East St. Johns Street and run thence S 8846’E, along the South line of said East St. Johns Street 89 feet; thence s 733’W, 101.29 feet; thence N 8846’W, 89 feet to the East line of said Ermine Street; thence N 733’E along the East line of said Ermine Street 101.21 feet more or less to the POINTOF BEGINNING. LESS AND EXCEPTthe South 15 feet thereof. All lying and being in Sec-tion 33, Township 3 South, Range 17 East, Columbia County, Florida.shall be sold by the Clerk of this Court, at public sale, pursuant to the Final Judgment in the above styled action dated October 3, 2012, at the Columbia County Courthouse in Lake City, Columbia County, Flori-da, at 11:00 A.M., on Wednesday, November 7, 2012, to the best and highest bidder for cash. Any person claiming an interest in any surplus from the sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the notice of lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.WITNESS my hand and official seal in the State and County aforesaid this 3rd day of October, 2012.P. DEWITTCASON,Clerk of CourtBy /s/ S. SandsDeputy Clerk05535180October 5, 12, 2012 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTFOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAPROBATE DIVISIONFile No. 12-231-CPIN RE: ESTATE OF DOROTHYPUESCHELGUYNN A/K/ADOROTHYP. GUYNNDeceased.NOTICE TO CREDITORSThe administration of the estate of Dorothy Pueschel Guynn a/k/a Doro-thy P. Guynn, deceased, whose date of death was July 17, 2012, is pend-ing in the Circuit Court for Columbia County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 173 NE Her-nando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055. The names and addresses of the personal representatives and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims in or demands against dece-dent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the de-cedent and other persons having claims or demands against dece-dent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITH-IN THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2 ) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publi-cation of this notice is October 12, 2012.Personal Representative:Iris Jeanette Pueschel303 NWIrma AvenueLake City, Florida 32055Attorney for Personal Representa-tive:/s/ John J. KendronJohn J. KendronAttorney for Iris Jeanette PueschelFlorida Bar Number: 0306850Robinson, Kennon & Kendron, P.A.PO Box 1178Lake City, FL32056-1178Telephone: (386) 755-1334Email: jjk@rkkattorneys.com05535262October 12, 19, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURT, THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO. 12-63-CASUBRANDYLIMITED PART-NERSHIP, a Florida limited partner-ship,Plaintiff,vs.HUGO HERSCHELGODOY, AND THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, LEGATEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIE-NORS, CREDITORS, AND TRUSTEES OF HUGO F. GODOY, DECEASED,Defendants.NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALENotice is hereby given that the fol-lowing described real property: PARCEL1-SOUTHAparcel of land lying in Section 16, Township 5 South, Range 17 East, Columbia County, Florida, being more particularly described as fol-lows:COMMENCE at the SWcorner of the SW1/4 of he NW1/4 of Section 16, Township 5 South, Range 17 East, Columbia County, Florida, and run N 0108’06” E along the West line of said Section 16 a distance of 1323.97 feet to the NWcorner of said SW1/4 of the NW1/4 of Sec-tion 16; thence S 8952’51” E along the North line of said SW1/4 of the NW1/4 a distance of 21.96 feet to the Easterly maintained right-of-way of Mixon Road (a county maintained road); thence continue S 8952’51” E still along the North line of the SW1/4 of the NW1/4 a distance of 630.71 feet to the Westerly limited access right-of-way line of Interstate Highway No. 75; thence S 1747’19” E along said Westerly limited access right-of-way line 353.12 feet to a line being parallel with the North line of said SW1/4 of the NW1/4 and the POINTOF BEGINNING: thence continue South 1747’19” E along the West right-of-way line of I-75, 288.89 feet; thence N 8952’51” W, 840.58 feet to a point on the East right-of-way line of Mix-on road; thence N 0108’06” E along said East right-of-way line 274.93 feet; thence S 8952’51’E, 744.81 feet to a point on the West right-of-way line of I-75 and the POINTOF BEGINNING, Containing 5.00 acres more or less. Subject to Power Line Easement and subject to Deed Re-strictions recorded in O.R. Book 1030, pages 1077-1079, Columbia County, Florida.SUBJECTTO: a 20 foot under-ground telephone line easement along the east line of said parcel, also being Westerly limited access right-of-way line of Interstate Highway No. 75.shall be sold by the Clerk of this Court, at public sale, pursuant to the Final Judgment in the above styled action dated October 3, 2012, at the Columbia County Courthouse in Lake City, Columbia County, Flori-da, at 11:00 A.M., on Wednesday, November 7, 2012, to the best and highest bidder for cash. Any person claiming an interest in any surplus from the sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the notice of lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.WITNESS my hand and official seal in the State and County aforesaid this 3rd day of October, 2012.P. DEWITTCASONClerk of CourtBy /s/ S. SandsDeputy Clerk05535185October 5, 12, 2012 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUN-TY, FLORIDACAPITALCITYBANK,Plaintiff,v.Case No: 2012-21-CACHARLES B. BROWN, III; WIL-LIAM E. FRAZIER; DAVID B. BROWN; RAULGUERRERO; RO-SARODEZNO; JANETS. BROWN; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, DEPARTMENTOF TREASURY, INTERNALREVE-NUE SERVICE; WAKULLABANK k/n/a CENTENNIALBANK; CAMPUS USACREDITUNION; RUSSELLSWEEM; DE-BORASWEEM; DAVID L. CRAWFORD; VINNIE DANIELS-CRAWFORD; JUAN CHIRINO; DUSTIN DUPREE and ELENADUPREE,Defendants.NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to the Final Summary Judg-ment of foreclosure dated 9/27/2012 and entered in Case No. 2012-21-CAof the Circuit Court of the Third Ju-dicial Circuit, in and for Columbia County, Florida, wherein CAPITALCITYBANK is the Plaintiff and CHARLES B. BROWN, III; WIL-LIAM E. FRAZIER; DAVID B. BROWN; RAULGUERRERO; RO-SARODEZNO; JANETS. BROWN; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, DEPARTMENTOF TREASURY, INTERNALREVE-NUE SERVICE; WAKULLABANK K/N/ACENTENNIALBANK; CAMPUS USACREDITUNION; RUSSELLSWEEM; DE-BORASWEEM; DAVID L. CRAWFORD; VINNIE DANIELS-CRAWFORD; JUAN CHIRINO; DUSTIN DUPREE and ELENADUPREE are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the third floor of the Colum-bia County Courthouse, 173 N.E. Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Flori-da at 11:00 a.m. on the 31st day of October, 2012, the following descri-bed properties as set forth in said Fi-nal Judgment:COMMENCE ATTHE SOUTH-EASTCORNER OF SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 15 EAST, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE NORTH 01 DEG. 42 MIN. 41 SEC. EAST, 39.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEG. 10 MIN. 24 SEC. WEST, 616.90 FEET; THENCE NORTH 01 DEG. 02 MIN. 38 SEC. EAST, 1051.01 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTIN-UE NORTH 01 DEG. 02 MIN. 38 SEC. EAST, 346.25 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEG. 01 MIN. 07 SEC. WEST, 633.16 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 00 SEC. 22 MIN. 41 SEC. WEST, 346.25 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEG. 01 MIN. 07 SEC. EAST, 629.14 FEETTOTHE POINTOF BEGINNING.TOGETHER WITH A25 FOOTWIDE NON-EXCLUSIVE EASE-MENTOVER AND ACROSS A25 FEETWIDE STRIPOF LAND LY-ING EASTAND ADJACENTTO THE EASTLINE OF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PARCELFOR ROAD WAYPURPOSES.TOGETHER WITH A50 FOOTWIDE NON-EXCLUSIVE EASE-MENTOVER AND ACROSS A50 FOOTSTRIPOF LAND WHOSE CENTER LINE IS AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE ATTHE SOUTH-EASTCORNER OF SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 15 EAST, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE NORTH 01 DEG. 42 MIN. 41 SEC. EAST, 39.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEG. 10 MIN. 24 SEC. WEST, 616.90 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING; THENCE NORTH 01 DEG. 02 MIN. 38 SEC. EAST, 1051.01 FEETTO THE POINTOF ENDING.SUBJECTTO A25 FOOTWIDE NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENTOVER AND ACROSS THE EAST25 FEETOF THE ABOVE DE-SCRIBED PARCELFOR ROAD WAYPURPOSES.TOGETHER with a 1999 Meri HS (Serial Numbers FLHMLCY145019800Aand FLHMLCY145019800B)and TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EASTSection 10: commence at the North-east corner of the NW1/4 of SW1/4 of said Section 10, in Columbia County, Florida, and run S 142'30" E along the East line of said NW1/4 of SW1/4 a distance of 348.48 feet to the point of beginning; thence continue S 142'30" E still along said East line 174.24 feet; thence run S 8759'09" W, 250.00 feet to the East line of a 50 foot street (Asena Ave-nue); thence run N 142'30" Walong said East line of Asena Avenue 174.24 feet; thence run N 8759'09" E 250.00 feet to the point of begin-ning.Together with a 1999 DYNAHS (Serial Numbers H813317GLand H813317GR)Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-er than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on 9/28/2012.P. DEWITTCASONCOLUMBIACOUNTYCLERK OF COURTBy:/s/ B. ScippioDeputy Clerk05535179October 5, 12, 2012 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURT, THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO. 12-130-CASUBRANDYLIMITED PART-NERSHIP, a Florida limited partner-ship,Plaintiff,vs.WENDELLBECKLES,Defendant.NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALENotice is hereby given that the fol-lowing described real property:LOT46 OF AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS CAR-DINALFARMS. Aparcel of land in Section 10, Township 6 South, Range 16 East, Columbia County, Florida being more particularly des-ribed as follows:COMMENCE at the Southeast cor-ner of Section 11, Township 6 South, Range 16 East, Columbia County, Florida and run thence South 8819’59” West along the South line of said Section 11 a distance of 5311.34 feet to the Southwest corner of Section 11; thence North 0122’42” West along the West line of Section 11, being also the East line of Section 10 a distance of 1995.16 feet; thence South 8838’56” West a distance of 60.18 feet; thence North 0101’15” East a distance of 642.99 feet; thence North 0121’04” West a distance of 1137.80 feet; thence South 8703’34” West a distance of 872.34 feet to the POINTOF BEGINNING; thence South 8854’43” West a dis-tance of 872.01 feet; thence North 0121’04” West a distance of 500.08 feet; thence North 8854’43” East a distance of 872.01 feet; thence South 0121’04” East a distance of 500.08 feet to the POINTOF BEGINNING.WITNESS my hand and official seal in the State and County aforesaid this 3rd day of October, 2012.P. DEWITTCASON,Clerk of CourtBy /s/ S. SandsDeputy Clerk05535186October 5, 12, 2012 NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE: JIM'S AUTO SERVICE gives Notice ofForeclosure of Lien and intent to sell these vehicles on 10/31/2012, 08:30 am at 2550 SWMAIN BLVD. LAKE CITY, FL32025, pursuant to subsection 713.78 of the Florida Statutes.JIM'S AUTO SERVICE reserves the right to accept or reject anyand/or all bids.1FAFP4440WF1019791998 FORD1GNCT18W02K1362262002 CHEVROLET2G4WS52M4X14578431999 BUICK2HGEJ6575WH6154211998 HONDA05535281OCTOBER 12, 2012 PUBLIC NOTICECOLUMBIACOUNTYBOARD OF COUNTYCOMMISSIONERSREQUESTFOR QUALIFICA-TIONSRental/Resale Housing Developer and Property Management for Neighborhood Stabilization Pro-gram 3The Board of County Commissioners of Columbia County, Florida an-nounces that professional Rental/Re-sale Housing Developer services for the Neighborhood Stabilization Pro-gram 3 are required on the project listed below.The County encourag-es qualified firms or individuals who desire to provide professional serv-ices for this project to submit a state-ment of qualifications and experi-ence.This public notice will be ad-vertised in the Lake City Reporter, The Gainesville Sun and posted on the County Website at: http://www.columbiacountyfla.com/PurchasingBids.asp.Project: Rental/Resale Housing De-veloperCDBG Project No.: 12DB-Q5-03-22-01-F04County Project No.: 2012-NThis project is financed with federal funds by the Neighborhood Stabili-zation Program 3 from the Florida Department of Economic Opportuni-ty under Title III, Division B of the Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008 (Public Law 110-289).DESCRIPTION:The County is seeking the services of a not for profit developer to renovate County purchased dwelling units to the standards of the Neighborhood Stabilization Program 3 and subse-quent to renovation act as property manager for the dwelling units.Property Management will include transfer ownership of the dwelling units to the not for profit company, the management of the dwelling units on a day to day basis and ensur-ing the units are rented to income qualified individuals using the cur-rent income standards and maintain-ing the required records.The Coun-ty, using Neighborhood Stabilization Program 3 funding, will acquire a minimum of seven foreclosed dwell-ing units to rehabilitate for resale or rental to families meeting the low and low-moderate income guidelines of the program.The dwelling units must be within the specified target area.At a minimum, 50 percent of the total number of dwelling units must be rental with 25 percent of the total number of dwell-ing units reserved for rental to low-income families. SERVICE REQUESTED:Not for profit developer or contractor to assist the County with the pur-chase, renovation and management of dwelling units under the Neigh-borhood Stabilization Program 3.Renovated dwelling units which are maintained for rental will be trans-ferred to the developer for on-going management and maintenance, which will include proper documen-tation of the eligibility of renters. QUALIFICATIONS:Prospective Rental/Resale Housing Developer firm must be a not for profit corporation, have the ability to Legalrehabilitate single family residential and multi-family residential proper-ties and the ability to manage the long-term rental and maintenance of rental dwelling units.Aperson or affiliate who has been placed on the convicted vendor list following a conviction for a public entity crime, pursuant to Section 287.133, Florida Statutes, may not submit a bid on a contract to provide any goods or services to a public entity, may not submit a bid on a contract with a public entity for the construction or repair of a public building or public work, may not submit bids on leases of real property to a public entity, may not be awarded or perform work as a contractor, supplier, subcontrac-tor, or consultant under a contract with any public entity, and may not transact business with any public en-tity in excess of the threshold amount provided in Section 287.017 Florida Statutes, for Category Two for a pe-riod of 36 months from the date of being placed on the convicted vendor list.SELECTION CRITERIA: The criteria used in making the se-lection of the Rental/Resale Housing Developer for this project will in-clude the following items based upon a total of 100 points, as follows: (1) Specific experience with the Neigh-borhood Stabilization Program; (20 points); (2) capacity to complete the work in a timely manner (30 points); (3) technical qualifications (20 points); (4) past experience with lo-cal governments (20 points); and (5) quality of submittal (clarity, concise-ness and compliance with the re-quirements in the Request for Quali-fications) (10 points).ADDITIONALINFORMATION:If you have any questions concerning this matter, please contact David Kraus, Safety Manager, Columbia County, 135 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055, telephone number 386.755.4100.APPLICATION:QualifiedRental/Resale Housing Developers should submit ten (10) copies of a statement of qualifications and experience to: David Kraus, Safety Manager, Co-lumbia County, P. O. Box 1529, Lake City, FL32056-1529 or in per-son at 135 NE Hernando Avenue.Envelopes should be marked “Neigh-borhood Stabilization Program 3 Housing Developer and Property Management Request for Qualifica-tions.”Statement of qualifications shall include the following: The sub-mittals should include the following: (1) Description of the firm’s exper-tise in meeting the needs of the County; (2) brief overview of the firm’s history and organization that includes the name of the firm’s con-tact person, telephone, facsimile number and email address; (3) re-sumes of all personnel that will be assigned to the project(s) with a copy of their professional license, includ-ing client contact information for all projects listed in resumes; (4) list a maximum of five (5) recent projects that the firm performed during the past five (5) years to indicate profi-ciency in similar work, and if availa-ble, please provide client reference letters on these projects; (5) identifi-cation and address of any sub consul-tants that will be involved, including a description of qualifications; (6) provide a short narrative outlining the firm's approach to manage a proj-ect in order to meet schedule and budget requirements; (7) describe the current workload and the firm’s daily ability to handle the scope of serv-ices; (8) relative to the scope of serv-ices for the project, describe the spe-cific ability of the firm.Include any innovative approaches to providing the services: briefly describe your quality assurance/quality control pro-gram.Describe how your firm en-sures constructability and design per-formance of projects.Describe how your firm interacts with regulatory agencies.Facsimile or electronic mail state-ments of qualifications will not be accepted.The deadline for the re-ceipt of statements of qualifications is October 18, 2012 at 4:00 p.m. Eastern Daylight Savings Time.Any statements received after the dead-line will not be considered by the County.05535150October 5, 12, 2012 020Lost & Found FOUND Cordless Electric Drill, in Lake City. Call to identify. and pay for cost of Ad. Contact 386-397-9070 100Job Opportunities05535155(Ladies wear factory outlet) Lake City Mall is looking for P/TTHIRD KEY Days, nights, and weekends. Flexible hours a necessity. Competitive wages, discount, EOE Apply in person at store location Retirees are encouraged to apply. 05535253Experienced Housekeeper Needed. Professional References and background check required. Contact Susan 365-8807 MANAGEMENT OPPORTUNITIES McDonald's of Alachua has multiple positions available for qualified/experienced mgrs. $8-$16 hr /benefits/bonuses Apply on line @ www.mcstate.com/alachua Or Call 386-755-2475

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10B LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDFRIDAY& SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12-13, 2012 1986 CorvetteWell maintained, runs great. 95,000 miles.$8,500 obo 386-344-2107 100Job OpportunitiesEstablished Ocala business is Looking to hire additional sales teams for our expanding product line.Earn $500.00/week, plus commission!If you’re upbeat, friendly and enjoy working with the public, then contact us for a confidential interview and start earning the income you deserve! Valid driver’s license, proof of insurance and overnight travel is required. Call us TODAYat 352-233-2818.Telecom Service Bureau, Inc. FULL-TIME CUSTODIAN Wanted. Primary duties include basic knowledge of boilers and HVAC system, cleaning sanctuary and Fellowship Hall, mowing, minor repairs, setup and taking down tables and chairs and general building maintenance.Must be able to lift 60 lbs. Criminal background check required. Please send resume and references to Staff Parish Relations, First United Methodist Church, Lake City, 973 S. Marion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025. Deadline is Oct. 19, 2012. KNUCKLE BOOMOPERATOR CLASS AREQUIRED, Operate knuckle boom truck, truck maintenance minor repairs truck Send reply to Box 05097, C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056 Land Survey Help Wanted 386-755-6166 140 NWRidgewood Avenue Lake City, FL32055 MILLWRIGHT Welding, Machining, Hydraulics, Gear Ratios, Fabricating, Problem Solving, Repair, Maintenance, Dismantle, Reassemble – Send reply to Box 05096, C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056 SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 Small historic non-denominational church with a heart for children is seeking a pianist for Sunday services. Please contact 904-259-4194 if interested. The City of Lake City has openings for the following positions: Girls Club Leader P/T Recreation Collection Technician I Utilities Collection Technician I Waste Water WWTPOperator "C" Waste Water Temp WWTPOperator "C" Waste Water Obtain detailed job descriptions and applications by visiting 1st floor receptionist in City Hall 205 N Marion Avenue, Lake City, FL32055 or visit our web site at www.lcfla.com The City of Lake City is an EEO/AA/ADA/VPemployer. Wanted-P/T Handi-Man, Exp. in Routine Maintenance such as plumbing, elect, painting & carpentry. Applications Available at Camp Weed & Cerveny Conference Center, 11057 Camp Weed Place, Live Oak. WELDER NEEDED Must have experience, the ability to measure in .010 and fit a must. Machine shop experience helpful. Apply in person, Grizzly Mfg., 174 NE Cortez Terrace, Lake City, FL32055, or Email: guy@qiagroup.com: NO CALLS Whack A-Do now hiring Stylist. Full time/Part time Hourly pay + commission. No Clientel needed Full Service or Just Hair Cuts. Contact Darlene. 386-984-6738 120Medical Employment05535249Rehab Director/ PT Avalon Healthcare Center is currently accepting applications for the full time position of Rehab Director/PT Please apply at Avalon Healthcare and Rehabilitation Center. 1270 S.W. Main Blvd. Lake City, Florida 32025 or fax resume to 386-752-8556 EOE Medical practice needs Ophthalmic Technician FTor PT. Experience preferred. Fax resume 386-755-7561. 140Work Wanted Experience Dental Hygienist Looking for a Full, Part time or Substitute Position, Excellent References. Call 386-288-8321 240Schools & Education05534919Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class12/24/2012• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-11/05/12• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies BLACK & WHITE MERLE Austrian Shepherd dog, male, 19 mos. old, purebred, $250 or OBO. Good with children. Call 386-365-2900 Free Puppies Lab Mix. Approx 5 weeks old. Call, text, or email. (386)984-7975, firefigher126@yahoo.com Free to good home Beautiful, Female American Bulldog, 1yr 8mths, Needs room to run, Good With people and other animals. 386-752-8317 PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 330Livestock & SuppliesDeep Creek Farms Barn kept Square or Net Wrapped Round Hay Bales For Sale Ronnie Hughes (386)365-1425 403Auctions Personal Property Estate Liquidation Auction SundayOct. 14, 2012@ 2:00 PM Location: 617 SWDawn Lane Lake City, FL32024 Lots of Antiques, Electrical Supplies, Household Items Furniture and Much More. For more info contact: J.W. Hill and Assoc. 386-362-3300 or John Hill 386590-1214 AB2083 AU2847 10%Buyers Premium 413Musical MerchandiseBACH Trumpet TR300, Silver color. Excellent Condition With hard case. $400. 386-623-3149 430Garage Sales 10/12 & 10/13, 8 AM-?, 100 amp Power Pole, Sm. Fridge, fragrance lamps, Men’s, Ladies, & teen clothes & Lots of misc. items. 21609 47th Dr. LC 865-304-1248 Annual DeerCreek Sub Sale. “Saturday Only” Honda Power Washer, Guns, Ammo, Antiques, Glass ware, Carnival Glass, Furniture, Clothes, Christmas, Tools, Household, Large Sale. 252-B. Look for Signs FORESTCOUNTRY Sat. 10/13, 8 am to 12, 374 SW Short Leaf Drive Household items, clothes, toys, sewing items. FRI. 10/12 & SAT. 10/13, 8-?, 1282 Dakota Glen, 90 Wright on Gwen Lake Blvd., left on Dakota, furn, households, clothes, purses, and much more.386-397-4889. Lake City Elks Annual yard sale Sat. Oct. 13th 8a-1p. To be held in the Elks parking lot. Backs up to Lake Desoto. Look for signs! New Horizon Church of Christ, Sat. Oct. 13th 7 a.m-2p.m., 6130 South US Hwy 441, Drop off and vendors welcome ($10.00 fee). PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 440Miscellaneous Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, Root Raking, Bush Hog, Seeding, Sod, Disking, site prep, ponds & irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200 630Mobile Homes forRent2 BR MH. $400 $450. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 3BR/2BADWMH on 1 acre private lot, 1st+last+dep required located in Ellisville. No pets. Contact 352-870-5144 4bd/2ba -5 ac,Conv. to LC & G’ville, new energy efficient AC, lrg deck, 10x20 shed Sale or Lease $950 mth.1st + dept. 867-4586 Country Setting, 14 x70 MH. 2BR/2BA,large master tub, CH/A $575 mo. $300 dep. No Pets 386-755-0064 or (904) 771-5924 Eastside Village Realty, Inc. @752-5290 MLS #81960 Must be 55+ 2br/2ba Open Flrpln, Din/Liv off Kitchen, Carport, Enclosed screen porch,storage shed. Eastside Village Realty, Inc. @752-5290 MLS #81237 Must be 55+, 2br/2ba Lrg Screen porch, Lrg Laundry/Storage Area, in Excellent Shape. Must See. Eastside Village Realty, Inc. @752-5290 MLS #81959 Must be 55+, Site Built home 1 car garage, Scrren porch, lrg laundry, lots of upgrades. Check it out. Eastside Village Realty, Inc. @752-5290 MLS #81958 Must be 55+, 3br/2ba, Florida Room & Screen Porch, 2 car garage. Large Home LARGE CLEAN 2 & 3 bdms CH/A5 Points Area. Also 3 bdrm Westside. 1st + Deposit Required. No Pets. 961-1482 640Mobile Homes forSale(1) Only New Jacobsen Triplewide 42x64 Only $99,995 Del & Set with Air. Beautiful Home. North Pointe of Gainesville. 352-872-5566 4BD/2BADWMH on 4 acres Owner Financing Available. 386-623-3404 or 386-623-3396 640Mobile Homes forSale575 CREDITSCORE? New 3/2 or 4/2 doubles. Your Approved with 10% down. Call for details. North Pointe 352-872-5566 BIGGESTSALEEVER 13 Jacobsen Display Models reduced for Fast Sale! North Pointe Homes, 352-872-5566 LAND ANDHOME Attention land owners with good credit. No Money Down and Low Fixed Rates and Low Fees. Let’s Deal! North Pointe Homes, Gainesville 352-872-5566 650Mobile Home & Land2 OwnerFinanced Homes/ 1 RentalLake City, Mayo, Branford 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com CLEAN NICE 2/2 SW,and 740sf. frame studio, 1 bath outbuilding, nice country ac 8 mi to VA. $39,000 Cash only 86.961.9181 Owner Fin.-Nice huge 4/2.5 on 3 ac, x-fenced, creek, lrg deck,Paved Rd. McAlpin area. Small down $950/mth 386-867-1833. For picswww.suwanneevalleyproperties.com OwnerFinance 3/2 on 2.5 ac Mayo Area. $675 mth Small Down 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05534938We’ve got it all!$89 Deposit Limited Avail. Call Today! Windsong Apts. *Free afterschool program386-758-8455 1BR APT. Downtown Location, Clean. New Carpet $450 mo, plus Security. NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456 2/1 1300 sqft, duplex w/ gargage. totally refurbished,W/D hook up, CH/A, $650 mth Lease Req. 386-965-2407 or 386-758-5881 2BR/1BAAPT. w/garage. West side of town. $650. mo. 386-961-9000 2BR/2BAw/garage 5 minutes from VAhospital and Timco. Call for details. 386-365-5150 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 COZYCOTTAGE 1 BRNew paint & carpet. 10 mins. South of LC, all util. & satellite incl. $550 mo. Pet ok, 386-758-2408 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Quant 2br/1ba Apt. Peaceful Location with Lake View CH/A$500. mo $500 dep. No pets. 386-344-2170 720Furnished Apts. ForRentRooms forRent Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent2/1 Brick house Lrg eat in kit. & closets, CH/A, 514 SE First Ave. Jasper. $550 mth 1st,last+sec. No pets. 772-285-1032 3BD/1.5BAOn Leslie Gln CH/A, $725 mth & $725 dep. Contact 386-344-2170 3br/2ba DWon Tranquil Gln. Completely renovated. backyard fenced. $700/mo + $400 security. 386-938-5637 730Unfurnished Home ForRent05535236LAKE CITY 4BR/2BA 1248 SF $650 2 AVAILABLEJUSTREDUCED $45/MONTH3BR/2BA 1496 SF $695JUSTREDUCED3BR/2BA 1200 SF $725 3BR/2BA 980 SF $575 2BR/1BA M/HOME $475 BRANFORD 4BR/3BA 2108 SF $800 JUSTREDUCEDMADISON 2BR/1BA JUSTREMODELED $450 1 AVAILABLE 3BR/1.5BA REMODELED $550 Visit our website: www .NorthFloridahomeandland.com Mike Foster386-288-3596 Mitchell Lee 386-867-1155Accredited Real Estate Services 1688 SE Baya Dr., Suite 105 Lake City, FL32025 Accredited Real Estate Services is a Full Service Real Estate Office. We do: Rentals ~ Property Management ~ Property Sales. Cozy 2bd / 1ba home. CH/A, $500 mth & $500 dep. Contact 386-344-2170 750Business & Office RentalsCk out this Awesome DealFort White, Newly Remodled. Multi use Comm Prop. Approx 850sqft. Elec & water incl. Free WFI & yard Maint. High Traffic Area $725 mth 941-924-5183. FOR LEASE: Downtown Office Space. Convenient to Court house. Call 386-755-3456 ForRent orLease: Former Doctors office, Former professional office & Lg open space: avail on East Baya Ave. Competitive rates. Weekdays 386-984-0622 evenings/weekends 497-4762 PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 805Lots forSale PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 820Farms & Acreage10 acres with well/septic/pp (not guar); $300 dwn; $580 a mth. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 940Trucks 1992 FORD Ranger 4.0, 4x4, 5 speed transmission. Great Mud truck. $1800 OBO. Contact 386.758.3238 950Cars forSale 2006 MAZADA MIATACONV. Automatic, leather, power. $14,500 ($1,000 below KBB value). Call 386-365-2046.REPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Linewww.lakecityreporter.com PublishedMonthlybythe Lake City Reporter