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UFPKY NEH LSTA



The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01923
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 09-28-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01923
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Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

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By LAURA HAMPSON lhampson@lakecityreporter.com T raveling the world with the Harlem Globetrotters, Michael Douglas faced fans asking for autographs in foreign languages. I didnt know what they were saying but I went out, got a book and I learned how to speak some Japanese, Douglas said Thursday. Keep your mind open to learn ing new things. Because I could speak those languages I was the designated Globetrotter to do all the interviews, he said. At the end of the tour and after learning several languages, man agement paid him extra just for being able to communicate and keep the Globetrotter brand alive. The smarter you are the more valuable you are, he said. Douglas gave a basketballinfused motivational speech Thursday afternoon to about 400 Columbia High School students. Students jumped at the chance to learn tricks from Douglas and shoot free-throws. Some took home prizes, including a signed basketball. Douglas is in the area for Saturdays celebrity basketball show in Live Oak featuring the Harlem Legends taking on five Opinion ............... 4A People ................. 5A Obituaries ............. 5A Advice & Comics ....... 6-7B Puzzles ............... 6-7B TODAY IN PEOPLE Homeland hauls in Emmys. COMING SUNDAY Local news roundup. 87 66 Partly cloudy WEATHER, 2A Lake City ReporterFRIDAY & SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28-29, 2012 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | 75LAKECITYREPORTER COM WEEKEND EDITION CALL US: (386) 752-1293 SUBSCRIBE TO THE REPORTER: Voice: 755-5445 Fax: 752-9400 Vol. 138, No 173 1A Tough Enough Tough Enough To Wear Pink Golf Tournament to benefit Tough Enough To Wear Pink crisis fund and the residents of Columbia and surrounding coun ties will be held at Quail Heights Country Club on Sept. 29. Sponsor or player brochures are available at the Fair Office or download application on our website at www.columbiacountyfair. org. For more information call 752-8822. Kamrie benefit Friends and family of Kamrie Mitchell will have a benefit 11 a.m. Saturday next to Office Max on U.S. 90 in Lake City. All proceeds go directly to the family to help aid in locating Kamrie and bring her home. There will be a barbecue dinner, a rum mage sale, photography, bounce houses, raffle drawings, face painting and more. A Zumba class starts at 10 a.m. Bring the kids. Admission is $7 per per son, including dinner. Fall festival Westside Elementarys Fall Festival will be Saturday, Sept. 29 from 3 to 8 p.m. with activities for the whole family, including corn hole toss, minute to win it, sponge toss, frisbee toss, face painting, cupcake walk, bounce houses and a dunking machine. There will also be a fun run at 2:30 p.m. Walk 4 Life Pregnancy Care Center of Lake City will host the Annual Walk 4 Life event on Sept. 29 at Olustee Park with registration starting at 8 a.m. Events in Lake City and Live Oak will be chal lenging each other to reach or exceed the $25,000 goal. You may register online at www.facebookpcc.com or www.friendsofpcc.com. Registration forms may also be picked up at both Pregnancy Care Centers. BC fundraiser The Columbia County Chapter of Bethune Cookman University will have a fish dinner sale and car wash on Saturday, Sept. 29 starting at 11 a.m. at the corner of Wilson Street and Lake Jeffery Road near the Amtrack Station. Fish dinners will be $7.50 including a drink. The car wash is by donation. Orders of five or more can be delivered. Call 752-7054. Farmers market The Lake DeSoto Farmers Market is open every Saturday from 8 a.m. to noon in Wilson Park located along Lake DeSoto between the Columbia County Courthouse and Shands Lakeshore Hospital in downtown Lake City. The market is a regional favorite. By LAURA HAMPSON lhampson@lakecityreporter.com An elementary school teacher was suspended without pay after being arrested this month on a charge of vehicle theft. Virginia Ruth Ferguson, 59, of Lake City was arrested Sept. 7 on a third-degree felony charge of grand theft of a motor vehicle. Before her arrest, Ferguson was a Exceptional Student Education teacher at Westside Elementary School. She is certified until 2016 to teach early child hood education, elementa ry education and emotion ally handicapped education, according to the Florida Department of Education. Teacher faces auto theft charge Was suspended without pay by school board. TEACHER continued on 5A LEGENDS continued on 5A Ferguson Globe-trotting JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City Reporter Former Harlem Globetrotter Michael Douglas reacts after successfully transferring a spinning basketball onto the finger of Columbia High School freshman Kelsey Gonzalez, 14, Thursday. Douglas came to speak to more than 400 CHS stu dents to motivate them to aim high, never give up on their dreams and to keep learning. Keep your mind open to learn new things, he said. The smarter you are, the more valuable you are. Ex-Harlem Globetrotter, now a Harlem Legend, visits CHS Keep your mind open to learn, students are told. Trash transition a bit shaky for some By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com The transition to a new solid waste collection vendor for the City of Lake City is proving to be a bit troublesome after the vendor of the past 10 years removed residential trash carts before new replacment carts were distributed. The contract with Republic Services expires Sept. 30 and they are currently picking up their trash cans on their last trash collection day, said Jason Dumas, customer service manager for the City of Lake City. Waste Pro is the new contractor that were going to have and they in the process of putting new cans out. Several residents have called city officials asking what should they do because their trash cart has been taken away. Dumas said he has fielded about 20 calls from residents since COURTESY The new receptacles should be in place by Sunday, city officials say. From staff reports The Suwannee Valley Flood Jam, held August 16-18 at the Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park in Live Oak, netted more than $60,000 for victims of Tropical Storm Debbie in Columbia and Suwannee counties. Two checks of $30,036 each were presented to Love INC of Suwannee County and United Way of Suwannee Valley at the Spirit on Sept. 20. We are blessed to have so many able and willing partners in our community who came together for such a great cause, said Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park President/CEO James Cornett, who was unable to be present for the check pre sentation. We are very pleased to have been a part of this effort, and we appreciate the opportunity to help fellow North Floridians. Flood Jam nets $60K for TS Debby victims COURTESY From left are Flood Jam promoter Paul Levine, United Way of Suwannee Valley Columbia County Long Term Recovery Secretary Debby Freeman, United Way of Suwannee Valley Columbia County Long Term Recovery Coordinator Jenn Sawyer, Steve Briscoe of 1st Street Music and Sound Company, United Way Executive Director Rita Dopp, Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park Marketing Director Teena Peavey (making the check presenta tions), Love INC Executive Director Lisa A. Kriehn and the Rev. Arnold Philmore, Love INC Suwannee County Long Term Recovery Committee Vice-Chairman. Sexual offender assaulted local teen, say police TRASH continued on 5A From staff reports Local authorities arrested a convicted sexual offender from Arkansas Wednesday night for allegedly sexually assaulting a 17-year-old Columbia County girl he met on an Internet chat line. Deputies were notified by the victims father that his daughter may have had sexual conduct with the sus pect, said Sgt. Ed Seifert, Columbia County Sheriffs Office public informa OFFENDER continued on 5A Swanson

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CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS AROUND FLORIDA Woman contracts Dengue fever MIAMI South Florida health officials have con firmed the states first case of locally acquired dengue fever this year. The Miami-Dade County Health Department said Thursday that the victim a woman between 60 and 70 years old had not been traveling and contracted the flulike ill ness in Florida. She has recovered. Dengue fever is spread by the Aedes aegypti mos quito, a species common in the southeastern U.S. and the tropics. Its sometimes called breakbone fever because of the severe joint pain it can cause in extreme cases. PSC refuses to dismiss settlement TALLAHASSEE State regulators have rejected consumer advocate objec tions and agreed to hold formal hearings on a pro posed settlement increas ing Florida Power & Light Co.s residential rates. The Public Service Commission took the action Thursday. FPL, the states larg est electric utility, initially asked to increase base rates by $690.4 million a year. It then reached a settle ment with groups repre senting some commercial and government custom ers. It would reduce or keep their rates flat. Principal bans extreme hairstyle DELAND A high school senior will have to lose his twin 16-inch hair spikes if he wants to attend classes at DeLand High School. Asher Stonesifer, 17, was sent home from school Tuesday after school offi cials told him not to wear the Liberty Spike Mohawk to class anymore. Asher and his mother, Rae Stonesifer, complained to the Volusia County School Board, arguing the hairstyle is not clearly banned in the countywide dress code. Principal Mitch Moyer decided Thursday to stand by his ruling. Gunman injures 1, kills 2, self ORLANDO Authorities said a man fatally shot two women and injured another before turning the gun on himself in Orlando. Orange County Sheriffs deputies pursuing the suspect Thursday saw him put a handgun to his head and fire just before his car crashed into a tree. Earlier they said he killed his estranged girl friend and another woman at the Quality Suites. He then drove to the Westgate Resorts and shot another woman. Shes expected to survive. The shooting was part of an ongoing domestic dispute with the woman. Gator that injured woman is dead LEESBURG Wildlife officials said theyve caught and killed the alli gator that ripped off an elderly womans arm in a central Florida canal. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission spokeswoman Joy Hill said that while no human body parts were found in the alligators stomach, author ities believe it was the one that bit Carol Hough on Wednesday morning. Hill said the 7-foot-5-inch alligator was the same size they were looking for, and it had no fear of humans. Mack looks to unseat Nelson BELL Paula Helton wants Republican Senate candidate Connie Mack to get more aggressive in his campaign to unseat Democrat Bill Nelson. She gave Mack the advice at a barbecue res taurant in Bell during a stop on a bus tour Mack wraps up Thursday. Associated Press Lewis: Appealing terrorist on Homeland NEW YORK I t could be, no TV drama has ever given viewers such a damaged pair of protago nists as Brody and Carrie on Homeland. Marine Sgt. Nicholas Brody was a prisoner of war in Afghanistan who returned home a national hero and, covertly, a terrorist turncoat (having been turned by Al-Qaida during his 8-year imprisonment). Carrie Mathison was a CIA agent whose obsessive inability to prove Brodys betrayal, coupled with her bipolar disorder, led to her dismissal from the agency and a mental break down. During this Showtime series grip ping first season, Carrie and Brody played a cat-and-mouse game of global intrigue, swapping roles as one, then the other, seemed to gain the upper hand. Along the way, they had a brief, tumultuous love affair. On Sunday at 10 p.m. EDT, Homeland begins its second sea son, boasting a haul of Emmys that includes the best drama award and trophies for best actress and actor for stars Claire Danes and Damian Lewis. Six months after last seasons action, Brody is a newly elected U.S. congressman and a prospective vice presidential candidate still in thrall to al-Qaida. Carrie now works as a teacher and continues her recovery, still reeling from her painful conclu sion that Brody was innocent all along. The writers have carried off this trick havent they? of creat ing two engaging anti-heroes, said Lewis. Swimmer Lochte picks training over Tinseltown LOS ANGELES With his cam era-ready good looks, quirky catch phrases and funky fashion choices, swimmer Ryan Lochte, 28, parlayed the five medals he won at the 2012 Olympic Games into a burgeoning media career. Hes back in the pool training for future competitions and only embraced Hollywood to raise his sports pro file. My main goal is to make swim ming bigger than what it is, or what it was back in 2008, and the only way I can do that is by going and doing cameos, being on talk shows, doing all those little things. Suspect in killing was Sons of Anarchy actor LOS ANGELES Court records show Sons of Anarchy actor Johnny Lewis, 28, was released from jail a week before being found dead in his driveway after police said he apparently killed his landlady. Los Angeles police said Thursday that Lewis is the only suspect in the death of Catherine Davis, 81, who was discovered slain inside the hillside home in Los Feliz. Authorities said they are investigat ing Davis death and that it appears she was beaten. They said the actor died after climbing atop the home and either jumping or falling to the ground. Puerto Rico pop stars aide detained with $50K GUATEMALA CITY Guatemalan authorities said they have detained Sandra Patricia Vega, a promoter for Puerto Rican pop star Chayanne as she was trying to leave the country with $50,000 in unde clared cash. Chayanne is one of the most popular performers in the Spanishspeaking world and recently record ed a duet with Tony Bennett. Associated Press Thursday: Afternoon: 9-1-1 Evening: N/A Thursday: Afternoon: 0-9-4-5 Evening: N/A Wednesday: 10-20-24-27-32 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAIL Y BRIEFING FRIDAY & SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28-29, 2012 HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter ASSOCIATED PRESS Just a little off the top, please Nova Southeastern University President George Hanbury (left) cuts off a piece of stag horn coral to be transplanted as research assistant Liz Larson looks on, Thursday during a tour of the universitys offshore coral reef nursery in about 22 feet of water near Fort Lauderdale. ASSOCIATED PRESS Actor Damien Lewis, winner of the Outstanding Lead Actor In A Drama Series award for Homeland, poses backstage at the 64th Primetime Emmy Awards at the Nokia Theatre on Sunday in Los Angeles. Daily Scripture Celebrity Birthdays Actress Brigitte Bardot is 78. Singer Ben E. King is 74. Singer Helen Shapiro is 66. Movie writer-director-actor John Sayles is 62. Actress Sylvia Kristel is 60. Rock musician George Lynch is 58. Actress-comedian Janeane Garofalo is 48. Actress Mira Sorvino is 45. TV personality Moon Zappa is 45. Actress Naomi Watts is 44. Rapper Young Jeezy is 35. World Golf Hall of Famer Se Ri Pak is 35. Actress Hilary Duff is 25. But seek rst his kingdom and his righteousness, and all these things will be given to you as well. Matthew 6:33 Thought for Today Sometimes I think we Americans are the loneliest people in the world. To be sure, we hunger for the power of affection, the self-acceptance that gives life. It is the oldest and strongest hunger in the world. But hungering is not enough. Sherwood Anderson, American author and poet (1876-1941) Lewis Lochte

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Sept. 28Fundraiser for AmberThere will be a chicken pilau dinner fundraiser for Amber Hyde, a school district sign language interpreter who is recov-ering and unable to work for 6 months after Chemo treatment for Hodgkins Lymphoma. The dinner will be Sept. 28 starting at 11:30 a.m. at the Columbia County School District offices. The cost is $7 and includes green beans, cole slaw, bread and dessert. Please call Kathy or Belinda at 755-8050 with your order no later than Wednesday, Sept. 26. Sept. 29FACS meetingThe Filipino American Cultural Society of Lake City will hold its Fall Family Festival and general meet-ing from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sept. 29 at the Alligator Park Main Pavilion. All FACS active members and guest should plan to attend the group’s annual out-door event, featuring lots of games, prizes, music, dancing, cultural food, and just plain fun for the entire family. Everyone is asked to bring their best covered dish to share. For more information, contact Bob Gavette at 965-5905.Make-A-Wish trainingOn Saturday, Sept. 29 the Make-A-Wish Foundation of Central and Northern Florida will be hosting a Wish Granting Training Session in Lake City for volunteers in the Northeast Region. The Make-A-Wish Foundation grants the wishes of children with life threatening medical conditions to enrich the human experience with hope, strength and joy. This training session will teach the volunteers how to determine the child’s one true wish, different wish granting techniques, poli-cies & guidelines and how to grant the actual wish. Wish Granters volunteer their time around their own schedule and tradi-tionally requires one hour per week. Ideal wish grant-ers have great communi-cation, commitment and patience. You must be 21 or older to apply. To apply to become a volunteer and attend training, please con-tact Stephanie Smith at 407.622.4673 x201 or e-mail ssmith@wishcentral.org. Funding availableAltrusa Internation of Lake City has funding avail-able to assist qualified local nonprofits with projects benefiting women and chil-dren in Columbia County. Applications are available from Mantha Young at the Lake City Advertiser, 508 NW Main Blvd. or elec-tronically from Robin Hall at drrobin1@comcast.net. Applications must be com-pleted and submitted by Nov. 1.Farmers marketThis Saturday, Sept. 29 Megan Webb debuts in Wilson Park with her love of folk music. Megan’s musi-cal career began at the age of 2 and she has been sing-ing, writing music and play-ing ever since. Megan also helps lead worship services at Church on the Way in downtown Lake City. Also on Sept. 29, Vocal Impact will hold a Fundraiser Bake Sale. Vocal Impact is a free community show choir new to the community made up of young people ages 12-18. The Lake DeSoto Farmers Market is open every Saturday from 8 a.m. to noon in Wilson Park located along Lake DeSoto between the Columbia County Courthouse and Shands Lakeshore Hospital in downtown Lake City. The market is a regional favorite among shoppers looking for healthy local foods and creative locally made gift items. Oct. 1Candidate meet/greetA Meet and Greet with Stephanie Finnell, can-didate for School Board District 5, will be 6 to 8 p.m. Oct. 1 at the Mason City Community Center. Chicken pilau will be served. Free computer classesThe Greater Lake City Community Development Corp. will host a five week, 20 hour free basic comput-er classes to enhance the lifestyle of our residents in Lake City. Regular atten-dance will be required. Registration begins Monday, Oct. 1. Please contact Ann at 752-9785 for stop by at 363 NW Bascom Norris Drive. Classes will be Monday and Tuesday nights from 6 to 8 p.m. Oct. 2FFA open houseThe Fort White FFA Chapters and Alumni invite all parents, former mem-bers and friends of the FFA to the Annual Fort White Agriscience/FFA Open House on Tuesday, Oct. 2 at 7 p.m. in the Fort White Middle School cafeteria. This will be an informa-tive meeting about the FFA and our Alumni and sup-porters group as we begin the new year. There will be a cookout style dinner served and our 1st Annual Cake Auction to raise funds to help the FFA throughout the year. Looking forward to seeing members new and old there!Oct. 3Olustee meetingThe Blue-Grey Army will meet at 5:30 p.m. Oct. 3 to plan the Olustee Battle Festival. The meeting will be at the school district central building room 153, 409 SW St. Johns St.Newcomers luncheonThe October Friendship Luncheon of the Lake City Newcomers and Friends will be held at Applebees located at 2893 W US 90, Oct. 3 at 11:30 a.m. For more information call: Rose Taylor at 755-2175 or Barbara Test 754-7227.Builders’ meetingThe Columbia County Builders’ Assn. is excited to have speakers from Florida Home Builders Association in Tallahassee speak at our Oct. 3 General Council lunch at Guang Dong. Sponsors will be Columbia Bank and PCS Phosphate. Join us to hear what is happening in Florida regarding the building industry. Enjoy the buffet about 11:30 a. m. Meeting will start at noon. Come early to social-ize and do some network-ing. Members $12 and non-members $15. Reservations are appreciated. Call: 386-867-1998 to reserve your place now. Or, send an e-mail to: colcountybuild@comast.net.Oct. 4Grief supportCoping with the Loss of your Spouse will be offered to the public on Thursday, Oct. 4 at 11 a.m. at the Wings Education Center, 857 SW Main Blvd (Lake City Plaza). The workshop, facilitated by Jerry Tyre, will offer an overview of Grief and suggest ways of coping with a recent loss of a spouse. There is no cost. For information or to register, contact Vicki Myers at 755-7714 Ext. 2411 or 866-642-0962. The Wings Education Center is a program of Hospice of Citrus County, Inc.Oct. 5Dracula in theaterHigh Springs Community Theater will present a new comedy thriller by Leroy Clark, adapted from Bram Stoker’s book Dracula. Opening Oct. 5 and running weekends for all of October, “Dracula” ends October 28. In this adapta-tion, Dr. Van Helsing is a medical specialist with Tourette’s Syndrome, Renfield is a woman, Dr. Seward’s Aunt Quincy is tipsy at times, and there’s even a French maid. This actress is from Lake City. Continuing our new tradi-tion of an opening night free reception, the Friday Oct. 5 performance will have doors opening at 7:15 p.m. so patrons can enjoy the reception before the 8 p.m. showtime. Adult tick-ets are $11, children 12 and under, $8, and seniors on Sunday matinees are the special rate of $9. Tickets may be purchased at The Framery in downtown Lake City, 341 S. Marion Avenue, 386-754-2780. Online tickets are available at highspringscommuni-tytheater.com. Shows are Fridays and Saturdays, 8 p.m, and Sundays, 2 p.m. Oct. 6 Grief support campThe Hospice of the Nature Coast Wings Grief Support Team will present Camp Good Hope and Teen Encounter on Saturday, Oct. 6. Registration begins at 8:45 a.m. with camp end-ing at 4 p.m. at Alligator Lake Park, on Southeast Country Club Road in Lake City. The grief support camps give kids and family members an opportunity to gather together in an honest, safe environment with others who have expe-rienced the loss of a loved one. It is a day of hope and healing with all the fun of a Fall camp. There will be age-appropriate group ses-sions led by hospice grief specialists. Camp Good Hope and Teen Encounter is open to children ages 6 to 18 years old. The Wings Grief Support Team pro-vides grief support servic-es at no charge to those who have experienced the death of a loved one. For more information call Vicki Myers at 386-755-7714 (ext. 2411) or 866-642-0962.Singles reunionLake City Christian Singles will have a reunion Saturday, Oct. 6 at 2 p.m at Bethel United Methodist Church, 4869 US Highway 441, in the fellowship hall. Everyone is invited, with a special invitation to those who found their soul-mates through Lake City Christian Singles. Come share your stories, giving hope to oth-ers. Bring finger sandwich-es and deserts. For infor-mation call Wanda Opry at 386-963-3853. Register to voteLake City Get Out and Vote will help residents register to vote with fun, free food and souvenirs at the Fort White Community Center Oct. 6 from 9 a.m. to noon. To volunteer or for information call 755-3110. Oct. 7Noegel reunionThe Noegel Family Reunion will be Sunday, Oct. 7 at 1 p.m. on at Ed Bedenbaugh’s place, off C-135 (Noegel Road). Please bring a covered dish and come fellowship with friends and family. For more inforamtion call Jo Ann at 752-9334 or Patti at 752-0446. Little-Hill reunionThe annual Little-Hill Family Reunion will be held on Oct. 7 at Mason City Community Center. Come early to visit and bring a covered dish for lunch at approximately 1p.m. Paper products and drinks will be provided. Oct. 9Medicare seminarThe Lifestyle Enrichment Center of Lake City is spon-soring a free Medicare Edicational Seminar Tuesday, Oct. 9 from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. The semi-nar will be moderated by Irv Crowetz of C/C & Associates. Subjects cov-ered will be: what you need to know about Medicare, when to enroll, what’s cov-ered and is a supplement needed. This seminar is for educational purposes only, it is not a sales seminar. Please RSVP to 755-3476, ext. 107. Historical meetingThe Columbia County Historical Society will meet at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 9 in the downtown pub-lic library in Lake City. Guest speaker will be LaViece Smallwood Moser, Director of the Heritage Park Village in Macclenny. The meeting is free and open to the public. Contact Sean McMahon at 754-4293 for more information.Photo clubLake City Photo Club meets every 2nd Tuesday of each month from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Lifestyle Enrichment Center at Baya Ave. Share your photos and ideas with the group. Newcomers are welcome! LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY & SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28-29, 2012 3A3A COMMUNITY CALENDAR Q To submit your Community Calendar item, contact Laura Hampson at 754-0427 or by e-mail at lhampson@ lakecityreporter.com.JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City ReporterShake, rattle and rollWestside Elementary School fifth-grade teacher Tammy NesS mith (from left), curriculum resource teacher Janice Camp, reading coach Amand a Bullard and paraprofessional Kelly Erkinger show off their hula-hooping skills Wed nesday in preparation for the school’s Fall Festival, which kicks off at 2:30 p.m. on Saturday. The wo men were misidentified in Thursday’s Lake City Reporter

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Q Scripps Howard News Service F ormer President Bill Clinton is justifiably known for his politi-cal and psychologi-cal resilience. Not for nothing is he known as the Comeback Kid. But what happened Tuesday at a meeting of the Clinton Global Initiative in New York would have send a lesser man crashing to the floor of the Sheraton Hotel ballroom with a severe case of historical whip-lash. Clinton, whom the GOP strove mightily to evict from office, is being favorably invoked, even courted, by Mitt Romney, the Republican presi-dential nominee. Standing by the former president’s side, Romney said, “If there’s one thing we’ve learned in this election season, by the way, is that a few words from Bill Clinton can do a man a lot of good.” He was referring to Clinton’s speech in support of President Barack Obama at the Democratic convention, which resulted in a slight boost -a “bounce,” in political parlance -in the polls. Joked Romney, “All I got to do now is wait a few days for that bounce to happen.” Such comments from a leading Republican would have been unimaginable 13 and 14 years ago, when con-gressional Republicans were striving mightily to drive Bill Clinton from office. Thanks to their efforts, he became only the second U.S. president, after Andrew Johnson, to be impeached. The House, after a fouryear investigation by special prosecutor Kenneth Starr, impeached Clinton on two charges, perjury and obstruc-tion of justice, in connection with Paula Jones and, more notoriously, Monica Lewinsky. The votes, on Dec. 19, 1998, were almost strictly party line, 228 to 206 for perjury and 221 to 212 on obstruction. The charges then went to the Senate, where 13 House “man-agers” in wearily repetitive iteration of the charges over three days presented their case to an increasingly bored and irritated Senate. The Senate acquitted Clinton on Feb. 12, 1999, with 50 sena-tors voting guilty on obstruc-tion and 45 on perjury, well short of the 67 votes needed to remove him from office. No Democrat voted for conviction and several Republicans joined them. Then as now, it was a time of bitter partisanship by House Republicans who found not charge too outlandish or outra-geous to hurl at the president. To be fair, the Clintons gave them lots of ammunition with Travelgate, Chinagate, Hillary Clinton’s missing billing records, Bill Clinton’s woman-izing, treating top donors to use of the Lincoln Bedroom and, as the president left the White House, a clutch of what seemed to be politically moti-vated pardons. In spite of the prevailing nastiness, Clinton and the Republicans were able to enact welfare reform, balance the budget and enjoy several years of budget surpluses. Now Clinton has come back once again -to re-elect Obama. Notice that, unlike during the debates early this year, Romney didn’t offer to make a $10,000 bet on the out-come. Bill’sback in thepicture OUR OPINION HIGHLIGHTS IN HISTORY Today is Friday, Sept. 28, the 272nd day of 2012. There are 94 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History:On Sept. 28, 1787, the Congress of the Confederation voted to send the just-complet-ed Constitution of the United States to state legislatures for their approval. N ot totally happy with your body, your health, your life? Remember the “Million Dollar Man?” “We can make him bet-ter; stronger.” No matter what your circumstances, you have another chance. Science tells us that we grow new cells in our bodies every day. Every cell in our bodies is replaced within seven years. You’ve a new, dif-ferent person every day. Why not build that new person into the great “you” that you can be? I’ve seen on recent news reports individuals with no legs who dance and compete athleti-cally. A young surfer girl wins competitions, even after losing one arm to a shark. Folks with serious physical issues like MS or fibromyalgia commonly make outstanding contributions to mankind. Sounds great. How will you do it? I’m not a physical thera-pist or a doctor, but common sense and science agree on several tried-and-true principles, which you can use to build that “new, improved you.” You are what you eat, what you do, and what you think you are. You can control what you eat, what you do, and what you think. You probably already know healthy foods from junk, how to get physical activity, and how to have a positive attitude. All it takes is making the deci-sion to do the right thing for yourself. Here’s how: • Eat healthier. Take lighter and more regular meals. Become aware of calories and your appropriate daily caloric intake. Choose a variety of foods that supply protein, carbohydrates, vitamins and minerals. You’re omnivorous: you need both flora and fauna. Avoid “junk” food; that which is over-processed, with lots of fat and sugar added. Drink plenty of water, and veggie and fruit juices. Minimize sodas, alcohol and coffee. •Get regular daily physical activity. Bodies are for using, not just for parking somewhere. Whatever physical limitations you may have, you can look for ways to stretch and work those joints and muscles. Walk more. Can’t walk? Swim. Can’t run? Ride a bike. Start small. Very minor changes over a long period of time produce wonders. Work with your doctor to build the best health and fitness you could have. •Think positive. Research shows that optimists live on the average of 7 to 10 years longer than pessimists, and I bet they enjoy that life much more. Become aware of nega-tive thoughts you have during your day. When you feel a negative feeling, like anger, sad-ness, or worry, recognize that as a sign that you may be look-ing at the bad side rather than the good. Identify those nega-tive thoughts, and look for the positive side. When you face a problem or an obstacle, look at it as a situation life presents you as a challenge, an opportunity to learn and grow from, and a step to becoming the best you can be. Accept and appreciate your capabilities, and play the hand you’re dealt. All we know for sure is that we have at least this one life. Life is the most precious gift we get. Why not make the most of what you’ve got to work with, and enjoy this life to the fullest? Start right now. Total makeover LETTERS TO THE EDITOR To the Editor:The president’s key words last election cycle were “Hope and Change.” This time the word is “Forward.” Since he has totally failed in his first term, then what are we looking “Forward” to? “Forward” with giving billions of dollars to our enemies? “Forward” toward America’s collapse and relin-quishing our leadership role? “Forward” with the recruitment of welfare and food stamp recipi-ents? “Forward” to more credit downgrades, economic class warfare, blaming others for his failure, funny math and distor-tions, apologies for America’s greatness, more government control, wealth redistribution, assault on successful money makers, more abortions, more illegal alien protection, elevation of homosexual lifestyle, and the institution of Sharia law? Americans, we must fire this president and give some-one else a chance to restore America before it’s too late. If we don’t like the next president we can dump him too. We gave President Obama a chance and he failed miserably and we are becoming a socialist third world country. Please put our millionaire president (who gained that status while presi-dent) back in Chicago. “My reading of history convinces me that most bad gov-ernment results from too much government.” – Thomas Jefferson.God bless America.Bill GloverLake City ‘Forward’ – but toward what? Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding counties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, publisher Robert Bridges, editor Sue Brannon, controller Dink NeSmith, president Tom Wood, chairman LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY E-MAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com C olumbia County got good news on the school front with word that ACT scores here reached a five-year high in 2012. The ACT, counterpart to the better-known SAT, is the col-lege-readiness exam taken by most local students. This year our seniors scored an average of 19.8 out of 36, right on par with statewide results. That bodes well for yet-to-be-deter-mined high school grades, which are based in part on col-lege-readiness tests. Our story on local ACT scores appeared in yesterday’s paper. On Page 4A of that same edition was an editorial from The Washington Times bemoaning the state of SAT scores nationwide. SAT scores have been declining for years, the Times noted. This year they hit a 40-year low in reading. But what the piece didn’t note was that ACT scores haven’t been all that hot across the nation either. Of course, our numbers could surely be better as well. According to the ACT website, scores required for likely suc-cess in college are 24 for sci-ence, 22 for math, 21 for read-ing and 18 for English. So while our scores may have a ways to go, we’re pleased to see that our stu-dents, at least, are trending in the right direction. ACT scores rising Q Associated Press OPINION Friday & Saturday, September 28-29, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A4AOPINION Robert DennyBob.Denny8@gmail.com Q Contact Robert Denny at (386) 454-4950. To the Editor:This letter is in response to the letter written by Louis Beames and published in the Reporter on Wednesday, Sept. 26. First, for him to use Psalm 23, Psalm of David, to spew forth his vitriolic nonsense is beyond belief. But it may help to define who he is and where he is coming from. Any comparison of the work, employment and accom-plishments of President Obama and challenger candidate Romney can leave one with only one choice. The question is not whether you are completely happy with either. The question is whether you want to save America from Obama who wants to “funda-mentally change America.” We know our current government is a constitutional republic. Obama has not stated what he fundamentally wants to change us to and that should con-cern everyone. So we choose between a successful business-man who has created compa-nies, employed thousands of Americans, saved the Olympics from disaster and made himself and many others rich while doing, or, the other man who was a community organizer and trainer for ACORN which is now identified with voting fraud and harassing financial institutions to force loans to unqualified per-sons helping to cause the hous-ing meltdown, a former state senator who had no accomplish-ments and rarely showed up at all followed by serving as a U.S. Senator where he was noted for voting “present” on most legisla-tion. I do agree with Beames writing, “Wake up America. Your vote does count.” However I believe it is time to “restore America” to our constitutional republic and to stop this movement to “funda-mentally change America” to an unidentified location and posi-tion. I encourage everyone to vote to “Save America” before that fundamental change makes it impossible. Wilbur G. CorbittLake City Time to restore the Republic ANOTHER VIEW

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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY & SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28-29, 2012 5A5A COUPON REQUIRED ...Do you have the over-priced, slow-speedInternet Blues?GetFAST High-Speed Internet Today!Now Available Everywhere! Call your N. Central & N. Florida Authorized Dealer Today at386-269-0984 1-800-787-8041 $39.95to$59.99/Mo. “Because CABLE is so last century!”21st Century Communications, LLCDigital TV Service & UNLIMITED phone service, too!Ask About Phillip William BoslandMr. Phillip William Bosland, 67, of Lake City, passed away on Tuesday, September 25, 2012. He was a na-tive of North Kingsville, Ohio and had resided in Al-buquerque, New Mexico before moving to Lake City in 2008. He retired with the rank of First Sgt. from the United States Army after 20 years of service. During his service in the Army, he served three tours in Vietnam. He was the Second Vice-Commander of the Lake City American Legion Post #57 and a member of their honor guard, a location leader of Wreaths Across America and a lifetime member of the Veteran’s of Foreign Wars. Mr. Bosland also voluntarily served as the Regional Director for 10 years in the United States Naval Sea Cadet program for the South Georgia and North Florida area.Survivors include his wife, Caroline Bosland, Lake City; his daughter, Felicia Bosland, Lake City; two sons and daugh-ter in laws, Myron and Christy Trujillo, Jacksonville and Car-los and Julie Trujillo, Long-wood; two sisters, Deanna Sposito, North Kingsville, Ohio and Leota Bancroft, Tuscon, AZ; three brothers, Martin Bo-sland, III and Bert Brown both of North Kingsville, Ohio and Charles Bosland, Tucson, AZ; four grandchildren and numer-ous extended family and friends.Funeral services will be con-ducted at 3:00 PM, Saturday, September 29, 2012 in the Chapel of Guerry Funeral Home with Pastor Simon Middleton of Christ Central Ministries RIFLDWLQJ,QWHUPHQWZLOOEHat 1:00 PM, Monday, October 1, 2012 at the Florida National Cemetery in Bushnell, Florida with full military honors. Visi-tation with the family will be from 1-3:00 PM, two hours prior to the service at the fu-neral home on Saturday. In OLHXRIRZHUVGRQDWLRQVPD\be made to the American Le-gion Post #57, Lake City, Flor-ida in memory of Mr. Bosland. Arrangements are under the direction of the GUERRY FUNERAL HOME Lake City. Please sign the guestbook at www.guerryfuneralhome.netCordanus HopkinsCordanus (Candi) Hopkins, age 49 resident of Lake City, Fl.,departed this life, Sunday, Sept. 23, 2012 at the Lake City Medical Center termi-nating an ex-tended illness. Born in Mem-phis, Tenn., she was the daughter of Mr. Hazel Williams & the late Mr. Josh Hopkins. She attended the public schools of Shelby Souncy in Memphis, Tenn. Survivors include her mother, Mrs. Hazel Williams; a devoted friend, Richard Harrell; Chil-dren, Cenethia (Sha) Jackson (Sheldon), Keon (Betty) McKin-ley, Chimere McKinley, Ciera Hopkins, Cededra Hopkins, Clantra Hopkins, and Ceder-icka Hopkins; (5) Sisters, Di-ann (Leroy) Morgan, Jacqueline Morris, Mary (Norman) Ducre, Sophia L. Sterling, and Sherry (Eddie) Braddy; (4) Brothers, the late Otha James Britton, Al-len C. Britton (Rita), Cornelius (Francis) Wright, and Lorenzo (Shelia) Hopkins; (5) Grandchil-dren, Sheldon Jr., Asayjah Jack-son, Tyavious Cooper, Beona McKinley and Kiree Hopkins; (3) Aunts, Roseie (Raleigh) Rolan Roland, Bobbie (Allen) Brown, and Pearlean Brown; (1) Uncle, the late L.V. Ev-ans, a host of nieces, nephews, cousins, and other relative and friends also survive.Funeral services for Corda-nus (Candi) Hopkins will be held at 11:00 a.m. Monday, October 1, 2012 at Cooper Funeral Home, Chapel with 5HY$OOHQ%ULWWRQRIFLDWLQJArrangements entrusted toCOOPER FUNERAL HOME 251 N.E. Washington Street, Lake City, FL. Willis O. Cooper, L.F.D.Obituaries are paid advertise-ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporter’s classified department at 752-1293. OBITUARIES TRASH: Shaky transition for some Continued From Page 1A OFFENDER: Allegedly assaulted teen Continued From Page 1A TEACHER: Suspended without pay Continued From Page 1A LEGENDS: Former Harlem Globetrotter pays a visit to Columbia High Continued From Page 1ASuwannee Valley All Star Teams, made up of law enforcement officers, fire fighters, community leaders and teachers. The event kicks off at 4:30 p.m. at the Suwannee Valley Coliseum, 1301 11th St., and benefits the Girls and Boys Club of Suwannee County. Tickets are $13 for adults and $10 for students at the door. Douglas founded the the Michael Douglas Youth Foundation in 1991 to provide a fun, educational model of healthy living. The Harlem Legends, a group of professional athletes, former Globetrotters and Olympians, are part of the foundation. The group tours the country to raise money for nonprofits and motivate children. Douglas will speak today at Melrose Park Elementary against bullying. In 1986, Douglas was among 1,500 players invited to try out for the Globetrotters. Overwhelmed with the competition, Douglas said he didn’t know how he would stand out in the crowd of excellent players. “I came in with a positive attitude, I believed in myself and I had been work-ing on my skills since I was a kid,” he said. Douglas was the number one pick of three men selected to join the Globetrotters that year. He toured with the Globetrotters from 1986 to 1993. With the team, Douglas traveled to more than 100 countries around the world. People would ask how he got so lucky to be able to travel and play for a famous team. Douglas said he thought about it and coined the phrase: “Luck only occurs where preparation and oppor-tunity meet.” He started playing basketball at age 7, but didn’t become a professional basket-ball player until he was 24. “Those were my preparation years and that’s what you are doing right here today, prepar-ing yourself for your future,” he said to students. Everyone wants to be successful at what they set out to do, he said. “That means you need to say to yourself: if it’s to be, it’s up to me. You can’t blame your parents, your teachers or your friends. You have to decide whatever it is you want to be. It’s up to you to do it,” he said. Even with work hard, there are still obstacles, he said. “You can do everything right in life, but life is not going to be easy. Life is going to present you with obstacles,” he said. How hard you are willing to work is going to set you apart from the rest, Douglas said. CHS boys basketball coach Horace Jefferson said he thought students really tuned in to Douglas’ message. “I hope they learn the importance of not stopping,” Jefferson said. “You have to keep driving through that storm,” he said. Growing up, Jefferson said he was a Globetrotters fan, everyone was. Austin Chapman, a CHS ninth-grader, said Douglas connected with students by showing he had things in common with them. He used basketball to make exam-ples and stories fun. “It was awesome,” Chapman said. The Columbia County School Board voted Tuesday to suspend Ferguson without pay indefinitely, pending further investigation. Superintendent Michael Millikin said Ferguson’s arrest was not school-related. According to the Columbia County Sheriff’s Office, Ferguson got into an unlocked 2008 Chevrolet Silverado at a S&S Food Store, 4046 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, around 8:30 p.m. on Sept. 6. After realizing what she had done, Ferguson called the owner to return it. Ferguson admitted to stealing the truck because she needed a way home, accord-ing to the arrest report. The owner of the vehicle had left the truck unlocked and the keys on the floorboard before going into the store. He saw the taillights of the truck leaving the parking lot, ran outside and yelled for the Ferguson to stop, according to the report. When police responded to the scene, a store clerk told deputies an older women wearing a white jacket was in the store at the time and left before the vehicle owner. The same woman could be seen on the store’s video surveillance bending down next to the driver side tire of the truck. She then got into the truck and fled quickly, according to an arrest report. At about 1 a.m. Sept. 7, Ferguson called the owner, identifying herself as the per-son who stole his truck. Ferguson told the truck owner that he stole her vehicle and she wanted to make a swap at the B&B Food Store on Highway 247 and County Road 242, according to the report. The owner told police he didn’t know what Ferguson was talking about, but agreed to meet. There, Ferguson gave the owner back his keys and sat down casually inside the store, according to the report. Deputy John Snipes went into the store and saw that Ferguson matched the suspect seen on the surveillance video. Ferguson admitted to Snipes that she stole the truck when she saw it unlocked at the S&S because she needed a way home, according to the report. Ferguson told police she did not have permission to use the truck and did not know the vehicle’s owner. When she realized what she had done, Ferguson decided to return the truck, according to the report. Ferguson was arrested and booked into the Columbia Count Detention Facility. She was released on $5,000 bond. Monday where residents had con-cerns about their missing trash carts. Grayson Cason, Lake City assistant city manager, also spoke about getting calls from residents and explained how the problem is being remedied. “We’ve received calls from citizens and customers letting us be aware and notifying us that their trash carts from their residences have been removed from the last pickup from the service provider, Republic Services,” Cason said. “They want to know where are they going to put their trash now and it’s a big concern. It’s a concern of ours too. We’re working really hard to get them a new trash cart at their residence. We started putting them out Thursday, ahead of schedule and we anticipate having them all out by Sunday.” Waste Pro, which will be the city’s new solid waste collection vendor, begins its new contract with the city on Oct. 1. Republic Services owns the trash carts residents have been using as part of its contract with the city for the past decade, but its employees are taking the carts on their final trash col-lection, which was not anticipated by city or Waste Pro officials. “As I understand it, Republic Services is coming along in its normal sched-uled route to pick up the waste and when they empty the cart, they’re also loading the cart up on a truck or trailer and taking it away — they actually own the cart,” Cason said. “We’re working feverishly behind them with Waste Pro to replace that cart with a new one.” Dumas said residents who’ve had their carts taken should not be without a cart for an extended period of time and the cart will be replaced in the order they were taken. He estimated that about 3,500 new trash carts will be issued to city resi-dents, in addition to new trash collec-tion dumpsters given to local commer-cial and industrial customer s. tion officer. Anthony Bryant Swanson, 42, 1353 MC 5034, Yellville, Arkansas, was charged with sexual battery on a per-son under the age of 17 by a person over the age of 24, use or allowing a child to engage in sex, child abuse and resisting arrest without violence in connection with the case. He was booked into the Columbia County Detention Facility without bond. According to Columbia County Sheriff’s reports, around 9:45 p.m. Wednesday, deputies Chad Guerry and Cpl. Rick Glover learned that the suspect my be temporarily staying at the Piney Woods Lodge, a local Motel on U.S. 90. Guerry observed a man matching the suspect’s description walking on the sidewalk toward the hotel. Guerry ordered the suspect to stop, but the man fled across U.S. 90 toward the Publix supermarket. Guerry and Glover chased the suspect and were able to apprehend him after tackling him in the Publix parking lot. The suspect was interviewed by Guerry and reportedly admitted that he had traveled to Lake City from Arkansas to meet the 17-year-old girl. “He allegedly met her through a chat line and knew her age,” Seifert said. “The suspect admitted to depu-ties that he did in fact have sexual contact with the victim while he was here.” Bryant is a convicted sexual offender in Arkansas for a previous rape and sexual battery charge, Seifert said. Swanson is listed as a Level 3 offender in Arkansas. Arkansas describes a Level 3 offender as follows: “Typically offenders in this category have a history of repeat sexual offending, an/or strong anti-social, violent or predatory personal-ity characteristics. These are indi-viduals whose offense and criminal history require notification through-out the community.”Prescription drug take-back day is SaturdayFrom staff reportsThe Lake City Police Department and the Drug Enforcement Administration will hold the annual prescription drug take-back program Saturday from 10 a.m. 2 p.m. The event will take place at the Lake City Police Department Public Safety Building, 225 NW Main Blvd. and is free and anonymous. Residents are asked to rid their homes of potentially dangerous expired, unused, and unwanted prescrip-tion drugs through the program. According to data from the Lake City Police Department, in April Americans turned in 552,161 pounds, 276 tons, of pre-scription drugs at more than 5,600 sites operated by the DEA and nearly 4,300 state and local law enforcement partners. In its four previous Take Back event, DEA and its partners took in more than 1.5 mil-lion pounds, nearly 775 tons, of pills. The initiative addresses a vital public safety and public health issue. Medicines that languish in home cabinets are high-ly susceptible to diversion, misuse and abuse. Rates of prescription drug abuse in the U.S. are alarmingly high, as are the number of accidental poisonings and overdoses due to these drugs. Studies show that a majority of abused prescription drugs are obtained from fam-ily and friends, including from the home medicine cabinet. In addition, Americans are now advised that their usual methods for disposal of unused medicines — flush-ing them down the toilet or throwing them in the trash — both pose potential safety and health hazards. VA health fairTONY BRITT /Lake City ReporterJames Louque, of Perry, gets a flu shot vaccination from Je nny Adams, a Lake City VA Medical Center employee, during a VA health fair Thursda y. See story in Sunday’s paper.

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FAITH & VALUES Friday & Saturday, September 28-29, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 6A$)9 I closed last week’s article with the plea for Christians not to involve your selves with Halloween and that I would share some information with you about “The Origin of Halloween”. You may or may not know about the origin. The follow-ing information was compiled by James L. Melton: “The idea of observing October 31st as a holiday originated with the ancient Celtic priests, called “Druids”, around 300 B.C. The Druids lived in the area between Great Britain and Germany. Their new year began on November 1st, so October 31st was set aside to worship their god, Samhain, the god of the dead. So October 31st was the Celtic New Year’s Eve, the time for their Festival of Death. The Druids believed that Samhain gathered all the souls of the past year’s dead on this night. These souls had been confined to the bodies of various animals to atone for their sins. Animal sac-rifices and even human sacrifices were carried out, usually in forests. This practice was observed until around 61 A.D. when it was out-lawed by the Romans. However, some animal sacrifices were still practiced as late as 400 A.D. The Druids taught that the spirit world was closer to the earth on this night than at any other time, and that “the gods” would even appear on this night to play tricks on people Pope Bonoface III, in the sev-enth century, set aside May 13ths as “All Saints Day” or “All Hallows Day” as a time for Roman Catholics to honor all known dead saints. In the eighth century, Pope Gregory III moved the date to November 1st which conveniently merged “All Hallows Day” and “All Hallows Eve” with the Celtic New Year and the Festival of Samhain. This custom wasn’t much observed in America until the l940’s when large numbers of immigrants came over from Ireland and Scotland. “ “Halloween is Satanic! You may pretend that it’s a harmless game for kids, but in reality it represents paganism, Satanism, human sacri-fice, torture, rape, mur-der, idolatry, witchcraft, and spiritualism! Did you know that October 31st is consid-ered by Satanists to be their most important day of the year? WAKE UP! Don’t honor the Devil! Honor God instead by refusing to observe Halloween this year. The Lord Jesus Christ wouldn’t dress innocent children up like the dev-ils of Hell and march them around town, so why should you? Are you a TRUE follower of Jesus Christ? Then SKIP Halloween this year and tell others to do likewise!” Now the Spirit speaketh expressly, that in the latter times some shall depart from the faith, giving heed to seducing spirits, and doctrines of devils (I Tim. 4:1). And have no fellowship with the unfruitful works of darkness, but rather reprove them (Eph. 5:11). The night is far spent, the day is at hand; let us therefore cast off the works of darkness, and let us put on the armor of light (Rom. 13:12). The gospel of Satan is always an imitator of the True Gospel. Satan uses paganism like Halloween to keep people away from the True Gospel. Don’t believe him! Don’t fall into his cleaver trap! Don’t believe in the inno-cence of Halloween; it is not! The Doctrine of Satan Part 2 Hugh Sherrillems-hugh43@comcast.net Q Hugh Sherrill is an ordained minister and Bible Teacher at Eastside Baptist Church. Q Carlton G. McPeak is an evangelist working in the Lake City area. All Scriptural quotations are from the New American Standard Bible, Holman Bible Publishers, unless otherwise stated. Traits of people who dwell in God’s tentBefore people can go and dwell with distinguished dignitaries there must first be a back-ground check made. The researcher is looking for certain traits in the pro-spective dweller. If the person does not qualify, he is not allowed to enter into the dwelling of the dignitaries. David, a king himself, writes a Psalm (15) which describes the person who can abide or dwell with the Lord in His “tent.” Because he was a king, David could envision what the Lord, the King of everyone, would want as to the type of people who would live on His “holy hill.” The “man after God’s own heart” listed sever-al different traits of the person who would be welcomed in the Lord’s tent, located on the top of Mount Zion, in the city of Jerusalem. These traits had to do with character, speech, attitude, honesty, and helpfulness. King David concludes by say-ing that if a person has these traits and does them “they will never be shak-en” (15:5). The character of the person who will dwell in God’s tent must be one who “walks with integrity and works righteousness” (15:2). This type of person will live his life according to moral principles as set by God. He will live in such a way, and do things which are always right. The speech of a person who will dwell on God’s “holy hill” will always be truthful and he will never try to slander another per-son (15:2c, 3). From his tongue he will have the reputation of being one who speaks the truth. When he slanders some-one he is not telling the truth about them and he wants to hurt them in some way. The attitude of the person who wants to dwell in God’s tent towards other people is that he does not want to do any evil toward them. He is not one that is looking to find fault with them so that he can always be blaming them or cen-sure them in some way. When he recognizes their faults, it is so that he can help them to correct their faults and to change them, and not so that he can “put the person to shame.” The person who will dwell in God’s tent has a negative attitude towards those who are not follow-ing the commands of God. He honors those who fear God and wants the wicked to change their ways so that they both can dwell on God’s “holy hill.” A very difficult trait for the person who wants to dwell in God’s tent to have is always telling the truth even if it is to his disad-vantage. He is willing to suffer any consequences that may come his way because he has told the truth. Telling the truth is very important to him. To those who are less fortunate than the per-son who wants to dwell in God’s tent, he is very helpful. He will not charge interest to the less fortu-nate just so that he can help out his neighbor. Likewise, he is not going to put a burden upon “the innocent” by requiring that this person pay him for his testimony. When we consider these traits of the person who wants to live on God’s “holy hill” and in His “tent,” are we willing to develop these character-istics? How much do we want to dwell with God? How much do we want to be in His presence? If our background check is not what it should be, are we willing to make the neces-sary changes so we can dwell with God? Living with God is going to be wonderful. Living in His “tent” on His “holy hill” will be the greatest thing we will ever enjoy! BIBLICAL MEDITATION Carlton McPeakcarlton_mc@msn.com BIBLE STUDIES

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LAKE CITY REPORTER RELIGION FRIDAY & SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28-29, 2012 7A$5HOLJLRQ WORKSHOPMEETING CITYOFLAKECITY CITYCOUNCILNOTICEISHEREBYGIVEN thattheCityCouncilfortheCityofLakeCity,Floridawill holdaworkshopmeetingonMonday,October1,2012.Themeetingisscheduledfor5:00p.m.atCityHall,205NorthMarionStreet,LakeCity,Florida.Thepurposeofthe workshopis: RecreationServicesDiscussion Allinterestedpersonsareinvitedtoattend.Noofficialactionwillbe takenduringthismeeting. AUDREYESIKES,MMCCityClerkLAKECITYCOMMUNITYREDEVELOPMENTAGENCYMEETING CITYOFLAKECITYNOTICEISHEREBYGIVEN thattheLakeCityCommunityRedevelopmentAgencyforthe CityofLakeCity,FloridawillholdameetingonMonday,October1,2012,at6:45P.M.,i nthe CouncilChamberslocatedonthesecondfloorofCityHallat205NorthMarionAvenue ,Lake City,Florida.THEPURPOSEOFTHEMEETINGISTOCONSIDERTHEFOLLOWINGITEMS: Fa = adeGrantApplications Resolution-Contract-JonesEdmundsforPhaseIEnvironmentalAssessment(VannProperty) Allinterestedpersonsareinvitedtoattend. AUDREYESIKES,MMCCityClerkCITYCOUNCILMEETING THECITYCOUNCILOFTHECITYOFLAKECITY,FLORIDAWILL MEETONMONDAY,OCTOBER1,2012AT7:00P.M.INTHECOUNCIL CHAMBERSLOCATEDONTHESECONDFLOOROFCITYHALLAT 205NORTHMARIONAVENUE,LAKECITY,FLORIDAAllinterestedpersonsareinvitedtoattend.SPECIALREQUIREMENTS:Ifyourequirespecialaidorservicesforanyoft hemeetings identifiedabove,asaddressedintheAmericanDisabilitiesAct,pleas econtacttheCity Manager > sOfficeat(386)719-5768. AUDREYESIKES,MMCCityClerk L istening to “The Horse Whisperer” last night was real-ly interesting. ‘Buck’, had gone through a really tough childhood along with his brother. His dad had pushed them into stardom in TV com-mercials, since they had learned at a very early age about twirling a rope, doing fancy tricks that drew many crowds. Their dad was a drunk, and often they would receive beatings because of his anger over the least bit of imperfection he noticed in them. Eventually the football coach noticed the whelps left on ‘Buck’s’ back when he showered after PE, and called the local Sherriff, who had the boys taken away from their dad (their mom had passed away). It was hard but they had to learn to trust and love people again. As ‘Buck’ told his story, he spoke of how he had always been inter-ested in horses, and one day, met Ray Hunt a horse whisperer’. He followed him for years, watching how his method of gently handling the roughest horse, could accomplish more in a few days, than most could in a month. Now, ‘Buck’ is a ‘horse whisperer’, and he speaks of how training a horse is similar to training children, and dealing with people. He spoke of how his past helped him under-stand how horses and chil-dren are sensitive to body language, moods, sudden movements, anger, love, touching, etc.. They know when they are loved, and when they are hated and unwanted. You can hurt both to the point that any movement you make, will cause them to react in fear and self-defense. ‘Bending’ is a life principle, and deals with han-dling burdens. Sometimes the burden and stress gets too much, and sometimes you have a ‘flexible atti-tude’ in dealing with both a child and a horse. Being a rigid, over-demanding, perfectionist… is not the way to train either one. Trainers/parents have to have the love and patience to be flexible… and not get all bent out of shape over everything. The important thing to remember is, it takes love and time to train. If you don’t CARE, it will show. ‘Buck’ and his family now travel to appointments at ranches, where horse own-ers from all around come to learn how to handle their horses. Many are confront-ed by him for their bad methods, and they have to learn how to un-do the damage they have done. Sometimes, it is too late and the horse has to be put down… Sometimes it is too late for a child, and some end up in prison for life. Bottom line, it is time for people to wake up and seek help if they need help in raising their children. “And ye fathers, PROVOKE NOT YOUR CHILDREN TO WRATH (don’t push them to the point of hating you and others); but bring them up in the nurture (care) and admonition (teaching and encouragement) of the Lord. (Ephesians 6:4). Jesus never beat a child… and I doubt He would beat a horse. People young and old, wanted to be with Jesus because they knew He cared. If you want to change things… begin with the one in the mirror… try being flexible. S o you had a bad day? Flat tire? Slow waitress? Get cut off in traf-fic? At times, daily life can be pretty frustrat-ing and downright inconve-nient! However, the way we react in this type of situa-tion may tell us more about our own character than we want to know! In the book of Proverbs 24:10, the Bible suggests that: “If you falter in times of trouble, how small is your strength!” Times of trouble can be useful to show us what kind of moral fiber we are made of, and if we are willing, they can strengthen those fibers considerably. Often we fail to take advantage of this benefit because we misunderstand what a trial really is. Trouble actually means adversity or afflic-tion…real trouble, not sim-ply a minor inconvenience or a nuisance. It seems that we make it our goal to avoid any kind of real trouble and seek to detach from anything that might cause us discomfort. We grow comfortable in our luxury (compared to the rest of the world!), and become more and more self-absorbed. Our prob-lem then becomes mistak-ing simple annoyances for real suffering. For example, we grumble about standing in line too long at the grocery store, when many in the world won’t have enough to eat today. We stay busy running our errands and keeping the laundry done and perhaps ignore the very real struggles that our teenagers are facing. Irritated by the mistake of another driver, we assume that we are the only one on the road with an important place to be. Are we really living our lives so detached and self-absorbed? The trials that develop strength are ones that test your faith. Troubles that can only be overcome or even accepted by the understanding that we are not in control, nor does this world revolve around us. According to James 1:2-3, trials develop perseverance, which produces maturity. Webster’s defines maturity as being fully developed. In context, we are mature not because of our physi-cal size or the number of our years, but by how clearly we can differentiate between an inconvenience and an authentic trial. We are wise to learn to tell the difference, because our hearts matter! Blessings, Angie HEART MATTERS Angie Landangieland3@windstream.net Q Heart Matters is a weekly column written by Angie Land, director of the Family Life Ministries of the Lafayette Baptist Association, where she teaches bible studies, leads marriage and family conferences, and offers bibli cal counseling to individuals, couples and families.Times of troubleBlessed are the flexible, for they shall not be bent out of shape Jack Exum Jr.jackexumjr@yahoo.com Q Jack Exum Jr. Is a freelance writer who lives in Lake City, CHURCH CALENDARSept. 28Fish dinnerOur Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5056 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, prepares fish dinners every Friday from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The dinner is $6 for two Alaskan Pollock filets, corn, baked beans, hush puppies, cole slaw and tarter sauce. Take out or eat in. Sept. 29Benefit dinner for BJA benefit dinner for BJ Helton, a Lake City woman who just received a heart and lung transplant, will be held Saturday, Sept. 29 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Berea Baptist Church, 162 SW Ridge St. in Lake City. There is a $5 donation for chicken, a drink and des-sert. Call the church at 755-0900 for tickets as they are not available at the door. Pastor serviceMt. Tabor A.M.E. Church family will be honoring their Pastor, Rev. Robert Postell, and First Lady, Sis. Larese Postell, on the weekend of Sept. 29 and 30. The Saturday evening pro-gram is scheduled for 6:30 p.m., Sunday morning at 11 a.m. and Sunday afternoon at 3:30 p.m. The public is invited. Sept. 30Lighthouse singersLighthouse Children’s Home is scheduled to be at the Church of God in Fort White, 339 SW Bryant Ave., Sept. 30. The young ladies will sing from 11 a.m. to noon. Following the morn-ing service a covered dish dinner will be served. Jackson DayNorman Jackson Day at Wellborn Church of God will be Sept. 30 with an 10:45 a.m. worship serice. Everyone is asked to bring some covered dishes and drinks and enjoy a day of fellowship after the morn-ing service. HomecomingThe historic Swift Creek Church in Hamilton County, north of White Springs, will hold its annu-al homecoming on Sept. 30. Services will begin with singing at 10:45 a.m., fol-lowed by the sermon to be delivered by Elder Bob Dickerson. Immediately following the service, we will enjoy “dinner on the grounds.” Beverages will be provided by the church. For further information, please call 386-397-2922.Women’s society Union AME Church will have Fifth Sunday Women’s Missionary Society pro-gram Sunday, Sept. 30 at 11 a.m. The messenger for the hour is minister Martha Kelsey. Come out and hear this dynamic speaker. Brotherhood serviceThe DaySpring Missionary Baptist Church, 849 NW Congress Ave., will observe a brotherhood ser-vice on Sunday, Sept. 30 at 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. with speakers Brother Carlos Lake and Brother Ken Lake of Gainesville. Music will be provided by Brother Randolph Taylor and the Gospel Harmonniers. Dinner will be served after the service. Everyone is invited. Oct. 3Revival & homecomingLulu Advent Christian Church will have a revival Oct. 3, 4 and 5 at 7 p.m. Guest speaker will be Rev. Doug Lucas. The Jamie, It makes me want to cry to think of you now being Love you, Mom Homecoming will be Oct. 7 at 11 a.m. Dinner on the grounds following the morning service. Oct. 5Fish dinnerOur Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5056 SW State Road 47 in Lake City, pre-pares fish dinners every Friday from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The dinner is $6 for two Alaskan Pollock filets, corn, baked beans, hush puppies, cole slaw and tart-er sauce. Take out or eat in. Oct. 6Gospel competitionNew Mount Pisgah AMEC will host Let Us Exalt His Name Together, a gospel choir competition Oct. 6 at 6 p.m. Guest judg-es will award first, second and third place trophies. Please register you church, family of community choir by Sept. 26 to secure your participation in this histori-cal event. Each choir will have 5 minutes. For infor-mation call 752-1830. Oct. 7Homecoming & revivalFirst Full Gospel Church will host a homecoming with covered dish lunch 11 a.m. Oct. 7. The homecom-ing revival will be with Bro.Greg Roberts from Oct. 8 thrrough Oct. 12 at 7 p.m. nightly. The church is located off US 90 east to Jonesway, 1 block on the left. For information call Pastor Stan Ellis at 752-2618.HomecomingTustenuggee UMC will host their 167th Homecoming on Oct. 7. Pastor William Peeler will deliver the message at 11a.m. Dinner on the grounds at noon followed by an old-fashion hymn sing. Q To submit your Church Calendar item, contact Laura Hampson at 754-0427 or by e-mail at lhampson@ lakecityreporter.com.

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Lake City Reporter SPORTS Friday & Saturday, September 28-29, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas? Contact Tim Kirby Sports Editor 754-0421 tkirby@lakecityreporter.com RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET 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RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET 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RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET RONSONET NEW 2012 GMC SIERRA 1500 REGULAR CAB $ 2,000 CUSTOMER CASH See Dealer for Details. $ See Dealer for Details. $ 21,580 AS LOW AS NEW 2012 GMC SIERRA 1500 EXTENDED CAB SLE 1 FREE YEAR MSRP ........... $ 34,036 DISCOUNT ........ $ 8,000 DISCOUNT ........ $ 8,000 $ 26 036 CALL US TODAY 386-752-2180 MSRP .................... $ 34,036 PACKAGE DISCOUNT $ 2,000 ALLOWANCE ............. $ 6,000 TOTAL 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MUST BE A CURRENT OWNER/ LESSEE OF A 1999 OR NEWER MODEL YEAR BUICK OR GMC VEHICLE AND TRADE IN (EXCLUDES LEASES) A 1999 OR NEWER MODEL YEAR VEHICLE. NOT AVAILABLE WITH SOME OTHER OFFERS. TAKE RETAIL DELIVERY BY 10/31/12. PHOTOS FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. WAC. OR 0 % 72 MONTHS APR $ 2 000 CASH BACK New 2012 GMC Acadia New 2012 GMC Terrain SLE $ 229 /MO 39 MONTHS $2956 DUE AT SIGNING. AFTER ALL OFFERS. WWW R ONSONET COM INDIANS continued on 10B Fort White hosts states top-ranked team tonight. Columbia ends long road stretch with Vanguard. Tough task for Tigers, Indians By TIM KIRBY tkirby@lakecityreporter.com FORT WHITE Fort White High football will take on a ranked opponent for the second week in a row, this time at home. Union County High comes to Arrowhead Stadium for a 7:30 kickoff today. The Tigers are 4-0, while the Indians are 3-1 following a loss to Wakulla High which is ranked No. 3 in Class 5A. After being the No. 1 team in Class 1A all sea son in The Associated Press poll, Union County dropped to second despite a district win over Chiefland High. The Tigers remain at No. 1 in the FloridaHSFootball. com rankings. The Associated Press poll is voted on by Florida sports writers. Counting teams in the also-received-votes cate gory, Fort White is seventh in Class 3A. The Indians did not get any votes in the FloridaHSFootball.com rankings. In the last two weeks, Union County has squeaked by Keystone Heights High, 8-7, and Chiefland, 12-6. They might have been By BRANDON FINLEY bfinley@lakecityreporter.com For Columbia High to end the first half of the sea son at 4-1, its going to take a strong effort against a high-caliber opponent. Despite falling in its first game, Vanguard High still has the fire power to match the Tigers when the two teams square off at 7:30 p.m. tonight in Ocala. Columbia head coach Brian Allen sees a lot of similarities between the two teams and is looking to finish the road trip with a positive outcome heading into a district showdown with Ridgeview High next week in Lake City. You look at them and they want to establish the run like all good teams do, Allen said. Theyll try to hammer it at us and pick their spots with the pass. Allen said he feels like the offensive front rivals that of the Tigers. They have some big offensive linemen, not so much in height, but theyre wide, Allen said. That could work out to the Tigers advantage, how ever, with the quickness Columbia has up front on the defensive front starting with Javere Smith. We will have to use our quickness to our advan tage, Allen said. Our line backers and defensive line men are definitely a key matchup for us if we want to be in the winners circle. Allen spoke to the team earlier this week about overcoming obstacles something he believes the Tigers will have to do in order to win tonight. From here on out, every one that stands across from us is an obstacle from us acheiving our goal, Allen said. Each person that we have to block is trying to stop us from reaching Orlando and that finish line. We have to dominate from start to finish to pass the test. Allen said he believes that the Knights will try to execute a power running game based on what he has seen on tape. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Columbia Highs Ronald Timmons (23) powers through a tackle during a game against Buchholz High on Sept. 14. CHS continued on 3B

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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today AUTO RACING 11 a.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, practice for AAA 400, at Dover, Del. 12:30 p.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, final practice for OneMain Financial 200, at Dover, Del. 2:30 p.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, “Happy Hour Series,” final practice for AAA 400, at Dover, Del. COLLEGE FOOTBALL 7 p.m. MLB network (regional coverage); N.Y. Yankees at Toronto or Boston at Baltimore. 8 p.m. ESPN — Hawaii at BYU GOLF 8 a.m. ESPN — Ryder Cup, day one matches, at Medinah, Ill. 3 p.m. TGC — Web.com Tour, Chiquita Classic, second round, at Weddington, N.C. SOCCER 8:30 p.m. NBCSN — MLS, Chicago at Kansas City WNBA BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN2 — Playoffs, conference semifinals, game 1, Atlanta at Indiana 9 p.m. ESPN2 — Playoffs, conference semifinals, game 1, Seattle at Minnesota ——— Saturday AUTO RACING Noon SPEED — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, pole qualifying for OneMain Financial 200, at Dover, Del. 1:30 p.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, pole qualifying for AAA 400, at Dover, Del. 3 p.m. SPEED — Rolex Sports Car Series, at Lakeville, Conn. 3:30 p.m. ESPN2 — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, OneMain Financial 200, at Dover, Del. 7 p.m. MLB Network (regional coverage); Boston at Baltimore or Cincinnati at Pittsburgh. 8:30 p.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Truck Series, Smith’s 350, at Las Vegas BOXING 9:30 p.m. HBO — Champion Antonin Decarie (26-1-0) vs. Alex Perez (16-0-0), for WBC International welterweight title; junior featherweights, Luis Del Valle (16-0-0) vs. Vic Darchinyan (37-5-1); champion Edwin Rodriguez (21-0-0) vs. Jason Escalera (13-0-1), for USBA super middleweight title, at Mashantucket, Conn. COLLEGE FOOTBALL Noon ESPN — Penn St. at IllinoisESPN2 — Minnesota at IowaFSN — Missouri at UCFFX — Baylor at West VirginiaNBCSN — Penn at Dartmouth 3:30 p.m. ABC — Ohio St. at Michigan St.CBS — Tennessee at GeorgiaESPN — Clemson at Boston CollegeFSN — Houston vs. Rice (Reliant Stadium) NBCSN — Florida A&M vs. Southern, at Atlanta 4 p.m. FX — Arizona St. at California 6 p.m. ESPN — Florida St. at South Florida 7 p.m. ESPN2 — South Carolina at Kentucky FSN — TCU at SMU 7:30 p.m. FOX — Texas at Oklahoma St. 8:07 p.m. ABC — Wisconsin at Nebraska 9:15 p.m. ESPN — Mississippi at Alabama 10:30 p.m. ESPN2 — Oregon at Washington St. GOLF 9 a.m. NBC — Ryder Cup, day two matches, at Medinah, Ill. 3 p.m. TGC — Web.com Tour, Chiquita Classic, third round, at Weddington, N.C. MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 4 p.m. FOX — Teams TBA 8 p.m. WGN — Chicago Cubs at Arizona SOCCER 7:30 a.m. ESPN2 — Premier League, Arsenal vs. Chelsea, at London 9 p.m. NBCSN — MLS, Seattle at VancouverBASEBALLAL standings East Division W L Pct GB New York 90 66 .577 — Baltimore 89 67 .571 1Tampa Bay 85 70 .548 4 12 Boston 69 87 .442 21 Toronto 69 87 .442 21 Central Division W L Pct GB Detroit 84 72 .538 — Chicago 82 73 .529 1 12 Kansas City 70 86 .449 14 Cleveland 65 91 .417 19Minnesota 65 91 .417 19 West Division W L Pct GB Texas 92 64 .590 — Oakland 88 68 .564 4 Los Angeles 86 70 .551 6 Seattle 73 83 .468 19 Thursday’s Games Detroit 5, Kansas City 4Texas 9, Oakland 7Seattle 9, L.A. Angels 4Toronto 6, N.Y. Yankees 0Tampa Bay at Chicago White Sox (n) Today’s Games Boston (A.Cook 4-10) at Baltimore (Tillman 8-2), 7:05 p.m. Kansas City (W.Smith 6-8) at Cleveland (D.Huff 2-0), 7:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 14-11) at Toronto (Jenkins 0-2), 7:07 p.m. L.A. Angels (Weaver 19-4) at Texas (Dempster 7-2), 8:05 p.m. Detroit (Smyly 4-3) at Minnesota (Diamond 12-8), 8:10 p.m. Tampa Bay (Hellickson 9-10) at Chicago White Sox (Floyd 10-11), 8:10 p.m. Seattle (Beavan 10-10) at Oakland (Griffin 6-1), 10:05 p.m. Saturday’s Games N.Y. Yankees at Toronto, 1:07 p.m.Detroit at Minnesota, 4:05 p.m.L.A. Angels at Texas, 4:05 p.m.Seattle at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.Tampa Bay at Chicago White Sox, 4:05 p.m. Boston at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.Kansas City at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m. NL standings East Division W L Pct GB z-Washington 94 61 .606 —z-Atlanta 91 65 .583 3 12 Philadelphia 78 77 .503 16 New York 72 84 .462 22 12 Miami 66 90 .423 28 12 Central Division W L Pct GB x-Cincinnati 94 62 .603 — St. Louis 84 72 .538 10 Milwaukee 80 76 .513 14 Pittsburgh 76 80 .487 18 Chicago 59 97 .378 35Houston 51 105 .327 43 West Division W L Pct GB x-San Francisco 91 65 .583 — Los Angeles 80 75 .516 10 12 Arizona 78 78 .500 13 San Diego 74 81 .477 16 12 Colorado 62 94 .397 29z-clinched playoff berthx-clinched division Thursday’s Games Cincinnati 2, Milwaukee 1N.Y. Mets 6, Pittsburgh 5Colorado 7, Chicago Cubs 5San Francisco 7, Arizona 3Atlanta 6, Miami 2Washington at Philadelphia (n)L.A. Dodgers at San Diego (n) Today’s Games Cincinnati (H.Bailey 12-10) at Pittsburgh (A.J.Burnett 16-8), 7:05 p.m. Philadelphia (Cl.Lee 6-8) at Miami (Buehrle 13-13), 7:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Niese 12-9) at Atlanta (T.Hudson 16-6), 7:35 p.m. Houston (E.Gonzalez 2-1) at Milwaukee (Gallardo 16-8), 8:10 p.m. Washington (E.Jackson 9-10) at St. Louis (Wainwright 13-13), 8:15 p.m. Chicago Cubs (T.Wood 6-12) at Arizona (I.Kennedy 14-11), 9:40 p.m. San Francisco (Vogelsong 13-9) at San Diego (Werner 2-2), 10:05 p.m. Colorado (Francis 5-6) at L.A. Dodgers (Blanton 9-13), 10:10 p.m. Saturday’s Games Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.Houston at Milwaukee, 7:10 p.m.N.Y. Mets at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.Philadelphia at Miami, 7:10 p.m.Washington at St. Louis, 7:15 p.m.Chicago Cubs at Arizona, 8:10 p.m.San Francisco at San Diego, 8:35 p.m.Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, 9:10 p.m.FOOTBALLAP Top 25 games Saturday No. 1 Alabama vs. Mississippi, 9:15 p.m. No. 2 Oregon vs. Washington State at Seattle, 10:30 p.m. No. 3 LSU vs. Towson, 7 p.m.No. 4 Florida State at South Florida, 6 p.m. No. 5 Georgia vs. Tennessee, 3:30 p.m.No. 6 South Carolina at Kentucky, 7 p.m. No. 9 West Virginia vs. No. 25 Baylor, Noon No. 12 Texas at Oklahoma State, 7:50 p.m. No. 14 Ohio State at No. 20 Michigan State, 3:30 p.m. No. 15 TCU at SMU, 7 p.m.No. 17 Clemson at Boston College, 3:30 p.m. No. 18 Oregon State vs. Arizona, 10 p.m. No. 19 Louisville at Southern Miss., 8 p.m. No. 22 Nebraska vs. Wisconsin, 8 p.m.No. 24 Boise State at New Mexico, 6 p.m.NFL schedule Sunday’s Games Tennessee at Houston, 1 p.m.San Diego at Kansas City, 1 p.m.Seattle at St. Louis, 1 p.m.New England at Buffalo, 1 p.m.Minnesota at Detroit, 1 p.m.Carolina at Atlanta, 1 p.m.San Francisco at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m.Miami at Arizona, 4:05 p.m.Oakland at Denver, 4:05 p.m.Cincinnati at Jacksonville, 4:05 p.m.New Orleans at Green Bay, 4:25 p.m.Washington at Tampa Bay, 4:25 p.m.N.Y. Giants at Philadelphia, 8:20 p.m.Open: Indianapolis, Pittsburgh Monday’s Game Chicago at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28-29, 2012%632576 BRIEFS BOWLING League resultsLake City Bowl league play: GOLDEN ROLLERS Team standings: 1. Gamblers; 2. 4 S’s; 3. Quirky Quad. Team high handicap game: 1. Jo’s Crew 835; 2. Gamblers 834; 3. 2 Girls & 2 Guys 824. Team high handicap series: 1. You’re Up 2,551; 2. Wild Things 2,447; 3. Quirky Quad 2,341. High scratch game: 1. Elaine Nemeth 187; 2. Betty Carmichael 160; 3. Pat Hale 157. 1. Wayne Johns 223; 2. (tie) Bill Dolly, Dave Duncan 202; 4. Dan Ritter 178. High scratch series: 1. Judy Johnson 484; 2. Susan Mears 457; 3. Sandra Johns 443. 1. George Mulligan 567; 2. Ric Yates 561; 3. Bill Price 513. High handicap series: 1. Debbie Walters 664; 2. Debi Evert 650; 3. Yvonne Finley 606. 1. Sandy Sanders 649; 2. (tie) Ronnie Grey, Sal Annello 645.(results from Sept. 13) HIT & MISS Team standings: 1. Silver Ladies (13-3); 2. Legal Ladies (12.5-7.5); 3. Spare Us (12-8, 528 average); 4. All Mrs’s (12-8, 524 average). Team high handicap game: 1. Oddballs 797; 2. Silver Ladies 786; 3. High Five 745. Team high handicap series: 1. All Mrs’s 2,393; 2. Sandbaggers 2,299; 3. (tie) Spare Us, Legal Ladies 2,169. High handicap game: 1. Karen Clampett 232; 2. Donna Schneiders 214; 3. Judy Daniels 199. High handicap series: 1. Joan Carman 622; 2. Joyce Crandall 599; 3. (tie) Susan Mears, Elsie Huddleston 593.(results from Sept. 18) WATERGUARD LEAGUE Team high handicap game: 1. Wolf Pack 863; 2. Split/House 834; 3. All In 824. Team high handicap series: 1. 10 in the Pitt 2,636; 2. All in the Family 2,448; 3. O 2 Cool 2,397. High scratch game: 1. Mary Lobaugh 218; 2. Lorrie Geiger 215; 3. Mary Lobaugh 190. 1. Dave Ward 222; 2. George Walters 215; 3. Tony Harper 204. High scratch series: 1. Mary Lobaugh 614; 2. Lorrie Geiger 506; 3. Maggie Battle 490. 1. George Walters 597; 2. Bill Dolly 568; 3. Jim Lobaugh 566. High handicap game: 1. Mary Lobaugh 255; 2. Lorrie Geiger 237; 3. (tie) Linda Oliver, Maggie Battle 220. 1. Dave Ward 254; 2. George Walters 238; 3. Ken Watson 237. High handicap series: 1. Pat Fennell 742; 2. Julie Bell 656; 3. Samantha Lovell 622. 1. George Mulligan 661; 2. Bob Wheeler 647; 3. Bill Dolly 640. High average: Lorrie Geiger 179; James Price 199.(results from Sept. 25) TGIF Team standings: 1. The IncrediBowls (16-4); 2. Gutter Dusters (14.5-5.5); 3. Fun Tyme Travel (13-7, 12,924 pins); 4. Trinity (13-7, 12,662 pins). Team high handicap game: 1. Oh Split! 963; 2. The Incredi-Bowls 945; 3. Strike Zone 943. Team high handicap series: 1. Strike Zone 2,687; 2. The Bowling Stones 2,672; 3. The Incredi-Bowls 2,671. High scratch game: 1. Chrissy Fancy 212; 2. Karen Coleman 209; 3. Cara Lashley 193. 1. Zech Strohl 266; 2. Wally Howard 264; 3. Walt Sherrod 236. High scratch series: 1. Karen Coleman 577; 2. Shannon Howard 512; 3. Chrissy Fancy 499. 1. Zech Strohl 682; 2. Wally Howard 662; 3. David Adel 609. High handicap game: 1. Chrissy Fancy 262; 2. Cara Lashley 255; 3. Dawn Madden 247. 1. Zech Strohl 283; 2. Wally Howard 282; 3. Walt Sherrod 279. High handicap series: 1. Christine Williams 691; 2. Samantha Jolliff 677; 3. Karen Coleman 676. 1. Zech Strohl 733; 2. Thomas Stemp 726; 3. David Adel 720.(results from Sept. 21) MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS Team standings: 1. Ronsonet BuickGMC (80-40); 2. GN Construction (70-50); 3. Team 10 (68-52). High scratch game: 1. Dale Coleman 276; 2. Zech Strohl 247; 3. Dave Duncan 246. High scratch series: 1. Dale Coleman 680; 2. Zech Strohl 671; 3. (tie) Jeremy Dohrn, Bill Duncan 633. High handicap game: 1. Jeremy Dohrn 287; 2. Dale Coleman 276; 3. Mike Pringle 273. High handicap series: 1. Jeremy Dohrn 771; 2. Tim Carson 744; 3. Mike Pringle 742. High average: 1. Dale Coleman 217.22; 2. Wally Howard 214.67; 3. Bill Duncan 213.17.(results from Sept. 17) Youth leaguesMAJORS SCRATCH Team standings: 1. Ten in the Pit (53.5-26.5); 2. Ninja Bowling Inc. (47.5-32.5); 3. The CBC (39-41). High scratch game: 1. Courtney Schmitt 230; 2. Linden Barney 206; 3. Courtney Schmitt 201. 1. Dalton Coar 216; 2. Cody Howard 214; 3. Gary Beames 211. High scratch series: 1. Courtney Schmitt 620; 2. Linden Barney 545; 3. Sara Sykes 468. 1. Josh Pettigrew 574; 2. (tie) Cody Howard, Gary Beames 565. MAJORS Team standings: 1. Team 5 (14-6); 2. Holy Splitz (12-8); 3. Team Ace (11.5-8.5). Team high handicap game: 1. Team Ace 660; 2. Holy Splitz 625; 3. Team 3 617. Team high handicap series: 1. Team Ace 1,859; 2. Team 3 1,808; 3. The Ballers 1,803. High handicap game: 1. Tiffany Ritch 243; 2. Sara Johns 242; 3. Crystal Campbell 220. 1. Chase Williams 230; 2. Zach Mauldin 225; 3. Dominic Campbell 219. High handicap series: 1. Tiffany Ritch 689; 2. Sara Johns 672; 3. Amanda Schmitt 609. 1. Chase Williams 676; 2. Carson Lyons 627; 3. Robert Martin 605. JUNIORS Team standings: 1. Dynamite (12.5-7.5); 2. The Emergency Exits (12-8); 3. 3G’s (11-9). Team high handicap game: 1. Pinheads 588; 2. Dynamite 583; 3. The Emergency Exits 578. Team high handicap series: 1. Dynamite 1,670; 2. 3G’s 1,664; 3. The Emergency Exits 1,591. High handicap game: 1. Biancah Billingsley 234; 2. Savannah Barr 233; 3. Mickie Steiskal 215. 1. Douglas Christensen 211; 2. (tie) Jarrett Moehl, David Becker 207. High handicap series: 1. Biancah Billingsley 610; 2. Callie Pierce 587; 3. Mickie Steiskal 580. 1. Douglas Christensen 580; 2. Jarrett Moehl 553; 3. Austin Tompkins 542. BANTAMS High handicap game: 1. Daphne Greene 169; 2. (tie) Amber Rouse, Allison Presnell 149. 1. Jacob Hartman 184; 2. Austin Bailey 182; 3. Jacob Burch 164. High handicap series: 1. Daphne Greene 470; 2. Allison Presnell 421; 3. Amber Rouse 401. 1. Austin Bailey 491; 2. Jacob Burch 476; 3. Jacob Hartman 439. (results from Sept. 22) CHS WRESTLING Ken Chertow camp offered Columbia High wrestling is offering a Ken Chertow Weekend Warrior camp on Oct. 6-7. Cost for Columbia County students is $100, a discount from the regular $175 cost. The camp is 2-8 p.m. Saturday and 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday. The CHS wrestling boosters will proved dinner on Saturday and lunch on Sunday. For details, call Kevin Warner at (352) 281-0549. CHS SOCCER Moe’s Night set for Monday Columbia High’s soccer teams are hosting a Moe’s Night fundraiser from 5-8 p.m. Monday at Moe’s Southwest Grill on U.S. Highway 90 west. The soccer program will receive a percentage of the sales. For details, call Lori Green Berry at 755-1001. CHS CHEERLEADING Youth clinic planned at gym Columbia High has a cheerleading clinic for all children pre-K through eighth grade from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday at the CHS gym. Cost of $25 includes T-shirt, snack and drink. Clinic participants will perform with the cheerleaders at the CHS home football game on Oct. 5. For details, call Debbie Godbold at 755-8080. RUNNING Breast Cancer Awareness 5K Suwannee River Breast Cancer Awareness Association has a 5K run/walk set for 8 a.m. Oct. 6 at Olustee Park in downtown Lake City. Entry fee is $25 or $30 day of race (6:30-7:30 a.m. registration), with proceeds going to those in the community battling cancer or experiencing financial hardship associated with the disease. Register online at www. onestoprace.com or www. jax365.com For details, call Shannon Thomas at 288-4692.Chomp Cancer Foundation 5K Chomp Cancer Foundation has its second Chomp Cancer 5K Run/Walk planned for 8 a.m. Dec. 15 in Fort White. UF Shands Cancer Center is the beneficiary. There will be music, post-race snacks, an award ceremony and a silent auction/raffle. Sponsorships at several levels are available. The race will be chip-timed by Half Mile Timing. For details, call Lauren Valentine at (321) 501-9526. OUTDOORS Hunter safety courses offered Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is offering hunter safety Internet-completion courses for Columbia County from 6-9 p.m. Oct. 12 and 8 a.m. to noon Oct. 13. A second class will be Oct. 25 and Oct. 27. Students who have taken the online course and wish to complete the classroom portion must bring the online-completion report. Firearms, ammunition and materials are provided. Students should bring pen and paper. An adult must accompany children younger than 16. Class locations will be given at pre-register. Call the regional office at 758-0525 or go to www. myfwc.com /HunterSafety. Q From staff reports JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Jessie Bates (22) returns a serve in a match against Fort White High on Sept. 12. Lady Tigers stay undefeated with fourth district victoryFrom staff reportsColumbia High gained a leg up in the district with a hard-fought victory against Atlantic Coast High in Jacksonville on Thursday. The Lady Tigers beat Atlantic Coast 28-26, 25-22 and 33-31 to remain unde-feated at 7-0. Columbia is 4-0 in the district. “The girls played together as a team and communi-cated very well,” Columbia head coach Rebecca Golden said. “That was the key to success tonight.” Kelbie Ronsonet led the team with nine kills and also had three blocks in the match. Jessie Bates led the Lady Tigers in assists with 20 in the match. Charlee Watson had seven digs to lead the team and Annie Milton had three blocks. Columbia will compete in the Oak Hall tournament in Gainesville today and Saturday.Lady Tigers golfColumbia High’s Lady Tigers golf team fell in a tri-match at Quail Heights Country Club against Chiles and Lincoln. The Lady Tigers shot 238, while Chiles shot 201 and Lincoln finished with a 226. Columbia is down to three players on the team after two players quit. Gillian Norris earned medalist honors with a 46. Brooke Russell finished with a 53 and Abby Blizzard shot a 67. “I’m proud of the girls we have remaining,” Columbia coach Todd Carter said. “I think that they have a great chance at advancing to regionals.”Tigers golfColumbia High’s boys golf picked up two wins this week to improve to 10-3, after defeat-ing Oak Hall School 169-177 on Thursday. The Tigers defeated Santa Fe High 154-182 on Tuesday. “We played a lot better today than we did on Tuesday,” Columbia head coach Steve Smithy said. “I’m really proud of Luke Soucinek as he’s moved up from our No. 4 player to our No. 1 over the last few weeks. He’s played great in the last five matches.” Soucinek was medalist in both matches with a 39 against Oak Hall and a 37 against Santa Fe. Tim Bagley finished with a 38 against Santa Fe and a 44 against Oak Hall. Dean Soucinek finished with a 39 against Santa Fe and a 43 against Oak Hall.Nick Jones had a 40 against Santa Fe and a 43 against Oak Hall.Lady Indians volleyballFort White High picked up its fourth win of the year by defeating Interlachen High in straight sets. The Lady Indians won 25-23, 25-14 and 25-19. Ashley Cason had 27 assists to lead the Lady Indians. Lync Stalnaker had six kills, Leah Johnson had three kills and Arianna House, Hallie Stringfellow and Ashley Beckman each had one.

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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28-29, 2012 3B%6SRUWV CHS: Sticking to the run offensively Continued From Page 1BCasteneda believes Knights will get revenge By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comIf Ocala’s Vanguard High head coach Alex Casteneda’s Knights are intimidated by tonight’s matchup against Columbia High, Casteneda certainly isn’t showing it. In fact, Casteneda went as far as to say that the Knights may be the better team. Despite a 52-7 loss against Georgia’s peren-nial power Camden County High to open the season, the Knights have rebound-ed to a 2-1 record to start the season including a 35-7 win over Buchholz High — a team that the Tigers have already seen. “Camden County was our first game and their third,” Casteneda said. “We didn’t play as bad as the score would show, but had a lot of turnovers in our red zone. Our defense is playing out-standing, taking away the Camden game. We have a lot of kids back from last year. We played Buchholz and our young QB Adam Robles threw four touch-down passes in the first half and threw for 227 yards. We are just trying to get consistent. We’ll play one good half and not a good second half.” Casteneda believes that the Knights will have a run-ning game that can pound away against the Tigers’ front. Rashard Sweet and Tyronte Files will lead the charge. “We’re running the ball good,” he said. “We have two kids averaging 100 yards a game.” The Knights will base their offense out of the I-formation and also throw in some one-back sets. Defensively, they’re a 4-3 unit. As far as matchups, Casteneda didn’t point to a particular area where Vanguard could have the advantage. “I think we’re evenly matched to tell the truth because they play good defense,” Casteneda said. “Offensively they have the big kid (Laremy Tunsil) they like to run behind and the quarterback (Jayce Barber) is pretty good. He’s mobile and can throw. Against Gainesville they dropped a few passes or probably should have beat them. Gainesville just pow-ered it right down the mid-dle. We might have more speed than that. I think we will be the faster team.” As far as keys to the game, Casteneda offered up a little coach speak. “It’s going to come down to special teams and turn-overs,” he said. “We won three or four games last year just off special teams. We have to protect the football. We have done a good job except for one game and maintain a good consistency.” And despite a heartbreaking 22-21 loss last year to the Tigers, Casteneda said there’s no rivalry in this contest. “We just talked about the game briefly on Monday,” Casteneda said. “We know they have a lot of kids com-ing back. We thought we won the game with a lateral, which was a lateral. It’s more of a playoff atmosphere. You can’t complain about that. There’s no rivalry.” The two teams will square off at 7:30 p.m. tonight in Ocala. BRENT KUYKENDALL /Lake City ReporterColumbia High quarterback Jayce Barber throws a pass against Oakleaf High during the Tigers 19-13 win last w eek. “They’re going to try to throw a lot of two-back and twins I-formation stuff at us,” Allen said. “They’ll run the power and iso plays. They’ll run the smash com-bos. They’ll throw in a little dive out of the one-back for-mation. The quarterback isn’t as mobile as we’ve seen, so we won’t have to watch the zone read this week like we’ve been see-ing. Most of the stuff will come at us from under center and focus on the inside running game. This is a game you look forward to on defense, because it gives you the opportunity to make a lot of tackles.” Defensively, the Knights run an old-school style 4-3 defense. “They’re going to base out of the 4-3 and show us some robber,” Allen said. “They’ll bring the safety down in some cover two and he’ll play some cover three. They’re going to blitz here and there, but won’t change much from the 4-3.” Allen’s goal for the Tigers on offense won’t change despite having some matchups with his talented receiving core against linebackers in coverage. “We’re still going to try to establish the run,” Allen said. “We have to get going there. You look and through four games we’re nearing in on 1,000 yards on the ground. We have to dig our cleats in and run the ball offensively. We need to establish the run early, because that’s what we do and pick our spots. We haven’t thrown the ball a bunch, but we can still stick it in the end zone.” Gators’ Debose goes from big hope to big letdownBy MARK LONGAssociated PressGAINESVILLE — It no doubt wasn’t fair for for-mer Florida coach Urban Meyer to compare receiv-er Andre Debose to Percy Harvin before he even stepped on campus. Harvin was one of the top playmakers in school history. He turned short passes into huge gains, made defenders look silly with open-field moves and probably would have been a Heisman Trophy con-tender had he not shared the spotlight with all-every-thing quarterback Tim Tebow. Debose was supposed to fill the void created when Harvin left school early for the NFL in 2009. Instead, the fourth-year junior from Sanford has seemingly taken a step back this season. “There’s a key to every kid, and we’ve got to find that key to motivate any young man, not just Andre,” coach Will Muschamp said. “Day in, day out, to consistently perform well, to consistently do it the right way, generally your practice habits carry over to the game.” Debose doesn’t have a catch for the 11th-ranked Gators (4-0, 3-0 Southeastern Conference), who are off this weekend before hosting No. 3 LSU. The program’s prized recruit in 2009 has two car-ries for a yard, has seven punt returns for 67 yards and is averaging 24.2 yards on six kickoff returns. He has more fumbles than first downs. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFlorida wide receiver Andre Dubose (4) struggles to sta y on his feet as two Bowling Green defenders attempt to stop him from driving down the field. QBs take center stage in Florida State-USF gameBy BRENT KALLESTADAssociated PressTALLAHASSEE — Florida State quarterback EJ Manuel remembers the day well, too well. Manuel watched helplessly from the sidelines three years ago as Christian Ponder’s understudy while an untested freshman from Tallahassee, B.J. Daniels, led South Florida to a 17-7 upset of the Seminoles in his first collegiate start. “It was a bad feeling,” Manuel said. “We haven’t forgotten it at all.” Saturday the two fifthyear seniors square off when Florida State (4-0) hits the road for the first time this season to play South Florida (2-2) in Tampa. The fourth-ranked Seminoles are a 17-point favorite. Manuel, who was frustrated with being redshirted a year earlier, marveled at how Daniels shined in what was his first collegiate start. “B.J., being from Tallahassee, was kind of his coming out party,” Manuel said. “He had a huge game.” And Daniels has had many more since. He has amassed 9,333 total yards, sixth best in Big East Conference history. Manuel put himself into the Heisman Trophy dis-cussion with his perfor-mance Florida State’s 49-37 win over Clemson last week. Manuel passed for 380 yards and ran for anoth-er 102 in a performance similar to what Daniels did to the Seminoles when he threw for 215 yards and two touchdowns and ran for another 126. “He’s a phenomenal athlete,” Florida State coach Jimbo Fisher said of Daniels. Fisher, who was in his final season as the Seminoles’ offensive coor-dinator during that game in 2009, added: “No play is ever dead” when Daniels has the ball. Daniels’ teammates know that as well. “You never know how he can come out of any situa-tion,” Bulls’ wide receiver Terrence Mitchell said. “He’s a different kind of quarterback.” Although Daniels played at Lincoln High School about five miles east of the Florida State campus, he wasn’t recruited by the Seminoles. Fisher wanted Manuel — the signature recruit for the eventual head coach. There are many similarities between the two QBs. Both are 22 and are known by their initials, although Daniels — Bruce Jr. — uses the conventional periods between letters while Manuel — Erik Jr. — doesn’t. There are some differences too. The 6-foot Daniels played as a freshman and soph-omore at USF, the more highly recruited and taller Manuel picked up most of his experience those two years in six starts behind an oft-injured Ponder. Manuel’s 67.2 completion percentage is the best career average in the Atlantic Coast Conference, slightly above former Virginia star Matt Schaub. Falcons earn first winBy BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comLake City Middle School picked up its first win under new head coach Richard Keen with a 34-6 whipping of Taylor County Middle School on Thursday. The Falcons started hot and stayed hot throughout, only giving up a touchdown on the game’s final play. Derontae Jordan scored from 60 yards out to give the Falcons an early lead and added an interception return from midfield to give Lake City a 13-0 lead before a lightning delay took place. After the lightning, the Falcons struck again. Alec Norton picked off a Taylor County pass inside the 10-yard line and Donald Robinson did the rest with 80 yards on the ground capped by a 20-yard run on Lake City’s following drive. Brock Edge added an extra point to make it 20-0 before the half. Hunter Sweet scored on a 10-yard scamper with 4:31 remaining in the third quarter to make it 34-0 and bring out a running clock. Taylor County got on the board during the game’s final play with a 50-plus yard run to make the final 34-6. “This is kind of exciting,” Keen said. “The kids are excited, the coaches are excited and the fans are excited. Maybe this will turn us in the right direction. We finally played up to the poten-tial that we’re capable of playing. Everyone played great.” BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterLake City Middle School’s Donald Robinson breaks a ta ckle on a touchdown run during the Falcons’ 34-6 win at Memorial Stadium on Thursday. Suwannee spoils Wolves’ homecomingBy TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comRichardson Middle School’s homecoming was spoiled by Air Suwannee. Suwannee Middle School quarterback Stephen Anderson threw to Jamari Wheeler for a 31-yard touchdown with 1:31 left in the game to give the Bulldogs a 34-28 comeback win. It was the third touchdown play for the two Bulldogs. They connected for 43 and 91 yards as Suwannee built a 12-0 lead. Richardson was in comeback mode after that. Trailing by the two touchdowns midway though the second quarter, Kamario Bell took a pitch around the left side and raced 50 yards for a touch-down. Quarterback Ronnie Collins hit Darrell Mitchell for the two-point conver-sion and a score of 12-8. Suwannee took over after a scuffed kickoff at the Wolves 31. On fourth down, Anderson broke sev-eral tackles on the way to the end zone for an 18-8 Suwannee lead at halftime. “At the half I told them it was do or die, or else they were going to embarrass us,” Wolves head coach Joey O’Neal said. “We had it won, but let it slip away.” Richardson responded by forcing a fumble on the kickoff. Sam Aymond fell on it for the Wolves at the Suwannee 38. Bell ran for eight yards and added 11 more after a keeper by Collins pro-duced a first down. Jovares Thomas went over right tackle for 16 yards and a touchdown. Suwannee’s lead was 18-14 at 5:56 of the third quarter. The Bulldogs struck back, starting at their 41. A horse collar penalty gave them 15 yards and JaDames Gardner ripped off a 37-yard run. Wheeler went around the left side for nine yards and a touch-down. Gardner ran in the PAT and the Bulldogs led 26-12 with 4:26 left in the quarter. Bell fielded the kickoff on a bounce and returned it 81 yards for a touchdown. Bell added a two-point run and the lead was 26-22 14 seconds after Suwannee had scored. The defense made a stop and the Wolves took over at their 45. Thomas con-verted a fourth down with a 10-yard run and three plays later scored from 30 yards out. Richardson finally had the lead, 28-26, with 5:17 left in the game, but Suwannee marched 65 yards for the winning score. Richardson (1-3) hosts Baker County Middle School at 6 p.m. Oct. 9.

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4B LAKE CITY REPORTER NASCAR FRIDAY & SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28-29, 20124BNascar NOTEBOOK Eury Jr. departed over change Dale Earnhardt Jr.told reporters at New Hampshire Motor Speedway last week that themain issue that led to the departure of his cousinTony Eury Jr.from JR Motorsports centeredaround the team’s interaction with HendrickMotorsports.Rick Hendrick owns the company,which employs Earnhardt Jr.as driver,and he’s apart owner of JR Motorsports along withEarnhardt and his sister Kelley.Eury Jr.was anowner,too,as well as crew chief before beingreplaced by Ryan Pemberton. “For us to get better,we’ve had to maximize our relationship with Hendrick [Motorsports],”he said.“Those resources are there at our fingertips.Thecompanies that we compete against have thoseresources.The companies we want to beat,and arerunning up front in the series,have those kinds ofresources.We needed to improve on that.That wasbecoming clearer,and clearer as we ran the lastcouple of years that we needed to improve thatrelationship. “That was really why we decided to make the move of Ryan [Pemberton] ...because there is agreat relationship between Ryan and my crewchief [Steve Letarte] and Hendrick as well.” He said Eury Jr.disagreed with that direction for the company to take.JR Motorsports hasn’twon a race since 2010,when Jamie McMurraywon at Atlanta.Austin Dillon gets 2nd Ky. win Austin Dillon’s victory in Saturday’s Nationwide Series race at Kentucky Speedway moved him towithin 19 points of leader Elliott Sadler,with six races remaining in the battle for the series cham-pionship. Dillon’s second victory of the season – and second at Kentucky – came in a race in which Sadlerand the previous points leader,Ricky StenhouseJr.,both had issues that took them out of con-tention for the win. Stenhouse’s fall to 17th at the finish was due to a pit-road collision with Eric McClure,whileSadler appeared poised to win before steeringproblems relegated him to a sixth-place finish.Still,Sadler reclaimed the points lead and has aone-point margin heading into this weekend’s raceat Dover International Speedway. In the Camping World Truck Series,Austin Dillon’s younger brother Ty Dillon clings to a four point lead in the standings,while James Bueschermoved into second place with his win on Friday atKentucky.Dillon finished third,while Timothy Peters gave up the second spot in the standingsafter a crash left him with a 21st-place finish.Jeff Gordon nixes mustache Jeff Gordon brought back his ’stache after he raced his way into the Chase for the Sprint Cup.But a week later,after a crash in the Chase open-er at Chicagoland left him in the points cellar,thewhiskers are gone. “I just changed my mind,”he said.“It’s not that we’re out of it by any means,we know we have alot of work to do,but we can certainly win thisthing.I guess the other thing was that I went inthe other weekend saying,‘Okay,the only way I’mnot going to look ridiculous is if we’re out therewinning.’ Obviously,we didn’t do that at Chicago. “It wasn’t hard to take it off,I can promise you that.”It’s a debate as old as the sport itself:AreNASCAR drivers really athletes? Ofcourse it’s usually those with no firsthand knowledge of the sport who ask thatquestion.Those who have been around itknow otherwise. In the early days,NASCAR’s athlete drivers generally stayed in shape for driving racecars by driving race cars. But in today’s world,most of the top drivers have personal trainers,strict workoutroutines and well-planned diets. Still,there are a few throwbacks,like three-time and defending Sprint Cup champi-on Tony Stewart,who still considers himselfan athlete despite his old-fashioned approachto fitness. “I definitely think race drivers are athletes,”he said.“We’re not necessarily running,jumping or trying to knock people over,butwe’re wrestling with a 3,400-pound car,witha firesuit,helmet and gloves on,and you’resitting in a hot area for three and a half orfour hours.” And he’s won 47 Sprint Cup races,in some of the toughest conditions,by preparing fordriving a race car by driving not only hisSprint Cup cars,but winged sprint cars,dirtLate Models and various other short-trackvehicles. “To this day I don’t like working out,”he said.“I know there are benefits to it.I don’tmind being out on my property and working,but I’m not big on sitting in a gym.I proba-bly work out less than anybody in thisgarage area,but I race two or three timesmore than most of these guys do,too.That’swhat keeps you race-fit and gets you in the best shape.” His Stewart-Haas Racing teammate Ryan Newman takes a similar approach,staying inshape by building fences and baling hay onhis North Carolina farm. But there are plenty of others who spend hours in the gym and eat special foods tomaximize their performance behind thewheel. Jimmie Johnson and his Hendrick Motorsports teammate Kasey Kahne partici-pated in a triathlon in Charleston,S.C.,justhours after racing at Daytona in July. The event consisted of a 600-yard swim,12mile bike ride and 3.1-mile run. Kahne finished fourth in his age group, while Johnson was seventh in his. Johnson has often spoken of his fondness for ice cream,but his physique indicates thathe rarely indulges. Instead,he’s into more healthy foods.“Breakfast burritos in the morning,that’s a pretty regular deal for me,”he said.“Then it’sreally just chicken,fish,a bunch of steamedvegetables throughout the day.Good carbsfrom brown rice to sweet potatoes,things likethat. “I’ve been pretty focused on the diet side lately. “If I’m home and in control,that’s kind of the lineup.But on the road,it changes dra-matically.” He said that when he can,he tries to eat a small meal every three hours. “If I’m on the run,a power bar,”he said. “Gatorade has these good bars to eat as well.Just focusing on lean protein five,six timesthroughout the day.” Before and during races,Johnson and his fellow drivers focus on hydration as much asanything. Johnson’s crew packs 80 ounces of Gatorade into his in-car drinking system foreach race,and he usually consumes it all inaddition to three or four bottles of water hetakes on during pit stops. Danica Patrick said she tries to eat healthy all the time and work out,too. “It makes me feel better as well as makes it easier to do photo shoots and look the way Iwant to look,”she said.“I work out a lotbecause I need to obviously stay fit and haveendurance for the car. “For all those reasons,I eat egg whites and oatmeal,salads,sandwiches with good breadand things like that.” At the track,she eats salmon,brown rice, grilled peppers and grilled onions for dinnerthe first night.Then it’s chicken the nextnight,plus yogurt and cottage cheese duringthe day. “Inside of the car I have a drink mix that I put in my camelback that is a blend of carbo-hydrate and protein that is recommended bymy trainer,”she said. Carl Edwards,whose workout routine and general fitness helped land him a spoton the President’s Council on Fitness,Sports and Nutrition,isn’t keen on reveal-ing the specifics of his diet or his pre-racepreparation,but he does say that he puts alot of emphasis on it. “I’m not going to tell you what I do,but I do prepare for it,”he said.“I feel at the end ofthese races that I usually feel like I couldstart the race again and go run.” By RICK MINTER / Universal Uclick By RICK MINTER / Universal Uclick Strategies vary for keeping in top racing formThe 2012 Chase contenders (top row from left): Jeff Gordon,Brad Keselowski,Denny Hamlin,Martin Truex J r.,Dale Earnhardt Jr.,Jimmie Johnson; (bottom row f rom left): Tony Stewart,Greg Biffle,Kevin Harvick,Kasey Kahne, Clint Bowyer and Matt Kenseth.(NASCAR photo) NEXTUP... Race: OneMain Financial 200 Where: Dover International Speedway When: Saturday, 3 p.m. (ET) TV: ESPN2 2011 Winner: Carl Edwards SPRINT CUP CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS NATIONWIDE SERIES Race: Smith’s 350 Where: Las Vegas Motor Speedway When: Saturday, 8p.m. (ET) TV: SPEED 2011 Winner: Ron Hornaday Jr. Race: AAA 400 Where: Dover International Speedway When: Sunday, 1 p.m. (ET) TV: ESPN 2011 Winner: Kurt Busch (right) NUMERICALLYSPEAKING Laps led byJimmie Johnson in the past 15 Cupraces at Dover,tops amongall drivers Laps led by DaleEarnhardt Jr.in the past 15 Cup races at Dover Sprint Cup victo-ries by Joe Gibbs Racing after Denny Hamlin’swin at New Hampshire Chase victories forcrew chief Darian Grubb in the past 12 Chaseraces (five with Tony Stewartand one with Denny Hamlin)3 1,880 6 100 Athletic drive 2012 CHASE CONTENDERS Points standings following Sunday’s Sylvania 300 at New Hampshire Motor Speedway 1.Jimmie Johnson 2,096 (finished second) The five-time champion took the points lead after one week and said his team was “best inclass”behind Denny Hamlin’s.And he pointedout that he’s off to a strong Chase start.“To onlyleave seven points on the table in two races ispretty good,”he said.2.Brad Keselowski -1 (finished sixth) He remains in championship form a week after winning the Chase opener.“We’d like to bejust a little bit faster than where we were [atNew Hampshire],but this is what a champi-onship team does,”he said.“They take weekendswhere they’re not the best and they make some-thing out of it.”3.Denny Hamlin -7 (finished first) He overcame a mistake in qualifying in which his team used the wrong air pressures and droveto the front from the 32nd starting spot to lead193 laps.“I know we made a couple of big mis-takes in the last two weeks,but I said we werefast enough to make it up and we were,”he said.“I’m going to have these guys’ backs until theydie on me.This is my team.”4.Tony Stewart -10 (finished seventh) The defending series champion charged from 10th to seventh in the final 22 laps,but saidthat’s not enough to win another title.“Itmight’ve been a solid result,but we need to bebetter than that,”he said.5.Kasey Kahne -15 (finished fifth) He’s off to a steady,but not spectacular,start to the Chase after getting in through one of the twowild card spots.“Hopefully,we can keep it goingand get a little faster,”he said.6.Clint Bowyer -15 (finished fourth) He was encouraged by another solid run in the Chase.“We’re still in the thing,just got to keepthese solid finishes coming,”he said.“Reallyproud of our race team.”7.Dale Earnhardt Jr.-26 (finished 13th) He improved by one position from his starting spot,but that’s not enough to make a serious runto the title when all of the top seven finisherswere Chase drivers.8.Kevin Harvick -31 (finished 11th) His finish at New Hampshire was right in line for this season.He’s finished 11th four times andhas an average finish of 11.9 for the year.9.Greg Biffle -33 (finished 18th) The points leader at the end of the regular season dropped another spot in the standings.“Wegot up to 10th and then just went straight back-wards,”he said.“I don’t know what happened.”10.Martin Truex Jr.-34 (finished 17th) After a lackluster run at New Hampshire,he heads to Dover,where he got his first Cup poleand only Cup win in 2007.11.Matt Kenseth -35 (finished 14th) He was the highest finishing Ford driver on a day in which the Fusions all lacked speed.“Wegot everything we could get out of our car,”hesaid.“It wasn’t much better than that.”12.Jeff Gordon -45 (finished third) A strong run wasn’t enough to get him out of the points hole that a stuck throttle atChicagoland Speedway put him in.“It’s such ashame what happened to us in Chicago lastweekend because I think we would have back-to-back top-fives,”he said. Austin Dillon drives the No.3 Chevrolet to victory in Saturday’s Nationwide Series Kentucky 300.(NASCA R photo)

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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28-29, 2012 5B% FRIDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 28, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Shark Tank (N) (:01) Last Resort “Captain” 20/20 “Classroom Con dential” (N) News at 11(:35) Nightline (N) 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryNewsFootball FridayChann 4 News(:35) The Insider 5-PBS 5 -Journal Nightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Washington WeekNeed to Know (N) The Cliburn: 50 Years of Gold (N) VOCES on PBS (DVS) BBC World NewsTavis Smiley (N) 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge Judy Two and Half MenCSI: NY “Reignited” Made in Jersey “Pilot” Blue Bloods “Family Business” Friday Night BlitzLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneTMZ (N) America’s Next Top Model (N) Nikita “Homecoming” Vote America 2012Access HollywoodThe Of ce The Of ce 10-FOX 10 30 30Are We There Yet?Family Guy Family Guy The SimpsonsThe X Factor Auditions continue. Fringe (Season Premiere) (N) NewsFriday Night BlitzTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) Grimm “Quill” (DVS) Grimm A Wesen church is robbed. (N) Dateline NBC (Season Premiere) (N) NewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(2:00) Politics & Public Policy Today Politics & Public Policy Today Politics & Public Policy Today WGN-A 16 239 307Old ChristineOld ChristineAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine (N) 30 Rock 30 Rock TVLAND 17 106 304(5:40) M*A*S*H(:17) M*A*S*HHome Improve.Home Improve.The Cosby ShowThe Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Police Women of CincinnatiPolice Women of CincinnatiPolice Women of DallasPolice Women of DallasPolice Women of DallasPolice Women of Dallas A&E 19 118 265Criminal Minds “The Longest Night” Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds “Coda” Criminal Minds (:01) Criminal Minds “The Stranger” HALL 20 185 312Little House on the Prairie Little House on the Prairie “Love’s Long Journey” (2005) Erin Cottrell, Logan Bartholomew. Frasier Frasier Frasier “Detour” Frasier FX 22 136 248Two and Half MenTwo and Half Men(6:56) “The Karate Kid” (2010) Jaden Smith. A Chinese master schools an American boy in the martial arts. The Ultimate Fighter (N) “Hitman” (2007) Timothy Olyphant. CNN 24 200 202(4:00) The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245The Mentalist A Santa is murdered. The Mentalist “Bloodsport” “Blade: Trinity” (2004, Horror) Wesley Snipes, Kris Kristofferson. “Daredevil” (2003) Ben Af eck. A blind attorney ghts crime at night. NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBob SquarePants Victorious Full House Full House The Nanny The Nanny Friends (:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241(5:53) Gangland Sons of Silence. “Glory Road” (2006, Drama) Josh Lucas, Derek Luke. Premiere. A coach leads the rst all-black NCAA team. (9:51) “I, Robot” (2004, Science Fiction) Will Smith, Bridget Moynahan. MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*H M*A*S*H Monk A radio shock-jock. Monk The death of Lt. Disher’s uncle. Seinfeld Frasier The Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Phineas and FerbGood Luck CharlieJessie Gravity Falls My BabysitterCode 9 (N) Phineas and FerbGravity Falls (N) A.N.T. Farm Good Luck CharlieGood Luck CharlieGood Luck Charlie LIFE 32 108 252America’s Most Wanted America’s Most Wanted America’s Most Wanted America’s Most Wanted (N) America’s Most Wanted America’s Most Wanted USA 33 105 242Law & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitCSI: Crime Scene Investigation BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Freestyle Friday” (N) “The Cookout” (2004, Comedy) Ja Rule, Tim Meadows, Jenifer Lewis. (:35) “Major Payne” (1995) Damon Wayans. A gung-ho Marine commands young recruits. ESPN 35 140 206g 2012 Ryder Cup Day One. (N) SportsCenter (N)e College Football Hawaii at BYU. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209NFL32 (N) (Live) d WNBA Basketball Atlanta Dream at Indiana Fever. (N) d WNBA Basketball Seattle Storm at Minnesota Lynx. (N) NFL Kickoff (N) (Live) SUNSP 37 -Reel Animals (N) Inside the RaysInside the RaysRays Live! (N)a MLB Baseball Tampa Bay Rays at Chicago White Sox. From U.S. Cellular Field in Chicago. (N) Rays Live! (N) Inside the Rays DISCV 38 182 278Bering Sea Gold: Under the Ice Flying Wild Alaska Deadliest Catch Bering Sea Gold: Under the Ice (N) Yukon Men “Man Up, Move Out” (N) Bering Sea Gold: Under the Ice TBS 39 139 247King of QueensKing of QueensSeinfeld Seinfeld House of PayneHouse of PayneBetter WorseBetter Worse “Wild Wild West” (1999, Action) Will Smith, Kevin Kline. HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace Mysteries (N) Jane Velez-MitchellNancy Grace MysteriesShowbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236Married to JonasThe SoupE! News (N) Keeping Up With the KardashiansNo DoubtFashion PoliceChelsea Lately (N) E! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernParanormalParanormalGhost Adventures Ghost Adventures (N) The Dead Files The Dead Files Special Investigation HGTV 47 112 229Selling LA Selling LA Hunters Int’lHunters Int’lThe White Room Challenge (N) Flea Market FlipFlea Market FlipHouse Hunters (N) Hunters Int’lHunters Int’lHunters Int’l TLC 48 183 280Say Yes: ATLSay Yes: ATLSecret Princes Say Yes: ATLSay Yes: ATLSay Yes: ATLSay Yes: ATLSecret Princes “The Princely Paupers” Say Yes: ATLSay Yes: ATL HIST 49 120 269Sniper: Deadliest Missions Military job requires accurate shooting. American Pickers “Mike’s Holy Grail” American Pickers “Airstream Dream” American Pickers “An Indian Reunion” (:02) American Pickers ANPL 50 184 282Call of the Wildman “Beast-of Special” Call of WildmanCall of WildmanCall of WildmanCall of WildmanCall of WildmanCall of WildmanCall of WildmanCall of WildmanCall of WildmanCall of Wildman FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, Drive$24 in 24Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, Drive TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the Lord It’s SupernaturalThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesHal Lindsey The Harvest Perry StonePraise the Lord FSN-FL 56 -UEFA MagazineMarlins Live! (Live)a MLB Baseball Philadelphia Phillies at Miami Marlins. From Marlins Ballpark in Miami. (N) Marlins Live! (Live) Inside the MarlinsAction Sports World Tour SYFY 58 122 244 “Saw V” (2008) Tobin Bell. A new disciple carries on the Jigsaw legacy. WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) Haven Raving barbarians run loose. (N) Alphas The team uncovers a plot. AMC 60 130 254(5:00) “Apollo 13” (1995, Historical Drama) Tom Hanks, Bill Paxton. “The Green Mile” (1999, Drama) Tom Hanks, David Morse, Michael Clarke Duncan. A guard thinks an inmate has a supernatural power to heal. COM 62 107 249(:02) Tosh.0 The Colbert ReportDaily Show(:44) Tosh.0 (:17) Tosh.0 (8:50) Key & Peele(:23) Tosh.0 (9:56) Brickleberry(:28) South Park “Without a Paddle” (2004) CMT 63 166 327Reba Reba Reba Reba Reba “Encounters” Reba Dallas Cowboys CheerleadersCheer (N) Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer “Blind Rage” Ultimate Predators “Jaws of Death” Ultimate Predators “Death by Dragon” Ultimate Predators “Chimp Attack” Ultimate Predators “Animal Assassins” Ultimate Predators “Death by Dragon” NGC 109 186 276Wicked Tuna “The Bite Is On” Wild Justice “Hike From Hell” AbandonedAbandonedFamily Guns “I Wanna Jeep” Wicked Tuna “Payback’s a Fish” Wicked Tuna “Payback’s a Fish” SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeDark Matters: Twisted but True Dark Matters: Twisted but True Dark Matters: Twisted but True Dark Matters: Twisted but True Dark Matters: Twisted but True ID 111 192 285On the Case With Paula Zahn Deadly Women “Sins of the Sister” Deadly Women “Love to Death” Deadly Affairs “Battle of the Sexes” Deadly Women “Love You to Pieces” Deadly Women “Love to Death” HBO 302 300 501(:15) “Hop” (2011, Comedy) Voices of James Marsden. ‘PG’ “In Time” (2011, Science Fiction) Justin Timberlake. ‘PG-13’ Real Time With Bill Maher Real Time With Bill Maher MAX 320 310 515(5:00) Caddyshack(:40) “Final Destination 5” (2011) Nicholas D’Agosto. (:15) “The Hangover Part II” (2011, Comedy) Bradley Cooper. ‘R’ Strike Back (N) Skin to the MaxStrike Back SHOW 340 318 545(5:00) “Melancholia” (2011, Drama) Kirsten Dunst. ‘R’ (:25) “Source Code” (2011) Jake Gyllenhaal. ‘PG-13’ “Real Steel” (2011, Action) Hugh Jackman, Evangeline Lilly. ‘PG-13’ (:15) Inside the NFL SATURDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 29, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -e College FootballEntertainment Tonight (N) e College Football Wisconsin at Nebraska. (N) News at 11 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsPaid Program30 Rock 30 Rock Rules/EngagementRules/EngagementBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryNewsInside EditionChann 4 NewsFirst Baptist 5-PBS 5 -The Lawrence Welk ShowAndy Grif th ShowAndy Grif th Show “Auntie Mame” (1958, Comedy) Rosalind Russell, Forrest Tucker, Coral Browne. Ribbon of SandAustin City Limits “Arcade Fire” 7-CBS 7 47 47e College Football Tennessee at Georgia.Action News at 7:00pm on CBS47 (N) Vegas “Pilot” Elementary “Pilot” 48 Hours “My Dad’s Killer” Action Sports 360Two and Half Men 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneFantasy FootballLike, LoveDaryl’s HouseYourjax MusicYourJax MusicJacksonvilleI Know JaxLocal Haunts 10-FOX 10 30 30a(4:00) MLB Baseball Teams TBA. FOX Collegee College Football Texas at Oklahoma State. (N) NewsAction Sports 360 12-NBC 12 12 12g 2012 Ryder Cup Day Two. (N) Wheel of FortuneJeopardy! Revolution “Chained Heat” Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Capt. Cragen is arrested for the murder. NewsSat. Night Live CSPAN 14 210 350Washington This CommunicatorsWashington This Week WGN-A 16 239 307Law & Order: Criminal Intent America’s Funniest Home Videosa MLB Baseball Chicago Cubs at Arizona Diamondbacks. From Chase Field in Phoenix. (N) WGN News at NineFunny Videos TVLAND 17 106 304Roseanne (:32) Roseanne(:05) Roseanne(:43) The Cosby Show The Cosby ShowLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Stolen VoicesStolen VoicesWelcome to Sweetie Pie’s Welcome to Sweetie Pie’sWelcome to Sweetie Pie’s (N) Iyanla, Fix My Life “Fix My Mistake” Welcome to Sweetie Pie’s A&E 19 118 265Parking WarsParking WarsParking WarsParking Wars “Independence Day” (1996) Will Smith, Bill Pullman. Earthlings vs. evil aliens in 15-mile-wide ships. Shipping WarsShipping Wars HALL 20 185 312(5:00) “Love Begins” (2011) “Love’s Everlasting Courage” (2010) Cheryl Ladd, Bruce Boxleitner. “Love Comes Softly” (2003, Drama) Katherine Heigl, Dale Midkiff. “Love’s Enduring Promise” (2004) FX 22 136 248e(4:00) College Football Arizona State at California. (N) Two and Half Men “The Karate Kid” (2010) Jaden Smith, Jackie Chan. A Chinese master schools an American boy in the martial arts. (:04) Louie(:39) Spider-Man 3 CNN 24 200 202The Situation RoomCNN Newsroom (N) Putting America to WorkPiers Morgan TonightCNN Newsroom (N) Putting America to Work TNT 25 138 245 “Resident Evil: Extinction” (2007, Horror) Milla Jovovich, Oded Fehr. “The Book of Eli” (2010, Action) Denzel Washington, Gary Oldman, Mila Kunis. (DVS) “American Gangster” (2007) Denzel Washington. NIK 26 170 299Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Big Time RushVictorious Victorious (N) Big Time Rush (N) How to Rock (N) iCarly The Nanny The Nanny Friends (:33) Friends SPIKE 28 168 241(4:22) “Glory Road” (2006, Drama) (:10) “I, Robot” (2004) Will Smith, Bridget Moynahan. A homicide detective tracks a dangerous robot in 2035. “The Punisher” (2004, Action) Thomas Jane, John Travolta, Will Patton. MY-TV 29 32 -Hogan’s HeroesHogan’s HeroesBatmanBatmanLost in Space “The Colonists” Star Trek “Assignment: Earth” “Dr. Cyclops” (1940, Science Fiction) Albert Dekker, Janice Logan. DISN 31 172 290(5:30) Shake It Up! “Made in Japan” Austin & Ally Austin & Ally My BabysitterGood Luck CharlieGravity Falls Code 9 Jessie Gravity Falls Shake It Up! Shake It Up! LIFE 32 108 252“Last Hours in Suburbia” (2012) Kelcie Stranahan, Maiara Walsh. “A Mother’s Nightmare” (2012, Suspense) Annabeth Gish. Premiere. “The Preacher’s Daughter” (2012, Drama) Andrea Bowen. Premiere. USA 33 105 242NCIS Director’s contact is killed. NCIS The team hunts a killer. NCIS The team hunts for a killer. NCIS “Caged” Women’s prison riot. NCIS “Broken Bird” NCIS Gibbs’ former mother-in-law. BET 34 124 329(5:58) The Parkers “Major Payne” (1995) Damon Wayans. A gung-ho Marine commands young recruits. “Akeelah and the Bee” (2006) Laurence Fishburne. A girl hopes to compete in a spelling bee. He’s Mine ESPN 35 140 206e College Football Florida State at South Florida. (N)e(:15) College Football Mississippi at Alabama. (N) ESPN2 36 144 209e College FootballCollege Footballe College Football South Carolina at Kentucky. (N) College Footballe College Football Oregon at Washington State. (N) SUNSP 37 -e College Footballe College Football Texas Christian at Southern Methodist. (N) Future PhenomsHalls of FameFitness Truth (N) Future Phenoms DISCV 38 182 278I (Almost) Got Away With It I (Almost) Got Away With It I (Almost) Got Away With It I (Almost) Got Away With It I (Almost) Got Away With It I (Almost) Got Away With It TBS 39 139 247King of QueensKing of QueensSeinfeld Seinfeld Big Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryFranklin & Bash “Waiting on a Friend” “Get Smart” (2008) Steve Carell. HLN 40 202 204The InvestigatorsBody of EvidenceBody of EvidenceThe InvestigatorsBody of EvidenceBody of EvidenceThe InvestigatorsBody of EvidenceBody of Evidence FNC 41 205 360America’s News Headquarters (N) FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Justice With Judge Jeanine (N) StosselJournal EditorialFOX News Watch E! 45 114 236Keeping Up With the KardashiansKeeping Up With the KardashiansKeeping Up With the KardashiansKeeping Up With the KardashiansMarried to JonasMarried to JonasFashion Police TRAVEL 46 196 277The Bermuda Triangle: Beneath WavesMysteries of the Smithsonian Ghost Adventures Savannah, Ga. Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures “Tooele Hospital” HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lHome by NovoMillion DollarLove It or List It A couple is torn. Love It or List It “Colin and Beth” House HuntersHunters Int’lHouse HuntersHunters Int’l TLC 48 183 28048 Hours: Hard Evidence Dateline: Real Life Mysteries Dateline: Real Life Mysteries Dateline: Real Life Mysteries (N) Dateline: Real Life Mysteries (N) Dateline: Real Life Mysteries HIST 49 120 269How the States Got Their ShapesPawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars (:31) Pawn Stars(:02) Pawn Stars(:32) Pawn Stars ANPL 50 184 282My Cat From Hell My Cat From Hell My Cat From Hell “Cat Escape!” My Cat From Hell “My Cat Is a Bully” My Cat From Hell “Bitten” My Cat From Hell “My Cat Is a Bully” FOOD 51 110 231Restaurant: Impossible “Michele’s” Restaurant StakeoutRestaurant StakeoutRestaurant StakeoutRestaurant StakeoutIron Chef America TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the Lord Gaither: Precious MemoriesIn Touch With Dr. Charles StanleyHour of Power Billy Graham Classic Crusades “Love Takes Wing” (2009, Drama) FSN-FL 56 -e College Football Houston at Rice. (N)a MLB Baseball Philadelphia Phillies at Miami Marlins. From Marlins Ballpark in Miami. (N) Marlins Live! (N) Inside the MarlinsInside the MarlinsInside the Marlins SYFY 58 122 244(5:00) “Anaconda” (1997) “Lake Placid 2” (2007, Horror) John Schneider, Sam McMurray. “Lake Placid: The Final Chapter” (2012, Horror) Robert Englund. Premiere. “Lake Placid 3” (2010) Colin Ferguson. AMC 60 130 254Into the West “Hell on Wheels” Mary Light Shines. (Part 4 of 6) “Tombstone” (1993) Kurt Russell, Val Kilmer. Doc Holliday joins Wyatt Earp for the OK Corral showdown. “Hang ’Em High” (1968) COM 62 107 249(4:14) “Mr. Deeds” (2002) (6:48) “Without a Paddle” (2004, Comedy) Seth Green, Matthew Lillard. (8:56) Daniel Tosh: Happy ThoughtsDemetri Martin. Standup Comedian. (N) (:04) “Accepted” (2006) CMT 63 166 327Reba Reba Reba Reba Reba “Switch” Reba Bayou BillionairesBayou BillionairesRedneck Rehab “The Carolus Family” Bayou BillionairesBayou Billionaires NGWILD 108 190 283The Incredible Dr. PolThe Incredible Dr. PolDog Whisperer “Stuck in the Mirror” Dog Whisperer A wheaten terrier mix. The Incredible Dr. Pol “Whoa Mama!” Dog Whisperer “Stuck in the Mirror” NGC 109 186 276Being “Silver Shovel” Explorer “24 Hours After Hiroshima” Nazi Scrapbooks From HellHuman Lampshade: MysteryHitler’s G.I. Death CampHuman Lampshade: Mystery SCIENCE 110 193 284Oddities San FranciscoOddities Oddities Oddities Oddities Oddities Oddities Oddities Oddities Oddities Oddities ID 111 192 285Deadly Women “Love You to Pieces” Blood Relatives “Reap What You Sow” Scorned: Love Kills Happily Never After (Season Finale) (N) Deadly Affairs “Lust for the Job” (N) Scorned: Love Kills HBO 302 300 501Rise of Apes “D.O.A.: Dead or Alive” (2006) Devon Aoki. ‘PG-13’ “The Sitter” (2011) Jonah Hill. Premiere. ‘R’ s Boxing Jason Escalera vs. Edwin Rodriguez, Super Middleweights. (N) MAX 320 310 515Along Came Polly(:45) “The A-Team” (2010) Liam Neeson. Former Special Forces soldiers form a rogue unit. Strike Back “Beyond” (2011) Jon Voight. Premiere. ‘PG-13’ Strike Back SHOW 340 318 545Homeland “The Weekend” Homeland “Achilles Heel” Homeland Brody relives his captivity. Homeland “Representative Brody” Homeland Carrie is hospitalized. Homeland “Marine One” Upset alerts highlight weekendBy RALPH D. RUSSOAssociated PressWest Virginia is ready to start a new era, with what is primed to be a classic Big 12 scoring spree, and Urban Meyer will coach a Big Ten game for Ohio State for the first time. Florida State, meanwhile, is on letdown alert. The ninth-ranked Mountaineers host one of the two games this week-end matching ranked teams. No. 25 Baylor comes to Morgantown, W.Va., for West Virginia’s first Big 12 game. The Mountaineers fled the Big East last year, pay-ing the conference $20 mil-lion for an early release so they could play in the Big 12 this year. The timing was excellent because West Virginia (3-0) brings a team capable of contending for a Big 12 title into its new neighborhood. Heisman Trophy contend-er Geno Smith is piling up huge passing stats (1,072 yards and 12 touchdowns) and leading an offense that is averaging 47 points — or four less points than what Baylor (3-0) is averaging. Nick Florence has proved to be a more-than-capable replacement for Heisman winner Robert Griffin III. He has passed for 1,004 yards and 11 touchdowns. The other ranked matchup is unlikely to be as much fun. No. 14 Ohio State visits No. 20 Michigan State as the Big Ten begins con-ference play after a rather uninspiring four weeks of nonconference games. Meyer’s first Buckeyes team is saddled with NCAA sanctions, so it can’t go to a bowl game or play for the Big Ten championship. But Ohio State could still end up being the best team in the conference. “I think by the end of the year this might be a hell of a football team,” Meyer said. “I mean, it might be sooner than that.” To be that, Ohio State needs to work on its defense. The Buckeyes are last in the conference, allowing 395 yards per game. Ohio State features two of the best defensive linemen in the country in Johnathan Hankins and John Simon. Tying up blockers isn’t the problem. Wrapping up ball carriers has been. That could be an issue when facing Le’Veon Bell, the Spartans’ 245-pound tailback who is third in the nation in rushing at 152 yards per game. Michigan State can win the Big 12 title, but will need to fix an offense that has struggled to find a com-plement for Bell in the pass-ing game. All of the top six teams in the nation are big favor-ites this week, but it might be worth keeping an eye on No. 4 Florida State. The Seminoles are on the road for the first time this season, facing South Florida in a nonconference game. Coming off last week’s 49-37 victory against Clemson, Florida State has to avoid a letdown against a Bulls team that has talent but is hard to figure. USF lost at Ball State last week. One thing is for sure, the Bulls can make their season by beating Florida State. The picks: SATURDAY Mississippi (plus 31) at No. 1 Alabama Rebels are 1-24 in Tuscaloosa. ... ALABAMA 48-14. No. 2 Oregon (minus 28 12 ) vs. Washington State at Seattle Losing to Colorado is no way to prepare for Ducks. ... OREGON 42-21. Towson (no line) at No. 3 LSU Towson’s mascot also is the Tigers. That is only thing these two have in common. ... LSU 60-7. No. 4 Florida State (minus 17) at South Florida Bulls won 17-7 in Tallahassee in 2009. ... FLORIDA STATE 28-13. Tennessee (plus 13 12 ) at No. 5 Georgia If Vols can protect Tyler Bray from Jarvis Jones, they have a shot. ... GEORGIA 35-24. No. 6 South Carolina (minus 20 12 ) at Kentucky Wildcats QB Max Smith (shoulder) expected to play. ... SOUTH CAROLINA 38-14. No. 25 Baylor (plus 13 12 ) at No. 9 West Virginia Prediction: Fun. ... WEST VIRGINIA 48-38. No. 12 Texas (minus 2) at Oklahoma State Cowboys have won two straight in series, but only 4 of 26 overall. ... TEXAS 31-21. UPSET SPECIAL No. 14 Ohio State (plus 3) at No. 20 Michigan State Spartans last beat Buckeyes two straight in 1998-99. ... OHIO STATE 24-21. BEST BET No. 15 TCU (minus 16) at SMU Mustangs upset Horned Frogs last season. ... TCU 45-14. No. 17 Clemson (minus 9 12 ) at Boston College Tigers can’t afford another ACC loss. ... CLEMSON 34-24. No. 18 Oregon State (plus 3) at Arizona Beavers going for two in a row on road. ... OREGON STATE 28-27. No. 19 Louisville (minus 10) at Southern Miss Winless Golden Eagles off to worst start since los-ing first nine in 1976. ... LOUISVILLE 37-28. Wisconsin (plus 12 12 ) at No. 22 Nebraska Badgers welcomed Huskers to Big Ten last season with a loss. ... NEBRASKA 28-21. No. 24 Boise State (plus 26) at New Mexico Lobos already matched win total of last two sea-sons combined. ... BOISE STATE 28-13. ———— Last week’s record: 16-3 (straight); 8-10 (vs. points) Season record: 72-14 (straight); 35-36 (vs. points)

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6B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & PUZZLES FRIDAY & SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28-29, 2012 DEAR ABBY: I have been married for 35 years. We have one daughter. My husband has this “thing” about grabbing other women’s behinds. He hugs them and then goes in for a grab. It bothers me so much. It hurts my feelings and I have told him so, but he still does it. Men have told me they don’t want him touch-ing their wives this way. Others have said it’s dis-respectful to me. He says he will try to stop doing it. Try? That doesn’t set well with me. What do you think about this? Am I overreacting? After all these years, I just don’t know what to think. -HANDS OFF IN ROCHESTER, N.Y. DEAR HANDS OFF: I agree that pinching other women’s bottoms is dis-respectful (unless you’re in Italy, where it’s the norm). It appears you have spent 35 years married to an unrepentant lecher. I’d think that by now he would have trouble hug-ging any woman twice if she saw him with arms outstretched. Because you can’t convince your husband to change his ways, try this: When a man complains about your husband’s misbehavior, tell him he should deliver that mes-sage directly to your spouse. Perhaps that will get the point across. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: I recently married a wonderful man, and I like my in-laws very much. They’re nice, wel-coming people and we get along well. There’s just one problem: They are the biggest enablers I have ever met! With my husband it isn’t a big deal because he’s very self-sufficient. On the other hand, his 30-year-old brother has lived with them for three years. He is jobless and has a drinking problem. His par-ents don’t encourage him to look for work. They give him an allowance, pay all his court costs and drive him around because he got a DUI. They even pay his cellphone bill. What is my place in all of this? Should I say anything? My fear is that when my husband’s par-ents die, his brother will become OUR problem. -LOOKING AHEAD IN COLORADO DEAR LOOKING AHEAD: Don’t say any-thing to your husband’s parents. The pattern they are following is one that was set long ago, and nothing you can say will change it. It may, however, cause serious hard feel-ings. The person you should talk to is your husband, so that well in advance of his parents’ demise, you will be in agreement about his brother finally taking responsibility for himself or suffering the conse-quences of his actions. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: I love my co-workers, but several of them have an aggravating habit of walking into my office, uninvited, while I’m eating lunch at my desk. They then proceed to tell me their latest news, joke or war story. Abby, those of us who eat at our desks do it so we can keep working and be ready to respond to work-related contacts as they come in, NOT to socialize. Besides, isn’t it just as rude to interrupt someone while they’re eat-ing as it is while they’re talking? I wish my beloved co-workers would save it for the water cooler. -“SANDWICHED” IN SAN DIEGO DEAR SANDWICHED: I don’t think it’s rude. But because YOU do, it’s up to you to tell your well-mean-ing co-workers that when you’re working at your desk, you’d prefer not to be interrupted because it breaks your concentration. If you speak up nicely, I’m sure they won’t love you any less, and then you will love them even more. ** ** **DEAR ABBY: My boyfriend of one year has told me he needs to focus on getting his life together -getting a better job, con-centrating on his career and finding himself. At this point in his life, he knows he can’t provide for me and give me what I want, which is to settle down in a few years. He said he is unsure when he will have his life together and he doesn’t want me to wait for him. He feels he needs to be “selfish” now and focus only on himself. We have talked about breaking up, and while he has faith that we will be together again, I can’t bring myself to end things with this amazing man. -AFRAID TO LET GO DEAR AFRAID: When a man says he wants to focus only on himself and he doesn’t want you to wait for him, what he is really saying is, “It’s over.” While the prospect of moving on after having invested a year in the relationship may be anxiety-provoking, at this point, you really have no choice. And don’t expect to “be together again” anytime soon because his road to self-discovery could take a long, long time if it happens at all. Please accept my sym-pathy for your heartache. ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: I am a 13year-old boy. My dad and I have a disagreement. I have been throwing away the lunches my mom packs for school because I don’t like them and buying school lunches. I realize this was ungrateful and dishonest, and I regret doing it. As a punishment, Dad won’t let me go to one of my best friends’ birthday party. I’m fine with being punished, but I think this punishment is unfair to my friend because he doesn’t get to have me at his party. Instead, I think it would be better to be grounded or made to do extra chores. Who’s right? -NORMAL TEEN IN ORINDA, CALIF. DEAR TEEN: You are a born negotiator. Instead of taking your punish-ment, you’re trying for a plea bargain. I wouldn’t be surprised if in the future you become a successful lawyer. However, regarding your question -I’m not getting in the middle of this one. And I’m pretty sure that this is a punish-ment you won’t soon for-get. Bon appetit! ** ** **DEAR ABBY: My aunt has been diagnosed with a progressive form of dementia and has had to be permanently hospital-ized. She is no longer able to perform basic life func-tions and also has violent outbursts. Her prognosis is not good, and she’ll likely die within a year. I’m engaged and getting ready to send out invitations to my wedding. However, I’m unsure how to address the invitation to my uncle. My aunt will almost certainly be alive at the time of my wedding, but there is no possible way she can attend. It seems wrong to ignore her existence and address the invitation only to “Mr. John Smith.” But it feels equally wrong to address it to “Mr. and Mrs. John Smith,” knowing she cannot attend. Your advice would be greatly appreciat-ed. -POLITE BRIDE-TO-BE IN CONNECTICUT DEAR POLITE BRIDETO-BE: Address the invi-tation to both your aunt and uncle, but when you do, include a sweet note saying you understand that she won’t be able to attend, but hope that he will be able to join you on your special day. I’m sure it will be appreciated. HOROSCOPES DEAR ABBY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Hold on to informa-tion. What you now have to offer is valuable and you don’t want to give it away for free. A partnership will help you get further ahead, but only if you both bring equal amounts of knowledge to the table. +++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Changes at work or with your peers may be unnerving, but don’t show your surprise. Do the groundwork required to come up with alternate solutions to any situation you face. Look out for your interests first and foremost. Finish what you start. ++++ GEMINI (May 21June 20): A proposal being offered may not be as opportunistic as it’s portrayed. Do your due diligence before you agree to something you may regret. Honesty will be required on your part as well. Stick close to home. Self-improvement is in the stars. ++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Don’t be afraid of suc-cess or failure. Expose what you can do, and you can make improvements as you move forward. New experiences will do you good and help to shape what’s to come. Listen to your heart, not what every-one else says. +++++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): A change of heart will catch you by surprise. Don’t give in to someone unwilling to meet you halfway. Be upfront and you will make an impression that will alter circumstances. Love can play an important role in your financial future. +++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): An emotional plea will help you sort out a personal problem you face. Take a physical approach to what needs to be done. Walk the walk instead of just talking the talk. Nurturing a situation will lead to a better future. +++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Search for a better way to use your talents and skills to earn higher wages or to obtain the gratifica-tion you want for what you do. Don’t sit around when you should be out looking for professional opportuni-ties. +++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Stick close to home and make your surround-ings conducive to your cre-ative needs. Keep things mellow and avoid anyone who is acting argumenta-tive. An unusual project will ease your stress. Share ideas with people you consider worthy con-tributors. +++++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Temptation is apparent, but so is disil-lusionment and emotional deception. Before you agree to anything person-ally or professionally, ques-tion both your motives as well as others’. You are best to focus on your love life and personal self-improvements. ++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Keep things out in the open. A misunder-standing will end up cost-ing you time and money. Don’t get lured into a situation that will lead to personal complications. An unusual project will help open doors that were closed in the past. ++++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Discretion will be necessary to avoid hurt-ing someone’s feelings. Concentrate on raising your income and utilizing your talents to better suit the current economic cli-mate. Improve your home and you will be able to cut your overhead. +++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Go over a pending situation and consider the mistake you may have made. It’s hard to move forward if you don’t rectify situations that need to be addressed. You will be judged by your actions and the way you deal with oth-ers. +++++ THE LAST WORD Eugenia Last Husband’s rear attacks require frontal approach Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com Puzzle Solutions on the next page.

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FRIDAY & SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28-29, 2012 PUZZLES & COMICS LAKE CITY REPORTER 7B DILBERT BABY BLUES BLONDIE BEETLE BAILEY B.C. FRANK & ERNEST FOR BETTER OR WORSE ZITS HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH GARFIELD CELEBRITY CIPHER CLASSIC PEANUTS PUZZLE ANSWERS

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8B LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDFRIDAY& SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28-29, 2012 CLASSIFIED AD vantageTake ADvantage of the Reporter Classifieds!755-5440Lake City Reporter FIND IT SELL IT BUY IT $17504 lines 3 days Includes 2 Signs Each additional line $1.65 Garage Sale Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$10104 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.10One item per ad Under $500 Personal Merchandise Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$16754 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.15One item per ad Under $1,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$23704 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.45One item per ad Under $2,500 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $4,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$27404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.55One item per ad Under $4,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$30404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.65One item per ad Under $6,000 Placing An Ad Service Guide Limited to service type advertis-ing only.4 lines, one month....$92.00 $10.80 each additional lineIncludes an additional $2.00 per ad for each Wednesday insertion. DeadlinesBe Sure to Call Early You can call us at 755-5440 Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.Some people prefer to place their classified ads in person, and some ad categories will require prepay-ment. Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street.You can also fax or email your ad copy to the Reporter.FAX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the Classified Department.EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreporter.comAd is to Appear:TuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday Call by:Mon., 10:00 a.m.Mon., 10:00 a.m.Wed., 10:00 a.m.Thurs., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fax/Email by:Mon., 9:00 a.m.Mon., 9:00 a.m.Wed., 9:00 a.m.Thurs., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.These deadlines are subject to change without notice. Cancellations, Changes & Billing Questions Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject, or classify all advertisements under appropriate headings. Copy should be checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day of pub-lication. Credit for published errors will be allowed for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement which was incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be published, nor for any general, special or consequential damages. Advertising language must comply with Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition of discrimi-nation in employment, housing and public accommodations. Standard abbreviations are acceptable; how-ever, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated. Ad Errors-Please read your ad on the first day of publication. Weaccept responsibility for only the first incorrect insertion, and only the charge for the ad space in error. Please call 755-5440 immediately for prompt correc-tion and billing adjustments.CancellationsNormal advertising deadlines apply for cancellation.Billing InquiriesCall 755-5440. Should further information be required regarding payments or credit limits, your call will be trans-ferred to the accounting depart-ment. General Information In Print and Onlinewww.lakecityreporter.com Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$2504 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $.25One item per ad Under $100 CLASSIFIED AD vantageTake ADvantage of the Reporter Classifieds!755-5440Lake City Reporter FIND IT SELL IT BUY IT $17504 lines 3 days Includes 2 Signs Each additional line $1.65 Garage Sale Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$10104 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.10One item per ad Under $500 Personal Merchandise Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$16754 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.15One item per ad Under $1,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$23704 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.45One item per ad Under $2,500 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $4,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$27404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.55One item per ad Under $4,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$30404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.65One item per ad Under $6,000 Placing An Ad Service Guide Limited to service type advertis-ing only.4 lines, one month....$92.00 $10.80 each additional lineIncludes an additional $2.00 per ad for each Wednesday insertion. DeadlinesBe Sure to Call Early You can call us at 755-5440 Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.Some people prefer to place their classified ads in person, and some ad categories will require prepay-ment. Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street.You can also fax or email your ad copy to the Reporter.FAX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the Classified Department.EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreporter.comAd is to Appear:TuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday Call by:Mon., 10:00 a.m.Mon., 10:00 a.m.Wed., 10:00 a.m.Thurs., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fax/Email by:Mon., 9:00 a.m.Mon., 9:00 a.m.Wed., 9:00 a.m.Thurs., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.These deadlines are subject to change without notice. Cancellations, Changes & Billing Questions Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject, or classify all advertisements under appropriate headings. Copy should be checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day of pub-lication. Credit for published errors will be allowed for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement which was incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be published, nor for any general, special or consequential damages. Advertising language must comply with Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition of discrimi-nation in employment, housing and public accommodations. Standard abbreviations are acceptable; how-ever, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated. Ad Errors-Please read your ad on the first day of publication. Weaccept responsibility for only the first incorrect insertion, and only the charge for the ad space in error. Please call 755-5440 immediately for prompt correc-tion and billing adjustments.CancellationsNormal advertising deadlines apply for cancellation.Billing InquiriesCall 755-5440. Should further information be required regarding payments or credit limits, your call will be trans-ferred to the accounting depart-ment. General Information In Print and Onlinewww.lakecityreporter.com Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$2504 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $.25One item per ad Under $100 ServicesBack Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root raking, bush hog, seeding, sod, disking, site prep, ponds & irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200 Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILDIVISIONCase #: 2008-CA-000603HSBC Bank USA, National Associa-tion, as Trustee under the Pooling and Servicing Agreement dated as of December 1, 2006, Fremont Home Loan Trust 2006-EPlaintiff,vs.Carlos Palacio and Fanny Palacio, Husband and Wife; United States Department of TreasuryDefendant(s)AMENDED NOTICE OF SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to an Order rescheduling fore-closure sale dated September 18, 2012 entered in Civil Case No. 2008-CA-000603 of the Circuit Court of the 3rd Judicial Circuit in and for Columbia County, Florida, wherein HSBC Bank USA, National Associa-tion, as Trustee under the Pooling and Servicing Agreement dated as of December 1, 2006, Fremont Home Loan Trust 2006-E, Plaintiff and Carlos Palacio and Fanny Palacio, Husband and Wife are defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bid-der for cash, ATTHE COURT-ROOM ONE OF THE COLUMBIACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE, LO-CATED AT173 HERNANDO AVENUE, LAKE CITY, COLUM-BIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, at 11:00 A.M., October 17, 2012, the follow-ing described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit:LOT92, CALLAWAYPHASE III, ASUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TOTHE PLATTHEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 7, PA-GES 145-146, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA.ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN IN-TERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.DATED at Lake City, Florida, this 18 day of September, 2012./s/ B. ScippioP. DEWITTCASONCLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURTColumbia County, FloridaATTORNEYFOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN, & GACH, LLP4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd., Suite 100Tampa, FL33614(813) 880-888802500390September 2 8 2012 October 5 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILDIVISIONCASE #: 2010-CA-000530JPMorgan Chase Bank, National As-sociationPlaintiff,-vs-Ricky Mayo and Denise Mao, Hus-band and Wife; Unknown Tenants in Possession #1; If living, and all Un-known Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above names Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Un-known Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grant-ees, or Other ClaimantsDefendant(s).AMENDED NOTICE OF SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to an Order rescheduling fore-closure sale dated September 12, 2012, entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA-000530 of the Circuit Court of the 3rd Judicial Circuit in and for Columbia County, Florida, wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, Na-tional Association, Plaintiff and Ricky Mayo and Denise Mayo, Hus-band and Wife are defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bid-der for cash ATTHE COURT-ROOM ONE OF THE COLUMBIACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE, LO-CATED AT173 HERNANDO AVE., LAKE CITY, COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AT11:00 A.M. on November 7, 2012, the fol-lowing described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit;LOT5, OF MERLE’S ADDITION, ASUBDIVISION OF APARTOF LOTOR BLOCK 297 OF THE EASTERN DIVISION OF THE CITYOF LAKE CITY, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE MAPOR PLATRECORDED IN PLATBOOK 3, PAGE 8, PUBLIC RE-CORDS OF COLUMBIACOUN-TY, FLORIDA.ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN IN-TERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.DATED at Lake City, Florida, this 14th day of September, 2012.-sP. ScippioP. DEWITTCASONCLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURTColumbia County, FloridaATTORNEYFOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACH4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd., Ste 100Tampa, FL33614(813) 880-888805534483September 21, 28, 2012 LegalDISTRICTCOURTCLARK COUNTY, NEVADACase No. A-12-660969-CWYNN LAS VEGAS, LLC d/b/a WYNN LAS VEGAS, a Nevada lim-ited liability company,Plaintiff,v.CHARLES MIDDLETON KEL-LEY, JR., an individual,Defendant.NOTICE! YOU HAVE BEEN SU-ED. THE COURTMAYDECIDE AGAINSTYOU WITHOUTYOUR BEING HEARD UNLESS YOU RESPOND WITHIN 20 DAYS. READ THE INFORMATION BE-LOW.TOTHE DEFENDANT: Acivil Complaint has been filed by the Plaintiff’s against you for the relief set forth in the ComplaintCHARLES MIDDLETON KEL-LEY, JR.1. If you intend to defend this law-suit, within 20 days after this sum-mons is served on your exclusive of the day of service, you must do the following:a. file with the Clerk of this Court, whose address is shown below, a for-mal written response to the Com-plaint in accordance with the rules of the court, with the appropriate filing fee.b. Serve a copy of your response upon the attorney whose name and address is shown below.2. Unless you respond, your default will be entered upon application of the Plaintiff and this Court may enter a judgment against you for the relief demanded n the Complaint which could result in the taking of money or property or relief requested in the Complaint.3. If you intend to seek the advice of an attorney in this matter, you should do so promptly so that your response may be filed on time.4. The object of this action is brought to recover a judgment for failure to repay debts associated with credit in-struments.5. The State of Nevada, its political subdivision, agencies, officers, em-ployees, board members and legisla-tors, each have 45 days after service of this summons within which to file an answer or other responsive plead-ing to the Complaint.STEVEN GRIERSON, CLERK OF COURTBy: /s/ Kristie M. GormanDeputy ClerkDate May 10, 2012County Courthouse200 Lewis AvenueLas Vegas, Nevada 89155Issued at the request of:/s/ Stacie MichaelsNevada Bar No. 97053131 Las Vegas Boulevard SouthLas Vegas, Nevada 89109(702) 770-2112Attorney for Plaintiff05535005September 28, 2012October 5, 12, 19, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURT, THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAPROBATE DIVISION CASE NO. 12-211-CPIN RE: ESTATE OFNED FULLER DICKS,deceased.NOTICE T O CREDIT ORS The administration of the estate of NED FULLER DICKS, deceased, whose date of death was August 15, 2012; File Number 12-211-CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for Co-lumbia County, Florida, Probate Di-vision, the address of which is 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055. The names and ad-dresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's at-torney are set forth below.All creditors of the decedent and oth-er persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICA-TION OF THIS NOTICE.ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITH-IN THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publi-cation of this notice is: September 28, 2012.Personal Representative:/s/ Peggy Byrd CarterPEGGYBYRD CARTER127 SE County Road 252Lake City, Florida 32025Attorneys for Personal Representa-tive:FEAGLE & FEAGLE, ATTOR-NEYS, P.A.By: /s/ Mark E. FeagleMark E. FeagleFlorida Bar No. 0576905153 NE Madison StreetPost Office Box 1653Lake City, Florida 32056-1653386/752-7191mefeagle@bellsouth.net 05535018September 28, 2012October 5, 2012 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILDIVISIONCase No.: 2010-CA-000209BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.Plaintiff,v.DAVID KAMPMEYER; et al.,Defendants,NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALENOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to Final summary Judgment dated May 31, 2012, entered in Civil Case No.: 12-2010-CA-0002089, of the Circuit Court of the Third Circuit in and for Columbia County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is Plaintiff, and DAVID KAMPMEYER; REBECCAKAMPMEYER; ANYAND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINSTTHE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUALDEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAYCLAIM AN INTERESTAS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIM-ANTS; JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A. F/K/AWASHING-TON MUTUALBANK F/K/AWASHINGTON MUTUALBANK, FA.; JOHN DOE AND JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION are Defendants.I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at 11:00 a.m., at the Columbia County Courthouse, located at 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, FL32055 at 11:00 a.m. on the 24th day of October, 2012 the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit:LOT13, CANNON CREEK ACRES, ACCORDING TO THE PLATTHEREOF, RECORDED IN PLATBOOK 4, PAGE(S) 56 AND 56AOF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLOR-IDA.If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of re-cord as of the date of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus.WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on 9/10/12.P. DEWITTCASONCLERK OF THE COURTBy: -sB. ScippioDeputy ClerkAttorney for Plaintiff:Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A.350 Jim Moran Blvd. Suite 100Deerfield Beach, FL33442Telephone: (386) 354-3544Facsimile: (954) 354-3545AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-TIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accom-modation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Individuals with a disability who need any accommoda-tion to participate should call the ADACoordinator, Jacquetta Brad-ley, 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Room 408, Lake City, FL32055, 386-719-7428, within two (2) work-ing days of your receipt of this notice to appear.05534617September 21, 28, 2012 IN THE CIRCUITCOURTFOR COLUMBIACOUNTY,FLORIDAPROBATE DIVISIONIN RE: ESTATE OFMADELINE G. SWEAT,Deceased.File No. 11-286-CPDivision ProbateNOTICE TO CREDITORSThe administration of the estate of MADELINE G. SWEAT, deceased, whose date of death was November 14, 2011, and whose social security number is ***-**-8970, is pending in the Circuit Court for COLUMBIACounty, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 173 NE Her-nando Ave., Columbia County Courthouse, Lake City, Fl. 32055. The names and addresses of the per-sonal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below.All creditors of the decedent and oth-er persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICA-TION OF THIS NOTICE.ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITH-IN THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED.NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.The date of first publication of this notice is September 28, 2012, Attorney for Personal Representa-tive:Lloyd E. Peterson, Jr., AttorneyFlorida Bar Number: 0798797905 SWBaya Drive,Lake City, FL32025Telephone: (386) 961-9959Personal Representative:CHARLES DANIELSWEAT,7843 LaBarrington Blvd., Powell, Tenn. 3784905534970September 28, 2012October 5, 2012 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE 3RD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILDIVISIONCASE NO.: 12-67-CALAVERNE AUBREYMETHVIN,Plaintiff,vs.LINABIBLE, if alive and if de-ceased; the Estate of LINABIBLE, the decedent’s unknown spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors and all parties claiming by through, under or against him; the unknown spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees and creditors of deceased persons, and all other parties claiming by, through, under or against them; and all un-known natural persons if alive, and if dead or not known to be dead or alive, their several and respective un-known spouses, heirs, devisees grantees and creditors, or other par-ties claiming by, through or under those unknown natural persons; and the several and respective unknown assigns, successors in interest, trust-ees or any other person claiming by, through, under or against any corpo-ration or other legal entity named as defendant; and all claimants, per-sons, or parties, natural or corporate, or whose exact legal status is un-known, claiming under any of the above-named or described defend-ants or parties claiming to have any right, title or interest in and to the lands and property hereinafter descri-bedDefendantsCLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE UN-DER F.S. CHAPTER 45NOTICE GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclo-sure dated September 19, 2012 in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Columbia County Courthouse, 173 NE Hernando Ave. at 11:00 A.M. on October 24, 2012, the fol-lowing described property:LOT8, OF SANTAFE WOODS, ASUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO THE PLATTHEREOF AS RE-CORDED IN PLATBOOK 6, PAGE 124, OF THE PUBLIC RE-CORDS OF COLUMBIACOUN-TY, FLORIDA.Dated: September 19, 2012P. DeWitt CasonClerk of CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy ClerkStrickland Law Firm, P.L.3132 Ponce de Leon Blvd.Coral Gables, FL3313405534986September 28, 2012October 5, 2012 IN THECIRCUITCOURT, THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDAPROBATE DIVISIONCASE NO. 12-209-CPIN RE: ESTATE OFANNIE BEULAH ANDERSON,deceased.NOTICE T O CREDIT ORS The administration of the estate of ANNIE BEULAH ANDERSON, de-ceased, whose date of death was Jan-uary 22, 2012; File Number 12-209-CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for Columbia County, Florida, Pro-bate Division, the address of which is 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055. The names and addresses of the personal representa-tive and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below.All creditors of the decedent and oth-er persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICA-TION OF THIS NOTICE.ALLCLAIMS NOTFILED WITH-IN THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.The date of first publication of this notice is: September 28, 2012.Personal Representative: /s/ Kayatta F. Williams KAYATTAF. WILLIAMS2309 Old Bainbridge Road, Apt. 1202Tallahassee, Florida 32303Attorneys for Personal Representa-tive:FEAGLE & FEAGLE, ATTOR-NEYS, P.A.By: /s/ Mark E. FeagleMark E. FeagleFlorida Bar No. 0576905153 NE Madison StreetPost Office Box 1653Lake City, Florida 32056-1653386/752-719105535010September 28, 2012October 5, 2012 SUWANNEE RIVER WATER MANAGEMENTDISTRICTPUBLIC NOTICE OF APPLICA-TIONNotice is hereby given that pursuant to Chapter 373, Florida Statutes, the following application for permit was received on September 21, 2012:North Central Florida Catalyst Site Formal Wetland Determination Modification 2, Columbia County Economic Development Authority, 259 NE Franklin Street, Suite 101, Lake City, FL32055, has submitted an application for a Formal Wetland Determination, Environmental Re-source Permit Application Number 11-0065M2, for a total project area of +/787 acres. The project is lo-cated in Township 3 South, Range 18 East, Sections 32 and 33, and Township 4 South, Section 18 East, Sections 4 and 5, in Columbia CounLegalty.Interested persons may comment upon the application or submit a written request for a staff report con-taining proposed agency action re-garding the application by writing to the Suwannee River Water Manage-ment District, Attn: Resource Man-agement, 9225 C.R. 49, Live Oak, Florida 32060. Such comments or requests must be received by 5:00 PM within 21 days from the date of publication.No further public notice will be pro-vided regarding this application. Acopy of the staff report must be re-quested in order to remain advised of further proceedings. Substantially affected persons are entitled to re-quest an administrative hearing, pur-suant to Title 28, Florida Administra-tive Code, regarding the proposed agency action by submitting a writ-ten request after reviewing the staff report.05535049September 28, 2012 020Lost & Found Found horse On October Road in Ellisville 386-344-3634 Free to the right home. 8 mth old Red Nose Pit Bull puppy 386-466-7662 LOSTTOOLS Hwy 47 & SWHarmony Lane REWARD Contact 755-0537 100Job Opportunities05535032The City of Lake City has openings for the following positions: Warehouseman Girls Club Leader Part-Time Obtain detailed job descriptions and applications by visiting 1st floor receptionist in City Hall 205 N Marion Avenue, Lake City, FL32055 or visit our web site at www.lcfla.com The City of Lake City is an EEO/AA/ADA/VPemployer. Administrative Assistant Needed Full time, Must be able to work flexible hours, some nights & weekends, good communication skills, some over night travel required. Send Resume to Marketing Director: 3076 95th Dr. Live Oak, FL32060 Auto Body Technician with experience, combo tech preferred, must have own tools. Contact 386-754-0040 Camping World of Lake City Has Numerous position Avail. Apply in person 530 SWFlorida Gateway Blvd. Land Survey Help Wanted Electronic Data Collection Experience a MUST. FDOTExperience Preferred 386-755-6166 140 NWRidgewood Avenue Lake City, FL32055 Lifeguard Ambulance Services has an immediate opening for an ASE Certified General Service/ Maintenance Technician in our Lake City, FLoperation. Lifeguard offers a team culture, opportunities for advancement, competitive wages, and an excellent benefit package. For details about this opportunity call 386-487-0387 or Email HR@LifeguardAmbulance.com Office Management Full Time. Flexible hours, some nights & weekends. Send resume to General Manager: 3076 95th Dr. Live Oak, FL32060 Sales Position Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Toyota Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 SALONCENTRIC SALES CONSULTANTS As an industry leader, our goal is to find elite, highly motivated, well trained sales professionals. We represent the beauty industry’s leading product lines, infused with new technology & supported with full time educators. DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES:*Achieves sales goals & objectives thru key performance indicators (KPIs) established & monitored by mgmt.*Introduces, presents & sells new products for Professional Products Division distributors (PPD); using a consistent & balanced selling approach within an assigned territory. REQUIREMENTS:*Bachelors’pref*Demonstrates outside sales/ industry exp*Computer lit/Access to internet*Valid FLDL& solid driving record*Attendance at conventions, shows, educational classes & special events may require overnight &/or some weekends Email: vbogar@saloncentric.com Temporary Full time Maintenance Experience Necessary in Drywall Repair, Floor Tile, Painting, and Finish Carpentry. $9.36 Per Hour Apply in person @ Suwannee Health Care Center 1620 East Helvenston Street S.E. Live Oak, FL32064 EOE/V/D/M/F PublishedMonthlybythe Lake City Reporter

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FRIDAY& SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28-29, 2012 CLASSIFIEDLAKE CITYREPORTER 9B For Sale ByAUCTION2,400 SF HOME ON 40 ACRES2BR/1.5BA, large open oor plan, gorgeous land, mature timber, camellias, azaleas, magnolias, fruit trees, etc. large sun room, shed, workshop, barn, over 1,400 sf of porch space, 2 wells, 2 septics, plus much more! Auction held on site 18943 128th Street, Live Oak, FLSat., Sept. 29 @ 12 PMOPEN from 11AM Sale DayCall 352-519-3130 for more infoFor Details Visit Our Website Michael Peters • 352-519-3130 100Job OpportunitiesWANTED CLASSACDLFlatbed Driver. Home weekends. Call 386-454-5688 WANTED: DISPATCHER White Springs, FL Florida Rock and Tank Lines has an immediate opening for a dispatcher. Supervise drivers, take customer orders, review and complete the order process and prepare driver schedules for delivery. Strong computer skills required and previous dispatching experience preferred. Contact Michelle at 904-858-9142 or mcomer@patriottrans.com 120Medical EmploymentExecutive Nursing Director The Florida Department of Veterans Affairs – Jenkins Domiciliary has an immediate opening for an Executive Nursing Director. All applicants must hold a Florida R.N. license and be certified in C.P.R. Requirements for all candidates include a strong clinical background, good communication abilities, and excellent computer skills. Ideal candidates will have nursing management experience. Apply on-line: https://peoplefirst.myflorida.com/ logon.htm Or call Amelia Tompkins for more information at 386-7580600 x1009 Req #50000024 Closing Date 10/03/2012 EEO/AAE F/TPHLEBOTOMIST Needed for busy Medical practice. Fax resume to 386-487-1232. FTAccounts Payable / Administrative Assistant position in fast Past medical office. Exp. a plus But not required. Excellent Benefit Package. Please send resume to PO Box 489, LC, FL32056 Medical practice needs Ophthalmic Technician FTor PT. Experience preferred. Fax resume 386-755-7561. Pharmacy Technician needed. Must be Florida registered. Experience required. Preferably in a retail environment. Excellent computer & communication skills needed. FTposition. Competitive pay. Send reply to Box 05088, C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056 Resolutions Health Alliance Has an opening for a Full Time Family Specialist in Live Oak. This position requires 2 years experience working with children or children and families or Bachelor’s Degree, $23K-26K salary. Excellent benefits. Email resume to: employment@rhapa.net or fax (386) 754-9017, or website application: www.rhapa.com The Health Center of Lake City Has openings for CNA’s Shifts available are 3 pm-11pm, 11pm-7 am & 7pm-7am. Apply in person at the Health Center of Lake City 560 SWMcFarlane Avenue Lake City, FL32025 EOE/ADA Drug Free Workplace 240Schools & Education05534919Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class12/24/2012• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-11/05/12• LPN 03/11/13 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies Blonde FMini-Schnauzer, 18 lbs, fixed, house broken, good natured, family friendly. $300 OBO Contact 386-292-3927 PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 408Furniture Green Leather Sleeper Couch w/chair, two over stuffed recliners, Exec. Cond. $700 for all or OBO Call 386-755-4059 430Garage Sales Multi Family Sat. 9/29 7am ?, Various HH items, electronics/ gaming systems, M/F clothing, Multi B/G like new baby items, lawn mower, M/F Beach Cruisers. Too Much to Mention, Must See! Forest Cntry 307 SWSlash LN. PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. Queen bedroom set $225, Sofa $125, Dinette set $125, Call 386-984-0207 or 386-288-5240 for appt. 440Miscellaneous GATOR FOOTBALL TICKETS Two seats 3 & 4, seat backs, west side sect 14, Row 41 Home Remainder of Season + G Growl. Call 752-0699 or 397-3335 440Miscellaneous GE electric stove white, Worked great. $225 OBO Contact 386-292-3927 Large Capacity Washer and Dryer white, work great. $275 OBO Contact 386-292-3927 P/U Topper LEER 8 FTBed only, Locks, Side windows, $100 Contact 755-5409 before 8 pm 630Mobile Homes forRent3BD/1.5 BA MH for Rent Country Living Contact 623-4213 3BR/2BADWMH on 1 acre private lot, 1st+last+dep required located in Ellisville. No pets. Contact 352-870-5144 LARGE CLEAN 2 & 3 bdms CH/A5 Points Area. Also 3 bdrm Westside. 1st + Deposit Required. No Pets. 961-1482 640Mobile Homes forSale(1) Only New Jacobsen Triplewide 42x64 Only $99,995 Del & Set with Air. Beautiful Home. North Pointe of Gainesville. 352-872-5566 2013 DOUBLEWIDE $33,995 inc. set-up, trim-out & A/C Call 386-288-8379. 3BR/2BA28X64 in a great location, a lot of upgrades, fireplace. Only $2,500 down $399 a month. Call Paula at 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com 4BD/2BADWMH on 4 acres Owner Financing Available. 386-623-3404 or 386-623-3396 5 LIKENew Mobile Homes!!! For under $30,000. MUSTSEE Call John T. 386-752-1452 575 CREDITSCORE? New 3/2 or 4/2 doubles. Your Approved with 10% down. Call for details. North Pointe 352-872-5566 BANK REPO 3BR/2BADoublewide ’09 Excellent condition. Only $999 down $377 a month. Call Paula 386-752-1452 or E-mail ammonspaula@yahoo.com BIGGESTSALEEVER 13 Jacobsen Display Models reduced for Fast Sale! North Pointe Homes, 352-872-5566 Brittany Stoeckert386-397-3473 Results Realty, MH on 10 acres. Most property cleared. 2 car covered carport. Huge Deck. $77,900 MLS#79417 Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Results Realty, Nice Lg home on 1 Ac., 4BR/2B Open kitchen & Fla. Room, beautiful yard, $129,000 MLS# 77292 LAND ANDHOME Attention land owners with good credit. No Money Down and Low Fixed Rates and Low Fees. Let’s Deal! North Pointe Homes, Gainesville 352-872-5566 MUSTSEE 2013 2x6 walls, R30 insulation, OSB wrap, house wrap, real wood cabinets, and thermal pain windows. Payment $399 per month call John T386-752-1452. WANTED…CASH PAID for your Mobile Home, Singlewide or Doublewide flood homes welcome. Call 386-288-8379 Palm Harbor Village Red Tag Sale Over 10 Stock Units Must Go New Homes Start at $39,900 800-622-2832 ext 210 650Mobile Home & LandCLEAN NICE 2/2 SW, and 740 sf Unfinished frame house, nice Country acre 8 mi to VA. $39,000 Cash only 386.961.9181 Coldwell BankerBishop Agency Elaine Tolar755-6488 Mobile Home Park on 19 Ac. Home, single & double wides. Needs TLC MLS #81507, $189,900 Coldwell BankerBishop Agency Elaine Tolar755-6488 Home on 5+ Ac. 3BR/2.5B, Lg Kitchen spacious L.R. M.Suite bath with 2 closets. MLS #81630, $219,900 Hallmark Real Estate APlace to Plat Stretch out & enjoy manufactured home on 1.9 acres. 2 bedroom w/ CH/A. $54,000 Call Nate Sweat 386-628-1552 Hallmark Real Estate HUD Home in Trenton! $40,000! 3/2, Needs Handyman www.hudhomestore.com Case #091-381778 Robin Williams 386-365-5146 Hallmark Real Estate HUD Home in Trenton! $40,000! 3/2, Needs Handyman www.hudhomestore.com Case #091-381778 Robin Williams 386-365-5146 Nice 2BR/2BA, 1996 DW, energy efficient, 3/4 frnshd, 3 yr old roof, 1/2 ac lot in Oak Wd subdv in Live Oak $39,900. Call 309-645-2659 REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 3BR/2B, 1860 sqft. features DW on 5 acres plus above ground pool. MLS#80543 $125,000. 705Rooms forRent Room for Rent. Microwave, fridge, laundry, internet, private entrance. Convenient. Contact 386-965-3477 for info. 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent1BR APT. Downtown Location, Clean. New Carpet $450 mo, plus Security. NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05534938We’ve got it all!WINDSONG APTS 2/2 $5363/2 $573 *Free afterschool program386-758-8455 2/1 1300 sqft, duplex w/ gargage. totally refurbished,W/D hook up, CH/A, $680 mth Lease Req. 386-965-2407 or 386-758-5881 2BR/1BAAPT. w/garage. West side of town. $650. mo. 386-961-9000 2BR/2BAw/garage 5 minutes from VAhospital and Timco. Call for details. 386-365-5150 3BD/2BAfenced yard, CH/A Close to Shopping $700 mth & $700 dep. Contact 386-344-2170 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Amberwood Hills Apts. Private Patio area. Beautiful yard. Washer/dryer hkup. Free water & sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special. 386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com Brandywine Apartments Now Renting 1, 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A. 386-752-3033 W. Grandview Ave. Equal Housing Opportunity TDD Number 1-800-955-8771 Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2 mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet Friendly. Pool laundry & balcony. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com Cute 2br/1ba Apt. Peaceful Location with Lake View CH/A$450. mo $500 dep. No pets. 386-344-2170 Great area West of I-75, deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups & patio. $600-$750 plus SEC .386-438-4600 or 965-5660 Greentree Townhouse Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free water & sewer. Balcony & patio. Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com Large & clean 1br/1ba apt. CH/Alg walk in closet. Close to town. $395. mo and $350. dep. (904)563-6208 Redwine Apartments Pets welcome. with 5 complexes, we have a home for you. 386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com TENANTS DREAM Only 1 left Newly remodeled, 2bd/1ba duplex w/ w/d hook up. Call for details 386-867-9231 Wayne ManorApts. Spacious 2bedroom washer/dryer. Behind Kens off Hwy 90. 386-754-1800 www .myflapts.com WindsorArms Apartments. Move in! 2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free 200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.386-754-1800. www .myflapts.com 720Furnished Apts. ForRentRooms forRent Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 750Business & Office RentalsForRent orLease: Former Doctors office, Former professional office & Lg open space: avail on East Baya Ave. Competitive rates. Weekdays 386-984-0622 evenings/weekends 497-4762 805Lots forSale Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Results Realty, Small home on corner lot with 3 Fenced yards. Needs TLC. MLS # 81204 $26,900 Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473 Results Realty Lot on Suwnnee. Lot has well & anerobic septic system. Stairway down to dock. Brittany Stoeckert386-397-3473 Results Realty, Nice vacant lot in Desirable river Community, MLS #73268 $15,000 LOVELIESTLOT 1/2 Located in the Newest section of Plantation S/D 598 NWSavannah Drive. Call 386-397-6316 PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 810Home forSale ACCESS REALTY Gorgeous views 3bd/3ba on Lake Montgomery. Elevator, fishing dock & jacuzzi.MLS 81438 $249,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 810Home forSale ACCESS REALTYTwo story 1895 Victorian house w/ electrical upgrades throughout. double -deck porches, MLS 71594 $149,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 ACCESS REALTYSpacious 4 bd/3ba Cypress Lake w/ 3643 sqft 1.25 acres on lake. Vaulted ceilings. MLS 81314 $279,900. Patti Taylor386-623-6896 Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 Contempary with Amenities open great room Lg Master Suite, 3BR/2B MLS# 81538 $103,900 Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 Immaculate Log home. 11Acres, Open great room, 3BD/2B over 2100 sq ft. MLS# 78237 $247,500 Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 3BD/2B, 1971 sq ft. Wood Floors. Vaulted Ceilings, Fenced. MLS# 79567 $165,000 Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 Brick 3BD/2B, Lg Spacious rooms, Split Floor Plan, Lot on Lake. Master has Whirlpool tub. MLS# 76769 $210,000 Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 Almost 5.25 acres, 3BD/2B, Lg Living w/ separate Dining Room, Screened patio. MLS# 81340 $137,900 Century 21 Darby Rogers 752-6575 4BD/3B, over 2500 sqft, Maple Cabinets, Solid surface Countertops, Fireplace & More. MLS# 81239 $203,900 Coldwell BankerBishop Agency Elaine Tolar755-6488 Home in Crest Pointe. 3BR/2B, dining & Breakfast nook. Motivated seller. MLS #81426, $149,900 Coldwell BankerBishop RealtySherry Ratliff 365-8414 Walk to Sante Fe River. 4 Ac, RVw/ great porch, 2 car carport, lots of plants MLS# 81060, $74,900. Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Neil Holton 984-5046 Well Maintained, good access to every where, quality construction. MLS# 81536, $159,000 Coldwell BankerBishop Realty Mary Brown Whitehurst 965-0887 Stately older home on 39 + Ac within City limits. 6BR/3.5B MLS# 76111, $994,000 FSBO ‘05 Brick 3/2/2 3rd detached garage, tiled w/in shower, w/in closet, 10ft ceilings, crown molding, 168,800 417-396-2134 Hallmark Real Estate 3/2 Home South of town w/tile flrs, lush bdrm carpets, updated baths & fixtures, $99,900 MLS 81229 Robin Williams 386-365-5146 Hallmark Real Estate Just Reduced! Brick 3/2 home on one acre Backyard fenced, sprinklersystem $114,900 MLS 80332 Call Jay Sears 386-867-1613 Hallmark Real Estate Pool & Lakefront Home on 7.95 acres. 30 X 60 workshop guest house, 4 bdrms-3-1/2 bths. MLS 80554. Janet Creel 386-719-0382 REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 Two story, tons of sq footage, BR upstairs, 2 full BA, 2 car carport $124,900. MLS#80555 REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 3BR/2B DWMH on 5.1 acres. 1984 sqft, 2 car carport $124,900. MLS#80903 REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 6.45 Acres of investment property on Suwannee, Consist of 3 lots, Pool Barn. MLS# 77414 $75,000. REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 Fabulous L.C. Country Club 4/3 undergone some beautiful renovation. MLS# 78637 $159,900. REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271 Arare sight 1 acre tract for Manufactured home close to springs. MLS# 79060 $11,500. 820Farms & Acreage10 acres with well/septic/pp (not guar); $300 dwn; $580 a mth. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com ACCESS REALTY10 acre square tract, High & Dry, O/F Avail. w/ 25% down. Convenient Location MLS 81258 $39,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 ACCESS REALTY10 acre square tract, High & Dry, OF Avail. w/ 25% down. Convenient Location MLS 81258$39,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 ACCESS REALTY43.64 acres wooded acreage in N.Columbia County. Scenic & Private. MLS 74429 $89,900. Patti Taylor 386-623-6896 830Commercial PropertyHallmark Real Estate Estate Sale Warehouse units on 5 acres in central location. Flexible sales terms or O/F. $279,000. Janet Creel 386-719-0382 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. Brittany Stoeckert386-397-3473, RESULTS REALTY, Great Investment on McFarlane Ave. 2 units with 2BR/1B, $230,000 MLS# 79271 870Real Estate WantedI Buy Houses CASH! Quick Sale Fair Price 386-269-0605 950Cars forSale 1986 CORVETTE, Well Maintained, power windows & Seats. Runs great. Stored in Garage. 95,000 miles. $8,500 OBO 386-344-2107 1996 Chevrolet Cavalier Z24 Sunroof, Power Steering, New a/c, Runs great. $2,900 Call 386-752-1811 ‘97 MARQUISLS Loaded, Low miles only 65 K, Leather, Gold color, Like New. $4,500 Contact 755-5409 before 8 PM 951Recreational VehiclesRV1997 Pace Arrow (Fleetwood) 34 ft sleeps 6, Gen, New fuel Pump. Good Condition $13,000 OBO 386-965-0061 LAKE CITY REPORTER This Reporter Works For You! 755-5440Classifieds 755-5445 Circulation We’re on target! days a weekSubscribe Today 386-755-5445 ADVERTISE YOUR Job Opportunities in the Lake City Reporter Classifieds. Enhance Your Ad with Your Individual Logo For just pennies a day. Call today, 755-5440.

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By TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comL ake City Recreation Department Director Roger Little turned in his keys today. Little is retiring after 37 years with the City of Lake City, the last 33 as a department head. His keys are the final item that Little will give up. Over the years he has gone through whistles, flags, mops, rakes, paint brushes, washing machines and field-lining equipment. “In 1972-73 while in college I was running the intramural program at Lake City Community College and I took a part-time job with the city,” said Little, a 1971 graduate of Columbia High. Little became a full-time employee in 1975 as athletic director. The LCRD director job came open in 1979. “I didn’t apply at first,” Little said. “I went to the city council meeting and they automatically appointed me as director.” Little signed on at $7,500 a year and was lucky to only put in eight hours in a day. “I would referee games, mow the grass, paint the buildings, mop the floors and rake the leaves,” Little said of the early days. “We didn’t have maintenance at that time. I worked as a lifeguard at the pool. After every football game, (long-time secretary) Paula Owens and I would wash jerseys and cheerleader uniforms. We used to line the football field for the high school. I remember many times still running that machine when the National Anthem was playing.” The recreation department offered youth baseball, adult softball, flag football, basketball, old-timers programs and even boxing and karate out of the Teen Town office. “All the coaches would chip in and do stuff,” Little said. “We would have fundraisers to buy pads. Kids would come off the field and swap off pads with another player.” In 1980 Little won election to the school board and served for two terms. “It helped me a lot to see what goes on in the system,” Little said. “I saw kids that had no chance to play ball at school and we started the CYFA (Columbia Youth Football Association) to give them a place to play. I could see what we needed and I asked about using school buses, which led to the recreation satellite centers.” Little stepped down from the school board in 1988. Children Roger Jr. and Laurie were 5 and 2, respectively, at the time and the combination of recreation director and school board was too much of a demand on his time. “I would have somebody fussing at me and would have to ask, ‘Is this for recreation or school,’” Little said. “I enjoy working with kids, but when you become a politician you can lose friends quickly.” Little keeps a low profile, probably because he has seen it all. He was there when Lake City hired its first city manager. He was on a recreation committee that included two city councilmen, two county commissioners and two school board members. When it disbanded he was put in charge of what then included parks and recreation. Little suggested the start-up of the Girls Club and it is one of the most popular city programs. The Westwind Complex of four softball fields was built and led to the Southside Sports Complex and other joint ventures between the city and county. Southside Community Center was built and Richardson Community Center was developed. South Columbia Sports Complex has been built. Southside Sports Complex has grown to include baseball, soccer, adult softball and girls softball. The city and county have parted ways on much of the handling of recreation and parks, but Little said both always have been supportive of the programs. “I can relate to being around kids all the time,” Little said. “When kids come to our centers and play sports, they are generally better behaved in school and they have got to make good grades to play.” Another plus for recreation is the ability and knowledge of the people who work and run the programs. “I kept my staff together, about seven of us, for 20-something years,” Little cited as one of his proud accomplishments. “I know I was pretty tough to work with, but I wouldn’t ask them to do anything I wouldn’t do.” Little was a bass tournament fisherman and the Lake City Reporter was fortunate to have him as a freshwater correspondent for 10 years. With retirement he plans to step up his fishing and hunting and lower his golf handicap. Little’s children live in Lake City. Roger Jr. is a resource teacher at Five Points Elementary and Laurie Evans is in human resources at People’s State Bank. His sister, Terri Metrick, is principal at Summers Elementary. His late mom, Marilyn, was a long-time school teacher and guidance counselor, and his dad, Ralph, is retired from the Department of Transportation. “We have been here since God knows when,” Little said. “My granddaddy had one of the first two school buses in the county. He would take the kids to school then go back and take the women to town to shop. My daddy had 10 brothers and sisters (his mom was a Nettles) and that was one reason I got elected. I was related to about half the county.” Little won’t completely go away. He is on the Retirement Board for the city and has some offers, if they don’t distract from his fishing. “(Recreation) is in my blood,” Little said. “Working with the city you will never get rich, but I enjoyed stability with the job and it was something I really wanted to go into. I have no regrets. I think I was good for the city and the city was good for me. I had opportunities to do other stuff, but this is all I’ve ever known.” 10B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY & SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28-29, 2012%6SRUWV Lake City Institute of Neurology 4355 American Ln • Lake City, FL Ph: 386-755-1211 Fax: 386-755-1219 About Dr. NidDr. Nidadavolu has completed his medical training at Siddhartha Medical College, India and completed his residence & EMG/ Neuromuscular Fellowship training from renowned University of Miami, FL. He is Board Certi ed, member of American Academy of Neurology.Dr. Nidadavolu provides services in general neurology, Stroke, MS (Multiple Sclerosis), Epilepsy, Dementias, encephalopathies, Parkinson’s and other movement disorders. He also performs outpatient EEG (electroencephalogram) and Lumbarc punctures procedures.Dr. Nidadavolu is trained in EMG (electromyography)/ Never Conduction Studies for diagnosing various neurological conditions at his clinic.We are glad to inform that we are now offering Neurological services in the heart of Lake City and surrounding areas. Dr. NL Prasad Nidadavolu and his staff offer excellent neurological services to the community in a caring, parofessional environment. url: lcneuro.com INDIANS: Home tonight Continued From Page 1B A life in recreationJASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterRoger Little, Lake City Recreation Department director, is r etiring today after 37 years of service. Little said his fondest memories were ‘watching kids grow up and go to college and then getting to play in the pros. I’ve seen troubled kids s traighten up — kids that didn’t have a chance ended up making it.’ holding back on some things they didn’t need to show, but they would not hold back too much in a district game,” Fort White head coach Demetric Jackson said. “They have got some real good play-ers.” Jackson said Union County has not faced many passing teams and the Indians offense will probe the Tigers’ defense. “Their secondary hasn’t been tested,” Jackson said. “We still want to run the ball, but we want to see what their secondary looks like. We have to stop their run. They pride themselves on their wing-T and they will come out in a heavy package (extra lineman). They have got some big boys and they run right at you.” Union County has five touchdown passes this year, but it is somewhat of an illusion. “We are trying to put as much passing in as we can,” Tigers head coach Ronny Pruitt said. “We’re going to run the ball at you and teams are putting 8-9 in the box. We are not going to live by the pass, but we have been able to air it out a little earlier in games. It is a double-edged sword.” Jackson said the Indians spent some practice time this week getting over a tough loss. “We did a lot of mental preparation on Monday and had a good practice for the first half of Tuesday,” Jackson said. “The biggest test is for us to compete every week and not worry about what happened last week.” Fort White had four interceptions and lost four fumbles in the game at Wakulla, something rare for the Indians. “We have to clear up some mistakes,” Jackson said. “Those turnovers really hurt us. We were unlucky on a couple of the turnovers, but we have to protect the ball and make better decisions passing — not try to force it in there.” Jackson said Drew Gaylard would be out with a high ankle sprain. Justin Young is back and cleared to play, and Cameron White is cleared. Pruitt is expecting the usual tough game between the two teams, moreso after the Tigers won last year on a last-second field goal. “We have had a target on our back this year and Fort White is probably a littler bitter from last year,” Pruitt said. “That game could have gone either way.” JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White quarterback Andrew Baker (12) feels the pressure as he is hounded by two Wakulla defenders Friday. Goodell apologizes to fans for replacement officialsBy RACHEL COHENAssociated PressNEW YORK — NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell apologized to the fans who fretted through three weeks of replacement officials calling their favor-ite teams’ games. “Obviously when you go through something like this it is painful for everybody,” he said on a conference call Thursday, about 12 hours after the league reached a deal to bring back the regu-lar officials. “Most impor-tantly, it is painful for our fans. “We are sorry to have to put our fans through that, but it is something that in the short term you some-times have to do to make sure you get the right kind of deal for the long term and make sure you con-tinue to grow the game.” Two days after a missed call on the final play cost the Green Bay Packers in their loss to the Seattle Seahawks, the NFL and the officials’ union announced a tentative eight-year agree-ment to end a lockout that began in June. Goodell insisted the timing of the deal was not a reaction to the outcry over “Monday Night Football.” The two sides had been in “intensive negotiations” the last two weeks. Strahan, Ogden, Lynch nominated for Hall of FameAssociated PressCANTON, Ohio — John Lynch, Michael Strahan and Morten Andersen are among 13 first-year eli-gible players for the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Safety Lynch, defensive end Strahan and kicker Andersen join offensive linemen Jonathan Ogden and Larry Allen, defensive tackle Warren Sapp and 121 other total nominees for induction. The list will be whittled to 25 semifinal-ists in late November. Fifteen finalists from the modern era will be announced in early January, with elections taking place Feb. 2, 2013, the day before the Super Bowl. Between four and seven new members will be selected, with inductions next August. Among the contributors nominated are former NFL Commissioner Paul Tagliabue and longtime team owners Bud Adams of the Titans and Robert Kraft of the Patriots.