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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01867
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 07-12-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01867
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Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

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By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com More than five months of work, sweat, bonding and fellowship culminated earlier this week in a celebration when the local Habitat for Humanity affiliate dedicated its recently completed house. The house dedication took place Monday afternoon, when Annie Mosley and her family received the keys to a 1,200 sq. ft. home with four bedrooms and two bathrooms. George L. Burnham Jr., chair man of the board of the Habitat for Humanity of Lake City/ Columbia County said it took a little more than five months for the Habitat for Humanity of Lake City/Columbia County and its vol unteers to complete the home. Roughly 40 people total attended the event, predominantly vol unteers, directors, officers and donors. It was a great day for the affili ate, but especially for the family, Burnham said. Annie Mosley and her family were the recipients of the home. It feels wonderful to finally have my home completed, she said. Its wonderful because this is like a dream come true. Judy Conklin, a local Habitat For Humanity board member who volunteered on the project, said she is happy its been com pleted. I feel honored and fortunate to have worked on this home for a deserving family, Conklin said. I met Annie last year working on a previous house. Its a pleasure to have helped her own her own home. Mosley also spoke about hav ing a new home. It means the world to me to have a new home, Mosley said. Its an opportunity that I never thought would be presented to me and my family and Im very appreciative and thankful for everybodys help. The dedication of the home marked the fifth home that the Habitat for Humanity of Lake City/Columbia County has com pleted. Weve built five houses since 2005, Burnham said. It provides simple, decent, affordable hous ing for low income families. Its a hand up and not a hand out. Burnham said completing the home improved the neighbor hood. This home is a safe haven for a family and we did improve the neighborhood, he said. The lots were donated and we cleaned them up and removed 14 con tainer loads of rubbish. Mosley said she and her chil dren are enjoying the home. The kids love it and picking out their rooms and the colors, she said. Its still hard to believe, but were taking it all in. Although the organization just CALL US: (386) 752-1293 SUBSCRIBE TO THE REPORTER: Voice: 755-5445 Fax: 752-9400 Opinion ............... 4A People ................. 2A Obituaries ............. 5A Advice & Comics ......... 3B Puzzles ................. 4B TODAY IN PEOPLE T he return of Breaking Bad. COMING FRIDAY Local news roundup. 9 3 72 T-Storm Chance WEATHER, 2A Lake City ReporterTHURSDAY, JULY 12, 2012 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | 75 LAKECITYREPORTER COM 1Vol. 138, No 121 Columbia High Richardson Middle Melrose Park Elementary Eastside Elementary Five Points Elementary Fort White Elementary Fort White Middle/High Summers Elementary Niblack Elementary Lake City Middle Columbia City Elementary Westside Elementary Pinemount Elementary 2011 B C A A C A B A C A A A A 2012 Pending D B A C A Pending B D Pending A A A School grades take a tumble New city emergency alert plan in effect By LAURA HAMPSON lhampson@lakecityreporter.com One third of Columbia County elementary schools dropped a letter grade and two schools fell to a D this year. Five county schools maintained their grades, but no school was able to improve a letter grade. State education officials released elementary and middle school grades Wednesday, which show a statewide decrease in the number of A-rated schools, the result of a tougher school grading formula. Since 1999, the state has handed out A-to-F grades that are used to reward top schools and sanc tion those that get failing marks. Students this year faced a new, tougher Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test with a higher grad ing score. Also for the first time scores Grading formula toughened; scores fall across Florida. RIGHT: State education officials have not yet released high school grades, which are based on additional factors like graduation rates. The state did not issue a grade for Lake City Middle on Wednesday, likely due to error, say local officials. 600-plus seek federal aid JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter A crane is used Wednesday to remove furniture and personal items taken from homes in the Callaway subdivision after floodwaters receded. From staff reports More than 600 Columbia County residents have applied for federal disaster aid, county public infor mation officer Harvey Campbell said Wednesday. Its good that theyre doing it sooner than later, Campbell said. The impor tant thing is, do it. The figure was current as of the close of business Monday and is sure to rise, Campbell said. FEMA persists with open doors at the DRC at Suite 145 in the Westfield Square Shopping Center. The office is open from 8 a.m. until 6 p.m., seven days a week. The county urges resi dents to pre-register with FEMA if they plan to file an application for grants, loans or low interest loans from the Small Business Administration. You can contact FEMA by calling 1-800-621-FEMA or on the web at www.disas terassistance.gov. Residents Number is certain to rise, says county emergency ofcial. GRADES continued on 6A AID continued on 3A DAVE KIMLER/ Lake City Reporter Habitat turns over the keys to 5th home COURTESY George Burnham, chairman of the board of the Habitat for Humanity of Lake City/Columbia County, presents a Bible to Annie Mosley and her family during a Habitat For Humanity House dedication ceremony earlier this week. By TONY BRITT tbritt@lakecityreporter.com City residents can now get emergency alerts about severe weather, fire, floods, toxic environmental issues and other emergencies through a new service provided by the City of Lake City. The city recently finalized a service agreement with Everbridge Aware for Citizen Alerts, an emergency notifica tion service, to communicate with businesses and residents quickly in an emergency situ ation. Messages can be sent to residents on any communi cation path desired, includ ing cell phone, home phone, e-mail, text messaging, fax, pager, PDA and more, ensur CITY continued on 6A HABITAT continued on 6A

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HOW TO REAC H US Main number ....... (386) 752-1293 Fax number ............. 752-9400 Circulation .............. 755-5445 Online .. www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is pub lished Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permis sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com) NEWS Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityr e porter.com) A DV ERT I S ING ........ 752-1293 (ads@lakecityr e porter.com) C L ASS IFI E D To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 B US IN ESS Controller Sue Brannon ... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com) C I RCU L AT I O N Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser vice error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or ser vice related credits will be issued. Circulation .............. 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com) Home delivery rates (Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46 Rates include 7% sales tax. Mail rates 12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this space. And thanks for reading. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Thought for Today Celebrity Birthdays AROUND FLORIDA Breaking Bad returns with new season, new twists Wednesday: Afternoon: 2-5-6 Evening: N/A Wednesday: Afternoon: 5-0-1-5 Evening: N/A Tuesday: 2-10-14-19-31 2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAIL Y BRIEFING THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2012 Page Editor: Rick Burnham, 754-0424 2AWEATHER n Comedian Bill Cosby is 75. n Musician Christine McVie is 69. n Basketball player Paul Silas is 69. n Fitness guru Richard Simmons is 64. n Rocker Walter Egan is 64. n Actress Cheryl Ladd is 61. n Figure skater Kristi Yamaguchi is 41. n Actress Anna Friel is 36. n Actress Michelle Rodriguez is 34. n Actor Topher Grace is 34. Ah, Sovereign LORD, you have made the heavens and the earth by your great power and out stretched arm. Nothing is too hard for you. Jeremiah 32:17 NIV TALLAHASSEE An ongoing criminal case against a former top aide to Florida Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll is transforming into a swirl of allegations about improper relation ships, widespread illegal taping and other incidents inside Carrolls office. The allegations, which Carroll denies, were included in a court filing made late last week by the attorney representing Carletha Cole, who was arrested last October on charges that she gave an illegally taped conversation with another Carroll aide to a newspaper reporter. The court filing was made in response to a push by prosecutors to keep confidential informa tion that Coles attorneys wanted to use as possible evidence in the case. In the filing, Cole con tends that she witnessed Carroll and a top aide in a compromising position inside Carrolls office, that Carrolls chief of staff secretly recorded conver sations routinely at the direction of those working for Gov. Rick Scott, and that the trash can at Coles desk might have been deliberately set ablaze following an argument between her and the aide. Cole also said at one point she was ordered by the aide, Beatriz Ramos, to find adjoining hotel rooms for Carroll and Ramos when they traveled. Cole said that she was scolded by an agent with Carrolls security team when she placed Ramos next door to Carroll when the lieuten ant governor and her hus band traveled last summer to Puerto Rico. The agent told her to not do it again, Cole says, although he did not explain why. She says Ramos was also living in Carrolls home. Carroll, a former Navy officer who is also a moth er of three, says the allega tions are all lies. Thats totally false and absurd, said Carroll, a former Republican legisla tor who was chosen by Scott as his running mate in 2010. Carroll said the allega tions are an attempt by Cole and her attorney to get the criminal charges against Cole dropped. Cole is charged with a third-degree felony and could get up to five years in prison. They are trying to pull at straws, Carroll said. All this stuff you men tioned doesnt excuse what happened. Parents infuriated over comment BRADENTON, Fla. Parents are infuriated over a Florida school districts decision to issue only a verbal warning to a teach er who described a student as the evolutionary link between orangutans and humans on Facebook. Music teacher Lauren Orban at Rogers Garden Elementary School in Bradenton, about 45 miles south of Tampa, made the comment in a Facebook conversation that included two other teachers from the school in May. She identified the 8-year-old boy by his initials. The principal was alerted and, after review ing Orbans record and discussing the matter with other school leaders, issued a verbal reprimand to all three teachers, dis trict spokeswoman Margi Nanney said. They were also given a copy of the districts rules of ethics. On Tuesday, the childs mother and her attorneys criticized the Manatee County School District for not taking tougher action. They said the districts response is a mere slap on the wrist. At minimum, the teacher should be sus pended without pay, attorney Sasha Watson said, the Bradenton Herald reported. Shipments to Cuba resume MIAMI Direct mari time shipments to Cuba are set to resume from Miami for the first time in half a century. The humanitarian ship ments will leave from a Miami River terminal through a weekly service provided by International Port Corp. The Miami Herald reports the shipments will begin Wednesday. They will include items from autho rized religious groups and charitable groups and from individuals shipping pack ages to family and friends on the island. The company says it holds licenses from both the Office of Foreign Assets Control and the U.S. Commerce Department. Shipments will cost about $6 per pound and will take between a week and two weeks to arrive, depending on their destination. Ex Carroll aide alleges misconduct NEW YORK Turns out Breaking Bad is an inadvertent argument for Obamacare. Consider: If affordable health care had been avail able to Walter White when Breaking Bad began five seasons ago, this strug gling high school chemis try teacher might not have felt driven to cook and sell crystal meth to avert finan cial ruin for his family after he was diagnosed with ter minal lung cancer. On the other hand, there would have been no Breaking Bad. This would have deprived viewers of arguably TVs most twisted, bleakly funny and just plain addictive series ever. On Sunday at 10 p.m. EDT on AMC, Breaking Bad returns for a run of eight episodes that pave the way to a final eight airing next year. By this point in its fast-evolving narrative, the formerly milquetoast teacher has morphed into a trium phant drug lord (played by Bryan Cranston) in tumultuous cahoots with his one-time slacker pupil, Jesse Pinkman (co-star Aaron Paul). Last season ended with Walt successfully assas sinating Gus Fring, the reigning meth distributor in Albuquerque, to solidify his own rule. Sundays episode picks up with the same phone call Walt placed to his wife, Skyler, moments after the monstrous Fring was blown up in last seasons finale. Its over, Walt tells her. Were safe. Long pause. Was this you? Skyler asks him, the question catching in her throat. What happened? I won, Walt growls with satisfaction. Thinking about that scene and how it gobsmacks Skyler makes Anna Gunn, who portrays her, laugh. At that moment, a ham mer comes down, says Gunn, voicing what goes through Skylers mind: We can never come back. This is a corner we can never un-turn. If Walt was involved with this guy Fring and had something to do with his death: Omigod, were in trouble! Just one of many hitches to Walts victory dance: the Drug Enforcement agents (including, inconveniently, his own brother-in-law) are hot on the trail of the mys terious Heisenberg, which happens to be Walts druglord alter ego. Gabors husband is conservator LOS ANGELES A judge has appointed Zsa Zsa Gabors husband as her temporary conservator in an agreement reached with the ailing actress daughter. Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Revaa Goetz appointed Frederic von Anhalt as conservator during a brief hearing Wednesday. The appoint ment will remain in effect until the next court hear ing in January. Hiltons attorney Kennethh Kossoff says he will be receiving monthly statements on Gabors finances and spending will be controlled through a special account. He says a settlement agreement also calls for Hilton to be able to visit her weekly. Hilton sought a con servatorship in March, citing concerns about von Anhalts care and financial management. Kossoff says he is cau tiously optimistic the arrangement will work. Bryan Cranston as Walter White, right, and Aaron Paul as Jesse Pinkman return for season 5 of Breaking Bad, on AMC. ASSOCIATED PRESS n ASSOCIATED PRESS n ASSOCIATED PRESS

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Page Editor: Rick Burnham, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2012 3A 3A Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Columbia and Suwannee counties 2 Apply online for fast approval at campuscu.com or call 754-9088 and press 4 OFFER NOT AVAILABLE ON EXISTING CAMPUS LOANS. OFFER IS FOR NEW LOANS ONLY. MAY NOT BE COMBINED WITH ANY OTHER OFFER. 1. Credit approval required. Your APR may be higher based on creditworthiness, vehicle and term of loan. For example, a $30,000 loan with no money down at 2.24% for 60 months would require 59 monthly payments of $532.90 and a final payment of $517.30, finance charge of $1,852.35, for a total of payments of $31,958.40. The amount financed is $30,106.05, the APR is 2.37%. APR = Annual Percentage Rate. 2. Credit approval and initial deposit of $5 required. Mention this ad and well waive the $15 new member fee. 3. Offer is only good thru July 31, 2012. 4. Interest will accrue from date of purchase. Choosing this option will increase the total amount of interest you pay. in Celebration of our Anniversary In Lake City ATTN: EILEEN BENNETT LAKE CITY REPORTER Runs: Thursday, July 12, 2012 Size: 6 col. (10.625) x 10.5, Black and White Sent out: by e-mail 7/11/12 Anne Powell, Clark/Nikdel/Powell Advertising, 863-299-9980 x1024 Lake City 183 SW Bascom Norris Dr. Gville E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunters Walk 5115 NW 43rd St. Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St. Shands at UF Room H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Alachua 14759 NW 157th Ln. Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E. Silver Springs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. Summereld 17950 US Hwy. 441 This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration. 2 3 7 % AS LOW AS AP R 1 2008 or newer for up to 60 months PLUS an additional $10 if you sign up for automatic payments! 3 Plus, no payments for 60 days! 4 Get $ 110 cash bonus when you bring your auto loan to CAMPUS 3 By HANNAH O. BROWN hbrown@lakecityreporter.com The Economic Development Department continues to review proposals from local businesses on plans for expansion in Columbia county. President Paul Yatsko of Columbia Technology Inc., a waste sorting business that owns 300 acres of land in Columbia county, addressed the board concerning the marketing of 65 parcels within the companys purchased acreage. According to Yatsko, CTI uses specific technology to process and sort a bag filled with various kinds of trash into separate components. Organic matter, metals and plastics are divided into categories by weight, compo sition and other factors. Each type of trash is then processed accordingly, filling the landfill with less waste. We dont just expect you from your home to separate things out and make the trash stream clean for us, Yatsko said. We expect a Hefty bag, 50 gallon or 40 gallon or 30 gallon or a 13 gallon kitchen bag with chicken bones, diapers, anything you can put in there. Yatsko said the process saves space in a landfill by filtering out non-biodegradable materials. Byproducts produced from the sys tem can also supply added benefit. Small organic materials are composted until they transform into fine, black soil. Raw materi als such as aluminum and steel are sold for reuse. For a county, we take their dollar and stretch it sometimes double or triple in length, Yatsko said. The CTI facility in Columbia county is expected to be around 60,000 square feet on around 60 acres of land. According to Yatsko, the project is in limbo because of changes in the author ity at the county landfill. The company is also in the process of waiting for a the Department of Environmental Protection to approve a wetlands permit. Economic Development Board member Stephen Douglas told Yatsko it was impor tant to focus on the CTI project before diverting energy to selling land parcels. Were focused on your project right now, Douglas said. We have very limited resources. Yatsko argued that projects should be considered in parallel to ensure that inter ested land investors do not become impa tient. Douglas assured Yatsko that the EDD would help move the process along and get questions answered by county offi cials. CMS Staffing also presented, telling the board about their hopes for expansion in the county. CMS Staffing is health care staffing company that employs over 300 medi cal professionals in Florida as well as in Washington D.C. The company also pro duces a staffing software called Schedulit. Founder Chris Samson and account executive Byron Borchardt spoke to the board about receiving assistance for the acquisition and renovation of a new build ing. Samson said CMS Staffing already has contracts all over the country but is unable to pursue them because there is not enough room in their current head quarters to administrate that business. We are a snake in a cage, Samson said. The board agreed they would consult with county officials and attempt to find ways to assist the company. I think its a wonderful idea and we want to be as helpful as we possibly can for you, EDB member Glenn Owens said. Econ board reviews trash-sorting proposal with smart phones can make contact with the site at m.fema.gov. If you have already registered with FEMA and filed your assis tance application, please be remind ed you will have an appointment with a FEMA inspector to assess the amount of damages. If the inspector is unable to get into your home because of flood waters remaining high, youll have to contact FEMA again and arrange for a new inspection once flood waters have receded enough to allow for full access to your home or property. The emergency shelter at Richardson Middle School for resi dents displaced by the flooding has now been closed. Falling Creek Park has now reopened. The Alligator Lake Recreation Park and Rum Island Park near Fort White continue to be closed until floodwaters recede more and repairs are made to the facilities. Mosquito spraying continues on a nightly basis, seven days a week. County officials have received a new supply of pellets to treat standing water and kill mosquito larvae. Residents are urged to patrol their property for accumulated water in which mosquitoes could breed. Pellets to kill larvae in stand ing water are not available to the public at the Health Department, but residents can call the agency at 758-1058 to report locations to be treated. Columbia County has requested approval for aerial spraying from the Florida Department of Agriculture for mosquitoes, but approval has not yet been given. The Columbia County Health Department has extended its days of operation to test for potentially con taminated well water. Testing will be done Monday through Friday. A Human Services Disaster Recovery Center has also open at Suite 105 in the Westfield Square Shopping Center, 426 S.W. Commerce Drive. Red Cross, Catholic Charities, United Way, Meridian Health Care, Florida Crown and Department of Children and Family Services are among the various agencies that can provide assistance to local residents affected by the flooding caused by Tropical Storm Debby last week. The Human Services DRC will also be open from 8:00 a.m. until 6:00 p.m., seven days a week. The Columbia County Citizens Information Center (CID) has reduced its hours to 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. You can contact the CIC at 719-7530. You can call to report any new sink holes you find, general questions about recovery efforts and other non-emergency issues. AID: 600-plus Continued From Page 1A JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ Lake City Reporter Sanitation technician Eddie Allen (from right), of Veolia Environmental Services, and Columbia County landfill employees Ben Skipper watch as Michael Nettles uses a claw Wednesday to collect a pile of per sonal items that have been soaking in floodwaters. The waters have gone down in some homes within the Callaway Subdivision where residents can begin clearing away items that cannot be salvaged.

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MiddleEasternchaos ONE OPINION Requiem for college life as I knew it Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding counties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, publisher Robert Bridges, editor Sue Brannon, controller Dink NeSmith, president Tom Wood, chairman LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY E-MAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com Lowertaxesa lot Q The Orange County Register Q The Washington Times OPINION Thursday, July 12, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A4AOPINION ANOTHER VIEW I am fortunate to have had my college experiences dur-ing the 1960s and the early 1970s. I am glad I am not attending an American institution of higher education today. I would not do well. Unlike President Thomas Jefferson, who drafted the Declaration of Independence and founded the University of Virginia, I did not have the “sub-lime luxury” of reading original works in Greek and Latin. I had the freedom to learn for the sake of learning, for enlightenment. All of my courses were valuable, and the overwhelming majority of my schoolmates thought the same. Our course catalogs were virtual road maps to freedom, with many electives. Looking back, I realize that electives were fortifying expe-riences. By taking them, my schoolmates and I were express-ing our individuality. The lectures and texts were springboards into other intellectual adventures. I will always remember that afternoon, as a sophomore major-ing in biology, when I overheard two English majors discuss-ing Joseph Conrad’s “Heart of Darkness.” Their debate -over whether its protagonist was Charlie Marlow or Kurtz -had been so animated that I bor-rowed a copy of the novel from the library and read it over the weekend. The rest of my undergraduate years were just as intellectually freewheeling. I read on my own and traveled as often as possible. Like many of my schoolmates, I put my formal studies aside for a while. For two semesters, I registered black voters throughout the South for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. The knowledge I gained as a young civil rights worker was irreplace-able. Today, because of profound changes -including online instruction and other technol-ogy-related practices, budget constraints, fast-track graduation requirements and governing boards primarily composed of businesspeople who meddle and micromanage -campus life in the United States is a shadow of its old self. U.S. higher education is being radically commercialized. Far too many non-academics are making the big decisions, shunting aside faculty and ignoring the interests of students, who should have a direct say in their studies. I am glad I graduated during those good old days. I n the past week, I have eaten small portions of sustainable blue fin tuna, sea asparagus, crab, shrimp, octopus and raw fish. (It was a caloric experi-ment, not a dare.) So it was with great interest that I learned that the Chinese central government is banning shark fin soup at official ban-quets. I have tasted shark fin soup in China on a reporting story and enjoyed the idea of eating it very much if not the actual bland taste. But I have no doubt that I will never taste it again. And that is fine with me. Not only is it very expensive, but also the consumption of vast quantities of shark fin soup has endangered global shark popu-lations. Given all our troubles this summer, from killer fires to killer storms and an economy that seems lifeless, worrying about sharks may appear to be a luxury we don’t need. But, folks, this is serious stuff. Scientists worry that every time we kill off a species, which we are doing at an astounding rate, we destroy a chance to learn more about our universe. Even worse, we may be destroy-ing a cure for a major disease or a path to some remarkable discovery that could change lives for the better. Also, plants and animal species rely on each other; when a species becomes extinct, other plants and animals are endangered. The entire eco-system is weakened. Humans spent $10 billion to build a Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland which found the long-sought Higgs boson. Particle physics will never be the same. And while we non-physicists struggle to grasp the enormity of the discovery in explaining our universe (and fail), we have to be proud as humans that there are people so smart that 1) they found the Higgs boson and 2) they under-stand it. Which is why it is so careless and shortsighted of us to destroy creatures and the ozone layer and pristine wilderness when we don’t understand their significance or the ramifications of what we are doing. You would think that even in a bad economy, what we are doing to our environment would be of some interest in the presidential campaign. But is a non-issue. President Barack Obama wants to be a good environ-mental steward. But he wants even more to be re-elected and knows that talking like an environmentalist (aka “tree hug-ger”) won’t help him because so many Americans falsely think environmental protection kills jobs. (Studies repeatedly show that being good stewards of the environment creates more jobs than it kills.) GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney equates environ-mental protection with hamper-ing big oil companies. He oppos-es mandates on businesses to clean up. He doesn’t seem to think that climate change is real or if he does, he doesn’t want it known because so many conser-vatives think it is akin to heresy and prefer to ignore scientific reality. It is interesting that China, which has some of the dirtiest air on the planet, is concerned enough about endangered species that it is banning (or attempting to ban) a soup that has been an important staple of lavish banquets for centuries. All over the globe we are overfishing. Such fish as Atlantic, Chinook and sock-eye salmon as well as white sturgeon, blue whales, finback whales, humpback whales, sperm whales and a wide variety of sea turtles are endangered. Some of our favorite animal species also are endangered: African and Asian elephants, bald eagles, grizzly bears, tigers, Western gorillas, cari-bou, Florida cougars, alligators, black-footed ferrets, West Indian manatees, Canadian lynxes, American alligators, jaguars, short-tailed chinchillas, black rhinos, California condors, Utah prairie dogs, whooping cranes and Northern spotted owls. It is a false argument to be told that we have to choose between the environment and jobs. No, we don’t. We can be good stewards and create jobs too, and we need politicians to make that clear. Enough. I’m going out for a sandwich. R adical Muslims want to tear down Egypt’s pyramids and take over the world. The least the rest of us can do is take them seriously. Islamist political victories in Egypt have invigorated the debate in certain circles over what to do with the country’s historical sites, or as the extremists call them, the sym-bols of pagan idolatry. The most pious Muslim theologians do not see the ancient statues, carvings and pyramids as important tourist destinations so much as affronts to their beliefs. Bahraini Sunni leader Abdal-Latif al-Mahmoud called on the Egyptians to “destroy the Pyramids and accomplish what [Egypt’s Muslim con-queror] Amr bin al-As could not.” Abdel Moneim Al-Shahat, a leading member of Egypt’s radical Nour party, suggested that should the pyramids be too difficult to dismantle, structures that have stood for five millennia ought at least be covered in wax to hide them from view. Others plan to bring this same degree of common sense and tolerance to the rest of the world. This week a group called the United Muslim Nations International released a 23-page pamphlet entitled “The Global Islamic Civilization: The Power of a Nation Revived” which out-lines a plan for Islamic world domination. The group’s leader, Sheik Farook al-Mohammedi, writes in the plan that “Christianity should be destroyed and wiped from the face of the earth,” along with all faiths other than Islam. He maintains that “submission to Allah” will be the future of the “Islamic State of America” and “Eurabia” and other parts of the world not currently under the sway of Shariah. This type of grandiose vision is certainly nothing new in radical circles, as al Qaeda has been pursuing its global domination plan for years. Although Sheik Farook al-Mohammedi is a lesser-known extremist with a minis-cule following who is unlikely to surmount the Caliph’s throne, he’s still dangerous. The best and the brightest likewise scoffed at misfits like Hitler, Lenin and Mao — until the secret police arrived. Where fanatics hold sway, they implement their plans as well as they can. In dusty Timbuktu, Mali, militants have systematically destroyed tombs and shrines that they consider idolatrous. Eight of 16 ancient mausoleums in the city have been torn apart by local radi-cals of the Ansar Dine group. The world was also horrified this week by a viral video showing a Taliban executioner shooting a burqa-clad woman nine times as a mob of men chanted “God is great!” The woman was allegedly accused of adultery, but may have sim-ply been the victim of a Taliban leader’s jealousy. What the video showed is the rule, not the exception. Lest anyone dismiss the notion that any government would be so foolish as to destroy the only surviving ancient wonder of the world, the threat is real. The Taliban set the modern standard when they ruled Afghanistan. In 2001, they dynamited the mon-umental, 1,500-year-old Buddha statues carved into a mountain face at Bamiyan. If the radicals ever are allowed the chance of fulfilling their ultimate dreams, Mt. Rushmore won’t be far behind. No choice needed between the environment and jobs Ann McFeattersamcfeatters@nationalpress.com Q Scripps Howard columnist Ann McFeatters has covered the White House and national politics since 1986. Bill Maxwellmaxwell@sptimes.com Q Bill Maxwell is a columnist and editorial writer for the St. Petersburg Times. A s the economy continues to stag-nate, President Barack Obama and Congress still dither over extending income tax cuts first enacted under President George W. Bush. Mr. Obama wants to continue the reduced rates for taxpayers earning less than $250,000 a year, but let them expire for those making that amount or more, meaning the top tax rate would rise to 39.6 percent from the current 35 percent. Republicans in Congress, where they form a majority in the House but not the Senate, are insisting on extending the cuts for everybody, or making the cuts permanent. That also is the position of Mitt Romney, the presumptive GOP nominee for president. Mr. Obama obviously is making this class-warfare campaign of envy a major plank in his re-election bid. The tax-cut exten-sions might not be resolved until after the November elec-tion. Yet the news isn’t all bad. “The message here is that at least Mr. Obama is willing to extend the tax cuts for the middle class. That’s a posi-tive,” Esmael Adibi told us; he’s the director of the A. Gary Anderson Center for Economic Research at Chapman University. “Having no cuts at all would be a disaster.” He said the best option would be to make the tax cuts permanent. Next-best would be to pass another extension for all taxpayers, followed by the Obama option of extend-ing tax cuts for some people. Worst of all would be no extension, meaning a full whammy of tax increases on everyone. “No wonder the latest numbers showed the May national unemployment rate stuck at a dismal 8.2 percent, the same as in April. Investing, hiring, spending and other fiscal deci-sions all await the voters’ deci-sions.

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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2012 5A5A Linwood (Taylor) Anderson Linwood Charles (Taylor) An-derson, 59, departed this life July 6, 2012. Linwood was born November 11, 1952 to Coetta Anderson Tay-lor. He was united in Holy Matrimony to Linda Lu-cas Anderson. He received his education in the Colum-bia County public school sys-tem. Linwood was converted at an early age, attended Trinity United Methodist Church, later joining Grace Holiness Church under the leadership of Pastor Willie James Lucas. Linwood was a Chaplain of American Le-gion Post #322. He is preceded in death by a son, Terrell Taylor. Left to cherish memories: a devoted wife, Linda Ander-son, mother, Coetta A. Burney, GDXJKWHU/D7R\D7D\ORUYHstepchildren, Pamela Crum (Darrian), Linda Louise Jack-son, Yvonne, Jackson, Yvette Jackson, Christinia Jones; eight sisters, Cassandra Taylor, Mar-cia Turner (Alyson), NaaComia Taylor ( Robert), Collita Jenkins (OJ), Charlene Bowles, Alesia Johnson, Virginia Rahming, Mary Nelson (Paul); two broth-ers, Quintin Taylor (Nikki), Kevin Burney (Verna); seven, brothers-in-law, Freddie Lucas (Mable), Willie James Lucas (Shirley), Tommy Lucas, Ber-nard Lucas, Rudolph Lucas, Nathaniel Lucas, Arthur Lu-cas; two, sisters-in-law, Rossie Coles (Arthur), Betty McCloud (Johnny); hosts of nieces, neph-ews, other relatives and friends. Funeral services for Mr. Lin-wood Anderson will be 1:00 p.m. Saturday, July 14, 2012 at Trinity United Methodist Church. 248 NE Martin Lu-ther King Street. Lake City, FL. The family will receive friends from 5-7p.m. Fri-day, July 13, 2012 at Trin-ity United Methodist Church. Arrangements entrusted to COMBS FUNERAL HOME 292 NE Washington Street. Lake City, FL. (386) 752-4366. “The Caring Professionals”Keith Vernard Cray Keith Vernard Cray was born August 27, 1965 In Lake City, Florida to Bishop Zane Cray, Sr. and the late Evange-list Thereasa Ramsey Cray. He was edu-cated in the public school system of Columbia County, and as a young man, he attended his father’s church. Keith was known for his ener-getic personality and his infec-tious laughter. There was never a dull moment when you were in his presence. Keith worked dili-gently at the Lake City Commu-nity College (Florida Gateway College) as a Custodial Engineer for 10 years. He later became Head Custodial Engineer at the Columbia County Recreation Department (Richardson Com-munity Center) where he worked faithfully until his health failed.Those left to cherish his memo-ries: His Father, Bishop Zane Cray, Sr., Lake City, FL.; chil-dren, Keiona Cray, Brooklyn, N.Y., Jaseline Cray, West Palm Beach, FL, Dante Bailey (Ken-dra), West Palm Beach, FL., two grandchildren, Deion and Dominic Bailey, West Palm Beach, FL; sisters, Thereasa Cray NcNeil, Brenda Cray Clark (Kelvin), both of Lake City, FL.; brothers, Dale Cray, Dwayne Cray, both of Lake City, FL.; Zane Cray (Elaine), Valdosta, GA.; special aunt, Carolyn Ramsey, Gaines-ville, FL.; special niece, Reese Johnson, Lake City, FL.; special friends, Mr. Aubrey Scott, Mr. Mario Coppock, Mr. Darrel Bai-ley, Mr. Rodney “A.D.” Farmer, Mr. & Mrs. Dave and Jenifer Pauwels, Pastor Alvin Baker; hosts of loving aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends mourn his passing.Celebratory services for Mr. Keith Cray will be held 12:00 p.m. Saturday, July 14, 2012 at New Bethel Missionary Baptist Church. 550 NE Martin Lu-ther King Street. Lake City, FL. The family will receive friends from 6:30 – 8:00 p.m. at the funeral home.Keith’s care entrusted to COMBS FUNERAL HOME 292 NE Washington Street. Lake City, FL. (386) 752-4366. Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D. “The Caring Professionals”Dorothy Flowers WilsonDorothy Flowers Wilson, 91, of Greenville, FL departed this life for eternal rest on Saturday, July 7, 2012. She leaves to cher-ish her memo-ries, three daughters; Barbara Lake of Lake City, FL, Roshell (William) Clark of Winston-Salem, NC, and Loretta (Alphonso) Watson, of Houston, TX; six grandchil-dren: Gretchen (John) Jackson, Chiquita (Cedric) Kornegay, Angela (Mark’el) Graham, De-nise (Dexter) Kenon, Dealdon Watson, and Doretta Watson; ten Great-Grandchildren and three Great-Great-Grandchild. She was preceded in death by her parents, Charleston and Alberta Flowers and all of her siblings, (IH$OH[DQGHU-LPER)ORZ ers, Ollie Wyche, Eulee Evans, Clemenmtine Roundtree, and Bernard Flowers. Home going Services will be held on Satur-day, July 14, 2012, at 11:00 AM at Allen Chapel AME Church in Greenville, FL. Viewing will be Saturday morning from 10:00 AM-10:45 AM, prior to the service. The family will receive visitors at the church on Friday, July 13, 2012 from 3:00 PM 4:30 PM. 1697 S.W. Grand Street, Greenville, FL.Mother Wilson was a faith-ful and active member of Al-len Chapel AME Church in Greenville, FL where the Rev. Ernest Washington is the Pas-tor. She received many awards for her faithful service to her church and community. In lieu RIRZHUVWKHIDPLO\UHTXHVWthat donations be made to the Pulpit Aid Board of Allen Cha-pel A.M.E. Church in her honor.Arrangements entrusted to: COOKS-COOPER FUNERAL HOME 701 Third Street, Madison, FL. Announce-ment courtesy of COOPER FUNERAL HOME 251 N.E. Washington Street, Lake City, FL. Willis O. Cooper, L.F.D. Obituaries are paid advertise-ments. For details, call the Lake City Reporter’s classified department at 752-1293. OBITUARIES COMMUNITY CALENDAR Q Submit Community Calendar announcements by mail or drop off at the Reporter office located at 180 E. Duval St., via fax to (386) 752-9400 or e-mail lhampson@ lakecityreporter.com.July 13Car cruise inThe Southern Knights Street Rodders will have a Cruise In at Hardee’s on U.S. Highway 90 July 13 from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Bring your old car and show it off. Contact Bob McGraw at 386-984-6573 for more information.July 14Kids summer art programCalling young artists ages 10 to 14, the Young DaVinci Summer Art Program is offering free art classes. Hosted by the Art League Of North Florida and the Columbia County Library, registration for the program is from 10 to 11:30 a.m. July, 14 at the West Branch Library, 435 NW Hall of Fame Drive in Lake City. Professional artists will teach classes on drawing, fabric art, and painting. Classes will be held on July 21, 28, and August 4, from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at the West Branch Library. Space is lim-ited and offered on a first come basis. For more information call 758-7853. Dance class charity event ZUMBA Blacklight Charity Event for flood victims in the Lake City and Live Oak areas Saturday, July 14 from 6 to 7:30 p.m. at the Richardson Community Center, 255 NE Coach Anders Lane in Lake City. We are asking for dona-tions of boxed and canned goods, diapers, bottled water, and toilet-ries for this free event. There will be local ZUMBA instructors to keep you moving and grooving ZUMBA-style. So come out and support your neighbors and have some fun. Wear something com-fortable that glows in the dark.July 17Pet loss workshopCoping with the Loss of your Pet will be offered to the public on Tuesday, July 17 at 2 p.m. at the Wings Education Center, 857 SW Main Blvd (Lake City Plaza). The workshop, facilitated by Dr. Joy Dias, director of Client Counseling and Support Services at the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine will offer an overview of grief and understanding with a loss of a pet. There is no cost. For information or to register, con-tact Vicki Myers at 755-7714 Ext. 2411 or 866-642-0962. The Wings Education Center is a program of Hospice of Citrus County, Inc./Hospice of the Nature Coast.July 19 ’72 class meeting The CHS Class Of 1972 will have reunion meeting 7 p.m. July 19 at Beef O’Bradys. For informa-tion contact George H. Hudson Jr. 386-623-2066. July 20Juggler eventThe Columbia County Public Library will host Ron Anglin, Juggler Friday, July 20 at 10 a.m. at the Fort White Branch Library and 3 p.m. at the Main Library.July 21Class of ‘80 partyThe Columbia High School class of 1980 will have a 50th birthday party July 21 at 5 p.m. at Ed Higgs’ place. Cost is $23 per person, which includes a barbecue dinner with two sides and soft drinks. RSVP by July 16 and mail money to Melinda Spradley Pettyjohn, 1811 SW County Rd 242A, Lake City, Fl 32025. For more information call 229-232-1238. Jazz and Soul Fundraiser The Greater Lake City CDC and Levy Entertainment present a Jazz and Soul Fundraiser Saturday, July 21 at 8:30 p.m. at the Columbia County Fairgrounds. Tickets are available for $20. For information call 752-9785 or 344-5928. FACS road cleanupThe Filipino American Cultural Society of Lake City’s Adopt-a-Highway Community Service Pickup number 2 will be Saturday, July 21 at 8 a.m. All FACS mem-bers please plan to meet at the corner of U.S. Highway 90 and Turner Road to help complete our 2nd Community Service Trash Pickup of the two mile stretch north on U.S. 90. For more info contact; Bob Gavette 965-5905. July 25Early Learning CoalitionThe Early Learning Coalition of Florida’s Gateway, Inc. Program Quality Committee Meeting will begin at 9 a.m. July 25 at the Coalition office. The Coalition oversees state and federal fund-ing for all school readiness pro-grams birth to age five for the following counties: Columbia, Hamilton, Lafayette, Suwannee and Union. Community participa-tion is encouraged and welcome. Anyone interested in attending the meeting who has a disabil-ity requiring special assistance should contact Stacey Nettles at (386) 752-9770.Aug. 10 Alzheimer’s workshopThe Alzheimer’s Association in partnership with Columbia County Senior Services will be presenting a workshop Aug. 10 from 1:00 to 2:30 p.m. at the Lifestyle Enrichment Center in Lake City entitled “Maintain Your Brain.” This program is free of charge and anyone interested in learning more about maintaining optimal cognitive health is wel-come to attend. Topics covered will include: mental exercises, the importance of physical activ-ity, the role of nutrition, cardio-vascular health, stress/depres-sion issues, and much more. To register for this workshop or for more information, please contact the Alzheimer’s Association at (800) 272-3900. OngoingLive Oak Artists Guild showThe Live Oak Artists Guild, in partnership with the Suwannee River Regional Library, will be rep-resenting their annual fine arts exhibition Autumn Artfest 2012 Sept. 10-21. Applications, with an entry fee of $25 for members and $35 for nonmembers, must be sub-mitted by Aug. 21. Applications are available at the following locations. The Frame Shop and Gallery, Rainbow’s End and the Suwannee River Regional Library. Artists can also download and print an applica-tion from liveoakartistsguild.org. All artists 18 and older are eligible and invited to submit an applica-tion. Autumn Artfest 2012 awards will be determined by the entries and donations received. A minimum of $3,000 will be awarded. Artwork selected for these awards will be exhibited at a special “Featured Exhibition” at the Suwannee River Regionial Library, Sep. 22-Oct. 5. For more information, call Suzanne Marcil at (386) 362-7308.Small Farms conferenceInterested in becoming part of Florida’s small farm commu-nity? University of Florida/IFAS Columbia County Extension is partnering to host the Florida Small Farms and Alternative Enterprises Conference, July 27-29 in Kissimmee, FL. The conference will feature Florida farmers, a trade show with suppliers and resources, farm tours and networking opportunities, live animal exhibits and a Saturday evening social. Early registration ends July 9. To register or for more information go towww.con-ference.ifas.ufl.edu/smallfarms or contact Derek Barber at the Columbia County Extension Office at (386)752-5384.Kindergarten registrationRegistration for kindergarten is ongoing in the local area and should be done at the school for which children are zoned. School zoning information is available from any school. The following items are needed to register a child: birth certificate. immuniza-tion record (the school’s nurse reviews all records), records of physical examination (which must have been completed within a year before school begins), and the child’s social security card (if available). Each elementary school is open from 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Thursday.Class of ’62 reunionThe Columbia High School class of 1962 is planning a reunion this year. Addresses are needed for all classmates. Please send your mailing address to Linda Sue Lee at lslee44@aol.com or call Linda Hurst Greene at (386) 752-0561. Volunteer driver neededShands LakeShore Regional Medical Center Auxiliary is look-ing for volunteer golf cart drivers to transport staff and patients to and from parking lots and the hospital. Volunteers are asked to work a four-hour shift once per week, but are welcome to work more often. They will receive a shirt and one free meal. To help call (386)292-8000, ext. 21216. Crews work on the foundation of a building in downtown L ive Oak where a sinkhole has formed. The sinkhole sits across from the Suwannee County Courthouse and has created cracks in the asphalt and pa rking lot area. Live Oak flood damageJASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter

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6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2012 Page Editor: Rick Burnham, 754-0424 6A for students with disabilities and English language learners counted towards the total school grade. Fifty percent of the graded schools in Columbia County earned an A, compared to 43 percent statewide. Niblack Elementary and Richardson Middle schools both dropped to a D this year from a C in 2011. Columbia City, Eastside, Westside, Pinemount and Fort White elementary schools all received an A this year and last year. Melrose Park and Summers elementary schools both dropped from an A in 2011 to a B this year. Five Points Elementary School main tained a C grade. Lake City Middle Schools grade was marked as pending by the state, although the school does not have high school grades. Millikin said the school scored more points than last year when it was an A. It was likely classified incorrectly, but the district is checking into the grade, he said. The school is expected to score and A or B, said Michael Millikin, superintendent of schools. Bradford, Hamilton and Suwannee coun ties did not have any A elementary or middle schools this year. The elementary and middle schools in Union County both earned an A. We are always disappointed when any school drops, Millikin said. We are pleased with our successes at our schools, he said. Millikin said depending on the outcome of pending scores, the district could have 10 of 13 schools with As or Bs, which is the same as last year. Education Commissioner Gerard Robinson earlier this month warned that the school grades would drop because of grading system changes. To help compensate for the changes, the State Board of Education in May voted not to let any school drop more than one letter grade. Also this year, school grades were not penalized if the lowest performing stu dents did not meet guidelines for adequate progress. The state has raised expectation for school grades five times in the past 10 years, Robinson said in a statement. Results show that after an initial drop, grades improve consistently in the following years. With the grades, the district can pin point the issues some schools are facing, whether problems are in a specific subject or with the number of students making yearly progress. Science at Niblack is a major problem, Millikin said. Richardson also struggled in science and math, but the school did make some gains in science. Science is one of newer FCAT sections, he said. Its an area we need to greatly improve, Millikin said. At Richardson, Melrose Park, Five Points and Niblack, more than 80 percent of students are on free or reduced lunch. Many of those families struggle to make a daily living. It has to have an impact on student performance, he said. High school grades, which include other factors like graduation rates and participa tion in accelerated coursework, are expect ed to be complete this winter. Millikin said Fort White and Columbia high schools are on track to receive an A. Preliminary scores show the schools total points are higher than last year, he said. The district is waiting on graduation rates to be released, but both schools typically graduate students at a higher rate than the state average, Millikin said. Florida is raising education standards because we know from past experience that students and teachers consistently rise to occasion when challenged, said Gov. Rick Scott in a press release. In just two years, Florida will move to a new testing standard that significantly reduces our reliance on the FCAT and moves to Common Core State Standards. This new system will allow us to compare our stu dents with those in other states so that we can benchmark results, measure progress, and adjust curriculum to better prepare students for college and the workforce, so that they are better able to compete in the global marketplace, Scott said. It is never easy to raise the standards for excellence in education. This year is no exception, Scott said. But every time we raise the expectations of our stu dents and teachers, they ultimately get better in later years. Simply put, raising the bar works. The Associated Press contributed to the article. GRADES: Drop Continued From Page 1A dedicated its most recent ly completed home ear lier this week, Burnham said they are looking for another eligible family so the organization can begin building again in the near future. We are currently seek ing qualified, hardworking partner families, he said. We currently do not have anyone to build another house for at this time. There are three require ments to become a partner family with the Habitat for Humanity of Lake City/ Columbia County. The requirements are: The fam ily must live in substandard housing; the family has to put 350 sweat equity hours in their home or someone elses home and the family must sign a 20-year zero interest mortgage. We would like to thank all of our donors, volunteers, advocates and partner fam ily for making this such an exciting event for the com munity, Burnham said. Burnham also spoke of presenting a Bible to the Mosley family as part of the home dedication. This organization is a Christian ministry to pro vide housing which began in 1976 by Millard Fuller and his wife Linda, he said. Thirty-six years later, this organization has 1,700 affiliates in 93 nations and has built more than a 1.5 million homes serving 2 million people around the world. The local Habitat affili ate has no paid staff and is operated by volunteers. We currently have enough money in the bank to immediately start anoth er house, provided we can get a qualified, hardwork ing partner family from Columbia County or Lake City, Burnham said. We already have the property to construct the home. We would like to emphasize more involvement from the churches and large employ ers for donors and volun teers and partner families. HABITAT: New home Continued From Page 1A Camp Kulaqua Sunday, July 15, 9 A.M. to 3 P.M. 23400 Northwest 212 Avenue High Springs, FL 32643 Serving North Florida since 1979. Licensed as a not-for-profit hospice since 1980. At Camp Safe Haven we help children who have lost a loved one rediscover the fun of being young while honoring and remembering the person theyve lost. A day at camp starts with big smiles, welcoming hugs, free t-shirts and hands-on sessions that help children join in, express themselves and cope with their feelings. Camp Safe Haven is a free day camp for children ages 6-12 who have lost a loved one. The childs loved one did not have to be cared for by Haven Hospice. If your child is struggling with the loss of someone special, our caring grief counselors can help. To sign your child up for Camp Safe Haven or to learn more call 800-HOSPICE (467-7423). To learn more about Haven, visit havenhospice.org 800H O S PI C E (467-7423) HA VEN H O S PI C E.ORG We believe every day is a gift. ing that residents, customers and city staff receive life-saving emer gency information and important public service announcements in minutes. Citizens and utility customers listed in the citys 9-1-1 database will be automatically subscribed to alerts by land-line phone. However, city officials encourage all citizens to self-register, providing the best contact information, or opt out. The city also plans to use the Everbridge system to notify resi dents about other important activi ties, such as community alerts and water utility maintenance. Wendell Johnson, city manager, said the city has already imple mented the system, its active and residents can enroll. There is no cost to the citizens, he said, noting the city is paying $13,034 annually for the service. This is a courtesy service to the residents. City council members started looking at the service in November 2010 and the resolution to initi ate the service was adopted in November 2011 with a service agreement with Everbridge. The city recently installed the software for the service. Johnson described the system as a reverse call-in system, where once people are enrolled, a notice or message can automatically be sent to them whether its a storm threat, boiled water notice or any type of other emergency. Johnson encouraged residents to check-out the service through the citys website at www.lcfla.com or call city hall if they need additional information. This is giving residents the added protection of knowing when something is a treat to the citi zens in this community, he said. I think its a good thing without costing anything. I think every body would be wise to make sure theyre enrolled in the Everbridge CITY: 911 Continued From Page 1A SPIRIT OF THE SUWANNEE MUSIC PARK, LIVE OAK Willow Creek Band of Mayo will entertain at the Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park in Live Oak July 14, in the Music Hall. This popular Mayo band plays old and new country, Southern rock and blues and classic rock music. These guys have played the Wellborn Blueberry Festival for the past three years with resounding approval from festival goers, as well as a variety of other venues that include radio shows, the Big 98, fairs and festivals. The bands founding roots are in Mayo but members are from Mayo, Live Oak, OBrien and Ellisville. We love playing and entertaining the crowd, said Lawrence Bryan. Band members are Tony Bryan bass guitar, Dave Ward drums, Lawrence Bryan lead vocals and guitar, Rodney Coble vocals and guitar, Edwin Ward lead guitar and vocals and Rocky Knight keyboard and vocals. Be sure to bring those danc ing shoes Saturday night when the Willow Creek Band will be in the house at the SOSMP! The park is 4.5 miles south of Interstate 75 and 4.5 miles north of Interstate 10 off US 129. Keep an eye out for the SOSMP sign and white painted board fence. COURTESY Willow Creek Band includes (l-r) Tony Bryan bass guitar, Dave Ward drums, Lawrence Bryan lead vocals and guitar, Rodney Coble vocals and guitar, Edwin Ward lead guitar and vocals and Rocky Knight keyboard and vocals. Willow Creek Band set to perform at SOSMP

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Page Editor: Rick Burnham, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2012 7A 7AHEALTH WASHINGTON Getting older doesnt just mean a risk for physical ailments like heart disease and bum knees: A new report finds as many as 1 in 5 seniors has a mental health or substance abuse problem. And as the population rapidly ages over the next two decades, millions of baby boomers may have a hard time finding care and services for mental health problems such as depres sion because the nation is woefully lacking in doctors, nurses and other health workers trained for their special needs, the Institute of Medicine said Tuesday. Instead, the country is focused mostly on prepar ing for the physical health needs of whats been called the silver tsunami. The burden of mental illness and substance abuse disorders in older adults in the United States borders on a crisis, wrote Dr. Dan Blazer of Duke University, who chaired the Institute of Medicine panel that investigated the issue. Yet this crisis is largely hidden from the public and many of those who develop policy and programs to care for older people. Already, at least 5.6 mil lion to 8 million Americans age 65 and older have a mental health condition or substance abuse disorder, the report found calling that a conservative esti mate that doesnt include a number of disorders. Depressive disorders and psychiatric symptoms related to dementia are the most common. While the panel couldnt make precise projections, those numbers are sure to grow as the number of seniors nearly doubles by 2030, said report co-author Dr. Peter Rabins, a psy chiatrist at Johns Hopkins University. How much substance abuse treatment for seniors will be needed is a particular question, as rates of illegal drug use are higher in boomers cur rently in their 50s than in previous generations. Mental health experts welcomed the report. This is a wake-up call for many reasons, said Dr. Ken Duckworth of the National Alliance on Mental Illness. The com ing need for geriatric mental health care is quite profound for us as a nation, and something we need to attend to urgent ly, he said. Merely getting older doesnt make mental health problems more like ly to occur, Rabins said, noting that middle age is the most common time for onset of depression. But when they do occur in older adults, the report found that theyre too often overlooked and tend to be more complex. Among the reasons: People over 65 almost always have physical health problems at the same time that can mask or distract from the mental health needs. The physical illnesses, and medications used for them, also can complicate treatment. For example, up to a third of people who require longterm steroid treatment develop mood problems that may require someone knowledgeable about both the medical and mental health issues to determine whether its best to cut back the steroids or add an antidepressant, Rabins said. On the other side, older adults with untreat ed depression are less likely to have their dia betes, high blood pres sure and other physical conditions under control and consequently wind up costing a lot more to treat. Age alters how peoples bodies metabolize alcohol and drugs, includ ing prescription drugs. That can increase the risk of dangerous overdoses, and worsen or even trig ger substance abuse prob lems. Grief is common in old age as spouses, other relatives and friends die. It may be difficult to dis tinguish between grief and major depression. That also means a loss of the support systems that earlier in life could have helped people bet ter recover from a mental health problem, said Dr. Paul D.S. Kirwin, president of the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Adding stress may be loss of a profes sional identity with retire ment, and the role rever sal that happens when children start taking care of older parents. Therell never be enough geriatric psychia trists or geriatric medicine specialists to take care of this huge wave of people that are aging, Kirwin said. The Institute of Medicine report rec ognizes that. It says all health workers who see older patients including primary care physicians, nurses, physicians assis tants and social workers need some training to recognize the signs of geri atric mental health prob lems and provide at least basic care. To get there, it called for changes in how Medicare and Medicaid pay for mental health ser vices, stricter licensing requirements for health workers, and for the gov ernment to fund appropri ate training programs. Too little mental health care for baby boomers MARILYNN MARCHIONE, AP Chief Medical Writer Were about to find out if there will be a way anytime soon to slow the course of Alzheimers disease. Results are due within a month or so from key studies of two drugs that aim to clear the sticky plaque gumming up patients brains. A pivotal study of a third drug will end later this year, and results from a small, early test of it will be reported next week at an Alzheimers con ference in Vancouver, British Columbia. These three treatments are practically the last men stand ing in late-stage trials, after more than a decade of failed efforts to develop a drug to halt the mind-robbing disease. Current medicines such as Aricept and Namenda just tem porarily ease symptoms. There is no known cure. Experts say that if these fail, drug companies may pull out of the field in frustration, leav ing little hope for the millions of people with the disease. An estimated 35 million people worldwide have dementia, which includes Alzheimers. In the U.S., experts say about 5 million have Alzheimers. The three treatments being tested are not even drugs in the traditional, chemical sense. They are antibodies proteins made by the immune system that promote clearance of amy loid, the stuff that forms the plaque. Its a strategy with a check ered history, and scientists arent even sure that amyloid causes Alzheimers or that removing it will do any good in people who already have symptoms. But there are some hopeful signs they may be on the right track. Everybody in the field is probably holding their breath that there is something posi tive to come out of these tri als, said Dr. Ronald Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinics Alzheimers Disease Research Center. It may not be a home run in terms of improving memory and cognition, but if brain imaging or spinal fluid tests show the drugs are hit ting their target, they will be regarded as successes, he said. William Thies, scientific director of the Alzheimers Association, agreed. Even if there is just a small effect, that would be a huge finding because that would let you know you had a drug that worked, he said. It then could be tried as a preventive medicine or given earlier in the course of the disease when it may have more impact. The three drugs and their developers are: Bapineuzumab (bapih-NOOZ-uh-mab), by Pfizer Inc. and Johnson & Johnsons Janssen Alzheimer Immunotherapy unit. Solanezumab (sol-ahNAYZ-uh-mab), by Eli Lilly & Co. Gammagard, by Baxter International Inc. All are given as periodic intravenous infusions; some companies are trying to refor mulate them so they could be given as shots. If a major study shows that one of the drugs works, there will be a huge effort to make it more convenient and practical, Thies predicted. Still, it would probably be very expensive. The first two on the list are lab-made, single antibodies against amyloid. Gammagard is intravenous immune globulin, or IVIG multiple, natural antibodies culled from blood. Half a dozen companies already sell IVIG to treat immune system and blood disorders. It takes 130 plasma donations to make enough to treat one patient for a year. Treating Alzheimers with IVIG would cost $2,000 to $5,000 every two weeks, depending on the patients weight, said Dr. Norman Relkin, head of a memory dis orders program at New YorkPresbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center. He consults for some drugmakers and has patents for tests that measure amyloid. Relkin is also leading a latestage, 400-patient study of Gammagard that will wrap up late this year. A much smaller, earlier study he led showed less brain shrinkage among people receiving the drug than among those getting dummy infusions. It was so startling that I sent it to two laboratories for independent verification, Relkin said. Next week, at the Alzheimers Association International Conference in Canada, Relkin will give a three-year progress report on 16 patients out of the origi nal 24 enrolled in that earlier study. Jason Marder is among them. The New York City man, who turned 70 on Tuesday, was diagnosed with Alzheimers more than eight years ago. It was devastating, said his wife, Karin Marder. I thought, Our life is over together as a couple. But in fact it really has not been, and I have to attri bute this really to the clinical trial. In the roughly five years that her husband has taken Gammagard, there has been decline in his health, but it is minimal and the kind of slow ing down you might expect from ordinary aging, she said. He travels the subways, he does things that you and I do. And our quality of life together is whats most important, she said. Jason Marder said he takes a creative writing class, runs errands for his wife and bikes around the city. As for his disease, I fight it as much as I can, he said. I feel I can handle it. Its impossible to say how Marder would have fared without the treatment. Some patients decline rapidly, while others not for years. Hard evi dence comes from large stud ies like the one that will con clude later this year, in which a group of patients getting the treatment is compared with a similar group given dummy infusions. Studies on the two other drugs already have ended and results are being analyzed. The main outcome is likely to be announced by the companies as soon as it is known, and detailed results are to be pre sented at scientific conferences in October. Bapineuzumab is one of the largest bets ever placed in Last drugs standing: Key Alzheimer results coming Jason and Karin Marder pose for a picture in their home in New York. Jason Marder, who turned 70 July 10, was diagnosed with Alzheimers more than eight years ago. In the roughly five years that her husband has taken Gammagard, there has been decline in his health but it is very minimal and the kind of slowing down you might expect from ordinary aging, she said. He travels the subways, he does things that you and I do. And our quality of life together is whats most important. ASSOCIATED PRESS DRUGS continued on 8A n ASSOCIATED PRESS

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8A LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2012 Page Editor: Rick Burnham, 754-0424 8AHealth Traveling with oxygen this summer? Limited on space? Let Baya help. We have the new Invacare oxygen machines. Half the size and half the noise! Baya Medical 755-2277 Traveling with oxygen this summer? Limited on space? Accepting New Patients Medicare, Blue Cross and most insurance plans accepted, worker compensation Specializing in adult medical care including: Primary Care High Blood Pressure Heart Disease Lung Disease Gastrointestinal High Cholesterol Diabetes Headache Evaluation and Treatment Arthritis Low Back Problems Evaluation and Treatment Optifast Weight Loss System Full Dizziness, vertigo and balance diagnosis and treatment Womens Health Accepting New Patients SOUTHERN INTERNAL MEDICINE Located in the Lake City Mediplex Building 404 N.W. Hall of Fame Drive, Lake City, FL Visit our website at www.SouthernInternalMedicineLC.com 386-719-2540 Allison B. Baris, ARNP Stephanie K. Finnell, ARNP Lori Belote, ARNP New Patients New Patients INTERNAL MEDICINE Dr. Guy S. Strauss, D.O.,F.A.C.O.I SHANDS Lake City, Live Oak and Starke, Florida Womens Center of Florida ALL MAJOR INSURANCES ACCEPTED INCLUDING MEDICAID & MEDICARE FREE Pregnancy Ultrasound WITH THIS AD* *Insurance Billing may occur if necessary. Some Restrictions apply. OBSTRETRICS & GYNECOLOGY PRENATAL CARE & ULTRASOUNDS STDS & HPV TESTING BIRTH CONTROL & INFERTILITY MENOPAUSE & INCONTINENCE WEIGHT LOSS & 4D ULTRASOUNDS $ 70 BOTOX & LASER HAIR REMOVAL $ 70 NO INSURANCE VISITS $ 50 CHANDLER MOHAN, MD EMAD ATTA, MD ANN MARIE FENN, CNM 386-466-1106 SERVICES: OB-GYN www.myobcare.com New Patient Exam and Necessary X-rays DO150, DO330 First-time patient Reg. $136 $ 29 SAVINGS OF $107 Expires July 31, 2012 ASPEN DENTAL GROUP the field of Alzheimers disease. More than 4,000 patients are participating in four studies around the world two in people with a gene that raises the risk of Alzheimers and two in people who dont carry that gene. The studies, which started enrolling patients in 2007, involve brain scans every few months. Thats enormously expensive and time-con suming, said Dr. Eric Yuen, head of clinical development for Janssen. These experiments are just now yielding results. Concern arose when an earlier study found pos sible bleeding or brain abnormalities in up to 10 percent of patients on the drug. However, most had no symptoms and were able to resume treat ment after a brief break, Yuen said. In fact, some researchers think these changes might be a sign the drug is working to clear the amyloid plaque. The fact that indepen dent monitors have not stopped the new stud ies has made Dr. Reisa Sperling optimistic the drug will prove to be safe. Director of the Alzheimers center at Brigham and Womens Hospital in Boston, she has consulted for Janssen and Pfizer and enrolled patients in the studies. Relkin, who is leading the Gammagard study, said that if all three of these drugs fail, were in trouble. There hasnt been a new drug even to help symptoms in nine years, he said. Petersen of the Mayo Clinic agrees. If theyre dead-flat negative, the impact on the field and the impli cation for Big Pharma could be huge, he said. Companies may bail from the field entirely. They may just say, This nut is too tough to crack. FREE TO THE PUBLIC: Informational Lecture on the eye condition caused by: Diabetes Thursday, July 19 5:30 pm [after hours] 1615 SW Main Blvd Lake City, Florida 32025 386-755-2785 Dr. William Avonda is pleased to be Presenter at this months Public Service Eye Care Lecture, and to answer questions on this Lecture Topic as well, because he is passionate about maintaining healthy vision and quality eye care, and because the doctors place great emphasis on patient education concern ing vision. Please encourage friends and family members that might have interest in this topic to attend this very important free lecture. Dr. William Avonda LECTURE LOCATION: LIFESTYLE ENRICHMENT CENTER OF LAKE CITY 628 S E A LLI S O N COURT L AK E CIT Y 32025 Gammagard, a treatment that is being tested for Alzheimers disease, is seen at the home of a patient in New York. Three treatments, including Bapineuzumab and Solanezumab, being tested for the disease are antibodies proteins made by the immune system that promote clearance of amyloid, the stuff that forms the plaque. DRUGS From Page 7A ASSOCIATED PRESS

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FREE On Site Comprehensive Evaluation Toll Free: (855) 934-7688 or (386) 755-3002 RESIDENTIAL & COMMERICAL Lifetime Warranty STOP Foundation Settlement For Good, Guaranteed... For Life Indians 16U second at state Fort White Indians who placed in the skills competition at the state tournament are: Bella Valdes, second in Throwdown to Second Base (from left); Ashley Chesney, sixth in Bases Run; Shania Pelham, third in Bases Run; Kayla Redwine, second in Throwdown to Second Base; Brianna Selgas, second in Batting; Shea Chesney, second in Pitching; Caitlyn Bruce, first in Long Throw. By TIM KIRBY tkirby@lakecityreporter.com FORT WHITE The Fort White Indians 16-under softball team faced its first real adversity of the season at the state tourna ment and fought through it for a second-place finish. The 2012 Babe Ruth Softball Florida State Championships was last week at Shocker Park in Ocala. Fort White entered the tournament with a 13-0 record that included a dis trict championship and a win in a Babe Ruth World Series qualifier tournament in March. The Indians promptly dropped their first game in the tournament to Julington Creek, 7-5, on Wednesday. Fort White then won four games in the losers brack et, including a revenge win over Julington Creek. The Indians faced Southeast Volusia in the final and had to win two games. Volusia took the state title with a 7-2 win. The girls played an out standing tournament, head coach Jay Harvey said. We dropped our first game and it is hard to come all the way back in the losers bracket. Pitcher Brianna Selgas struck out three and had four RBIs in the opening game, which served as a wake-up call. Losing that first game didnt do any damage, but it made us think, Kayla Redwine said. We were undefeated before and it showed us we could lose. We regrouped and made it all the way to the final. Fort Whites comeback started in a big way with a 25-2 win over Port Orange. Ashley Chesney had three doubles and a single with four runs scored and three RBIs. Redwine had a double and four singles, with two runs scored and three RBIs. Shea Chesney had a double and three sin gles with two runs scored and three RBIs. Selgas had three hits with two RBIs and three runs scored. Caitlyn Bruce had a hit and scored three runs. Alexis Gibbons had a hit and scored twice. Bella Valdes had a hit and scored a run. Shania Pelham scored three runs and had an RBI. Madysen Greek had two hits and scored two runs. Kristen Timberlake score a run, Kateri Allen had an RBI and Cheyenne Bronson reached on a walk. The Indians beat Northside, 11-7, in their second elimination game on Friday. Ashley Chesney had a triple and two singles with three runs scored and an RBI. Selgas had two doubles and a single with three RBIs and three runs scored. Shea Chesney and Bruce both had two hits and scored a run. Allen had two hits with two RBIs and a run scored. Redwine (double, RBI, run scored), Timberlake (run scored) and Gibbons also had hits. Fort White opened Saturdays elimination schedule with a 15-6 win over Waldo. Redwine (double, sin gle, two RBIs), Pelham (two singles) and Gibbons (single) each scored three runs. Timberlake had three hits with a double and run scored. Selgas had a triple and double and scored two runs. Valdes had two hits and scored two runs. Allen had a single and scored a run. The rematch with Julington Creek came next and Fort White won, 16-12. We came together as a team and got behind Brianna, Shea Chesney said. Once we got our bats going, they couldnt stop us. We werent going to let them beat us. Gibbons had five hits and scored three runs. Redwine and Pelham each had a hit and scored three runs. TIM KIRBY /Lake City Reporter The Fort White Indians 16-under softball team placed second at the Babe Ruth Softball state tournament in Ocala. Team members are (front row, from left) Shania Pelham, Ashley Chesney, Kateri Allen, Cheyenne Bronson, Caitlyn Bruce, bat girl Jennifer Allen, Bella Valdes and Shea Chesney. Back row (from left) are coach Paul Valdes, Alexis Gibbons, Kriston Timberlake, coach Mike McIntosh, Madysen Greek, Kayla Redwine, Brianna Selgas and head coach Jay Harvey. Fort White team gearing up for World Series trip. INDIANS continued on 2B TIM KIRBY /Lake City Reporter

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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today BASKETBALL 9 p.m. ESPN — Men’s national teams, exhibition, Dominican Republic vs. U.S., at Las Vegas CYCLING 7 a.m. NBCSN — Tour de France, stage 11, Albertville to La Toussuire-Les Sybelles, France GOLF 9:30 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Scottish Open, first round, at Inverness, Scotland 3 p.m. ESPN2 — USGA, U.S. Senior Open Championship, first round, at Lake Orion, Mich. TGC — PGA Tour, John Deere Classic, first round, at Silvis, Ill. 6:30 p.m. TGC — Web.com Tour, Utah Championship, first round, at Sandy, Utah WNBA 7 p.m. ESPN2 — Los Angeles at IndianaBASEBALLAL standings East Division W L Pct GBNew York 52 33 .612 —Baltimore 45 40 .529 7 Tampa Bay 45 41 .523 7 12 Boston 43 43 .500 9 12 Toronto 43 43 .500 9 12 Central Division W L Pct GBChicago 47 38 .553 — Cleveland 44 41 .518 3 Detroit 44 42 .512 3 12 Kansas City 37 47 .440 9 12 Minnesota 36 49 .424 11 West Division W L Pct GBTexas 52 34 .605 —Los Angeles 48 38 .558 4Oakland 43 43 .500 9Seattle 36 51 .414 16 12 Tuesday’s Game NL All-Stars 8, AL All-Stars 0 Wednesday’s Games No games scheduled Today’s Games No games scheduled Friday’s Games Detroit at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.L.A. Angels at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m.Cleveland at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.Boston at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.Chicago White Sox at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m. Oakland at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.Texas at Seattle, 10:10 p.m. NL standings East Division W L Pct GBWashington 49 34 .590 — Atlanta 46 39 .541 4New York 46 40 .535 4 12 Miami 41 44 .482 9Philadelphia 37 50 .425 14 Central Division W L Pct GBPittsburgh 48 37 .565 —Cincinnati 47 38 .553 1St. Louis 46 40 .535 2 12 Milwaukee 40 45 .471 8 Chicago 33 52 .388 15 Houston 33 53 .384 15 12 West Division W L Pct GBLos Angeles 47 40 .540 —San Francisco 46 40 .535 12 Arizona 42 43 .494 4San Diego 34 53 .391 13Colorado 33 52 .388 13 Tuesday’s Games NL All-Stars 8, AL All-Stars 0 Wednesday’s Games No games scheduled Today’s Games No games scheduled Friday’s Games Arizona at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.St. Louis at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.Washington at Miami, 7:10 p.m.N.Y. Mets at Atlanta, 7:35 p.m.Pittsburgh at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.Philadelphia at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.San Diego at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.Houston at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m. All-Star runs National First: Justin Verlander pitching. C.Gonzalez strikes out swinging. Me.Cabrera singled to left. Braun doubled to right, Me.Cabrera scored. Votto strikes out looking. Beltran walks. Posey walks, Braun to third, Beltran to second. Sandoval triples to right, Braun, Beltran and Posey scored. Uggla singled to short, Sandoval scores. Furcal grounds into force out by second baseman Cano. 5 runs, 4 hits, 0 errors, 1 left on. National 5, American 0. National Fourth: Matt Harrison pitching. Sandoval flies out to center field-er Granderson. Uggla flies out to center fielder Granderson. Furcal triples down the right field line. Matt Holliday pinch hit for C.Gonzalez and singles to right, Furcal scores. Me.Cabrera homers to left on a 2-2 pitch, Holliday scores. Braun triples down the right field line. Votto grounds out to second baseman Cano to first baseman Fielder. 3 runs, 4 hits, 0 errors, 1 left on. National 8, American 0.Baseball calendar Friday — Deadline for amateur draft picks to sign. July 22 — Hall of Fame induction, Cooperstown, N.Y. July 31 — Last day to trade a player without securing waivers. Aug 15-16 — Owners’ meetings, Denver. Sept. 1 — Active rosters expand to 40 players. Oct. 5 — Postseason begins, wild-card playoffs. Oct. 7 — Division series begin.Oct. 13 — League championship series begin. Oct. 24 — World Series begins.FOOTBALLNFL calendar Late July — Training camps open.Aug. 4-5 — Hall of Fame inductions; Hall of Fame game, Canton, Ohio. Aug. 9-13 — Preseason openers.Sept. 5 — Regular-season opener.Sept. 9-10 — First full regular-season weekend.AUTO RACINGRace week NASCAR LENOX INDUSTRIAL TOOLS 301 Site: Loudon, N.H.Schedule: Friday, practice (Speed, noon-1:30 p.m.), qualifying (Speed, 3:30-5:30 p.m.); Saturday, practice (Speed, 11 a.m.-1 p.m.); Sunday, race, 1 p.m. (TNT, noon-4:30 p.m.). Track: New Hampshire Motor Speedway (oval, 1.058 miles). Race distance: 318.46 miles, 301 laps.Next race: Brickyard 400, July 29, Indianapolis Motor Speedway, Indianapolis. Online: http://www.nascar.com NATIONWIDE F.W. WEBB 200 Site: Loudon, N.H.Schedule: Friday, practice (Speed, 1:303 p.m.); Saturday, qualifying (ESPN2, 10-11 a.m., race, 3 p.m. (ESPN, 2:30-6 p.m.). Track: New Hampshire Motor Speedway (oval, 1.058 miles). Race distance: 211.6 miles, 200 laps.Next race: Indy 250, Indianapolis Motor Speedway, Indianapolis. Online: http://www.nascar.com CAMPING WORLD TRUCK AMERICAN ETHANOL 200 Site: Newton, Iowa.Schedule: Friday, practice (Speed, 78:30 p.m.); Saturday, qualifying (Speed, 6:30-7:30 p.m.), race, 8:30 p.m. (Speed, 8-11 p.m.). Track: Iowa Speedway (oval, 0.875 miles). Race distance: 175 miles, 200 laps.Next race: American Ethanol 225, July 21, Chicagoland Speedway, Joliett, Ill. Online: http://www.nascar.com INDYCAR Next race: Edmonton Indy, July 22, Edmonton City Centre Airport, Edmonton, Alberta. Online: http://www.indycar.com FORMULA ONE Next race: German Grand Prix, July 22, Hockenheimring, Hockenheim, Germany. Online: http://www.formula1.com NHRA FULL THROTTLE Next event: Mile-High NHRA Nationals, July 20-22, Bandimere Speedway, Morrison, Colo. Online: http://www.nhra.com OTHER RACES ARCA RACING SERIES: Prairie Meadows 200, Friday (Speed, 9-11 p.m.), Iowa Speedway, Newton, Iowa. Online: http://www.arcaracing.com WORLD OF OUTLAWS: Sprint Car: Friday-Saturday, Eldora Speedway, Rossburg, Ohio. Late Model: Thursday, Red River Co-op Speedway, Winnipeg, Manitoba; Friday, River Cities Speedway, Grand Forks, N.D.; Saturday, North Central Speedway, Brainerd, Minn. Online: http://www.worldofoutlaws.com U.S. AUTO RACING CLUB: Sprint Car: Friday, Gas City I-69 Speedway, Gas City, Ind.; Saturday, Kokomo Speedway, Kokomo, Ind.; Sunday, Lawrenceburg Speedway, Lawrenceburg, Ind. Online: http://www.usacracing.comBASKETBALLWNBA schedule Wednesday’s Games San Antonio 77, Chicago 68Atlanta at Seattle (n)Washington at Connecticut (n) Today’s Games Tulsa at Minnesota, 1 p.m.Los Angeles at Indiana, 7 p.m. Friday’s Games Washington at New York, 11 a.m.Atlanta at San Antonio, 8 p.m.Connecticut at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.Seattle at Phoenix, 10 p.m.CYCLINGTour de France June 30 — Prologue: Liege, Belgium, 6.4 kilometers (4 miles) (Stage: Fabian Cancellara, Switzerland; Yellow Jersey: Cancellara) July 1 — First Stage: Liege to Seraing, Belgium, plain, 198 (123) (Peter Sagan, Slovakia; Cancellara) July 2 — Second Stage: Vise, Belgium to Tournai, Belgium, plain, 207.5 (128.9) (Mark Cavendish, Britain; Cancellara) July 3 — Third Stage: Orchies, France to Boulogne-sur-Mer, medium mountains, 197 (122.4) (Sagan; Cancellara) July 4 — Fourth Stage: Abbeville to Rouen, plain, 214.5 (133.3) (Andre Greipel, Germany; Cancellara) July 5 — Fifth Stage: Rouen to SaintQuentin, plain, 196.5 (122.1) (Greipel; Cancellara) July 6 — Sixth Stage: Epernay to Metz, plain, 205 (127.4) (Sagan; Cancellara) July 7 — Seventh Stage: Tomblaine to La Planche des Belles Filles, medium mountains, 199 (123.7) (Chris Froome, Britain; Bradley Wiggins, Britain) July 8 — Eighth Stage: Belfort to Porrentruy, medium mountains, 157.5 (97.9) (Thibaut Pinot, France; Wiggins) July 9 — Ninth Stage: Arc-et-Senans to Besancon, individual time trial, 41.5 (25.8) (Wiggins; Wiggins) July 10 — Rest Day: MaconJuly 11 — 10th Stage: Macon to Bellgarde-sur-Valserine, high mountains, 194.5 (120.9) (Thomas Voeckler, France; Wiggins) July 12 — 11th Stage: Albertville to La Toussuire-Les Sybelles, high mountains, 148 (92) July 13 — 12th Stage: Saint-Jean-deMaurienne to Annonay Davezieux, medi-um mountains, 226 (140.4) July 14 — 13th Stage: Saint-Paul-TroisChateaux to Le Cap d’Agde, plain, 217 (134.8) July 15 — 14th Stage: Limoux to Foix, high mountains, 191 (118.7) July 16 — 15th Stage: Samatan to Pau, plain, 158.5 (98.5) July 17 — Rest Day: PauJuly 18 — 16th Stage: Pau to Bagneresde-Luchon, high mountains, 197 (122.4) July 19 — 17th Stage: Bagneres-deLuchon to Peyragudes, high mountains, 143.5 (89.2) July 20 — 18th Stage: Blagnac to Brivela-Gaillarde, plain, 222.5 (138.3) July 21 — 19th Stage: Bonneval to Chartres, individual time trial, 53.5 (33.1) July 22 — 20th Stage: Rambouillet to Champs-Elysees, Paris, 120 (74.6) Total — 3496.9 kilometers (2172.9 miles) ——— Wednesday 10th Stage (A 120.9-mile ride from Macon in southern Burgundy into the Jura moun-tains to Bellegarde-sur-Valserine, with the first “Hors categorie” climb of this year’s tour to the Col de Grand Colombier) 1. Thomas Voeckler, France, Team Europcar, 4 hours, 46 minutes, 26 seconds. 2. Michele Scarponi, Italy, Lampre-ISD, 3 seconds behind. 3. Jens Voigt, Germany, RadioShackNissan, :07. 4. Luis Leon Sanchez, Spain, Rabobank, :23. 5. Dries Devenyns, Belgium, Omega Pharma-QuickStep, :30. 6. Sandy Casar, France, FDJ-Big Mat, 2:44. 7. Egoi Martinez, Spain, EuskaltelEuskadi, same time. 8. Pierre Rolland, France, Team Europcar, same time. 9. Jurgen Van den Broeck, Belgium, Lotto Belisol, same time. 10. Dmitriy Fofonov, Kazakhstan, Astana, 2:52. 11. Thibaut Pinot, France, FDJ-Big Mat, 3:16. 12. Cadel Evans, Australia, BMC Racing, same time. 13. Bradley Wiggins, Britain, Sky Procycling, same time. 14. Nicolas Roche, Ireland, France, AG2R La Mondiale, same time. 15. Vincenzo Nibali, Italy, LiquigasCannondale, same time. 16. Denis Menchov, Russia, Katusha, same time. 17. Alejandro Valverde, Spain, Movistar, same time. 18. Chris Froome, Britain, Sky Procycling, same time. 19. Rui Costa, Portugal, Movistar, same time. 20. Jerome Coppel, France, SaurSojasun, same time. Overall standings (After 10 stages) 1. Bradley Wiggins, Britain, Sky Procycling, 43 hours, 59 minutes, 02 sec-onds. 2. Cadel Evans, Australia, BMC Racing, 1:53 behind. 3. Chris Froome, Britain, Sky Procycling, 2:07. 4. Vincenzo Nibali, Italy, LiquigasCannondale, 2:23. 5. Denis Menchov, Russia, Katusha, 3:02. 6. Haimar Zubeldia, Spain, RadioShackNissan, 3:19. 7. Maxime Monfort, Belgium, RadioShack-Nissan, 4:23. 8. Jurgen Van den Broeck, Belgium, Lotto Belisol, 4:48. 9. Nicolas Roche, Ireland, France, AG2R La Mondiale, 5:29. 10. Tejay Van Garderen, United States, BMC Racing, 5:31. 11. Rui Costa, Portugal, Movistar, 5:46.12. Rein Taaramae, Estonia, Cofidis, 5:56. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2012 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421%$*$7( THURSDAY EVENING JULY 12, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Duets The celebrity singers pick songs. Wipeout “It’s the John Henson Show” Rookie Blue “Coming Home” (N) News at 11(:35) Nightline (N) 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondKing of QueensBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) The Insider 5-PBS 5 -Journal Nightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) The This Old House Hour Jesse Owens: American ExperiencePOV “Guilty Pleasures” (N) BBC World NewsTavis Smiley (N) 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge Judy Two and Half MenBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryBig Brother (Season Premiere) (N) Person of Interest “Matsya Nyaya” Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneThe Vampire Diaries “Ordinary People” The Vampire Diaries “Homecoming” The Of ce The Of ce TMZ (N) Access Hollywood 10-FOX 10 30 30How I Met/MotherFamily Guy Family Guy The SimpsonsTake Me Out “Episode 6” (PA) (8:58) The Choice “Season Finale” (PA) NewsAction News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) The Of ceParks/RecreatSaving Hope A hypnotized patient. (N) Rock Center With Brian Williams (N) NewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(5:00) U.S. House of Representatives Capitol Hill Hearings WGN-A 16 239 30730 Rock 30 Rock America’s Funniest Home VideosHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos TVLAND 17 106 304M*A*S*H (:32) M*A*S*H(:05) M*A*S*H(:43) Home Improvement Home Improve.Love-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Who the BleepWho the BleepWho the BleepWho the Bleep48 Hours: Hard Evidence 48 Hours: Hard Evidence 48 Hours: Hard Evidence 48 Hours: Hard Evidence A&E 19 118 265The First 48 “Last Wish” The First 48 A gun ght at a gas station. 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Farm Shake It Up! Phineas and FerbA.N.T. Farm Jessie LIFE 32 108 252Trading Spouses: Meet New MommyTrading Spouses: Meet New MommyWife Swap A hip-hop artist’s mom. Wife Swap “Petersen/Vaughn” Wife Swap “McGoldrick/Noel” Dance Moms USA 33 105 242NCIS A blogger turns up dead. NCIS A Marine’s body surfaces. NCIS “A Man Walks Into a Bar ...” Burn Notice “Under the Gun” (N) (:01) Suits “Discovery” (N) (:02) Covert Affairs (DVS) BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Top 10 Countdown” (N) The BET Awards 2012 Chris Brown, Nicki Minaj and Kanye West. The Game ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) NFL Live SportsCenter Special d Basketball Dominican Republic vs. United States. From Las Vegas. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209g Golfd WNBA Basketball Los Angeles Sparks at Indiana Fever. (N) SportsCenter Special Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) MMA Live (N) Baseball Tonight SUNSP 37 -The Game 365The Game 365Florida Insider Fishing ReportRev3 TriathlonRev3 TriathlonFitness TruthFlorida Insider Fishing ReportSportsman’s Adv. DISCV 38 182 278Auction KingsAuction KingsAuction KingsAuction KingsAuction KingsAuction KingsAuction Kings (N) Auction KingsProperty Wars (Series Premiere) (N) Auction KingsAuction Kings TBS 39 139 247King of QueensKing of QueensSeinfeld “The Pie” Seinfeld Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryMen at Work (N) Men at Work (N) Conan HLN 40 202 204(5:00) Evening ExpressJane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) Dr. Drew (N) Nancy GraceShowbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236Keeping Up With the KardashiansE! News (N) The SoupSex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CitySex and the CityChelsea Lately (N) E! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Bizarre Foods With Andrew ZimmernMan v. Food “Miami” Best SandwichBest SandwichTrip Flip “Maui” Trip Flip “Cabo” Top Spot “Miami” Top Spot (N) Coaster WarsXtreme Waterparks HGTV 47 112 229Property VirginsProperty VirginsHunters Int’lHouse HuntersCeleb-HomeSelling LA Born SellersSelling London (N) House Hunters (N) Hunters Int’lHouse HuntersHunters Int’l TLC 48 183 280Undercover Boss “BrightStar Care” Undercover Boss Undercover Boss On the Fly (N) On the Fly D.U.I. (N) D.U.I. (N) On the Fly On the Fly HIST 49 120 269Swamp People “King of the Swamp” Swamp People “Man Down” Swamp People “Stick and Move” Swamp People “Bayou’s Best” Mountain Men (N) (:01) Picked Off “Cagey Strategy” ANPL 50 184 282River Monsters: Unhooked River Monsters: Unhooked River Monsters: Unhooked River Monsters Bizarre cat sh tales. Rattlesnake Republic River Monsters: Unhooked FOOD 51 110 231Chopped “Prove It On the Plate” ChoppedChopped “On the Line” Chopped “All American Competition” Chef Wanted With Anne Burrell (N) Sweet Genius “Golden Genius” TBN 52 260 372(5:00) Praise the Lord Always Good NewThe Potter’s TouchBehind the ScenesJoel Osteen Joseph PrinceHillsong TVPraise the Lord (Live). FSN-FL 56 -Boys in the HallUFC InsiderWorld Poker Tour: Season 10World Poker Tour: Season 10Action Sports World ChampionshipsThe Dan Patrick ShowLondon 2012Volvo Ocean Race SYFY 58 122 244 “Land of the Lost” (2009, Comedy) Will Ferrell, Anna Friel. “The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian” (2008, Fantasy) Georgie Henley, Skandar Keynes, William Moseley. “Land of the Lost” (2009) AMC 60 130 254CSI: Miami “In Plane Sight” CSI: Miami “Bad Seed” “Rambo” (2008, Action) Sylvester Stallone, Julie Benz. Premiere. “Rambo” (2008, Action) Sylvester Stallone, Julie Benz. COM 62 107 249 “National Lampoon’s Van Wilder” (2002) Ryan Reynolds, Tara Reid. South Park South Park South Park The Comedy Central Roast Actor David Hasselhoff. Tosh.0 Tosh.0 CMT 63 166 327The Dukes of Hazzard Trick My TruckTrick My TruckTrick My TruckTrick My Truck “Unforgiven” (1992) Clint Eastwood. Premiere. Clint Eastwood’s Oscar-winning portrait of an aged gunman. NGWILD 108 190 283Dog Whisperer “Killer in the Window” Built for the KillBuilt for the Kill “Hide and Eat” Built for the Kill “Savannah Predators” Built for the Kill “Lions” Built for the Kill “Hide and Eat” NGC 109 186 276American Colony: Meet the HutteritesBorder Wars “Lost in the River” American Colony: Meet the HutteritesAmerican Colony: Meet the HutteritesTurtle BoyAmerican Colony: Meet the Hutterites SCIENCE 110 193 284How It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeHow It’s MadeThey Do It?They Do It?How It’s MadeHow It’s Made ID 111 192 285Dateline on ID “Ransom, Part 1” Dateline on ID “Ransom, Part 2” Behind Mansion Walls Behind Mansion Walls (N) Blood Relatives “The Ties That Bind” Behind Mansion Walls HBO 302 300 501(5:45) “X2: X-Men United” (2003, Fantasy) Patrick Stewart. ‘PG-13’ “Something Borrowed” (2011) Ginnifer Goodwin. ‘PG-13’ The Newsroom “The 112th Congress” True Blood “Let’s Boot and Rally” MAX 320 310 515The Girl Next Door(:20) “A Nightmare on Elm Street” (2010) ‘R’ “What’s Love Got to Do With It” (1993) Angela Bassett. ‘R’ “Titanic” (1997, Historical Drama) Leonardo DiCaprio. ‘PG-13’ SHOW 340 318 545(5:00) “Primary Colors” (1998) John Travolta. ‘R’ “The Help” (2011) Viola Davis. An aspiring writer captures the experiences of black women. The Real L Word (Season Premiere) (N)Polyamory: MarriedThe Real L Word INDIANS: Trip Aug. 8-15 Continued From Page 1B ASSOCIATED PRESSMiami Heat president Pat Riley (left) guard Ray Allen (center) and head coach Erik Spoelstra (right) hold up Allen’s jersey after Allen signed an NBA basketball co ntract with the Heat, in Miami, on Wednesday. Allen, Lewis sign with Miami HeatBy TIM REYNOLDSAssociated PressMIAMI — Rashard Lewis has already thought plenty about what it could mean to share the court with LeBron James, Dwyane Wade, Chris Bosh and Ray Allen. In short, he knows defenses could be a bit con-founded. Lewis and Allen signed their free-agent deals with the NBA champion Miami Heat on Wednesday, with talk immediately turn-ing to how the new faces — both 3-point threats — could extend opponents who might find themselves focusing defensively on James, Wade and Bosh. Allen agreed to join the Heat on Friday. Lewis agreed to terms with Miami on Tuesday. Neither deal could be completed until the NBA’s offsea-son moratorium expired Wednesday. Allen has one championship from his time in Boston. Lewis played for a title with Orlando, falling short in the finals. And the lure of that elusive ring is what brought him to Miami. Allen was to be introduced by the Heat later Wednesday. Allen and Lewis were Seattle teammates for five seasons, from 2003 through 2007 — and both figure to fit perfectly into Miami’s plan to surround James, Wade and Bosh with even more shooters who can stretch defenses. Allen’s 2,718 made 3pointers are the most in NBA history, and Lewis ranks fifth among active players with 1,690 makes from beyond the arc. Timberlake had a double, two singles and scored two runs. Ashley Chesney had three hits and scored a run. Selgas, Greek and Valdes each had a hit and scored a run. Shea Chesney scored a run and Allen had a hit. In the loss to Volusia, Selgas (two hits) and Redwine (double) scored the two runs. Pelham had two hits, while Shea Chesney, Bruce and Gibbons each had one hit. Except for a brief stint by Shea Chesney in the Port Orange game, Selgas han-dled all the pitching duties for the Indians. For the tournament, she recorded 24 strikeouts and had 17 assists in the field. The tournament Skills Competition was Thursday and Fort White won the 16U division. “The tournament brought us together as a team,” Shea Chesney said. “For some of us it was our third trip to state and the third time is a charm.” The Babe Ruth World Series is Aug. 8-15 in Wilson, N.C., and the Indians are raising money for the trip. The team has chicken dinners on sale for $6 at the South Columbia Sports Park meeting room from 1-7 p.m. Friday. “When we first started, a couple of the girls didn’t know how to play,” Ashley Chesney said. “They all played in the state tourna-ment and did great. We have our coaches to thank for that. They pulled us through.”

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DEAR ABBY: “Wants to Do the Right Thing” (April 18) asked about using email to thank those who donated to a fundraiser for her son, who has bone cancer. What is wrong with that? I have been there. One of my twin boys was diag-nosed with cancer at age 2. I was grateful for all the help my family and friends gave me, but I did not always have the time or energy to devote to writing thank-you cards. You really have to have experienced this kind of long-term stress and trauma to understand. It takes all the strength you have to just get through each day without break-ing down. For larger donations, I would write a card when I could or print some out on my computer. Sometimes I recruited a friend or family member to handle thank-you notes. People always ask, “What can I do?” Well, assign them this task! Another way of thanking people was through a blog, like CaringBridge. These free websites were a great way to keep in touch with people and let them know what was going on. I often posted general notes of thanks there, then emailed everyone who contributed with a link to the site. The truth is, it was difficult to accept charity and help from others, and I often found myself overwhelmed by the outpouring of love and support. -TRULY THANKFUL IN NEW YORK DEAR TRULY THANKFUL: Thank YOU for your heartfelt letter and helpful suggestions. I reminded “Wants” that writing personal thank-you notes was the proper thing to do, but not all readers agreed. Their comments: DEAR ABBY: Any spare time that mom has needs to be spent with her family or taking care of herself. They are going through a very difficult time. I believe that in this day and age, the majority of people would under-stand and not expect a thank-you note for their donation. So a quick email of thanks would be more than appreciated. Email is more acceptable now, especially among younger people. If this is all she has time for, it’s better than no thank-you at all. -KELLY IN WINCHESTER, VA. DEAR ABBY: To that mother of the child with cancer: Instead of writing thank-you notes to all the people who help you in the community, please spend that time with your son. Someday, return the favor with some other family’s child. Many families in our town cope with child-hood cancer. We help each other. It is important that you spend every pre-cious moment with him, not writing cards. We all understand. -PAYING IT FORWARD IN CLYDE, OHIO DEAR ABBY: You correctly advised “Wants” that a handwritten, per-sonal note was in order. However, having found myself in this position, I sometimes first send out a quick “blanket” email to all the donors: “Dear Friends and Family, you are great to contribute to our cause. Please forgive this email reply, but we want you to know right away how much your support means to us. You’ll be hearing from us personally as soon as possible.” This acknowledges the generosity immedi-ately, while relieving some stress for the writer at a busy time. -WISE IN WASHINGTON DILBERT BABY BLUES HOROSCOPES DEAR ABBY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Move money around to cover your costs. A deal being offered is too good to refuse. A partner-ship will be a stabilizing factor in your life. New surroundings will give you a creative injection that improves your skills and productivity. +++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Listen to your heart, and don’t be influenced by someone trying to manipulate your decision. Concentrate on creating your own scenario and deciding what works for you. You will learn a lot if you follow your own path. +++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Don’t let the actions of others cause doubt. There is plenty you can do to improve your life if you sign up for events, activities and lessons that will benefit you. Don’t be a follower when you are a leader at heart. +++ CANCER (June 21July 22): Keep up with the trends and the times. Updates must be made, both personally and profes-sionally. What you learn now will help you in the future. Don’t pass up an opportunity to acquire skills or to get involved in a serviceable venture. ++++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Rely on what you know, not how you feel about what’s going on around you. A costly mistake will occur if you listen to some-one you love instead of relying on facts and figures to lead you in the right direction. ++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Someone’s action is likely to disturb you. Take steps to secure your position and protect your assets and reputation. Travel to discuss what you want to see happen face-to-face with someone impor-tant. +++++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): You need a change of pace and surroundings. Don’t be fooled into taking an expensive trip. You’ll get just as much out of a more budget-friendly des-tination that lets you enjoy people, places or things you don’t see that often. +++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Don’t get wrapped up in someone else’s melodra-ma. Back away from any-one trying to dump guilt or responsibilities in your lap. Do something that allows you to be creative and productive. Travel for business connections or knowledge. +++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Excess and oppor-tunity will go hand in hand. Showing off a little will impress the right people. Your drive, attitude and abil-ity to take action will lead to a proposal that will be too hard to turn down. Love is highlighted. +++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Listen carefully. You don’t want to miss important information that will influence the choice you make. Not everyone will be on your team, so be careful not to fall for a biased point of view. Rely on what you know. +++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Make a point of spending time with positive people who have similar interests. An oppor-tunity to make a move geographically or to try out a different way of life is apparent. Educational pur-suits will give you greater skills and confidence. ++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Don’t take unneces-sary risks. You must stick to what you know and do best to avoid suffering a loss. Too much of anything will not bring you the suc-cess you hope to achieve. Moderation and common sense will be required. ++++ CELEBRITY CIPHER Abigail Van Burenwww.dearabby.com BLONDIE BEETLE BAILEY B.C. FRANK & ERNEST FOR BETTER OR WORSE ZITS HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH GARFIELD THE LAST WORD Eugenia Last Email, online thank-yous suffice in stressful times Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. CLASSIC PEANUTS Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2012 3B

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTHURSDAY, JULY12, 2012 Classified Department: 755-5440 4B CLASSIFIED AD vantageTake ADvantage of the Reporter Classifieds!755-5440Lake City Reporter FIND IT SELL IT BUY IT $17504 lines 3 days Includes 2 Signs Each additional line $1.65 Garage Sale Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$10104 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.10One item per ad Under $500 Personal Merchandise Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$16754 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.15One item per ad Under $1,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$23704 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.45One item per ad Under $2,500 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $4,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$27404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.55One item per ad Under $4,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$30404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.65One item per ad Under $6,000 Placing An Ad Service Guide Limited to service type advertis-ing only.4 lines, one month....$92.00 $10.80 each additional lineIncludes an additional $2.00 per ad for each Wednesday insertion. DeadlinesBe Sure to Call Early You can call us at 755-5440 Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.Some people prefer to place their classified ads in person, and some ad categories will require prepay-ment. Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street.You can also fax or email your ad copy to the Reporter.FAX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the Classified Department.EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreporter.comAd is to Appear:TuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday Call by:Mon., 10:00 a.m.Mon., 10:00 a.m.Wed., 10:00 a.m.Thurs., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fax/Email by:Mon., 9:00 a.m.Mon., 9:00 a.m.Wed., 9:00 a.m.Thurs., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.These deadlines are subject to change without notice. Cancellations, Changes & Billing Questions Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject, or classify all advertisements under appropriate headings. Copy should be checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day of pub-lication. Credit for published errors will be allowed for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement which was incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be published, nor for any general, special or consequential damages. Advertising language must comply with Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition of discrimi-nation in employment, housing and public accommodations. Standard abbreviations are acceptable; how-ever, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated. Ad Errors-Please read your ad on the first day of publication. Weaccept responsibility for only the first incorrect insertion, and only the charge for the ad space in error. Please call 755-5440 immediately for prompt correc-tion and billing adjustments.CancellationsNormal advertising deadlines apply for cancellation.Billing InquiriesCall 755-5440. Should further information be required regarding payments or credit limits, your call will be trans-ferred to the accounting depart-ment. General Information In Print and Onlinewww.lakecityreporter.com Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$2504 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $.25One item per ad Under $100 CLASSIFIED AD vantageTake ADvantage of the Reporter Classifieds!755-5440Lake City Reporter FIND IT SELL IT BUY IT $17504 lines 3 days Includes 2 Signs Each additional line $1.65 Garage Sale Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$10104 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.10One item per ad Under $500 Personal Merchandise Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$16754 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.15One item per ad Under $1,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$23704 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.45One item per ad Under $2,500 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $4,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$27404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.55One item per ad Under $4,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$30404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.65One item per ad Under $6,000 Placing An Ad Service Guide Limited to service type advertis-ing only.4 lines, one month....$92.00 $10.80 each additional lineIncludes an additional $2.00 per ad for each Wednesday insertion. DeadlinesBe Sure to Call Early You can call us at 755-5440 Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.Some people prefer to place their classified ads in person, and some ad categories will require prepay-ment. Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street.You can also fax or email your ad copy to the Reporter.FAX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the Classified Department.EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreporter.comAd is to Appear:TuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday Call by:Mon., 10:00 a.m.Mon., 10:00 a.m.Wed., 10:00 a.m.Thurs., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fax/Email by:Mon., 9:00 a.m.Mon., 9:00 a.m.Wed., 9:00 a.m.Thurs., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.These deadlines are subject to change without notice. Cancellations, Changes & Billing Questions Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject, or classify all advertisements under appropriate headings. Copy should be checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day of pub-lication. Credit for published errors will be allowed for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement which was incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be published, nor for any general, special or consequential damages. Advertising language must comply with Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition of discrimi-nation in employment, housing and public accommodations. Standard abbreviations are acceptable; how-ever, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated. Ad Errors-Please read your ad on the first day of publication. Weaccept responsibility for only the first incorrect insertion, and only the charge for the ad space in error. Please call 755-5440 immediately for prompt correc-tion and billing adjustments.CancellationsNormal advertising deadlines apply for cancellation.Billing InquiriesCall 755-5440. Should further information be required regarding payments or credit limits, your call will be trans-ferred to the accounting depart-ment. General Information In Print and Onlinewww.lakecityreporter.com Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$2504 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $.25One item per ad Under $100 Professional Sales Associates Needed No experience necessary. STRONG desire to succeed needed. Extremely aggressive pay plan. Health and dental insurance available. EOE. Apply in person with Dino or Jeffrey at Rountree-Moore Chevrolet, Cadillac and Nissan 4316 US Hwy 90W Lake City, FL ServicesRoof Repairs Shingles, Metal, and Flat Decks. Starting at $50.00. Contact Roger at 386-365-4185 Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE 3RD JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO. 08-000713CAYALE MORTGAGE CORPORA-TION,Plaintiff,-vs-CASSANDRACRAY, etc., et al., Defendants.NOTICE OF SALEPURSUANTTO CHAPTER 45NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pur-suant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure dated the June 25, 2012, entered in the above captioned ac-tion, 08-000713CA, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at 11:00 o’clock A.M., on August 1, 2012, on the third floor of the Co-lumbia County Courthouse at 173 N.E. Hernando Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055, the following descri-bed property as set forth in said final judgment, to-wit:Lot 1, OPAL’S ADDITION, ac-cording to the Plat thereof, as record-ed in plat Book 3, Page 7, of Public Records of Columbia County, Flori-da.ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN IN-TERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANYOTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.DATED 7/21/12.If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceed-ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assis-tance. Please contact Court Adminis-tration at the Moore Justice Center, 2825 Judge Fran Jamieson Way, 3rd Floor, Viera, FL32940-8006, (321) 633-2171, ext 2, at least 7 days be-fore your scheduled court appear-ance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; If you are hearing or voice im-paired call 1-800-955-8771.P.DEWITTCASONClerk, Circuit CourtBY: B ScippioAs Deputy Clerk05533650July 12, 19, 2012 REGISTRATION OFFICTI-TIOUS NAMESWethe undersigned, being duly sworn, do hereby declare under oath that the names of all persons interest-ed in the business or profession car-ried on under the name of BEL-MONTACADEMYCHARTER SCHOOLat 496 RING COURT, LAKE CITY, FL32025Contact Phone Number: (386)487-0500 ext 742 and the extent of the in-terest of each, is as follows:Name: BELMONTACADEMY, INC.Extent of Interest: 100%by:/s/ ABRAM HUBERSTATE OF FLORIDACOUNTYOF COLUMBIASworn to and subscribed before me this 10TH day of JuLY, A.D. 2012.by:/s/ CRISTIN GUTHRIE05533712July 12, 2012 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURTOF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUITINAND FOR COLUMBIACOUN-TY, FLORIDAJUVENILE DIVISIONIN THE INTERESTOF:CASE NO. 2010-68-DPJ. C. DOB:12/12/2006C.C.DOB:12/3/2007I. C.DOB:12/29/2009C.G.DOB:2/17/2011MINOR CHILDREN.SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF AD-VISORYHEARING FOR TERMI-NATION OF PARENTALRIGHTS AND GUARDIANSHIPSTATE OF FLORIDA:TO: Jesus Cantu(address unknown)WHEREAS a Petition for Termina-tion of Parental Rights under oath has been filed in this Court regarding the above-referenced child(ren), a copy of which is on file with the Clerk of the Court,YOU ARE HEREBYCOMMAND-ED TO APPEAR before the Honora-ble E. Vernon Douglas, Circuit Judge, at the Columbia County Courthouse, Lake City, Florida, on AUGUST 8, 2012, A T 10:20 A.M. for a Termination of Parental Rights Advisory Hearing.YOU MUSTAPPEAR ON THE DATE AND ATTHE TIME SPECI-FIED HEREIN.******FAILURE TO PERSONAL-LYAPPEAR ATTHIS ADVISORYHEARING CONSTITUTES CON-SENTTO THE TERMINATION OF PARENTALRIGHTS TO THIS CHILD (OR CHILDREN). IF YOU FAILTO APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MAYLOSE ALLLEGALRIGHTS TOTHE CHILD (OR CHILDREN) NAMED IN THE PETITION ON FILE WITH THE CLERK OF THE COURT******WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court at Lake City, Columbia Coun-ty, Florida, on the 15th day of June 2012.P. DEWITTCASONClerk of Circuit Court(SEAL)By: Trish BrewingtonDeputy ClerkTracy L. Sorcek, Esq.Florida Bar No. 46860Children’s Legal Services1389 West US Highway 90, Suite 110Lake City, FL32055(386) 758-1437Special Accommodations In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any ac-commodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Carrina Cooper, Court Administra-tion, 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Room 408, Lake City, Florida 32055, Telephone (386) 758-2163, at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance or imme-diately upon receiving this notifica-tion if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired or voice impaired, call 711. 05533288June 21, 28, 2012July 5, 12, 2012 Moore Family Management, LLC, dba Rountree-Moore Chevrolet Ca-dillac Nissan, located at 4316 West US Hwy 90, Lake City, Columbia County, FL32055, phone 386-752-6933 claims a lien pursuant to Sec-tion 713.585 Florida Statutes, on 2008 GMC SIERRA3500HD VIN: 1GTJK33668F176155, located at 4316 West US Highway 90, Lake City, Columbia County, FL32055, for labor and services performed, and storage charges accrued in the amount of $5,482.53.The lien claimed by the above named lienor is subject to enforcement pur-suant to Section 713.585, Florida Statutes, and unless said motor vehi-cle is redeemed from the said lienor by payment as allowed by law, the above described motor vehicle may be sold to satisfy the lien. If the mo-tor vehicle is not redeemed and re-mains unclaimed or charges for re-pair and storage remain unpaid, the vehicle may be sold after 60 days free of all prior liens whatsoever, un-less otherwise provided by Court Or-der. The above designated lienor proposes to sell the motor vehicle as follows.Public Auction to be held at Roun-tree-Moore Chevrolet Cadillac Nis-san, 4316 West US Highway 90, LegalLake City, FL32055 commencing at 10:00 AM on the 10th day of Au-gust, 2012.The owner may redeem the vehicle at the date of sale for the cash sum of $5,482.53.Notice that the owner of the motor vehicle or any person claiming inter-est in or lien thereon has a right to a hearing at any time prior to the scheduled date of sale by filing a de-mand for a hearing with the Clerk of the Circuit Court in the County in which the motor vehicle is held by the lienor and by mailing copies of the demand for hearing to all other owners and lienors as reflected in the Notice of Claim of Lien and Pro-posed Sale of Motor Vehicle mailed certified to the owner by the lienor.Notice that the owner of the motor vehicle has a right to recover posses-sion of the motor vehicle without in-stituting judicial proceedings by posting a bond in accordance with the provisions of Florida Statute 559.917.Notice that any proceeds from the sale of the Motor Vehicle remaining after payment of the amount claimed to be due and owing to the lienor will be deposited with the Clerk of the Circuit Court for Disposition upon Court Order pursuant to Subsection (6) of Florida Statute 713.585.05533707July 12, 2012 ROUNTREE-MOORE FORD,LLLPdba Rountree-Moore Ford Lincoln Kia located at 2588 West US Hwy 90, Lake City, Columbia Coun-ty, FL32055, phone 386-755-0630 claims a lien pursuant to Section 713.585 Florida Statutes, on 2003 FORD TAURUS VIN: 1FAFP55U23A127917, located at 2588 West US Highway 90, Lake City, Columbia County, FL32055, for labor and services performed, and storage charges accrued in the amount of $300.00.The lien claimed by the above named lienor is subject to enforcement pur-suant to Section 713.585, Florida Statutes, and unless said motor vehi-cle is redeemed from the said lienor by payment as allowed by law, the above described motor vehicle may be sold to satisfy the lien. If the mo-tor vehicle is not redeemed and re-mains unclaimed or charges for re-pair and storage remain unpaid, the vehicle may be sold after 60 days free of all prior liens whatsoever, un-less otherwise provided by Court Or-der. The above designated lienor proposes to sell the motor vehicle as follows.Public Auction to be held at Roun-tree-Moore Ford Lincoln Kia, 2588 West US Highway 90, Lake City, FL32055, commencing at 10:00 AM on the 10th day ofAugust, 2012.The owner may redeem the vehicle at the date of sale for the cash sum of $300.00.Notice that the owner of the motor vehicle or any person claiming inter-est in or lien thereon has a right to a hearing at any time prior to the scheduled date of sale by filing a de-mand for a hearing with the Clerk of the Circuit Court in the County in which the motor vehicle is held by the lienor and by mailing copies of the demand for hearing to all other owners and lienors as reflected in the Notice of Claim of Lien and Pro-posed Sale of Motor Vehicle mailed certified to the owner by the lienor. LegalNotice that the owner of the motor vehicle has a right to recover posses-sion of the motor vehicle without in-stituting judicial proceedings by posting a bond in accordance with the provisions of Florida Statute 559.917.Notice that any proceeds from the sale of the Motor Vehicle remaining after payment of the amount claimed to be due and owing to the lienor will be deposited with the Clerk of the Circuit Court for Disposition upon Court Order pursuant to Subsection (6) of Florida Statute 713.585.05533688July 12, 2012 Rountree-Moore Motors, LLLP, dba Rountree-Moore Toyota Scion/dba North Florida Auto Agency (NFAA) located at 1232 West US Hwy 90, Lake City, Columbia County, FL32055, phone 386-755-0631 claims a lien pursuant to Section 713.585 Florida Statutes, on 1994 Toyota Celica VIN: JT2ST07F6R0005218, located at 1232 West US Highway 90, Lake City, Columbia County, FL32055, for labor and services per-formed, and storage charges accrued in the amount of $524.49.The lien claimed by the above named lienor is subject to enforcement pur-suant to Section 713.585, Florida Statutes, and unless said motor vehi-cle is redeemed from the said lienor by payment as allowed by law, the above described motor vehicle may be sold to satisfy the lien. If the mo-tor vehicle is not redeemed and re-mains unclaimed or charges for re-pair and storage remain unpaid, the vehicle may be sold after 60 days free of all prior liens whatsoever, un-less otherwise provided by Court Or-der. The above designated lienor proposes to sell the motor vehicle as Legalfollows.Public Auction to be held at Roun-tree-Moore Toyota Scion, commenc-ing at 10:00 AM on the 10th day of August, 2012.The owner may redeem the vehicle at the date of sale for the cash sum of $524.49.Notice that the owner of the motor vehicle or any person claiming inter-est in or lien thereon has a right to a hearing at any time prior to the scheduled date of sale by filing a de-mand for a hearing with the Clerk of the Circuit Court in the County in which the motor vehicle is held by the lienor and by mailing copies of the demand for hearing to all other owners and lienors as reflected in the Notice of Claim of Lien and Pro-posed Sale of Motor Vehicle mailed certified to the owner by the lienor.Notice that the owner of the motor vehicle has a right to recover posses-sion of the motor vehicle without in-stituting judicial proceedings by posting a bond in accordance with the provisions of Florida Statute 559.917.Notice that any proceeds from the sale of the Motor Vehicle remaining after payment of the amount claimed to be due and owing to the lienor will be deposited with the Clerk of the Circuit Court for Disposition upon Court Order pursuant to Subsection (6) of Florida Statute 713.585.05533708July 12, 2012 755-5440Toplace your classified ad call LAKE CITY REPORTER This Reporter Works For You! 755-5440Classifieds 755-5445 Circulation

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDTHURSDAY, JULY12, 2012 5B Classified Department: 755-5440 2001 1800 Goldwingw/2011 conversion motor trike. Piggy Packer Trailer + 2 helmets & more.$20,000 386-965-8655 1985 380SL Mercedes ClassicCreme colored ext., beige leather interior. Only 76,338 miles. 2 owners.$16,000 386-758-8458 020Lost & Found FOUND DOG Chow found in the vicinity Lake Jeffery Road Contact 755-3436 FOUND PUPPIES Off County Road 252 Call to identify 386-755-1785 SETOF KEYS found on US 90 East. near Sav-A-Lot, has ProxCard II & key to Chevy Vehicle. Call to identify 386-754-0436. 100Job Opportunities05530981Maintenance Manager needed for a chain of convenience stores. Comm’l Refrigeration Exp, & Universal EPACard req’d. Responsibilities include but not limited to Refigeration, Heat/Air, Plumbing, & Ele. Salary Neg. approx. $16-$18 hr depending on knowlege & exp. Applications avail at the Jiffy Store Office. 1102 Howard Street, East, Live Oak, FLor jif fyfoodstores.com. Please return application to the address listed above. 05532093The Lake City Reporter, a daily newspaper seeks Independent Contractor Newspaper Carrier Apply in person during normal business hours or email Mandy Brown Circulation Director at: mbr own@lakecityr epor ter .com NO PHONE CALLS 05533594Johnson & Johnson Inc. Is looking for a dedicated, polite, hard-working individual to fill a Fuel Tanker driver position. Lead Driver position, Days (Tuesday thru Saturday). Truck is based in Lake City. Health Insurance, 401K, Paid Vacation,Uniforms. Must have two years driving experience, clean MVR. Call 850-973-2277 ask for Heather. Applications available by email at info@jj-fuel.com 05533630 FT& PTPC Tech needed for busy local shop. Exp required. Send email to: bdj@startech.cc 05533634EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COLUMBIACOUNTY Columbia County is accepting applications for Maintenance Technician I Public Works Mowing Crew. Will perform manual work in maintenance of various County properties including ball fields, roadside parks, boat ramps, playgrounds and road right-of ways. Minimum requirements: High School diploma/G.E.D., 18 years of age. One (1) year experience in grounds keeping or similar maintenance work or any equivalent combination of training & experience. Valid FLdriver’s license required. Salary: $10.02 per hour plus benefits. Successful applicants must pass pre-employment physical, drug screening & criminal history check. Applications available on website: www.columbiacountyfla.com or the Human Resources Office, Board of County Commissioners, 135 Hernando, Suite 203, Lake City, FL32055. (386)7192025, TDD (386)758-2139. Deadline: 07/27/12. AA/EO/ADA/VPEmployer CNA’S NEEDED EEOE/DFWP Please contact Carol Shanklin at 386-752-5655. License CDLDriver w/2 yrs Logging Exp. Must have Clean CDL. Also, FT, semi/heavy equip. mechanic wanted Deep South Forestry 386-365-6966 LICENSED DENTAL Hygienist needed For Live Oak office Contact 386-362-1646. Moving Assistance Needed 10X10 storage unit + 1 rm. 7/17/12. $50 For the day, $20 Bonus if on time. Lunch provided. 904-674-3019 P/TSwitchboard Operator. Lake City. Apply in person 512 SWSisters Welcome Road Sales Position Available for motivated individual. Rountree -Moore Toyota Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 Seeking cashier for Internet Cafe. F/Tflexible hours. Background check and References Needed. Must have your own transportation Send reply to Box 05091, C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056 100Job OpportunitiesThe Health Centerof Lake City Has an opening for an Assistant Bookkeeper. The qualified candidate must be a highly motivated person for a fast paced office. Candidate must be experienced with personnel, payroll, accounts payable and have computer skills. Qualified applicants may complete an application at 560 SWMcFarlane Avenue, Lake City, FL. EOE, ADA, Drug Free Workplace 310Pets & Supplies AKC Boston Terrier puppies 10 wks old w/ health cert. & shots. $350 Black-Brindle n White. Very cute & loveable. 590-4814 PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. 407Computers DELLComputer $100.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 420Wanted to Buy Paying Top Dollar On The Spot, Depending On Condition On Any Vehicle. Contact 386-205-1096 430Garage Sales PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. SAT7/14 7:30 am Sharp ? Multi family Too much to mention, must see. 1326 SWCastle Heights Terr. 440Miscellaneous 6 PC all oak bedroom set with queen mattress. $485. one (1) all oak chest of drawers w/ doors $45. 6x16 12000 GVWutility trailer w/ ramps, dual axle. $2,000 obo. 1 (one) electric handicap scooter “Pride” 4 wheels in good condition $400. Contact 386-362-3740 450Good Things to EatGREEN PEANUTS For Sale Graded and washed. $30.00 a bushel. 386-752-3434 620Mobile Home Lots forSaleTALLTREES &beautiful pasture. Well kept DWw/ split floor plan, walkin closets, workshop. MLS 80899 Robin Williams Hallmark Real Estate (386)365-5146 630Mobile Homes forRent2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo. plus deposit. Water & sewer furnished. Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422 640Mobile Homes forSale2007 SWMobile Home 14x72 3br/2ba. Must be moved! Contact 904-662-1699 BIG FAMILYSPECIAL! New 2013 4/2 Jacobsen $47,995. Only 8 More at this Low Price! Can’t go a dime cheaper! Del-setac-shirting and steps. North Pointe, Gainesville 352-872-5566. Hours Sat till 7 PM Sunday 10-3 DEALFELLTHROUGH! $55,900 Buys New 2012 Town Home 32x80 4/2 Entertainer home. YES $55,900 Delivered and Set on your property. Below Factory Cost. North Pointe, Gainesville. 352-872-5566. Handyman Special 2br/2ba Moble Home starting at $350 to own. Family Community. 305-984-5511 or 386-344-0830 HOME ON HIGH LAND Picturesque roll down to tree shaded creek. 3/2 DWon 1.25 acres with detached carport $78,000 Call Paula Lawrence 386-623-1973 THIS MONTHT’SSPECIAL! New 2013 Jacobsen 28x52 3/2 only $44,995 del-set-ac-skirting and steps. Not a dime lower. Best Price Pricing! Only 10 at this LOWPrice! North Pointe Homes, Gainesville, Fl., Hwy 441. Call Today 352-872-5566. Now Open Sunday 10-3! 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent1BD/1BA$500 month $200 Security Deposit, Utilities included, in town, Call Chris 386-365-2515 2 Bedroom / 1 Bath Apts for rent in Live Oak. Call for price. Contact 386-623-3404 & 386-362-9806 2/1 w/garage & washer/dryer hookups. East side of town, Call for details 386-755-6867 2BR/1BAAPT. w/garage. West side of town. $650. mo. 386-961-9000 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $600. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351 or 352-208-2421 Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1, 1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A, $650 month 386-965-2407 or 386-758-5881 Great area Wof I-75, spacious deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups, patio, $600-750 + Sec. 386-965-3775 or 965-5560 Large & clean 1br/1ba apt. CH/Alg walk in closet. Close to town. $395. mo and $350. dep. (904)563-6208 720Furnished Apts. ForRentRooms forRent Hillcrest, Sands, Columbia. All furnished. Electric, cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly or monthly rates. 1 person $135, 2 persons $150. weekly 386-752-5808 730Unfurnished Home ForRent3 BR/2 BA, 2,400 sq. ft., 290 SW Leisure Dr., Quail Heights, $1,200 mo. plus $1,000 sec. Call 386-752-6062 3BR/1BA House with fenced in back yard, central heat and air, window treatments, $700 mth + $700 dep. Contact 386-344-2170 LAKE CITY, FL 2/1 CH/A, large yard & in town. $550. mo + dep. 386-961-3031 or 386-752-3444 Renovated3bd/1ba 4 miles from Timco. Lg yard, central heat & air, new carpet. Off Gum Swamp Rd Contact 623-9764 750Business & Office Rentals05532259OFFICE SPACE for Lease 576 sq' $450/mth 700 sq' at $8.00 sq' 1785 sq' at $7.00 sq'8300 sq' at $7.00 sq' also Bank Building Excellent Locations Tom Eagle, GRI (386) 961-1086 DCARealtor ForRent orLease: Former Doctors office, Former professional office & Lg open space: avail on East Baya Ave. Competitive rates. Weekdays 386-984-0622 evenings/weekends 497-4762 790Vacation Rentals Scalloping Horseshoe Beach Spcl Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock, fish sink. wkend $395./wk $895. 386-235-3633/352-498-5986 alwaysonvacation.com #419-181 “Florida’s Last Frontier” 805Lots forSale 1/4 acre, new well, septic and power, paved rd, owner fin, no down pym’t, $24,900, ($256 month) 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 810Home forSale COWBOYESTATEon 25 acres, large workshop, horse stalls, in ground pool, cross fenced. MLS 80178 call Janet Creel -Hallmark Real Estate (386)623-1973. HIGH SPRINGSCOUNTRY Natural setting close to Santa Fe River. Compact. MLS 80894. Call Teresa Spradley Hallmark Real Estate (386)365-8343 HUNTER'S PARADISE Deer & turkey roam this tract. 3/2 brick home, fenced pasture. MLS 80851. Call Ginger Parker Hallmark Real Estate 386-365-2135 RENTALINVESTMENTNear schools, doctors, town activity. Tiled kitchen, nice deck on back. $55,900 Call Ginger Parker 386-365-2135 MLS 80750 820Farms & Acreage200 ACRES 5 miles NE of Live Oak. Half Wooded & Pasture with fish lake. Creek flows through property, Plenty of deer & turkey. Will Finance 386-364-6633 820Farms & Acreage4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com Owner Financed land with only $300 down payment. Half to ten ac lots. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www .landnfl.com SUWANNEE RIVER Water Front 1.25 acres. BUILDABLE. Huge trees, great fishing. Has water, sewer and electric. RVready. For Directions and price please Call 912-843-2603. 850Waterfront PropertyRIVER HOME Excellent Location $199,000 Call Susan Eagle (386) 623-6612 DCARealtor 860Investment Property2 ACRES of land with 8,000 sf. building. $80,000. Located in Olustee. Owner Financing possible. 904-318-7714. 930Motorcycles 2001 1800 GOLDWING w/ 2011conversion motor trike. Piggy Packer Trailer + 2 Helmets & more. $20,000. Call 386-965-8655 951Recreational Vehicles1997 Airstream Safari 25 ft excellent condition, everything works, many new replacement. With hitch and leveling bars. $8,900 386-243-8019 1997 INTEGRITY By Air Stream Fifty Wheel 7,000 OBO 3 slides 36 Ft, 2 a/c units, very clean, 2 tv’s. Contact 365-3956REPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Linewww.lakecityreporter.com SOLD IT FAST IN THE CLASSIFIEDSSelling your stuff is simple with a little help from the Lake City Reporter Classifieds. Let our sales team help you place an ad today, in print and online! Call 386-755-5440 or go to www.lakecityreporter.com We’re on target! days a weekSubscribe Today 386-755-5445

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6B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2012 6BSports Artist photos, left to right: Ragamala Dance, West Side Story Alison Balsom. Background: Benise. The Capitol Steps Monday, November 5, 7:30 p.m. Sponsored by The Gainesville Sun Benise – En Fuego! Wednesday, November 7, 7:30 p.m. West Side Story Tuesday, November 27, 7:30 p.m.Wednesday, November 28, 7:30 p.m. Sponsored by Dharma Endowment Foundation Gainesville Magazine and Oak Hammock at the University of Florida MOMIX – Botanica Thursday, January 24, 7:30 p.m. Sponsored by Dharma Endowment Foundation Vienna Boys Choir Wednesday, February 13, 7:30 p.m. Sponsored by Holloway Financial Services Hooray for Hollywood Friday, February 15, 7:30 p.m. Sponsored by North Florida Retirement Village Alvin Ailey American Dance TheaterRobert Battle, Artistic DirectorMasazumi Chaya, Associate Artistic Director Tuesday, February 19, 7:30 p.m. Sponsored by UF&Shands HAIR Monday, April 8, 7:30 p.m. Sponsored by HOME Magazine Monterey Jazz Festival on Tour: 55th Anniversary Friday, April 12, 7:30 p.m. Sponsored by Best Western Gateway Grand and UF&Shands Tickets go on sale tomorrow at noon and are available at the Phillips Center Box Of ce, by calling (800) 905-2787 and at ticketmaster.com.For a full list of events visit www.performingarts.u .edu Find us on Facebook! All listed performances will be at the Phillips Cen ter. A University of Florida Performing Arts 20th Annive rsary performance. University of Florida Performing Arts