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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01924

Material Information

Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 10-07-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01929

Related Items

Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01924

Material Information

Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 10-07-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01929

Related Items

Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

From staff reportsLIVE OAK An early-morning crash in Suwannee County left one man dead and another critically hurt Friday, according to the Florida Highway Patrol. Jonathan Michael Matthews, 21, Live Oak, was pronounced dead at the scene, said FHP. His passenger, Dillon Wayne Gardner, 18, Live Oak, was flown to Shands at the University of Florida in critical condition. Matthews was headed south on County Road 249 at 12:45 a.m. when the right wheels of his 2002 Ford F-150 drove onto the wet grass of the right shoulder. Matthews over-cor-rected, according to FHP, sending the pickup across the roadway and FATALITY continued on 7A CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Opinion ................ 4ABusiness ................ 5AObituaries .............. 6A Advice & Comics ......... 8B Puzzles ................. 2B TODAY IN PEOPLE A big hello from Elmo. COMING TUESDAY Local news roundup. 91 64 T-Storm Chance WEATHER, 2A Opinion ................ 4ABusiness ................ 1CObituaries .............. 7AAdvice.................. 5DPuzzles ................. 5B 89 63 Iso. T-Storms WEATHER, 8A Lake City ReporterSUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 | YOUR COMMUNITY NE WSPAPER SINCE 1874 | $1.00 LAKECITYREPORTER.COM Gators down LSU 14-6 inthe Swamp. Local retailerspreparing forthe holidays. SUNDAYEDITION Vol. 138, No. 179 1C 1B 1A By LAURA HAMPSONlhampson@lakecityreporter.comW ith a perfect match, three teams of doc-tors took just over five hours to renew a Lake City woman’s future. B.J. Helton, 30, was born with a rare, genetic disorder called Alstrm Syndrome. The condition weakened her heart and lungs to the point that a double transplant was her only chance. It’s been just over a month since Helton received a heart and lung transplant at Shands at the University of Florida and the changes in her health have been drastic and immedi-ate. “I’ve gotten my child back,” said her mother, Mary Register. “I haven’t seen B.J. like this in years. She’s making plans again,” she said. Helton is the only person in the United States with Alstrms to suc-cessfully receive both a heart and lung transplant, Register said. More than 500 people have followed Helton’s journey through a Facebook group named “Seeking BJ’s Heart.” “Knowing that people have been praying has really been the biggest thing,” Helton said. Now friends, family and other supporters are sending cards of encour-agement to Helton’s Gainesville apartment, where they will remain for four to six weeks for frequent hospital checkups. “I knew I was sick. It’s been at least 4 to 6 years since I’ve felt so healthy,” Helton said. “I never had completely normal organs, so at 30 I don’t know what to do with them,” she laughs. Helton, who is blind, is now able to see more shapes and light than ever before due to increased blood flow. Pain is only a fraction of what it was before the transplant, Register said. With daily physical therapy sessions, Helton is gaining strength. “I’ve By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comCounty officials hope building an events center in Columbia County will promote the county and bring addition-al revenue from tourists and convention visitors and at the same time enhance the quality of local events. How to pay for it, construct it and make it viable is what will be discussed when county officials host a special meeting to discuss the proposal at 6 p.m., Tuesday in the Columbia County Resources Inc. enter-tainment building at the coun-ty fairgrounds, 438 SW State Road 247. The purpose of the meeting is to allow the Events Center Fact Finding Committee and Clemons & Rutherford Architects the opportunity to give a presentation regarding the proposed events center. No action by the board of county commissioners will be taken at the meeting. “This is the project that has been under study for at least a year,” said Dale Williams, county manager. “The com-mittee is going to present its findings to the board.” Representatives from the Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of Commerce, the Columbia County Economic Development Board and Columbia County Resources Public to get rst look at events center plans COURTESYB.J. Helton of Lake City walks with her stepfather, Michael Register, 14 days after receiving a heart-lung transplant. Woman is the only person in U.S. with rare disorder to have double transplant. Aim of proposed center: To promote tourism, commerce.COURTESYArchitect’s rendition of a proposed events center for Colu mbia County. A public meeting will be held Tuesday to d iscuss the proposal. Presentation set for Tuesday night JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterA motorist is seen driving onto the Interstate 75 north ramp Friday afternoon in Ellisville. Some of the sites under possible consideration for the Florida Gateway Center are in the Ellisville area Marker hits 100JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterThe Olustee Battlefield monument marks its cen-tennial next week. See story, Page 1D. New heart,new lungs,new hope ‘I’ve gotten my child back,’ said Helton’s mother, Mary Register. ‘I haven’t seen B.J. like this in years.’ HOPE continued on 7A CENTER continued on 7A 1 killed, 1 critical in Suwannee crash Locals caught up in I-10 meleeFrom staff reportsAbout 53 vehicles were involved in crashes on a four-mile stretch of I-10 Friday afternoon, including Lake City and O’Brien residents. Drivers said heavy rain at about 3:40 p.m. was a factor in 20 traffic crashes in Duval County, east of U.S. 301 and west of SR-23, according to the Florida Highway Patrol. Portions of I-10 were shut down for several hours as 13 FHP troop-ers and 25 Jacksonville Sheriff’s Offices deputies responded to the accidents. Jacksonville Fire Rescue transported 18 people to area hos-pitals, FHP said. MELEE continued on 7A

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PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Daily Scripture Celebrity Birthdays Retired South African Arch bishop Desmond Tutu is 81. Comedian Joy Behar is 70. Former National Security Council aide Lt. Col. Oliver North (ret.) is 69. Singer John Mellencamp is 61. Rock musician Ricky Phil lips is 61. Actress Mary Badham is 60. Actress Christopher Norris is 59. Cellist Yo-Yo Ma is 57. Gospel singer Michael W. Smith is 55. Actor Dylan Baker is 54. Recording executive and TV personality Simon Cowell is 53. Country singer Dale Wat son is 50. Pop singer Ann Curless is 49. Rock singer-musician Thom Yorke (Radiohead) is 44. Rock musician-dancer Leeroy Thornhill is 43. Trust in the L ord forever, for the L ord the L ord himself, is the Rock eternal . Isaiah 26:4 CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading. AROUND FLORIDA Friday: 12-27-32-35 MB 10 Friday: 4-7-16-21-31 Saturday: Afternoon: N/A Evening: N/A Saturday: Afternoon: N/A Evening: N/A Saturday: N/A Jacksonville may prove key to Florida victory JACKSONVILLE E ric Allen was 18 and voting in his first presi dential election when he chose Barack Obama over John McCain. Four years older now and looking for a job, he is just the kind of voter Republican Mitt Romney needs to win and win big in northeast Floridas Duval County and take the most coveted of the toss-up states. I voted for him last time just to see the change, Allen says of Obama, and there was no change. For Lashawn Williams, the excitement she felt from Obamas first run is still there in spite of an economy in the doldrums. The 39-year-old bank employee is volunteer ing for the re-election campaign and telling those who are frustrated with the president that the blame is misplaced. People say, Oh, well, hes in there and hes not changing anything and blah, blah, blah. But he cant do it by himself, Williams says during her lunch break in downtown Jacksonville. Everything hes tried to do hes got ten resistance from the Republican Party. The Obama campaign targeted the Jacksonville area with surprising success in 2008, nearly equaling Republican John McCain in Duval County votes as Obama carried the state. Whether Obama can do as well again may determine if he takes Florida a second time and with it a second term. In GOP regions of swing states, Republicans must turn out in huge numbers to overcome Democratic advantages elsewhere. Republicanfriendly regions like south east Ohio and southwest Virginia share northeast Floridas mission of over whelming Democrats at the polls. For both campaigns, Florida is one of the keys to winning the White House. Its even more important for Romney, whose paths to Electoral College victory are few without the states 29 votes. Even though each side has already spent $60 million on TV and radio ads, Republicans are expected to spend even more than Democrats in the campaigns final weeks. Polling shows a tight race in Florida with Obama slightly ahead in some surveys, making the Democrats turnout in Duval County essential to his overall strategy. Obama persuaded enough moderate Republicans, conservative Democrats and indepen dents to give his message of hope and change a chance to cancel out the usual Republican advan tage there. The Democratic cam paign was more com petitive in 2008 in part because it built excitement in Duval Countys large black community with voter registration drives and get-out-the-vote efforts to support the nations first black presidential candidate on a major party ticket. Duval County has more than 516,000 registered voters out of a total popula tion of about 871,000. The percentage of black resi dents, 29.8, is nearly dou ble the statewide figure. The campaign will have to keep the same enthusiasm among black voters to keep Duval competitive. Teen runaway dies after crash JACKSONVILLE Authorities say a 16year-old runaway has died Friday from injuries she suffered after a car she was riding in crashed dur ing a police chase. Kyrsten QAmise Veal has been missing from Seminole County since July. On Wednesday, authori ties said they tried to pull over a vehicle that Veal and two others were in. The car sped away and a Georgia state trooper tried to spin the suspects car off the road. The car slammed into a tree and split in two. The 24-year-old David Sessions died at the scene. Camden County sheriffs Deputy William Terrell said Veal died Friday at a Jacksonville hospital. Driver Jamal Jones was hospitalized in serious con dition. The 19-year-old faces several charges including aggravated assault. Police: man played cop for free food ST. PETERSBURG Authorities in southwest Florida have arrested a man they say pretended to be an officer in an attempt to get free food. Pinellas County Sheriffs deputies said Joseph Pineda rolled up to a McDonalds drive-through Friday saying he deserved free food because he was a cop. Authorities said he flashed a badge and gun and told restaurant employees he had just come from a sting and didnt have his wallet. Employees called the police. Pineda initially ignored commands to show his hands but even tually surrendered at gun point. Authorities said they found two fake police badges and a handgun in the center console. Thirty-three year-old Pineda was charged with impersonating a police officer and improper exhi bition of a firearm. He was being held in the Pinellas County Jail. Associated Press NEW YORK D aredevil stuntman David Blaine lit up New Yorks Pier 54 on Friday for his latest high voltage feat. The illusionist is scheduled to spend three days and nights standing in the middle of a million volts of electric currents streamed by tesla coils. The stunt is called Electrified: One Million Volts Always On. Electrified also is being streamed on YouTube, thanks to computing company Intel. Viewing stations are located in London, Beijing, Tokyo and Sydney. Viewers at the stations are able to control the coils. The 39-year-old Blaine is wearing a chainmail bodysuit as a barrier between himself and the electric cur rents. Blaines past stunts include hang ing upside down over Central Park, being buried alive and encased in a block of ice. OReilly, Stewart to tangle in mock debate WASHINGTON Bill OReilly and Jon Stewart are to tangle in a sold-out mock presidential debate thats as much about laughs as about politics. The Fox News anchor squares off with the star of Comedy Centrals The Daily Show Saturday in Washington. Its a chance to blow off a little steam amid a heated presiden tial race. The celebrity odd-couple have appeared on each others programs since 2001, exhibiting actual respect for the others opposing views. This is their first head-to-head debate. George Washington University will host the event, dubbed The Rumble in the Air-Conditioned Auditorium. Half of the proceeds will go to char ity. Unlike the debates between President Barack Obama and Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney, this one wont air on television but will be live-streamed online, for $4.95. Bond memorabilia goes under hammer in London LONDON James Bond lovers have spent thousands of pounds for pieces of memorabilia from the spy movies at a London auction. Christies auction house is sell ing the items to coincide with the 50th birthday of the Bond movies. The first Bond film, Dr. No, was released Oct. 5, 1962. Among the items under the ham mer Friday in London was the com plete works of Ian Fleming, Bonds creator. That fetched 91,250 pounds ($147,197), handily beating esti mates of between 10,000 and 15,000 pounds. A navy, wool Tom Ford suit worn by Daniel Craig in the new Skyfall film due out on Oct. 26 sold for 46,850 pounds. Proceeds will go to several chari ties, including the U.N. childrens fund, UNICEF. Railroad Revival Tour canceled in 2nd year NASHVILLE, Tenn. The Railroad Revival Tour has run off the tracks. The cross-country tour featuring Willie Nelson, Jamey Johnson, Band of Horses and John C. Reilly has been canceled by organizers. A note on the tours website says certain complications would not permit us to host the shows in the manner intended, but gave no fur ther details. The eight-stop tour in vintage rail cars was expected to start Oct. 20 in Duluth, Ga., and conclude Oct. 28 in Oakland, Calif. Full ticket refunds are being given. Emails sent to organizers were not immediately answered. This would have been the second Railroad Revival Tour. The first, fea turing Mumford & Sons, Old Crow Medicine Show and Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros. Associated Press Blaine goes for shock-factor Saturday: N/A 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 Page Editor: Laura Hampson, 754-0427 HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter 2A ASSOCIATED PRESS A hello from Elmo Elmo, from the Sesame Street Live, Elmo Makes Music, show, visits with St. Joesephs Childrens Hospital patient Xiomara Nunez, 5, of Tampa, Friday, Oct. 5 at the Tampa hospital. Both Elmo and character Cookie Monster brought some cheer and fun to patients. Sesame Street Live Elmo Makes Music, is in Tampa for five performances at the Sun Dome, Friday through Saturday. ASSOCIATED PRESS Magician David Blaine stands inside an apparatus surrounded by a million volts of electric currents streamed by tesla coils during his 72-hour Electrified: 1 Million Volts Always On stunt on Pier 54, Friday in New York. The stunt, sponsored by Intel, is the latest of daredevil endeavors by the magician whose previous stunts included being encased in ice for over 60 hours in Times Square.

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Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER NATIONAL SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 3A 3A Lake City Institute of Neurology 4355 American Ln Lake City, FL Ph: 386-755-1211 Fax: 386-755-1219 About Dr. Nid Dr. Nidadavolu has completed his medical training at Siddhartha Medical College, India and completed his residence & EMG/ Neuromuscular Fellowship training from renowned University of Miami, FL. He is Board Certi ed, member of American Academy of Neurology. Dr. Nidadavolu provides services in general neurology, Stroke, MS (Multiple Sclerosis), Epilepsy, Dementias, encephalopathies, Parkinsons and other movement disorders. He also performs outpatient EEG (electroencephalogram) and Lumbarc punctures procedures. Dr. Nidadavolu is trained in EMG (electromyography)/ Never Conduction Studies for diagnosing various neurological conditions at his clinic. We are glad to inform that we are now offering Neurological services in the heart of Lake City and surrounding areas. Dr. NL Prasad Nidadavolu and his staff offer excellent neurological services to the community in a caring, parofessional environment. url: lcneuro.com Outstanding Leader of Inpatient Therapy Our therapy program is designed to rehabilitate individuals back to their highest level of independence and functioning. Our therapists and nurses work closely with the physician and resident in order to create a plan of treatment that will combine comprehensive care with the patients personal goals. Take a step towards your independence. Individualized Physical Occupational & Joint Replacement (Knee, Hip. etc) Stroke Cardiac Disease Fractures (Hip, Shoulder, Pelvic, etc) Arthritis Neck/Back Pain Balance Disturbances Dif culties Walking Generalized Weakness Impaired Abilities to Perform Activities (Bathing, Ambulating, Dressing, Eating and Transferring) Wound Care OUR SPECIALTIES INCLUDE: 560 SW McFarlane Ave. Lake City, FL 32025 386-758-4777 Call to pre-register or for a tour. Charter Loans Services Pay outstanding bills, credit cards. Lowest compared rates. Personal loans. Business, debt loans. Auto Home Improvement Loans Bad Credit options. No apps. fees Call today: 1.877.359.533 Charteracc@usa.com In Orlando, Romney cites jobs crisis By STEVE PEOPLES Associated Press ORLANDO Declaring that the nation is in a jobs crisis, Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney is charging ahead with his economic arguments in spite of unemployment dropping to its lowest level since President Barack Obama took office. Romney all but ignored the posi tive jobs numbers while campaign ing Friday night in Florida, instead highlighting his strong debate perfor mance and presenting a more com passionate message as he sought to overcome Obamas narrow lead in the polls. He made clear earlier in the day that he did not agree with the presidents assessment that the unemployment statistic it dipped from 8.1 percent to 7.8 percent in September is a sign of an economy heading in the right direction. By any rational measure, its crys tal clear were in the middle of a jobs crisis, Romney said in a fundraising message to supporters. My prior ity is jobs. And from Day One of my presidency, I will lead us out of this crisis. Obama said the creation of 114,000 jobs in September, coupled with the drop in unemployment, was a remind er that this country has come too far to turn back now. Jabbing at his rivals plans, the president declared, Weve made too much progress to return to the policies that caused this crisis in the first place. Obama was planning to spend Saturday celebrating the 20th wed ding anniversary he had put aside because it fell on the day of the debate. With Vice President Joe Biden and Romney running mate Paul Ryan forgoing public events ahead of their own debate, on Thursday in Danville, Ky., Romney has the stage to himself for a campaign event near Orlando. Aides say Romney would spend part of Saturday preparing for his next debate with Obama, scheduled for Oct. 16 in Hempstead, N.Y., before speaking at an evening rally. The presidents team says he hasnt had any formal practice sessions since the first debate. While sticking with his focus on economic issues, Romney was also bringing up intimate details of friend ships that had ended in death as part of a shift to present himself in more personal terms. His wife, Ann, has often talked about Romneys compassionate side, but the former Massachusetts governor rarely dis cusses it publicly. At a rally in St. Petersburg., Romney recalled the time he spent with a young teenager dying of leu kemia, returning to a story the boys parents had related from the stage of the Republican National Convention. Ive seen the character of a young man like David, who wasnt emo tional or crying. He had his eyes wide open, Romney said Friday night. Theres a saying: Clear eyes, full heart, cant lose. David couldnt lose. I loved that young man. The Romney campaign was releas ing a TV ad featuring a woman who says she voted for Obama in 2008 but is supporting the Republican today. Why Mitt Romney? she asks. Being a woman, you think about your children and you think about their future. And what I want to think about is a future that has jobs. That our economys growing again. Thats important to women and its impor tant to me. Widely regarded as having lost the debate Wednesday night in Denver to Romney, Obama came out with more energy and a retooled response in ral lies in Colorado, Wisconsin and Ohio over the last two days. On Sunday, Obama is scheduled to launch a lucrative and celebri ty-packed fundraising swing to Los Angeles and San Francisco, a two-day trek followed by a campaign rally in ever-important Ohio on Tuesday. Obama and his surrogates plan to hammer Romney on two fronts: con tending that Romney lied about his positions during the debate and criti cizing him as downplaying Fridays positive jobs reports. ASSOCIATED PRESS Republican Presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney laughs as he speaks to a supporter after a campaign speech Friday in St. Petersburg. Meningitis outbreak means weeks of worry for those possibly infected By BRUCE CHREINER AND KRISTIN M. HALL Associated Press NASHVILLE, Tenn. Patsy Bivins tossed and turned all night after find ing out the steroid shot she received to ease her chron ic back pain could instead threaten her life. For now, all the 68-yearold retired waitress can do is hope she doesnt develop the telltale signs of a rare form of fungal meningitis that health officials say has sickened more than 60 peo ple in nine states: a splitting headache, fever, stiff neck, difficulty walking or wors ening back pain. There may be hundreds or even thousands more like her. She called her doctors Friday, right after her first cup of coffee, hoping to relieve the anxiety stirred a day earlier when she learned she might be at risk. Bivins was told only that she didnt need to be checked unless she devel oped symptoms. Im not sure if I like it, Bivins, of Sturgis, Ky., said Frida. Seems like there should be some way to tell it before you get the symp toms. Honestly, it makes me worse than I was. Federal health officials say seven people have died so far, and they fear thou sands more could have been exposed. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has said the outbreak may have been caused by a steroid made by a specialty pharmacy in Massachusetts, where inspectors found at least one sealed vial that was con taminated. Its not yet clear how the fungus got into the steroid, which is com monly used to treat back pain. But officials have told health professionals not to use anything made by the pharmacy. So far, the government has identified about 75 facilities in 23 states that received the recalled doses. It is not yet clear exactly how many people could get sick, though health offi cials say the fungus is not transmitted from person to person. The CDC has called for clinics and doctors to imme diately identify those who could have been exposed between July 1 and Sept. 28. It could be weeks before any of the patients are in the clear. Sure Im apprehensive, but theres not a thing I can do except wait and see what happens, said Richard Jenkins, an 81year-old from Nashville who received his most recent shot Sept. 11 at the Saint Thomas Outpatient Neurology Surgery Center. The chief medical offi cer for the Tennessee Department of Health said Friday the incubation peri od for the disease isnt yet known and he advised atrisk patients to be vigilant for symptoms for weeks. A month is the shortest wed possibly want to con sider that. Were looking at a longer period of time before wed feel confident that somebody is out of the woods, Dr. David Reagan said. The company at the cen ter of the outbreak, the New England Compounding Center, had been investi gated by Massachusetts regulators in 2006. That led to an agreement for a full inspection of its drug com pounding practices, includ ing sterility. A spokesman for NECC said the company would have no further comment Friday. It has previously said that it is cooperating with health investigators to determine the source of the infections. Bivins, a widow who lives in western Kentucky about an hour from Evansville, Ind., received two injections in her lower back on Aug. 27. It was the first time she had received steroid injec tions and the constant pain in her lower back, hips and legs was eased. She said she doesnt blame the doctors they were just trying to help her, not knowing the ste roid could have been contaminated. Calif. gas prices hit all-time high LOS ANGELES Its a record, though just barely. The price of gasoline hit an all-time average high in California of $4.6140 a gal lon Saturday, fueled by a reduced supply and a vola tile market. The record was set by a fraction of a penny, according to AAA spokesman Michael Green. The previous high was $4.6096 on June 19, 2008. Prices throughout the state were expected to increase for several more days. The Associated Press

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I t’s bad enough when the universal consen-sus is that you lost the first presidential debate. What’s worse for President Obama is that his own team concedes he did so without telling the truth. Stephanie Cutter, Mr. Obama’s deputy campaign manager essentially called her boss a liar on Thursday. During the previous night’s contest, Mitt Romney refused to allow the president to get away with saying the GOP tax plan would result in a $5 trillion cut that is not paid for. “My No. 1 principle is there will be no tax cut that adds to the deficit,” the for-mer Massachusetts governor explained to the former Illinois senator. “So any language to the contrary is simply not accurate.” When CNN informed Ms. Cutter that its own analysis confirmed that the Romney plan closes loop-holes and deductions to bring in more revenue, she was forced to admit, “Well, OK, stipulated, it won’t be near $5 trillion.” The facts didn’t get in the way of Mr. Obama repeating more debate falsehoods on Friday. He told an audience at George Mason University in Virginia that the GOP candi-date “said there’s no way that he’d close the loophole that gives big oil companies bil-lions each year in corporate welfare.” Actually, Mr. Romney said Wednesday that the hun-dred-year-old tax credit that amounts to less than $3 billion a year is “probably not going to survive” if he is successful in reducing the corporate tax rate from a worldwide high of 35 percent to 25 percent. Mr. Obama continues to claim his Republican chal-lenger would raise taxes on middle-class families by $2,000 a year. He said in the debate that the GOP candidate’s plan could never be revenue neutral without closing deduc-tions and loopholes for aver-age Americans, insisting, “It’s math. It’s arithmetic.” If so, it’s some kind of new math. Mr. Romney vows to do the oppo-site, lowering taxes on middle-income families through a 20 percent reduction in rates. He also pointed out that the one study upon which Mr. Obama based his accusations has been debunked by neutral econo-mists and fact checkers. A new report from the American Enterprise Institute shows Mr. Obama is the one who will oppress the middle class because the massive debt incurred under the current administration will result in higher taxes. The economists estimated the real annual cost for households to service the debt — the current $16.2 trillion plus the $7.6 trillion increase projected under Mr. Obama’s policies — would be a $4,000 a year tax hike on middle-income families. The Romney campaign released a new TV ad Friday on this point. “Obama’s four deficits are the four largest in U.S. his-tory,” the announcer intones over slides showing the facts. “He’s adding almost as much debt as all 43 previous presi-dents combined, and over 30 cents of every dollar Obama spends is borrowed.” The year-end fiscal 2012 books reflected another $1.1 trillion deficit, the fourth highest since World War II. It’s as if Mr. Obama is acting under the illusion that no one will call him out on his false-hoods. However, it’s looking more and more likely that vot-ers will realize a second term would mean larger deficits for the budget and the truth. Obama’struthdeficit OUR OPINION I n this county in 1940, Mary J. Lightfoote was the ‘Jeanes teacher.’ She was called a Jeanes teacher because the funding for her position came from the Anna T. Jeanes Foundation. Ms. Jeanes, a white Quaker woman, had donated $1,000,000 in 1908 to set up a foundation to help upgrade the black rural schools in the South. So, Mrs. Lightfoote’s mission here was to visit our black rural schools and try to improve them. This was no easy task because, in the first place, simply getting to these schools could be a challenge. They were often located on primi-tive dirt roads, and heavy rains sometimes made the roads almost impassable. Once there, she had the difficult job of help-ing the students and teachers who were usually housed in sec-ond class buildings. This might mean the teacher’s desk could be a crate and the students’ chairs might be odds and ends of boxes. Mrs. Lightfoote was often heard to say that, although the build-ings might be second class, the teachers were first class. But Mrs. Lightfoote had a missionary zeal and was up to the challenge. Her driving philosophy was to “work on the next needed thing.” Some of the schools she visited were Bethel, Bethlehem, King’s Welcome, Winfield, Jerusalem, Kiota, Scrubtown, Falling Creek, and Springville. Some of the teachers she visited were Arrie Lee Gainey, Agnes C. Norton, Herman R. Tunsil, R. R. Kenon, Margaret Hall, James E. Green, Minnie J. Niblack, and Callie A. Zow. Mrs. Lightfoote, and all like her, should be held in a place of honor in American history for all her contributions to black teachers and students under trying circumstances way back when. TAX COLLECTOR INFOWhen I visited the Tax Collector’s office recently to renew my driver’s license, I noticed a wall chart that dis-played interesting information about the tax office: “The tax collector’s office was created statewide by the Florida Constitution of 1885. The longest serving tax collec-tor in Florida is Earl K. Wood of Orange County—some 44 years, since 1965. Columbia County’s longest serving tax collector was the late Alvin C. Hosford. He served 32 years, from 1941-1973. The Lake City tax office handles over $65,000,000 a year in our taxes. The highest single tax bill is $496, 403. 98, paid by Lake City Medical Center. There are 111 specialty license plates and as of 2008 the sales leader was the Florida Gator tag.” To their credit, Tax Collector Ronnie Brannon’s excellent staff seems to handle everything in this busy office with politeness and efficiency. FORT McCOY SCHOOL Our School Museum has a copy of a pictorial history of the old Ft. McCoy school in Marion County. The Ft. McCoy school history goes back to 1917 and would be a treasure for the right people in Marion County to have. If any reader attended Ft. McCoy, or knows someone who did, we would be glad to give this book to you. Call 386-755-8183. POETIC SUPT.In July of 1944, Madison County (Florida) School Superintendent, Edwin B. Browning was extended an invitation to attend a school meeting in Lake City. He wrote back saying he could not attend that meeting but would attend an alternate meeting to be held in October. Supt. Browning, a literate and religious man (“a deep water Baptist”), wrote these words in replying to the invitation: “I shall look forward to coming in the golden brown of invigorat-ing October when the leaves, leisurely and sentimentally, drift to Mother Earth, speaking to us the message that we, too, following our fitful spasm of life—moved by trials, and prob-lems and motives, good and base—shall drift back to Mother Earth and await the glorious springtime of the resurrection morning.” CALL THE COPSA young mother was driving her five year old son to school one day when a nude woman riding in the convertible just ahead stood up and waved. The son said, “Mom, call the police. That lady isn’t wearing a seat belt!” Mary J. Lightfoote, ‘Jeanes teacher’ LETTERS TO THE EDITOR To the Editor:In rebuttal of Louis Beames High Springs, Wed 9-26-12: Barack is your shepherd and the want will never stop – he will see to it. He forces you to sleep on park benches and leads you beside shut down oil wells and coal industries and boarded up businesses strangled by regula-tion. He will restore your knowledge of the corruption of the “Dim” party if you will only listen. He guides you to the path of unemployment for the sake of communism, Yea, though you walk thru the valley of soup kitchens, you are still hungry and have no hope because of his trickle up theory. We, the poor, do fear your evil as we watch you destroy our Christian nation. He anoints our income with taxes so he can spend more and more of our money on Solyndra, the many other bankrupt green energy programs and Government Motors while shut-ting down the Gulf oil Industry, the coal industry and the Keystone Pipeline at the same time borrowing $2 BILLION and loaning it to Chavez to drill oil wells telling him that we will be his best customer. Poverty and hard living will follow us all the days of the “DIM” party and we shall live in a tent forever without housing because the government has destroyed our income and our country by purposely bankrupt-ing it. Only real prayer to God will save our nation. I will stay on my knees as I hope our entire nation is doing. The communist idea of fairness is for them (the dictator and the ruling class) to live in luxury and for the rest of the people to live in abject poverty. Think not. Take a good look at Cuba and any of the other commu-nist nations. They take all the resources for themselves and the rest of the people have noth-ing. You can’t help the poor nations of the world – after tril-lions of our dollars was sent to them – the corrupted (or communist) governments take it all and the people still live in poverty. This is what your fearless leader wants for you but you are asleep and can’t see it. Barack Obama had the House, the Senate and the presi-dency for two full years but the only thing he did was shove ObamecareLESS down our throats with corruption behind closed doors which is all about power and control and has abso-lutely nothing to do with our health or well being. Just wait until you face the death panels. Wonder what you will have to say then. I sure hope you are very young. The mess he inherited was his own mess – he was in the Senate when we had the meltdown. Don’t you think maybe he needs to accept some responsibly for the meltdown since you seem to think that the Republicans are stopping Barack Obama from saving our nation. While you have your thinking cap on-think about food prices, the price of gas at the pump and your power bill. How are you really liking his hopeless change? The only thing I ever needed to know about Barack Obama was that he voted twice while in the Illinois legislature to WITHHOLD all medical care from babies BORN ALIVE from botched abortions. These babies get another death sen-tence when the first did not work. And you probably want him in charge of your health care. Just think what he is willing to do to you. As far as Mitt Romney’s tax returns – what has he to prove-that he is very wealthy? So was Kennedy and Kerry – who cares? He can do what he wants with his own money, I am far more interested in my tax returns and the money Barack Obama has wasted, by the trillions, of all taxpaying Americans and the $16 trillion deficit caused by 43 cents of every dollar that contin-ues to be borrowed. Wonder how long your household would last if you borrowed 43 cents of every dollar you spend. It puzzles me that suddenly capitalism is evil since we have only prospered for over 230 years of capitalism. America and capitalism has done well until Barack Obama got elected with him & his “Dim” buddies in charge. Don’t see anyone risking life and limb to get into China, North Korea or Cuba, do you? By the way, the “dims” were in charge in the House and Congress until the elections of 2010 – so whose mess is this really? I would suggest you take your own wake up advice. America is fully awake-too bad you are not. Jo LytteLake City ‘Barack is your shepherd...’ Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding counties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, publisher Robert Bridges, editor Sue Brannon, controller Dink NeSmith, president Tom Wood, chairman LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY E-MAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com L ess than two weeks after the Suwannee River Water Management District, responding to the worst drought here since 1932, instituted tough new restrictions on water usage last summer, Tropical Storm Debby brought a deluge the likes of which we’ve never seen. Months later, groundwater levels are up and the immediate crisis has passed. Consequently, the district allowed the tough new rules to expire Sept. 30. In their place are the now-standard limita-tions of twice-per-week lawn watering, among other restric-tions. We think the tougher rules should have remained in place. Rather than fly by the seat of our pants from one crisis to the next, we should be focused on learning to conserve our most precious natural resource throughout the year – rain or shine. Debby’s downpour was a short-term fix for a long-term problem. Water is a finite resource, and as the economic climate improves and the local popu-lation once again begins to swell, the problem will only get worse. We’re not suggesting that once-per-week lawn watering is the answer to all our woes. Nonetheless, such a rule, were the political will there to leave it in place, would slowly and subtly change the way we think about a resource we far too easily take for granted. Inconvenient?For some, surely.But as conservation measures go, it’s far more palatable than some. There are otherwise sensible people who seriously propose making water so expensive that average folks have no choice but to ration it. We like the district’s original idea better. Water rules should have stayed Q The Washington Times OPINION Sunday, October 7, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A4AEDIT ANOTHER VIEW Morris WilliamsPhone: (386) 755-8183williams_h2@firn.edu372 W. Duval St.Lake City, FL 32055 Q Morris Williams is a local historian and long-time Columbia County resident.

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Oct. 7Noegel reunionThe Noegel Family Reunion will be Sunday, Oct. 7 at 1 p.m. on at Ed Bedenbaugh’s place, off C-135 (Noegel Road). Please bring a covered dish and come fellowship with friends and family. For more information call Jo Ann at 752-9334 or Patti at 752-0446. Little-Hill reunionThe annual Little-Hill Family Reunion will be held on Oct. 7 at Mason City Community Center. Come early to visit and bring a covered dish for lunch at approximately 1p.m. Paper products and drinks will be provided. Oct. 8Cancer support groupThe Women’s Cancer Support Group of Lake City will meet at the Cracker Barrel Restaurant on West Highway 90 at 5:30 p.m. on Monday, Oct. 8 to celebrate Breast Cancer Awareness Month. This Dutch Treat dinner is for all women can-cer survivors. Information at 386-752-4198 or 386-755-0522. School readinessOn Monday, Oct. 8 from 6 to 8 p.m., Florida’s Office of Early Learning will host, at Florida Gateway College’s Wilson S. Rivers Library & Media Center, a Town Hall Meeting to present to all interested parties their plan for the state-wide reallocation of School Readiness (subsi-dized child care) funds for the coming five years. Oct. 9Medicare seminarThe Lifestyle Enrichment Center of Lake City is spon-soring a free Medicare Edicational Seminar Tuesday, Oct. 9 from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. The semi-nar will be moderated by Irv Crowetz of C/C & Associates. Subjects cov-ered will be: what you need to know about Medicare, when to enroll, what’s cov-ered and is a supplement needed. This seminar is for educational purposes only, it is not a sales seminar. Please RSVP to 755-3476, ext. 107. Historical meetingThe Columbia County Historical Society will meet at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 9 in the downtown pub-lic library in Lake City. Guest speaker will be LaViece Smallwood Moser, Director of the Heritage Park Village in Macclenny. The meeting is free and open to the public. Contact Sean McMahon at 754-4293 for more information.Photo clubLake City Photo Club meets every 2nd Tuesday of each month from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Lifestyle Enrichment Center at Baya Ave. Share your photos and ideas with the group. Newcomers are welcome!Oct. 10Hiring Our Heroes Florida Crown Workforce Board has announced the 2012 Hiring Our Heroes veterans’ job fair event 9 a.m. to noon on Wednesday, Oct. 10 at the American Legion Post 57, 2602 SW Main Blvd in Lake City. This will be a free, one-of-a-kind, hiring fair for both employ-ers and veteran jobseek-ers. Veterans, active duty military members, Guard and Reserve members and qualifying military spouses are encouraged to attend. Veterans are asked to bring a copy of their DD-214 and copies of their current resume. These individuals can register online at HOH.Greatjob.net to guarantee admission and walk-ins are welcome. Customer serviceA customer service workshop will be held Wednesday, Oct. 10 at the Columbia County Fairgrounds entertainment building. There will be two sessions from which to choose, from 8 a.m.-noon or from 1 p.m.-5 p.m. The workshop is free but registration is required. Call 758-1312 or email tdc@columbiacountyfla.com to register.Newcomers luncheonThe regular Luncheon of the Lake City Newcomers and Friends will be held at 11 a.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 10 at Eastside Village Clubhouse. Our Program is the Installation of Officers and some games. Lunch is $11. Any questions call Barbara Cutcher 752-9783 or Joan Wilson 755-9897.Early learning meetingThe Early Learning Coalition of Florida’s Gateway, Inc., Board Meeting will be held on Wednesday, Oct. 10 at 9 a.m. at the Coalition Office, 1104 SW Main Blvd. The Coalition administers the state and federal funding for all School Readiness and Voluntary Prekindergarten. We encourage community participation and welcome any input. Dine for crisis fundDine to donate every Wednesday in October at Applebee’s in Lake City. The Tough Enough to Wear Pink Crisis Fund will receive 10 percent of the bill. Ask for a flier, by the Columbia County Fairgrounds Office or call 752-8822 to have one e-mailed to you. Oct. 11Woodturners ClubBell Woodturners Club meets the second Thursday of the month in the Bell community Center at 7 p.m. Every meeting features a show and tell of members current projects. There is also a full demon-stration of a woodturning project by a club member. There are opportunities to take home project wood, tools and receive help from other turners. All experi-ence levels are welcome. For additional info contact Kent Harriss at 365-7086.Garden Club meetingThe Lake City Garden Club will hold meet Oct. 11 at the Clubhouse, 257 SE Hernando Ave. The pro-gram this month will be a presentation on ground cover by Betsy Martin. Social time begins at 9:30 a.m. and the meeting is at 10 a.m. Everyone is invit-ed. Oct. 12Class of ‘62The CHS class of 1962 will be celebrating their 50th class reunion Oct. 12-13. Contact Linda Hurst Greene at (386) 752-0561 for more information.Oct. 13Monument rededicationPlease join the Sons of Confederate Veterans and the United Daughters of the Confederacy on Saturday, Oct. 13 at 11 a.m. for the Rededication of the Confederate Monument, which was originally dedicated 100 years ago. LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 5A5A One coupon per guest. Coupon discount does not apply to previous transactions, previously initiated price holds, non-purchases such as rentals, deposits and charitable donations, purchases of alcohol, purchases of gift cards, and purchases of phone or calling cards and cannot be used in combination with any other coupon, associate discount or other discount such as Rewardsredemptions. Coupon must be surrendered at time of purchase. Value is forfeited if item is returned. Only original coupons accepted. Big Lots is not responsible for lost, stolen or expired coupons. By using coupon, user unconditionally agrees that decisions of Big Lots are nal on all matters of interpretation, fact and procedure in respect of coupon. Valid only on in-stock goods. Void where prohibited. No cash value or cash back. Offer valid 10/7/2012 with coupon. CASHIER: To apply discount, scan this coupon.PROMOTIONAL OFFER VALID ONLY 10/7/12 WITH COUPON PRESENT THIS COUPON & SAVE SUNDAY ONLY OCTOBER 7, 2012EXTENDED HOURS TO 10 P.M. COMMUNITY CALENDAR Q To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Laura Hampson at 754-0427 or by e-mail at lhampson@ lakecityreporter.com.JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterJesse Neely, of North Florida Fence, works to construct a ch ain link fence around Youngs Park earlier this week. Neely said that the fence is inten ded to help the children who play in the area. ‘It doesn’t take but 10 seconds for a child to get from the slide to under someone’s tire. If it saves one kid, then it’s definitely worth it.’

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By MICHAEL BRAUN The News-Press FORT MYERS What used to be part of the states largest military airfield is now the countys newest green space, the 3,000-plus-acre Wild Turkey Strand Preserve. The new Conservation 20/20 pre serve between Fort Myers and Lehigh Acres opened recently off State Road 82 west of the Hendry County line. It provides wildlife habitat as well as a place for nature enthusiasts, hikers, photographers and picnickers. It came together wonderfully, said Cathy Olson, senior supervisor for the Conservation 20/20 program in the county Parks and Recreation Department. The design team tried to make it as green as possible. The preserve sits amid what used to be the Buckingham Army Airfield, once the states largest airfield train ing base during World War II. The airfield, used from 1942 to 1945, was instrumental for gunnery training. Little evidence of the facility now remains, but Olson said workers are in the process of installing historic interpretative panels describing the fields use during WWII. The area offers a wilderness feel despite the steady drone of jetliners every three minutes or so on approach to Southwest Florida International Airport not far away. Also included at the new preserve are picnic areas, a 1.8-mile nature trail and two wetland observation decks. Two primitive portions of the nature trail remain somewhat under water during the areas wet seasonal and visitors are recommended to wear appropriate shoes. Sherri Furnari, the 20/20 coordina tor for the preserve, said a brochure is being put together to describe the site as well as others being planned such as the Buckingham Trails Preserve, 8790 Buckingham Road, set to open in 2014, and Six Mile Cypress Preserve North, set for 2017. It has historical as well as natural perspective, Furnari said of the new preserve. Trailblazing trail Olson said the site also is Lee Countys first large-scale application of Flexi-Pave, a pavement made of shredded tires and stone. Flexi-Pave gave us a really good price, she said. They were anxious for us to use it. The surface also is used at the Imaginarium in Fort Myers. Flexi-Paves porous surface allows rainfall to percolate through, forming good bacteria that filter clean water into the groundwater table. Olson said the pavement was used to help enhance one of the preserves green purposes, groundwater recharging. Initial acquisition of the property began in 2001 and was completed at a cost of $18 million in 2008. Money from the Conservation 20/20 management fund was supple mented by grants. The preserve was acquired as three parcels in 2001, 2003 and 2008 and is considered Conservation 20/20s sec ond-largest conservation area. Animals and plants known to flour ish at the new preserve include whitetailed deer, marsh rabbits and eastern cottontails, northern river otter, feral hogs, wild turkey, Everglades snail kites, yellow-billed cuckoo, flatwoods, cypress strand swamps, cypress dome swamps, freshwater marshes, wet prairies and abandoned pastures. The area was damaged from a wildfire in April 2007 that burned through pine flatwoods and cypress. Contractors working with the Caloosahatchee Districts Florida Division of Forestry have removed large melaleuca trees and thinned dense pine tree stands. 6A LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION & STATE SUNDAY OCTOBER 7, 2012 Page Editor: Jim Barr, 754-0424 6A COUPON REQUIRED ...Do you have the over-priced, slow-speed Internet Blues? Get FAST High-Speed Internet Today! Now Available Everywhere! Call your N. Central & N. Florida Authorized Dealer Today at 386-269-0984 1-800-787-8041 $ 39. 95 to $ 59.99 /Mo. 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THG-12901 N O T I C E O F M E E T I N G A D V I S O R Y B E A U T I F I C A T I O N C O M M I T T E E C I T Y O F L A K E C I T Y N O T I C E I S H E R E B Y G I V E N t ha t t he A dvi s or y B e a ut i f i c a t i on C om m i t t e e f o r t he C i t y of L a ke C i t y, F l o r i da w i l l hol d a m e e t i ng on T ue s da y, O c t o be r 9, 2012 a t 4: 00 P M i n t he C ounc i l C h a m be r s l oc a t e d on t he s e c ond f l oo r of C i t y H a l l a t 205 N o r t h M a r i on A ve nue L a ke C i t y F l or i da A l l i nt e r e s t e d pe r s ons a r e i nvi t e d t o a t t e nd A U D R E Y E S I K E S M M C C i t y C l e r k N O T I C E O F M E E T I N G C O M M U N I T Y R E D E V E L O P M E N T A D V I S O R Y C O M M I T T E E C I T Y O F L A K E C I T Y N O T I C E I S H E R E B Y G I V E N t ha t t he C om m uni t y R e de ve l opm e nt A dvi s or y C om m i t t e e f or t he C i t y of L a ke C i t y, F l or i da w i l l hol d a m e e t i ng on T ue s da y, O c t obe r 9 2012 a t 5: 30 P M i n t he C ounc i l C ha m be r s l oc a t e d on t he s e c ond f l oo r of C i t y H a l l a t 205 N or t h M a r i on A ve nue L a ke C i t y, F l or i da A l l i nt e r e s t e d pe r s ons a r e i nvi t e d t o a t t e nd S P E C I A L R E Q U I R E M E N T S : I f you r e qui r e s pe c i a l a i d or s e r vi c e s f or a ny of t he m e e t i ngs i de nt i f i e d a bove a s a ddr e s s e d i n t he A m e r i c a n D i s a bi l i t i e s A c t pl e a s e c ont a c t t he C i t y M a na ge r s O f f i c e a t ( 386) 719 5768. A U D R E Y E S I K E S M M C C i t y C l e r k Military site returned to nature WWII airfield becomes preserve for wildlife, green space for people. Ga. congressman calls evolution lie from pit of hell Associated Press ATHENS, Ga. Georgia Rep. Paul Broun said in vid eotaped remarks that evo lution, embryology and the Big Bang theory are lies straight from the pit of hell meant to convince people that they do not need a savior. The Republican lawmak er made those comments during a speech Sept. 27 at a sportsmans banquet at Liberty Baptist Church in Hartwell. Broun, a medical doctor, is running for reelection in November unop posed by Democrats. Gods word is true, Broun said, according to a video posted on the churchs website. Ive come to understand that. All that stuff I was taught about evolution and embry ology and Big Bang theory, all that is lies straight from the pit of hell. And its lies to try to keep me and all the folks who are taught that from understanding that they need a savior. Broun also said that he believes the Earth is about 9,000 years old and that it was made in six days. Those beliefs are held by fundamentalist Christians who believe the creation accounts in the Bible to be literally true. Broun spokeswoman Meredith Griffanti told the Athens Banner-Herald that Broun was recorded speaking off-the-record to a church group about his religious beliefs. He sits on the House Committee on Science, Space and Technology. It seems unlikely that Brouns remarks were sup posed to be kept private. The banquet was adver tised, Broun spoke before an audience and the video of his remarks was posted on the churchs website. ASSOCIATED PRESS Georgia U.S. Rep. Paul Broun, a Republican seeking reelection in the states 10th Congressional District seat, said that evolution, embryology and the Big Bang theory are lies straight from the pit of hell meant to convince people that they do not need a savior. The lawmaker made those com ments during a speech at a sportsmans banquet. Private space station delivery to launch today MARCIA DUNN Associated Press CAPE CANAVERAL A private company is on the verge of launching another cargo ship to the International Space Station. On Sunday night, California-based SpaceX will attempt to send a Dragon capsule to the orbiting lab and its three-member crew. Liftoff of the companys unmanned Falcon rocket is scheduled for 8:35 p.m. EDT. Forecasters put the odds of acceptable weather at 60 percent. Thick clouds and rain are the main con cerns. A Dragon cargo ship successfully docked to the space station last May, but that was considered a test flight. The coming mis sion is the first under a $1.6 billion contract with NASA that calls for a dozen resupply flights by SpaceX, essential in the post-shuttle era. We got there once. We demonstrated we could do it, so there might be a teeny, teeny bit of relax ation. Not a lot, though, SpaceX President Gwynne Shotwell told reporters Saturday night. NASA was monitoring a potentially threatening piece of orbiting junk, but said that even if the space station had to steer clear of the object, that would not delay the SpaceX mission. This newest Dragon will haul about 1,000 pounds of food, clothes and gear, including ice cream for the American, Russian and Japanese astronauts on board. (The ice cream will go up in freezers meant for research). Even more cargo will be coming back. The capsule will remain docked to the space sta tion for most of October. Astronauts will fill the cap sule with blood and urine samples, other experiments and old equipment, for its return to Earth at the end of the month. By then, the complex will be back to a full crew of six. The nearly 500 tubes of blood and syringes of urine have been stashed in space station freezers since the last space shuttle flight, by Atlantis, in July 2011. The decommissioned Atlantis, and sister ships Discovery and Endeavour, are now museum relics. NASA nutritionist Scott Smith said these blood and urine samples part of medical studies will be the first to be returned since Atlantis final voyage. This is the first real return vehicle for this type of sample, Scott said. The cargo ships periodi cally flown by Russia, Japan and Europe do not have the capability to return any thing; they burn up upon reentry. The SpaceX Dragons parachute down into the Pacific, reminiscent of NASAs old-time capsules. While it may seem very strange to some folks, my typical line is that, It may be urine to you, but its gold to us, Smith said. Theres a lot of science that comes out of this. NASAs space station program manager, Mike Suffredini, is also thrilled about having an American spacecraft bearing goods. Its much easier to get lastminute equipment aboard a U.S. capsule, he noted. The Dragon, for example, will carry up a new pump for the space stations urineinto-drinking water recy cling system. Shipping and customs can kill you when youre trying to get overseas, Suffredini said.

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got a lot more energy, she said. Helton said she sets a high and low goal every day to stay motivated. She is now able to walk 14 min utes on the treadmill and has even asked therapists for more weight on the weightlifting machines. Every day I set a specific goal I want to reach, she said. She is walking farther and much more talkative, Register said. There are just over 800 documented cases of Alstrm Syndrome, which has claimed two of B.J.s siblings. B.J.s sister, Rebekah, died as a baby. Her brother Andrew battled the disorder until he was 29. Late in the day on Sept. 5 they got a call telling Helton to stop eating, youre going to transplant, Register said. Register said the day before doctors were sup posed to remove a device that measures Heltons pulmonary pressures and puts her on the top of the national transplant list. The device can only be in for so long and remov ing it lowers her on the transplant list, Register said. For some reason a new doctor never came to remove the device, so when the organ donation came in, Helton was ready, her mom said. That was amazing. I laughed, I cried, I jumped for joy, she said. After the transplant, Register said a surgeon told her personally that he didnt know how Helton had survived for so long with such a weak heart. Now, Helton takes 16 medicines daily, including three anti-rejection medi cines, Register said. There have been some post-sur gery challenges, she said. Two days after surgery, Helton started having sei zures as her body adjusted to receiving more oxygen, Register said. However biopsies on her lungs and heart have shown no problems, Register said. Weekly, mother and daughter meet with a sup port group of transplant patients and their care givers. Register said it is wonderful to talk to people who understand. The medications sup press Heltons immunity so for the rest of her life she will have to be care ful about getting sick, Register said. Helton said she will wear gloves and a mask and stay away from big crowds. You dont want to waste a gift youve been given, she said. Appreciating the small things, Helton is grateful to be able to shower on her own, free of tubes and monitoring devices. After two months in the hospital, she is also happy to be in the apartment. People arent coming in poking me when Im sleeping, she said.. Helton said she has been invited to several churches to share her story. I have been called to go and give my testimo ny. Thats really exciting, she said. Helton is also hoping to be healthy enough to attend an international Alstrm conference in May, where her brother and sister will be featured on a memory board. I really want to go, Helton said. Helton already has a degree in psychology and shes planning her next degree. Im going back to school. I want my mas ters, she said. As long as Im not sick, Im not a person who likes to sit around and not enjoy things, she said. To make a donation for Heltons recovery, visit her page on the National Foundation for Transplants Website at http://patients. transplants.org/bjhelton. Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY OCTOBER 7, 2012 7A 7A NOTICE to all who are all eligible to vote in Floridas Columbia County School Board District 5 on November 6, 2012. I am humbly honored to share with you that Bill Gootee has told me and others that Columbia County Students are created in the image of God and that none evolved from a hominid. Paid for by Kenny Merriken October 7, 2012. Florida Voter ID #113877356 Kenny Merriken 386-344-7339, kbmerriken@hotmail.com Genesis 1:26-27 And God said, Let us make man in our image OF FLORIDA A Cal-Tech Company Is your homes foundation letting you down?? FREE On Site Comprehensive Evaluation Toll Free: (855) 934-7688 or (386) 755-3002 RESIDENTIAL & COMMERICAL Lifetime Warranty STOP Foundation Settlement For Good, Guaranteed... For Life Glenn Cookout Come & Meet the Candidate P OLITICAL A DVERTISEMENT P AID F OR A ND A PPROVED B Y G LENN H UNTER F OR C OLUMBIA C OUNTY S UPERINTENDENT O F S CHOOLS F OR S UPERINTENDENT OF S CHOOLS Thursday, October 11, 2012 at 6:00 p.m. Mason City Community Center Free Perry David Pollard Perry David Pollard, 30, died in a tragic accident Monday, October 1, 2012. He was born in Gainesville, Florida, but had lived here in Lake City for the past 15 years having moved from Live Oak, Florida. He was a devoted family man and hard worker who liked to spend time restoring old things to new, an a huge Seminole Fan. He is pre ceded in death by his, sister, Eliz abeth Whisnant, and his adoptive father, Perry Daniel Pollard Sr. Survivors include his adoptive mother, Elizabeth Young Pol lard of Live Oak, FL; biological mother, Sherry (Jeff) Edwards of Lake City, FL; biological fany Wilson of Lake City, FL; daughters, Morgan, Pagan, Ely ana all of Lake City, FL; broth ers, David Pollard of Jennings, FL, Joe Lucas of Lake City, FL, James Lucas of Live Oak, FL, William Lucas of Live Oak, FL, Randy Pollard of Lake City, FL, Perry Pollard Jr. of WI, Rob bie Pollard of Lake City, FL, ; step brother, Allen Edwards of Columbia, SC; sisters, Sandra Wood of Live Oak, FL Danette Ocala, FL, Sarah Jolley of Live Oak, FL, Mindy Pollard of Lake City, FL and Casey Warner of Boise, ID; step sister, Sheena Wooten of Ft. Lee, VA; mater nal grandmother, Beulah Gil liard of Lake City, FL; numerous aunts, uncles, nieces neph ews and cousins also survive. Funeral services will be con evening, October 9, 2012 in the Gateway-Forest Lawn Memo rial Chapel with Pastor Clyde vices will be held at a later date. Visitation with the family will be from 5:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. Monday evening, Octo ber 8, 2012 at the funeral home. GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN FUNERAL HOME 3596 South U.S. Hwy 441, Lake City, Florida 30225, (386) 752-1954. Please leave words of comfort for the family at www.gatewayforestlawn.com Doris Ann Burdick Thomas beloved Wife and Mother passed away at her home in Lake City, FL on Oct. 3rd, 2012. Doris was born on April 13th 1928 in Rix ford, a small community north of Live Oak, in Suwanee County, FL. She was a graduate of Leon tended Florida State University and the University of Florida. Doris was an Employee of the State of Florida for 32 years in both the State Insurance State Employment and Unem burg and Clearwater, FL. Doris was one of the founding members of the Vagabond Square Dance Club Live Oak, FL (18 years) and attended the Lake City Christian Church in Lake City, FL. Doris was preceded in passing by her Mother Ann Burdick, father Max Burdick and beloved brothers Winston and Charles Burdick. Doris is survived by her husband (Christy) of St. Augustine, FL; Friedlander (Philip) of Clear water, FL; her grandchildren Anne Piant. She is also sur vived by nephews Bill Burdick (Candy) and Bob Burdick (Patti) and their joyous gift of many great nieces and nephews. She doted on her loving dog Holly. as will be conducted at 11:00 A.M. on Saturday, October 13th, 2012 in the Lake City Christian Church located at 2400 SW State Road 247 Lake City, FL with Pas Interment will follow in the Pine Grove United Methodist Church Cemetery, 5300 County Road family will receive friends for One hour prior to the funeral ser vice at the church. Arrangements are under the direction of the DEES-PARRISH FAMILY FU NERAL HOME 458 S. Marion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025 7521234 Please share your thoughts and wishes for the family at our on-line family guestbook at parrishfamilyfuneralhome.com OBITUARIES Obituaries are paid advertise ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporters classified depart ment at 752-1293. CENTER: Proposal will be discussed at meeting Continued From Page 1A MELEE: 53 vehicles Continued From Page 1A FATALITY: 1 killed Continued From Page 1A HOPE: Lake City woman afflicted with rare disorder has double transplant Continued From Page 1A Inc., the owners and operators of the Columbia County Fairgrounds, were invited to attend the meeting. The public is also encouraged to attend the meeting. The presentation is scheduled to include the architects rendition of the building and reports giving the potential economic impact. The events building concept originated from the Columbia County Tourist Development Council. The TDC was looking at unmet needs and what we need to do as a tourist development council to fill the needs we see that will help us pro mote the county and the hotel/motel industry, Williams said. The two ideas that were devel oped: Recreation (sports tourna ments) and expanding the Southside Sports Complex; the other idea was the events center proposal. The TDC appointed a committee to handle the fact finding tasks associ ated with both concepts. The TDC decided they only want ed to concentrate on the recreation side, Williams said. The board of county commissioners decided they would go ahead and continue with the events center side. The commission appointed a fact finding committee and the commit tee has been collecting data for more than a year to complete the back ground to see whether an events facil ity is feasible. Several sites are being considered as possible locations for the events building, including pos sible sites in the Ellisville area that have interstate frontage. The construction of an events facil ity would allow the county to hold conventions, shows, exhibitions and a number of other events. Its wouldnt be unlike another convention center youve seen, except probably it will be on a much smaller scale than those, Williams said. Its not going to be something that would hold 50,000 people. He said the center would be capa ble of housing graduations and there would be rooms available for rent to do weddings, business conferences and other events on a smaller scale. The idea is if you bring those events, the people will rent hotel rooms, buy gas, and spend money in retail stores, Williams said. onto the east shoulder, where it overturned and struck a tree with its roof. Matthews, who was not wearing a seat belt, was ejected, FHP said, and the roof of the truck came to rest on top of him. The crash occurred about 6.5 miles north of Live Oak. Gardner was wear ing a seat belt at the tie of the crash, reports show. Donald Burk, 52, of Lake, City was unin jured when another driver rear-ended his 2002 Mazda two-door on I-10 at about 3:45 p.m., according to police. Burk was driving westbound and slowed for traffic east of U.S. 301. The other driver, Tanya Weltzein of Adel, Ga., was unable to see Burks vehicle because of the rain. Weltzien was cited for careless driving, according to the FHP report. Charles R. Frazier, 24, and Dewayne C. Pugh, 31, both of OBrien, were uninjured when their 2011 Dodge pick up was involved in a five-vehicle crash at about 3:30 p.m. Friday, according to FHP. Frazier was driving west on I-10 when two vehicles slowed sudden ly due to traffic. Frazier was unable to slow down and his vehicle struck the right side of a 2012 Volkswagen four-door, driven by John Nguyen of Jacksonville, accord ing to the report. Fraziers vehicle also struck the left rear of a 2011 Ford pickup, driv en by David A. Young of Jacksonville, according to the FHP report. Fraziers vehicle then crossed the median into the eastbound lanes of I-10. The pickup struck a 2004 Toyota SUV and a 1994 Chevrolet twodoor, which were driv ing east and unable to avoid the pickup, according to the FHP report. Frazier was cited for careless driving, accord ing to the FHP report. COURTESY Side view of the proposed events center in Columbia County.

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An exclusive service brought to our readers by The Weather Channel. 8A LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY OCTOBER 7, 2012 Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 8AWEATHER Sometimes no makes you say Call 7 54-9088 and press 7 or apply online at campuscu.com today! Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Columbia and Suwannee counties 2 1. Offer is for new loans only. Existing CAMPUS loans not eligible. Rate based on the September 15th rate sheet and is subject to change daily. Please call 800-367-6440 and press 7 for the most accurate rate information. Must mention offer at time of loa n application. No closing cost offer is available only when obtaining a CAMPUS mortgage and only in the State of Florida. Offer applies only to s tandard buyers closing costs as itemized in the CAMPUS Good Faith Estimate and does not apply if seller pays buyers closing c osts. Offer subject to credit approval, sufficient income, adequate property valuation, and maximum $417,000 loan amount. CAMPUS will pay up to $5, 000 of closing costs. Owner-occupied property only. Offer excludes mobile homes, new construction, FHA and VA loans. Prepaid in terest, initial escrow deposit and fees for rate buy down, if any, must be paid by borrower. Property, Flood and Mortgage insurance may be required at an additional expense to the borrower. If loan is paid in full within the first 24 months, closing costs paid b y CAMPUS will be added to the loan payoff amount. For example, a $150,000 loan with a 20% down payment of $37,500 and prepaid interest of $215.7 0 at a 3.5% rate for 180 months would require 179 payments of $1072.33 and a final payment of $1,070.82; finance charge of $44, 719.59 for a total of payments of $193,017.89. The amount financed is $148,298.30, the APR is 3.67%. APR=Annual Percentage Rate. Certain o ther restrictions apply. 2. Credit approval and initial $5 deposit required. Mention this ad and well waive the $15 new member fee. Typical Closing Costs on a $150,000 Mortgage $ 3,428 CAMPUS Closing Costs on a $150,000 Mortgage No Cost! vs NO -Closing-Cost Mortgage 1 from CAMPUS. YES! 3 6 7 % APR 1 As low as FIXED RATE No points Purchase or refinance As little as 5% down Ask about discounted closing costs on construction loans Lake City 183 SW Bascom Norris Dr. Gville E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunters Walk 5115 NW 43rd St. Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St. Shands at UF Room H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Alachua 14759 NW 157th Ln. Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E. Silver Springs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. Summer eld 17950 US Hwy. 441 Tallahassee 1511 Killearn Center Blvd. and press 7 or apply online at campuscu.com today! This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration. An exclusive service brought to our readers by The Weather Channel.

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By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comGAINESVILLE — Mike Gillislee ran for 146 yards and two touchdowns and the Florida defense showed its mettle, allowing LSU to convert only two of 14 third downs as the Gators defeated the Tigers, 14-6, at Ben Hill Griffin Stadium in Gainesville on Saturday. Looking for a signature win under Will Muschamp, it was a Muschamp-style game that got it done for the Gators as the defense shut out LSU in the second half. Muschamp came into Gainesville saying he wants the Gators to be a physical football team that prides itself on running the ball and defense. Both were the determining factors in Florida’s signature win since the coach took over for Urban Meyer last year. After being shut out in the first half, Florida’s ground game began to take over under Gillislee in the third quarter. The senior capped an eight play, 85-yard touch-down drive with a 12-yard run with 5:15 remaining in the third quarter. With 4:27 left in the third quarter, Florida started its second scoring drive. Again it was Gillislee that would lead the Gators. He fin-ished with 45 yards on the drive including a 12-yard run to put Florida up 14-6 after Caleb Sturgis kicked the extra point with 13:18 Lake City Reporter SPORTS Sunday, October 7, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com 1BSPORTS BRIEFS GATORS continued on 6B Florida shuts out LSU in second half for 14-6 victory. Columbia jumps into District 4-6A driver’s seat. CHS continued on 5B Tuesday Q Columbia High girls golf vs. Branford High, Keystone Heights High at Quail Heights Country Club, 4 p.m. Q Columbia High boys golf vs. Buchholz High at The Country Club at Lake City, 4 p.m. Q Fort White High volleyball at Santa Fe High, 6 p.m. (JV-5) Q Columbia High volleyball vs. Stanton Prep, 6:30 p.m. (JV-5:30) Wednesday Q Fort White High bowling vs. Columbia High at Lake City Bowl, 4 p.m. Thursday Q Columbia High girls golf in Alachua County Tournament at Meadowbrook Golf Club, noon Q Columbia High boys golf in Alachua County Tournament at Gainesville Country Club, noon Q Fort White High volleyball at Bradford High, 6 p.m. (JV-5) Q Columbia High volleyball vs. Atlantic Coast High, 6:30 p.m. (JV-5:30) Q Fort White JV football at Dixie County High, 7 p.m. Friday Q Fort White High football at Williston High, 7:30 p.m. Saturday Q Columbia High swimming vs. Fernandina Beach High, Baker County High, 9:30 a.m. Q Columbia High, Fort White High cross country in Bobcat Cross Country Invitational at Santa Fe College in Gainesville GAMES FORT WHITE BASKETBALL Player, parent meeting Monday A meeting for Fort White varsity, junior varsity and middle school boys interested in playing basketball, and their parents, is 6:30 p.m. Monday in the high school gym. For details, call coach Isiah Phillips at 344-3215 or 497-5952. ZUMBA Pink Party charity event A Zumbathon Pink Party to benefit the Suwannee Valley Breast Cancer Awareness Association is 5:30-7 p.m. Saturday at Teen Town Recreation Center. Donation is $10. Remember to wear pink. For details, call Sarah Sandlin at 758-0009. CHS FOOTBALL Q-back Club meeting Monday The Columbia County Quarterback Club meets at 7 p.m. Monday in the Jones Fieldhouse. For details, call Joe Martino at 984-0452. FORT WHITE FOOTBALL Q-back Club meets Monday The Fort White Quarterback Club will meet at 7 p.m. Monday in the faculty lounge at the high school. For details, call Harold Bundy at 365-5731.Q From staff reports Tigers say no Moore ABOVE : Columbia High’s Ronald Timmons (23) runs through a Ridgeview High tackler during the Tigers’ 52-17 win on Friday. LEFT : Ridgeview High quarterback Josh Moore (8) is brought down by Columbia High’s Roger Cray (9) and Brett Newcomb (99). Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER Lake City Reporter By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High came into Friday’s contest against Ridgeview High looking to take back District 3-6A and make a statement. After a 52-17 demolishing of the Panthers, consider both missions accomplished. The Tigers only trailed at one point in the game and that was after the Panthers’ first drive when quarter-back Josh Moore nailed a 44-yard field goal to put Ridgeview up 3-0 with 6:03 left in the first quarter. That lead lasted 44 seconds until Ronald Timmons burst through the line and ran 70 yards to give Columbia a 7-3 lead. “It felt so good to do something like that for my team,” Timmons said. “I just grabbed the ball and ran.” Timmons finished the night with 15 carries for 241 yards and two scores. Columbia’s next drive began at its own nine with 1:50 remaining in the first quarter. A 10-play drive was highlighted by a 20-yard run from Timmons and a 26-yard pass from Jayce Barber to Darren Burch in his first game back since suffering a punctured lung against Buchholz High. Barber capped off the drive with a quarterback sneak, after hitting Alex Webber for 21 yards to the one-yard line. Braydon Thomas added the extra point for a 14-3 lead. Columbia kept the ball rolling in its direction on the next possession as five plays resulted in 75 yards and a 21-3 lead with 7:27 remaining in the first half. Braxton Stockton had an 18-yard run and Alex Webber caught his second pass for a 32-yard touchdown. The Panthers kept things interesting in the first half with a 13 play, 80-yard drive that would eat up 5:29 of the clock and cut the Tigers’ lead to 21-10 after Moore sneaked in a one-yard run. Columbia began to take Signature win for MuschampJASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFlorida running back Mike Gillislee (23) runs for a to uchdown in the Gators’ 14-6 over LSU in Gainesville on Saturday.

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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today AUTO RACING 2 p.m. ESPN — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Good Sam Roadside Assistance 500, at Talladega, Ala. 7 p.m. ESPN2 — NHRA, Auto-Plus Nationals, at Reading, Pa. (same-day tape) 11 p.m. SPEED — FIA World Rally, at Ajaccio, Corsica (same-day tape) CRICKET 1 p.m. ESPN2 — ICC World Twenty20, final, teams TBD, at Colombo, Sri Lanka (same-day tape) CYCLING 5 p.m. NBCSN — Paris-Tours, Chateauneufen-Thymerais to Tours, France (same-day tape) GOLF 7:30 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Alfred Dunhill Links Championship, final round, at St. Andrews, Scotland 1:30 p.m. TGC — Champions Tour, SAS Championship, final round, at Cary, N.C. 4 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Shriners Hospitals for Children Open, final round, at Las Vegas 7:30 p.m. TGC — Web.com Tour, Neediest Kids Championship, final round, at Potomac, Md. (same-day tape) MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL Noon MLB — Playoffs, American League Division Series, game 2, Oakland at Detroit 3 p.m. TBS — Playoffs, National League Division Series, game 1, Washington at St. Louis 6 p.m. TBS — Playoffs, American League Division Series, game 1, New York at Baltimore 9:30 p.m. TBS — Playoffs, National League Division Series, game 2, Cincinnati at San Francisco MOTORSPORTS 4 p.m. SPEED — FIM World Superbike, race 1, at Magny-Cours, France (same-day tape) 6 p.m. SPEED — FIM World Superbike, race 2, at Magny-Cours, France (same-day tape) 12 Midnight SPEED — AMA Pro Racing, at New Orleans (same-day tape) NFL FOOTBALL 1 p.m. CBS — Regional coverageFOX — Regional coverage 4 p.m. FOX — Regional coverage 4:25 p.m. CBS — Doubleheader game 8:20 p.m. NBC — San Diego at New Orleans SAILING 4:30 p.m. NBC — America’s Cup World Series, at San Francisco SOCCER 2 p.m. FOX — Premier League, Manchester United at Newcastle (same-day tape) 9 p.m. ESPN — MLS, Portland at Seattle WNBA BASKETBALL 3:30 p.m. ABC — Playoffs, Western Conference finals, game 2, Minnesota at Los Angeles ——— Monday MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 4:30 p.m. TBS — Playoffs, National League Division Series, game 2, Washington at St. Louis 8 p.m. TBS — Playoffs, American League Division Series, game 2, New York at Baltimore NFL FOOTBALL 8:30 p.m. ESPN — Houston at N.Y. Jets WNBA BASKETBALL 8 p.m. ESPN2 — Playoffs, Eastern Conference finals, game 2, Connecticut at IndianaFOOTBALLNFL standings AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAN.Y. Jets 2 2 0 .500 81 109New England 2 2 0 .500 134 92Buffalo 2 2 0 .500 115 131Miami 1 3 0 .250 86 90 South W L T Pct PF PAHouston 4 0 0 1.000 126 56Indianapolis 1 2 0 .333 61 83Jacksonville 1 3 0 .250 62 97Tennessee 1 3 0 .250 81 151 North W L T Pct PF PABaltimore 3 1 0 .750 121 83Cincinnati 3 1 0 .750 112 112Pittsburgh 1 2 0 .333 77 75Cleveland 0 4 0 .000 73 98 West W L T Pct PF PASan Diego 3 1 0 .750 100 71Denver 2 2 0 .500 114 83Kansas City 1 3 0 .250 88 136Oakland 1 3 0 .250 67 125 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAPhiladelphia 3 1 0 .750 66 83Dallas 2 2 0 .500 65 88Washington 2 2 0 .500 123 123N.Y. Giants 2 2 0 .500 111 84 South W L T Pct PF PAAtlanta 4 0 0 1.000 124 76Tampa Bay 1 3 0 .250 82 91Carolina 1 3 0 .250 80 109New Orleans 0 4 0 .000 110 130 North W L T Pct PF PAMinnesota 3 1 0 .750 90 72Chicago 3 1 0 .750 108 68Green Bay 2 2 0 .500 85 81Detroit 1 3 0 .250 100 114 West W L T Pct PF PAArizona 4 1 0 .800 94 78San Francisco 3 1 0 .750 104 65St. Louis 3 2 0 .600 96 94Seattle 2 2 0 .500 70 58 Thursday’s Game St. Louis 17, Arizona 3 Today’s Games Baltimore at Kansas City, 1 p.m.Atlanta at Washington, 1 p.m.Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.Green Bay at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.Cleveland at N.Y. Giants, 1 p.m.Miami at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.Seattle at Carolina, 4:05 p.m.Chicago at Jacksonville, 4:05 p.m.Buffalo at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.Tennessee at Minnesota, 4:25 p.m.Denver at New England, 4:25 p.m.San Diego at New Orleans, 8:20 p.m. Monday’s Game Houston at N.Y. Jets, 8:30 p.m.Open: Dallas, Detroit, Oakland, Tampa BayBASEBALLMLB playoffs WILD CARD Friday National League: St. Louis 6, Atlanta 3American League: Baltimore 5, Texas 1 ——— DIVISION SERIES (Best-of-5) American League Oakland vs. Detroit Saturday Detroit 3, Oakland 1, Detroit leads series 1-0 Today Oakland (Milone 13-10) at Detroit (Fister 10-10), 12:07 p.m. (MLB) Tuesday Detroit (Sanchez 4-6) at Oakland, 9:07 p.m. (TBS) New York vs. Baltimore Today New York (Sabathia 15-6) at Baltimore (Chen 12-11), 6:15 p.m. (TBS) Monday New York at Baltimore, 8:07 p.m. (TBS) ——— National League Cincinnati vs. San Francisco Saturday Cincinnati at San Francisco (n) Today Cincinnati (Arroyo 12-10) at San Francisco (Bumgarner 16-11), 9:37 p.m. (TBS) Tuesday San Francisco at Cincinnati (Latos 144), 5:37 p.m. (TBS) Washington vs. St. Louis Today Washington (Gonzalez 21-8) at St. Louis (Wainwright 14-13), 3:07 p.m. (TBS) Monday Washington (Zimmermann 12-8) at St. Louis (Carpenter 0-2), 4:37 p.m. (TBS)BASKETBALLNBA preseason Today’s Games Washington at Charlotte, 1 p.m.Miami at Atlanta, 2 p.m.Orlando vs. New Orleans at Mexico City, Mexico, 2:30 p.m. Golden State vs. L.A. Lakers at Fresno, Calif., 10 p.m. Monday’s Game Utah at Golden State, 10:30 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04202BSPORTS COURTESY PHOTOMorgan completes Tower of Terror runColumbia County’s Shayne Morgan completed the Twilight Zone Tower of Terror 10-mile run on Sept. 29 at Disney World in Orlando. Morgan finished in 2:44:32. COURTESY PHOTOMeeting an Olympic championColumbia High’s golf team met Olympic Champion Ryan Lo chte during a recent match at Ironwood Country Club in Lake City. Pictured with Lochte (center back) are Luke Soucinek (from left), Dillan VanVleck, Nick Jones, Jacob Soucinek, Lochte, Tim Bagley and Dean Soucinek. COURTESY PHOTOFolds of Honor ironmanRobby Acosta, a 1990 graduate of Florida Gateway College’ s Golf Course Management Program, completed a half ironman competition in Augusta, Ga., on Sept. 30. His time for the 1.2-mile swim, 56-mile bike ride and 13.1-mile run was 6:07.38. Acosta dedicated his participation as a fundraiser for the Folds of Honor Founda tion, which provides scholarships and assistant to spouses and children of killed and dis abled soldiers, and donated more than $3,000. Detroit defeats OaklandAssociated PressDETROIT — Justin Verlander shut down Oakland after a leadoff homer, and Alex Avila went deep in the fifth inning to lift the Detroit Tigers over the Athletics 3-1 in their AL playoff opener Saturday. Verlander allowed three hits in seven innings and matched his career postsea-son high with 11 strikeouts. Joaquin Benoit pitched the eighth and Jose Valverde finished for the save. Triple Crown winner Miguel Cabrera was hitless.

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Associated PressThat next edition of LSUAlabama most likely won’t be a 1 vs. 2 matchup. Florida made sure of that. The 10th-ranked Gators got their biggest victory yet under second-year coach Will Muschamp, beating the No. 4 Tigers 14-6 in Gainesville. LSU was one of four undefeated teams to fall in Saturday’s early games. Iowa State handed No. 15 TCU its first loss, 37-23, to stop the Horned Frogs’ 12-game winning streak, which had been the longest in major college football. Penn State made it four straight victories by beat-ing No. 24 Northwestern 39-28. The Wildcats were trying to go to 6-0.No. 7 Kansas State 56, Kansas 16MANHATTAN, Kan. — John Hubert ran for 101 yards and four touch-downs on just 10 carries, and Collin Klein had two touchdowns running and throwing as Kansas State routed Kansas. Klein finished with 129 yards passing and 116 yards rushing to help the Wildcats (5-0, 2-0 Big 12) pile up more than 50 points for the third straight year against their biggest rival. They’ve won four straight against the Jayhawks (1-4, 0-2) since Bill Snyder returned as coach. Kansas’ Dayne Crist threw for 189 yards and a touchdown, but he also threw three interceptions and lost a fumble. James Sims had 115 yards rushing and a touchdown for the Jayhawks.No. 15 Clemson 47, Georgia Tech 31CLEMSON, S.C. — Tajh Boyd threw for a career high 397 yards and DeAndre Hopkins had 173 yards receiving to lead Clemson over Georgia Tech. The Tigers (5-1, 2-1 Atlantic Coast Conference) gained 601 yards, while the Yellow Jackets (2-4, 1-3) gained 483. Boyd threw for two touchdowns, including a 35-yard touchdown to Hopkins that put Clemson up 38-31 with 10:29 left in the game. Orin Smith gained 117 yards on seven carries for Georgia Tech. Along with completing 26 of 41 passes, Boyd also ran for a touchdown and caught a 2-point conversion.No. 14 Oregon State19, Washington State 6CORVALLIS, Ore. — Jordan Poyer had three interceptions, Sean Mannion passed for 270 yards and No. 14 Oregon State sur-vived a shaky start. Markus Wheaton had 95 yards receiving and a touchdown but it was the Beavers defense which kept the Cougars at arm’s length on the day when Mannion, who threw three intercep-tions, was more down than up. Oregon State (4-0, 3-0 Pac-12) has surpassed its win total from all of 2011. Mannion completed 25 of 42 passes and was sacked three times. Jeff Tuel was 11 of 17 for 126 yards after replac-ing Connor Halliday, who threw three interceptions in just over one half of action. However, Tuel’s telegraphed pass that led to Poyer’s interception ended the threat for Washington State. Marquess Wilson had four catches for 54 yards to lead the Cougars (2-4, 0-3).Iowa State 37, No. 15 TCU 23FORT WORTH, Texas — Jared Barnett threw three touchdowns to Josh Lenz, who later had a scor-ing toss of his own on a trick play, as Iowa State ended TCU’s FBS-best 12-game win streak. It was the first Big 12 home game for conference newcomer TCU (4-1, 1-1), which played without sus-pended quarterback Casey Pachall. Barnett was 12-of-21 passing for 183 yards and ran nine times for 30 yards in his first start this season for the Cyclones (4-1, 1-1). The Frogs had won a nation-best 25 conference games in a row, the first 24 while winning the Mountain West championship each of the last three seasons. Lenz had TD catches of 51 and 74 yards in the first quarter. Trevone Boykin started for TCU and was 23-of-40 passing for 270 yards with a touchdown and three interceptions.No. 17 Oklahoma 41, Texas Tech 20LUBBOCK, Texas — Landry Jones passed for two touchdowns, Blake Bell ran for two more and Oklahoma beat Texas Tech to avenge a home loss to the Red Raiders last season. Both of Jones’ touchdown passes went for 13 yards — one each to Justin Brown and Kenny Stills. Javon Harris put the game out of reach midway through the third quarter when he returned an inter-ception 46 yards for a TD to put the Sooners (3-1, 1-1) up 38-13. Seth Doege was 22 of 36 for 203 yards and had three interceptions for Texas Tech (4-1, 1-1).No. 18 Stanford 54, Arizona 48, OTSTANFORD, Calif. — Chase Thomas intercepted a tipped pass by Matt Scott in overtime, Stepfan Taylor ran for a 21-yard score two plays later and Stanford ral-lied from a two-touchdown deficit to stun Arizona. Josh Nunes threw for a career-high 360 yards and two touchdowns and ran for three more scores for Stanford (4-1, 2-1 Pac-12) to offset Scott’s record-setting performance. Scott completed 45 of 69 passes — both school records — for 491 yards and three touchdowns for Arizona (3-3, 0-3).No. 20 Mississippi State 27, Kentucky 14LEXINGTON, Ky. — Tyler Russell passed for two touchdowns and Mississippi State held Kentucky to just 228 yards on offense. LaDarius Perkins carried 25 times for 110 yards, including a 31-yard score, as Mississippi State moved to 5-0 for the first time since 1999. The Bulldogs are 2-0 in the SEC. Russell was 23 of 39 for 269 yards, hitting Adrian Marcus and Chad Bumphis for touchdowns of 10 and 27 yards, respectively. By PETE IACOBELLIAssociated PressCOLUMBIA, S.C. — Connor Shaw threw two touchdown passes and ran for another, Ace Sanders had a dazzling 70-yard punt return touchdown and No. 6 South Carolina’s defense dominated fifth-ranked Georgia in a 35-7 victory Saturday. The Gamecocks (6-0, 4-0 Southeastern Conference) won their school-record 10th straight game with a performance that marked them an Eastern Division front-runner — and maybe showed they’re capable of even more. Those tests come soon as South Carolina travels to once-beaten LSU next week and then to Florida on Oct. 20. It’d be hard to pick against the Gamecocks after this one. South Carolina grounded “Gurshall,” holding Georgia’s stellar freshmen Todd Gurley and Keith Marshall to 76 yards com-bined. The Bulldogs (5-1, 3-1) finished with 224 yards, less than half their season’s average coming in. Marcus Lattimore ended with 109 yards and a touch-down, the third straight time he’s gone past the century mark on the Bulldogs. The Gamecocks have posted their first-ever three game win streak in the series that began in 1894? The Gamecocks 10th straight victory surpasses a school best set with their 9-0 start in 1984. Steve Spurrier’s Gamecocks look capable at a championship run this season. There are plenty of hurdles ahead. Still, South Carolina showed the brand of championship defense usually found on the SEC’s best teams. Georgia came in with a league-leading 48.2 points and 536 yards a game of offense — and where shut down by the Gamecocks. Gurley and Marshall kept pounding the line to little effect, held scoreless after combining for 294 yards and five TDs in last week’s win over Tennessee. Aaron Murray was 11 of 31 for 109 yards. He was sacked twice and threw one interception. Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 3B3BSPORTS Gamecocks, Spurrier embarrass Georgia ASSOCIATED PRESSSouth Carolina running back Marcus Lattimore (right) br eaks through the Georgia defensive line as linebacker Jarvis Jones (29) pursues during the game in Columbia, S.C., on Saturday. ASSOCIATED PRESSFlorida State quarterback EJ Manuel (3) jumps over N.C. State’s Sterling Lucas (7) during their game in Raleigh, N.C., on Saturday. ASSOCIATED PRESSMiami offensive linesman Jon Feliciano (70) battles Notre Dame linebacker Manti Te’o during the game at Soldier Field in Chicago on Saturday.ASSOCIATED PRESSMississippi State running back LaDarius Perkins rushe s against Kentucky in the game in Lexington, Ky., on Saturday Other SEC Bulldogs move to 5-0 Irish crush MiamiAssociated PressCHICAGO — Cierre Wood and George Atkinson III gave Notre Dame its first 100-yard rushing duo in a decade, and Everett Golson came off the bench to lead the No. 9 Irish to a 41-3 victory over Miami on Saturday night in what was a very tame sequel to the famed “Catholics vs. Convicts” rivalry. Wood rushed for 118 yards and two touchdowns, and Atkinson added 123 yards and another score. Golson, who sat the first series as punishment for violating team rules, com-pleted his first six passes and finished 17 of 22 as Notre Dame improved to 5-0 for the first time since 2002. The loss snapped a three-game win streak for Miami, which was held to just 285 yards after pil-ing up 1,260 yards and 86 points in its previous two games. The Hurricanes (4-2) were hurt by at least a half-dozen drops by their receivers. FSU upsetBy AARON BEARDAssociated PressRALEIGH, N.C. — Mike Glennon found Bryan Underwood for a 2-yard touchdown pass on fourth down with 16 seconds left, helping North Carolina State rally to beat third-ranked Florida State 17-16 on Saturday night. The Seminoles (5-1, 2-1 Atlantic Coast Conference) appeared poised to strengthen their grip on their division, leading 16-0 at halftime behind a dominating defensive performance. But the Wolfpack (4-2, 1-1) inched closer after halftime before coming up with a game-turning blocked punt with 2:27 left, giving the ball back to Glennon at the FSU 43 with a chance to complete a stunning comeback. Glennon marched the Wolfpack down the field and completed a pair of fourth-down passes, the second when he found Underwood alone over the middle to tie the game and take the lead on the ensu-ing point-after kick. FSU drove near midfield in the final seconds, but the Wolfpack defense knocked down EJ Manuel’s desper-ation heave near the goal line to end it. Smith leads West Virginia over TexasAssociated PressAUSTIN, Texas — Geno Smith passed for four touchdowns, leading No. 8 West Virginia to another wild shootout win in the Big 12, this time tak-ing out No. 11 Texas 48-45 on Saturday night. Smith, who has 24 touchdown passes this season without an interception, hit Stedman Bailey with a 6-yard score with 10:50 left to play. Andrew Buie ran for 207 yards and two touch-downs, the second coming giving the Mountaineers a critical 10-point lead late. West Virginia (5-0, 2-0) didn’t seal the win until recovering an onside kick with 14 seconds left after Texas scored a touchdown on a pass from David Ash to Marquise Goodwin. Joe Bergeron scored four touchdowns, all on short runs, for Texas (4-1, 1-1), which is 2-7 at home in conference games the since 2010. Smith was 25-of-35 passing for 268 yards in a game he had to be sharp. Texas’ aggressive defense hit him early and often and forced a second quarter fumble that the Longhorns recov-ered for a touchdown. But just as he did when West Virginia ran up 70 points on Baylor a week earlier, Smith made all the big throws when the Mountaineers needed them in a game where every possession was criti-cal. West Virginia went 5 for 5 on fourth downs. Buie averaged 6.7 yards against a Texas defense that continues to struggle with tackling.

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4B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-04204BSportsTigers take control of district JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Alex Weber (15) reaches out to catch a Jayce Barber pass for a touchdown during the Tigers 5 2-17 win against Ridgeview High on Friday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Milla Chasteen (63) and Thomas Holmes (75) provide protection for quarterback Jayce Barber (5) as he searches for an op en receiver. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Roc Battle (1) runs the ball on a kick off return against Ridgeview High. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Darren Burch (36) carries the ball fo r a first down against Ridgeview High during Friday’s game. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Roger Cray makes a tackle against Rid geview High on Friday. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterA group of Ridgeview High defenders swarm Columbia Hi gh’s Ronald Timmons (23).

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CHS: Beats Ridgeview Continued From Page 1B Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 5B5BSports FROM THE SIDELINE Brandon FinleyPhone: (386) 754-0420bfinley@lakecityreporter.com Q Brandon Finley covers sports for the Lake City Reporter .Tigers improving each weekT he sign of a good coaching staff can be measured by the improvement of a team from the beginning of the year until the end. I can’t say enough how much I believe in the current Columbia High coaching staff. It’s showing up every week. Each time the Tigers take the field, there are signs of improvement. It’s the little things that they’re doing better. It’s the mistakes they are fixing on a week in and week out basis. It all starts at the top with head coach Brian Allen, but he’ll be the first to tell you that the staff around him is one of a kind. Columbia is in the fortunate situation of having a staff loaded with former college players and there’s NFL experience to go with it from some on the staff. It’s not every day that high-school players get to play for an entire staff made up of players that know what it takes to get to the next level. Often times, staffs are comprised of teachers and volunteers. To say that the Columbia staff knows the game of football is an understatement. But the truly great thing about this staff, is that they know how to get the best out of their players. Columbia is beggining to peak at the right time and the last three games are prime examples. Columbia started the season with a 2-1 record with its only loss coming in a 17-14 game against the state’s No. 1 ranked Gainesville High. After a beatdown of an overmatched Buchholz High team, the Tigers broke into district play. That’s where the maturity of this team began. Clinging to a 19-13 lead late in the Oakleaf High game, the Tigers made a goal-line stand on the road in a hostile environment. It showed that the Tigers could overcome adversity. A week later, the Tigers went on the road and trailed Vanguard High 20-7 entering the fourth quarter. Columbia scored 21-unanswered points to once again overcome adversity. This week, Columbia had a chance for revenge. It was a chance to show how far the Tigers have come since finishing as district runner-up last season. Ridgeview High handed Columbia its only district loss last season and in doing so, the Tigers had to go on the road for the playoffs. This year, the Panthers entered 5-0 and left with a 52-17 whipping. In its biggest game of the year, Columbia was all business. It showed the growth it has made since spring workouts. More importantly, the team realizes that it needs to keep growing to reach its ultimate goal — a trip to the state championship. over in the second half with its running game and defense. Columbia came out and hammered it down the Panthers’ throat on its first possession. Timmons began the drive with a 35-yard run and fin-ished it with a run from 14-yards out to put Columbia up 28-10. Marquez Cobb added Ridgeview’s last points to the board with a 52-yard touchdown run with 3:07 remaining in the third quarter. After a three-and-out by the Tigers, the Panthers looked like they might draw the game close, but Trey Marshall came up with a fumble to give the ball back over to the Tigers. “To be honest, they kind of caught me, but I was able to recover and rip the ball out,” Marshall said. After Marshall forced the turnover, the Tigers began to add to their lead. Stockton helped the Tigers take only one play with a 46-yard touchdown run to give Columbia a 35-17 lead at the end of the third quarter. Ridgeview attempted a fourth down on its next pos-session at its 25-yard line but Roc Battle broke up the pass to set the Tigers up in scoring position. This time, Columbia would settle for a field goal and Thomas connected from 27 yards. After another fourthdown stop, Columbia took over and Timmons put the punctuation point on his night with a 50-yard score. For good measure, Columbia added a scoring drive starting with 1:54 remaining in the contest. Burch carried it four times for 51 yards on the series and capped off the drive with a four-yard score for the 52-17 final. “Their coach said that this was the best team he has ever coached,” Columbia head coach Brian Allen said after the game. “Well, this is the best team I’ve ever coached. Were we flawless tonight? No, but we were pretty close. Now, we need to come back and finish out the district.” Columbia heads into a bye week before heading to take on Middleburg High at 7 p.m. on Oct. 18.——— Columbia 7 14 14 17 — 52 Vanguard 3 7 7 0 — 17 First Quarter R—Moore 44 field goal 6:03CHS—Timmons 70 run (Thomas kick) 5:19 Second Quarter CHS—Barber 1 run (Thomas kick), 11:00 CHS—Weber 32 pass from Barber (Thomas kick), 7:27 R—Moore 1 run (Moore kick) 1:58 Third Quarter CHS—Timmons 14 run (Thomas kick), 7:42 R—Cobb 52 run (Moore kick) 3:07CHS—Stockton 46 run (Thomas kick) 0:00 Fourth Quarter CHS—Thomas 27 field goal 3:52CHS—Timmons 50 run (Thomas kick) 4:21 CHS—Burch 4 run (Thomas kick) 0:04 ——— Columbia RidgeviewFirst downs 13 12Rushes-yards 36-419 29-143Passing 87 99Comp-Att-Int 3-9-0 11-19-0Penalties-Yards 5-45 6-75 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Columbia, Timmons 15-241, Stockton 8-110, Underwood 3-1, Barber 5-9, Woods 1-7. Ridgeview, Moore 21-58, Cobb 8-85. PASSING—Columbia, Barber 3-9-79-0, Thomas 1-1-8. Ridgeview, Moore 11-19-99-0. RECEIVING—Columbia, Weber 2-53, Pelham 1-8, Burch 1-26. Ridgeview, Galloway 7-49, Patterson 4-26, Maloney 1-5, Green 1-13, Burns 2-16, Woods 1-7. Defense shines in second halfBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comLast year, Felix Woods had to watch from the sideline as Columbia High watched its chances at a district championship slip away at the hands of Ridgeview High. This year, the senior helped the Tigers do some-thing about it in a 52-17 win against the Panthers at Tiger Stadium. After quarterback Josh Moore rushed for 61 yards and passed for 68 yards in the first half, the Tigers defense sunk in its claws to hold Moore to negative yardage rushing and only 31 yards passing in the second half. “There weren’t really adjustments,” Woods said. “We were missing assign-ments and we just had to settle down.” Drew Clark, who has shown up big for the Tigers over the last two games, said Columbia knew it was time to up the intensity after going into the half up only 21-10. “We had to kick it up a notch,” he said. “We had to play like we did in the sec-ond half against Vanguard.” The chance for revenge motivated Woods through-out the contest. “It feels good to go out and get this one as a senior after not being able to play in this game last year,” Woods said. Clark missed much of the season with a concussion, so being back on the field at all is big for him. To pos-sibly have nailed down the district meant even more. “It’s just good to be back,” Clark said. “It feels good to be notice and we want to leave here with a bang.” Despite the win, the duo knows that the road to a district championship is not over even though the chal-lenge may have been made easier. “We still have work to do,” Woods said. “We can’t slack off. We have to keep working just as hard and can’t get a big head.” Clark echoed Woods statement. “We have to stay focused,” he said. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Ronald Timmons (23) outruns a Ridgev iew High defender on the way to a 70-yard touchdown. Timmons turning heads for Tigers By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comIn last week’s 171-yard performance against Vanguard High, the only thing Columbia High’s Ronald Timmons was look-ing back at was opposing defenders. Timmons backed up his career high with another record-setting perfor-mance this week by rush-ing for 241 yards and two touchdowns on only 15 carries against Ridgeview High in the Tigers’ 52-17 win. “To be honest, I think I can do this all the time,” Timmons said. After his performance during the last two weeks, it’s hard to argue. The running back didn’t know he had broken the 200-yard barrier until told after the game. Even still, he wasn’t too worried about the numbers game. “My goal is to help as much as I can to help this team win state,” he said. As far as how many yards he thinks he can rush for this season, Timmons isn’t setting a cap. “The sky is the limit,” he said. “It feels great and I’m never going to give up. I’m just doing the best that I can do.” It all starts in practice according to his position coach Quinton Callum. “This is a guy who is a workhorse in practice,” Callum said. “He does it every day and he’s worked hard in the weight room. It doesn’t hurt that he’s running behind (Laremy) Tunsil and that big offen-sive line or that he can run 4.4 speed.” Callum also said the return of fullback Darren Burch this week benefits the running game as a whole, which also featured Braxton Stockton running for 110 yards on eight car-ries. Burch even got into the running game with four carries for 51 yards. “Burch helps a heck of a lot,” Callum said. “We can open the playbook and he’s a guy that knows the system.” But on a night when Columbia took a big step to assure itself the district, it was all about Timmons. “Like I said last week, you just see him do this every day in practice,” Tunsil said. Tunsil was especially happy for Timmons’ per-formance to help get a monkey off his back against Ridgeview. “They’ve got the best of us since 10th grade,” Tunsil said. “It felt great to finally get these guys, and to score 50, oh my God.” For head coach Brian Allen, Timmons’ year was all just a matter of time. “In his ninthand 10thgrade years, not a lot of people knew who he was,” Allen said. “He comes from a great football family around here. He’s battled through adversity and busted his butt in the weight room. He’s totally dedicated himself and he’s finally reaping the benefits.” Allen said that it was matter of Timmons buying in and now that he has, he could continue to put up these kind of numbers. “That’s what the cornerstone of our program is all about,” Allen said. “He committed himself to work-ing hard this summer and bought in. Initially when I got here, he was still in the other mind set, so we had some apprehension with him, but he’s shown that he cares and has worked his butt off. That just shows that if you work your butt off, it’s going to pay off.”

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remaining in the game. LSU had a chance with 20 seconds remaining in the game. Zach Mettenberger passed to Odell Beckham who attempted a hook-andladder but Neiron Ball fell on the loose ball to ensure the win. We won the game in the second half is what Im most proud of, Muschamp said. A lot of that was due to the Gators ability to run the ball in the second half when Florida went to the ground for 22 straight plays. We made some adjust ments in the second half, and we felt like the run ning game was there, Muschamp said. The first half showed that Floridas defense had returned to an elite level, holding LSU to only 81 yards in the half. The turn over battle proved to be the difference as the Gators put the ball on the ground twice with fumbles from Frankie Hammond and Jeff Driskel. LSU came out with a 78-yard drive to begin the game, but sputtered throughout the rest of the half as the Tigers failed on all seven of their third-down attempts. The first drive resulted in a Drew Allen field goal from 31 yards to give the Tigers a 3-0 lead. Floridas offense sput tered throughout much of the first half, but punter Kyle Christy was the games MVP through two quarters for the Gators. He averaged 49.3 yards per punt includ ing a career high 61-yard punt. Christy pinned the Tigers inside their 10-yard line on three occasions. Florida twice had the ball within range for kick er Caleb Sturgis including a drive starting at 9:45 in the second quarter that reached the LSU 22-yard line. Driskel hit Hammond on a quick pass to the left and Hammond fumbled. Floridas next mistake was even more costly as the Tigers had a coverage sack on Driskel after he failed to get rid of the ball on time and Barkevious Mingo recovered a fumble at the Gators 7-yard line. An attempted jump pass failed on third-and-goal and the Gators avoided serious damage. Allen converted a second field goal, this time from 21 yards to give LSU a 6-0 lead at the half. Weve got to give LSU a lot of credit, theyve won 18 straight regular season football games for a rea son, Muschamp said. 6B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 6BSPORTS GATORS: Snap LSUs winning streak Continued From Page 1B JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter CHS senior cheerleaders Columbia High School senior cheerleaders pose for a photograph before the start of the football game against Ridgeview High School on Friday. Pictured are captains Brianne Crusaw (front row, from left), Regan Anderson, Stephanie Harris, Akeidria Bailey. Back row (from left) are Brodi Sargent (back row, from left), Alexis Marcus, Ashtyn Marsee and Shaunice Moore. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Columbia Highs Annie Milton (1) spikes the ball during a game against Suwannee High on Tuesday. Lady Tigers lose district contest to St. Augustine By BRANDON FINLEY bfinley@lakecityreporter.com Columbia High lost a hard-fought district home match against St. Augustine High on Friday. The Lady Tigers were defeated 18-25, 13-25, 25-23 and 16-25 in four sets. Jara Courson led the team in kills with nine in the match and Kelbie Ronsonet had seven kills. Ronsonet also had four digs. Ashleigh Bridges and Annie Milton each had three kills. Milton added two blocks. Hanna Baker led the team in assists with 10 in the match and Jessie Bates added six more assists. We werent on our game tonight, Columbia head coach Rebecca Golden said. There were some unforced errors at key moments in the game that caused us to lose momentum. Golden and the Lady Tigers will have another shot at the Lady Yellow Jackets in the district tournament. We look forward to another shot at St. Augustine, she said. Wed also like to give a big thank you to all the stu dents, parents and fans for their support tonight. Columbia is 11-4 on the season and travels to Atlantic Coast High at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday. CHS x-country at FSU Invitational From staff reports Columbia Highs cross country team ran in the FSU Invitational in Tallahassee on Saturday. Columbias girls competed in the Invitational Girls Division and placed 11th out of 24 teams. Nease High placed first, followed by The First Academy of Orlando and Park Vista Community High. Elizabeth Mulford of Vanguard High won the division in 19:11.6. Lady Tiger runners were (with place and time): Emma Tucker, eighth-20:06.4; Samantha Ziegaus, 10th-20:16.8; Ashley Jones, 63rd-21:48.6; Sydni Jones, 86th22:14.7; Abby Williams, 111th-22:46.6; Nicole Morse, 128th-23:24.3; Ashlyn Martin, 141st-23:43.2; Hayley Lewis, 23:46.4. Columbias boys competed in the Large School Division, which was won by Seminole High with Buchholz High in second and West Florida Tech in third. The Tigers placed 16th out of 18 teams. Harrison Edwards of Pensacola Washington High was the individual win ner in 16:42.0. Columbia runners were: Timothy Pierce, 32nd-18:21.7; Shaykhiem, 69th-19:28.3; Noah Henderson, 106th-21:04.2; Wyatt Snook, 107th-21:18.9; Dillan Beckelheimer, 113th-21:43.4; Zachary Peterson, 114th21:55.3; David King, 117th-22:24.7. Columbia will run in the Bobcat Cross County Invitational at Santa Fe College in Gainesville this Saturday.

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1CBIZ FRONT Lake City Reporter 1CBIZ FRONT Week of October 7-13, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section C Columbia, Inc. Your marketplace source for Lake City and Columbia County Same Day Service Open Saturday See Now Pay Later with financing available through Lake City Lake City Commons Center (Publix Shopping) 752-3733 BUY 1 Pair Eyeglasses Includes lenses & frames. Some Restrictions Apply. COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES OCT 3 1 2012 Where you get the Best for Less Credit approval required. See store for details. GET 1 Pair FREE E YE EXAM S by Independent Optometrist COUNTY TOURISM Harvey Campbell 386-758-1397 A welcome to our new TDC employee The Columbia County Tourist Development Council is proud to announce the hiring of Lori Regan as our new admin istrative assistant in late August. Regan has been a resident of Columbia County for the past three years, coming here from Utah. We welcome Regan to our staff and believe the local community, especially those in the hospitality and tourism industry, will be impressed by her skills and personality. Bidding for outdoor writers convention Holiday Inn Hotel & Suites General Manager Rod Butler and I will be making a proposal to the Board of Directors of the Florida Outdoor Writers Association at the groups annual convention this month in Titusville. Lake City is expected to be one of three com munities in the state vying to host the organizations 2014 state convention. The meeting traditionally brings together more than 100 outdoor journalists from around Florida, not only for the conference itself, but also for pre-conference and post-conference activities. Monthly tourism update TOURISM continued on 2C Local retailers prepping for holidays By LAURA HAMPSON lhampson@lakecityreporter.com Although October has just begun, retailers locally and across the county are gearing up for the winter holiday shopping season. Americans are expect ed to spend more during whats traditionally the bus iest shopping season of the year, but theyre not exactly ready to shop til they drop like they have been in the past two years. The National Retail Federation, the nations largest retail trade group, said it expects sales during the winter holiday shopping period in November and December to rise 4.1 per cent this year. Thats more than a percentage point lower than the growth in each of the past two years, and the smallest increase since 2009 when sales were up just 0.3 percent. Local business owner George Ward said he ordered heavily in July and is anticipating a decent sea son. He said new products are already coming into Wards Jewelry and Gifts in downtown Lake City. Typically after an elec tion business gets better, no matter who goes in, Ward said. Ordering the right amount of the right products takes experience, but there are still uncer tainties. Its really a gam ble, he said. The projections are an important indicator for retailers that depend on the last two months of the year for up to 40 percent of their annual sales. But the esti mates also offer valuable insight for economists who closely watch consumer spending, which accounts for up to 70 percent of eco nomic activity. Stores are already offer ing enticements to lure holiday shoppers. Kmart, Toys R Us and Wal-Mart Stores Inc. have announced last month theyre either lowering or waiving the upfront ser vices fees for their inter est-free pay-over-time pro gram. All three said the moves were in response to complaints from shoppers. Layaway programs help ease the financial burden of large purchases, like professional-quality instru ments, said Steve Briscoe, owner of 1st Street Music & Sound Co. in Lake City. Briscoe said this year the store will have a 12 weeks of Christmas program to spotlight new arrivals as well their annual layaway program without fees or interest. Briscoe said while it is early in the shopping sea son, this is when the inven tory starts coming in as stock is needed for early shoppers and the layaway program. Were definitely gearing up, he said. During the summer ven dors offered up their pre dictions for the hot holiday items and the music store placed its orders, he said. I think its going to be a little bit better Christmas for everybody all the way around, Briscoe said. The holiday shopping season is one gauge of not only the shopping habits, but also the mindset of the average American during what has turned out to be a slow and uneven economic recovery. Right now, peo ple are feeling better about rising home prices and a rebounding stock market, but job growth is still weak and prices for everything from food to gas are high er. And all the economic vari ables that will likely have an impact on this years shop ping season make predict ing sales that much more difficult. Among them, the worry that the U.S. econ omy will fall into another recession next year. Thats when tax increases and deep government spending cuts will take effect unless Congress reaches a budget deal. Still, Americans are more optimistic than they have been in a long time. Consumers confidence rose to a seven-month high in September even as the unemployment rate has been stuck at around 8 percent, according to the Conference Board. Gallup Poll, which tracks consum er confidence daily. The Associated Press contributed to this article. ASSOCIATED PRESS In this file photo, a checkout line winds through a Best Buy store as shoppers take advantage of a midnight Black Friday sale on Friday, Nov. 25, 2011, in Brentwood, Tenn. The National Retail Federation, the nations largest retail trade group, said it expects sales during the winter holiday shopping period in November and December to rise 4.1 percent this year. talk Top 3 Conditions Women Worry About Worry #1 as the years go by? Hormone replacement. Worry #2? Pelvic and bladder problems. What to do? Join us for Girl Talk at Lake City Medical Center. Gynecologist Dr. Anthony Agrios discusses these major concerns and what you should know. What about Worry #3? Thats up to you. Bring your questions. Well have answers. Tuesday, October 16 12:00 Noon 1:00 p.m. Lake City Medical Center Classroom Our program is free and includes lunch. Please RSVP by October 15. Call 11113. GIR L

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2C LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEEK OF OCTOBER 7, 2012 &%,=027/(< NO TIME LIKE THE PRESENT TO KEEP YOUR FUTURE ON TRACK. Lots of times, changes in life also affect your investments. That’s why there’s never been a better time to schedule your free portfolio review. We’ll talk about the changes in your life, and help you decide whether it makes sense to revise your investments because of them. Name That Company=fle[\[`e(0+*Xe[YXj\[`e NXlb\^Xe#@cc%#@[\j`^e#gif[lZ\Xe[ [`jki`Ylk\\c\Zkife`Z^Xd`e^\ek\ikX`e$ d\ekXe[^Xd`e^dXZ_`e\j]fik_\ZXj`ef`e[ljkip]fi\oXdgc\#i\\c$jg`e$ e`e^dXZ_`e\jXe[m`[\fcfkk\ipk\id`eXcj% Dp]fle[\i[\j`^e\[k_\k`ckk\Z_efcf^p ]fig`eYXccdXZ_`e\j#Xe[fm\ik`d\@j_`]k\[ dp]fZlj]ifdg`eYXccdXZ_`e\jkf^XdYc`e^ dXZ_`e\j%@defn`emfcm\[`e^cfYXcfec`e\^Xd$ Yc`e^j\im`Z\jXjn\cc%Dpk`kc\j`eZcl[\I\\c\d @e#C`]\f]Clolip#Q\ljXe[AXZbgfkGXikp# Xe[Xb\pYiXe[f]d`e\`j9cl\Y`i[%@m\Y\\e [\m\cfg`e^e\knfib\[^Xd`e^#j\ejfip`dd\ij`fe ^Xd`e^k\Z_efcf^`\jXe[dfi\%N_fXd@6Know the answer? Send it to us with Foolish Trivia on the top and you’ll be entered into a drawing for a nifty prize! panies, if some do very well, their impact is diluted by the many less stellar performances. Even if you wanted to (and could) spend 10 percent of a $60 billion fund’s value, $6 billion, on one company, you may run into problems. By buying many shares, you’ll drive the stock price up. Also, imagine you think Tupperware would be a great investment. Oops. Its entire market value is around $3 billion. You can’t buy entire companies. If you’re limited, as many managers are, to not buy-ing more than 10 percent of any one company, you can spend only about $300 million on it. It’s hard to avoid spreading yourself too thin when $300 million is merely a drop in your mutual fund’s bucket. For most investors, index funds are the best solution. Learn more about them at fool.com/ mutualfunds/mutualfunds.htmand indexfunds.com To see which managed funds we have recommended, try our “Rule Your Retirement” newsletter for free at fool.com/shop/newsletters (The Motley Fool owns shares of and has recommended Apple.) K_\Dfkc\p=ffcKXb\ Success and PromiseFrance-based Sanofi SA (NYSE: SNY), the fifth-largest pharmaceu-tical company, recently received FDA approval for Aubagio, an oral treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS). That holds great promise, as analysts see Aubagio’s future sales near $400 million by 2016, when some expect the overall global MS market to reach $17.3 billion. Sanofi recently hit the skids with its dengue fever vaccine. It had expected more than $1.3 billion in annual sales from the product, but a Phase IIb trial produced disappointing results. Still, the vaccine proved highly effective against three of the virus’ strains, another trial is under way, and the World Health Organization estimates 50 million to 100 million new cases of the disease a year. Pipeline strength is critical to drug companies, and Sanofi has more than 45 drugs, vaccines and other products in various stages of devel-opment. (Remember that not all drugs make it through development and win FDA approval.) Sanofi’s going to need that pipeline to combat expiring patents. Its Plavix blood thinner’s patent expired in May, with the drug having generated nearly $7 billion in the U.S. alone. Sanofi has also performed well with its acquisitions. Recently purchased Genzyme, for example, delivered more than 8 percent of Sanofi’s pharmaceutical revenue in 2011. With a dividend yield near 4 percent, Sanofi warrants consideration. TheMotley Fool To Educate, Amuse & Enrich 8jbk_\=ffc Dp;ldY\jk@em\jkd\ek Two BlundersMy top two dumbest investments would have to be buying Drugstore.com at more than $60 per share and then not hanging on to it, and also PhotoWorks, for nearly $60. My shares were worth pennies on the dollar when it was bought by American Greetings, so I didn’t even get a piece of that! — N.H., Lynnwood, Wash. The Fool Responds: Hanging on to Drugstore.com may not have paid off much. It was acquired by Walgreen last year, for more than twice its going price on the market, but by then it had been trad-ing in the low single digits. Only some of those who had bought it after it plunged did well. Buying such troubled companies can be a big gamble, though. There are often good reasons why a stock plunges, and it’s up to interested investors to determine whether the company’s problems are likely to be fleeting or permanent. Stocks trading for just a few dollars per share can be especially risky. Remember that there are lots of compelling companies out there, ones that are healthy, growing and undervalued. Perhaps seek them out, instead.Do you have an embarrassing lesson learned the hard way? Boil it down to 100 words (or less) and send it to The Motley Fool c/o My Dumbest Investment. Got one that worked? Submit to My Smartest Investment. If we print yours, you’ll win a Fool’s cap! C8JKN<
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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDSUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 3C Classified Department: 755-5440 CLASSIFIED AD vantageTake ADvantage of the Reporter Classifieds!755-5440Lake City Reporter FIND IT SELL IT BUY IT $17504 lines 3 days Includes 2 Signs Each additional line $1.65 Garage Sale Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$10104 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.10One item per ad Under $500 Personal Merchandise Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$16754 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.15One item per ad Under $1,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$23704 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.45One item per ad Under $2,500 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $4,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$27404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.55One item per ad Under $4,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$30404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.65One item per ad Under $6,000 Placing An Ad Service Guide Limited to service type advertis-ing only.4 lines, one month....$92.00 $10.80 each additional lineIncludes an additional $2.00 per ad for each Wednesday insertion. DeadlinesBe Sure to Call Early You can call us at 755-5440 Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.Some people prefer to place their classified ads in person, and some ad categories will require prepay-ment. Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street.You can also fax or email your ad copy to the Reporter.FAX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the Classified Department.EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreporter.comAd is to Appear:TuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday Call by:Mon., 10:00 a.m.Mon., 10:00 a.m.Wed., 10:00 a.m.Thurs., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fax/Email by:Mon., 9:00 a.m.Mon., 9:00 a.m.Wed., 9:00 a.m.Thurs., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.These deadlines are subject to change without notice. Cancellations, Changes & Billing Questions Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject, or classify all advertisements under appropriate headings. Copy should be checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day of pub-lication. Credit for published errors will be allowed for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement which was incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be published, nor for any general, special or consequential damages. Advertising language must comply with Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition of discrimi-nation in employment, housing and public accommodations. Standard abbreviations are acceptable; how-ever, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated. Ad Errors-Please read your ad on the first day of publication. Weaccept responsibility for only the first incorrect insertion, and only the charge for the ad space in error. Please call 755-5440 immediately for prompt correc-tion and billing adjustments.CancellationsNormal advertising deadlines apply for cancellation.Billing InquiriesCall 755-5440. Should further information be required regarding payments or credit limits, your call will be trans-ferred to the accounting depart-ment. General Information In Print and Onlinewww.lakecityreporter.com Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$2504 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $.25One item per ad Under $100 MAINSTREET ISGone! Get High-Speed Internet NOW!Now Available Everywhere!21st Century Communications LLC386-269-0984 1-800-787-8041 020Lost & Found FOUND HORSE On October Road in Ellisville 386-344-3634 060Services Bankruptcy/Divorce/Resumes Other Court Forms Assistance 18 years Exp./ Reasonable 386-961-5896 8 a.m.8 p.m. 100Job Opportunities05535155(Ladies wear factory outlet) Lake City Mall is looking for P/TTHIRD KEY Days, nights, and weekends. Flexible hours a necessity. Competitive wages, discount, EOE Apply in person at store location Retirees are encouraged to apply. 05535170Cabinetmakers Mill Finish Wood Prep. Jobs available for experienced workers only. Wages negotiable based on experience of one year or more. Stable work history. Benefits include: Paid Holidays, Paid Vacation, and Family Health Insurance. Some hand tools required. Please apply in person at Marlow-HunterLLC 14700 NWHwy 441 in Alachua. Pay negotiable with experience. Child Care Workers Needed Experienced Helpful but not necessary.Apply at Green Gables Learning Tree. 386-755-7677 Delivery Drivers/Independent Contractors. Need a Reliable Vehicle for Same Day Delivers. Call 1-800-818-7958 Established Ocala business is Looking to hire additional sales teams for our expanding product line.Earn $500.00/week, plus commission!If you’re upbeat, friendly and enjoy working with the public, then contact us for a confidential interview and start earning the income you deserve! Valid driver’s license, proof of insurance and overnight travel is required. Call us TODAYat 352-233-2818.Telecom Service Bureau, Inc. EXPERIENCED SEWING Machine Operator. Full time good wages for experience 386-755-6481 PTMerchandiser to Service Magazines in Lake City, FLaccounts. Apply online @ www.apply2jobs.com/selectmerchandisingservices SALES POSITION Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Ford, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 Salmon Companies. Now hiring full time drivers! To haul US mail. Excellent hourly pay. $18.58 p/h + $4.44 H&W. Class ACDL& 24 mo. exp. req. in the past five years. EOE/AA. Salmon Companies. Apply online @ www.driveforsalmon.com Wanted-P/T Handi-Man, Exp. in Routine Maintenance such as plumbing, elect, painting & carpentry. Applications Available at Camp Weed & Cerveny Conference Center, 11057 Camp Weed Place, Live Oak. 100Job OpportunitiesSALONCENTRIC SALES CONSULTANTS As an industry leader, our goal is to find elite, highly motivated, well trained sales professionals. We represent the beauty industry’s leading product lines, infused with new technology & supported with full time educators. DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES:*Achieves sales goals & objectives thru key performance indicators (KPIs) established & monitored by mgmt.*Introduces, presents & sells new products for Professional Products Division distributors (PPD); using a consistent & balanced selling approach within an assigned territory. REQUIREMENTS:*Bachelors’pref*Demonstrates outside sales/ industry exp*Computer lit/Access to internet*Valid FLDL& solid driving record*Attendance at conventions, shows, educational classes & special events may require overnight &/or some weekends Email: vbogar@saloncentric.com Small historic non-denominational church with a heart for children is seeking a pianist for Sunday services. Please contact 904-259-4194 if interested. 120Medical Employment05535111Advent Christian VillageCurrent JOBS Line Advertisement call 658-5627 orvisit www.acvillage.net 24 hrs/day, 7 days/week Be your BEST, Among the BEST! FTLicensed Physician Assistant (PA-C) FTposition to deliver primary care in HPSAdesignated, established rural clinic with on site board certified physician. On-call rotation with two other practitioners for evenings / weekends and medical support for 161-bed skilled nursing facility required. Experience preferred but not required. Unrestricted FLlicense required. Experience in electronic medical records and geriatrics a plus. RN Quality of Care Leader Unrestricted Florida RN license, excellent clinical nursing / assessment skills, current CPR certification, verifiable IVskill (start, regulate, maintain, discontinue IV’s) required. Good communication, organization, and computer skills required; must work as part of interdisciplinary team to assure outstanding quality of life / quality of care for LTC residents. On-call rotation required. Management / supervisory experience and knowledge of LTC regs desired. FTpositions include health, dental, life, disability, supplemental insurance; 403b retirement account; paid time off, access to on site day care and fitness facilities. Apply in person at Personnel Office, Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m., or fax resume/credentials to (386) 658-5160. EOE / Drug Free Workplace/Criminal background checks required. Medical practice needs Ophthalmic Technician FTor PT. Experience preferred. Fax resume 386-755-7561. 120Medical Employment05535115Physical Therapist Avalon Healthcare Center is currently accepting applications for the full time position of Physical Therapist. Please apply at Avalon Healthcare and Rehabilitation Center. 1270 S.W. Main Blvd. Lake City, Florida 32025 or fax resume to 386-752-8556 EOE 240Schools & Education05534919Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class12/24/2012• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-11/05/12• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies 55 gallon Aquarium with screen, three heat lamps, Great Condition, Like New. $150.00 Contact 386-362-7441 FREE Kittens to a good home. 1 gray w/ beige, 2 are dark brown W/ beige, of which one is a long hair. 6-8 weeks old. Litter trained and eat dry/wet cat food. Call or text 386-867-0232 Free Puppies Lab Mix. Approx 5 weeks old. Call, text, or email. (386)984-7975, firefigher126@yahoo.com Free to good home Beautiful, Female American Bulldog, 1yr 8mths, Needs room to run, Good With people and other animals. 386-752-8317 PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. Tiny Toy YorkiePoo Male 1.12 Pounds, Health Cert. Looking for Loving home. Call 867-0035 330Livestock & SuppliesDeep Creek Farms Barn kept Square or Net Wrapped Round Hay Bales For Sale Ronnie Hughes (386)365-1425 413Musical MerchandiseBACH Trumpet TR300, Silver color. Excellent Condition With hard case. $400. 386-623-3149 PIANO FOR Sale Spinet type $995.00 Call 386-842-5548 430Garage Sales PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 440Miscellaneous Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, Root Raking, Bush Hog, Seeding, Sod, Disking, site prep, ponds & irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200 IPOD 4THGen./8GB $75 OBO Contact 984-9010 630Mobile Homes forRent2/1 S of Lake City, Branford Area, Quiet Area. $525 mth plus security 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 3BR/2BADWMH on 1 acre private lot, 1st+last+dep required located in Ellisville. No pets. Contact 352-870-5144 630Mobile Homes forRent4bd/2ba -5 ac,Conv. to LC & G’ville, new energy efficient AC, lrg deck, 10x20 shed Sale or Lease $950 mth.1st + dept. 867-4586 LARGE CLEAN 2 & 3 bdms CH/A5 Points Area. Also 3 bdrm Westside. 1st + Deposit Required. No Pets. 961-1482 New 3/2 MH on 5 acres, 10 mins from Lake City, quiet area. Amanda@386-365-6493. Secluded SW2br/2ba, Located Between Wellborn & Lake City. $500 mth +$500 dep. Contact 386-623-2545 640Mobile Homes forSale(1) Only New Jacobsen Triplewide 42x64 Only $99,995 Del & Set with Air. Beautiful Home. North Pointe of Gainesville. 352-872-5566 4BD/2BADWMH on 4 acres Owner Financing Available. 386-623-3404 or 386-623-3396 575 CREDITSCORE? New 3/2 or 4/2 doubles. Your Approved with 10% down. Call for details. North Pointe 352-872-5566 BIGGESTSALEEVER 13 Jacobsen Display Models reduced for Fast Sale! North Pointe Homes, 352-872-5566

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDSUNDAY, OCTOBER 7 2012 Classified Department: 755-5440 4C 1998 CorvetteWell maintained, runs great. 95,000 miles.$8,500 obo 386-344-2107 _____________________________ Announcements _____________________________ Turn your art into cash! FREEART APPRAISALS FOR POSSIBLE CONSIGNMENT* Oct 13 & 14. Noon to 10pm at Baterbys Art Gallery. 9101 International Drive, Ste. 1008, Orlando, FL 32819. Call (866)537-1013 or visit www.Baterbys.com for more information. *Verbal appraisals & consignments taken based on consideration. _____________________________ Get Your Ad Noticed Here and in Over 100 Papers throughout Florida for One Low Rate. Advertising Networks of Florida, Put us to work for You! (866)742-1373 www.AdNetworksFlorida.com _____________________________ Autos Wanted _____________________________ Sell Your Classic: Get top dollar for your classic car at the Lake Mirror Auto Festival Auction in Lakeland Oct. 20th. (800)257-4161 Lic: Higgenbotham AU305 AB158 _____________________________ Financial Services CASH NOW!! RECEIVING PAYMENTS from Mortgage Notes, Structured Settlements, Contest annuity or Cell Tower Lease? SELL PAYMENTS NOW! NYAC (800)338-5815 _____________________________ Health & Medical _____________________________ Do you suffer from Arthritis? Local doctors need volunteers for research study comparing FDA-approved Arthritis medications. Compensation up to $50.00 per visit. Call: (866)785-1251 _____________________________ Help Wanted _____________________________ Driver Annual Salary $45K to $60K. Quarterly Bonus. Flexible hometime. Refrigerated & Dry Van Freight. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR exp. (800)414-9569. www.driveknight.com _____________________________ AFew Pro Drivers Needed. Top Pay & 401K. Need CDL Class A Driving Exp. (877)258-8782 www.drive4melton.com _____________________________ Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualieddrivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.com EOE _____________________________ Miscellaneous _____________________________ MEDICAL CAREERS begin here -Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualied.SCHEV authorized. Call 888-203-3179 www. CenturaOnline.com _____________________________ NURSING CAREERS BEGIN HERE – GET TRAINED IN MONTHS, NOT YEARS. FINANCIAL AID IF QUALIFIED. HOUSING AVAILABLE. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. CALL CENTURA INSTITUTE (877) 206-6559 _____________________________ AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualied Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 _____________________________ OTR Drivers Wanted _____________________________ Drivers/ Class A Flatbed. GET HOME WEEKENDS! Up to 39/mi, Late model equipment & Big Miles! 1yr OTR Flatbed experience, (800)572-5489 x227, SunBelt Transport _____________________________ TIRED OF LIVING PAYCHECK TO PAYCHECK? There’s great earning potential as a Professional Truck Driver! The average Professional Truck Driver earns over $700/wk*! 16-Day CDL Training @ NFCC/Roadmaster! Approved for Veterans Training. CALL TODAY! (866)467-0060 *DOL/BLS 2012 _____________________________ Driver / O-Op Regional PAY INCREASE Multiple Fleets Available Class A CDL / Home weekly Call (800)695-9643 www.driveforwatkins.com _____________________________ Real Estate _____________________________ WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA LIQUIDATION SALE! Somersby Park is an established community in Hendersonville, NC offering homesites starting in the mid-$20’s. Call Today! (828)489-6760 of SomersbyPark.net _____________________________ Schools & Instruction _____________________________ MEDICAL BILLING TRAINING! Train for Medical Billing Careers at SCTrain.edu No Experience Needed! Job placement assistance after training! HS/GED/PC Needed (888)872-4677 Week of October 1, 2012 640Mobile Homes forSaleLAND ANDHOME Attention land owners with good credit. No Money Down and Low Fixed Rates and Low Fees. Let’s Deal! North Pointe Homes, Gainesville 352-872-5566 Palm Harbor Homes New Homes at $39,900 $5k for your used mobile home 3 New models, 1,100-2,400 SQ FT 800-622-2832 ext 210 650Mobile Home & LandCLEAN NICE 2/2 SW, and 740 sf Unfinished frame house, nice Country acre 8 mi to VA. $39,000 Cash only 386.961.9181 Owner Fin.-Nice huge 4/2.5 on 3 ac, x-fenced, creek, lrg deck,Paved Rd. McAlpin area. Small down $950/mth 386-867-1833. For picswww.suwanneevalleyproperties.com OwnerFinance 3/2 on 2.5 ac Mayo Area. $675 mth Small Down 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05534938We’ve got it all!$89 Deposit Limited Avail. Call Today! Windsong Apts. *Free afterschool program386-758-8455 1BR APT. Downtown Location, Clean. New Carpet $450 mo, plus Security. NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456 2/1 1300 sqft, duplex w/ gargage. totally refurbished,W/D hook up, CH/A, $650 mth Lease Req. 386-965-2407 or 386-758-5881 2BR/1BAAPT. w/garage. West side of town. $650. mo. 386-961-9000 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Ck out this Awesome Dea l 2/1, in Fort White, Lg.Ft & bporch, Lg Liv/Kit/Din, Fenced byard, elec, trash, mowingincl No pets. Free WFI $695 mth. 941-924-5183 Quant 2br/1ba Apt. Peaceful Location with Lake View CH/A$500. mo $500 dep. No pets. 386-344-2170 TENANTS DREAM Only 1 left $600 Newly remodeled, 2bd/1ba duplex w/ w/d hook up. Call for details 386-867-9231 720Furnished Apts. ForRentImmaculate Studio Apt. Avail Now $500. mo. $300. dep. Incl. appliances, cable, internet, water. Smoke Free Envir. 386-965-9083 Rooms forRent Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent2/1 Brick house Lrg eat in kit. & closets, CH/A, 514 SE First Ave. Jasper. $550 mth 1st,last+sec. No pets. 772-285-1032 3BD/1.5BAOn Leslie Gln CH/A, $725 mth & $725 dep. Contact 386-344-2170 3bd/2ba-Near Branford Stilt Home on 5 fenced wooded ac. Barn & shop. 1st,last,Sec $800/ mth.Ref. Needed. 813-714-4850. 3br/2ba DWon Tranquil Gln. Completely renovated. backyard fenced. $700/mo + $400 security. 386-938-5637 COZYCOTTAGE 1 BRNew paint & carpet. 10 mins. South of LC, all util. & satellite incl.$575 mo. Pet ok, 386-758-2408 Quaint 2bd / 1ba home. CH/A, $500 mth & $500 dep. Contact 386-344-2170 750Business & Office RentalsCk out this Awesome DealFort White, Newly Remodled. Multi use Comm Prop. Approx 850sqft. Elec & water incl. Free WFI & yard Maint. High Traffic Area $725 mth 941-924-5183. ForRent orLease: Former Doctors office, Former professional office & Lg open space: avail on East Baya Ave. Competitive rates. Weekdays 386-984-0622 evenings/weekends 497-4762 PROFESSIONAL OFFICEUNIT Oakbridge Office Complex 725 SE Baya Dr Call 752-4820 770Condos ForRent Golf Course condo for rent. 1400 s.f., 2/2 Incl.Some utilities. $975/mo. Call (386) 344-0433 805Lots forSale LOVELIESTLOT 1/2 Located in the Newest section of Plantation S/D 598 NWSavannah Drive. Call 386-397-6316 PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the 805Lots forSale law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 810Home forSale FSBO ‘05 Brick 3/2/2 3rd detached garage, tiled w/in shower, w/in closet, 10ft ceilings, crown molding, 168,800 417-396-2134 820Farms & Acreage10 acres with well/septic/pp (not guar); $300 dwn; $580 a mth. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 951Recreational Vehicles17FT 2009R-Pod Camper, Pull Behind, Self Contained, Sleeps 3 Adults. $9,500. Contact 386-269-0861REPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Linewww.lakecityreporter.comADVERTISE YOUR Job Opportunities in the Lake City Reporter Classifieds. Enhance Your Ad with Your Individual Logo For just pennies a day. Call today, 755-5440.

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LIFE Sunday, October 7, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section D Story ideas? Contact Robert Bridges Editor 754-0428 rbridges@lakecityreporter.com Lake City Reporter 1DLIFE Sandy Kishton H ow well can you handle long periods of silence? Can you toler ate someone else singing in the car? Are you a late sleeper or up at the crack of dawn? A late night par tier or more of homebody? These are all questions you should ask yourself before choosing your travel partner when taking a road trip. Im sure its not some thing you would think about at first. When taking most of our vacations my husband, Scott, is my first choice in a travel partner. However, thats not the case on a road trip. Hes more concerned with the destination, but Im all about the journey. Going with family mem bers can also be a chal lenge. Youve heard the saying, you can pick your friends, but you cant pick your family, well for a road trip, PICK A FRIEND! In my case, I picked my best friend, Sue. Crazy enough, we didnt have many periods of silence. Youd think wed have run out of things to talk about, but that has never been the case. Neither one of us can sing very well actually we are pretty bad but just laugh about it. When weve hit the most rural of places and cant get a radio station to come in, well use the i-pod and access our go-to playlist for the road. Sue did have to get used to my touristy ways, including all of the photo ops along the way; espe cially the infamous giants along Historic Route 66. The first time I made her get out of the car for a picture with a state wel come sign I thought shed shoot me. But shes got her posing down pat. I also had to climb more stairs (rather than take the elevator) than I ever imagined after learning about her claustro phobic tendencies. She also figured out pretty quickly that Im not big on heights when I scooted around the Skywalk at the Grand Canyon at record pace. Im such a planner, or control freak if you want to know the truth! She already knew that about me, though. I take prepara tion and organization to an extreme. So much so, that I have a folder for every day of our trip. It might contain maps, articles about the area we are driving through or visiting, the hotel reserva tions and anything else Ive managed to Google online and thought was important. I dont want to miss any thing! We may not stop at everything, but at least we have that option. Im not so structured that I cant fly by the seat of my pants either. We are both flexible enough to make our final Pick the perfect travel partner TRAVEL continued on 2D I n Florida, gardeners have the opportunity to attract a wide vari ety of wildlife to their properties. Their motion and activ ity adds interest and enjoyment as we view our surroundings. Gardeners also know that a larger diversity of life creates a healthier habitat for crit ters and plants. Animals need water, food, and some cover that offers them safety. By providing these resources for wildlife on your property, you may attract more than you had hoped. A few nuisance creatures that are pests or cause damage in your yard may show up to enjoy your hospitality, also. They may feast on your favorite trees, flowers or vegetables, rut in the yard, eat your desirable wildlife guests, create hazardous holes in the landscape, and make your life miserable. Nuisance wildlife may include wild hogs, coyotes, moles, gophers, squirrels, armadillos, rabbits, deer, birds and many more. Wildlife, including nests, eggs, and young are pro tected by both federal and state laws. Many species may be destroyed if they are caus ing damage, but a permit may be needed. Permits can often be obtained if you document the damage and you have tried encour aging them to leave by using other methods. Do some homework before acting and save yourself a fine. Laws can be found online at: http://myfwc. com/conservation/youconserve/assistnuisancewildlife. There is a wide array of tactics that can be used to convince nuisance wildlife that they should move on. But the first step is to identify the culprit. With a little Sherlock Holmes work at the scene of the damage, you can figure out the species from tracks and droppings left behind, or scratching and bite marks. Check out the area for burrows, holes and tun nels. A great site to help identify wildlife is http:// icwdm.org/ Figure out what makes your property so appealing to the particular animal that you identified. This will have some thing to do with food, water or cover. Do you have a birdbath where it gets water? Or an unmowed area where it is finding plenty of small rodents to eat? Determine how can you change or modify the habitat so it wont be so appealing and this animal will move on. Barriers such as fences or nets may work in your situation, but many options are expensive. Scare tac tics such as fake preda tors, shiny streamers, and sound alarms may work temporarily to keep ani mals away as well as taste and odor repellents. Animals get used to these after time, so employ more than one tactic at a time and diligently keep moving their location around. Keep the element of surprise on your side and keep the animal con fused. If you keep at it, it just may go away and give you some peace. Call the Extension Office at 352-5384 or Florida Fish and Wildlife for more information on managing nuisance wild life. D. Nichelle Demorest is a horticulture agent with the Columbia County Extension of the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. GARDEN TALK Nichelle Demorest dndemorest@ufl.edu Strategies for unwelcome garden critters Olustee monument 100 years later By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com OLUSTEE T he Battle of Olustee occurred more than 148 years ago, on Feb. 20, 1864, in Baker County. What started out as a series of small skirmishes quickly escalated through the hours into the only major Civil War battle fought on Florida soil when Confederate forces repelled Union troops who were headed westward to capture the capital in Tallahassee. A combined total of 2,807 troops from both sides lay on the battlefield either dead or wounded following five hours of gunfire, cannon shots and more. About 48 years after the Battle of Olustee, a monu ment was erected at the Olustee Battlefield paying homage to Confederate troops. The monument was originally dedicated Oct. 23, 1912. Next weekend the Olustee Battlefield Monument will be rededicated during the 100year Anniversary of the dedication of the Olustee Battlefield Monument. The rededication cer emony will take place from 11 a.m. 3 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 13 at the Olustee Battlefield Historic State Park. On Oct. 13 Im look ing to have 100 men in uniform with 100 rifles and some cannons and were going to do a 100gun salute, said Larry Rosenblatt, 16th Brigade commander of the Sons of Confederate Veterans and a member of the Capt. Winston Stephens SCV camp in Baker County, who helped organize the event. Im looking to have 100 troops here, at least, and we would like to fire one round for every year this monument has been here. The program also includes several speakers who will address the audi ence detailing a history of the park and monument as well as a synopsis of the battle. Kelly Barrow, First Lt. Commander and chief of the National SCV is the scheduled keynote speaker for the event. According to a United Daughters of the Confederacy magazine article, in 1897 the Florida Division of the UDC began raising money to place a monument on the battlefield and the Florida Legislature appropriated $2,500 for the monument. Linda Rosenblatt, Larrys wife and a member of the UDC, said UDC information indicates many public officials, dignitar ies, UDC members and veterans and their families attended the dedication on Oct. 23, 1912, where U.S. Senator Duncan U. Fletcher made the keynote address. Documents said Fletcher remarked: This granite tower... stands sentinel over the field where the Confederate soldier won admission to the temple of fame. The monument faces the south and is about 40-feet tall. It has a white marble slab panel, facing the south, which contains an inscription detailing the battle, the amount of troops for each side and the commander officers of the forces. The inscription: The Battle of Olustee was fought on this ground February 20th, 1864, between 5,000 Confederate troups [sic] commanded by Joseph E. Finnegan and 6,000 Federal troups under General Truman Seymore. The Federals were defeated with a loss of 2,000 men. The Confederate loss was less than 1,000. The northern side of the monument contains a panel with the inscription: To the men who fought and triumphed here in defence [sic] of their homes and firesides. This monument is erected by the United Daughters of the Confederacy aided by the State of Florida in commemoration of their devotion to the cause of lib erty and state sovereignty. MCMXII Granite strips on the side of the monument com memorate the Confederate units that found in the battle. Larry Rosenblatt said Gen. Colquitt, from Georgia, saved the battle for the Confederate troops. Most of the men that were fighting at the first of the battle were home guards, old men out of the hospital and young kids, he said. This dedication is something that we wanted to do. We felt like some body needed to do it. TOP: Larry Rosenblatt and his wife, Linda, stand next to the Olustee Battlefield Monument. A rededication ceremony for the monument will take place from 11 a.m. 3 p.m. Saturday. The Olustee Battlefield Historic State Park was the first park in the Florida State Park system. BOTTOM: A State Archives of Florida photo shows the public officials, United Daughters of the Confederacy members veterans and their families that gathered to dedicate the Olustee monument Oct. 23, 1912. TONY BRITT /Lake City Reporter COURTESY

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2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 Page Editor: Laura Hampson, 754-0427 Stop by the Lake City Reporter for your complimentary engagement package. Aisle Style Complimentary Engagement Package Camp Weed Cerveny Conference Center 386-364-5250 GeGees Studio 758-2088 Holiday Inn 754-1411, ext. 106 Sweetwater Branch Inn 800-595-7760 Wards Jewelry & Gifts 752-5470 All donors receive a Gators or Seminoles T-Shirt while supplies last. October 2012 Scheduled Life Saving Community Blood Drives. Times and dates subject to change. Call Tony at (386)438-3415 if you cannot nd us. 5 Hardees at the Lake City Mall 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 6 Lake DeSoto Farmers Market 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. 6 Lake City Internet Services 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. 7 Ole Times Country Buffet 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 8 Lake City Mall (Columbus Day) 12 p.m. to 7 p.m. 9 Senior Home Care 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. 10 Reception Medical Center 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. 11 Department of Transportation 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 13 First Federal Savings Bank 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 13 Lake City Mall 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. 14 Lake City Mall 12 p.m. to 6 p.m. 15 Hardees at the Lake City Mall 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. 16 Winn Dixie 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. 17 Baker Correctional 12 p.m. to 9 p.m. 18 Health Center of Lake City 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. 19 Florida State Prison 12 p.m. to 8 p.m. 20 Big Boy Toys at Fairgrounds 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 21 Big Boy Toys at Fairgrounds 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 22 Walmart 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. 23 Pizza Boy Pizza (Free Large Pizza*) 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. 24 Subway on SR 47 (Free 6 Combo*) 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. 25 Union Correctional 12 p.m. to 8 p.m. 27 Hungry Howies ( Free Small Sub*) 12 p.m. to 6 p.m. 28 St. James Episcopal Church 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. 28 Hardees at the Lake City Mall 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. 29 Winn Dixie 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. 30 FGC Halloween Blood Drive 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. 31 Christ Central Fall Festival 4 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. decisions about stops and destinations together. Ive been lucky and very fortunate to have a friend like Sue. We are blessed to have had the opportunities to travel together and just completed our third road trip. We tend to have at least one night on the road where we get slap happy or punch drunk and laugh so hard at nothing until tears are flowing, but I wouldnt have it any other way. Cant wait for our next road trip! There are still a few states untouched by Sandy and Sue! TRAVEL Continued From 1D Sandy Kishton is a free lance travel writer who lives in Lake City. Mr. and Mrs. Jimmie Pitman of Lake City and Ms. Charlene Pitman of Lake City announce the engagement and upcoming marriage of their daugh ter, Adrea Michelle Pitman of Lake City, to Nicholas Shane Harris, son of Karen and Randy Harris of Forney, Texas. The couple will be mar ried on Nov. 10 in a small ceremony at Springs Preserve in Las Vegas, Nev. The bride-elect recent ly graduated from the University of Central Florida with a masters degree in mass communications. She is a 2004 graduate of Columbia High School. The future groom attended the United States Military Academy, Westpoint, and went on to receive his masters in busi ness administration at the University of Texas. He is employed as a proj ect management consultant and is currently working in Singapore. Pitman-Harris Buster and BaDonna Oxendine of Jasper announce the engagement and approaching marriage of their daughter, Jana Elizabeth Oxendine of Navarre, to Ronald Wayne Frost II of Navarre, son of Deaker and Sharon Frost Sterling of Lake City. The wedding is planned for Dec. 29 and the location will be announced at a later date. The bride-elect is a 2009 graduate of Hamilton County High and is cur rently employed with Olin Marler Charters in Destin. She is the granddaughter of Hugh and Jan Hunter of White Springs, Calvin Graves of Crawfordville and BeHie Oxendine of Jasper. The future groom is 2008 graduate of Columbia High School. He is the grandson of Joseph and Doris Szalay of Rogersville, Tn. He is currently enlisted in the United States Air Force and stationed at Hurlbert Field AFB. Oxendine-Frost Wedding announcements By LORI HINNANT Associated Press PARIS French chil dren go to school four days a week. They have about two hours each day for lunch. And they have more vacation than their counter parts almost anywhere in the West. It may sound a bit like the famously leisurely work pace enjoyed by their par ents, most of whom work 35 hours per week as dic tated by law. But the nations new gov ernment says elementary school kids risk classroom burnout, and is moving to help them cope. The issue: French school days may be relatively few, but they are at least as long as a day of work for adults. Even 6year-olds are in class until late into the afternoon, when skies are dark, atten tion flags and stomachs rumble. As a candidate, President Francois Hollande prom ised to change things by adding a fifth day of classes on Wednesday while short ening the school day. For France, its something of a revolutionary idea that would overturn more than a century of school tradi tion. The thinking is that the days are too full for young children under the current system and that Wednesday free time could be put to more productive use. France has the shortest school year and the longest day, Hollande said at the time, promising change. His education minister, Vincent Peillon, will decide this month how to carry out the reform. He has said he may also compensate for a shorter school day by trimming Frances sacred summer vacation. A panel of experts will present their conclusions on Friday, and the president is expected to address the issue on Tuesday. No proposal affects tradi tion and potentially fam ily and municipal budgets as much as what the French call changes to the scholastic rhythms. Theres been a midweek break in French primary schools dating back to the 19th century, a government concession to the Roman Catholic Church, which wanted children to study the catechism on their week day off. In todays secular France, Wednesdays cur rently are a blur of sports, music, tutoring for families of means, or a scramble for working parents strug gling to get by who must either find a sitter or send their kids to a full day at a state-run leisure center. Things arent exactly easy for French kids. Despite long summer breaks and the four-day school week, French ele mentary school students actually spend more hours per year in school than average 847, compared with 774 among countries in OECD, a club of wealthy nations. But the time is compressed into fewer days each year. The French school day begins around 8:30 and ends at 4:30 p.m., even for the youngest, despite studies showing the ability of young chil dren to learn deteriorates as the day goes on. But many parents are afraid that the changes will force them to figure out extra childcare five days a week, especially at schools where the afterschool pro gram amounts to sitting silently at a desk for two hours or near-chaos in the play areas. Under the education proposal, school would end at lunchtime on France looks to upend school year traditions ASSOCIATED PRESS Students enter the school of La Ronce in Ville dAvray, west of Paris, Friday. French children go to school four days a week with about two hours each day for lunch. And they have more vacation than their counterparts almost anywhere in the West. As a candidate, President Francois Hollande promised to change things by adding a fifth day of classes on Wednesday while shortening the school day and education minister, Vincent Peillon, will decide this month how to carry out the reform. Wednesday. Its completely unreal istic, Valerie Marty, presi dent of the national par ents organization, said of the proposed timetable. They have to figure out who will take care of the children after school, who will finance it. In France, the answer is usually the government. The state is expected to provide for just about everything education-relat ed: Classes come under the national budget, and lunches and leisure are the domain of municipalities. So if school lets out most days at 3:30 p.m., under the plan most recently floated, more working par ents than ever would need afterschool care and towns would have to figure out what to do with rest less children. That would almost certainly involve something more construc tive than sitting quietly at desks, kicking around a ball, or playing cards until the evening when parents get out of work. The Education Ministry has proposed more orga nized extracurricular activi ties like sports, theater and art to replace the relatively free-form time children now have after school. But that means trained staff and, of course, more money from local budgets already strained in difficult eco nomic times. Marty, who has three children, proposes some thing entirely different: lengthening lunch to three hours. After a meal, children have a moment when theyre tired. Theyre not ready for intellectual activi ties and could do some thing more relaxing, she said, suggesting theater, or quiet time in a library for others. Afterward, she said, classes could resume until evening. Trimming the hallowed summer break is another tricky proposition. The school year ends at the beginning of July. Some families take July off, some August. But nearly every one takes a month, and many French families travel for the entire period. Peillon said he was flex ible about vacation time: If the question of vacation is blocking things, Ill pro pose that the prime minis ter leave it alone. Eric Charbonnier, an OECD education expert, supports the proposed changes. He believes the current system isnt work ing for the children most in need of a good education.

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Page Editor: Laura Hampson, 754-0427 LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 3D'/,)(By KAREN MATTHEWSAssociated PressNEW YORK — Thousands of teenagers who can’t take their cell-phones to school have another option, courtesy of a burgeoning industry of sorts in always-enterpris-ing New York City: paying a dollar a day to leave it in a truck that’s parked nearby. Students might resent an expense that adds up to as much as $180 a year, but even so, leaving a phone at one of the trucks in the morning and then picking it up at the end of the day has become as routine for city teenagers as getting dressed and riding the morning-rush subway. “Sometimes it’s a hassle because not everyone can afford it,” said Kelice Charles, a freshman at Gramercy Arts High School in Manhattan. “But then again, it’s a living.” Cellphones and other devices, such as iPods and iPads, are banned in all New York City public schools, but the rule is widely ignored except in the 88 buildings that have metal detectors. Administrators at schools without detec-tors tell students, “If we don’t see it, we don’t know about it.” Schools where violence is considered a risk have metal detectors to spot weapons, but they also spot phones. They include the Washington Irving Educational Complex in the bustling Union Square area, a cluster of small high schools housed in a mas-sive century-old building that used to be one big high school. The trucks that collect the cellphones have their own safety issues — one was held up in the Bronx in June, and some 200 stu-dents lost their phones. That could be why one operator near Washington Irving refused to speak to a reporter recently. A converted disabilityaccess van that’s parked a block away on school days is painted bright blue and labeled “Pure Loyalty Electronic Device Storage.” The owner is Vernon Alcoser, 40, who operates trucks in three of the city’s five boroughs. Alcoser would not comment, even though the names of news out-lets that have run stories about Pure Loyalty are affixed to his trucks. Pure Loyalty employees chatted but would not give their names as students from the Washington Irving com-plex lined up on a drizzly morning to surrender their phones. “Next, next, have the phone off, have the money out,” an employee yelled as the teens texted and lis-tened to music until the last possible second. At the truck window, each student exchanged a phone and a dollar for a numbered yel-low ticket. “It’s not that much of a hassle unless it’s really crowded,” said Gramercy Arts sophomore Chelsea Clouden. “My whole four years I’ve been putting my phone in this truck, and it’s been great,” said Melquan Thompson, a senior at the High School for Language and Diplomacy. “Only a dol-lar. It’s not bad.” The cellphone trucks appear to be unique to New York City. “That is hilarious,” said Debora Carrera, a high school principal in Philadelphia who had never heard of a phone storage truck. “Wow. It is very strange.” At Carrera’s school, Kensington Creative and Performing Arts High School, students operate a cellphone storage room where phones can be dropped off in the morning at no charge and picked up after school. For many teens, it would be unthinkable to leave the devices at home all day, Carrera said. “Their phone is like a family member,” she said. “It’s like a pet. They love it.” For parents, the phone may be the only way of communicating with a teen who commutes two hours to school and gets home at 8 p.m., after sports practice. “In this day and age, it’s ridiculous that the Department of Education doesn’t allow us to store them on site,” said Robin Klueber, the PTA president at Frank McCourt High School on Manhattan’s Upper West Side. Frank McCourt, named for the late writer and teacher, shares a metal-detector building with sev-eral other schools. Some students store their phones in a truck, and others use a nearby shoe store, Klueber said. She wishes the city Department of Education would let the PTA run a storage room instead. “In this day and age, especially when many of us still feel the scare of 9/11, students should be able to travel with their phones,” Klueber said. “Many of these kids come from other boroughs and participate in after-school activities where they are far from home late into the evening.” The Department of Education did not com-ment on whether lockbox-es in schools were being considered. Spokeswoman Marge Feinberg said only, “We have a longstand-ing policy that does not allow students to use cell-phones in schools. It is in Chancellor’s Regulation A-412, and there are no plans to change this.”A phone home: NY teens pay valets to store devices ASSOCIATED PRESSStudents from New York’s Washington Irving educational co mplex line up to leave their cellphones and other electronic devices, for a dollar a day per item, in a privately operated truck parked near their school. Cellphones are banned in al l New York City public schools, but the rule is widely ignored except in schools with metal de tectors. Outside those schools, entrepreneurs park trucks where students drop off devices before class and get them back at the end of the day. By RAPHAEL SATTERAssociated PressLONDON — In a remote fishing town on the tip of Scotland’s Black Isle, the last native speaker of the Cromarty dialect has passed away, taking with him a little fragment of the English linguistic mosaic. Academics said Wednesday that Bobby Hogg, who was 92 when he died last week, was the last person fluent in the dialect once common to the seaside town of Cromarty, 175 miles (280 kilometers) north of Edinburgh. “I think that’s a terrible thing,” said Robert Millar, a linguist at the University of Aberdeen in northern Scotland. “The more diver-sity in terms of nature we have, the healthier we are. It’s the same with lan-guage.” The demise of an obscure dialect spoken by a few hundred people may not register for most English speakers — “We’ll all live,” Millar said — but it’s part of a relentless trend toward standardization which has driven many regional dia-lects and local languages into oblivion. Linguists often debate how to define and differentiate the world’s many dialects, but most agree that urbaniza-tion, compulsory education and mass media have con-spired to iron out many of the kinks that make rural speech unique. Cromarty, which counts just over 700 people, is at the very end of a sparsely populated peninsula of for-est and farmland. It’s sepa-rated from Inverness, the closest city, by the Beauly Firth, a wide body of cold water where salmon run and dolphins frolic. The Cromarty dialect included a helping of archa-ic “thees” and “thous” as well as a wealth of seafaring vocabulary, including three sets of words for “second fishing line.” The aspirate “h’’ was often added or subtracted, so that “house” would be pro-nounced “oos” and “apple” would be pronounced “hay-pel.” The “wh” sound was often dropped entirely. A lexicon of Cromarty words, relying in large part on Hogg’s speech, gave “Oo thee keepan?” as Cromarty’s version of “How are you?” and “Hiv thoo a roosky sazpence i thi pooch?” for “Can you lend me some money?” Urban dialects may be strong — Millar referred to “Toonserspik,” the “town speech” of cities like Aberdeen — but he said they don’t replace what’s being lost. He said urban dialects tend to be more similar to one another than their rural counterparts, with an emphasis on differences in pronunciation over dif-ferences in vocabulary. And even rival cities like Glasgow and Edinburgh “sound more like each other than they used to.” Author Mark Abley, who has written about the dyna-mism of the English lan-guage, agrees. “I don’t believe there’s a straightforward balancing act in which urban dialects grow as rural ones shrink,” he said in an email. “Cities are always melting pots, and isolation for any group is very hard to maintain.” As the worlds’ melting pots grow ever bigger — half the Earth’s popula-tion now lives in cities — lesser-known dialects are evaporating. Worldwide, languages are disappearing regularly, with half of the globe’s 6,000-plus languag-es expected to be extinct by the end of the century, according to UNESCO. The British Isles saw two languages go extinct within living memory, UNESCO says. The last native speak-er of Alderney French, a Norman dialect spoken in the Channel Islands, died around 1960, and the last speaker of traditional Manx, the language once spoken on the Isle of Man, died in 1974. Donna Heddle, the director of the Center for Nordic Studies at Scotland’s University of the Highlands and Islands, said the loss of each language or regional dialect leaves the world poorer than it was before. “It’s one less little sparkle in the firmament,” she said. “One little star might go out and you might never notice it, but it’s not there anymore.”Scottish man dies, taking town’s dialect with him ASSOCIATED PRESSThis image released by Am Baile High Life Highland on Thursday Oct. 4 shows an undated image of Bobby Hogg, who recently passed away aged 92. Hogg was the last person fluent in the dialect once common to the Scottish seaside town of Cromarty, about 175 miles (280 kilometers) north of Edinburgh. By ALISON LADMANFor The Associated PressWhen baking season brings thoughts of savory loaves of bread hot from the oven, we often overlook egg breads. But these rich, moist — and yes, eggy — loaves deserve serious consideration. They are satisfying in a way we typically associate with quick sweet breads, yet are versatile enough to accompany dinner and make delicious sandwiches. For this recipe, we studded a basic egg bread with four varieties of seeds — sesame, sunflower, poppy and pumpkin. The seeds add a satisfying crunch without detracting from the moist crumb of the bread. But if you’d rather leave out the seeds, feel free.FOUR-SEED EGG BREADStart to finish: 3 hoursServings: 161 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds1 tablespoon toasted sunflower seeds1 tablespoon poppy seeds2 tablespoons toasted pumpkin seeds (also called pepitas) 1/4-ounce packet instant yeast1/2 cup warm milk1/2 cup warm water4 egg yolks4 cups all-purpose flour2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil 2 tablespoons vegetable oil1/4 cup honey1 tablespoon saltIn a large bowl, combine the sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, poppy seeds, pumpkin seeds and yeast. Stir in the milk and water, then mix in the egg yolks. When well mixed, add the flour, sesame oil, vegetable oil, honey and salt. Knead, either by hand or with a dough hook on an electric mixer on low speed, for 8 to 10 minutes. Cover with plastic wrap and allow to rise in a warm place for 1 to 1 1/2 hours, or until doubled in bulk. Meanwhile, coat a baking sheet with cook-ing spray. Transfer the dough to a lightly floured counter. Fold the dough over itself, then work into a ball. Transfer the dough to the prepared baking sheet. Cover the bread with plastic wrap and allow to rise again for 1 hour, or until risen and puffy. Toward the end of the rising time, heat the oven to 325 F. Using a paring knife, cut 2 deep slashes in the top of the load. Bake for 40 to 50 minutes, or until deep golden and cooked through. Transfer to a rack to cool. Nutrition information per serving: 200 calories; 60 calories from fat (30 percent of total calories); 6 g fat (1 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 55 mg cholesterol; 29 g carbo-hydrate; 1 g fiber; 5 g sugar; 5 g protein; 370 mg sodium. Moist, rich egg bread with seeds for fall By ALISON LADMANFor The Associated PressThis savory muffin studded with zucchini and cheddar cheese pairs as wonder-fully with dinner as it does breakfast. And consider taking advantage of all that extra zucchini piling up in the garden by baking a double batch. The moisture from the zuc-chini means these muffins freeze well. Want to make a whole-grain version? Substitute regular whole-wheat flour for half of the all-purpose flour. Or go all the way and use white whole-wheat flour in place of all of the all-purpose. White whole-wheat flour has the same nutrition as regu-lar whole wheat, but is made from a lighter grain that produces a flour that tastes and looks similar to white.ZUCCHINI CHEDDAR MUFFINSStart to finish: 45 minutesServings: 122 1/4 cups all-purpose flour1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder1/2 teaspoon baking soda1/4 cup sugar1 teaspoon salt2 eggs1 1/4 cups buttermilk 1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, melted 1 cup packed shredded zucchini3/4 cup shredded sharp cheddar cheese Heat the oven to 400 F. Line a 12-cup muffin pan with paper liners or coat with baking spray. In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, sugar and salt. In another bowl, whisk together the eggs and buttermilk, then whisk in the melted butter. Gently fold the liquid mix-ture into the dry mixture, then fold in the zucchini and cheddar just enough to incorporate. Scoop the batter into the prepared muffin pan and bake for 25 to 30 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted at the center comes out clean. Allow to cool for 10 minutes in the pan before turning out on a rack to cool com-pletely. Nutrition information per serving: 220 calories; 100 calories from fat (45 percent of total calories); 11 g fat (7 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 60 mg cholesterol; 23 g car-bohydrate; 1 g fiber; 5 g sugar; 6 g protein; 360 mg sodium. A zucchini muffin fit for breakfast or dinner

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4D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 4DLIFE SUNDAY EVENING OCTOBER 7, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosOnce Upon a Time “We Are Both” (N) Revenge “Resurrection” (N) (:01) 666 Park Avenue “Murmurations” News at 11Private Practice 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsThe Insider (N) Love-RaymondBig Bang TheoryCSI: Miami “Power Trip” Criminal MindsNewsSports ZoneChann 4 NewsBig Bang Theory 5-PBS 5 -Keeping UpAs Time Goes ByNOVA World’s fastest elevator. Call the Midwife (N) Masterpiece ClassicBroadway: The American MusicalMI-5 The team learns of Zaf’s fate. 7-CBS 7 47 47(4:30)SnatchAction News Jaxe NFL Football60 Minutes (N) The Amazing Race (N) The Good Wife “And the Law Won” (N) The Mentalist “Devil’s Cherry” (N) Action Sports 360 9-CW 9 17 17Yourjax MusicAccording to JimYourJax MusicVoid TVLaw & Order “Hot Pursuit” Local HauntsLocal HauntsTMZ (N) The Of ceThe Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30e NFL Football: Bears at Jaguars The SimpsonsCleveland ShowThe Simpsons (N) Bob’s Burgers (N) Family Guy (N) American Dad (N) NewsAction Sports 360Leverage “The Homecoming Job” 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsFootball Night in America (N) (Live) e(:20) NFL Football San Diego Chargers at New Orleans Saints. (N) News CSPAN 14 210 350NewsmakersWashington This Week Q & APrime MinisterRoad to the White House Q & A WGN-A 16 239 307Law & Order: Criminal Intent “F.P.S.” Bloopers!How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine(:40) Instant Replay30 Rock30 Rock TVLAND 17 106 304“Jurassic Park” (1993) Sam Neill. Premiere. Cloned dinosaurs run amok at an island-jungle theme park. Love-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Oprah’s Next ChapterOprah’s Next ChapterOprah’s Next ChapterOprah’s Next Chapter Jason Russell. Oprah’s Next Chapter Usher Raymond. Oprah’s Next Chapter A&E 19 118 265ExterminatorExterminatorDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck Dynasty(:01) Duck Dynasty(:31) Duck Dynasty HALL 20 185 312(5:00) “The Wish List” (2010) “Accidentally in Love” (2010, Drama) Jennie Garth, Ethan Erickson. “Undercover Bridesmaid” (2012) Brooke Burns, Gregory Harrison. FrasierFrasier FX 22 136 248(5:30)“Eagle Eye” (2008, Action) Shia LaBeouf, Michelle Monaghan.“Taken” (2008, Action) Liam Neeson, Maggie Grace, Famke Janssen.“Taken” (2008, Action) Liam Neeson, Maggie Grace, Famke Janssen. CNN 24 200 202CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) Latino in America (N) Piers Morgan TonightCNN Newsroom (N) Latino in America TNT 25 138 245Law & Order “Take-Out” (DVS) Law & Order “Second Opinion” Law & Order “Sweetie” (DVS) Law & Order “Humiliation” Law & Order “Evil Breeds” Law & Order “Hitman” (DVS) NIK 26 170 299You Gotta SeeYou Gotta SeeYou Gotta SeeYou Gotta SeeSee Dad RunFull HouseFull HouseFull HouseThe NannyThe NannyFriendsFriends SPIKE 28 168 241Auction HuntersAuction HuntersAuction HuntersAuction HuntersAuction HuntersAuction HuntersAuction HuntersAuction HuntersAuction HuntersAuction HuntersAuction HuntersAuction Hunters MY-TV 29 32 -The MillionaireThe MillionaireM*A*S*HM*A*S*HColumbo “Swan Song” Thriller “Portrait Without a Face” The Twilight ZoneThe Twilight Zone DISN 31 172 290Austin & AllyShake It Up!Good Luck CharlieGravity FallsGood Luck CharlieAustin & Ally (N) A.N.T. FarmJessieMy BabysitterMy BabysitterA.N.T. FarmMy Babysitter LIFE 32 108 252“Tyler Perry’s the Family That Preys”“Abducted: The Carlina White Story” (2012) Aunjanue Ellis, Keke Palmer. “Steel Magnolias” (2012) Queen Latifah, Phylicia Rashad. Premiere. “Abducted: The Carlina White Story” USA 33 105 242Law & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims Unit“Pirates of the Caribbean: End” BET 34 124 329Battle eld America“Roll Bounce” (2005) Bow Wow. A roller-skater prepares for a big showdown. “The Janky Promoters” (2009, Comedy) Ice Cube, Mike Epps. Don’t Sleep!Don’t Sleep! ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) BCS Countdownf MLS Soccer Portland Timbers at Seattle Sounders FC. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209 NHRA Drag Racing NHRA Drag Racing Auto-Plus Nationals. From Reading, Pa. (N Same-day Tape) 2012 World Series of PokerNASCAR Now (N) SUNSP 37 -To Be Announced3 Wide LifeSport Fishing College Football Florida State at North Carolina State. (Taped) DrivenShip Shape TVFlorida Sportsman DISCV 38 182 278MythBusters “Blue Ice” MythBusters “Duct Tape Plane” MythBusters “Titanic Survival” Plane Crash An unmanned 727 is deliberately crashed. (N) MythBusters “Titanic Survival” TBS 39 139 247a(3:30) MLB Baseball (N)a MLB Baseball (N)a MLB Baseball (N) HLN 40 202 204Murder by the BookDominick Dunne: Power, PrivilegeDominick Dunne: Power, PrivilegeMurder by the Book “David Baldacci” Murder by the BookDominick Dunne: Power, Privilege FNC 41 205 360FOX News Sunday With Chris WallaceFOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) FOX News Sunday With Chris WallaceGeraldo at Large (N) Huckabee E! 45 114 236Keeping Up With the Kardashians“She’s Out of My League” (2010) Jay Baruchel, Alice Eve, T.J. Miller. Married to JonasMarried to JonasMarried to JonasKeeping Up With the KardashiansMarried to Jonas TRAVEL 46 196 277Most Terrifying Places in America 6Halloween Fright House: RevealedMaking Monsters “Transworld 29.0” Making Monsters “You Bug Me” (N) Halloween Crazier (N) Destination FearDestination Fear HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lMillion Dollar RoomsExtreme HomesBuying and SellingProperty Brothers “Olivia” House Hunters Renovation (N) TLC 48 183 280Island MediumIsland MediumIsland MediumIsland MediumIsland MediumIsland MediumLong Island Medium: On the Road (N) Breaking Amish (N) Long Island Medium: On the Road HIST 49 120 269American Pickers “Psychic Pickings” American Pickers “They Boldly Go” American Pickers “Backroad Samurai” American PickersPawn StarsRestoration(:02) American Pickers ANPL 50 184 282Swamp Wars “Deer-Eating Python” Call-WildmanCall-WildmanDrug Kingpin HipposEating Giants: HippoEating Giants: Elephant (N) Eating Giants: Hippo FOOD 51 110 231Diners, Drive$24 in 24The Great Food Truck RaceCupcake Wars “Big Time Rush” (N) Halloween Wars “Evil Clowns” Iron Chef America (N) Restaurant Stakeout TBN 52 260 372T.D. JakesJoyce MeyerLeading the WayThe Blessed LifeJoel OsteenKerry ShookBelieverVoiceCre o Dollar“Barabbas” (1962, Historical Drama) Anthony Quinn, Silvana Mangano. FSN-FL 56 Bull Riding CBR Eldorado Shootout. The Game 365World Poker Tour: Season 10 (Taped) UFC Unleashed (N) Being: Liverpool (N) World Poker Tour: Season 10 SYFY 58 122 244(4:30)“Blade II” (2002, Horror)“Primal” (2009, Horror) Krew Boylan, Ch’aska Cuba de Reed. “Wrong Turn 4: Bloody Beginnings” (2011) Sean Skene, Scott Johnson. “Leprechaun” (1992, Horror) AMC 60 130 254(4:54) Into the West Custer’s death. Into the West “Ghost Dance” Army slaughter of Indians. (Part 6 of 6) Hell on Wheels “Blood Moon; Blood Moon Rising” Cullen prepares for battle. Hell on Wheels COM 62 107 249(5:30)“Grandma’s Boy” (2006) Doris Roberts. Jeff Dunham: Controlled ChaosJeff Dunham: Minding the Monsters (N) Jeff Dunham: Minding the MonstersTosh.0South Park CMT 63 166 327Dallas Cowboys CheerleadersDallas Cowboys CheerleadersExtreme Makeover: Home EditionExtreme Makeover: Home EditionExtreme Makeover: Home EditionExtreme Makeover: Home Edition NGWILD 108 190 283Built for the Kill “Savannah Predators” Killer Dogs of AfricaWar ElephantsAfrica’s Thunder River Following the Zambezi River. War Elephants NGC 109 186 276Alaska State TroopersAlaska State Troopers “Gun N Hide” Alaska State Troopers “Extreme Justice” An Intoxicated miner blocks a road. Alaska State Troopers “Knife Fight” Alaska State Troopers SCIENCE 110 193 284Survivorman “South Paci c” How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s Made ID 111 192 285Fatal Encounters “Living on the Edge” Final Witness “Fatal Devotion” 48 Hours on ID (N) Sins & Secrets “Kansas City” Unusual Suspects (N) 48 Hours on ID HBO 302 300 501“Big Mommas: Like Father, Like Son”“Cowboys & Aliens” (2011, Science Fiction) Daniel Craig. ‘PG-13’ Boardwalk Empire “Blue Bell Boy” (N) Treme Toni searches for a killer. (N) Boardwalk Empire “Blue Bell Boy” MAX 320 310 515(:15)“Due Date” (2010, Comedy) Robert Downey Jr. ‘R’ “Underworld” (2003, Horror) Kate Beckinsale, Scott Speedman. ‘R’ “What’s Your Number?” (2011, Romance-Comedy) Anna Faris. ‘R’ SHOW 340 318 545(5:15)“A Better Life” (2011) Dexter “Are You ...?” Homeland “The Smile” Dexter “Sunshine and Frosty Swirl” (N) Homeland “Beirut Is Back” (N) Dexter “Sunshine and Frosty Swirl” MONDAY EVENING OCTOBER 8, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Dancing With the Stars: All-Stars (N) (Live) (:01) Castle “Secret’s Safe With Me” News at 11(:35) Nightline (N) 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) The Insider 5-PBS 5 -JournalNightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Antiques RoadshowMarket Warriors (N) Independent LensBBC World NewsTavis Smiley (N) 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJaguars AccessTwo and Half MenHow I Met/MotherPartners (N) 2 Broke Girls (N) Mike & Molly (N) Hawaii Five-0 “Lana I Ka Moana” (N) Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneTMZ (N) 90210 “Til Death Do Us Part” Gossip Girl “Gone Maybe Gone” Vote America 2012Access HollywoodThe Of ceThe Of ce “China” 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family GuyFamily GuyThe SimpsonsBones “The Tiger in the Tale” (N) (PA) The Mob Doctor “Change of Heart” (N) NewsAction News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) The Voice “The Battles Premiere” Famous musicians assist the coaches. (N) (:01) Revolution “The Plague Dogs” (N) NewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(5:00) U.S. House of Representatives Politics & Public Policy Today WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosWGN News at Nine (N) 30 Rock30 Rock TVLAND 17 106 304M*A*S*HM*A*S*H “Lil” M*A*S*HThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Undercover BossUndercover BossUndercover BossUndercover BossUndercover BossUndercover Boss A&E 19 118 265The First 48 “Twist of Fate” Hoarders “John; Vivian” Hoarders “Doug & Ruth” Hoarders “Shanna & Lynda” (N) Intervention “Susie & Miriam” (N) (:01) Intervention “Amanda” HALL 20 185 312Little House on the Prairie “Rage” Little House on the Prairie “Little Lou” NUMB3RS “Prime Suspect” NUMB3RS “Sabotage” FrasierFrasierFrasierFrasier FX 22 136 248How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherTwo and Half MenTwo and Half Men“The Devil Wears Prada” (2006) Meryl Streep. A recent college graduate lands a job at a fashion magazine.“The Devil Wears Prada” (2006) CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245The Mentalist (Part 1 of 2) The Mentalist (Part 2 of 2) Major CrimesMajor Crimes (N) The Mentalist A witness gets killed. Major Crimes NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobiCarlySpongeBobSee Dad RunFull HouseFull HouseThe NannyThe NannyFriends(:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241CSI: Crime Scene Investigation“Star Wars V: The Empire Strikes Back” (1980, Science Fiction) Mark Hamill, Harrison Ford, Carrie Fisher.“Star Wars V: The Empire Strikes Back” (1980) Mark Hamill. MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*HM*A*S*H “Letters” Law & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitSeinfeldFrasierThe Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Phineas and FerbJessieAustin & AllyGood Luck CharlieA.N.T. Farm“Halloweentown” (1998) Debbie Reynolds. Phineas and FerbPhineas and FerbA.N.T. FarmMy Babysitter LIFE 32 108 252(5:30)“Selena” (1997) Jennifer Lopez, Edward James Olmos. “Steel Magnolias” (2012, Comedy-Drama) Queen Latifah, Phylicia Rashad. “Abducted: The Carlina White Story” (2012) Aunjanue Ellis, Keke Palmer. USA 33 105 242NCIS Gibbs works with Kort. NCIS: Los Angeles “Black Widow” WWE Monday Night RAW (N) (:05) CSI: Crime Scene Investigation BET 34 124 329(4:00) Roll Bounce“The Janky Promoters” (2009, Comedy) Ice Cube, Mike Epps. “All About the Benjamins” (2002, Action) Ice Cube, Mike Epps, Eva Mendes. Don’t Sleep!The Game ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) Monday Night Countdown (N) (Live) e NFL Football Houston Texans at New York Jets. (N Subject to Blackout) SportsCenter (N) ESPN2 36 144 209NFL32 (N) SportsCenter (N) E:60d WNBA Basketball Eastern Conference Final, Game 2: Teams TBA. (N) SportsNationSportsCenter (N) Coll. Football Live SUNSP 37 -Sail sh Pro SeriesSport FishingShip Shape TVFlorida SportsmanFishing the FlatsSport FishingSportsman’s Adv.Reel AnimalsSaltwater Exp.Into the BlueHalls of FameBoxing DISCV 38 182 278I (Almost) Got Away With ItAmerican ChopperAmerican ChopperAmerican ChopperAmerican ChopperAmerican Chopper TBS 39 139 247a MLB Baseball (N)a MLB Baseball (N) HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) Dr. Drew (N) Nancy GraceShowbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236(5:00)“She’s Out of My League”E! News (N) Fashion PoliceE! Special “Kevin & Dani Jonas” Married to JonasMarried to JonasChelsea Lately (N) E! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. FoodMan v. FoodAnthony Bourdain: No ReservationsAnthony Bourdain: No Reservations (N)Anthony Bourdain: No ReservationsBizarre Foods With Andrew Zimmern HGTV 47 112 229Property VirginsProperty VirginsLove It or List ItLove It or List It “The Goddard Family” Love It or List It (N) House Hunters (N) Hunters Int’lLove It or List It “The Doudelet Family” TLC 48 183 280Island MediumIsland MediumLong Island Medium: On the RoadSecret PrincesSecret PrincesSecret PrincesSecret Princes HIST 49 120 269Pawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsPawn StarsAmerican Pickers “The Belly Dance” Pawn Stars(:31) Pawn Stars(:02) Counting Cars(:32) Counting Cars ANPL 50 184 282Fatal AttractionsNorth Woods Law: On the HuntFrozen Planet “Winter” Frozen Planet “Life in the Freezer” Frozen Planet “On Thin Ice” Frozen Planet “Winter” FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, Drive$24 in 24 (N) Diners, DriveDiners, Drive TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the LordMax LucadoThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesLiving EdgeKingdom Conn.Jesse DuplantisPraise the Lord (Live). FSN-FL 56 -World Poker Tour: Season 10 College Football West Virginia at Texas. DrivenBeing: Liverpool SYFY 58 122 244“Anaconda” (1997, Suspense) Jennifer Lopez, Ice Cube, Jon Voight. Alphas “If Memory Serves” (N) Haven A Boston cop arrives. Alphas “If Memory Serves”“Anaconda” (1997) Jennifer Lopez. AMC 60 130 254Into the West “Ghost Dance” Army slaughter of Indians. (Part 6 of 6) “Behind Enemy Lines” (2001, Action) Owen Wilson, Gene Hackman, Gabriel Macht. “Behind Enemy Lines II: Axis of Evil” (2006) Matt Bushell. COM 62 107 249It’s Always SunnyTosh.0The Colbert ReportDaily ShowFuturamaFuturamaSouth ParkSouth ParkBrickleberrySouth ParkDaily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327RebaRebaRebaRebaReba “Go Far” RebaDallas Cowboys Cheerleaders: Making the TeamDallas Cowboys Cheerleaders NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer “Collie Crisis” Killer Shots “Lion Stalker” World’s Deadliest “Asia Paci c” World’s Deadliest “Amazon” World’s DeadliestWorld’s Deadliest “Asia Paci c” NGC 109 186 276Drugs, Inc. “Ecstasy” Supercarrier: USS Ronald ReaganSecret Service Files (N) To Catch a SmugglerCocaine Wars “Airport Sting” To Catch a Smuggler SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeThe Human Body: Pushing the LimitsThe Human Body: Pushing the LimitsCuriosity “Plane Crash” Pilots will y a jet up to 10,000 ft. (N) The Human Body: Pushing the Limits ID 111 192 285On the Case With Paula ZahnTelling Amy’s Story (N) Blood, Lies & AlibisBlood, Lies & Alibis (N) Final Witness “The Kids Aren’t Alright” Blood, Lies & Alibis HBO 302 300 501(:15)“Red Riding Hood” (2011, Horror) Amanda Seyfried. ‘PG-13’ Real Time With Bill Maher“X-Men: First Class” (2011, Action) James McAvoy. ‘PG-13’ (:15)“The Adjustment Bureau” MAX 320 310 515The Running Man(:20) “Full Eclipse” (1993) Mario Van Peebles. ‘R’“In Time” (2011, Science Fiction) Justin Timberlake. ‘PG-13’ “The Running Man” (1987) Arnold Schwarzenegger. (:45) Strike Back SHOW 340 318 545“The Hours” (2002, Drama) Meryl Streep, Julianne Moore. ‘PG-13’ Dexter “Sunshine and Frosty Swirl” Homeland “Beirut Is Back” Dexter “Sunshine and Frosty Swirl” Homeland “Beirut Is Back” WEEKDAY AFTERNOON Comcast Dish DirecTV 12 PM12:301 PM1:302 PM2:303 PM3:304 PM4:305 PM5:30 3-ABC 3 -NewsBe a MillionaireThe ChewGeneral HospitalMauryDr. PhilBe a MillionaireNews 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsVaried ProgramsAndy Grif th ShowThe Jeff Probst ShowSteve HarveyThe Dr. Oz ShowChann 4 NewsChann 4 News 5-PBS 5 -WordWorldBarney & FriendsCaillouDaniel TigerSuper Why!Dinosaur TrainCat in the HatCurious GeorgeWild KrattsElectric Comp.WUFT NewsWorld News 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxThe Young and the RestlessBold/BeautifulThe TalkLet’s Make a DealJudge Joe BrownJudge JudyAction News JaxAction News Jax 9-CW 9 17 17Trisha GoddardLaw & Order: Criminal IntentJudge MathisThe Bill Cunningham ShowMauryThe People’s Court 10-FOX 10 30 30Jerry SpringerThe Jeremy Kyle ShowJudge Joe BrownWe the PeopleThe DoctorsDr. PhilFamily FeudFamily Feud 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsBe a MillionaireDays of our LivesFirst Coast LivingKatie The Ellen DeGeneres ShowNewsNews CSPAN 14 210 350(9:00) U.S. House of RepresentativesU.S. House of RepresentativesVaried Programs U.S. House of Representatives WGN-A 16 239 307In the Heat of the NightWGN Midday NewsWalker, Texas RangerWalker, Texas RangerWalker, Texas RangerLaw & Order: Criminal Intent TVLAND 17 106 304Andy Grif thAndy Grif thGunsmokeGunsmokeBonanzaBonanzaBonanza OWN 18 189 279Dr. PhilDr. PhilVaried Programs A&E 19 118 265(1:00) CSI: MiamiCriminal MindsCriminal MindsThe First 48Varied ProgramsThe First 48Varied ProgramsThe First 48Varied Programs HALL 20 185 312Marie Home & Family The WaltonsThe WaltonsThe Waltons FX 22 136 248(11:30) MovieVaried ProgramsMovie Varied Programs CNN 24 200 202CNN Newsroom CNN Newsroom The Situation Room TNT 25 138 245Varied Programs NIK 26 170 299Max & RubyMax & RubyDora the ExplorerDora the ExplorerSpongeBobSpongeBobRobot and MonsterRobot and MonsterOdd ParentsOdd ParentsSpongeBobSpongeBob SPIKE 28 168 241CSI: Crime SceneVaried ProgramsCSI: Crime SceneVaried Programs MY-TV 29 32 -Hawaii Five-0GunsmokeBonanzaThe Big ValleyThe Wild, Wild WestEmergency! DISN 31 172 290Mickey MouseLittle EinsteinsVaried ProgramsGaspard & LisaPhineas and FerbVaried Programs Good Luck CharlieVaried ProgramsGravity FallsVaried Programs LIFE 32 108 252Old ChristineOld ChristineVaried ProgramsGrey’s AnatomyGrey’s AnatomyHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherVaried Programs USA 33 105 242Varied Programs NCIS NCIS NCIS NCIS BET 34 124 329The ParkersThe ParkersMovieVaried Programs Jamie Foxx ShowJamie Foxx ShowThe ParkersThe Parkers ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenterSportsCenterSportsCenterOutside the LinesColl. Football LiveNFL LiveAround the HornInterruption ESPN2 36 144 209First Take Mike and MikeVaried Programs Numbers Never LieDan Le BatardSportsNationVaried Programs SUNSP 37 -Varied Programs DISCV 38 182 278Varied Programs TBS 39 139 247Fresh PrinceAmerican DadLove-RaymondKing of QueensKing of QueensSeinfeldSeinfeldVaried ProgramsBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryMLB on Deck HLN 40 202 204News Now Making It in AmericaEvening Express FNC 41 205 360(11:00) Happening NowAmerica Live Studio B With Shepard SmithYour World With Neil CavutoThe Five E! 45 114 236E! NewsVaried Programs KardashianVaried Programs TRAVEL 46 196 277Varied Programs Anthony Bourdain: No ReservationsBizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. FoodMan v. FoodAnthony Bourdain: No Reservations HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lVaried Programs TLC 48 183 280What Not to WearA Baby StoryA Baby StoryVaried Programs Say Yes, DressSay Yes, DressVaried Programs HIST 49 120 269Varied Programs ANPL 50 184 282Animal Cops HoustonAnimal Cops HoustonAnimal Cops HoustonPit Bulls and ParoleesThe HauntedMonsters Inside Me FOOD 51 110 231Best DishesBarefoot ContessaMoney Saving10 Dollar DinnersSecrets/Restaurant30-Minute MealsGiada at HomeGiada at HomeBarefoot ContessaBarefoot ContessaBest DishesBest Dishes TBN 52 260 372Varied ProgramsBehind the ScenesVaried ProgramsJames RobisonToday WithThe 700 ClubJohn Hagee TodayVaried ProgramsPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -Varied Programs Dan PatrickVaried Programs SYFY 58 122 244MovieVaried Programs AMC 60 130 254(10:00) MovieVaried Programs Movie COM 62 107 249Varied Programs Movie Comedy Central(:28) Futurama(4:59) FuturamaIt’s Always Sunny CMT 63 166 327(1:00) World’s Strictest ParentsStrictest ParentsVaried ProgramsYes, DearYes, DearYes, DearYes, DearRoseanneRoseanneRoseanneRoseanne NGWILD 108 190 283Dog WhispererVaried Programs NGC 109 186 276Alaska State TroopersBorder WarsTabooWild JusticeVaried Programs SCIENCE 110 193 284Varied Programs Time WarpTime WarpMythBustersThey Do It?They Do It? ID 111 192 285Dateline on IDVaried Programs Deadly Women48 Hours on ID48 Hours on ID HBO 302 300 501MovieVaried Programs MAX 320 310 515(11:30) MovieVaried ProgramsMovieVaried Programs (:20) Movie SHOW 340 318 545(11:45) MovieVaried Programs MovieVaried Programs

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DEAR ABBY: My Aunt “Betty,” with whom I have always been close, is 68 and retired. She is abus-ing prescription drugs and spends several days a week passed out or confused -sometimes hal-lucinating. I rarely call her anymore because all she does is mumble and make odd comments. Sometimes she passes out on the phone. My uncle is in denial. He comes from a generation where family problems are kept within the family. He refuses to seek profes-sional treatment for her or get her into detox. Aunt Betty doctor shops until she finds new doctors who load her up when the old ones won’t cooperate. She does have genuine health issues that require meds, but her doctors have said she would never be stoned if she used them properly. Confronting my aunt when she’s coherent only makes her angry. She denies she’s abusing drugs because “they are all prescription.” Help! -DESPERATE NIECE IN FLORIDA DEAR DESPERATE: Start calling your aunt more often, because addic-tion is an illness and denial is one of the symptoms. Older people do react dif-ferently to medications than younger ones do, and a dose that might be tolerated when someone is middle-aged can be too great for a senior. Because your uncle isn’t able to insist that your aunt get professional help, allow me to offer a sug-gestion. The next time she passes out during one of your phone conversations, do what you’d normally do if someone else lost con-sciousness while talking to you. Call 911. When she winds up in the emergency room, her doctor will be alerted about the over-dose. It would be a first step in seeing her get the help she needs. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: Our wedding plans have taken a sudden turn. My fiancee, “Carolyn,” has a wealthy father with a reputation for being an extreme tightwad. Carolyn was pro-foundly touched when he offered to pay for most of the wedding expenses. Last night, Carolyn’s mother confessed to us that Carolyn’s father is not paying for the wedding. He is deducting the expenses from Carolyn’s inheritance from her grandmother. (The father is executor of her grandmother’s estate.) He has no idea that his wife told Carolyn, and we’re sworn to secrecy because she will get into “deep, deep trouble” if he finds out she told. To make matters worse, he has the gall to make demands about the wed-ding as if he was paying for it himself. Carolyn is so deeply hurt by this deception that she doesn’t even want her parents to attend the wedding. All of the joy has gone out of the wedding for her -and therefore, for me as well. Abby, how do you think we should handle this? -FLUMMOXED FIANCE IN NEW YORK DEAR FLUMMOXED FIANCE: I think you should elope. DEAR ABBY HOROSCOPES ARIES (March 21-April 19): Avoid confrontations with people you need to work alongside. Problems with contracts and partner-ships can be expected if you are overly sensitive regarding who does what. ++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): The more versatile you are, the easier it will be to fit into a vocation that is in demand. Use your skills and practical abil-ity to get things done and someone will recognize what you have to offer. Love and romance are highlighted. ++++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Don’t overdo it physi-cally. Stick to what you know and do not venture off the beaten trail. If you travel into unknown terri-tory, you will be faced with situations that are riddled with problems. Sorrow is apparent if honesty doesn’t prevail. +++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): You may get your feelings hurt if you are too sensitive to criticism. Don’t take the foolishness of someone else to heart. +++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You’ll thrive on change, trying new things and meeting new people. Getting involved in a hobby, activity or event that gets you thinking about future prospects is your best bet. Expect someone who depends on you to feel jealous by your progress. +++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Don’t spend money you don’t have. Taking on too much and overdoing it will be your downfall. Organize your time wisely and add discipline to what-ever task you take on in order to ensure success. ++++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Get out with friends and explore interests. Turn something you enjoy doing into a moneymaking endeavor. ++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Look for unusual sources of entertainment and you will meet someone offering alternatives that will help you apply what you do best to different end users. +++++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Being evasive or running away from conflict will only add fuel to the fire. Honesty will be your best bet and help you resolve pending problems so you can get on with your life. Focus on per-sonal happiness. +++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Put greater effort into your goals and you will achieve success. Greater discipline coupled with experience will enable you to make the right choice when it comes to love, relationships and commitment. +++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Don’t be misled by false information being used to tempt you to make a commitment. Stick close to home, and do the things that will add to your comfort and productivity. Change old ways to make room for new beginnings. +++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Do a little redecorat-ing or make a residential move that promises to improve your lifestyle. You can make money in an unusual way if you get involved in a domes-tic product or service. Concentrate on a money-making venture, love and romance. +++++ Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com THE LAST WORD Eugenia Word SUNDAY CROSSWORD Across 1 First name in the White House 2OG1DY\VRZQHU13 Dandy16 Like one battery terminal: Abbr. 19 Start of a seasonal song 20 Tribute21 Source of some intolerance 23 What Katie Holmes lost in divorcecourt? 25 Unsteady26 Money of Laos27 Shoots in the foot28 Commuter on a FURZGHGEXVHJ" +XFN)LQQVIDWKHU.QLFNVYHQXHIRU short 7KURZLQWKHWRZHO6LQJRIROGBBBDQG WKHDQFLHQWZD\VYeats 3UHIL[ZLWKPHWHU36 Some modern memos 40 1946 Best Supporting Actornominee William %URVJUHHWLQJ45 Beam of support /HRQZKRZRQD Pulitzer for hisbiography of HenryJames $FWRU3DWHORI7KH Best Exotic0DULJROG+RWHO 'HDO\EREV51 Digit in military lingo 55 Epiphany?59 Some August QHZERUQV 6ODZHJ6WUHSWUHDWHUIRU short 65 Preschooler'UHDPLQJRI
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6D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 BREAST CANCER Tuesday October 23rd 4:00 pm 7:00 pm Massages and light refreshments will be provided. Pre-registration is encouraged by calling 1.888.681.6388 FREE BREAST SCREENINGS More details at www.cccnf.com 7000 NW 11th Place Gainesville 4520 W US Highway 90 Lake City THIS SCREENING INVOLVES A CLINICAL BREAST EXAM, NOT A MAMMOGRAM. By LEE REICH For The Associated Press PHILADELPHIA He was Americas first bota nist, and his garden is still one of the best. John Bartram was called the greatest natural bota nist in the world by no less than Carl Linnaeus, who in the 18th century devised our system for classifying plants. Bartrams garden is a convenient stop during a visit to Philadelphia, just minutes from the Liberty Bell. When he bought this tract along the Schuylkill River in 1728, it was rural land skirting the colonial city. Bartrams botanizing took him throughout what is now the eastern United States, and this land was where he grew the many plants and seeds he col lected in his travels. His son, William, was a knowledgeable companion for those travels. The notes and sketches that William made during a four-year journey throughout the South, beginning in 1773, were eventually published as Travels, a book that would be published in sev eral foreign editions as well. FIRST U.S. CATALOG PLANT NURSERY Among the Bartrams most exciting discoveries, in 1765, was the Franklinia tree (Franklinia alatamaha), which they found growing along the Alatamaha River in Georgia and named after their friend, Ben Franklin. William later revisited the beautiful trees and col lected seeds, which were planted in Philadelphia. For reasons unknown, this tree was never again seen in the wild after 1803, so the seeds William col lected are the source of all known Franklinia trees in existence today. (Franklinia, hardy to USDA zones 5-8, is a small to medium-size tree with white, fragrant, camellialike blossoms that open in mid-summer, and leaves that turn coppery red in fall. Good soil drainage is a must.) The Schuylkill River site also became a commercial plant nursery. Among the 220 species the Bartrams offered in 1783 were tulip poplar trees and poison ivy vines. (Admit it, poison ivy is a handsome plant much of the year.) Under the leadership of another son, John, Jr., Bartrams granddaughter, Ann, and her husband, Robert Carr, the nursery flourished. By the 1830s, 4,000 species of plants were being raised there, and there was greenhouse space for 10,000 potted plants. Bartrams nursery sup plied plants for such gardens as Jeffersons Monticello and Washingtons Mount Vernon. It was the first American nursery to pub lish a catalog. Compare that catalog now on dis play at Bartrams Garden and consisting of nothing more than a list of plants with the splashy photo graphs and hyperbole of catalogs today. COLONIAL TOFU, PERHAPS Native American plants were the mainstay of the gardens and nursery, but exotics also were grown. Soybeans, for exam ple, from seeds sent by Benjamin Franklin. Ben was thoughtful enough to include a recipe for tofu, as well. Another plant from China, a gingko tree, was planted in 1785 and sur vives today. It may be the oldest gingko tree in North America. Like many old gardens, Bartrams fell into disre pair for awhile. Industrial sprawl creeping along the Schuylkill threatened the site when family members lost interest in the nursery in the middle of the 19th century. To the rescue came Philadelphia industrialist Andrew Southwick, who bought the property, pro claiming, I dont want a solitary branch cut ... so that not a bush of this beloved old garden shall be disturbed. Unfortunately, with Southwicks death, the property was again sold, this time resulting in the loss of many plants. Salvation returned in 1891 when the property was bought by the City of Philadelphia. Restoration efforts were spurred by the discovery, in 1950, of a sketch made by William or John of their 8-acre botani cal garden. In addition to many of the plants grown by the Bartrams, the present Historic Bartrams Gardens also includes an education center housed in the stone barn built by John Bartram in 1775, as well as a wild flower meadow and the furnished Bartram home. More recently, a commu nity garden and orchard were added to the site. The Bartrams would have approved. Bartram nursery nations oldest botanical garden ASSOCIATED PRESS This image taken on July 16 shows Bartrams Garden with a Franklinia tree in the foreground in Philadelphia. WASHINGTON Dorothys ruby slippers from The Wizard of Oz are leaving Washington on their first international jour ney to Londons Victoria and Albert Museum. Judy Garland wore the shoes in the 1939 film in which she played a Kansas farm girl on a magical journey. The Smithsonians National Museum of American History announced the rare loan of its popular slippers Thursday. They will be shown with Dorothys blue-andwhite gingham dress in Hollywood Costume, an exhibit opening Oct. 20 in London. Curators say its the first time Dorothys dress and shoes have been together since the movie was filmed. The dress is part of a private collection. Oz was a movie mile stone for its extensive color sequences. To make the slippers, a designer dyed the shoes red and attached netting to cover them with red sequins. The Smithsonian plans to hold a departure ceremony Tuesday. The slippers will return Nov. 21. Associated Press Smithsonian to lend Dorothys ruby slippers