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UFPKY NEH LSTA



The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01785
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: February 23, 2012
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01785
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text




I YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874


"- I _
LINE OF FLORU2DA***3DII
Po BOX 0 HISTORY

GAINESVILLE FL 326111943


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Reporter


.ECITYREPORTER.COM


'More about the



message than the man'


JASON MA MTHEW WALKER/LaKe city Reporter
James Burbach, senior pastor of Mountaintop Ministries Worldwide, formally Meade Ministries, speaks during a press conference at the
church Wednesday in an effort to dispel long-term rumors concerning the church. Pictured are church officials Scott Kennedy (from left),
Abram Huber, Burbach and Isaac Bratkovich.



Church group changes course


By LAURA HAMPSON
Ihampson@lakecityreporter.com

churches don't rior-
tnally hold press
conferences, but
Motntaintop
Ministries
Worldwide opened their doors
to the media for the first time
Wednesday.
"We are in a community
that has been trained to think
there's something strange
or mysterious about you, but
really there's no mystery," said
James Burbach, senior pastor
of the church.
Burbach's grandfather was
Charles Meade, the church
founder.
Burbach said the church
has never given an answer to
rumors because Meade was
from a different time.
"His firm belief was we know
we are doing right and no tnat-
ter what they say it'll show out
who we really are. And I'm a lit-


Coming Sunday:
More on the new direction
of Mountaintop Ministries.

tie different I believe the same
things he does, but at the same
time I understand today's envi-
ronment. I understand today's
business climate," Burbach
said.
"If perception becomes a
reality, I can say this percep-
tion has become who people
think we are," he said.
"So today we are here to just
tell you who we are, what we
are really all about and let peo-
ple decide for themselves what
that want to believe," Burbach
said.
Burbach said the church
does not regulate what mem-
bers do.
"I'm a normal person. I go to
lumber stores. I go to Walmart
I buy groceries. There's not
really much mystery behind
who we are and what we do."


JASON MAI l HW WALKbn/LaKe Irly Reporter
The sanctuary at Mountaintop Ministries Worldwide has a capacity
of about 2,400 and features a balcony and audio and video centers,
The church has a membership of about 1,500.


Church officials said they
had come to dispel what they
called false rumors, such as a
ban on medical attention and
the belief that their worship
center could be inverted to


become an ark.
"You would think that you
wouldn't have -to answer
some of the wacky allega-
tions because they are so far
fetched," he said.


Officials


split on


charter


proposal


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

The Columbia County Charter Review
Commission's proposal for changing the
way county managers can be fired is getting
mixed reviews from two Columbia County
Commissioners.
District 3 Commissioner Jody DuPree
and District 1 Commissioner Ron Williams
have opposing views regarding the pro-
posed guidelines.
Tuesday night the
Columbia County Charter
Review Commission pro-
posed changing the county
charter so that the county
manager can be terminat-
ed in one meeting with 'a Dupree
supermajority vote or by a
simple majority at two con-
secutive meetings.
Tuesday afternoon
DuPree said he is in favor of
terminating the county man-
ager at one meeting with a
majority vote.Williams
DuPree said he thinks the
way the county charter now
reads 'if there was a vote to terminate the
employment of a county manager, the vote
would have to take place at one meeting and
then do it a second time two weeks later.
"I don't think that's a good idea simply
because in a position like that and you have
terminate him, you're going to need-him
CHARTER continued on 3A


Two arrested in

separate sexual

conduct cases

Woman faces charge
of lewd conduct.

From staff reports
Deputies seized a local woman's
phone on Monday then arrested her
for inappropriate sexual
contact with a 15-year-old
boy, according to sheriff's
reports.
Alicia Ann Hinkle, 29,
241 NW Neptune Court,
was charged with lewd
or lascivious battery in Hinkle
connection with the case.
She was booked into the
Columbia County Detention Facility on
CASES continued on 3A


Law banning false military

honors divides U.S. high court


By MARK SHERMAN
Associated Press
WASHINGTON The Supreme
Court appeared sharply divided
Wednesday over a law that makes
it a crime to lie about having been
awarded top military honors.
The justices engaged in spirited
debate over the constitutionality of
a 2006 law aimed at curbing false
claims about military exploits.
Some justices said they worried
that upholding the Stolen Valor Act
could lead to other limits on speech,
including laws that might make it ile-
gal to lie about an extramarital affair
or a college degree, or to impress a
date.


"Where do you stop?" Chief Justice
John Roberts asked at one point.
But Roberts later joined other
justices in indicating that the court
could make clear that, if it upheld
the law, it would only be endors-
ing an effort to prevent people from
demeaning the system of military
honors that was established by Gen.
George Washington in 1782.
The Obama administration's top
Supreme Court lawyer, Solicitor
General Donald Verrilli Jr., defended
the law as targeted to "protect the
integrity of the honors system."
Justice Sonia Sotomayor seemed
the least willing member of the court
to accept the administration's argu-
ment She disputed that the value


of the'highest award, the Medal of
Honor, or any others has been dimin-
ished because some people lie about
having received them.
Sotomayor said the issue provokes
a justifiable emotional reaction, but
said previous Supreme Court cases
make clear that taking offense by
itself is not enough to justify limiting
speech.
"So outside of the emotional reac-
tion, where's the harm? And I'm not
minimizing it. I, too, take offense
when people make these kinds of
claims, but I take offense when some-
one I'm dating makes a claim that's
not true," said Sotomayor, who is
HONORS continued on 3A


A new home for the family


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Fort White resident Lola Pipkin poses with her daughters
Mycala Pipkin (top right), 15, and Christy Pipkin, 17, in
front of their new, three-bedroom, two-bathroom home
Wednesday. Pipkin and her daughters had been living in a
condemned camper. The new home was due to a Community
Development Block Grant. See Sunday's Lake City Reporter
for the story.


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1 84 4Qi0002 I


Vol. 138 No. 18
CALL US:
(386)752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


79.-63 .
Isolated Showers
WEATHER, 2A


O pinion ................
Calendar................
Obituaries ..............
Advice & Comics........
Puzzles .................


TODAY IN COMING
PEOPLE FRIDAY
Cowell wants two Local news
women judges roundup
_.,-"NOVO


."T-...rTa^^,rai.T -lii T vai m l-, .B- --


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2012


I 75


3M*S ~~ I:**/*y !y- -'T T* .3 ---











2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2012


FLORIDA'


Wednesday:
N/A


-3 Wednesday:
e Afternoon: 2-0-5
Night: 3-0-7


Wednesday: I t Tuesday:
B Afternoon: 2-9-1-4 IV 6-18-20-23-35
Night: 4-4-2-8


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Cowell wants 2 female judges, hosts


LOS ANGELES Simon Cowel
is playing it coy about rumors that
Fergie, Britney Spears and Janet
Jackson are being considered for
"The X Factor."
Two judges' spots on the Fox TV
singing contest opened up when
Paula Abdul and Nicole Scherzinger
left after the first season. Cowell told
a teleconference Wednesday that two
women will replace
them, but he declined
to comment on who's
being considered.
Cowell says "The
X Factor" has been
contacted by people
interested in joining
the series, and meet- Cowell
ings will be held dur-
ing the next few weeks.
With host Steve Jones' exit, Cowell
says he wants to switch to a two-host
format. He didn't say who might be
hired.
'The X Factor" is based on Coweil's
hit British show. It returns for its sec-
ond season this fall.

Man's childhood comic
collection collects $2.7M
DALLAS The bulk of a man's
childhood comic book collection that
included many of the most prized
issues ever published sold at auction
Wednesday for about $3.5 million.
A copy of Detective Comics No. 27,
which sold for 10 cents in 1939 and
features the debut of Batman, got the
top bid at the New York City auction
.Wednesday. It sold for about $523,000,
including a buyer's premium, said Lon
Allen, managing director of comics for
Heritage Auctions, the Dallas-based
auction house overseeing the sale.
'This really has its place in the his-
tory of great comic book collections,"
said Allen, who added that the auction
was high energy, with "a bunch of


applause at a couple of the top lots."
Action Comics No. 1, a 1938 issue
featuring the first appearance of
Superman, sold for about $299,000;
Batman No. 1, from 1940, sold for
about $275,000; and Captain America
No. 2, a 1941 issue with a frightened
Adolf Hitler on the cover, brought in
about $114,000, Allen said.
Among the 345 well-preserved com-
ics bought decades ago by the Virginia
boy with a remarkable knack for pick-
ing winners were 44 of The Overstreet
Comic Book Price Guide's top 100
issues from comics' golden age.
"It was amazing seeing what they
,went for," said Michael Rorrer, who
discovered his late great uncle Billy
Wright's collection last year while ,
cleaning put his late great aunt's
house in Martinsville, Va., following
her death.
Opening up a basement closet,
Rorrer found the neatly stacked com-
ics that had belonged to Wright, who
died in 1994 at age 66.
'This is just one of those collections
that all the guys in the business think
don't exist anymore," Allen said.
Experts say the collection is
remarkable not only for the number"
of rare books, but also because the
comics were kept in such good condi-
tion for half a century by the man who
bought them in his childhood.

Heavy D documentary to
air on Centric TV
WASHINGTON The story of late
rap pioneer Heavy D will be chroni-.
cled in a documentary airing Sunday
on Centric TV.
"Be Inspired: The Life of Heavy
D" will feature interviews with the
Jamaican-born rapper's family and
artists such as Will Smith, Mary J.
Blige and Queen Latifah, according to
Centric TV, the 24-hour channel that
is part of the BET Network.


Heavy D, whose given name was
Dwight Myers, is considered one of
the most influential rap artists of the
late 1980s and early 1990s, both as
the front man for his group, Heavy D
and The Boyz, and as a solo artist He
died last November at age 44, from a
blood clot in his lung.
Centric said the documentary
includes footage from Heavy D's last
televised performance, at the BET
Hip-Hop Awards last October.

Franklin: Houston left
home 'with all right things'
NEW YORK Aretha Franklin
says Cissy Houston raised her daugh-
ter Whitney Houston well and that
an interview where Franklin said
parents need to make sure children
"leave home prepared" was taken out
of context
Franklin released a statement
Wednesday, four days after Houston's
funeral. She was expected to sing at
the funeral in Newark, N.J., Houston's
hometown, but bowed out because
of leg spams she said she suffered
after a concert at Radio City Music
Hall the night before. She performed
again at Radio City the.night of
Houston's funeral, and paid tribute to
Houston as "a very fine young lady'"
In an interview about Houston,
on NBC's 'Today" show last Week,
Al Roker asked Franklin about
Houston's superstardom.
Franklin said: "I think parents have
to really talk to their children before
-they leave home ... (that they) leave
home prepared, really. She left home
with all the right things."
After Franklin didn't attend the
funeral, there were some reports
that Houston's mother was upset
over Franklin's comments and that
Franklin was uninvited, a charge
Franklin denies.
'(AP)


Celebrity Birthdays


Actor Peter Fonda is
72.
Pro and College
Football Hall of Famer
Fred Biletnikoff is 69.
Singer-musician
Johnny Winter is 68.
Country-rock musi-
cian Rusty Young (Poco)
is 66.
Actress Patricia
Richardson is 61.
Rock musician Brad
Whitford (Aerosmith) is 60.


Singer Howard Jones
is 57.
Actress Kristin Davis
is 47.
Country singer Steve
Holy is 40.
Actress Kelly
Macdonald is 36.
Actress Emily Blunt
is 29.
Actor Aziz Ansari is
29.
Actress Dakota
Fanning is 18.


Daily Scripture
"There is no fear in love. But
perfect love drives out fear,
because fear has to do with
punishment. The one who fears
is not made perfect in love."

1 John 4:18 NIV


Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293 BUSINESS
Fax number .............752-9400 Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
Circulation............7555445 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
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CORRECTION._

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this
space. And thanks for reading.


NAACP files
legislative comment
TALLAHASSEE The
National Association
for the Advancement of
Colored People is urging
the Florida Supreme Court
not to cut the number
of minority majority and
minority opportunity legis-
lative districts.
.The Florida State
Conference of NAACP
branches also asked that
comments it submitted
Wednesday be accepted
for the justices' redistrict-
ing review although filed
late.
For the second day in
a row the justices, mean-
while, divided 4-3 over
procedure.
This time the majority
declined to let groups chal-
lenging the Legislature's
maps substitute a new.
alternate plan for one they
previously filed.
Justice Jorge Labarga
is emerging as the swing
vote. He's the only justice
in the majority for both
decisions.
On Tuesday, the court
ordered parties to submit
lawmakers' home address-
es to help determine if
House and Senate maps
improperly favor incum-
bents.

LeMieux: Mack is
politics 'Charlie Sheen'
TALLAHASSEE The
Republican Senate pri-
mary race got personal
Wednesday as former Sen.
George LeMieux called
Rep. Connie Mack IV "the
Charlie Sheen of Florida
politics" because of past
run-ins with the law, and
Mack's campaign respond-
ed that LeMieux is "an
extraordinary political hack"
who used his relationship
with former Gov. Charlie
Crist to become rich and
powerful.
LeMieux cited a Miami
Herald review of Mack's
court records and financial


documents to assert that
Mack doesn't have the char-
acter or temperament to
serve in the U.S. Senate.
"What we see is a 20-year
pattern of misconduct,"
LeMieux said at a news
conference. "Road rage
incidents, bar fights and
arrests; unable-to pay his
own taxes while a member
of Congress; sued by his
condominium association,
his yacht club, his lawyer,
not paying his family sup-
port payment"
LeMieux said attacking
Mack on personal character
issues is fair game because
Mack has done the same
for years, including calling
Republican presidential can-
didate Newt Gingrich dan-
gerous and erratic. Mack
supports Mitt Romney
for the GOP nomination.
Likewise, LeMieux ques-
tioned Mack's behavior.

Sex abuse survivor
ends 1,500-mile walk
TALLAHASSEE -
Sexual abuse survivor
Lauren Book is focused on
passing new laws now that
she's finished a 1,500-mile
walk through Florida.
Book arrived at the old
Capitol Wednesday after
the 39-day walk to raise
awareness about sexual
abuse and to support vic-
tims.
Book has fought for
new laws to help victims
and punish abusers since
revealing she was raped
by a nanny when she was
a child.
This year she's seeking
$1.5 million for rape crisis
centers and supporting
two bills (HB 1355 and SB
1816) that would strength-
en requirements to report
child abuse. Universities,
would be fined $1 mil-
lion and stripped of state
funding for two years if
officials don't report child
abuse. That's a response to
abuse cases at Penn State,
Syracuse University and
The Citadel.


Man gets 30 years
for fatal shooting
FORT LAUDERDALE
- A South Florida man has
been sentenced to 30 years
in prison for killing a man
he suspected was sleeping
with his wife.
. As part of a deal with
Broward County prosecu-
tors, 46-year-old Ricardo
Gutierrez pleaded guilty
Tuesday to second-degree
murder. He had faced a
possible death sentence if
convicted of first-degree
murder.
Authorities say Gutierrez
fatally shot 55-year-old
Antonio Noisette in July
2009 in the parking lot of
Memorial Hospital Miramar,
where Noisette worked as a
cafeteria cook.
- According to the South
Florida Sun Sentinel,
prosecutors revealed that
Noisette a married father
of four children had been
involved in an affair with
Gutierrez's wife.

Scott loses another
agency head in Miles
TALLAHASSEE Florida
Gov. Rick Scott is losing yet
another agency head after
just a year in office.
Jack Miles, the secre-
tary of the Department
of Management Services,"
resigned from his $140,000
a year job on Tuesday.
Miles plans to stay in his
post until March 31.
Miles, who joined the'
Scott administration after
retiring from the corporate
world, becomes another in
a line of officials who have
left in the last few months.
Two other agency heads
announced their depar-
tures last month, including
Secretary of State Kurt
Browning.
Miles said on Wednesday
that it was time to step
down and that he had prom-
ised Scott he would stay
through his first two legisla-
tive sessions.
(AP)


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LOCAL & STATE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2012


CHARTER: Officials split on charter proposal

Continued From Page 1A


to be able to be gone
from there," he said. "You
don't need anything to be
disruptive for the next two
weeks that could really
mess your government up.
You would hope that would
never happen."
DuPree said in other
professional jobs, once an
employee is terminated that
means immediately.
Williams said he is not in
favor of being able to termi-
nate the county manager on
one vote.
"We have a contract with
the county administrator.
It's a good contract and I
think we should still follow
the definition, of the contract
we made with the county
administrator," he said.
The county charter pro-
vides for separation of leg-
islative and administrative
functions. The responsibility
for setting policy rests with
the board of county commis-
sioners, while the responsi-
bility for implementing that
policy is vested with the
executive branch headed by
the county manager.
Last month the Charter
Review Commission sug-
gested revising the county
charter so the county man-
ager may be terminated by
a majority vote at a regular


county commission meet-
ing.
However, the charter
review commission pro-
posed the supermajority
vote or, majority vote in two
consecutive meetings, as a
way of terminating a county
manger.
The charter review com-
mission is also considering
limiting the authority of
the county manager in hir-
ing and firing department
heads and will discuss the
matter in its next meeting.
Williams said he is not in
favor of stripping from the
county manager power to
hire and fire county depart-
ment heads.
"This is a bunch of horse
malarkey," Williams said.
"This goes back to my Letter
to the Editor describing the
'backwoods politics' that are
trying to be played."
Williams askedwhywould
he expect the county man-
ager to be held accountable
if someone else is going to
hire the department heads
and have the ability of fire
them.
"This is the way it was 30
years ago when I became
a commissioner," he said.
"No one was held account-
able because if, they were
fired all they had to do was


run and tell their commis-
sioner and the commis-
sioner would intervene.
You couldn't make anybody
work and you had no day-to-
day control because there
was a conflict between the
employees and the com-
missioners would override
the decision of the county
manager. It was the good
ol' boy system. I'm sick to
my stomach anybody would
want to take Columbia
County back to the good ol'
boy days."
DuPree disagreed.
"I think department
heads should be confirmed
by the board of county com-
missioners and hired by the
county manager," he said,
pointing out the Suwannee
River Water Management
District executive direc-
tor has be confirmed by a
state senate committee after
being hired by a govern-
ing board. He also noted
that in school districts, the
superintendent's hiring rec-
ommendations have to be
approved by school board
members. "If it works for
them, I don't see whey it
shouldn't work for us."
If approved by the char-
ter review commission, the
both issues could go before
local voters.


Both commissioners
seemed confident voters
would side with them.
"I think it would be favor-
able because most people
around here who vote and
who are in the private sec-
tor understand how it works
for them," DuPree said. "I
think it would be OK."
He said it's the charter
review committee's duty to
determine the priorities of
the county charter which
will be addressed by the
review process.
"At the end of the day'
the purpose of the Charter
Review Committee is to
determine as the county
evolves, how the charter
needs to evolve and I trust
that's what they will do,"
he said.
Williams said he believes
both measures would fail at
.the ballot.
"The charter review com-
mittee might recommend
it, but thank God they
.don't have the last say so,"
Williams said. "I think the
voters of Columbia County
would turn it down 10-1.
This is going back to the
good old days of Columbia
County and Columbia
County is too far progressed
to go back to the good old
-days."


Porter recognized

for economic efforts


Representative Elizabeth
. Porter (R-Lake City)
has been recognized by
the Florida Chamber pf
Commerce with the 2011
Honor Roll for her support
of job creation and work-.
ing to help create an atmo-
sphere of economic devel-
opment for Florida.
"I was honored to receive
the 2011 Honor Roll Award
from the Florida Chamber,"
--Porter said. "Business is.the
engine that runs and moves
our economy and a huge


part
of that
engine
is our
small
busi -
nesses.
I look
forward


Porter


to con-
tinuing
my support of the Florida
Chamber and supporting
job creation for -Florida's
future."


divorced.
On the other side was
Justice Antonin Scalia.
"When Congress passed this
legislation, I assume it did so
because it thought that the
value of the awards that these
courageous members of the
armed forces were receiv-
ing was being demeaned
and diminished by charla-
tans. That's what Congress
thought," Scalia said.
Jonathan Libby, the fed-
eral public defender argu-
ing against the law, said
Congress' intent is hard to


discern because it passed the
legislation without any hear-
ings.
Libby's' client, Xavier
Alvarez, was one of the first
people prosecuted for vio- -
lating the Stolen Valor Act.
Alvarez told a meeting of
the Three Valleys Municipal
Water District in Pomona,
Calif, to which he had
been elected, that he was a
wounded war veteran who
has received the Medal of
Honor...._.. ..
He never served in the
armed forces.


CASES: Two arrested in

separate conduct cases

Continued From Page 1A


$50,000 bond.
According to Columbia
County Sheriff's reports,
authorities were investi-
gating an anonymous tip
about an alleged sexual
battery in which a woman
had sexual contact with
a child in December.
Authorities inter-
viewed Hinkle in January
and told her a warrant
was being sought for her
arrest, reports say.

Man charged with sexual
assault on 11-year-old

A Lake City man 'faces
sexual assault charg-
es after an 11-year-old
reported he touched her
inappropriately, accord-
ing to sheriff's reports.
Justin E. Swindell, 24,


I3~ -.


address withheld, was
arrested
Monday
on charg-
es of sex-
ual assault
in connec-
tion with
the case. Swindell
He was
booked
into the Columbia County
Detention Facility on
$200,000 bond.
According to Columbia
County Sheriff's reports,
the child told authorities
Swindell touched her
inappropriately on sev-
eral occasions, usually
while she was sleeping.
During an interview
with authorities, Swindell
reportedly told authori-
ties he touched the child
inappropriately on at
least five occasions.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER


f:

















OPINION


Thursday, February 23, 2012


ONE
OPINION



Dollar



signs?


ver the past several
years, the federal
government has
poured millions
of tax dollars into
digital signs that inform driv-
ers of highway traffic condi-
tions. These multimillion-dollar
efforts are styled as "intelligent
transportation.systems," which
is a fancy term jurisdictions use
to claim they're relieving con-
gestion when, in reality, they
just tell you that you're stuck.
Businesses that want to use
the same technology to get the
local economy moving are often
told to take a hike.
On Tuesday, the nonprofit
group FairWarning released
documents it obtained showing
the federal government has been
sitting on a study of the safety
effects of digital billboards since
December 2010. These elec-
tronic signs allow advertisers to
display their wares without the
need to dispatch a team to paste
up new material every time the
message changes. Multiple com-
panies can advertise throughout
the day, at a far lower cost, with
digital signs that rotate through
the ads. Therein lies the prob-
lem.
Anti-capitalist groups have
seized on the way one message
shifts to another after a delay of
around 10 seconds, claiming this
is something that would create
a massive distraction for drivers.
They've been anticipating the
release of a Federal Highway
Administration (FHWA) study
that began looking for a link
between such signs and-acci,
dents since 2007. Even before
any results have been published,
some local officials have pro-
posed sign-code ordinances that '
would ban private use of this new
technology.
The sign industry believes
FHWA is sitting on this study
because it failed to reach the con-
clusion that was expected.
Bringing in these customers
is precisely what drives busi-
ness, jobs and'the economy. N
Considering the official unem- -
ployment rate is 8.3 percent and
our economy is stuck in neutral;
the Obama administration ought
to stop playing games with attrac-
tive, commerce-generating bill-
boards.
Washington Times

Lake. City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of.
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double.
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.


BY MAIL: Letters; P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


A mountain adventure


I sit back into the harness,
and lean back over the
edge of the cliff. Taking a
couple of steps backward,
I'm hanging by the rope
and standing against the side of
the cliff. I feel a growing fear,
dizziness, and a numbing weak-
ness. I realize the only thing
between my life and a fall to
my death is the climbing rope.
It runs through a carabiner, a
little metal loop, attached to a
harness seat, made of a couple
of straps at my waist.
My instinct, my fear, tells
me to grab the rope and hold
on with both hands, to support
my weight. But because of
my training before the climb, I
remember that you can hold up
your weight for only seconds,
not a whole minute. After a
minute, exhaustion and fatigue
set in, and you can't hold on
any longer. You will die.
How ironic: The only way to
survive is to let go. You've got
to trust your equipment. Trust
the braking action you get from
the friction from the rope slip-
ping through the little metal
loop. You brake by letting the
rope slowly slip through your
fingers, and play through the
carabiner. It depends on your
body weight to keep it tight.


Robeit Denny
Bob.Denny8@gmail.com

The vital mountaineering
principle: To survive, you
must let your knowledge, your
common sense, and your con-
fidence, override your fear..
Otherwise, you will die. You
could be on the TV program,
"1,000 Ways to Die."
The psychological principle:
Feeling emotions is natural.
Fear alerts us, and protects us.
Like other negative emotions, it
warns us of dangers or threats,,
and prepares us for an emo-
tional response. Our endocrine
system goes into high gear,
and gets us ready to "fight or
flight"
But there's also a lesson
here for the way we live our.
daily lives. We can choose
how we want to respond to
the threat Rather than being.
controlled by an emotional,
automatic response, we can
use our knowledge, sense of


reason, common sense, and
confidence, to choose an appro-
priate response. Like in the sit-
uation above, it could save our
lives. When we get angry with
someone, we can pick a better
response than fighting, argu-
ing, or saying hurtful words
may never be forgotten. When
we're in any desperate situa-
-tion, we can choose to think
before we act. Take the time to
recognize a powerful negative
emotion you can get from a
dangerous or threatening situ-
ation, and use the opportunity
to respond in a way you'll be
proud of later.
Hopefully, you won't have
to learn this lesson from a life-
threatening incident, and you
can learn from mine. Life offers
us some wonderful lessons,
usually hidden as dangers or
tragedies. Recognize and take
advantage of the opportunities
you can find in life's challenges.
Have you had important life
experiences that you leaned
from? Email me about it
Bob Denny has counseled trou-
bled youth and families in Florida
fir 15 years, and teaches psychol-
ogy at Florida Gateway College.
Your comments and ideas are
appreciated at Bob.Denny@gmail.
com.


Make black male collegians


the rule, not exception


n 2007, then-presidential
candidate Barack Obama
told supporters at a rally
in Harlem that he did not
"want to wake up four
years from now and discover that
we still have more young black
men in prison than in college."
Obama was unintentionally
reinforcing an enduring nega-
tive stereotype: Black males as
a group are missing in higher
education and failing to gradu-
ate because of the pathologies
in black culture. And make no
mistake, cultural and racial ste-
reotypes, whether true or false
or incomplete, assume stub-
born lives of their own.
Black males are branded
before ever attempting to enroll
in a school. Nothing good is in
this. I felt the personal sting of
this stereotype in 1963, when I
first went to college. Because
I am dark-skinned and came
from a migrant farming family
in Florida, I automatically was
placed in remedial English -
without.being tested. I had been
labeled on sight as one doomed
to fail. I never bought into the
stereotype, never for a moment
thinking I would fail. After two
weeks, my English professor
agreed and transferred me to a
regular English class.
I was sustained by four car-
ing professors, a handful of
overachieving classmates, a
work-study job in our campus


Bill Maxwell
maxwell@sptimes.com


library, my obsession to study
and support from my mother and
grandparents. Although I gradu-
ated in four years as'summa cum
laude and won a fellowship to the
University of Chicago, no one
ever asked me how I did it But
a lot of people predicted that I
would fail
During my more than 20 years
as a college professor, I have
taught many black men who
beat the odds, who graduate and
lead productive lives. How do
they overcome the stereotype? I
currently have a black student,
Shaquille Malik, in my writing
class at St. Petersburg College,
where I am an adjunct professor.
Malik is a 40-year-old ex-convict
who is beating the odds. He is
one of my best students. He sits
up front, participates in discus-
sions, volunteers to read his
essays aloud and eagerly accepts
constructive criticism.L
Having Malik as a student
prompted me to read a new report
by Shaun R Harper, associate pro-
fessor and director of the Center


for the Study of Race and Equity
in Education at the University
of Pennsylvania, focused on 219
black male students who have
succeeded. The professor studied
students at 42 colleges and univer-
sities in 20 states.
Harper wanted to know what
distinguishes these achievers. He
found a mix of external factors
that seemed to give the students a
sense that they not only could but
must attend college. Among those
factors: committed parents who
expected a lot from them; at least
one teacher in K-12 who wanted
them to succeed academically-,
and money to pay for college.
Another significant factor was
a transition that included high
expectations from administrators
and faculty and from successful
black male juniors and seniors on
campus who motivated them.
Although the report is com-
plex, Harper has a simple and
reachable goal. He wants college
and university leaders to commit
themselves to finding black men
on their campuses like those in
the report and learn how they
achieved. Harper wants black
male student success to become
institutionalized. He wants to
erase the ugly stereotype of fail-
ure that hurts black males and
society at large.

* Bill Maxwell is a columnist
and editorial writer for the
St. Petersburg Times.


4A


ANOTHER
VIEW



In denial

over the

bailout of

automakers

Michigan are more
polite and restrained
than those in New
York City.
In 1975, when President
Gerald Ford ordained that
there would be no federal assis-
tance to save the Big Apple
from bankruptcy, a local tabloid
headlined, "FORD TO CITY:
DROP DEAD."
In essence, GOP presidential
candidates Mitt Romney and
Rick Santorum say they would
have followed Ford's example
back in 2008 and 2009, when
GM and Chrysler were heading
toward bankruptcy and likely to
take the Motor City with them.
Indeed, Romney wrote a
2008 opinion piece titled, "Let
Detroit Go Bankrupt" The
actual article, in The New York
Times, was somewhat more
nuanced than the headline.
Despite Romney's plea,
Uncle Sam intervened with a
bailout and GM and Chrysler
are alive and profitable, GM at
record levels.
The Republican candidates
like to point to the bailouts as
evidence of President Barack
Obama's "socialism," but the
idea.was President George W.
Bush's, and a good one it was.
Michael Gerson, Bush's chief
Sspeechwriter and senior policy
adviser for five years and now
a Washington Post columnist,
wrote this week, "No president
Republican or Democrat
would have allowed the eco-
nomic collapse of the Upper
Middle West in the midst of a
national economic panic."
Apparently a President
Santorum or a President
Romney would.
The Bush administration
provided billions in bridge
loans that bought enough time
to enable the two companies
to restructure and enter a
managed bankruptcy. Had the
companies immediately gone
belly-up and that was the only
immediate alternative they
would have been broken up
and liquidated to satisfy credi-
tors.
It is hard to imagine any cir-
cumstance in which they would
have emerged "alive and equal-
ly as well, or better off, than
they are now," as Santorum
says, without massive govern-
ment intervention.
But Santorum, who seems
untroubled by doubts or sec-
ond thoughts, told the Detroit
Economic Club: "My feeling
was that the government
should not be involved in bail-
outs, period."
As in any bankruptcy, there
was a certain unfairness. The
workers came out OK-at least
most of the remaining workers
still had jobs; the bondholders
got hammered.
Romney, who you would
think would know better, called
it "crony capitalism on a grand
scale," an odd position to take for
a former venture capitalist and
manager of a private equity firm.
But then all the policy '
choices facing political can-
didates are easy ones. If only
presidential choices were all so
clear-cut
The two auto companies
have paid back most of the $80
billion bailout. Even if the gov-
ernment takes a small loss on
its investment, that would still
be a pittance compared to the
economic havoc of letting the
two companies go under.
The two leading GOP candi-
dates in the Michigan primary
should man up and admit that


the bailouts worked, and it
wouldn't hurt to give a little
tip of the hat to our forgotten
Republican president, George
W. Bush.

M Scripps Howard News Service


I -










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2012 5A


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* Submit Community Calendar
announcements by mail or drop off at
the Reporter office located at 180 E.
Duval St., via fax to (386) 752-9400 or
email lhampson@lakecityreporter.com


Feb. 23


Feb. 24


Money Matters
Want to manage your
money better? The UF/
IFAS Columbia County
Extension Office is offer-
ing a series of four classes
on finances. Classes
include money manage-
ment, credit, FISCO Score
and investment on Feb.
16th, 23rd and March 1st
and 8th from 5:30-6:30 at
the Extension office, 164
SW Mary Ethel Lane,
at the Columbia County
Fairgrounds. Cost is $2 per
class or $5 for the series.
Spaces are limited and reg-
istration date is by Feb. 10.
Please call Jenny Jump at
(386) 752-5384 to register
or for more info.
Gospel Concert
The Kingdom Heirs,
a Southern Gospel male
quartet, will perform
Thursday, Feb. 23 at
6:30 p.m. at' Westside
Baptist Church, 10000
West Newberry Road in
Gainesville. A $12 donation
per person will be request-
ed at the door and the
concert will benefit mis-
sionary work in Nicaragua.
For information call (386)
496-3629.
Landlord meeting
Rental owners and
managers are welcome to
attend a landlord meet-
ing Thursday, Feb. 23
at 6 p.m. in the Shands
LakeShore Medical
Center conference room.
Attorneys WIlliam Haley
and Matt Mitchell, who
heads the real property
section of his law firm,
will speak on evictions,
leases, deposits and land-
lord responsibility. For
information call 755-0110.


FFA benefit auction
The Fort White and
Columbia FFA chapters
will be holding their 2nd
Annual Benefit auction'
on Friday, Feb. 24 at 6:30
p.m. in the Columbia High
School cafeteria. The pro-
ceeds from this auction


will help over 150 FFA
members further their
education in Agriscience
and attend various FFA
contest and leadership
events throughout the
year. Everyone is invited to
attend.
Art Exhibit
, The Art League of North
Florida invites the commu-
nity to the 7th
Annual Spring Members
Art Exhibit at the Levy


Performing Arts Center,
Florida Gateway College.
The exhibit opens with a
reception on
Feb. 24 at 5 p.m. There
will be refreshments,
award presentation, and
art from area artists
in several mediums. The
exhibit is on display from
Feb. 24 through March 22.
Artists that are not mem-


bers are invited to join the
Art League and be eligible
for judging in this show.
'Additional information
contact Jim Whiteside at
housesnoops2005@hotmail.
com.
Fish dinner
A fish dinner will be
available at Our Redeemer
Lutheran Church, 5056 SW
State Road 47, Feb. 24" and
every Friday starting at 3
p.m.


Columbia Top Talent
The Columbia Top
Talent show for Fort White
High School will be Friday,
Feb. 24 at 7 p.m. at the
school. Come out and enjoy
some wonderful singing
from these young adults.
Local landscape event
Lowe's Home


Improvement, 3463 NW
Bascom Norris Drive in
Lake City, will host a local
landscape event from noon
to 2 p.m on Feb. 24. There
will be vendors, samples,
and information for com-
mercial and home garden-
ers. Open to the public.

Feb. 25

Police Ball
The Lake City Police
Department's 19th annual


Police Ball Charity Gala to
benefit Haven Hospice will
be Saturday, Feb. 25 from 7
to 11 p.m. Join us for good
food, music and fellow-
ship. The attire is formal.
Individual tickets are $50.
Reserved tables and spon-
sorships are available. Call
719-5742 for information.
Community Concerts
The UNF Chamber
Singers perform 3 p.m.
Feb. 25 at the Levy
Performing Arts Center.
This elite singing ensem-
ble from the University of
North Florida performs
world music, vocal jazz,
and other choral gems.
Ticket and membership
information is available at
www. communityconcerts.
.info.
Banquet
'The 7th Annual
Fundraising Banquet will
be held on Saturday, Feb.
25 at the Great Lake City
Community Development
Corporation. This is a
"Black Tie Affair". Hope to
see you there.
Tickets are $30. For
tickets and information
contact CDC 386-752-9785,
Betty Powell 386-755-7377,
David Turner 386-697-4752,
or Marlette Robinson 386-
288-1856.
Race Day
Gulf Coast Financial
Services presents
First Annual Catherine
Kuykendall Race Da~y 5K
to benefit the Pancreatic
Cancer Action Network
on Saturday, Feb. 25 at
Rountree Moore Toyota,
1232 US Highway 90 West
Race starts at 8:15. Register
online active.com.
Zumbathon
There will be a
Zumbathon on Feb. 25


from 9 to 10:30 a.m. at the
Skating Palace. All pro-
ceeds from the $10 dona-
tion will help C02 Student
Ministries' teens go to
Summer Missions Camp!
Come GLOW so they can
GO! Wear fluorescent,
white or anything that
will glow in black light.
Contact Sarah Sandlin for
more info: lakecityzum-
ba@gmail.com or 386-758-
0009.

Community development
banquet
The Greater Lake City
Community Development
Corp. will host the 7th
Annual Fundraising
Banquet Saturday, Feb. 25
at 6 p.m. a the Columbia
County Fairgrounds
exhibition hall, 438
SW Branford Highway.
Tickets are $30 and
Allison Megrath of Plum
Creek will be the keynote
speaker. For information
call (386) 752-9785.

Feb. 26

Race Day Fair
Catherine Kuykendall
Race Day Fair. Sunday,
February 26, 1:00 p.m.
to 5:30 p.m. at Rountree
Moore Toyota. Watch the
Daytona 500 inside the
Toyota showroom! Enter
the Parkview Baptist Pie-
Cake Contest to try for
the' $100 prize! Enter the
Christ Central ROC Hot
Dog Eating Contest! See
the.race cars and other
tricked-out vehicles! Cheer
the kids entered into the
BoxCar Car Show (elemen-
tary age kids pick up boxes'
for decoration at Lowe's).
The school with the most
participation in the BoxCar
Car Show wins $100 for
their Teachers' Supply
Closet!


OBITUARIES


J. W. Baker
J.W. Baker on Tuesday, Febru-
ary 21, 2012, God made a call to
J.W. Baker to come and'join him
in heaven. As
J.W. so willingly
answered God's
call, we are left .
to mourn the loss *"
of a great man,
giving father, and a good friend.
In 1938, while our nation was
-in turmoil and on the brink of
war, J.W. boldly stepped into
the shoes of man at the tender
age of 17 and enlisted in the
U.S. Army/Air Corp. Without
hesitation, he proudly served
his country as a ground soldier
during World War II. Shortly
thereafter in 1950, J.W. gra-
ciously accepted the call to duty
to serve in the Korean War. It
was at this time; J.W. sustained a
grave injury and was Honorably
Discharged from his duties as a
Tech. Sergeant. In his commu-
nity, throughout his 42 years of
service jin veterinarian medicine
at Witt Animal Clinic, J.W. was
highly sought after to care for
the pets of countless of families.
He was the savior for the pets he
treated and for that those families
were eternally gratefully for his
time and dedication to his work.
J.W. was an active'member of
the American Legion Post 322.
There he would join in camara-
derie and fellowship with other
veterans and the community.
J.W. was preceded in death by
his wife, Clara Virginia Baker;
his daughters, Elaine Dunham
and' Virginia Ann Scott; his son,
Larry 'Bubba' Brooklyn; his
mother, Melissa 'Missy' Gan-
dy; his father Julius Baker; and
his brother Larry 'LC' Baker.
He leaves in mourning his chil-
dren: Manatee (Sandy) Baker,
Jennings, FL; Donell Staten,
Gainesville, FL; Janet Staten,
Lake City, FL; Freddie 'Terry'
Staten, Lake City, FL; Lesia
Michelle Clark, Lake City, FL;
Timothy Baker, Lake City, FL;
Melissa Ann Brown, Boynton
Beach, FL; John Wesley Baker,
Lake City, FL; Melissa 'Missy'
Baker, Jacksonville, FL; and,
Latonia Baker, Jacksonville,
FL; a loving sister, Queen Es-
ter Daniels, Jennings, FL; 18
grandchildren: and, two de-
voted granddaughters, Kenesha
McGuire and Mikayla Jones; 5
nephews Willie Paul, Frank,
Phillip, Kenneth, and JD Dan-
iels; 5 nieces Joann Collins,
Juanita Home, Queen 'Penny'
Daniels, and Ledia Jackson, and
the niece closest to his heart,
Betty Jo Cato; those he loved as
if they were his own: Sheila Riv-
ers, Patricia Cray, Stephen Witt,
Sherri Witt-Cason, Libby Witt,
and Danny Witt; friend and co-
worker, Dr. Paul Witt; a person


that loved and honored him, Sen-
etta Johnson, she called him her
granddaddy; and a host of other
sorrowing relatives arid friends.
The home going service will
be February 25, 2012 at 11:00
am at New Bethel Missionary
Baptist Church, 550 NE Martin
Luther King St., Lake City, FL
32055. The wake will be held
on Friday, March 24 from 5-7pm
at New Bethel M.B. Church.
Arrangements entrusted to
COMBS FUNERAL HOME,
292 NE Wasliington Street.
Lake City, FL. (386) 752-4366.
Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D.
"The Caring Professionals".

William Perace Brant
William Perace Brant, age 51
died February 15, 2012 termi-
nating a sudden illness. Born in
Jacksonville, FL he was the son
of the late James Brant, Sr. &
mother Thelma Small Brant. Sur-
vivors include his wife, Karen
Brant, Children, Jamie Brant &
Kentaree Brant; brothers, Albert
Brant, Biship James Brant Jr.,
Steven Brant & Michael Brant;
sisters, Cheryl Smith, Rosa M.
Sanders & Mary Hogg; mother
Thelma Brant; one grandson,
Christian Brant; one brother-
in-law; five sisters-in-law; a
host of nieces, nephews, cous-
ins other relatives and friends.
Funeral services for William
Perace Brant, will be Sat. Feb.
25, 2012 11:00 a.m. at.Zarepath
Tabernacle Church; 1028 E. 10th
Street; Jacksonville, FL. Bishop
James Brant, Jr. Pastor; Bishop
Gentle Groover, Eulogy. Inter-
.ment will follow at Gethsemany
Memorial Garden Cemetery,
800 Hammond Blvd. Jackson-
ville, FL. The family will receive
friends at Zarepath Tabernacle
Church on Friday, Feb. 24, 2012
from 6:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m.
Arrangements entrusted to
COOPER FUNERAL HOME,
251 N.E. Washington Street, Lake
City, FL. Willis 0. Cooper, L.F.D.

Hilmer Jean Dicks
Mrs. Hilmer Jean Dicks, 74,
resident of Lake City, Fl and
daughter of the late Edward
and Neta Smith Martin, died at
her home early Tuesday, Feb.
21, 2012 after an extended ill-
ness. She was preceded in death
by her husband of fifty-one
years, Clifford George Dicks.
She was a native of Colum-
bia County, F1 and had resided
here her entire life. She was a
school bus driver for the Co-
lumbia County School System
for 34 years until her retire-
ment. She enjoyed Camping,
Fishing, Gospel Music and
was devoted to her family.


Survivors; One son, Alan Dicks
(Kim) of Lake City, FL; two
daughters, Cynthia Graves
(Jack), and Sharon Timmons
(George) both of Lake City, FL.;
Seven grandchildren, Sari Hol-
combe (Kelly) of Lake City, FL,
Alaina Timmons (Bernard) of
Orlando, FL, Kevin Timmons of
Tampa, FL, George Timmons,
Jr., Orlando, FL, A.J Ross, Lake
City, FL, Kaleb Dicks of Lake
City, FL, and Kelsey Dicks of
Lake City, FL. One Great Grand-
son, Bernard McNeal, Jr. of
Lake City, FL. Numerous nieces,
nephews, extended family mem-
bers and friends also survive.
Funeral services will be con-
ducted at 11 A.M. Saturday,
February 25, 2012 at Hopeful
Baptist Church. with Dr. Rod-
ney Baker officiating assisted by
Dr. Ralph Rodriguez. Interment
will follow in Hopeful Cem-
etery. GATEWAY-FOREST
LAWN FUNERAL HOME,
3596 South U.S. Highway 441,
Lake City, FL is in charge 'of
arrangements. Visitation with
the family be held on' Friday,
Feb. 24th at the funeral home
from 5 P.M. until 7 P.M. If you
wish, you'may make donations
in Mrs. Hilmer Dicks honor to
the Suwannee Valley Care Cen-
ter (Haven Hospice) at 6037
U.S. Hwy 90 West,. Lake City,
FL 32055. Please leave words
of encouragement and love at
www.gatewayforestlawn.com
Deacon Burlie Leon
Gaskin
Burlie Leon Gaskin was born
on March 18, 1940 in Quitman
Georgia to the late Mrs. Lizzie
Mae Campbell. He was edu-
cated in the Columbia County
Public School System, where
he graduated from Richardson
High School in 1958. He later
joined Grace Holiness Church
under the leadership of Pastor
Willie James Lucas and was or-
dained as a deacon in December
1987. He was married on Oc-
tober 8, 2009 to Stella Gaskin.
He leaves to cherish his mem-
ory: His wife, Stella Gaskin;
mother-in-law, Margaree Gib-


son; brother, Samuel Stafford;
sons, Leon Gaskin Jr. and Leon-
ard Gaskin;_ daughters, Doro-
thy Donaldson (Ronald) and
Gwendolyn Jones (Kenton);
grandsons, Leon Gakin III and
Anthony 'Bernard Taylor; grand-
daughters, Delishia Williams and
Kentrion Williams; three step-
sons, Milton, Johnnie, and Clif-
ford; sisters-in-law, Linda (Sim-
lette and Henry), Annie Pearl,
Naomi (Rosa and James), and
Priscilla; brothers-in-law, Sid-
ney (Donald and Wanda, Melvin
and Adrian), Kenneth and Leroy.
A special cousin, Freddie Wil-
son, and a host of other sorrow-
ing family members and friends.
A memorial service for Mr. Gas-
kin will be held 11:00 A.M., Sat-
urday, February25,2012 at Grace
Holiness Church, Lake City,.
FL., Rev. Willie J. Lucas, Pastor.
Arrangements entrusted to


COMBS FUNERAL HOME,
292 NE Washington Street.
Lake City, FL. (386) 752-4366.
Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D.
"The Caring Professionals"

Eula Mae Watson
Sheppard
Ms. Eula Mae Watson Sheppard
85, a life long resident of Co-
lumbia County passed on Febru-
ary 15, 2012,
4:00 PM in
the .comfort
of her home.
She is sur-
vived by chil-
dren: Isaiah
Sheppard
(Elnora), Bar- '
bara Harris (Willislt) and Jo-
seph Sheppard (Shirley); a
host of grandchildren, nieces,


nephews, cousins and friends.,
The viewing for Ms., Sheppard .
will be held on Friday, Febru-
ary 24, 2012, from 6-8 PM at her
home church, Jerusalem Mission-
ary Baptist Church in Fort White,
Rev. G. A. Clark, Jr. Pastor.
Funeral services will be held Sat-
urday, February 25, 2012 at 3:00
at Bread of Life Outreach Minis-
tries, Lake City, Isaiah Sheppard
Jr., Pastor and Officiant. Burial
will follow in the Mt. Moriah (Je-
rusalem) Cemetery in Fort White.
Arrangements Entrusted
to A. JEROME BROWN
FUNERAL HOME, 1560 NW
1 stAvenue,HighSprings,Florida.



Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


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6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2012



What Black History means to me


By Bea Coker

The debate con-
tinues in assess-
ing progress
with respect to
the Dream of
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.?
How should progress be ana-
lyzed in America? Should we
look at education, economics
or some other social issue?
I have always found it to be
significant that any progress
relating to Black Americans
is correlated to the Dream of
Dr. King. I find it significant
because his vision of progress
was inclusion of all races, an
appreciation for .diversity in
a way that embraced unity
within America. He didn't
dream for poverty to end, but
for eradication to be a shared
pursuit of America. He didn't
dream for homelessness to
be removed, but for all citi-
zens to see the need of all
Americans. He didn't dream
for education standards to be
increased for blacks, but for
all Americans to share in the
attainment of success. He
didn't dream for the delivery
of forty acres and a mule,
but for communities to grow
together. I personally strug-
gle with his dream.
I struggle because each
year we celebrate the birth-
day of Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr. without an apparent
grasp that his focus was not
for the advancement of a race
of people, but for races of
people to align themselves
with a common brother-
hood. How can the Dream
of Dr. Martin Luther King
be. celebrated by the Black
Community and not be in
vein if it excludes the White
Community? How can we all
not come out and hold hands
together, if not for the one
day, to pay geniune tribute
to his legacy. Sometimes, I
believe that Dr. King would
turn over in his grave to find
the celebration of his legacy
not inclusive of the children
and families he so wanted to
come together.
When all Americans come
out to celebrate unity of our
great nation, and a purpose
that transcinds differences,
will be the day the Dream is
realized. What would that.
look like? Beautiful floats
from churches all across
Columbia County. Older


HISTORICALLY
SPEAKING







Bea Coker


white and black citizens com-
ing out to embrace without
fear, shame or retaliation
the ability to show brotherly
love. I see a cultured devel-
oped from a new tradition
of collard greens with the
cracklin loaf, cream of wheat
on Monday and grits on
Tuesday. Everyone sitting
around laughing about the
excess sugar in the koolaid
made in the empty margarine
container. Oh what a beauti-
ful thing it will be when we
celebrate Dr. King's legacy
with through a diverse cer-
emony and a common goal,
be it to clean up a neighbor-
hood, feed the hungry or fix
a common problem. Either
way, we have work to do
and what better way to began
today by demonstrating the
fundamental principles of
brotherly love. We have
some many historically
significant examples to'
model.
Assessing Progress
The fraternal organization
of Freemasons dates back to
the late 16th century and the
early 17th century.
Surprisingly, through
speculation of secret societ-
ies, and, cult affiliation the
organization was created
under an Order and purpose
to combine individuals of
mixed religion in a common
forum. The requirement for
a belief in a Supreme Being
has always been a require-
-ment; however, members
were historically forbidden
from discussion on politics or
religion and were not placed
in situations requiring justifi-
cation of personal interpreta-
tions of religion or politics.
Masons perform many com-
munity service roles includ-
ing but not limited to (1)
meeting specific community
needs in the provision of
social services, (2) provid-


ing educational programs,
(3) providing networking,
(4) strengthening the fam-
ily unit, (5) providing lead-
ership and guidance in the
development of outstanding
moral character, (6) youth
and adult mentoring pro-
grams, and (7) exhibition of
upstanding character as con-
tributing adults in the com-
munity.
This is significant to black
history because of the
historical plight concern-
ing meeting requirements
for general membership.
Candidates for member-
ship to Freemasons have
always been required to: (1)
be a male, (2) believe in a
supreme being, (3) be at
least 18 years of age, (4)
be of good moral character,
(5) be born free and not in
bondage, and (6) capable
of furnishing references.
. One can only imagine the
level of critical thought that
would be possible in an
environment as described
above, with no debates or
differences over religion and
politics. Black Freemasonry
began when Prince Hall and
fourteen other free black
men returning from mili-
tary duty in the American
Revolution, achieved ini-
tiation into Lodge No. 441,
Irish Constitution, attached
to the 38th Regiment of Foot,
British Army Garrisoned at
Castle William (now Fort
Independence) Boston
Harbor on March 6, 1775.
The Master of the Lodge was
SergeantJohnBattAlongwith
Prince Hall, the other newly
made masons were Cyrlus
Johnson, Bueston Slinger,
Prince Rees, John Canton,
Peter Freeman, Benjamin
Tiler, Duff Ruform, Thomas
Santerson, Prince Rayden,
Cato Speain, Boston Smith,
Peter Best, Forten Howard.
and Richard Titley. In 1784,
the fifteen men obtained a
warrant for Charter from.
the Grand Lodge of England
and became the first pre-
dominately African American
Lodge No. 459. Prince Hall,
is known as the father of
Black Masonry. The origi-
nal Charter No. 459 has long
since been made secure
between heavy plate glass
and is kept in a fire-proof vault
in a downtown Boston bank.
Today, the Prince Hall fra-


Bureau helps stretch


dollars to buy food


Food Check-Out Week
creates an opportunity for
Farm Bureau members to
help consumers use their
grocery dollars wisely as
they manage the continu-
ing effects of the. nation-
al economic recession.
Celebrated this year from
Feb. 19 through February
25, the event uses the
theme of "Stretching
Your Grocery Dollar With
Healthy, Nutritious Food."
Volunteers from the
Columbia County Farm
Brireau plan to deliver a
financial donation to Fort
White Thrift Shop, making
healthy food available to
needy citizens in the com-
munity.
Farmers and ranch-
ers receive 19 cents out
of every dollar spent on
food. Off-farm costs, such
as packaging, wholesal-
ing and retailing, account
for 81 cents. In 1980 the
farm producer received 31
cents of every dollar spent
on food.
According to the U.S.
Department of Agriculture,
higher retail food prices
have primarily resulted
from increasing energy
costs for processing, pack-
aging and transportation.
The agency also reports
that the prices of unpre-
pared fresh fruits and veg-
etables such as carrots,
bananas, tomatoes, broc-
coli, Red Delicious apples
and Iceberg lettuce has
remained stable compared
to dessert and snack foods.


U.S. consumers enjoy a
domestic food supply that
is among the safest, most
abundant and affordable in
the world.
Based on USDA studies,
in 2010 the average house-
hold in the U.S. devoted
less than 7 percent of
its disposable income to
food purchases. Only 3
other countries came in
between 7 to 10 percent.
Households in more than
40 other nations spent
more than 20 percent. In
24 countries the figure was
30 percent or more.
Agricultural producers
take pride in providing
consumers with the high-


est quality, nutritious food
possible. Food safety is
a fundamental goal of all
farmers and ranchers who
produce food products.
Food Check-Out Week
provides an opportunity
for farmers and ranch-
ers to share our nation's
food bounty with citizens
who are in need. Since
the program was initiated
in the mid-1990's, Farm
Bureau members have
donated more than $3 mil-
lion in food and monetary
contributions to Ronald
McDonald Houses and
other worthwhile charities
during Food Check-Out
Week.


3:00 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 25, 2012

The

Chamber

Singers

This elite singing ensemble from the University of North
Florida performs world music, vocal jazz, and other
choral gems. Each singer is chosen by audition
for solo-quality excellence and enthusiasm.
Award-winning director Cara Tasher
has served around the world as chorus master,
guest conductor, clinician, and soprano soloist.

Contact Community Concerts of Lake City, Inc.
for further information (386) 466-8999
www.communityconcerts.info


Freemasonary


Prince Hall


ternity
has over
4,500
lodges
world-
wide,
forming
46 inde-
pendent
jurisdic-
tions
with a
m e m -
bership
of over


300,000
masons.
Sources listed below.
,1. Prince Hall Masonic
Directory, 4th Edition
1992. Conference of Grand
Masters, Prince Hall Masons.
2. Black Square and Compass
- 200 years of Prince Hall
Freemasonry. Page 8. Joseph
A Walkes, Jr. 1979. Macoy
Publishing & Masonic Supply
Co. Richmond, Virginia
While the gender require-
ment remains for member-
ship, female auxiliary organi-
zations are allowed and afford
women opportunities to


demonstrate leadership in
community development In
honor of the national theme
of recognizing women in the
celebration of Black History
Month in 2012, we recog-
nize the accomplishment of
the female auxiliaries of the
Masons. In particular, the
four Florida auxiliaries under
the Grand Lodge include
the Eastern Stars, Heroines
of Jericho, LCOP, and the
Crusaders. The Lake City
Chapter of Heroines -of
Jericho was formed under
the Jacqueline P Strappy
Court No. 130,
.and includes Christian
minded men and women in
a bond of sister and goodwill,
transcending beyond com-
mon thought.
Membership includes
the Most Ancient Matron
Leondra Fleming, her hus-
band James Fleming, Shontez
Strauder, Shaleda Mirra,
Mary Allen, Wanda Ford,
Barbara T. Gipson, LaTavia
Deliford, Chris Mirra,
Earnest Claridy, Al Nelson,
and Trisheka Nelson.


The local chapter focuses
on providing community
based charity programs,
through food programs that
support education, elderly
services, and leadership
development The progress
of such organizations though
controversial to some, stands
to demonstrate the ability
for positive change to occur
in America with meaningful
improvements to the quality
of life in all communities.

Test Your History Knowledge

Local History:
The first black school in
Lake City was formed in 1890,
named Finley High School.
E.T. Holmes of Jacksonville
founded the school, and it
was located in Watertown.
National History Trivia:
Who was the first African
American Supreme court
justice?
Answer:
Thurgood Marshall, (July
2, 1908 January 24, 1993)
,was an American jurist and
the first African American
to serve on the Supreme .
Court of the United States.
Before becoming a judge,
he was a lawyer who was
best remembered for his
high success rate in argu-
ing before the Supreme
Court and for the victo-
. ry in Brown v. Board of
Education. He was nomi-.
nated to 'the court by
President Lyndon Johnson
in 1967.


Lake City Masonic Lodge #27 honors members


Lake City Masonic Lodge #27 held its annual installation of newly-elected officers recently.
Bottom row, from left: R.W. Robert Fowler: Installing Officer, Charles Peeler: Senior
Warden, David Mangrum: Worshipful Master, Doug Peeler: Junior Warden, R.W. Wyatt
Clark: Installing Marshal, James Clayton: Chaplain, Joseph H. Chancy, Dion, Cole: Tyler.
Back row, from left: Roger Ward: Treasurer, Richard Tompkins: Senior Deacon, Jack King:
Marshal, Bill Causey: Junior Deacon, Bob Breyer: Installing Chaplain.


J. Robert Weaver is pre-.
sented a gold pin and
certificate for 65 years of
service by W.M. David
Mangrum. Mr. Weaver :
entered the Lake City
Lodge in January 1946
when he was 21 years
old, and has been a
faithful member since.
He has been awarded
five service pins.


on their
February 16, 2012
ribbon cutting
ceremony located
at
404 NW Hall of
Fame Drive


|?|p.3ah i
0wer 0Brian& Me-inda* an *









LAKE CITY REPORTER


HEALTH


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2012


SDoctors telling

more adults: Get

out and exercise


This undated image provided by the Fried Lab/UCLA shows. a brain MRI with an arrow showing where
researchers applied deep-brain stimulation during tests on learning. A painless bit of electrical current
applied to the brain helped some people play a video game, and someday it might help Alzheimer's dis-
ease patients. remember what they've learned, a small study suggests.



Study: Electric boost helps


the brain to learn better


Research still
in early stages.

BY MALCOLM RITrER
Associated Press
NEW YORK Pe(
learned better when a
part of their brains got
zaps of electricity, a f
ing that may someday I
Alzheimer's patients k
more of their memories
In a small but tantali
study, participants pla
a video game in wl
they learned the locat
of stores in a virtual
They recalled
the locations
better if they
learned them
while receiv- ,
ing a painless
boost from tiny
electrodes bur-
ied deep inside
their-brains.
In the future,
that strategy
might help curb mem
loss for people in the e
stages of Alzheimer's
ease, suggested Dr. Itz
Fried, a neurosurgeon
the University of Califor
Los Angeles. But he
tioned that the results v
preliminary.
Using implanted e


trodes to treat brain disease tion
is hardly new. Such "deep- ing
brain stimulation" has been coi
used for about a decade he
for Parkinson's disease B
'and some other disorders. tio:
op Researchers are also test- wa
ople ing it for depression. es.
key Some 80,000 or more
fnd- people worldwide have had late
pIn- stimulation units implanted, ful
help mostly for Parkinson's. sai
.eep Fried and colleagues ad(
s. reported the new work in nee
zmg Thursday's issue of the
ayed New England Journal of bra
which Medicine. It was financed un]
ions by the federal government cle
city.


Some 80,000 or more
people worldwide have
had stimulation units
implanted, mostly for
Parkinson's.


and the Dana Foundation. the
aory I
early "I think it's a terrific he]
dis- paper," said Dr. Andres sot
;hak Lozano, a professor of neu- Fri
n at rosurgery at the University ad&
rnia, of Toronto, who didn't par- late
cau- ticipate in the work but is tha
'vere studying the approach in pat
Alzheimer's patients. The sting
.lec- new work shows stimula- T


n can modify the work-
;s of brain circuits that
ntrol memory in people,
said.
But like Fried, he cau-
ned that the research
s still in the early stag-

"Whether it will trans-
e into something use-
, we do not know," he
d, noting that years of
ditional study would be
eded,
"You don't want to do
ain surgery on people
less you have a pretty
ar idea you're going
to, make them
better," Lozano
said. Deep-
brain electrodes
are implanted
through holes
drilled in the
skull.
The study par-
ticipants were
seven epilepsy
patients who had
electrodes implanted to
lp surgeons identify the
urce of their seizures.
ed and colleagues took
vantage of that to stimu-
e a part, of the brain
at's key to learning. The
tients could not feel the
emulation,
The patients played the


video game on a laptop
at their beds. Using a joy-
stick, they took the role of
taxi drivers in a small town
consisting of four blocks
by four blocks. They
searched for passengers
and dropped them off at
any of six stores they were
asked to find. The electri-
cal stimulation was turned
on while they learned the
locations of some stores,
but not others.
Testing showed that the
stimulation made a differ-
ence. When given a store
to find, the patients took a
more direct route to it, and
got there faster, if they
had learned its location
during a time of stimu-
lation. When research-
ers looked at how much
extra wandering they did
beyond the shortest pos-
sible path, they found that
stimulation reduced this
excess by an average of 64
percent.
The patients were test-
ed only a few minutes
after learning the store
locations, so it's not yet
clear how long the effect
can last, Fried said.
Researchers will also have
to see if stimulation helps
for other kinds of knowl-
edge, he said.


Increases cited
in patients age
85 and older.
BY MIKE STOBBE
Associated Press
ATLANTA- More and
more U.S. adults are being
told by their doctor to get
out and exercise, accord-
ing to government survey
released Thursday.
Nearly 33 percent of
adults who saw a doctor
in the previous year said
they were told to exer-
cise. That was tip from
about 23 percent in 2000,
the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention
reported.
The report also found
more women got. that
advice than men. And
among people, with
chronic health problems,
diabetics, were the most
likely to get the advice
and cancer patients were
least likely. .
The most dramatic -
and surprising increas-
es were reported in


patients age 85 and older.
In 2000, about 15 percent
were told by doctors to
exercise. By 2010, almost
30 percent were getting
such a recommendation.
"It's very encouraging
that doctors feel people
at that age still have time
to live and can make their
health better," said Pat
Barnes, a CDC health
statistician who was lead
author of the report.
The report was based
on a survey of nearly
22,000 adults in 2010. The
CDC then compared the
results to similar surveys
done in 2000 and 2005.
The doctors' advice
may be getting through
to at least some people.
Other CDC data has
found that about 51 per-
cent of Americans said
they exercise regularly in
.2009, up from about 46
percent in 2001.
However, more than
one third of U.S. adults
are obese, a statistic that's
.held steady for nearly a
decade.


Recent spike in HIV

cases involved military
Associated Press of this year.
ANCHORAGE, Alaska The state Department of
- A recent -spike in Health and Social Services
HIV infections has been says from 2007 through
linked to military men in 2010, the number of HIV
Fairbanks. cases reported in the
The Anchorage Daily Fairbanks area was fairly
.News (http://bit.ly/ybxrzi stable.
) says newly-released pub- However, that changed
lic health data .shows that this last year. Health offi-
the increase is linked to cials say of the nine people
military men finding sex infected last year, eight
partners online, were men who had sex
Data shows that the out- with other. men. Seven
break involves nine cases were either in the Army
of HIV infection from Jan. in Fairbanks or had sexual
1, of last year to Jan. 31 partners in the military.


tI A ( I; 1 1 R f o North, Forida
.. General Eye Care & Surgery
. .. .. ..". .: '


*,,> +.-S


Bee Gee Robin Gibb says his health has improved


Associated Press
LONDON Bee Gee
star .Robin Gibb says
he is making a. strong
recovery and putting on
weight 'after suffering-
from a serious illness.
He told BBC radio
on Friday that he feels
better than he has


in a decade.
The 62-year-old had
suffered from severe
weight loss in recent
months and has been
hospitalized for stomach
and colon problems that
forced him to curtail pub-
lic appearances.
He has not specified


the exact nature of his
illness but told the BBC
he had a growth on. his
colon that was removed.
The singer says his doc-
tors have been amazed
by his recovery.'
Gibb and his brothers
scored many top hits dur-
ing the disco era.'


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8A LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2012


Labyrinths designed to encourage reflection


Paths become
popular addition
to gardens, more.

BY MELISSA KOSSLER
DUTTON
Associated Press
When Carol Maurer has
a lot on her plate, she finds
it useful to visit the laby-
rinth made of river rocks at
the Delaware Art Musu nm,.
in Wilmington.
"It quiets my mind."
said Maurer, who lives in
Hockessin, Del. "It sets the
path for me so I can spiral
inward."
Labyrinths, which have
been constructed for thou-
sands of years,
have become a
popular addition
to hospitals, gar-
dens and public
institutions.
With a sin-
gle path in and
out, labyrinths
are designed to
encourage reflec-
tion. They differ
from mazes, which
are designed
as puzzles.
Labyrinths have
been associated
with religions and
cultures through-
out the world.
The number of labyrinths
in the United States has
been steadily increasing for
about 15 years, said Robert
Ferre, a labyrinth builder
who founded
Labyrinth
Enterprises.
"Nowadays 'As
they're so to re
widespread, rel
it's more about
how to best uti- prepal
lize them than You g
what they are," be
he said from
San Antonio,
Texas.
When he
started the
business in
1995, church-
es were his primary cus-
tomers. Labyrinths were.
an important feature of
European Roman Catholic
churches in the Middle
Ages; walking one. was a
devotional activity and rep-
resented a spiritual jour-
ney. -
The most famous remain-
ing labyrinth from that peri-
od is at Chartres Cathedral,
near Paris. Many newer
labyrinths are based on the
Chartres pattern.
They can be constructed
of turf or stone or painted
on pavement.
Today, labyrinths are
widely used in secular spac-
es too, said Maurer, who
serves on the board of The
Labyrinth Society, an orga-
nization dedicated to using
and promoting the paths.
She helped get the laby-
rinth built near the sculp-
ture garden at the Delaware
Art Museum.
"People are looking for
ways to travel inward," she
said. "They're trying to find
a deeper connection with
themselves that may be
spiritual but not necessarily
religious."
It's even possible for hom-
eowners to build labyrinths
themselves in their yard,
with rock, gravel or mulch,
Ferre said. Plans are avail-
able online or through his
company.
Patricia Cadle, the oncol-
ogy chaplain at N.C. Cancer
Hospital in Chapel Hill,
N.C., encourages patients,
family members and
hospital employees to


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this 2005 photo released by Allegany College of Maryland, people
walk a labyrinth at the Allegany College of Maryland in Cumberland ,
Md Labyrinths, which have been constructed for thousands of years,
have become a popular addition to hospitals, gardens and public nsti-
tutions. Designed to have a single path in and out, labyrinths create
opportunities for reflection.


walk a labyrinth.
The medical facility dedi-.
cated an outdoor labyrinth
in 2009, and just completed
an indoor one this month
(February).
"It's a great tool for


nect the mind, the body and
the spirit I think we can
use that when we're dealing
with disease."
Allegany College of
Maryland in Cumberland
built a labyrinth in 2005


you walk, you are able
lease what you need to
ease. You go back out
red to reenter the world.
get a sense of, what do I
believe and who am I.'

JoAnn Shade, corps officer
for the Salvation Army facility.


meditation and relaxation," with the pr
Cadle said. "Many c
"Labyrinths can help con- have inco


as part of its
integrative
health pro-
gram, which
focuses
on holistic
approaches
to healing.
The walk-
ing path
has become
widely used
on campus,
said Cherie
Snyder, a
professor
and director
program.
if the faculty here
Drporated it into


their teaching," she said.
The community, initially
unsure of the labyrinth,
also has put it to good use,
she said.
"A lot of times people


think it's a religious cult,"
she said. But once area res-
idents understood the laby-
rinth's history, they began
to visit. Cancer support
groups, church groups and


organizations that serve the
developmentally disabled
have all used the labyrinth,
Snyder said.
"It's just been a wonder-
ful tool to introduce people
to walking meditation, walk-
ing prayer and communing
with nature," she said.
Many users feel a lab-
yrinth inspires creativ-
ity, said Katja Marquart, a
member of The Labyrinth
Society and an associate
professor of interior archi-
tecture at the University of
Wisconsin-Stevens Point.
She has encouraged gradu-
ate students to walk a laby-
rinth to help them sort out
their work.
"They always came back
with really great insights,"
she said.
And walking a labyrinth
does not have to be a solo
endeavor, saidAmy Morgan,
a homeless services coor-
dinator for The Salvation
Army's Ray and Joan Kroc
Corps Community Center
in Ashland, Ohio, which has
a labyrinth on its grounds.
To build a sense of commu-
nity, Morgan walks through
it with a women's group she
leads.
"As you walk, you are
able to release what you
need to release. You go
back out prepared to reen-
ter the world," said JoAnn
Shade, corps officer for
the Salvation Army facility.
"You get a sense of, what do
I believe and who am I."


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Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@Jakecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Thursday, February 23, 2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS
GOLF
Branford Rotary
tourney March 3
The Branford Rotary
Club's annual golf
tournament is March 3
at Quail Heights Country
Club, with an 8 a.m.
shotgun start. Format is
three-person scramble
and entry fee of $50
includes golf,, lunch and
a prize. Team prizes
and door prizes will be
awarded. There will be
a hole-in-one contest on
Creeks No. 8
sponsored by Barnes
Pine Straw. A winner
would receive $10,000
towards an ATV from
McDuffie Marine &
Sporting Goods.
For details, call John
Lacquey at 935-1705.
SEMI-PRO FOOTBALL
Falcons at home
on Saturday
The Lake City Falcons
will host the Tampa
Bay Bengals at 5 p.m.
Saturday at Memorial
Stadium. Admission is $6
for adults and $3 for
students with no charge
for children 10 and
under. For details, call
Elaine at 292-3039.
ADULT SOFTBALL
City leagues
registration open
The Lake City .. ,.
Recreation Department'
registration for adult
softball is 8:30 a.m. to
5 p.m." weekdays at
Teen Town Recreation
Center. Leagues are co-
ed church, commercial
and women. Cost is $350
per team. For details, call
Heyward Christie at
754-3607.
LCMS, RMS TRACK
Krispy Kreme
fundraiser set
The track teams
at Lake City Middle
School and Richardson
Middle School have a
Krispy Kreme fundraiser
planned for Friday. Cost
is $7 and orders are
being taken by track ath-
letes at both schools.
For details, call coach
Quinton Jefferson at 755-
8130.
* From staff reports

GAMES

Thursday
Columbia High girls
tennis vs. P.K. Yonge
School, 3:30 p.m.
Fort White High
softball vs. P.K. Yonge
School, 6 p.m.
Columbia High JV
baseball vs. Melody
Christian Academy,
6 p.m.
Fort White High
baseball at Union County
High, 7 p.m. (JV-4)
Friday
Columbia High boys
tennis vs. Lecanto High at
Central Florida College,
3:30 p.m.
Columbia High
softball at Santa Fe High,
7 p.m.
Fort White High
baseball at Interlachen
High, 7 p.m. (JV-4)
Fort White High
softball vs. Williston High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Saturday
Columbia High
baseball vs. Auburndale
High, 1 p.m.
Fort White High track


at Wildcat Invitational in
Ocala, TBA


SJunior's on


the rise at


Daytona


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Dale Earnhardt Jr. talks during an interview at NASCAR media day at Daytona International
Speedway Thursday in Daytona Beach.


Tigers


Columbia knocks
off Femandina
Beach Tuesday.
By BRANDON FINLEY
* bineyvtlakecjreporter corn
Columbia High rallied
from a 3-2 deficit to beat
Fernandina Beach High,
4-3, on the road Tuesday.
Alan Espenship picked
up the win in 32A inning sal-
lowing three hits and one
walk. Espenship gave up
three runs, but they were
unearned.
Brent Stalter pitched 2'A
innings with one hit and one
strikeout. Blaine Courson
picked up his third save in
as many tries by closing out
the game.
Kellan Bailey led the
game off with a home run
on the first pitch and the
STigers added one more in
the first. After a Courson
single, Levi Hollinsworth
doubled to score Courson.
After three from the
Pirates in the first, the Tigers
entered the sixth inning
trailing. An Alex Milton sin-
gle scored Andrew Nettles.
The winning run came in
on a bases-loaded walk to
score Milton.
Columbia is 3-0.


sink


Earnhardt gaining
confidence
entering 2012.
By MARK LONG
Associated Press
DAYTONA BEACH
- Dale Earnhardt Jr. left
Daytona frustrated and furi-
ous last July.
One of his favorite tracks,
the place forever linked
to his family name, had
become a bore.
Junior disliked every
aspect of the newfangled
tandem racing at NASCAR's


superspeedways: the blind
pushing, the feeling of not
being in .total control and
the need for constant com"
munication.
"It was a foolish freakin'
race," he said after a 19th-
place finish.
His outlook has changed
considerablysince. Between
some NASCAR-mandated
changes, results during
testing and 54 wild laps in
the. exhibition Budweiser
Shootout, Earnhardt's con-
cerns have been alleviated.
Now, he might even be
JUNIOR continued on 3B


Pirates


Columbia High's Ryan Thomas looks on as Jayce Barber slides into home plate in a game played last season.


Woods survives


opening round of


World Match Play ....


Tiger has to go
the distance
in first round.
By DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press
MARANA, Arizona
- Tiger Woods had to go
the distance to get to the
second round of the Match
-Play Championship.
Woods took too many
journeys through the des-
ert and was trailing Gonzalo
Fernandez-Castano until he
drove the 15th green for a
birdie to square the match,
then took advantage of the
Spaniard's struggles with
the putter.


It was the fourth time
Woods was taken to the
18th hole in the opening
round of this fickle event.
He next plays Nick Watney,
who had no trouble beat-
ing British Open champion
Darren Clarke.
The top seeds teed off
late, with top-ranked Luke
Donald trailing Ernie Els at
the turn.
Dustin Johnson made
the greatest escape, beat-
ing Jim Furyk in 20 holes.
Ryo Ishikawa also rallied
late to beat Riviera winner
Bill Haas.
Luke Donald became only
the third No. 1 seed to lose
in the opening round of the
Match Play Championship.


Ernie Els built an early
lead and never let go in a
5-and-4 victory over the top-
ranked player in the world.
A year after Donald
never trailed in any of the
six matches he won to cap-
ture the title, he never led
against Els. He joins Tiger
Woods in 2002 and Steve
Stricker in 2010 as the only
top seeds to fail to get out of
the opening round.
Woods barely made it
through at Dove Mountain.
He trailed Gonzalo
Fernandez-Castano by one
hole until winning the 15th
and 16th, then holed an 8-
foot par putt on the 18th
hole to avoid going into
extra holes.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tiger Woods follows an approach shot on the eighth
fairway while playing Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano during the
Match Play Championship golf tournament on Wednesday in
Marana, Ariz.


FILE PHOTO


_ _









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2012


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
10 a.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, practice for Drive4COPD 300, at
Daytona Beach, Fla.
Noon
SPEED NASCAR, Truck Series,
practice for NextEra Energy Resources
250, at Daytona Beach, Fla.
2 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Duel
at Daytona, at Daytona Beach, Fla.
6:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCARTruck Series, final
.practice for NextEra Energy Resources
250, at Daytona Beach, Fla.
GOLF
10:30 a.m.
TGC LPGA, Women's Champions,
first round, at Singapore (same-day tape)
2 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour-WGC, Accenture
Match Play Championship, second round
matches, at Marana,Ariz.
6:30 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Mayakoba Classic,
first round, at Playa del Carmen, Mexico
(same-day tape)
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN Duke at Florida St.
ESPN2 -Alabama at Arkansas
9 p.m.
ESPN Louisville at Cincinnati
ESPN2 -Wisconsin at Iowa
10:30 p.m.
FSN Stanford at Colorado
II p.m.
ESPN2 BYU at Gonzaga
NBA BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
TNT NewYork at Miami
9:30 p.m.
TNT LA Lakers at Oklahoma
City

BASKETBALL

NBA standings

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division ,
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 20 13 .606 -
NewYork 16 17 .485 4
Boston 15 16 .484 4
New Jersey 10 24 .294101/2
Toronto 9 23 .281101/2
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 26 7 .788 -
Orlando 21 12 .636 5
Atlanta 19 13 .5946 1/2
Washington 7 25 .219181/2
Charlotte 4 27 .129 21
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago..- --.-- -26. 8- 6765--
Indiana 20 12 .625 5
Cleveland 13 17 .433 If
Milwaukee 13 19 .406 12
Detroit II 23 .324 15
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 23 10 .697 -
Dallas 21 12 .636 2
Houston 19 14 .576 4
Memphis 19 15 .5594 1/2
New Orleans 7 25 .219151/2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 25 7 .781 -
Denver 18 15 .5457 1/2
Portland 18 16 .529 8
Minnesota 16 17 .4859 1/2.
Utah 15 16 .4849 1/2
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 19, II .633 -
L.A. Lakers 19 13 .594 I
Phoenix 14 19 .4246 1/2
Golden State 12 17 .4146 1/2
Sacramento 10 22 .313 10

Tuesday's Games
Cleveland 101, Detroit 100
Indiana 117, New Orleans 108, OT
Miami 120, Sacramento 108
Memphis 89, Philadelphia 76
Portland 137, San Antonio 97
Wednesday's Games
Boston at Oklahoma City (n)
Indiana at Charlotte (n)
New Orleans at Cleveland (n)
Detroit at Toronto (n)
Sacramento atWashington (n)
Orlando at New Jersey (n)
Atlanta at NewYork (n)
Milwaukee at Chicago (n)
Philadelphia at Houston (n)
Utah at Minnesota (n)
Golden State at Phoenix (n)
LA. Lakers at Dallas (n)
Denver at LA. Clippers (n)
Today's Games
NewYork at Miami, 7 p.m.
Orlando atAtlanta, 7:30 p.m..
San Antonio at Denver, 9 p.m.
LA. Lakers at Oklahoma City, 9:30
p.m.

APTop 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. 5 Duke at No. IS Florida
State, 7 p.m.
No. 14 Murray State at Tennessee
State, 8:30 p.m.
No. 16Wisconsin at Iowa,9 p.m.
No. 17 Louisville at Cincinnati, 9 p.m.
Friday's Game
No, 10 Marquette at West Virginia,
9 p.m.
Saturday's Games
No. I Kentucky vs.Vanderblit, Noon
No. 2 Syracuse at UConn, 9 p.m.
No. 3 Missouri at No. 4 Kansas,
4 p.m.


No. 5 Duke vs.Virginla Tech, Noon
No. 6 Michigan State vs. Nebraska,
8 p.m.
No. 7 North Carolina at No, 25
Virginia, 4 p.m.
No. 9 Georgetown vs. Villanova,
2 p.m.
No. I I Michigan vs. Purdue, 6 p.m.
No. 12 Florida at Georgia, 4 p.m.
No. 13 Baylor vs.,Oklahoma, 1:45
p.m.
No. 14 Murray State at Tennessee
Tech, 8:30 p.m.
No. 18 New Mexico atTCU, 7 p.m,


No. 19 Wichita State vs. Drake, 1:30
p.m.
No. 20 Notre Dame vs. St. John's at
Madison Square Garden, Noon
No. 21 UNLV vs.Air Force, 4 p.m.
No. 22 Temple at Saint Joseph's, 7 p.m.
No. 24 San Diego State vs. Colorado
State, 10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
No. 8 Ohio State vs. No. 16Wisconsin,
4 p.m.
No. 15 Florida State at Miami,
6 p.m.
No. 17 Louisville vs. Pittsburgh, 2 p.m.
No. 23 Indiana at Minnesota, I p.m.

BASEBALL

Baseball calendar

Friday -Voluntary reporting date for
other team's other players. Mandatory
reporting date for Oakland and Seattle.
March 2 Mandatory reporting
date for teams other than Oakland and
Seattle.
March 2-1 I -Teams may renew con-
tracts of unsigned players.
March 19 Last day to place a
player on unconditional release waivers
and pay 30 days termination pay instead
of 45 days.
March 28-29 Seattle vs. Oakland
atTokyo.
April 2 Last day to request uncon-
ditional release waivers on a player with-
out having to pay his full 2012 salary.
April 4 Opening day, St. Louis
at Miami. Active rosters reduced to 25
players..
May 16-17 -Owners' meetings, New
York.
June 4 -Amateur draft.
July 10 All-Star game, Kansas City,
Mo.
July 13 Deadline for amateur draft
picks to sign.
July 22 Hall of Fame induction,
Cooperstown, N.Y.
July 31 Last day to trade a player
without securing waivers.
Sept. I Active rosters expand to
40 players.

College polls

BASEBALL AMERICA
DURHAM, N.C. -The top 25 teams
in the Baseball America poll with records
through Feb. 19 and previous ranking
(voting by the staff of BaseballAmerica):


Record
1. Florida 2-1
2. Stanford 3-0
3. South Carolina 3-0
4.Arkarisas 3-0
5. Rice 3-0
6.TexasA&M '3-0
7. Louisiana State 3-0
8.Arizona 2-1
9. Georgia 3-0
10. North Carolina 2-1
I I. GeorgiaTech 3-1
12,Texas 2.. .
13.Arizona State 3-0
14. Miami 3-0
15.Texas Christian I-I
16. Clemson 2-1
17.Vanderbilt 0-3
18. Florida State 3-0
19. Central Florida3-0
20. Mississippi 1-1
2-1. Oregon State' 3-1
22. UCLA 1-2
23. Oklahoma 1-2
24. Louisville 2-1
25. Baylor 3-0


Pvs

2
3
4
6
7
8
5
I
.9
12
17
18
15
16
10
20
21
22
23,
14
19
24
SNR


COLLEGIATE BASEBALL
TUCSON, Ariz. The Collegiate
Baseball poll with records through Feb. 19,
points and previous rank. Voting is done
by coaches, sports writers and sports
information directors:
Record Pts Pvs ,
I. Florida 2-1I 495 I
2. South Carolina 3-0 494 2
3.Stanford 3-0 493 3
4.Texas A&M 3-0 490 6
5. Rice 3-0 487 7
6. North Carolina' 2-1 485 4
7.Texas 2-I 482 5
8.Arkansas 3-0 480 8
9. Louisiana St. 3-0, 479 12
10. Georgia Tech 3-1 477 9
11. Florida St. 3-0 475 13
12. Miami 3-0 473 14
13.Arizona St. 3-0 471 17
14. Georgia 3-0 468 18
15.Texas Christian I-I 467 10
16. Louisville 2-1 464 15
17. Oklahoma 1-2 461 16
18. St. John's 1-2 458 II
19. CalSt. Fullerton 1-2 457 21
20. California 3-0 454 22
21. Oregon St. 3-1 449 24
22.Arizona 2-1 447 20
23. Stetson 3-0 444 26
24. Oregon 2-1 442 27
25. Clemson 2-1 439 25
26. Baylor 3-0 437 28
27. U.C. Irvine 3-0 436 29
28. Southern Miss. 2-1 433 30
29. Coll. of Charleston3-0 429 -




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

HUVCO E


@2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.

GRUEP !




PORMIT




NEROEC

^^ ~ ~ 2 ^ j


30. Georgia Southern 3-0


426 -


GOLF

Golf week

WORLD GOLF CHAMPIONSHIPS
ACCENTURE MATCH PLAY
CHAMPIONSHIP
Site: Marana,Ariz.
Schedule:Today-Sunday.
Course: Dove Mountain, The Ritz-
Carlton Golf Club (7,791 yards, par 72).
Purse: $8.5 million. Winner's share
$1.4 million.
Television: Golf Channel (Today, noon-
6 p.m., 7:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m.; Thursday
2-6 p.m., 8:30 p.m.-J2:30 a.m.; Friday
2-6 p.m., 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m.; Saturday
noon-2 p.m., 8:30 p.m.- 12:30 a.m.; Sunday
9 a.m.-I p.m., 9:30-11:30 p.m.) and NBC
(Saturday-Sunday, 2-6 p.m.).
Online: http://www.pgatour.com
PGA European Tour site: http://www
europeantour.com
PGATOUR
MAYAKOBA GOLF CLASSIC
Site: Playa Del Carmen, Mexico.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course:Mayakoba ResortEl Camaleor
Golf Club (6,923 yards, par 70).
Purse: $3.7 million. Winner's share
$660,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday
6:30-8:30 p.m.; Friday, 1:30-3:30 a.m., 6:30.
8:30 p.m.; Saturday, 2:30-4:30 a.m., 6:30.
8:30 p.m.; Sunday, 1-3 a.m., 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Monday, 1-3 a.m.).
Last week: Bill Haas won the
Northern Trust Open' at Riviera, beating
Phil Mickelson and Keegan Bradley witt
a 45-foot birdie putt on the second hole
of a playoff. Mickelson and Bradley birdie
the final hole of regulation to force th<
playqff.... South Africa's Jbe Kruger w'o
the Avantha Masters in India for his firs
European-Tour tide, beating Spain's Jorge
Campillo and Germany's Marcel Siem by
two strokes.
LPGATOUR
HSBC WOMEN'S CHAMPIONS
Site: Singapore.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Tanah Merah Country Clue
Garden Course (6,547 yards, par 72).
Purse: $1.4 million. Winner's share
$210,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday
Friday, 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.; Saturda3
2-6 p.m.; Sunday, 1:30-6 p.m.).
Last week Top-ranked Yani Tseng suc
cessfully defended her LPGA Thailani
title for her 13th LPGATour victory, bird
ieing the final two holes to hold off play
ing partner Ai Miyazato by a stroke. The
23-year-old Tseng, a seven-time winne
last year on the LPGATour, has 33 career
worldwide professional victories.
Online: http://www.lpga.com
CHAMPIONS TOUR
Next event: Toshiba Classic, Marcl
16-18, Newport Beach Country Club
Newport Beach, Calif.
Last week: Kenny Perry won the ACI
Group Classic in Naples for his second'
Champions Tour title, beating 2011 win
ner Bernhard Langer by five stroke:
Perry closed with a 70 after opening with
rounds of 64 and 62 to break tihe tour'
36-hole record at 18-under 126.
NATIONWIDE TOUR
Next event: Panama Championship
March 1-4, Panama Golf Club, Panam
City.
Last week: Skip Kendall holed a 25
foot birdie putt on the final hole for
one-stroke victory in the season-openin
Colombia Championship in Bogota.At 4
years, 5 months, 10 days, Kendall became
the fourth-oldest winner in Nationwid
history.
OTHER TOURNAMENTS
MEN
eGOLF PROFESSIONAL TOUR
Oldfield Open, Today-Saturday, Oldfield
Country Club and Chechessee Creek
Club, Okatie, S.C. Online: http://www.
egolflrofessionaltour.com
NGA TOUROK: Members Only
Shootout, Today-Friday, Black Bear. Golf
Club, Eustis. Online: http://ww.ngatour.
com

HOCKEY

,NHL schedule

Monday's Games
Ottawa 6, N.Y. Islanders 0
Carolina 5,Washington 0
Tuesday's Games
Phoenix 5, Los Angeles 4, SO
Buffalo 2, N.Y. Islanders I
New Jersey 4,Toronto 3, OT
Pittsburgh 2, N.Y. Rangers 0
Columbus 6, San Jose 3
Philadelphia S5Winnipeg 4, OT
Dallas 3, Montreal 0
Tampa Bay 3,Anaheim 2
Nashville 3,Vancouver I
Chicago 2, Detroit I
Edmonto 6, Calgary I

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer:
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: VALVE SWEPT SHADOW SHOULD
Answer: The prison play wasn't going well because
they all wanted to STEAL THE SHOW


BCS leaders far from


agreement on changes


By STEPHEN HAWKINS
Associated Press

GRAPEVINE, Texas
- Before there will be sig-
nificant changes to college
football's postseason and
how to 'determine a cham-
pion, there are plenty of
options to be considered.
Conference commis-
sioners who run the Bowl
Championship Series are
just getting started on that
process.
"We're just trying to
understand conceptually
what the pieces are. ... It's
at the very beginning," Big
Ten Commissioner Jim
Delany said. "While I think
people have a reasonable
idea on the range of what's
under consideration, the
study and the inspection
and understanding of that
range I think is g6ing to be
months in the making."
The 11 conference com-
missioners and Notre
Dame's athletic direc-
tor spent two days meet-
ing with BCS Executive
Director Bill Hancock at
a hotel at the Dallas-Fort
Worth airport. They are
scheduled to meet there
again March 26.
Hancock character-
ized the meetings, which
encompassed more than
eight hours over two days,
as "very, very, very produc-
tive" with great dialogue
and sharing .of ideas. He
wouldn't get into specifics
about what discussed.
"They are determined
to do what's best for the
game," Hancock said.
"Everything is still on the
table and there will be a
time when they obviously
have to start taking things
off the table. But that point
hasn't come yet."
In a joint statement
posted on Facebook even
before they had emerged
from their meeting room,
the group said it had a
self-imposed deadline of
"sometime this summer"
to decide what changes to
propose.
The process could take
much longer to get fin-
ished.
"No one really knows
what the actual drop-dead
date is," said long-time
WAC Commissioner Karl


ACROSS
1 Possibly
6 Concoct
11 More cunning
12 Avila saint
13 Accepts
14 Sea off
Greece
15 Doctrine
S16 Karachi
language
17 O.K. Corral
name
19 Soothe
23 Coral island
26 Doctor's
'advice
28 Jayhawker st.
29 Fate
31 It ma be
airtight
33 Opera
highlights
34 Burned and
looted
35 TV brand
36 Hudson Bay
tribe
39 Boathouse
item


Benson, who takes over
as the Sun Belt's commis-
sioner in April.
As Delany described it,
"Nothing has been ruled
out, nothing has been ruled
in. ... This is going to be an
extra-inning game."
While there seems to be
growing support for cre-
ating .a four-team playoff
to determine a champion,
how exactly that would
work remains to be seen.
But there also appears
to be some confusion over
what a plus-one model
would mean. Some attend-
ing the meeting, again with-
out being specific about
what they had discussed,
indicated that a plus-one
mddel could be a singular
championship game played
after all the bowls when the
top two teams would then
be determined.
But there are also plen-
ty of other things to be
figured out before how to'
determine a champion.
Among them are revenue
issues and access issues
for teams now in confer-
ences without automatic
BCS possibilities.
Mountain West
Commissioner Craig
Thompson likened the
process to what's going
on with his conference in
forming a new league with
Conference USA. Plans are
to begin in 2013 aind have
as many as 24 teams in five
time zones.
"You've got a big
circle and you're try-
ing to tighten the circle
and get it down to some
manageable, workable
deals," Thompson said.
"Everybody's come in
good faith and conscious-
ly trying to do what's
right for college football.
... There is no clubhouse
leader from what I'm lis-
tening to:" "
SEC Commissioner
Mike Slive, whose league
has won the last six BCS
national championships,
said there, are plenty of
issues that have to be
reviewed.
"Every aspect of this
is going to be looked at,"
Slive said. "By making
this a marathon and not a
sprint, ive're gping to have
the luxury of looking at


every element of every pos-
sibility and view it against
the regular season. I think
that's the sum and sub-
stance of where we are."
Part of the meeting
Tuesday was spent review-
ing final exam sched-
ules for all 120 schools.
Hancock said the commis-
sioners would like to avoid
playing games from early
December to about Dec.
21, when most schools
have finals.
They also don't want to
play games much past Jan.
1. The BCS title game has
been held as late as Jan.
10, and has regularly been
played on Jan. 7 or 8 since
it was implemented for the
2006 season.
"I'm very pleased with
the conversation, a lot of
good, robust discussion
about objectives and oppor-
tunities related to postsea-
son college football.... Very
open, very engaged, very
creative and thinking about
the bigger picture," Pac-12
Commissioner Larry Scott
said. "Everyone's focused
on balancing the regular
season, balancing the bowl
tradition, balancing the
very important academic
parameters, and from my
perspective, we're focused
on the right issues.
"I'm pleased with how
it's begun," he said. "It's
an ongoing process that is
going to take some time.
We're at the very early
stages."

G ET- lakecilyreporter.con


CONNECTED

REPORTER

NEWS

WEATHER
OPINION
SPORTS

ARCHIVES

CLASSIFIED
COMMUNITY

ENTERTAINMENT


X""tywityreportr.com

CONNECTED


Answer to Previous Puzzle


Q U I Z a^BSJC AIRES
HRMMER S|OR BJET
fMOP'P|ET CLAUDE
|MISO ErLII MTS
UNS~AF


HEN NA GIG LE
GRADSGRII DIS
TA SESEP' I A
SED0A.|T|E OASES
UR0GENT
SOU OOP DEK E
DAMSEL I SABEL
ANN EAL CAC NO pY
E.I.SZ-T T ENZT


18 Gallery
display
20 Watchdog
breed
21 Cavalry
weapon
22 Novelist
Bagnold
23 About that
time
24 Like bok choy
25 Ms. Sumac
27 "- -Pan"
29 Benz or
Malone
30 PC button
32 London lav
34 Vintage car
37 Delhi
currency
38 Codgers'
queries
41 Prospect
for oil
43 Shake a leg
45 Jealousy
47. Without
the ice
48 100-meter
event
49 Sporty trucks
50 Hairpin curve
51 Gray-clad
soldier
52 Wide st.
53 Frank De -
Orchestra
54 Speaker pro -


DOWN
Pie a la -
Dendrite's
partner ,
Holy cow!
Midler or
UdVW-


Davis
Sounds of 10 Luke and
hesitation Leia's friend
Listen 11 -Skim milk's
carefully lack
Debate 12 Infield covers
Pigskin prop 16 Suffix for
Dixie, once forfeit


2-23 2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


SCOREBOARD


40 Secure a
contract
42 Klutz's cry
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44 ym
iterations
46 Exaggerated
51 Gulch
54 Picks up the
tab
55 Mutate
56 Tapes over
57 Kind of laugh
or dance
58' Ancient
stories


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com I


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420












Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2012


NASCAR makes smooth


transition to fuel injection


By CHRIS JENKINS
Associated Press

DAYTONA BEACH -
Jack Roush once was the
most hands-on team owner
in the NASCAR garage.
It wouldn't be odd to
walk into the garage on
a race weekend and see
Roush under the hood, fid-
dling with a carburetor.
But with the advent of
electronic fuel injection
in the Sprint Cup Series
this season, Roush jokes
that the level of technol-
ogy finally has exceeded
his ability to tinker.
After winning pole posi-
tion for the Daytona 500
on Sunday, Roush Fenway
Racing driver Carl Edwards
joked that one of the keys
to the team's great start
to the season is that "Jack
hasn't been doing much
carburetor tuning."
Roush,. sitting next to
Edwards in the interview
session, had to acknowl-
edge it was true. .
"They're working me
closer to the door," Roush
said. 'The more this tech-
nology expands, the less
there is for a dinosaur like
me to do. I'm just a come-
dian right now."
After clinging to carbure-
tors for decades after they
were regularly found in
passenger cars, NASCAR
finally is making the switch
to fuel injection. -
It was a major change
for teams and their engine
builders, making right now
an exciting time for guys
like engine builders. Doug
Yates, the CEO of Roush
Yates Engines, said he
has more data than ever,
to analyze and can make
far more adjustments to
affect the engines' perfor-
mance.
"It's very exciting from
an engine builder and an
engineer's perspective,
having new technology
in NASCAR." Yates said.
"And it's our job to hope-
fully make it seamless."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Car owner Jack Roush (left) talks to driver Carl Edwards, in car, in his garage during
practice for Sunday's NASCAR Daytona 500 auto race in Daytona Beach on Wednesday.


The transition mostly has
flown under the radar dur-
ing Daytona Speedweeks
so far a good sign that
there aren't any major
issues.
"It's out there, and
it's quiet," said Robin
Pemberton, NASCAR's
vice president of compe-
tition. "Knock on wood,
but it just goes to show
you how hard everybody's
working."
. Pemberton said the
move to fuel injection
helps make NASCAR more
relevant, especially to
automakers backing the
sport It also gives teams
a little more leeway to
tune their engines to a
point.
'There are tools in the
toolbox that we are not
using with this system,
for obvious reasons,"
Pemberton said. "And that
is to keep the drivers driv-
ing and the crew chiefs
working on their setups."
Pemberton expects
teams to try to get away
with something at some
point. There has been
speculation that allowing


electronic fuel injection
could open the door for
a team to come up with
a hidden traction control
system, giving them an ille-
gal advantage.
'That's what everybody
says," Pemberton said.
"But the truth be known,
that's probably not your
biggest problem. The big-
gest problem is the one you
don't know about, right?"
NASCAR officials now
have electronic devices
that plug into teams',com-
puter systems to make,
they aren't altering their
software. And if a team
gets caught messing with
its fuel injection system,
Pemberton says the pen-
alty will be harsh.
"It'll be a top of the line
penalty," Pemberton said..
Driver Jeff Burton said
fans probably won't notice
the change.
"From a performance
standpoint, I am not sure
there is going to be a major
difference," Burton said. "I
think fuel mileage should
increase a little bit; per-
formance should increase
a little bit, probably not


enough for the fans to real-.
ly be able to tell."
Burton said using fuel
injection will help the auto-
motive industry, making
it more likely that tech-
nology tested on the track
eventually will make its
way into passenger cars.
But Burton acknowledges
it has been a burden to the
teams.
'Teams have had to
spend a lot of money, put
a lot of resources to 'it,
not just in money, sq yes
it is tough," Burton said.
"It also comes at a time
where the economy is
down, so it is not at the
best time. NonethelesS, it is
something that had to hap-
pen."
The idea of switching to
fuel injection wasn't uni-
versally accepted right
away. Last 'year, driver
Brad Keselowski was fined'
by NASCAR officials for
criticizing the move, say-
ing the technology being
introduced still lags far
behind street cars and
"does nothing for the sport
except cost the team own-
ers money."


FSU rounds out

football schedule

with Savannah St.


By BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE -
Florida State has replaced
perennial college football
power West Virginia on its
2012 schedule with little
Savannah State.
The Seminoles will
host The Tigers, from the
Football Championship
Subdivision, on Sept. 8 as
a replacement opponent
for the Mountaineers. West
Virginia broke the front
end of a home-and-home
contract with the Seminoles
to ostensibly accommodate
their move from the Big
East Conference to the Big
12.
Athletic Director Randy
Spetman and his top asso-
ciate, Monk Bonasorte,
said Wednesday they have
been scrambling for nearly
three weeks trying to fill
the scheduling hole created.
by West Virginia's decision
earlier this month to back
out of the highly anticipated
early season contest.
Florida State receives a
$500,000 buyout and may
sue to recover approximate-
ly $2 million in revenue
losses.
"We contacted every
BCS school that had an
opening in hopes to replace
(West Virginia) with a BCS
opponent," Spetman said.
"None of those few schools
could make it work either
because of our dates or
theirs."
Spetman said they talked
with Arkansas, Cincinnati,
Oklahoma, Pitt, Syracuse
and Texas A&M among
others.
"We've done everything
we could to explore all the
options for a home game,"
said coach Jimbo Fisher,
who is 19-8 after his first two
seasons at Florida State.
Spetman said Florida
State plans to honor its end
of the deal and play the
scheduled 2013 game in
Morgantown, W. Va.


Florida State rejected
some overtures to turn a
scheduled home date into a
road game in consideration
of local merchants. Lee
Daniel, the executive direc-
tor of Visit Tallahassee,
said the economic impact
of home football games
range between $1 million
and $10 million depending
on the opponent and time
of game.
Spetman said the uni-
versity grossed roughly
$2.5 million more from last
year's home game against
Oklahoma than it did from
a game one week earlier
against tiny Charleston
Southern, a smaller-division
school that finished its 2011
season 0-11.
A member of the
Mid-Eastern Athletic
Conference, Savannah
State finished 1-10 in the
2011 season and was out-
scored by an average of
nearly 31 points in its loss-
es. Florida A&M, which sits
less than a mile away from
the Florida State campus,
routed Savannah State 47-7
last year in Savannah.
"Savannah State has got a
great band," Spetman said,
noting that the school would
make Sept. 8 band day.
Savannah State will receive
$475,000 for its visit.
The Seminoles now have
two smaller-division FCS
schools on their seven-game
home schedule. Murray
(Ky.) State visits Sept. 1.
The Racers from the Ohio
Valley Conference finished
7-4 last season. Their other
two nonconference games
are Sept 29 at South Florida
and Nov. 24 at home against
archrival Florida.
The Atlantic Coast
Conference, which plans
to go to nine conference
games once 'Syracuse"and
Pitt become, official mem-
bers, is working on final-
izing the full conference
schedule shortly, league
spokesman Mike Finn said
Wednesday.


JUNIOR: Carrying on Earnhardt name


Continued From Page 1B

considered a front-runner
heading into Thursday's
qualifying race and Sunday's
season-opening Daytona
500.
"I do feel like I have a
better shot at winning in
this current style of racing,"
Earnhardt said Wednesday.
"I do feel more confident
than I did coming down
here and tandem drafting. I
never felt really great about
that. It is a completely dif-
ferent style of racing and
it's not what I enjoyed.
"I definitely feel better.
about this."
Still, Earnhardt and oth-
ers believe tandem racing
in the final laps will deter-
mine the outcome in the
qualifying races and "The
Great American Race."
But not having to push,
pull, sweat and swap for
200 laps around the high-
banked track means every-
thing to NASCAR's most
popular driver and
maybe even more fun to his
legion of fans.
After all, Earnhardt won
the 2004 Daytona 500 and
has a dozen other victories
at NASCAR's most storied
track. It's also the place
where his father, seven-time
NASCAR champion Dale
Earnhardt, won 34 races
and died on the final lap in
the 2001 opener. So Daytona
has become synonymous
with the Earnhardt legacy.
It will always be an impor-
tant place for Junior, for
better or worse. He knows
it, and so does everyone
around him.
And now that the rac-
ing has returned, at least
in part, to the pack style
Junior enjoys and seems to
thrive in it was just two
years ago that he, stormed
through the field on the


final lap and finished sec-
ond to Jamie McMqrray in
a thrilling .finish it only
makes sense that he would
[be a favorite again. .
Nonetheless, he knows
he needs good fortune to
stay out front
"I really wouldn't know
what to tell you do to as far
a series of moves or what
kind of mind-set to have,"
said Earnhardt, whose win-
less streak is at 129 races.
"There is no sure strategy
that is going to keep you
out of a wreck or having
you lead the race off turn
four. You just have to go
throughout the race and
hope you continue to make
every decision right, kind
of like a line of dominos;
you just hope everyone that
falls hits the next one.
"Eventually, you come off
the last corner-and you are
in position to try to make
that last decision that is
going to win the race. That
is about it I think you just
have to have good instinct
about drafting and what is
happening around you. ...
You have to be really self-
ish and always want to help
yourself and always do what
is gqing to help you, which
is really not my personality,
but for whatever reason I'm
pretty good at it Hopefully
it will work out for us."
It worked to perfection in
2004, a victory Earnhardt
still savors nearly a decade
later.
He vividly remembers
the raucous celebration in
Victory Lane, the unremit-
ting adulation from fans
and media, and the flatter-
ing comparisons to his late
father.
"I had no idea what win-
ning that race would feel
like- until I won it," Junior


said. "I didn't know what
to compare that to. When
you win that race, it is
really hard to explain. All
the things that you want
out of life and all the pres-
sures you put on yourself
or you feel from other peo-
ple, all the things you want
to accomplish; everybody
sort of has this mountain in
front of them that they put
in front of themselves that
they want to climb.
"For a moment, or for a
day, you are at the top of
that mountain."
Nothing else matters, he
said. Little things that can
be bothersome are distant
memories.
"You just feel like you
have realized your full poten-
tial," he said. "Everything
is sort of just maxed out
for the day. All the things
that you wanted to achieve.
Obviously you set a lot of
goals for yourself, and that
is just one of the goals. But
just for a moment, just for
that one day, whether it is
30 minutes or an hour after
you cross that finish line,
you feel like it can't get any
better than this.
"It is a pretty incredible
emotion. I feel so lucky to
have had that opportunity
to experience it. It is such a
special moment."
Those memories come
flooding back every time
he sees a replay of the race,
especially the celebration.
He would love to create
a second version Sunday.
And considering that pack
racing is back, he has as
good a chance as anyone.
"Some of the greatest
drivers come through this
sport and don't win it," he
said. "It just doesn't seem
right, but only certain ones
get that opportunity."


BRIEFS


RUNNING
Kuykendall
5K Race Day
Saturday
The Catherine
Kuykendall Race Day 5K
run is 8:15 a.m. Saturday
from Rountree Moore
Toyota Scion. Online
registration is at active.
com and costs $20 plus a
transaction fee. GulfCoast
Financial Services is
presenting the race for
the benefit of Pancreatic
Cancer Action Network.
Sponsorships are
available.
For details, call Melanie
at 755-9018.

Race the Tortoise
5K March 3
The fourth annual Race
the Tortoise 5K run/walk
is 8 a.m. March 3 at
O'Leno State Park. Entry
fee is $25 and includes a
T-shirt. Proceeds go to
the Park's Nature Center
and for an audio/visual
system for training and
education. Donations will
be accepted. To register
go to www.friendsofoleno.
org.
For details, call James
Salvo at (386) 454-4115 or
e-mail jvsalvo26@gmail.
com.

ZUMBA
Zumbathon
benefit planned
The Let's Glove
Zumbathon fundraiser
to help C02 Student
Ministries teens attend
Summer Missions Camp
is 9-10:30 a.m. Saturday at
the Skating Palace. Wear
clothing that will glow in
black light. Donation is


$10.
For details, call Sarah
Sandlin at 758-0009 or e-
mail lakecityzumba@gmail.
com.


For details, e-
mail information@
girlssoftballassociation. org
or call 7554271.


FISHING
CHS FOOTBALL FFA tournament
Q-back meeting on March 3
on1E r k3r
Msrp h-5;


The Columbia County
Quarterback Club will ,
meet at 6 p.m. March 5 at
the Jones Fieldhouse.
For details, call Joe
Martino at 984-0452.

ADULT SOFTBALL
City leagues
registration open
The Lake City
Recreation Department
has registration for
adult softball set for 8:30
a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays
through March 2 at Teen
Town Recreation Center.
Leagues (ASA sanctioned)
offered are co-ed church,
commercial and women.
Cost is $350 per team.
For details, call
Heyward Christie at 754-
3607 or e-mail christieh@
lcfla.com.

YOUTH SOFTBALL
GSACC spring
registration set
The Girls Softball
Association of Columbia
County has registration
set for its spring
recreation season for girls
ages 4-17. Registration
is at the Girls Softball
Complex on Bascom
Norris Drive at 5-7 p.m.
Tuesday and March 1 and
March 5. Players may also
register at Brian's Sports
on U.S. Highway 90 west.
Cost is $45 per player or
$65 for siblings.


The Columbia
High FFA Open Bass
Tournament is March 3
from safe light to 3 p.m.
out of Clay Landing. Entry
fee is $70, and there is
a $10 optional Big Bass
Pot Proceeds of the
tournament will be used
toward a scholarship in
honor of tournament
founder Justin Brown.
For details, call Chris at
288-7633 or Karen Brown
at 961-2526.

T-BALL
Lake City
registration set
The Lake City
Recreation Department
is offering T-ball for ages
4-5 and 6-7. Fee is $40
and a birth certificate is
required when signing up.
Registration for returning
players is 8 a.m. to 5
p.m. March 10 at Teen
Town Recreation Center.
Registration for new
players is 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
March 17 at Teen Town.
Parents may select teams,
but there is a 15-player
limit per team filled on
a first come/first served
basis. A mandatory rules
clinic for coaches and
officials is 6:30 p.m. April
21 at the Girls Club. A
coaches meeting is 6:30
p.m. April 29 at the Girls
Club.
For details, call
Heyward Christie at 754-
3607 or e-mail christieh@
lcfla.com. .


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2012


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420









Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2012


DILBERT


DEAR ABBY


Couple can't come to terms

over bathroom battleground


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD'


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY: My other-
wise loving, honest, gen-
erous, kind and attentive
husband of 10 years feels
it's his right to walk into
the bathroom whenever he
wants, even when I'm in
there. He says it's coinci-
dence, but I think he does
it intentionally. We don't
have locks or even doors
- to shut our master bath-
room. We do have other
bathrooms in the house.
I have asked him repeat-
edly not to come in or to
make some noise so I know
he's coming. He says he
"forgets." If I'm in the show-
er or bent over with my
head upside down blow-dry-
ing my hair and-turn around
or look up and see another
person, I get startled. My
adrenaline pumps and I end
up yelling at him.
I'd prefer to get clean
and pretty in peace.
My husband thinks Fm
overreacting. Am I? -
- BOTHERED IN THE
BATHROOM
DEAR BOTHERED:
Feeling as strongly as you
do, it's surprising that you
would move into a house
in which the master bed-
room and bath are set up
this way. And yes, I do
think you're overreacting.
However, you have a
couple of options: The first
would be for you to get
clean and pretty in one of
the other bathrooms. The
second would be to start
a remodeling project and


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Concentrate
on you for a change. Do
something that will make
you feel good, look good
and bring good results.
Re-evaluate your relation-
,ships with people you deal
with daily to find ways to
improve or discontinue
each connection. ***
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): You can only do
so much. Find ways to
restore something that has
meaning to you. Whether
it's a relationship, a group
affiliation or even a plan
that has taken a wrong
turn, you can make a
difference with-positive
reforms. ****
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): You'll face confusion,
dishonesty and poor advice
if you listen to someone
who is jealous of you. Do
your best to remain posi-
tive and to strive for suc-
cess. Your ability to stay
on course and reach your
destination will impress
the right people. **
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Discussing your plans
with someone you respect
will result in suggestions
that fit your budget and
your emotional, mental
* and physical corhfort
zones. A unique offer from
someone special will fill in
whatever is missing from
your plans. ******
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorobby.com
have a door (or doors) to
your master bath installed
so your husband can
knock before entering.
** ** **
DEAR ABBY: I am
married to a wonderful
and unique man. Despite
his privileged upbring-
ing he is very down-
to-earth. His parents'
affluence afforded him
many opportunities and
still does. Unfortunately,
my in-laws are snobbish,
self-absorbed and competi-
tive..They are critical of
everyone especially their
grown son. They put him
and each other down con-
stantly. They cause scenes
and can't enjoy life.
My husband is trying
to be patient because he
knows his parents aren't
going to change at their
age. But they consume so
much of our energy with
their constant dramatic
highs and lows. Any advice
for dealing with drama
queens (and kings)? They
do love us and can be
considerate. LIVING IN
THE REAL WORLD IN
NEW JERSEY
DEAR REAL: It may


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

Socializing and getting to
know new acquaintances
should be your intent, but
that doesn't mean you
should pick up the tab,
overspend, overindulge
or overdo in an attempt to
win popularity. Strive for
equality, not ownership.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Travel or sign up for
a seminar or conference
that interests you. Getting
involved in activities that
are challenging can take
your mind off your prob-
lems, easing your stress
and helping you come to
terms with what you must
do. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): The more time you
spend with colleagues,
clients or classmates, the
better. Take whatever
opportunity you get to
discuss what's required of
you to ensure that you are
on the right track and that
you don't let anyone down,
including yourself. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Make overdue altera-
tions to your living quar-
ters and you will be able to
start a new hobby. A cre-
ative outlet will give you
plenty to talk about and
push you in a social direc-
tion that will bring you in


help you and your husband
to understand that people
who act the way your in-
laws do are usually inse-
cure on some basic level.
They put others down
to inflate their egos and '
reassure themselves that
they're "OK" by magnify-
ing (or inventing) flaws in
others. When your in-laws
start to criticize, be pleas-
ant and make a point of
saying something positive
about their target. It will
short-circuit the rant.

DEAR ABBY: I'm a 40-
year-old working mother
raising a daughter who is
the joy of my life. Once in
a great while I'll accept an
invitation to go on a date
and hire a baby sitter to
watch my daughter.
My question is, who
should pay for the sitter?
The man who asked me out
or should I? I have yet to
have a suitor offer to pay. ,
Is that just the way it is, or
are these men just cheap? -
MOM ON A BUDGET
DEAR MOM: Paying for
your daughter's sitter is
YOUR responsibility. When
you become involved in a
steady relationship and the
cost of a sitter becomes a
financial burden, discuss it
then with your boyfriend,
who should be willing to
share some of the cost
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


contact with like-minded
people. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.,
22-Dec. 21): Choose your
words carefully. Take
action rather than discuss-
ing your plans. Someone is
sure to disagree with what
you want to do and make
your life difficult should
you try to pursue your
dreams. Love is on the
rise. **
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Look at your
past and consider the
choices you made. You
will come up with a good
solution that will enable
you to retrieve what you
left behind and rid your-
self of the things you still
have but no longer need.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Do what you can
to help others, but don't
go into debt doing so. A
change that'someone from
your past makes will make
an impression on you that
helps you move in a new
direction as well. A partner-
ship can be beneficial. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Sensitive emotional
issues must be handled
carefully. Much can be
accomplished if you are
reasonable. An unusual
suggestion will help with
regard to how you earn
your living. Understanding
and patience will be neces-
sary. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY Y'S CLUE: A equals F
"OUOXD YTVBZ YWT R W H Z F P PWO
HP R WO TZCD UHERHV TA UHTCOZEO
W B P RT FZTY RWBR RWOXO BXO VBZD
VTXO." PBCVB WBDOF

Previous Solution: "Some day, following the example of the United States of
America, there will be a United States of Europe." George Washington
2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 2-23


FOR BETTER ORWORSE


HOROSCOPES


LAKE CITY REPORTER


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


CLASSIC PEANUTS


ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23,2012












Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2012

Lake City Reporter





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You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
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East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.comr





Ad Is toAppear Call by: Fax/Emall by:
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In Print and Online
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Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION:
CASE NO: 12-2007-CA-000008
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JOSEPH BOONE A/K/A JOSEPH
A. BOONE; JESSICA A. BOONE;
THERESA D. BOONE; UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF JESSICA A.
BOONE; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
JOSEPH BOONE A/K/A JOSEPH
A. BOONE; UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF THERESA D. BOONE; JOHN
DOE; JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN
TENANTS) IN POSSESSION OF
THE SUBJECT PROPERTY,
Defendants.
RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order Resetting Foreclo-
sure Sale dated the 13th day of Feb-
ruary, 2012, and entered in Case No.
12-2007-CA-000008,of the Circuit
Court of the 3RD Judicial Circuit in
and for Columbia County, Florida,
wherein BANK OF AMERICA,
N.A. is the"Plaintiff and JOSEPH
BOONE A/K/A JOSEPH A.
BOONE, JESSICA A. BOONE,
THERESA D. BOONE, UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF JOSEPH
BOONE A/K/A JOSEPH A.
BOONE, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
JESSICA A, BOONE, UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF THERESA D.
BOONE, JOHN DOE and JANE
DOE N/K/A EDITH MCWIL-
LIAMS IN POSSESSION OF THE
SUBJECT PROPERTY are defend-
ants. The Clerk of this Court shall
sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash at the, Columbia County Court-
house, 173 N.E. HERNANDO AVE-
NUE, LAKE CITY, FL 32055,
11:00AM on the 28th day of March
2012, the following described prop-
erty as set forth in said Final Judg-
ment, to wit:
LOT 17 AND 18 OF SASSAFRAS
ACRES, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGES 8 AND
8-A, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS,
OF COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
DATED THIS 16TH-DAY OF FEB-
RUARY, 2012.
P.DeWitt Cason
Clerk Of The Circuit Court
By: B, Scippio
Deputy Clerk
February 23, 2012
March 1, 2012


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
GENERAL-JURISDICTION DIVI-
SION
Case No. 09000041 CA
Central Mortgage Company
Plaintiff,
vs.
Jackie Schwartz, et al,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Summary Final Judgment
of Foreclosure Including Award of
Attorney's Fees and Costs dated De-
cember 1, 2011, entered in Case No.
09000041 CA of the Circuit Court of
the THIRD Judicial Circuit in' and
for Columbia County, Florida,
wherein Central Mortgage Company
is the Plaintiff and Jackie Schwartz,
et al,. are the Defendanits, that the
Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to
the highest and best bidder for cash,
at 173 NE Hemando Avenue, Lake
City Fl. 32055. 11:00 A.M., on
March 14, 2012, the following de-
scribed property, as set forth in said
Summary Final Judgment of Fore-
closure including Award of Attor-
neys' Fees and Costs, to-wit:
LOT 10, BLOCK B, CENTURY
OAK, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 4, AT PAGE 68,
OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
Dated this 9th day of February, 2012.
Columbia County Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk .

05530712
February 16, 23, 2012


Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
' raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200


Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale
Delivery of 100 bales $260
386-688-9156


Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
TAXES, RESUMES.
Other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Need Protection? Gateway To
Florida Security 386-438-8282.
gatewavtofloridasecurityva gmail.com.
Our security guards specialize in
Honesty, Courtesy & Alertness.


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 12-2010-CA-000476
U.S. BANK, N.A.
Plaintiff,
v.
JOSHUA A. MOOSE; TIFFANY C.
MOOSE; UNKNOWN TENANT 1;
UNKNOWN TENANT 2; and all
unknown parties claiming by,
through, under or against the above
named Defendant(s), who (is/are) not
known to be dead or alive, whether
said unknown parties claim as heirs,
devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors,
creditors, trustees, spouses, or other
claimants;
Defendants,
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant
to the Final Judgment dated February
16, 2012, in this cause, I will sell the
property situated in COLUMBIA
County, Florida, described as:
LOT 7, WOODGATE VILLAGE,
UNIT 2, A SUBDIVISION RE-
CORDED IN PLAT HEREOF AS'
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5,
PAGES 84 AND 84A, PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA.
TOGETHER WITH THAT CER-
TAIN 1992 MERIT DOUBLE-
WIDE MOBILE HOME ATTACH-
ED THERETO, .HAVING VIN
#FLHML2F5478129A, TITLE
#63411657 AND VIN
#FLHLM2F5478129B, TITLE
#63411660, WHICH HAS BEEN
RETIRED.
a/k/a 215 S.W., SWEET GUM GLN,
LAKE CITY, FL 32024 at public
sale on 3/21/2012, to the highest bid-
der for cash, at the Columbia County
Courthouse, 173 NW Hemando Ave-
nue, Lake City, in COLUMBIA
County in Florida 32055, in accord-
ance with section 45.031, Florida
Statutes, using the following method

At the Columbia County Courthouse,
173 NW Hemando Avenue, Lake
City, Fl. 32055, beginning at 11:00
a.m., on the prescribed date.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens'must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated at Lake City, Florida, this 16th
day of February,, 2012.
P.DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
NOTICE TO PERSONS WITH DIS-
ABILITIES: IF YOU ARE A PER-
SON WITH A DISABILITY WHO
NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION
IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN
THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE
ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO
YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF
CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE
CONTACT NANCY NYDAM AT
ROOM 205, COLUMBIA COUN-
TY COURTHOUSE, P.O. BOX
1569, LAKE CITY, FL 32056,
(904)758-2163; SUNCOM 839-
2163, WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS
OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NO-
TICE. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR
VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL
(904)758-2139.

05530869
February 23, 2012
March 1, 2012


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 11-318-CA
EAGLE ASSETS, LLC
a Florida Corporation
Plaintiff,
JEFFREY S. LINZY, individually,
AND ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN
PARTIES CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED
INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS)
WHO ARE NOT KNOW N TO BE
DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER
SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIM-
ANTS, ,
Defendants
AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that,
pursuant to a Final Judgment of
Foreclosure date January 24, 2012,
Case No. 11-318-CA, of the Circuit
Court of Colimbia County, Florida,
in which EAGLE ASSETS, LLC, A
Florida Corporation, is the Plaintiff,
and JEFFREY S. LINZY, Individu-
ally, is the Defendant, I will sell to
the highest and best bidder for cash
in the lobby at the Front Door of the
Columbia County Courthouse, in
Lake City, Florida, at 11:00 A.M. on
the 7th day of March, 2012, the fol-
lowing described property set forth
in the Order of Final Judgment.
COMM SE COR OF NW 1/4 OF SE
1/4, RUN W 675.90 FT FOR POB,
CONT W 329.12 FT, N 1324.80 FT,
S 1324.99 FT TO POB. (AKA LOT
29 SHILOH RIDGE S/D UNREC)
ORB 842-1189. WD 1018-861,
CWD 1049-1585. WD 1079-2585.
WD 1117-1920. TAX PARCEL
#04226-129. Columbia County, Flor-
ida.
DATED this 6th day of February,
2012.
CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT
BY:/s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk

05530740
February 16, 23, 2012
Public Auction to be held
March 24, 2012 at 8AM at
Ozzie's Towing & Auto, LLC 2492
SE Baya Ave. Lake City FL, 32025.
(386)719-5608
Following Vin Numbers:
2005 Chrysler
Vin# 2C3JA43R55H664613
05530893
February 23, 2012


To place your
classified ad call

755-5440

I Rl 0l kU bt z,)i t


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 11-87-CA
ROBERT B. HAGAN, JR., as Per-
sonal Representative of the Estate of
CAREY M. HAGAN,
deceased,
Plaintiff,
v.
BORAZE MADEUS, also known as
BOAZ CARTER; ESLIN GEDEON
and BRUNO SURPRISE,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE is hereby given that, pur-
suant to Summary Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated February 15, 2012,
entered in the above styled cause, I
will sell to the highest and best bid-
der for cash at the Columbia County
Courthouse in Lake City, Columbia
County, Florida, at 11:00 A.M. on
March 14, 2012, the following de-
scribed property:
The East 1/2 of the Northwest 1/4 of
the Southeast 1/4 of Section 32,
Township 6 South, Range 16 East,
Columbia County, Florida.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens filed herein
must file a claim with this court
within sixty (60) days after the date
of the sale.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have
executed this Notice and affixed the
seal of this Court this 15th day of
February, 2012.
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of Court
By: B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that on March
09, 2012 at 9:00 am at Mini-Storage
& Record Storage of Lake City, 442
SW Saint Margaret Street, Lake
City, FL 32025; will sell at public
sale by competitive bidding, the per-
sonal property heretofore stored with
the undersigned:
AA-09 Patricia Avery
BB-02 Ronald Blue
BB-18 Brandi Harden
G-03 Christopher Peyton
1-04 Kimberly Skinner
J-27 Renita Jenkins
1-03 Oleatha R Byrd
E-22 Willie R Collier
CC-03 Revan Hawkins
K-15 Natriea Taylor
K-27 Leanne Levy
BB-10 Heidi Combs
BB-34 Judy Hall
W-20 James Parrish Jr.
OP-13 Thomas Collins
Y-04 Ronald'Blue
U-18 Jeanine Steiiruck
V-18 Erin Brown

05530898 :- -.- -
February 23, 2012
March 1, 2012


NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE
NOTICE is hereby given that pur-
suant to a Writ of Execution issued
in Circuit Court, of Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida, on the 1st day of Decem-
ber, 2011. In the cause wherein
L.W.T., INC., was Plaintiff and An-
nie L Taylor, was Defendant, being
Case No. 11-423-CA, in said Court,
I, Mark Hunter, As Sheriff of Co-
lumbia County, Florida, have levied
upon all the right, title, and interest
of the defendant, Annie L Taylor, in
and to the following described per-
sonal property, to-wit:
2007 Blue Chevrolet Suburban
VIN: 3GNFC16037G205176
I shall offer this property for sale
March 27, 2012 at the Columbia
County Detention Facility, 389 N.W.
Quinten Street, Like City, County of
Columbia, State of Florida, at the
hour of 10:00 A.M., or as soon there-
after as possible. I will offer for sale
all the said defendant's, Annie L
Taylor, right,-title and interest in the
aforesaid personal property, at public
auction and will sell the same, sub-
ject to taxes, all prior liens, encum-
brances and judgments, if any to the
highest and best bidder for CASH IN
HAND. The proceeds to be applied
as far as may be to the payment of
costs and the satisfaction of the
above described execution.
Mark Hunter, As Sheriff
of Columbia County, Florida
By: Sergeant Robert Holloway,
Deputy Sheriff

05530897
February 23, 2012
March 1,8, 15, 2012
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
Competitive sealed proposals will be
received by the Mid-Florida Area
Agency on Aging dba Elder Options
until 4:00 p.m. on April 10, 2012 for
the designation of Community Care
for the Elderly Lead Agencies. The
Community Care for the Elderly
Lead Agency designation includes
the provision of an array of home
and community based services to
frail older persons. A Community
Care for the Elderly Lead Agency
will be designated for each county in
Planning and Service Area 3. These
counties are: Alachua, Bradford, Cit-
rus, Columbia, Dixie, Gilchrist,
Hamilton, Hernando, Lafayette,
Lake, Levy, Marion, Putnam, Sumt-
er, Suwannee, and Union. The Com-
munity Care for the Elderly program
is administered pursuant to provi-
sions of Chapter 430, F.S. The pro-
posal package and application in-
structions may be obtained from Eld-
er Options' offices on March 1, 2012
or thereafter. Elder Options' office is
located at 5700 SW 34th Street,
Suite 222, Gainesville, Fl. Elder Op-
tions reserves the right to reject any
and all proposals.
A Bidders Conference will be con-
ducted concerning this Request for
Proposals at 2:00 p.m. on March 9,
2012. Interested parties are encour-
aged to attend the Bidders Confer-
ence at the following location:
Elder Options
5700 SW 34th Street, Suite 222
Gainesville, Florida
Correspondence concerning this Re-
quest for Proposals should be ad-
dressed to:
Ms. Katina Mustipher, Director of
Program Operations
Elder Options
5700 SW 34th Street, Suite 222
Gainesville, Florida 32608
(352)378-6649


Legal


05530859
February 23, 2012
March 1,2012


020 Lost & Found

FOUND US off Old Country Club
Rd. Female dog. Reddish brown
w/s ome black, short hair, very
friendly, no collar. 386-752-8854


060 Services

Title Mobile Rust Repair.
Cut out rust and reweld new metal
www.floorpanrepairs.vpweb.com
(727)253-0658

100 J0b
100 Opportunities

5 Temporary Farm Workers
Needed. Employer: William
David Furnish, KY. Perform all
duties of Tobacco, Straw/Hay, &
Greenhouse/Nursery, including
seeding, fertilizing, planting,
plowing, weeding, spraying,
harvesting, & packaging; and
general farm maintenance.
Employment Dates: 04/15/2012 -
02/01/2013. Wage of $9.38/hr.
Worker guaranteed 3/4 of contract
hours. Tools provided at no
cost. Free housing provided to
non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest Florida One Stop Career
Center or call 386-755-9026 and
reference job order #KY0446247.

05530592
Maintenance Manager needed
for a chain of convenience
stores. Comm'l Refrigeration
Exp, & Universal EPA Card
req'd. Responsibilities include
but not limited to Refigeration,
Heat/Air, Plumbing, & Ele.
Salary Neg. approx. $16-$18 hr
depending on knowledge & exp.
Applications avail at the Jiffy
Store Office. 1102
Howard Street, East, Live Oak,
FL or jiffyfoodstores.com.
Please return application to the
address listed above.
p1


05530819
TIMCO
aviation nservlc'es

Facilities Maintenance
Mechanic
Full-time positions available for
individuals with roof coating
and sealing experience. Apply
online at www.timco.aero
AAP / EEO Employer


05530883
FANTASTIC
OPPORTUNITY
Housekeeping PT/FT
MUST have a strong work ethic,
DEPENDABLE, good
communication skills, and
willingness to learn. MUST be a
team player and able to work a
'flexible schedule including
weekends and holidays.
We offer Competitive Pay and
Health Benefits. Hotel
Experience Highly Preferred.
Only those seeking long term
employment apply in person
at Comfort Suites 3690 W US
HWY 90. Please do not call the
hotel regarding your application.

6 Temporary Farm Workersv;
Needed. Employer: Brian
Forsee Owenton, KY. Perform
all duties of Tobacco &
Greenhouse/Nursery, including
seeding, fertilizing, planting,
plowing, weeding, spraying,
harvesting, &,packaging; and
general farm maintenance.
Employment Dates: 04/15/2012 -
02/01/2013. Wage of $9.38/hr.
Worker guaranteed 3/4 of contract
hours. Tools provided at no
cost. Free housing provided to
non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest Florida One Stop Career
Center or call 386-755-9026 and
reference job order #KY0445765.
CDL Class A Truck Driver.
Flatbed exp. for F/T SE area.
3 years exp or morg. Medical
benefits offered. Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773

2 Temporary Farm Workers
Needed. Employer: David Wimpy
Pembroke, KY. Perform all
duties of Tobacco, Straw/Hay,
Row Crop, & Greenhouse/
Nursery, including seeding,
fertilizing, planting, plowing,
weeding, spraying, harvesting, &
packaging; and general farm
maintenance. Employment Dates:
04/15/2012 01/15/2013. Wage
of $9.38/hr. Worker guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. Tools
provided at no cost. Free housing
provided to non commuting
workers. Transportation &
subsistence reimbursed when
50% of contract is met. Apply for
this job at the nearest Florida One
Stop Career Center or call
386-755-9026 and reference job
order #KY0446396.

Sales Position available for
motivated individual Rountree -
Moore Toyota, Great benefits, paid
training/vacation. Exp. a plus but
not necessary. Call Anthony
Cosentino 386-623-7442


100 Job
Opportunities

4 Temporary Farm Workers
Needed. Employer: Joe Ryan -
Russellville, KY. Perform all
duties of Tobacco, Straw/Hay,
Row Crop, & Greenhouse/
Nursery, including seeding.
fertilizing, planting, plowing,
weeding, spraying, harvesting, &
. packaging; and general farm
maintenance. Employment Dates:
04/15/2012- 01/15/2013. Wage
of $9.38/hr. Worker guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. Tools
provided at no cost. Free housing
provided to non commuting
workers. Transportation &
subsistence reimbursed when
50% of contract is met. Apply for
this job at the nearest Florida One
Stop Career Center or call
386-755-9026 and reference
job order #KY0446277.

MECHANIC for busy truck shop.
Experience required with own
tools. Southern Specialized
386-752-9754

New Business Expanding to North
Florida. Looking for motivated
individuals. Will be having
Opportunity Meeting.
Call 386-754-8811 for details

Now accepting resumes for a
general manager for Mochi Frozen
Yogurt. Full time 50-60 hrs per
week. Scheduled to open in
March. Please mail to: 1396 NE
20th Ave. Bldg 300 Ocala, FL
34470 or e-mail to:
bulldog@laloenterprises.com

Preschool Teacher
Apply in person at Bullfrogs and
Butterflies 1226 SW Grandview
St. Lake City.

12r sMedical
0 Employment

05530652
Physical Thrapy Center hiring a
Physical Therapist/Physical
Therapist's Assistant or Rehab
Aide. F/T or P/T.
Hands-on training w/some exp.
preferred. Personal training or
fitness background a plus. Basic
knowledge of anatomy and.
exercises are a MUST.
Candidate must be confident,
have good people skills,
great attitude and be willing to
learn. Extreme motivation
promotes rapid growth. Send
resume to: pta714@hotmail.com
or fax to 386-755-3165.

05530834
Full Time Registered Nurse
The World's leader in dialysis
services is seeking a Registered
Nurse for our out-patient dialy-
sis center in Lake City.
Apply at: 1445 S.W. Main Blvd.
Suite 120

05530846
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328.

Medical practice needs
Ophthalmic Technician.
FT or PT. Experience preferred.
Fax resume 386-755-7561.

f240 Schools &
240v Education

05530910
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant. $479
next class-03/05/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-03/12/12

*LPN 03/12/12

Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828,29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


401 Antiques

ANTIQUE DUNCAN
Fife Desk.
$500. obo
386-590-1206

Antique Duncan
Fife Server.
Good condition. $600. obo.
386-590-1206

Antique Duncan Fife Dining
Table and 4 chairs, Very large
China Cabinet. In fair condition.
$1000. obo. 386-590-1206


407 Computers


DELL Computer,
$100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

HP 17" Flat Screen Monitor,
w/built in speakers. $60.00 obo
.386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


I


IjBUYI


S E L L IT


FmIND 11








Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2012


408 Furniture
4 Postered, dark wood queen bed-
room set. Dresser w/ mirror, chest,
night stand & mattress (King coil
pillow top). $800. 386-590-1206
BUNK BED w/mattress. All
wood, dark finish. With Book
shelf and desk on either side.
Like new. $700. (904)704-9377
Chest of Drawers.
Really nice.
$25.00
386-365-0262
Complete dark wood Queen
bedroom set. Dresser, night stand,
chest of drawers. $650.obo
386-590-1206
FULL SIZE Serta mattress
and box springs. $500.
386-590-1206

QEUEEN BEDROOM Set. *
Solid pine., Dresser mirror, chest
of drawers ,night stand. $500.
(904)704-9377
Wood dining table w/extension.
2 pholstered chairs on casters.
$25.00
386-365-0262


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-288-6875.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$300 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales
DOWNSIZING, SAT. 2/25, 8-?,
3081 S.E. SR 100, 1/2 mile past
College Rd., big barn on left, furn.,
silver, dishes, clothes, shoes, misc.
Estate Sale: Sat, 2/25, 8:30 AM -
5 PM; 6386 S.W. State Rd. 47.
Mostly furniture, few household
items, no clothing or jewelry.
ESTATE TAG SALE
Fri. 2/24 &Sat. 2/259-3, kitchen.
& household, leather couch, over-
sized chair w/ottoman, misc. furn.,
441 S. to Ellisville, W. on CR 349,
Magnolia Place Subdivision.
MULTI FAMILY Garage Sale.
Large mix of items. Clothing, etc.
Sat. 8-2. 1129 SW Flagler Ct. off
Grandview. All must GO!
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

SALE EVERY WEEKEND
COUNTRY CLUB ROAD AND
HANOVER PLACE 9AM-2PM
386-697-1946


440 Miscellaneous
Like new 20 inch
Chrome Wheels. 6 lug.
Come off GMC Sierra.
$500 obo. 386-623-5219


460 Firewood
It's Getting Colder!! Firewood
$65. Truck Load. we will. call you
Back. We deliver under 20 mi
$100 per load. Over 20 mi $120
per load. Joey 965-0288. Lv mess.

520 Boats for Sale
-06 Alum 17" Bass boat. 50hp, 4
stroke Suzuki motor. Bought new,
mint cond. Valued at $900.
Asking $600 obo. 386-288-0121

0 Mobile Homes
630for Rent
1 BR/1 BA Furnished, all utilities
included + satellite,
$125 week, $125 deposit.
Call 386-758-6939.
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Units.
Free Water,
sewer and trash pickup.
386-984-2025 or 386-984-2063
2BR MH. Good location. CH/A
$395. mo. $200. dep.
386-755-0064
or (904)771-5924
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779

640rt Mobile Homes
U for Sale
2011 Blowout
4/2 Doublewide only $34,995
On your land or mine
Call John T 386-752-1452

4/2 on 1 ac. New carpet, roof, a/c,
FP, roomy kitchen. Koi pond,
barn/workshop, garage & shed.
MLS 78833 $115,000 Results Re-
alty, Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
4BR/2BA
Over 2000 sq ft.
of living area.
Only $61,900
Call 386-752-3743


640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
Bank Repo!! 3br/2ba Triplewide
$999 Down $377 month.
Call Paula 386-292-6290
E-mail
ammonspaula@yahoo.com
Factory Special 4/3
2280 Sq. Ft.
Home priced to go.
Call Catherine
386- 754-6737
Jacobson Homes Factory Outlet
Prices! New 2012 3/2 start at
$39,900 and New 4/2's start at
$49,900. All new homes inc
delivery and set up, ac-skirt and
steps. North Pointe Gainesville
(352)872-5566
Looking for a Quality Home?
Manufactured or Modular
Home at Royals
CallCatherine
386-754-6737
Lot Model Sale
All Show Models
w/Factory Rebate
Call Charles
386-754-6737
Lot Model Specials on 2011
Models making room for 2012
at Royals Homes
Come see Catherine
386-754-6737
Maintained on 10 ac. Two car cov-
ered carport. Back deck & a front
ramp. Wood laminate floors. MLS
79417 $94,900 Results Realty
Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473
Modular HomesBuilt
to your Speckscall
Charles at
386-754-6737

Need a Home?
Bad Credit or No Credit?
Call 386-755-2132.
We Finance You
Must have Land.
NEW 2012
28X80
4BR/2BA FACTORY REPO
$61,900
Call 386-7523743
New And Used! North Pointe
Homes in Gainesville has 4 used
homes in stock! Don't delay as
these will go Fast.
Call North Poite in Gainesville
(Hwy 441, 6 Blocks north of
Hwy 222) (352)872-5566
NEW SINGLEWIDE
2br/lba set up
w/air $799 DOWN $179. mo!
Owner will Finance!
Call Kevin 386-719-5641
ONLY $59,995
New 2012 4br/2ba 28X80 Inc.
Delivery, set up, A/C,
skirting & steps.
Call 386-752-1452
OWNER FINANCE!
New 4br Doublewide!
Set up on your land
$0 Down/$329. mo
Call Kevin 386-719-6578
PAL HARBOR
Give Away
$20,000 in Options FREE
All sizes
1-888-313-2899
Palm Harbor Homes
New Home Stimulus
5K For Your Used Mobile Home-
Any Condition
800-622-2832 ext 210
Showcase Closeout
All Palm Harbor
Lot models
Make Dreams Happen!
386-758-9538
USED DOUBLEWIDE!
3 br/2ba w/Den, SBS Fridge!
One Owner! I Finance!
Call Kevin!
386-719-6574
Used Singlewide
3br/2ba 16x803yrs Old,
Loaded
Call Charles
386-754-6737
WE HAVE access to
New & Used Homes.
Call 386-755-8854 to make sure.
You are getting your best deal

WOODGATE VILLAGE! 3BR
2BA DWMH wxfenced yd,
carport & wkshop $39,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY
INC. 755-5110 #79078

650 cMobile Home

3 br/2ba, DWMH w/lots of space
in Providence close to 1 75 on 1 ac
fenced, Ig Utility Bldg. MLS#
79810 Eastside Village Realty,
Inc, Denise Bose 386-752-5290
3br/2ba 2.75 ac. w/fish pond.
Small down plus $725 month
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

710 Unfurnished Apt.
For Rent








Amberwood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com


710 Unfurnished Apt. 5 Lots for Sale
710 For Rent 805 Lots for Sale


Brandywine Apartments
Now Renting
1, 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A.
386-752-3033 W. Grandview Ave.
Equal housing Opportunity
TDD Number 1-800-955-8771
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $99.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Great area W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage.
W/D hookups, patio, $600-750 +
Sec. 386-965-3775 or 965-5560
Greentree Townhouse
Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com
Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2-& 3 br apartments. Also, larg-
er 2/br. for $495. mo. Incl water.
386-755-2423 rigsbvrentals.com
NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled
1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living
room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951
Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $99. Limited time. Pets
welcome. with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.mvflapts.com
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $99. Spacious bedroom
washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.mvflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Move In Madness! $99. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com

720 Furnished Apts.
72 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
05530814
Century 21/
The Darby Rogers Group
Totally remodeled in down
town White Springs 3/2
$840./mo.
16884 53rd Road Wellborn
3/2 $800./mo
1306 NW Scenic Lake Drive,
Lake City 3/2 spacious
home/Lake Front $1,650./mo
453 SW Mayflower Glen "
Forth White 2/1 $750./mo
Kayla Carbono 386-623-9650

lbr/1.5ba Country Cottage, Cathe-
dral ceilings, brick fireplace, .wash-
er/dryer,1 ac fenced, private, some
pets, lease. 1st, last, sec, ref. Lake
City area $725 mo. Smoke Free
environment. 352-494-1989
2BR/1BA DUPLEX, Carport
Off Branford Hwy
$595. mo. $595. dep. Very clean..
Contact 386-752-7578
3br/1.5ba. Very clean, Block great
area. CH/A & indoor laundry.
Carport & Fenced (privacy) back
yard. $800. mo $800. dep.
(941)920-4535
3BR/2BA NEW construction
Lease option. 1st, last plus $400.
sec.$900. mo. South of town.
Credit ref's req'd. 386-755-9476
Brick 3br/2ba Large yard, garage',
CH/A. 179 SW Stanley Ct. Lake
City. $900. mo + $850 dep.
Call 386-365-8543
CUTE & CONVENIENT
2br Apartment.
$485. mo $585 dep.
386-344-2170
Spacious 3br/2ba home in town
with large bonus room, recently
remodeled. $900.mo. includes yard
service. NO PETS. Ist/last/sec Dep.
required. 386-867-9231

750 Business &
SOffice Rentals

05530343
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
900 sq' $600/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mth
8300 sq' $5533/mth
Also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor

2 Business Offices For lease:
Approximately ll00sq ft each.
Located SE Baya Ave.
Call 386-755-3456 for info
For Rent or Lease: Former Doc-'
tors office, Former professional
office & Lg open space: avail on
East Baya Ave. Competitive rates.
Weekdays 386-984-0622
evenings/weekends 497-4762
Office space across from the
Courthouse. 152 N Marion
1200 sqft Newly remodeled. $650.
mo. Excellent cond 386-961-8466

780 Condos for Sale

Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Country Club, 2br/2ba condo. New
granite tops & more. Tennis court
& pool. Elaine K Tolar 386-755-
6488 MLS# 77219 $129,900


BANK OWNED- 7 lots in the
Plantation subdivision. Priced to
sell at just $17,900. Call 386-362-
4539 for a list of available lots.
MLS#79509 Poole Realty
Beautiful buildable lot in a estab-
lished neighborhood, site built
homes only MLS# 76668 High &
Dry Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Denise Bose @ 386-752-5290
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of,
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale


1,330 heated sqft. on 1/2 ac.
Fenced. Garage made into a 4th
BR, New laminate wood floors,
new tile. $104,900 MLS#77003
Carrie Cason 386-623-2806 -
2 FOR PRICE OF 1! 2 mfg homes
on 4.62 acres, Ig wkshop &
fencing $120,000 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY INC
386-755-5110. #78340
3 Bed/1 Bath home on
Poplar St'.
Nice yard and carport.
$48,000 call 484-678-6385
3 br/2 ba brick on a .5 ac lot. Great
area. Built in 1994. 1,468 heated
sqft. Fenced yard & workshop
w/carport. $115,000 MLS#77717
Carrie Cason 386-623-2806
4/2 on 10 ac in Bell. 2;200.heated
sqft in a country setting. 10x20
frame shed. Bring all offers! MLS
76582 $89,000 Results Realty,
Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473
4BR/2BA CONCRETE BLOCK
Home ONLY $38,500; apply
TLC & make this house a home
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #79477
5 Ac for $7,500! Wooded flag lot
with 5.44 ac. Restricted to site
built homes w/a min of 1500 sqft
climatized. MLS 77872 $7,500
Access Realty 386-623-6896
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
1512 sqft. + 210 sqft Florida room.
remodeled kitchen, paint, floors &
more. $94,500 Lori Giebeig Simp-
son 386-365-5678 MLS# 79839
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4/3, lake in town. Many upgrades,
Elaine K Tolar 386-755-6488 Or
Mary Brown Whitehurst 386-965-
0887 MLS# 76085 $299,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Split plan. 3/2 Brick, Woodcrest
S/D. Fenced yard. Oversized
garage, Shed. $169,900 Elaine K
Tolar 386-755-6488 MLS# 77708
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
2 story. 4br/3ba + bonus. Mother -
in-law suite. Fenced yard nice
area. Elaine K Tolar 386-755-6488
MLS# 79349 $279,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Superb area, brick 3/2 lg screen
porch. 2 car garage. Nice back-
yard, $129,900 Lori Giebeig Simp-
son 386-365-5678 MLS# 79763
Custom built. 3/2, 1.37 ac, High
Springs. Real wood floors w/new
SS appl. 340 sq. ft. scr. lanai w/ce-
ramic tile. $178,000 MLS 79601
Access Realty 386-623-6896
FSBO Custom 3br/2.5ba. 1748sqft
Eastside Village. Oversized garage
w/extra garage in rear. Lg master
w/shower &8 tub. $149,000
386-752-2783 or 904-631-7390
Great investment property in the
city limits. Both units are occupied
w/tenants that want to stay! MLS
79206 $50,000 Results Realty,
Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473
Hallmark Real Estate
LIKE NEW COZY HOME with
excellent storage features,
3/2 Short sale $124,900
Call Ginger Parker 386-365-2135
Hallmark Real Estate TWO
STORY HOME with water access
to Gulf or River. Features boatlifts
for the angler. Call Teresa
Spradley 386-365-8343
Hallmark Real Estate
WEST OF TOWN near shopping,
medical and banks. 3/2 brick
home with workshop.
Call Janet Creel 386-719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate
SOUTH OF TOWN 3 bedroom
1-1/2 bath home on full acre.
Budget priced $72,000
Call Tanya Shaffer 386-397-4766
Just Reduced 2br/2ba 1 car garage
screen porch, fenced yard, large
utility/ workshop MLS# 76708
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Denise Bose @386-752-5290


Poole Realty Queen Anne Victori-
an, Live Oak. 3/2, wood floors.
Listed on the historic registry. Lg
yard, 2 car garage. $159,000 Kellie
Shirah 386-208-3847 MLS75212
Price Reduced! 06 Fleetwood An-
niversary Series. 3/2 + retreat off
master, privacy fence. South of
Lake City MLS 78411 $67,900
Access Realty 386-623-6896
PRICE SLASHED! 3BR/2BA
Brick home REMODELED!
Fenced backyard $69,500
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY
INC 755-5110 #78340
Remax Professionals Beautifully
kept in Callaway. Lg beds & baths.
Covered porch w/vinyl fence.
MLS 79005 $190K Missy Zecher
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Remax Professionals Brick in
nice S/D w/fenced back yard. High
ceilings, gas fireplace, more. MLS
79421 $199,000 Missy Zecher
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Remax Professionals Custom
home. Block construction. Lg.
Master, privacy fence. MLS 79569
$229,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Remax Professionals Nice home
in Woodcrest. Split floor plan. Lg
closets, screened porch, shed MLS
79506 $129,000 Missy Zecher
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Remax Professionals Open floor
plan. Wood burning fireplace.
Fenced back yard. MLS 79330
$115,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Remax Professionals Well kept &
updated. New paint, carpet, AC &
roof. Lg fenced backyard MLS
79658 $119,900 Missy Zecher
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Remax Realty Almost new, great
area! 4br/2.5ba/3cg, 3052sq, 5ac,
gas FP, SS appls, hardwood. Front
, &back porch #79877 $289,000
Pam Beauchamp 386-303-2505
Remax Realty Country Feel!
Awesome 3br/2ba, brick, 5ac, split
floor plan, Ig master, above ground
pool, 2 sheds, #79789 $219,000
Pam Beauchamp 386-303-2505
Remax Realty Restored Vintage,
zoned comm'l. 3br/2.5ba, 2208 sq.
ft., 2 ac, FP in living & master,
wkshop w/bath. #77141 $209,000
Pam Beauchamp 386-303-2505
REO Realty Group, Nancy Rog-
ers 386-867-1271-4/2, Fairly new
roof, HVAC 3yrs old & additional
insulation. Workshop has two br
MLS 77602 $149,900
REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers
867-1271- 3/1.5. Ceramic counters
& back splashes, wood laminate
flooring. Landscaping, privacy
fence. MLS 80014 $99,900
REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers
867-1271- Lake City's Country
Club 4/3 W/beautiful interior *
renovation. 2,328 sq ft.
MLS 78637 $169,900
Rockford Realty Group 3/2, new
cabinets, countertops, updated
baths, paint, flooring.Appr 1 ac
workshop/shed $77,000. Luke
Sparks 386-487-1584 MLS#77208
Rockford Realty Group Short
Sale. Nice older home in the city.
Newer metal roof, open floor plan
vw/wood floors. $55,000 MLS#
78018 Luke Sparks. 386-487-1584
Rockford Realty Group. 3/2 split
plan N. Columbia Co. Open kit.,
upgraded cabinets & appl. Cov-
ered patio, fenced yard. MLS#
79720 Jim Curry 386-755-0100
Rockford Realty Group. Cypress
Landing. Brick 3br/2ba w/lg
kitchen area, spacious great room a
neat patio. MLS#79775. $124,900.
Call Charlie Sparks. 386-755-0808


810 Home for Sale
LARGE 2,000+ SqFt 3BR/2BA
home near schools & shopping
ONLY $28,500 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC
755-5110 #77505
Lg 4/2 on 1 ac. Granite floors.
Open kitchen & Florida rm. Beau-
tiful yard & wrap around porch!
MLS 77292 $129,000 Results Re-
alty, Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Live on a Golf Course. 3/2 brick
on 1/2 ac. Formal living, dining &
family room. 2 car garage.
$129,900 Frank 386-984-5217
MLS 79567 Callaway S/D Well
kept 3br/2ba, vaulted, comer lot,
SS appl. Fenced yard & double ga-
rage. $175,000 Century 21 The
Darby-Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
MLS 79876 3br/2ba w/many up-
grades. Garage made into a 1 br
studio. 1,760 sqft in Oak Hill
Estates. $90,000 Century 21
The Darby-Rogers Co 752-6575
MLS 79982 3br/2ba, 1,805 sqft,
laminate floors, eat in kitchen
w/breakfast bar. Lg luxurious mas-
ter bath $169,900 Century 21 The
Darby-Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Poole Realty 4br/3ba, Custom
built Between Live Oak & Lake
City, 10 ac w/planted pines &
hardwoods. $249,000 Kellie
Shirah, 386-208-3847 MLS#78032
Poole Realty Custom 3/2 home,
12 ac.Vaulted cypress ceilings,
hardwood & granite counters,
stone FP, guest cottage. $255,000.
Kellie 386-208-3847 MLS#76293
Poole Realty Just Listed 1,066 sq.
ft., 3 brl ba located South of Lake
City. $57,000. Call for an appoint-
ment. 386-362-4539. MLS#79937
266 Delhia Lane, Lake City


Owner Financed land with only
$300 down payment. Half to ten ac
lots. Deas Bullard/BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

fed lake. Old renovated farmhouse.
Lg master, w/wood burning FP,
LR w/FP & updated kit. #76096
$499,000. Kellie 386-208-3847

i830 Commercial
Property
Hallmark Real Estate 53.87 ac
zoned resid'l office & resid'l
high density on By-Pass. Bank
Owned. Janet Creel 386-719-0382
or Paula Lawrence 386-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate. Centrally
located lots zoned for retail,
automotive or commercial services
on Waterford Ct. Bank owned.
Call Janet Creel 386-719-0382 or
Paula Lawrence 386-623-1973

87 0 Real Estate
870 Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605

920 Auto Parts
20 & Supplies
4 TIRES with matching
aluminum Rims. 5-lug.
Off F-150. 265/70/17
$175.00 FIRM. 386-365-5099

930 Motorcycles
HARLEY DAVIDSON Electric
Glide Classic. 2006. 12,500 mi
LOADED $12,000.
(734)255-4820

950 Cars for Sale
2003 ACURA TL3.2. Loaded.
Midnight blue. New stereo.
179k miles. Good condition.
$4,200. obo. 386-590-1206





La i t l ler

Lake City Reporter


10 Day


ONU


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for youl
* Your ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.


2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-623-9026

If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.




(36)75-54


NEED


L set UIs Write d


C Yassieour A
Classified Ad -t


810 Home for Sale
Rockford Realty Group. River
Front! 3br/2ba Kit & LR overlooks
Suwannee River. Screen porch,
Gazebo & dock. MLS#79887
$295,000 Jim Curry 386-755-0100
Rockford Realty GroupCallaway
3br/2ba built in '04. 1,568 sqft liv-
ing area. Bank approved short sale.
Make an offer! $106.800. MLS#
79248 Mark Cook. 386-288-9378
Very well kept, 3 br/2 ba on 1/2 ac
Close to 1-75 for easy commute.
Nice wood cabinetry, open floor &
much more! $169.900 MLS
#78825 Carrie Cason. 623-2806
WELLBORN! 3BR/2BA mfg
Home w/FP on 4.79 acres
$63,000 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY INC 755-5110
#79960

820 Farms &
Acreage
20 ac wooded tract. Nice piece of
land. Property is located approx 10
miles from Cedar Key. MLS
78886 $70,000 Results Realty,
Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473


4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com


HE- ELP f