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The Lake City reporter ( March 3, 2012 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01924

Material Information

Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 10-04-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01927

Related Items

Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01924

Material Information

Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 10-04-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01927

Related Items

Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

By DAVID ESPO andJULIE PACEAssociated PressDENVER — In a showdown at close quarters, President Barack Obama and Republican Mitt Romney sparred aggressively in their first campaign debate Wednesday night over taxes, deficits and strong steps needed to create jobs in a sput-tering national economy. “The status quo is not going to cut it,” declared the challenger. Obama in turn accused his rival of seeking to “double down” on economic policies that actually led to the devastating national downturn four years ago — and of evasiveness on details for Romney proposals on tax changes, health care, Wall Street regulation and more. Both men made frequent references to the weak economy and high national unemployment, by far the dominant issue in the race for the White House. Public opinion polls show Obama with a slight advantage in key battle-ground states and nationally, and Romney was particularly aggres-sive, like a man looking to shake up the campaign with a little less than five weeks to run. With a prime-time television audience likely counted in the tens of millions, moderator Jim Lehrer was pressed at time to enforce time limits on the two rivals. The president occasion-ally shook his head as Romney talked over Lehrer. And Romney virtually lectured Obama at one point after the president accused him of seek-ing to cut education funds. “Mr. Opinion ................ 4APeople.................. 2AObituaries .............. 5A Advice & Comics ......... 3B Puzzles ................. 4B TODAY IN PEOPLE New Zealand: No to Tyson COMING FRIDAY Local news roundup. 86 69 T-Storms WEATHER, 2A Lake City ReporterTHURSDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2012 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | 75¢ LAKECITYREPORTER.COM CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 138, No. 177 Romney, Obama clash in DenverBy TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comGAINESVILLE — Gainesville police continue to investigate a weekend shoot-ing in which a Columbia County man fired several rounds at a passing vehicle and then turned the gun on himself. Stephen James Osborn, 22, of Lulu, died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound, said Ben R. Tobias, Gainesville Police Department public information officer. His identity was released on Tuesday. According to Gainesville Police Department reports, around 11:40 p.m. Sunday, units were dispatched to South Main Street after several calls to the police department were made reporting JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterMike McKee (left), Florida Gateway College’s executive di rector of media and public information, speaks with Josh Crapps, an attorney with Darby & Peele, during a taping of the Constitutional Amendment show Wednesday. The 30-minute seg ment, set to run in conjunction with the candidate forums on Oct. 22-23 on Comcast Cha nnel 8, is the first show to be taped in the new studio at the Wilson S. Rivers Library & Media Center and will analyze and explain the proposed amendments to the state constitution on the November 6 ballot. The candidate forum is sponsored by the Lake City Reporter FGC and the Lake City/Columbia County Chamber of Commerce. Explaining the amendments By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comSuwannee Lumber Company has set up shop in Columbia County with a plans for a mulch and firewood operation. Company officials hope to create up to 100 jobs within the next year if county officials provide incentives to help the company expand. The company’s Lake City location, 854 Guerdon St., is at the former Corbitt Manufacturing facility, north of town. Suwannee Lumber Company, whose main facility is in Cross Creek and employs an estimated 300 people, has been operating at the local site for about a month. ASSOCIATED PRESSPresident Barack Obama and Republican presidential ca ndidate and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney meet on s tage at the start of the first presidential debate in Denver Wednesday. Economy, health care dominate debate Lumber company hopes to add 100 jobs in a yearGainesville gunman was Lulu man TONY BRITT/ Lake City ReporterSuwannee Lumber Company has recently established a branch in Lake City. Candidates spar aggressively in first of three contests. By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comCounty officials want a complete run-down on the services, plans and activities of the North Florida Broadband Authority, which was supposed to provide broadband Internet access to rural areas with federal fund-ing. North Florida Broadband Authority officials are scheduled to give a presentation detailing broad-band authority work and proj-ects to county officials during the commis-sion’s 7 p.m. meeting tonight at the Columbia County School Board Administrative Complex Auditorium, 372 W. Duval St. “The purpose of the presentation is to give county officials an update on where the broad-band project is currently at,” said Dale Williams, Columbia County manager. “The presenta-tion will also give commission-ers the opportunity to ask ques-tions about any of the activities that are currently on-going.” He said county officials wanted to know who has broadband access and who doesn’t and when the service can be expect-ed to be available in certain areas of the county and what issues the broadband authority faces. “I’m sure the board will want to address some of the rumors they’ve heard,” Williams said. The broadband authority is also requesting the county take part in an agreement that would provide leases for certain public 1LUMBER continued on 6A NFBA continued on 6A CountywantsanswersfromNFBA Broadband Authoritywill provide updateto commissioners. Williams LULU continued on 6A DEBATE continued on 6A

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HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS AROUND FLORIDA School board upholds firing FORT LAUDERDALE The Broward County School Board heard hours of testimony from parents, but in the end decided not to intervene in the firing of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School cheerleading coach. About 75 support ers of Melissa Prochilo attended the board meet ing on Tuesday in Fort Lauderdale. Prochilo blamed school board poli tics for her ouster. Critics of Prochilo said she bullied students and allowed the cheer captain to bully others on the team. They also said she pressured parents to con tribute large amounts of money to the booster club and told cheerleaders to forge their parents signa tures on field trip forms. Prochilos supporters said the parents who com plained are on a witch hunt because their daugh ters didnt have starring roles on the team. Teen arrested by US Marshals TALLAHASSEE Franco Thomas, 14, of St. Petersburg, was arrested Tuesday in Tallahassee by U.S. Marshals and is being charged as an adult with first-degree murder. Authorities have been searching for him since July. Police said Thomas beat a 21-year-old man to death with a shotgun during a home invasion robbery in St. Petersburg in July. Officials received infor mation that Thomas was living in Tallahassee with a relative. 1 dead in crash involving train DELRAY BEACH Authorities said one per son is dead after a Tri-Rail train crashed into a car in Delray Beach. The crash happened Wednesday morning in Palm Beach County. Delray Beach police said the cars driver apparently tried to bypass the gate at the train track as the train approached. They believe only one person was in the car. No one on the train was injured. Machete-wielding man arrested FORT MYERS Authorities said theyve arrested a 20-year-old man who walked into the Fort Myers Police Department and began swinging a machete. No one was injured in the Wednesday morning incident. Spokeswoman Shelly Flynn reports the man began swinging at officers but was subdued before anyone was injured. Woman calls to complain, arrested DELAND When a woman wasnt happy with the way a central Florida sheriffs deputy was han dling an incident shed reported, she called 911 to ask for another deputy. That call helped land Desarea Clark, 21, in the Volusia County Jail on Monday. The charge? Misusing the 911 system. It started when Clark called the Volusia County Sheriffs Office Monday night to report a stolen wallet. She told Deputy Scott Gering that shed seen the wallet at her neighbors apartment. Clark became upset when he said he didnt have suf ficient evidence to make an arrest. Man dies while walking on beach PANAMA CITY BEACH Deputies said Ronald Anderson, of Clinton, Tenn., collapsed while walking in rough surf along Panama City Beach and later died at a hospital. A second person is was pulled from the water Tuesday after apparently becoming exhausted while fighting rip currents near the Treasure Island Condominiums. Associated Press New Zealand looks to deny entry to Tyson WELLINGTON, New Zealand N ew Zealand canceled a visa for Mike Tyson on Wednesday because of his rape conviction, saying it reversed its earlier approval because a charity that would have benefited from his appearance said it wants nothing to do with the former heavyweight box ing champion. Tyson had said he had been looking forward to meeting New Zealands indigenous Maori people, the inspiration for his notorious facial tattoo. But now his whole Downunder speaking tour, sched uled for next month, is threatening to fall apart: Australian immigration authorities said theyve yet to decide whether to let him in. Tysons 1992 rape conviction would normally prevent his entry in New Zealand and could be grounds for denial in Australia as well. New Zealands denial came days after Prime Minister John Key spoke out against the visit. Tyson was to speak at a November event in Auckland, the Day of the Champions, which is being pro moted by Sydney agency Markson Sparks. On Wednesday the agency continued to promote tickets for appearances in New Zealand and five major Australian cities. New Zealands Associate Immigration Minister Kate Wilkinson said she initially granted entry because a childrens health charity would get some of the pro ceeds from Tysons speech. She said in a statement her decision was a finely balanced call but that the charity that would have benefited, the Life Education Trust, withdrew its support Tuesday. Singers Keys, Warwick among BET honorees NEW YORK Alicia Keys and Dionne Warwick are known for singing pop and R&B, but theyll be honored as black women who rock on BET. The Black Girls Rock! special, which honors the accomplishments of black women, returns to the network on Nov. 4; the actual ceremony will be held Oct. 13 in the Bronx, N.Y., with actresses Tracee Ellis Ross and Regina King returning as hosts. Kimmel, Chenoweth to honor Ellen DeGeneres WASHINGTON Jimmy Kimmel, Kristin Chenoweth, Steve Harvey and Lily Tomlin have signed on to honor Ellen DeGeneres with tribute performances as she wins the nations top humor prize. The Kennedy Center in Washington is awarding DeGeneres the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor on Oct. 22. The show will be broadcast on PBS stations Oct. 30. The lineup also includes John Krasinski, Sean Hayes and Jason Mraz. Fast, but not magical sales for Rowling book NEW YORK Sales for J.K. Rowlings first adult novel were hard ly magical during its first six days. But the publisher isnt complaining. Little, Brown and Company announced Wednesday that The Casual Vacancy has sold 375,000 copies so far, a figure which includes hardcovers, e-books and audio books, among the fastest selling new releases of the year. Associated Press Wednesday: Afternoon: 3-8-4 Evening: N/A Wednesday: Afternoon: 3-0-4-4 Evening: N/A Tuesday: 4-18-19-23-28 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAIL Y BRIEFING THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2012 Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430 2AWEATHER ASSOCIATED PRESS Former heavyweight boxing champion Mike Tyson speaks at a press conference at the 19th Credit Lyonnais Securities Asia (CLSA) investors Forum at a hotel in Hong Kong. In a reversal, Tyson has been denied entry to the country whose indigenous Maori people he said inspired his facial tattoo. ASSOCIATED PRESS Thank God for this dog Father Sean OBrien (left) blesses Lulu, a mini dachshund, held by Sister Caroline Cerveny at the annual blessing of the animals in observance of the feast of Saint Francis of Assisi at the Franciscan Center in Tampa. Daily Scripture Celebrity Birthdays Author of Future Shock Alvin Toffler is 83. Bestselling horror novelist Anne Rice is 70. Praise be to the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ! In his great mercy he has given us new birth into a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead. 1 Peter 1:3 Thought for Today One of the most tragic things I know about human nature is that all of us tend to put off living. We are all dreaming of some magical rose gar den over the horizon instead of enjoy ing the roses that are blooming out side our windows today. Dale Carnegie, American writer, lecturer (1888-1955 DeGeneres Keys

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Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430 LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2012 3A3A Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Columbia a nd Suwannee counties!44 Credit approval and initial $5 deposit required. Mention this ad and we’ll waive the $15 new membership fee.Lake City 183 SW Bascom Norris Dr. G’ville E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunter’s Walk 5115 NW 43rd St. Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St. Shands at UF Room H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Alachua 14759 NW 157th Ln. Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E. Silver Springs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. Summer eld 17950 US Hwy. 441 Tallahassee 1511 Killearn Center Blvd. $ 1 00 Give our Free Checking account a try... and we’ll give you Here’s how it works: We’ll give you:Present these coupons when you Open a CAMPUS Free Checking Account1$50Keep it active2$25Set up CAMPUS PAY online bill payer3$25 $100!EQUALS 1 Credit approval and initial $50 opening deposit required. Member must elect to receive eStatements and Direct Deposit of at least $200 per month must be established within the rst 90 days. $50 reward will bedeposited to the member’s savings account and will be on hold for 90 days. At that time if the requirements are met and the account remains open, the $50 reward will be made available to the member, otherwise it will be debited from the member’s account.Open aFREE Checking Accountwith eStatements and Direct Deposit Set upOnline Bill Pay $2 5GET$ 2 5GET2 The new checking account must remain active for at least 90 days. Member must have elected to receive eStatements and received at least one month of direct deposit for at least $200. There must be a minimum of 5 debit card transactions per month for the last 3 months. Coupon must be presented in order to receive incentive. If all promotional requirements are met incentive will be credited immediately. $50GET Use your Debit Card3 The new checking account must remain active for at least 90 days. Member must have elected to receive eStatements and received at least one month of direct deposit of at least $200. CAMPUS PAY online bill pay service must be set up, with a minimum of 3 bills paid online within the rst 90 days of account open date. Visit us today to sign up for your free checking account and get what’s coming to you!754-9088 and press 5Give CAMPUS Free Checking a try! www.campuscu.com This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration. AA, unions agree to resume contract talksDALLAS — American Airlines and its pilots’ union have agreed to resume stalled contract negotia-tions.The union also said Tuesday that it will delay releasing results of a strike-authori-zation vote scheduled to end Wednesday.The developments could lead to a breakthrough in a bitter standoff between the nation’s third-biggest airline and its 7,500 active pilots.Thomas Horton, CEO of American parent AMR Corp., which is operating under bankruptcy protec-tion, said Tuesday he was pleased that “intensive bar-gaining” was scheduled to begin this week.Horton said that AMR has finished most of its financial restructuring and is steadi-ly returning to profitability. This despite “a very chal-lenging couple of weeks for our company,” he said.Noting that American’s other unions agreed to new contracts, he said a deal with pilots was an impor-tant step for the company. In a message to Allied Pilots Association members, union spokesman Gregg Overman said the group would seek “an industry-standard contract.”The pilots rejected American’s last offer in August. In early September, a federal bankruptcy judge gave AMR permission to throw out the pilots’ con-tract and impose terms for pay, benefits and work rules.Last week, American said some pilots were con-ducting an illegal work slowdown that was caus-ing delayed and canceled flights, and it threatened to take the union to court. The union said there was no sickout or slowdown.ASSOCIATED PRESSCaptain Mike McClellan, ORD Domicile Chairman of the Allied Pilots Association (left) joins over 200 America n Airline pilots marching on a picket line at O’Hare International Airport, in Chicago. There could be progress in breakin g the standoff between American Airlines and its pilots that app ears to be causing a spike in canceled and delayed flights. T-Mobile USA will merge with MetroPCSBARBARA ORTUTAYJUERGEN BAETZAssociated PressNEW YORK — T-Mobile and MetroPCS have agreed to combine their struggling cellphone businesses in a deal aimed at letting them compete better with their three larger rivals. The combined company will use the T-Mobile brand and have 42.5 million sub-scribers. Although T-Mobile will stay No. 4 among U.S. wire-less companies, it will get access to more space on the airwaves, a critical fac-tor as cellphone carriers try to expand their capacity for wireless broadband. T-Mobile USA’s German parent, Deutsche Telekom AG, will hold a 74 percent stake, while MetroPCS Communications Inc.’ shareholders will own the remainder. MetroPCS shareholders will also receive a payment of about $1.5 billion. Both companies have faltered in the highly competi-tive U.S. cellphone market led by Verizon Wireless and AT&T Inc. T-Mobile had 33.2 million subscrib-ers, well behind No. 3 Sprint Nextel Corp’s 56 mil-lion. MetroPCS was even further back, ranking fifth with 9.3 million. Getting more access to airwaves was the main rea-son for AT&T tring to buy T-Mobile for $39 billion last year. But that deal was shot down by regulators, which said competition would suffer if the second-largest cellphone company were to gobble up the fourth. Deutsche Telekom said the combined T-Mobile-MetroPCS would have revenue of about $24.8 billion based on analysts’ estimates. The deal is also expected to lead to around $6 billion to $7 billion in combined savings. The deal still has to be agreed by shareholders of both companies and will require government approval. But the regula-tory concerns this time appear set to be much milder than the proposed deal involving AT&T. Both companies are relatively small, and T-Mobile USA has been losing subscrib-ers for the last two years. “We are committed to creating a sustainable and financially viable national challenger in the U.S., and we believe this com-bination helps us deliver on that commitment,” Deutsche Telekom CEO Rene Obermann said in a statement. U.S. Rep. Anna G. Eshoo, the ranking Democrat on the House subcommittee on communications and technology, said there’s a big need for a “strong national competitor” in the wireless marketplace when two companies — Verizon Wireless and AT&T — dominate the space. “The proposed merger of T-Mobile and MetroPCS has the right ingredients to provide consumers with a viable alternative for wire-less voice and data ser-vice,” she said. “I hope the FCC and the Department of Justice will conduct a thor-ough, but swift review of the transaction’s merits.”ASSOCIATED PRESSA man using a cellphone passes a T-Mobile store in N ew York. Struggling cellphone companies T-Mobile USA and MetroPCS Communications are set to merge, in a deal that will create an operator with more than 40 million subscribers. NY charges in US-Russia military electronics caseTOM HAYSAssociated PressNEW YORK — A Kazakhstan-born owner of a Texas export firm was charged in New York on Wednesday with being a secret Russian agent involved in a multimillion-dollar scheme to, in the words a U.S. prosecutor, “steal American technol-ogy” for Russian military and intelligence agencies. Alexander Fishenko was among 11 defendants, including seven of his employees, named in an indictment unsealed in federal court in Brooklyn. The FBI arrested the 46-year-old Fishenko and eight others Tuesday night and Wednesday morning and were to be arraigned in Houston; the names of their attorneys were not immediately available. Three defendants were still being sought. The indictment alleges that since October 2008, Fishenko and his co-defen-dants “engaged in a sur-reptitious and systematic conspiracy” to obtain cut-ting-edge microelectron-ics from U.S. makers and export them to Russian while purposely evading licensing requirements. The microelectronics are subject to strict govern-ment controls. Authorities said they could have a wide range of military uses, including radar and sur-veillance systems, weapons guidance systems and deto-nation triggers. U.S. authorities said the charges come amid a mod-ernization campaign by the Russian military. Officials there are seeking compo-nents that are unavailable in Russia and often can only be bought in the United States.

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Q The Washington Times T he gender gap has been a fixture on the political landscape for decades, but men have never enjoyed equal rights. The story line is about how it relates to women, even though the gap cuts both ways. A recent headline such as “What’s behind Obama’s big lead among women?” could as easily be “What’s behind Romney’s big lead among men?” Instead of a story head-ed “Why Obama is so popular among women” it could be “Why Romney is so popular among men.” Barack is the self-described “eye candy” sharing herbal tea on your set-tee. Mitt is hanging out on the couch watching the game with the guys. How men vote is as important as which candidate women prefer, and in this election, perhaps more so. In 2008, the male vote essentially was split between Mr. Obama and John McCain, and that’s not likely to change this year. Democrats have never won the White House without gaining at least a plurality of male voters, but the contrary is not true. George W. Bush won the race in 2000 and 2004 while losing among women by 8 points both times. The political class treats radical feminists as repre-sentatives for their sex even though they are a small group of single-issue extremists. The Obama campaign would have the country believe American women are fanati-cally obsessed with securing birth-control handouts. To the contrary, there’s little empirical evidence to suggest women vote much differently from men. A YWCA survey last month of more than 1,400 women found the economy, unemployment and the bud-get deficit topped women’s list of national priorities. Reproductive health care and abortion were at the bottom. For women and men alike, it’s still the economy, stupid. Other variables can weigh more heavily than sex. According to the latest Gallup survey, white women favor Mr. Romney by 7 points, 50 percent to 43 percent. Mr. Obama’s overwhelming appeal to minority women drags the female poll numbers for Republicans into negative ter-ritory. Likewise, Mr. Romney enjoys a 22-point lead among white men, but he faces a chasm among black and Hispanic males. Marital status is another important variable. Republicans consistently have carried the married vote, and Mr. Romney has a 12-point lead among couples. Being married dramatically reverses the sex gap. In 2004, exit polls showed that while John F. Kerry secured the overall women’s vote by 8 points over George W. Bush, Mr. Bush won among married women by a commanding 16 points, 58 percent to 42 percent. There was no discernible difference between the votes cast by mar-ried women and married men. Mr. Romney’s current challenge may not be finding ways to be more appealing to women but bringing in more men. He leads Mr. Obama by 5 points, a better showing than Mr. McCain in 2008 but still too close for comfort. Perhaps he needs a series of ads explaining his position on critical men’s issues — like football, guns and bacon. Obama: A gender gap ofhis own ONE OPINION W hen I rolled out of bed this morning and padded out to the kitchen, my husband was sitting at the table with a mug of coffee, reading the paper. This was not unusual. We are newspaper people. He’s an editor. I’m a columnist. We read the paper the way farm-ers check the weather report: We like to know what’s on the horizon. The paper is a big part of our morning ritual. So is coffee. One gives us the news. The other helps us to face it. Without coffee, I am groggy, bordering on cranky. But my husband is entirely worthless. Well, until he’s had sufficient caffeine -lots of it -after which he is a perfectly fine human being, or at least, somewhat more human. Seriously. It’s best he doesn’t try to shower, let alone shave, before he has a second cup. This morning, however, he was scheduled for a routine physical, including blood tests, that required fasting -as in nothing to eat or drink. Lucky for him, I stopped him just as he lifted the mug to take a swig. “You’re having COFFEE?”He looked at me the way I used to look at my sister when we watched “Wild Kingdom” and I thought Marlin Perkins was about to get snake-bit. “Yes,” he said. “Yes, I am.”“What about the blood work?”He blinked hard, looking back and forth from me to the mug, until finally it dawned on him. “Oh,” he said, slowly putting down the mug. “Oh, no.” I thought he was going to cry. Instead, he went back to reading the paper. That’s when I noticed it. The newspaper. Instead of dingy gray, it was pink. October is National BreastCancer Awareness Month. The paper was pink (like the pink-ribbon symbol) to recognize the month, and featured stories in every section on breast cancer -its prevention, treatment and, most of all, its survivors. So I poured myself a cup of coffee and started reading. What makes a story not just good, but great? First, you need a villain that strikes without warning, inflicting pain and suf-fering, even unto death. Then you need a hero -an ordinary person like most of us -who didn’t ask for the fight, but can’t walk away, refuses to be a victim, takes every punch, endures the pain and suffering, sometimes even unto death. Cancer is the perfect villain. And those who battle it -the patients, their families and friends, doctors and nurses and others who stand with them -are, for me, the perfect heroes. They were all great stories. I couldn’t put them down. And after reading them, I couldn’t stop thinking about them. Later, after my husband called to say his checkup went fine and he was going into work as soon as he stopped for coffee, I went back through the paper to look at the stories again. I wanted to find a common thread. What made them so compelling? Cancer is an all-too-common story. Why does it need to be told and retold, read and reread? What can it teach us that we don’t already know? Sometimes, even if we know things, it helps to be reminded. First, cancer is everyone’s story -every woman’s, every man’s, every child’s. No one is immune, whether it attacks us personally or, worse, someone we love. Second, awareness is both a weapon and a shield. It enables us to be proactive, empowers us with choices and inspires us with the stories of others. At best, the stories are not about cancer. They’re about courage and hope, strength and frailty and the beautiful, stub-born persistence of the soul. They make us less, not more, afraid; show us what matters; remind us to be thankful; and leave us just a little more alive. Such is the power of a life well-lived, and a story well-told. A life well-lived, a story well-told T he national capi-tal is giddy with excitement over the race. No, not the presidential race. Washingtonians have momen-tarily forgotten that there is a presidential race. Many of them do not have a meaningful vote in it anyway. You see the Nationals, the city’s baseball team that seemed doomed to haplessness every bit as much as its prede-cessors, clinched the National League East title Monday night, ending a 79-year run of futility, failure and humiliation. Newsworthy? Channel 5 broke into its 10 o’clock news broadcast to cover the festivi-ties, the luster of which was not dimmed by the fact that the Nats went on to lose that night and the title was delivered to them via the backdoor by the Pittsburgh Pirates, a team that had just clinched its 20th straight losing season. Nor was it dimmed by the fact that the Nats had long since locked up a wild-card berth, but that would have meant a one-game play-in that Washington sports fans, who have long since moved past pes-simism and into hopelessness, had already resigned them-selves to losing. The city’s original team, the Senators, won just three pennants, the most recent in 1933, and just one World Series, in 1924. The Senators left town for Minneapolis in 1961 and, later, its replacement team for Arlington, Texas, in 1971, where both teams went on to great things. The capital was without the national pastime until 2005 when the Montreal Expos came to town, became the Nationals and after a promising .500 first season seemed destined to con-tinue the franchise’s storied los-ing ways. This season, with a veteran manager and a clutch of young phenoms, the team began winning and winning and, while the fans steeled themselves for the inevitable collapse, it never came. And so it came to pass that Tuesday night the Nats were spraying each other with champagne, although the team’s sensational outfielder, Bryce Harper, is technically too young to drink it and celebrated -or so we’re told -with apple cider. The capital was suffused with happiness, well-being and unaccustomed optimism. Maybe these good spirits will spill over to Congress when the lawmakers return for a critical lame-duck session. But more than one miracle a season is too much to hope for. Losing builds character, but winning is more fun Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding counties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, publisher Robert Bridges, editor Sue Brannon, controller Dink NeSmith, president Tom Wood, chairman LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY E-MAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com T he West’s stiffened sanctions against Iran are apparently starting to bite. Since July, when the European Union voted to end purchases of Iranian oil, Iran’s main source of income, exports have fallen by 30 per-cent or more. And sanctions against Iran’s banks, including its Central Bank, have blocked access to as much as $110 billion in foreign currency reserves. The sanctions are intended to halt Iran’s uranium-enrichment program, the first step toward developing a nuclear weapon. Iran has blustered and stalled in international talks aimed at reaching some kind of agree-ment to restrain the program. Now the country is seeing its currency collapse, dramatically so in the past week. On Sunday, the unofficial exchange rate was 29,500 rials to the U.S. dollar; by Tuesday, it was 35,500. Two years ago, according to the Associated Press, the rate was 10,000 rials to the dollar. President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad blames the col-lapse on Western sanctions and “psychological pressures.” But the decline of the rial has become an issue in Iran’s cor-rosive internal politics, with his rivals blaming it on economic mismanagement. Iran’s ruling clerics are clearly worried that economic dis-content may translate into polit-ical discontent, and although there has been nothing like the massive protests that followed the last election, it was a worri-some sign that 10,000 workers signed an open petition to the government protesting their loss of purchasing power. Iran’s monetary problems give credence to President Barack Obama’s refusal to let Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu browbeat him into drawing “red lines” for military strikes in favor of giving the sanctions more time to work. In Iran,sanctionsbegin to bite Q Scripps Howard News Service OPINION Thursday, October 4, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A4AOPINION ANOTHER VIEW Sharon Randall www.sharonrandall.com Q Sharon Randall can be contacted at P.O. Box 777394, Henderson, NV 89077. Q Dale McFeatters is editorial writer for Scripps Howard News Service. Dale McFeattersmcfeattersd@shns.com

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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2012 5A Johnnie Lee Collins, III Johnnie Lee Collins, III, 22, transitioned from life to eter-nal rest, September 28, 2012. Johnnie was born July 12, 1990 to John-nie Collins, II and Lisa Ann Hicks. He was educated in the Columbia County School System. He is preceded in death by his grandparents, James Hicks and Louisiana Williams. Cherishing memories: Parents, Johnnie L. Collins, II and Lisa Hicks; sisters, Tomeka and Tanna Hicks; grandparents, Johnnie L. Collins, Sr. and Mil-dred Collins; nephew, Mason Hadley; special friend, Janielle Gunsby; hosts of aunts, uncles, other relatives and friends. Funeral services for Johnnie Lee Collis, III will be held at 2:00 p.m. Saturday, October 6, 2012 at True Church of God and Unity. 1037 NE Annie Mattox Street, Lake City, FL.The family will receive friends from 6:00 – 8:00 p.m. at Grace Holiness Church. 1751 NE Coldwater Ave. Lake City, FL. Arrangements entrusted to COMBS FUNERAL HOME 292 NE Washington Street. Lake City, FL (386) 752-4366. “The Caring Professionals” Marilyn Rossin Gilmore Mrs. Marilyn Rossin Gilmore passed away September 26, 2012 in Lake City, Florida. Marilyn, 47, was born January 6, 1965 in Lake City, Florida to Allen Jr. and Margaret Murphy Ros-sin. Both pre-ceded her in death. Marilyn was educated in the school system of Colum-bia County, graduating with the Columbia High School class of 1983. She furthered her edu-cation at Pensacola State Col-lege, Pensacola, FL., obtaining an Associate Degree. She en-joyed traveling and spending time with her family. She was employed with the Florida De-partment of Corrections, retir-ing from Lawtey Correctional Institution, Lawtey, Florida af-ter twenty-six years of service. Cherishing memories: Husband, Eric Gilmore; children, Walter Johnson (Christine), Hercules and A’Miracle Gilmore; grand-children, Eamarion, Jamarion, Malachi and Brandy; siblings, Clarence Rossin, Jannette Ros-sin, George Rossin, Izell Ros-sin (Corenthain), Jeraline Ros-sin, Elouise Rossin, Ronald Rossin; mother-in-law, Laura Smith; hosts of nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends. Funeral services for Mari-lyn R. Gilmore will be 11:00 a.m. Saturday, October 6, 2012 at The Columbia County School Board. 327 West Du-val Street, Lake City, FL. The family will receive friends from 5:00 – 7:00 p.m. Friday, October 5, 2012 at New Day Springs MB Church. 709 NW Long Street. Lake City, FL. Arrangements entrusted to COMBS FUNERAL HOME 292 NE Washington Street. Lake City, FL. (386) 752-4366. “The Caring Professionals”Lorenzo Jones Mr. Lorenzo Jones passed away peacefully in the Serenity Place at the VA Medical Center, Lake City, Florida on September 25, 2012 after an extended ill-ness. Mr. Jones, 64, was born September 7, 1948 in Well-born, FL. to Robert Jones, Sr. and Mary Crusaw-Jones. Both pre-ceded him in death. Loren-zo served in the US Army dur-ing the Vietnam Era. Settling in the O’Brien community, he became a suc-cessful farmer, skilled mechan-ic and welder. He graciously helped several area farmers in their operations. Other prec-edents in death: brothers, Rob-ert Jones, Jr. and Henry Jones; sister, Rosalee Jones-George. Left to cherish memories: Lov-ing and supportive wife of twenty-four years, Faye Jones; son, Lorenzo Jones, Jr.(Lesley); daughters, Tina Jones, Tomeka Jones, Terria Jones, Dominique Jones; (10) grandchildren; sisters, Gussie Thomas (Bil-lie), Rolene Williams, Dorothy Wilson(Freddie), Ernest Gad-dis (Terry ); brothers-in-law, Charles Powell, Andrew Powell, Jr.(Marie), Van Powell (Rema); sisters-in-law, Betty Harps, Bob-by Perry (Albert), Shirley Brew-HU-HDQ3RZHOO3DXOLQH*ULIQAngelina Grisson(Michael), Annette Powell; hosts of niec-es and nephews other rela-tives and friends, including special friend Mary Daniels. Funeral services for Lorenzo Jones will be 2:00 p.m. Oc-tober 6, 2012 at Free Will Church of God In Christ. 630 NE Center Ave. Lake City, FL. The family will receive friends from 6:00 – 8:00 p.m. Friday, Oc-tober 5, 2012 at the funeral home. Arrangements entrusted COMBS FUNERAL HOME 292 NE Washington Street. Lake City, Florida. (386) 752-4366. “The Caring Professionals” Obituaries are paid advertise-ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporter’s classified department at 752-1293. OBITUARIES Oct. 4Grief supportCoping with the Loss of your Spouse will be offered to the public on Thursday, Oct. 4 at 11 a.m. at the Wings Education Center, 857 SW Main Blvd (Lake City Plaza). The workshop, facilitated by Jerry Tyre, will offer an overview of Grief and suggest ways of coping with a recent loss of a spouse. There is no cost. For information or to register, contact Vicki Myers at 755-7714 Ext. 2411 or 866-642-0962. The Wings Education Center is a program of Hospice of Citrus County, Inc.Oct. 5Dracula in theaterHigh Springs Community Theater will present a new comedy thriller by Leroy Clark, adapted from Bram Stoker’s book Dracula. Opening Oct. 5 and running weekends for all of October, “Dracula” ends October 28. In this adap-tation, Dr. Van Helsing is a medical specialist with Tourette’s Syndrome, Renfield is a woman, Dr. Seward’s Aunt Quincy is tipsy at times, and there’s even a French maid. This actress is from Lake City. Continuing our new tradi-tion of an opening night free reception, the Friday Oct. 5 performance will have doors opening at 7:15 p.m. so patrons can enjoy the reception before the 8 p.m. showtime. Adult tick-ets are $11, children 12 and under, $8, and seniors on Sunday matinees are the special rate of $9. Tickets may be purchased at The Framery in downtown Lake City, 341 S. Marion Avenue, 386-754-2780. Online tick-ets are available at high-springscommunitytheater.com. Shows are Fridays and Saturdays, 8 p.m, and Sundays, 2 p.m. Oct. 6 Grief support campThe Hospice of the Nature Coast Wings Grief Support Team will present Camp Good Hope and Teen Encounter on Saturday, Oct. 6. Registration begins at 8:45 a.m. with camp end-ing at 4 p.m. at Alligator Lake Park, on Southeast Country Club Road in Lake City. The grief support camps give kids and family members an opportunity to gather together in an honest, safe environment with others who have expe-rienced the loss of a loved one. It is a day of hope and healing with all the fun of a Fall camp. There will be age-appropriate group ses-sions led by hospice grief specialists. Camp Good Hope and Teen Encounter is open to children ages 6 to 18 years old. The Wings Grief Support Team pro-vides grief support servic-es at no charge to those who have experienced the death of a loved one. For more information call Vicki Myers at 386-755-7714 (ext. 2411) or 866-642-0962.Singles reunionLake City Christian Singles will have a reunion Saturday, Oct. 6 at 2 p.m at Bethel United Methodist Church, 4869 US Highway 441, in the fellowship hall. Everyone is invited, with a special invitation to those who found their soul-mates through Lake City Christian Singles. Come share your stories, giving hope to oth-ers. Bring finger sandwich-es and deserts. For infor-mation call Wanda Opry at 386-963-3853. Register to voteLake City Get Out and Vote will help residents register to vote with fun, free food and souvenirs at the Fort White Community Center Oct. 6 from 9 a.m. to noon. To volunteer or for information call 755-3110. Oct. 7 Noegel reunionThe Noegel Family Reunion will be Sunday, Oct. 7 at 1 p.m. on at Ed Bedenbaugh’s place, off C-135 (Noegel Road). Please bring a covered dish and come fellowship with friends and family. For more inforamtion call Jo Ann at 752-9334 or Patti at 752-0446. Little-Hill ReunionThe annual Little-Hill Family Reunion will be held on Oct. 7 at Mason City Community Center. Come early to visit and bring a covered dish for lunch at approximately 1p.m. Paper products and drinks will be provided. Oct. 9Medicare seminarThe Lifestyle Enrichment Center of Lake City is spon-soring a free Medicare Edicational Seminar Tuesday, Oct. 9 from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. The semi-nar will be moderated by Irv Crowetz of C/C & Associates. Subjects cov-ered will be: what you need to know about Medicare, when to enroll, what’s cov-ered and is a supplement needed. This seminar is for educational purposes only, it is not a sales seminar. Please RSVP to 755-3476, ext. 107. Historical meetingThe Columbia County Historical Society will meet at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 9 in the downtown pub-lic library in Lake City. Guest speaker will be LaViece Smallwood Moser, Director of the Heritage Park Village in Macclenny. The meeting is free and open to the public. Contact Sean McMahon at 754-4293 for more information.Photo clubLake City Photo Club meets every 2nd Tuesday of each month from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Lifestyle Enrichment Center at Baya Ave. Share your photos and ideas with the group. Newcomers are welcome!Oct. 10United Way luncheonJoin the United Way of Suwannee Valley for our October community fund-raising campaign report luncheon at the Camp Weed and Cerveny Center, in the Varn Dining Hall, at noon on Oct. 17. The cost of the luncheon is $12 per person and everyone is invited. Reservations for the luncheon are needed may be made by contacting the United Way office at 386-752-5604 x 102 by Oct. 10. During each month of United Way’s annual com-munity fundraising cam-paign, the local United Way conducts a campaign report luncheon to provide an opportunity for campaign team volunteers, commu-nity citizens, business rep-resentatives and agency personnel to learn more about the partner agency services, United Way com-munity impact initiatives and businesses support-ing our community’s well being through their sup-port of the United Way.Hiring Our Heroes Florida Crown Workforce Board has announced the 2012 Hiring Our Heros vet-erans’ job fair event 9 a.m. to noon on Wednesday, Oct. 10 at the American Legion Post 57, 2602 SW Main Blvd in Lake City. This will be a free, one-of-a-kind, hir-ing fair for both employ-ers and veteran jobseek-ers. Veterans, active duty military members, Guard and Reserve members and qualifying military spouses are encouraged to attend. Veterans are asked to bring a copy of their DD-214 and copies of their current resume. These individuals can register online at HOH.Greatjob.net to guarantee admission and walk-ins are welcome. Newcomers luncheonThe regular Luncheon of the Lake City Newcomers and Friends will be held at 11 a.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 10 at Eastside Village Clubhouse. Our Program is the Installation of Officers and some games. Lunch is $11. Any questions call Barbara Cutcher 752-9783 or Joan Wilson 755-9897.Early learning meetingThe Early Learning Coalition of Florida’s Gateway, Inc., Board Meeting will be held on Wednesday, Oct. 10 at 9 a.m. at the Coalition Office, 1104 SW Main Blvd. The Coalition administers the state and federal funding for all School Readiness and Voluntary Prekindergarten. We encourage community participation and welcome any input. Oct. 11Woodturners ClubBell Woodturners Club meets the second Thursday of the month in the Bell community Center at 7 p.m. Every meeting features a show and tell of members current projects. There is also a full demon-stration of a woodturning project by a club member. There are opportunities to take home project wood, tools and receive help from other turners. All experi-ence levels are welcome. For additional info contact Kent Harriss at 365-7086.Oct. 12Class of ‘62The CHS class of 1962 will be celebrating their 50th class reunion Oct. 12-13. Contact Linda Hurst Greene at (386) 752-0561 for more information.5A COUPON REQUIRED ...Do you have the over-priced, slow-speedInternet Blues?GetFAST High-Speed Internet Today!Now Available Everywhere! Call your N. Central & N. Florida Authorized Dealer Today at386-269-0984 1-800-787-8041 $39.95to$59.99/Mo. “Because CABLE is so last century!”21st Century Communications, LLCDigital TV Service & UNLIMITED phone service, too!Ask About statefarm.comWith competitive rates and personal service, it’s n o wonder more drivers trust State Farm. Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there.CALL FOR A QUOTE 24/7. Ride with the #1 car insurer in 1001143.1State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company State Farm Indemnity Company Bloomington, IL John Kasak, Agent 904 SW SR 247 Branford Hwy Lake City, FL 32025 Bus: 386-752-7521 johnkasak.com John Burns III, Agent 234 SW Main Boulevard Lake City, FL 32056 Bus: 386-752-5866 johnburnsinsurance.com FLORIDA. Charter Loans Services Pay outstanding bills, credit cards. Lowest compared rates. Personal loans. Business, debt loans. Auto Home Improvement Loans Bad Credit options. No apps. fees Call today: 1.877.359.533 Charteracc@usa.com Community service projects for UW COURTESYTarget Distribution Center employees conducted community service projects in conjunction with the company’s annual United Way employee givi ng campaign. The local Target Distribution Center employees constructed a blackboard a nd an entertaining chute system composed of gutters and downspouts. Both items, which were ideas published in a Lowe’s idea magazine, are in use at the LifeStyle Enrichment Cen ter. COMMUNITY CALENDAR Q To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Laura Hampson at 754-0427 or by e-mail at lhampson@ lakecityreporter.com.

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6A LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2012 Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 Suwannee Lumber Company sells Suwannee River brand mulch, pot ting soil, sand, top soil, baled pine straw and other mulch by-products. The company was founded in 1954 and has been owned by the same families for more than 50 years. Wednesday afternoon Suwannee Lumber Company representatives, F. Brian Faircloth and Phil Amrell, addressed the county Economic Development Board during its regu lar scheduled meeting, seeking an incentive package where the busi ness could be expanded. During a 30-40 minute presenta tion, company representatives made a proposal to the board requesting an incentive package that would provide for updated drainage and other infrastructure needs on the property. More than two months ago the Corbitt facility was sold off at an asset sale leaving behind a large, empty production facility. Suwannee Lumber Company purchased and re-opened the site. The company plans to make the facility a premi um firewood manufacturing plant, eventually adding mulch processing and bagging. The capital investment listed for the project was at least $1.5 million. According to the documentation presented to the board, Suwannee Lumber Company has created 23 job positions, (11 full time and 12 full time seasonal), at the Lake City locale. The company is seeking the incentive package because they would like to create up to 100 jobs within the next 12 months. Suwannee Lumber Company ser vices several Home Depots in the region all the way to the Panhandle with mulch, as well as Ace Hardware stores in Jacksonville and sometimes packages mulch for other compa nies. Company representatives said the Cross Creek facility makes 1012 million bags of mulch annually and they anticipate 2-5 million bags coming from the Lake City facility within its first year. The mulch goes directly to the stores. The company is also in the pro cess of installing four portable kilns that will be used to dry the fire wood and is considering installing four additional one million BTU per hour kilns that would use natural gas. The firewood will go through a distribution center as its route to consumers. Following discussion the Columbia County Economic Development Board unanimously authorized Jesse Quillen, Columbia County Economic Development director, to develop an incentive package for Suwannee Lumber Company to be considered by the board. multiple gun shots in the area of South Main Street and a person pos sibly lying in the street. One caller said the person in the roadway might have shot himself. When officer Tony Lipski arrived witnesses told him a black Nissan was seen leaving from the area where the victim was found and the car was headed southbound. Authorities found the victim was a man who had a gunshot wound to the head and there were multiple bullet casings around him on the ground. A Glock handgun was also found next to the man. Officers William Gough and Bryan Dulez gave first aid to the victim until an EMS unit arrived. The victim was alive and taken to Shands. Officers searched and found the vehicle that was seen leaving the scene. An inspection of the vehicle revealed there were at least three bullet holes in the cars hood and the passengers side fender. An Alachua County Sheriffs Office K-9 unit responded to the scene conducted a track from the vehicle that led back to the original crime scene. The Gainesville Police Departments Criminal Investigation Division and Forensic Crime Laboratory were notified and responded. Authorities interviewed witnesses and collected physical evi dence that suggested the victim hay have shot himself after shooting at the vehicle. The victim died a short while later and witnesses all said that the person (victim) walked out into the street, pulled a handgun and began firing at the black Nissan, which authorities labeled as a ran dom vehicle. After shooting multiple times at that victim, he turned the gun on himself, Tobias said. Witnesses told police they saw Osborn sitting in a gold Honda just south of University Avenue on South Main and the black Nissan Altima was stopped at the traffic light, headed south. When the traf fic light changed, Osborn report edly pulled a pistol and shot at the passing vehicle, then he turned the gun on himself. Gainesville police department reports said examination of Osborn on the scene showed clearly that the wound was self-inflicted. There is no possibility of the round coming from the Altima, the report said. Multiple witnesses confirmed that Osborn was the only shooter, and shot four-five times at the passing car before placing the gun to the right side of his head. Witnesses heard a final shot, then saw Osborn fall out of the vehicle. Authorities said no one in the Nissan, believed to be a random tar get, was injured in the shooting. President, youre entitled to your own airplane and your own house, but not your own facts. Romney said he had plans to fix the economy, repeal Obamas health care plan, remake Medicare, pass a substitute for the legislation designed to pre vent another financial crash and reduce deficits but he provided no specifics despite Obamas prodding. Said Obama: At some point the American people have to ask themselves: Is the reason Governor Romney is keeping all these plans secret, is it because theyre going to be too good? Because middle class families benefit too much? No. At times the debate turned into rapid-fire charg es and retorts that drew on dense facts and figures that were difficult to follow. The men argued over oil industry subsidies, federal spending as a percentage of the GDP, Medicare cuts, taxes and small businesses and the size of the federal deficit and how it grew. Obama sometimes seemed somewhat profes sorial. Romney was more assertive and didnt hesi tate to interrupt the presi dent or the moderator. Despite the wonky tone of the debate, Romney managed to make some points by personalizing his comments with recol lections of people he said he had met on the cam paign trail. In another folksy reference, Romney told Lehrer, a veteran of the Public Broadcasting Service, that he would stop the federal subsidy to PBS even though I love Big Bird. Generally polite but pointed, the two men agreed about little if any thing. Obama said his oppo nents plan to reduce all tax rates by 20 percent would cost $5 trillion and benefit the wealthy at the expense of middle income taxpay ers. Shot back Romney: Virtually everything he just said about my tax plan is inaccurate. The former Massachusetts governor and businessman added that Obamas proposal to allow the expiration of tax cuts on upper-level income would mean tax increases on small businesses that create jobs by the hundreds of thousands. The two campaign rivals clasped hands and smiled as they strode onto the debate stage at the University of Denver, then waved to the audience before taking their places behind identi cal lecterns. There was a quick moment of laughter, when Obama referred to first lady Michelle Obama as sweetie and noted it was their 20th anniversary. Romney added best wishes, and said to the first couple, Im sure this is the most romantic place you could imagine, here with me. Both candidates wives were in the audience. The two men debated before a television audi ence likely to be counted in the tens of millions. They will meet twice more this month, and their running mates once, but in past election years, viewership has sometimes fallen off after the first encounter. Without saying so, the two rivals quickly got to the crux of their race Romneys eagerness to turn the contest into a ref erendum on the past four years while the incumbent desires for voters to choose between his plan for the next four years and the one his rival backs. Romney ticked off the dreary economic facts of life a sharp spike in food stamps, economic growth lower this year than last and million people out of work or stropped look ing for work. But Obama criticized Romneys prescriptions and his refusal to raise taxes and said, if you take such an unbalanced approach then that means you are going to be gutting our investment in schools and education ... health care for seniors in nursing homes (and) for kids with disabili ties. Not surprisingly, the two men disagreed over Medicare, a flash point since Romney placed Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan on his ticket. The president repeatedly described Romneys plan as a voucher program that would raise out-of-pocket costs on seniors. He continued, directly addressing the voters at home: If youre 54 or 55 you might want to listen because this will affect you. Romney said he doesnt support any changes for current retirees or those close to retirement. If youre 60 or 60 and older you dont need to lis ten further, he said, but he contended that fundamen tal changes are needed to prevent the system from becoming insolvent as mil lions of baby boom gen eration Americans become eligible. Romney also made a detailed case for repeal ing Obamacare, the name attached to the health care plan that Obama pushed through Congress in 2010. It has killed jobs, he said, and argued that the best approach is to do what we did in my state. Though he didnt say so, when he was governor Massachusetts passed leg islation that required resi dents to purchase coverage the so-called individual mandate that conservatives and he oppose on a national level. Romney also said that Obamacare would cut $716 billion from Medicare over the next decade. The president said the changes were part of a plan to lengthen the programs life, and he added that AARP, the seniors lobby, supports it. Jim Lehrer of PBS drew moderators duties, with Obama getting the first question and Romney the last word. Five weeks before Election Day, early voting is under way in scattered states and beginning in more every day. Opinion polls show Obama with an advantage nationally and in most if not all of the battle ground states where the race is most likely to be decided. That put particular pres sure on Romney to come up with a showing strong enough to alter the course of the campaign. The sputtering economy served as the debate back drop, as it has for virtually everything else in the 2012 campaign for the White House. Obama took office in the shadow of an eco nomic crisis but promised a turnaround that hasnt materialized. Economic growth has been sluggish throughout his term, with unemployment above 8 percent since before he took office. The customary secu rity blended with a festi val-like atmosphere in the surrounding area on a warm and sunny day. The Lumineers performed for free, and Black Eyed Peas frontman will.i.am deliv ered a pep talk of sorts to Obamas supporters. School officials arranged to show the debate on monitors outside the hall for those without tickets. There was local politi cal theater, too, includ ing female Romney sup porters wearing short shorts and holding signs that said, What War On Women? a rebuttal to claims by Obama and the Democrats. Both campaigns engaged in a vigorous pre-debate competition to set expecta tions, each side suggest ing the other had built-in advantages. Romney took part in 19 debates during the cam paign for the Republican primary early in the year. The president has not been onstage with a politi cal opponent since his last face-to-face encounter with Arizona Sen. John McCain, his Republican rival in 2008. Obama and Romney pre pared for the evening with lengthy practice sessions. Romney selected Ohio Sen. Rob Portman as a stand-in for the president; Obama turned to Massachusetts Sen. John Kerry to play the Republican role. The two presidential rivals also are scheduled to debate on Oct. 16 in Hempstead, N.Y., and Oct. 22 in Boca Raton, Fla. Vice President Joe Biden and Republican Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin have one debate, Oct. 11 in Danville, Ky. Both men have already begun holding practice ses sions. Associated Press writer Kristen Wyatt contributed to this story. David Espo reported from Washington. 6A Duncan graduates Army boot camp From staff reports A Lake City man recently graduated Army boot camp and continues training toward his goal of being a drone pilot. Pvt. Larry Michael Duncan, 24, of Lake City, graduated from boot camp at the U.S. Army infantry training facility at Fort Benning, Ga., on July 19. Michael Duncan, as he is known by family and friends, is the son of Larry Michael Duncan Sr. and Juanna Duncan of Lake City. Upon his graduation from boot camp, Duncan was assigned to the drone flight school training pro gram at Fort Huachuca, Ariz., where he will be sta tioned until he completes his training in January. Duncan enlisted in the Army to be a drone pilot and has the long-term goal of becoming an Army heli copter pilot, according to his mother. Duncan attended Columbia High School and Florida Gateway College before enlisting in the Army. He continues to study at the college level in the Army and currently is pur suing an associates degree while serving his country. Michael Duncan DEBATE: Aggressive sparring on wide range of domestic, economic issues Continued From Page 1A LULU: Local man identified as gunman Continued From Page 1A LUMBER: Company hopes to add 100 jobs Continued From Page 1A NFBA: Will give update Continued From Page 1A assets such as communica tion towers, where broad band companies could use those assets in order to pro vide the service. More than two years ago the North Florida area, including Columbia County, was awarded more than $30 million in stimulus funding as part of a federal broadband grant. The North Florida Broadband Authority was to receive an estimated $30,142,000 in federal stim ulus money for the grant award to provide broad band Internet services to rural areas. Federal rules mandated that the project be complet ed within three years. The broadband project was initially designed to increase broadband access to 22 North Florida govern ments North Florida counties, and eight North Florida cities. Several counties and cit ies have pulled out of the broadband authority since its inception.

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Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430 LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2012 7A LAURAN NEERGAARD AP Medical Writer WASHINGTON A new rapid way to decode the DNA of sick newborns may help doctors diagnose genetic diseases faster in their tiniest patients in roughly two days instead of weeks. Gene-mapping currently takes so long, and is so expensive, that its not part of routine medical care. But researchers at Childrens Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, Mo., said a speedier method could shorten the anguished wait for a diag nosis for some newborns in intensive care. They combined a faster gene-analyzing machine with a computer program that uses a babys symp toms to zero in on the most likely culprit. Wednesday, they reported using the faster test to help diagnose a handful of babies, and plan to begin more routine gene mapping of sick new borns by years end. 7AHEALTH Benefits seen in hormone use early in menopause MARILYNN MARCHIONE AP Chief Medical Writer A new study may reas sure some women consid ering short-term use of hormones to relieve hot flashes and other meno pause symptoms. Starting low-dose treatment early in menopause made women feel better and did not seem to raise heart risks during the four-year study. However, the research didnt address the risk of breast cancer, perhaps the biggest fear women have about hormones since a landmark study a decade ago. The new one was too small and too short for that. Still, it is the first fresh research in many years on the sometimes confus ing effects of hormones on womens health. The advice remains the same: Use hormones only for severe symptoms not to prevent bone loss or agingrelated problems at the lowest dose for the short est time possible. The benefits outweigh the risks when hormone therapy is used for symptom management with relative ly short-term treatment, said Dr. JoAnn Manson, preventive medicine chief at Brigham and Womens Hospital in Boston. She was a study leader and will dis cuss results Wednesday at a conference of the North American Menopause Society in Orlando. For decades, doctors believed hormone pills helped prevent heart prob lems and were good for bones and minds. That changed in 2002, when a big federal study was stopped because women taking estrogen-progestin pills had higher rates of cardiovascular disease and cancer. Critics pounced on the studys limitations. Participants were well past menopause 63 on aver age and most were not seeking symptom relief. Many were overweight and smokers, and at higher risk of heart disease to start with. Only one type of pill in one dose was tested. Women who could take estrogen alone those who had had hysterecto mies did not have the risks that women on the combination hormone pills did. In fact, they had lower rates of breast cancer. These factors led many experts to think some hor mones might help certain women, and that the type and dose might matter. The new study tested that. It enrolled about 700 healthy women ages 42 to 58 within three years of menopause. They were given either low-dose estro gen pills (Premarin, made by Wyeth, now part of Pfizer Inc.), a low-dose estrogen skin patch (Climara, made by Bayer), or a placebo. Women on estrogen also received Prometrium, a progesterone that more closely mimics what the body makes. All women received a patch and two types of pills, but some of those were fake treatments and neither they nor their doc tors knew who had the real medicine versus placebos until the study ended. That is standard study design to test who is really helped by a medication. The main goal was seeing whether hormones made a difference in hardening of the arteries, a precursor to heart disease, as seen on imaging tests. Other health measures also were tracked. After four years, doctors found: No effect on blood pressure or artery harden ing. Both types of estrogen reduced hot flashes and improved bone density, mood and sexual health. Estrogen pills raised good cholesterol and low ered the bad form, but also caused triglycerides (another type of fat in the bloodstream) to rise. Estrogen patches did not affect cholesterol but improved blood-sugar levels and insulin sensitiv ity, possibly making them a better choice for over weight women at risk of diabetes. Patches and pills have different effects, said Dr. S. Mitchell Harman, an endocrinologist and direc tor of the Kronos Longevity Research Institute, a Phoenix-based group with no industry ties that paid for the study. Oral estrogen goes straight to the liver, resulting in higher con centrations than when its absorbed through the skin. That raises blood-clotting factors that might be espe cially harmful to smokers. But higher estrogen levels also cause the liver to make more HDL, or good cho lesterol. So estrogen can have good and bad effects depending on the form, he said. ASSOCIATED PRESS Bayers Climara low-dose estrogen skin patch is seen. A new study may reassure some women considering short-term use of hormones to relieve hot flashes and other menopause symptoms. WASHINGTON Teva Pharmaceuticals is pulling its generic version of a pop ular antidepressant off the market after a federal analy sis showed the pill does not work properly. The Food and Drug Administration called on Teva to withdraw Budeprion XL 300 after chemical testing showed the drug releases its key ingredi ent faster than the original drug Wellbutrin, made by GlaxoSmithKline. The action contradicts the FDAs previous update on the issue in 2008, when regulators said the drugs are essentially the same. That review came after hundreds of patients com plained that Tevas drug did not work or caused side effects like headaches, anx iety and insomnia. FDA: Teva pill reported as ineffective Report: Some dietary supplements illegally labeled GARANCE BURKE Associated Press SAN FRANCISCO Dozens of weight loss and immune system supple ments on the market are illegally labeled and lack the recommended type of scientific evidence to back up their purported health claims, government investi gators warn in a new review of the $20 billion supple ment industry. The report, released Wednesday by the Department of Health and Human Services inspec tor general, found that 20 percent of the 127 weight loss and immune-boost ing supplements investiga tors purchased online and in retail stores across the country carried labels that made illegal claims to cure or treat disease. In addition, many of those and other supplements lacked the scientific studies recommended to support their suggested uses. Some products went so far as to state that the supplements could cure or prevent diabetes or cancer, or that they could help treat people with HIV or AIDS, which is strictly prohibited under federal law. Consumers may not just be wasting their money on pills or tablets, but they could be endangering their health if they take a supple ment in place of a drug thinking it will have the same effect, the report con cluded. Consumers rely on a supplements claims to determine whether the product will provide a desired effect, such as weight loss or immune support, the report said. Supplements that make disease claims could mis lead consumers into using them as replacements for prescription drugs or other treatments for medical conditions, with potentially dangerous results. The market for dietary supplements which can include anything from vita min C tablets to capsules of echinacea is a huge one with hundreds of products. The inspector generals investigation focused on one segment that officials said is booming. Federal law doesnt require supplements to go through rigorous testing to prove they are safe or even that they work. The Food and Drug Administration can act only after consum ers get sick or a safety issue comes to light. The Office of Inspector General found that in numerous cases, when companies did submit evidence to back up their health claims, it fell far short of government rec ommendations. One company submitted a 30-year-old handwritten college term paper to sub stantiate its claim, while oth ers included news releases, advertisements and links to Wikipedia or an online dictionary, according to the report. Overall, the review raises questions about whether the system is allowing com panies to mislead consum ers, investigators said, and recommended that FDA ramp up its oversight. The report did not name indi vidual brands or products, and also did not estimate the total number of dietary supplements on the mar ket. In response, the food safety agency said in writ ten comments it would con sider asking Congress for more oversight powers to review supplement compa nies evidence proving their products purported health benefits. FDA agreed that the agency should expand surveillance of the market to detect spurious claims that supplements can cure or treat specific diseases. FDA recognizes the importance of the concerns raised about industry com pliance and will address the recommendations as its resources and priorities allow, FDA spokeswoman Tamara Ward said in a statement Wednesday. Investigators also found that 7 percent of the weight loss and immune support supplements they surveyed lacked the required dis claimer stating that FDA had not reviewed whether the statement on the label was truthful. Two-day test spots diseases in newborns Farm tied to salmonella outbreak RICK CALLAHAN Associated Press INDIANAPOLIS A federal inspector found two strains of salmonella and unclean conditions at an Indiana cantaloupe farms fruit-packing plant during visits following a deadly out break linked to its melons. The Food and Drug Administration posted a report on its website on the inspectors findings during mid-August visits to Chamberlain Farm Produce Inc., in Owensville. The FDA said the farm is the source of at least some of the salmonella outbreak that sickened 270 people in 26 states this summer. Officials said 101 people were hospitalized, and three deaths were reported in Kentucky. $2.5M set for HIV treatment program ATLANTA Georgia has received $2.5 million in federal funding to link HIVpositive Georgians with treatment. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention grant to the state Department of Public Health is mean to identify those who still do not have or are not seeking treatment. Health workers in Georgias HIV unit last month reduced the waiting list for medication under the AIDS Drug Assistance Program to zero. The state health depart ment earlier this year adopted a national model of treatment as prevention in the fight against AIDS.

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8A LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2012 Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430 NEW YORK Shares of Sarepta Therapeutics Inc. nearly tripled in value Wednesday after the company reported positive clinical data for its Duchenne mus cular dystrophy drug eteplirsen. Sarepta said eteplirsen slowed the prog ress of the disease and increased patients levels of the protein dystrophin in an exten sion of a midstage trial. Low levels of that protein are the cause of Duchenne muscu lar dystrophy. Eteplirsen is Sareptas most advanced drug candidate, and in morning trading the stock jumped $25.70 to $40.69. Shares of the Cambridge, Mass., com pany closed at $14.99 on Tuesday. On Wednesday the shares peaked at $43.10, their highest price since 2006. Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a con dition that occurs in about 1 of every 3,600 male infants. The National Institutes of Health say patients typically die before the age of 25, and Sarepta tested the drug on 12 patients between the ages of 7 and 13. Shares of Sarepta had already more than doubled in value since July, when the company reported earlier data from the study. Sarepta also announced that the U.S. Department of Defense canceled a con tract for the development of a treatment for Ebola virus. Work on the program was stopped in August because of budget constraints. Sarepta is still developing a potential treatment for Marburg virus for the Defense Department. The Marburg virus is indigenous to Africa and is spread through contact with infected animals or the bodily fluids of infected humans. Symptoms also include shock, delirium and multi-organ dysfunc tion. Sarepta said the virus is classified as a bioterrorism threat. 8AHealth SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE Dine & Recline Dine & Recline Dine & Recline Dine & Recline Dine & Recline Dine & Recline All Dining Room All Dining Room All Dining Room All Dining Room All Dining Room All Dining Room and Reclining and Reclining and Reclining and Reclining and Reclining and Reclining Sofas, Sofas, Sofas, Loveseats Loveseats Loveseats and Sectionals and Sectionals and Sectionals and Sectionals and Sectionals and Sectionals and Sectionals and Sectionals and Sectionals and Sectionals and Sectionals and Sectionals and Sectionals and Sectionals and Sectionals and Sectionals and Sectionals and Sectionals Dine & Recline Dine & Recline Dine & Recline Dine & Recline Dine & Recline Dine & Recline Get ready for the holidays! Sarepta shares soar on muscular dystrophy study Lawyer: Bad medicine led family to strip naked MEDIA, Pa. The attorney for a woman who stripped naked with three of her children outside a suburban Philadelphia high school said an adverse medical reaction triggered the psychotic episode. Sara Butlers lawyer said contradictory medications for lupus led the 44-year-old mother to think the world was ending. Butler drove to Upper Darby High School in March with two adult children and a teenage son. She wanted to pick up another child, but the student wasnt released because Butler was not the custodial parent. Police said family mem bers then shed their clothes in the parking lot and chant ed religious phrases. Butler and her adult daughters pleaded guilty Monday to indecent expo sure and related charges. All were placed on proba tion. Baby bust: Births down for 4th year MIKE STOBBE AP Medical Writer NEW YORK U.S. births fell for the fourth year in a row, the govern ment reported Wednesday, with experts calling it more proof that the weak econo my has continued to damp en enthusiasm for having children. But there may be a silver lining: The decline in 2011 was just 1 percent not as sharp a fall-off as the 2 to 3 percent drop seen in other recent years. It may be that the effect of the recession is slowly coming to an end, said Carl Haub, a senior demog rapher with the Population Reference Bureau, a Washington, D.C.-based research organization. Most striking in the new report were steep declines in Hispanic birth rates and a new low in teen births. Hispanics have been dis proportionately affected by the flagging economy, experts said, and teen birth rates have been falling for 20 years. Falling births is a rela tively new phenomenon in this country. Births had been on the rise since the late 1990s and hit an alltime high of more than 4.3 million in 2007. But fewer than 4 million births were counted last year the lowest number since 1998. Among the people who study this sort of thing, the flagging economy has been seen as the primary explanation. The theory is that many women or cou ples who are out of work, underemployed or have other money problems feel they cant afford to start a family or add to it. ASSOCIATED PRESS LeeAnn Taylor-Dragon holds her newborn baby, Katelyn, at Christus Spohn Hospital South in Corpus Christi, Texas. U.S. births fell for the fourth year in a row, the government reported Wednesday.

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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Thursday, October 4, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas? Contact Tim Kirby Sports Editor 754-0421 tkirby@lakecityreporter.com District decider JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Columbia Highs Ronald Timmons breaks a tackle against Buchholz High earlier this year. Tigers host Panthers Friday By BRANDON FINLEY bfinley@lakecityreporter.com Its been a long month for Columbia High as the Tigers have played their last four games on the road. What better time to return home than in a rematch against Ridgeview High in a game that could decide the District 3-6A champion. Thats exactly what will happen at 7:30 p.m. on Friday. Im extremely happy to be off the road and back in front of the home crowd, Columbia head coach Brian Allen said. Were enthusiastic to play in front of our family and friends. Allen said playing at home doesnt just come down to the fan support as the Tigers travel well. Its also about breaking away from the routine of what comes with being on the road. Itll be good to be in our locker room, Allen said. We wont have to go to an end zone or walk a mile to the visiting locker room at the half. CHS returns home for first time in 5 weeks. CHS continued on 2B JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Fort Whites Kimberly Baily competes in a bowling match earlier this season. BRIEFS Today Columbia High girls golf vs. Buchholz High at Quail Heights Country Club, 3:30 p.m. Columbia High boys golf vs. Gainesville High at Ironwood Golf Club, 4 p.m. Columbia High swimming at Fleming Island High, 4:30 p.m. Fort White High volleyball at Williston High, 6 p.m. (JV-5) Fort White JV football vs. Williston High, 7 p.m. Friday Columbia High volleyball vs. St. Augustine High, 6:30 p.m. (JV-5:30) Columbia High football vs. Ridgeview High, 7:30 p.m. Saturday Columbia High cross country in FSU Invitational at Apalachee Park in Tallahassee GAMES Running Chomp Cancer Foundation 5K Chomp Cancer Foundation has its second Chomp Cancer 5K Run/Walk planned for 8 a.m. Dec. 15 in Fort White. UF Shands Cancer Center is the beneficiary. There will be music, post-race snacks, an award ceremony and a silent auction/raffle. Sponsorships at several levels are available. The race will be chip timed by Half Mile Timing. For details, call Lauren Valentine at (321) 501-9526. OUTDOORS Hunter safety courses offered Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is offering hunter safety Internetcompletion courses for Columbia County from 6-9 p.m. Oct. 12 and 8 a.m. to noon Oct. 13. A second class will be Oct. 25 and Oct. 27. Students who have taken the online course and wish to complete the classroom portion must bring the online-completion report. Firearms, ammunition and materials are provided. An adult must accompany children younger than 16. Class locations will be given to those who register in advance. Call the regional office at 7580525 or go to www.myfwc. com/HunterSafety CHS FOOTBALL Q-back Club meeting Monday The Columbia County Quarterback Club meets at 7 p.m. Monday in the Jones Fieldhouse. For details, call club president Joe Martino at 984-0452. From staff reports Lady Indians win first point in Baker match By BRANDON FINLEY bfinley@lakecityreporter.com In only her second match as head coach, Fort White Highs Cassie Sparks guided the Lady Indians to their first ever point against Columbia High. Despite the Lady Tigers 2-1 victory over Fort White and Suwannee high schools, the story of the day was the Lady Indians breakthrough. Columbia took home the first two rounds with scores of 661 and 711. Suwannee was right behind with a 649 and 633. Fort White finished third with a 545 and 558. But in the Baker match, which comprises five girls from each school each bowl ing two frames, Fort White had its breakthrough. The Lady Indians won with a score of 140. Columbia finished with a 107 and Suwannee bowled a 90. Its my first year coach ing and we beat CHS, which is a county rival, so thats pretty cool, Sparks said. Were pretty pumped. The girls are pretty excited. Columbias Tori Wise bowled a match high 172 in the contest. Courtney Schmitt bowled the second highest round of the day for the Lady Tigers with a 156. Linden Barney bowled a 149, Shea Spears finished with a 140 and Christine Peters had a 133. The conditions were a little different from the lanes that were used to in Lake City, Columbia head coach Brian Saunders said. We improved in the sec ond game, but the Baker game, thats just one of those things that can hap pen. It didnt come together for us. Saunders was compli mentary of Fort Whites performance, however, not ing that it must have had something to do with the coaching. Ive been coaching for eight years and thats the first time theyve got a point on us, Saunders said. Sparks didnt take too much credit for the victory, instead noting the improved play of her team this week. Our top five has been consistent and we hope they keep improving, Sparks said. Maddie Greek led the Lady Indians with a 120 aver age and Jessica Woodland finished with a 117. Taylor Terry and Jessica Pollard both broke 100 on average with a 109 and 105 respectively. Carly Morrison finished with a respectable 96. Both teams return to Lake City next week as Fort White and Columbia square off at 4 p.m. at Lake City Bowl. CHS defeats Fort White, Suwannee in Live Oak. *Free Admission Ticket To S&S Day At The Fair November 8 th With Quantity Purchase of Items. LASSO THE FUN at & PRICES IN EFFECT OCT. 1 st NOV. 8 th *GUSTAFSONS FARM (1/2 Gallon) 2 / $ 4 99 or $2.50 EA. CHOCOLATE MILK *BLUE BELL ICE CREAM 4 / $ 5 49 or $1.39 ea. (Pint) *MONSTER ENERGY DRINK (24oz. Can) 2/ $ 5 Sunshine True Value Hardware OPEN OPEN

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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today AUTO RACING 1 a.m. SPEED — Formula One, practice for Grand Prix of Japan, at Suzuka, Japan COLLEGE FOOTBALL 9 p.m. ESPN — Southern Cal at Utah GOLF 8:30 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Alfred Dunhill Links Championship, first round, at Kingsbarns, Angus, and St. Andrews, Scotland 4 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Shriners Hospitals for Children Open, first round, at Las Vegas 7:30 p.m. TGC — Web.com Tour, Neediest Kids Championship, first round, at Potomac, Md. (same-day tape) NFL FOOTBALL 8 p.m. NFL — Arizona at St. Louis PREP FOOTBALL 7 p.m. FSN — McKinley (Ohio) at Canton Glen Oak (Ohio) WNBA BASKETBALL 8 p.m. ESPN2 — Playoffs, Western Conference finals, game 1, Los Angeles at MinnesotaBASEBALLAL standings East Division W L Pct GB x-New York 94 67 .584 — y-Baltimore 93 69 .574 1 12 Tampa Bay 90 72 .556 4 12 Toronto 73 89 .451 21 12 Boston 69 92 .429 25 Central Division W L Pct GB x-Detroit 87 74 .540 — Chicago 85 77 .525 2 12 Kansas City 72 89 .447 15 Cleveland 68 94 .420 19 12 Minnesota 66 96 .407 21 12 West Division W L Pct GB x-Oakland 94 68 .580 — y-Texas 93 69 .574 1 Los Angeles 89 73 .549 5 Seattle 75 87 .463 19 Today’s Games Oakland 12, Texas 5Seattle 12, L.A. Angels 0Chicago White Sox 9, Cleveland 0N.Y. Yankees 14, Boston 2Toronto 2, Minnesota 1Tampa Bay 4, Baltimore 1Detroit at Kansas City (n) End of Regular Season NL standings East Division W L Pct GB x-Washington 96 64 .600 —y-Atlanta 93 67 .581 3 Philadelphia 81 79 .506 15 New York 73 87 .456 23 Miami 68 92 .425 28 Central Division W L Pct GB x-Cincinnati 96 64 .600 — St. Louis 87 73 .544 9 Milwaukee 82 78 .513 14Pittsburgh 78 82 .488 18 Chicago 60 100 .375 36Houston 54 106 .338 42 West Division W L Pct GB x-San Francisco 93 67 .581 — Los Angeles 85 75 .531 8 Arizona 80 80 .500 13 San Diego 75 85 .469 18 Colorado 63 97 .394 30 x-clinched divisiony-clinched wild card Wednesday’s Games Atlanta 4, Pittsburgh 0Washington 5, Philadelphia 1Chicago Cubs 5, Houston 4N.Y. Mets 4, Miami 2Colorado 2, Arizona 1L.A. Dodgers 5, San Francisco 1San Diego at Milwaukee (n)Cincinnati at St. Louis (n) End of Regular SeasonFOOTBALLAP Top 25 games Thursday No. 13 Southern Cal at Utah, 9 p.m. Saturday No. 2 Oregon vs. No. 23 Washington, 10:30 p.m. No. 3 Florida State at N.C. State, 8 p.m. No. 4 LSU at No. 10 Florida, 3:30 p.m. No. 5 Georgia at No. 6 South Carolina, 7 p.m. No. 7 Kansas State vs. Kansas, NoonNo. 8 West Virginia at No. 11 Texas, 7 p.m. No. 9 Notre Dame vs. Miami at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. No. 12 Ohio State vs. No. 21 Nebraska, 8 p.m. No. 14 Oregon State vs. Washington State, 6 p.m. No. 15 Clemson vs. Georgia Tech, 3:30 p.m. No. 15 TCU vs. Iowa State, 3:30 p.m.No. 17 Oklahoma at Texas Tech, 3:30 p.m. No. 18 Stanford vs. Arizona, 3 p.m.No. 20 Mississippi State at Kentucky, 12:21 p.m. No. 22 Rutgers vs. UConn, NoonNo. 24 Northwestern at Penn State, Noon No. 25 UCLA at California, 10 p.m. NFL standings AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAN.Y. Jets 2 2 0 .500 81 109New England 2 2 0 .500 134 92Buffalo 2 2 0 .500 115 131Miami 1 3 0 .250 86 90 South W L T Pct PF PAHouston 4 0 0 1.000 126 56Indianapolis 1 2 0 .333 61 83Jacksonville 1 3 0 .250 62 97Tennessee 1 3 0 .250 81 151 North W L T Pct PF PABaltimore 3 1 0 .750 121 83Cincinnati 3 1 0 .750 112 112Pittsburgh 1 2 0 .333 77 75Cleveland 0 4 0 .000 73 98 West W L T Pct PF PASan Diego 3 1 0 .750 100 71Denver 2 2 0 .500 114 83Kansas City 1 3 0 .250 88 136Oakland 1 3 0 .250 67 125 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PAPhiladelphia 3 1 0 .750 66 83Dallas 2 2 0 .500 65 88Washington 2 2 0 .500 123 123N.Y. Giants 2 2 0 .500 111 84 South W L T Pct PF PAAtlanta 4 0 0 1.000 124 76Tampa Bay 1 3 0 .250 82 91Carolina 1 3 0 .250 80 109New Orleans 0 4 0 .000 110 130 North W L T Pct PF PAMinnesota 3 1 0 .750 90 72Chicago 3 1 0 .750 108 68Green Bay 2 2 0 .500 85 81Detroit 1 3 0 .250 100 114 West W L T Pct PF PAArizona 4 0 0 1.000 91 61San Francisco 3 1 0 .750 104 65St. Louis 2 2 0 .500 79 91Seattle 2 2 0 .500 70 58 Today’s Game Arizona at St. Louis, 8:20 p.m. Sunday’s Games Baltimore at Kansas City, 1 p.m.Atlanta at Washington, 1 p.m.Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.Green Bay at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.Cleveland at N.Y. Giants, 1 p.m.Miami at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.Seattle at Carolina, 4:05 p.m.Chicago at Jacksonville, 4:05 p.m.Buffalo at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.Tennessee at Minnesota, 4:25 p.m.Denver at New England, 4:25 p.m.San Diego at New Orleans, 8:20 p.m. Monday’s Game Houston at N.Y. Jets, 8:30 p.m.Open: Dallas, Detroit, Oakland, Tampa Bay 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2012 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 CHS: District on line Friday night? Continued From Page 1B Associated PressGAINESVILLE — Florida linebacker Jelani Jenkins is expected to play Saturday against No. 4 LSU after missing the last two games. Jenkins broke his right thumb Sept. 8 at Texas A&M and missed games against Tennessee and Kentucky. Coach Will Muschamp says Jenkins has practiced in a non-contact jersey this week, but should be cleared for full contact later in the week. Muschamp says Jenkins will “be able to play in all situations. ... If he can play, he can play. And that means he can play on first-and-10, he can play on third down. As we move forward, that’s the way I would see it.” Jenkins, a fourth-year junior, was third on the team with 75 tackles last season.Florida LB Jenkins back vs. LSU But Columbia’s advantages aren’t the only impor-tant aspect of playing at home. Ridgeview will be at the same disadvantages that the Tigers have expe-rienced over the last four games. “They’ll have to come into a hostile environ-ment,” Allen said. “The game should be packed out if the weather holds up. That’s what our expecta-tions were heading into the Baker County game and at 4-1 we expect the fans to show up and support.” Adding to the hostile environment will be the fact that the district cham-pionship could be decided. “Our conversation on Monday to the team was that we think this game will decide the district and runner-up,” Allen said. “Oakleaf is playing well and might surprise somebody, but we think this game will decide it. It happened last year and we think it will happen again. We’ve had two tough contest to prepare and we’re heading into our third.” On the flip side, Ridgeview hasn’t been tested by the likes of Gainesville and Vanguard high schools. Because of that, the Tigers aren’t sure if the Panthers’ 5-0 record is deceiving. “We’re questioning if they’re really as good as they have looked or if the competition isn’t as good,” Allen said. “We’re going to find out Friday. They’re good up front, but they’ll play both ways, so we hope that works out to our advantage.” Georgia WR Bennett out for season with knee injuryAssociated PressATHENS, Ga. — Georgia is dealing with a big loss heading into its Southeastern Conference showdown against South Carolina. Michael Bennett, the fifth-ranked Bulldogs’ lead-ing receiver, tore up his right knee in practice and is out for the year, coach Mark Richt announced Wednesday. Bennett injured the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) toward the end of Tuesday’s practice. He will undergo reconstructive surgery, though no date has been set. The third-year sophomore leads Georgia (5-0, 3-0 SEC) with 24 catches for 345 yards and four touchdowns. Though he wasn’t heavily recruited out of high school, Bennett had developed into one of Aaron Murray’s favorite targets. Chris Conley and Rhett McGowan could also take more of a role in the offense. Georgia faces No. 6 South Carolina (5-0, 3-0) on Saturday in a game that will play a big role in the SEC East race.ASSOCIATED PRESSDetroit Tigers’ Miguel Cabrera waves to the crowd after b eing replaced during the fourth inning of a baseball game against the Kansas City Royal s at Kauffman Stadium in Kansas City, Mo., on Wednesday. Cabrera achieved baseball’s firs t Triple Crown since 1967 by leading the league with a .330 average, 44 home runs an d 139 RBIs in the regular season. Settling the playoff pictureBy BEN WALKERAssociated PressA dropped fly ball by Josh Hamilton, a home run by Ryan Zimmerman and pitch by pitch, the baseball playoff picture became a bit more clear on the final day of the regular season. The Oakland Athletics clinched the AL West, trumping Texas 12-5 by tak-ing advantage of Hamilton’s error. Trailing by 13 games a week before the All-Star break, the A’s overcame a four-run deficit Wednesday to relegate the Rangers to a wild-card spot. The Athletics’ next destination — for the moment, anyway — was uncertain. Not that they seemed to mind. The New York Yankees claimed the AL East crown a few hours later when they defeated Boston at home. The Yankees owned a one-game edge over the Baltimore Orioles coming into the day, but won the division by two games. The playoffs begin Friday when the defend-ing World Series champion St. Louis Cardinals visit Chipper Jones and the Atlanta Braves in the win-ner-take-all NL wild-card matchup.%$*$7( THURSDAY EVENING OCTOBER 4, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Last Resort “Blue on Blue” (N) Grey’s Anatomy “Remember the Time” (:02) Scandal “The Other Woman” (N) News at 11(:35) Nightline (N) 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) The Insider 5-PBS 5 -Journal Nightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) The This Old House Hour Lords of the Gourd: PursuitPOV A 19-year-old is sentenced to death. (N Subtitled) Tavis Smiley (N) 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge Judy Two and Half MenBig Bang TheoryTwo and Half Men(:01) Person of Interest “Bad Code” (N) (:01) Elementary (N) Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneTMZ (N) The Next “Finale” (Season Finale) The winner is announced. (N) (Live) Vote America 2012Access HollywoodThe Of ce The Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family Guy Family Guy The SimpsonsThe X Factor “Boot Camp No. 2” (N) Glee Unexpected visitors in New York. NewsAction News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) 30 Rock Up All Night (N) The Of ce (N) Parks/RecreatRock Center With Brian Williams (N) NewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(5:00) U.S. House of Representatives Capitol Hill Hearings WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine (N) 30 Rock 30 Rock TVLAND 17 106 304(5:12) Bonanza(:24) M*A*S*HHome Improve.Home Improve.The Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of QueensKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Hardcover Mysteries Dr. Kathy Reichs. Hardcover Mysteries “Harlan Coben” 48 Hours: Hard Evidence 48 Hours: Hard Evidence 48 Hours: Hard Evidence 48 Hours: Hard Evidence A&E 19 118 265The First 48 A drug deal turns deadly. The First 48 A gun ght at a gas station. The First 48 The First 48 (N) Beyond Scared Straight (N) (:01) Beyond Scared Straight HALL 20 185 312Little House on the Prairie Little House on the Prairie Little House on the Prairie Little House on the Prairie Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier FX 22 136 248How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherTwo and Half MenTwo and Half Men “Grown Ups” (2010, Comedy) Adam Sandler, Kevin James, Chris Rock. “Big Daddy” (1999, Comedy) Adam Sandler, Joey Lauren Adams. CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245The Mentalist “The Red Mile” The Mentalist The Mentalist “Ladies in Red” The Mentalist A girl is suspect. The Mentalist Patrick traps a killer. Leverage “The Blue Line Job” NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobiCarly Victorious Victorious Full House Full House The Nanny The Nanny Friends (:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241Jail Jail Jail Jail (N) iMPACT Wrestling (N) MMA Uncensored Live (N) (Live) 1,000 Ways to Die1,000 Ways to Die MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*H “Dreams” M*A*S*H White Collar “Pilot (Part 1)” White Collar “Pilot (Part 2)” Seinfeld Frasier The Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Phineas and FerbGood Luck CharlieMy BabysitterMy BabysitterMy BabysitterMy BabysitterMy BabysitterMy BabysitterA.N.T. Farm Phineas and FerbA.N.T. Farm My Babysitter LIFE 32 108 252Project Runway “It’s All About Me” Project Runway Project Runway “It’s Fashion Baby” Project Runway “In a Place Far, Far Away” (N) Prank My Mom (N) Prom QueensProm Queens USA 33 105 242NCIS “Missing” NCIS Navy SEAL’s death was murder. NCIS “Reveille” NCIS Memories overwhelm Gibbs. NCIS “Hiatus” (DVS) Burn Notice “Under the Gun” BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Top 10 Countdown” (N) The Game “Coming to America” (1988, Comedy) Eddie Murphy, Arsenio Hall, John Amos. Don’t Sleep!The Game ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) Audibles (N) (Live) College Football Live (N) (Live) e College Football USC at Utah. (N) ESPN2 36 144 209NFL32 (N) (Live) Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Numbers Never LieSportsNation (N)d WNBA Basketball Western Conference Final, Game 1: Teams TBA. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SUNSP 37 -how to Do oridaFitness Truth (N) The New College Football Show (N) SEC Gridiron LIVEC-USA ShowcaseSeminolePrep Zone SpoO’Neill Outside:58 Flat (N) DISCV 38 182 278Texas Car Wars Texas Car Wars “Flip or Flop” Texas Car Wars Texas Car Wars “Dukin’ Donuts” Texas Car Wars “A Presidential Flip” Texas Car Wars “Dukin’ Donuts” TBS 39 139 247King of QueensKing of QueensSeinfeld Seinfeld Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryConan (N) HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) Dr. Drew (N) Nancy GraceShowbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236(4:00) “Sex and the City” (2008) E! News (N) The SoupMarried to JonasKardashianKeeping Up With the KardashiansKardashianChelsea Lately (N) E! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. Food “DC” Man v. Food Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernAnthony Bourdain: No ReservationsMonumental Mysteries Biblical history. The Dead Files HGTV 47 112 229Selling New YorkSelling New YorkHunters Int’lHouse HuntersBuying and Selling “Paul and Terri” Extreme Homes (N) House Hunters (N) Hunters Int’lLiving Abroad (N) Hunters Int’l TLC 48 183 280Island MediumIsland MediumDown South Dance Say Yes: ATLSay Yes: ATLFour Weddings “... and a Racy Tattoo” Bling It On (N) Four Weddings “... and a Racy Tattoo” HIST 49 120 269Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Nor’Eastermen “Into the Storm” Nor’Eastermen “The Gamble” (N) (:02) Nor’Eastermen “Redemption” (N) ANPL 50 184 282Fatal Attractions “My Croc and Me” River Monsters “The Deadliest” Wild Russia Wild Russia Wild Russia Wild Russia FOOD 51 110 231Chopped “Go for It!” Chopped Piquillo peppers. Chopped “A Guts Reaction” Chopped “Class Acts, Too” Chopped “Wok This Way” The Great Food Truck Race TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the Lord Always Good NewThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesJoel Osteen Joseph PrinceHillsong TVPraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -Football PrevUFC InsiderGame TimeACC All-Accessf Women’s College Soccer Boston College at North Carolina. (N) The Dan Patrick Show UEFA Champions League Soccer SYFY 58 122 244Star Trek IV “Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country” (1991) William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy. “Star Trek: First Contact” (1996, Science Fiction) Patrick Stewart, Jonathan Frakes. Star Trek VI AMC 60 130 254CSI: Miami “By the Book” CSI: Miami “Sinner Takes All” “Fargo” (1996, Suspense) Frances McDormand, Steve Buscemi. “Fargo” (1996, Suspense) Frances McDormand, Steve Buscemi. COM 62 107 249South Park Tosh.0 The Colbert ReportDaily ShowChappelle’s ShowTosh.0 Gabriel Iglesias: I’m Not FatStand-Up Rev.Key & Peele Daily ShowThe Colbert Report CMT 63 166 327Reba Reba “Surprise” Reba Reba Reba Reba “RV” (2006) Robin Williams. A dysfunctional family goes on vacation. (:15) Redneck Rehab NGWILD 108 190 283Dog WhispererAmerica the WildWild Mississippi “Deep Freeze” Wild Mississippi “Raging Waters” Wild Mississippi “Delta Blues” Wild Mississippi “Deep Freeze” NGC 109 186 276Taboo “Extreme Bodies” Wild Justice “Later, Baiter” Witness: Disaster in JapanForecast: Disaster “Deadly Floods” Forecast: Disaster “Deadly Tornadoes” Forecast: Disaster “Deadly Floods” SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeThey Do It?They Do It?How It’s MadeHow It’s Made ID 111 192 285On the Case With Paula Zahn Fatal Encounters “Wicked” Fatal Encounters “The Road to Hell” Fatal Encounters “Living on the Edge” Very Bad MenVery Bad MenFatal Encounters “The Road to Hell” HBO 302 300 501 “Antitrust” (2001, Suspense) Ryan Phillippe. Premiere. ‘PG-13’ “Kung Fu Panda 2” (2011) Voices of Jack Black. ‘PG’ “A Thousand Words” (2012) Eddie Murphy. ‘PG-13’ Cathouse: ThreeReal Sex MAX 320 310 515Gulliver’s Travels “BASEketball” (1998, Comedy) Trey Parker. ‘R’ (:15) “An American Werewolf in Paris” (1997) Tom Everett Scott. ‘R’ “Resident Evil: Apocalypse” (2004) Milla Jovovich. ‘R’ Emmanuelle SHOW 340 318 545(:15) “The Other F Word” (2011, Documentary) ‘NR’ “A Better Life” (2011, Drama) Demin Bichir. ‘PG-13’ Latino FilmmakerSteve Trevino: Grandpa Joe’s Son (N) Gigolos (N) Polyamory: Married

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DEAR ABBY: I had been single a long time when I married a wonderful man, “Edgar,” who had custody of his two children. After we had dated awhile, he told me about his vasec-tomy. He said he and his wife had agreed not to have any more children. As our relationship pro-gressed, Edgar told me he would have the vasectomy reversed if I wanted to have children -which I said I definitely did. After two years of marriage, I finally brought up the subject. Edgar then informed me he didn’t want to reverse the operation. He said he couldn’t handle hav-ing another child. Abby, I am crushed. I thought Edgar loved me enough to give me children out of our union and love. I love his children and wouldn’t favor our children over his. I would never consider leaving Edgar over this, but I don’t know if I can ever forgive him for deceiving me and leading me on. My husband has denied me the children he knew I so desperately wanted. Abby, I urge couples who may find themselves in a similar situation to be honest with each other before they marry. -CHILDLESS AND HEARTBROKEN DEAR CHILDLESS AND HEARTBROKEN: Many churches -and some states -now encour-age couples who are con-sidering marriage to go through prenuptial coun-seling to ensure compat-ibility. I’m all for it. If both parties are honest with each other, it could pre-vent a world of heartache down the line. You have my condolences for the children you and Edgar will never have together. While you would never leave him, his dishon-esty is grounds for an annul-ment of the marriage. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: I am 13 and have a problem with my friend “Will.” He trans-ferred to my school last year, and I seem to be his only friend. It has become a problem because I have other friends I like to hang out with. Will is not a good “people” person. He’s hard to have around when I have parties, and he constantly interrupts me when I’m trying to talk to other kids. He just doesn’t know the right things to say. Also, he comes from a very wealthy family, and sometimes makes sick jokes about middle-class people. This has offended me and some of my friends. Will is obsessed with politics and likes to strike up debates with me over petty issues. It’s really annoying. My main problem is that at lunch he follows me around when I go to talk to my other friends. I wish he could find some other friends and not hang out with me all the time. I like him as a person, but what can I do to make him stop follow-ing me? -BUGGED IN CHATHAM, N.J. DEAR BUGGED: Level with him privately and tell him exactly what you have told me. You would be doing him a kindness. Explain to him that while you like him, you also need to spend time with your other friends -and to please make other seat-ing arrangements a couple of days a week. That way, you’re not cutting him off completely. DILBERT BABY BLUES HOROSCOPES DEAR ABBY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Reassess your work before moving forward. You must leave no room for error. Discuss your plans for the future with someone influential or knowledgeable regarding future trends. Personal change must be made for the right reason. Check your motives. ++++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): A partnership may make your job difficult if you cannot agree. Don’t argue when it may be time to go your separate ways -at least where money or business concerns come into play. Love is highlight-ed, but romantically, your vision may be clouded. +++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Don’t show your vulnerability. Uncertainty will be a mark against you when it comes to your position or personal status. Focus on knowledge and exploring new possibilities that will help you advance and improve your lifestyle. +++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Don’t overspend, overdo or overexaggerate to impress someone who interests you. You will be appreciated for your good qualities if you present exactly who you are, what you believe in and what your goals are for the future. +++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Choose your words care-fully. It’s better to be silent than to have regrets. You will fall behind if you are too busy debating sense-less topics. Let discipline lead to victory. Stay busy doing what’s important and you will discover a brighter future. ++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Tie up loose ends and address pending problems. Love is in the stars, but being honest about the way you feel and what you want will be necessary if you want to reach your personal goals. Home improvement will pay off. +++++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Make alterations at home that will allow you greater freedom to expand an interest. Investigate an idea you have, and elabo-rate on a plan that will help you achieve a goal. Take precautions if you are doing something that requires physical exertion. +++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23Nov. 21): Reassess your personal and professional positions, and decide what you can do to regain a loss you incurred or to add to a service you already offer. Be honest regarding the possibilities, or you may find it difficult to reach your goals. +++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Offer assis-tance and you will impress someone you want to work alongside. An interest in someone may run deeper than you are admitting. Consider the changes you must make at home or personally before you can follow your dreams. +++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Don’t push your will on others. You are likely to meet with aggres-sive reactions. Learn from past mistakes and bide your time until you are certain you are doing the right thing. Don’t let love cost you emotionally or financially. +++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Check out your options. A chance to secure your position or to make extra cash is appar-ent. Making changes at home that add to your comfort and happiness will also enhance a relationship that is important to you. +++++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Find an outlet or a place to show your attri-butes. Getting involved in social activities that put you in the limelight will help raise your profile, but might cause some prob-lems with someone feeling threatened. ++ CELEBRITY CIPHER Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com BLONDIE BEETLE BAILEY B.C. FRANK & ERNEST FOR BETTER OR WORSE ZITS HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH GARFIELD THE LAST WORD Eugenia Last Wife is crushed to learn man doesn’t want more children Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. CLASSIC PEANUTS Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2012 3B

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTHURSDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2012 Classified Department: 755-5440 4B CLASSIFIED AD vantageTake ADvantage of the Reporter Classifieds!755-5440Lake City Reporter FIND IT SELL IT BUY IT $17504 lines 3 days Includes 2 Signs Each additional line $1.65 Garage Sale Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$10104 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.10One item per ad Under $500 Personal Merchandise Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$16754 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.15One item per ad Under $1,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$23704 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.45One item per ad Under $2,500 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $4,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$27404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.55One item per ad Under $4,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$30404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.65One item per ad Under $6,000 Placing An Ad Service Guide Limited to service type advertis-ing only.4 lines, one month....$92.00 $10.80 each additional lineIncludes an additional $2.00 per ad for each Wednesday insertion. DeadlinesBe Sure to Call Early You can call us at 755-5440 Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.Some people prefer to place their classified ads in person, and some ad categories will require prepay-ment. Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street.You can also fax or email your ad copy to the Reporter.FAX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the Classified Department.EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreporter.comAd is to Appear:TuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday Call by:Mon., 10:00 a.m.Mon., 10:00 a.m.Wed., 10:00 a.m.Thurs., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fax/Email by:Mon., 9:00 a.m.Mon., 9:00 a.m.Wed., 9:00 a.m.Thurs., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.These deadlines are subject to change without notice. Cancellations, Changes & Billing Questions Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject, or classify all advertisements under appropriate headings. Copy should be checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day of pub-lication. Credit for published errors will be allowed for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement which was incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be published, nor for any general, special or consequential damages. Advertising language must comply with Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition of discrimi-nation in employment, housing and public accommodations. Standard abbreviations are acceptable; how-ever, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated. Ad Errors-Please read your ad on the first day of publication. Weaccept responsibility for only the first incorrect insertion, and only the charge for the ad space in error. Please call 755-5440 immediately for prompt correc-tion and billing adjustments.CancellationsNormal advertising deadlines apply for cancellation.Billing InquiriesCall 755-5440. Should further information be required regarding payments or credit limits, your call will be trans-ferred to the accounting depart-ment. General Information In Print and Onlinewww.lakecityreporter.com Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$2504 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $.25One item per ad Under $100 CLASSIFIED AD vantageTake ADvantage of the Reporter Classifieds!755-5440Lake City Reporter FIND IT SELL IT BUY IT $17504 lines 3 days Includes 2 Signs Each additional line $1.65 Garage Sale Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$10104 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.10One item per ad Under $500 Personal Merchandise Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$16754 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.15One item per ad Under $1,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$23704 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.45One item per ad Under $2,500 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $4,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$27404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.55One item per ad Under $4,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$30404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.65One item per ad Under $6,000 Placing An Ad Service Guide Limited to service type advertis-ing only.4 lines, one month....$92.00 $10.80 each additional lineIncludes an additional $2.00 per ad for each Wednesday insertion. DeadlinesBe Sure to Call Early You can call us at 755-5440 Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.Some people prefer to place their classified ads in person, and some ad categories will require prepay-ment. Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street.You can also fax or email your ad copy to the Reporter.FAX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the Classified Department.EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreporter.comAd is to Appear:TuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday Call by:Mon., 10:00 a.m.Mon., 10:00 a.m.Wed., 10:00 a.m.Thurs., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fax/Email by:Mon., 9:00 a.m.Mon., 9:00 a.m.Wed., 9:00 a.m.Thurs., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.These deadlines are subject to change without notice. Cancellations, Changes & Billing Questions Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject, or classify all advertisements under appropriate headings. Copy should be checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day of pub-lication. Credit for published errors will be allowed for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement which was incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be published, nor for any general, special or consequential damages. Advertising language must comply with Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition of discrimi-nation in employment, housing and public accommodations. Standard abbreviations are acceptable; how-ever, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated. Ad Errors-Please read your ad on the first day of publication. Weaccept responsibility for only the first incorrect insertion, and only the charge for the ad space in error. Please call 755-5440 immediately for prompt correc-tion and billing adjustments.CancellationsNormal advertising deadlines apply for cancellation.Billing InquiriesCall 755-5440. Should further information be required regarding payments or credit limits, your call will be trans-ferred to the accounting depart-ment. General Information In Print and Onlinewww.lakecityreporter.com Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$2504 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $.25One item per ad Under $100 ServicesBack Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root raking, bush hog, seeding, sod, disking, site prep, ponds & irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200 Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Artwork-Ask Yo ur Representative For Details 386-755-5440 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTFOR COLUMBIACOUNTY,FLORIDAPROBATE DIVISIONIN RE: ESTATE OFDORMAN WEBSTER CLAYTON,File No. 12-189-CPDivision PROBATEDeceased.NOTICE TO CREDITORSThe administration of the estate of DORMAN W. CLAYTON, de-ceased, whose date of death was July 18, 2012, and last four digits of whose social security number are 5920, is pending in the Circuit Court for COLUMBIACounty, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Columbia County Court-house, 173 NE Hernando Ave., Lake City, FL32055. The names and ad-dresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's at-torney are set forth below.All creditors of the decedent and oth-er persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICA-TION OF THIS NOTICE.ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITH-IN THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED.NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.The date of first publication of this notice is SEPTEMBER 25, 2012.Attorney for Personal Representa-tive:LLOYD E. PETERSON, JR., AttorneyFlorida Bar Number: 0798797905 SWBaya Dr. Lake City, FL32025Phone: (386) 961-9959; Fax: 961-9956Personal Representative:DORMAN WEBSTER CLAYTON, JR.239 SE Cedar LoopLake City, Florida 3202505534968October 4, 11, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO.: 12-2011-CA-000361SEC.:CITIMORTGAGE, INC.,Plaintiff,v.CHRISTOPHER L. STEPHENSON; ANGELASTEPHENSON; ANYAND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UN-DER, AND AGAINSTTHE HERE-IN NAMED INDIVIDUALDE-FENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN-KNOWN PARTIES MAYCLAIM AN INTERESTAS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS.Defendant(s).NOTICE OF SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to an Order of Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated Sep-tember 19, 2012, entered in Civil Case No. 12-2011-CA-000361 of the Circuit Court of the Third Judicial Circuit in and for Columbia County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Cir-cuit Court will sell to the highest bid-der for cash on 24th day of October, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. on the Third LegalFloor of the Columbia County Court-house, 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit:NE 1/4 of SW1/4 of SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP2 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, SOUTH OF GRADED ROAD AND EASTOF RAILROAD RIGHT-OF-WAYANDTOWNSHIP2 SOUTH-RANGE 16 EASTSECTION 27: BEGIN ATTHE NORTHWESTCORNER OF NW1/4 OF SE 1/4, AND RUN THENCE N 8927” E, ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID NW1/4 OF SE 1/4, 328.00 FEET; THENCE S 004”E, 1042.55 FEETTO THE NORTH-EASTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE OF G.S. & F. RAILROAD; THENCE N 3138’30”WALONG SAID NORTHEASTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE 108.28 FEETTO THE POINT-OF-A-CURVE AND RUN THENCE NORTHEASTER-LYALONG SAID CURVE CON-CAVE TO THE RIGHTALONG ACHORD BEARING N 2747’52” WADISTANCE OF 583.01 FEETTO THE POINT-OF-INTERSECTION OF SAID CURVE WITH THE WESTLINE OF SAID NW1/4 OF SE 1/4; THENCE N 004’W431.49 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGIN-NING. SUBJECTTO EXISTING COUNTYMAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAYOF SCARBOROUGH ROAD ACROSS THE NORTH SIDE THEREOF.LESS AND EXCEPTAPARTOF NW1/4 OF THE SE 1/4 OF SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP2 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE ATTHE NWCORNER OF SAID NW1/4 OF THE SE 1/4 AND RUN N 8927’E ALONG THE NORTH LINE THEREOF, 298.00 FEETFOR APOINTOF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE N 8927” E 30.00 FEET; THENCE S 004’E, 642.55 FEET; THENCE S 8956’W30.00 FEET; THENCE N 004’W642.30 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING. SUBJECTTO EX-ISTING COUNTYMAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAYOF SCARBOR-OUGH ROAD ACROSS THE NORTH SIDE THEREOF.ALSO LESS AND EXCEPTCOMMENCE ATTHE NORTH-WESTCORNER OF THE NW1/4 OF SE 1/4, SECTION 27, TOWN-SHIP2 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND RUN THENCE N 8927’E ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID NW1/4 OF SE 1/4 328.00 FEET; THENCE S 004’E 642.55 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGIN-NING; THENCE CONTINUE S 004’E 400.00 FEETTO THE EASTRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE OF G.S. & F. RAILROAD; THENCE N 3138’30” WALONG SAID EASTRIGHT-OF-WAYLINE, 108.28 FEETTO THE P.C. OF ACURVE; THENCE NORTHERLYALONG SAID CURVE CONCAVE TO THE RIGHTHAVING ARADIUS OF 5596.58 FEETALONG ACHORD BEARING N 2900’42” W351.68 FEET; THENCE N 8956’E 226.90 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGIN-NING.Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-er than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceed-ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assis-tance. Please contact:ADACoordinator173 NE Hernando Avenue, Room 408Lake City, FL32055Phone: (386) 719-7428within two (2) business days of re-ceipt of notice to appear. Individuals who are hearing impaired should call (800) 955-8771. Individuals who are Legalvoice impaired should call (800) 955-8770.DATED ATLAKE CITY, FLORI-DATHIS 19th DAYOF September, 2012./s/ B. ScippioP. DEWITTCASONCLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURTCOLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA02500389October 3, 10, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURTFOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAPROBATE DIVISIONIN RE: ESTATE OFJAYALAN MILISAVIC,File No. 12-190-CPDivision PROBATEDeceased.NOTICE TO CREDITORSThe administration of the estate of JAYALAN MILISAVIC, deceased, whose date of death was June 3, 2012, and the last four digits of whose social security number are 8042, is pending in the Circuit Court for COLUMBIACounty, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 173 NE Hernando Ave., Columbia County Courthouse, Lake City, Florida 32055. The names and addresses of the personal representa-tive and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below.All creditors of the decedent and oth-er persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICA-TION OF THIS NOTICE.ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITH-IN THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED.NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.The date of first publication of this notice is September 21, 2012.Attorney for Personal Representative:LLOYD E. PETERSON, JR.Florida Bar Number: 798797905 SWBaya Drive,Lake City, FL32025Phone: (386) 961-9959; Fax 961-9956Personal Representative: MICHAELGOODYEAR254 SE Dustin TerraceLake City, Florida 3202505534905September 27, 2012October 4, 2012 LegalNOTICE TOCONTRACTORSNotice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received in the Columbia County Manager’s office until 11:00 A.M. on October 17, 2012, for Co-lumbia County Project No. 2012-7. This office is located on the second floor of the Courthouse Annex at 135 Hernando Avenue, Room 203 Lake City FL32055.This project consists of full depth reclamation of existing asphalt sur-face and limerock base, and asphalt pavement of approximately 6550 LF of asphalt roadway located in the Lake City County Club. Roads in-cluded are:NWFrontier Drive – 4450 LFNWOtter Court – 900 LFNWMallard Place – 850 LFNWWiregrass Court – 180 LFNWBroomsage Court – 180 LFScope of work includes full depth reclamation, asphaltic concrete pave-ment, erosion control, and incidental items.The Bid Forms and Construction specifications may be obtained from the County’s web site at http://www .columbiacountyfla.com/ PurchasingBids.asp The successful bidder will be re-quired to furnish the County Manag-er with a performance bond and lia-bility insurance prior to commencing work.The Columbia County Commission reserves the right to reject any or all bids and to add to the contract or de-lete from the contract to stay within their funding capabilities.Columbia County Board of County CommissionersScarlet Frisina, Chair 05535138October 4, 11, 2012 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTFOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORI-DAPROBATE DIVISIONIN RE: ESTATE OFFile No. 12-167-CPGEORGE W. HUNTER,Deceased.NOTICE TO CREDITORSThe administration of the estate of GEORGE W HUNTER deceased, whose date of death was August 2, 201 1; File Number 12-167-CP is pending in the Circuit Court for Columbia County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 173 N.E. Hernando Street Lake City Florida 32055 The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's at-torney are set forth below.All creditors of the decedent and oth-er persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.REPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Linewww.lakecityreporter.com

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTHURSDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2012 5B Classified Department: 755-5440 1998 CorvetteWell maintained, runs great. 95,000 miles.$8,500 obo 386-344-2107 LegalAll other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICA-TION OF THIS NOTICE.ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITH-IN THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED.NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.The date of first publication of this notice is: September 27, 2012.Attorney for Personal Representa-tive:JAMES P. HINESFlorida Bar No. 125737Hines Norman Hines, P.L.315 S. Hyde Park AvenueTampa, FL33606Telephone: (813) 251-8659Personal Representative:Elga B. HunterP.O. Box 958Lake City, FL32056-095805534994September 27, 2012October 4, 2012 020Lost & Found FOUND HORSE On October Road in Ellisville 386-344-3634 100Job Opportunities05535155(Ladies wear factory outlet) Lake City Mall is looking for P/TTHIRD KEY Days, nights, and weekends. Flexible hours a necessity. Competitive wages, discount, EOE Apply in person at store location Retirees are encouraged to apply. 05535170Cabinetmakers Mill Finish Wood Prep. Jobs available for experienced workers only. Wages negotiable based on experience of one year or more. Stable work history. Benefits include: Paid Holidays, Paid Vacation, and Family Health Insurance. Some hand tools required. Please apply in person at Marlow-HunterLLC 14700 NWHwy 441 in Alachua. Pay negotiable with experience. Established Ocala business is Looking to hire additional sales teams for our expanding product line.Earn $500.00/week, plus commission!If you’re upbeat, friendly and enjoy working with the public, then contact us for a confidential interview and start earning the income you deserve! Valid driver’s license, proof of insurance and overnight travel is required. Call us TODAYat 352-233-2818.Telecom Service Bureau, Inc.05535119T eachers Join our team of over 100 professional teachers! Want to make a difference in the lives of children? Pr eschool 10 Mo FTLead Teacher (Jasper) Lead Teacher position requires min. AS/BS in Early childhood or Child Development and 3 years relevant experience. $11.07-$14.97/hr. DOE Infant/T oddler 12 Mo FTTeacher 12 Mo PTFloater(PT30 Hrs.) (Lake City) Child Development Associate (CDA) or equivalent credential (FCCPC, or ECPC) required. $8.71/hr. Excellent Benefits, Paid Holidays, Sick/Annual Leave, Health/Dental Insurance, and more. Apply at 236 SWColumbia Ave, Lake City, FLor Send resume to: employment@sv4cs.org Fax (386) 754-2220 or Call 754-2225 EOE Sales Position Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Toyota Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 SALONCENTRIC SALES CONSULTANTS As an industry leader, our goal is to find elite, highly motivated, well trained sales professionals. We represent the beauty industry’s leading product lines, infused with new technology & supported with full time educators. DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES:*Achieves sales goals & objectives thru key performance indicators (KPIs) established & monitored by mgmt.*Introduces, presents & sells new products for Professional Products Division distributors (PPD); using a consistent & balanced selling approach within an assigned territory. REQUIREMENTS:*Bachelors’pref*Demonstrates outside sales/ industry exp*Computer lit/Access to internet*Valid FLDL& solid driving record*Attendance at conventions, shows, educational classes & special events may require overnight &/or some weekends Email: vbogar@saloncentric.com 100Job OpportunitiesSmall historic non-denominational church with a heart for children is seeking a pianist for Sunday services. Please contact 904-259-4194 if interested. Wanted-P/T Handi-Man, Exp. in Routine Maintenance such as plumbing, elect, painting & carpentry. Applications Available at Camp Weed & Cerveny Conference Center, 11057 Camp Weed Place, Live Oak. WANTED: DISPATCHER White Springs, FL Florida Rock and Tank Lines has an immediate opening for a dispatcher. Supervise drivers, take customer orders, review and complete the order process and prepare driver schedules for delivery. Strong computer skills required and previous dispatching experience preferred. Contact Michelle at 904-858-9142 or mcomer@patriottrans.com 120Medical Employment05535115Physical Therapist Avalon Healthcare Center is currently accepting applications for the full time position of Physical Therapist. Please apply at Avalon Healthcare and Rehabilitation Center. 1270 S.W. Main Blvd. Lake City, Florida 32025 or fax resume to 386-752-8556 EOE Medical practice needs Ophthalmic Technician FTor PT. Experience preferred. Fax resume 386-755-7561. 240Schools & Education05534919Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class12/24/2012• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-11/05/12• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies 55 gallon Aquarium with screen, three heat lamps, Great Condition, Like New. $150.00 Contact 386-362-7441 Blonde FMini-Schnauzer, 18 lbs, fixed, house broken, good natured, family friendly. $250 OBO Contact 386-292-3927 FREE Kittens to a good home. 1 gray w/ beige, 2 are dark brown W/ beige, of which one is a long hair. 6-8 weeks old. Litter trained and eat dry/wet cat food. Call or text 386-867-0232 PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. Tiny Toy YorkiePoo Male 1.12 Pounds, Health Cert. Looking for Loving home. Call 867-0035 330Livestock & SuppliesDeep Creek Farms Barn kept Square or Net Wrapped Round Hay Bales For Sale Ronnie Hughes (386)365-1425 413Musical MerchandisePIANO FOR Sale Spinet type $995.00 Call 386-842-5548 430Garage Sales 10/6 & 10/7, 8am to ?. Everything must go & under $3. Free hots dogs with purchase. Corner of North Marion Ave and 100 A. 211 SWBalboa Place Near the High School Every Saturday in Oct. 8am noon Multi-Family lots of stuff COMMUNITYYARDSALE Eastside Village off Baya Oct. 5 & 6 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. ESTATE SALE Oct 6 8am to? Antiques to Junk 159 NWClubview Cir. 32055 ESTATE/GARAGE SALE Sat. 10/6, 8 1 p.m., No Early Birds. Hwy 247, 2 mi. South, Woodcrest subdv., 330 SW Guthrie Terr., 10th house on left. Long driveway full of bargains. Antiques, jewelry, collectibles, Zippo lighters, juicer, tapes, beaded purses, other items too numerous to mention. RAIN CANCELS Huge & Indoor Fri & Sat. Clothing, Appl. Electronics, You name it we got it. Next to Pet Spot 846 Sw Main Blvd. 7am 2pm Multi Family 6/5 & 6/6, 8am-? Baby items & Clothing, Girls & Women dress & Casual clothes, Lots of misc, Country Club Rd to Seclusion Gln. Look for Signs. PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 430Garage Sales Sat. 10/6 26420 89th RD, Branford. cast iron wood heater, dual recliner-matching rocker recliner, camping supplies, 13” TV, & several misc items. 440Miscellaneous GATOR FOOTBALL TICKETS Two seats 3 & 4, seat backs, west side sect 14, Row 41 Home Remainder of Season + G Growl. Call 752-0699 or 397-3335 IPOD 4THGen./8GB $75 OBO Contact 984-9010 P/U Topper LEER 8 FTBed only, Locks, Side windows, $100 Contact 755-5409 before 8 pm 630Mobile Homes forRent3BD/1.5 BA MH for Rent Country Living Contact 623-4213 3BR/2BADWMH on 1 acre private lot, 1st+last+dep required located in Ellisville. No pets. Contact 352-870-5144 Clean 2br/1ba partially furnished Lots of trees on Turner Rd. Leave message if no answer. 386-752-6269 LARGE CLEAN 2 & 3 bdms CH/A5 Points Area. Also 3 bdrm Westside. 1st + Deposit Required. No Pets. 961-1482 New 3/2 MH on 5 acres, 10 mins from Lake City, quiet area. Amanda@386-365-6493. Secluded SW2br/2ba, Located Between Wellborn & Lake City. $500 mth +$500 dep. Contact 386-623-2545 640Mobile Homes forSale(1) Only New Jacobsen Triplewide 42x64 Only $99,995 Del & Set with Air. Beautiful Home. North Pointe of Gainesville. 352-872-5566 2013 DOUBLEWIDE $33,995 inc. set-up, trim-out & A/C Call 386-288-8379. 3BR/2BA28X64 in a great location, a lot of upgrades, fireplace. Only $2,500 down $399 a month. Call Paula at 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com 4BD/2BADWMH on 4 acres Owner Financing Available. 386-623-3404 or 386-623-3396 5 LIKENew Mobile Homes!!! For under $30,000. MUSTSEE Call John T. 386-752-1452 575 CREDITSCORE? New 3/2 or 4/2 doubles. Your Approved with 10% down. Call for details. North Pointe 352-872-5566 BANK REPO 3BR/2BADoublewide ’09 Excellent condition. Only $999 down $377 a month. Call Paula 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com BIGGESTSALEEVER 13 Jacobsen Display Models reduced for Fast Sale! North Pointe Homes, 352-872-5566 Brittany Stoeckert386-397-3473 Results Realty, MH on 10 acres. Most property cleared. 2 car covered carport. Huge Deck. $77,900 MLS#79417 Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Results Realty, Nice Lg home on 1 Ac., 4BR/2B Open kitchen & Fla. Room, beautiful yard, $129,000 MLS# 77292 LAND ANDHOME Attention land owners with good credit. No Money Down and Low Fixed Rates and Low Fees. Let’s Deal! North Pointe Homes, Gainesville 352-872-5566 MUSTSEE 2013 2x6 walls, R30 insulation, OSB wrap, house wrap, real wood cabinets, and thermal pain windows. Payment $399 per month call John T386-752-1452. WANTED…CASH PAID for your Mobile Home, Singlewide or Doublewide flood homes welcome. Call 386-288-8379 Palm Harbor Homes New Homes at $39,900 $5k for your used mobile home 3 New models, 1,100-2,400 SQ FT 800-622-2832 ext 210 650Mobile Home & LandCLEAN NICE 2/2 SW, and 740 sf Unfinished frame house, nice Country acre 8 mi to VA. $39,000 Cash only 386.961.9181 Coldwell BankerBishop Agency Elaine Tolar755-6488 Mobile Home Park on 19 Ac. Home, single & double wides. Needs TLC MLS #81507, $189,900 Coldwell BankerBishop Agency Elaine Tolar755-6488 Home on 5+ Ac. 3BR/2.5B, Lg Kitchen spacious L.R. M.Suite bath with 2 closets. MLS #81630, $219,900 Hallmark Real Estate APlace to Plat Stretch out & enjoy manufactured home on 1.9 acres. 2 bedroom w/ CH/A. $54,000 Call Nate Sweat 386-628-1552 Hallmark Real Estate HUD Home in Trenton! $40,000! 3/2, Needs Handyman www.hudhomestore.com Case #091-381778 Robin Williams 386-365-5146 Hallmark Real Estate HUD Home in Trenton! $40,000! 3/2, Needs Handyman www.hudhomestore.com Case #091-381778 Robin Williams 386-365-5146 Owner Fin.-Nice huge 4/2.5 on 3 ac, x-fenced, creek, lrg deck,Paved Rd. McAlpin area. Small down $950/mth 386-867-1833. For picswww.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 650Mobile Home & LandREO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 3BR/2B, 1860 sqft. features DW on 5 acres plus above ground pool. MLS#80543 $125,000. 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05534938We’ve got it all!$89 Deposit Limited Avail. Call Today! Windsong Apts. *Free afterschool program386-758-8455 1BR APT. Downtown Location, Clean. New Carpet $450 mo, plus Security. NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456 2/1 1300 sqft, duplex w/ gargage. totally refurbished,W/D hook up, CH/A, $650 mth Lease Req. 386-965-2407 or 386-758-5881 2BR/1BAAPT. w/garage. West side of town. $650. mo. 386-961-9000 2BR/2BAw/garage 5 minutes from VAhospital and Timco. Call for details. 386-365-5150 3BD/1.5BAOn Leslie Gln CH/A, $725 mth & $725 dep. Contact 386-344-2170 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Amberwood Hills Apts. Private Patio area. Beautiful yard. Washer/dryer hkup. Free water & sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special. 386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com Brandywine Apartments Now Renting 1, 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-752-3033 W. Grandview Ave. Equal Housing Opportunity TDD Number 1-800-955-8771 Ck out this Awesome Dea l 2/1, in Fort White, Lg.Ft & bporch, Lg Liv/Kit/Din, Fenced byard, elec, trash, mowingincl No pets. Free WFI $695 mth. 941-924-5183 Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2 mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet Friendly. Pool laundry & balcony. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5660 Greentree Townhouse Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free water & sewer. Balcony & patio. Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com Quant 2br/1ba Apt. Peaceful Location with Lake View CH/A$500. mo $500 dep. No pets. 386-344-2170 Redwine Apartments Pets welcome. with 5 complexes, we have a home for you. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com TENANTS DREAM Only 1 left $600 Newly remodeled, 2bd/1ba duplex w/ w/d hook up. Call for details 386-867-9231 Wayne ManorApts. Spacious 2bedroom washer/dryer. Behind Kens off Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 www .myflapts.com WindsorArms Apartments. Move in! 2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free 200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com 720Furnished Apts. ForRentImmaculate Studio Apt. Avail Now $500. mo. $300. dep. Incl. appliances, cable, internet, water. No pets. Josen 386-965-9083 Rooms forRent Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent2/1 Brick house Lrg eat in kit. & closets, CH/A, 514 SE First Ave. Jasper. $550 mth 1st,last+sec. No pets. 772-285-1032 2BR/1BA House with yard. Near College & Airport. $450 mo. $450. sec. 386-752-0335 Monday -Friday 8A-4P 3br/2ba DWon Tranquil Gln. Completely renovated. backyard fenced. $700/mo + $400 security. 386-938-5637 COZYCOTTAGE 1 BRNew paint & carpet. 10 mins. South of LC, all util. & satellite incl.$575 mo. Pet ok, 386-758-2408 Quaint 2bd / 1ba home. CH/A, $500 mth & $500 dep. Contact 386-344-2170 750Business & Office RentalsForRent orLease: Former Doctors office, Former professional office & Lg open space: avail on East Baya Ave. Competitive rates. Weekdays 386-984-0622 evenings/weekends 497-4762 770Condos ForRent Golf Course condo for rent. 1400 s.f., 2/2 Incl.Some utilities. $975/mo. Call (386) 344-0433 805Lots forSale Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Results Realty, Small home on corner lot with 3 Fenced yards. Needs TLC. MLS # 81204 $26,900 Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Results Realty Lot on Suwnnee. Lot has well & anerobic septic system. Stairway down to dock. Brittany Stoeckert386-397-3473 Results Realty, Nice vacant lot in Desirable river Community, MLS #73268 $15,000 LOVELIESTLOT 1/2 Located in the Newest section of Plantation S/D 598 NWSavannah Drive. Call 386-397-6316 PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 810Home forSale ACCESS REALTY Gorgeous views 3bd/3ba on Lake Montgomery. Elevator, fishing dock & jacuzzi.MLS 81438 $249,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 ACCESS REALTYTwo story 1895 Victorian house w/ electrical upgrades throughout. double -deck porches, MLS 71594 $149,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 ACCESS REALTYSpacious 4 bd/3ba Cypress Lake w/ 3643 sqft 1.25 acres on lake. Vaulted ceilings. MLS 81314 $279,900. Patti Taylor386-623-6896 Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 Contempary with Amenities open great room Lg Master Suite, 3BR/2B MLS# 81538 $103,900 Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 Immaculate Log home. 11Acres, Open great room, 3BD/2B over 2100 sq ft. MLS# 78237 $247,500 Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 3BD/2B, 1971 sq ft. Wood Floors. Vaulted Ceilings, Fenced. MLS# 79567 $165,000 Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 Brick 3BD/2B, Lg Spacious rooms, Split Floor Plan, Lot on Lake. Master has Whirlpool tub. MLS# 76769 $210,000 Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 Almost 5.25 acres, 3BD/2B, Lg Living w/ separate Dining Room, Screened patio. MLS# 81340 $137,900 Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 4BD/3B, over 2500 sqft, Maple Cabinets, Solid surface Countertops, Fireplace & More. MLS# 81239 $203,900 Coldwell BankerBishop Agency Elaine Tolar755-6488 Home in Crest Pointe. 3BR/2B, dining & Breakfast nook. Motivated seller. MLS #81426, $149,900 Coldwell BankerBishop RealtySherry Ratliff 365-8414 Walk to Sante Fe River. 4 Ac, RVw/ great porch, 2 car carport, lots of plants MLS# 81060, $74,900. Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Neil Holton 984-5046 Well Maintained, good access to every where, quality construction. MLS# 81536, $159,000 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Mary Brown Whitehurst 965-0887 Stately older home on 39 + Ac within City limits. 6BR/3.5B MLS# 76111, $994,000 FSBO ‘05 Brick 3/2/2 3rd detached garage, tiled w/in shower, w/in closet, 10ft ceilings, crown molding, 168,800 417-396-2134 810Home forSale Hallmark Real Estate 3/2 Home South of town w/tile flrs, lush bdrm carpets, updated baths & fixtures, $99,900 MLS 81229 Robin Williams 386-365-5146 Hallmark Real Estate Just Reduced! Brick 3/2 home on one acre Backyard fenced, sprinklersystem $114,900 MLS 80332 Call Jay Sears 386-867-1613 Hallmark Real Estate Pool & Lakefront Home on 7.95 acres. 30 X 60 workshop guest house, 4 bdrms-3-1/2 bths. MLS 80554. Janet Creel 386-719-0382 REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 Two story, tons of sq footage, BR upstairs, 2 full BA, 2 car carport $124,900. MLS#80555 REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 3BR/2B DWMH on 5.1 acres. 1984 sqft, 2 car carport $124,900. MLS#80903 REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 6.45 Acres of investment property on Suwannee, Consist of 3 lots, Pool Barn. MLS# 77414 $75,000. REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 Fabulous L.C. Country Club 4/3 undergone some beautiful renovation. MLS# 78637 $159,900. REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 Arare sight 1 acre tract for Manufactured home close to springs. MLS# 79060 $11,500. 820Farms & Acreage10 acres with well/septic/pp (not guar); $300 dwn; $580 a mth. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com ACCESS REALTY10 acre square tract, High & Dry, O/F Avail. w/ 25% down. Convenient Location MLS 81258 $39,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 ACCESS REALTY10 acre square tract, High & Dry, OF Avail. w/ 25% down. Convenient Location MLS 81258$39,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 ACCESS REALTY43.64 acres wooded acreage in N.Columbia County. Scenic & Private. MLS 74429 $89,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 830Commercial PropertyHallmark Real Estate Estate Sale Warehouse units on 5 acres in central location. Flexible sales terms or O/F. $279,000. Janet Creel 386-719-0382 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. Brittany Stoeckert386-397-3473, RESULTS REALTY, Great Investment on McFarlane Ave. 2 units with 2BR/1B, $230,000 MLS# 79271 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 950Cars forSale 1986 CORVETTE, Well Maintained, power windows & Seats. Runs great. Stored in Garage. 95,000 miles. $8,500 OBO 386-344-2107 1996 Chevrolet Cavalier Z24 Sunroof, Power Steering, New a/c, Runs great. $2,900 Call 386-752-1811 ‘97 MARQUISLS Loaded, Low miles only 65 K, Leather, Gold color, Like New. $4,500 Contact 755-5409 before 8 PM

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6B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2012 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 Championship implications everywhere By RALPH D. RUSSO Associated Press A burgeoning rivalry hits a peak in the SEC, a new rivalry begins to emerge in the Big Ten and Notre Dame and Miami bring an old rivalry to a new setting. The college football sea sons first huge Saturday is coming, and its packed with championship implica tions. In the Southeastern Conference, No. 5 Georgia and No. 6 South Carolina meet in a matchup of the last two East Division win ners. Georgia is our biggest conference rival, though were certainly not their biggest, South Carolina coach Steve Spurrier said Wednesday. True, Florida and Auburn have a more storied his tory with Georgia than the Gamecocks, who are in the midst of their best run of success since joining the SEC in 1992. For the first time in 65 meetings, the Gamecocks and Bulldogs are both ranked in the top 10 when they play. South Carolina has won two straight in the series, though it wasnt good enough to win the East last year. The Gamecocks ended up dropping a cou ple of games to SEC West opponents after beating the Bulldogs in Athens. This season the schedule favors Georgia again. South Carolina plays at LSU next week, though that home game in November against Arkansas doesnt look so bad now. The Bulldogs play Auburn and Mississippi out of the West, as Spurrier reminded everyone at SEC media days back in the summer. The winner gets the inside track to Atlanta and the conference title game. In the Big Ten, No. 21 Nebraska visits No. 12 Ohio State. Its the Cornhuskers first trip to Columbus as a conference rival. The only other time Nebraska played at Ohio State was 1956. The Buckeyes won that game 34-7. The two tradition-rich programs didnt meet again until last season, when Nebraska, in its first Big Ten season, rallied from 21 down to beat Ohio State 3427 in Lincoln. This season, the Buckeyes are undefeated, though NCAA sanctions will keep them out of the postseason. They still look primed to have a large say in who does win the Big Ten in Urban Meyers first season as coach. Then there is Miami and No. 9 Notre Dame at Soldier Field in Chicago. The Hurricanes and Fighting Irish havent played a regu lar-season game since 1990. The rivalry got so nasty in the late 1980s, the schools decided to stop playing. The Sun Bowl revived the matchup a couple years ago and Notre Dame beat a Miami team that had its coach fired weeks before, 33-17. The Irish are unbeaten and a couple of victories away from starting to have real national championship hopes. Miami is loaded with inexperienced players, especially on defense, but the Canes also have enough skill on offense to provide a good test for the Notre Dames tough defense. The picks: THURSDAY No. 13 Southern California (minus 14) at Utah Trojans last game in Salt Lake city was 1917, won 51-0 ... USC 35-20. SATURDAY No. 23 Washington (plus 24) at No. 2 Oregon Ducks have won eight straight meetings, all by at least 17 points ... OREGON 45-17. No. 3 Florida State (plus 14 1 2 ) at N.C. State Wolfpacks pass defense is next-to-last in ACC ... FLORIDA STATE 42-21. UPSET SPECIAL No. 4 LSU (minus 2 1 2 ) at No. 10 Florida Shuffled offensive line has been a problem for Tigers ... FLORIDA 21-19. No. 5 Georgia (plus 2 1 2 ) at No. 6 South Carolina In 65 meetings, Gamecocks have never won three straight ... SOUTH CAROLINA 34-28. Kansas (plus 24) at No. 7 Kansas State Coach Bill Snyder is 9-1 at home against Jayhawks ... KANSAS STATE 35-14. No. 8 West Virginia (plus 6 1 2 ) at No. 11 Texas Now this is a week Geno Smith can make some real Heisman headway ... WEST VIRGINIA 42-38. No. 9 Notre Dame (minus 13) vs. Miami at Chicago Rivalry brings back memories; current Canes D looks nothing like those from the glory days ... NOTRE DAME 31-21. No. 21 Nebraska (plus 3 1 2 ) at No. 12 Ohio State Can Huskers contain Braxton Miller? ... OHIO STATE 28-24. Washington State (plus 15) at No. 14 Oregon State Who would have guessed Beavers have top pass ing offense in Pac-12? ... OREGON STATE 45-28. BEST BET Georgia Tech (plus 10) at No. 15 Clemson Yellow Jackets have allowed 1,119 yards last two games ... CLEMSON 58-28 Iowa State (plus 11 1 2 ) at No. 15 TCU Cyclones LB duo of Jake Knott, A.J. Klein one of best in nation ... TCU 28-20. No. 17 Oklahoma (minus 5 1 2 ) at Texas Tech Red Raiders No. 1 in total defense; time to see if its for real ... OKLAHOMA 31-27. Arizona (plus 9 1 2 ) at No. 18 Stanford Wildcats trying to avoid three-game skid after 3-0 start ... STANFORD 27-21. No. 20 Mississippi State (minus 9 1 2 ) at Kentucky Wildcats to play two freshman quarterbacks ... MISSSISSIPPI STATE 35-14. Connecticut (plus 8) at No. 22 Rutgers Home team is 5-1 in series ... RUTGERS 21-10. No. 24 Northwestern (plus 3) at Penn State Nittany Lions QB Matt McGloin leads Big Ten with 1,217 yards passing ... PENN STATE 35-31. No. 25 UCLA (minus 2 1 2 ) at California Bears are another home loss away from being in full downward spiral ... UCLA 38-24. Last weeks record: 15-1 (straight); 12-3 (vs. points) Season record: 86-15 (straight); 47-39 (vs. points) JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Floridas Sharrif Floyd (73) takes down Bowling Green runningback Anthon Samuel (6) during a game on Sept 1. G. W. HUNTER, INC. 1130 US Hwy 90 W (386) 752-5890 WE NOW HAVE ETHANOL FREE PLUS GASOLINE ONLY AT INTENDED USES: BOATS & WATERCRAFTS COLLECTABLE VEHICLES OFF-ROAD VEHICLES MOTORCYCLES SMALL ENGINES Lake City Reporter Located at SHANDS Lake City, Live Oak & Starke Womens Center of Florida ALL MAJOR INSURANCES ACCEPTED INCLUDING MEDICAID & MEDICARE FREE Pregnancy Ultrasound WITH THIS AD* *Insurance billing may occur if necessary. Some Restrictions apply. 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