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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01924

Material Information

Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 10-11-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01932

Related Items

Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01924

Material Information

Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 10-11-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01932

Related Items

Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

By LAURA HAMPSONlhampson@lakecityreporter.comDavion Markhel Smith was a kind boy with a ready smile. A typical teenager, he liked football, video games and being with friends, said his mother, Charita Williams. Quiet by nature, there wasn’t a change in his personality, but relentless bullying caused Davion to take his own life just days before starting eighth grade this year, she said. Several hundred people gathered Wednesday evening for the inaugural Unity Day at the Lake City Mall. The anti-bul-lying event served as a way to remem-ber Davion and prevent others from also suffering from taunting, teasing and harassment. Community organizations set up booths promoting self confidence and support. Lake City Police Chief Argatha Gilmore told audience members her experience with a bully as a child. “In the name of Davion Smith, we are going to say enough is enough,” she said. Richardson Middle School Principal and Assistant Superintendent Lex Carswell said he applauded everyone gathered against bullying and encour-aged students to report all incidents. “If Opinion ................ 4APeople.................. 2AObituaries .............. 5A Advice & Comics ......... 3B Puzzles ................. 4B TODAY IN PEOPLE Bieber takes on bullying. COMING FRIDAY Local news roundup. 84 56 Mostly sunny WEATHER, 2A Lake City ReporterTHURSDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2012 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | 75¢ LAKECITYREPORTER.COM CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 138, No. 182 1The candidates have their say By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comCurrent and would-be county officials continue to digest information a possible $28.2 million events center for Columbia County. Tuesday night county commissioners and community members heard a 90-minute presentation on the feasibility of constructing a 265,000 sq. ft. multi-purpose facility in the county. The information was offered by a fact-finding committee tasked with looking at the financial, and economic ramifications of mak-ing the proposed building a reality. However, after reviewing a 58-page presentation, some county officials – along with those wishing to replace them – said they needed more time and more information to determine whether it’s time to make the pro-posal a reality. District 1 District 1 county commissioner Ron Williams as well as his opponent in the election, Oni Allen, both said they would like more information before making a final decision. Allen said she didn’t attend Tuesday’s presentation because of a previously scheduled engagement, but that she’s still weighing her deci-sion. “I can see where an events center Six vying for county commission weigh in on proposed center. City officials plan to reorganize, reopenmarket next spring. EVENTS CENTER PROPOSAL COURTESYArchitect’s rendition of a proposed events center for Colu mbia County. A mother’s plea After 17 months,farmersmarketto closeCENTER continued on 6ATONY BRITT /Lake City ReporterJeff Vorpagel (from left), a National Training Inc. admis-sions representative, and Caitlyn Cox, talks to Brian Maur er, Charity Maurer and Frank Willis during the Hiring Our Heroes job fair Wednesday at American Legion Post 57. By LAURA HAMPSONlhampson@lakecityreporter.comUnable to energize the downtown area, the Lake DeSoto Farmers Market, a weekly Saturday morning feature in Wilson Park, will close at the end of this month. City officials plan to reorganize and reopen the market in the spring. The Lake City Community Redevelopment Agency launched the market in May 2011, drawing strong supporters and more than 100 vendors over 17 months, said Jackie Kite, com-munity redevelopment administrator. City Manager Wendell Johnson said the market wasn’t drawing visitors and business to the city’s downtown area, as it was intended to do. Johnson said the downtown area had little to offer those going to the market, as most busi-nesses are closed. “We thought it would encourage some of the businesses to open Saturday morning but it just wasn’t the case,” he said. The city did well setting up the market, but can’t control other factors, he said. In areas like Fernandina Beach, the downtown commercial district is vibrant on Saturdays, with people coming for the farmers market as much as the downtown stores, he said. Johnson said he would have liked to keep the market open, but this time of year activity starts dropping off. Johnson said city officials will back off the market for now and regroup. After the Olustee Festival, officials will start planning and hope to have the market relaunched by April or May, he said. “My opinion is that it would have been beneficial to struggle through this and leave it running,” Kite said. A farmers market is intended to provide locally grown, fresh foods, a goal overshad-owed by the revitalization effort, she said. The farmers market brought people downtown, but there weren’t shops and restaurants open to keep them there, she said. “A few businesses took advantage of it, but we have to have more than a few,” she said. September and October are slower times for fresh produce, but it would have picked up by late October and November, she said. She said the market recently lost two key vendors, a produce seller who relocated and a goat milk producer who stopped to focus on a degree. “It seems like the market has shrunk, but supporters are still coming,” Kite said. Even established markets in other cites are slower this time of year, she said. It takes about three years for a market to become established in a community, at which point the goal was to let a nonprofit take over running the market, she said. By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comVeterans from Columbia and surrounding counties visited American Legion Post 57 show-ing off their job skills to poten-tial employers during the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Hiring Our Heroes job fair. Ernie Lombardi, Southeast Regional Associate for the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, said about 20 employers attended Wednesday’s job fair. The event was sponsored by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and Lombardi estimated that more than 70 veterans attended the 3-hour event. “We had pre-registered veterans as well as walk-in regis-trants,” he said. “The purpose of the event is simple: To put veter-ans in front of these employers so the veterans could explain MARKET continued on 6A JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterCharita Williams, the mother of Davion Smith, sheds a tear as she speaks at the Unity Day event at the Lake City Mall Wednesday. Smith, a Richardson Middle School student, took his own l ife as a result of bullying, his mother said. ‘Hiring our Heroes’ draws 20 employers HEROES continued on 6A After son’s death, seeks end to bullying Davion Smith Inaugural Unity Daydraws hundreds toLake City Mall. UNITY continued on 6A

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HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter Parking garage collapse kills one MIAMI A section of a parking garage under construction at a com munity college collapsed Wednesday, killing one worker and trapping at least two others in the rub ble, officials said. One of the workers was rescued, but there was too much debris around the other to immediately get him out. Several other workers were hurt when the roof of the five-story concrete garage fell, creating a pancake-style collapse on the campus of Miami-Dade College, officials said. It was a floor upon floor, collapsing all the way down to the ground floor, a Miami-Dade Fire Rescue official said. The trapped worker was getting oxygen and being treated by a physician, but officials did not describe the extent of his injuries. Fernandez said the rescue would be a long, tedious effort. Mystery monkey bites woman ST. PETERSBURG Wildlife officials in Florida say the mystery monkey of Tampa Bay bit a woman during an unprovoked attack in St. Petersburg. Florida Fish and Wildlife spokesman Gary Morse said the woman was sit ting outside Tuesday when the monkey bit her on the back. The Tampa Bay Times reported the incident was reported to wildlife offi cials, who sent a trapper to the area. The wild rhesus macaque has become famous in the Tampa Bay area. It has a Facebook page and has been fea tured on Comedy Centrals Colbert Report. The elusive monkey has been spotted numerous times in the Tampa Bay area in recent years. Ex-congressman Sam Gibbons dies TAMPA Former U.S. Rep. Sam M. Gibbons, who served 17 terms in Congress and rose to head the powerful Ways and Means Committee before his retirement, died late Tuesday or early Wednesday at a Tampa retirement home, accord ing to his son. The elder Gibbons was 92. Tim Gibbons said his father died peacefully at the retirement home, where the two had chatted Tuesday night while look ing out over Tampa Bay. Elected in 1962, Gibbons never lost an election and was among the Tampa Bay regions best-known politi cians. He is considered the father of the University of South Florida for pushing legislation to cre ate the school in the 1950s. 8 mussel species receive protection MONTGOMERY, Ala. Eight species of fresh water mussels in south Alabama and northwest Florida are now pro tected by the Endangered Species Act. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced it has granted endangered species status for the Alabama pearlshell, Choctaw bean, fuzzy pig toe, narrow pigtoe, round ebonyshell, southern kidneyshell, southern sandshell, and tapered pigtoe. They are found in the Florida counties of Bay, Escambia, Holmes, Jackson, Okaloosa, Santa Rosa, Walton and Washington. A conservation biolo gist with the Center for Biological Diversity, Tierra Curry, said mussels are an integral part of the natural and cultural heritage of the Southeast, and its excit ing to see the species get protection. Associated Press MINEOLA, N.Y. A new anti-cyberbullying video by Justin Biebers helped his manager and a record executive resolve a legal matter. The video released Wednesday by a New York prosecutor is part of a plea deal settling misdemeanor charges filed after a mall fan frenzy in 2009. The manager and executive were arrested after police ordered a Bieber autograph session at a cloth ing store shut down over fears some one could get hurt. More than 3,000 teens and younger girls had arrived by 1 p.m. for an event scheduled for 4 p.m., leading to the cancellation. During the 11-minute video intro duced by Nassau County District Attorney Kathleen Rice, whose office negotiated the plea deal, Bieber speaks to a Long Island high school student about her experiences with cyberbullying. An attorney also offers definitions on cyberbully ing, sexting and other offenses and warns teens they could be subject to criminal prosecutions if they are caught. The Internet can be used as a place to have a greater positive impact on the world, Bieber tells viewers. The Web should be used to inspire others, not spread hate or hurt. Singer Debbie Reynolds hospitalized in L.A. LOS ANGELES A publicist said Debbie Reynolds has been hospitalized and is canceling upcom ing appearances after suffering an adverse reaction to medication. Reynolds publicist Kevin Sasaki said the singer-actress was hospital ized in Los Angeles after having the bad reaction. She is canceling shows and appearances through the end of the year. Reynolds is famous for her role in Singin in the Rain and earned an Oscar nomina tion for her gutsy character in The Unsinkable Molly Brown. The 80-year-old performs numer ous shows and makes appear ances each year. She is scheduled to appear on a float promoting pet adop tion in the upcoming Rose Parade. Singer Sarah Brightman plans flight to space MOSCOW Sarah Brightmans voice, beloved by audiences and renowned for its three-octave range, rocketed to fame more than two decades ago as the heroine of The Phantom of the Opera. Now the worlds biggest-selling soprano is heading to outer space. On Wednesday, Brightman told a news conference in Moscow that she has booked a trip to the International Space Station. Brightman, who had a hit in 1978 with I Lost My Heart to a Starship Trooper and has sold more than 30 million records, will become the first recording artist in space. The British singer said that after touring the world in 2013 for her new album, Dreamchaser, she will spend six months in Russias Star City cosmonaut training center. Associated Press CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Celebrity Birthdays Former U.S. Defense Secretary William Perry is 85. Country singer Paulette Carlson is 61. Pro Football Hall of Famer Steve Young is 51. Actress Joan Cusack is 50. Actor Sean Patrick Flanery is 47. AROUND FLORIDA Bieber video ends NY legal case Wednesday: Afternoon: 6-6-0 Evening: N/A Wednesday: Afternoon: 9-6-7-8 Evening: N/A Tuesday: 5-17-23-28-30 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAIL Y BRIEFING THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 2AWEATHER ASSOCIATED PRESS Firefighters look over the rubble after a section of a parking garage under construction at Miami-Dade College in Doral collapsed Wednesday, killing one worker and trapping at least two others in the rubble. ASSOCIATED PRESS Teen heart throb Justin Bieber recently completed a video to teach about cyberbul lying as part of a legal deal to keep his manager and record company from being prosecuted for causing a public disturbance at a Bieber autograph session. Reynolds Thought for Today Daily Scripture Listen to advice and accept dis cipline, and at the end you will be counted among the wise. Many are the plans in a persons heart, but it is the Lords purpose that prevails. Proverbs 19:20-21 When a friend speaks to me, whatever he says is interesting. Jean Renoir, French movie director (1894-1979) Gibbons

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Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & ST A TE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2012 3A 3A Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Columbia and Suwannee counties! 2 ATTN: EILEEN BENNETT LAKE CITY REPORTER Runs: Thursday, August 9, 2012 Size: 6 col. (10.625) x 10.5, Black & White File name: -9_CMPS_CarLoan-YouChoose-BWrev2_LC.pdf Sent out: by e-mail 8/6/12 Fran Rowe, Clark/Nikdel/Powell Advertising, 863-299-9980 x1030 Lake City 183 SW Bascom Norris Dr. Gville E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunters Walk 5115 NW 43rd St. Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St. Shands at UF Room H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Alachua 14759 NW 157th Ln. Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E. Silver Springs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. Summer eld 17950 US Hwy. 441 Tallahassee 1511 Killearn Center Blvd. OFFER NOT AVAILABLE ON EXISTING CAMPUS LOANS. OFFER IS FOR NEW LOANS ONLY. MAY NOT BE COMBINED WITH ANY OTHER OFFER. 1. Credit approval required. Your rate may be higher based on creditworthiness, vehicle and term of loan. For example, a $39,000.00 loan with no money down at 2.14% for 48 months would require 47 monthly payments of $854.12 and a nal payment of $833.58, nance charge of $1,839.67, for a total of payments of $40,977.22. The amount nanced is $39,237.55, the APR is 2.26%. APR = Annual Percentage Rate. 2. Credit approval and initial deposit of $5 required. Mention this ad and well waive the $15 new member fee. 3. Interest will accrue from date of purchase. Choosing this option will increase the total amount of interest you pay. For a limited time only. These o ers may expire without notice. This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration. Choice Rates for Choosy Shoppers. APPLY NOW! Accelerate your approval when you apply online at www.campuscu.com or call us at 754-9088 and press 4. YOU CHOOSE THE CAR: NEW OR NEW-to-YOU (2008 or newer) YOU CHOOSE THE TERM: 36, 48 OR 60 months Rates as low as APR 1 EITHER WAY: Plus, no payments for 90 days 3 COURTESY Lake City Police Departments Explorer Post No. 386 held graduation ceremonies Tuesday. Participants in the ceremony included (front row, from left) Assistant City Manager Grayson Cason, Third Circuit Chief Judge Leandra G. Johnson, Isaac Cook, Sam Cook, Josh Truesdale, Officer Mitchell Kline, Officer Brian Bruenger and city Community Relations Coordinator Audre Washington; and (back row, from left) Police Chief Argatha Gilmore, Officer Michael Lee, Jeremy Barwick, Stuart Robinson and Chris Futch. Police Explorers graduate 76,000 votes already cast by Floridians By BRENDAN FARRINGTON AP Political Reporter TALLAHASSEE Floridians have already cast more than 76,000 bal lots in the presidential elec tion as of Wednesday morn ing and the campaigns for Republican Mitt Romney and President Barack Obama are scrambling to reach out to 2 million other voters who have requested absentee ballots. More than three weeks before voters go to the polls Nov. 6, the battle for early votes is in full force in this state that will be cru cial to winning the White House. Almost our entire vol unteer army in the state is being converted now into an absentee ballot chase and an early voter notifi cation, said Brett Doster, a Tallahassee-based Republican strategist work ing with Romney. If you can get a vote cast today thats in the bank, thats another voter you dont have to spend money on trying to message. While campaigns have always encouraged sup porters to request absentee ballots, Floridas new voting laws have shortened the inperson early voting period from 14 to eight days, a decision which some elec tion officials say will create longer lines and possibly effect turnout. So this elec tion theres an even greater incentive to ask supporters to vote by absentee ballot. Floridas 29 electoral votes are more than 10 percent of the 270 needed to win the presidency, the most of any state thats con sidered a toss-up. So far, Romneys campaign has a slight edge in absentee voting. Republicans have request ed 894,544 absentee ballots and returned 33,143, com pared to 820,865 request ed and 31,305 returned by Democrats, accord ing to the Romney cam paign. Independent and minor party voters have requested 374,551 ballots and returned 12,083. The state Democratic Party has numbers that reflect the same ratio of requested and returned ballots. The state only releases the information to political par ties, elections officials and candidates until the elec tion is over. At the same point before the 2008 election, Democrats lagged even further in absentee ballot requests, with Republicans requesting nearly 730,000 ballots compared to just more than 517,000 for Democrats, according to figures provided by the Obama campaign. Traditionally, Republicans have voted absentee in larger numbers than Democrats, but Obama still won the majority of votes cast before Election Day in 2008. Early voting at the polls begins Oct. 27 and runs through Nov. 3. Obamas campaign is aggressively pushing what it calls its Vote Now! effort. Its telling support ers to request an absentee ballot in person and then fill it out and return it on the spot. It laid the ground work by contacting elec tions officials to ensure that theyd allow people to absentee vote in person. Most of Floridas 67 coun ties allow it. MARCIA DUNN AP Aerospace Writer CAPE CANAVERAL A private company successfully delivered a half-ton of supplies to the International Space Station early Wednesday, the first official shipment under a billion-dollar contract with NASA. The SpaceX cargo ship, called Dragon, eased up to the orbiting lab, and sta tion astronauts reached out with a robot arm and snared it. Then they firmly latched it down. Looks like weve tamed the Dragon, reported space station commander Sunita Williams. Were happy shes on board with us. Williams thanked SpaceX and NASA for the deliv ery, especially the choco late-vanilla swirl ice cream stashed in a freezer. The linkup occurred 250 miles above the Pacific, just west of Baja California, 2 days after the Dragons launch from Cape Canaveral, Fla. Nice flying, radioed NASAs Mission Control. Its the first delivery by the California-based SpaceX company under a $1.6 billion contract with NASA. The contract calls for 12 such shipments. This newest Dragon holds 1,000 pounds of gro ceries, clothes, science experiments and other gear. Williams and her crew wont get access to all that until Thursday, when the hatch is opened. The vessel will remain at the space station for nearly three weeks before departing with almost twice that much cargo at the end of the month. Dragon is the only cargo ship capable of bringing back research and other items, filling a void left by NASAs retired shuttles. SpaceX owned by PayPals billionaire creator Elon Musk launched Dragon aboard a Falcon 9 rocket Sunday night. One of the nine first-stage engines failed a minute into the flight, but the other engines compensated and managed to put the cap sule into the proper orbit. The mishap, however, left a secondary payload aboard the rocket an Orbcomm communication satellite in too low of an orbit. This is the second Dragon to visit the space station. Last May, SpaceX conducted a test flight. NASA is hiring out space station supply runs to American companies now that the shuttles are muse um relics. The shuttle fleet was retired in 2011 after 30 years of operations. ASSOCIATED PRESS This image from NASA-TV shows the capture of the Dragon capsule by a robot arm on the International Space Station as they passed over the South Atlantic Ocean early Wednesday. It was the first official delivery by the California-based SpaceX company under a $1.6 billion contract with NASA. SpaceX capsule makes delivery

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S ince the Great Recession hit about four years ago, Florida lawmakers have struggled to balance the state budget. To make up for falling tax revenues, they’ve raised hundreds of millions of dollars in fees and slashed hundreds of millions more from basics like education and health care. The bottom line is that Florida doesn’t have a dollar to waste on gratuitous business tax breaks. Yet, as was recently reported, a program created to redevelop polluted urban areas known as brownfields has been cut-ting some companies’ tax bills for bogus reasons, like leasing space in downtown office towers or building on farmland. The brownfields program is intended to encourage compa-nies to clean up and redevelop sites abandoned or underused because of environmental con-tamination. When they open or expand in a brownfield, compa-nies can qualify for $2,500 in tax breaks for every job they create. A few South Florida communities have looked at the tax break in hopes of combating urban blight. If a tax break can achieve this alchemy of turn-ing polluted industrial sites into locations for infill devel-opment that creates jobs and revitalizes communities, that’s a small price to pay. The idea has caught the attention of a few South Florida communities that hope the tax break can help curb urban blight. T he U.S. economy since the mid-20th century has always been driven by Americans willing to spend beyond their means — on a bigger house, a better car, a prestige college, a nice vacation, maybe skiing in the winter, the beach in the summer. Basically, it was the American Dream. The spending was fueled by borrowed money and the sub-lime confidence of American wage earners that with regular pay increases they ultimately would be able to afford it all, plus put something aside for retirement. That came to a harsh and abrupt halt in the Great Recession, and while the economy is steadily improv-ing, car sales are healthy, and home sales and prices are rising in selected neighbor-hoods, it was clearly a traumatic event, no more so than on that group loosely defined as the “Millennial generation.” Technically, these are people born between 1981 and 1999, but the term has come to define a state of mind as much as a cer-tain age. And that state of mind is reflected in a recent news story that asserted, “Recent studies show Millennials are the cheapest generation.” They are defined by high student-loan debt, high unem-ployment — and, if they have a job, it’s probably not particu-larly well-paying and offers few raises. This group’s morale is not helped by economists who say that when the economy fully recovers, the benefits will be showered not on their gen-eration but the ones to follow. The result is that when they leave college they rent an apart-ment and stay in the city. Even if they get a good job, appar-ently they are content to keep living in an apartment instead of moving to a nice split-level in the suburbs. If they have a car, it’s part of a ride-share pro-gram. They save their money despite banks’ efforts to dis-courage them from doing so by paying ridiculously low interest rates. Studies show that Millennials will spend on technology, but only so they can surf for cut-rate bargains and entertain them-selves at home. And the Millennials seemed to have inherited their ances-tors’ philosophy of consump-tion: Mend it; make do; or do without. Worse yet, some Millennials who went astray are moving back to the cities. This is so un-American. Our economy depends on people moving into the suburbs and deciding to move up to a riding mower. This yawning cultural divide has led some visionaries in the suburb of Overland Park, Kan., to proposed a Museum of Suburbia, to build a ’50s-era suburb inside a giant six-acre building. If this is a desirable idea, why not just buy one of those par-tially complete subdivisions in Las Vegas or Phoenix and help the remaining homeowners struggling with foreclosure by conducting tours? If the money will help a family hang on to its house, the members surely won’t object to Japanese tourists traipsing through. Maybe some Millennials will come along — purely for educa-tional purposes, mind you. Millennials, the cheapest generation ONE OPINION H ere’s a murder mys-tery for you: Why is the man who killed Army Sgt. 1st Class Christopher Speer likely to go free a few short months from now? A little background and a few clues might help you better understand the case. Two years ago, a jury of senior military officers at Guantanamo Bay convicted Omar Khadr of war crimes in Afghanistan, including the murder of Speer, 28, a Special Forces medic. But as the jury was deciding to hand Khadr a 40-year sen-tence, Pentagon prosecutors were concluding a plea bargain with Khadr’s attorneys. “No public explanation for the deal has ever been given,” writes Canadian journalist Ezra Levant, the author of a book on Khadr. “But regardless of what the jury decided, Khadr would receive a sentence of just eight years. And he would have to serve only a single year of that sentence in U.S. custody before applying, with Washington’s blessing, to transfer to Canada,” Levant continued. Late last month, Khadr was flown from Guantanamo to Ontario, where he is being held in a civilian prison. His lawyers are expected to ask the independent Parole Board of Canada to release him in the spring. Self-described human rights activists have organized a cam-paign to achieve that result. My colleague, Thomas Joscelyn, recently wrote: “For the worldwide left, Khadr has become a symbol of all that is supposedly wrong with America’s fight against the al-Qaida terror network. He is now, in many minds, a victim.” Khadr’s supporters emphasize that he is a Canadian citizen and that when he killed Speer, he was not quite 16 — a “child soldier.” A book on Khadr, “Guantanamo’s Child,” by Toronto Star national securi-ty reporter Michelle Shephard, is a bestseller in Canada. The fact is that before Khadr was Guantanamo’s Child he was al-Qaida’s child. His father, Ahmed Khadr, was a senior member of the jihad organization and a close associate of Osama bin Laden. An immigrant to Canada from Egypt, Ahmed Khadr moved his family to Pakistan and Afghanistan for the specific purpose of waging jihad. In Omar Khadr’s “stipulation of fact,” his confession to the court in Gitmo, he acknowl-edges that he was trained by al-Qaida in the use of “rocket-propelled grenades, various assault rifles, pistols, grenades and explosives.” American troops found videos of Khadr assembling impro-vised explosive devises. Khadr also has acknowledged that he chose to remain in a compound with members of an “al-Qaida explosives cell” who refused to surrender peacefully to American forces. He chose not to be among the women and children who accepted an American offer to leave prior to the battle, and who were then escorted to safety by U.S. soldiers. It was after the firefight was over, when American troops were tending to the wounded, that Khadr threw the grenade that killed Speer. In response, another U.S. Special Forces soldier shot Khadr. Levant recounts that “his first words to the U.S. forc-es who shot and captured him were in English, cursing the soldiers and calling on them to shoot him again — and thus make him a martyr.” Instead, U.S. medics treated him and turned him over to American surgeons — saving his life. The last chapter in this murder mystery has yet to be writ-ten. If Khadr is set free next year, will he return to the battle-field, as have more than 160 of the detainees released from Guantanamo (including the top al-Qaida-affiliated leader in Libya)? Dr. Michael Welner, an American forensic psychiatrist who studied and interviewed Khadr, concluded that he remains a committed jihadist and may see himself stepping into the shoes of his father, who was killed in a shootout with Pakistani army soldiers in 2003. My guess about where the story goes from here: Khadr, now 26, will be paroled but he won’t throw any more gre-nades. Nor will he apply to medical school. Instead, he will become a professional propagandist, telling audiences he was tor-tured in Afghanistan and/or Gitmo (claims not supported by evidence, the military judge presiding over the case ruled), while promoting anti-Americanism and furthering the Islamist cause. Yes, Khadr has led a tragic life. But the blame for that is not America’s or Gitmo’s. And, unlike Speer, Khadr still has a life, and before long he is likely to be both free and celebrated by people calling themselves human rights activists. In the real world, you see, murder mysteries don’t always have sat-isfying endings. ‘Guantanamo’s Child’ may come back to haunt U.S. Brownfield program worth a tax break Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding counties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, publisher Robert Bridges, editor Sue Brannon, controller Dink NeSmith, president Tom Wood, chairman LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY EMAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com T he more the coun-try learns about what happened in Benghazi, Libya, on Sept. 11, the less credible the White House ver-sion of events becomes. The House Oversight Committee will hold a hearing on the terror attack that took the life of U.S. Ambassador to Libya J. Christopher Stevens and three other Americans. The committee is expected to focus on the Obama adminis-tration’s blindness to the clear and present terrorist threat in Benghazi. Internal communica-tions confirm the administra-tion had been forewarned of the increasing vulnerability of U.S. and Western interests, but the State Department appar-ently chose to deny requests to maintain or increase security. It was clear for months that Benghazi was growing more hazardous by the day. A series of terror attacks had taken place in the months leading up to the Sept. 11 assault, includ-ing a bombing attack in June on the same U.S. Consulate. Newspaper reports and other open sources carried specific threats from al Qaeda-linked terrorist groups and others, as well as reports of failed and successful attacks. It should come as no surprise that Mr. Stevens was trying to augment his security detail. Not only was Benghazi insecure, Mr. Stevens was a prime terrorist target. The committee also will inquire into the shifting and conflicting administration accounts of what happened. The notion that the consul-ate assault was a spontane-ous reaction to a low-budget YouTube video lacked credibil-ity from the start. The White House wanted to shift blame from Islamic extremists to the video to provide President Obama with a platform he could use to lecture Americans on toler-ance — anything to avoid the perception that the war on ter-rorism is not going as well as advertised. Obama’s deadly oversight Q The Washington Times Q Sun Sentinel, Fort Lauderdale OPINION Thursday, October 11, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A4AOPINION ANOTHER VIEW Q Dale McFeatters is editorial writer for Scripps Howard News Service. Dale McFeattersmcfeattersd@shns.com Cliff May Q Clifford D. May is president of the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies, a policy institute focusing on terrorism.

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Oct. 11Woodturners ClubBell Woodturners Club meets the second Thursday of the month in the Bell Community Center at 7 p.m. Every meeting fea-tures a show-and-tell of members’ projects. There is also a demonstration of a woodturning project by a club member. There are opportunities to take home project wood and tools and to receive help from other turners. All experience lev-els are welcome. For addi-tional information, contact Kent Harriss at 365-7086.Garden Club meetingThe Lake City Garden Club will meet at the Clubhouse, 257 SE Hernando Ave. The pro-gram will be a presentation on ground cover by Betsy Martin. Social time begins at 9:30 a.m., and the meet-ing is at 10. Everyone is invited. Volunteer opportunityHospice of the Nature Coast is searching for indi-viduals interested in vol-unteering in Columbia, Suwannee, Hamilton and Lafayette areas. Volunteers are needed to provide gen-eral office support and nonmedical assistance to patients and their families. Hospice volunteers can provide services such as: telephone calls, socializa-tion, light meal prepara-tion, shopping or errands and staffing information booths at seasonal festivals. Specialized training will be provided. To volunteer contact Volunteer Manager Drake Varvorines at (386) 755-7714 or email: dvarvo rines@hospiceofthenature coast.org.Plant clinicUniversity of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon to answer ques-tions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions to the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane. For more information, call 752-5384. Oct. 12Class of 1962The Columbia High School class of 1962 will be celebrating its 50th class reunion Oct. 12 and 13. Contact Linda Hurst Greene at (386) 752-0561 for more information.Classic car paradeFrom 6 to 9 p.m., American Hometown Veteran Assist Inc. will host a cruise-in and classic car parade at Hardees on U.S. 90. All proceeds benefit local veterans. Oct. 13Monument rededicationJoin the Sons of Confederate Veterans and the United Daughters of the Confederacy at 11 a.m. for the rededication of the Confederate Monument, at Olustee Battlefield, which originally was dedicated 100 years ago. Zumba charityA Zumbathon to benefit local breast cancer aware-ness will be from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at the Teen Town Recreation Building, 533 NW Desoto St. The event will benefit the Suwannee River Breast Cancer Awareness Association, and all proceeds will be used locally. There is a $10 donation. For informa-tion, call Sarah Sandlin at 758-0009. Grief supportThe Grief Share Support Group, a ministry of Orchard Community Church, meets every Saturday from 2 to 4 p.m. in room D at the Willowbrook Assisted Living center, 1580 S. Marion Ave. The group offers support for those who have lost loved ones, through videos, discussion time and prayer. There are fees. For information call 288-7429. Car showAmerican Hometown Veteran Assist Inc. will host a car show from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Columbia County Fairgrounds. All proceeds will benefit local veterans. There will be street rods, classics, antiques, muscle cars and customs. Benefit yard saleA yard sale to raise money for B.J. Helton’s recov-ery after a heart and lung transplant will run 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Busch Urology, 4601 U.S. Highway 90 in Lake City. All sales will go to Helton’s recovery fund. Safety patrol fundraiserCome support Eastside Elementary’s safety patrols at Village Square. Near Moe’s Southwest Grill there will be a car wash from 8:30 a.m. to noon. Mochi will donate 10 per-cent of proceeds to the safety patrols from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Firehouse Subs and GameStop donated gift cards for drawings. Each chance to win is $1. Oct. 14 Dicks family reunionThe 51st annual Joseph Dicks Family Reunion will begin at 12:45 p.m. at Hopeful Baptist Church in the Life Center. Friends and family are welcome. Bring a covered dish. Santa Fe River contestThe third annual Our Santa Fe River Singing and Song-writing Contest will be from 4 to 7 p.m. at the Boat House Patio at the Great Outdoors Restaurant. Performances begin at 4 p.m. There will be no reservations on the patio during that time. So come early and get a good seat. Plan for a fun-filled afternoon listening to lyr-ics singing praises to our cpmunity’s most valuable asset, the Santa Fe River.Oct. 15DoC meetingDr. Sean McMahon, professor of history at Florida Gateway College, will be the United Daughters of the Confederacy, Olustee Chapter, guest speaker. The monthly meeting will be at 5:15 p.m. at the China Buffet, 345 W. Duval St. McMahon will speak about popular culture during the Civil War. Buffet will be served after the meeting. Cost is $9. Reservations are not required. For more information, call Linda Williams at (352) 215-8776.Oct. 16Art LeagueThe Art League of North Florida will have its monthly meeting at 6:30 p.m. at the First Presbyterian Church Education Building. The community is invited. There will be refreshments, fellowship, a short meeting and speaker. Duffy Soto will give a presentation on “Using Your Computer To Compose Your Art.” Before you wet a brush, start with your computer to combine elements from different sources, including photos, scale models, and video frames to get the look and feel your mind sees for the finished painting you want to create. Sea level presentationNonprofit Save Our Suwannee will host a pre-sentation on the impacts of sea level rise at 7 p.m. at Unity Church of Gainesville, 8801 NW 39th Ave. Whitney Gray, sea level rse outreach coordi-nator with FWC, will give the presentation. Free. Plant clinicUniversity of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon to answer ques-tions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions to the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane. For more information, call 752-5384. Oct. 17Reading enhancementIt’s About My Efforts is offering a reading enhancement program for all ages. Classes will be at Antioch Baptist Church on Wednesdays from 5 to 6 p.m., starting today Registration is $25. For information, call 867-1601. United Way luncheonJoin the United Way of Suwannee Valley for its October community fund-raising campaign report luncheon at the Camp Weed and Cerveny Center, in the Varn Dining Hall, at noon. The cost is $12 per person, and everyone is invited. Reservations are needed. For information, contact the United Way office at (386) 752-5604 ext. 102. During each month of annual campaign, the United Way conducts a lun-cheon for campaign team volunteers, citizens, busi-ness representatives and agency personnel to learn more about partner agen-cy services, United Way community impact initia-tives and businesses sup-porting our community’s well -being.Dine to donateDine to donate every Wednesday in October at Applebee’s in Lake City. The Tough Enough to Wear Pink Crisis Fund will receive 10 percent of the bill. Ask for a flier, by the Columbia County Fairgrounds Office or call 752-8822 to have one e-mailed to you. Grief workshopGood Grief, An Overview of Grief and Loss will be offered to the public on at 10 a.m. at the Wings Education Center, 857 SW Main Blvd. The workshop, facilitated by Jerry Tyre, will offer an overview of grief and ways of coping with a recent loss. There is no cost. For information or to register, contact Vicki Myers at 755-7714 ext. 2411 or 866-642-0962. The Wings Education Center is a pro-gram of Hospice of Citrus County. Plant clinicUniversity of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Wednesday from 1 to 4 p.m. to answer questions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for free diagnosis or solutions to the Fort White Public Library on Route 47. For more information, call 752-5384. Oct. 19Dracula in High SpringsHigh Springs Community Theater is pre-senting a comedy thriller by Leroy Clark, adapted from Bram Stoker’s book “Dracula” on weekends in October, ending Oct. 28. In this adaptation, Dr. Van Helsing is a medical specialist with Tourette’s syndrome, Renfield is a woman, Dr. Seward’s Aunt Quincy is tipsy at times, and there’s even a French maid. Adult tickets are $11, children 12 and under, $8, and Sunday matinees are the special rate of $9 for seniors. Tickets may be purchased at The Framery, 341 S. Marion Ave. in Lake City. Call (386)-754-2780. Online tickets are avail-able at highspringscommu nitytheater.com. Shows are Fridays and Saturdays and 8 p.m, and Sundays at 2 p.m. Oct. 20Howlin’ HalloweenThe public is invited to the Howlin’ Halloween Yappy Hour at the Pet Spot, 872 SW Main Blvd., from 2 to 5 p.m. For a $10 dona-tion everyone will receive one 5x7 pet photo, activi-ties and hors d’oeuvres. Beer, wine, soda and water will be available. Ask the Dog Trainer therapy and obedience will be featured along with live music, ven-dors and raffle drawings. Everyone is encouraged to dress up with your pet to win prizes. &RUQHOLXV*ULIQ0U&RUQHOLXV%RDJLH*ULIQtransitioned to his eternal resting place October 2, 2012. Cornelius was born No-vember 9, 1939 in Lake City, Florida to Char-lie and Geneva *ULIQ%RWKpreceded him in death. He was educated in the public schools of Columbia County. Mr. Grif-QZDVD9HWHUDQRIWKH8QLWHGStates Army, where he earned the marksmanship medal with WKH0DQG05LHV7KHNational Defense Service Medal, WKH9LHWQDP6HUYLFH0HGDODQGthe Purple Heart Medal. He was a member of the American Le-gion Post 322 of Lake City and a member of the OO Buck Hunt-ing Club. Boagie enjoyed hunt-ing despite his disability. He was united in Holy Matrimony WR%HWW\7LPPRQVLQ-XQHCornelius was also predeceased by two sisters, Maggie Lee and Lena Mae. He was known for his quiet and humble demeanor. Cherishing fond memories: Wife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ews, other relatives and friends. Funeral services for Mr. Cornelius %RDJLH*ULIQZLOOEHa.m. Saturday, October 13, 2012 at Salvation Holiness Church. -HP6WUHHW/DNH&LW\)/%LVKRS&.7URXSH3DVWRU7KHIDPLO\ZLOOUHFHLYHIULHQGVIURPSP)ULGD\2FWR ber 12, 2012 at the funeral home. Arrangements entrusted to COMBS FUNERAL HOME. 1(:DVKLQJWRQ6WUHHW/DNH&LW\)/7KH&DULQJ3URIHVVLRQDOVLizzie Mae Hopkins 2Q2FWREHU0RWKHULizzie Mae Hopkins answered the summons to meet her Heav-enly Father. Mother Hopkins, ZDVERUQ-DQXDU\LQFort White, Florida to Horace DQG(YHOOD0F+HQU\%RWKSUH ceded her in death. She accepted Christ at an early age under the leadership of 5HY(//DZ rence. She served faith-fully until her health failed. A daugh-ter, Fran-ces McNair also preceded her in death. She leaves to cherish her memo-ULHVGDXJKWHUV5XWK0%LQJ(XJHQH5XE\0DMRUV3DWUL cia Cook, Marie Laster (David), 5RVH%XUOVVRQV*HRUJH&RRN-U'HORUHV$OIRQVR&RRN%/-XONV3K\OOLV-DPHV3DW WHUVRQ%HYHUO\VLVWHU*HQHYD6HDERUQEURWKHU5RRVHYHOW0F+HQU\(YHO\QVLVWHUVLQODZ(PPD/RX+RSNLQV%HDWULF+DPSWRQ&KHQQLH'DYLVJUDQGFKLOGUHQJUHDWJUDQG FKLOGUHQJUHDWJUHDWJUDQG FKLOGUHQKRVWVRIQLHFHVQHSK ews, other relatives and friends. Funeral services for Mother Lizzie Mae Hopkins will be 3:00 P.M. Saturday, October 13, 2012, at Antioch Missionary Baptist Church, Fort White, FL. Rev. Donell Sanders, Pastor. Arrangements entrusted to COMBS FUNERAL HOME. 1(:DVKLQJWRQ6WUHHW/DNH&LW\)/7KH&DULQJ3URIHVVLRQDOV LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2012 5A5A statefarm.comWith competitive rates and personal service, it’s n o wonder more drivers trust State Farm. Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there.CALL FOR A QUOTE 24/7. Ride with the #1 car insurer in 1001143.1State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company State Farm Indemnity Company Bloomington, IL John Kasak, Agent 904 SW SR 247 Branford Hwy Lake City, FL 32025 Bus: 386-752-7521 johnkasak.com John Burns III, Agent 234 SW Main Boulevard Lake City, FL 32056 Bus: 386-752-5866 johnburnsinsurance.com FLORIDA. Charter Loans Services Pay outstanding bills, credit cards. Lowest compared rates. Personal loans. Business, debt loans. Auto Home Improvement Loans Bad Credit options. No apps. fees Call today: 1.877.359.5533 Charteracc@usa.com Obituaries are paid advertise-ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporter’s classified department at 752-1293. OBITUARIES COMMUNITY CALENDAR Q To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Laura Hampson at 754-0427 or by e-mail at lhampson@ lakecityreporter.com.

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for the county would defi nitely have its advantages, but what I have concerns with is the costs, she said. The newspaper said it would run roughly $28 mil lion and thats definitely a concern. Also looking at the first two years being in the red and the third year possibly making a profit is a concern. I can see the potential for it and it would probably boost Columbia County if its a really well planned out facility that is used to its potential. Allen said she thinks additional informational meetings about the events center would be beneficial. However, she noted con cerns that were aired at the meeting about the pro posed costs associated with the facility. I would probably want to have a little more public input into the final deci sion, she said. I would hope a lot more informa tion will be coming down in reference to this project and more information on the areas that theyre look ing to possibly locate this facility. Williams said he thinks the events center is a good idea. I think this will make Columbia County a leader in North Florida by being aggressive and going after an all-purpose center, he said. I like the idea that Columbia County Resources are very enthused and willing to give their land up for the county to help pay for it. Williams said the con cept also depends on work ing out the particulars and noted there may be grants available to help fund the project that were not includ ed in the presentation. Williams said he took under consideration the information that was pre sented and he felt that the facilitys potential location should be closer to the strip on U.S. 90. However, he said he understood the idea behind putting it in an area where potential growth is needed possibly Ellisville rather than trying to ram it in to where its congested now. He suggested letting the situation play itself out. Well have more pub lic comments, everybody will voice their opinions and well go from there, Williams said. District 3 In the Columbia County Commission District 3 race, Mike Gordon and Sylvester Bucky T. Nash are com peting for the position. Gordon said he thinks its necessary to give officials more information about the events center before any final decisions can be made. I think you have to have more information and I think the public needs to be given the right to vote on a referendum, he said. This is a $28 million-plus project and I dont think we should, right now in the middle of an election, leave it to folks, some of them who are already outgoing. I think the public needs to have a regularly scheduled board of commissioners meeting on the traditional first or third Thursday, properly advertised and get some feedback. Gordon said he thinks its an appropriate idea to give the public an opportunity to vote on the project through a referendum. This is lot of money that were talking about, he said. I think we need to look at it and move care fully and slowly, but at this point I would lean towards having a public referen dum. Gordon said he agrees that the idea deserves con sideration. My suspicion is that the public may not be in sup port of this and after all its their taxpayer dollars. Its their money, he said. I definitely want to see the public weigh-in on this. If the majority of people in this town are not for it than thats the way I would want to go. Nash said the presenta tion left a lot to be desired and there is additional information that needs to be asked before the project is approved. First and foremost we need to know if we can afford a project of this mag nitude, he said. Im nei ther for it or against it right now. At this point you cant make a decision. Nash said infrastructure costs associated with the property purchased for the proposed events build ing may also change the preliminary costs for the facility. I dont know if this is a good idea or a bad idea, he said. We need to break down the numbers and do a lot more due diligence. You can throw numbers out there for a nice pre sentation, but what is there to back up those numbers theres a lot of hypotheti cals such as if you sold this or you sold that. Whats the contingency plan if those things dont fall in line. If we have a Taj Mahal, whose going to have to pick it up if we make a mistake, he continued. They (county officials) have got to do a lot more number crunching for me. If I had to vote on it today, I wouldnt vote for it, but I dont want to be the one that stops something that could be a potential good thing for the county, but I dont want to be the one that bankrupts the county either. District 5 Incumbent commis sioner for District 5 Scarlet Frisina is competing against Tim Murphy and both said they wanted time to digest the information from Tuesdays meeting. Im looking forward to getting to go through all the material in-depth and getting to study it to make sure I know it inside and out, Frisina said. I think the concept is a wonderful idea. Frisina, a member of a local service organization, said the organization is hosting a regional conven tion next year but cant do it here because the county doesnt have a facility. So, she realizes there is a need, but she wants to be sure all the information is there to make an educated deci sion. I have to be able to go through the presentation in-depth in the next few weeks and hopefully be able to ask questions and get answers and just do everything I can to have all the information at hand to make the best decision, she said. Its not a decision we can make in a split sec ond or even within the next week or so. Its something were really going to have to take into consideration and look at. Everybody is always talking about need ing more jobs and needing to improve our economic base and really getting into economic development and I really think this is some thing you have to look at because of what it could mean for our economy here in Columbia County in terms of jobs and rev enue. Murphy said he sup ports the way the informa tion was delivered during the informational meeting. Im going to look at anything that hopefully is going to contribute to the benefit of Columbia County and keep an open mind, he said of the proposed proj ect. I didnt get as much information as I was expect ing. If I was a sitting county commissioner, I wouldnt have enough information with what was presented Tuesday night to make an evaluation whether or not to proceed on. Murphy said one of his biggest questions is the next step and what will be the total cost. He said several people have spoken to him about Tuesdays presentation that saw the projected cost and they said that the events building is not a good thing to do. At this point and time, if I was a sitting commis sioner, I dont think there is enough information avail able to give a decision on where we go from here, he said. To sit here and say the Columbia County Events Center is not the right thing for Columbia County, Id have to research it to the fullest and make the best decision we can thats going to benefit all the taxpayers of Columbia County. 6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2012 Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 6A COUPON REQUIRED ...Do you have the over-priced, slow-speed Internet Blues? Get FAST High-Speed Internet Today! Now Available Everywhere! Call your N. Central & N. Florida Authorized Dealer Today at 386-269-0984 1-800-787-8041 $ 39. 95 to $ 59.99 /Mo. Because CABLE is so last century! 21st Century Communications, LLC Digital TV Service & UNLIMITED phone service, too! Ask About O CT O BER 11-31 (with coupon) 25 P AINT % O FF Bring this coupon in & save! on DeckScapes Deck Stains & WoodScapes Wood Stains SAVE 30% *Retail sales only. Discount taken o of full retail price. Sale pricing or other oers that result in greater savings will supersede this oer. Limit one per household. Excludes Multi-Purpose primers, Minwax Wood Finishes Quarts, ladders, spray equipment & accessories & gift cards. Other exclusions may apply. See store or sherwin-williams. com for details. Must surrender coupon at time of redemption. Cash value: 1/100 of 1. Not valid on previous purchases. Void if copied, transferred, purchased or sold. Valid at Sherwin-Williams and Sherwin-Williams operated retail paint stores only. Not valid in Canada. Oer valid 10/1110/31/12. 2012 The Sherwin-Williams Company. S AVE 25% ON PAINT S AVE 15% ON PAINTING SUPPLIES To locate a Sherwin-Williams store near you visit sherwin-williams.com or call 1-800-4-SHERWIN. Join us on S TO R E H OU R S : M ON FR I : 7 AM TO 7 PM S AT : 8 AM TO 6 PM S UN : 10 AM TO 6 P M Store hours may vary. See store for details. The family of the late Mr. Jesse Franklin Fleming wishes to express our sincere thanks and appreciation for your prayers, visits, phone calls, kindness extended to us on the loss of our loved one. Special thanks to Rev. Alvin J. Baker and the entire New Bethel Miss. Bapt. Church and Cooper Funeral Home staff for your services and support. May God bless each of you for your thoughtfulness. The Fleming Family Curry Land Service Complete Site Preparation and Landscape Services Bush Hogging Back Hoe Disking Bulldozer Work Seeding Sodding Leveling Mulching Mowing Pine Tree Planting Irrigation Installation and Repair and Much More Free Estimates Chris Curry God Bless America Tel: (386) 755-3890 Cell: (386) 623-3200 CENTER: Incumbents, challengers weigh in on proposed events center Continued From Page 1A With an $11,000 budget last year, the market generated $8,528 in fees from vendors, Kite said. The market went about $2,000 over budget. Last years expenses included $5,900 in entertainment for 32 weeks, $3,140 for portable toilets, $4,233 in adver tisements and $2,000 on promo tional items like free watermelons on the Fourth of July, Kite said. The market manager, who man aged marketing like newsletters and a Facebook site, was paid $150 per week, she said. Kite said the market, open 8 a.m. to noon, has plenty to offer until Oct. 27. On Saturday, Oct. 13 the Alligator Community Theatre will present short scenes from their upcoming play, Love, Sex, and the I.R.S. which is a full length comedy for all ages by Billy Van Zandt and Jane Milmore. The community theater has been in existence since 2007, and has done several productions under the umbrella of other groups such as Blue-Grey Army and Fort White High School. They are now estab lishing themselves as a stand-alone theater group. Florida Gateway College day will be Oct. 20 and Ted Wright will per form Oct. 27. MARKET Continued From Page 1A their job skills that they bring to the table as an employee. This is a great way for some of these employers to meet some of these men and women who have given so much to this country, hope fully find a good fit for them and put them to work. John Lynn is a veteran who is currently self-employed, but decided to attend the Hiring Our Heroes job fair to see what else is available. This program is great, I appreciate it and I appreciate the turnout, he said. Im surprised by it because there hasnt been any thing like this for veterans. Lynn said he walked by sev eral of the booths during the job fair and he likes the concept. I think they should do this regularly for veterans, he said. HEROES: Job fair draws 20 employers, about 70 veterans Continued From Page 1A we do not know about it, we cant stop it, he said. Area Girl Scouts, dance groups, martial arts students performed routines with an anti-bullying message. I feel like a part of me is not here, Williams told the audience gathered in the mall center court. He didnt deserve it. No child deserves it, she said with tear-stained cheeks. I feel like he was backed into a corner and he had no where to turn, Williams said. Its a shame. We live in such a small com munity and such a tragedy had to happen. I feel its a shame we have bullies, she said. Parents, it starts at home, the way you raise your child, she said. I feel like if somebody wouldnt have started at home, my child would still be here, she said. Williams urged children to talk to a trust ed adult if they are bullied and speak up when others are picked on. Its OK to be a tattletale, she said. I urge parents before you are in my shoes, to make it your business to know more about your child, Williams said. Williams said she prayed that no one will have to experience the same kind of pain. I dont know of anything at this point that can ease my pain, she said. Organizer Genovese Terry said although she didnt know Davion, she was touched by his story and know something had to be done to acknowledge the bullying. For a first-time event, Terry said she was amazed at the turnout. People I didnt even know volunteered to help, she said. Terry said she hopes the event can be organized annually. In the weeks spent organizing, Terry said she has seen the prevalence of bullying from many event helpers personal stories. Fort White eighth-grader Samaira Sams, 13, said she came to the Unity Day event after reading about Davion in the newspaper. I get bullied myself, she said. Recently, Samaira joined an anti-bullying club at school. I wanted to stand up for myself, she said. Fort White High School showed support for Davion, whom she didnt know, by wearing orange and handing out anti-bul lying ribbons Wednesday, she said. Samaira said she saw both bullies and vic tims at the event and hopes the message will create a change. After the event, Williams said she was pleased to see so many people attend. I would like people to know its not OK to bully, she said. I had no idea, she said. There was no change in his personality, she said. As a bystander, speaking up could save some ones life, Williams said. I feel like his death was not in vain, Williams said. An organ donor, Davion saved three lives, she said. UNITY: Inaugural event held in memory of Davion Smith Continued From Page 1A

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By JAMIE STENGLEAssociated PressDALLAS — In the months after Doug Robinson started driving a truck, he noticed his clothes were increasingly more snug-fit-ting. He was already over-weight but soon realized that spending up to 11 hours behind the wheel, frequently eating fast food and not exercising was a poor combination. When his employer, U.S. Xpress, took part in a weight-loss challenge spon-sored by the Truckload Carriers Association, the 321-pound, 6-foot-1-inch Robinson signed up. So far, he’s about 40 pounds into his goal of dropping 100. His truck’s refrigerator is stocked with chicken, tuna and vegeta-bles. And after his day’s drive, he walks — either on trails near rest stops or just circling his truck. “I have asthma, so with the extra weight on there, it isn’t good for me,” said Robinson, a 30-year-old from Philadelphia. “When I started losing weight, instantly I was breathing better. I was sleeping better at night.” From trucking companies embracing wellness and weight-loss programs to gyms being installed at truck stops, momentum has picked up in recent years to help those who make their living driving big rigs get into shape. “I think a lot of trucking companies are coming around to the idea that their drivers are their assets,” said Boyd Stephenson of the American Trucking Associations, the indus-try’s largest national trade association. He added that healthier employees help a company’s bottom line. There’s an additional incentive for truckers to stay in shape — their job might depend on their health. Every two years, they must pass a physi-cal exam required by U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration. They’re checked for conditions that might cause them to become incapacitated — suddenly or gradually — while driving, including severe heart conditions, high blood pressure and respiratory disorders. While there are no weight restrictions, a commer-cial driver who has been diagnosed with obstruc-tive sleep apnea and isn’t undergoing treatment will not get a medical certifi-cate. Sleep apnea, more common among those who are overweight, leads to daytime sleepiness, a dan-ger on long drives. But there are obstacles for truck drivers who are mindful of their health. In addition to being seated for many hours at a time, eating options are usual-ly limited to places with parking lots big enough to accommodate their tractor-trailers — most often truck stops, which historically have not been known for wholesome food or work-out equipment. That’s something truck stop chains have been try-ing to change. TravelCenters of America, which operates under the TA and Petro Stopping Centers brands, launched a program two years ago called StayFit that includes placing small, free gyms in truck stops, offering healthier eating options and half portions, mapping walking routes near truck stops and build-ing basketball courts in some locations. “We wanted to remove as many barriers to drivers’ health as possible,” said TravelCenters spokesman Tom Liutkus, who said the company has gyms at 42 of its more than 240 locations, with plans to outfit them all by the end of next year. He added that the gyms have been accessed more than 30,000 times. Gym franchiser Snap Fitness has partnered with Rolling Strong, which pro-vides wellness programs aimed at truckers, to open gyms at Pilot Flying J loca-tions. The first one opened south of Dallas in June: A nearly 1,000-square-foot stand-alone building filled with weights and a dozen or so machines. So far, more than 120 member-ships have been sold for that gym. “We know that we have an audience out there that needs help,” said Snap Fitness chief executive officer and founder Peter Taunton. By the end of the year, they also plan to install gyms inside Pilot Flying J truck stops in Georgia and Tennessee. A monthly membership of about $30 also gives truckers access to Snap Fitness’ more than 1,300 gyms, Taunton said, 60 of which have tractor trailer-friendly parking. Pilot Flying J plans to add a function to their smart-phone app to help truck-ers identify healthy food choices at their locations and fast food restaurants. David Parmly, the com-pany’s employee services manager, says their truck stops have adjusted recipes to make them healthier and offer oatmeal for breakfast. Bob Perry, president of Rolling Strong, said truck-ers flock to daylong well-ness screenings that his company sets up at truck stops nationwide. “We never have to recruit anyone over. We are packed from the time we open till the time we leave,” Perry said. Robinson, the U.S. Xpress driver trying to lose weight, said that before joining the weight-loss program, he spent his evenings on the road watching television, checking Facebook and talking on the phone. “At first I was like, ‘I don’t know how I’m going to exercise.’ At the end of the day, I don’t want to walk. It’s all about plan-ning,” he said. “I just had the willpower to do it.” Bruce Moss, vice president of human resources for Con-way Freight, said they’ve found that their wellness program reduces the number of people who call in sick, lowers work-place injuries and controls health care costs. The pro-gram gives truckers access to wellness coaches and has them stretch before starting a shift. Last year, more than 11,500 of Con-way Freight’s 21,000 employees, the majority of them drivers, consulted with wellness coaches. Eleven carriers participated in the Truckload Carriers Association’s inau-gural Trucking’s Weight Loss Showdown this spring, with each carrier signing up 12 employees — half drivers, half office staff. A second showdown, which, like the first, offers the individual winner $2,500, is happening this fall. Besides taking part in association’s spring weight-loss challenge, U.S. Xpress has a points system that rewards healthy behaviors with cash. They also hold health fairs and have placed blood pressure machines in their main terminals. Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2012 7A7AHEALTH Push for healthier truckers gains speed ASSOCIATED PRESSA customer works out at a Snap Fitness truck stop gym in D allas. From trucking companies embracing wellness and weight-loss programs to gyms being installed at truck stops, momentum has picked up in recen t years to help those who make their living driving big rigs get into shape. Alzheimer drug shows promise in mild casesBy MARILYNN MARCHIONEAP Chief Medical WriterBOSTON — Combined results from two studies of an experimental Alzheimer’s drug suggest it might mod-estly slow mental decline, especially in patients with mild disease. Taken separately, the studies on the drug — Eli Lilly & Co.’s solanezumab — missed their main goals of significantly slowing the mind-robbing disease or improving activities of daily living. But pooled results found 34 percent less mental decline in mild Alzheimer’s patients compared to those on a fake treatment for 18 months. Doctors called the results encouraging although prob-ably not good enough to win approval of the drug now, without another study to confirm there is a ben-efit. Investors were more enthused, driving Lilly’s stock up about 5 percent on Monday and about 19 percent since August, when the company described the results in general terms. Detailed results were revealed for the first time Monday at an American Neurological Association conference in Boston. “It’s certainly not the home run we all wanted, but we’re very encour-aged by these results,” said Maria Carillo, chief science ASSOCIATED PRESSAlexis McKenzie, right, executive director of The Methodist Home of the District of Columbia Forest Side, an Alzheimer’ s assisted-living facility, laughs with resident Catherine Peake, in Washington. Combined results released, Monday from two studies of an experimental Alz heimer’s drug under development by Eli Lilly & Co. called solanezumab, suggest that it might modestly slow mental decline, especially in patients with mild cases of the disease. DRUG continued on 8A

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8A LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2012 Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-04288AHealth Offer expires: October 31, 2012 officer for the Alzheimer’s Association, which had no role in the research. Dr. Stephen Salloway, an Alzheimer’s expert at Brown University, agreed. “It’s exciting to see that there may be clini-cal benefit,” he said, but it is modest and may not make a difference in how well patients live — what matters most to them and their families, he said. About 35 million people worldwide have demen-tia, and Alzheimer’s is the most common type. In the U.S., about 5 million have Alzheimer’s. Current medicines such as Aricept and Namenda just temporarily ease symp-toms. There is no known cure. Solanezumab (sol-ahNAYZ-uh-mab) is one of three drugs in late-stage testing that seek to alter the course of the disease. Results on one drug were disappointing, and results of the other won’t be ready until early next year. Solanezumab aims to bind to and help clear the sticky deposits that clog patients’ brains. The two studies each had about 1,000 patients, about two-thirds with mild disease and one-third with moderately severe Alzheimer’s, in 16 countries. Their average age was 75. The main measures were two tests — one reflect-ing language, memory and thinking and the other, ability to perform daily activities such as feeding oneself and personal and grooming. The combined results on the mild disease patients showed a nearly 2-point difference in the roughly 90-point score on thinking abilities. Previous studies suggest that a change of 3 to 4 on the score is needed to show a clinical benefit, like an improvement in how well patients can take care of themselves. “It’s a small difference,” Dr. Rachelle Doody of Baylor College of Medicine said of the drug’s effect. She heads a nationwide research network funded by the National Institute on Aging that did an inde-pendent analysis of Lilly’s results on the studies and presented them Monday at the conference. Still, “you slow the decline” with the drug, she said. Independent experts cautioned that the improve-ment was small, and needs to be verified in another study. “I hate to get too enthusiastic ... there’s a flicker of a signal” of benefit, but less than what some other once-promising treatments showed, said Dr. Sam Gandy, head of Alzheimer’s disease research at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York. Dr. Ronald Petersen, director of Alzheimer’s research at the Mayo Clinic, called the drug’s effect “subtle” and said it may mean just that “some-body remembers one extra word out of a 15-word list” without any real improve-ment in how well they live. The drug, if ever approved, is likely to be expensive, and that means “we need more evidence” of its benefit to justify its use, Petersen said. Encouragingly, solanezumab had few side effects. About 1 percent of people on the drug had some chest pain from reduced blood flow to the heart. There were few cases of worrisome brain swelling and small bleeding in the brain, an effect that caused concern with another experimental Alzheimer’s drug, bapineuzumab by Pfizer Inc. and Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen Alzheimer Immunotherapy unit. That drug failed to help patients in two late-stage studies announced last month, but did show signs of hitting its target and clearing deposits from the brain. The Lilly drug seems to be safer, and that is an advantage, said Dr. Norman Relkin, head of a memo-ry disorders program at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center. “There is some cause for encouragement here. It’s not the magnitude we’d like to see” but certainly warrants further studies on the drug, he said. Relkin heads testing of the third drug in late-stage development — Gammagard, by Baxter International Inc. Results are expected early next year. Meanwhile, Dr. Eric Siemers, senior medi-cal director for Lilly, said the company will discuss its results and next steps with the Food and Drug Administration. Lilly shares closed up $2.55, or 5.3 percent, to $50.78. During the day they peaked at $50.94, their highest price since April 2008. (This is also their highest closing price since that month.) The shares are up 19.8 percent since August 24. DRUG: Slows decline in mild cases of Alzheimer’s Continued From Page 7A ASSOCIATED PRESSThis photo released by Good Morning America shows Ann Romney, wife of Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney, left, planting a kiss on Lord Ludger while his rider Rebecca Hart watches on the set of the television show in New York. Mrs. Romney says horses helped with MS diagnosisBy NEDRA PICKLERAssociated PressWASHINGTON — The wife of Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney said Wednesday that her love of horses helped her overcome her fear that multiple sclerosis would put her in a wheelchair. Ann Romney was guest hosting ABC’s “Good Morning America” when she spoke about her depression after receiving the diagnosis 14 years ago. “I was very, very weak and very much worried about my life, thinking I was going to be in a wheelchair as well,” she said. “Turned to horses, my life has been dramatically different. They gave me the energy, the passion to get out of bed when I was so sick that I didn’t think I’d ever want to get out of bed.” Mrs. Romney is part-owner of a horse that competed this summer in the Olympic sport of dressage, the equine equivalent of ballet. She spoke about her love of hors-es while standing in New York’s Times Square, petting Paralympic horse Lord Luger as rider Rebecca Hart discussed how equine therapy helped keep her out of a wheelchair. Mrs. Romney also helped interview the competitors eliminated Tuesday night from “Dancing with the Stars.” The begin-ning of her appearance went a little awry when she said the show’s staff turned the heat up too high for her family’s Welsh cake recipe. “I’ve got a cooking emergency!” she said, smiling as the camera turned to her pulling the cakes off the griddle. She was filling in for co-host Robin Roberts, who is recovering from a bone marrow transplant. ABC says it is in dis-cussions with first lady Michelle Obama for a similar guest appearance. Mitt Romney told voters at an event in Ohio that he watched his wife’s appear-ance and saw a lot of campaign ads against him during commercial breaks. “It’s a good thing I don’t do that very often because my blood pressure would be very high,” he said.

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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Thursday, October 11, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com %632576 *Free Admission Ticket To S&S Day At The Fair November 8th With Quantity Purchase of Items.* LASSO THE FUN at & PRICES IN EFFECT OCT. 1st NOV. 8th *GUSTAFSON’S FARM (1/2 Gallon) 2/$499 or $2.50 EA. CHOCOLATE MILK *BLUE BELL ICE CREAM 4/$549 or $1.39 ea.(Pint) *MONSTER ENERGY DRINK (24oz. Can) 2/$5 Today Q Columbia High girls golf in Alachua County Tournament at Meadowbrook Golf Club, noon Q Columbia High boys golf in Alachua County Tournament at Gainesville Country Club, noon Q Fort White High volleyball at Bradford High, 6 p.m. (JV-5) Q Columbia High volleyball vs. Atlantic Coast High, 6:30 p.m. (JV-5:30) Q Fort White JV football at Dixie County High, 7 p.m. Friday Q Fort White High football at Williston High, 7:30 p.m. Saturday Q Columbia High swimming vs. Fernandina Beach High, Baker County High, 9:30 a.m. Q Columbia High, Fort White High cross country in Bobcat Cross Country Invitational at Santa Fe College in Gainesville GAMES BRIEFS FORT WHITE BASEBALL Team at Walmart on Saturday Members of the Fort White High baseball program will be collecting donations at Walmart from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. For details, call Jeanne Howell at 288-5537. CHEERLEADING Columbia Cheer hosting Cheer Fest Columbia Cheer Association is sponsoring a Cheer Fest from 3-6 p.m. Saturday at Richardson Community Center. Admission is $2 for students through high school and $3 for adults. For details, call Wilda Drawdy at 965-1377. YOUTH SOCCER Winter sign-up through Nov. 29 Columbia Youth Soccer Association’s 2013 Winter Recreational Soccer Season registration for ages 3-16 is 6-7 p.m. Thursdays and 1-2:30 p.m. Saturdays through Nov. 29 (not Thanksgiving week). All teams will be gender specific. Fee of $65 includes uniform and year-end trophy. Get a sponsor for your child’s team and your child plays free. For details, go to columbiayouthsoccerasso-ciation.com or call 288-2504.Q From staff reports INDIANS continued on 2B An independent, Williston has to pick its battles. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High head coach Brian Allen speaks with his team during a timeout of the Tigers’ 52-17 win against Ridgeview High in District 3-6A actio n. Going it alone JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterThe Columbia High School bowling team poses for a photo graph during a game on Sept. 26. Pictured are Shea Spears (front row, from left), Tori Wise, Hannah Shaffer, Rachel Umstead, Lauren Snipes, Leslie Ann Ronsonet (back row, from left), Haley Wheeler, Courtney Schmitt, Libby Taylor, Haley Davis, Christine Peters and Linden Barney. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High’s Trey Phillips (5) attempts to run through a tackle in a game against Union County High on Sept. 2 8. By TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comFORT WHITE — Playing as an independent, Williston High has to choose its bat-tles. One goal is to be invited to a bowl game, which would provide postseason play. Another would be to beat Fort White High, which was in Williston’s dis-trict before the Red Devils decided to go it alone. Fort White travels to Williston for a 7:30 p.m. game on Friday. The original FHSAA district realignment for 2011-12 and 2012-13 had Fort White, Williston and Trinity Catholic High in 3-3A. Williston had spent the previous four years in dis-trict with Trinity Catholic and decided another group-ing with the private power-house was too much. Williston petition the One last look at RidgeviewBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comUsually a team doesn’t want to make too big a deal over one game, but let’s face it, Columbia High’s 52-17 win against Ridgeview High was a big deal. Not only did it improve the Tigers to 5-1 heading into this week’s bye, but it also improved Columbia to 2-0 in the District 3-6A race. That puts the Tigers squarely in the driver’s seat for a home playoff game. “It’s funny how things can change in a year,” Columbia head coach Brian Allen said. “Last year, that was a game that kind of stuck in our craw. We were without a couple of guys and had different players playing in unfamiliar positions. We made mistakes.” Columbia was as close to mistake-free football as it could come on Friday. The Tigers’ running game led the way with Ronald Timmons running for 241 yards and Braxton Stockton running for 110 CHS continued on 2B Tigers take command of district standings. CHS bowlers move to 3-0By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High swept the competition at Lake City Bowl on Wednesday to improve to 3-0 on the year. The Lady Tigers bowled 771, 741 and 170 in the Baker game to finish ahead of Suwannee and Fort White high schools. Suwannee finished second with one point — two behind Columbia’s three to finish second. The Lady Bulldogs bowled 535, 523 and 81. Fort White finished in third with a half point com-ing in the Baker Game. The Lady Indians bowled 488, 478 and 102. “Being back on our own lanes helped,” Columbia head coach Brian Saunders said. “Our average scores today were competitive with what we bowled last Lady Tigers finish off Suwannee, Fort White High. BOWL continued on 2B

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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today AUTO RACING 2 p.m. ESPN2 — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, practice for Dollar General 300, at Concord, N.C. 3:30 p.m. ESPN2 — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, practice for Bank of America 500, at Concord, N.C. 6 p.m. ESPN2 — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, final practice for Dollar General 300, at Concord, N.C. 7 p.m. ESPN2 — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, pole qualifying for Bank of America 500, at Concord, N.C. 1 a.m. SPEED — Formula One, practice for Grand Prix of Korea, at Yeongam, South Korea COLLEGE FOOTBALL 8 p.m. FSN — UTEP at Tulsa 9 p.m. ESPN — Arizona St. at Colorado GOLF 9 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Portugal Masters, first round, at Vilamoura, Portugal 4 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Frys.com Open, first round, at San Martin, Calif. 7:30 p.m. TGC — Web.com Tour, Miccosukee Championship, first round, at Miami (same-day tape) 9:30 p.m. TGC — LPGA Malaysia, first round, at Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (same-day tape) MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 1 or 2 p.m. TBS — Playoffs, NLDS, game 5, San Francisco at Cincinnati 4 or 5 p.m. TBS — Playoffs, NLDS, game 4, St. Louis at Washington 7:30 or 8:30 p.m. TBS — Playoffs, ALDS, game 4, Baltimore at New York 9:30 p.m. TNT — Playoffs, ALDS, game 5, Detroit at Oakland NOTE: If the Detroit-Oakland series ends Wednesday, the other games will start at the later time. NFL FOOTBALL 8 p.m. NFL — Pittsburgh at Tennessee WNBA BASKETBALL 8:30 p.m. ESPN2 — Playoffs, Eastern Conference finals, game 3, Indiana at ConnecticutBASEBALLMLB playoffs DIVISION SERIES (x-if necessary) American League Detroit 2, Oakland 1 Tuesday Oakland 2, Detroit 1 Wednesday Detroit at Oakland (n) Today x-Detroit (Verlander 17-8) at Oakland, 9:37 p.m. (TNT) New York 1, Baltimore 1 New York 7, Baltimore 2 Monday Baltimore 3, New York 2 Wednesday Baltimore at New York (n) Today Baltimore (Tillman 9-3) at New York (Hughes 16-13), TBD (TBS) ——— National League Cincinnati 2, San Francisco 1 Cincinnati 5, San Francisco 2Cincinnati 9, San Francisco 0 Tuesday San Francisco 2, Cincinnati 1 Wednesday x-San Francisco at Cincinnati (n) St. Louis 2, Washington 1 Washington 3, St. Louis 2 Monday St. Louis 12, Washington 4 Wednesday St. Louis 8, Washington 0 Today St. Louis (Lohse 16-3) at Washington (Detwiler 10-8), TBD (TBS)FOOTBALLAP Top 25 games Saturday No. 1 Alabama at Missouri, 3:30 p.m.No. 3 South Carolina at No. 9 LSU, 8 p.m. No. 4 Florida at Vanderbilt, 6 p.m. No. 5 West Virginia at Texas Tech, 3:30 p.m. No. 6 Kansas State at Iowa State, Noon No. 7 Notre Dame vs. No. 17 Stanford, 3:30 p.m. No. 8 Ohio State at Indiana, 8 p.m.No. 10 Oregon State at BYU, 3:30 p.m. No. 11 Southern Cal at Washington, 7 p.m. No. 12 Florida State vs. Boston College, 5:30 p.m. No. 13 Oklahoma vs. No. 15 Texas, Noon No. 18 Louisville at Pittsburgh, NoonNo. 19 Mississippi State vs. Tennessee, 9 p.m. No. 20 Rutgers vs. Syracuse, NoonNo. 21 Cincinnati vs. Fordham, 7 p.m.No. 22 Texas A&M at No. 23 Louisiana Tech, 9:15 p.m. No. 24 Boise St. vs. Fresno State, 3:30 p.m. No. 25 Michigan vs. Illinois, 3:30 p.m. NFL standings AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PANew England 3 2 0 .600 165 113N.Y. Jets 2 3 0 .400 98 132Miami 2 3 0 .400 103 103Buffalo 2 3 0 .400 118 176 South W L T Pct PF PAHouston 5 0 0 1.000 149 73 Indianapolis 2 2 0 .500 91 110Jacksonville 1 4 0 .200 65 138Tennessee 1 4 0 .200 88 181 North W L T Pct PF PABaltimore 4 1 0 .800 130 89Cincinnati 3 2 0 .600 125 129Pittsburgh 2 2 0 .500 93 89Cleveland 0 5 0 .000 100 139 West W L T Pct PF PASan Diego 3 2 0 .600 124 102Denver 2 3 0 .400 135 114Oakland 1 3 0 .250 67 125Kansas City 1 4 0 .200 94 145 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAPhiladelphia 3 2 0 .600 80 99N.Y. Giants 3 2 0 .600 152 111Dallas 2 2 0 .500 65 88Washington 2 3 0 .400 140 147 South W L T Pct PF PAAtlanta 5 0 0 1.000 148 93Tampa Bay 1 3 0 .250 82 91Carolina 1 4 0 .200 92 125New Orleans 1 4 0 .200 141 154 North W L T Pct PF PAMinnesota 4 1 0 .800 120 79Chicago 4 1 0 .800 149 71Green Bay 2 3 0 .400 112 111Detroit 1 3 0 .250 100 114 West W L T Pct PF PAArizona 4 1 0 .800 94 78San Francisco 4 1 0 .800 149 68St. Louis 3 2 0 .600 96 94Seattle 3 2 0 .600 86 70 Monday’s Game Houston 23, N.Y. Jets 17 Today’s Game Pittsburgh at Tennessee, 8:20 p.m. Sunday’s Games Oakland at Atlanta, 1 p.m.Kansas City at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.Indianapolis at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m.Cincinnati at Cleveland, 1 p.m.Detroit at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.St. Louis at Miami, 1 p.m.Dallas at Baltimore, 1 p.m.Buffalo at Arizona, 4:05 p.m.New England at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.N.Y. Giants at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.Minnesota at Washington, 4:25 p.m.Green Bay at Houston, 8:20 p.m. Monday, Oct. 15 Denver at San Diego, 8:30 p.m.Open: Carolina, Chicago, Jacksonville, New OrleansBASKETBALLNBA preseason Today’s Games Miami vs. L.A. Clippers at Beijing, China, 7:30 a.m. New York at Washington, 7 p.m.Philadelphia at Orlando, 7 p.m.New Orleans at Charlotte, 7:30 p.m. Friday’s Games Detroit at Toronto, 7 p.m.Minnesota at Indiana, 7 p.m.Cleveland vs. Chicago at Champaign, IL, 8 p.m. New Orleans at Houston, 8 p.m.Denver at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.Oklahoma City at Utah, 9 p.m.Portland at Phoenix, 10 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2012 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420%$*$7( THURSDAY EVENING OCTOBER 11, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Last Resort “Eight Bells” (N) Vice Presidential Debate At Centre College in Danville, Ky. 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Action News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) 30 Rock (N) Up All Night (N) Vice Presidential Debate At Centre College in Danville, Ky. (N) (Live) NewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(5:00) U.S. House of RepresentativesDebate Preview (N) (Live) Vice Presidential Debate At Centre College in Danville, Ky. Call-In for Debate Reaction (N) (Live) Vice Presidentia WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine (N) 30 Rock 30 Rock TVLAND 17 106 304(5:11) Bonanza(:22) M*A*S*HM*A*S*H The Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Real InterrogationsReal InterrogationsReal InterrogationsReal Interrogations48 Hours: Hard Evidence 48 Hours: Hard Evidence 48 Hours: Hard Evidence 48 Hours: Hard Evidence A&E 19 118 265The First 48 “The Chase; One Shot” The First 48 The First 48 The First 48 (N) Beyond Scared Straight (N) (:01) Beyond Scared Straight HALL 20 185 312Little House on the Prairie Little House on the Prairie Little House on the Prairie Little House on the Prairie Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier FX 22 136 248How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherTwo and Half MenTwo and Half Men “Easy A” (2010, Comedy) Emma Stone, Penn Badgley. Premiere. It’s Always SunnyThe LeagueBrandX WithTotally Biased CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Vice Presidential Debate At Centre College in Danville, Ky. (N) (Live) Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245The Mentalist “Ring Around the Rosie” The Mentalist “Blood and Sand” The Mentalist “The Thin Red Line” The Mentalist “Flame Red” The Mentalist “Red Brick and Ivy” Leverage “The Gimme a K Street Job” NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobiCarly Teenage Mut.You Gotta SeeFull House Full House The Nanny The Nanny Friends (:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241Jail Jail Jail Jail (N) iMPACT Wrestling (N) Ink Master “Tattooing the Dead” Ink Master “Semi Nude 911” MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*H M*A*S*H White Collar “Threads” White Collar Precious Bible disappears. Seinfeld Frasier The Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Phineas and FerbGood Luck CharlieShake It Up! Jessie My Babysitter “Return to Halloweentown” (2006) Sara Paxton. (:10) Gravity FallsPhineas and FerbA.N.T. Farm My Babysitter LIFE 32 108 252To Be AnnouncedTo Be AnnouncedProject Runway Project Runway Tim visits the designers’ hometowns. (N) Abby’s Ultimate Dance CompetitionPrank My Mom USA 33 105 242NCIS Ducky is kidnapped. NCIS A woman witnesses a murder. NCIS A Marine tapes his own murder. NCIS “Enemies Foreign” NCIS “Enemies Domestic” Burn Notice “Shock Wave” BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Top 10 Countdown” (N) The Game The Game BET Hip Hop Awards 2012 Celebrating hip-hop history and culture. Don’t Sleep!The Game ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) Audibles (N) (Live) College Football Live (N) (Live) e College Football Arizona State at Colorado. (N) ESPN2 36 144 209h NASCAR Racingh NASCAR Racingd WNBA Basketball Eastern Conference Final, Game 3: Teams TBA. (N) SportsCenterSportsCenter (N) (Live) SUNSP 37 -how to Do oridaPrep Zone SpoThe New College Football Show (N)f Women’s College Soccer Virginia Tech at Florida State. (N) Women’s College Soccer Rice at Memphis. DISCV 38 182 278Auction KingsAuction KingsProperty Wars Property Wars Auction KingsAuction KingsTexas Car Wars (N) Auction KingsAuction Kings TBS 39 139 247a MLB Baseball (N)a MLB Baseball (N) HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) Dr. Drew (N) Nancy GraceShowbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Vice Presidential Debate At Centre College in Danville, Ky. (N) (Live) The O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236(5:00) “Adventureland” (2009) E! News (N) The SoupMarried to JonasKardashianKardashianKardashianKardashianChelsea Lately (N) E! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. Food Man v. Food Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernBizarre Foods America “New Orleans” Mysteries at the Museum The Dead Files “Fatal Attachment” HGTV 47 112 229Selling New YorkSelling New YorkHunters Int’lHouse HuntersBuying and Selling Extreme Homes House Hunters (N) Hunters Int’lLiving Abroad (N) Hunters Int’l TLC 48 183 280My Big Fat Gypsy Wedding My Big Fat Gypsy Wedding Say Yes: ATLSay Yes: ATLFour Weddings “...and a Pig Dance” Little Shop of Gypsies Four Weddings “...and a Pig Dance” HIST 49 120 269History of the World in Two Hours A rapidre history of the world. Pawn Stars Pawn Stars How the Earth Made Man How Earth has transformed and why. (N) (:02) America’s Book of Secrets ANPL 50 184 282Fatal Attractions “Chimps” River Monsters: The Most BizarreWild Russia Wild Russia Wild Russia Wild Russia FOOD 51 110 231Chopped “One in a Hundred” Chopped “In a Pinch” Halloween Wars “Evil Clowns” Chopped “No Kidding!” Chopped “Chop on Through” Chopped “Chard & True” TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the Lord Always Good NewThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesJoel Osteen Joseph PrinceHillsong TVPraise the Lord (Live). FSN-FL 56 -Football PrevUFC InsiderDrivenThe Gamebreakere College Football Texas-El Paso at Tulsa. (N) Football Prev SYFY 58 122 244(5:30) “Hannibal” (2001, Suspense) Anthony Hopkins, Julianne Moore. “Shutter Island” (2010) Leonardo DiCaprio, Mark Ruffalo. A 1950s lawman hunts an escaped murderess. “The Skeleton Key” (2005) AMC 60 130 254 “Christine” (1983, Horror) Keith Gordon, John Stockwell. “Thinner” (1996, Horror) Robert John Burke, Joe Mantegna. “Cujo” (1983, Horror) Dee Wallace, Danny Pintauro. COM 62 107 249South Park Tosh.0 The Colbert ReportDaily ShowChappelle’s ShowStand-Up Rev.Jeff Dunham: Minding the MonstersStand-Up Rev.Tosh.0 Daily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327Reba Reba Reba Reba Reba Reba “Pure Country” (1992) George Strait. A country singer struggles with the burden of stardom. Broken Bridges NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer “Turf Wars” Croc LabyrinthWorld’s Deadliest “Africa” Africa’s Thunder River Following the Zambezi River. World’s Deadliest “Africa” NGC 109 186 276Forecast: Disaster “Deadly Tornadoes” On Board Air Force OneAmerica’s Money Vault (N) Secret Service FilesTop SecretSecret Service Files SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeThey Do It?They Do It?How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeThey Do It?They Do It?They Do It?They Do It? ID 111 192 285On the Case With Paula Zahn Behind Mansion Walls Behind Mansion Walls Behind Mansion Walls Very Bad Men (N) Very Bad MenBehind Mansion Walls HBO 302 300 501“Harry Potter and Deathly Hallows” “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2” (2011) Daniel Radcliffe. (:15) “Red Riding Hood” (2011, Horror) Amanda Seyfried. ‘PG-13’ Katie Morgan’sKatie Morgan’s MAX 320 310 515 “The Matrix Reloaded” (2003) Keanu Reeves. Freedom ghters revolt against machines. ‘R’ (:20) “Anacondas: The Hunt for the Blood Orchid” “Kingpin” (1996, Comedy) Woody Harrelson, Randy Quaid. ‘PG-13’ SHOW 340 318 545(:15) That Guy... Who Was in That Thing (N) (:35) “The Trouble With Bliss” (2011) Michael C. Hall. (:15) “Detachment” (2011, Drama) Adrien Brody, Marcia Gay Harden. ‘NR’ Gigolos (N) Polyamory: Married CHS: Sitting 5-1 during bye week Continued From Page 1B INDIANS: Face independent Devils Continued From Page 1BFHSAA to join the new Class 1A for rural schools, but was turned down. The school then decided to play as an independent, leaving Fort White in a two-team district that guaranteed a playoff berth. It is not like Williston is averse to the football playoffs. The school has made the field 18 times since 1968, the last in 2009 under coach Derek Chipoletti who is now at Oakleaf High. Current Williston head coach Jamie Baker took the Red Devils to the play-offs four straight years from 2005-08. Williston was state runner-up in 1968 and again in 1988, the second time under coach Jimmie Ray Stephens. Stephens left for Fort Walton Beach High where he won a state championship in 1991 with Danny Wuerffel at quar-terback. In last year’s game at Arrowhead Stadium, Fort White won 35-20. The Red Devils led 7-0 at the end of the first quarter and trailed 14-7 at the half. Quarterback Andrew Baker had a big game for the Indians. He com-pleted 15-of-25 passes for 199 yards with touchdown throws to Trey Phillips, A.J. Legree and Wesley Pitts. It was a breakout game at receiver for Phillips who had a season-high eight catches. Phillips also rushed for 59 yards. Tavaris Williams ran for 27 yards, as the Indians rolled up 207 yards on the ground. Williston quarterback David Heinkel was 4 of 9 for 86 yards. Damien Strange, an honorable mention all-state receiver, had a touch-down catch. Tyus Williams recovered a fumble in the end zone for a touchdown. Last year was the first time Demetric Jackson faced Williston as head coach of the Indians. Williston won three of the four games when the teams played in 2001-04. This year, Williston has sandwiched wins against P.K. Yonge School (24-13) on opening day and Wildwood High (34-28) last Friday around losses to Crystal River (48-21), West Nassau (34-30) and Newberry (26-0) high schools. Against P.K. Yonge, Heinkle rushed for 116 yards and two touchdowns. Keith Neal scored a touch-down. Against West Nassau, Heinkle scored a pair of touchdowns. Strange had six catches for 132 yards, including an 85-yard scor-ing play. Stephen Cochlin was 12-of-26 passing for 148 yards. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Braydon Thomas connects on a field goa l during the Tigers’ 52-17 win against Ridgeview High on Friday. yards. It led not only to a win, but a win in convinc-ing fashion. “It was very gratifying,” Allen said. “The fact that we were able to beat a team that is 5-0 like that, a team that the coach eluded to as the best team he’s ever coached puts us close to where we need to be.” Allen said he won’t let things change for the Tigers after the win. He doesn’t want Columbia thinking its headed to state without the same hard work it has put in through-out the season. “We still carry our lunch to work with our hard hats and steel-toe boots,” Allen said. “This is a team that doesn’t complain when we ask them to run a beast on Monday. They’ve bought into what we’re selling them and they’re not selfish.” Allen said that the team’s goal still hasn’t been accomplished. “Our goal coming into the year was to be 10-0 and win the district,” he said. “We won’t be able to go 10-0, but 9-1 is still pretty dang good. We have to handle our business in the four games we have left and get ready to play a tough Middleburg on the road for our last road game. We want to put another notch on the belt.” Columbia returns to action after the bye on Oct. 18. BOWL: Columbia sweeps match Continued From Page 1Byear to advance past region to state. We need to keep somewhere in that 774-741 range to get where we need to be. We just need to keep working hard.” Christine Peters led the way for Columbia with a 160.5 average. Lauren Snipes averaged 108, Linden Barney finished with a 155 average and Tori Wise averaged 148. For the Lady Indians, Maddie Greek led the team with a 102 average. Jessica Pollard had a 93 average, Harley Morrison finished at an 89 averege, Taylor Terry an 83 and Brittany Alexander aver-aged 81 on the day. “We were missing our top bowler, Jessica Widland,” Fort White head coach Casie Sparks said. “We didn’t bowl our bess, but hopefully we’ll bounce back after taking next week off for homecoming.”

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DEAR ABBY: My life has always been scary. My parents divorced when I was 3. Dad always seemed to cause trouble for Mom, who struggled to provide for me and my older sister. She always struggled with alcohol and drugs. I have spent a portion of my life incarcerated, start-ing when I was a teenager. I’m now 22 and doing time for selling drugs. I have never been able to find a decent job, although I have my GED and tried to attend a school for nurs-ing, but I screwed it up. Selling drugs seemed to be the only way to make enough to support myself. I’d like to find a decent job with opportunity, and be able to pay my bills and save a little. I’m tired of my crazy lifestyle and want to settle down. How can I go about finding a job? Keep in mind, I don’t have a resume and although I have had many jobs, I never stayed very long, and I have a criminal record. -SERVING TIME IN PENNSYLVANIA DEAR SERVING TIME: I admire that you have decided to change your life and walk the “straight and narrow” from now on. A place to start would be to talk to the prison chaplain. Some religious denomina-tions have programs in place to help inmates and former inmates success-fully transition back into society. The oldest prison/reentry group in the country is the Pennsylvania Prison Society. Their website is at prisonsociety.org. If they don’t serve the commu-nity into which you will be released, they will know an organization that does. Their re-entry program helps former prisoners attain self-sufficiency through a four-day job readiness workshop, which teaches the skills neces-sary to find and keep a job. Pre-registration is recom-mended, and their phone number is 215-564-6005, ext. 117. Call Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: I had my first boyfriend when I was 16. The relationship lasted 13 years and we had a child together. Now that it’s over I don’t know what to do. It has been nine months and it seems like my heartache is getting worse. I can’t breathe. It feels like my heart has been ripped out of my chest and stepped on. It hurts even more because he started dating immediately after the breakup. I can’t even talk to another man. I feel lost and have never been on a date with anyone but my ex. I feel like I deprived myself of my youth. I cry every day. I can barely watch or see couples without getting depressed and breaking down. Do you have any advice? -DEPRIVED OF MY YOUTH DEAR DEPRIVED: Nine months is a long time to cry every day. You have been hit with what I call a “double-whammy.” You are grieving for your lost relationship, and because this was your first and only one, you never learned how to handle a broken romance. A counselor can help you through your grieving process and, in addition, help you to build the social skills you will need to move forward. Please don’t put it off. DILBERT BABY BLUES HOROSCOPES DEAR ABBY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Details will speak volumes about the work you produce. It’s the little extras that will make a difference when dealing with peers and loved ones. You don’t have to spend to make a difference, you just have to contribute time and your expertise. +++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Take part in an activ-ity that allows you to show off. What you do to help others will separate you from the crowd and bring you recognition that will help stimulate what you plan to do in the future. Love is accentuated. +++++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Don’t try to pacify someone for the wrong reason. Ulterior motives are evident and no matter what the outcome is, it will be difficult to justify how the situation unfolds. Be honest about your inten-tions so you don’t have any regrets. ++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Share information and you will discover new ways to improve your attributes. Relationships with friends, family and peers will be enhanced by the events and activities you enjoy together. Love is in the stars and socializing will help expand your interests and your relationships. ++++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You’ll have a lot to deal with at home. Don’t let responsibilities stop you from doing your own thing. Organize your time wisely. Refuse to let any-one make you feel guilty for wanting a little time to explore your own inter-ests. +++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Do what needs to be done and move on. Don’t waste time with people or projects that have noth-ing to contribute to your future. Socialize with someone who interests you personally or profes-sionally and you will dis-cover options you didn’t know existed. +++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Reflect on your past relationships in order to avoid making a similar mistake. You are best to secure your position by being blunt about what you want and what you can offer. Expand your circle of friends and your interests. ++++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Your timing is right, so present and promote what you have to offer. You’ll grab the attention of someone who needs your services or has a diverse interest in your business that can lead to greater earning potential. ++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Take better care of your health and wellness. Minor mishaps or overdoing it will set you back physically. Make changes at home that will add to your comfort and ease your stress. A partnership must be moni-tored and excess avoided. +++++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Take part in industry or community events and you will make an interesting contact that can help you out. Love is on the rise. Putting extra effort into your personal relationships and contracts will pay off financially. +++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Balance, modera-tion and patience will be required. You will attract interest and money, but also underhanded individu-als looking to take advan-tage of you. Stick close to home and perfect what you are working on before sharing your plans. +++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): You’ve got plenty to look forward to, so don’t lose out because of indulgence or overreact-ing. Listen carefully and you will gain insight into how you can get ahead. Financial and emotional opportunities can be yours with the right gestures. +++ CELEBRITY CIPHER Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com BLONDIE BEETLE BAILEY B.C. FRANK & ERNEST FOR BETTER OR WORSE ZITS HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH GARFIELD THE LAST WORD Eugenia Last Repeat offender is ready now to try new path to a good job Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. CLASSIC PEANUTS Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2012 3B

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTHURSDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2012 Classified Department: 755-5440 4B CLASSIFIED AD vantageTake ADvantage of the Reporter Classifieds!755-5440Lake City Reporter FIND IT SELL IT BUY IT $17504 lines 3 days Includes 2 Signs Each additional line $1.65 Garage Sale Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$10104 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.10One item per ad Under $500 Personal Merchandise Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$16754 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.15One item per ad Under $1,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$23704 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.45One item per ad Under $2,500 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $4,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$27404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.55One item per ad Under $4,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$30404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.65One item per ad Under $6,000 Placing An Ad Service Guide Limited to service type advertis-ing only.4 lines, one month....$92.00 $10.80 each additional lineIncludes an additional $2.00 per ad for each Wednesday insertion. DeadlinesBe Sure to Call Early You can call us at 755-5440 Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.Some people prefer to place their classified ads in person, and some ad categories will require prepay-ment. Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street.You can also fax or email your ad copy to the Reporter.FAX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the Classified Department.EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreporter.comAd is to Appear:TuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday Call by:Mon., 10:00 a.m.Mon., 10:00 a.m.Wed., 10:00 a.m.Thurs., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fax/Email by:Mon., 9:00 a.m.Mon., 9:00 a.m.Wed., 9:00 a.m.Thurs., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.These deadlines are subject to change without notice. Cancellations, Changes & Billing Questions Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject, or classify all advertisements under appropriate headings. Copy should be checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day of pub-lication. Credit for published errors will be allowed for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement which was incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be published, nor for any general, special or consequential damages. Advertising language must comply with Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition of discrimi-nation in employment, housing and public accommodations. Standard abbreviations are acceptable; how-ever, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated. Ad Errors-Please read your ad on the first day of publication. Weaccept responsibility for only the first incorrect insertion, and only the charge for the ad space in error. Please call 755-5440 immediately for prompt correc-tion and billing adjustments.CancellationsNormal advertising deadlines apply for cancellation.Billing InquiriesCall 755-5440. Should further information be required regarding payments or credit limits, your call will be trans-ferred to the accounting depart-ment. General Information In Print and Onlinewww.lakecityreporter.com Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$2504 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $.25One item per ad Under $100 CLASSIFIED AD vantageTake ADvantage of the Reporter Classifieds!755-5440Lake City Reporter FIND IT SELL IT BUY IT $17504 lines 3 days Includes 2 Signs Each additional line $1.65 Garage Sale Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$10104 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.10One item per ad Under $500 Personal Merchandise Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$16754 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.15One item per ad Under $1,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$23704 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.45One item per ad Under $2,500 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $4,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$27404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.55One item per ad Under $4,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$30404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.65One item per ad Under $6,000 Placing An Ad Service Guide Limited to service type advertis-ing only.4 lines, one month....$92.00 $10.80 each additional lineIncludes an additional $2.00 per ad for each Wednesday insertion. DeadlinesBe Sure to Call Early You can call us at 755-5440 Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.Some people prefer to place their classified ads in person, and some ad categories will require prepay-ment. Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street.You can also fax or email your ad copy to the Reporter.FAX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the Classified Department.EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreporter.comAd is to Appear:TuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday Call by:Mon., 10:00 a.m.Mon., 10:00 a.m.Wed., 10:00 a.m.Thurs., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fax/Email by:Mon., 9:00 a.m.Mon., 9:00 a.m.Wed., 9:00 a.m.Thurs., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.These deadlines are subject to change without notice. Cancellations, Changes & Billing Questions Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject, or classify all advertisements under appropriate headings. Copy should be checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day of pub-lication. Credit for published errors will be allowed for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement which was incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be published, nor for any general, special or consequential damages. Advertising language must comply with Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition of discrimi-nation in employment, housing and public accommodations. Standard abbreviations are acceptable; how-ever, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated. Ad Errors-Please read your ad on the first day of publication. Weaccept responsibility for only the first incorrect insertion, and only the charge for the ad space in error. Please call 755-5440 immediately for prompt correc-tion and billing adjustments.CancellationsNormal advertising deadlines apply for cancellation.Billing InquiriesCall 755-5440. Should further information be required regarding payments or credit limits, your call will be trans-ferred to the accounting depart-ment. General Information In Print and Onlinewww.lakecityreporter.com Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$2504 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $.25One item per ad Under $100 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, LOGISTICS AND SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT 164 Duty Days-POSITION # F99918 RE-ADVERTISED Teach courses in logistics and supply chain management such as Principles of Quality Management, Operations Management, Transportation & Distribution, Purchasing & Inventory Management, Introduction to Supply Chain Management, and Warehouse Management. Requires Master’s degree in logistics or similar or Master’s in Business Administration with some emphasis in Supply Chain Management or with a minimum of 3 years of experience in logistics or supply chain. SALARY: Based on degree and experience. APPLICATION DEADLINE: 10/22/12 Persons interested should provide College application, vita, and photocopies of transcripts. All foreign transcripts must be submitted with official translation and evaluation. Position details and applications available on web at: www.fgc.edu Human Resources Florida Gateway College 149 S.E. College Place Lake City, FL 32025-2007 Phone (386) 754-4314 Fax (386) 754-4814 E-Mail: humanr@fgc.eduFGC is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. VP/ADA/EA/EO College in Education and Employment LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTFOR COLUMBIACOUNTY,FLORIDAPROBATE DIVISIONIN RE: ESTATE OFDORMAN WEBSTER CLAYTON,File No. 12-189-CPDivision PROBATEDeceased.NOTICE TO CREDITORSThe administration of the estate of DORMAN W. CLAYTON, de-ceased, whose date of death was July 18, 2012, and last four digits of whose social security number are 5920, is pending in the Circuit Court for COLUMBIACounty, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Columbia County Court-house, 173 NE Hernando Ave., Lake City, FL32055. The names and ad-dresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's at-torney are set forth below.All creditors of the decedent and oth-er persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICA-TION OF THIS NOTICE.ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITH-IN THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED.NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.The date of first publication of this notice is SEPTEMBER 25, 2012.Attorney for Personal Representa-tive:LLOYD E. PETERSON, JR., AttorneyFlorida Bar Number: 0798797905 SWBaya Dr. Lake City, FL32025Phone: (386) 961-9959; Fax: 961-9956Personal Representative:DORMAN WEBSTER CLAYTON, JR.239 SE Cedar LoopLake City, Florida 3202505534968October 4, 11, 2012 NOTICE TOCONTRACTORSNotice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received in the Columbia County Manager’s office until 11:00 A.M. on October 17, 2012, for Co-lumbia County Project No. 2012-7. This office is located on the second floor of the Courthouse Annex at 135 Hernando Avenue, Room 203 Lake City FL32055.This project consists of full depth reclamation of existing asphalt sur-face and limerock base, and asphalt pavement of approximately 6550 LF of asphalt roadway located in the Lake City County Club. Roads in-cluded are:NWFrontier Drive – 4450 LFNWOtter Court – 900 LFNWMallard Place – 850 LFNWWiregrass Court – 180 LFNWBroomsage Court – 180 LFScope of work includes full depth reclamation, asphaltic concrete pave-ment, erosion control, and incidental items.The Bid Forms and Construction specifications may be obtained from the County’s web site at http://www .columbiacountyfla.com/ PurchasingBids.asp The successful bidder will be re-quired to furnish the County Manag-er with a performance bond and lia-bility insurance prior to commencing work.The Columbia County Commission reserves the right to reject any or all bids and to add to the contract or de-lete from the contract to stay within their funding capabilities.Columbia County Board of County CommissionersScarlet Frisina, Chair 05535138October 4, 11, 2012 LegalCOLUMBIACOUNTYBOARD OF COUNTYCOMMISSIONERSPROJECTNUMBER 2012-8County Road 131 – NWFalling Creek RoadNOTICE TOCONTRACTORSNotice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received in the Columbia County Manager’s office until 11:00 A.M. on October 26, 2012, for Co-lumbia County Project No. 2012-8. This office is located on the second floor of the Courthouse Annex at 135 Hernando Avenue, Room 203 Lake City FL32055.The project consists of improving CR 131 from State Road 25 (US 441) to CR 246, for a distance of 4.8 miles.Scope of Work will include rework-ing limerock base with widening, as-phaltic concrete pavement (structural and surface), driveway paving, guardrail, pipes, and incidental items.The Scope of Work also includes the superstructure replacement of Bridge No. 290041. Work includes partial demolition of existing bridge and ap-proach slabs, substructure construc-tion, superstructure construction (beams, deck, and railings), approach slabs, and incidental items.The Bid Forms and Construction specifications may be obtained from the County’s web site at http://www .columbiacountyfla.com/ PurchasingBids.asp All bidders will supply the County with a bid bond for 5% of the total bid amount.The successful bidder will be re-quired to furnish the County Manag-er with a performance bond and gen-eral liability insurance prior to com-mencing work.The Columbia County Commission reserves the right to reject any or all bids and to add to the contract or de-lete from the contract to stay within their funding capabilities.Columbia County Board of County CommissionersScarlet Frisina, Chair05535244October 11, 18, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO.: 12-2011-CA-000361SEC.:CITIMORTGAGE, INC.,Plaintiff,v.CHRISTOPHER L. STEPHENSON; ANGELASTEPHENSON; ANYAND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UN-DER, AND AGAINSTTHE HERE-IN NAMED INDIVIDUALDE-FENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN-KNOWN PARTIES MAYCLAIM AN INTERESTAS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS.Defendant(s).NOTICE OF SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to an Order of Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated Sep-tember 19, 2012, entered in Civil Case No. 12-2011-CA-000361 of the Circuit Court of the Third Judicial Circuit in and for Columbia County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Cir-cuit Court will sell to the highest bid-der for cash on 24th day of October, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. on the Third Floor of the Columbia County Court-house, 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit:NE 1/4 of SW1/4 of SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP2 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, SOUTH OF GRADED ROAD AND EASTOF RAILROAD RIGHT-OF-WAYANDTOWNSHIP2 SOUTH-RANGE 16 EASTSECTION 27: BEGIN ATTHE NORTHWESTCORNER OF NW1/4 OF SE 1/4, AND RUN THENCE N 8927” E, ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID NW1/4 OF SE 1/4, 328.00 FEET; THENCE S 004”E, 1042.55 FEETTO THE NORTH-EASTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE OF G.S. & F. RAILROAD; THENCE N 3138’30”WALONG SAID NORTHEASTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE 108.28 FEETTO THE POINT-OF-A-CURVE AND RUN THENCE NORTHEASTER-LYALONG SAID CURVE CON-CAVE TO THE RIGHTALONG ACHORD BEARING N 2747’52” WADISTANCE OF 583.01 FEETTO THE POINT-OF-INTERSECTION OF SAID CURVE WITH THE WESTLINE OF SAID NW1/4 OF LegalSE 1/4; THENCE N 004’W431.49 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGIN-NING. SUBJECTTO EXISTING COUNTYMAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAYOF SCARBOROUGH ROAD ACROSS THE NORTH SIDE THEREOF.LESS AND EXCEPTAPARTOF NW1/4 OF THE SE 1/4 OF SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP2 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE ATTHE NWCORNER OF SAID NW1/4 OF THE SE 1/4 AND RUN N 8927’E ALONG THE NORTH LINE THEREOF, 298.00 FEETFOR APOINTOF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE N 8927” E 30.00 FEET; THENCE S 004’E, 642.55 FEET; THENCE S 8956’W30.00 FEET; THENCE N 004’W642.30 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING. SUBJECTTO EX-ISTING COUNTYMAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAYOF SCARBOR-OUGH ROAD ACROSS THE NORTH SIDE THEREOF.ALSO LESS AND EXCEPTCOMMENCE ATTHE NORTH-WESTCORNER OF THE NW1/4 OF SE 1/4, SECTION 27, TOWN-SHIP2 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND RUN THENCE N 8927’E ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID NW1/4 OF SE 1/4 328.00 FEET; THENCE S 004’E 642.55 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGIN-NING; THENCE CONTINUE S 004’E 400.00 FEETTO THE EASTRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE OF G.S. & F. RAILROAD; THENCE N 3138’30” WALONG SAID EASTRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE, 108.28 FEETTO THE P.C. OF ACURVE; THENCE NORTHERLYALONG SAID CURVE CONCAVE TO THE RIGHTHAVING ARADIUS OF 5596.58 FEETALONG ACHORD BEARING N 2900’42” W351.68 FEET; THENCE N 8956’E 226.90 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGIN-NING.Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-er than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceed-ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assis-tance. Please contact:ADACoordinator173 NE Hernando Avenue, Room 408Lake City, FL32055Phone: (386) 719-7428within two (2) business days of re-ceipt of notice to appear. Individuals who are hearing impaired should call (800) 955-8771. Individuals who are voice impaired should call (800) 955-8770.DATED ATLAKE CITY, FLORI-DATHIS 19th DAYOF September, 2012./s/ B. ScippioP. DEWITTCASONCLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURTCOLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA02500389October 4, 11, 2012 020Lost & Found FOUND Cordless Electric Drill, in Lake City. Call to identify. and pay for cost of Ad. Contact 386-397-9070 100Job Opportunities05535155(Ladies wear factory outlet) Lake City Mall is looking for P/TTHIRD KEY Days, nights, and weekends. Flexible hours a necessity. Competitive wages, discount, EOE Apply in person at store location Retirees are encouraged to apply. 05535253Experienced Housekeeper Needed. Professional References and background check required. Contact Susan 365-8807 Delivery Drivers/Independent Contractors. Need a Reliable Vehicle for Same Day Delivers. Call 1-800-818-7958 Established Ocala business is Looking to hire additional sales teams for our expanding product line.Earn $500.00/week, plus commission!If you’re upbeat, friendly and enjoy working with the public, then contact us for a confidential interview and start earning the income you deserve! Valid driver’s license, proof of insurance and overnight travel is required. Call us TODAYat 352-233-2818.Telecom Service Bureau, Inc. Experienced only Full Time & Part Time Book Keeper Needed. Excel & QuickBooks Experience ABig Plus. Fax Resume Attention Cheryl 754-3657 or Email to officemanager@primarycaremedic.com KNUCKLE BOOMOPERATOR CLASS AREQUIRED, Operate knuckle boom truck, truck maintenance minor repairs truck Send reply to Box 05097, C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056 Land Survey Help Wanted 386-755-6166 140 NWRidgewood Avenue Lake City, FL32055 MANAGEMENT OPPORTUNITIES McDonald's of Alachua has multiple positions available for qualified/experienced mgrs. $8-$16 hr /benefits/bonuses Apply on line @ www.mcstate.com/alachua Or Call 386-755-2475 SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 100Job OpportunitiesMILLWRIGHT Welding, Machining, Hydraulics, Gear Ratios, Fabricating, Problem Solving, Repair, Maintenance, Dismantle, Reassemble – Send reply to Box 05096, C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056 Small historic non-denominational church with a heart for children is seeking a pianist for Sunday services. Please contact 904-259-4194 if interested. WELDER NEEDED Must have experience, the ability to measure in .010 and fit a must. Machine shop experience helpful. Apply in person, Grizzly Mfg., 174 NE Cortez Terrace, Lake City, FL32055, or Email: guy@qiagroup.com: NO CALLS Wanted-P/T Handi-Man, Exp. in Routine Maintenance such as plumbing, elect, painting & carpentry. Applications Available at Camp Weed & Cerveny Conference Center, 11057 Camp Weed Place, Live Oak.REPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Linewww.lakecityreporter.com

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTHURSDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2012 5B Classified Department: 755-5440 1986 CorvetteWell maintained, runs great. 95,000 miles.$8,500 obo 386-344-2107 100Job OpportunitiesThe City of Lake City has openings for the following positions: Girls Club Leader P/T Recreation Collection Technician I Utilities Collection Technician I Waste Water WWTPOperator "C" Waste Water Temp WWTPOperator "C" Waste Water Obtain detailed job descriptions and applications by visiting 1st floor receptionist in City Hall 205 N Marion Avenue, Lake City, FL32055 or visit our web site at www.lcfla.com The City of Lake City is an EEO/AA/ADA/VPemployer. Whack A-Do now hiring Stylist. Full time/Part time Hourly pay + commission. No Clientel needed Full Service or Just Hair Cuts. Contact Darlene. 386-984-6738 120Medical EmploymentMedical practice needs Ophthalmic Technician FTor PT. Experience preferred. Fax resume 386-755-7561. 140Work Wanted Experience Dental Hygienist Looking for a Full, Part time or Substitute Position, Excellent References. Call 386-288-8321 240Schools & Education05534919Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class12/24/2012• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-11/05/12• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies BLACK & WHITE MERLE Austrian Shepherd dog, male, 19 mos. old, purebred, $250 or OBO. Good with children. Call 386-365-2900 Free Puppies Lab Mix. Approx 5 weeks old. Call, text, or email. (386)984-7975, firefigher126@yahoo.com Free to good home Beautiful, Female American Bulldog, 1yr 8mths, Needs room to run, Good With people and other animals. 386-752-8317 PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 330Livestock & SuppliesDeep Creek Farms Barn kept Square or Net Wrapped Round Hay Bales For Sale Ronnie Hughes (386)365-1425 403Auctions Personal Property Estate Liquidation Auction SundayOct. 14, 2012@ 2:00 PM Location: 617 SWDawn Lane Lake City, FL32024 Lots of Antiques, Electrical Supplies, Household Items Furniture and Much More. For more info contact: J.W. Hill and Assoc. 386-362-3300 or John Hill 386590-1214 AB2083 AU2847 10%Buyers Premium 413Musical MerchandiseBACH Trumpet TR300, Silver color. Excellent Condition With hard case. $400. 386-623-3149 430Garage Sales 10/12 & 10/13, 8 AM-?, 100 amp Power Pole, Sm. Fridge, fragrance lamps, Men’s, Ladies, & teen clothes & Lots of misc. items. 21609 47th Dr. LC 865-304-1248 Annual DeerCreek Sub Sale. “Saturday Only” Honda Power Washer, Guns, Ammo, Antiques, Glass ware, Carnival Glass, Furniture, Clothes, Christmas, Tools, Household, Large Sale. 252-B. Look for Signs FORESTCOUNTRY Sat. 10/13, 8 am to 12, 374 SW Short Leaf Drive Household items, clothes, toys, sewing items. FRI. 10/12 & SAT. 10/13, 8-?, 1282 Dakota Glen, 90 Wright on Gwen Lake Blvd., left on Dakota, furn, households, clothes, purses, and much more.386-397-4889. Lake City Elks Annual yard sale Sat. Oct. 13th 8a-1p. To be held in the Elks parking lot. Backs up to Lake Desoto. Look for signs! New Horizon Church of Christ, Sat. Oct. 13th 7 a.m-2p.m., 6130 South US Hwy 441, Drop off and vendors welcome ($10.00 fee). PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 440Miscellaneous Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, Root Raking, Bush Hog, Seeding, Sod, Disking, site prep, ponds & irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200 630Mobile Homes forRent2 BR MH. $400 $450. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 2/1 S of Lake City, Branford Area, Quiet Area. $525 mth plus security 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 3BR/2BADWMH on 1 acre private lot, 1st+last+dep required located in Ellisville. No pets. Contact 352-870-5144 4bd/2ba -5 ac,Conv. to LC & G’ville, new energy efficient AC, lrg deck, 10x20 shed Sale or Lease $950 mth.1st + dept. 867-4586 Country Setting, 14 x70 MH. 2BR/2BA,large master tub, CH/A $575 mo. $300 dep. No Pets 386-755-0064 or (904) 771-5924 LARGE CLEAN 2 & 3 bdms CH/A5 Points Area. Also 3 bdrm Westside. 1st + Deposit Required. No Pets. 961-1482 640Mobile Homes forSale(1) Only New Jacobsen Triplewide 42x64 Only $99,995 Del & Set with Air. Beautiful Home. North Pointe of Gainesville. 352-872-5566 4BD/2BADWMH on 4 acres Owner Financing Available. 386-623-3404 or 386-623-3396 640Mobile Homes forSale575 CREDITSCORE? New 3/2 or 4/2 doubles. Your Approved with 10% down. Call for details. North Pointe 352-872-5566 BIGGESTSALEEVER 13 Jacobsen Display Models reduced for Fast Sale! North Pointe Homes, 352-872-5566 LAND ANDHOME Attention land owners with good credit. No Money Down and Low Fixed Rates and Low Fees. Let’s Deal! North Pointe Homes, Gainesville 352-872-5566 650Mobile Home & LandCLEAN NICE 2/2 SW, and 740 sf Unfinished frame house, nice Country acre 8 mi to VA. $39,000 Cash only 386.961.9181 Owner Fin.-Nice huge 4/2.5 on 3 ac, x-fenced, creek, lrg deck,Paved Rd. McAlpin area. Small down $950/mth 386-867-1833. For picswww.suwanneevalleyproperties.com OwnerFinance 3/2 on 2.5 ac Mayo Area. $675 mth Small Down 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05534938We’ve got it all!$89 Deposit Limited Avail. Call Today! Windsong Apts. *Free afterschool program386-758-8455 1BR APT. Downtown Location, Clean. New Carpet $450 mo, plus Security. NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456 2/1 1300 sqft, duplex w/ gargage. totally refurbished,W/D hook up, CH/A, $650 mth Lease Req. 386-965-2407 or 386-758-5881 2BR/1BAAPT. w/garage. West side of town. $650. mo. 386-961-9000 2BR/2BAw/garage 5 minutes from VAhospital and Timco. Call for details. 386-365-5150 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 COZYCOTTAGE 1 BRNew paint & carpet. 10 mins. South of LC, all util. & satellite incl. $550 mo. Pet ok, 386-758-2408 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Quant 2br/1ba Apt. Peaceful Location with Lake View CH/A$500. mo $500 dep. No pets. 386-344-2170 720Furnished Apts. ForRentRooms forRent Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent2/1 Brick house Lrg eat in kit. & closets, CH/A, 514 SE First Ave. Jasper. $550 mth 1st,last+sec. No pets. 772-285-1032 3BD/1.5BAOn Leslie Gln CH/A, $725 mth & $725 dep. Contact 386-344-2170 3bd/2ba-Near Branford Stilt Home on 5 fenced wooded ac. Barn & shop. 1st,last,Sec $800/ mth.Ref. Needed. 813-714-4850. 3br/2ba DWon Tranquil Gln. Completely renovated. backyard fenced. $700/mo + $400 security. 386-938-5637 730Unfurnished Home ForRent05535236LAKE CITY 4BR/2BA 1248 SF $650 2 AVAILABLEJUSTREDUCED $45/MONTH3BR/2BA 1496 SF $695JUSTREDUCED3BR/2BA 1200 SF $725 3BR/2BA 980 SF $575 2BR/1BA M/HOME $475 BRANDFORD 4BR/3BA 2108 SF $800 JUSTREDUCEDMADISON 2BR/1BA JUSTREMODLED $450 1 AVAILABLE 3BR/1.5BA REMODELED $550 Visit our website: www .NorthFloridahomeandland.com Mike Foster386-288-3596 Mitchell Lee 386-867-1155Accredited Real Estate Services 1688 SE Baya Dr., Suite 105 Lake City, FL32025 Accredited Real Estate Services is a Full Service Real Estate Office. We do: Rentals ~ Property Management ~ Property Sales. Cozy 2bd / 1ba home. CH/A, $500 mth & $500 dep. Contact 386-344-2170 750Business & Office RentalsFOR LEASE: Downtown Office Space. Convenient to Court house. Call 386-755-3456 ForRent orLease: Former Doctors office, Former professional office & Lg open space: avail on East Baya Ave. Competitive rates. Weekdays 386-984-0622 evenings/weekends 497-4762 PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 805Lots forSale PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 820Farms & Acreage10 acres with well/septic/pp (not guar); $300 dwn; $580 a mth. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 950Cars forSale 2006 MAZADA MIATACONV. Automatic, leather, power. $14,500 ($1,000 below KBB value). Call 386-365-2046.REPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Linewww.lakecityreporter.com LAKE CITY REPORTER This Reporter Works For You! 755-5440Classifieds 755-5445 Circulation ADVERTISE YOUR Job Opportunities in the Lake City Reporter Classifieds. Enhance Your Ad with Your Individual Logo For just pennies a day. Call today, 755-5440. We’re on target! days a weekSubscribe Today 386-755-5445

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6B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2012 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 G. W. HUNTER, INC. 1130 US Hwy 90 W (386) 752-5890 WE NOW HAVE ETHANOL FREE PLUS GASOLINE ONLY AT INTENDED USES: BOATS & WATERCRAFTS COLLECTABLE VEHICLES OFF-ROAD VEHICLES MOTORCYCLES SMALL ENGINES Lake City Reporter Located at SHANDS Lake City, Live Oak & Starke Womens Center of Florida ALL MAJOR INSURANCES ACCEPTED INCLUDING MEDICAID & MEDICARE FREE Pregnancy Ultrasound WITH THIS AD* *Insurance billing may occur if necessary. Some Restrictions apply. OBSTRETRICS & GYNECOLOGY PRENATAL CARE & ULTRASOUNDS STDS & HPV TESTING BIRTH CONTROL & INFERTILITY MENOPAUSE & INCONTINENCE WEIGHT LOSS & 4D ULTRASOUNDS BOTOX & LASER HAIR REMOVAL NO INSURANCE VISITS ASK ABOUT OUR $ 50 CHANDLER MOHAN, MD EMAD ATTA, MD ANN MARIE FENN, CNM ELIZABETH BEARDSLEY, ARNP 386-466-1106 SERVICES: OB-GYN www.myobcare.com New Patient Exam and Necessary X-rays DO150, DO330 First-time patient Reg. $136 $ 29 SAVINGS OF $107 Expires October 31, 2012 ASPEN DENTAL GROUP T IMELESS M EMORIES 386-466-1888 White Outdoor Rockers $ 109 In Stock In Time for Autumn A great addition for your outdoor space. White Outdoor Rockers BCS pole position on the line By RALPH D. RUSSO Associated Press The first BCS standings of the season come out Sunday. Is this important? Well, sort of. Since the BCS was imple mented in 1998, only twice has neither of the teams ranked first or second in the initial standings reached the national title game. Seven out of 13 teams that started No. 1 in the standings played for the national championship. Six times the second-place team in the first standings played for the BCS title. Four times a team has started third and finished in the top two, and four times a team has started fourth and played in the big game. Six teams have come from fifth place or farther back to reach the champi onship game. LSU started the farthest back in 2003 at No. 12. Conclusion: Just like in auto racing, it helps to start in the front row, but expect some passing and maybe a wreck or two. The coaches poll and the Harris poll are the driv ing forces behind the BCS standings. A compilation of six computer rankings also count for a third of a BCS rating, but essentially the computers break ties when two teams are very close in the polls. Alabama, an overwhelm ing No. 1 in the polls, is just about a lock to be first when the standings are released Sunday, barring a major upset of the Crimson Tide at Missouri on Saturday. The Tigers are still looking for their first Southeastern Conference victory, coming off a loss to Vanderbilt, and they will be without injured starting quarterback James Franklin (knee). So good luck beating Bama. Oregon is off this week and stands a good chance to be right behind Alabama in the BCS standings, just as it is in the polls. The Ducks are a solid No. 2 in both. The computer ratings going into this weekend treat Notre Dame a bit bet ter than the pollsters. The Fighting Irish are ranked seventh in the polls, but first in two of the five com puter ratings that have already been released. A sixth doesnt start coming out until Sunday. And with the Irish facing another strong opponent Saturday, at home against Stanford, dont be surprised to see Notre Dame ahead in the BCS standings of some teams that it trails in the polls if it beats the Cardinal. The most important thing to remember is this: Dont get too worked up. There are plenty of games to be played. Wait about a month or so, and then get worked up. The picks: SATURDAY No. 1 Alabama (minus 21 1 2 ) at Missouri You know who is enjoy ing the Tigers first season in the SEC? Kansas fans ... ALABAMA 38-13. No. 3 South Carolina (plus 2 1 2 ) at No. 9 LSU Death Valley wont be so intimidating if Tigers cant fix their offense ... SOUTH CAROLINA 17-13 No. 4 Florida (minus 7 1 2 ) at Vanderbilt Gators have won 21 straight against Commodores ... FLORIDA 17-9. No. 5 West Virginia (minus 4 1 2 ) at Texas Tech Can Mountaineers stay focused in between trip to Texas and home game against K-State? ... TEXAS TECH 38-35. No. 6 Kansas State (minus 6 1 2 ) at Iowa State Wildcats have won four straight in series, all by eight or less ... KANSAS STATE 28-24. No. 17 Stanford (plus 8 1 2 ) at No. 7 Notre Dame Cardinal have won three straight against Irish ... NOTRE DAME 23-13. No. 8 Ohio State (minus 17) at Indiana Braxton Miller Heisman hype picking up steam ... OHIO STATE 40-17. No. 10 Oregon State (plus 6) at BYU QB injuries have both teams scrambling ... BYU 12-10. No. 11 Southern California (minus 12) at Washington Trojans are second-most penalized team in the nation at 10 per game ... USC 2817. Boston College (plus 28) at No. 12 Florida State Seminoles return home in a bad mood ... FLORIDA STATE 45-14. No. 13 Oklahoma (minus 3) vs. No. 15 Texas at Dallas Big 12 elimination game; one group of fans is going to be really ticked off ... OKLAHOMA 28-27. No. 18 Louisville (minus 3) at Pittsburgh Panthers have been a hard team to decipher ... LOUISVILLE 28-24. UPSET SPECIAL Tennessee (plus 3) at No. 19 Mississippi State Huge game for Vols with Alabama, South Carolina up next ... TENNESSEE 35-31. Syracuse (plus 7) at No. 20 Rutgers Orange DE Brandon Sharpe had four sacks vs. Pitt last week ... RUTGERS 21-13. Fordham (no line) at No. 21 Cincinnati Been a long time since the Seven Blocks of Granite were playing for Fordham ... CINCINNATI 58-10. BEST BET No. 22 Texas A&M (minus 8) vs. No. 23 Louisiana Tech in Shreveport, La. Biggest hurdle between Bulldogs and BCS bid ... TEXAS A&M 52-24. Fresno State (plus 7) at No. 24 Boise State Conference rivals again, Broncos have won six straight in series ... BOISE STATE 31-21. Illinois (plus 23 1 2 ) at No. 25 Michigan Denard Robinson coming off 235-yard rushing perfor mance against Purdue ... MICHIGAN 39-14. Last weeks record: 15-5 (straight); 11-7 (vs. points) Season record: 10120 (straight); 58-46 (vs. points) Best bets: 2-4. Upset specials: 3-3. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Florida quarterback Jeff Driskel (6) is taken down by a group of LSU defenders during a game at Ben Hill Griffin Stadium in Gainesville on Saturday. Florida beat LSU 14-6. Carpenter pitches Cards past Nats 8-0 for 2-1 lead By HOWARD FENDRICH Associated Press WASHINGTON Chris Carpenter was every bit the postseason ace hes been in the past for the St. Louis Cardinals. Taking the mound for only the fourth time in 2012, missing a rib after surgery to cure numbness on his right side, the 37-year-old Carpenter pitched scoreless ball into the sixth inning, rookie Pete Kozma deliv ered a three-run homer, and the defending cham pion Cardinals beat the Washington Nationals 8-0 Wednesday to take a 2-1 lead in their NL division series. All in all, quite a damper on the day for a Nationals Park-record 45,017 redwearing, towel-twirling fans witnessing the first major league postseason game in the nations capital in 79 years. Three relievers finished the shutout for the Cardinals, who can end the best-of-five series in Thursdays Game 4 at Washington. Kyle Lohse will start for St. Louis. Ross Detwiler pitches for Washington, which is sticking to its long-stated plan of keeping Stephen Strasburg on the sideline the rest of the way.