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UFPKY NEH LSTA



The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01809
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 2012
Publication Date: 04-22-2012
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01809
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Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

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Surprise tribute offered to 37-year employee.By LAURA HAMPSONlhampson@lakecityreporter.comMen laughed as they recalled boyhood memories of fun and mischief Saturday night for the Boys Club of Columbia County’s 40th anniversary celebration. The celebration at the Columbia County Fairgrounds banquet hall was also a surprise tribute to Kathleen Cummings, the club’s familiar face and 37-year employee. Affectionately called Mrs. Kay and technically the administrative assistant and bookkeeper, Cummings is a driving force for the club, said Bill Caley, Boys Club executive director. “Before I do anything I ask Mrs. Kay,” he said. When the club was without an executive director, Cummings kept the club running, he said. Caley and Cummings are the club’s only full-time employees. Fletcher Kirby, 1975 Boy of the Year, said memories about the club came flood-ing back to him Saturday after seeing old friends, pic-tures and newspaper clip-pings. “It’s truly been a special place to a lot of people in this county,” he said to the crowd of about 150 people. The club had humble beginnings in an old house near the current Girls Club, he said. The boys played pool, collected stamps and coins, took music lessons, played sports and went on trips, he said. “It was just a great time.” Kirby said he remembers Vol. 138 No. 63CALL US:(386) 752-1293SUBSCRIBE TOTHE REPORTER:Voice: 755-5445Fax: 752-9400 Opinion ................ 4A Obituaries .............. 5A Weather ................ 8A Advice ................. 5D Puzzles ................. 2BTODAY IN PEOPLEFox marks 25 years.COMING TUESDAYLocal news roundup. 79 50 T-Storms Likely WEATHER, 8A Early Learning Director looks for ‘smiling, happy children’ What will you do for the environment on Earth Day? Lake City ReporterSUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874 | $1.00 LAKECITYREPORTER.COM 6A D1 Home sales highest since 2006Median sale priceup slightly as wellover March 2011.By LAURA HAMPSONlhampson@lakecityreporter.comSixty homes sold in the Lake City-Live Oak mar ket last month, the highest monthly sales total since 2006. The number of closed sales increased 13.2 percent from March 2011, when 53 single family, site-built homes were sold, accord-ing to the Lake City Board of Realtors. Thirty homes were sold in February. Pending sales increased 89.7 percent from March 2011, as offers were accept-ed on 74 homes. Nine homes in March sold for more than $200,000, while four homes sold for less than $20,000, said Dan Gherna, Lake City Board of Realtors vice president. The median sale price last month was $98,650, up 1.7 percent from the year-ago figure. Housing analysts note that sales of foreclo-sures and other distressed properties can downwardly distort the median price. The average sale price was $114,045, down 4.4 per-cent from last year. Gherna said March and April are generally busy times in real estate, as people often begin home searches in January and close in spring. Summer is also a popular time to buy a home because parents want to settle into a home before the school year begins, he said. Local real estate broker Charlie Sparks said positive housing trends can seen across the state and nation, not just in the Lake City HOMES continued on 3A MEET YOUR NEIGHBOR: INGO JOHR JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City ReporterLake City resident Ingo Johr, 82, gestures as he recollec ts his time as a youth in Germany during World War II, an d even recalls riding through Hamburg in Adolf Hitler’s car.He met Hitler as a boy, chose America insteadFamily risked death housing a Jewish man.By HANNAH O. BROWNhbrown@lakecityreporter.comEditor’s note: Meet Your Neighbor is an occasional series on local residents whose stories we think you’d like to hear. At age 6, Ingo Johr rode through the town of Hamburg, Germany in Adolf Hitler’s car. Johr remembers hearing Hitler’s voice. He recalls it sounded soft and nice. Johr, who has lived in Lake City since 1984, was born in Hamburg in 1930. His father was a state attorney and like many Germans during that time, was enchanted by the prom-ises of work that Hitler espoused. “The German people didn’t know that Hitler was a dictator,” Johr said. “He was our Fuehrer, you know. We believed him.” Johr grew up during the burgeoning of World War II in the seat of the conflict. He dodged bullets while he walked to school, hiding from fighter planes in the ditches. “It was fun. We thought it was a joke,” Johr said. “A big thing was after an attack we climbed around the rooftops and collected shrapnel and all the bombs had different colors.” His father was a paying member of the Nazi party, but did not attend meet ings. “He was just paying his dues,” Johr said. One day during the war, his father brought home a Jewish man to their fam-ily apartment. The man hid out in the apartment for six months in a room with no windows. “One day he told my mother he was leaving,” Johr said. “He said it was too dangerous.” After the war the man showed up again. He had survived the concentration JOHR continued on 3A WatergatefigureColson diesOnce considered ruthless, he became known for prison ministry.By JESSICA GRESKOAssociated PressWASHINGTON — Charles Colson, the tough-as-nails special counsel to President Richard Nixon who went to prison for his role in a Watergate-related case and became a Christian evangelical helping inmates, has died. He was 80. Colson’s death was confirmed by Jim Liske, the chief executive of the Lansdowne, Va.-based Prison Fellowship Ministries that Colson founded. Liske said the preliminary cause of death is complications from brain surgery Colson had at the end of March. Colson, with his trademark hornrimmed glasses, was known as the “evil genius” of the Nixon administration who once said he’d walk over his grandmother to get the president elected to a second term. “I shudder to think of what I’d been if I had not gone to prison,” Colson said in 1993. “Lying on the rotten floor of a cell, you know it’s not prosperity or pleasure that’s important, but the maturing of the soul.” The Washington Post described him in 1972 as “one of the most powerful presidential aides, variously described as a troubleshooter and as a ‘master of dirty tricks.’” COLSON continued on 7A Boys Club celebrates 40 years CLUB continued on 3A Colson LAURA HAMPSON/Lake City ReporterJohn Bailey, past executive director of the Boys Club; Kathleen Cummings, long-time club employee; and Bill Ca ley, executive director, pose together Saturday at a celebration for the Boys Club’s 40th anniversary.14-year-old dies of injuries in ATV crashFrom staff reportsWELLBORN – A Wellborn teen died Saturday of injuries sus tained in a Thursday evening ATV accident in Wellborn, according to family and friends. Raivyn Brooke Summerfield, 14, died Saturday at Shands at the University of Florida, her father Michael Summer-field, said in a mes sage post ed today on Summerfield CRASH continued on 3A

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CORRECTION The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the space. And thanks for reading. AROUND FLORIDA Daily Scripture Celebrity Birthdays Actress Charlotte Rae is 86. Actress Estelle Harris is 80. Singer Glen Campbell is 76. Actor Jack Nicholson is 75. Movie director John Waters is 66. Singer Peter Frampton is 62. Baseball manager Terry Francona is 53. Comedian Byron Allen is 51. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS LOS ANGELESTelevision networks are masters of self-promotion, so its no surprise that Fox is carving out two prime-time hours Sunday to celebrate its 25th year. But why quibble over the hoopla planned for the 8-10 p.m. EDT showcase? With Ryan Seacrest as ringmaster, lets give a shout-out to the stars of Married ... With Children, The X Files, In Living Color, Ally McBeal, Beverly Hills, 90210, House and . And, in center stage, the enduring The Simpsons and TVs great gamechanger, American Idol, are taking a bow. Its an impressive showing for a network thats less than half the age of competitors NBC, CBS and ABC. As analyst Brad Adgate of Horizon Media sees it, Fox hasnt just met expectations, its exceeded them. Of the major networks, its the only one that can bring in younger audiences on a regular basis, Adgate said. They have brought out some breakthrough shows ... Theyve really done things that the other three networks wouldnt have done with their programming. From a modest October 1986 debut with The Late Show Starring Joan Rivers and its first night of primetime programming in April 1987, Fox weathered industry skepticism and midlife crisis (Who Wants to Marry a Multi-Millionaire? and other groaners) to make its case for survival and success. Fox proved that, yes, there was room for a fourth U.S. broadcast network, three decades after Dumont dissolved in 1955 and left the Big Three networks to slice up an increasingly rich pie. Yes, a broadcast network could shrink its prime-time lineup to the hours between 8-10 p.m. ET, allowing lucrative local newscasts control of the 10 oclock hour, and prosper. Yes, airing outrageously cheeky fare ranging from clever (Tracey Ullman) to exploitive (Temptation Island) would lure the 18-to-49year-old audience that make advertisers swoon. Fox became profitable after just three years of operation, according to Outfoxed, the 1990 book by Alex Ben Block detailing the networks birth. That success turned competitors into copycats, extending Foxs influence across the medium. The networks creation was a real trial by fire for all of us, said Garth Ancier, Foxs inaugural programming chief. My mentor at NBC, Brandon Tartikoff, thought I was crazy, and he was probably right. The challenge: How do we carve the audience in a different way from NBC, ABC and CBS? How do you grab people by their shirt collars and drag them over to an alternative? Ancier said. A key answer was development of a stable of reality shows including Americas Most Wanted and Cops, the latter using portable video cameras to reimagine the scripted police drama. Rupert Murdoch, the News Corp. media mogul behind Fox, also urged his executives to look outside the U.S. market for ideas, Ancier recalled. Hes always been an internationally focused guy and knows whats working in other countries, he said. That global focus helped bring American Idol to Fox from the U.K. in June 2002, but not before Fox found itself on shaky ground, said Gail Berman, its programming head from 2000-05. When I came in, the network was not in particularly good shape, she recalled, with then-News Corp. President Peter Chernin cautioning her that she had to boost company morale along with ratings (although Fox had reached No. 1 with teenagers and adults 18 to 34). Having been the fourth network, there was a sense that being at the bottom of the barrel was an OK place to be, Berman said. We built a great team of people that could really change the culture of When Animals Attack to the culture of American Idol. In her tenure at Fox, the network also found a new measure of scripted success, with and The O.C. among the hits, and new peer respect. In 2005, Fox earned 49 Emmy Award nominations, the most in its history, including 11 nods each for 24 and the critically acclaimed Arrested Development, which the year before won the Emmy for best comedy series. But it was the next wave of reality American Idol and the talent contest genre that put the ratings into orbit. Mike Darnell is a key part of Foxs culture, past and present. Among Foxs longest-serving executives and currently president of alternative entertainment, with Idol part of his portfolio, his network bio proudly lists previous hits including Worlds Wildest Police Chases and Worlds Most Amazing Medical Oddities. He hasnt, and wont, apologize for that brand of shows. With apparent glee, he recalls how they were routinely branded by critics as the end of Western civilization, sleazy and lowbrow. (AP)I give them eternal life, and they shall never perish; no one will snatch them out of my hand. My Father, who has given them to me, is greater than all; no one can snatch them out of my Fathers hand. I and the Father are one. John 10:28-30 NIV Scott signs off on new state university in LakelandTALLAHASSEEGov. Rick Scott, ignoring calls for a veto from influential business leaders, signed a measure into law on Friday that will create the states 12th public university. Scott also signed nearly 30 other bills, many of them carrying out provisions in the nearly $70 billion budget that he approved earlier this week. He also vetoed four others dealing with early learning, technology purchases, insurance and the state employee health insurance program. Scotts decision will allow a branch campus of the University of South Florida in Lakeland to become a stand-alone university. It follows months of wrangling over the future of the school that will now be called Florida Polytechnic University. Last year, backers of the school called for independence, but instead the state board that oversees universities insisted that the school meet accreditation and other requirements over the next several years before being allowed to part from USF. State Sen. J.D. Alexander, however, used his clout in the GOP-controlled Legislature to pass a bill (SB 1994) that called for a divorce from USF as soon as possible. The Lake Wales Republican and powerful Senate budget chairman called it a great day for Florida. He said it will help the state since the schools focus will be on producing graduates in fields such as science, technology, engineering and math. Im confident that the governors decisions will help us put Florida to work in a way that improves our economy, Alexander said. Critics questioned the idea of establishing a startup university during a year when the overall state university system had its state funding cut by $300 million. The school also will not initially have any students since current USF students will be allowed to remain enrolled at the branch campus. This move is nothing more than an appalling and wasteful power play by the Republicans in Tallahassee, said Florida Democratic Party spokeswoman Brannon Jordan. The people of Florida didnt ask for this university, they dont need it and cant afford it. The Florida Council of 100 a group of business leaders that includes officials from such companies as Publix Super Markets and AT&T wrote to Scott and urged a veto, pointing out it could be years before the school could even gain accreditation, which is needed so students can obtain federal aid or researchers can apply for federal grants. Scott, however, defended his decision to create the new school. To remake the states economy, he said in a bill signing letter, its crucial to create more jobs in fields that will allow Florida to compete with states such as California and Texas. Both of those states have outpaced Florida in the number of jobs grown in the last year. The establishment of Florida Polytechnic University will help us move the needle in the right direction, Scott said. It is vital for the future of Floridas economy. Dean Colson, the current chairman of the panel that oversees all state universities, said that the Board of Governors would respect the alternative path chosen by elected leaders for Florida Polytechnic. The board takes its constitutional duties for oversight seriously and will work hard to ensure that the Polytech is a success, Colson said. The bills that Scott vetoed on Friday included a bill (HB 5103) dealing with early learning and school readiness programs. Lawmakers had pushed the changes in the wake of scathing state audit that found widespread problems with the more than $1 billion program responsible for helping the states preschool children. The governor, however, said he was concerned some of the restrictions mandated by lawmakers would put federal funding for the program in jeopardy.Friends of 2 teens killed, burned seek answersWINTER PARK The family and friends of two central Florida teenagers whose bodies were found engulfed in flames are trying to help find out who is responsible for their deaths. The Orlando Sentinel reports more than two dozen people passed out flyers Saturday with details about a reward for information leading to an arrest. The bodies of 16-year-old Nicholas Presha and 18-yearold Jeremy Stewart were found about a week ago by bicyclists on an Orange County trail. Both teens were students at Winter Park High School and said to be best friends. Few details have been released on their deaths. Crimeline has offered a reward of $5,000 for information leading to an arrest; a fund set up at United Legacy Bank by the families will be used to bolster that amount.Tortoise, believed to be more than 100, diesSILVER SPRINGS A 660-pound tortoise in central Florida believed to be more than 100 years old has died. The Ocala Star-Banner reports Frank the Tank died in his pen at Silver Spring Natures Theme Park on Thursday. The Aldabra tortoise was the oldest animal at the theme park, where he lived for nearly 40 years. Aldabra tortoises are a native species in a group of islands belonging to Seychelles, a country off Africas east coast. Frank the Tank is believed to have died from old age.Man charged after boy tests positive for cocaineJACKSONVILLE Jacksonville police have charged a man with child neglect after a 4-year-old boy tested positive for cocaine. Published reports say police responded to a complaint of prostitution and narcotics activity at a Candlewood Suites hotel room Wednesday. When they arrived and knocked on the door, a 4-year-old boy answered and said, Hi, policeman. The door was then abruptly shut. Officers were eventually able to get inside the room, where they found a substance that tested positive for crack cocaine on a table and on the floor. The boy was taken to a hospital where he tested positive for cocaine. Quentine Crawford has been charged with possession of cocaine. Matthew Reagan is charged with renting a space for prostitution and willfully neglecting a child, among other charges.Liquor store converted into churchLAKE WALES A Pentecostal church in Polk County has renovated a former liquor store and turned it into a house of worship. The Lakeland Ledger reports that the Pentecostals of Lake Wales church opened on March 31 in a former ABC Liquor store. The pastor and congregation members stripped the store back to bare concrete and its steel roof, then reinstalled electrical and plumbing lines with new walls, lighting and floors. The church pastor says quite a few members of his congregation tell him their former life used to be connected to the liquor store.Small fire on Allure of the Seas extinguishedFORT LAUDERDALE A small fire aboard the Allure of the Seas cruise ship has been extinguished with no reported injuries. Royal Caribbean International spokeswoman Cynthia Martinez says the engine fire occurred Friday at about 7:45 p.m. The gargantuan cruise ship was sailing from St. Maarten to Port Everglades when the fire broke out. (AP) Saturday: Not available Saturday: Not available Saturday: Afternoon: 0-6-4 Evening: 1-1-2 Friday: 10-12-16-33-36 Friday: 8-11-39-43 132A LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012 Saturday: Afternoon: 7-3-3-4 Evening: 9-4-6-5 Fox marks 25th year today HOW TO REACH USMain number ........ (386) 752-1293 Fax number .............. 752-9400 Circulation ............... 755-5445 Online ... www lakecityreporter com The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is published Tuesday through Friday and Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated Press. All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the permission of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No. 310-880. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, Fla. 32056. Publisher Todd Wilson ..... 754-0418 (twilson@lakecityreporter.com)NEWSEditor Robert Bridges ..... 754-0428 (rbridges@lakecityre porter.com)A DVERTI S ING ......... 752-1293 (ads@lakecityre porter.com)C L ASSIFIE DTo place a classified ad, call 755-5440B USINESSController Sue Brannon .... 754-0419 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)C I RCUL AT I O NHome delivery of the Lake City Reporter should be completed by 6:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday, and by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any problems with your delivery service. In Columbia County, customers should call before 10:30 a.m. to report a service error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or service related credits will be issued. In all other counties where home delivery is available, next day re-delivery or service related credits will be issued. Circulation ............... 755-5445 (circulation@lakecityreporter.com)Home delivery rates(Tuesday -Friday and Sunday) 12 Weeks .................. $26.32 24 Weeks ................... $48.79 52 Weeks ................... $83.46Rates include 7% sales tax.Mail rates12 Weeks .................. $41.40 24 Weeks ................... $82.80 52 Weeks .................. $179.40 Lake City Reporter ASSOCIATED PRESSIn this Sept. 4, 2002 file photo, Kelly Clarksonsings A Moment Like This, after winning in the final episode of Foxs television competition American Idol.

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going to “far away places like Valdosta for basketball games” and being excited to play in a gym, as the club didn’t have one at the time. The Boys Club was a place to go after school, where you felt safe and belonged, he said. “It was just a great place growing up and it still is.” “I don’t have any memories of the Boys Club that don’t have Mrs. Kay in them,” he said. Cummings helped with bruised knees, hurt feelings and listened when children needed her, he said. “Mrs. Kay raised seven chil dren of her own but helped raised thousands more,” he said. As the matriarch of the Boys Club, a tribute to Cummings was long over due, Kirby said. “Thank you for making a difference in so many people’s lives,” he said to Cummings. Thyron Taylor, past vol unteer of the year, said the club is a family environment where children from differ ent backgrounds and schools come together. His son Tavion Taylor, 9, now goes to the club, he said. Taylor said he volunteered for a summer program in 1993 as a young teenager and has coached there ever since. “It’s not a job, it’s a home,” he said. Taylor said Cummings makes the club feel like a family. “She’s the heartbeat of the Boys Club.” John Bailey, Boys Club executive director from 1983 to 2004, said the club is a safe, fun place for boys. Past members, parents, directors and board mem bers have kept the club run ning for 40 years because of their love for the club, he said. They want to keep it running for future generations of chil dren, he said. Floyd Messer, Pop Norton and Pat Summerall helped the Boys Club get into their cur rent building in 1987, Bailey said. Bailey said the club sold everything but pencils to raise money for the building, which was built with the help of pris oners on work release. Caley said not having a mortgage payment is what keeps the club afloat. Cummings said she was a little bit hurt she wasn’t allowed to help organize the celebration and had no idea it was also a tribute to her. “This is the first thing we’ve ever had that I didn’t help with.” Cummings said she has no plans to retire from her work at the club. Interacting with the chil dren and their parents is what she said keeps her coming back. Cummings said men who were once members tell her they remember how she put them in the corner when they misbehaved and how she’d yell “Snack bar!” in her Boston accent for snack time. “We have been blessed in the community to have the Boys Club,” said Wanda Jones, Boys Club board of directors president. “But more than that we have been blessed to have Mrs. Kay.” LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012 3AJOHR: Worked with concentration camp survivors Continued From Page 1A QQQQQQQ ?K>>ik^`gZg\rm^lmlbgma^h_\^Zg] Outstanding Leader of Inpatient TherapyOur therapy program is designed to rehabilitate individuals back to their highest level of independence and functioning. Our therapists and nurses work closely with the physician and resident in order to create a plan of treatment that will combine comprehensive care with the patient’s personal goals.Take a step towards your independence.5) %0% /'%2! $1-%'/+.%*)'*%).!+'!(!).)!!%+!.75.,*&!5, %%-!-!5,./,!-%+$*/' !,!'0%!.75,.$,%.%-5!&n&%) 5n')!%-./,)!-5%"4/'.%!-'&%)#5!)!,'%2! !&)!--5(+%,! %'%.%!-.*!,"*,(.%0%.%!-n.$%)#(/'.%)#,!--%)#r.%)#) ,)-"!,,%)#5*/) ,! OUR SPECIALTIES INCLUDE: 560 SW McFarlane Ave. Lake City, FL 32025386-758-4777 Call to pre-register or for a tour. SPECIALIZING IN:Q Non-Invasive Laparoscopic Gynecological SurgeryQ Adolescent Gynecology Q High and Low Risk Obstetrics Q Contraception Q Delivering at Shands Lake Shore Q In-Ofce ultrasounds for our patients Q 3D/4D Entertainment Scans ?K>>ik^`gZg\rm^lmlbgma^h_\^Zg] offering DaVinci Robotic Surgeries. New Patients Welcome Call today for a personal appointment:386-755-0500 449 SE Baya Drive Lake City, Floraida 32025 www.dainagreenemd.com“WE ARE WOMEN, WE ARE M OTHER’S, WE UNDERST A ND” 5) %0% /'%2! $1-%'/+.%*)'*%).!+'!(!).)!!%+!.75.,*&!5, %%-!-!5,./,!-%+$*/' !,!'0%!.75,.$,%.%-5!&n&%) 5n')!%-./,)!-5%"4/'.%!-'&%)#5!)!,'%2! !&)!--5(+%,! %'%.%!-.*!,"*,(.%0%.%!-n.$%)#(/'.%)#,!--%)#r.%)#) ,)-"!,,%)#5*/) ,! JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City ReporterJohr displays a photograph of himself and his mother, Lu ise, in America in 1956. camps though his family had not. The man was an actor and got Johr a job in show business, working as a stand-up comedian. Shortly after his brief stint in show business, Johr began working with young survivors from concentra tion camps. “When those young kids came out of concentration camps, they were animals,” Johr said. He described them crouching over bowls, eating with their hands. “I volunteered. We trained those kids to relax, to be human, to eat, to have con versations,” Johr said. “They didn’t talk to each other. They were scared of each other. You wouldn’t believe, in six weeks time, they knew how to dress, how to talk.” Soon after, Johr came to America. He was 21 at the time and spoke little English. Johr remembers roman ticizing American culture when he was a young man in Germany. Once a group of Americans came to Hamburg driving large Buicks and pulling Airstream trailers. They boldly parked in the middle of the city. However, when he arrived he quickly realized the American Dream was not what it seemed. “American people are hard working people,” Johr said. “Nothing is given to you.” He spent some time work ing as a baker, making 4 pies at a time for 60 cents a piece. In 1953, Johr was drafted into the American military during the Korean War. Johr was stationed in Germany as a mess sergeant. He stayed in the Army for 30 months. His father, sister and other relatives still lived in Hamburg at the time. The response he received as a new American in his hometown was “terrible,” Johr said. “They can smell you’re American, the soap, you know. It’s just they know you’re American,” he said. Johr said there were many differences between American and German cul ture. “Culture-wise it was a nothing,” Johr said. “In Germany, when you are in school you learn to go to the opera. The whole class goes to the opera. On Sunday, regardless of you go to church or not, you dress up your Sunday best. When women go shopping they dress up, they don’t go with their hair all a mess. Americans, they are noisy, loud, they scream, ‘Hello Mabel! Hey!’ They don’t do that in Germany. It’s a total-ly different life,” he said. He has since visited Hamburg, but was shocked by the surge in population of the city in recent years. “I wouldn’t fit in there again,” he said. Johr entered the retail business in 1960 and stayed in until he retired in 1994. He worked as a store manager in several loca tions, living in Miami at one point. “I wasn’t the best merchant, but I was very good with people,” Johr said. He said his accent helped him succeed because it made people really have to listen to what he had to say. “I was never a day unemployed,” Johr said. “I never looked how much I make, it doesn’t matter. I have to eat and pay rent, that’s all that counts really and you always do that. Money always came. I was pretty good. I was a good worker anywhere I went. Any job I had I enjoyed. I knew I had to work so I might as well make the best of it, right?” Johr now lives with his wife in a two-story house in a picturesque community in Lake City. His home is filled with bowls of candy and pictures of smiling fam-ily. “I think I had an interest ing life,” Johr said. “I was born at the right time and I was at the right places.” Drive One 4 Ur School market. In Florida pending sales and median prices increased while inventory was reduced in March, according to Florida Realtors, formerly known as the Florida Association of Realtors. The statewide median sales price was $139,000, up 10.3 percent from last year. The interest rate for a 30-year fixed rate mortgage averaged 3.95 percent in March, down from the 4.84 percent average in March 2011, according to the state wide group. “All of our trend lines are heading in the right direc tion,” Sparks said. The number of transac tions is going up, prices are creeping up, interest rates are hovering in the same spot and inventory has dropped, he said. The market is more balanced than what we’ve seen in the past, Sparks said. “It’s an absolutely perfect time to buy,” he said. “I think people are are starting to feel much more positive about the future.” HOMES: Sales price up Continued From Page 1A LAURA HAMPSON/Lake City ReporterJessica Arnold starts up a Lincoln MKZ for a test drive a t Rountree-Moore Ford on Saturday for the Drive One 4 Ur School event. For every test drive, Ford donated $20 to Columbia High School clubs and activities, for up to $6,000. Arnold said her brother Travis Wilson, a CHS student, asked her to take a test drive to support the band. “ It’s one of the best fundraisers for out students because multiple clubs are involved and ev eryone likes to drive a new car,” said Terry Huddleston, CHS principal.From staff reportsColumbia County’s unemployment rate in March fell to 8.1 percent, down from 8.6 percent in February, according to fig-ures released Friday by the state. The state jobless rate fell from 9.4 to 9 percent, the lowest since January 2009. The four-tenths per-cent drop is the largest single-month decline since October 1992. The U.S. unemployment rate in March was 8.2 per-cent. The March 2011 job less rate was 9.3 percent in Columbia County and 10.7 percent statewide.Jobless rate falls in county, state CLUB: Fond memories Continued From Page 1AFacebook. He wrote that his “beauti ful baby Raivyn went to live with the Lord Jesus Christ.” The crash occurred when the ATV, on which Summerfield was a passen ger, struck a ditch on private property near County Road 417 at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, according to a Florida Highway Patrol report. She was ejected, as was driver James Michael Jones, who was also badly injured. An update on his condition was not immediately avail able. A Facebook page in mem ory of Raivyn Summerfield was created Saturday after noon.CRASH: Was Thursday Continued From Page 1A

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Today is Sunday, April 22, the 113th day of 2012. There are 253 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History:On April 22, 1864, Congress authorized the use of the phrase “In God We Trust” on U.S. coins. On this date:In 1889, the Oklahoma Land Rush began at noon as thou-sands of homesteaders staked claims. In 1898, with the United States and Spain on the verge of war, the U.S. Navy began block-ading Cuban ports. Congress authorized creation of the 1st U.S. Volunteer Cavalry, also known as the “Rough Riders.” In 1964, President Lyndon B. Johnson opened the New York World’s Fair. I f there were ever any doubt that the federal government is out of control, the recent revela-tions of taxpayer-fueled parties at the General Services Administration should put it to rest. Both House and Senate committees this week began digging deeper into the $822,751 shindig the agency hosted at a Las Vegas luxury hotel. GSA’s mission is to supply everything from the pencils and paper to the buildings the federal leviathan needs to oper-ate. In October 2010, about 300 of the agency’s Western-region employees treated themselves to a lavish vacation at a cost to taxpayers of $2,742 per head. The high-profile scandal has exposed one of the federal gov-ernment’s dirty little secrets: Public servants frequently help themselves to the public purse to serve themselves. Congressional testimony pinned the blame on Public Buildings Service Regional Commissioner Jeff Neely, who was the final word when it came to setting up the Vegas bash featuring clowns and mind readers. Attendees munched on “mini Monte Cristo” sandwich-es and “petit beef Wellington.” Each was treated to a $49 breakfast one of many clear-cut violations of federal rules, according to GSA’s inspector general. The agency watchdog pointed out that even though regulations prohibit commemo-rative items, the conference spent $8,130 on souvenir books for participants, $3,749 on shirts, $1,840 on casino vests and $6,325 on specially minted coins celebrating President Obama’s stimulus bill. Not only is Mr. Neely still on the federal payroll, but former GSA Administrator Martha N. Johnson also gave him a $9,000 bonus while the investigation was under way. “The senior executives were entitled to bonuses,” Ms. Johnson testi-fied Monday in explaining her action. The federal employees involved in this conference like-wise thought they were entitled to stay in 2,400-square-foot VIP suites. They felt entitled to bring along spouses at taxpayer expense. They saw nothing wrong with jetting to Vegas for eight scouting trips to “pre-pare” for the conference. Similar, but far less lavish, parties took place at GSA under previous administrations, and GSA certainly isn’t the only agency spending big money to keep bureaucrats entertained. Mr. Obama should start by issuing guidance cracking down on government confer-ences that are thinly disguised vacations on the public dime. Congress needs to back up these policies with a law forcing public employees to pay back out of their own pockets any benefits received from improperly used funds. If these employees received advance approval from ethics officials and supervisors, everyone in the chain of com mand should be held financially accountable for the inappropriate expenditure. Public-sector unions will complain such a system would have a chilling effect on governmental travel. That’s exactly the point. The bureaucracy’s culture tosses around public money with abandon because it’s not their money. The only way to get them to treat the national Treasury with the respect it deserves is to make sure their wallets are on the line. Let’s putan endto thepartying ONE OPINION ANOTHER VIEW HIGHLIGHTS IN HISTORY A pril 29 will mark three years since Senate Democrats passed a budget. This dereliction of duty flagrantly violates the 1974 Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act. “On or before April 15 of each year, the Congress shall complete action on a concur-rent resolution on the budget for the fiscal year,” this stat-ute states. Senate Democrats couldn’t care less about this federal law. This is a milestone in human sloth. While it has taken major-ity “leader” Harry Reid of Nevada and Senate Democrats 36 months to conceive zero budgets, House Republicans have delivered two -one for each year they governed. Nonetheless, Reid said on February 3: “We do not need to bring a budget to the floor this year. It’s done. We don’t need to do it.” “This is the wrong time to vote on the floor,” Senate Budget Committee Chairman Kent Conrad, D-N.D, declared Tuesday. “I don’t think we will be prepared to vote before the election.” Floor votes would require Senate Democrats to borrow and spend, which annoys tax-payers, or cut outlays, which aggravates liberal lobbyists and porcine government-employee unions. So, Senate Democrats break the law and, instead, demand continuing resolutions, which spend on autopilot. Meanwhile, consider what focused, energetic humans have completed in less time than Senate Democrats have consumed to accomplish noth-ing on the budget. -Broad Group, a Chinese construction company, erected the 30-story Ark Hotel in just 15 days, late last year. Laboring around the clock, employees in Changsha used prefabricated modules to build an energy-effi-cient structure that reportedly can withstand a magnitude-9 earthquake. According to London’s Daily Mail, no worker was injured on this project. -Producer David O. Selznick and director Victor Fleming took nine months and 16 days (January 26 to November 11, 1939) to shoot, edit, and release “Gone with the Wind.” This beloved Civil War epic features a huge cast, massive sets, lav-ish costumes, and landmark performances, all of which made it a box office smash. It eventually scored a then-record 10 Academy Awards. -Led by Supreme Commander Dwight Eisenhower, Allied forces landed on France’s Normandy Beach on June 6, 1944 and bravely battled Nazi Germany until Victory in Europe Day on May 8, 1945. American and allied GIs needed 11 months and 2 days to liberate Europe. -Creating the Empire State Building required one year, three months, and nine days. Between January 22, 1930 and May 1, 1931, some 3,400 workers built what stood as the world’s tallest skyscraper for 42 years, rising 1,454 feet above the sidewalks of New York. (The late, great World Trade Center won that distinc-tion in 1973.) As documentarian Ric Burns noted, the build-ing’s steel beams were forged in Pittsburgh and whisked to the site via trains, barges, and trucks. As they were riveted into place, they still were warm -The Pentagon’s construction began on September 11, 1941 and ended one year, four months, and two days later, on January 15, 1943. Col. Leslie Groves (who later spearheaded the assembly of the atomic bombs that ended World War II) led the installation of this 6.5 million-square-foot office building, still Earth’s most vast. Oddly enough, the 9/11 hijack-ers crashed into the Pentagon on the 60th anniversary of its groundbreaking, killing 189 people. -According to the latest Department of Education data, 656,784 students earned MBAs and other master’s degrees in 2008-09. Most secured these credentials within two academic years. -In the War of 1812, American GIs spent two years, six months, and six days (June 18, 1812 to December 24, 1814) persuading revanchist British soldiers that we weren’t kid-ding when we declared inde-pendence on July 4, 1776. These triumphs of human action are both private and public. Even government some-times can finish what it starts, assuming leadership, industri-ousness, and responsibility. Too bad these virtues are AWOL in today’s Democratic Senate. Senate Dems: We don’t need no stinkin’ budget LETTERS TO THE EDITOR To the Editor:As a teacher whose class is primarily focused on FCAT remediation, I was disappointed in the Lake City Reporter’s choice to run the “New FCAT: Plenty’s at Stake” article. Teachers and administration work with our students all year to ensure they are as comfortable and confi dent as possible before FCAT. Running an article on projected FCAT failure among schools during FCAT week is incredibly discouraging. I understand the need to inform the general public of foreseen failures; however, it would have been more appropri ate to do so after FCAT testing is complete. As you can imagine, our students are vulnerable during this stressful time. The last thing they need is their local, home-town newspaper putting such negative statistics on its front page. Perhaps next year, you may try to produce an article that highlights the students’ hard work and preparation, or simply offer encouraging words and well wishes. This way the students and teachers may feel like they have the support of the town in which they live. Caroline E. Martin 7th Grade Intensive Reading FCAT article discouraging to students Lake City Reporter Serving Columbia County Since 1874 The Lake City Reporter is published with pride for residents of Columbia and surrounding counties by Community Newspapers Inc. We believe strong newspapers build strong communities —“Newspapers get things done!” Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable communityoriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to truth, integrity and hard work. Todd Wilson, publisher Robert Bridges, editor Sue Brannon, controller Dink NeSmith, president Tom Wood, chairman LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor should be typed or neatly written and double spaced. Letters should not exceed 400 words and will be edited for length and libel. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number for verification. Writers can have two letters per month published. Letters and guest columns are the opinion of the writers and not necessarily that of the Lake City Reporter BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400. BY E-MAIL: news@lakecityreporter.com T his is the sound of the White House throwing down the gauntlet to House Republicans: “Until the House of Representatives indicates that it will abide by last summer’s agreement, the president will not sign any appropriations bills.” The letter, from acting White House budget director Jeffrey Zients, was sent to Rep. Harold Rogers, R-Ky., the chairman of the House Appropriations Committee, who finds himself in an unenviable position. Rogers’ committee must report out the 12 annual spend-ing bills that will fund virtually the entire government’s opera-tions for the fiscal year begin-ning Oct. 1. President Barack Obama said he will not sign any of those bills if they call for spend-ing less than the amounts that he and House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, agreed to in a debt-ceiling accord last August. But Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., chairman of the House Budget Committee, has reneged, with considerable support from his party’s right, on that agreement. Meanwhile, the Democratic-controlled Senate is going ahead with its own ver-sions of the 12 spending bills, ones that adhere to the original budget agreement. The House and Senate versions of the bills must be reconciled before they can be sent to Obama for his signature. The typical course is that the two sides come right up to the edge of a full or partial govern-ment shutdown and then pass a clutch of stopgap funding mea-sures to buy enough time to clean up the mess they’ve made after the election. However, it would take only one gross political miscalcula-tion to turn this political game of chicken into a fiscal disaster, and the current atmosphere of poisonous partisanship leaves plenty of room for fiscal miscal-culation. Anothernastybudgetfight Q Scripps Howard News Service Q Washington Times OPINION Sunday, April 22, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com 4A Deroy Murdockderoy.murdock@gmail.com Q New York commentator Deroy Murdock is a columnist with the Scripps Howard News Service and a media fellow with the Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and Peace at Stanford University.

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Ferris Raymond LovelessFerris Raymond Loveless, 69, of Nashville, GA and Lake City, Fla died Thursday, April 19, 2012 at the VA Medical Center in Lake City, Fla. He was born in Hahira on August 22, 1942 to the late Thomas A. and Jewel Joiner Loveless. Mr. Loveless was retired from Chaparral Boats Inc. and was a veteran of the United States Air Force. He loved family and people and enjoyed making them feel good. Survivors include his wife, Linda Lokey Loveless of Lake City, Fla and Nashville, one daughter and son in law, Rhonda and Neal Bennett of Stockton, stepchildren and their spouses, John Gregory and Terri May, Kenneth and Angie May all of Lake City, Fla., Angela Young of Ocala, Fla., grandchildren, Kimberly (Brandon) Wood of Lakeland, GA., Jessica Young, Ashley Young, Gregory May, Jr., Destiny May, Amanda May, K.J. May all of Lake City, Fla., great grandchildren, AnnaLynn Wood and Brayden Young., one brother and sister in law, John and Martha Loveless of MacClenny, Fla, one sister, Euna Lehman of Panama City, Fla. He was preceded in death by two brothers, Bert Loveless and Jack Loveless and two sisters, Dean Hall and Nell Lewis. Memorial services will be held at 2pm, Sunday in the chapel of Martin/McLane Funeral Home in Hahira with Rev. Ken Morgan The family will receive friends following the services. Condolences to the family may be conveyed online at www.mclanecares.com. Martin/McLane Funeral Home of Hahira.Edith A. HurstMrs. Edith A. Hurst, 88, resident of Lake City, Fl and widow of the late Casper Hurst, died at Suwannee Valley Care Center in Lake City early Saturday April 21, 2012 after an extended illness. She was a native of Columbia County, Fl and had made her home here her entire life. She enjoyed Cooking, Gardening, Word Puzzles,loved her cats, was devoted to her family and friends, and was a member of Southside Baptist Church. She was preceded in death by her husband of 44 years, Casper Hurst and son, Ralph L. Hurst. Survivors; Daughter in Law, Paulette Hurst, Lake City, Fl. Two granddaughters, Sabrina Ballew (Hal) of Tallahassee, Fl. and Tina R. Hurst, Lake City, Fl Two Great Grandsons, Will Ballew and Sam Ballew both of Tallahassee, Fl. Funeral services will be conducted at 2 P.M. Tuesday, April 24, 2012 at The Chapel of GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN FUNERAL HOME, 3596 South U.S. Highway 441 Lake City, Fl with Dr. Ralph Rodriquez, pastor of Southside Baptist Church in Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens. Visitation with the family will be 1 hour prior to service time (2.P.M.) Tuesday, April 24, 2012 at the funeral home. Please leave words of love and comfort for the family at www. gatewayforestlawn.com. may be made to Haven Hospice, 6037 US. 90 West, Lake City, Fl 32055 or your favorite charity. LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012 5A5A Shout it from the Mountain Top!Tell everyone how proud you are Sunday, May 20th!MY KID HAS GRADUATED!2012 2012 Graduation We are so proud of you! You're hard work has really paid off! Amanda CheyenneBROWNLove, Mom & Dad2 Ads Sizes1 column by 4 inches (pictured)$462 column by 4 inches$85 Lake City ReporterPUBLISHING Sunday, May 20 DEADLINE Sunday, May 14 Dont forget to send in your photo.180 E. Duval St., Lake City, FL 32055Bring your graduates informatin by theReporter oce or call 754-0417for additional information and sending options. Altrusa Club of Lake City Be a Diva For a Day!Altrusa International, Inc. of Lake City is a recognized international professional business club, committed to community service and developing leadership. Proceeds will be distributed to local charities. Banquet Facilities at the Columbia County Fairgrounds Call For More Info: 386-961-3217 Shopping bags will be handed out to participants. Enjoy vendors with items such as jewelry, handbags, candles, soaps, make-up, cakes, chocolates and more! Other displays include a variety of health screenings and food and beverages will be available. Presenting Sponsor: Altrusa International, Inc. of Lake City is a recognized international professional business club, committed of Lake City Tickets Available at: 3rd Annual 3rd Annual 3rd Annual 3rd Annual 3rd Annual 3rd Annual 3rd Annual 3rd Annual Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day ENTERS YOUFOR A CHANCETO WIN$500Admission Ticket Up to $150 Value. Compliments of Wards Jewelry. Downtown Lake City a Mariana BraceletOR Two Silver Tickets to Bring your Mother, your BFF, your Sister or your Daughter! Make it a great day together while you shop and get pampered! CANCER BENEFIT DINNERfor Shelby Witt BaxterSaturday, April 28, 2012 5:00 pm 8:00 pm Hopeful Baptist Church Tickets: $10 DonationAll proceeds go to medical expenses. Were Back! Lake City Pets & Supplies (386) 752-77001101 W. US Hwy 90, Ste. 100 ~ Gateway CenterHours: Mon.-Sat. 10am-6pm; Closed SundaySaturday Grooming and late appt. available.Large selection of fresh & salt water sh. Ask abou Rewards Card9 Grooms & 10th Groom FREEFormerly known as Puppies & MoreFree Hampster with purchase of Hampster Cage Parakeets starting at 14.99Shih-tzu, Chihuahua & Cockerspaniel PuppiesCerti ed & experienced groomer with one on one attention. Feeders(Mice, Rats, Crickets, Mealworms, etc.) Lowest price in townMetal Dog Crates from$29.99 Obituaries are paid advertisements. For details, call the Lake City Reporters classified department at 752-1293. OBITUARIES 5A OBITS 4-22 1 4/21/12 3:56:57 PM LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012 5A Ferris Raymond LovelessFerris Raymond Loveless, 69, of Nashville, GA and Lake City, Fla died Thursday, April 19, 2012 at the VA Medical Center in Lake City, Fla. He was born in Hahira on August 22, 1942 to the late Thomas A. and Jewel Joiner Loveless. Mr. Loveless was retired from Chaparral Boats Inc. and was a veteran of the United States Air Force. He loved family and people and enjoyed making them feel good. Survivors include his wife, Linda Lokey Loveless of Lake City, Fla and Nashville, one daughter and son in law, Rhonda and Neal Bennett of Stockton, stepchildren and their spouses, John Gregory and Terri May, Kenneth and Angie May all of Lake City, Fla., Angela Young of Ocala, Fla., grandchildren, Kimberly (Brandon) Wood of Lakeland, GA., Jessica Young, Ashley Young, Gregory May, Jr., Destiny May, Amanda May, K.J. May all of Lake City, Fla., great grandchildren, AnnaLynn Wood and Brayden Young., one brother and sister in law, John and Martha Loveless of MacClenny, Fla, one sister, Euna Lehman of Panama City, Fla. He was preceded in death by two brothers, Bert Loveless and Jack Loveless and two sisters, Dean Hall and Nell Lewis. Memorial services will be held at 2pm, Sunday in the chapel of Martin/McLane Funeral Home in Hahira with Rev. Ken Morgan The family will receive friends following the services. Condolences to the family may be conveyed online at www.mclanecares.com. Martin/McLane Funeral Home of Hahira.Edith A. HurstMrs. Edith A. Hurst, 88, resident of Lake City, Fl and widow of the late Casper Hurst, died at Suwannee Valley Care Center in Lake City early Saturday April 21, 2012 after an extended illness. She was a native of Columbia County, Fl and had made her home here her entire life. She enjoyed Cooking, Gardening, Word Puzzles,loved her cats, was devoted to her family and friends, and was a member of Southside Baptist Church. She was preceded in death by her husband of 44 years, Casper Hurst and son, Ralph L. Hurst. Survivors; Daughter in Law, Paulette Hurst, Lake City, Fl. Two granddaughters, Sabrina Ballew (Hal) of Tallahassee, Fl. and Tina R. Hurst, Lake City, Fl Two Great Grandsons, Will Ballew and Sam Ballew both of Tallahassee, Fl. Funeral services will be conducted at 2 P.M. Tuesday, April 24, 2012 at The Chapel of GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN FUNERAL HOME, 3596 South U.S. Highway 441 Lake City, Fl with Dr. Ralph Rodriquez, pastor of Southside Baptist Church in Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens. Visitation with the family will be 1 hour prior to service time (2.P.M.) Tuesday, April 24, 2012 at the funeral home. Please leave words of love and comfort for the family at www. gatewayforestlawn.com. may be made to Haven Hospice, 6037 US. 90 West, Lake City, Fl 32055 or your favorite charity. LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012 5A5A Shout it from the Mountain Top!Tell everyone how proud you are Sunday, May 20th!MY KID HAS GRADUATED!2012 2012 Graduation We are so proud of you! You're hard work has really paid off! Amanda CheyenneBROWNLove, Mom & Dad2 Ads Sizes1 column by 4 inches (pictured)$462 column by 4 inches$85 Lake City ReporterPUBLISHING Sunday, May 20 DEADLINE Sunday, May 14 Dont forget to send in your photo.180 E. Duval St., Lake City, FL 32055Bring your graduates informatin by theReporter oce or call 754-0417for additional information and sending options. Altrusa Club of Lake City Be a Diva For a Day!Altrusa International, Inc. of Lake City is a recognized international professional business club, committed to community service and developing leadership. Proceeds will be distributed to local charities. Banquet Facilities at the Columbia County Fairgrounds Call For More Info: 386-961-3217 Shopping bags will be handed out to participants. Enjoy vendors with items such as jewelry, handbags, candles, soaps, make-up, cakes, chocolates and more! Other displays include a variety of health screenings and food and beverages will be available. Presenting Sponsor: Altrusa International, Inc. of Lake City is a recognized international professional business club, committed of Lake City Tickets Available at: 3rd Annual 3rd Annual 3rd Annual 3rd Annual 3rd Annual 3rd Annual 3rd Annual 3rd Annual Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day ENTERS YOUFOR A CHANCETO WIN$500Admission Ticket Up to $150 Value. Compliments of Wards Jewelry. Downtown Lake City a Mariana BraceletOR Two Silver Tickets to Bring your Mother, your BFF, your Sister or your Daughter! Make it a great day together while you shop and get pampered! CANCER BENEFIT DINNERfor Shelby Witt BaxterSaturday, April 28, 2012 5:00 pm 8:00 pm Hopeful Baptist Church Tickets: $10 DonationAll proceeds go to medical expenses. Were Back! Lake City Pets & Supplies (386) 752-77001101 W. US Hwy 90, Ste. 100 ~ Gateway CenterHours: Mon.-Sat. 10am-6pm; Closed SundaySaturday Grooming and late appt. available.Large selection of fresh & salt water sh. Ask abou Rewards Card9 Grooms & 10th Groom FREEFormerly known as Puppies & MoreFree Hampster with purchase of Hampster Cage Parakeets starting at 14.99Shih-tzu, Chihuahua & Cockerspaniel PuppiesCerti ed & experienced groomer with one on one attention. Feeders(Mice, Rats, Crickets, Mealworms, etc.) Lowest price in townMetal Dog Crates from$29.99 Obituaries are paid advertisements. For details, call the Lake City Reporters classified department at 752-1293. OBITUARIES 5A OBITS 4-22 1 4/21/12 3:56:57 PM Ferris Raymond LovelessFerris Raymond Loveless, 69, of Nashville, GA and Lake City, Fla died Thursday, April 19, 2012 at the VA Medical Center in Lake City, Fla. He was born in Hahira on August 22, 1942 to the late Thomas A. and Jewel Joiner Loveless. Mr. Loveless was retired from Chaparral Boats Inc. and was a veteran of the United States Air Force. He loved family and people and enjoyed making them feel good. Survivors include his wife, Linda Lokey Loveless of Lake City, Fla and Nashville, one daughter and son in law, Rhonda and Neal Bennett of Stockton, stepchildren and their spouses, John Gregory and Terri May, Kenneth and Angie May all of Lake City, Fla., Angela Young of Ocala, Fla., grandchildren, Kimberly (Brandon) Wood of Lakeland, GA., Jessica Young, Ashley Young, Gregory May, Jr., Destiny May, Amanda May, K.J. May all of Lake City, Fla., great grandchildren, AnnaLynn Wood and Brayden Young., one brother and sister in law, John and Martha Loveless of MacClenny, Fla, one sister, Euna Lehman of Panama City, Fla. He was preceded in death by two brothers, Bert Loveless and Jack Loveless and two sisters, Dean Hall and Nell Lewis. Memorial services will be held at 2pm, Sunday in the chapel of Martin/McLane Funeral Home in Hahira with Rev. Ken Morgan The family will receive friends following the services. Condolences to the family may be conveyed online at www.mclanecares.com. Martin/McLane Funeral Home of Hahira.Edith A. HurstMrs. Edith A. Hurst, 88, resident of Lake City, Fl and widow of the late Casper Hurst, died at Suwannee Valley Care Center in Lake City early Saturday April 21, 2012 after an extended illness. She was a native of Columbia County, Fl and had made her home here her entire life. She enjoyed Cooking, Gardening, Word Puzzles,loved her cats, was devoted to her family and friends, and was a member of Southside Baptist Church. She was preceded in death by her husband of 44 years, Casper Hurst and son, Ralph L. Hurst. Survivors; Daughter in Law, Paulette Hurst, Lake City, Fl. Two granddaughters, Sabrina Ballew (Hal) of Tallahassee, Fl. and Tina R. Hurst, Lake City, Fl Two Great Grandsons, Will Ballew and Sam Ballew both of Tallahassee, Fl. Funeral services will be conducted at 2 P.M. Tuesday, April 24, 2012 at The Chapel of GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN FUNERAL HOME, 3596 South U.S. Highway 441 Lake City, Fl with Dr. Ralph Rodriquez, pastor of Southside Baptist Church in Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens. Visitation with the family will be 1 hour prior to service time (2.P.M.) Tuesday, April 24, 2012 at the funeral home. Please leave words of love and comfort for the family at www. gatewayforestlawn.com. may be made to Haven Hospice, 6037 US. 90 West, Lake City, Fl 32055 or your favorite charity. LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012 5A5A Shout it from the Mountain Top!Tell everyone how proud you are Sunday, May 20th!MY KID HAS GRADUATED!2012 2012 Graduation We are so proud of you! You're hard work has really paid off! Amanda CheyenneBROWNLove, Mom & Dad2 Ads Sizes1 column by 4 inches (pictured)$462 column by 4 inches$85 Lake City ReporterPUBLISHING Sunday, May 20 DEADLINE Sunday, May 14 Dont forget to send in your photo.180 E. Duval St., Lake City, FL 32055Bring your graduates informatin by theReporter oce or call 754-0417for additional information and sending options. Altrusa Club of Lake City Be a Diva For a Day!Altrusa International, Inc. of Lake City is a recognized international professional business club, committed to community service and developing leadership. Proceeds will be distributed to local charities. Banquet Facilities at the Columbia County Fairgrounds Call For More Info: 386-961-3217 Shopping bags will be handed out to participants. Enjoy vendors with items such as jewelry, handbags, candles, soaps, make-up, cakes, chocolates and more! Other displays include a variety of health screenings and food and beverages will be available. Presenting Sponsor: Altrusa International, Inc. of Lake City is a recognized international professional business club, committed of Lake City Tickets Available at: 3rd Annual 3rd Annual 3rd Annual 3rd Annual 3rd Annual 3rd Annual 3rd Annual 3rd Annual Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day Diva Day ENTERS YOUFOR A CHANCETO WIN$500Admission Ticket Up to $150 Value. Compliments of Wards Jewelry. Downtown Lake City a Mariana BraceletOR Two Silver Tickets to Bring your Mother, your BFF, your Sister or your Daughter! Make it a great day together while you shop and get pampered! CANCER BENEFIT DINNERfor Shelby Witt BaxterSaturday, April 28, 2012 5:00 pm 8:00 pm Hopeful Baptist Church Tickets: $10 DonationAll proceeds go to medical expenses. Were Back! Lake City Pets & Supplies (386) 752-77001101 W. US Hwy 90, Ste. 100 ~ Gateway CenterHours: Mon.-Sat. 10am-6pm; Closed SundaySaturday Grooming and late appt. available.Large selection of fresh & salt water sh. Ask abou Rewards Card9 Grooms & 10th Groom FREEFormerly known as Puppies & MoreFree Hampster with purchase of Hampster Cage Parakeets starting at 14.99Shih-tzu, Chihuahua & Cockerspaniel PuppiesCerti ed & experienced groomer with one on one attention. Feeders(Mice, Rats, Crickets, Mealworms, etc.) Lowest price in townMetal Dog Crates from$29.99 Obituaries are paid advertisements. For details, call the Lake City Reporters classified department at 752-1293. OBITUARIES 5A OBITS 4-22 1 4/21/12 3:56:57 PM COMMUNITY CALENDAR Submit Community Calendar announcements by mail or drop off at the Reporter office located at 180 E. Duval St., via fax to (386) 752-9400 or email lhampson@lakecityreporter.comApril 22Student recognition dayBethel A.M.E Church, 838 SW CR242A, will recognize all Columbia County high school juniors and seniors and college students at our Annual High School Jr. Sr./ College Student Recognition Day on April 22 at 11 a.m.Service center anniversaryThe Christian Service Center is searching for all former volunteers, board members and executive directors to celebrate 30 years of service in Columbia County with an anniversary/ reunion on April 22. Please call 755-1770 and give us an updated address so we can send you an invitation. Trustee day serviceThe trustees of New Mt. Zion AME Church will be having a service on Sunday, April 22 at 3 p.m. with speaker Rev. Japan Ruise of New Jerusalem Church of God in Christ of Margaretta. Come and bring a friend. For information call 752-8179. Owens family reunionDescendants of William Joseph & Harriet Green Owens will hold their annual family reunion on Sunday, April 22 at the Mason City Community Center, US 41 South of Lake City. A covered dish lunch will be shared at 1p.m. All friends and relatives are invited to attend. If you have questions, please call Danny Owens at 752-8497.Earth Day clean uplimited space so please call the ranger station at 3974331 to sign up. Please register before April 18. Gospel extravaganzaThe Church of Faith and Deliverance Through Christ, 379 NW Long St., will host a gospel musical extravaganza on Sunday, April 22 at 4 p.m. The featured group will be gospel recording artist New Creations Gospel Singers of Montgomery, Ala. All choirs, soloists and gospel groups are invited to participate. Everyone is welcome. A love offering will be received during the service. Call 758-1886 for information. Mens day serviceThe Mount Tabor A.M.E Church will celebrate their annual mens day service on Sunday, April 22 at 3:30 p.m. The speaker will be Rev. James McDaniel from Allen Chapel AME Church in High Springs. We invite you to come and worship with us and being a friend. For information call 755727.Worship sessionNew Life Christian Fellowship, 422 SW Baya Dr., will have a Burning Heart Session with special guest Kelanie Gloeckler on Sunday, April 22 at 6 p.m. Well be changed forever as we worship, pray and seek Gods face together. Call 758-8397 for more information.Music in the parkOn Sunday, April 22 at 2 p.m., the City of High Springs will present a free concert featuring some local country favorites Three Chord Strum and Cliff Dorsey at James Paul Park, located behind city hall, 110 NW 1st Avenue in High Springs. Bring your own blankets, lawn chairs and refreshments! Enjoy our beautiful downtown area with your family and friends on a Sunday afternoon. April 23Gardening North Florida StyleUF/IFAS and Master Gardener Volunteers will host a two-day Gardening $10,000 for Habitat for HumanityCOURTESYTD Bank, through the TD Charitable Foundation, recently donated $10,000 to Habitat for Humanity of Lake City/Columbia County affiliate to help build their fifth house at 383 SE Lomond Ave. as part of the banks commitment to giving back to the community. Accepting the check from local TD Bank is Carl Fatzinger (from left), executive board member; Lynn Causey, assistant vice president; Bill Cobb, vice president; and Suzanne Norris, regional vice president.Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State Park will host an Earth Day Clean-up on Sunday, April 22 from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Join us on Earth Day for ranger led family fun activities and help clean up Mother Earth. Take a ranger led hike and while learning about the flora and fauna and help clean up nature. Please remember to wear comfortable shoes. There will also be a ranger led canoe trip, please come prepared and be ready to paddle the Suwannee clean. Trash bags and gloves will be provided. Preregistration for these activities is required due to CALENDAR continued on 6A

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North Florida Style workshop on April 23 and 24 at the Columbia County Extension Facility located at the Columbia County Fairgrounds. Topics ranging from from rain barrel making to edible landscaping are demonstration and handson. Single day fee is $15 or both days for $25 and there is a spousal 2-day discount with both spouses attending both days for $40. For more information or to register please contact Nichelle Demorest at the Columbia County Extension Office at 752-5384.Aglow state officer speaks The Lake City Aglow Lighthouse is honored to have Dr. Ellamae Dennard as our featured speaker on April 23. Currently she serves as the Florida State Prayer Coordinator for Aglow International. She now lives in Jacksonville where she is a professor at Zoe University. The meeting will be Monday at 7 p.m. at Christ Community Church located near the intersection of SR 47 & I-75. Everyone is welcome. For more information, call 935 4018.April 24 Hospice benefit eventThe Pet Spot of Lake City announces the first annual Spring Fling Yappy Hour on Tuesday, April 24 from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. located at 872 S.W. Main Blvd. in Lake City to benefit the Hospice of the Nature Coast. For a $10 donation there will be pet photos, pet therapy and obedience training, Lake City Police Departments K-9 unit, and Ask a Vet advice from the Lake City Animal Hospital. Hors d Oeuvres, Beer, Wine, soft drinks and water will be available throughout the evening. Come and enjoy live music, various vendors and a raffle. For more information call the Hospice of the Nature Coast at 386-755-771.April 25Quilters guildThe Lady of the Lake Quilters Guild will meet on Wednesday, April 25 at 10 a.m. with social time at 9:30 a.m. at Teen Town, 533 NW Desoto St. The program this month will be the Ugly Fabric Swap. Bring one yard of fabric you dont like and trade for someone elses ugly fabric. Bring fourteen 2 1/2 strips of the same fabric, cut WOF, in a zip lock with your name on it for this fun fabric exchange. You will receive 14 strips back of assorted fabrics. April fabric is small spring flowers/floral. You dont have to be a member to attend a meeting. For information call 386 7549330.Food assistanceCatholic Charities Lake City Regional Office and the Department of Children and Families presents Feed a Family Outreach and SNAP Outreach April 25 from 9 a.m. to noon at 501 SE Demorest Street in Live Oak. Food Stamp applications being taken onsite. First come, first served. Suwannee County residents do not need an ID. You are eligible to receive food from TEFAP if your household meets the income guidelines or participates in Income Eligibility, SNAP (Food Stamps), TANF, SSI, or Medicaid. For more information please call: Catholic Charities 386-754-9180.April 26Military officers meetingThe Suwannee River Valley Chapter of the Military Officers Associaton of America (MOAA) will hold its monthly meeting at the Lake City Elks Lodge, 359 NE Hernando St., on Thursday, April 26 at 6:30 p.m. If you are a retired or former military officer, please join us at out next meeting. For information or to RSVP call Susan Palmer at 697-6828. Kindergarten orientationKindergarten orientation for students and parents will be held at each elementary school on Thursday, April 26 at 6:30 p.m. Parents or guardians of children who will be five years of age on or before September 1 should attend the meeting at the school for which their child is zoned. For more information call the school district office at (386) 7558000. By LAURA HAMPSONlhampson@lakecityreporter.comWide-eyed children yelled Hi! as a swing set launched them into the air. Others paused from sidewalk chalk art to wave as a state officials toured Happy House, a Lake City child care center. Dr. Melody Jurado, director of Floridas Office of Early Learning, toured the cen ter and the Early Learning Coalition of Floridas Gateway Thursday in an effort to visit all 31 coalitions in the state. Formerly part of the state Agency for Workforce Innovation, the Office for Early Learning oversees the operation and funding of the early learning coalitions and reports directly to Gov. Rick Scott. Jurado was appointed to the position in September. Early learning coalitions distribute school readiness funds for subsidized child care, coordinate voluntary pre-kindergarten programs and serve as a child care resource and referral service. The local coalition funds about 90 facilities in Columbia, Hamilton, Lafayette, Suwannee and Union counties. The subsidized child care and voluntary pre-kindergarten program helps ensure all children are ready for kindergarten, no matter their economic background, said Thomas Logan, executive director for Early Learning Coalition of Floridas Gateway. Logan said he wanted Jurado to experience a set of centers that was very different than larger coalitions elsewhere in Florida. Our coalition is probably the most rural in the state, he said. Formed in 1999 as a school readiness coalition, it changed to the Early Learning Coalition of Floridas Gateway when the state introduced the voluntary pre-kindergarden program in 2004, he said. The coalitions $10 million budget from state and federal tax dollars goes into the local economy, through child care providers and training, Logan said. Its a really nice deal for the local economy, he said. After touring the centers playgrounds, classrooms and garden, Jurado said it was wonderful to see the children smiling and engaged with their peers and teachers. Too often adults dont realize the impact you have on a child, said Jurado, who was the chairwoman of the Early Learning Coalition of Hillsborough County before being appointed director. More and more, state and federal legislators are realizing how important the time from birth to age 5 is in a childs development, she said. Preschool child care is not just babysitting or playtime, it is an important time for cognitive brain development, she said. Every $1 spent on programs for preschool-age children yields $17 to $33 savings in remediation costs later on, she said. Less money spent on re-teaching material means more money to better enhance a childs education, she said. Jurado said she is the states point person on how important the preschool age is for a childs development and for the success of the state. I cant let any of these children down. Jurado said her goal is see how the state can better serve and be an adjunct to coalitions and child care providers. We want to hear how we are doing, what more can be done, she said. Over the next year, Jurado said, the state will be rolling out new measures to screen for developmental delays, observe classrooms for quality teacher-student interactions, and measure developmental growth. Its not a baby FCAT, she said, but rather a way to find problems and make improvements. Sheryll Walker, executive director of nonprofit Happy House, said she was honored to have Jurado tour the center. Walker said centers 250 children are used to visitors because United Way often tours and college students do internships there. For more information, visit the coalition at 1104 SW Main Blvd in Lake City, or call 752-9770. 6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012 CALENDAR: State Aglow officer speaksContinued From Page 5A 6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & ST A TE SUNDAY APRIL 22, 2012 Page Editor: Xxx, 754-xxxx6A To Candidates for Floridas Columbia County School District Superintendent:I have a question for all of you. Am I correct when I proclaim to you that Columbia High School students are created in the image of God and that they did not evolve from a hominid? The three possible answers are YES, or NO or PCSR (Politically Correct Sidestep Response) Kenny Merriken 386-344-7339, kbmerriken@hotmail.com (Compare Holy Bible versus Florida Biology 1 End-if-Course Assessment Test Items Specications, page 32 SC.7.L.15.1; page 52 SC.912.L.15.10 http://fcat.doe.org/eoc/pdf/BiologyFL11Sp.pdf)Paid for by Kenny Merriken April 22, 2012Ephesians 6:12, I John 4:1 but try the spirits whether they are of God on their April 17, 2012 ribbon cutting ceremony located at 149 SE College Place Lake City, FL149 SE College Place ((386)752-1822 www.fgc.eduwould like to congratulateWilson S. Rivers Library & Media CenterWilson S. Rivers Library & Media Center 6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & ST A TE SUNDAY APRIL 22, 2012 Page Editor: Xxx, 754-xxxx6A To Candidates for Floridas Columbia County School District Superintendent:I have a question for all of you. Am I correct when I proclaim to you that Columbia High School students are created in the image of God and that they did not evolve from a hominid? The three possible answers are YES, or NO or PCSR (Politically Correct Sidestep Response) Kenny Merriken 386-344-7339, kbmerriken@hotmail.com (Compare Holy Bible versus Florida Biology 1 End-if-Course Assessment Test Items Specications, page 32 SC.7.L.15.1; page 52 SC.912.L.15.10 http://fcat.doe.org/eoc/pdf/BiologyFL11Sp.pdf)Paid for by Kenny Merriken April 22, 2012Ephesians 6:12, I John 4:1 but try the spirits whether they are of God on their April 17, 2012 ribbon cutting ceremony located at 149 SE College Place Lake City, FL 149 SE College Place ((386)752-1822 www.fgc.edu would like to congratulate Wilson S. Rivers Library & Media CenterWilson S. Rivers Library & Media Center 6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & ST A TE SUNDAY APRIL 22, 2012 Page Editor: Xxx, 754-xxxx6A To Candidates for Floridas Columbia County School District Superintendent:I have a question for all of you. Am I correct when I proclaim to you that Columbia High School students are created in the image of God and that they did not evolve from a hominid? The three possible answers are YES, or NO or PCSR (Politically Correct Sidestep Response) Kenny Merriken 386-344-7339, kbmerriken@hotmail.com (Compare Holy Bible versus Florida Biology 1 End-if-Course Assessment Test Items Specications, page 32 SC.7.L.15.1; page 52 SC.912.L.15.10 http://fcat.doe.org/eoc/pdf/BiologyFL11Sp.pdf)Paid for by Kenny Merriken April 22, 2012Ephesians 6:12, I John 4:1 but try the spirits whether they are of God on their April 17, 2012 ribbon cutting ceremony located at 149 SE College Place Lake City, FL149 SE College Place ((386)752-1822 www.fgc.eduwould like to congratulateWilson S. Rivers Library & Media CenterWilson S. Rivers Library & Media Center State Early Learning director looks for smiling, happy children JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City ReporterDr. Mel Jurado, the new Director of Floridas Office of Early Learning, ties a shoelace while taking a tour of the Happy House Day Care Center Thursday. My criteria isnt to look at the newest and biggest centers, she said, but what I look for is smiling, happy children. JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City ReporterHappy House executive director Sheryll Walker (right) and Thomas Logan, executive director of the Early Learning Coalition of Floridas Gateway, gives Jurado a tour of one of the Happy House classrooms. The biggest job children can have is falling in love with learning, Jurado said.

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By TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comElaine Warner started volunteering her time at the Lake City VA Medical Center when her husband died 10 years ago. Friday, Warner and other VA volunteers were recognized for donating their time to the facility at the Lake City VA Medical Centers Annual Volunteer Awards Ceremony and Luncheon. The ceremony and luncheon was held at the Florida Gateway College conference center with more than 130 in attendance. Warner received the 10,000-hour award for the time she has volunteered to the VA. Im absolutely astounded that I received this award, she said after the ceremony. I knew I had hours, but I didnt know I had accumulated that many. Warner, 79, was proud that the time she volunteered helped so many veterans. Im a window of a veteran, Im retired and I have time on my hands, she said. I like volunteering at the VA because of what I do for the patients. We go and deliver goody bags and the looks on their faces when they are given something that they never thought they would get is priceless. Warner encouraged others to volunteer as well. Being a volunteer is the least we can do for the living veterans for what they did for us, she said. Warner was the recipient of the top award given at the ceremony, but others were also recognized for donating their time to improve the lives of veterans. the Presidential Lifetime Achievement award recipients were Hoyt Holland and Roy McLendon; the 5,000-hour award recipient was Linda Curry and the 7,500-hour award recipient was Michael Weldon. Volunteers with anywhere from 100 hours to 16,640 hours were recognized during the ceremony as part of National Volunteer Week. Michael Weldon received a service award plaque for volunteering 7,500 hours at the Lake City VA Medical Center. Weldon has served as a volunteer for more than 12 years. It was astounding to get the plaque, he said. I didnt know I was getting the award plaque, it was shock to me, but Im dedicating this in memory of my daddy, Cleveland Weldon Sr., he died 20 years ago and he was a Korean War veteran. Weldon said he is happy to volunteer and help veterans. I started volunteering because I love helping people and you never know when its going to be your turn and you might have to have someone help you out, he said. Maureen Wilkes, Lake City VA Medical Center acting associate director, said the Lake City VA Medical Center and surrounding clinics have more than 462 volunteers who donated over 38,000 hours of service during the last fiscal year, estimated at a cost of $830,000. Volunteers at the facility deliver goody bags, take care of certain veterans, serve coffee in the waiting rooms, man the facilitys information desks, help with mailing and stuffing envelopes, escort patients to various departments and perform a number of other tasks. The volunteers function in numerous roles its amazing what they do, Wilkes said. The volunteers for us are critical. They are critical to us to fulfill our missions of honoring Americas veterans and they serve in valuable roles and they are essential to our functions. LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NA TION SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012 7ACOLSON: Ran CREEPContinued From Page 1A Page Editor: Xxx, 754-xxxx LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & ST A TE SUND AY APRIL 22, 2012 7A7A State workshop set for Monday on social status of black men, boysBy TONY BRITTtbritt@lakecityreporter.comThe Florida Council on the Social Status of Black Men and Boys will have a strategic planning workshop at the Lake City Police Department on Monday. The workshop is open to the public and begins 9 a.m. The workshop is designed to help provide better structure in accomplishing the councils full mission. Several Florida legislators are members of the council and will be participating in the strategic planning workshop. The council has repeatedly stressed the importance of community support in efforts to raise awareness about the socioeconomic conditions affecting black men and boys in Florida. The council on the Social Status of Black Men and Boys is housed in the Office of the Attorney General. Created by the state legislature during the 2006 legislative session, the council is charged with making a systematic study of the conditions affecting black men and boys including homicide rates, arrest and incarceration rates, poverty, violence, drug abuse, death rates, disparate annual income levels, health issues and school performance. The goal of the council is to propose measure to alleviate and correct the underlying causes of the conditions described above. These measures may consist of changes to the law or systematic changes that can be implemented without legislative action. The councils next full meeting will be on May 16-17 in Tampa. The purpose of the May 16 meeting is to discuss the recommendations included in the 2011 Annual Report; May 17 is a workshop designed to discuss four areas of interest in Education, Health and Families, Criminal Justice and Crime Prevention and Employment. The meetings are open to the public. TONY BRITT/Lake City ReporterElaine Warner (from left), a Lake City VA Medical Center volunteer who has donated more than 10,000 hours of her time at the facility, stands with Maureen Wilkes, Lake City VA Medical Center acting associate director and Michael Weldon, volunteer. Warner and Weldon were two of many VA volunteers who received awards for volunteering at the Lake City VA Medical Centers Annual Volunteer Awards Ceremony and Luncheon Friday.VA volunteer joins 10,000-hour club Obama has 10-1 financial edge on RomneyBy JACK GILLUMAssociated PressWASHINGTON President Barack Obamas re-election effort enjoyed a 10-to-1 financial edge over Republican rival Mitt Romney last month, out-raising the former Massachusetts governor by millions as Obama stuffed more than $104 million into his campaign war chest. A nasty primary battle between Romney and his GOP rivals took a financial toll on his presidential campaign, which raised $12.6 million in March and left Romney with about $10 million in the bank by months end. All told, Obama and the Democratic Party raised a combined $53 million in donations during that period, while Romney with his party pulled in about half of that. Still, an anticipated fire hose of cash from major Republican super political committees and the Republican Party is likely to bring some financial parity to the general election, for which Romney only recently started collecting donations. Super PACs like American Crossroads and its nonprofit arm, Crossroads GPS, raised $100 million this election cycle, and the groups plan to flood the airwaves in coming months with ads critical of Obama. Also helping Romney is the Restore Our Future super PAC, which reported an $8.6 million last month, largely from a handful of wealthy donors and some continued supporters. The group, for its part, spent more than $11 million on TV spots during the month, coming off a successful track record of battering Romneys GOP primary opponents with attack ads. He helped run the Committee to Re-elect the President when it set up an effort to gather intelligence on the Democratic Party. The arrest of CREEPs security director, James W. McCord, and four other men burglarizing the Democratic National Committee offices in 1972 set off the scandal that led to Nixons resignation in August 1974. But it was actions that preceded the actual Watergate break-in that resulted in Colsons criminal conviction. Colson pleaded guilty to efforts to discredit Pentagon analyst Daniel Ellsberg. It was Ellsberg who had leaked the secret Defense Department study of Vietnam that became known as the Pentagon Papers. The efforts to discredit Ellsberg included use of Nixons plumbers a covert group established to investigate White House leaks in 1971 to break into the office of Ellsbergs psychiatrist to look for information that could discredit Ellsbergs anti-war efforts.

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An exclusive service brought to our readers by The Weather Channel. 8A LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012 8A LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012 Page Editor: Xxx, 754-xxxx8AWEATHER Lake City 183 SW Bascom Norris Dr.Gville E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunters Walk 5115 NW 43rd St. Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St. Shands at UF Room H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Alachua 14759 NW 157th Ln. Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E. Silver Springs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. Summereld 17950 US Hwy. 441OFFER NOT AVAILABLE ON EXISTING CAMPUS LOANS. OFFER IS FOR NEW LOANS ONLY. MAY NOT BE COMBINED WITH ANY OTHER OFFER. Subject to credit and property approval. Your rate may be higher based on your creditworthiness and property valuation. Higher rates apply to non-owner-occupied properties. Oer excludes mobile homes. Property insurance is required; ood and/or title insurance may be required at an additional expense to the borrower. Example: a $50,000 loan at 4.871% for 6 years would require 72 monthly payments of $799.22 and a nal payment of $266.70; total nance charge of $7,710.37, for a total of payments of $57,543.37 and a total amount nanced of $49,833. APR = Annual Percentage Rate. APR is 4.99% 2. No closing costs for xed-rate home equity loans $10,000 to $50,000. $350 o closings costs for loans over $50,000. Normal closing costs range from $125 to $1,000. Appraisal fees not included and may be required prior to closing. 3 Credit approval and initial deposit of $5 required. Mention this ad and well waive the $15 new member fee. www.campuscu.com As low as% Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Columbia and Suwannee counties!3Apply online at campuscu.com for fast approval, or call 754-9088 and press 4 today! Up to 90% nancing available Use the equity in your home for a new pool, home improvements, education expenses or even a vacation No closing costs for home equity loans $10,000 to $50,0002 Get a hot rate for a cool addition.HOME E QUITY LOAN FROM C AM P U SA P R1xedU p to 6 years(other rates and terms also available) This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration. An exclusive service brought to our readers by The Weather Channel.

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By TIM KIRBYtkirby@lakecityreporter.comFORT WHITE — A few days can seem like forever to a team on a roll. Fort White High’s baseball team finally returns to action when the District 5-4A tournament begins on Monday. Fort White plays host school Keystone Heights High at 7 p.m. Only making the wait longer is the Indians are riding a six-game win streak from March 30 to the last game of the regular season on April 17. “The players are chomping at the bit,” Fort White head coach Mike Rizzi said on Friday. “They wish they were playing today. We are looking forward to the opportu-nity to compete in the tournament. We know that it is a new season and what has happened during the regular season has prepared us for this moment.” Fort White (15-9) was 5-5 in district and received the No. 4 seed. Bradford High also was 5-5, but won the tiebreaker because of two wins over the Indians. Williston High is the top seed and Lake City Reporter SPORTS Sunday, April 22, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section B Story ideas?ContactTim KirbySports Editor754-0421tkirby@lakecityreporter.com INDIANS continued on 3B Matchups of Indians at 7 p.m. today in Keystone Heights. Monday Q Fort White High baseball vs. host Keystone Heights High in District 5-4A tournament, 7 p.m. Tuesday Q Columbia High softball at Oakleaf High in Class 6A regional quarterfinal, 4 p.m. Q Columbia High baseball vs. Wolfson High/Atlantic Coast High winner in District 4-6A tournament at Atlantic Coast, 7 p.m. Wednesday Q Columbia High track in Region 1-3A meet at University of North Florida, noon Saturday Q Fort White High’s Sitia Martinez in FHSAA Class 2A state track meet at University of North Florida, 4 p.m. GAMES BRIEFS CHS continued on 5B STATE continued on 3B Lady Tigers travel to take on Oakleaf High on Tuesday. CHS FOOTBALL Meeting to plan BBQ fundraiser The Columbia County Quarterback Club has a barbecue planning meeting at 6 p.m. Monday in the Jones Fieldhouse. For details, call Joe Martino at 984-0452. FORT WHITE FOOTBALL Fundraiser at Applebee’s The Fort White Quarterback Club has a fundraiser Wednesday at Applebee’s Neighborhood Grill & Bar on U.S Highway 90 west. Submit a flyer and Applebee’s will donate 10 percent of the bill to the Quarterback Club. For details, call Harold Bundy at 365-5731.Yard sale for Q-back Club The Fort White Quarterback Club has a yard sale of donated items from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. May 5 at the Fort White Train Depot. Merchandise and donations are now being accepted and all proceeds will go to the Quarterback Club. For details on drop-off times and locations, call Dana Brady at 365-3103, Gloria Jackson at 497-4808, April Parnell at 623-6694 or Priscilla Newman at 719-2586. INDIANS CHEERLEADING Tryouts for high, middle schools Fort White High cheerleading tryouts for high school and middle school are 3:45-5:30 p.m. April 30 through May 4 at the high school gym. Tryouts packets are in the front offices. For details, call Kathy DePratter at 497-5952. WOLVES CHEERLEADING Tryout packets in guidance office Tryouts packets for Richardson Middle School cheerleading are available at the school’s guidance office at the school. Packets are due back by 3 p.m. Friday. For details, call Shannon Hall at 623-4058.Q From staff reports Fort White on a roll for tourneyJASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterFort White High center fielder Taylor Morgan tracks down a fly ball in a game against Bradford High on March 13. Playoff push begins Tuesday for Lady Tigers BRANDON FINLEY /Lake City ReporterColumbia High’s Kayli Kvistad connects with a pitch dur ing the Lady Tigers game against Atlantic Coast High on Thursday. FROM THE SIDELINE Brandon FinleyPhone: (386) 754-0420bfinley@lakecityreporter.comBigger picture still availableC olumbia High must quickly put behind its 4-3 loss in the championship game of the District 4-6A championship, or use it for By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comAfter a 4-3 loss against Atlantic Coast High in the District 4-6A championship, Columbia High will be look-ing for a little revenge when it begins the state playoffs on Tuesday. The Lady Tigers drew the winner of Orange Park and Oakleaf high schools with Oakleaf coming out on top in a 5-0 win. Columbia will travel to Oakleaf for a 4 p.m. game Tuesday in Orange Park. “They’re extremely like Atlantic Coast,” Columbia head coach Jimmy Williams said. “They’ve got a group CHS enters districts as No. 1 seedTigers will face winner of Atlantic Coast/ Wolfson on Tuesday By BRANDON FINLEYbfinley@lakecityreporter.comColumbia High looks to keep its unbeaten record in District 4-6A unblimished as the Tigers enter the district tournament as the No. 1 seed beginning on Tuesday. Columbia (13-11) finished the regular season with a perfect 5-0 record in district play to earn the top seed. The Tigers will travel to Atlantic Coast high school for the tournament where it will meet the winner of Atlantic Coast High and Wolfson High at 7 p.m. on Tuesday. Atlantic Coast finished in a three-way tie for sec-ond in the district with a 3-2 record in 4-6A play during the regular season. The Stingrays’ only losses came against Columbia and Stanton Prep. Columbia coach J.T. Clark fully expects to take on the home team in the opening game, but he doesn’t think the home crowd will play too much of a factor. “We have to handle our business either way,” Clark said. “It’ll be tough in what is basically a home game for them, but we travel well, so hopefully it doesn’t become a factor.” The Tigers defeated the Stingrays in their only regular-season meeting on March 14. Columbia won the game 5-2 with a strong pitching performance from Kellan Bailey. Bailey went the complete game and struck out 12 bat-ters while allowing only one hit in the game. “We’ll have Kellan on the mound again,” Clark said. “He’s been our horse all year. We want to step up our hitting and if we get two or three runs, that should be enough for Kellan to win us the game.” Columbia had five hits last time against the Stingrays with Levi Hollingsworth leading the way with a 2-for-3 performance at the plate. “We saw their No. 1 last time and he was decent, but we definitely need to get more than five or six hits,” Clark said. “We need to do what we can do to make it a little easier on oursevles.” St. Augustine will take on the winner of Stanton Prep and Lee high schools in the other semifinal game. Clark offered up his prediction and expects to see St. Augustine in the finals if the Tigers win on Tuesday. The championship game will take place at 7 p.m. on Thursday. “Honestly, St. Augustine is the better of the teams,” Clark said. “They’re coached well, play hard and although they don’t have a superstar, they battle, scratch and claw.” Clark doesn’t want to completely discount Stanton Prep from the con-test either after it finished in a tie for second during the regular season. “Stanton has a very good record, I just feel that St. Augustine is surging at the right time,” Clark said. The Yellow Jackets also hit a hot streak late last season and won the dis-trict title before advancing a couple rounds in the state playoffs. Clark is hoping that the Tigers can be the roadblock for St.Augustine this year. JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City ReporterColumbia High baseball head coach J.T. Clark (left) hig h-fives Levi Hollingsworth (18) as he rounds third base after hitting a home run against Robert E. Lee High on March 29. TIGERS continued on 5B

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SCOREBOARD TELEVISIONTV sports Today AUTO RACING 7:30 a.m. SPEED — Formula One, Bahrain Grand Prix, at Manama, Bahrain 12:30 p.m. FOX — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, STP 400, at Kansas City, Kan. COLLEGE BASEBALL 3 p.m. ESPN2 — Georgia at Florida COLLEGE SOFTBALL 3:30 p.m. ESPN — Missouri at Oklahoma CYCLING 12:30 a.m. NBCSN — Liege-Bastogne-Liege, Liege to Ans, Belgium (delayed tape) GOLF 9 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, China Open, final round, at Tianjin, China (same-day tape) 1 p.m. CBS — Champions Tour, Legends of Golf, final round, at Savannah, Ga. 3 p.m. CBS — PGA Tour, Texas Open, final round, at San Antonio MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 1 p.m. TBS — Texas at Detroit 2:10 p.m. WGN — Cincinnati at Chicago Cubs 8 p.m. ESPN — N.Y. Yankees at Boston MOTORSPORTS 5 p.m. SPEED — FIM World Superbike, at Assen, Netherlands (same-day tape) 11 p.m. SPEED — AMA Pro Racing, at Braselton, Ga. (same-day tape) NBA BASKETBALL 1 p.m. ESPN — New York at Atlanta 3:30 p.m. ABC — Oklahoma City at L.A. Lakers NHL HOCKEY Noon NBC — Playoffs, Pittsburgh at Philadelphia 3 p.m. NBC — Playoffs, Boston at Washington 8 p.m. NBCSN — Playoffs, Los Angeles at Vancouver SOCCER 6 p.m. ESPN2 — MLS, New York at D.C. United ——— Monday MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 7 p.m. ESPN — N.Y. Yankees at Texas NHL HOCKEY 7:30 p.m. NBCSN — Playoffs, conference quarterfinals, teams TBA 10 p.m. NBCSN — Playoffs, conference quarterfinals, teams TBABASKETBALLNBA standings EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct GB y-Boston 37 27 .578 — x-New York 33 30 .524 3 12 Philadelphia 32 30 .516 4 New Jersey 22 41 .349 14 12 Toronto 22 41 .349 14 12 Southeast Division W L Pct GB y-Miami 45 17 .726 — x-Atlanta 38 25 .603 7 12 x-Orlando 36 26 .581 9 Washington 16 46 .258 29Charlotte 7 55 .113 38 Central Division W L Pct GB y-Chicago 47 16 .746 —x-Indiana 41 22 .651 6 Milwaukee 29 33 .468 17 12 Detroit 23 40 .365 24 Cleveland 21 41 .339 25 12 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct GB y-San Antonio 46 16 .742 — x-Memphis 38 25 .603 8 12 x-Dallas 36 28 .563 11 Houston 32 31 .508 14 12 New Orleans 20 43 .317 26 12 Northwest Division W L Pct GB y-Oklahoma City 46 17 .730 — Denver 35 28 .556 11 Utah 33 30 .524 13 Portland 28 35 .444 18 Minnesota 26 38 .406 20 12 Pacific Division W L Pct GB x-L.A. Lakers 40 24 .625 —x-L.A. Clippers 39 24 .619 12 Phoenix 33 31 .516 7 Golden State 22 40 .355 17 Sacramento 20 43 .317 19 12 x-clinched playoff spoty-clinched division Late Thursday New Orleans 105, Houston 99, OTMiami 83, Chicago 72Phoenix 93, L.A. Clippers 90 Friday’s Games Atlanta 97, Boston 92Memphis 85, Charlotte 80Cleveland 98, New York 90Dallas 104, Golden State 94San Antonio 121, L.A. Lakers 97Oklahoma City 103, Sacramento 92 Saturday’s Games Denver 118, Phoenix 107Philadelphia at Indiana (n)Washington at Miami (n)Dallas at Chicago (n)Golden State at Houston (n)Portland at Memphis (n)New Jersey at Milwaukee (n)Orlando at Utah (n) Today’s Games New York at Atlanta, 1 p.m.Oklahoma City at L.A. Lakers, 3:30 p.m. Sacramento at Charlotte, 6 p.m.Toronto at Detroit, 6 p.m.Houston at Miami, 6 p.m.Golden State at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Cleveland at San Antonio, 7 p.m.Orlando at Denver, 8 p.m.New Orleans at L.A. Clippers, 9:30 p.m. Monday’s Games Detroit at Indiana, 7 p.m.Charlotte at Washington, 7 p.m.Philadelphia at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.Cleveland at Memphis, 8 p.m.Toronto at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.Portland at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m. NBA Draft early entries Harrison Barnes, f, North CarolinaBradley Beal, g, FloridaJ’Covan Brown, g, TexasDominic Cheek, g, VillanovaJared Cunningham, g, Oregon StateAnthony Davis, f, KentuckyAndre Drummond, c, UConnJustin Hamilton, c, LSUMoe Harkless, g-f, St. John’sJohn Henson, f, North CarolinaJohn Jenkins, g, VanderbiltTerrence Jones, f, KentuckyPerry Jones III, f, BaylorMichael Kidd-Gilchrist, f, KentuckyDoron Lamb, g, KentuckyJeremy Lamb, g, UConnMeyers Leonard, c, IllinoisDamian Lillard, g, Weber St.Kendall Marshall, g, North CarolinaFab Melo, c, SyracuseKhris Middleton, g-f, Texas A&MArnett Moultrie, f, Mississippi St.Austin Rivers, g, DukeThomas Robinson, f, KansasTerrence Ross, g, WashingtonRenardo Sidney, f, Mississippi St.Jared Sullinger, f, Ohio StateMarquis Teague, g, KentuckyHollis Thompson, f, GeorgetownDion Waiters, g, SyracuseMaalik Wayns, g, VillanovaRoyce White, f, Iowa StateTony Wroten, g, WashingtonBJ Young, g, ArkansasBASEBALLAL standings East Division W L Pct GB New York 9 6 .600 — Baltimore 8 6 .571 12 Toronto 7 6 .538 1Tampa Bay 7 7 .500 1 12 Boston 4 10 .286 4 12 Central Division W L Pct GB Detroit 9 5 .643 — Cleveland 7 5 .583 1Chicago 8 6 .571 1Minnesota 5 9 .357 4 Kansas City 3 10 .231 5 12 West Division W L Pct GB Texas 12 2 .857 — Oakland 7 8 .467 5 12 Seattle 7 9 .438 6 Los Angeles 5 9 .357 7 Late Thursday Texas 10, Detroit 3Tampa Bay 9, Toronto 4Oakland 4, L.A. Angels 2Cleveland 2, Seattle 1 Friday’s Games N.Y. Yankees 6, Boston 2Texas at Detroit, ppd., rainMinnesota 5, Tampa Bay 4Toronto 4, Kansas City 3L.A. Angels 6, Baltimore 3Cleveland 4, Oakland 3Chicago White Sox 7, Seattle 3 Saturday’s Games Texas 10, Detroit 4, 1st gameChicago White Sox 4, Seattle 0N.Y. Yankees 15, Boston 9Texas at Detroit, 2nd game (n)Minnesota at Tampa Bay (n)Toronto at Kansas City (n)Baltimore at L.A. Angels (n)Cleveland at Oakland (n) Today’s Games Texas (Lewis 2-0) at Detroit (Smyly 0-0), 1:05 p.m. Minnesota (Liriano 0-2) at Tampa Bay (Niemann 0-2), 1:40 p.m. Toronto (R.Romero 2-0) at Kansas City (Duffy 1-1), 2:10 p.m. Baltimore (W.Chen 1-0) at L.A. Angels (Haren 0-1), 3:35 p.m. Cleveland (Masterson 0-1) at Oakland (T.Ross 0-0), 4:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Danks 1-2) at Seattle (Millwood 0-0), 4:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 1-0) at Boston (Bard 0-2), 8:05 p.m. Monday’s Games N.Y. Yankees at Texas, 7:05 p.m.Boston at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.Toronto at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m.Chicago White Sox at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.NL standings East Division W L Pct GB Washington 12 4 .750 —Atlanta 9 5 .643 2 New York 8 6 .571 3 Philadelphia 7 7 .500 4 Miami 7 8 .467 4 12 Central Division W L Pct GB St. Louis 10 4 .714 — Milwaukee 6 8 .429 4Cincinnati 6 9 .400 4 12 Pittsburgh 5 8 .385 4 12 Houston 5 9 .357 5 Chicago 4 11 .267 6 12 West Division W L Pct GB Los Angeles 11 3 .786 — Colorado 7 6 .538 3 12 Arizona 7 7 .500 4 San Francisco 7 7 .500 4 San Diego 3 12 .200 8 12 Late Thursday Atlanta 10, Arizona 2Philadelphia 2, San Diego 0 Friday’s Games Cincinnati 9, Chicago Cubs 4Washington 2, Miami 0St. Louis 4, Pittsburgh 1San Francisco 4, N.Y. Mets 3, 10 innings L.A. Dodgers 3, Houston 1Colorado 4, Milwaukee 3Atlanta 9, Arizona 1Philadelphia 4, San Diego 1 Saturday’s Games Chicago Cubs 6, Cincinnati 1Washington 3, Miami 2, 10 inningsN.Y. Mets 5, San Francisco 4L.A. Dodgers at Houston (n) St. Louis at Pittsburgh (n)Colorado at Milwaukee (n)Atlanta at Arizona (n)Philadelphia at San Diego (n) Today’s Games San Francisco (Lincecum 0-2) at N.Y. Mets (Gee 1-1), 1:10 p.m. Miami (Jo.Johnson 0-2) at Washington (G.Gonzalez 1-0), 1:35 p.m. St. Louis (Lohse 2-0) at Pittsburgh (Bedard 0-3), 1:35 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Billingsley 2-0) at Houston (W.Rodriguez 0-2), 2:05 p.m. Colorado (Guthrie 1-1) at Milwaukee (Gallardo 1-1), 2:10 p.m. Cincinnati (Cueto 1-0) at Chicago Cubs (Dempster 0-1), 2:20 p.m. Philadelphia (Blanton 1-2) at San Diego (Bass 0-2), 4:05 p.m. Atlanta (Delgado 2-0) at Arizona (I.Kennedy 2-0), 4:10 p.m. Monday’s Games Colorado at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.San Francisco at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.St. Louis at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m.Houston at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.Philadelphia at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.Atlanta at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.AUTO RACINGRace week SPRINT CUP STP 400 Site: Kansas City, Kan.Schedule: Today, race, 1 p.m. (FOX, 12:30-4 p.m.). Track: Kansas Speedway (oval, 1.5 miles). Race distance: 400.5 miles, 267 laps. FORMULA ONE BAHRAIN GRAND PRIX Site: Sakhir, Bahrain.Schedule: Today, race, 8 a.m. (Speed, 7:30-10 a.m., 1:30-4 p.m.). Track: Bahrain International (road course, 3.36 miles). Race distance: 191.53 miles, 57 laps. STP 400 qualifying Saturday qualifying; race today (Car number in parentheses) 1. (22) A J Allmendinger, Dodge, 175.993. 2. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 175.747. 3. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 175.724.4. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 175.667.5. (55) Mark Martin, Toyota, 175.484.6. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 175.444. 7. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 175.313. 8. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 175.302.9. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 175.092. 10. (12) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 175.086. 11. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 175.063. 12. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 174.927. 13. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 174.887. 14. (51) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 174.876. 15. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 174.803. 16. (10) David Reutimann, Chevrolet, 174.803. 17. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 174.706.18. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 174.486.19. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 174.323. 20. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 174.261. 21. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 174.244.22. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 174.171.23. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 174.143. 24. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 174.031. 25. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 174.02.26. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 174.003.27. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 173.947.28. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 173.863. 29. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 173.756. 30. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 173.745. 31. (49) J.J. Yeley, Toyota, 173.516.32. (83) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 173.388. 33. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 173.383. 34. (23) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet, 173.249. 35. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 173.221.36. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 173.182. 37. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 173.155. 38. (26) Josh Wise, Ford, 172.756.39. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 172.507. 40. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 171.985.41. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 171.625. 42. (32) Reed Sorenson, Ford, Owner Points. 43. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 171.396. Failed to Qualify 44. (79) Tim Andrews, Ford, 170.989.45. (33) Jeff Green, Chevrolet, 169.769. 46. (74) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, 169.444.HOCKEYNHL playoffs FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) Late Thursday Phoenix 3, Chicago 2, OT, Phoenix leads series 3-1 St. Louis 2, San Jose 1, St. Louis leads series 3-1 Friday Pittsburgh 3, Philadelphia 2, Philadelphia leads series 3-2 Nashville 2, Detroit 1, Nashville wins series 4-1 Saturday Washington 4, Boston 3, Washington leads series 3-2 New Jersey at Florida (n)Ottawa at NY Rangers (n)San Jose at St. Louis (n)Chicago at Phoenix (n) Today Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, noonBoston at Washington, 3 p.m.Los Angeles at Vancouver, 8 p.m. 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, APRL 22, 2012 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421 2 DailyJumbles 2 Daily Crosswords Lake City ReporterThe first puzzles will have Friday’s answers and the second will have the answers for the first.EVERY SUNDAYIN SECTION BSPORTS COURTESY PHOTOWoodpecker Mud Bog winners in bogging and racing on March 24 show off their trophies. The White Springs bog and track are open today. Mud bogging, racing todayFrom staff reportsWoodpecker Mud Bog bogging and mud rac-ing continue at the track in White Springs. Today’s hours are 12:30-6 p.m. The last event was March 24 and the racing was dominated by the Raulerson family, which took first place in five of the six classes. Trey Raulerson, 10, notched his first win in Street Legal and Spencer Raulerson won the Donut Competition with a track record of eight turns in 60 seconds. Scott Raulerson gave the fans a treat as he did the freestyle mud bog with his alcohol Chevy. Results from March 24 follow.Milton’s Country Store Under 12 1. Logan Charles, 2. Trey Raulerson, 3. Matt Ross, 4. Colby Holton, 5. Stephen Pilkington; Suwannee Hardware and Feed ATV Open 1. Jody Raulerson, 2. Lashonna Crews, 3. Steve Raulerson, 4. Jimmy Deckar, 5. Gary Littles; Complete Automotive Street Legal 1. Trey Raulerson, 2. Brad Cheshire, 3. Stephen Pilkington, 4. James Morgan, 5. Joey Raulerson; The Boat Doctor Stock Bodies Modified 1. Ricky Raulerson, 2. Trey Raulerson, 3. Spencer Raulerson, 4. Kare Drawdy, 5. Alen Price; Townsend Timber Open Class 1. Ricky Raulerson, 2. Nick Raulerson, 3. Paul Sweat, 4. Larry Drawdy, 5. Scott Raulerson; Peloni Pump Donut Competition 1. Spencer Raulerson, 2. Charles Strickland, 3. Scotty Raulerson, 4. Charles Childress, 5. Chris Bell.

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By TIM KIRBY tkirby@lakecityreporter.com Fort White Highs Sitia Martinez added a region championship to her three district titles and qualified for state in two events for the second straight year. The Region 1-2A meet was at The Bolles School on Thursday. Martinez won the 300meter hurdles in a time of 44.45, and also earned a state berth in the 100 meters with a fourth-place finish. The 18 points earned by Martinez placed Fort White 13th in the competi tion, which was won by the host school. Lake Highland Prep won for the boys. There are 40 schools in Region 1-2A. In her other events, Martinez was 14th in the high jump and recorded a did not finish in the 200 meters. Tavaris Williams missed making the finals of the 200 meters with a ninth-place finish in the preliminaries. He was 14th in the long jump. Sydni Jones and Ashley Jones were 12th and 13th, respectively, in the 1,600 meters. In the 3,200 meters Ashley Jones was 14th and Sheridan Plasencia was 16th. Danielle Leon tied for 15th in the high jump. The Lady Indians 4x400 relay team of Danielle Wooley, Carolee Marrow, Shania Pelham and Marissa Fletcher finished 14th. The FHSAA Class 2A state meet is Saturday at the University of North Floridas Hodges Stadium. Indians weightlifting Fort Whites Jonathan Dupree tied for 11th in the Heavyweight Division at the FHSAA Class 1A state meet at the Kissimmee Civic Center on Friday. Dupree bench pressed 330 pounds and had a clean & jerk of 285 pounds for a 615 total. He beat his total at the sectional meet qualifier on April 5 by 15 pounds. Darrien Booker of Auburndale High won in heavyweight with 420-300720. Blake Mills of Baker County High placed fifth. Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012 3B 3BSPORTS Road trip! M AY 7-13 TPC SAWGRASS PON T E VED RA BE AC H, FL Create your PLAY E RS story on and off the course and experience all the First Coast has to offer. Getaway packages start at $99 To book your trip, visit theplayerschampionshiptravel.com or visitjacksonville.com/golf INDIANS: Begin districts on Monday Continued From Page 1B STATE: CHS must forcus on big picture Continued From Page 1B COURTESY PHOTO DuBose signs with Averett University Garrett Dubose, a quarterback at Lafayette High, signed a football scholarship to Averett University in Danville, Va. DuBose lives in Columbia County where he played youth soccer, football and baseball and was in FFA and 4H. He attended The Blake School and Fort White High before transferring to Lafayette, where he also played baseball. DuBose threw for 975 yards and 12 touchdowns for the Hornets. Joining Garrett at the signing table are mom Sondra DuBose and dad Lennard DuBose. Standing (from left) are Lafayette coaches Stephen Clark, Josh Akers, head football coach Joey Pearson and Derek Garland. Martinez wins hurdles at region; also qualifies for state in 100 meters COURTESY PHOTO Fort White Highs Sitia Martinez sprints ahead of competition at the District 4-2A meet at Baldwin High on April 11. motivation. The Lady Tigers begin their trek for a state championship when Columbia travels to Orange Park at 4 p.m. Tuesday. Oakleaf High stands in the way of a rematch against Atlantic Coast High on Thursday Columbia cant think about how the Lady Stingrays stole a district championship from their grasp, or they use it to drive them. Theres no time for feeling sad. Theres no time to think about what might have been. Theres only time to think about whats to come next. Theres only time to think about knocking off one more opponent to have a chance at revenge. The Lady Tigers have been stung twice by the Stingrays now, but the good news is that it only takes winning one game. And what better time for Columbia to choose its win than the state playoffs. If Columbia can pick up two wins in a row to begin the Class 6A playoffs and early-season loss and district championship heartbreak will quickly be erased. Its hard to beat a good team twice. Its harder to beat a great team three times. Make no mistake, Columbia softball team is great. How else do you define three playoff appearances? How else do you define over 90 wins? Columbia cannot let this loss define them. The Lady Tigers must find a way to feed off the loss or forget it completely. The goal coming into the season was never a district title. Sure, it would have been nice, but this team has loftier expectations. They have bigger dreams. Most of all, they have the talent to reach those expectations and dreams. Its not an easy task. Each out must be played like theres a runner on third with two outs in the bottom of the seventh while protecting a one-run lead. Each at bat must be taken like its the last chance to tie the game with nobody on and two outs in the final inning. Each pitch it the most important. Each swing is the most crucial. Everything that has happened before Tuesday is preparation. This is the moment the Lady Tigers have been waiting for. This is where the road to the ring begins. Brandon Finley covers sports for the Lake City Reporter JASON MATTHEW WALKER /Lake City Reporter Columbia Highs Jayce Barber (7) delivers a pitch during a game against Robert E. Lee High on March 29. Tigers take down Bulldogs to end regular season By BRANDON FINLEY bfinley@lakecityreporter.com After a late-season slump, Columbia Highs baseball team pulled it together to end the season on a high note. The Tigers defeated Suwannee High, 2-0, in a rain-shortened game on Thursday. Columbia went five innings without a hit against the Bulldogs before the Tigers put up the tworun difference in the bot tom of the fifth. Ryan Thomas start ed the inning with a hit, stole second base and advanced to third after the pick at second got away from a Bulldog player. Caleb Vaughn walked and Travis Brinkley laid down a suicide squeeze to catch the Bulldogs by surprise. Brinkley not only scored the runner, but he also reached on the bunt attempt for the 1-0 lead. Alan Espenship deliv ered the Tigers second run with a base hit to score Vaughn. He was also pretty good at the mound. Despite sporting a 0.00 ERA for the year, Espenship picked up his first win since returning from injury. He went five innings, allowed four hits, struck out three batters and walked one batter. He threw really well, Columbia head coach J.T. Clark said. It was his lon gest outing since returning from injury. Clark was especially pleased how Espenship responded when facing a jam in the top of the fifth. He did a great job get ting out of a bases-loaded situation, Clark said. He didnt have any outs and struck out two batters and got a 6-3 play for the third out. Clark also credited the defense behind Espenship. It was by far the best defense we have played all year, Clark said. We didnt have any errors for what seems like the first time all year. Were stepping up at the right time and playing team baseball. Columbia (13-11) opens the Disrict 4-6A tourna ment against the winner of Atlantic Coast and Wolfson high schools at 7 p.m. Tuesday. Santa Fe High is No. 2. Both receive first-round byes and will play Mondays winners on Tuesday. In Mondays 4 p.m. game, Bradford plays No. 6 Interlachen High. Despite having to face the tournament host, Fort White has had success against Keystone Heights during the season. The hometown Indians beat the visitors, 4-0, on March 1 as Robby Howell fired a no-hit ter. Fort White won 8-5 on the road. Rizzi plans to start Kevin Dupree against Keystone Heights with Lane Pendergrast on relief duty. If we are fortunate to advance, we will go with Robby Howell and Brandon Sharpe in relief, Rizzi said. Our strength going into the tournament, as well as all year, has been our pitch ing. I have a lot of confi dence in all four of these guys and I am hopeful we will play strong defense behind them and swing the bats well enough to give them some run support. Leading the offense is Bryce Beach, who is hit ting .365 with 17 runs, 12 RBIs, two doubles and 10 stolen bases. Dupree is hit ting .306 with nine runs, 11 RBIs, five doubles and two home runs. He has drawn 19 walks, several of them intentional. Kody Moniz leads the Indians in runs scored with 16. He has nine RBIs, four doubles, one triple and seven stolen bases. Brandon Myers is hitting .259 with 10 runs, seven RBIs, one double, one triple and 10 walks. Howell has a pair of doubles and a home run. Pendergrast has scored 10 runs and has four doubles. Taylor Morgan has scored 12 runs and Sharpe has scored 10. Brady Wilkinson has scored seven runs and has seven RBIs. Nick Butler is hitting .263 with five RBIs. We have a very strong district and any team is capable of beating any other team on a given day, Rizzi said. I feel like we are peaking at the right time, as we have been playing some of our best baseball to date. They understand we have been preparing all season for this time of year. A Fort White win over Keystone Heights would bring on Williston at 7 p.m. Tuesday. The Indians split with the Red Devils this year. The championship game is 7 p.m. Thursday.

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4B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420S&S Charity Golf Tournament Annual fundraiser event raised $80,000 By ANTONIA ROBINSONSpecial to the ReporterThe Foundation for Florida Gateway College and Catholic Charities each received $30,000 from the 12th Annual S&S Charities Golf Tournament at The Country Club at Lake City on Friday. “We’re just very appreciative of our vendors that have supported this golf tournament for 12 years,” said Lester Scaff who, along with wife Anne, owns S&S Foods. “The tournament provides about $80,000 in one day. Many of the vendors are outside of the community but participate to support the local cus-tomers. We look forward to next year.” Since the tournament’s inception the Foundation for Florida Gateway College has been one of the chari-ties receiving a donation. The Foundation provides financial support to Florida Gateway College. “This has been a tremendous benefit to our founda-tion for the last 12 years,” Foundation Executive Director Mike Lee said. “Our share of the proceeds has been more than $325,000, and with the match we’ve received on the funds from the state it’s been more than half a million. “We really appreciate Mr. and Mrs. Scaff, and we appreciate Mrs. Scaff’s 30 years of service on our foundation board.” The Scaffs and the S&S team have always been supportive of Catholic Charities. “It’s an outstanding event with outstanding people participating in this for our community,” said Catholic Charities COO Suzanne Edwards. “The money raised makes a difference to the families serviced and in need. We know even in these times we can use the extra money to help some-one in need.” More than 100 golfers participated in the scramble tournament. “What better way to spend a beautiful day with friends raising money for S&S Charities,” the tournament’s Master of Ceremonies Mike McKee said. “Lester and Anne do a wonderful job every year.” Friday’s winner in the gross division was the team of Brian Parent, Ernie Reiter, Pat Womble and David Morgan with a 57. The second-place team was Christian Danuser, Jordan Hale, James Edwards and George Burnham. The third-place team was Jesse Shireman, Steven Burkhardt, Don McIntyre and Ray Soucy. Net team winners were: John Moore, Terry Davidson, Brian Bolen and Don Benton in first; Kevin Francisco, Roger Little, Greg Flowers and Dennis Crawford in second; Donnie Dobbins, Warren Buck, John Galanti and Steve Edinger in third. Individual prizes went to: Chad Hunter, men’s longest drive (No. 3); Ashley Price, women’s longest drive (No. 8); Glenn Adams, closest to the pin (No. 5); Jason Powell, straightest drive (No. 13); Don Benton, longest putt (No. 18). Mike McKee, Florida Gateway College executive director fo r media, (from left) S&S Food Stores owners Lester and Ann e Scaff and Suzanne Edwards, COO of Catholic Charities Bur eau Lake City Regional Office visit before the start of the 12th Annual S&S Charities Golf Tournament at The Country C lub at Lake City on Friday. The funds will benefit the FGC’s Foundation and Catholic Charities. ‘I’m real thankful for the vendors, most of which had to travel from outside of Lake City,’ Lester Scaff said. ‘We’re thankful for everyone coming ou t to take part in this fundraiser. They support us tremendous ly.’ Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER Lake City Reporter ABOVE: Matt Thompson (from left) and Robert Rathbone watch as Chuck Walker putts during the 12th Annual S&S Charities Golf Tournament.LEFT: Jacksonville resident Sam Parker (right) puts a dreadlock hat on Larry Wilson of High Springs. ‘I love it. This is one of the best events I go to all year,’ Wilson said. ‘This is lots of fun. My favorite part is the camaraderie, meeting new people.’RIGHT: Jordan Hale follows through after hitting to the green on No. 3.BOTTOM LEFT: Dave Mehl of Lake City is forced to wear a skirt and hat to hit from the ladies tee on No. 12. BELOW: Kevin Hanson of Ocala tees off on No. 3.

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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012 5B TIGERS: Looking for district title Continued From Page 1B CHS: Lady Tigers travel to Oak Leaf Continued From Page 1BFrom staff reportsVoices for Children of the Suwannee Valley Corporation had a charity softball tournament at the First Federal Sportsplex in Live Oak on March 24. The Swack team from Live Oak and Mayo defeat-ed Stateline from Perry in the championship. Members of the winning team were manager Kraig Kennington, Jeremy Yates, Blake Keene, Dave Anderson, Lance McCray, Paul Lee, Shane Michael Goldie, Billy Moran, Nick Combass, Lee Trawick and Kevin Kennington.Voices for Children COURTESY PHOTOTexas Hold ’em at Shrine ClubThe Lake City Shrine Club had a Texas Hold ’em tournam ent on April 6 and raised $285 for the club. Tournament winners Charles Peeler (from left), J anet Creel and Doug Peeler split the $490 prize pot. of seniors and it’s only a second-year school. They’ve been beat by some teams that aren’t that good, but they’re playing really good ball right now.” Oakleaf will use two pitchers against Columbia who are polar opposites. “They have two girls and the second girl throws really hard,” Williams said. “That tends to work out in our favor, because we seem to hit better against the girls that throw hard.” When the dust settles, Williams doesn’t believe the district championships will play a role. He said before the game that the cream will rise to the top by Thursday. “In order to get where we want to be, we have to beat these teams,” he said. “Whoever is going to advance has to win two in a row. After all is done, the best team will advance.” Orange Park also has a chance to beat Atlantic Coast on the other end of the bracket. The Lady Raiders have already done so once this season in a 3-2 win. “They’re playing good toward the end of the year as well, so you never know,” Williams said. At the end of the day, Williams doesn’t care which team the Lady Tigers draw in the second round as long as they make it there. “The best team will come out of the group,” he said. “We would have liked a dis-trict championship, but it didn’t happen. Who knows, we might have a chance to play them again.” Williams said there were tears following the game, but the group is mature enough to know that the next game is the most important. “We’re truly excited about our chances,” he said. “Even if we would have won, we still would have to put together two wins. It would just have been in a different sequence. But to be the best, we’ll have to beat the best. Nothing about our goal has changed. We’ve played Atlantic Coast twice and if we get them a third time, we hope it’s the charm. They’re not out of our league by any means. The players are over it. They understand that we’re not out of it.” Now Williams is excited to play a team that doesn’t know the ins and outs of the Lady Tigers. “The good thing about playing Oakleaf is they don’t know anything about us,” Williams said. “The problems we’ve had all year came to focus in the last game, but hopefully we’ve learned. We didn’t get a dis-trict title, but we can still be the top team and come out of it.” “They struggled again early this year, but just like last year they got hot,” Clark said. “I feel they’ll win the game.” Columbia actually played the Yellow Jackets twice during the regular season. The second game was counted as a non-district game and the Tigers didn’t throw their ace allowing St. Augustine to split the series. “I feel they’ll win,” Clark said. “It’ll be the rubber match for us. They weren’t afraid of us last time.” Clark expects to throw Alan Espenship in the championship game if things go according to plan. “Espenship is slated to throw, but we’ve got to win one to get there,” he said. “It’s not out of the realm of possibility that we might have to use him in the first game.” When asked for the key to winning the district championship, Clark offered a simple strategy. “What we have to do is what we’ve been doing the last couple games,” he said. “We have to fight to move runners over. We have to play unselfish and pitch like we’ve been pitching all year. I feel like we’ll be the best team if we do those kind of things. We have to build on what we’ve put together over the last cou-ple of games and keep that going.” Allmendinger to start on pole at Kansas SpeedwayBy DAVE SKRETTAAssociated PressKANSAS CITY, Kan. — AJ Allmendinger rolled off the track and hopped out of his car, convinced that he’d put together a decent quali-fying run but expecting to start somewhere in the top 15 on Sunday. Turns out he’ll be starting up front. Allmendinger captured his second career Sprint Cup pole Saturday, turning a lap of 175.993 mph in his Penske Racing Dodge to knock Kevin Harvick off the top spot. Joey Logano had the third fastest time but will start at the rear after changing engines dur-ing practice Friday. It was the first pole for Allmendinger since 2010 at Phoenix. He nearly had the pole last month at Bristol but was edged out by Greg Biffle by a thousandth of a second. “I didn’t think the lap was amazing. I thought it was OK,” said Allmendinger, who learned his lap time from crew chief Todd Gordon moments later and couldn’t help but smile. “I was kind of shocked by it,” he said. “Everybody has been working hard. We’re getting closer — we’re not where we want to be at.” Logano went off first in qualifying and posted a lap of 175.724 mph, then watched as car after car failed to touch his time. It wasn’t until Harvick turned a lap of 175.747 that Logano was finally bumped. “We’ll shotgun the field,” Logano said. “It’s like the old short-track days. Didn’t they pay you more if you started at the back and you passed them all? “I’ll have to talk to NASCAR about that.” Denny Hamlin posted the fourth-fastest lap, followed by Mark Martin and Martin Truex Jr. Dale Earnhardt Jr. qualified seventh for Hendrick Motorsports, which is try-ing to an end a 13-race drought and reach mile-stone win No. 200. The team hasn’t reached Victory Lane since Jimmie Johnson’s win at Kansas last October, the longest winless stretch since the 2002 and ’03 sea-sons. Johnson qualified 15th after going sideways in Turns 1 and 2. He managed to recover down the back stretch and put together a solid second lap, but the bobble through the corner may have cost him a chance for his second consecutive top-10 qualifying run. “An eventful 1 and 2,” said Johnson, a two-time winner at Kansas. “We know we got an awesome race car. I just hope we don’t hurt our-selves too bad here.” Local favorite Clint Bowyer — who is from Emporia, Kan., and raced on the dirt track at nearby Lakeside Speedway — qual-ified eighth. Kasey Kahne was ninth and Sam Hornish Jr. was 10th. Hornish was among 11 cars that had to make the field on time. The full-time Nationwide driver will be making his first Sprint Cup start since Pocono last June. ASSOCIATED PRESSRick Hendrick (left) and Jimmie Johnson (right) are se en before the NASCAR Sprint Cup Samsung 500 race at Texas Motor Speedway in Ft. Worth, Tx. o n Friday. Hendrick still seeks 200th win at Kansas SpeedwayBy DAVE SKRETTAAssociated PressKANSAS CITY, Kan. — It’s turned into the joke that nobody can really laugh about, the cloud hanging over one of the most successful teams in the history of NASCAR. Thirteen races have passed since Hendrick Motorsports reached Victory Lane, the longest drought the team has expe-rienced since the 2002-03 seasons. And the result is that Hendrick is still stuck on 199 victories, the mile-stone maddeningly just out of reach. “You know, now it’s turned. We’ve been so close to getting it the last month or so, it’s kind of a deal now where we’re joking, like, let’s not even think about it,” said five-time Sprint Cup champi-on Jimmie Johnson, who claimed the team’s last vic-tory in October at Kansas Speedway. The series is back this weekend for the first of two races this year. It should give the powerhouse team some positive vibes. Johnson also won from the pole at Kansas in 2008, and Jeff Gordon won the first two races at the track in 2001 and ’02. Dale Earnhardt Jr. has five top-10 finishes on the 1 12 -mile oval and is currently third in points, while Kasey Kahne is coming off a Trucks series win at Rockingham. No owner has more wins at Kansas Speedway than Hendrick. “We know our teams are all capable of win-ning races. We’ve all been there,” Johnson said Friday. “Whenever it hap-pens, you’ll see a very big sigh of relief from Rick and the team.” It’s not as though Hendrick Motorsports hasn’t been competitive. To the contrary: It has been frustratingly close. Hendrick’s stable has finished second four times since Johnson’s victory during last season’s Chase, including his second-place run last Saturday night at Texas.

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6B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012 6BSPORTS What should I look for in a breast imaging center? B ECAUSE I DONT WANT TO MISS A SINGLE MOMENT OF THIS cccnf.com Welcomes LAKE CITY MEDI C A L CENTER 3140 NW Medical Center Lane, Suite 180, Lake City, FL 32055 www.LakeCityMedical.com To schedule your new patient appointment or for more information, please call ( 386) 755-9750 Ofce Hours: Monday-Friday, 8am to 4:30pm Accepting Most Insurance Plans Cancer Detection and Treatment Gallbladder Removal Skin Lesions Abdominal Pain Management Hemorrhoids Diverticulitis Polyps Colonoscopy & Upper Endoscopy Hernia Surgery Thyroid & Parathyroid Disorders Breast Cancer Management & Benign Breast Disorders Specializing in: Lake City Medical Center is pleased to welcome Eric Koch, MD. Dr. Koch is a board-certied general surgeon. Eric Koch, MD LCM-3052 Eric Koch 5.25x10.indd 1 4/18/12 2:17:38 PM

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By HANNAH O. BROWNhbrown@lakecityreporter.comFlorida Gateway Colleges new library, the Wilson S. Rivers Library and Media Center, is expected to contribute significantly to the local economy, Executive Director of Library and Community Services Jim Morris said. The new library has a wide range of resources devoted to business education. Florida Gateway College offers business as a major, and provides for its students access to databases that contain thousands of business journals and magazines. Newspaper subscriptions such as the New York Times, Wall Street Journal and Rolling Stone are available for anyone in the community to peruse. The new library, which has a coffee shop offering strudels and lattes, is open to everyone. Wireless Internet access is available as well as around 40 Internet stations. Community members are asked to attain a library card, which are issued at no cost. No card is needed, however, to come to the library to relax and read magazines. We have always welcomed everyone, Morris said. We are super friendly. Lake City Reporter Week of April 22 April 28, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section CColumbia, Inc.Your marketplace source for Lake City and Columbia County 1CBIZ FRONTON BUSINESSJerry Osteryoung(850) 644-3372 jostery@comcast.netLake City Reporter1CBIZ FRONT FSU Finance Professor Dr. Jerry Osteryoung is Executive Director of the Jim Moran Institute for Global Entrepreneurship at Florida Business.Week of April 22 April 28, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section CColumbia, Inc.Your marketplace source for Lake City and Columbia County1CColumbia Inc. Chambers website will better serveThe Lake City Columbia County Chamber is proud to announce we have a new and improved website to better serve our members. This is part of our ongoing effort to meet the goals of our strategic plan. Our members expressed they wanted a way to find out what was going on in our community as well as be able to have a one stop site where they could find out information that would help their business. While you are Thinking Lake City First, and you need a business, be sure to check out the website for a list of our members as well as their contact information. The site also has a calendar of events that lists not only Chamber events but other events hosted by our members or nonprofit groups. We also realize that local citizens arent the only people who are looking at our site. We have a relocation guide for people who are thinking of moving to the area as well as listings of our major employers in Columbia County. It will continue to be a work in progress but we encourage you to check out www.lakecitychamber.com and let us know what you would like to see us add to the site! In the last month we have had two of our highly anticipated annual events, The Business/Citizen of the Year luncheon and the Legislative Breakfast. Both events had over 100 attendees! At the Business/Citizen of the Year luncheon we honored the three finalists in the large and small business category. The finalists in the small business category were: Pro Motion Physical Therapy, Anytime Fitness, and Restoration Specialists. Restoration Specialists was awarded the top small business of the year honor. In the large business category the finalists were: Florida Gateway College, Century Ambulance Service, and First Federal Bank of Florida. This was the second consecutive year First Federal was nominated and they took home the award this year. Charlene Brown, with Columbia Bank, was presented with the honor of Citizen of the Year for her many years of dedicated service to several organizations in Columbia County. The Legislative Breakfast, sponsored by Clay Electric and Peoples State Bank, gave our local legislators a chance to talk about what they accomplished during the recent session. There was representation from Senator Rubios office, Senator Nelsons office, Congressman Crenshaws office. Senator Olerich, Senator Dean and Representative Porter were able to make the event in person. After each legislator was given an opportunity to speak to the group, the attendees were then able to ask questions. We appreciate the support of our legislators who always make it a priority to speak to By JOYCE M. ROSENBERGAssociated PressNEW YORK Dont be misled by reports that inflation is tame. For small business owners, its a threat to profits and expansion plans. An 8 percent increase in the cost of eggs over the past year is eating away at restaurants and bakeries. Cottons 14 percent increase is hurting clothing manufacturers and retailers. And any business that sends somebody on a sales trip is bearing the brunt of an 8 percent increase in jet fuel or 7 percent rise in gasoline. If this were a normal economy, companies could pass along the cost of doing business to customers. But these days, customers are demanding to pay less, not more. As a result, small businesses are often left with no options. You have to absorb a lot, says Celeste Hilling, whose skin-care company has seen travel costs rise 30 percent in the past year after a 20 percent gain the year before. Rising fares, baggage fees and hotel bills are to blame. Many companies have to adjust the way they operate. Hillings Carlsbad, Calif.-based Skin Authority is doing more training through online seminars rather than in person. The kind of numbers that Hilling deals with may surprise anyone who believes that the governments Consumer Price Index tells the story of inflation. In the 12 months that ended in March, the CPI rose 2.7 percent. Subtract food and gas as some economists do, and whats left is called core inflation. It rose 2.3 percent. Thats close to the target of 2 percent set by the Federal Reserve, which sets monetary policy so inflation doesnt get out of hand. CHAMBER BUSINESS Dennille Deckerdennille@lakecitychamber.comCHAMBER continued on 2C JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City ReporterThe newly built Wilson S. Rivers Library & Media Center at Florida Gateway College.FGC facility has resources that will help bolster the local economy. LIBRARY continued on 2C ASSOCIATED PRESSBill Reeder, president of Campus Cooks, goes over numbers with staff member Liz OMalley, Wednesday in Glenview, Ill. The cost of many goods and services that small companies need has gone up sharply the last two years. Many companies have to adjust the way they work because they cant or dont want to pass their higher costs on to customers.Inflation poses big problems for small businesses INFLATION continued on 2C

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The updated space has two meeting rooms and a set of study rooms, a notable upgrade from the previous facility which had no meeting rooms. “We have much more space for a conference and for people to come and share information,” Morris said. The new space has the potential to attract more people to the area, bene fiting the college as well as the local economy. Currently the library is investing $60,000 on materials for the col lege’s nursing major. The college is hoping to have its first four-year program approved by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. If approved, the school hopes to invest in additional programs such as Early Childhood Education and a busi ness and logistics pro gram. “Once they have approved your four-year program, they don’t scrutinize you as much,” Morris said. If these plans come to fruition, new resources will be acquired to aug ment the library’s selec tion in those specific areas. Executive Director of Media and Community Information Mike McKee said the new library could lead to an increase in stu dent enrollment. “Students like learning in a new modern facility,” McKee said. “We would hope that our enrollment would increase.” Morris said the library was built to be a techno logically plugged-in facil ity. “The library was built for the future, not the present or the past,” Morris said. Morris said there was not much additional room for books in the facility. “It’s all going electron ic,” he said. 2C LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012 CHAMBER: Website will better serve Continued From Page 1C April 22 is Earth Day. Started in 1970 by Senator Gaylord Nelson, Earth Day is designed to create awareness of the Earth’s environment and to encourage conservation efforts. If you and your family participate in Earth Day events, such as helping clean up a local park or taking materials to a recycling center, you know the EHQHWVRIGRLQJ\RXUSDUWWRLPSURYH\RXUsurroundings. But are you doing everything you can to upgrade your environment for investing? Actually, as an investor, you can learn a lot from the lessons of Earth Day. Here are just a few ideas: ‡'LYHUVLI\ If you’re familiar with Earth Day, you know that it involves multiple activities, including educational programs and do-it-now action steps. This variety is necessary because protecting our environment is a complex challenge. Meeting your shortand long-term investment goals can be challenging, too, but you’ll have a better chance of success by diversifying your investment dollars across a range of vehicles, such as stocks, bonds, government securities and FHUWLFDWHVRIGHSRVLW&'V'LYHUVLFDWLRQcan help reduce the impact of volatility on your portfolio — and high volatility can be an obstacle for some people trying to follow an LQYHVWPHQWVWUDWHJ\.HHSLQPLQGWKRXJKWKDWGLYHUVLFDWLRQE\LWVHOIFDQQRWJXDUDQWHHDSURWRUSURWHFWDJDLQVWORVV ‡6HHNJURZWKRSSRUWXQLWLHV Some people plant trees on Earth Day, hoping to watch them grow over the years. As an investor, you, too, need to plant “seeds” today in the hopes of growth in the future. That means, among other things, that when you purchase growth-oriented investments for the long term, you need to try to stick with them and not “uproot” them after short-term declines in price. ‡'HYHORSJRRGKDELWV If you attend an Earth Day program, you will learn about many eco-friendly habits you can develop, from XVLQJHQHUJ\HIFLHQWOLJKWEXOEVWRUHF\FOLQJold computers and other electronic devices. To invest successfully, it’s important to develop good habits, such as staying invested in all types of markets, seeking tax-advantaged investments and reviewing your portfolio regularly to make sure it’s still appropriate for your risk tolerance, time horizon and long-term objectives. ‡$YRLGWR[LQV At some Earth Day events, you can learn about “green” substitutes for toxic chemicals in common household cleaners. When you invest, you may also want to avoid “toxins” — or at least “toxic” behaviors, such as chasing after “hot” stocks that are inappropriate for your needs or trading so frequently that you run up big fees, commissions and taxes. ‡7KLQNORQJWHUP Above all else, Earth Day is a reminder to us that we all want to leave a healthy planet to future generations — which means we need to make moves that DUHEHQHFLDOIRUWKHHQYLURQPHQWRYHUWKHORQJterm. When you invest, you also need to focus on the future. That means following a long-term investment strategy and not getting sidetracked by short-term events, such as political crises and economic downturns. Earth Day comes once a year, but its lessons can have a lasting impact on our environment. When you apply these same lessons7KLVDUWLFOHZDVZULWWHQE\(GZDUG-RQHVIRUXVHE\\RXUORFDO(GZDUG-RQHV)LQDQFLDO$GYLVRU Earth Day Lessons Can Apply to Investors, Too ADVERTISEMENT Name That Company@eJXe;`\^f`e(0,*#k_\k_i\\ \dgcfp\\jf]k_\IfZb\k:_\d`ZXc :f%ki`\[+'k`d\jkf[\m\cfgXNXk\i ;`jgcXZ`e^]fidlcX]fiiljk$gi\m\ek`fe jfcm\ekjXe[[\^i\Xj\ij%K_\`in`ee`e^ ]fidlcXnXj]`ijklj\[Ypk_\Xm`Xk`fe `e[ljkipXe[`jefn]fle[`edfjk_fd\j% K_\i\Xi\dfi\k_Xe)#'''lj\j]fidp ]cX^j_`ggif[lZk#n_`Z_j_Xi\jdpeXd\%@k_Xj b\gkg`^\fejf]]YXcZfe`\j#]i\\[XeXb\[Yli$ ^cXijklZb`eXm\ekXe[i\dfm\[Xgpk_fe]ifd XYlj%Dpfk_\iYiXe[j`eZcl[\*$@E$FE<#CXmX# O$(+#Jfcmfc#)'''=clj_\j#:Xig\k=i\j_Xe[Jgfk J_fk%N_fXd@6Know the answer? Send it to us with Foolish Trivia on the top and you’ll be entered into a drawing for a nifty prize! many people, the answer is no. Fortunately, it’s not too late for most of us. We can, and should, ramp up our saving and investing. Here are some other suggestions: s3EEHOWYOUREDOINGANDMAKE a plan to help you reach your goals. Try some online retirement calcu-lators, such as those at fool.com/ calcs/calculators.htm s-AKETHEMOSTOFRETIREMENTPLANS AVAILABLEATWORK-ANYEMPLOYERSoffer matching funds to those who contribute — that’s free money! s4IGHTENYOURBUDGET9OUCAN live well while you save and invest. ,EARNHOWINh4HE-OTLEY&OOL0ERSONAL&INANCE7ORKBOOKvBYDavid and Tom Gardner (Fireside, h4HE-ILLIONAIRE.EXT$OORvBY4HOMAS*3TANLEYAND7ILLIAM$$ANKO4AYLOR4RADEANDh4HE5LTIMATE#HEAPSKATES2OADrMAPTO4RUE2ICHES!0RACTICAL(and Fun) Guide to Enjoying Life -OREBY3PENDING,ESSvBY*EFF9EAGER"ROADWAY s9OUCANALSOMAKEABIGDIFFERr ENCEBYWORKINGAFEWMOREYEARSif you need to. .OWGOASKYOUR(2DEPARTMENT FORTHEPAPERWORKTOINCREASEYOURKCONTRIBUTION K_\Dfkc\p=ffcKXb\ -C$ONALDS)S'OLDENThe Dow’s top performer in 2011, -C$ONALDS.93%-#$RECENTLYposted disappointing February sales and has a new CEO on the way. Don’t worry too much, though, about the company’s growth prospects. )NCOMING#%/$ON4HOMPSON HASSPENTYEARSWITH-C$ONrald’s, recently overseeing more than 53STORESANDTHEROLLOUTOFTHEPROFITABLE-C#AFEBEVERAGELINE "ETWEENAND-C$ONr ald’s increased average annual sales by 6.4 percent and more than dou-bled its operating profit margins. The company boasts a five-year average OPERATINGMARGINOFPERCENTtrouncing that of its closest competi-TOR-C$ONALDSHASPAIDUNINTERrRUPTEDDIVIDENDSSINCEWITHANimpressive recent yield of 2.9 percent ANDAREMARKABLEAVERAGEANNUALdividend growth rate of 20 percent over the past five years. !NOFTrOVERLOOKEDASPECTOF -ICKEY$SISITSVALUEASAREALestate play, as it owns thousands of prime commercial properties throughout the world. 7HILE-C$ONALDSSTILLFACESSOME near-term headwinds from commod-ity cost increases and a strengthening DOLLARITSLIKELYTOOVERCOMETHEMWITHITSUNRIVALEDMARKETINGBUDGETAGGRESSIVEEXPANSIONABROADANDresponsiveness to changing con-sumer demands. This top dog in fast food continues to be one of the best DEFENSIVEDIVIDENDrPAYINGSTOCKSYOUCANBUYTODAYh4HE-OTLEY&OOL)NCOME)NVESTORvNEWSLETTERHASRECOMMENDED-C$ONALDS The Motley Fool To Educate, Amuse & Enrich 8jbk_\=ffc Dp;ldY\jk@em\jkd\ek /NLY,OST0ERCENT)BOUGHTSTOCKIN&ANNIE-AEAND &REDDIE-ACAFTERBELIEVINGAHIGHrRANKINGOFFICIALTHATTHEYWEREINGREATFINANCIALSHAPE)COULDHAVEDOUBLEDMYPROFITINTWOWEEKSBUT)WASNOTPLANNINGTOSPECULATE)JUSTWANTEDINVESTMENTSthat would pay decent and reliable dividends. 4HENTHESTOCKSCOLr LAPSED)ENDEDUPSELLINGATApercent loss — which was still a good move, since they later fell EVENMORE)LEARNEDNOTTOTRUSThEXPERTSvˆ T.S., via email The Fool Responds: 9OUCAN get useful insights and ideas from EXPERTSBUTNOEXPERTISPERFECTand some don’t even have strong TRACKRECORDS!LWAYSTRYTOMAKEyour own decisions, assessing an INVESTMENTSSTRENGTHSRISKSANDpotential. 3TOCKSTHATHAVEPLUNGEDMAY SEEMLIKEBARGAINSBUTREMEMBERTHATTHEYCANKEEPFALLINGSOMErTIMESTOZERO!NDASADIVIDENDrPAYINGSTOCKFALLSITSDIVIDENDyield rises. The high yield might attract you, but do your due dili-GENCEFIRST3OMEFALLENSTOCKSAREindeed bargains facing short-term challenges, but others are in deep and lasting trouble.Do you have an embarrassing lesson learned the hard way? Boil it down to 100 words (or less) and send it to The Motley Fool c/o My Dumbest Investment. Got one that worked? Submit to My Smartest Investment. If we print yours, you’ll win a Fool’s cap! C8JKN<
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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDSUNDAY, APRIL22, 2012 3C Classified Department: 755-5440 CLASSIFIED AD vantageTake ADvantage of the Reporter Classifieds!755-5440Lake City Reporter FIND IT SELL IT BUY IT $17504 lines 3 days Includes 2 Signs Each additional line $1.65 Garage Sale Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$10104 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.10One item per ad Under $500 Personal Merchandise Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$16754 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.15One item per ad Under $1,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$23704 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.45One item per ad Under $2,500 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $4,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$27404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.55One item per ad Under $4,000 Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$30404 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $1.65One item per ad Under $6,000 Placing An Ad Service Guide Limited to service type advertis-ing only.4 lines, one month....$92.00 $10.80 each additional lineIncludes an additional $2.00 per ad for each Wednesday insertion. DeadlinesBe Sure to Call Early You can call us at 755-5440 Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.Some people prefer to place their classified ads in person, and some ad categories will require prepay-ment. Our office is located at 180 East Duval Street.You can also fax or email your ad copy to the Reporter.FAX: 386-752-9400 Please direct your copy to the Classified Department.EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityreporter.comAd is to Appear:TuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday Call by:Mon., 10:00 a.m.Mon., 10:00 a.m.Wed., 10:00 a.m.Thurs., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fri., 10:00 a.m.Fax/Email by:Mon., 9:00 a.m.Mon., 9:00 a.m.Wed., 9:00 a.m.Thurs., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.Fri., 9:00 a.m.These deadlines are subject to change without notice. Cancellations, Changes & Billing Questions Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject, or classify all advertisements under appropriate headings. Copy should be checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day of pub-lication. Credit for published errors will be allowed for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement which was incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be published, nor for any general, special or consequential damages. Advertising language must comply with Federal, State or local laws regarding the prohibition of discrimi-nation in employment, housing and public accommodations. Standard abbreviations are acceptable; how-ever, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated. Ad Errors-Please read your ad on the first day of publication. Weaccept responsibility for only the first incorrect insertion, and only the charge for the ad space in error. Please call 755-5440 immediately for prompt correc-tion and billing adjustments.CancellationsNormal advertising deadlines apply for cancellation.Billing InquiriesCall 755-5440. Should further information be required regarding payments or credit limits, your call will be trans-ferred to the accounting depart-ment. General Information In Print and Onlinewww.lakecityreporter.com Rate applies to private individuals selling personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. Each item must include a price. This is a non-refundable rate.$2504 lines • 6 daysEach additional line $.25One item per ad Under $100 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, NURSING 224 Days Tenure Track Conduct the learning experience in the classroom, laboratory and/or clinical area. Prepare for instruction – syllabi, lesson plans, tests; use assessment strategies to assist the continuous development of the learner; use effective communication techniques with students and others. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the subject matter, use appropriate technology in the teaching and learning process. Hours will vary and require evenings. Minimum Qualifications:Masters of Science in Nursing degree and be licensed in FL or eligible for licensure in FL. Three years experience as staff nurse (acute care preferred). Ability to present information in a coherent manner and the ability to fairly evaluate student retention of that information. Computer literate. Postsecondary teaching experience desired. EXCELLENT SALARY PAID BENEFITS DESIRABLE SCHEDULE APPLICATION DEADLINE: 5/8/12 Persons interested should provide College application, vita, and photocopies of transcripts. All foreign transcripts must be submitted with official translation and evaluation. Position details and applications available on web at: www.fgc.edu Human Resources Florida Gateway College 149 S.E. College Place Lake City Fl 32025-2007 Phone (386) 754-4314 Fax (386) 754-4814 E-Mail: humanr@fgc.edu FGC is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. VP/ADA/EA/EO College in Education and Employment INSTRUCTOR/COORDINATOR, PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT PROGRAM (224 Days–Tenure Track) RequiresMaster’s degree, with at least one degree in the field of Physical Therapy or Physical Therapist Assistant. Licensure as a physical therapist or certification as a physical therapist assistant. Minimum 3 years experience in clinical practice; didactic and/or clinical teaching experience; experience in administration, educational theory and methodology; experience in instructional design and methodology; experience in student evaluation and outcomes assessment. Desirable Qualifications:Community College teaching experience. DPT preferred. EXCELLENT SALARY PAID BENEFITS DESIRABLE SCHEDULE Application deadline: Open until filled Position details and applications available on web at: www.fgc.edu Human Resources Florida Gateway College 149 S.E. College Place Lake City, FL 32025-2007 Phone (386) 754-4314 Fax (386) 754-4814 E-Mail: humanr@fgc.edu FGC is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. VP/ADA/EA/EO College in Education and Employment EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, NURSING AND HEALTH SCIENCES Responsible for development and supervision of program areas. Implement and maintain the Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing program, continue to expand all program areas and resources, provide effective leadership, manage multiple budgets, and understand strong personnel management. Requires a master’s degree and eligibility for or hold a Florida Nursing license or closely related field, and at least five years of progressive administrative experience, a strong background in program design and accreditation, and a valid driver’s license. Desirable Qualifications: Doctorate degree in Nursing or health related field preferred. Record of teaching at tenured professor level; experience in business in conjunction with health background. Experience in the community college teaching/working environment. EXCELLENT SALARY PAID BENEFITS DESIRABLE SCHEDULE Application Deadline: Open Until Filled. Persons interested should provide College application, vita, and photocopies of transcripts. All foreign transcripts must be submitted with official translation and evaluation. Position details and applications available on web at: www.fgc.edu Human Resources Florida Gateway College 149 S.E. College Place Lake City, FL 32025-2007 Phone (386) 754-4314 Fax (386) 754-4814 E-Mail: humanr@fgc.edu FGC is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. VP/ADA/EA/EO College in Education and Employment ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, NURSING PARAMEDIC TO RN PROGRAM 224 Days (Grant Funded Four Year Position to Permanent) Develop new Paramedic to RN program to begin Spring 2013. Assume teaching responsibilities for the program January 2013. Conduct the learning experience in the classroom, laboratory and/or clinical area. Prepare for instruction; use assessment strategies; use effective communication techniques with students and others. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the subject matter, use appropriate technology in the teaching and learning process. Hours will vary and may require evenings. Requires Masters of Science in Nursing degree and be licensed in FL or eligible for licensure in FL. Three years of experience as staff nurse (acute care preferred). Ability to present information in a coherent manner. Ability to fairly evaluate students with a focus on retention and success. Attention to detail. Strong organizational skills. Computer literate. Teaching experience at the post-secondary level. EMT/Paramedic licensure a plus. ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, NURSING SIMULATION LAB 224 Days (Grant Funded Four Year Position to Permanent) Conduct the learning experience in the simulation laboratory. Prepare for instruction; use assessment strategies; use effective communication techniques with students and others. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the subject matter, use appropriate technology in the simulation laboratory and learning process. Hours will vary and may require evenings. Requires Masters of Science in Nursing degree and be licensed in FL or eligible for licensure in FL. Three years of experience as staff nurse (acute care preferred). Ability to present information in a coherent manner. Ability to fairly evaluate students with a focus on retention and success. EXCELLENT SALARY PAID BENEFITS DESIRABLE SCHEDULE APPLICATION DEADLINE: 5/8/12 Persons interested should provide College application, vita, and photocopies of transcripts. All foreign transcripts must be submitted with official translation and evaluation. Position details and applications available on web at: www.fgc.edu Human Resources Florida Gateway College 149 S.E. College Place Lake City Fl 32025-2007 Phone (386) 754-4314 Fax (386) 754-4814 E-Mail: humanr@fgc.edu FGC is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. VP/ADA/EA/EO College in Education and Employment ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, SPEECH 164 Duty Days Tenured Track To Commence Fall Term 2012 Advise students in class selections. Prepare and schedule teaching materials. Assess student learning outcomes. Participate in collegial discussions on best instructional practices. Prepare course outlines, syllabi and tests. Meet all scheduled classes and use scheduled classroom time appropriately. Maintain accurate student records for grading and attendance purposes. Master’s degree with minimum of 18 graduate credit hours in communication courses. Ability to present information in a coherent manner and to fairly evaluate student retention of that information. Desirable Qualifications: Experience with online course development and other distance learning. Experience teaching Speech. SALARY: Based on degree and experience. APPLICATION DEADLINE: 5/8/12 Persons interested should provide College application, vita, and photocopies of transcripts. All foreign transcripts must be submitted with official translation and evaluation. Position details and applications available on web at: www.fgc.edu Human Resources Florida Gateway College 149 S.E. College Place Lake City, FL 32025-2007 Phone (386) 754-4314 Fax (386) 754-4814 E-Mail: humanr@fgc.edu FGC is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. VP/ADA/EA/EO College in Education and Employment Lawn & Landscape ServiceMOW&TRIM No Contract Required, 20% Senior Discount, Free Estimate Call 386-365-6228 Lake City Reporter Classifieds Classifieds dial-a-pro Reporter Service DirectoryTo place a Reporter Service Directory Ad in Columbia and surrounding CountiesHighlight Your Reporter Service Directory Ad With Ar twork-Ask Your Representative For Details 386-755-5440 LegalIN THECIRCUITCOURT, THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR COLUMBIACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO.: 11-587-CAPEOPLES STATE BANK,Plaintiff,vs.JAMES R. OLIN, a/k/a JAMES ROBERTOLIN; MELISSAG. OLIN; and THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,Defendants.NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALENotice is hereby given that the fol-lowing described real property:SEE SCHEDULE “A” ATTACHED HERETO.SCHEDULE ATO NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE PEOPLES STATE BANK vs. OLIN, et alCOUNTIPARCELASection 5, Township 4 South, Range 16 East. The North 132.58 feet of the South 455.49 feet of the West 333.16 feet of the South-east 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4, less and except road right of way off the East side thereof. And: The South 190.33 feet of the West 333.16 feet of the Southeast 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4 of Section 5, Township 4 South, Range 16 East, less and except road right of way along the East side thereof lying and being in Columbia County, Flor-ida. The above described parcel is al-so known Lot q1, of unrecorded sub-division, sometimes referred to as Cason’s Tract. Also: The North 132.58 feet of the South 322.91 feet of the West 333.16 feet of the se 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4 of Section 5, Township 4 South, Range 16 East, less and except road right of way along the East side thereof lying and being in Columbia County, Florida. The above described parcel is also known as Lot 2, of an unrecorded subdivision, sometimes referred to as Cason’s Tract.COUNTIIAll that certain piece, parcel or tract of land situate, lying and being in the county of Columbia and State of Florida and being more particularly described as follows:That part of Section 4, Township 4 South, Range 16 East more particu-larly described as follows:Commence at a point on the North right-of-way line of State Road No. 252 (Pinemount Highway) where the West line of the SE 1/4 of the NW1/4 intersects the North right-of-way line, and run thence N 58 35’30” E along the North right-of-way line of State Road No. 252, 595.79 feet to the POINTOF BEGINNING; thence run N 2 3’53” W634.46 feet; thence N 88 41’46” E 150 feet; thence N 2 3’53” W365.00 feet to the South right-of-way line of Mur-phy Road; thence N 88 41’46” E along the South line of Murphy Road 223.20 feet; thence S 2 3’53” E 774.20 feet to the North right-of-way line of said State Road No. 252; thence Southwesterly along the North right-of-way line of said State Road 252 a distance of 433.64 feet to the POINTOF BEGINNING. SUB-JECTto power line easement along the South and North lines thereof.EXCEPTING THEREFROM that portion thereof lying Northwesterly of and within fifty (50) feet of the survey line of State Road S-252, Section 29520, said survey line being described as follows: Begin on the West line of Section 4 Township 4 South, Range 16 East, at a point 1998.8 feet Northerly from the Southwest corner thereof; thence N 66 31’29” E, 988.67 feet to the be-ginning of a curve concave North-westerly having a radius of 3819.72 feet; thence Northeasterly along said curve through a total central angle of 9 39’30” a distance of 643.89 feet to the end of said curve; thence N 56 51’59” E, 1083.50 feet to the be-ginning of a curve concave South-easterly having a radius of 2291.83 feet; thence Northeasterly along said curve through a total central angle of 18 53’30” a distance of 755.67 feet to the end of said curve; thence N 75 45’29” E, 659.59 feet to the be-ginning of a curve concave North-westerly having a radius of 2291.83 feet; thence Northeasterly along said curve through a total central angle of 16 42’30” a distance of 668.33 feet to the end of said curve; thence N 59 02’59” E, 1138.05 feet to the East line of said Section 4, at a point 800.2 feet Southerly from the North-east corner thereof, and end of said survey line.COUNTIIILots 3, 4, 5, 11, 12, 13 and 14, Block 6, Town of Lulu, Florida, parts of section 26, 27, 34 and 35, Township 4 South, Range 18 East, according to the public records of COLUMBIACounty, Florida.shall be sold by the Clerk of this Court, at public sale, pursuant to the three Final Judgments (as to Counts I, II and III) in the above styled ac-tion all dated March 14, 2012, at the Columbia County Courthouse in Lake City, Columbia County, Flori-da, at 11:00 A.M., on Wednesday, May 16, 2012, to the best and high-est bidder for cash. Any person claiming an interest in any surplus from the sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the notice of lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.WITNESS my hand and official seal in the State and County aforesaid this 14th day of March, 2012.P. DEWITTCASONClerk of CourtBy: /s/ B. ScippioDeputy Clerk05532194April 22, 29, 2012 LegalTOWHOMIt May Concern:You are hereby notified that I will offer for sale and sell at public sale to the highest and best bidder for cash the following described live-stock, 2 goats, tan with cropped ears, at 12:00 pm. on the 28th day of April at the following place, North Florida Livestock Market, to satisfy a claim in the sum of $278.90 for fees, ex-penses for feeding and care and costs hereof.Mark Hunter, SheriffColumbia County, Florida05532217April 22, 2012 020Lost & Found LOSTFAMILY PET Adult male yorkie. Lost in Country Club area. REWARD. Please call 386-365-2125. 100Job Opportunities05532111Sales Position available at the North Florida Auto Agency. Benefits package, bonuses, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Looking for highly motivated, positive attitude & professional appearance. Apply in person or call Brad today at 386-758-6171. 05532175NOWHIRING Managers & Assistant Managers, Cashiers & Baggers for High Springs fruit & gift stores. Please fax resume to: (352) 748-2196 CHEVROLETDEALER is looking for a GM trained Parts Manager with hands on experience. Major benefits available. Good working environment at single point dealership. Apply in person or email resume to bburkins1@gmail.com Commercial Driver Class Afor OTR employment with local company. Volvo 780 with reefer trailer. Exp’d req’d. Absolutely clean record. Call for interview, Trava Bros LLC (386) 854-1400. TEEKO GRAPHICS,INC. is looking for an Office Assistant. No phone calls, you can fax your resume to 386-754-5557, email to resumes@teeko.com or mail to 1252 East Duval Street, Lake City, FL32055. 100Job OpportunitiesFASTGROWING company is looking to hire individuals in our Customer Service, Production and Sales departments. Looking for reliable people with drive and determination to work in this fast paced environment. Full time positions with flexible hours available. Applicants must have a great attitude and be willing to learn. We need rock stars! Please send resume to channah.vicenzi@signordersystem.com or fax to 386-755-4704. FRITO LAY Part Time Detailer Competitve pay & flexible schedule. Can lead to fulltime opportunities. Apply online @ www.fritolayemployment.com Equal Opportunity Employment FTSUPERVISOR NEEDED Position requires person exp. in the admin. of community and social service programs; ability to get along with all ages of clients; an excellent customer service attitude; ability to multi-task and accept multiple interruptions during work day. Afour year degree in healthcare or social work is desired, however, exp. may satisfy educational requirements. No phone calls. Please mail resume’to Executive Director @ CCSS, Inc. at P.O. Box 1772, Lake City, Fl 32056-1772. $12/hr. to start. Closes 4/30/12. 100Job OpportunitiesSales Position available for motivated individual Rountree Moore Toyota, Great benefits, paid training/vacation. Exp. a plus but not necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino 386-623-7442 WE ARELOOKING for an Experienced (2+ yrs.) OTR Driver. Please Call 1-877-745-8730 to receive an application. 100Job OpportunitiesSOCIALWORKPROGRAM MANAGER The Florida Department of Veterans Affairs – Jenkins Domiciliary is seeking a Social Work Services Program Manager. All applicants must have minimum (2) years recent experience working directly with individuals in a clinical/social work environment in a long term care nursing home/assisted living facility or related field. Apply on-line: https://peoplefirst.myflorida.com/logon.htm Or call Amelia Tompkins for more information at 386-7580600 x1009 Req #50000106 Closing Date 4/27/2012 EEO/AAE SENIOR LICENSED PRACTICALNURSE The Florida Department of Veterans Affairs – Jenkins Domiciliary is seeking a Senior L.P.N. for the 3:30 PM to 12 midnight shift All applicants must hold a Florida L.P.N. license and be currently certified in C.P.R. Call Amelia Tompkins at 386-758-0600 x1009 for more information or apply online at https://peoplefirst.myflorida.com/logon.htm Req # 50000033 Closing Date is 4/27/2012 EEO/AAE MAINTENANCE REPAIRMAN The Florida Department of Veterans AffairsJenkins Domiciliary is seeking a Maintenance Repairman. All applicants must have at least (1) year experience in the maintenance and repair of buildings, plumbing or mechanical equipment. Call Alan Turner at 386-758-0600 x1052 for more information or apply online at https://peoplefirst.myflorida. com/logon.htm Req #50001531 Closing Date is 4/30/2012 EEO/AAE 120Medical Employment05532115Advent Christian VillageCurrent JOBS Line Advertisement call 658-5627 orvisit www.acvillage.net 24 hrs/day, 7 days/week Work in a Community; Feel like one of the Family! FTPA-C orARNP FTposition to deliver primary care in HPSA-designated, established rural clinic with onsite board certified physician. Oncall rotation with two other practitioners for evenings/weekends and medical support for 161-bed skilled nursing facility required. Experience preferred but not required. Unrestricted FLlicense required. Experience in electronic medical records and geriatrics a plus. FTCook/Chef FTposition for cook/chef; experience or vocational training required, supervisory skills preferred; must be creative with attention to detail & presentation, and willing to work variable schedule that includes days, nights, weekends, & holidays for community cafeteria and special events. FTFacility Operations DirectorSkilled Nursing Facility FTposition to oversee building properties, physical operations, maintenance, laundry, & housekeeping services for the facility. Good working knowledge of life safety code and state/federal fire & safety regulations required. Experience working in a healthcare setting or skilled nursing facility preferred. PTDesk Attendant PTposition to answer phone, greet visitors, manage inquiries to apartment building front desk. Must be dependable, courteous, and communicate clearly. Work schedule may include weekends. FTpositions include health, dental, life, disability, supplemental insurance; 403b retirement account; paid time off, access to onsite daycare and fitness facilities. Apply in person at Personnel Office, Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m., or fax resume/credentials to (386) 658-5160. EOE/DFW/Criminal background checks required. 755-5440Toplace your classified ad call

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LAKECITYREPORTER CLASSIFIEDSUNDAY, APRIL22, 2012 Classified Department: 755-5440 4C 120Medical EmploymentFTMEDICALOFFICE MANAGER Must be expd. in Verifications, Authorizations, Scheduling, Billing and Coding. Email: ars2009@ymail.com Fax (386) 487-3988 JOB OPENING Certified Pharmacy Tech, Regular Schedule, Apply in person DeSoto Drug Store, 297 N. Marion Ave. Madison County Memorial Hospital Now Hiring: RN Nurse Manager Medical Lab Technologist RN’s FT& As NeededPlease contact Human Resources (850)973-2271 ext. 1906 EOE/DFW OFFICE MANAGER Needed for medical office. Experience needed in bookkeeping/accounting principals, medical office procedures, coding/billing and marketing. Excellent communication and customer service skills a must. Fax resume to 386-719-5654. 240Schools & Education05531665Interested in a Medical Career?Express Training offers courses for beginners & exp • Nursing Assistant, $479next class-04/30/12• Phlebotomy national certifica-tion, $800 next class-05/07/12• LPN 09/10/12 Fees incl. books, supplies, exam fees. Call 386-755-4401 or expresstrainingservices.com 310Pets & Supplies FREE LAB MALE BLACK Neutered, 3 years old. Up to date on shots. Good with kids. Call 386-758-9494 PUBLISHER'S NOTE Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs and cats being sold to be at least 8 weeks old and have a health certificate from a licensed veterinarian documenting they have mandatory shots and are free from intestinal and external parasites. Many species of wildlife must be licensed by Florida Fish and Wildlife. If you are unsure, contact the local office for information. YORKSHIRE STUD, 500 lbs ?, $250 Call 386-758-2978 402Appliances GE Gas Stove White, Works great $150.00. OBO 386-292-3927 GE REFRIGERATOR 18-20 cu ft Very clean. $175. OBO 386-292-3927 WHITE GEPROFILE REFRIGERATOR WITH ICE MAKER FOR SALE $150.00 CALL 386-752-1811 403Auctions REALESTATEPublic AuctionsIn Fort White, FLThursday, April 26, 201210:00 A.M. SR 47 & US 2712:00 P.M. Lot 35 Fort White Park2:00 P.M. Lots 3,4 5,6 Block D Hollingworth EstatesFor More Info on these auctions please contact:J.W. Hill and Associates 386-362-3300.www.jwhillauctions.com AB2083 AU2847. 407Computers DELLComputer $100.00 386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170 408Furniture MOTELFURNITURE Everything goes. Coin washer/dryer, TVs 25 inches, Bathroom fixtures, corean/marble vanities, toilets, etc. etc. EXECUTIVE SUITES 386-697-6396 430Garage Sales PUBLISHER'S NOTE All Yard Sale Ads Must be Pre-Paid. 440Miscellaneous PATIO SET with table & 6 cushioned chairs. Like new Call 386-758-5959 520Boats forSale 06 Alum 17” Bass boat. 50hp, 4 stroke Suzuki motor. Bought new, mint cond. Valued at $9,000. Asking $6,000 obo. 386-288-0121 630Mobile Homes forRent2 BR/2BA, Very clean, furnished, in the country, $600 mo. plus utilities. NO PETS. Call 386-935-2461 3 BR/2 BA, completely refurbished, appliances furnished, $775 month. & $775 deposit 386-752-7578 3 BR/2 BA, Doublewide in Lake City, $700 mo. Call Linda 386-623-0295 630Mobile Homes forRent3 BR/2BA CH&APrivate lot, lease & references required. NO PETS Call 386-752-4348 BEAUTIFUL2 BR, 2 BA, eat in kitchen, washer & dryer hookups, security gate, water/trash incl., 1st+last month rent $625 & $400 sec., moves you in! 386-984-0530 LOVELYSWMH 3/2, Built 2006 on 2 fenced acres in Olustee. $700 mo. Income & rental history verif. 904-349-5192 owner/agent. Quiet Country Living 3 BR/2 BA$550.mo., 2 BR/1 BA $425 mo. Very clean, NO PETS! Ref’s & dep req’d. 386-758-2280 640Mobile Homes forSaleFACTORYOUTLETPRICES (4) Brand New Doublewides by Jacobsen under $50,000. All new homes in del-set-skirting-steps and central AC. Only At North Pointe Homes in Gainesville on Hwy. 441. Call 352-872-5566. HUGE 32X80 4/2 $65,955 New 2012 Home has 9 ft. ceilings and Huge Man Cave Family Room. 2,300 sq. ft. Price incl. del-set-AC-shirt-steps. North Pointe Homes. Pre-approval by Phone, Hwy. 441 Gainesville, 352-872-5566. Palm HarborHomes New 2012 Models $15K Off All Homes 800-622-2832 ext. 210 710Unfurnished Apt. ForRent 05531989Best deal in town!WINDSONG APTS386-758-8455 2/2 MH. Central quite location. Rental to Own, starting at $400 mo. Close to everything. 305-984-5511 or 386-344-0830 ALandlord You Can Love! 2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great area. CH/Awasher/dryer hookups. 386-758-9351/352-208-2421 CLEAN 1/1 Duplex, laundry room, fireplace, privacy near Baya/McFarlane. $500 mo. + dep. No dogs 386-961-9181 Great area Wof I-75, spacious deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage. W/D hookups, patio, $600-750 + Sec. 386-965-3775 or 965-5560 Large & clean 1br/1ba apt. CH/Alg walk in closet. Close to town. $395. mo and $350. dep. (904)563-6208 730Unfurnished Home ForRent1br/1ba Free ele. Utilities incl. 4mi S. Lake City. $300dep. $375mo. 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com 3br/1.5ba. Very clean, Block great area. CH/A& indoor laundry. Carport & Fenced (privacy) back yard. $800. mo $800. dep. (941)920-4535 421 SW Chapel Hill St. In Town 3 BR/2 BA, Lg. Kit./Fam., Lg. L.R., covered patio, 2 car CP w/closed laundry/storage Rm., CH & A, $985 mo., incl. lawn maint. 386-397-3335. Brick 3br/1ba on 5 acres, 989 SWSuwannee Valley Road, Lake City, $750 mo. + $800 dep. Call 386-365-8543 CONVENIENTLOCATION 2brApartment. Close to downtown. $485. mo $585 dep. No pets 386-344-2170 SITE-BUILT HOME, On 5 acres, near Fort White, 1st last + deposit. Call 386-758-1789 750Business & Office RentalsCOMMERCIALPROPERTY FOR LEASE, 15,000 Sq. ft.,with office area, $1,800 month. Call 386-438-8555 ForRent orLease: Former Doctors office, Former professional office & Lg open space: avail on East Baya Ave. Competitive rates. Weekdays 386-984-0622 evenings/weekends 497-4762 Midtown Commercial Center, Suite w/warehouse. Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832. 770Condos ForRent 3 BR/3 BAon golf course in Country Club area, remodeled, hardwood floors, fireplace, $1,200 mo. 1st+last+sec. 386-362-4216. 790Vacation Rentals Horseshoe Beach Special Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock, fish sink. wkend $395./wk $895. 386-235-3633/352-498-5986 alwaysonvacation.com #419-181 “Florida’s Last Frontier” 805Lots forSale 1 to 5 acre lots paved roads Falling Creek area, $300 down $300 a month. Call 386-623-0232. PUBLISHER'S NOTE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the fair housing act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin; or any intention to make such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the 805Lots forSale law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777, the toll free telephone number to the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 810Home forSale OPEN HOUSE, Sun. 4/22, 2-4 p.m., 224 SWPheasant Way Callaway. Sandy Kiston, REMAX 386-344-0433. 820Farms & Acreage4 acres, Wellborn, New Well installed, Beautifully wooded w/cleared Home Site, owner fin, no down, $39,900, $410 mon Call 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com Owner Financed land with only $300 down payment. Half to ten ac lots. Deas Bullard/BKLProperties 386-752-4339 www .landnfl.com 952Vans & Sport Util. Vehicles2007 DODGE Caravan Low mileage 58,900 $14,500 or Best Offer Call 386-755-5834 SOLD IT FAST IN THE CLASSIFIEDSSelling your stuff is simple with a little help from the Lake City Reporter Classifieds. Let our sales team help you place an ad today, in print and online! Call 386-755-5440 or go to www.lakecityreporter.com RECYCLE YOUR Lake City Reporter

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D I V A LIFE Sunday, April 22, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Section D We were joined by Tim Brock today for lunch at Mikes Caf & Grille. In 1995 Andys Kitchen opened at 426 SW Commerce Drive and it was basically an upscale kitchen store with unique kitchenware. In 1996 Mike and Andi Grecian expanded into the next storefront and opened Mikes Out to Lunch. It was and still is a place to go when you want a meal that is out of the Lake City norm and has an elegant yet comfortable atmosphere. Andi says that the name came about because folks would ask where is Mike and the answer usually was Mikes out to Lunch. Dont know what that says about you, Mike, although the name has now been changed and most days we see you there with your apron on. The wait staff, dressed in their signature black uniforms, are courteous, efficient and menu savvy. This always makes a restaurant visit memorable. The menu is primarily soups, salad, sandwiches and sides. They are open evenings Wednesday through Saturday where full dinner entres are offered. They have also expanded their times to include Sunday brunch and lunch. Catering is also available. On this visit we tried three different items. Tims AUCE fish and chips came with cole slaw and fries. Mary Kay had the steak sandwich on Cuban bread and the chicken tortilla soup and Genie had the half chicken salad with the 3-potato salad. Of course, we tasted each others dishes and came up with an A+ for all of them. The fish was especially good and was a mild fish called Swai. We werent familiar with this fish but it was light and flaky and didnt have that strong fishy taste. It was cut into strips, lightly breaded and crisply fried. Tim says that he would have that one again. The tortilla soup was loaded with chicken, kidney beans, corn, sour cream and tri-color tortillas on top. It was very hearty and thick. The steak sandwich was cooked just right and served with grilled onions on delicious Cuban bread. The potato salad was made with white, new and sweet potatoes. Uniquely different and delicious. Weve been to Mikes many times so we want to mention some other favorites. Genie loves, loves, loves the Sriracha chicken salad and has it almost every time she goes. The chicken is in bite size pieces, lightly fried and then dipped in the wonderful spicy Sriracha sauce. It reminds us of Bam Bam shrimp at Taste Buddies visit Mikes Story ideas? Contact Robert BridgesEditor 754-0428rbridges@lakecityreporter.com Lake City Reporter TASTE BUDDIESBy LAURA HAMPSONlhampson@lakecityreporter.comGather the girls for a fun, relaxing afternoon of retail therapy. This Saturday the latest in jewelry, handbags, candles and makeup will be gathered in one spot for a pampering event thats also good for the community. The third annual Diva Day, hosted by the Altrusa Club of Lake City, is Saturday April 28 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Columbia County Fairgrounds banquet hall, 438 SW State Road 247 in Lake City. The event will also have vendors with craft supplies, dietary supplements, party rentals, accessories, health screenings, cakes and chocolate, said Jan Smithey, co-chair of Diva Day. Some vendors will have giveaways and drawings at their booths. Its a fun day for the girls to shop, she said. The first 300 Diva Day visitors in the door will get a free cosmetic bag from Altrusia, she said. Admission is $5, which enters you in a drawing for two silver tickets for the upcoming Suwannee River Jam, worth about $400, or a Mariana bracelet, worth about $150. People can buy tickets to enter the drawing even if they are not able to make it to Diva Day, she said. Proceeds from the event go to local charities. After last years Diva Day, Altrusia donated $9,300 to the community, Smithey said. We are a builder of women and it really plays into what we stand for, she said. Most of the 45 vendors are from Columbia County and some are from surrounding counties, she said. The event allows businesses to show their wares and meet potential customers. Its a good thing for small businesses, Smithey said. The event gives the community an opportunity to meet Altrusa members and share in their volunteer work to help the community, she said. Tickets are available at the Lake City Reporter, the Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of Commerce, the Lake City Advertiser and at the door. Altrusa is a professional business club that devotes time and energy to community service and developing leadership. TASTE BUDDIES continued on 2DImagine a community that allows industry to spew smokestack pollution into the air and discharge all sorts of toxic pollutants into nearby rivers and lakes. Up until 1970, thats exactly what happened all across the country, and it was even legal. We had no agencies or regulations to protect our environment. In the spring of 1970, a U.S. senator created Earth Day as a way to force the government and millions of Americans to become aware of environmental issues and take action. Each community seized the opportunity to address local problems, and this grassroots movement had a profound national impact. In December of 1970, as a result of this first Earth Day, Congress authorized the creation of a new federal agency. The new agency, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, or EPA, had quite a challenge ahead. The public wanted cleaner air, land and water. Since 1970, the EPA has been working to repair damages and set regulations to further protect human health and the environment. Communities and individuals recognize Earth Day by focusing on local issues and environmental concerns. At North Palm Beach, locals enjoy the Annual TurtleFest: A billion Acts of Green celebration. West Palm Beach holds an Earth Day Festival to encourage appreciation and conservation of South Floridas natural resources. Atlanta is holding an Earth Day Cleanup Challenge. Birmingham Gardens focus on plant pollinators and native plants. So, what are you going to do for the Earth on April 22? Plant a tree, remove invasive plants, fine tune your sprinklers, plant some native butterfly plants? Whatever it is, the world will be a better place for you, and for me. Just wait and youll see... Our drought periods can stress water supplies when people use so much to keep lawns green. When you understand your lawns environmental needs and the lawn care practices for our local conditions, you get a healthy, environmentally friendly lawn. You can even design a yard so it thrives on rainwater alone, without additional irrigation. http://fyn.ifas. ufl.edu/ Threats to our springs are numerous, but we can all work on ways to help protect springs, the aquifer and our drinking water. In Columbia County, we have very personal reasons for springs protection, and one of them is assuring the health of the Ichetucknee. Find more information http:// www.floridasprings.org/ D. Nichelle Demorest is a horticulture agent with the Columbia County Extension of the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. Genie Norman and Mary Kay HollingsworthTasteBuddiesLakeCity@gmail.com GARDEN TALK Nichelle Demorestdndemorest@ufl.edu FILELake City Altrusia members (right) check in participants at the 2011 Diva Day, which had about 450 people attend and raised $9,300 for the community. This years event is Saturday, April 28. Event allows businesses to show their wares and meet potential customers. We are a builder of women and it really plays into what we stand for.Jan Smithey, co-chair of Diva Day. What will you do for Mother Earth and the environment?

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2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012 TASTE BUDDIES: Visit to MikesContinued From Page 1D 2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012 Page Editor: Xxx, 754-xxxx2DLIFE Stop by the Lake City Reporter for your complimentary engagement package. Aisle Style Complimentary Engagement Package Conference Center 386-364-5250 758-2088 754-1411, ext. 106 386-243-8298 800-595-7760 752-5470 Bonefish. Sriracha shrimp is also available. The salad greens are always crispy and fresh and with a side of Vidalia vinaigrette you cant go wrong. We both love the Reuben and the Monte Cristo sandwich. Several years ago Genie was in San Diego and had the opportunity to visit the Hotel del Coronado where she had her first Monte Cristo sandwich sitting on the terrace with her friend, Linda Hawkins, overlooking the Pacific Ocean. A great memory recall when she bites into one of Mikes delicious renditions. If you have room after your meal dont hesitate, order one of the special desserts. Numerous choices include Berry Torte, carrot cake, Death by Chocolate, Lava Cake (enough for four to share), tiramisu and two types of cheesecake. The ice cream is made by Working Cow and the Cappy Kahlua is especially goooood. After Mary Kay rushed back to work, Tim and Genie sat back and savored a wonderful, piping hot cup of cappuccino generously topped with foaming milk. So, when you want to enjoy a different kind of dining give Mikes Caf & Grille a try. For more information you can check out Mikes at info@ mikescafeandgrille.com. Telephone number is 386 9619080. You can contact us at www. tastebuddieslakecity@gmail. com Genie Norman and Mary Kay Hollingsworth are Columbia County residents who love good food and fun, at home and out. Their column on area restaurants appears twice monthly. You can contact them at TasteBuddiesLakeCity@ gmail. com. Wedding announcementJackson EricksonZearah and Betty Jackson announce the engagement and approaching marriage of their daughter, Jamia Eles Jackson to Karl Christian Erickson of Zumbro Falls, Minn., the son of Tyrone and Sharon Erickson of Zumbro Falls, Minn. The bride-elect is a 2000 graduate of Columbia High School and a 2004 graduate of the University of South Florida with a degree in Exercise Science. She is currently employed with the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities as an assistant director of strength & conditioning. She works with Womens Track & Field, Cross Country, Tennis and Gymnastics teams. She is also a former member of the USA Womens Bobsled Team and two-time Olympic Weightlifting National Champion. She is the granddaughter of Zeffie Daniels and the late Willis Daniels and the late Zearah Sr. and Lillie Jackson of Jasper. The future groom is a graduate of the University of MinnesotaTwin Cities with a degree in Kinesiology. He is the director of sports performance at 1st Athlete Training Center in Edina, Minn. Karl was a 7-time AllAmerican in shot put and Discus at the University of Minnesota and former resident athlete of the US Olympic Training Center. The wedding is planned for Sunday, May 27 at the Crowne Plaza Northstar Hotel Rooftop Sky Garden, followed by a reception at Windows of Minnesota in Downtown Minneapolis. Ty Benson StevensEric and Kylie Stevens of Lake City announce the birth of their son Ty Benson Stevens April 5 at Shands at the University of Florida in Gainesville. He weighed 7 pounds and measured 19 1/4 inches. He joins Tayah, 6. Grandparents are Leon and Paula Edwards, of Live Oak, and A.H. and Carol Stevens of Lake City. Great grandparents are Edward and JoAnne Howell of Live Oak, Wade and Winona Edwards of Live Oak, Pat Stevens and the late Alex Stevens of Lake City, and the late Preston and Lorene Cook of Moultrie, Ga. Birth Announcement By RUSS BYNUMAssociated PressSAVANNAH, Ga. Owners and managers of swimming pools at hotels, city recreation centers and public parks are scrambling to install mechanical chair lifts to comply with new federal requirements that all public pools be accessible to disabled swimmers. Some hotels fear the cost of the equipment or fines for noncompliance could put them out of business, and an industry lobbyist says others may close their pools this summer if they cant upgrade in time, though the government can offer more time to those having trouble paying for it. Swimmers with disabilities say the changes are overdue. I couldnt get into the pool without it, said Karyn Kitchen of Savannah, who has multiple sclerosis and relies on a poolside chair lift at the Chatham County Aquatic Center for her physical therapy workouts up to four times a week. Adding to the problem is a backlog of orders created by the rush to meet a May deadline. Harry Spirides ordered lifts last month for the hotel he owns on Georgias largest public beach and was told they should arrive in late April. He expects to pay $12,000 for the lifts at the Ocean Plaza Beach Resort on Tybee Island. Our supplier is backed up with orders, said Spirides. Everybodys rushing to comply; everybody wants to comply. But when you have tens of thousands of swimming pools that have to be retrofitted with these lifts, it takes time. Changes to the Americans with Disabilities Act in 2010 say pools must be upgraded with chair lifts, essentially mini cranes that move wheelchair users into the water. The initial deadline was March 16, but confusion over the details and pool owners insistence for more time caused the Justice Department to give them until May 21. The law doesnt affect private clubs or pools owned by neighborhood associations that arent open to the public. Its a massive and expensive undertaking. The Association of Pool and Spa Professionals says its research shows that between 235,000 and 310,000 pools require the upgrade. Manufacturers estimate the lifts run $3,500 to $6,500, and installation can double those costs. Altogether, owners could face combined costs exceeding $1 billion. Still, whatever hurdles pool operators face will ensure fewer obstacles for thousands of disabled swimmers. After a car crash left Beth Kolbe unable to walk 12 years ago, she took up swimming and went on to compete in college and on the U.S. Paralympic team in 2008. Despite her athleticism, she needs a persons help or a lift to access a pool. Kolbe says when she visits pools, she usually takes a friend to avoid asking for help from lifeguards, who often seem uncomfortable lifting her. I cant tell you how many times Ive been to a pool and they have a lift but nobody knows how to use it its in the corner and probably broken, said Kolbe, a 26-yearold student at Stanford Law School in California. Once the requirements take effect, the Justice Department will investigate complaints and can fine businesses up to $55,000 for the first offense and double that for further violations. Pools operated by local governments dont face monetary penalties but are subject to federal oversight. The government can give pools more time if they show financial hardship and have a plan to save up for the equipment. Pool owners say theyre not opposed to making accessibility upgrades, but argue they need more time especially after a clarification to the requirements in January. The Justice Department now says chair lifts must be bolted down. That declaration came as most hotels were buying portable lifts that dont require expensive installation and can be wheeled into storage until a guest needs them, said Kevin Maher of the American Hotels and Lodging Association. The group argues that fixed chair lifts pose a risk to children who are tempted to play on them. Maher, the associations vice president for government relations, said hoteliers fear their insurance rates could increase. The association is urging the Justice Department to reconsider portable lifts and extend the deadline. Without more time, Maher said, some hotels may close their pools this summer rather than risk lawsuits or fines. Whether they actually do it, I dont know, Maher said. Its a notion pool owners and operators are contemplating. In Desert Hot Springs, Calif., the requirements have created an uproar among owners of boutique inns built By MICHAEL TARMAssociated PressCHICAGO Getting news from a big trial once took days, moving at the speed of a carrier pigeon or an express pony. The telegraph and telephone cut that time dramatically, as did live television broadcasts. Now comes Twitter with more changes, breaking up courtroom journalism into bite-size reports that take shape as fast as a reporter can tap 140 characters into a smartphone. But the microblogging site is increasingly putting reporters on a collision course with judges who fear it could threaten a defendants right to a fair trial. The tension was highlighted recently by a Chicago courts decision to ban anyone from tweeting or using other social media at the upcoming trial of a man accused of killing Oscar winner Jennifer Hudsons family. Reporters and their advocates insist the practice is essential to providing a play-by-play for the public as justice unfolds. Were troubled by this ban, said Ed Yohnka, Chicago spokesman for the American Civil Liberties Union. Tweeting and social media are merely the 21st century version of what reporters have always done gather information and disseminate it. Judges, he said, should embrace Twitter as a way to shed light on the judicial process, which, for many Americans, remains shrouded in mysterious ritual. The judge in the Illinois case fears that feverish tweeting on smartphones could distract jurors and witnesses when testimony begins Monday. Tweeting takes away from the dignity of a courtroom, said Irv Miller, media liaison for Cook County Judge Charles Burns. The judge doesnt want the trial to turn into a circus. Burns is allowing reporters to bring cellphones and to send e-mails periodically, a notable concession in a state that has only recently announced it will begin experimenting with cameras in court and where cellphones are often barred from courtrooms altogether. Theres also an overflow courtroom where reporters can tweet freely. But there will be no audio or video of proceedings in the room, just live transcripts scrolling across a screen. The issue extends beyond journalists to jurors, whose tweets have raised issues of their own across the country. Last year, the Arkansas Supreme Court threw out a death row inmates murder conviction after one juror tweeted during proceedings and another slept. Juror Randy Francos tweets ranged from the philosophical to the mundane. One read, The coffee sucks here. Less than an hour before the jury returned with a verdict, he tweeted, Its all over. Theres little gray area regarding jurors tweeting. The Arkansas trial judge had warned jurors, Dont Twitter anybody about the case. Burns was similarly explicit during jury selection in Chicago. But theres no consensus among either state or federal judges about the propriety of in-court tweets, so individual judges are often left to craft their own rules. For instance, the judge in the child sexual abuse case of former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky has allowed reporters to tweet from pretrial hearings but not to transmit verbatim accounts or to take photographs. Judge John Cleland hasnt indicated whether he will change that policy for the June trial. In some ways, Judge Burns has gone further than others. To ensure his ban is respected, hes assigned a member of the sheriffs department to track reporters Twitter accounts while court is in session. To get accreditation to cover the trial, reporters had to disclose their Twitter handles.Judges, journalists clash over tweetsHotels, rec centers try to slow pool access regsASSOCIATED PRESSStefan Freeman demonstrates how to access a swimming pool using a hydraulic car lift in Mission Viejo, Calif. Hotels, municipal recreation centers and other swimming pool operators are scrambling to comply with new government regulations requiring public pools to be acces sible to people with disabilities. POOL continued on 6D

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LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012 3D DAVID GERMAINAssociated PressLOS ANGELES — As superhero summers go, this one is truly super. Amid one of the mostpromising box-office seasons Hollywood has ever served up, three movies stand above the rest. The first weekend in May brings “The Avengers,” the ensemble adventure team ing Robert Downey Jr.’s Iron Man with such fellow Marvel Comics heroes as Thor, Captain America and the Incredible Hulk. “The Amazing Spider-Man” follows over the Fourth of July as Marvel’s web-slinger gets a fresh origin story, with Andrew Garfield taking over as teen-turned-superhero Peter Parker. Finally, in late July, there’s “The Dark Knight Rises,” with Christian Bale returning as DC Comics’ masked vigi lante in the finale of director Christopher Nolan’s Batman trilogy. These three are the gold standard for fans: “The Dark Knight,” Tobey Maguire’s three “Spider-Man” flicks and Downey’s two “Iron Man” movies are the six top-gross ing superhero adventures ever. Add in solid receipts for solo turns of “Avengers” co-stars Chris Hemsworth in “Thor” and Chris Evans in “Captain America: The First Avenger” — plus the lure of a new incarnation of the Incredible Hulk by Mark Ruffalo in “Avengers” — and summer’s superhero meter is off the charts. “’The Avengers’ is literally one of the first books I fol lowed regularly. ... Some of the work that was done in there was really groundbreak ing and really epic,” said “The Avengers” writer-director Joss Whedon (“Buffy the Vampire Slayer”). “It’s great fun to take characters that you are so invested in, because you grew up with them, and get to put words in their mouths and figure out what they’re going to be doing with their lives for a while. Of course, there’s plenty to fill in the gaps between super hero sagas. Other action tales include “Men in Black 3,” with Will Smith and Tommy Lee Jones; Kristen Stewart and Charlize Theron’s fairy-tale makeover “Snow White and the Huntsman”; Ridley Scott’s return to sci-fi with “Prometheus”; “Avengers” co-star Jeremy Renner’s “The Bourne Legacy”; Colin Farrell’s remake “Total Recall”; and the board game adaptation “Battleship.” Cartoon makers offer up the Scottish adventure “Brave,” the latest from the animation virtuosos at Pixar, while talking-animal franchis es return with “Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted” and “Ice Age: Continental Drift.” The comedy and music front brings Adam Sandler’s fatherhood story “That’s My Boy”; the all-star song fest “Rock of Ages”; Ben Stiller, Vince Vaughn and Jonah Hill’s suburban romp “Neighborhood Watch”; Sacha Baron Cohen’s tyrant tale “The Dictator”; and Whitney Houston’s final film, “Sparkle.” And what would summer be without vampires? Johnny Depp turns blood-sucker as he reunites with director Tim Burton for “Dark Shadows,” a big-screen take on the gothic soap opera. “Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter” has the great emancipator taking down the undead. Like director Whedon with “The Avengers,” ‘’Amazing Spider-Man” star Garfield practically has Peter Parker in his DNA. Garfield has been a huge Spider-Man fan since age 4. “I know the character real ly well. It’s part of me already. It’s like I’ve been preparing for the role for 24 years,” said Garfield, who hints that des tiny is at work in this version as orphan boy Peter’s search for his parents puts him on a path with the mutant spider that endows him with super powers. Directed by Marc Webb and co-starring Emma Stone as romantic interest Gwen Stacy and Rhys Ifans as the villainous Lizard, “Amazing Spider-Man” aims to walk the line between gravity and exu berance, Garfield said. “Marc Webb has approached this with a real eye for authenticity, emo tional authenticity, a kind of groundedness and grittiness. It feels a bit darker to me,” Garfield said. “Also, it’s really important that Spidey has fun and is witty. The mask’s a very powerful thing for any one who wears it. It gives you leave to do anything you want, and I think in the hands of a teenager, he’ll just run riot. I hope we’ve managed to have some of that.” “The Avengers” has super hero puppetmaster Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson) rounding up Downey’s Iron Man, Scarlett Johansson’s Black Widow, Evans’ Captain America, Hemsworth’s Thor, Ruffalo’s Hulk and Renner’s Hawkeye to take on Thor’s evil brother (Tom Hiddleston), who plots to unleash alien marauders on Earth. “’The Avengers’ challenge was just not so much the scope of it,” Downey said. “It’s funny to think about a superhero movie as being complex, but I think it was a little bit daunting imagining how you get the balance of all of these intersecting sto ries. ... “It was a bit of a welcome relief in a certain sense in that ‘Avengers,’ once it took shape, was a very, very smartly executed and con trolled venture.” Whether alone or togeth er, much of the gang will be back. Downey’s about to start shooting “Iron Man 3,” Hemsworth and Evans have “Thor” and “Captain America” sequels coming and there’s talk of solo spinoffs for some of the other Avengers. Unlike “Avengers” and “Amazing Spider-Man,” ‘’Dark Knight Rises” will not be playing in 3-D. Director Nolan just isn’t a fan. Nolan does like shooting for the huge-screen IMAX format, so fans can count on a visual spectacle in those theaters. “On 3-D, I don’t know if that was ever even a debate,” said Gary Oldman, who returns as Batman’s police commis sioner ally, Jim Gordon. “It’s IMAX. That’s as big and bold as it gets, so there’s plenty of that.” Anne Hathaway signs on as Catwoman, while Nolan’s “Inception” co-stars Marion Cotillard, Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Tom Hardy join returning Batman cast mem bers Morgan Freeman and Michael Caine. Nolan and his cast have kept details secret, but the film could spell a dark end for Bale’s Dark Knight: Hardy plays the villain Bane, the brawny brute who broke Batman’s back in the comic books. Hardy has a tough act to follow. The late Heath Ledger won an Academy Award as Batman’s last foe, the Joker, in “The Dark Knight.” “I find it interesting that he picked Bane as a villain, and he was not tempted to use the Riddler or the Penguin, the more obvious choices,” Oldman said. “It suits the story better. It’s a great read, it’s a great piece. And there we are. There’s the end of it.” ____Here’s a look at other sum mer highlights: MAY— “Battleship”: Taylor Kitsch and Liam Neeson are in the Navy now as sailors take on inhuman invaders in an action tale inspired by the game. — “The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel”: Those classy Brits put some sophistication into summer with a tale of UK retirees in India. With Judi Dench, Bill Nighy, Maggie Smith and Tom Wilkinson. — “Chernobyl Diaries”: Six rookie tourists mistakenly visit the site of the nuclear disaster and find unexpected horrors in the abandoned place. — “Dark Shadows”: We bet the latest reunion of Johnny Depp and Tim Burton will bring some fresh bite to vam pires as they adapt the creepy TV soap opera featuring a 200-year-old blood-sucker. JUNE— “Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter”: Can’t wait for Steven Spielberg’s upcom ing biopic “Lincoln”? Then catch the 16th president (Benjamin Walker) as he emancipates the land from blood-suckers. — “Brave”: A Scottish lass (voiced by Kelly Macdonald) must undo the chaos her defi ance has unleashed on her kingdom in the latest from the animation maestros at Pixar. — “G.I. Joe: Retaliation”: The toy soldiers inspire another live-action firefight featuring Channing Tatum, Bruce Willis and Dwayne Johnson.Private company’s 1st space station visit on track By MARCIA DUNNAssociated PressCAPE CANAVERAL — A private U.S. company is on track to become the first commercial visitor to the International Space Station. NASA said Monday there’s a good chance that Space Exploration Technologies Corp., or SpaceX, will make its April 30 date to launch a cargo ship to the space station. More software testing is needed before a final “go” is given. Managers said they will meet again next Monday to review everything. The Dragon spacecraft will be hoisted aboard the company’s Falcon rocket from Cape Canaveral. The company’s chief executive officer and chief designer, Paypal co-founder Elon Musk, said the Falcon and Dragon are proven vehicles. What’s new is get ting the supply ship to the space station. Musk was hesitant to give out odds for success, stressing that this is a test flight. NASA has paid $381 million to SpaceX to get this far, under its post-shuttle push for commercially provided cargo and, in three or more years, possibly crew. Musk said the company has put about $1 billion of its own money into the venture. SpaceX is one of several companies competing for the right to handle astro naut ferry trips. Until then, American astronauts will have to travel aboard Russian spacecraft to the space station. Musk plans two more Dragon flights to the space station this year, if all goes well on the upcoming mission. NASA loaded the Dragon with nonessential items such as clothing, food, computers and science experiments. The capsule is designed to return to Earth with a full load as well, something none of the other visiting cargo ships — from Russia, Europe and Japan — can do. NASA says by bringing back old equipment, money can be saved by refurbishing the pieces and launching them back up, rather than buying new replacements. By retiring the space shuttles last year, NASA wanted to focus on getting astro nauts beyond low-Earth orbit, possibly asteroids and ultimately Mars. By MATT VOLZAssociated PressGREAT FALLS, Mont. — Regardless of whether claims are true that author Greg Mortenson fabricated portions of “Three Cups of Tea,” neither he nor his publisher can be held liable because the First Amendment protects exaggerations or lies in memoirs, his publisher’s attor ney said Wednesday. Penguin Group (USA) attorney Jonathan Herman and attorneys for Mortenson, co-author David Oliver Relin and Mortenson’s charity, the Central Asia Institute, asked a federal judge to dismiss a lawsuit filed by four people who bought Mortenson’s bestselling books. The lawsuit was filed after “60 Minutes” and author Jon Krakauer published reports last year that Mortenson fabri cated parts of “Three Cups of Tea” and “Stones Into Schools,” which recount his efforts to build schools in Central Asia. The suit claims Mortenson and the others committed fraud, deceit and were involved in a racketeering conspiracy in publishing lies. Mortenson headed the conspiracy to set himself up as a false hero so that he could sell millions of books and raise tens of millions of dollars for his charity, the plaintiffs’ attorney Zander Blewett said. “Mortenson obviously is the main, main liar,” he said. “He has just drafted himself a web of deception ... and used it to raise $62 million.” In arguing to reject the case, neither Herman nor Mortenson attorney John Kauffman addressed the specific fabrica tion claims. Herman said the proper place for some one to object to the books is in the sphere of public debate, not in a courtroom to be prosecuted by self-appointed “truth police.” ‘’The First Amendment permits someone who writes an autobiography to exaggerate or even lie,” Herman said. U.S. District Judge Sam Haddon did not make an immediate ruling, saying he wanted to consider the arguments further. “Three Cups of Tea,” which has sold about 4 million copies since being pub lished in 2006, was conceived as a way to raise money and tell the story of his institute, founded by Mortenson in 1996. The book and tireless promotion of the charity by Mortenson, who appeared at more than 500 speaking engagements in four years, resulted in tens of millions of dollars in donations. The book recounts how Mortenson lost his way after a failed mountaineering expedition and was nursed back to health in a Pakistani village. Based on the villag ers’ kindness and the poverty he saw, he resolved to build a school for them. The lawsuit — filed by two California residents, a Montana man and an Illinois woman who bought the books — says that tale is among more than two dozen alleged fabrications and accusations of wrongdoing by Mortenson and the oth ers. The hearing comes less than two weeks after Mortenson and the Montana attorney general announced a $1 mil lion agreement to settle claims that Mortenson mismanaged the institute and misspent its funds. The agree ment removes Mortenson from any financial oversight and overhauls the charity’s struc ture, but did not address the books’ contents. That’s where the civil lawsuit comes in. The plaintiffs are asking Haddon to certify their lawsuit as a class action that would make every body who bought the books a plaintiff. They want an accounting of all the money collected form book sales, have that money refunded to the people who bought the books and have additional damages put into a trust for a humanitar ian organization selected by their attor neys and approved by the court. A First Amendment expert called the lawsuit absurd, regardless of whether the books contain fabrications. Mortenson did not defame or harm anyone in his books and, barring nar row exceptions like national secrets, he can write what he wants and does not have to justify it, said Wayne Giampietro, a Chicago attorney and general coun sel of the First Amendment Lawyers Association. “It is what it is: Here’s a book. If you want to buy it, buy it. If you don’t, don’t,” Giampietro said. The defendants’ lawyers said such a case, if it were allowed to proceed, would damage the publishing industry and dampen free speech because it would require prohibitively expensive fact-checking for every book published. In the case of Mortenson’s memoir, it would be virtually impossible to inde pendently verify all of his experiences in Central Asia, especially with several people cited who are now dead, Relin attorney Sonia Montalbano said. His story hasn’t injured anyone, so there is no need to, she said. “No one can be damaged by someone telling his own life story,” she said. After the “60 Minutes” and Krakauer reports last year, Penguin promised an internal investi gation into the allegation that portions of the books were fab ricated. Blewett referenced that investigation Wednesday. Herman declined to pro vide any updates, either during or after the hearing. “The publisher knows only what the author has told it. That’s it,” Herman said. One of the lawyers in the case is Larry Drury, who also represented plaintiffs in a class-action lawsuit against James Frey, who admitted on the “Oprah Winfrey Show” that he lied in his memoir “A Million Little Pieces.” That lawsuit ended in a settlement that offered refunds to buyers of the book. Drury and Blewett say the Mortenson and Frey cases “are stunningly close,” but Haddon said he would not consider that case in these proceedings because it was settled without addressing any of the issues before him now. Avengers, Spidey, Batman lead summer lineup ASSOCIATED PRESSIn this film image released by Sony, Will Smith, left, and T ommy Lee Jones are shown in a scene from “Men in Black 3.” Author Greg Mortenson faces civil suit over best-seller ‘Three Cups of Tea’ The lawsuit was filed after “60 Minutes” and author Jon Krakauer published reports last year that Mortenson fabricated parts of “Three Cups of Tea” and “Stones Into Schools,” which recount his efforts to build schools in Central Asia.

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4D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012 SUNDAY EVENING APRIL 22, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosOnce Upon a Time “The Return” (N) (:01) “Firelight” (2012) Cuba Gooding Jr., DeWanda Wise. Premiere. News at 11Brothers & Sisters 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsThe Insider (N) Love-RaymondBig Bang TheoryNUMB3RS A serial letter-bomber. Criminal Minds “Retaliation” NewsSports ZoneChann 4 NewsBig Bang Theory 5-PBS 5 -Keeping UpAs Time Goes ByNOVA “Why Ships Sink” (DVS) Finding Your Roots-Henry Louis GatesMasterpiece Classic Lovers are torn apart by World War I. Powering the Planet -EarthMI-5 7-CBS 7 47 47CBS Evening NewsAction News Jax60 MinutesThe Amazing Race (N) The Good Wife “The Penalty Box” (N) NYC 22 “Firebomb” (N) Action Sports 360Two and Half Men 9-CW 9 17 17House of PayneVoid TVTMZ (N) Law & Order “Animal Instinct” Local HauntsLocal Haunts“Iron Monkey” (1993, Action) Rongguang Yu, Donnie Yen. 10-FOX 10 30 30(5:00)“The Addams Family”Married... WithThe SimpsonsFox’s 25th Anniversary Special Celebrities honor the network. (N) NewsAction Sports 360Bones “A Boy in a Tree” 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsDateline NBC “Driving” (N) Harry’s Law “Breaking Points” (N) The Celebrity Apprentice A display for Donald’s new fragrance. (N) NewsSports Final (N) CSPAN 14 210 350NewsmakersWashington This Week Q & ABritish CommonsRoad to the White House Q & A WGN-A 16 239 307Law & Order: Criminal Intent30 Rock “Argus” How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherWGN News at Nine(:40) Instant ReplayThe Unit “Extreme Rendition” TVLAND 17 106 304M*A*S*H “Tuttle” M*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279Oprah’s Next ChapterOprah’s Next ChapterOprah’s Next Chapter “Gloria Steinem” Oprah’s Next Chapter (N) (Part 1 of 4) Oprah Presents Master Class (N) Oprah’s Next Chapter “Gloria Steinem” A&E 19 118 265Storage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsBreakout Kings “SEALd Fate” (N) (:01) Breakout Kings “SEALd Fate” HALL 20 185 312“Undercover Bridesmaid” (2012) Brooke Burns, Gregory Harrison. “Straight From the Heart” (2003) Teri Polo, Andrew McCarthy. FrasierFrasierFrasierFrasier FX 22 136 248(4:30)“The Day After Tomorrow”“2012” (2009, Action) John Cusack, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Amanda Peet. A global cataclysm nearly wipes out humanity.“2012” (2009, Action) John Cusack, Chiwetel Ejiofor. CNN 24 200 202CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN PresentsPiers Morgan TonightCNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents TNT 25 138 245“Resident Evil: Extinction” (2007, Horror) Milla Jovovich, Oded Fehr. “The Dark Knight” (2008, Action) Christian Bale. Batman battles a vicious criminal known as the Joker. (:15)“Watchmen” (2009) NIK 26 170 299SpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobSpongeBobThat ’70s ShowThat ’70s ShowGeorge LopezGeorge LopezMy Wife and KidsMy Wife and KidsFriendsFriends SPIKE 28 168 241Bar Rescue “Bar Fight” Bar Rescue “Chumps” Bar Rescue “Bad to the Bone” Bar Rescue “Shabby Abbey” Bar Rescue “Hogtied Ham’s” Bar Rescue “Beach Bummer” MY-TV 29 32 -I Love LucyI Love LucyM*A*S*HM*A*S*HColumbo “Mind Over Mayhem” M*A*S*HThriller “Pigeons From Hell” The Twilight Zone DISN 31 172 290JessieShake It Up!Austin & AllyAustin & AllyAustin & Ally (N)“Beethoven” (1992) Charles Grodin, Bonnie Hunt. (:10) Austin & Ally(:35) JessieA.N.T. FarmShake It Up! LIFE 32 108 252(5:00) “The Wife He Met Online” (2012) “The Craigslist Killer” (2011, Docudrama) Jake McDorman, Billy Baldwin. Army Wives “Non-Combatants” (N) The Client List Riley gets a promotion. (:01) “The Craigslist Killer” (2011) USA 33 105 242Law & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims Unit“He’s Just Not That Into You” BET 34 124 329(5:00) “Hurricane Season” (2009) Forest Whitaker. “Eve’s Bayou” (1997) Jurnee Smollett. A girl’s family life unravels in 1960s Louisiana. The GameStay TogetherThink Like a ManStay Together ESPN 35 140 206(5:30) SportsCenter (N) (Live) Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) a MLB Baseball New York Yankees at Boston Red Sox. From Fenway Park in Boston. (N Subject to Blackout) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209f MLS Soccer New York Red Bulls at D.C. United. (N) Tim Tebow Everything in BetweenESPN First TakeGruden’s QB CampSport ScienceGruden’s QB CampWho’s Number 1? SUNSP 37 -Captain’s TalesSport shing TVFlats ClassShip Shape TVSprtsman Adv.Florida Sport.Fishing the FlatsAddictive FishingPro Tarpon TournamentReel AnimalsPowerboating DISCV 38 182 278Frozen Planet “Winter” Frozen Planet “Spring” Frozen Planet “On Thin Ice” (N) MythBusters “Battle of the Sexes” (N) Unchained Reaction “Movie Mayhem” Frozen Planet “On Thin Ice” TBS 39 139 247(5:45)“Last Holiday” (2006) Queen Latifah, Grard Depardieu. “Hitch” (2005) Will Smith. A smooth-talker helps a shy accountant woo an heiress. (:35)“Hitch” (2005) Will Smith, Eva Mendes. HLN 40 202 204Murder by the Book “Lisa Scottoline” Dominick Dunne: Power, PrivilegeDominick Dunne: Power, PrivilegeMurder by the Book “Faye Kellerman” Murder by the Book “Lisa Scottoline” Dominick Dunne: Power, Privilege FNC 41 205 360FOX News Sunday With Chris WallaceFOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) FOX News Sunday With Chris WallaceGeraldo at Large (N) Huckabee E! 45 114 236Ice Loves CocoIce Loves CocoIce Loves CocoIce Loves CocoKhloe and LamarKhloe and LamarKhloe and LamarKhloe and LamarKhloe and LamarIce Loves Coco (N) Chelsea LatelyThe Soup TRAVEL 46 196 277RV 2012Sand MastersSand MastersHotel ImpossibleBaggage BattlesBaggage BattlesCool Tools: Travel Edition (N) Travel UnraveledTravel Unraveled HGTV 47 112 229House HuntersHunters Int’lHolmes on Homes Victorian home. Holmes on Homes “Let’s Rejoist” Best of Holmes on Homes (N) Holmes Inspection “Failing Grade” Holmes on Homes “Hit the Deck” TLC 48 183 280Hoarding: Buried AliveHoarding: Buried Alive “It’s Just Sex” Island MediumIsland MediumIsland MediumIsland MediumWilliam & Kate: One Year Later (N) Island MediumIsland Medium HIST 49 120 269Ax Men “Let ‘Er Rip” Ax Men “Burning the Bear” Ax Men “Where’s Willy?” Ax Men “Falling Apart” (N) (:01) Ax Men “Up in Flames” (N) (:01) Sold!(:31) Sold! ANPL 50 184 282The Blue Planet: Seas of LifeTanked “Old School vs. New School” River Monsters “Invisible Executioner” Frozen Planet “The Ends of the Earth” River Monsters “Asian Slayer” (N) Frozen Planet “The Ends of the Earth” FOOD 51 110 231Diners, DriveDiners, DriveChopped All-StarsCupcake Wars “Derby Dolls” (N) Chopped All-Stars (N) Iron Chef America “Flay vs. Staib” Chopped “Ready, Set, Escargot!” TBN 52 260 372T.D. JakesJoyce MeyerLeading the WayLive-Holy LandJoel OsteenKerry ShookBelieverVoiceCre o Dollar“The Story of Jacob and Joseph” (1974) Keith Michell, Tony Lo Bianco. FSN-FL 56 -Volvo Ocean Race Baseball’s GoldenInside the MagicMagic Live! (Live)d NBA Basketball Orlando Magic at Denver Nuggets. From the Pepsi Center in Denver. Magic Live! (Live) World Poker Tour: Season 10 SYFY 58 122 244(5:00)“Dead Silence” (2007) “Wrong Turn 3: Left for Dead” (2009, Horror) Janet Montgomery. “Wrong Turn 4: Bloody Beginnings” (2011, Horror) Sean Skene. Premiere.“The Hills Have Eyes 2” (2007) AMC 60 130 254“Sahara” (2005) Matthew McConaughey. Premiere. Adventurers search for a Confederate ship in Africa. The Killing “Ghosts of the Past” (N) Mad Men “Far Away Places” (N) (:04) The Killing “Ghosts of the Past” COM 62 107 249“Year One” (2009, Comedy) Jack Black, Michael Cera, Oliver Platt. “Without a Paddle” (2004, Comedy) Seth Green, Matthew Lillard. South ParkTosh.0“Harold & Kumar Escape” CMT 63 166 327“Blue Collar Comedy Tour: The Movie” (2003) Jeff Foxworthy. Ron White’s Celebrity Salute to the Troops“Ace Ventura: Pet Detective” (1994) Jim Carrey, Courteney Cox. Them Idiots NGWILD 108 190 283(4:00) GalapagosReturn of the Clouded LeopardsWar Elephants (N) Elephants: The Dark SideSuper SnakeWar Elephants NGC 109 186 276Wicked Tuna “Weekend Warriors” Drain the Great LakesLight the Ocean (N) The Whale That Ate JawsWicked Tuna “Size Matters” (N) Light the Ocean SCIENCE 110 193 284Morgan Freeman: WormholeWhen Earth EruptsWhen Earth Erupts “Europe” When Earth Erupts “Paci c Rim” When Earth Erupts “Americas” When Earth Erupts “Europe” ID 111 192 285Disappeared “Just a Nice Guy” Fatal Encounters48 Hours on ID (N) (Part 1 of 2) 48 Hours on ID (N) (Part 2 of 2) Unusual Suspects “Death of an Angel” 48 Hours on ID (Part 1 of 2) HBO 302 300 501(5:10)“Water for Elephants”(:10) “Your Highness” (2011, Comedy) Danny McBride. ‘R’ Game of Thrones “Garden of Bones” Veep “Fundraiser” Girls (N) Game of Thrones “Garden of Bones” MAX 320 310 515(5:35)“Alien” (1979) Tom Skerritt, John Hurt. ‘R’ (:35)“The Tree of Life” (2011, Drama) Brad Pitt, Sean Penn, Jessica Chastain. ‘PG-13’ “X-Men: First Class” (2011, Action) James McAvoy. ‘PG-13’ SHOW 340 318 545(5:30)“180 Degrees South” (2010) The Borgias “Paolo” The Big CNurse JackieNurse Jackie (N) The Big C (N) The Borgias “The Beautiful Deception” Nurse JackieThe Big C MONDAY EVENING APRIL 23, 2012 Comcast Dish DirecTV 6 PM6:307 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:30 3-ABC 3 -TV20 NewsABC World NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Dancing With the Stars (N) (Live) (:01) 20/20 (N) News at 11(:35) Nightline (N) 4-IND 4 4 4Chann 4 NewsChann 4 NewsEntertainment Ton.Inside Edition (N) Love-RaymondKing of QueensBig Bang TheoryBig Bang TheoryThe 10 O’Clock News (N) Chann 4 News(:35) The Insider 5-PBS 5 -World NewsNightly BusinessPBS NewsHour (N) Antiques Roadshow “Atlanta” (N) Antiques Roadshow “Providence, RI” America RevealedBBC World NewsTavis Smiley 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxCBS Evening NewsJudge JudyTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother2 Broke GirlsTwo and Half Men(:31) Mike & MollyHawaii Five-0 “Lapa’au” Action News JaxLetterman 9-CW 9 17 17Meet the BrownsMeet the BrownsHouse of PayneHouse of PayneGossip Girl “Despicable B” (N) Hart of Dixie “Destiny & Denial” (N) The Of ceThe Of ceTMZ (N) Access Hollywood 10-FOX 10 30 30How I Met/MotherFamily GuyFamily GuyThe SimpsonsBones “The Warrior in the Wuss” (N) House “Body & Soul” (N) (PA) NewsAction News JaxTwo and Half MenHow I Met/Mother 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsNBC Nightly NewsWheel of FortuneJeopardy! (N) The Voice Vocalists compete in hope of advancing. (N) (Live) Smash “Publicity” (N) NewsJay Leno CSPAN 14 210 350(5:00) U.S. House of Representatives Politics & Public Policy Today WGN-A 16 239 30730 Rock30 RockAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosAmerica’s Funniest Home VideosWGN News at Nine (N) 30 RockScrubs TVLAND 17 106 304M*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HHome Improve.Home Improve.Home Improve.Love-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondKing of Queens OWN 18 189 279(5:00) Oprah’s Next ChapterOprah’s Next Chapter “Joel Osteen” Oprah’s Lifeclass: The Tour Spiritual solutions. (N) Breakthrough With Tony RobbinsOprah’s Lifeclass: The Tour A&E 19 118 265The First 48 “Marked for Death” Storage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck DynastyDuck Dynasty(:01) Duck Dynasty(:31) Duck Dynasty HALL 20 185 312Little House on the Prairie “Annabelle” Little House on the PrairieLittle House on the PrairieLittle House on the PrairieFrasierFrasierFrasierFrasier FX 22 136 248How I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherTwo and Half MenTwo and Half Men“Wild Hogs” (2007, Comedy) Tim Allen, John Travolta. Four friends take a motorcycle road trip.“Wild Hogs” (2007, Comedy) Tim Allen, John Travolta. CNN 24 200 202John King, USA (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360Erin Burnett OutFront TNT 25 138 245Law & Order “Choice of Evils” Law & Order “Harm” (DVS) The MentalistThe MentalistThe Closer “Repeat Offender” Rizzoli & Isles NIK 26 170 299VictoriousVictoriousSpongeBobFred: The Show (N) George LopezGeorge LopezGeorge LopezGeorge LopezGeorge LopezGeorge LopezFriendsFriends SPIKE 28 168 241CSI: Crime Scene“Joy Ride” (2001, Suspense) Steve Zahn, Paul Walker. Premiere.“Halloween” (2007, Horror) Malcolm McDowell, Scout Taylor-Compton, Tyler Mane. 1,000 Ways to Die1,000 Ways to Die MY-TV 29 32 -The Ri emanThe Ri emanM*A*S*HM*A*S*HLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitLaw & Order: Special Victims UnitSeinfeldFrasierThe Twilight ZonePerry Mason DISN 31 172 290Shake It Up!Good Luck CharlieJessieAustin & AllyShake It Up!“Princess Protection Program” (2009) Selena Gomez. (:10) Jessie(:35) Austin & AllyWizards-PlaceGood Luck Charlie LIFE 32 108 252To Be AnnouncedTo Be AnnouncedTo Be Announced To Be Announced USA 33 105 242NCIS “Smoked” NCIS: Los Angeles “Pushback” WWE Monday Night RAW (N) (:05)“G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra” BET 34 124 329106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live Emeli Sande performs. (N)“Notorious” (2009) Angela Bassett. Based on the life of slain rapper Christopher Wallace. The GameThe GameThe GameThe Game ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenter (N) (Live) a MLB Baseball New York Yankees at Texas Rangers. From Rangers Ballpark in Arlington, Texas. (N Subject to Blackout) Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN2 36 144 209NFL32 (N) (Live) NFL Live (N) (Live) SportsCenter Special: On the Clock (N) NBA Coast to Coast (N) (Live) NFL Live SUNSP 37 -ScubaNationCaptain’s TalesSport shing TVFlats ClassShip Shape TVSprtsman Adv.Florida Sport.Fishing the FlatsAddictive FishingPro Tarpon TournamentBoxing in 60 DISCV 38 182 278American Chopper: Senior vs. JuniorAmerican Chopper: Senior vs. JuniorAmerican Chopper: Senior vs. JuniorAmerican Chopper: Senior vs. JuniorWorld’s Scariest Plane Landings (N) American Chopper: Senior vs. Junior TBS 39 139 247King of QueensKing of QueensSeinfeldSeinfeldFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyFamily GuyConan Actress Kathy Grif n. (N) HLN 40 202 204Prime News with Vinnie PolitanJane Velez-MitchellNancy Grace (N) Dr. DrewNancy GraceShowbiz Tonight FNC 41 205 360Special Report With Bret Baier (N) The FOX Report With Shepard SmithThe O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) On the Record W/Greta Van SusterenThe O’Reilly Factor E! 45 114 236The Voice Vocalists face elimination. E! News (N) Fashion PoliceKhloe and LamarKhloe and LamarDeath in Paradise (N) Chelsea Lately (N) E! News TRAVEL 46 196 277Anthony Bourdain: No ReservationsAnthony Bourdain: No ReservationsAnthony Bourdain: No ReservationsAnthony Bourdain: No Reservations (N)Hotel Impossible (N) Hotel Impossible HGTV 47 112 229Property VirginsProperty VirginsLove It or List It A formidable facelift. Love It or List It Jim and Connie. 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Steves’ Europe 7-CBS 7 47 47Action News JaxThe Young and the RestlessBold/BeautifulThe TalkLet’s Make a DealJudge Joe BrownJudge JudyAction News JaxAction News Jax 9-CW 9 17 17Law & Order: Criminal IntentJudge GunnJudge GunnJudge MathisLifechangersLifechangersMauryThe People’s Court 10-FOX 10 30 30Jerry SpringerThe Jeremy Kyle ShowJudge Joe BrownWe the PeopleThe DoctorsDr. PhilFamily FeudFamily Feud 12-NBC 12 12 12NewsExtraDays of our LivesFirst Coast LivingSwift JusticeAndersonThe Ellen DeGeneres ShowNewsNews CSPAN 14 210 350(9:00) U.S. House of RepresentativesU.S. House of RepresentativesVaried Programs U.S. House of Representatives WGN-A 16 239 307In the Heat of the NightWGN Midday NewsWalker, Texas RangerWalker, Texas RangerWalker, Texas RangerOld ChristineOld Christine TVLAND 17 106 304M*A*S*HM*A*S*HGunsmokeGunsmokeBonanzaBonanzaBonanza OWN 18 189 279Varied Programs A&E 19 118 265CSI: MiamiVaried ProgramsCriminal MindsVaried ProgramsCriminal MindsVaried ProgramsThe First 48Varied ProgramsThe First 48Varied ProgramsThe First 48Varied Programs HALL 20 185 312Emeril’s TablePetkeepingThe Martha Stewart ShowThe Martha Stewart ShowThe WaltonsThe WaltonsThe Waltons FX 22 136 248(10:30) MovieVaried Programs How I Met/MotherHow I Met/Mother CNN 24 200 202(11:00) CNN NewsroomCNN Newsroom CNN NewsroomThe Situation Room With Wolf Blitzer TNT 25 138 245Las VegasLas VegasLeverageThe CloserLaw & OrderLaw & Order NIK 26 170 299Mike the KnightTeam UmizoomiDora the ExplorerDora the ExplorerSpongeBobSpongeBobKung Fu PandaThe PenguinsBig Time RushiCarlySpongeBobSpongeBob SPIKE 28 168 241CSI: Crime Scene InvestigationCSI: Crime Scene InvestigationCSI: Crime Scene InvestigationCSI: Crime SceneVaried ProgramsCSI: Crime SceneVaried Programs MY-TV 29 32 -Hawaii Five-0GunsmokeBonanzaThe Big ValleyKojak The Rockford Files DISN 31 172 290Mickey MouseVaried ProgramsSpecial Agent OsoNever LandMovieVaried Programs LIFE 32 108 252Old ChristineOld ChristineGrey’s AnatomyGrey’s AnatomyGrey’s AnatomyHow I Met/MotherHow I Met/MotherTo Be AnnouncedVaried Programs USA 33 105 242Varied Programs BET 34 124 329The ParkersThe ParkersMovie My Wife and KidsMy Wife and KidsMy Wife and KidsThe ParkersThe Parkers ESPN 35 140 206SportsCenterSportsCenterSportsCenterSportsCenter SpeVaried ProgramsNFL LiveAround the HornInterruption ESPN2 36 144 209ESPN First Take Lines First ReportSportsCenterNASCAR NowBest of First TakeNumbers Never LieDan Le BatardSportsNation SUNSP 37 -Varied Programs DISCV 38 182 278Varied Programs TBS 39 139 247Yes, DearYes, DearAmerican DadMy Name Is EarlLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondFriendsFriendsFriendsFriends HLN 40 202 204News Now HLN Special Report FNC 41 205 360(11:00) Happening NowAmerica Live Studio B With Shepard SmithYour World With Neil CavutoThe Five E! 45 114 236E! 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DEAR ABBY: “Melody” has been my best friend since we were in the fourth grade. (We’re now in our 30s.) Over the past few years, Melody’s life has changed. She separated from her husband, lives alone and shares custody of their three children. She started dating almost immediately after her separation, going out with almost anyone who showed her a little attention. She’s now involved with a man who told her he’s bisexual and has never taken her out on a date. (Still, he never hesitates to call and ask her to clean his bathroom or cook him a meal.) She’s always crying on my shoul-der because she ends up with losers, yet the picture she has on her profile on all the dating sites shows her in a skimpy bikini. One evening Melody asked me why she can’t attract a “decent man.” I told her that she needs to love herself before she can be loved. I also mentioned that if she wants to stop attract-ing sleazy men, she should consider changing her profile picture. She became angry and hasn’t spoken to me since. As a friend I felt it was my responsibility to tell her the truth. I want to help get her life back on track in a positive way. Was I wrong to be honest with her? -HAD HER BEST INTERESTS AT HEART DEAR HAD: Your straight answer clearly wasn’t what your friend wanted to hear, but you did the right thing by being honest with her. In light of the length of your friend-ship, call and offer her an apology “if I hurt your feel-ings.” Let’s hope that once she cools off, she’ll appreci-ate that you said something important. Because of the way she’s advertising herself on her profile, it’s little wonder the men she’s attracting are looking for nothing more than two headlights and a tan. Yipes! ** ** ** DEAR ABBY: When I was 25 I placed a baby girl for adoption. I made a decision I thought was best for her and for me. I am 50 now and still believe I made the right decision. Last year she searched for and found me. I answered all her questions and eventually met with her and her parents. By all accounts she has a wonder-ful family and had a great childhood. We have stayed in touch through email. Abby, I feel nothing toward this girl. There is no maternal attachment. I did my job as a good mother and made sure she had the home I could not give her. If I never see her again it wouldn’t bother me. I can’t be the only woman who feels this way. I’m not looking for a way to change my feelings. I just need to know I’m not a cold-hearted freak. -FINE WITH MY DECISION DEAR FINE: You are not a cold-hearted freak. You’re a woman who never bonded with her baby. Please stop beating yourself up for not feeling something for a person who is a virtual stranger. When I hear from other women who read this letter and who feel as you do -please notice I didn’t say “if” I hear from them -I will share their thoughts with you. DEAR ABBY HOROSCOPES ARIES (March 21-April 19): Stick to the familiar and avoid making impulsive decisions that can affect your status or reputation. Preparation will be key to getting ahead professionally. Put more thought into your career strategy, and look for job opportunities. +++ TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You’ll have all the right moves and the chance to show off your skills. Getting involved in a project, event or activity you feel comfort-able with will enhance your popularity with new acquain-tances. +++ GEMINI (May 21-June 20): What you do for others will count. Finding solutions and making reforms will garner appreciation and raise your profile. Your charm and spontaneity will enhance your love life. Making alterations to your living arrangements will be beneficial. +++ CANCER (June 21-July 22): Use your imagination and you’ll find a way to please everyone. Your abil-ity to tune in to what others are thinking will help you win favors and build a closer relationship. A partnership will open up a host of oppor-tunities. ++++ LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Weed out what you no longer need or use, and simplify your life. A sudden change of attitude will help you make a long overdue decision. Don’t let anyone manipulate or pressure you into something you don’t want to do. ++ VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Take a moment to collect your thoughts and proceed with confidence. Interacting with people who share your interests will lead to a proposition that is hard to refuse. +++++ LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Set out to acquire infor-mation that will help you develop new skills. Love is in the stars, and doing some-thing with someone special or looking for romance via the Internet or a social event will pay off. +++ SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Use your intuition when dealing with partners or regarding domestic matters that could cost you money. Let instinct guide you person-ally, professionally and finan-cially. A change of plans will be to your benefit. +++ SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Don’t be fooled by what others lead you to believe. Trust your own judg-ment and make the changes you need to make in order to advance with your personal plans. A work-related matter must be pushed in order to get things moving. +++ CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Get busy fixing up your digs, or make plans to invite friends over. Visitors will be impressed with your abode and your ability to host a great get-together. Connect with someone from your past. +++++ AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Keep things simple. Responsibilities you don’t expect will slow you down, making it impossible to honor a promise or com-mitment. Act fast and you will make a good impres-sion instead of damaging your reputation. Update your image. ++ PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): A job worth doing is worth doing right. Attending to the details and striving for perfection will make a lasting impres-sion, leading to great opportunities and mon-etary rewards. 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No. 0415 5(/($6('$7( *5,',521%\.HYLQ*'HU(GLWHGE\:LOO6KRUW] For any three answers,FDOOIURPDWRXFKWRQHSKRQHHDFKPLQXWHRUwith a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. 12345678910111213141516171819202122232425262728293031323334353637383940 414243444546474849 505152535455565758596061626364656667686970717273747576777879808182 83848586 87888990919293949596979899100101102103104105106107108109110111112113114115116 117118119120121122123124 125126127128129130131132133134135136137138139140141142143144145146147148149150151 152 153154 155156157 When this puzzle is finished, 12 special squares, along with theshaded squares, will create an image of 56-Down. The 12squares correspond-ing to the “reflection” of the special squares,when read clockwise from top left, will spell an alternative namefor 56-Down. Woman looking for a decent guy should take friend’s advice GODUTCHVACATEDBORG INUTEROARCHIVEARNIE AFRICANAMERICANSEINE NOELMELOKNAPSACKSNOSIRYOOHOODIOCESE ITSTOLDUSINGAWATCH YOREENORMEEGOS DAPFOWLTREATYRESULT IROCNSECPSEUDADE SCOOPEASESTIGER COLORFORVALENTINESDAY SKIEDDOZESSPINE PHIMEOWSDAMSYANG JUDGESMATTERREPONOG SMEECURLERAINU THELONELIESTNUMBER ASTAIREFONDUESLAVE PARCHEESIURALAGOD ASYLAWOOLFACETIOUSLY SHOUTABUSIVEEMOTIVESANEYESDEARROOSTED Answers to last Sunday’s Crossword. Q Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. CELEBRITY CIPHER Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012 5D

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6D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2012 POOL: Slowing pool access regs Continued From Page 2D Same Day Service Includes Saturday Lake CityLake City Commons Center(Publix Shopping)752-3733 Carrying “Vera Bradley”CONTACTSEYE EXAMS by Independent Optometrist 2 Complete Pair Eyeglasses $119 Includes Lenses & FramesSome Restrictions Apply.COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES APRIL 30, 2012 NOW FREE GLASSES FREEPAIR OF GLASSES Buy one complete pair of glasses at regular price & receive aSome Restrictions Apply.COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES APRL 30, 2012 $99 1 PairEyeglasses Includes lenses & frames.Some Restrictions Apply.COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES APRIL 30, 2012 NOW “Where you get the Best for Less”Ask about Care Credit By MALCOLM FOSTERAssociated PressTOKYO — A Tokyo developer took visitors up the world’s tallest freestanding broadcast structure on Tuesday, a 634-meter (2,080-foot) tower with special technology meant to withstand earth-quakes that often strike Japan. The Tokyo Skytree is the world’s second-tallest structure behind the 828-meter (2,717-foot) Burj Khalifa in Dubai, according to owner Tobu Tower Skytree Co. The needle-like radio and television tower opens to the public on May 22. Journalists given a tour Tuesday saw sweeping if hazy views of the Tokyo skyline. It took about 50 seconds in a high-speed elevator Tuesday to zip up to the lower observation deck at 350 meters (1,148 feet), and another 30 seconds to reach the higher deck at 450 meters (1,476 feet). The Skytree has a restaurant and two cafes on the observation decks, a vertigo-inducing glass floor that allows visitors to look straight down, and an emer-gency staircase with 2,523 steps. The tower was constructed with extremely strong steel tubes surrounding a central concrete column that are structurally separate from each other in the tower’s mid-section. In the event of an earthquake, the concrete core and steel frame are designed to offset each other to reduce the building’s over-all motion. The Skytree has been built to stand firm even if a mag-nitude 7 quake were to strike beneath the building, said Sho Toyoshima, a spokesman for Tobu Tower. He said the tower sustained no structural damage from the magnitude 9.0 quake that struck off Japan’s north eastern coast last March, even as it was being built. The Skytree is expected to bolster television and radio transmissions in the capital region. Owners hope it will also become a new tourist destination in Tokyo. ASSOCIATED PRESSThe Tokyo Sky Tree, the world’s tallest freestanding broad cast structure, stands 2,080 feet tall. It will open to the public in May.Japan’s newest tower uses anti-quake technology The tower was constructed with extremely strong steel tubes surrounding a central concrete column that are structurally separate from each other in the tower’s mid-section. around mineral hot springs. Some retreats have only six or 10 rooms, but have multiple pools at varying temperatures to give guests a sampling of the waters. “If you have three pools that’s $18,000 plus tax” to attach a chair lift to each, said Bruce Abney, owner of the 12-room El Morocco Inn & Spa. “That’s just huge for us and would put some of us under, I’m afraid.” If the 20 hotels there could share portable lifts, it would satisfy the requirements and protect their bottom line, said Judy Bowman, owner of Living Waters Spa. “I’ve never had a request for a pool lift in eight and a half years. It seems exces sive,” said Bowman, who has nine rooms and six condos. For large chains such as Hilton or Holiday Inn, the challenge is more likely about time than money because of their deep pockets. But chains can also get bogged down in bureaucra cy, said Mehmet Erdem, a professor who studies hotel operations at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Corporate headquarters have to work with management companies, building owners and others to make sure upgrades are done uniformly and without tarnishing their brands.