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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01787
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: February 25, 2012
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01787
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text




I YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874


000016 120312 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


ty


Reporter


LAKECITYREPORTER.COM


Hazing

probe

worries

parents


Seven arrested in
pair of incidents
at FAMU.

By MIKE SCHNEIDER
Associated Press
ORLANDO In the
three months since a Florida
A&M University drum
major was beaten to death,
his parents have waited as
authorities arrested seven
people in a pair of other haz-
ing cases tied to the school's
renowned Marching 100.
Four FAMU band mem-
bers were arrested last
month for punching and
paddling band pledges.
Three more band members
were charged in December
with hazing after a female
band member's beating left
her with a broken thigh and
blood clots.
Both of those episodes
happened within weeks of
Robert Champion's fatal
beating on a FAMU bus
outside an Orlando hotel
after a performance, but no
one has been charged in
that case.
His parents, Robert Sr.,
and Pamela, trust the pro-
cess but find the investi-
gation's pace troubling,
said their lawyer, Chris
Chestnut
"It's very dishearten-
ing, discouraging and dis-
appointing to see .arrests,
made for hazing with minor
injuries but none for a mur-
der," Chestnut said.
There are dozens of wit-
nesses and possible sus-
pects to be interviewed in
Champion's killing, and
most of them live outside
the Orlando area. Some
may not be cooperating.
Also, the case has gar-
nered international atten-
tion for revealing the cul-
ture of hazing within the
famous band, adding great-
er pressure to make sure
there are no holes in the
investigation.
Detectives were unable to
interview all the witnesses
who know what. happened
on the bus immediately after
Champion died because his
death wasn't ruled a homi-
cide until a month after
he collapsed. They have
been trying to recreate the
events by interviewing wit-
nesses," often traveling to
Tallahassee where FAMU
is located.
"It's not like arriving at the
scene of a homicide where
there has been a shooting
and you interview all the
witnesses," said Danielle
Tavernier, a spokeswoman
for the State Attorney's


FAMU continued on 3A


Robert and Pam Champion Sr.


Blueberry Blues


S, 'JASON MATTHEW WALKERLake City Reporter
The local blueberry crop suffered serious damage during a hard freeze in mid-February.
Healthy blueberries from local farm are seen in this file photo.



Freeze may result in


major price hike.


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

LIVE OAK
Amidst of one of the mildest
winters in recent memory,
most people would expect
a banner year for Florida
crops. However, an estimated
20 percent of Florida's 2012 blueberry
crop may have been damaged by freez-
ing temperatures earlier this month.
According to reports, the'ehortage of
Florida blueberries combined with even
larger damage-to the Georgia blueberry
crop could result in prices increases by
as much as 20 percent
Florida is the sole U.S. supplier of
fresh blueberries between late March
and early May. By May
other states begin sup- p"Ou
,plying the U.S. blueberry "Our Cr
market and push the farm ing pre
prices below the break- r
even point in Florida. but we 1
Walter Hurst of Hurst though
Family Blueberry Farm in
Live Oak said the freezing cold w
temperatures damaged his Walt
crop the weekend of Feb. Hs"Waly
11-12. Hurst Family
"Our crop is looking
pretty good, but we took a
hit though from the cold weather from
those two nights," he said. "We probably
lost around 20 percent of the crop."
The Hurst Family Blue Farm has 11
acres of blueberries plants and Hurst
estimates they'll lose about 10,000
pounds of blueberries.
He said they attempted to protect the
plants from the sub-freezing tempera-
tures, "but it just got too cold."
Hurst, whose farms produces blueber-
ries for commercial operations, won't


f


e
B


know the full impact of the weather on
Shis blueberry crop until mid-April the
harvest begins.
In addition to the cold temperatures,
growers are also concerned about a fun-
gus, called the mummy berry fungus,
that also attacked their crops.
The mummy berry fungus, Monillinia
vaccinii-corymbosi, causes blueberries to
become dried, shriveled and gray-white.
"We sprayed for that," Hurst said.
According to information from the
Florida Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services website, Florida
Agriculture.com, in the mid-1980s
there were only a few hundred acres of
blueberries being grown in Florida, but
now there are more than 4,000. Thanks
in large part to the improved varieties
bred by Dr. Paul Lyrene, farm-gate sales
of blueberries in Florida
have increased from less
p is look- than $500,000 in the 1980s
ty good, to over $65 million in
2009. Florida is now one
ook a hit of the biggest blueberry-
from the growing states in the
e country, second only to
weather" Michigan.
?r Hurst Kathie Snowden,
Farm whose husband Wendell
blueberry Farm nowden is the presi-
dent of the Wellborn
Community Association,
the organization that sponsors the
annual Wellborn Blueberry Festival, said
several hundred.pounds of local blueber-
ries are used during each year's festival
and they hope the local blueberry crops
don't suffer too much from the past cold
weather.
"We sell our blueberry pies and cob-
blers made by Pat Gaylord and she uses
about 400 pounds for the festival," she
said. "We're going to need blueberries." '


Romney:


Medicare



eligibility


Candidate's far-reaching
plan would also affect
Social Security.

By DAVID ESPO
Associated Press
DETROIT Four days before critical primary elec-
tions; Republican presidential contender Mitt Romney
outlined a far-reaching plan Friday to gradually delay
Americans' eligibility for Medicare as well as Social
Security.
Romney said the shift, as people live longer, is needed
to steer the giant benefit programs toward economic
sustainability.
Speaking to the Detroit Economic Club in cavern-
ous Ford Field, where the Detroit Lions football team
plays he also made a play for primary election sup-
port in Michigan, which votes on Tuesday along with
Arizdna.
Romney said previous steps to toughen government
emission standards had "provided a benefit to some of
the foreign automakers" at the expense of American
companies. He said future changes should be worked
out cooperatively between government and industry.
Campaigning in the city where he was born, Romney
. described himself as ."a car guy" who has a Ford
Mustang and a Chevy pickup and whose wife, Ann,
drives "a couple of Cadillacs." Aides said they were
ROMNEY continued ron .,',


MOO IAJ Ii I, rnEoS
Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov.
Mitt Romney speaks at Ford Field in Detroit on Friday.



House panel

OKs random

drug-test bill

Proposal would allow
testing by stateagencies
every three months.

By JAMES L. ROSICA
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE After a roller-coaster ride through
the House, a bill that allows state agencies to randomly
drug-test their employees was cleared by a final com-
mittee on Friday.
The House State Affairs Committee cleared the bill
(HB 1205) by a party-line vote of 9-6.
The measure allows, but does not require, state agen-
cies to randomly test workers every three months. It
makes it easier to fire those workers who show positive
for drugs after a first test that has been confirmed.
An earlier committee had rejected the measure after
Republicans and Democrats. questioned its cost and
legality. Rep. Jimmie Smith, the Inverness Republican
sponsoring the bill, changed it so that no extra money
for drug tests is needed. Tests will be paid for out of the
agencies' existing budgets.
Under this latest version of the revived bill, a random
sample of employees to be tested can't be more than
TESTING continued on 3A


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TODAY IN
PEOPLE
Oscar nominees
bust at box office


COMING
SUNDAY
Local news
roundup


I 75


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25,2012











2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2012


FLORID" DA F '
O Wednesday: Friday: Friday:
6-12-17-21-26-42 N w Aftemoon: 2-1-7 Afternoon: 2-0-4-8
x3 Evening: 5-9-5 Evening: 9-0-9-7


td Thursday:
2-10-20-28-30


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Oscar gold fails to translate to cash


LOS ANGELES
t's a common complaint ,
among movie fans that the
Academy Awards honors films
no one has seen.
Not quite right, but closer to
the mark this year than most
For the first time in the three years
since Oscar organizers expanded the
best-picture category to more than five
films, there's not a single blockbuster
in the running. Billion-dollar worldwide
hits such as "Avatar" and 'Toy Story 3"
have been in the best-picture mix the
last two years, along with such huge
smashes as "Up," "Inception" and "The
Blind Side."
The only contender this time that
has made it to the $100 million mark
domestically is the Deep South tale
'The Help" at $169.7 million big
business for a drama with a heavily
female audience.
But the rest of the best-picture
lineup ranges from a slim $13.3 million
domestically for the family drama '"he
Tree of Life" to a modest $78.8 million
for the World War I saga "War Horse""
- one of the smallest audiences ever
for a film from blockbuster maestro
Steven Spielberg.
It's not just studio bottom lines that
are affected when Oscar films fail to
catch fire at the box office. The Oscar
show itself can suffer, since bigger TV
audiences tend to tune in when enor-
mous hits such as 'Titanic" or "'The
Lord of the Rings: The Return of the
King" are in the thick of the awards
race.
As of last weekend, the domestic
haul for this season's nine best-,
picture nominees totaled $595.6 mil-
lion, according to box-office tracker
Hollywood.com. Thafs less than half
the business done by the 10 nominees
a year ago and about a third of the
revenues for the 10 contenders two
years ago. (The Oscars have only nine
nominees this time because of a rule


change requiring that films receive a'
certain percentage of first-place votes.)
The big hits of 2011 "Harry
Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part
2," "Transformers: Dark of the Moon,"
"The Twilight Saga. Breaking Dawn -
Part 1," "The Hangover Part II" just
were not best-picture material.
"I think there is a disconnect, but
then I think there's supposed to be
a disconnect It's not about what
are the most popular films. Its the
films deemed by the voting body
to be the best pictures of the year,"
said Hollywood.com analyst Paul
Dergarabedian. "Often times, what the
academy thinks is a great movie isn't
a movie a general audience wants to
see."
Only four times in the last 30 years
has the year's top-grossing film won
best picture at the Oscars 1988's
"Rain Man," 1994's "Forrest Gump,"
1997s "Titanic" and 2003's "The Lord
of the Rings: The Return of the King.",
'The Hurt Locker" domestic
gross just $17 million won best
picture two years ago over "Avatar,"
which pulled in $760 million domesti-
cally and $2.8 billion worldwide.
Critical acclaim and commercial suc-
cess merged last year as 'The King's
Speech" was crowned best picture, the
Oscar attention helping it to a domestic
take of $138.8 million, a fortune for an
old-fashioned period drama.
Most of 'The King's Speech" riches
came after Oscar nominations were
announced, the film packing in audi-
ences in the wake of all the awards
buzz.
That's often been the great value of
Oscar nominations for films that lack
big marketing budgets. But this sea-
son, that usual bump at the box office
has lost much of its bounce.
George Clooney's family drama
'The Descendants" fared the best, pull-
ing in $24.3 million domestically since-'
the nominations Jan. 24 to raise its total


through last weekend to $75.6 million.
"We still have a movie out there
that's in release, and we want to get
people to see it," "Descendants" pro--
ducer Jim Burke said on nominations
morning. "Frankly, these nominations
help in that cause. We make what we
call human films, and it requires word
of mouth and people telling others to
see it and critical response and audi-
ence reaction. It all helps. It all helps
a lot."
The silent film "The Artist," which
has 10 nominations and is favored to
win best picture, would be one of the
lowest-grossing winners ever, with
$28.1 million through last weekend.
The Oscar attention certainly has
helped, though. A bit more than half of
its box-office cash has come in since
the nominations.
Martin Scorsese's Paris adventure
"Hugo," which leads with 11 nomina-
tions, has had a so-so commercial run,
padding its domestic dollars to $67.3
million, up $11.4 million since nomina-
tions day. Yet it has a timeless appeal
that could keep it alive on video for the
long haul.
"It seems to be a picture that plays
to the entire family and plays f6r differ-
ent ages," Scorsese said. "It might have
a life more than a year or two. Maybe
in the future people will still see it and
get more out of it as they grow older."
That's a key purpose of theOscars
- calling attention to films that.
deserve to live on for years to come,
rather than those that put up big.num-
bers over opening weekend.
Oscar attention can make all the dif-
ference for tiny films such as the Irish
drama "Albert Nobbs," which went
into general release the weekend after
the nominations and has pulled in $2.4
million since, largely on the strength
of acting honors for Glenn Close and
Janet McTeer.
.AP)


Celebrity Birthdays


Country singer Ralph
Stanley is 85.
CBS newsman Bob
Schieffer is 75.
Actress Tea Leoni is
46.
Comedian Carrot Top


is 45.
Actor Sean Astin is 41.
Latin singer Julio
Iglesias Jr. is 39.
Comedian-actress
Chelsea Handler is 37.


Daily Scripture

"For I know the plans I have for
you," declares the LORD, "plans
to prosper you and not to harm
you, plans to give you hope and
a future. Then you will call on
me and come and pray to me,
and I will listen to you. You will
seek me and find me when you
seek me with all your heart."

Jeremiah 29:11-13


Lake City Reporter


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Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation...............755-5445
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Community Newspapers Inc., Is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St, Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, RFla.
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CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this
space. And thanks for reading.


Scott calls for changes to
auto insurance law
IVEST PALM BEACH
Goy. Rick Scott pushed
Fridayfor changes to the
state'satto insurancelaw,
saying it could lie the single
greatest factor in reducing .
residents' cost of living
Speaking in West Palm
Beach, Scott said costs
associated with motorists'
personal injury protec-
tion, or PIP, inordinately
affect the poor and must be
addressed.
A House bill, which the
Republican governor sup-
ports, aims to bring down
such costs, but opponents
have called it anti-consumer.
Taking questions from
reporters after his speech,
Scott said addressing PIP
was a top priority.
"Ifs an unbelievable tax
on our citizens," he said.
"Ifs probably the thing that
we can have the biggest
impact on reducing the cost
of living in the state."
Scott addressed a wide
range of topics in his
address to the Forum Club -
of the Palm Beaches, a busi-
ness and community group.
He said the state uni-
versities should work more ,
as a system and eliminate
cross-school competition.
"We don't have to have 11
different places where you
can get the exact same
degree," Scott said.
He said he hasn't seen
a school prayer bill making
its way through the House.
He said he won't make
an endorsement in the
Republican presidential
primary. "I think the citizens
ought to pick those on their
own," Scott said.
Though Scott has
included money in his bud-
get proposal for the Florida
Forever land-purchasing
program, which is part
of Everglades restoration
efforts, he said state own-
ership of massive blocks
of land wasn't the goal. "I
don't believe ifs our goal
that the state ought to own


all the land," he said. "Our
goal is to say, 'What la nd
do we need to make sure
that we have restored the.
Everglades, but we continue
to allow business to happen
in, the state?": ''..
S'M Scott also confirmed
he would run for re-lettion
in 2014, no surprise since
he has talked of a second
term since he earned the
Republican nomination and
based his core campaign
promise of jobs creation on
earning another four years.

House passes wrongful
conviction compensation
TALLAHASSEE -
William Dillon was momen-
tarily overcome with emo-
tion in the Florida House
gallery on Friday as the
chamber passed a bill that
would compensate him
$1.35 million for spending,
27 years in prison for a mur-
der he did not commit
The vote came about 10
months after the House
failed to act on a similar
measure as time ran out
on the 2011 legislative
session. The Senate, as it
did last year, passed the
legislation first and sent it
to the House. This year's
bill (SB 2) now goes back
to the Senate for approval
of changes made by the
House, which did not alter
the dollar amount or the
measure's effect
"Ifs definitely a closure to
a great degree," Dillon said,
fighting back tears. "They're
admitting that something
wrong did happen."
Dillon, now 52, was
cleared by DNA test-
ing in the beating death
of James Dvorak on a
Brevard County beach in
1981. Dillon was freed in
November 2008. A jailhouse
informant also has since
recanted his testimony
against Dillon and authori-
ties reopened the murder
investigation.
The Legislature must
pass a claims bill for Dillon
to receive compensation


because he does not qualify
for automatic payment due
to a prior drug conviction
when he was 19 years old.
The House applauded
when Dillon was introduced
and after debate by Rep.
Will Weatherford, a Wesley
, Chapel Republican who is
in line to become speaker in
November.

Lawmaker resigns over
texts to prosecutor
TALLAHASSEE A
Democrat lawmaker
resigned Friday over sug-
gestive and harassing
text messages he sent to
a married federal pros-
ecutor using a hidden
identity.
Rep. Richard Steinberg
of Miami Beach said his
resignation is effective
immediately and asked
for privacy while he deals
with his personal affairs.
He left the Capitol after
The Miami Herald report-
ed the story Wednesday
and issued an apology.
'The events of the past
week have been difficult
for my family, for me and
for everyone involved,"
Steinberg said in a writ-
ten statement. "As I
did earlier this week, I
want to once again, very
directly and sincerely,
apologize to everyone I
have hurt."
Steinberg, 39, is mar-
ried and has a young
daughter. He admitted
sending unsolicited texts
to Marlene Fernandez-
Karavetsos, an assistant
U.S. attorney in Miami.
Federal authorities were
investigating the messag-
es as a possible stalking
case, an offense that car-
ries a maximum one-year
jail sentence.
Fernandez-Karavetsos,
37, is married to George
Karavetsos, also a federal
prosecutor and chief of
the Miami U.S. attorney's
narcotics section

(AP)


THE WEATHER


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Sunday
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80.. 64 ipc
63,52/sn
62 52 sn
78i 70; in
59.,49 sh
79 75. pc
82, 69 pc
67,55.'sh
73., 61. c
59..50..r,
5., 50.. sr,
59 46 .sn
73/62.. c
58 43,1
77. 14/pr


Monday
77/65/sh
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80/76/pc
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76/56'sh
72 56 sh
79 7 1,pc
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81.. '74.sn
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An exclusive
a.m. servi
p.m. brought to
a.m. HIt our readers
p.m. 30mirlesi olm
Today's by
ultra-violet The Weather
a.m. radiation risk Channel.
p.m. for the areaon
p.m. ascalefrom 0

* weather.com
March V Forecasts, data and
22 graphics 2012 Weather
New i Centra, IP, Madison, Ws.
weather J www.weatherpubllsher.com


et Connected


14/TU


LAKCTYALANAC


TEMPERATURES
HIgh Friday
Low Friday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Friday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date.


83
70
71
47
88 in 1962
25 in 1989

0.00"
0.31"
1.16"
2.72"
6.03"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunnse tom.
Sunset tonm.
MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise torn.
Moonset tom.


7-01
6:26
7:00
6:27

8:46
10:04
9:20
10:57


000
Feb. March March
29 8 14
First Full Last


On this date in
1977, dust reduced
visibilities from east-
ern Virginia through
the southeastern
states to Florida.
The dust originated
in the western Great
Plains on the 22nd
and 23rd, when
wind gusts above
100 mph were
reported in Texas.


AROUND FLORIDA


City
SdiatSolve Cape Canaveral
e CY 63/40 Daytona Beach
V40 Ft. Lauderdale
ainesle Daylna Beach Fort Myers
64/42 62J52 Gainesville
Ocala Jacksonville
65/45 Key West
Ordando Cape Canaveral Key West
68/51 66/57 Lake City
Miami
Tp* Naples E
69/5n West Pahn Beach Ocala
75/63 Orlando
0 Ft Lauderdal Panama City
FLyers 78/67 Pensacola
77/56 Naples Tallahassee
78/58 Miami Tampa
79,/67 Valdosta
Key Wes-* W. Palm Beach


m m~~~"^


I WATERBY-' THE-H" "'al


iE HMM' SP OSOEDB










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2012 3A

ROMNEY: GOP candidate's plan would increase age for Medicare eligibility
Continued From Page 1A


model year 2007 and 2010 SRX vehicles,
one each registered in Massachusetts and
California.
Romney said his proposals for Medicare
and Social Security would begin in 2022,
meaning no current or near-retirees would
be affected. He also said he favors adjust-
ments to curtail the growth of future ben-
efits for the relatively well-to-do, so "lower-
income seniors would receive the most
generous benefits." He had described his
Social Security proposals previously.
The two programs provide retirement
and health care benefits to tens of millions
of older Americans.
Beginning in 2022, Romney said, "We will
gradually increase the Medicare eligibility
age by one month each year. In the long-
run, the eligibility ages for both programs
will be indexed to longevity so that they
increase only as fast as life expectancy."
Under current law, the age for collecting
full Social Security benefits is gradually rising
from-65 to 67. Medicare is available at age
65. In both cases, the age is set in law, and
Romney's suggestion that it be tied automati-
cally to increases in the life expectancy of
Americans would mark a major change.


He spoke in the run-up to a pair of prima-
ries that mark his latest tests as he tries to
-break free of Rick Santorum and his other
persistent but underfunded rivals in the
presidential race.
He is widely expected to win Arizona.
Neither he nor his rivals is airing television
ads in the state, a reliable sign that all sides
view it as a closed case.
Although public and private .polls in
, Michigan show Romney has erased much
or all of an earlier deficit, he still faces a
stiff challenge from Santorum in the state,
where the disparity in television advertis-
ing is not as overwhelmingly in Romney's
favor has it has been elsewhere.
It is an unwritten rule of Michigan politics
that presidential candidates appear before
the Detroit Economic Club. Santorum
addressed the group several days ago,. and
officials familiar with the details said Newt
Gingrich's camp had been in discussions
for an appearance as late as last week. A
spokesman for the former House speaker
did not respond to a request for comment
Romney's commitment caused a spike in
interest, and as a result, the former gover-
nor spoke in the huge stadium. He stood


on a makeshift stage set up on the 35-yard
line, with his audience on the stadium
floor ringed by thousands of empty sta-
dium seats. Goalpost uprights were visible
above the black draping that served as his
backdrop. United Auto Workers protested
outside.
He spoke as Santorum intensified his
effort to score an upset on what amounts
to Romney's political home field.
The former Pennsylvania senator often
stresses social issues in his campaign
appearances. Btit public opinion polls con-
sistently show the voters care most about
the economy, and Santorum's campaign
announced that later in the day, he would
unveil an "economic freedom agenda" that
he hoped to enact in his first 100 days in
office.
By contrast, Romney rarely strays from
economic issues as he presses his case
that as a former businessman he is best
equipped to help restore an economy still
recovering from the worst recession in
decades.
"I not only think I have the best chance.
I think I have the only chance" of defeating
Obama, Romney told his midday audience,


although he quickly added with a nervous-
sounding laugh, "Maybe I'm overstating it
a bit"
While aides earlier had touted the speech
as a major economic address, Romney
seemed to pre-empt himself earlier in the
week when he called for across-the-board
income tax cuts of 20 percent to help the
economy grow and begin creating jobs in
large numbers.
He repeated that proposal, along with
his calls to cut the corporate income tax
rate and abolish the estate tax.
On Medicare, Romney also supports
changing the program to give beneficiaries
a choice between the traditional setup and
one in which the government provides
them with a monthly payment that can be
used to purchase private coverage.
"With these.commonsense changes, we
will have fixed our balance sheet," Romney
said. "Instead of $62 trillion in unfunded
commitments hanging over America's
future, we'll have a balance sheet that is
actually in balance."
In all there are 30 Republican National
Convention delegates at stake in Michigan
next week, 29 in Arizona.


TESTING: Panel OKs drug-testing bill
Continued From Page 1A


10 percent of the agency's
workforce and must be gen-
erated by an "independent
third-party" computer.
Smith told the panel he
wasn't insinuating that state
workers have more drug
problems than society at
large, and didn't have any
evidence to that effect.
But drug use anywhere
shouldn't be tolerated, he
added.
"We can change society
as we know it," Smith said
of his bill. "Be brave enough
to do it."
Rep. Alan Williams, a
Democrat from Tallahassee
who represents thousands
of state employees, said the
bill would do nothing to
help the already depressed
morale of those constitu-'
ents.


"It's the wrong direc-
tion at the wrong time,"
he said. "'Just say 'no' to
this bill."
But Rep. Scott Plakon
pointed out that employ-
ees of private companies
already work under the pos-
sibility they'll be tested.
"I don't see why state
workers should be treated
any better than the private
sector," the Longwood
Republican said.
Civil liberties experts
and public worker .advo-
cates continue to oppose
the bill as unconstitutional
and unfair.
"It's a Big Brother act
and we don't believe in
that," said Gail Marie Perry
of the Communications
Workers of America.
Drug testing invokes the


Fourth Amendment, which
protects against unreason-
able searches and seizure.
Courts generally frown
on drug testing without
a reasonable suspicion of
employee drug use, though"
the U.S. Supreme Court has
ruled "suspicionless" test-
ing constitutional in a hand-
ful of situations, including
on student athletes and
railroad employees after a
major accident
A separate execu-
tive order by Gov. Rick
Scott requiring random
drug testing of state work-
ers resulted in a lawsuit
and a hearing in that case
was held this week. Scott
supports Smith's bill.
The bill should next go
to the full House for con-
sideration.


FAMU: Hazing probe worries family
Continued From Page 1A


Office. "They have to go
out and coordinate with
those people who were
there that day."
Half a dozen detectives
have interviewed or are in
the process of interview-
ing 30 to 35, witnesses,
said Ginette Rodriguez,
a spokeswoman for the
Orange County Sheriff's
Office.
"With this amount of
people ... three months
really isn't a lot of time
with an active caseload
that these detectives are
carrying," Rodriguez
said. "We're going to send
this over to the state, and
of course, they're going
to want to make sure that
they're presenting a good
case. That is basically all
it is."
SAfter an autopsy, author-
ities ruled Champion's
death a homicide. They
found Champion suffered
blunt trauma blows to
his body and died from
shock caused by severe
bleeding after he endured
hazing on a bus outside
the hotel where band
members were staying
after FAMU's annual
football game against
rival Bethune-Cookman
University.
Witnesses have told
Champion's parents the
26-year-old drum major
may have been targeted
for severe hazing because
of his opposition to the
marching band's culture
of hazing, said Chestnut,
the lawyer for the subur-
ban Atlanta family. Other


witnesses have told them
Champion being gay, and
the fact that he was a
candidate for chief drum
major, also may have
played roles, Chestnut
said.
The case will be present-
ed to a grand jury once
detectives with the Orange
County Sheriff's Office
turn it over to prosecutors.
The earliest the grand jury
would likely meet on it
would be next month.


Champion's parents
have not been told much
about how the investiga-
tion is progressing but
would like to be better
informed, Chestnut said.
"The family isn't try-
ing to second-guess law
enforcement,". Chestnut
said. "I think they're
doing their job. I think
they would just like the
courtesy of contact. At
least tell us what is going
on."


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8th-grade FCAT

workshop set fo
An FCAT Writing work- ing the workshop. Mary
shop will be hosted by Lewis Style essay writing
Richardson Middle School techniques enhance writ-
on Saturday, February 25, ing skills and are proven to
2012 from 9AM-12PM in raise FCAT Writing scores.
the Richardson Middle Students will learn how to
School Cafeteria. write an essay that provides
All 8th grade students are all the essential elements
invited in Columbia County of effective writing includ-
are encouraged to attend. ing basic elements such
RMS Language Arts as Focus, Organization,
Teachers, who have been Support, Conventions, and
trained with Mary Lewis much more!
strategies, will be teach- Students will also be


Writing

r today


provided FCAT Writing
Strategies packet to take
home & review.
Snacks will be provided
compliments of the RMS
WOW Parent Group.
Ms. B. Whitfield,
Principal RMS & faculty/
staff would like to wel-
come all 8th graders of
Columbia County to attend
this powerfully educational
and extremely informative
workshop.


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OPINION


Saturday, February 25, 2012


ONE


OPINION


Procedure

really does

save lives

Here's some
uncomfortable
good news:
Colonoscopies real-
ly do save lives.
Doctors at Memorial Sloan-
Kettering Cancer Institute in
New York City tracked 2,602
patients who had colonosco-
pies between 1980 ind 1990.
In follow-up studies, done 16
years after the procedure,
they found that 12 had died
of colon cancer, while the
normal mortality from the
disease for a group that size
would be 25.4. That's a reduc-
tion in colon-cancer deaths of
53 percent.
In the words of Robert A.
Smith, senior director of can-
cer control at the American
Cancer Society, "This is a
really big deal."
The society estimates that
51,000 people will die of col-
orectal cancer in the United
States this year and 143,000'
new cases will be diagnosed.
The disease is easily curable
if detected in time, but barely
half of adults are up to date
on screenings that normally
start at age 59. If a person's
test is normal and there is no
family history of the disease,
a screening ,is not repeated
for another 10 years.
The colonoscopy, however,
maybe one of the least popu-
lar, and thus most avoided, of
the common medical screen-
ings. A thin probe with a
miniature TV camera and a
pair of snippers is inserted
into the rectum and wiggled
deep into the intestines. Any
polyps encountered along the
way are snipped and biopsied.
Not all polyps are cancerous,
but all colorectal cancers
start as polyps.
Until this study, there had
never been truly definitive
proof that colonoscopies
worked, leaving just enough
doubt so that the squeamish
could rationalize opting out.
Not now.
One doctor counsels waver-
ing patients: "You'll feel really
stupid if you die of colon can-
cer." A little humiliation and
discomfort are a small price
to pay to be smart and alive.

E Scripps Howard News Service


Lake City Reporter
'Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers 'build
strong communities -'Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced, Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letter, must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verrfi.ation WrI,-r, can have two
letters per month published, Letters


and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not rir<,i...iily that of
the Lake City Reporter,
BY MAIL; I.,ll.r., P O, 3, 1709,
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BY E-MAIL;
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www.lakecityreporter.com


Democratic leaders increasingly


oppose Obamacare


J r he ongoing contro-
versy over President
Barack Obama's
universal, female-
contraception
entitlement decree reportedly
'found Vice President Joseph
Biden, Defense Secretary
Leon Panetta, former Chief of
Staff Richard Daley and five
Democratic senators oppos-
ing Obama's fusillade against
religious liberty and economic
freedom. (It is tyrannical to
force faith-based organizations
to commit what they consider
sins and dictate to insurance
companies that they deliver a
service for free namely, birth-
control coverage for which.
they normally charge money.)
Obamacare's chief mandate
has enraged Democrats across
America.
Last spring, for instance,
Missouri Attorney General
Chris Koster, a Democrat, filed
a friend-of-the-court brief back-'
ing anti-Obamacare litigation
filed by Florida and 25 other
states.
"If Congress can force activi-
ty under the Commerce Clause,"
then it could force individuals
to receive vaccinations or annu-
al checkups, undergo mam-
mogram or prostate exams, or
maintain a specific body mass,"


Deroy Murdock
deroy.murdock@gmail.com

argues Koster's brief in the
case that the Supreme Court
Will hear in March.
Missourians voted 71 per-
cent to 29 percent on Aug. 3,
2010, to prohibitany law that
compels "any person, employer
or health-care provider to
participate in any health-care
system." This anti-mandate ini-
tiative won nearly 100,000 votes
from citizens who did not cast
Republican ballots in that day's
primary election. "When one
in six Democratic primary vot-
ers decides they want the state
of Missouri to defend them
from the signature issue of the
Democratic Party, you've got
a recipe for electoral disaster,"
RedState.com concluded.
On Nov. 8, 2011, Ohio
voters approved Issue 3,
another referendum against
the Obamacare mandate. In an
election driven by union opposi-
tion to GOP Gov. John Kasich's


restrictions on Big Labor's
perks, Issue 3 actually received
more votes than did Issue
2, which scrapped Kasich's
reforms. While Issue 2 passed,
61 percent to 39 percent, Issue
3 did even better, passing 66
percent to 34 percent All 88
of Ohio's counties supported
Issue 3.
Virginia enacted a law in
2010 that protects every resi-
dent from "any penalty, assess-
ment, fee or fine as a result of
his failure to procure or obtain
health-insurance coverage." In
Virginia's House of Delegates,
55 percent of Democrats
backed this anti-mandate mea-
sure, as did eight of 11 (73 per-
cent) of the chamber's Black
Caucus.
These and other Democrats
underscore something
about Obamacare that has
been true since it was jack-,
hammered down the throats
of the American people. The
only thing bipartisan about
Obamacare is its chorus of crit-
ics.
* New York commentator
Deroy Murdock is a columnist
with the Scripps Howard News
Service and a media fellow with
the Hoover Institution on War,
Revolution and Peace at Stanford
University.


Religion will disappear as an issue


Really? Really, folks,
are we really going
to elect a president
based on his religi-
osity?
In a nation whose Constitution
mandates separation of church
and state, a presidential candi-
date's religious intensity seems to
have become a major criterion this.
year.
In a time when many
Americans have to get rid of their
pets because they can't afford to
feed them, Rick Santorum wants
wives to stop having sex with their
husbands if they can't afford more
children.
In an era when millions don't
have jobs or are underemployed,
Mitt Romney says women who
accidentally get pregnant should
not be permitted to get abortions.
While Newt Gingrich has had
three wives, he wants us to believe
he is of good character because he
has newly committed to a faith that
condemns adultery and forbids
remarriage after divorce.
President Barack Obama
is incapable of speaking to us
without ending with "God bless
America." He regularly goes to
church. He's faithful to his wife.
He prays at public prayer break-
fasts. Yet many of the Republican
presidential candidates who have
been denouncing him for months
keep insinuating that he is not
really a Christian or at least not as
SI- ii .iiui as they are.


Ann McFeatters
omcfeatters@notionalpress.org
At the 20th GOP debate, the
topic that got the candidates' blood
pumping was contraception. The
debate ended before the candi-
dates could debate how planes
stay in the air, whether a tree fall-
ing in the forest makes a noise or
how many hours in Sunday school
are necessary for salvation.
After watching Congress in
action recently, it seems there are
a lot of men who advocate insur-
ance coverage of Viagra, while
forbidding women easy access to
health care that might be essential
after the men get enhanced. Yet
some of these same men want to
gut benefits for programs that feed
and shelter children.
What's going on here?
Aside from the fact that the
Republican presidential candidates
are desperate to appeal to the most
socially conservative Americans,
part of the reason for this renewed
desperation for showy religious
demonstration is that nobody has
a solution to the complicated eco-
nomic ills that plague our planet
It's much easier to rouse the


people with cries that birth control
(widely used by the vast majority
of American women of child-bear-
ing-age) promotes irresponsible
behavior. Or to condemn those
who don't wear their faith on their
sleeves. (And why didn't Catholic
. Santorum and Gingrich have
ashes on their foreheads during
Ash Wednesday's debate?)
"It's much easier to gain sup-
port by invoking your God-fearing
grandfather who worked in a coal
mine than to admit we can't afford
to cut taxes, give the military
everything the commanders want
and keep the government intrud-
ing in our private lives.
When Americans are stressed,
they seek leaders who are like
them and in tough times like
these, many seek the comfort of
religion. If a candidate goes to my
church, he must think and act like
me, so I can trust him. It's better
still if he tries to impose the tenets
of our faith on everybody else.
Clearly, he has "family values."
Here's betting that in
November, most Americans will
try to elect a president who is com-
petent, intelligent, experienced,
personable, knowledgeable about
global problems and committed
to the good of the nation. And his
religion won't matter. Really.

* Scripps Howard columnist
Ann McFeatters has covered.
the White House and national
politics since 1986.


4A


ANOTHER
VIEW



Obama's


burning


Koran


apology


mobs have forced
a presidential apol-
ogy, even after two
American soldiers
were killed. The extremists win
again.
Yesterday, Afghanistan saw
its third day of rioting after
workers collecting garbage at
NATO's Bagram air base found
charred remains of religious
texts, including the Koran.
The texts in question had been
defaced with extremist propa-
ganda and had been disposed
of. It's unclear who did the dis-
posing, but it was reported that
the process was overseen by a
U.S. officer. Since then, crazed
mobs have gathered in Afghan
streets chanting "Death to
America," and the Taliban urged
Afghans to "continue seeking
revenge until punishment is
dished out with your hands." On
Thursday, outside a U.S. base in
eastern Nangarhar province, an
Afghan soldier did just that, kill-
ing two American soldiers and
escaping into the welcoming
arms of an approaching mob.
U.S. Gen. John R. Allen, com-
mander of the international forc-
es, quickly noted the "error" of
the burnings, ordered an inves-
tigation and apologized to "the
noble people of Afghanistan."
President Obama then upped
the ante with a letter to Afghan
President Hamid Karzai, saying
the United States "will take the
appropriate steps to avoid any
recurrence, to include holding
accountable those responsible."
There has been no reciprocal
pledge of accountability from
Kabul.
The U.S. government posi-
tion is that the incineration was
inadvertent, but independent
reports indicate it was intention-
al. The "religious texts" in ques-
tion were enemy propaganda,
which for Islamists also happen
to be holy writ. This is one of
the nagging problems in com-
bating an extremist ideology
based on religion. Sensitivity to
this issue can go to extremes.
In 1997, the then-ruling Taliban
banned the import and use of
paper bags out of concern that
recycled pulp from religious
texts would be defiled. But if
a Koran contains marginalia
explaining why certain passages
impose a duty on Muslims to
wage war on Christians and
Jews, it is prudent to dispose of
it in an approved manner.
Authoritative 19th-century
Muslim scholar Muhammad
Amin ibn Abidin wrote that
burning a Koran is not usu-
ally permitted, except as a last
resort, and that burial or sinking
in water is preferable. Rather
than framing this issue as one of
respectful disposal, Mr. Obama
caved to the extremist view and
admitted America was complete-
ly in the wrong.
Meanwhile, two U.S. service-
men lie dead, betrayed by a
member of the Afghan military
they were in the country to
train. These troops were defend-
ing an Afghan regime that
seems to believe their deaths
were justified. What offends
Americans is not just the obse-
quiousness of Mr. Obama's
response but its one-sidedness.
Mr. Karzai will not apologize for
the deaths of our troops, for the
American-flag and Obama-effigy
burnings or for the uncivilized
behavior of his volatile people.
Mr. Obama should have


learned by now that bowing to
foreign mob violence only justi-
fies and encourages the extrem-
ists. Counterinsurgency means
never having to say you're
sorry.
N Washington Times















FAITH &


VALUES


We are living in an age
of complicated pro-
grams and long-range
planning. We hear
about this plan to bal-
ance the budget, a five year plan for
this or a 10 year plan for that We hear
about this plan for peace in the Middle
East, a plan for peace with Israel and
all those who wish to destroy her.
Someone has said agencies have mul-
tiplied like dollar weeds on a lawn.
We have agencies for Social Reform,
Defense Programs, Soil Conservation,
Flood Control, Health Insurance, and
the list goes on and on.
All this reflects mans search for
security and peace in a world where
there can be no security or peace
outside the Lord Jesus Christ None
of mans programs have worked thus
far. We still have all the problems we
had had and many have multiplied.
The unrest in the Middle East is, in
my opinion, worse than ever because
of the threat of nuclear war. With gas
prices rising almost daily, we have a
generation of people who are becom-
ing more uneasy about the future.
Maybe it is time for people, especial-
ly the Church, to start looking ahead
for God's plan for peace and security.
To do this we must look away from
man's programs. Thousands of years
ago God promised His people, Israel,
they would have a time of peace. It
is known as "The Kingdom Age". It
is a covenant God made to David (2
Samuel 7:8-17; Zach 12:8-9). The Lord
Jesus will rule over the Kingdom. In
the example prayer given by Jesus in
the Sermon on the Mount (Matt. 5-7),
He said we are to pray for "His king-
dom to come, so that things on earth
will be as it is in heaven" (Matt. 6:9-13).
When will this time be? Some say
it will not be that Jesus did not mean
He would'set up a literal kingdom for
earth, but I say when He caught John,
the beloved, up to the third heaven ino


the book of Revelation, He showed him
the future kingdom and John recorded
it for us in Revelation 20:1-6: John says
he saw an angel with the key to the
bottomless pit and the angel laid hold
of the Devil and locked him in the pit
for a thousand years so that he could
deceive the people no more till the
thousand years is over. John closes in
verse 6 saying we shall live and reign
with Christ for a thousand years (para-
phrase is mine).
So only when this Kingdom age, also
referred to as the Millennial Kingdom
is ushered in, immediately following
the seven year tribulation will we final-
ly see peace and contentment on earth.
All mans
pro- BIBLE STUDIES
grams "
will
surely
fail in the
future,
.asthey
have in
the past. "
Our only l
hope is Hugh Sherrill Jr.
in the ems-hugh43@comcastnet
. Lord.
That
is why the last prayer in the Bible as
recorded in Revelation 22:20 "Even so,
come, Lord Jesus". And that is why
Jesus said pray "Thy kingdom come,
thy will be 'done on earth as it is in
heaven".

Hugh Sherrill, an ordained minister
and Bible teacher at Eastside Baptist
Church, is available for revivals.


On childhood heroes


Did you have a favorite superhero
when you were growing up?
There are so many now, it might
be hard to decide, but when I
was a little girl, there was really
only one choice: Wonder Woman! She had
her own TV show, the coolest outfit, and an
invisible jet.. .but these were just added ben-
efits. What really caught my attention were
her remarkable silver bracelets that doubled
as defensive weapons against a villain's bullet
(I suppose a bulletproof vest didn't quite work
with her outfit) To me, it just didn't get any
better than life-saving protection that also hap-
pened to be a fashion accessory.. .and let's just
say my cousin and I went through numerous
rolls of aluminum foil in order to fight crime
in Wonder
HEART MATTERS Woman
style!
u As chil-
.dren, we
loved the
r idea of being
invincible.
The longer
we li ve,
however,
Angle Land it becomes
ongieland3@windstream.net more and
more obvi-
ous that
our greatest hurts'aren't caused by bullets
or villains with super powers. Instead, they
are usually the result of relationships that
have taken a turn for the worst...and how we
respond to them. In 2 Corinthians 10:3-4, the
Bible records the Apostle Paul's reminder to
us that we have a critical decision to make:
"For though we live in the world, we do not
wage war as the world does. The weapons we
-fight with are not the weapons of the world.
On the contrary, they have divine power to
demolish strongholds."
This passage acknowledges that because
we live in this world, even as believers in
Christ, we still have the opportunity to. fight
like the world does, with the-same weapons.
Think about what those weapons are in con-
nection to relationship conflicts: unforgive-


ness, retaliation, slander, sarcasm, angry
outbursts, silent treatments, contempt.. .just
to name a few. The problem with using these
weapons is two-fold: first, the more we use
them, the better we get at using them, and
two, the better we get at using them, the more
likely we are to end up...alone. Correct me if
I have this all wrong, but it is not the goal in
any given relationship to end up alone.. .right?
In fact, according to Genesis 2:18, being alone
is the only thing in all six days of creation that
God said was NOT good!
According to the rest of this passage, we
have other weapons to choose from.. .weapons
with divine power. Divine power implies that
these weapons were not founded upon human
reasoning, but by the wisdom of God, which
gives them the authority to demolish strong-
holds. What better to battle unforgiveness
than to forgive even when nothing in you feels
like it? Could anything take the sting out of
sarcasm like an apology... or render the silent
treatment useless by saying "I love you and I
want to make this right".. .and what remedies
slander better than humbling yourself and
finding something positive to say about some-
one who has dealt you a low blow?
Yes.. .these weapons have the divine power
to demolish destructive patterns of behavior
but we have to intentionally be willing to wield
them. Chances are good these weapons can
get rusty from time to time, but with regular
use they bring relief and healing to hurting
relationships.. .and that is way more impres-
sive than an invisible jet! Still, having a pair
of those bracelets would have been really cool.

Because Every Heart Matters,
Angie

Heart Matters is a weekly column written
by Angie Land, Director of the Family Life
Ministries of the Lafayette Baptist Association,
where she teaches bible studies, leads mar-
riage and family conferences and offers biblical
counseling to individuals, couples and families.
Contact Angie with questions or comments at
angieland3@windstream.net


ADVENT CHRISTIAN
First Advent Christian
1881 SW McFarlane Ave.
386-752-3900
Sunday School: 9:45AM
Sunday Service: 11:00AM
Wednesday Service: 7:00PM

ASSEMBLY OF GOD
FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD
1571 E. Duval Street, Lake City .
Sunday 10:30AM & Wednesday 7:00PM
www.firstassemblylc.comr

GLAD TIDINGS ASSEMBLY OF GO0
993 NW Lake Jeffery Road
386-752-0620.
Sunday Worship 10:30AM & 6PM.
Wed. Fam. Bible Study 7:00PM
"A church where JESUS is Real"

BAPTIST
BEREA BAPTIST CHURCH
SR47 S 755-0900
Sunday School 9:30AM
Sunday Worship 10:45AM & 6PM
Wednesday Eve. Service 6:30PM
Interim Pastor. Kenneth Edenfield

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Sunday Bible Study- 9:15AM
Sunday Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. 6:00PM Prayer Service, &
Children Ministry 6:15PM
Downtown Lake City 752-5422

OUVET MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
541 N.E. Davis Street
(386) 752-1990
Ronald V. Waiters, Pastor
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00AM
Wed. Mid-Week Worship 6:00PM
"In God's Word, Will & Way"


PINE GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
1989 N US Hwy 441
386-752-2664
Sunday Bible Study
Sunday Worship 11AM
Wed. Kids & Youth Ministry
Pastor: Ron Thompson


9:45AM
& 6PM
6:30PM


SALEM PRIMITIVE BAPTIST
Sunday Seryices 10:30 AM
a. tr Elder Herman Griffin
752-4198,

SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
388 S.E. Baya Drive* 755-5553
Sunday:


Bible Study
Moving Worship
Evening Worship

AWANA
Prayer & Bible Study


9:15 AM
10:30AM
6:15PM,

5:45PM
6:15 PM


TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH
(Independent Baptist)
144 SE Montrose Ave.* 752-4274
Sunday School 10 AM
Sun. Mom. Worship 11 AM
Sunday Eve. 6 PM
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7:30 PM
Pastor: Mike Norman

THE VINEYARD
Sunday School 9:30 AM
Sunday Worship 10:30 AM
Sunday Night 6:00 PM
1832 SW Tomaka Terrace
(off SW Bascom Norris Dr.)
thevinevardoflakecity.com

CATHOLIC
EPIPHANY CATHOLIC CHURCH
1905 SW Epiphany Court 752-4470
Saturday Vigil Mass 5:00 PM
Sunday Mass 8:15 AM, 10:30 AM,
"2 30 PM 'sp3rrili Enl'l iish
Sunday ScriHl/Reiigiou,. EOucator,
9:00 AM-10:15 AM

CHRISTIAN
CHRISTIAN SCIENClE S0frTi
239 SE Baya Ave.,
Sunday Service 11:00 AM
Wednesday Evening Service 7:30 PM

LAKE CITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Hwy 247 S. 755-9436
Sunday School 9:30 AM
Sun. Mom. Worship 10:30 AM
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7 PM


aVrONtR


Tires for every need.
US 90 West across from Wal-Mart
752-0054


CHURCH OF GOD
LAKE CITY CHURCH OF GOD
167 Ermine St.* 752-5965
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun WVorhip 10:30AM & 6:00PM
WI Farmiily Night 7PM
Wed. Youth Service 7 PM
Pastor: Carroll Lee

EVANGEL CHURCH OF GOD
370 SW Monitor Glen *755-1939
Sunday School' 9:45 AM
Sunday Worship 10:50 & 6:30
Wed. Spiritual Enrichment 7PM
"Shock Youth Church"
Boys and Girls Clubs
Bible Study :
Pastor: John R. Hathaway

EPISCOPAL
S JAMES EPIS(l'PAL CHURChH
2423 SW Bascom Norris Dr.,
Lake City Fi i2025- 386-752-2218
Website: www.stjameslakecity.org
HOLY EUCHARIST
Sunday e 0u & 1' 00AM'
Wednesday 5:15PM
Pdest: TI e Rtv MiLel Anirlriiq

LUTHERAN
:1Ui jRELEMER LI.IiHERJ CHURCHH
LCMS
1 1/2 miles S. of 1-75 on SR 47
755-4299


Sunday Services
(Nursery Provided)
Christian Education Hour
For all ages at 10:45AM
Pastor: Rev. Bruce Alkire


9:30AM


SPIRIT IF (HRISr LUJHERANI
Hwy 90,1.5 miles West of 1-75e752-3807
Sunday Worship 9:30AM
Nursery Avail.
Wed. Pot Luck 6PM Worship 7PM
Pastor/Reverend John David Bryant


Morrell's
Your Complete decorating and
home furnishings store
SW )cput Jef t),f s l ane n lornlierly ineniotnt Rd.)
752-39io(lor 800 SC-597-3526
Mon Sa 8X)-S 30 Closed Sunday


METHODIST
First United Methodist Church
973 S. Marion Ave.
386-752-4488.
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship
Casual Worship Service 8:50AM
Traditional Service 11:00AM
Program opportunities available in all areas
for all ages.
For a complete schedule,
contact church office at
752-4488

WESLEY MEMORIAL UNITED
1272 SW McFarlane 752-3513
(Adjacent to Summers School)
Worship 8:00 & 10:OOAM
Praise & Worship 6:00PM
Sunday School 9:00AM
Nursery provided
Awana (ages 3-18) 5:30-7:30PM
Pastor: The Rev. J. Louie Mabrey
www.wesleymem.com

WATERTOWN CONGREGATIONAL
METHODIST CHURCH
U.S. 90 E. turn on Cortez (next to Quality
IInd.) right on Okinawa.
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sun. Worship 11AM & 6 PM
Wed, Night Service .7PM
Pastor, Randy Ogburn

NAZARENE
LAKE CITY CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
Services:
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Worship 10:45AM
Wednesday 6:30PM
Adult, Youth Ministry, Children's Ministry
Pastor: Craig Henderson
Nursery Provided
SW SR 47 and Azalea Park Place

PENTECOSTAL
FIRST FULL GOSPEL CHURCH
IjE .one Way & NE Washington St
Sunday School 10:00 AM
Morning Worship 11:00AM
Evangelistic Service 6:00 PM
Youth Services Wednesday 7:00PM
Mid-week Service Wednesday 7:00 PM
For info call 755-3408* Everyone Welcome
Pjailur Rev bian Elii




A.NDERSONCOLUMBIA CO.. INC.
S ASPHALT PAVING
COMMERCIAL INDUSTRIALL
Site Preparation Road Building Parking Lots
Grading & Drainage
752-7585
871 NW Guerdon St., Lake City


29e* & ed4e4
I OBSTETRICS& GYrIECOLOGY

(386)466-1106


PRESBYTERIAN
RRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
697 SW Baya Drive 752-0670
Sun. School 10AM Sun tWorsnip 9AM
Contemporary 9AM
Traditional 11AM
NURSERY PROVIDED
Pastor: Dr. Roy A. Martin
Direclor of MUSH Bill Poplhin

NON-DENOMINATIONAL
CHRIST CENTRAL MINISTRIES
Celebration Service 9:30 & 11:15 AM
Wednesday Service 7:00PM'
217 Dyal Ave., from Hwy 90 take
Sisters Welcome Rd., go 5 miles, South, '
church on left. 755-2525
Lead Pastor: Lonnie Johns
"A Church on the Move"

CHRISTIAN HERITAGE CHURCH
Comer SR. 47 & Hudson Circle
Sunday Celebration 10:30 AM
Pastor Chris Jones *.752-9119

FALLING CREEK CHAPEL
Falling Creek Road 755-0580
First and Third Sundays 9:30 A.M.
Second and Fourth Sundays 3:00 P.M.
Pastor: Rev. Cheryl R. Pingel

NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Highway 242 E. of Branford Highway
Sunday School 10:OOAM
Morning Worship 11:00AM
Sunday Evening 6:00PM
Wednesday 7:00PM
A Full Gospel Church Everyone Welcomed
(386) 755-5197


3 HARRY'S
". Heating & Air Conditoning Inc.
Harry Mosley, President


PiJn 752-2308 -,4.


Central States
Enterprises
Columbia tiounty's Feed Headquarters
FEED PET SUPPLIES IAWN & GARDEN
ANIMAL HEATH
668 NW Waldo St. 386-755-7445

MIKELLS POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
Your Lawn & Garden Headquarters
MOWERS CHAIN SAWS TRIMMERS
1152 US 90 WEST LAKE CITY, FL.
386-752-8098



LAKE CITY
,.. 755-7050

BAYWAYjit.oria Services
FIRE & Water Restoration
Floor & Carpet Care
lfesidental & commerciall
755-6142

D North Florida
Pharmacy
7 Locations to Serve You
Lake City, Ft. White, Branford,
Chiefland, Mayo & Keystone Heights


W.,,MRT
Supercenter
"LOW PRICES EVERY DAY"
US 90 WEST 755-2421

GW Hunter, Inc.
Cvr, Chevron Oil
Jobber




Holly/l~iectuc, Inc.
'Quality ,work at a reasonable price"
We also do solar hook-ups
(386) 755-5944


FOOD STORES
Open 7 [Days Week
1036 E. Duval St.. Lake City FI .
(386) 752-0067
Fresh Meat, Fresh Produce!
'[iltpp ian 4 13

To Advertise in
this Church Directory
I call
755-5440.


Saturday, February 25, 2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


God's peace plan


5A


"05

P "
71' i..,. p.


K lay Electric Cooperative, Inc,
Competitive rates, non-projit,
right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectric.com











6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2012


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* Submit Community Calendar
announcements by mail or drop off at
the Reporter office located at 180 E.
Duval St., via fax to (386) 752-9400 or
email Ihampson @lakecityreporter.com


Feb. 25

Police Ball
The Lake City Police
Department's 19th annual
Police Ball Charity Gala to
benefit Haven Hospice will
be Saturday, Feb. 25 from 7
to 11 p.m. Join us for good
food, music and fellow-
ship. The attire is formal.
Individual tickets are $50.
Reserved tables and spon-
sorships are available. Call
719-5742 for information.
Community Concerts
The UNF Chamber
Singers perform 3 p.m.
Feb. 25 at the Levy
Performing Arts Center.
This elite singing ensemble
from the University of
North Florida performs
world music, vocal jazz,
and other choral gems.
Ticket and membership
information is available at
www. communityconcerts.
info.
Banquet
The 7th Annual
Fundraising Banquet will
be held on Saturday, Feb.
25 at the Great Lake City
Community Development
Corporation. This is a
"Black Tie Affair". Hope to
see you there.
Tickets are $30. For
tickets and information
contact: CDC 386-752-9785,
Betty Powell 386-755-7377,
David Turner 386-697-4752,
or Marlette Robinson 386-
288-1856.
Race Day
Gulf Coast Financial
Services presents
First Annual Catherine
Kuykendall Race Day 5K
to benefit the Pancreatic
Cancer Action Network
on Saturday, Feb. 25 at
Rountree Moore Toyota,
1232 US Highway 90 West
Race starts at 8:15. Register
online active.com.
Zumbathon
There will be a
Zumbathon on Feb. 25
from 9 to 10:30 a.m. at the
Skating Palace. All pro-
ceeds from the $10 dona-
tion will help C02 Student
Ministries' teens go to
Summer Missions Camp!
Come GLOW so they can
GO! Wear fluorescent,
white or anything that will
glow in black light. Contact
Sarah Sandlin for more
info: lakecityzumba@gmail.
com or 386-758-0009.

Community development
banquet
The Greater Lake City
Community Development
Corp. will host the 7th
Annual Fundraising
Banquet Saturday, Feb. 25.
at 6 p.m. a the Columbia
County Fairgrounds exhibi-


tion hall, 438 SW Branford
Highway. Tickets are $30
and Allison Megrath of
Plum Creek will be the key-
note speaker. For informa-
tion call (386) 752-9785.
Farmers Market
This week at the Lake
DeSoto Farmers Market,
the University of Florida/
IFAS, Columbia County
Extension Office will have
current information on
upcoming local workshops.
UF Extension offers a
wide variety of public pro-
grams Something for
everyone! Topics include
raising livestock, growing
vegetable gardens, grafting
and pruning fruit trees, han-
dling your diabetes, money
management, attracting
birds, 4-H opportunities, row
crop field days, muscadine
grapes, citrus trees and so
much more. Stop and find
out what's available for you
this spring. Live music by
Ted Wright It is the long
term goal of the Community
Redevelopment Agency
to create a Waterfront
Entertainment District sur-
rounding Lake DeSoto, with
Wilson Park highlighted
as the premiere park in
downtown for weekly com-
munity events. The Lake
DeSoto Farmers Market is
open every Saturday from
8am to noon in Wilson Park,
located along Lake DeSoto
between the. Columbia
County Courthouse and
Shands Lakeshore Hospital.
Vendor space is available.
The market features locally
grown fresh fruits and veg-
etables, plants, honey, baked
goods, jams & jellies, artists
and much more! For more
information about the Lake
DeSoto Farmers Market
call 386-719-5766 or visit
market.lcfla.com. Join us on
Facebook and sign up at the
market booth for our weekly
email updates!

Feb. 26:

Race Day Fair
Catherine Kuykendall
Race Day Fair. Sunday,
February 26, 1:00 p.m. to
5:30 p.m. at Rountree Moore
Toyota. Watch the Daytona
500 inside the Toyota show-
room! Enter the Parkview
Baptist Pie-Cake Contest to
try for the $100 prize! Enter
the Christ Central ROC Hot
Dog Eating Contest! See the
race cars and other tricked-
out vehicles! Cheer the kids
entered into the BoxCar Car
Show (elementary age kids
pick up boxes for decora-
tion at Lowe's). The school
with the most participation
in the BoxCar Car Show
wins $100 for their Teachers'
Supply Closet! Drop off your
school supplies at GulfCoast
Financial Services, SunState
Federal Credit Union, or


Slam dunk


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Joseph Piccioni, 16, jumps over Herschell Holmes, 21, while
participating in a slam dunk contest recently at Youngs Park
with their friends Alan Henry (far right), 19, and Rob Puzio,


Rountree Moore Toyota
until Friday, February 24.
Community donated school
supplies will be divided
equally between all the ele-
mentary schools with kids
participating in the BoxCar
Car Show! Play the games,
enjoy the bounce houses,
get a health-check with Lake
City Medical Center, talk
about your old gold with
Grace Estate Buyers, visit
with Haven Hospice staff,
see who takes home the
2012 Camry in the give-
away, and learn about the
silent killer-pancreatic
cancer!
General admission tick-
ets $25. Camry/admission
Gold tickets $100. For
the benefit of Pancreatic
Cancer Action Network.
To enter Pie-Cake Contest
contact Lanita Bishop 386-
752-5202. Contact Dustin
Busscher 386-867-1615 to
enter hot dog contest For
more info call Melanie
Cosentino, GulfCoast
Financial Services, 386-
755-9018 or mcosentino@
gulfcoastfinancial.net
Free concert
First Baptist Church,
182 NE Justice St., will
host a free piano con-
cert at 6 p.m. on Sunday,
Feb. 26 by Lee Turner, a
member of the Hendricks
Avenue Baptist Church
in Jacksonville. Turner
and his Wife Dianne col-
laborate under the name
Turnersong and have
been featured in the Billy
Graham Crusade.


OBITUARIES


Larry Wayne Williams, Sr.
Mr. Larry Wayne Williams, Sr.,
age 65, of Lake City, Fla. died
Wednesday, February 22, in the
Shands Lake Shore Hospital,
Lake City, Fl. following an ex-
tended illness. He has resided
in Lake City all of his life. He
worked as a boilermaker in the
construction industry for over
25 years until his retirement in
1986. He was a member of the
Church of Jesus Christ of L.D.S.
Branford Ward, a member of Lo-
cal #199 of Tampa, Fl. Boiler-
makers Union and loved fishing,
hunting, camping at Horseshoe
Beach, Fl. and spending time
with his grandchildren. He was
preceded in death by his mother
Iva Iris Dicks Williams and a sis-
ter-in-law Mary Lou Williams.
He is survived by his wife of 30
years, Lynn Williams of Lake
City, Fl.: His Father, James Cur-
tis Williams, Lake City; Three
daughters, Deanna (Randy) Otis
of West Jefferson, Ohio, Saman-
tha (Walter) Howard and Cristin
O'Neal Williams both of Lake
City, Fla.: Three sons, Larry
Wayne (Tammy) Williams, Jr.
of Laporte, Texas, Christopher
O'Neal Williams and Larry
James Williams both of Lake
City, Fl.: One sister, Iris (Larry)
Lackey of Lake City, Fl,: Two
brothers, Jackson Williams and
Curry (Kim) Williams both of
Lake City, Fl.: Father and moth-
er-in-law Benny aid Nadine
Overton of Lakeland, Fl.: Father
and Mother-in-law, Connie Mac


and Mary O'Neal of Lake City,
Fl., Seventeen grandchildren
and one great grandchild also
survive. Funeral services will be
conducted at 2 P.M. Saturday,
February 25, in the Lake Butler
Church of Jesus Christ of L.D.S.,
Lake Butler, Fl. Interment will
be in Oak Grove Cemetery,
Union County, Fl. Visitation


will be from 6 to 8 P.M. Fri-
day, February 24, at GUERRY
FUNERAL HOME, 2659
S.W. Main Blvd., Lake City, Fl
www.guerryfuneralhome. corn

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


WHEN YOU CAN'T LIVE ALONE
AND A NURSING HOME IS NOT THE ANSWER...













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Black history program
Shiloh Missionary Baptist
Church, 948 NE Aberdeen
Ave in Lake City, will cel-
ebrate their annual Black
History Program on Sunday
Feb. 26 at 11:30 a.m. The
speaker for the houtr will
be Elder Curtis Ruise of
Sanderson, Florida. Please
come share with us!
Pastor's anniversary
Help the New Dayspring
Church family cele-
brate Pastor Lantz G. Mills,
Sr.'s three year anniversary
Sunday, Feb. 26 at 11 a.m.


with Pastor Willie Caison of
Macedonia Baptist Church
in Gainesville and the 4
p.m. speaker will be Pastor
Larry G. Mills of Mt. Sinai
Baptist Church, Orlando.
100 Men in Black
Mt Tabor A.M.E.
Church presents an eve-
ning of "100 Men in Black"
on Sunday, Feb. 26 at 3:30
p.m. The speaker will be
Pastor Louis Kirkland,
Fountain Chapel A.M.E.
Church of Jacksonville.
The community is invited.
Feb. 27

FFA Alumni meeting
Columbia FFA Alumni
will have a meeting Monday,
Feb. 27 at the Columbia
High FFA Land Lab, behind
the school. Dinner is at 6:30
p.m. and the meeting at 7
p.m. Please join us as we
make plans to support the
Columbia FFA Chapters.

Auditions for High Springs
Community Theater
High Springs Community
Theater auditions for
Deathtrap by Ira Levin
(author of Rosemary's Baby
and The Stepford Wives),
directed by Leroy Clark, are
scheduled for February 27
and 28, at 7 p.m. on stage at
the theater, 130 NE 1st Street,
High Springs. There are
roles for 2 women and 3 men.
These include a middle-aged
playwright and his wife, the
Bruh1s; his lawyer, and his
psychic neighbor, all about 50
years old, and a younger play-
wright in his 20's. Deathtrap
is an ingeniously constructed
comedy-thriller which offers
a rare and skillful blending
of two priceless ingredients-
-gasp-inducing thrills and
spontaneous laughter. The
show will run from April 13
through May 6,2012.


Hazel Long coming to
Aglow
The Lake City Aglow
Lighthouse will host an
outstanding meeting with
Hazel Long as our guest
speaker on Feb. 27 at 7
p.m. at Christ Community
Church. Hazel organized
the first local Aglow chap-
ter in 1991 and served as
the first president Jespen
Peters was the recording
secretary and served as
the second president.She
will also be present This
is a opportunity to get
reconnected with these two
ladies who are responsible
for founding our Lake City
Aglow. Every president
who has served from 1991
to now will be present For
more information call (386)
935-4018.
Feb. 28

SCORE workshop
SCORE of Suwannee
Valley presents a work-
shop dedicated to
manufacturing Tuesday
Feb. 28 at Guangdong
Restaurant, Price is only
$20 and includes dinner.
Speakers and dinner
from 5:30 pm to 7:30
p.m., Q&A and displays
7:30 from 8:00 p.m. The
keynote speaker is Mr.
Robert Morgan, inter-
national manufacturing
consultant, as well as pre-
sentations from two local
manufacturing companies.
There will be a display
of products produced
by local manufacturers,
along with a question/
answer session at the end
for all to openly participate.
Manufacturing is a busi-
ness opportunity often
overlooked because of start
up expenses. Meet local
manufacturers and listen to
their success stories.


February 25th at 6pm


Food Lion has enjoyed being

a part of the Lake City
community and we would

like to THANK YOU

for shopping at our store

on SW Heritage Oaks Circle.









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2012


DILBERT


MY POWERPOINT
SLIDES HAVE A LITTLE
SOME-THING FOR
EVERYONE.


JA)


BABY BLUES


FOR MY INTELLIGENT
VIEWERS, I HAVE DATA,
AND FOPR THE MORONS.
I HAVE MANIPULATIVE
ANECDOTES.


WHICH REMINDS IME -
DID YOU HEAP, ABOUT
THE BOSS WHO DIED
BECAUSE HE DIDN'T
PRAISE HIS EMPLOYEE?


BLONDIE


ALWAYS DREAM 5IG, SON, AND AS A MATTER OF FACT, NOW IN MY DREAM, YOU DREAM ON,
NEVER LET O OF YOUR DREAMS I DO HAVE A'G REAM YOU'RE TRIPLE MY, ALLOWANCE SON
|TALKIN'V AND T14ROW MY CURFEW
SOUNDS LIKE A WINNER OUT THE WINDOW!

-Co.,
~'~_r~ T~--


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


I WILL !! ME AN'
OL' SPARK PLUG
HERE ARE GOIN'
INTO HONEST
WORK !!


DEAR ABBY


Take simple steps to avoid

delays at doctor's office


DEAR ABBY: I have
worked in a medical clinic
for 35 years and hear a lot
of complaints about the
wait for doctor appoint-
ments. May I explain some
of the reasons for it?
Sometimes the doctor
arrives late, but other fac-
tors can cause delays:
1. If you need to be
seen, call first to get an
appointment time. Most
offices leave open spots to
accommodate urgent-care
matters. If you just walk
in, we must work you in
with patients who already
have .appointments, which
pushes the doctor behind.
2. Do NOT come an
hour.early and announce
in front of the entire wait-
ing room that you must
be somewhere and expect
to get worked in before
your scheduled time.
Reschedule instead.
3. Always bring your
insurance cards with you.
Do not tell us to call anoth-
er doctor's office to get the
information.
4. Don't walk in with
forms you need filled out
and signed by the doctor
and expect someone to
take care of it immediately.
It requires your chart to
be pulled, a nurse to fill
out the information and
the doctor to look over the
form and sign. Instead,
leave the form. We'll mail
it or call you to pick it up.
5. Don't expect to call
the office and speak with
the doctor in the middle


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
of a clinic day. A nurse can
usually handle the ques-
tion. If not, she'll have
the doctor call you back
after seeing the sched-
uled patients. GENTLE
REMINDER IN S.D.
DEAR GENTLE: Thank
you for the reminders,
which may help readers
avoid some of the frustra-
tions they encounter when
going for a medical appoint-
ment

DEAR ABBY: My hus-
band and I have become
fond of a delightful elderly
couple, "Frank" and
"Annie." We bought the
home across the street
from them 10 years ago.
They have four children,
two of whom live nearby.
Two years ago, Frank
was diagnosed with demen-
tia. They are adamant about
staying in the house they've
owned since they were new-
lyweds. This means more
of the burden of caring for
the house and finances
now falls to Annie, who has
health problems of her own.
We help out whenever
we can, because I know
money is tight for them.
When their lawnmower


broke, we bought them a
new one, and with the help
of another neighbor, we
take care of general yard-
work and house issues.
I am growing increas-
ingly concerned about the
state of their finances, and
bewildered that their chil-
dren never seem to help.
They interact with their
parents at birthdays and
on holidays. I don't know
the children well, but is
there a way to help them
understand that their par-
ents may not be volunteer-
ing all their troubles?
Frank and Annie are
proud of what.they've
accomplished, but now
they need a little extra sup-'
port. They never ask for
help, but gratefully accept
it if it's offered. Would I be
out of line to communicate
with our neighbors' family?
- LOVE THY NEIGHBOR
DEAR LOVE THY
NEIGHBOR: Out of line?
Not at all. The "children"
should be told about your
concerns, and also the
various things you and the
other neighbors have been
doing to help their parents.
Sometimes the children
of aging parents don't rec-
ognize the subtle changes
that take place when a
loved one has dementia.
Bring it out in the open,
and you'll be doing all of
them a favor.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Take on responsibili-
ties that will help you show
off your skills. What you
do now will reflect the
type of advancement you
can expect in the future.
Love is in the stars, and
emotions will be out of
control. Think before you
act. ***
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Work on self-improve-
ment, updating your look
or learning something that
will expand your horizons.
There will be a fine line
between doing something.
wholeheartedly and taking
on too much. Gauge your
time to fit your desires.

GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Not everyone
will agree with you, but
that doesn't mean you
shouldn't follow your heart
and do as you please.
Socializing with people
who share your interests
will enhance a new rela-
tionship that has potential
to grow into something
worthwhile. ****
CANCER (June 21-July
22): You don't have to
change because someone
wants you to. Find your
own path and create a life-
style that suits your needs.
Communication will be
the key to doing what you
want without any interfer-
ence. Jealousy is likely to


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

ruin a relationship. **
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Take a short trip orfmake
a change to your routine.
You need to shake things
up a bit in order to feel
stimulated. Adventure will
result in an experience
that will help you make an
important decision regard-
ing your personal life and
status. ****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept
22): You can accomplish
a lot by expressing your
thoughts to a partner or to
someone you wish to be
involved with. Changing
how you deal with overhead
to lessen a financial burden
will relieve stress and help
your disposition. ***
LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct
22): Don't wait until you
are forced to make chang-
es. Take a critical look at
your personal and financial
situation .and do whatever
it takes to improve it Love
is on the rise, and a part-
nership can help reduce
your stress. ***
SCORPIO (Oct 23-
Nov. 21): Create a space
at home that allows you
to indulge in hobbies
or pastimes you want to
pursue. Partnerships will
develop if you get involved
in groups that share your
interests. Communication


will bring positive results '
and reform. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): A disagreement
can ruin your day. Make a
point to compromise and
get along. Concentrate
on the positive changes
you can make at home.
Love and romance should
be high on your list, and
special plans for two, your
goal. *****
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Stick to tried-
and-true methods and to
the people you know you
can rely on for support and
contributions. Initiating
something new or look-
ing for new friendships or
relationships will lead to
short-lived encounters and
disappointment. **
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Resurrect old
hobbies, friendships and
goals. Expand on what
you've done in the past
and you will find a way to
earn extra income doing
something you enjoy.
Start small. Taking on too
much too soon will be your
downfall. ****
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Question anyone who
appears to be giving you
inaccurate information. Do
your due diligence and find
out firsthand if an idea you
have is plausible. Someone
from your past can clear up
a misunderstanding. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY Y'S CLUE: X equals F
"EGEKBY EKL WLEZNZOTLYY HJ
WL, EZB N DEFL ZJH.DNZO RSH
BNYBENZ XJK EZCJZL GDJ EPHNFLTC


PEWAENOZ'Y HJ OLH JZL."


- R N T T


W S K K E C

Previous Solution: "Work hard to sharpen your talent, to get better at whatever
it is that you do ... that's what it comes back to." Ed Bradley
2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 2-25


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


CLASSIC PEANUTS


Ill ONERIF TERARE'PERE'
9TAR AND "DO6"6TAR6 ?I


MAYBE SOMETHING' IN
POLITICS OR ON
WALL STREET !!


HOROSCOPES


- I


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2012

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


UYIsT--"N


[SELL IT


FINDITW0 "'4


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755.5440


Rate applies to private Individuals selling
Personal merchandise totalling $500 or less.
Each tem must include a price




One item per ad J mu |de
4 lines 6 days tlonal $
SRate applies to private Individuals selling
Personal merchandise totalling 500 or less.
Each item must include a price.
This a nn-refundable rat



One hem per ad $ 16
4 lines 6 days additional
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
S personal merchandise totalling $,000 or less.
Each Item must Include a price.
This Is a non-refundable rate.



One Item per ad $23
4 lines 6 days Each additional
line $1.n5







4 lines 6 days aad itional
Rateappliesto private Individuals seeing
Spersona merchanse totalling or less.
Eachs oem mostIncouds 0ce
This Is a non-refundable rate.




One Item per adadditional
4 lines 6 days yine 1.5ton
Rate apples to private Individuals selling
persona mrchanse tg $6,000 or less.
Each eItm must Incle price:
Thi as a non-refundable rate. s





n. Ou o s


Include, 2 Sgn E additionalline 165


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....s92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad is to Appear: Call by: FaxlEmail by:
Tuesday MOn., :00ax M. on., 9:0 a.m.
Wednesday Mon.,10:00a.m. Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Thursday Wed., 10:00 a.m. Wed.,9:00 a.m.
Friday TIiim., 10:00 a.m. Thulis.,9:00 a.m.
Saturday Fri., 10:00 a.m. Fri.,9:00a.m.
Sunday Fri.,10:00am. Fri., 9:00 a.m.
These deadlines are subject lo changewithout notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect Insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
Immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
BIlling Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
mentha p o t d s


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the

will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and.


public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.iakeeityreporter.com


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 12-2011-CA-000554
JPMNORGAN CHASE BANK, NA-
TIONAL ASSOCIATION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JOSEPH RAULERSON, et al,
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:
THE UNKNOWN BENEFICIA-
RIES OF THE JOSEPH AND JO-
SEPH, II RAULERSON FAMILY
LAND TRUST, UNDER TRUST
AGREEMENT DATED OCTOBER
10,2006
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UN-
KNOWN
CURRENT ADDRESS: UN-
KNOWN
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER, AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR
ALIVE, WHETHER SAID' UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM
AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
OR OTHER CLAIMANTS
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UN-
KNOWN
CURRENT ADDRESS: UN-
KNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
to foreclose a mortgage on the fol-'
lowing property in COLUMBIA
County, Florida:
SECTION 33: COMMENCE AT
THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF
THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE
SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 33,
TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 17
EAST; THENCE SOUTH 89 DE-
GREES 04 MINUTES 42 SEC-
ONDS WEST, ALONG THE
NORTH LINE OF SAID SOUTH-
EAST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST
1/4, A DISTANCE OF 444.94 FEET
FOR A POINT OF BEGINNING;
THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 89
DEGREES 04 MINUTES 42 SEC-
ONDS WEST, ALONG SAID
NORTH LINE 664.73 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 08
MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST,
210.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89
DEGREES 04 MINUTES 42 SEC-
ONDS EAST, 282.00 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 08
MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST,
203.80 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89
DEGREES 04 MINUTES 42 SEC-
'ONDS EAST, 384.21 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 21
MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 413.79 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING, BE-
ING AND LYING IN THE SOUTH-
EAST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST
1/4 OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 1
SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
TOGETHER WITH A CERTAIN
2001 CHAMPION MOBFIE HOME
LOCATED THEREON AS A FIX-
TURE AND APPURTENANCE
THERETO: VIN# 11437940.
has been filed against you and you
a required to serve a copy of your
written, defenses within 30 days after
' the first publication, if any, on Flori-
da Default Law Group, P.L,. Plain-
tiffs attorney, whose address is 4919
Memorial Highway, Suite 200, Tam-
pa, Florida 33634, and file the origi-
nal with this Court either before
service on Plaintiff's attorney or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the Complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for two consecutive
weeks in the Lake City Reporter.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this court on this 14 day of February,
2012.
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Court
By: B. Scippio
As Deputy Clerk
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a special accommodation to par-
ticipate in this proceeding should
contact the Deputy Court Adminis-
trator whose office is located at 3301
East Tamiami Trail, Building L, Na-
ples, Florida 33962, telephone num-
ber (813)774-8124; 1-800-955-8771
(TDD), or 1-800-955-8770 (v), via
Florida Relay Service, not later than
seven (7) days prior to this proceed-
ing.
05530932
February 25, 2012
March 3, 2012

REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com






Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale
Delivery of 100 bales $260
386-688-9156

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
TAXES, RESUMES.
Other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Legal

Notice of Change in Control
of a Bank Holding Company
Renny B. Eadie, Hl, Lake City, Flor-
ida and Robert M. Eadie, Lake City,
Florida intend to apply to the Federal
Reserve Board for permission to ac-
quire 10 percent or more of the
shares and thereby control of PSB
BancGroup, Inc., Lake City, Florida.
PSB BancGroup, Inc. controls Peo-
ples State Bank, Lake City, Florida.
The Federal Reserve considers a
number of factors in deciding wheth-
er to approve the notice.
You are invited to submit comments
in writing on this notice to the Feder-
al Reserve Bank of Atlanta, 1000
Peachtree Street N.E., Atlanta, Geor-
gia 30309-4470. The comment peri-
od will not end before at least 20
days after the date this notice-is first
published and may be somewhat lon-
ger. The Board's procedures for
processing applications may be
found at 12 C.F.R. Part 262.25. To
obtain a copy of the Federal Reserve
Board's procedures, or if you need
more information about how to sub-
mit your comments on the notice,_
contact Chapelle Davis, Assistant
Vice President, at (404) 498-7278.
The Federal Reserve will consider
your comments and any request for a
public meeting or formal hearing on
the notice if they are received in
writing by the Reserve Bank on or
before the last day of the comment
period.
05530900
February 25, 2012


020 Lost & Found
FOUND US off Old Country Club
Rd. Female dog. Reddish brown
w/s ome black, short hair, very
friendly, no collar. 386-752-8854
FOUND: Small Black and white
dog. Found in the Defender/Baya
area on Monday the 6th. Please
call to identify 386-752-2492

100 Job
Opportunities
05527609
Sales Associate
Camping World of Lake City is
accepting applications for Sales
Associates in our Lake City, FL
location. Sales Exp a plus but
not req'd. We're looking for
personality, character, & .energy.
Applicants must be outgoing
and have the ability to interact
and communicate with our loyal
customers. As the nations
Number 1 RV dealer with over
80 locations this is an excellent
opportunity to learn a new ca-
reer in a thriving industry.
Excellent earning potential with
an excellent employee benefit
plan. Call Jeff at 386-752-3723
or email to:
jdillard@campingworld.com
All applications with be held
with the strictest of confidence.

05530592
Maintenance Manager needed
for a chain of convenience
stores. Comm'l Refrigeration
Exp, & Universal EPA Card
req'd. Responsibilities include
but not limited to Refigeration,
Heat/Air, Plumbing, & Ele.
Salary Neg. approx. $16-$18 hr
depending on knowledge & exp.
Applications avail at the Jiffy
Store Office. 1102
Howard Street, East, Live Oak,
FL or jiffvfoodstores.com.
Please return application to the
address listed above. ,

05530883
FANTASTIC
OPPORTUNITY
Housekeeping PT/FT
MUST have a strong work ethic,
DEPENDABLE, good
communication skills, and
willingness to learn. MUST be a
team player and able to work a
flexible schedule including
weekends and holidays.
We offer Competitive Pay and
Health Benefits. Hotel
Experience Highly Preferred.
Only those seeking long term
employment apply in person
at Comfort Suites 3690 W US
HWY 90. Please do not call the
hotel regarding your application.

05530971
Receptionist/Office Assistant
White Springs, Florida
Seeking a personable and
cheerful individual to join our
team. Strong computer skills.
Good communication skills.
Able to operate fax, copier and
scanner machines. Must be
flexible and a team player.
POSITION NEEDS TO BE
FILLED IMMEDIATELY.
Please email resume to
hr@speced.org.

CDL Class A Truck Driver.
Flatbed exp. for F/T SE area.
3 years exp or more. Medical
benefits offered. Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773
Line Cook w/comm'l cooking exp
needed at Milton's Country Store.
Will be taking orders, cooking &
serving. Kitchen open to view.
Apps avail Milton's 8 mi N, of
I-10 hwy 441 (386)755-6975
MECHANIC for busy truck shop.
Experience required with own
tools. Southern Specialized
386-752-9754


Now accepting resumes for a
general manager for Mochi Frozen
Yogurt. Full time 50-60 hrs per
week. Scheduled to open in
March. Please mail to: 1396 NE
20th Ave. Bldg 300 Ocala, FL
34470 or email to:
bulldog@laloenterprises.com


10n Job
100" 'O Opportunities
Sales Position available for
motivated individual Rountree -
Moore Toyota, Great benefits, paid
,training/vacation. Exp. a plus but
not necessary. Call Anthony
Cosentino 386-623-7442

120 Medical
120 Employment

05530652
Physical Thrapy Center hiring a
Physical Therapist/Physical
Therapist's Assistant or Rehab
Aide. F/T or P/T.
Hands-on training w/some exp.
preferred. Personal training or
fitness background a plus. Basic
knowledge of anatomy and
exercises are a MUST.
Candidate must be confident,
have good people skills,
great attitude and be willing to
learn. Extreme motivation
promotes rapid growth. Send
resume to: pta714@hotmail.com
or fax to 386-755-3165.

05530834 .
Full Time Registered Nurse
The World's leader in dialysis
services is seeking a Registered
Nurse for our out-patient dialy-
sis center in Lake City.
Apply at: 1445 S.W. Main Blvd.
Suite 120

05530846
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

Part Time CMA & Front Desk.
Experience preferred in Peds
and/or Family Practice. Experience
injections and taking accurate
vital signs. Good communications,
* documentation, assessment and
organizational skills.
Fax to 386-758-5628
Part-time experienced Sleep
Technician needed for sleep
center. Fax resume to
386-754-1712

240 Schools &
240 Education

05530910
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-03/05/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-03/12/12
LPN 03/12/12
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com

To place your
classified ad call
WIM.,s
A P% ,"


ACROSS
1 TV statuette
5 Mr. Lugosi
9 Camp bed
12 Demented
13 Pinnacle
14 Narrow inlet
15 "Peanuts" kid
16 "Between '
you, me and
the -"
18 Busybodies
20 Fastens
21 Textile
colorers
22 Half a fly?
23 Cartoon duck
26 Gambling
stake
30 Pilot a ferry
33 Follow
34 Draw closer
35 Abound
37 Remnant
39 Poodle, for one
40 In (as
found)
41 Like a wolf's
howl


310 Pets & Supplies

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


401 Antiques

ANTIQUE DUNCAN
Phyfe Desk.
$500. obo
386-590-1206

Antique Duncan Phyfe Dining
Table and 4 chairs, Very large
China Cabinet. In fair condition.
$1000. obo. 386-590-1206
Antique Duncan
Phyfe Server.
Good condition. $600. obo.
386-590-1206


407 Computers

DELL Computer,
$100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Furniture

4 Postered, dark wood queen bed-
room set. Dresser w/ mirror, chest,
night stand & mattress (King coil
pillow top). $800. 386-590-1206



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to eaoh square,
to fprm four ordinary words.

I REETX I


408 Furniture
BUNK BED w/mattress. All
wood, dark finish. With Book
shelf and desk on either side.
Like new. $700. (904)704-9377

Complete dark wood Queen
bedroom set. Dresser, night stand,
chest of drawers. $650.obo
386-590-1206
FULL SIZE Serta mattress
and box springs. $500.
386-590-1206

QEUEEN BEDROOM Set.
Solid pine., Dresser mirror, chest
of drawers ,night stand. $500.
(904)704-9377


416 Sporting Goods
BassHunter, 2 L-vests, ele. motor
All for $475.00 386-752-0987
Pictures & information at:
http://dollhousedesigns.com/boat


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-288-6875.

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$300 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales
2 FAMILY Garage Sale. Sat.
7-12. Plantations S/D off Hwy
90W. Look for signs. Household,
kids clothes and lots more.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek



A ) I need some
more leg toom!






2 (W --




THEY WOUL- HAVE BEEN
BETTER OFF IF THE BOAT
HAP MORPE OF THESE
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer here:
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: FUROR GRANT AMBUSH HAIRDO
I Answer: The ranch worker looked forward to his break
so he could play a few FARM HANDS


13 Hi-fi records
15 Contended
48 "The Zoo
Story" penner
S1 Nonstick
coating
S3 Start of.
summer
6 Bona -
(genuine)
17 Rough shelter
18 Marched
along
9. Rim
10 Fabric meas.
51 Orange
veggies
32 Suggestive
look

DOWN
1 Pipe bends
2 Pitcher's
place
3 "Star Trek"
physician
4 Vacillated
(hyph.)
5 Totes


Answer to Previous Puzzle


River to the
Seine
Trims a doily
Joyous
outburst
Exam for jrs.
Mary
- Moore
Bleaches out
Dragon's
breath
- Jarrett of
NASCAR
Way of Lao Tzu
Joule fraction
Qt. parts
Aloha token
To date
Pack animals
Become a
donor
Paris' Tower
Trivial
"Forget" a
letter
Matt Dillon's
city
Wan
Stentorian
Luncheonette
orders
Koppel and
Turner
- -do-well
Retiree's kitty
End of a
website,
perhaps


2-25 2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


- ADvantage


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D RIAICO E M U G 0 A
SIMON N TT H E D



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SORE ERECT
BN BEE TIAR
R EL qOn DRIP


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Pu
at QuillDriverBooks.com
2 13 14 5 16 17 18


6 MPG monitor 10
7 on
(pretend) 11
8 Ice-skating 17
leaps
9 Gator's 19
cousin 22

sizzles" books 24
25

9 10 11
27
14
28
7 .29
30
31
32
36
38
6 27 28 29 4
42
4 44
46

47

48
46 47 49
50
524
51
52
54
T- 55


Need Protection? Gateway To
Florida Security 386-438-8282.
gatewaytofloridasecuritv @mail.com.
Our security guards specialize in
Honesty, Courtesy & Alertness.


AURROP




TILUGY 1
-T-0-^











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2012


430 Garage Sales
DOWNSIZING, SAT. 2/25, 8-?,
3081 S.E. SR 100, 1/2 mile past
College Rd., big barn on left, fum.,
silver, dishes, clothes, shoes, misc.
ESTATE SALE. Sat & Sun 7:30 -
3. 941 NW Eadie Street, off Hwy
90 behind Supervisor of Election.
Furniture, hshold, collec & more
Estate Sale: Sat, 2/25, 8:30 AM -
5 PM; 6386 S.W. State Rd. 47.
Mostly furniture, few household
4 items, no clothing or jewelry.
ESTATE TAG SALE
Fri. 2/24 &Sat. 2/25, 9-3, kitchen.
& household, leather couch, over-
sized chair w/ottoman, misc. furn.,
441 S: to Ellisville, W. on CR 349,
Magnolia Place Subdivision.
Moving Sale Sat. 7-2, St. Johns &
McCray. King Sz European Bed
Suit w/over 25 drawer, 2 flat
screen TV's, 2 TV stands, girl's
pink & white twin bed suit, w/new
mattress, Boy's blue & brown bed
suit, w/new mattress, computer &
2 desk, clothing, wall decor, cur-
tains, kitchen items, entire bath set,
salon equip. 386-697-2057
MULTI FAMILY Garage Sale.
Large mix of items. Clothing, etc.
Sat. 8-2. 1129 SW Flagler Ct. off
Grandview. All must GO!
Multi Family Sat. 7-3. CR 242 to
Wise Estates to 353 SW Wise Dr.
Few pcs of furniture, tons of kids
& baby clothes & much more.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

SALE EVERY WEEKEND
COUNTRY CLUB ROAD AND
HANOVER PLACE 9AM-2PM
386-697-1946
Sat. Only 8-3 Branford Hwy to
Troy Rd. Follow signs.
Electronics, household, game sys-
tems, clothes, much much more!


440 Miscellaneous
BassHunter, 2 L-vests, ele. motor
All for $475.00 386-752-0987
Pictures & information at:
http://dollhousedesigns.com/boat
Like new 20 inch
Chrome Wheels. 6 lug.
Come off GMC Sierra.
$500 obo. 386-623-5219


460 Firewood
It's Getting Colder!! Firewood
$65. Truck Load. we will call you
back. We deliver under 20 mi
$100 per load. Over 20 mi $120
per load. Joey 965-0288. Lv mess.

520 Boats for Sale


06 Alum 17" Bass boat. 50hp, 4
stroke Suzuki motpr. Bought new,
mint cond. Valued at $900.
Asking $600 obo. SOLD

63 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Units.
Free Water,
sewer and trash pickup.
386-984-2025 or 386-984-2063
2br/1.5 ba Fully furnished..
Utilities, washer dryer, TV,'cable
Owner non smoker. 2 mi S of V.A.
$800.mo $500. sec. 386;755-0110
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779-

A640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
2011 Blowout
4/2 Doublewide only $34,995
On your land or mine
Call John T 386-752-1452


4/ 2 on 1 ac. New carpet, roof, a/c,
FP, roomy kitchen. Koi pond,
barn/workshop,.garage & shed.
MLS 78833 $115,000 Results Re-
alty, Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
4BR/2BA
Over 2000 sq ft.
of living area.
Only $61,900
Call 386-752-3743
Bank Repo!! 3br/2ba Triplewide
$999 Down $377 month.
Call Paula 386-292-6290
E-mail
ammonspaula@yahoo.com
Factory Special 4/3
S2280 Sq. Ft.
Home priced to go.
Call Catherine
386- 754-6737
Jacobson Homes Factory Outlet
Prices! New 2012 3/2 start at
$39,900 and New 4/2's start at
$49,900. All new homes inc
delivery and set up, ac-skirt and
steps. North Pointe Gainesville
(352)872-5566
Looking for a Quality Home?
Manufactured or Modular
Home at Royals
CallCatherine
386-754-6737
Lot Model Sale
All Show Models
w/Factory Rebate
Call Charles
386-754-6737
Lot Model Specials on 2011
Models making room for 2012
at Royals Homes
Come see Catherine
386-754-6737
Maintained on 10 ac. Two car cov-
ered carport. Back deck & a front
ramp. Wood laminate floors. MLS
79417 $94,900 Results Realty
Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473
Modular HomesBuilt
to your Speckscall
Charles at
386-754-6737

Need a Home?
Bad Credit or No Credit?
Call 386-755-2132.
We Finance You,
Must have Land.


A640 Mobile Homes
Wv for Sale
NEW 2012
28X80
4BR/2BA FACTORY REPO
$61,900
Call 386-7523743
New And Used! North Pointe
Homes in Gainesville has 4 used
homes in stock! Don't delay as
these will go Fast.
Call North Pointe in Gainesville
(Hwy 441, 6 Blocks north of
Hwy 222) (352)872-5566
NEW SINGLEWIDE
2br/lba set up
w/air $799 DOWN $179. mo!
Owner will Finance!
Call Kevin 386-719-5641
ONLY $59,995
New 2012 4br/2ba 28X80 Inc.
Delivery, set up, A/C,
skirting & steps.
Call 386-752-1452
OWNER FINANCE!
New 4br Doublewide!
Set up on your land
$0 Down/$329. mo
Call Kevin 386-719-6578
PALM HARBOR
Give Away
$20,000 in Options FREE
All sizes
1-888-313-2899
Palm Harbor Homes
New Home Stimulus
5K For Your Used Mobile Home-
Any Condition
800-622-2832 ext 210
Showcase Closeout
All Palm Harbor
Lot models
Make Dreams Happen!
386-758-9538
USED DOUBLEWIDE!
3 br/2ba w/Den, SBS Fridge!
One Owner! I Finance!
Call Kevin!
386-719-6574
Used Singlewide
3br/2ba 16x803yrs Old,
Loaded
Call Charles
386-754-6737
WE HAVE access to
New & Used Homes.
Call 386-755-8854 to make sure.
You are getting your best deal

WOODGATE VILLAGE! 3BR
2BADWMH w/fenced yd,
carport & wkshop $39,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY
INC. 755-5110 #79078

650 Mobile Home
5 1 &Land

3 br/2ba, DWMH w/lots of space
in Providence close to 175 on 1 ac
fenced, lg Utility Bldg. MLS#
79810 Eastside Village Realty,
Inc, Denise Bose 386-752-5290


3br/2ba 2.75 ac. w/fish pond.
Small down plus $725 month
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

710 Unfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent,








A Landlord You Can Love!
2 brApts $550. & up + sec. Great
'area., CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421


Amberwood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com
Brandywine Apartments
Now Renting
1, 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A.
386-752-3033 W. Grandview Ave.
Equal housing Opportunity
TDD Number 1-800-955-8771
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $99.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Greaf area W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage.
W/D hookups, patio, $600-750 +
Sec. 386-965-3775 or 965-5560
Greentree Townhouse
Move 1I Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com
Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, larg-
er 2/br. for $495. mo. Incl water.
386-755-2423 rigsbyrentals.com
NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled
1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living
room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951
Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $99. Limited time. Pets
welcome. with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $99. Spacious bedroom
washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Move In Madness! $99. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com

720 Furnished Apts.
SFor Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

73O0 Unfurnished
730V Home For Rent
2BR/1BA DUPLEX, Carport
Off Branford Hwy
$595. mo. $595. dep. Very clean.
Contact 386-752-7578
3br/1.5ba. Very clean, Block great
area. CH/A & indoor laundry.
Carport & Fenced (privacy) back
yard. $800. mo $800. dep.
(941)920-4535


730 Unfurnished
7 Home For Rent

3BR/2BA NEW construction
Lease option. 1st, last plus $400
sec.$900. mo. South of town.
Credit ref's req'd. 386-755-9476
Brick 3br/2ba Large yard, garage,
CH/A. 179 SW Stanley Ct. Lake
City. $900. mo + $850 dep.
Call 386-365-8543
CUTE & CONVENIENT
2br Apartment.
$485. mo $585 dep.
386-344-2170
Quail Ridge Estates.
1547 Ironwood Drive SW
3 bedroom, 2 bath house. $700 a
month. Kevin @ 1-800-553-4287
Spacious 3br/2ba home in town
with large bonus room, recently
remodeled. $900.mo. includes yard
service. NO PETS. lst/last/sec Dep.
required. 386-867-9231

750 Business &
750 Office Rentals
2 Business Offices For lease:
Approximately ll00sq ft each..
Located SE Baya Ave.
Call 386-755-3456 for info
For Rent or Lease: Former Doc-
tors office, Former professional
office & Lg open space: avail on
East Baya Ave. Competitive rates.
Weekdays 386-984-0622
eveftings/weekends 497-4762
Office space across from the
Courthouse. 152 N Marion
1200 sqft Newly remodeled. $650.
mo. Excellent cond 386.-961-8466


780 Condos for Sale
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Country Club, 2br/2ba condo. New
granite tops & more. Tennis court
& pool. Elaine K Tolar 386-755-
6488 MLS# 77219 $129,900


805 Lots for Sale
BANK OWNED- 7 lots in the
Plantation subdivision. Priced to
sell at just $17,900. Call 386-362-
4539 for a list of available lots.
MLS#79509 Poole Realty
Beautiful buildable lot in a estab-
lished neighborhood, site built
homes only MLS# 76668 High &
Dry Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Denise Bose @ 386-752-5290
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
1,330 heated sqft. on 1/2 ac.
Fenced. Garage made into a 4th
BR, New laminate wood floors,
new tile. $104,900 MLS#77003
SCarrie Cason 386-623-2806
2 FOR PRICE OF 1 !.2 mfg homes
on 4.62 acres, Ig wkshop &
fencing $120,000 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC
386-755-5110. #78340
3 Bed/I Bath home on
Poplar St.
Nice yard and carport.
$48,000 call 484-678-6385
3 br/2 ba brick on a .5 ac lot. Great
area. Built in 1994. 1,468 heated
sqft. Fenced yard & workshop
w/carport. $115,000 MLS#77717
Carrie Cason 386-623-2806
4/2 on 10 ac in Bell. 2,200.heated
sqft in a country setting:.- 10x20
frame shed. Bring all offers! MLS
76582 $89,000 Results Realty,
Brittany Stoe.ckert 386-397-3473
4BR/2BA CONCRETE BLOCK
Home ONLY. $38,500; apply
TLC & make this house a home
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #79477
5 Ac for $7,500! Wooded flag lot
with 5.44 ac. Restricted to site
built homes w/a min of 1500 sqft
climatized. MLS 77872 $7,500
Access Realty 386-623-6896
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
-1512 sqft. + 210 sqft Florida room.
remodeled kitchen, paint, floors &
more. $94,500 Lori Giebeig Simp-
son 386-365-5678 MLS# 79839
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty'
4/3, lake in town. Many upgrades,
Elaine K Tolar 386-755-6488 Or
Mary Brown Whitehurst 386-965-
0887 MLS# 76085 $299,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Split plan. 3/2 Brick, Woodcrest
S/D. Fenced yard. Oversized
garage, Shed. $169,900 Elaine K
Tolar 386-755-6488 MLS# 77708
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
2 story. 4br/3ba + bonus. Mother -
in-law suite. Fenced yard nice
area. Elaine K Tolar 386-755-6488
MLS# 79349 $279,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Superb area, brick 3/2 lg screen
porch. 2 car garage. Nice back-
yard, $129,900 Lori Giebeig Simp-
son 386-365-5678 MLS# 79763




Custom built. 3/2, 1.37 ac, High
Springs. Real wood floors w/new
SS appl. 340 sq. ft. scr. lanai w/ce-
ramic tile. $178,000 MLS 79601
Access Realty 386-623-6896


810 Home for Sale
FSBO Custom 3br/2.5ba. 1748sqft
Eastside Village. Oversized garage
w/extra garage in rear. Lg master
w/shower & tub. $149,000
386-752-2783 or 904-631-7390
Great investment property in the
city limits. Both units are occupied
w/tenants that want to stay! MLS
79206 $50,000 Results Realty,
Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473
Hallmark Real Estate
LIKE NEW COZY HOME with
excellent storage features,
3/2 Short sale $124,900
Call Ginger Parker 386-365-2135
Hallmark Real Estate TWO
STORY HOME with water access
to Gulf or River. Features boatlifts
for the angler. Call Teresa
Spradley 386-365-8343
Hallmark Real Estate
WEST OF TOWN near shopping,
medical and banks. 3/2 brick
home with workshop.
Call Janet Creel 386-719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate
SOUTH OF TOWN 3 bedroom
1-1/2 bath home on full acre.
Budget priced $72,000
Call Tanya Shaffer 386-397-4766
Just Reduced 2br/2ba 1 car garage
screen porch, fenced yard, large
utility/ workshop MLS# 76708
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Denise Bose @386-752-5290
LARGE 2,000+ SqFt 3BR/2BA
home near schools & shopping
ONLY $28,500 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC
755-5110 #77505
Lg 4/2 on 1 ac. Granite floors.
Open kitchen & Florida rm. Beau-
tiful yard & wrap around porch! ,
MLS 77292 $129,000 Results Re-
alty, Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Live on a Golf Course. 3/2 brick
on 1/2 ac. Formal living, dining &
family room. 2 car garage.
$129,900 Frank 386-984-5217
MLS 79567 Callaway S/D Well
kept 3br/2ba, vaulted, comer lot,
SS appl. Fenced yard & double ga-
rage. $175,000 Century 21 The
Darby-Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
MLS 79876 3br/2ba w/many up-
grades. Garage made into a 1 br
studio. 1,760 sqft in Oak Hill
Estates. $90,000 Century 21
The Darby-Rogers Co 752-6575
MLS 79982 3br/2ba, 1,805 sqft,
laminate floors, eat in kitchen,
w/breakfast bar. Lg luxurious mas-
ter bath $169,900 Century 21 The
Darby-Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Poole Realty 4br/3ba, Custom
built Between Live Oak & Lake
City, 10 ac w/planted pines &
hardwoods. $249,000 Kellie
Shirah, 386-208-3847 MLS#78032
Poole Realty Custom 3/2 home,
12 ac.Vaulted cypress ceilings,
hardwood & granite counters,
stone FP, guest cottage. $255,000.
Kellie 386-208-3847 MLS#76293
Poole Realty Just Listed 1,066 sq.
ft., 3 brl ba located South of Lake
City. $57,000. Call for an appoint-
ment. 386-362-4539. MLS#79937
266 Delhia Lane, Lake City


Poole Realty Queen Anne Victori-
an, Live Oak. 3/2, wood floors.
Listed on the historic registry. Lg
yard, 2 car garage. $159,000 Kellie
Shirah 386-208-3847 MLS75212
Price Reduced! 06 Fleetwood An-
niversary Series. 3/2 + retreat off
master, privacy fence. South of
Lake City MLS 78411 $67,900
Access Realty 386-623-6896
PRICE SLASHED! 3BR/2BA
Brick home REMODELED!
Fenced backyard $69,500
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY
INC 755-5110 #78340
Remax Professionals Beautifully
kept in Callaway. Lg beds & baths.
Covered porch w/vinyl fence.
MLS 79005 $190K Missy Zecher
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Remax Professionals Brick in
nice S/D w/fenced back yard. High
ceilings, gas fireplace, more. MLS
79421 $199,000 Missy Zecher
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Remax Professionals Custom
home. Block construction. Lg.
Master, privacy fence. MLS 79569
$229,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Remax Professionals Nice home
in Woodcrest. Split floor plan. Lg
closets, screened porch, shed MLS
79506 $129,000 Missy Zecher
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Remax Professionals Open floor
plan. Wood burning fireplace.
Fenced back yard. MLS 79330
$115,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Remax Professionals Well kept &
updated. New paint, carpet, AC &
roof. Lg fenced backyard MLS
79658 $119,900 Missy Zecher
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Remax Realty Almost new, great
area! 4br/2.5ba/3cg, 3052sq, 5ac,
gas FP, SS appls, hardwood. Front
& back porch #79877 $289,000
Pam Beauchamp 386-303-2505
Remax Realty Country Feel!
Awesome 3br/2ba, brick, 5ac, split
floor plan, Ig master, above ground
pool, 2 sheds, #79789 $219,000
Pam Beauchamp 386-303-2505
Remax Realty Restored Vintage,
zoned comm'l. 3br/2.5ba, 2208 sq.
ft., 2 ac, FP in living & master,
wkshop w/bath. #77141 $209,000
Pam Beauchamp 386-303-2505
REO Realty Group, Nancy Rog-
ers 386-867-1271- 4/2, Fairly new
roof, HVAC 3yrs old & additional
insulation. Workshop has two br
MLS 77602 $149,900


Corial\ Homes
Ar tt.hur PRuienltfer.


810 Home for Sale
REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers
867-1271- 3/1.5. Ceramic counters
& back splashes, wood laminate
flooring. Landscaping, privacy
fence. MLS 80014 $99,900
REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers
867-1271- Lake City's Country
Club 4/3 W/beautiful interior
renovation. 2,328 sq ft.
MLS 78637 $169,900
Rockford Realty Group 3/2, new
cabinets, countertops, updated
baths, paint, flooring.Appr 1 ac
workshop/shed $77,000. Luke .
Sparks 386-487-1584 MLS#77208
Rockford Realty Group Short
Sale. Nice older home in the city.
Newer metal roof, open floor plan
w/wood floors. $55,000 MLS#
78018 Luke Sparks. 386-487-1584
Rockford Realty Group. 3/2 split
plan N. Columbia Co. Open kit.,
upgraded cabinets & appl. Cov-'
ered patio, fenced yard. MLS#
79720 Jim Curry 386-755-0100
Rockford Realty Group. Cypress
Landing. Brick 3br/2ba w/lg
kitchen area, spacious great room a
neat patio. MLS#79775. $124,900.
Call Charlie Sparks. 386-755-0808
Rockford Realty Group. River
Front! 3br/2ba Kit & LR overlooks
Suwannee River. Screen porch,
Gazebo & dock. MLS#79887
$295,000 Jim Curry 386-755-0100
Rockford Realty GroupCallaway
3br/2ba built in '04. 1,568 sqft liv-
ing area. Bank approved short sale.
Make an offer! $106.800. MLS#
79248 Mark Cook. 386-288-9378
Very well kept, 3 br/2 ba on 1/2 ac
Close to 1-75 for easy commute.
Nice wood cabinetry, open floor &
much more! $169,900 MLS
#78825 Carrie Cason. 623-2806
WELLBORN! 3BR/2BA mfg
Home w/FP on 4.79 acres
$63,000 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY INC 755-5110
#79960

820 Farms &
820 Acreage
20 ac wooded tract. Nice piece of
land. Property is located approx 10
miles from Cedar Key. MLS
78886 $70,000 Results Realty,
Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com


Owner Financed land with only
$300 down payment. Half to ten ac
lots. Deas Bullard/BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
Poole Realty 120 ac farm w/spring
fed lake. Old renovated farmhouse.
Lg master, w/wood burning FP,
LR w/FP & updated kit. #76096
$499,000. Kellie 386-208-3847

Q830 Commercial
830 Property
Hallmark Real Estate 53.87 ac
zoned resid'l office & ,kid'l
high density on By-Pass. Bank
Owned. Janet Creel 386-719-0382
or Paula Lawrence 386-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate. Centrally
located lots zoned for retail,
automotive or commercial services
on Waterford Ct. Bank owned.
Call Janet Creel 386-719-0382 or
Paula Lawrence 386-623-1973

870 Real Estate
S Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605


930 Motorcycles
HARLEY DAVIDSON Electric
Glide Classic. 2006. 12,500 mi
LOADED $12,000.
(734)255-4820

950 Cars for Sale

2003 ACURA TL3.2. Loaded.
Midnight blue. New stereo.
179k miles. Good condition.
$4,200. obo. 386-590-1206

Q91 Recreational
951 Vehicles
2009 39 Foot Travel Trailer,
Self Contained, 2 slides, Awning,
W/D, many extras. $22,500 OBO
Call 443-306-8710 Cell


Lake City Reporter
HCdvlaM


Lak Ciw eprer


Jasmine
Visit the model in
The Prmesee ai
Laurd Like
227 Bellfl-A er Drive
Model Hours:
Tuesday-Friday 12-5
Saa 11-3
Sun. l-4pm
C.Al Rob Edwards
(386) 96'-0763


BEA x
0N WHEELS a W TRCRf.T









Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
Ad runs 10 consecutive day,.
with a description and photo the
newspaper and online E-ediii'n.
Ad runs 10 consecutive day., ,s a
classified line ad online.
You must include vehicle price
All ads are prepaid.
Private party only.





2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.




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25, 2012


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Noon
CBS -Vanderbilt at Kentucky
ESPN2 Notre Dame at St.John's
2 p.m.
CBS Regional coverage, UCLA at
Arizona orVillanova at Georgetown
ESPN2 -Texas A&M at Oklahoma St.
4 p.m.
CBS National coverage, Missouri
at Kansas
ESPN North Carolina atVirginia
ESPN2 Creighton at Indiana St.
FSN Memphis at Marshall
NBCSN -Air Force at UNLV
6 p.m.
ESPN Mississippi St. at'Alabama
ESPN2 George Mason atVCU
8 p.m.
ESPN2 Richmond at Xavier
9 p.m.
ESPN Syracuse at UConn
MOTORSPORTS
7:30 p.m.
SPEED Supercross, at Atlanta
NBA BASKETBALL
8:30 p.m.
TNT Exhibition, Shooting Stars,
Skills Challenge, Three-point Contest, and
Slam Dunk, at Orlando, Fla.
RODEO
9 p.m.
NBCSN PBR, WinStar World
Casino Invitational, at Houston (same-
day tape)
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
6 p.m.
FSN Oklahoma at Texas
8 p.m.
FSN -Texas Tech at Texas A&M

BASKETBALL


AP Top 25 schedule

Saturday's Games
No. I Kentucky vs.Vanderbilt, Noon
No. 2 Syracuse at UConn, 9 p.m.
No. 3 Missouri at No. 4 Kansas,
4 p.m.
No. 5 Duke vs.Virginia Tech, Noon
Ne. 6 Michigan State vs. Nebraska,
8 p.m.
No. 7 North Carolina at No. 25
Virginia, 4 p.m.
No. 9 Georgetown vs. Villanova,
2 p.m.
No. II Michigan vs. Purdue, 6 p.m.
No. 12 Florida at Georgia,
4 p.m.
No. 13 Baylor vs. Oklahoma, 1:45 p.m.
No. 14 Murray State atTennesseeTech,
8:30 p.m.
No. 18 New Mexico atTCU, 7 p.m.
No. 19 Wichita State vs. Drake, 1:30
p.m.
No. 20 Notre Dame vs. St. John's at
Madison Square Garden, Noon
No. 21 UNLV vs.Air Force,4 p.m.
No. 22 Temple at Saint Joseph's, 7 p.m.
No. 24 San Diego State vs. Colorado
State, 10 p.m.

BASEBALL

Baseball calendar
March 2 Mandatory reporting
date for teams other than Oakland and
Seattle.
March 2-11 -Teams may renew con-
tracts of unsigned players.
March 19 -. Last day to place a
player on unconditional release, waivers
and pay 30 days termination pay instead
of 45 days.
March 28-29 Seattle vs. Oakland
at Tokyo.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White's Alexa Hatcher (7) catches a fly ball for an out
while playing Bradford on Tuesday.


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com

Columbia High will play
its first game against an
unfamiliar opponent at an
unfamiliar place home.
The Tigers (3-0) open
their home schedule after
five games on the road
(including preseason)
against Auburndale High
at noon today.
"We're really excited
to return home and play
in our own environment,"
Columbia head coach
J.T. Clark said. "After five
games on the road, we're
definitely ready to play in
our home town. We're hop-
ing for a good crowd to
come out and support us
and it should be a good
environment for an after-
noon baseball game."
Auburndale enters with
an 0-2-1 record early in the
season, but don't be fooled
by the Bloodhounds'
record.
"Historically, they have
had very good teams,"
Clark said. "I actually
played with a former play-
er of theirs, Eric O'Cain in


college, so there's a little
connection there for me
as well."
It was the first game
that Clark scheduled this
year after Auburndale
head coach Tom Taylor
called the Tigers' coach
to pick up a game on the
Bloodhounds' road trip.
"For us, itwas a chance to
play someone that we're not
familiar with," Clark said.
"They're not from around
here, they are a good oppo-
nent and hopefully it will
give us a chance to expand
our exposure around the
state a little more."
Because it's not a district
game, Columbia will sit ace
pitcher Kellan Bailey in
favor of a couple of other
pitchers looking to develop
another starter.
"It's a chance for us
to go out there and get
some guys innings that we
haven't seen before in live
competition," Clark said.
"We may throw a combi-
nation of Sam Bass, Ryan
Thomas, Dalton Mauldin
and Brent Stalter, who
threw a little for us the
other night at Fernandina.


Indians beat rain, Devils


Fort White High
picks up 6-1 win
agaisntWilliston.

By.BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com

FORT WHITE After a
cold night at the plate in a
4-0 loss against Santa Fe
High on Thursday, the Lady
Indians bats caught fire in
a 6-1 win against Williston
High on Friday.
Fort White was held to
only two hits with Alexa
Hatcher and D'Kota
Cassady each reaching
base once against Santa Fe.
All four of the Lady
Raiders' runs came in the
fifth inning.


Friday was a different
story. Each Fort White bat-
ter had at least one hit and
Ali Wrench, Alexa Hatcher,
Cecile Gomez and Jess
Widland each reached base
twice.
"We're finally starting
to put hits together," Fort
White head coach Casie
Sparks said.
The Lady Indians also
had a fine pitching perfor-
mance to go with the bats
from Gomez.
Gomez went the entire
way, struck out 14 batters,
walked five and gave up
two hits in the contest Her
only earned run came in
the final inning.
"She's the heart of this
team," Sparks said. "She's


pitching good and the
defense is playing strong
behind her after a week
where we had too many
errors."
Fort White scored one in
the first when Gomez bat-
ted Wrench in for a 1-0 lead
and never looked back.
A triple in the second
inning from Widland scored
Ashley Chesney and Shea
Chesney for the 3-0 lead. A
Wrench hit scored Widland
to round out the inning up
4-0.
Gomez helped her own
cause in the fourth by bat-
ting in Wrench and Hatcher
for the 6-0 lead.
The Lady Indians return
to the diamond at Eastside
at 6 p.m. on Thursday.


We're going to find out
what some of these other
guys have so they're ready
to compete in the district"
One thing that's start-
ing to come around for the
Tigers is the bats. After
what Clark called a slow
start, Columbia explod-
ed for nine hits against
Fernandina Beach in a 4-3
win on Tuesday.
It all starts with senior
Blaine Courson, who is
leading the team with a.545
average for the season.
"He's on fire for us,"
Clark said. "He's 6-of-ll
from the plate and leading
the team."
He 'also complimented
the bats of Bailey and Levi
Hollingsworth.
"Kellan is swinging it
well after the home run
against Fernandina," Clark
said. "He's tied with Levi in
the team lead for doubles.
Hopefully, as a team we're
starting to build a little
confidence for district."
The Tigers will begin
their district schedule
against Stanton Prep at
6:30 p.m. on Friday in Lake
City.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Jason Plyn takes a pitch to the thigh in a
game played last season. CHS opens its home schedule
against Auburndale High today at noon.


FROM THE DELNDespite loss, FSU gains respect


hot-shooting Duke left the Still, Florida State has only led 61-58 with they're still one of the
Seminoles a game back on done enough this season just a few ticks over nation's premier teams
the outside looking in. to earn the respect of just four minutes left in the and Florida State is
But this isn't the same about everyone around game, those missed gunning to get there.
Florida State. It wasn't a the country. opportunities could have They're not there yet,


Brandon Finley
Phone:(386) 754-0420
by@lakecityreporter.com

TALLAHASSEE

alk about
gaining respect
and you have
to mention the
Florida State
basketball team. For years,
the Seminoles were the
doormat of the ACC with
teams like Duke, North
Carolina, Wake Forest
and Maryland winning
championships.
On Thursday, Florida
State had a chance to
move one step closer to
claiming its first ACC
championship, but a


matter of the Seminoles
not being fundamentally
sound. It wasn't a lack of
talent or a difference in
coaching. Duke simply
shot the ball much' better
from the three-point line.
Teams usually don't
knock down 46.4 percent
of their three point shots.
That's what Duke did in
Tallahassee on Thursday
to split the season series.
with the Seminoles.
Florida State's defense
inside the arc was
tremendous. Duke was
just 9-of-24 inside the
three-point line. But 13
made shots from outside
the arc, including two
shots that turned into
four-point plays, led to the
Seminoles' doom.


"I have so much respect,
before and after, for
their team and coaching
staff," Duke coach Mike
Krzyzewski said. "They're
legitimately one of the
best teams in the country."
Strong words from the
most storied coach in the
game today.
But to make that
next step, Florida State
needs games like this.
With a sold-out crowd,
it seemed at times the
pressure mounted on the
Seminoles. Florida State
was just 54 percent from
the charity stripe, shot
26.7 percent from three-
point range and missed
multiple chances under
the basket.
In a game that Duke


made the difference. Then
again, Duke's Seth Curry
knocked down one of 13
threes for the Dukies right
after Florida State cut the
margin.
While Duke's program
constantly plays in these
type of games, it was
Curry showing while


but following up on a
sweet 16 appearance,
coach Leonard Hamilton
has the team playing
better than it has in its
history. Not bad for a
coach that was rumored
to be on his way out after
early season losses against
Princeton and Duke.


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25TH

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Saturday, February


10A


Tigers host home opener today



First pitch set for noon


Joey Busscher
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is SMOKIN' Boston Butts,
Boneless PorK Loin. Ribs
& Chicken
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