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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01924

Material Information

Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 10-10-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01931

Related Items

Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01924

Material Information

Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 10-10-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01931

Related Items

Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

By LAURA HAMPSONlhampson@lakecityreporter.com As the state grapples with growing needs and a stagnant budget, North Florida is losing money that helps the work-ing poor send their children to child care programs. This year the Early Learning Coalition of Florida’s Gateway lost 27 percent of its budget for subsidized child care in Columbia, Hamilton, Lafayette, Suwannee and Union counties. Over six years, the area would lose $1.8 million, according to a plan designed to reallocate money based on demographic changes across the state. That represents about 28 percent of the 2011-12 local budget for subsidized child care. State offi-cials met Monday in Lake City with child care providers and area early learning coalitions to discuss the changes. A state auditor general report found the formula that had been used for a decade to dis-tribute more than $628 million in School Readiness Funding to counties was not equitable, as required by state law. The School Readiness Program was created in 1999 by the state legislature to prepare children for school and enable parents to work and become financially self-sufficient. The program targets children of low-income families, children at risk for abuse or neglect and children with disabilities. The coalition would be able to serve about 400 fewer children after the cuts, said Dr. Thomas Logan, executive director of the Early Learning Coalition of Florida’s Gateway. Currently, the coalition sends about 1,600 children in the five-county to day care with a budget of $6.8 million. Under the cuts, the area risks losing child care providers who might be unable to stay in busi-ness without the subsidizes, he said. For example, Union County has one large private child care provider. “Without that center, Union County By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comA group of thieves known by authorities across the state as “The Felony Lane Gang” are operating in Lake City, according to police. The group burglarized a local vehicle result-ing in more than $6,000 worth of fraudulent purchas-es to the owner’s checking and credit card accounts in less than 48 hours, authorities said. According to Lake City Police Department reports, the inci-dent occurred about 11:20 a.m. on Aug. 30 when Lisa Huchingson parked her vehicle in the front drive-way of the Kountry Kids Daycare and went inside. While she was inside, two witnesses said they saw a black, four-door vehicle pull up alongside Huchingson’s vehicle. The driver got out and went directly into Huchingson’s car, which was unlocked. Huchingson’s check-book, Social Security card, driver’s license, numerous credit cards and By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comA fact-finding committee tasked with looking at the feasibility of constructing an events center in Columbia County unveiled a proposal Tuesday night to build a 265,000-square-foot, multi-purpose facility for $28.2 million. An estimated $23.6 million would be financed through bonds for at least 30 years, with $4.6 million coming from the sale of the current fairgrounds property. The debt service portion of the project’s cost would come from funds from compa-nies that were given tax abatements, where the money they owed the county would go back into the event center project. County officials say they are continuing to digest information from the meeting and did not vote in favor of adding the proposal to the next board agenda. Preliminary estimates from SMG, an entertainment and convention venue man-agement company, indicated the operating costs for the first year of the event center would be in the red about $240,810, an estimated $58,712 in the red in its second year and $117,576 in the black during its third year. The fact-finding committee made its presentation to a group of elected officials, resi-dents, chamber of commerce and Columbia County Resources representatives Tuesday night. About a 100 people attended the meeting, which lasted about 90 minutes, at the Columbia County Resources entertain-ment building. The meeting was held to provide attendees with the information necessary to decide if it’s feasible to construct an events By MARK SCOLFOROAssociated PressBELLEFONTE, Pa. — In what sounded at times like a locker room pep talk, Jerry Sandusky rambled in his red prison suit about being the underdog in the fourth quarter, about forgiveness, about dogs and about the movie “Seabiscuit.” With his accusers seated behind him in the courtroom, he denied committing “dis-gusting acts” against children and instead painted himself as the victim. And then, after he had said his piece, a judge sentenced him to 30 to 60 years in prison Tuesday, all but ensuring the 68-year-old Sandusky will spend the rest of his life behind bars for the child sexual abuse scandal that brought disgrace to Penn State and triggered the downfall of his former boss, football coach Joe Paterno. He leaves behind a trail of human and legal wreckage that could take years for the university to clear away. “The tragedy of this crime is that it’s a story of betrayal. The most obvious aspect is your betrayal of 10 children,” Judge John Cleland said after a hearing in which three of the men Sandusky was convicted of molesting as boys confronted him face to face and told of the lasting pain he had inflicted. The judge said he expects Sandusky to die in prison. In a disjointed, 15-minute address before he learned his sentence, Sandusky said: “In my heart I did not do these alleged disgusting acts.” Sprinkling his remarks with sports refOpinion ................ 4APeople.................. 2AObituaries .............. 5A Advice & Comics ......... 4B Puzzles ................. 2B TODAY IN PEOPLE‘Peanuts’ headed to big-screen. 84 56 Mostly sunny WEATHER, 2A Lake City ReporterWEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012 | YOUR COMMUNIT Y NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | 75¢ LAKECITYREPORTER.COM CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 138, No. 181 1A COMING THURSDAYBullying in the community. Committee presentsfindings on feasibilityof $28 million project. Proclaims innocencein rambling speech before sentencing. Thefts reported throughout thestate, beyond. CUTS continued on 3A SANDUSKY continued on 6A GANG continued on 3A CENTER continued on EA Suspect 3 Suspect 1 Suspect 2 Sandusky gets 30 years, denies guilt ‘Felonylanegang’strikeshere Coming attraction? JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterGreg Kelley (right) and Bill Rutherford of Clemons & Ru therford Architects make a presentation about the proposed events center at a special information session on the proposed project held by the Columbia County Board of Commissioners.County hears pitch on events center JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterDylan Cannon (left), 10, helps Cooper Willis, 4, with a la rge pumpkin while visiting the Pumpkin Patch at First United Methodist Church Tue sday. The patch has more than 3,500 pumpkins and gourds all from a Nav ajo reservation in northern New Mexico. The pumpkins are for sale for the fa ll holidays. Pumpkins by the ton More child care cuts eyed Working poorwould feel brunt of state reduction

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CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, pleas e call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS “ ” “I have a strong moral sense — by my standards.” — Rex Stout, American writer (1886-1975) Thought for Today Celebrity Birthdays QFormer Illinois Sen. Adlai Stevenson III is 82. QActor Peter Coyote is 71. QEntertainer Ben Vereen is 66. QCountry singer Tanya Tucker is 54. QActress Julia Sweeney is 53. QNFL quarterback Brett Favre is 43.QRace driver Dale Earnhardt Jr. is 38.Q Singer Mya is 33. AROUND FLORIDA Hazing defendant pleads no contest ORLANDO — The first of more than a dozen defendants charged in the hazing death of a Florida A&M drum major entered a plea of no contest Tuesday to third-degree felony hazing. A judge didn’t impose a conviction on 23-year-old Brian Jones, of Parrish, who switched his plea from not guilty. Jones isn’t admitting or denying guilt in the no-contest plea. Jones refused to comment after the hearing in an Orlando courtroom. Sentencing is set for Oct. 22. In agreeing to the deal, Circuit Judge Marc Lubet said Jones’ role in the hazing death of Robert Champion was relatively minimal. “It is my understanding ... that there is no testimo-ny that he at any time beat or hit Mr. Champion. Is that correct? Lubet asked Jones’ attorney, Alisia Adamson. “That is correct,” she said. Champion died last November after being beaten by fellow band members during a hazing ritual aboard a bus parked outside an Orlando hotel following a football game. An autopsy concluded Champion suffered blunt trauma blows to his body and died from shock caused by severe bleeding. Ten other FAMU band members face felony haz-ing charges, while two others face misdemeanor counts for alleged roles in Champion’s hazing. Their trials are set for early next year. Champion’s death revealed a culture of haz-ing at Florida A&M and other schools. It also contributed to the abrupt resignation of the university’s president in July, the resignation of the band’s longtime director and the suspension of the famed March 100 until next year.5 teens accused of attacking two HOLIDAY — Police said five Pasco County teens face multiple charges in an attack on their neighbors over a home-grown mari-juana plant. According to police, three boys and two girls broke into a Holiday home Friday evening and dragged a woman out of the home. When a man ran out to help her, police said they beat him with a baseball bat and metal pipe. Pasco Sheriff’s spokesman Doug Tobin said the teens believed the man had stolen their pot plant. The Tampa Bay Times reported the man suffered severe damage to his face, including possible frac-tures. The teens, ages 15 to 17, were charged with aggravated burglary with a deadly weapon and attempted burglary. The Times said police did not find the marijuana plant.Top GOP officials won’t back party TALLAHASSEE — Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi is refusing to back her own party when it comes to whether or not three state Supreme Court justices deserve a new term. The Republican Party of Florida is officially urg-ing its members to vote against three justices who will be on the November ballot. Bondi, the state’s chief legal officer, said Tuesday that she has cases before the high court, and she won’t say if she agrees with the decision by party leaders.Q Associated Press ‘Peanuts’ headed to big-screenLOS ANGELES C harlie Brown and his “Peanuts” pals are com-ing to the big-screen. Charles Schulz’ beloved characters are starring in their own animated film scheduled to hit theaters Nov. 25, 2015. That year marks the 65th anniversary of the “Peanuts” comic strip and the 50th anniversary of “A Charlie Brown Christmas,” the first of the gang’s many TV specials. The as-yet-untitled film will be produced by 20th Century Fox and its Blue Sky Studios animation unit, the outfit behind the “Ice Age” flicks and such cartoon hits as “Dr. Seuss’ Horton Hears a Who!” Schulz’ son Craig and grandson Bryan co-wrote the screenplay with Cornelius Uliano, and the three also are producing the film. Steve Martino, co-director of “Horton Hears a Who” and “Ice Age: Continental Drift,” will direct the “Peanuts” film.Lil Wayne talks about Drake-Aaliyah project NEW ORLEANS — Lil Wayne thinks the late Aaliyah’s music is better than a lot of music out today — and he’s confident that Drake’s plan to produce unreleased Aaliyah songs will be an “awesome collaboration.” Drake — a huge Aaliyah fan — has announced that he is working on a posthumous album of Aaliyah music, and he’s already released the song “Enough Said” featuring himself and the singer-dancer, who was killed in a plane crash in 2001. Some who were close to Aaliyah have not expressed support for the album. Missy Elliott and Timbaland, who produced most of Aaliyah’s music, are not involved, and DMX, who co-starred with Aaliyah in the movie “Romeo Must Die” and recorded a song with her, has been critical of the project.Marvel’s changes no superhero reboot PHILADELPHIA — It’s not a reboot or relaunch. Instead, Marvel Comics’ new “NOW” initiative aims to recharge the publisher’s heroes and villains, the publisher’s editor-in-chief Axel Alonso said of the new effort that starts this week. “This ain’t a reboot, we’re simply hitting the refresh button. ‘Marvel NOW!’ simply offers a line-wide entry-point into the Marvel Universe that you’re already reading about,” he said of the endeavor, which starts Wednesday with the release of “Uncanny Avengers” No. 1 in comic shops worldwide. “All of the stories take place in the aftermath of ‘Avengers Vs. X-Men.’ Q Associated Press Tuesday: Afternoon: 5-8-8 Evening: N/A Tuesday: Afternoon: 4-0-6-3 Evening: N/A Monday: 2-5-10-22-24 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 HOW TO REACH USMain number ........(386) 752-1293 Fax number ..............752-9400Circulation ...............755-5445Online... www.lakecityreporter.comThe Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis-sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)NEWSEditor Robert Bridges.....754-0428(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)ADVERTISING.........752-1293 (ads@lakecityreporter.com)CLASSIFIEDTo place a classified ad, call 755-5440BUSINESSController Sue Brannon....754-0419(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)CIRCULATIONHome delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday.Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service.In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-vice related credits will be issued.In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser-vice related credits will be issued.Circulation...............755-5445(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)Home delivery rates(Tuesday -Friday and Sunday)12 Weeks.................. $26.3224 Weeks...................$48.7952 Weeks...................$83.46Rates include 7% sales tax.Mail rates12 Weeks.................. $41.4024 Weeks...................$82.8052 Weeks..................$179.40 Lake City Reporter 2AWEATHER ASSOCIATED PRESSCharlie Brown and the gang from the cartoon strip ‘Peanu ts’ will appear in a feature-length movie, schedulted to debut in November 2015, 2 0th Century Fox said. Daily Scripture“It is the Lord your God you must follow, and him you must revere. Keep his commands and obey him; serve him and hold fast to him.”— Deuteronomy 13:4 Aaliyah Ironman ASSOCIATED PRESSA juvenile alligator sits in swampy waters at Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary, near Naples. The sanctuary is a 13,000acre preserve and is home to the largest remaining stan d of old growth bald cypress in North America. A 2.25mile boardwalk trail is open to the public daily.

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would have very little to fall back on, he said. Logan said small rural counties without alternative resources should receive special consideration in the new funding formula. Some coalitions receive funding from other sources, such as county commissions, but the Gateway coalition depends entirely on the state for money. I think our child care sit uation is more fragile than it is in other counties, Logan said. Many families could not afford to work without out a subsidy for child care, which costs about $90 a week for a toddler, Logan said. A family of four can not make more than $30,000 and must be working to be eligible, he said. At least half of the cen ters that receive state fund ing are in Columbia County, Logan said. With less stu dents able to go to the cen ters, less teachers would be needed. Itll be noticed in Columbia County, he said. Counties near Orlando and Tampa have seen an in need and population, while North Florida and some areas in South Florida are seeing a decline, Logan said. Floridas Office of Early Learning will submit a final formula for allocation to the legislature next spring. Our goal this evening is really to hear from you, said Mel Jurado, director of the state early learning office, while meeting with child care providers at Florida Gateway College. The stakeholder workshop was the third of nine hap pening across the state this month. We are just as important as Miami, Fort Lauderdale or Pensacola, said Janice Summers, owner of A Plus Learning Center and the Busy Bee Playschools, dur ing the meeting. Every day on a waiting list they are falling behind, she said of children waiting to enter the program. Summers said this was the first time the state had offered a meeting with child care providers and she thought it was helpful for voicing her concerns. During the workshop, providers worked in small groups to define equity, dis cuss the fair allocation of state funding and discuss how the state early learn ing office could do better. Gordon Tremaine, CEO of the Early Learning Coalition of Alachua County, said there isnt a fair way to spread child care money throughout the state because there just isnt enough money to pro vide for every child in need. Tremaine said residents cant ask for a tax break and expect social services not to be cut. Every child should get an equal share at a quality education, he said. In a response to the audi tor general report, the state early learning office estimat ed that an additional $907 million would be required to provide for existing unmet needs across the state. John Burn, Gateway coalition chairman, said during the meeting that nothing about the situa tion was equitable. Florida ranks 45th among how much states spend on chil dren, he said. Yall are demanding too much and supplying too lit tle, said Angela Turbeville, owner of Happy Hearts Child Care Centers in Lake City, to Jurado. Rates paid to providers for subsidized child care havent increased in years while reporting and other require ments have increased. My rates dont cover the cost of care, Turbeville said. cash were stolen. The two witnesses went inside to notify Huchingson of the theft, at which time she notified her bank. The bank let Huchingson know that someone had just used her credit card to purchase gas at the S&S Food Store #5 at 704 S. Marion Ave. Huchingson immediately closed her accounts and filed a report with LCPD. During her initial on-scene investiga tion, Officer Connie Hightower went to S&S #5 and found the victims purse in the trash can next to the gas pumps. However, Huchingsons drivers license, Social Security card and two credit cards were missing. Investigator Tammy Cox of the depart ments Criminal Investigation Division learned that the thieves had not only used the card at the S&S but also com mitted several other crimes in surround ing counties and Valdosta, Ga. Craig Strickland, LCPD assistant pub lic information officer, said the timeline is a quick one for the thieves as they stole the purse about 11:20 a.m. and got gas from the S&S station at 11:27. Less than a hour later, at 12:12 p.m., the suspects attempted to use the debit card at an ATM in Live Oak and were declined. In a similar case from Gainesville, Tiffany Pridgens vehicle was burglar ized and her purse and checkbook were stolen on the same day at 10:23 a.m., where her checkbook was stolen. After the attempt to use Huchingsons ATM card failed, the suspects wrote a check from Pridgens stolen checkbook to Huchingson and cashed the check for $1,750 at 12:13 p.m. in Live Oak. The trio then drove to Madison and at 1:07 p.m. wrote another check for $1,850 and got it cashed in Huchingsons name. The crew reportedly turned around and went back to Live Oak where the three suspects went into the Walmart store on U.S. 129 and opened a charge account in Huchingsons name, using her stolen ID. About 4 p.m., the three suspects charged more than $2,000 to the card in electronic merchandise and loaded the goods into the trunk of a black, four-door vehicle. The next day, Aug. 31, the white female suspect went to the Gainesville airport and rented a white, 2013 Chevy Malibu, with license plate number F78-45N from Hertz. The vehicle had not been returned or located and has been entered into a criminal database as stolen by the Gainesville Police Department. Later that day the suspects opened a checking account at a bank in Gainesville in Huchingsons name. The suspects are also accused of using a check belonging to Huchingson to buy merchandise totaling $421 at the Walmart store in Valdosta, Ga. The suspects are described as a heavyset white woman with dark hair and aver age height. The first black male suspect has short hair, a beard and mustache. The second black male suspect appears to be shorter and has a thin mustache. The original vehicle is possibly a black Chrysler 200 sedan with tinted windows. Strickland said Huchingson was tar geted by the thieves. Theyre targeting women frequenting daycares, gyms, church parking lots, where they would normally leave their purses in the vehicle often on the seat or floor board in plain sight, he said. He said local authorities believe the Felony Lane Gang was only operating in Lake City for that one incident. Because of the similarities to other cases reported around the state, it is believed the suspects are part of the Felony Lane Gang. The gang is accused of operating in sev eral parts of Florida, Arkansas, Missouri, South Carolina, Nebraska, Tennessee, Illinois and Wisconsin. Authorities across the state used the label due to the thieves use of a banks outer drive-through lanes to pass fraudu lent checks. Those lanes often dont have good camera coverage and the cashiers cant see into the vehicles well. Members of the group often commit burglaries and steal IDs, checkbooks and credit cards, then write checks on the accounts for thousands of dollars and charge up the cards until they are shut down by the victims bank. Reports said the thieves often travel with a woman and two men and the woman usually wears a wig to suit the identity theft victims hair color and other disguises. As we approach the holiday season and as our city is attracting more and more people, Lake City Police Department is encouraging our citizens to secure their vehicles and ensure valuable items are not left lying in open view in their vehicles, Strickland said. Remember to lock before you leave. This will greatly decrease the crime of opportunity. Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 10, 2012 3A 3A Charter Loans Services Pay outstanding bills, credit cards. Lowest compared rates. Personal loans. Business, debt loans. Auto Home Improvement Loans Bad Credit options. No apps. fees Call today: 1.877.359.5533 Charteracc@usa.com Dale Carnegie Training presented by Folkner Training Associates, Inc. You are invited to an Executive Breakfast Thursday, October 11, 2012 8:05 a.m. 9:25 a.m. The Lake CityColumbia County Chamber of Commerce and Lake City Reporter cordially invited you to attend an Executive Breakfast at The Country Club at Lake City 717 NW Fairway Dr., Lake City You may bring interested friends with you as long as they are business owners, executives or in management positions. Reservation Required Call the Chamber at (386) 752-3690 $12.00 per person Includes meal and a copy of Dale Carnegies Golden Book Lake City Reporter CENTER: Sites on either side of Interstate 75 near Ellisville considered Continued From Page 1A GANG: Woman, two men sought for identity theft, other property crimes Continued From Page 1A center in Columbia County. The meeting included financial plans for funding the building, an estimated cost of the building, an architects rendering of the site, employment possibilities, poten tial locations and an explanation of where the data was collected. The presentation was devel oped by the fact-finding commit tee, which worked on the project for at least 16 months, after visit ing other event and convention centers out of state and in other parts of Florida. The presentation also noted the project hinged on a partner ship with Columbia County and Columbia County Resources. Dale Williams, county man ager, told the audience that a memorandum of understand ing between Columbia County Resources and the county was in the works, where the land of Columbia County Resources would transfer to the county and then be available for sale and/or development. The Columbia County Resources campus is 82.56 acres. Based on the fair market value established by the county Property Appraisers Office, the land is listed at $4.6 million, or $56,216 per acre. The commit tees presentation indicated that 100 percent of the land sale pro ceeds could be allocated to the Events Center. The top priority the fact-find ing committee emphasized was acquiring a large acreage with interstate frontage. Officials believe interstate frontage is cru cial to a successful center and cre ates a presence and awareness of the facility. A campus setting with multiple buildings would allow for multiple events simultaneous ly. Parking is a major concern, and the plan called for 1,500 to 2,000 parking spaces. The second priority was that the facilities need to be designed for multi-purpose events and not be limited to conferences or con ventions. Priority three event facilities are seldom self-supporting and will require financial assistance. However, most events should be structured to cover their costs. The best management projec tions only provided 75 to 80 per cent return on operating expens es. The most successful facilities used fairs to generate a large portion of their annual revenue. The proposed site would be a minimum of 200 acres with inter state frontage; would have access to public utilities and adequate ingress and egress; and the build ing would be multi-purpose in design and contain approximate ly 250,000 square feet. The project would require a strong governance plan, and the project must be done in coop eration with Columbia County Resources, the owners and oper ators of the Columbia County fairgrounds. The proposal is based on new jobs being created on the fair grounds site, which eventually will be developed into commer cial buildings, hopefully bringing in at least 1,760 jobs with three hotels, five restaurants and two merchandise supercenters. Following the meeting, county commissioners fielded questions and comments. Ed Harris, a Lake City resi dent, voiced his concerns about the county commission poten tially having the last word on the proposal. I think a project of this mag nitude should be voted on by the general public and not passed by a general committee, he said. He also questioned who owned the land that was being consid ered. Officials were also questioned why Ellisville was being consid ered as a potential location for the events center, since it is at least 10 miles away from town. Commissioner Jody DuPree said that land near the U.S. 90 and State Road 47 interchanges was too expensive and noted offi cials were looking at two poten tial sites in Ellisville, one on the east side of the Interstate 75 and the other on the west side. CUTS: Many families in area would need to choose between jobs and care Continued From Page 1A By BILL KACZOR Associated Press TALLAHASSEE A higher education task force appointed by Gov. Rick Scott may recommend tuition increases and vary ing tuition rates based on a students year in school or academic field ideas simi lar to those in a bill recently vetoed by Scott. The panel is scheduled to hold a webinar Friday to discuss those and other sug gestions before finalizing its recommendations to the Republican governor and GOP-controlled Legislature. The working draft of the Blue Ribbon Task Force on State Higher Education notes that Floridas tuition rates remain among the lowest in the nation and includes comparisons with universities in other states. For example, annual tuition is $6,403 at Florida State University and $6,170 at the University of Florida, the states two leading research schools. That compares to $7,694 at the University of North Carolina, $10,037 at Ohio State University and $16,006 at Pennsylvania State University. Tuition at Floridas then-11 active universities increased by 22 percent, or $202.2 million, from 2007-08 through 2009-10, according to the draft. Over that same three-year period, though, state support dropped by 19 percent, or $443.3 mil lion, for a net loss of $241.1 million. If the foregoing condi tions persist, it should be understood by all inter ested parties that Floridas research universities and, to a lesser extent, all of the institutions are vulnerable to (faculty) raids,... State government panel eyes raising college tuition rates

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H ow do you get the likes of Sen. Bill Nelson and Rep. Steve Southerland on the same side of an issue? Threaten to touch Florida’s share of money from the BP oil spill settlement. After months of political wrangling, Congress in June finally passed the RESTORE Act (which President Obama signed into law in July). It allocates 80 percent of Clean Water Act fines from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill to Florida and the four other Gulf states. The act directs that the fines returned to those states be used for eco-logical and economic recov-ery efforts. Florida law ensures that the Panhandle counties most affected by the spill — Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, Walton, Bay, Gulf, Franklin and Wakulla — receive three-fourths of the Sunshine State’s share of the money. According to the funding formula, that could mean tens of millions of dollars for each county. Recently, reports swirled that the Justice Department was negotiating a deal with BP to settle civil and criminal charges resulting from the oil spill. It would give the federal government more control over the billions of dollars in fines paid by BP, shifting that authority away from the affected states, and it would divert a greater por-tion of those fines toward a Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA), reduc-ing the civil penalties for vio-lating the Clean Water Act. NRDA fines have stricter federal controls on them, whereas CWA fines are sub-ject to the RESTORE Act and are more flexible. The NRDA fines are also tax-deductible. That means BP would be able write off hundreds of millions of dol-lars in penalties, thus easing the financial pain it should feel for operating in such a reckless and destructive manner. Put simply, that deal would be outrageous. It’s a slap in the face to every resident of the Gulf Coast — and a slap on the wrist to BP. Gulf Coast members of the House and Senate, including Florida’s 2nd District Rep. Southerland, R-Panama City, and 1st District Rep. Jeff Miller, R-Chumuckla, recently sent a letter to Attorney General Eric Holder express-ing “in the strongest possible terms” their opposition to any settlement agreement that disproportionately applies penalties to NRDA over the CWA. Sen. Nelson, a Democrat, wrote to President Barack Obama: “I urge you to hold BP fully accountable for the harm it caused and send the bulk of the fines to the Gulf as directed by the RESTORE Act. Anything less would be an injustice to Gulf Coast com-munities.” The Gulf Coast thought it had finally cleaned up this mess. Now here comes Washington muddying the waters. Holder needs to back off and let the RESTORE Act work. DealwoulderodeBP fines OUR OPINION HIGHLIGHTS IN HISTORY Today is Wednesday, October 10, the 284th day of 2012. There are 82 days left in the year. On this date:In 1938 Nazi Germany completes the annexation of Czechoslovakia’s Sudetenland. D uring this presiden-tial election year, as Republicans seek to oust President Barack Obama from the White House, Americans are getting a chilling blast from the past. The right to vote, which sets the United States apart from many other nations worldwide, is under attack as it has not been in nearly 50 years. Using the ruse of wanting to assure that everyone who votes is eligible to vote, several state legislatures controlled by Republicans have passed strict voter identification laws requir-ing the show of a photo. This requirement may seem innocu-ous, but its purpose is to sup-press voting among racial and ethnic minorities, especially Hispanics and African-Americans, and other groups who tend to vote Democratic. It is voter suppression redux.Having come of age during the 1960s in the South, I am familiar with the relationship between voting and disenfranchisement. I knew that the right to vote, along with actually casting a ballot, was essential to full citizenship. In 1963, during the height of the voting rights movement, Donald Matthews and James Prothro, professors at the University of North Carolina, wrote a prescient assessment of blacks and the vote in an article for the American Political Science Review: “The vote is widely considered the Southern Negro’s most important weapon in his struggle for full citizenship and social and economic equality. It is argued that ‘political rights pave the way for all others.’ Once Negroes in the South vote in substantial numbers, white politicians will prove responsive to the desires of the Negro community. Also, federal action on voting will be met with less resistance from the white South -and Southerners in Congress -than action involving schools, jobs, or housing.” As a child, I did not know any blacks who voted. We could not vote. I recognized an ugly irony up close: Several of my relatives who had served as Marines and soldiers during World War II and the Korean conflict could not vote after returning to U.S. soil. They were not alone. More than 500,000 blacks fought, and many died, as members of racially seg-regated units during World War II. More than 600,000 served during the Korean conflict. Many died. To keep blacks out of voting booths back then, whites used practices that included poll taxes, proof of residency, physical intimidation and even murder. The most effective tool, though, was the literacy test. In 1964, during my first college summer break, I joined the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and traveled throughout the South with fel-low students as a volunteer for the federally endorsed Voter Education Project. Our job was to help register black voters. We had our clients memorize as much of their state constitutions as they could. We would drive the brave ones downtown where white registrars would ask constitution-related questions. Even many highly educated white citizens could not answer these questions. Of course, whites did not have to take the tests. Even after quot-ing entire sections of the con-stitutions verbatim, most blacks were deemed illiterate and were rejected. In some towns, we were warned to be outside the city limits by sundown. These places were appropriately named “sun-down towns.” In one Mississippi town, a sign read: “NIGGERS! Don’t Let the Sun Set on Your Behinds in This Town.” Being smart college kids, we were gone long before sunset. My scariest experience came in Alabama, when a sheriff’s dep-uty and a mob raided the tables we had set under a magnolia tree on an all-black college campus. The deputy massaged his hol-stered pistol as he cursed and hurled epithets. Every man in the mob carried either a baseball bat or an ax handle. The mob battered our tables and chairs and ripped up our documents. Our leader was clubbed to the ground when he protested. We put him in the bed of our pickup and drove to a black church where we hid until the next morning. Our next stop was Selma.I was a changed young man after returning to college that fall. I had learned that the vote was a right brave people would die for. I learned, too, that tak-ing away the vote is the most effective way to disenfranchise entire groups. Chilling blast from the past LETTERS TO THE EDITOR To the Editor:Mr. Romney, heard your foreign policy speech today. You read a speech written by the same War Profiteers that con-trolled the Bush administration. It is what got us into almost bankruptcy in the first place! I’m sure you are sending your five sons to enlist into this future army. You want boots on the ground don’t you? Please stop the fear promotions! Even with our defense budget cutbacks to stop wasteful spend-ing and WAR FOR PROFIT, the U.S.A. budget is still more than the rest of the world put together! So, what I see — as a GOLD STAR DAD — is that nothing has changed. You are a war monger for never eding wars for profit! Leave the Middle East people alone. They are having their own revolutions for freedom — which President Obama helped spark by giving them a little respect! That’s all they wanted! And knowing he would not invade them for their oil while they did away with tyranny in their countries! Sir, voting for you is like voting for Bush all over again! Stop obstructing jobs for our young people. They are not going to fight the Military Industrial Complex wars anymore! PS: Romney, tell your puppet masters that the American people don’t want to police the world anymore! Not when there are 40 million in poverty and 25 million going to bed hungry over night. Your $500,000 bombs mean that American’s suffer, their children die in wars and you just prolong the greening of America with renewable energy! Please stop scaring people into giving up their freedoms and jobs just so you — interna-tionalist with no country — can profit from never-ending war! We want peace ... now! Fred McGill, Fort White To the Editor:This is in reference to the proposed change in Amendment No. 8 in the upcoming election. The title is “Reliugious Freedon’” That is incorrect. It should say “Religious Bondage.” As proposed, it binds taxpayers to finance privagte schools, and is unconstitutional. The rewording tries to cover up the real purpose by saying no person may be denied a gov-ernment benefit. That is not the question. The question is: Is this benefit con-stittutional? No. Congress shall make NO laws (good or bad) in respecty to the establishment of religion, or the free exercise thereof. The amendment is about financing privat school by tax-payers. This amendment is designed to make it constitutional in Florida for the “voucher sys-tem.” Vote no. Hoyt McLendon, Lake City No wars for profit, Mr. Romney Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding counties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, publisher Robert Bridges, editor Sue Brannon, controller Dink NeSmith, president Tom Wood, chairman LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY E-MAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com P lenty of folks pitched in to help in the aftermath of Tropical Storm Debby, and not just the professionals. Churches, civic groups and just plain folks did everything they could and then some. It’s hard to single out any one individual for special praise, considering the com-munity-wide commitment of so many. But one local pastor in particular merits notice. Dale Tompkins of the Church on the Way was every-where during Debby and after-ward. Tompkins and his flock made it their jobs to bring relief to the hundreds here who sudden-ly found themselves in need. Now he’s in a position to help again. This time, he needs our help to make it happen. Tompkins is one of 15 people nationwide participating in a contest to bring $10,000 to the local chapter of United Way. How do we make it happen?Just go to safeco.com and click on “Safeco Community Hero” on the home page.You’ll be redirected to the bal-lot where you can recognize Tompkins for the hero he surely is. The contest runs through Oct. 29. Whoever gets the most votes wins. But unlike most political bouts, you can cast your ballot every day in this one. Please be sure you do.Every one of us can come out a winner. Vote early andoften inthis race Q Assocated Press OPINION Wednesday, October 10, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A4AOPINION Bill Maxwellmaxwell@sptimes.com Q Bill Maxwell is a columnist and editorial writer for the St. Petersburg Times. ANOTHER VIEW Q The News Herald, Panama City

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Viola CuniganMrs. Viola Cunigan, 91 of Ft. Laud., FL. was called home to glory on Oct. 4, 2012 at the FL. Medical Center of Ft. Laud., FL. after a sudden illness. She was born on Sept. 27, 1921 to the late Cora and Jerry Horne of Quincy, FL. In early 1950 she moved to Ft. Laud., FL and married the late Ishmael Thurston and from this union three daughters were born Rona, Dorothy and Barbara. Barbara and Doro-thy preceded her in death and a grand-daughter Chevalla Yates. She later married Eddie Cunigan who also preceded her in death.She gave her life to Christ and was a member of the New Mount Olive Baptist Church. She was a loving mother and nurturing grand-mother. Survivors are: Daughter Rona (Rudolph) Mizell Lake City, FL. A brother Willie (Mildred) Horne, Ft. Laud., FL. son-in-law Melvin Williams Ft. Laud., FL. (7) grand children MGY Sgt. Kerry (Frances) Yates Sr. Retired (USMC), Lake City, FL., Lt. Col. Demetrius (To-moe) Mizell (USAF), Washing-ton, D.C. Monique, Chamone and Nicole Williams all of Ft. Laud., FL. Lajeanne (Thom-as) Kerney Jacksonville, FL. (10) Great-grandchildren and (4) great-great Grandchildren.Funeral Services will be held Saturday, October 13, 2012 at 11:00 A.M. at the Mt. Olive Bap-tist Church 400 N.W. 9th Ave. Ft. Laud., FL. with Dr. Cyrus Pettis, RIFLDWLQJ9LVLWDWLRQIRUIDPLO\and friends will be Friday, Oct. 12 from 5-8P.M. at the ROY MIZELL/KURZT FUNERAL HOME 1305 N.W. 6th Street (Sistrunk Blvd., Ft. Lauder-dale, FL. Ph. 1(954) 467-3426.)David Ray EspenshipDavid Ray Espenship, age 58, of Lake City, Fla. died Monday, Oct. 8, at his residence. He was a life long resident of Lake City and worked as a construction superintendent with Bud Espen-ship Construction Company and Gator Utilities of Lake City, Fla. for over 40 years. He enjoyed KXQWLQJDQGVDOWZDWHUVKLQJDWHorseshoe Beach and Suwan-nee, Fla. He is survived by his daughter Brook (Aaron) Bass of Branford, Fla.: Three grandchil-dren Kelsey Rae Bass, Braden Bass and Eli Bass: His father Bud (Jackie) Espenship and his mother Betty Jo Richardson all of Lake City, Fla.: One brother D.B. “Puddy” Espenship IV of Lake City, Fla.: One half-brother Scott Carter Espen-ship of Alachua, Fla. Funeral services will be conducted at 4 P.M. Friday, Oct. 12, in the Chapel of Guerry Funeral Home with Rev. Howard Thomas, Pas-tor of the Deep Creek Advent &KULVWLDQ&KXUFKRIFLDWLQJInterment will be in Memorial Cemetery, Lake City, Fla. Visi-tation will be from 6 to 8 P.M. Thursday, Oct. 11, at GUERRY FUNERAL HOME 2659 S.W. Main Blvd., Lake City, Fla.www.guerryfuneralhome.netDannie C. SpludeMr. Dannie C. Splude, 61, of Lake City, passed away Sun-day, October 7, 2012 at his resi-dence. A native of Stambaugh, Michigan, Mr. Splude had been a resident of Lake City since 2003 having moved here from Texas. Dannie was a veteran of the U.S. Army having served in Vietnam. He had been employed for twenty-two years with Gen-eral Motors in Pontiac, Michi-gan prior to working for many years as a long distance truck driver. In his spare time Dannie enjoyed riding his motorcycle having recently completed a nine state ride out west. He was an avid Florida Gator fan and golfer and was of the Baptist faith. Dannie was preceded in death by his father, John Splude. Dannie is survived by his mother, Virginia Splude of Lake City; his daughter, Krista Splude and two sons, Jeremy Splude and Jonathan Splude; a sister Linda Landry (Rene’); and his brothers, Roger Splude (Cheryl) and Ron Splude. Funeral services for Mr. Splude will be conducted at 6:00 P.M. Wednesday October 10, 2012 in the Chapel of the Dees-Par-rish Family funeral home with 5HY5LFKDUG&DVRQRIFLDWLQJInterment with Military Hon-ors will be held at 1:00 P.M. on Thursday, October 11, 2012 in the Jacksonville National Cem-etery. The family will receive friends in the Chapel of the fu-neral home for One Hour prior to the funeral service Wednesday evening. Arrangements are under the direction of the DEESPARRISH FAMILY FUNERAL HOME 458 S. Marion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025 386-752-1234 Please share your thoughts and wishes for the family at our on-line family guestbook at parrishfamilyfuneralhome.com Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012 5A5A COUPON REQUIRED ...Do you have the over-priced, slow-speedInternet Blues?GetFAST High-Speed Internet Today!Now Available Everywhere! Call your N. Central & N. Florida Authorized Dealer Today at386-269-0984 1-800-787-8041 $39.95to$59.99/Mo. “Because CABLE is so last century!”21st Century Communications, LLCDigital TV Service & UNLIMITED phone service, too!Ask About OBITUARIES Obituaries are paid advertise-ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporter’s classified department at 752-1293. COMMUNITY CALENDAR Q To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Laura Hampson at 754-0427 or bye-mail at lhampson@ lakecityreporter.com.Oct. 10Veterans job fairFlorida Crown Workforce Board is conducting a Hiring Our Heros veterans job fair from 9 a.m. to noon at the American Legion Post 57, 2602 SW Main Blvd, in Lake City. This a free hir-ing fair for both employ-ers and veteran jobseek-ers. Veterans, active-duty military members, Guard and Reserve members and qualifying military spouses are encouraged to attend. Veterans are asked to bring copies of their DD-214 and their current resumes. Walk-ins are welcome. Newcomers and FriendsThe regular Luncheon of the Lake City Newcomers and Friends will be at 11 a.m. at Eastside Village Clubhouse. Our program is the installation of officers and some games. Lunch is $11. Any questions, call Barbara Cutcher 752-9783 or Joan Wilson 755-9897.Early learning meetingThe Early Learning Coalition of Florida’s Gateway Inc. board meet-ing will be at 9 a.m. at the coalition office, 1104 SW Main Blvd. The coalition administers state and fed-eral funding for all School Readiness and Voluntary Pre-kindergarten. We encourage community par-ticipation and welcome any input. Dine to donateDine to donate every Wednesday in October at Applebee’s in Lake City. The Tough Enough to Wear Pink Crisis Fund will receive 10 percent of the bill. Ask for a flier, by the Columbia County Fairgrounds Office or call 752-8822 to have one emailed to you. Oct. 11Woodturners ClubBell Woodturners Club meets the second Thursday of the month in the Bell Community Center at 7 p.m. Every meeting features a show-and-tell of members’ current projects. There is also a full demonstration of a woodturning project by a club member. There are opportunities to take home project wood, and tools and receive help from other turners. All experience lev-els are welcome. For more information, contact Kent Harriss at 365-7086.Garden Club meetingThe Lake City Garden Club will meet at the Clubhouse, 257 SE Hernando Ave. The pro-gram will be on ground cover by Betsy Martin. Social time begins at 9:30 a.m., and the meeting is at 10 a.m. Everyone is invited. Volunteer opportunityHospice of the Nature Coast is searching for indi-viduals interested in volun-teering in the Columbia, Suwannee, Hamilton and Lafayette areas. Volunteers are needed to provide gen-eral office support and nonmedical assistance to patients and their families. Hospice volunteers can provide services such as telephone calls, socializa-tion, light meal prepara-tion, shopping or errands and staffing information booths at seasonal festi-vals. Specialized training will be provided. To vol-unteer, contact Volunteer Manager Drake Varvorines at 386-755-7714 or email: dvarvorines@hospiceofthe naturecoast.org.Plant clinicUniversity of Florida Master Gardeners are available every Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon to answer ques-tions about lawns and plants. Bring samples for a free diagnosis or solutions to the Columbia County Extension Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel Lane. For more information, call 752-5384. Oct. 12Class of 1962The Columbia High School class of 1962 will be celebrating their 50th class reunion Oct. 12 and 13. Contact Linda Hurst Greene at (386) 752-0561 for more information.Classic car paradeOn Friday from 6 to 9 p.m., American Hometown Veteran Assist Inc. will host a cruise-in and classic car parade at Hardees on U.S. 90. All proceeds benefit local veterans. Oct. 13Monument rededicationJoin the Sons of Confederate Veterans and the United Daughters of the Confederacy at 11 a.m. for the rededication of the Confederate Monument, at Olustee Battlefield, which originally was dedicated 100 years ago. Zumba charityA Zumba benefit for local breast cancer awareness will be from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at the Teen Town Recreation Building, 533 NW Desoto St. The Zumbathon Charity Event will benefit the Suwannee River Breast Cancer Awareness Association. and all proceeds will be used locally. There is a $10 donation. For informa-tion call Sarah Sandlin at 758-0009. Grief supportThe Grief Share Support Group, a ministry of Orchard Community Church, meets every Saturday from 2 to 4 p.m. in room D at the Willowbrook Assisted Living Center, 1580 S. Marion Ave. The group offers caring sup-port for those who have lost loved ones, through videos, discussion time and prayer. There are fees. For information call 288-7429. Car showAmerican Hometown Veteran Assist Inc. will host a Car Show from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Columbia County Fairgrounds. All proceeds will benefit local veterans. There will be street rods, classics, antiques, muscle cars and customs. Benefit yard saleA yard sale to raise money for B.J. Helton’s recovery after a heart and lung transplant will be from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m at Busch Urology, 4601 U.S. Highway 90 in Lake City. All sales will go to Helton’s recovery fund. Oct. 14 Dicks family reunionThe 51st annual Joseph Dicks Family Reunion will begin at 12:45 p.m. at Hopeful Baptist Church in the Life Center. Friends and family are welcome. Bring a covered dish. Santa Fe River contestThe third annual Our Santa Fe River Singing and Song-writing Contest will be from 4 to 7 p.m. at the Boat House Patio at the Great Outdoors Restaurant. Performances begin at 4 p.m. There are no reserva-tions on the patio during this time. So come early and get a good seat. Plan for a fun-filled afternoon lis-tening to lovely lyrics sing-ing praises to our commu-nity’s most valuable asset, the Santa Fe River.Oct. 15DoC meetingDr. Sean McMahon, professor of history at Florida Gateway College, will be the United Daughters of the Confederacy, Olustee Chapter, guest speaker. The monthly meeting will be 5:15 p.m. at the China Buffet, 345 W. Duval St, McMahon will speak about popular culture during the Civil War. Buffet will be served after the meeting. Cost is $9. Reservations are not required. For more information, call Linda Williams at (352) 215-8776.Oct. 16Art LeagueThe Art League of North Florida will hold its monthly meeting at 6:30 p.m. at the First Presbyterian Church Education Building. The community is invited. There will be refreshments, fel-lowship, a short meeting. The speaker this month is Duffy Soto with a pre-sentation on “Using Your Computer To Compose Your Art.” Before you wet a brush, start with your computer to combine ele-ments from different sourc-es, including photos, scale models and video frames to get the look and feel for the painting you want to create. Sea level presentationNonprofit Save Our Suwannee will host a pre-sentation on the impacts of sea level rise at 7 p.m. at Unity Church of Gainesville, 8801 NW 39th Ave. Whitney Gray, sea level rise outreach coordi-nator with FWC will give the presentation. Free.Oct. 17Reading enhancementIt’s About My Efforts is offering a reading enhancement program for all ages. Classes will be at Antioch Baptist Church on Wednesdays from 5 to 6 p.m. starting today. Registration is $25. For information, call 867-1601. United Way luncheonUnited Way of Suwannee Valley’s October commu-nity fundraising campaign report luncheon will be at the Camp Weed and Cerveny Center in the Varn Dining Hall at noon. The cost is $12 per per-son. Everyone is invited. Reservations are needed and may be made by con-tacting the United Way office at (386) 752-5604 extension 102 by Oct. 10. During each month of United Way’s community campaign, a report lun-cheon is held to provide information about partner agency services. LAURA HAMPSON/ Lake City ReporterThe Richardson Middle School Chorus opens the Columbi a County School Board meeting with a performance Tuesda y night. School board serenaded

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erences, the former assis tant coach spoke of being locked up in a jail cell, sub jected to outbursts from fel low inmates, reading inspi rational books and trying to find a purpose in his fate. His voice cracked as he talked about missing his loved ones, including his wife, Dottie, who was in the gallery. Hopefully we can get better as a result of our hardship and suffering, that somehow, some way, something good will come out of this, Sandusky said. He also spoke of instanc es in which he helped chil dren and did good works in the community, adding: Ive forgiven, Ive been for given. Ive comforted oth ers, Ive been comforted. Ive been kissed by dogs, Ive been bit by dogs. Ive conformed, Ive also been different. Ive been me. Ive been loved, Ive been hated. Sandusky was convicted in June of 45 counts, found guilty of raping or fondling boys he had met through the acclaimed youth char ity he founded, The Second Mile. He plans to appeal, arguing among other things that his defense was not given enough time to prepare for trial after his arrest last November. Among the victims who spoke in court Tuesday was a young man who said he was 11 when Sandusky groped him in a shower in 1998. He said Sandusky is in denial and should stop coming up with excuses. Ive been left with deep painful wounds that you caused and had been bur ied in the garden of my heart for many years, he said. Another man said he was 13 in 2001 when Sandusky lured him into a Penn State sauna and 6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 10, 2012 6A L a k e C i t y M e d i c a l c o m | ( 3 8 6 ) 7 1 9 9 0 0 0 B e T o u g h E n o u g h t o W e a r P i n k & j o i n C o l u m b i a C o u n t y R e s o u r c e s I n c L a k e C i t y M e d i c a l C e n t e r & A f f i l i a t e s i n L U N C H & L E A R NS p e a k e r : D r M a n i s h J a n iT h u r s d a y O c t o b e r 1 1 | 1 2 n o o nC o l u m b i a C o u n t y F a i r g r o u n d s B a n q u e t H a l l 4 3 8 S W S R 2 4 7 | L a k e C i t y F L 3 2 0 2 5 S t a r t i n g O c t 2 L a k e C i t y M e d i c a l C e n t e r a n d i t s a f f i l i a t e s a r e h o n o r i n g m o r e t h a n 3 0 0 c o u r a g e o u s w o m e n d i a g n o s e d o r t r e a t e d f o r b r e a s t c a n c e r i n o n e o f o u r f a c i l i t i e s i n t h e l a s t t h r e e y e a r s b y d i s p l a y i n g 3 0 0 p i n k f l a m i n g o s f o r t h e m o n t h o f O c t o b e r F o r a $ 1 5 d o n a t i o n y o u c a n h a v e o n e o f t h e s e f l a m i n g o s t o d i s p l a y i n y o u r o w n y a r d s p r e a d i n g b r e a s t c a n c e r a w a r e n e s s t h r o u g h o u t o u r c o m m u n i t y F u n d s r a i s e d s u p p o r t C o l u m b i a C o u n t y R e s o u r c e s T o u g h E n o u g h t o W e a r P i n k C r i s i s F u n d a n d t h e A m e r i c a n C a n c e r S o c i e t y V i s i t t h e L a k e C i t y M e d i c a l C e n t e r l o b b y t o g e t y o u r f l a m i n g o SANDUSKY: Says conviction was a conspiracy Continued From Page 1A By LAURA HAMPSON lhampson@lakecityreporter.com Columbia County School Board members agreed Tuesday night to hold their annual reorganizational meeting Nov. 20 at 6:30 p.m. before the regular meeting at 7 p.m. Members agreed to cancel their Nov. 27 meeting as the two new board members will have state training that day and cannot attend the meeting. In other matters: A parent of a Shining Star Academy of the Arts students asked the board members to consider allow ing the charter school to enroll students up to their senior year in the future. Superintendent Michael Millikin said during the meeting Tuesday night the charter school would have to change its contract with the district, but a formal meeting can be arranged to discuss the process. Michael Friedman of Ring Power Lift Trucks said the company was excited to support the Columbia High School Global Logistics Academy during a brief presentation to the board. Last week Ring Power donated use of a $20,000 forklift for the school year. Friedman said teaching students how to operate forklifts and work in a ware house is important so when they get out of school they can be a valuable assets to the workforce. LAURA HAMPSON/ Lake City Reporter Representative from Ring Power Lift Trucks spoke to the Columbia County School Board Tuesday night about their forklift donation to the Columbia High School Global Logistics Academy. Pictured (from left) are CHS student Andrew Picklo; Michael Friedman of Ring Power; Superintendent Michael Millikin; Todd Sandlin, Ring Power Lake City Branch regional manager; CHS student Anthony Picklo and school board chairman Steve Nelson. School board prepares for transition Education board seeking budget increase of 4.4% By BILL KACZOR Associated Press The State Board of Education voted Tuesday to seek a $643 million, or 4.4 percent, spending increase next year for Floridas public schools and colleges. The board during its meeting in Orlando also approved other legislative requests and a new fiveyear strategic plan that envisions minority stu dents narrowing but not fully closing their achievement gap with white students. The total $15.6 billion spending request for the budget year beginning July 1, 2013, includes $9.88 billion in basic funding for kindergarten through 12th grade. That would be $322 million, or 3.37 percent, more than is cur rently being spent. The increase for community and state colleges would be $100.5 million, or 9.43 percent, for a total of $1.17 billion. The overall 4.4 percent increase equals the states estimated growth in gen eral revenue next year. Lawmakers last year approved a $1 billion increase for public schools, but that wasnt enough to offset prior cuts. Fifteen percent of the new money the board is seeking would be need ed just to keep up with enrollment growth. Other proposed new spending includes $442 million for K-12 technology improve ments, $63.6 million for charter school capital out lay and $64.8 million in matching funds for private donations to the colleges. Board member John Padget questioned why the achievement goals for all children, regardless of racial or ethnic back ground, shouldnt be the same. Board member Roberto Bobby Martinez said that would be a heck of a statement but noted that black and Hispanic chil dren are starting at a dif ferent place. We have to be realis tic, added board member Kathleen Shanahan.

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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Wednesday, October 10, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com %632576 BRIEFS Fort White High holds its own in tough first half. Today Q Fort White High bowling vs. Columbia High at Lake City Bowl, 4 p.m. Thursday Q Columbia High girls golf in Alachua County Tournament at Meadowbrook Golf Club, noon Q Columbia High boys golf in Alachua County Tournament at Gainesville Country Club, noon Q Fort White High volleyball at Bradford High, 6 p.m. (JV-5) Q Columbia High volleyball vs. Atlantic Coast High, 6:30 p.m. (JV-5:30) Q Fort White JV football at Dixie County High, 7 p.m. Friday Q Fort White High football at Williston High, 7:30 p.m. Saturday Q Columbia High swimming vs. Fernandina Beach High, Baker County High, 9:30 a.m. Q Columbia High, Fort White High cross country in Bobcat Cross Country Invitational at Santa Fe College in Gainesville GAMES OUTDOORS Hunter safety courses offered Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is offering hunter safety Internet-completion courses for Columbia County from 6-9 p.m. Friday and 8 a.m. to noon Saturday. Students who have taken the online course and wish to complete the classroom portion must bring the onlinecompletion report. Firearms, ammunition and materials are provided. Students should bring pen and paper. An adult must accompany children younger than 16. Call the regional office at 758-0525. ZUMBA Pink Party charity event A Zumbathon Pink Party to benefit the Suwannee Valley Breast Cancer Awareness Association is 5:30-7 p.m. Saturday at Teen Town Recreation Center. Donation is $10. For details, call Sarah Sandlin at 758-0009. FORT WHITE BASEBALL Team at Walmart on Saturday Members of the Fort White High baseball program will be collecting donations at Walmart from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. For details, call Jeanne Howell at 288-5537. CHEERLEADING Columbia Cheer hosts Cheer Fest Columbia Cheer Association is sponsor-ing a Cheer Fest from 3-6 p.m. Saturday at Richardson Community Center. Admission is $2 for students, and $3 for adults. For details, call Wilda Drawdy at 965-1377.Q From staff reports Prepping for playoffsBy TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comFORT WHITE — Fort White High football had its open date last week. The Indians are 3-2 at the mid-point of the season, with a schedule that is definitely top-loaded. First-half opponents Wakulla High and Union County High are both unde-feated and ranked third and second in their respective classes. Newberry High is 4-2 and Taylor County High is 2-3. Only Hamilton County High, at 0-5, could be considered a pushover. The five teams Fort White has played have a winning percentage of .696 when not counting their performance against the Indians. The difficulty tapers off in the second half. The win-ning percentage for teams down the stretch is .321 and only District 3-3A opponent Trinity Catholic High (3-3) is at .500. For the first half, Fort White is averaging 27 points per game while giving up 18 (134-89). The two top 3 opponents accounted for 65 points. “We knew we were playing some teams that were pret-ty good,” Fort White head coach Demetric Jackson said. “We thought we could take care of Hamilton, but the other games could have gone either way. To prepare ourselves for a playoff run, you need to play teams that will challenge you and that is what we tried to do. It will benefit us in the second half.” Fort White leads opponents in overall offensive yardage 1,529-1,195. The Indians have rushed for 683 yards on 158 carries for a 4.3 average. Opponents are 205-965 (4.7), which includes running jugger-nauts Newberry, Wakulla and Union County. Fort White is way ahead in passing yardage, 846-230. The Indians are 54 of 94 (.574) with five inter-ceptions and nine touchdown passes. Opponents are 14 of 51 (.275) with four interceptions. Fort White leads in first downs, 55-52, and has been penalized 39 times for 301 yards to the opponents’ 59 times for 439 yards. The Indians have fumbled 15 times and lost 10; oppo-nents have fumbled 12 times and lost eight. Quarterback Andrew Baker has the passing sta-tistics mentioned above. His touchdown passes have JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High quarterback Andrew Baker (12) runs the b all while searching for an open receiver during a ga me against Union County High on Sept. 28. INDIANS continued on 2B JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Kaleigh Sanderson (4) blocks the bal l from heading over the net during a game against Suwannee on Oct. 2. Lady Tigers bounce back Hard-luck night for Richardson By TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comRichardson Middle School football continued its hard-luck run with a 14-6 home loss to Baker County Middle School on Tuesday. Richardson got on the board first with a touch-down at 2:22 of the first quarter. The Wolves stopped the Bobcats on a fourth-down try on the opening drive and took over at the Richardson 45. Kamario Bell ran for 12 yards and a first down at the Baker County 43. On fourth-and-5, Bell took a pitch around the right side. He broke a tackle at the line of scrimmage and ran through two defenders at the 20-yard line to com-plete a 38-yard scoring play. The PAT run came up short. Richardson forced a three-and-out punt, but returned the favor. On the Wolves’ punt Baker County broke through and blocked it, then picked up the ball and ran 30 yards for the tying points. Later in the second quarter, the Wolves got inter-ceptions from Michael Doughtery — negated by a blow-to-the-head penalty — and Ronnie Collins to stop the Bobcats. Richardson moved into Baker County territory on an 18-yard run by Bell, but came up short on a fourth-and-1. The Wolves lost a couple of fumbles in the second half and one led to the win-ning touchdown by the Bobcats. Richardson (1-4) has lost each of its four games by one touchdown. The Wolves travel to Fort White for a 6 p.m. game on Oct. 16. Baker County Middle School wins 14-6. By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High picked up where it left off after drop-ping its first district game against St. Augustine on Friday. The Lady Tigers needed four sets but came out on top of the visiting Stanton Prep Lady Devils. Columbia earned a 25-7, 26-24, 20-25, 25-20 win on its home court. Although it was a district match, it didn’t count for the Lady Tigers’ record due to only being allowed to count the first game played against each district oppo-nent. Annie Milton had 11-consecutive service points in the first game to help the Lady Tigers cruise to vic-tory and helped shut down Stanton Prep in the second game. Stanton Prep was leading as late as 19-17 and after Milton earned a kill at 24-24, she closed the game out with two service points. Kelbie Ronsonet led the Lady Tigers in kills with nine in the match and added three blocks. Jara Courson had seven kills and Jessie Bates led the team wtih 22 assists. Hannah Baker had eight assists and Milton finished with five kills, four aces and three blocks in the match. Columbia will host Atlantic Coast High at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday. Although its a district opponent, the game will not count against the district record. Columbia defeats Stanton Prep in district contest.

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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 1 p.m. MLB — Playoffs, NLDS, game 3, St. Louis at Washington 4 p.m. TBS — Playoffs, NLDS, game 4, San Francisco at Cincinnati (if necessary) 7:30 p.m. TBS — Playoffs, ALDS, game 3, Baltimore at New York 9:30 p.m. TNT — Playoffs, ALDS, game 4, Detroit at Oakland (if necessary)BASEBALLMLB playoffs DIVISION SERIES (x-if necessary) American League Detroit 2, Oakland 0 Tuesday Detroit at Oakland (n) Today x-Detroit (Scherzer 16-7) at Oakland (Griffin 7-1), 9:37 p.m. (TNT) Thursday x-Detroit at Oakland, TBD New York 1, Baltimore 1 New York 7, Baltimore 2 Monday Baltimore 3, New York 2 Today Baltimore (Gonzalez 9-4) at New York (Kuroda 16-11), 7:37 p.m. (TBS) Thursday Baltimore (Tillman 9-3) at New York (Hughes 16-13), TBD (TBS) ——— National League Cincinnati 2, San Francisco 0 Cincinnati 5, San Francisco 2Cincinnati 9, San Francisco 0 Tuesday San Francisco 2, Cincinnati 1 Today x-San Francisco (Zito 15-8) at Cincinnati, 4:07 p.m. (TBS) Washington 1, St. Louis 1 Washington 3, St. Louis 2 Monday St. Louis 12, Washington 4 Today St. Louis (Carpenter 0-2) at Washington (Jackson 10-11), 1:07 p.m. (MLB) Thursday St. Louis (Lohse 16-3) at Washington (Detwiler 10-8), TBD (TBS) FOOTBALLAP Top 25 games Saturday No. 1 Alabama at Missouri, 3:30 p.m.No. 3 South Carolina at No. 9 LSU, 8 p.m. No. 4 Florida at Vanderbilt, 6 p.m. No. 5 West Virginia at Texas Tech, 3:30 p.m. No. 6 Kansas State at Iowa State, Noon No. 7 Notre Dame vs. No. 17 Stanford, 3:30 p.m. No. 8 Ohio State at Indiana, 8 p.m.No. 10 Oregon State at BYU, 3:30 p.m. No. 11 Southern Cal at Washington, 7 p.m. No. 12 Florida State vs. Boston College, 5:30 p.m. No. 13 Oklahoma vs. No. 15 Texas, Noon No. 18 Louisville at Pittsburgh, NoonNo. 19 Mississippi State vs. Tennessee, 9 p.m. No. 20 Rutgers vs. Syracuse, NoonNo. 21 Cincinnati vs. Fordham, 7 p.m.No. 22 Texas A&M at No. 23 Louisiana Tech, 9:15 p.m. No. 24 Boise St. vs. Fresno State, 3:30 p.m. No. 25 Michigan vs. Illinois, 3:30 p.m. NFL standings AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PANew England 3 2 0 .600 165 113N.Y. Jets 2 3 0 .400 98 132Miami 2 3 0 .400 103 103Buffalo 2 3 0 .400 118 176 South W L T Pct PF PAHouston 5 0 0 1.000 149 73Indianapolis 2 2 0 .500 91 110Jacksonville 1 4 0 .200 65 138Tennessee 1 4 0 .200 88 181 North W L T Pct PF PABaltimore 4 1 0 .800 130 89Cincinnati 3 2 0 .600 125 129Pittsburgh 2 2 0 .500 93 89Cleveland 0 5 0 .000 100 139 West W L T Pct PF PASan Diego 3 2 0 .600 124 102Denver 2 3 0 .400 135 114Oakland 1 3 0 .250 67 125Kansas City 1 4 0 .200 94 145 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAPhiladelphia 3 2 0 .600 80 99N.Y. Giants 3 2 0 .600 152 111Dallas 2 2 0 .500 65 88Washington 2 3 0 .400 140 147 South W L T Pct PF PAAtlanta 5 0 0 1.000 148 93Tampa Bay 1 3 0 .250 82 91Carolina 1 4 0 .200 92 125New Orleans 1 4 0 .200 141 154 North W L T Pct PF PAMinnesota 4 1 0 .800 120 79Chicago 4 1 0 .800 149 71Green Bay 2 3 0 .400 112 111Detroit 1 3 0 .250 100 114 West W L T Pct PF PAArizona 4 1 0 .800 94 78San Francisco 4 1 0 .800 149 68St. Louis 3 2 0 .600 96 94Seattle 3 2 0 .600 86 70 Monday’s Game Houston 23, N.Y. Jets 17 Thursday’s Game Pittsburgh at Tennessee, 8:20 p.m. Sunday’s Games Oakland at Atlanta, 1 p.m.Kansas City at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.Indianapolis at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m.Cincinnati at Cleveland, 1 p.m.Detroit at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.St. Louis at Miami, 1 p.m.Dallas at Baltimore, 1 p.m.Buffalo at Arizona, 4:05 p.m.New England at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.N.Y. Giants at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.Minnesota at Washington, 4:25 p.m.Green Bay at Houston, 8:20 p.m. Monday, Oct. 15 Denver at San Diego, 8:30 p.m.Open: Carolina, Chicago, Jacksonville, New OrleansBASKETBALLNBA preseason Today’s Games Toronto at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.Oklahoma City vs. Houston at Hidalgo, Texas, 8 p.m. Indiana vs. Minnesota at Fargo, N.D., 8 p.m. Atlanta at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.Phoenix at Sacramento, 10 p.m.Portland vs. L.A. Lakers at Ontario, Calif., 10 p.m. Thursday’s Games Miami vs. L.A. Clippers at Beijing, China, 7:30 a.m. New York at Washington, 7 p.m.Philadelphia at Orlando, 7 p.m.New Orleans at Charlotte, 7:30 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420%632576$*$7( INDIANS: Finish strong first half Continued From Page 1B been to Michael Mulberry (3), Melton Sanders (2), Trey Phillips, Tavaris Williams, Reginald Williams and Shayne Newman. Phillips has 19 catches for 201 yards, followed by Mulberry 13-256, Sanders 9-156, Tavaris Williams 5-88, Newman 4-79, Caleb Bundy 2-39 and Reginald Williams 2-27. Tavaris Williams leads the Indians in rushing with 432 yards on 76 carries and three touchdowns. Baker has carried 47 times for 164 yards and one touchdown. Reginald Williams had five carries for 59 yards with one touchdown, and Phillips has 11 carries for 25 yards. Tavaris Williams and Mulberry (one punt return) each have scored four touchdowns. Reginald Williams (one fumble return) and Phillips (one punt return) have scored three touchdowns. Sanders has two touchdowns with one each for Baker, Newman and Cameron White on a fumble return. Nathan Escalante has kicked 11 extra points and the Indians have recorded two safeties. Drew Gaylard, Ken Snider, Mulberry and Sanders have intercepted passes. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Gillian Norris tees off during a match earlier this season for the Lady Tigers. CHS takes tri-match over Branford, KeystoneBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High earned some revenge from a loss earlier this year against Branford High as the Lady Tigers took home a victory in a tri-match on Tuesday. The Lady Tigers finished with a 234 to beat out Branford High (241) and Keystone Heights High (245) at Quail Heights Country Club in Lake City. Gillian Norris earned medalist honors in the match with a 44. Brooke Russell also broke 50 finishing with a 49 in the match. Abbie Blizzard carded a 66 and Madison Stalvey fin-ished with a 75 for the Lady Tigers. Columbia improved to 9-5 with the victory. Donovan’s son transfers to FloridaAssociated PressGAINESVILLE — Florida coach Billy Donovan will have his oldest son on the bench this season — and maybe on the floor the fol-lowing year. Donovan’s son, also named Billy Donovan, has transferred to Florida from Catholic University. The walk-on junior guard must sit out this season under NCAA transfer rules and will be eligible to compete for the Gators next fall. Without Strasburg, Nats turn to Jackson for Game 3By HOWARD FENDRICHAssociated PressWASHINGTON — Stephen Strasburg joined his teammates for an off-day workout at Nationals Park on Tuesday, red socks pulled nearly up to his knees while tossing base-balls in the outfield a day before the first postseason game in the nation’s capital in 79 years. That’s about the extent of activity these days for Strasburg as the Washington Nationals carry on without their acknowledged ace, shut down a month ago. The NL East champions’ opponent right now, the St. Louis Cardinals, are very much counting on their returning ace, Chris Carpenter, who has pitched only 17 innings all year. Carpenter will be on the mound Wednesday afternoon for Game 3 of the NL division series, fac-ing Washington’s Edwin Jackson. The best-of-five series is tied at 1. The 37-year-old Carpenter had surgery in July for a nerve problem that left his throwing arm and much of the right side of his body numb. He came back on Sept. 21, and is 0-2 with a 3.71 ERA in three starts. “Everybody knows that it wasn’t supposed to hap-pen,” Carpenter said about the prospect of pitching at all in 2012. “I put a lot of work into it, to hopefully have this opportunity. I didn’t know if I was going to have this opportunity or not — and fortunately, I do.” He is 9-2 with a 3.05 ERA in the postseason for his career. That includes going 4-0 with a 3.25 ERA last year while helping St. Louis win the World Series; he beat the Texas Rangers in Game 7 for the title. “Him winning the World Series last year or when-ever isn’t going to do any-thing for him tomorrow,” Nationals third baseman Ryan Zimmerman said. “He’s a great pitcher, and nobody’s taking anything away from him in that aspect, but tomorrow we’re going to go out there with our plan and try and do what we’ve done all year.” Which was good enough to own the best record in the major leagues at 98-64. Strasburg played a key role up until his final start, a three-inning outing on Sept. 7. The No. 1 overall pick in the 2009 amateur draft went 15-6 with a 3.16 ERA with 197 strikeouts in 159 1-3 innings. General manager Mike Rizzo made quite clear all season that his prized right-hander’s innings would be limited in his first full season back from Sept. 3, 2010, reconstructive elbow surgery. “I bet the kid has to be going crazy, being in the situation where he is,” said Cardinals right fielder Carlos Beltran, who hit two of his team’s four homers Monday in Game 2. “He pitched all regular season, and right now he’s not available for them.” Unable to put Strasburg on the mound now, the Nationals used playoff rookies Gio Gonzalez and Jordan Zimmermann in Games 1 and 2. “The starting pitching, we showed a little inexperience there,” man-ager Davey Johnson said. “I mean, not going right after hitters — and also not pitching.” Washington now needs to rebound from that 12-4 loss in Game 2 at St. Louis, although the Nationals pre-fer to focus on having taken one of their two road games at the outset of the series. Going up against Carpenter will be his for-mer teammate Jackson, the only starting pitcher on Washington’s roster who ever had participated in a playoff game before this season. He was a member of the Cardinals’ champion-ship club in 2011, and his overall postseason mark is 1-1 with a 4.91 ERA. He went 10-11 this season, but Washington’s record in Jackson’s starts was only 12-19. “It’s high expectations on me. I have high expecta-tions on myself, as well,” the right-hander said. “This is one of those games where you go out and you try to lead by example.” That’s certainly the sort of thing the Cardinals expect from Carpenter, who won the 2005 Cy Young Award and helped St. Louis win a title the fol-lowing year.

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The first tee was the safest place in town Friday morning as area sheriffs and their supporters lined up for the annual Youth Ranch benefit tournament. The team of Richard Francis, Robert Kelly, Randy Sommers and Bill Casey claimed the best gross score with a round of 48. In the net score category, Shack Roberson, Sam Roberson and Henry Roberson teamed with Bill Casey to take top honors with a 42.2. The team of Brent Cothern, John Martz, Tom Tuckey and Gerald Drigger combined for a 42.5 to finish second. Greg Lyons, Todd Frier, Wayne Frier and Carey Lee took third place. Skill shot winners were Shack Roberson for longest drive, Roger Bouchard for closest to the pin and Greg Lyons for longest putt. Joe Paul +9, took a threeshot win over Tom Wade and Jonathan Allen, both at +6, in the Wednesday blitz. Emerson Darst was in fourth at +5, followed by Lynn Smith in fifth with +4. Cory Depratter, Bob McGraw and Don Howard tied for sixth at +3. Jordan Hale, Buddy Slay, Mickey Wilcox, Timmy Rogers and Mike McCranie split the skins pot. McCranie’s skin was good for a nice pot hole prize. The big pot hole car-ried over. Eddy Brown (+12) overcame strong efforts from Cory DePratter and Michael Yacovelli, both with +10, for first place in the Saturday blitz. Jonathan Allen (+7), Robbie Kerby (+6) and Terry Hunter (+4) trailed the leaders. Hunter, Kerby and DePratter shared a lucra-tive payoff in the skins game. Terry Hunter rolled in four birdies and an eagle en route to a +13 win in the Sunday blitz. Hunter needed all the firepower to overcome a fine round of +10 by Don Howard. Eddy Brown and Steve Thomas tied with + 4 to share third place. One of Hunter’s birdies and the eagle were good for skins. Shelton Keen also claimed two winners. Dave Mehl and Thomas each had a keeper. Closest to the pin winners were Mehl on No. 15, Thomas on No. 17, Hunter on No. 3 and Keen on No.7. The LGA played it straight this week with a low net tournament. Suzi Davis went subpar with 70 to edge Natalie Bryant’s 72 for the win. Jan Davis finished third with a round of 78. In Good Old Boys play, the team of Barney Hart, Rob Brown, Paul Davis and Howard Whitaker took a 6-4 win over the team of Marc Risk, Bobby Simmons, Mike Spencer and Dave Cannon. Match two was a near blow-out with the team of Don Christensen, Joe Persons, Jim Stevens and Dan Stephens notching a 7-3 win over the team of Ed Snow, Jim Bell, Jim McGriff and Hugh Sherrill. The final match ended with Monty Montgomery, Emerson Darst, Bill Rogers and Merle Hibbard on top of the team of Stan Woolbert, Rhea Hart, Tony Branch and Bill Wheeler by a score of 5-4. The battle for medalist honors was close. Montgomery scored late to finish first with a round of 38-36-74. Following close behind were Risk (75), Hart (76), Snow and Hart with 77 and Hibbard with 79. The Rountree tournament is Saturday and Sunday. In the match of the unbeatens, Garrett Odom was won the last hole to defeat Phillip Russell 1 up. Garrett now stands as the only undefeated golfer in the double elimination Match Play Tournament and will await the survivor of the elimination bracket. In the elimination bracket, Joe Herring defeated Todd Carter, and awaits the winner of the Pete Sapienza vs. Chet Carter match for the right to play Garrett in the final. In weekly tournament play, the Wednesday Blitz had Glen Sanders first at +9, with Gerald Smithy and Mike Kahlich tied for sec-ond at +7. Skin winners were Todd Carter with five and Jim Munns. In Friday’s Dogfight, Wallace Christie and Randy Heavrin tied for first at +7. Garrett Odom was third at +5. Skin winners were Odom (3), Christie (2), Heavrin, Joe Herring and Tim Tortorice. Closest to the pin contests had Heavrin closest on Ponds No. 5 and Creeks No. 15 In Sunday Scramble action, the team of Brooke Russell, Ryan Minster, and Chet Carter finished at 4 under to take first place. The rollover pot was in play on three holes Creeks Nos. 2, 4 and 5, all for the winning team. However, Creeks No. 3 was the lucky hole so the pot rolled over. Sunday’s scramble is open to all golfers regard-less of skill level. Sign up by 2:45 p.m. In Junior Golf action, Tiara Carter continued her dominance of the North Florida Junior Tour. This week’s tournament was at the Golf Club at South Hampton in Jacksonville. Carter finished in first place with a solid score of 80. Second place went to Lauren Waidner of Jacksonville (85), and third place went to Lake City’s Gillian Norris (90). Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012 3B%632576 WEDNESDAY EVENING OCTOBER 10, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) The Middle (N) The Neighbors (N) Modern Family (N) Modern Family (N) Nashville “Pilot” (Series Premiere) (N) News at 11(:35) Nightline (N) 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) The Insider 5-PBS 5 -Journal Nightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Nature Siberian tigers in remote Russia. 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Food Toy Hunter (N) Toy Hunter Hamburger Paradise 2 (N) Hot Dog Paradise HGTV 47 112 229Income PropertyIncome PropertyHunters Int’lHouse HuntersProperty Brothers “Dan & Brittany” Buying and Selling “Cristal and Scott” House Hunters (N) Hunters Int’lProperty Brothers “Stan & Leslie” TLC 48 183 280Island MediumIsland MediumCracking Addiction Hoarding: Buried Alive Half-Ton Killer (N) Addicted “Aaron” (N) Half-Ton Killer HIST 49 120 269Counting CarsCounting CarsCounting CarsCounting CarsRestorationRestorationRestorationRestorationCajun Pawn StarsCajun Pawn StarsCajun Pawn StarsCajun Pawn Stars ANPL 50 184 282Fatal Attractions “Reptiles” Wild Paci c “Eat or Be Eaten” Wild Paci c “A Fiery Birth” The Blue Planet: Seas of Life The Blue Planet: Seas of Life Wild Paci c “A Fiery Birth” FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveRestaurant: ImpossibleRestaurant: ImpossibleRestaurant: Impossible “Valley Inn” (N) Restaurant Stakeout (N) Restaurant: Impossible “Whistle Stop” TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the Lord Billy Graham CrusadeBehind the ScenesTurning PointJoseph PrinceEnd of the AgePraise the Lord (Live). FSN-FL 56 -ACC All-AccessUFC Insider College Football Arizona at Stanford. UFC InsiderFootball PrevWorld Poker Tour: Season 10 SYFY 58 122 244Paranormal WitnessParanormal Witness “The Abduction” Ghost Hunters “Ghostly Refuge” Ghost Hunters “Paranormal Politics” Paranormal Witness (N) Ghost Hunters “Paranormal Politics” AMC 60 130 254(5:30) “Four Brothers” (2005) Mark Wahlberg, Tyrese Gibson. “Terminator 2: Judgment Day” (1991, Science Fiction) Arnold Schwarzenegger, Linda Hamilton. “Terminator 2: Judgment Day” COM 62 107 249South Park Tosh.0 The Colbert ReportDaily ShowChappelle’s ShowKey & PeeleSouth Park South Park South Park (N) Key & Peele (N) Daily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327Reba Reba Reba Reba “Invasion” Reba Therapist. Reba “8 Seconds” (1994) Luke Perry. An Oklahoma youth becomes rodeo champ in 1987. Pure Country NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer Kathy Grif n’s dogs. Monster Jelly shWorld’s Deadliest “Ocean Killers” Morays: The Alien EelsInto the AbyssWorld’s Deadliest “Ocean Killers” NGC 109 186 276AbandonedAbandonedInside the Green BeretsInside Cocaine SubmarinesBid & DestroyBid & Destroy (N) Gold Rush Ghost ShipsBid & DestroyBid & Destroy SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeJourney to the Center of the EarthWhat Happened Before the Big Bang?Seeing Black Holes Black holes. Cheat Sheet “The Universe” What Happened Before the Big Bang? ID 111 192 285On the Case With Paula Zahn Dateline on ID “Crossing the Line” Dateline on ID “The Edge” Who the BleepDirty Little LiesMarried-MobsterMarried-MobsterDateline on ID “The Edge” HBO 302 300 501(5:30) “Life as We Know It” (2010) Katherine Heigl. Fight Game “The Thing” (2011) Mary Elizabeth Winstead. ‘R’ Cowboys & AliensBoardwalk Empire “Blue Bell Boy” Real Time With Bill Maher MAX 320 310 515(4:45) “Titanic” (1997, Historical Drama) Leonardo DiCaprio. ‘PG-13’ Strike Back (:45) “The Change-Up” (2011, Comedy) Ryan Reynolds. ‘NR’ (:45) “Hart’s War” (2002, War) Bruce Willis. ‘R’ SHOW 340 318 545(5:00) Loosies “Beastly” (2011, Fantasy) Alex Pettyfer. ‘PG-13’ Homeland “Beirut Is Back” Inside the NFL (N) Inside NASCAR (N) Inside ComedyInside the NFL QUAIL HEIGHTS COUNTRY CLUB Chet Carter COUNTRY CLUB at LAKE CITY Ed Goff GOLF REPORTS Odom unbeaten in match play Sheriffs patrol for Youth Ranch COURTESY PHOTOTough Enough To Wear PinkWinners in the Tough Enough To Wear Pink tournament at Quail Heights Country Club are Donnie Thomas (from left), Columbia High golfer Brooke Ru ssell standing in for Brad Wilson, Charlie Baker and David Tew. Still no Tebow for JetsBy DENNIS WASZAK Jr.Associated PressNEW YORK — Mark Sanchez is staying put as the New York Jets’ starting quarterback. Despite struggling again in a 23-17 loss to the Houston Texans, Sanchez is still Rex Ryan’s guy — despite many fans and media suggesting a switch to Tim Tebow could help the Jets (2-3) get back on track. “Yeah, no question,” the Jets coach said Tuesday without hesitation when asked if Sanchez remains the team’s starter. Sanchez has completed less than 50 percent of his passes in four straight games, and his 48.4 com-pletion percentage ranks last in the NFL. He also has an unsightly 66.6 quar-terback rating, which is 31st in the league — ahead of only Kansas City’s Matt Cassel (66.2) and Cleveland rookie Brandon Weeden (64.5). Ryan wouldn’t speculate on whether he might pull Sanchez for Tebow if the starter continues to struggle and the Jets’ two-game losing streak increases. “I’m not going to get into the what-ifs and all that,” Ryan said. “We’re not pre-paring to lose, that’s for sure. We’re thinking we’re going to win, starting this week.” New York is home again Sunday against Andrew Luck and the Indianapolis Colts, who stunned the Green Bay Packers 30-27. Another loss could really ramp up the Tebow Time chatter. Ryan thought Sanchez “played pretty good” Monday night, espe-cially considering that he was without top receiver Santonio Holmes, out for the season with a foot inju-ry, rookie wide receiver Stephen Hill and tight end Dustin Keller — both out with hamstring injuries. The Jets coach cited three dropped passes and four tips as skewing Sanchez’s final stats: 14 of 31 for 230 yards, a touchdown and two interceptions. “I thought he was accurate with the football,” Ryan said. But, he also had some poorly timed mishaps. With the Jets trailing 14-7 and driving before halftime, Sanchez had a pass tipped by J.J. Watt that went off Jeremy Kerley to Brice McCain, who ran back the interception 86 yards before Kerley caught him at the New York 9. Houston then kicked a field goal to take a 10-point advantage. Sanchez had a chance to lead the Jets on a poten-tial winning drive with 3 minutes left, but a pass to Jeff Cumberland tipped off the tight end’s hands and right to Texans cornerback Kareem Jackson to end the comeback bid.Goodell re-issues bounty suspensionsBy BRETT MARTELAssociated PressNEW ORLEANS — NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell upheld the suspen-sions of Jonathan Vilma and Will Smith on Tuesday for their role in the New Orleans Saints bounty scan-dal and reduced penalties for Scott Fujita and Anthony Hargrove. Vilma will sit out the entire season and Smith’s punishment stands at four games. Hargrove, a free agent defensive lineman, will face a two-game suspen-sion once he signs with a team. He originally was hit with eight games, but that was reduced to seven with five games already served. Fujita, who plays for Cleveland, will now miss only one game instead of three. The players were implicated in what the NFL said was a bounty pool run by former Saints defensive coordinator Gregg Williams and paid improper cash bonuses for hits that injured opponents. The players have acknowledged a pool but denied they intended to injure anyone. Goodell’s new ruling comes about a month after an appeal panel created by the NFL’s labor agreement vacated the original suspen-sions on technical grounds during Week 1 of the reg-ular season and informed Goodell that he needed to clarify the reasons for the punishment. The panel asked Goodell to clarify to extent to which his ruling involved conduct detrimen-tal to the league, which he has the sole authority to handle, and salary cap viola-tions resulting from bonus payments, which would have to be ruled upon by an arbitrator other than the commissioner. Only Smith and Fujita have played this season. Vilma has been recovering from offseason knee sur-gery and hopes to return in two weeks when the Saints play at Tampa Bay.

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DEAR ABBY: I am the single dad of two teen-age boys (17 and 18) who are both in high school. I am wondering about something they do with their friends. The boys take showers in large groups. When they come in from running or sports, or if a group is spending the night, they shower in groups of two, three or four. It’s not like we have a huge shower -it’s normal size. I know there’s nothing sexual going on because I can hear them talking and joking around. When I asked the boys about this, they looked at me like I had two heads. They said it was just a social thing and the same as showering together after football in the school gym. They also “air dry” after showers by walking around in towels, some-times watching TV or goof-ing off for hours while in their towels. When going out, they get naked in the bathroom, fixing their hair, shaving, brushing their teeth, etc. It’s like a big “nude fest” with them and their friends. While I’m glad they are comfortable with their bodies and who they are, it still bothers me somewhat. Am I being a prude in thinking this is unusual or inappropriate? -STUMPED IN KENTUCKY DEAR STUMPED: I see nothing inappropriate about what your sons and their friends are doing. Nor do I want to label you a prude. You are just not as comfortable in your skin as your sons and their “jock” friends are. Is it pos-sible that they take after their mother? ** ** **DEAR ABBY: My best friend and I do everything together and I love her, so when she showed up at the gym in “booty shorts,” I didn’t say a word, even though they don’t flatter her one bit. Heck, there’s a mirror on every wall, so she must have liked what she saw, and it’s none of my busi-ness. When she wore them to a school sporting event, my husband accused me of being a “bad friend” for not telling her that her rear view was getting the wrong kind of attention. Some of the other parents in the bleachers were snickering. I guess if the situation were reversed, I’d want my best friend to give me a hint, but I’m not exactly sure how to do it. Am I wrong to just keep my mouth shut and mind my own business? -ANONYMOUS IN A SMALL TOWN DEAR ANONYMOUS: Allow me to provide a couple of hints. First, tell your friend when you are alone and can’t be over-heard, which will spare her unnecessary embarrass-ment. Second, ask, “When you bought those shorts, did you get a look at yourself from the back?” If she says no, provide her with a mirror so she can look over her shoulder at herself. Then explain that at the school event, some of the other parents were staring, and not too kindly. You will be doing her a favor to speak up. That is what friendship is all about. And if she’s smart, she’ll thank you. DILBERT BABY BLUES HOROSCOPES DEAR ABBY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Take control; make changes. Discussing your plans with your peers or boss will help you get a better perspective on how you can take a step in a direction that allows you to use your skills more efficiently and profitably. Expand your interests. +++++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Do your best to help others. A relationship with someone from a different background or with an unusual past will develop. Don’t be too quick to agree to partner with someone without having all the facts and figures worked out beforehand. ++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Don’t exaggerate or make promises you can-not keep. Someone will be looking for an excuse to make you look bad. Stick to what you know and do best, and don’t presume to be something you are not. Abide by the rules. ++++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Take an interest in a hobby, activity or event that will introduce you to a different way of doing things or people who are different from you. Love is in the stars. Partnerships will enhance your life. Strive for perfection. +++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Limitations and frustra-tions due to older or younger family members or a lack of funds will cause stress. You need to change your surroundings or do something different in order to get a new per-spective on your life and what you want. +++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Focus and take care of your responsibilities. What you accomplish will impress someone who can help you advance and help you get revenge regarding someone who has done you an injustice in the past. Discipline and moderation will be required. +++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Readjust your way of thinking regarding your past, present and future prospects. You may need to change the way you do things in order to benefit the most from what you have to offer. Learn from your past in order to make better choices. ++++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Creativity will be the key to your emotional wellness. Don’t waste time on jealousy when you are capable of doing your own thing and doing it well. Spending quality time with someone who shares your interests will enhance your relationship. ++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Exploring dif-ferent places, interests or people who are a little bit eccentric will help open up ideas that can lead to your own spiritual or philo-sophic growth. Don’t let an insecure friend or lover lead you in the wrong direction. +++++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Focus on your finances and invest in your talents, skills and ideas. Conversations with people you respect or who work in a similar industry will help you expand your plans and raise issues you may not have considered in the past. +++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Spend time tak-ing care of your interests. Expect others to meddle in your affairs if you are too open about your plans. Put more emphasis on home, family and how you can utilize your space to increase your income or lower your overhead. +++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Contracts, money, legal or medical matters can all be taken care of with confidence. Your dis-cipline will impress others and entice a partnership that will help you get an endeavor up and running. A promise can be made. +++ CELEBRITY CIPHER Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com BLONDIE BEETLE BAILEY B.C. FRANK & ERNEST FOR BETTER OR WORSE ZITS HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH GARFIELD THE LAST WORD Eugenia Last Teenage sons’ group showers prove puzzling to their dad Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. CLASSIC PEANUTS Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012 4B

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDWEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012 5B Classified Department: 755-5440 CLASSIFIED AD vantageTake ADvantage of the Reporter Classifieds!755-5440Lake City Reporter FIND IT SELL IT BUY IT $17504 lines 3 days Includes 2 Signs Each additional line $1.65 Garage Sale Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$10104 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.10One item per ad Under $500 Personal Merchandise Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$16754 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.15One item per ad Under $1,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$23704 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.45One item per ad Under $2,500 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $4,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$27404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.55One item per ad Under $4,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$30404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.65One item per ad Under $6,000 Placing An Ad Service Guide Limited to service type advertis-ing only.4 lines, one month....$92.00 $10.80 each additional lineIncludes an additional $2.00 per ad for each Wednesday insertion. DeadlinesBe Sure to Call Early You can call us at 755-5440 Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.Some people prefer to place their classified ads in person, and some ad categories will require prepay-ment. Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street.You can also fax or email your ad copy to the Reporter.FAX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the Classified Department.EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreporter.comAd is to Appear:TuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday Call by:Mon., 10:00 a.m.Mon., 10:00 a.m.Wed., 10:00 a.m.Thurs., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fax/Email by:Mon., 9:00 a.m.Mon., 9:00 a.m.Wed., 9:00 a.m.Thurs., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.These deadlines are subject to change without notice. Cancellations, Changes & Billing Questions Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject, or classify all advertisements under appropriate headings. Copy should be checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day of pub-lication. Credit for published errors will be allowed for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement which was incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be published, nor for any general, special or consequential damages. Advertising language must comply with Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition of discrimi-nation in employment, housing and public accommodations. Standard abbreviations are acceptable; how-ever, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated. Ad Errors-Please read your ad on the first day of publication. Weaccept responsibility for only the first incorrect insertion, and only the charge for the ad space in error. Please call 755-5440 immediately for prompt correc-tion and billing adjustments.CancellationsNormal advertising deadlines apply for cancellation.Billing InquiriesCall 755-5440. Should further information be required regarding payments or credit limits, your call will be trans-ferred to the accounting depart-ment. General Information In Print and Onlinewww.lakecityreporter.com Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$2504 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $.25One item per ad Under $100 MAINSTREET ISGone! Get High-Speed Internet NOW!Now Available Everywhere!21st Century Communications LLC386-269-0984 1-800-787-8041 LegalNOTICE OFAPPLICATION FOR TAX DEEDSec. 197.241.F.S.Notice is hereby given that the Ger-man American Capital Corp of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a Tax Deed to be is-sued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and name in which it was assessed is as follows:Certificate Number: 38Year of Issuance: 2010Description of Property: SEC 25 TWN 3S RNG 15 PARCELNUM-BER 00211-001COMM NWCOR OF SEC 25 & RUN E ALONG N LINE 60 FTTO POB, CONTE 627 FT, S 1442.20 FTTO PTON N’THERELYR/WLINE OF US HWY90, NWALONG N R/WLINE OF US HWY90, 683.33 FT, THENCE N 1348.35 FTTO POB. TRSTEE DEED 1016-1498, WD 1016-1501.Name in which assessed: WILLIAM & CANDACE ALDRIDGEAll of said property being in the County of Columbia, State of Flori-da. Unless said certificate shall be re-deemed according to law, the proper-ty described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse on Monday the 29th of October at 11:00 A.M.P. DEWITTCASONCLERK OF COURTSAMERICANS WITH DISABILI-TIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accom-modation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Carrina Cooper, Court Administra-tion at 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Room 408, Lake City, Florida 32055, 386-758-2163 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appear-ance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice im-paired, call 711.05534977September 26, 2012October 3, 10, 17, 2012 NOTICE OFAPPLICATION FOR TAX DEEDSec. 197.241.F.S.Notice is hereby given that the Wells Fargo Bank of the following certifi-cate has filed said certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issu-ance, the description of the property and name in which it was assessed is as follows:Certificate Number: 2834Year of Issuance: 2010Description of Property: SEC 18 TWN 4S RNG 17 PARCELNUM-BER 08480-001COMM SE COR, RUN N 1417.87 FT, W577 FT, N 503.50 FT, W1744.17 FTFOR POB, CONTW180 FTTO E R/WSR-47, N ALONG R/W216 FT, E 155 FT, S 215 FTTO POB. (AKAUNITS 1,2,3,4 & 5 COUNTRYVILLACONDOMINIUM.) ORB 564-443, 709-291, 750-1854, 915-2081, 916-1495, 969-2691, WD 1056-1885.Name in which assessed: BELLA-MYINVESTMENTS III LLCAll of said property being in the County of Columbia, State of Flori-da. Unless said certificate shall be re-deemed according to law, the proper-ty described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse on Monday the 29th of October at 11:00 A.M.P. DEWITTCASONCLERK OF COURTSAMERICANS WITH DISABILI-TIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accom-modation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Carrina Cooper, Court Administra-tion at 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Room 408, Lake City, Florida 32055, 386-758-2163 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appear-ance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice im-paired, call 711.05534984September 26, 2012October 3, 10, 17, 2012 NOTICE OFAPPLICATION FOR TAX DEEDSec. 197.241.F.S.Notice is hereby given that the Wells Fargo Bank of the following certifi-cate has filed said certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issu-ance, the description of the property and name in which it was assessed is as follows:Certificate Number: 2395Year of Issuance: 2010Description of Property: SEC 30 TWN 3S RNG 17 PARCELNUM-BER 05842-109LOT9 SUNSETMEADOWS. WD 1127-1672, WD 1135-722Name in which assessed: ROCK CONTRACTORS INCAll of said property being in the County of Columbia, State of Flori-da. Unless said certificate shall be re-deemed according to law, the proper-ty described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse on Monday the 29th of October at 11:00 A.M.P. DEWITTCASONCLERK OF COURTSAMERICANS WITH DISABILI-TIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accom-modation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Carrina Cooper, Court Administra-tion at 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Room 408, Lake City, Florida 32055, 386-758-2163 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appear-ance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice im-paired, call 711.05534978September 26, 2012October 3, 10, 17, 2012 LegalNOTICE OFAPPLICATION FOR TAX DEEDSec. 197.241.F.S.Notice is hereby given that the Ger-man American Capital Corp of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a Tax Deed to be is-sued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and name in which it was assessed is as follows:Certificate Number: 1781Year of Issuance: 2010Description of Property: SEC 11 TWN 6S RNG 16 PARCELNUM-BER 03815-159LOT59 CARDINALFARMS UN-REC; COMM ATTHE SE COR, RUN W5311.34 FTTO THE SWCOR OF SEC. THENCE N 1995.16 FT. W60.18 FT, N 1780.79 FTTO POB CONTN 500.08 FT, N 77 DEG E 33.05 FT, TO APOINTON THE WLINE OF SEC 11, CONTN 77 DEG E 854.46 FT, S 500.08 FT, S 77 DEG W854.22 FTTO APOINTON THE E LINE OF SEC 10, CONTS 77 DEG W33.29 FTTOPOB. AG 1035-1789, WD 1059-2239.Name in which assessed: ANTHO-NY& ROSALIE GONZALESAll of said property being in the County of Columbia, State of Flori-da. Unless said certificate shall be re-deemed according to law, the proper-ty described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse on Monday the 29th of October at 11:00 A.M.P. DEWITTCASONCLERK OF COURTSAMERICANS WITH DISABILI-TIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accom-modation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Carrina Cooper, Court Administra-tion at 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Room 408, Lake City, Florida 32055, 386-758-2163 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appear-ance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice im-paired, call 711.05534980September 26, 2012October 3, 10, 17, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITOF FLORIDAIN AND FOR COLUM-BIACOUNTYCIVILACTIONCASE NO. 2012-000358 CAUNITED STATES OF AMERICA, acting through the United States De-partment of Agriculture, Rural De-velopment, f/k/a Farmers Home Ad-ministration, a/k/a Rural Housing ServicePlaintiff,vs.ROSE CRUDUP, et al.,DefendantNOTICE OF ACTIONSTATE OF FLORIDACOUNTYOF COLUMBIATO: Any and all unknown minors, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, trustees, or other claimants claiming by, through, under or against the Es-tate of LOIS C. MAYS a/k/a LOIS MAYS, DeceasedYOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage regarding the following property in COLUMBIACounty, Florida:Begin at a point of the South boun-dary of St. Johns Street, 630 feet East of the NE corner of Lot or Block No. 276 in the Eastern Divi-sion of the City of Lake City, Flori-da, and run South 105 feet; thence West 60 feet; thence North 105 feet; thence East 60 feet to the POINTOF BEGINNING, same being a part of Lot or Block Number 297has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on: FREDERICK J. MURPHY, JR., Es-quire, Attorney for Plaintiff, Boswell & Dunlap LLP, 245 South Central Avenue, Post Office Drawer 30, Bar-tow, FL33831, within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice Of Action, and file the origi-nal with the Clerk of this Court ei-ther before service on Plaintiff’s at-torney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or Petition.DATED on this 1st day of October, 2012.P. DeWITTCASONClerk of Circuit CourtP.O. Box 2069Lake City, FL32056BY: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkFrederick J. Murphy, Jr., EsquireBoswell & Dunlap LLPPost Office Drawer 30Bartow, FL33831Attorneys for Plaintiff(863) 533-7117Fax (863) 533-725505535201October 10, 17, 2012 THE COLUMBIACOUNTYBOARD OF COUNTYCOMMISSIONERS approved add-ing the positions of Administrative Manager, Operations Manager, and Safety Manager to the Senior Management Service Class (SMSC), effective September 20, 2012. This action is in accordance with Florida Statutes, Section 121.055.05535139October 3, 10, 2012 Public Auction to be held November 17, 2012 at 8AM at Ozzie’s Towing & Auto, LLC 2492 SE Baya Ave. Lake City FL, 32025.(386)719-5608Following Vin Numbers:1998 BMWVin#4USCJ3332WLB637862000 FORDVin#1FMDU85P3YZB3572805535233October 10, 2012 LegalNOTICE OFSHERIFF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN THATPURSUANTTO a Writ of Execution issued out of the Circuit Court of Columbia County, Florida, on the 5th day of April 2012 case Number 11-45-CAin the matter ofNorth Central Florida Title, LLC, a Florida limited liability company as plaintiffand William L. Johnson; and Michael K. Montgomery and his wife, Connye A. Montgomery, as de-fendant (s),I Mark Hunter, As Sher-iff of Columbia County, Florida, have this day levied upon all the right, title and interest of the defend-ants Michael K. Montgomery and Connye A. Montgomery entered in this cause, on the following descri-bedReal Property T o-W it: Commence at the NWcorner of the SE 1/4 of Section 19, Township 6 South, Range 17 East, Columbia County, Florida, and run S 0001'49" W,along the West line of said SE 1/4, 30.00 feet to the South right-of-way line of Cumorah Hill Road; thence S 8957'38" E, along said South right-of-way line, 1087.56 feet to the POINTOF BEGINNING; thence continue S 8957'38" E still along said right-of-way line, 287.47 feet; thence S 0001'49" W, 631.64 feet; thence N 8959'53" W, 287.47 feet; thence N 0001'49" E, 631.83 feet to the POINTOF BEGINNING. Tax Parcel No.: 19-6S-17-09698-030 And on October 30, 2012, at 10:00 am., or as soon thereafter as circum-stances permit at173 NE Hernando Ave. Lake City, State of Florida 32055, I will offer the above descri-bed property of the defendants, Mi-chael K. Montgomery and Connye A. Montgomery for sale at public auction and sell the same, subject to ALLprior liens if any, taxes, encum-brances, and judgments if any, to the highest and best bidder for CASH IN HAND, the proceeds to be applied as far as may be to the payment of costs and satisfaction of the above descri-bed execution. Mark Hunter, As Sheriff Of Columbia County, Florida By: Sgt. Michael Sweat Deputy Sheriff In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons need-ing special accommodation to partic-ipate in this proceeding should con-tact the individual or agency sending notice no later than seven days prior to the proceedings at Columbia County Sheriff Office Civil Division located at 173 N.E. Hernando Ave-nue, Lake City, Florida 32055. Phone (386) 758-1109. 05534975September 26, 2012October 3, 10, 17, 2012 NOTICE OFAPPLICATION FOR TAX DEEDSec. 197.241.F.S.Notice is hereby given that the Wells Fargo Bank of the following certifi-cate has filed said certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issu-ance, the description of the property and name in which it was assessed is as follows:Certificate Number: 2700Year of Issuance: 2010Description of Property: SEC 06 TWN 4S RNG 17 PARCELNUM-BER 08018-255LOT5 BLOCK B GRANDVIEWVILLAGE UNIT2. ORB 584-080, WD 1019-789, WD 1035-450.Name in which assessed: TIMOTEA& JEREMIAS PATRICIOAll of said property being in the County of Columbia, State of Flori-da. Unless said certificate shall be re-deemed according to law, the proper-ty described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse on Monday the 29th of October at 11:00 A.M.P. DEWITTCASONCLERK OF COURTSAMERICANS WITH DISABILI-TIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accom-modation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Carrina Cooper, Court Administra-tion at 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Room 408, Lake City, Florida 32055, 386-758-2163 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appear-ance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice im-paired, call 711.05534982September 26, 2012October 3, 10, 17, 2012 NOTICE OFAPPLICATION FOR TAX DEEDSec. 197.241.F.S.Notice is hereby given that the Wells Fargo Bank of the following certifi-cate has filed said certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issu-ance, the description of the property and name in which it was assessed is as follows:Certificate Number: 2687Year of Issuance: 2010Description of Property: SEC 05 TWN 4S RNG 17 PARCELNUM-BER 07840-000LOT8 BLOCK 9 LAKEWOOD S/D. ORB 908-2268, TR DEED 1152-477Name in which assessed: STEPHEN PUCKETAll of said property being in the County of Columbia, State of Flori-da. Unless said certificate shall be re-deemed according to law, the properLegalty described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse on Monday the 29th of October at 11:00 A.M.P. DEWITTCASONCLERK OF COURTSAMERICANS WITH DISABILI-TIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accom-modation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Carrina Cooper, Court Administra-tion at 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Room 408, Lake City, Florida 32055, 386-758-2163 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appear-ance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice im-paired, call 711.05534981September 26, 2012October 3, 10, 17, 2012 100Job Opportunities05535155(Ladies wear factory outlet) Lake City Mall is looking for P/TTHIRD KEY Days, nights, and weekends. Flexible hours a necessity. Competitive wages, discount, EOE Apply in person at store location Retirees are encouraged to apply. 05535170Cabinetmakers Mill Finish Wood Prep. Jobs available for experienced workers only. Wages negotiable based on experience of one year or more. Stable work history. Benefits include: Paid Holidays, Paid Vacation, and Family Health Insurance. Some hand tools required. Please apply in person at Marlow-HunterLLC 14700 NWHwy 441 in Alachua. Pay negotiable with experience. Delivery Drivers/Independent Contractors. Need a Reliable Vehicle for Same Day Delivers. Call 1-800-818-7958 Established Ocala business is Looking to hire additional sales teams for our expanding product line.Earn $500.00/week, plus commission!If you’re upbeat, friendly and enjoy working with the public, then contact us for a confidential interview and start earning the income you deserve! Valid driver’s license, proof of insurance and overnight travel is required. Call us TODAYat 352-233-2818.Telecom Service Bureau, Inc. EXPERIENCED SEWING Machine Operator. Full time good wages for experience 386-755-6481 Land Survey Help Wanted 386-755-6166 140 NWRidgewood Avenue Lake City, FL32055 MANAGEMENT OPPORTUNITIES McDonald's of Alachua has multiple positions available for qualified/experienced mgrs. $8-$16 hr /benefits/bonuses Apply on line @ www.mcstate.com/alachua Or Call 386-755-2475 SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 Small historic non-denominational church with a heart for children is seeking a pianist for Sunday services. Please contact 904-259-4194 if interested. Wanted-P/T Handi-Man, Exp. in Routine Maintenance such as plumbing, elect, painting & carpentry. Applications Available at Camp Weed & Cerveny Conference Center, 11057 Camp Weed Place, Live Oak. 100Job OpportunitiesWELDER NEEDED Must have experience, the ability to measure in .010 and fit a must. Machine shop experience helpful. Apply in person, Grizzly Mfg., 174 NE Cortez Terrace, Lake City, FL32055, or Email: guy@qiagroup.com: NO CALLS 120Medical Employment05535111Advent Christian VillageCurrent JOBS Line Advertisement call 658-5627 orvisit www.acvillage.net 24 hrs/day, 7 days/week Be your BEST, Among the BEST! FTLicensed Physician Assistant (PA-C) FTposition to deliver primary care in HPSAdesignated, established rural clinic with on site board certified physician. On-call rotation with two other practitioners for evenings / weekends and medical support for 161-bed skilled nursing facility required. Experience preferred but not required. Unrestricted FLlicense required. Experience in electronic medical records and geriatrics a plus. RN Quality of Care Leader Unrestricted Florida RN license, excellent clinical nursing / assessment skills, current CPR certification, verifiable IVskill (start, regulate, maintain, discontinue IV’s) required. Good communication, organization, and computer skills required; must work as part of interdisciplinary team to assure outstanding quality of life / quality of care for LTC residents. On-call rotation required. Management / supervisory experience and knowledge of LTC regs desired. FTpositions include health, dental, life, disability, supplemental insurance; 403b retirement account; paid time off, access to on site day care and fitness facilities. Apply in person at Personnel Office, Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m., or fax resume/credentials to (386) 658-5160. EOE / Drug Free Workplace/Criminal background checks required. Medical practice needs Ophthalmic Technician FTor PT. Experience preferred. Fax resume 386-755-7561. 240Schools & Education05534919Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class12/24/2012• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-11/05/12• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies BLACK & WHITE MERLE Austrian Shepherd dog, male, 19 mos. old, purebred, $250 or OBO. Good with children. Call 386-365-2900 FREE Kittens to a good home. 1 gray w/ beige, 2 are dark brown W/ beige, of which one is a long hair. 6-8 weeks old. Litter trained and eat dry/wet cat food. Call or text 386-867-0232 Free Puppies Lab Mix. Approx 5 weeks old. Call, text, or email. (386)984-7975, firefigher126@yahoo.com Free to good home Beautiful, Female American Bulldog, 1yr 8mths, Needs room to run, Good With people and other animals. 386-752-8317REPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Linewww.lakecityreporter.comREPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Linewww.lakecityreporter.com

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDWEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012 Classified Department: 755-5440 6B Friday, October 12th 8:00 p.m. rnr rr *(""+('&$ )*'"% &*)!'% &# &*%)',n Saturday, October 13th 8:00 p.m. r%rr **'r) ", r%rr **'r) ", r &-') #, rr &-') #, r n!/( $r+ 1986 CorvetteWell maintained, runs great. 95,000 miles.$8,500 obo 386-344-2107 310Pets & Supplies PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 413Musical MerchandiseBACH Trumpet TR300, Silver color. Excellent Condition With hard case. $400. 386-623-3149 PIANO FOR Sale Spinet type $995.00 Call 386-842-5548 430Garage Sales 10/12 & 10/13, 8 AM-?, 100 amp Power Pole, Sm. Fridge, fragrance lamps, Men’s, Ladies, & teen clothes & Lots of misc. items. 21609 47th Dr. LC 865-304-1248 Annual DeerCreek Sub Sale. “Saturday Only” Honda Power Washer, Guns, Ammo, Antiques, Glass ware, Carnival Glass, Furniture, Clothes, Christmas, Tools, Household, Large Sale. 252-B. Look for Signs FORESTCOUNTRY Sat. 10/13, 8 am to 12, 374 SW Short Leaf Drive Household items, clothes, toys, sewing items. FRI. 10/12 & SAT. 10/13, 8-?, 1282 Dakota Glen, 90 Wright on Gwen Lake Blvd., left on Dakota, furn, households, clothes, purses, and much more.386-397-4889. Lake City Elks Annual yard sale Sat. Oct. 13th 8a-1p. To be held in the Elks parking lot. Backs up to Lake Desoto. Look for signs! New Horizon Church of Christ, Sat. Oct. 13th 7 a.m-2p.m., 6130 South US Hwy 441, Drop off and vendors welcome ($10.00 fee). PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 440Miscellaneous Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, Root Raking, Bush Hog, Seeding, Sod, Disking, site prep, ponds & irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200 IPOD 4THGen./8GB $75 OBO Contact 984-9010 630Mobile Homes forRent2 BR MH. $400 $450. mo. Plus Deposit. Water & Sewer Furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 2/1 S of Lake City, Branford Area, Quiet Area. $525 mth plus security 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 3BR/2BADWMH on 1 acre private lot, 1st+last+dep required located in Ellisville. No pets. Contact 352-870-5144 4bd/2ba -5 ac,Conv. to LC & G’ville, new energy efficient AC, lrg deck, 10x20 shed Sale or Lease $950 mth.1st + dept. 867-4586 Country Setting, 14 x70 MH. 2BR/2BA,large master tub, CH/A $575 mo. $300 dep. No Pets 386-755-0064 or (904) 771-5924 LARGE CLEAN 2 & 3 bdms CH/A5 Points Area. Also 3 bdrm Westside. 1st + Deposit Required. No Pets. 961-1482 640Mobile Homes forSale(1) Only New Jacobsen Triplewide 42x64 Only $99,995 Del & Set with Air. Beautiful Home. North Pointe of Gainesville. 352-872-5566 4BD/2BADWMH on 4 acres Owner Financing Available. 386-623-3404 or 386-623-3396 575 CREDITSCORE? New 3/2 or 4/2 doubles. Your Approved with 10% down. Call for details. North Pointe 352-872-5566 BIGGESTSALEEVER 13 Jacobsen Display Models reduced for Fast Sale! North Pointe Homes, 352-872-5566 LAND ANDHOME Attention land owners with good credit. No Money Down and Low Fixed Rates and Low Fees. Let’s Deal! North Pointe Homes, Gainesville 352-872-5566 650Mobile Home & LandCLEAN NICE 2/2 SW, and 740 sf Unfinished frame house, nice Country acre 8 mi to VA. $39,000 Cash only 386.961.9181 OwnerFinance 3/2 on 2.5 ac Mayo Area. $675 mth Small Down 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 650Mobile Home & LandOwner Fin.-Nice huge 4/2.5 on 3 ac, x-fenced, creek, lrg deck,Paved Rd. McAlpin area. Small down $950/mth 386-867-1833. For picswww.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05534938We’ve got it all!$89 Deposit Limited Avail. Call Today! Windsong Apts. *Free afterschool program386-758-8455 1BR APT. Downtown Location, Clean. New Carpet $450 mo, plus Security. NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456 2/1 1300 sqft, duplex w/ gargage. totally refurbished,W/D hook up, CH/A, $650 mth Lease Req. 386-965-2407 or 386-758-5881 2BR/1BAAPT. w/garage. West side of town. $650. mo. 386-961-9000 2BR/2BAw/garage 5 minutes from VAhospital and Timco. Call for details. 386-365-5150 COZYCOTTAGE 1 BRNew paint & carpet. 10 mins. South of LC, all util. & satellite incl. $550 mo. Pet ok, 386-758-2408 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5560 Quant 2br/1ba Apt. Peaceful Location with Lake View CH/A$500. mo $500 dep. No pets. 386-344-2170 720Furnished Apts. ForRentRooms forRent Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent05535236LAKE CITY 4BR/2BA 1248 SF $650 2 AVAILABLE JUSTREDUCED $45/MONTH 3BR/2BA 1496 SF $695JUSTREDUCED3BR/2BA 1200 SF $725 3BR/2BA 980 SF $575 4BR/3BA 2108 SF $800 2BR/1BA M/HOME $475 MADISON 2BR/1BA JUSTREMODLED $450 1 AVAILABLE 3BR/1.5BA REMODELED $550 Visit our website: www .NorthFloridahomeandland.com Mike Foster386-288-3596 Mitchell Lee 386-867-1155Accredited Real Estate Services 1688 SE Baya Dr., Suite 105 Lake City, FL32025 Accredited Real Estate Services is a Full Service Real Estate Office. We do: Rentals ~ Property Management ~ Property Sales. 2/1 Brick house Lrg eat in kit. & closets, CH/A, 514 SE First Ave. Jasper. $550 mth 1st,last+sec. No pets. 772-285-1032 3BD/1.5BAOn Leslie Gln CH/A, $725 mth & $725 dep. Contact 386-344-2170 3bd/2ba-Near Branford Stilt Home on 5 fenced wooded ac. Barn & shop. 1st,last,Sec $800/ mth.Ref. Needed. 813-714-4850. Cozy 2bd / 1ba home. CH/A, $500 mth & $500 dep. Contact 386-344-2170 750Business & Office RentalsCk out this Awesome DealFort White, Newly Remodled. Multi use Comm Prop. Approx 850sqft. Elec & water incl. Free WFI & yard Maint. High Traffic Area $725 mth 941-924-5183. FOR LEASE: Downtown Office Space. Convenient to Court house. Call 386-755-3456 ForRent orLease: Former Doctors office, Former professional office & Lg open space: avail on East Baya Ave. Competitive rates. Weekdays 386-984-0622 evenings/weekends 497-4762 PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 805Lots forSale PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 810Home forSale FSBO ‘05 Brick 3/2/2 3rd detached garage, tiled w/in shower, w/in closet, 10ft ceilings, crown molding, 168,800 417-396-2134 820Farms & Acreage10 acres with well/septic/pp (not guar); $300 dwn; $580 a mth. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 950Cars forSale 2006 MAZADA MIATACONV. Automatic, leather, power. $14,500 ($1,000 below KBB value). Call 386-365-2046. SOLD IT FAST IN THE CLASSIFIEDSSelling your stuff is simple with a little help from the Lake City Reporter Classifieds. Let our sales team help you place an ad today, in print and online! Call 386-755-5440 or go to www.lakecityreporter.com