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The Lake City reporter
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01784
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: February 22, 2012
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01784
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text




I YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874


I 75


T


000015 120312 ****3-DIGIT
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


3 ty Reporter


-,_________ TYREPORTER.COM




4-1 vote could fire county manager


Charter proposal drops
2-meeting requirement
on supermajority vote.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
The Columbia County Charter Review
Commission on Tuesday proposed chang-
ing the county charter so that a county man-
ager can be terminated at one county com-
mission meeting by supermajority vote, or


by a simple majority at two
consecutive meetings.
Eleven of the 13 charter
review committee mem-
bers voted in favor of the
proposal, with Glynell
Presley and Ozell Graham
dissenting. Williams
The Columbia County
Charter acts as a mini con-
stitution for the county. Proposals are
approved at charter review commission
meetings will likely be added to the ballot


during the next general election.
Charter Review Commission member
Ray Walker asked whether public notice
would be given that the county commission
planned to terminate the county manager
during its next meeting. Walker said he
believed a county manager should receive
such notice.
Charter Review Commissioner Jack
Berry said he introduced the proposal dur-
ing January's meeting and that Walker's
suggestion of notice was getting away from
his initial proposal.


"I don't like to give a guy two weeks
notice that I'm going to terminate him,"
Berry said.
According to the current county charter,
if there was a vote to terminate a county
manager, the vote would have to take place
at one meeting, then again at the next com-
mission meeting two weeks later.
I The charter review commission als,
discussed the possibility of stripping th
county manager of authority to appoil

COMMISSION continued on


A New Beginning


This photograph from the Facebook page of Mountaintop Ministries Worldwide shows the interior of a building in the group's south county compound. .


Former 'End Time' group now
Mountaintop Ministries.
By HANNAH 0. BROWN
hbrown@lakecityreporter.com
Mountaintop, Ministries, a Lake City-
based religious organization, will hold a
press conference Wednesday afternoon.
to discuss the history of the organiza-


tion, their beliefs and current opera-
tions.
The meeting will specifically
address the recent name change,
from Meade Ministries -- a reference
to the founder, of the group, Charles
Meade, who died in 2010. Before that
the organization was known as End
Time Ministries.
Mountaintop- Ministries is also


behind a recent application for a char-
ter school near the group's headquar-
ters in southern Columbia County.
Most children of church members have
traditionally been 'home-schooled..
.Time permitting, a tour 'of the church
facility may be -conducted during the
press conference, say,officials.
See coverage in Thursday's Lake City
Reporter.


Youths

nabbed/

in theft

of cola,

candy

By HANNAH 0. BROWN
hbrown@lakecityreporter.com
Three juveniles were
arrested for burglary on
Saturday by the Columbia
County Sheriffs Office. The
suspects were found at 12:30
a.m. inside the concession
stand at the South Columbia
Sports Park in Fort White
with candy and snacks in'
their possession.
A window cover of the
concession stand had been
breached, say reports. The
burglary was estimated to
have caused over $1,000 in
damage to the building.
, Burglaries also occurred
at the concession stand the
previous Wednesday and
Thursday. Soft drinks were
stolen in both instances.
Deputy Todd Green and
Deputy Randy Harrison had
been conducting enhanced
patrols of the area because of
the recurring criminal activ-
ity when the suspects were
discovered on Saturday.
The juveniles were arrest-
ed and booked into the
Columbia County Detention
Facility without incident.
After booking, they were
released to their parents.
At this point, the juveniles
have been charged with bur-
glary and criminal mischief,
though additional charges
may be possible as the inves-
tigation of the previous bur-
glaries continues.


Residents urged

to be on alert.


Fraud schemes
designed to get
people to pay.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
The Columbia County
Sheriff's Office is warning
local residents to watch
their wallets in the wake of
scams that have bilked folks
out of a bundle.
Sgt. Ed Seifert, Columbia
County Sheriff's Office pub-
lic information officer, said
an unidentified person spoke
to a local pair by phone and
told them their grandson
had been arrested in New
York and they needed to
send bond money to secure
his release.
The victims sent the


funds to Mexico 'then real-
ized they had become the
victim of a scam.
The victims then spoke
with their grandson who
was fine and had not been
arrested.
"Since the money was
sent to Mexico, it is highly
unlikely that any of the vic-
tim's money will be recov-
ered," Seifert said in a pre-
pared statement
Authorities are warning
residents of several active
scams targeting seniors and
others including:
Bogus charities peo-
ple are approached at their
door or by telephone asking
to donate to a legitimate-
sounding charity;
*Home improvement
scams people are
SCAMS continued on 3A


One hurt in crash
I ~., as a


COURTESY
This sedan struck a tree around 9:15 a.m. at the intersection of Amberwood Loop and McFarlane Avenue on Tuesday. The
driver was taken to a local hospital for treatment. No further information was available at press time.


ll !Ul


Vol 138 N. 17
CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


7460
Chance of Showers
WEATHER, 2A


Opinion .......
Calendar...
Obituaries
Advice & Comics.
Puzzles .. .. . ...


4A
5A
.. 5A
S. 4B
. 2B


TODAY IN COMING
PEOPLE WEDNESDAY
Colbel. release:. L.:.cal ne.
boo.'. .r. fl-a. pi: le r ,,urt'iiduL


.


~ias~-~~---Ll-?-i


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2012


1- -









2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2012

I Celebrity Birthdays


FLOOR I D A"
M 1 Saturday:
7-18-37-41-45-51
x5


3o* Tuesday:
A Afternoon: 9-9-6
Night: 8-2-0


t 4- Tuesday:
Afternoon: 5-7-2-5
Night: 7-0-8-3


C 0- Monday:
V 010-18-27-30-35


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Colbert releases book on flag pole


NEW YORK With the blessing
of Maurice Sendak, Stephen Colbert
is releasing a children's book.
Grand Central Publishing said
'Tuesday that it will publish "I Am a
- Pole (And So Can You!)" on May 8.
I In a two-part "Colbert Report" seg-
ment that aired last month, Colbert
previewed the book with "Where the
. Wild Things Are" author Sendak.
Claiming he was looking to "cash-
in" on celebrity children's books,
,Colbert penned an illustrated story
about a flag pole's
'quest for identity.
Sendak called the
book "terribly ordi- A
nary" but acknowl-
edged, "The sad thing
is I like it."
In. a statement,
Colbert said: "I hope Colbert
the minutes you
and your loved ones
spend reading it are as fulfilling as
the minutes I spent writing it."
Grand Central previously pub-
lished Colbert's 2007 bestseller "I.
Am America (And So Can You!)"
It will also publish his next book,
"America Again: Re-Becoming the
Greatness We Never Weren't" in
October.
After a two-episode hiatus due to
his ailing mother, Colbert returned
to "The Report" on Monday.

Idol star Lambert will sing
lead for rock group Queen
LONDON Adam Lambert has .
nabbed his dream gig: Singing
vocals for the iconic British band
Queen as they headline the sec-
ond day of the U.K. rock festival
Sonisphere 2012. .
The former "American Idol" sing-
er-songwriter will step into the late
Freddie Mercury's shoes for the -
band's July 7 set at Knebworth Park


in Stevenage, north of London.
Queen's Brian May and Roger
Taylor confirmed the one-time col-
laboration Tuesday
with Lambert, 30, a
runner-up in season
eight of the popular
American TV song -
competition.
The Sonisphere
show marks the third
tinie Lambert has
sung with the land- Lambert
mark band, follow-
ing an eight-minute set at the MTV
Europe Awards in November to cel-
ebrate Queen's Global Icon Award,
and a 2009 performance of "We Are -
the Champions" on "American Idol."
"It's great, they are the coolest
guys, they are so down-to-earth,"
Lambert told The Associated Press
in a recent interview in London.
Mercury's final concert with
Queen also took place at Knebworth
in August 1986. But Lambert, who
is also gay and theatrical, insisted
he was not trying to take Mercury's
place.

Bieber's second book set
for release September
NEW YORK He's only 17, but
pop sensation Justin Bieber is back
with his second book.
HarperCollins announced Tuesday
that it will publish "Justin Bieber:
Just Getting Started." The book is
described as "the second official pho-
tographic book" from the multipfati-
num-selling superstar.
The company says it will be
released worldwide in September.
The new book promises a look
inside the world of Bieber: tour-
ing the globe, making a movie and
recording his new album.
His first'book, titled "First Step 2,
Forever: My Story," was published in


October 2010. It has sold more than a
million copies in 25 languages.

Angelou back home after
brief stint in hospital
WINSTON-SALEM Nationally
renowned poet Maya Angelou is
recovering from a brief illness that
forced her to cancel a planned
speech in Texas. "
Angelou's lecture agent David
LaCamera said Tuesday the
83-year-old poet was set to speak on
Wednesday but came down with an
illness that left her in the hospital for
three days.
LaCamera says Angelou is resting
at home in Winston-Salem, N.C., and
can't travel. He says her doctor told
her that she's on the road a lot and
has to cool it for afew days.
LaCamera declined to describe
the nature of the illness that kept
Angelou hospitalized until her
release on Saturday. ,

PBS trivia graphic feeds
'Downton Abbey' addiction
LOS ANGELES PBS is feeding
the addiction of "Downton Abbey"
fans with an online trivia graphic.
Among the tidbits: Jim Carter,
who plays dignified butler Carson,
takes part in charity bike rides
worldwide, and Elizabeth McGovern,
who is the show's Lady Cora, is in a
band called Sadie & the Hotheads.
The PBS graphic doesn't address
the fate of star-crossed lovers Lady
Mary and Matthew (Michelle
Dockery, Dan Stevens).
"Downton Abbey" is about an
English estate's family and servants
in the early 20th century. It has '
proved a hit for PBS.
The second-season finale airs 9 :
p.m. Sunday on public TV stations.
S .. (AP)


- ---I---- -- ---I--5 -


Announcer Don Pardo
is 94.
Hollywood "ghost
singer" Marni Nixon is 82.
Movie director
Jonathan Demme is 68.


Actor John Ashton is
64.
Basketball Hall of
Famer Julius Erving is 62.
Actress Drew
Barrymore is 37.


Daily Scripture

"The commandments, 'You
shall not commit adultery,' 'You
shall not murder,' 'You shall
not steal,' 'You shall not covet,'
and whatever other command
there may be, are summed up
in this one command: 'Love
your neighbor as yourself.' Love
does no harm to a neighbor.
Therefore love is the fulfillment
of the law."
Romans 13:9-10 NIV


Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293 BUSINESS
Fax number........ .. 752-9400 Controller Sue Brannon.. .. 754-0419
Circulation ..............755-5445 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
Online... www.lakecltyreporter.com CIRCULATION
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub- Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
listed Tuesday through Sunday at 180 should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
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Member Audit Eureau of Circulation and Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
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All material herein is property of theLake in Columbia County, customers should
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CORRECTION

The Lake 'City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items,
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this
space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA


Judge: Orlando can
build All-Star fence
ORLANDO Orlando
officials have been given the
green light to build a secu-
:.nrity fence around the arena
that will host this weekend's
NBA All-Star game.
A Florida judge on
Tuesday denied a motion
for a temporary injunction
that would have stopped the
erection of the fence.
Some owners of nearby
businesses filed the motion,
claiming the fence would
put them outside the All-
"Star festivities.
But Judge Alice Blackwell
agreed with city and arena
officials that the fence is
needed for crowd control
and public safety. '
She says business own-
ers failed to. show that they
would suffer irreparable
harm.
City officials say the
10 affected businesses
were involved throughout
the planning process and
declined a plan that would
have placed them inside the
perimeter of the barrier.

Redistricting decision
has justices split
TALLAHASSEE The
Florida Supreme Court is
divided over how-to proceed
with a review of legislative
redistricting.
By a narrow 4-3 vote the
justices on Tuesday agreed
they need to know where
incumbent lawmakers
live. That's because a new
amendment to the Florida
Constitution prohibits the
Legislature from intention-
ally favoring incumbents.
Challengers, including
Democrats and groups that
backed the Fair District
amendment, contend the
Republican-cofntrolled
Legislature violated that
ban.
Chief Justice Charles
Canady and Justice Ricky
Polston argued the justices
. don't need the addresses
because ilctiri review should


be "extremely limited." become law because the
That echoed written argu- House version (HB,299)
ments submitted by the hasn't moved. Leaders there
House, Senate and Attorney liken it to needless govern-
General Pam Bondi. ment intrusion into people's
Justice R. Fred Lewis did lives.
not explain his reason for "Ifs difficult to legislate
dissenting. every kind of human behav-
The high court has ior and then try and enforce
scheduled three hours of it," said Rep. Brad Drake,
oral argument for Feb. 29. who chairs the House's
highway safety subcommit-
Jury suggests life for tee. "People just need to be
man who killed wife responsible for themselves."
House Speaker Dean
MELBOURNE Jurors Cannon has also opposed
have recommended that a the bill.
central Florida man spend The proposal would out-
the rest of his life in prison law texting by all drivers
for killing his estranged wife operating motor vehicles.
and a man she was living Thirty-five states and the
with. District of Columbia already
The Brevard County have bans.
jury made its recommenda- A spokeswoman for
tion Tuesday. The same Republican Gov. Rick Scott,
panel convicted 41-year-old a proponent of fewer regula-
Patrick Wharen Sr. last tions and limited govern-
week on two counts of first- ment, has previously said he,
degree murder. A judge will. hasn't taken a position on
likely follow the jury's rec- a ban.
commendation a't a Thursday
hearing. Florida Today Fatal home invasion
reports that Wharen had gets man 40 years
been facing a possible death
sentence. OCALA- A north
Authorities say Wharen Florida man has been
fatally shot 34-year-old Kelly sentenced to 40 years in
Wharen and 19-year-old prison for a fatal home
Jonathon Vuick during invasion.
a confrontation at Kelly A Marion County judge
Wharen and Vuick's home sentenced 34-year-old
in April 2008. Jason Hardy on Monday
after he was convicted of
Budget panel clears home invasion robbery,
text-and-drive ban burglary and kidnapping
all with a firearm. The
TAllAHASSEE A state- Ocala Star-Banner reports
wide texting-while-driving that Hardy's sentence had
ban bill that has eluded been capped as part of
passage for several years a deal with prosecutors
cleared the Senate's budget to testify against Brian
panel on Tuesday. Hubbard, who authorities
The Budget Committee believe was the master-
unanimously voted for the mind behind the robbery.
bill (SB 416) that already Authorities say Hardy
has made it through three was one of six people
previous Senate panels who broke into a Marion
with just two votes against Oaks home in April 2006
it. Several interest groups, to steal drugs and money.
including AAA and Florida Austin was accused of
Sheriffs Association, sup- fatally shooting 17-year-old
port the bill. Kindrell Lamar Stocker,
It goes to the floor of the who was an innocent guest
Senate for final passage. at the home.
Supporters worry it won't (AP)


THE WEATHER


~* I'.


PARTLY PARTLY
" CLOUDY "CLOUDY


H65L036.i HI 6LO46
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Pensacola
70,/60


M esta
73/59
Tallahassee Lake City,
72 58 74 60
* Gainesville *
Panama Cy 75. 60
70/61 Ocala
76.61

Tampa *
76/65


* lack
7'

Day


Orian
80 6


ksU aie Cape Canaveral
4/59 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
ytona Beach Fort Myers
663 Gainesville
Jacksonville
do Cape Canaveral Key West
62 78/6.3 Lake City
Miami
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
81 65 0 Orlando


*. FL Lauderdale Panama City
FL Myers 79 67 Pensacola
82/65 Naples Tallahassee
79,63 Miami Tampa
K /67 Valdosta
ey est68 W. Palm Beach
78.,68


h som


TEMPERATURES .
Hign Tuesday
LowTuesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low
PRECIPITATION
Tuesday
Month total
Year total , "- "
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


S 70
45
71
46
86 inr 1997
22 in 1958

0.00"
0.10"
0.95"
2.35"
5.66"


SUN,
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset tom.
MOON
Moonride today
Moonset today
Moonrise torn.
Moonset tom.


7a Ip 7p la 6a
Wednesday Thursday







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7:04 a.m.
6:24 p.m.
7:03 a.m.
6:25 p.m.

7:10 a.m.
7:21 p.m.
7:42 a.m.
8:16 p.m.


On this date
in 1773, many
persons in New
England froze
extremities while
going to church, in
what was known
as the "Cold
Sabbath".*


15i uildes to un
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.cm


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2012 3A


Mardi Gras at FGC


JMO II~ nlIME I nWL MLf I..." ,Lty Reporte r
Florida Gateway College students Ashley Carroll (from left), 26, Joshua Starnes, 23, and Cheri Piccioni, 19, dance during a
Mardi Gras celebration Tuesday at the college.



SCAMS: Columbia residents urged to be on alert?

Continued From Page 1A


approached at their home or by tele-
phone by at least two individuals
posing as contractors that attempt to
persuade the property owner that the
home needs repairs;
Thefts from within the home
- residents approached at the door
of their home by at least two people
who use a ruse to get inside the
home. Once inside, one of the scam
artists gets the homeowner's atten-
tion while the other probes the home
looking for valuables;
Bank investigator scheme a
person is targeted outside the bank
or by telephone by a stranger who
says they are a police officer and asks
for the person's help in catching a
dishonest bank employee.
Sweepstakes scams the tar-


.geted person gets a telephone call
from either Canada or a state other
than Florida and explains the tar-
geted person has won a substantial
prize, but in order to collect the prize,
the sweepstakes winner must first
send money to the company.
"The sheriff's office receives sever-
al of these complaints a year," Seifert
said. "The majority of the scams are
not new but are updated and modi-
fied by the scam artists."
Seifert said people should always
verify information with other family
members on a loved one supposed-
ly arrested or in an accident before
sending any money.
He also urged residents to hang
up on telemarketers if they don't
feel comfortable with the conversa-


tion and to stay away from deals
that sound too good to be true.
He said people should not be taken
in by promises of miracle cures for
health problems and shouldn't send
nioney at the request of a telephone
solicitor.
"Unfortunately, most of these
scams originate from foreign coun-
,tries, making the identification and
apprehension of the suspects diffi-
cult," Seifert said. "It is also very
difficult to recover any money lost by
the victims. It is our hope that a we'll
informed public will not fall victim
to these scams. The sheriff's office
wants to ensure that our commu-
nity is aware that the scam artists are
active and to protect their financial
assets."


Scott builds up campaign


accounts for re-election


By GARY FINEOUT
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE Gov. Rick Scott
is quickly and somewhat quietly -
building up a large campaign account
for re-election even -though the race
is three years away.
In a matter of just four months, a
political committee tied to Scott has
received nearly $550,000 with checks
coming in various special interest
groups and a six-figure check from a
well-known South Florida health care
businessman.
Democrats say they aren't sur-
prised by Scott's decision to raise so
much money so far in advance of the
2014 election. They maintain it shows
that he's worried about his politi-
cal future. Recent polls have shown
Scott's favorable rating remains
below 50 percent.
"He's vulnerable and his agenda is
too extreme and he's vastly unpopu-
lar," said Scott Arceneaux, executive
director of the Florida Democratic
Party.
But Tony Fabrizio, a top political
adviser for Scott, said Tuesday there
is no reason for the governor to wait
since he's already made it clear he
plans to seek a second term.
"What's the logic to waiting?"
Fabrizio said.
He added that as the economy
improves and the state's unemploy-
ment rate drops, the governor's poll


Florida Gov. Rick Scott, center, gets down with D.J. Ro Parrish during his "work-
day" as a D.J. aboard the Carnival Cruise Lines' ship "Carnival Imagination,"
Friday, Nov. 4, 2011


number will inevitably rise.
The decision to start raising large
amounts of money now could help
dissuade any talk of a primary chal-
lenge within his own party and send
a message to any Democratic con-
tenders.
Scott spent more than $70 million
of his own money to win his first bid
for office, but the buildup of money
in his own political committee just


shows how daunting it could be for
someone to take on the multi-mil-
lionaire.
Florida law caps donations to a
campaign at $500, but donations to
certain types of political committees
are unlimited. Florida law allows
these organizations to coordinate
with a campaign and run television
and radio ads as long as they do not
say vote for or against someone.


Lake City


promotes


Van-Skyhawk


Wastewater plant
superintendent is
named director.

By HANNAH 0. BROWN
hbrown@lakecityreporter.com
Sonny Van-Skyhawk
was named Wastewater
Director by the City
Council at the Tuesday
night's meeting. Van-
Skyhawk previously occu-
pied the role of Wastewater
Plant Superintendent.
"Since he has come
on with the city, he has
taken on several additional
duties, of which he has
performed admirably,"
said Dave Clanton, execu-
tive director of Lake City
Wastewater Plant. "I guess
in a way, I'd like to reward
him with a promotion and
some additional duties."
The position will be
funded by the service
Enterprise Fund. In
accordance with this new
position, a maintenance
position may be dropped
because of lack of need
as well as to help fund
Van-Skyhawk's new pro-
motion.


Abandoned wells to be
filled in

The city will enter into
a contract with Cal-Tech
Testing, Inc., a corporation
that provides construction
materials field testing and
gathering services, to filll4
wells from the abandoned
water treatment facility
with concrete.
The city is required by
law to fill the underground
holes of the wells. The size of
the well cavities is unknown
because of the potential for
sediment absorbtion that
occurs over time. However,
Clanton cited video evidence
of the wells comprising a
series of intermittent holes
rather than one large cavity.
Councilman George Ward
suggested a limit be set on
the amount of concrete alot--"-.
ted in the Cal-Tech con
so as keep expenses
the project at a manageab
level.
The previous facility,
located near Melrose Park
Elementary School, was
abandoned for a larger facil-
ity that uses significantly
less chlorine, according to
Mayor Stephen Witte.


COMMISSION: 4-1 vote

could fire county manager

Continued From Page 1A


and terminate department
heads.
Kurt Spitzer, a consul-
tant hired by the Columbia
County Charter 'Review
Commission through con-
tract, said past practice
has been to give the coun-
ty manager" tie author-'
ity to hire and fire depart-
ment heads. However,
the department head can
appeal the county manag-
er's decision to the county
commission.
Berry said if there is
going to be an appeals pro-
cess for terminations, there
should be a confirmation


process conducted by the
county commission.
"The whole process ,is
out "of whack the way it is,"
he said.
Commissioner members
discussed taking the appeal
process out and allowing
teriiiffatidins be left up to
the county administrator.
However, officials did not
reach a decision and asked
Spitzer to bring copies ,of
other county charters so
they could see how other
counties handle the issue.
Spitzer said he would
provide the information at
the March 29 meeting.


By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE Two
environmental groups noti-
fied the U.S. Forest Service
on Tuesday that they'll sue
the agency if it doesn't agree
to remove the Rodman
Reservoir's dam because it
is imperiling manatees and
shortnose sturgeon, both
endangered species.
Efforts to remove the
George Kirkpatrick Dam
in Putnam County, drain,
the reservoir and restore
the Ocklawaha River
have met resistance in
the past from the Florida
Legislature, the St. Johns
River Water Management


District, local government
officials and bass fishing
interests. The dam is a ves-
tige of the ill-fated Cross
Florida Barge Canal proj-
ect, which was to cross
Central Florida and link
the Gulf of Mexico and the
Atlantic Ocean.
The dam is named for a
former state senator who
fought to preserve the
9,600-acre, 15-mile-long res-
ervoir that attracts 'anglers
from across the nation.
The environmentalists
filed the 60-day notice of their
intent to sue four decades
after President Richard
Nixon halted the cross-state
barge canal project because
it was a."failed boondoggle".


Both sides claim victory

in water-rule dispute


By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press
TALLAHASEE Both
sides in a dispute over water
pollution, rules are claim-
ing victory from a federal
court ruling that ordered the
Environmental Protection
Agency to implement the new
regulations for Florida's lakes
and springs by March 6 but
not for rivers and streams.
The Florida Department
of Environmental Protection,
meanwhile, on Tuesday sub-
mitted a pair of proposed state
rules covering both types of
inland waters to the EPA State
officials want the federal agen-


cy to adopt their rules instead.
Business, agriculture and
utility interests favor the state
rules, contending the federal
versions would be too expen-
sive to implement
Environmental groups
support the EPA, saying the
state's proposal would be too
weak to curtail toxic algae
blooms that are choking
many Florida waters, killing
fish and causing breathing
problems and skin rashes for
humans.
Both sets of rules would
set numeric limits for nitro-
gen and phosphorus con-
tained in such pollutants as
sewage, fertilizer and animal


waste that feed the algae,
but they differ in some key
details. Either would replace
existing state rules that use
words to describe what's
considered pollution instead
of setting numeric limits on
the nutrients.
U.S. District Judge Robert
Hinkle upheld the federal
rules on Saturday but gave
EPA until May 21 to revise
the river and streams provi-
sion because he found it to
be arbitrary and capricious.
David Guest, an
Earthjustice lawyer who rep-
resents the environmental
groups, called that a "techni-
cal defect."


Columbia County's Most Wanted


Larry Leon Dortly, Jr.
DOB: 12/5/80
Height: 5' 11" Weight: 180 Ibs.
Hair: Black-Eyes: Brown
Identifiers: 8 Gold Teeth
Wanted For: VOP Sale of a
Controlled Substance Within
1,000 ft. of a School or Church,
Possession of Cocaine with
Intent to Sell or Deliver Within
1,000 ft. of a School or Church


Earl Alexander
McFatten
DOB: 2/25/63
Height: 57" Weight: 200 Ibs.
Hair: Black Eyes: Brown
Scar: Left Cheek and Eye
Tattoos: Left Arm Devil
Wanted For: FTA VOP Hearing
Driving While License Suspended
or Revoked Habitual Offender


WANTED AS OF 2/2012012
ANYONE WITH INFORMATION ON THE WHEREABOUTS OF THESE INDIVIDUALS IS ASKED TO CALL CRIME STOPPERS OF COLUMBIA COUNTY.
WE DO NOT WANT YOUR NAME, JUST YOUR INFORMATION
The likeness of suspects is supplied by the Columbia County Sheriff's Office Warrants Division and/or other law enforcement agencies.
The cases are active at the time of publication unless otherwise noted. Crime Stoppers of Columbia County, Inc., and their volunteers
are jointly and individually exempt from any and all liability which might arise as a result of the publication of public records.

CALL (386) 754-7099 OR
SUBMIT A WEB TIP AT
F COLUMBIA COUNT www.columbiacrimestoppers.net
Funded by the Crime Stoppers Trust Fund; Administered by the Office of the Attorney General


Groups vow to sue

for removal of dam















OPINION


Wednesday, February


~ ~ --ANOTHER


ONE
OPINION


Anew

approach

to food-

stamp

fraud

The federal food
stamp program,
administered by the
U.S. Department of
Agriculture, is per-
haps the nation's most impor-
tant nutrition program.
At an annual cost of $75 bil-
lion, food stamps helped feed
46.2 million Americans last year.
Unfortunately, the program
is afflicted by a persistent and
resilient form of fraud that
undercuts its intent and credibil-
ity with the broader public.
Crooked retailers encourage
food stamp recipients to trade
their benefits for cash or ineligi-
ble merchandise like liquor and
tobacco, at a substantial markup.
The recipient swipes the USDA
benefit card and punches in a
PIN number, as with a debit
card. The government or a par-
ticipating bank reimburses the
retailer for the full price of what
has been represented as legal
merchandise.
Scripps Howard News
Service reporter Isaac Wolf, in
a computer-assisted investiga-
tion, obtained a USDA list of
4,600 permanently disqualified
vendors under the Freedom of
Information Act. He compared
it against a USDA list of all the
stores accepting food stamps,
finding that about a third 1,492
of the' bnnied stores continue'
to take them. Some of these
may represent a legitimate
change of ownership, but Wolf
found dozens of cases where
state and local records indicate
that the owners are the same.
Impressed by.Wolf's investi-
gation, the USDA is now incor-
porating his methods to search
the same records and broadly
expand the number of vendor
applications marked for closer
review. And it is doing follow-up
investigations of locations Wolf
identified as participating in the
food stamp program under false
pretenses.
We wish the USDA investi-
gators good hunting. It's too
beneficial a program to be so
coarsely tarnished.
Scrip'ps Howard News Service

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of


the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


22,2012


A succession of high-
profile left-wing
decisions and ini-
tiatives in recent
weeks drive home
the extent to which the left is
changing the face of America.
Notable among these are the
decision by a federal appeals
court in California to uphold
a lower court's finding of the
state's Proposition 8 defining
marriage as between a man and
a woman as unconstitutional;
the Susan G. Komen foundation
reversing its decision;,after a '
tsunami of left-wing pressure,
to withdraw funding from
Planned Parenthood; and the
Obama administration refusing
to grant a religious exemption
from the new health care law's
employer mandate requiring
provision of free contraception
and sterilization services as
part of coverage.
These developments are,
I think, helping to buoy the
newly surging candidacy of
Rick Santorum, former senator
from Pennsylvania.
Why?
Santorum stands out in the
current Republican field in the
clarity of his image and identity.
There is little doubt about who
the man is, and there are no
glaring inconsistencies between
who he says he is today and his
past behavior and positions.
Even Ron Paul, who is clos-
est to Santorum in consistency
and clarity of image, carries the
baggage of sickening racist and
anti-Semitic newsletters that
once carried his name.
So the issue with Santorum
is whether you buy what he is
selling, not whether you have to


www.lakecityreporter.com


Star Parker-
parker@urbancure.org
worry that there are different
Santorums hiding in the closet,
waiting to emerge when politi-
cal calculations might seem to
J Justify their appearance. :
And candidate Santorum is .
squeaky-clean conservative.
There is no pretense that so-
called social issues are a world
apart from economic issues.
And there is no inclination
to insert social issues as a foot-
note to please religious conser-
vatives while just talking about
the economy because this is
the main thing on everyone's
mind.
While the Republican Party
splits on whether "values"
should stand front and center
on its platform, Democrats and
the left make no pretense about
this.
The political left, led today
by President Barack Obama,
is defined and energized by an
ongoing sense of mission to
wage a cultural war in America.
And the left is determined to
win this war, to obliterate tra-
ditional values and to sever the
connection between rights and
responsibilities.
The three recent left-wing
victories all touch these key
areas: End the traditional insti-
tution of marriage as a bulwark
of our society. Continue to


promote sex as recreation and
relegate the life created by this
activity as a trivial byproduct
that we allow to be destroyed
with ease. Destroy the sanctity
of private property so govern-
ment can finance irresponsibil-
ity with other people's money.
Obama is unapologetic about
this agenda and even has the
audacity to call it Christian for.
government to borrow trillions
on the American people's good
credit and then permit politi-
ciansto determine who should
:::,be'taxed)to !pay for it a4 :, ,
The Santorum surgej, think,
is being fueled by a growing
sense that our economic crisis
is at its core a moral crisis. And
there is a growing sense among
Republicans and conserva-
tives that we must recognize
the cultural war being waged
and engage it with clarity and
aggressiveness that matches
that of the left.
An America with broken
families, with an aging popula-*
tion growing old alone, with,
no educational framework to
pass traditional truths on to our
children, and with no private
property so that our wealth and
our wages remain exposed to
politicians, is an America with-
out a future.
Santorum is offering the
very clear, consistent conserva-
,tive alternative to this disaster.
I think it's why he is becoming
the biggest surprise so far of
this campaign.

Star Parker is president of
CURE, Coalition on Urban
Renewal and Education
(www.urbancure.org) and
author of three books.


5 long months until GOP convention


M aybe the
Republicans
will have a real
whiz-bang con-
vention when
they get to Tampa in August.
The odds are still against it,
despite the neck-and-neck race
between Rick Santorum and
Mitt Romney.
The polls show them in a
dead heat nationally, but the
betting still is on Romney to
win, even if it's by a nose. The
usual reason applies here:
money. Romney has more of it
than Santorum, and that means
buying the advertising and
organization necessary. But this
is a battle for the nomination,
and the Republican conserva-
tives who have fed Santorum's
rise quite obviously don't count
Romney as their best choice.
If Romney should falter in
his home state of Michigan, in
the face of growing support for
Santorum, the entire dynamic
might change. Then the question
would become whether the for-


Dan K. Thomasson

mer Pennsylvania senator with
the retro ideas on social issues
could whip President Barack
Obama, given that Americans
are mainstream voters who rare-
ly shift far left or right Clearly,
Santorum appeals to much of
the GOP's sizable right-oriented
base. Are Republicans willing to
put ideology above electability?
Don't bet against it
So far, electability has played
a major role in Romney's suc-
cess, as up and down as that has
been. He is considered moder-
ate enough to at least hold his
own with independents and
those Republicans who gener-
ally vote the middle. Should
Romney be forced more to the


right just to win the nomination,
his chances of beating Obama
also diminish. This is especially
true because economic indica-
tions including employment
figures suddenly have given
the president a sunnier re-elec-
tion forecast
There are so many vari-
ables it is hard to keep up with
them. The one constant is that
Romney, despite his front-
running status for most of the
campaign, clearly doesn't excite
Republicans. A whole batch of
the GOP faithful find him not
only dull and perhaps a bit too
privileged, but also the perfect
model of the very rich white guy
who has dominated American
politics from the nation's very
beginning.
In the meantime, you may
want to plug your ears, close
your eyes and think about other
things.

* Dan K. Thomasson is former
editor of Scripps Howard News
Service.


4A


their upward trajectory until
Election Day, voters are likely
to look to a new leader to heal
their wounded wallets.

* The Washington Times


Liberals' recent victories


fuel Santolrum surge


ANOTHER
VIEW


Obama's


gas-price


spike

H ere we go again.
Gasoline prices are
rising rapidly and
already have shat-
tered the $4-a-gal-
lon mark in California. Industry
analysts say the all-time nation-
al average record of $4.11 could
be shattered this summer.
Some stations in Los Angeles
are charging $4.93. Americans
hired Barack Obama in 2008
partly in hope of finding relief
from that summer's pain at the
pump. As the agony returns,
voters could be primed by
November to pull the lever for
anybody but Barack.
The Golden State has the
unwelcome distinction of hav-
ing the nation's highest gas
prices, having reached $4.03
on Presidents Day, accord-
ing the AAA's Daily Fuel
Gauge Report Though the
national average was $3.56,
the California price jumped
.18.9 cents in just the past
week. Alaska, Florida and tra- .. -
ditionally pricey states in the
Northeast are not far behind.
The standard rule is that each
penny increase sucks about $1
billion out'of the economy, so ,
the financial impact will be felt
from coast to coast
This latest gas-price jolt is
predictable. President Obama
has done much to impede the ,
supply of petroleum products to
consumers. Most particularly,
:he exploited the 2010 BP oil
spill'-in the Gulf of Mexico as
: an excuse to clamp down on
oil drilling in the Gulf and also
along the Atlantic and Pacific
coasts.
Last week, the Republican-
led House of Representatives
passed an energy bill by a vote
of 237-187 that would reverse
Mr. Obama's recent deci-
sion to block construction of
the Keystone XL oil pipeline.
With his December announce-
ment to delay a final ruling
on the project until 2013, Mr.
Obama, as a favor to his radi-
cal anti-business political base, -
passed up an opportunity to
create an estimated 20,000
construction jobs. The House
bill grants pipeline developer
TransCanada a permit to pro-
ceed with the project and
allows for expanded oil drilling
in offshore reservoirs and in
the protected Arctic National
Wildlife Refuge.
If Senate Majority Leader
Harry Reid sticks to his usual
script, he'll prevent the upper
chamber from even voting on
the measure, saving the presi-
dent from the embarrassment
of vetoing an economy-boosting
measure in an election year.
Additionally, fellow Democratic
senators can be expected to
reiterate support for the presi-
dent's move to end tax breaks
for the oil industry. Don't be
surprised if they also call for
hearings to probe "price-fixing"
by oil executives as the pain at
the pump inevitably increases.
Mr. Obama would be wise to
make a virtue of necessity and
orchestrate Senate passage of
the energy bill. By signing it,
he could win back erstwhile
supporters disillusioned with
his economy-crippling leader-
ship.
More likely, though, Mr.
Obama will simply double
down on class-warfare rhetoric
about the oil industry needing
to pay its "fair share" in hopes
of diverting attention from
the growing gas-price crunch.
Promises of hope and change
won't smooth the campaign
trail for the president this time
around. If gas prices continue











LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2012 5A


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* Submit Community Calendar
announcements by mail or drop off at
the Reporter office located at 180 E.
Duval St., via fax to (386) 752-9400 or
email lhampson@lakecityreporter.com


Feb. 22

Ash Wednesday services
Ash Wednesday services
Feb. 22 at noon and 7:30
p.m. at Our Redeemer
Lutheran Church, 5056
SW State Road 47. Every
Wednesday during lent ser-
vices will be at 7:30 p.m.
Feb. 23

Money Matters
Want to manage your
money better? The UF/
IFAS Columbia County
Extension Office is offer-
ing a series of four classes
on finances. Classes
include money manage-
ment, credit, FISCO Score
and investment on Feb.
16th, 23rd and March 1st
and 8th from 5:30-6:30 at
the Extension office, 164
SW Mary Ethel Lane,
at the Columbia County
Fairgrounds. Cost is $2 per
class or $5 for the series. .
Spaces are limited and reg-
istration date is by Feb. 10.
Please call Jenny Jump at
(386) 752-5384 to register
or for more info.
Gospel Concert
The Kingdom Heirs,
a Southern Gospel male
quartet, will perform,
Thursday, Feb. 23 at
6:30 p.m. at Westside
Baptist Church, 10000
West Newberry Road in
Gainesville. A $12 donation
per person will be request-,
ed at the door and the
concert will benefit mis-
sionary work in Nicaragua.
For information call (386)
496-3629.
Landlord meeting
Rental owners and
managers are welcome to
attend a landlord meeting
Thursday, Feb. 23 at 6 p.m.
in the Shands LakeShore
Medical Center conference
room. Attorneys William
Haley and Matt Mitchell,
who heads the real prop-
erty section of his law
firm, will speak on evic-
tions, leases, deposits and
landlord responsibility. For
information call 755-0110.

Feb. 24

FFA benefit auction
The Fort White and
Columbia FFA chapters
will be holding their 2nd
Annual Benefit auction
on Friday, Feb. 24 at 6:30
p.m. in the Columbia High
School cafeteria. The pro-
ceeds from this auction
will help over 150 FFA
members further their
education in Agriscierice
and attend various FFA
contest and leadership
events throughout the
year. Everyone is invited to
attend.
Art Exhibit
The Art League of North
Florida invites the commu-
nity to the 7th


Annual Spring Members
Art Exhibit at the Levy
Performing Arts Center,
Florida Gateway College.
The exhibit opens with a
reception on
Feb. 24 at 5 p.m. There
will be refreshments,
award presentation, and
art from area artists
in several mediums. The
exhibit is on display from
Feb. 24 through March 22.
Artists that are not mem-
bers are invited to join the
Art League and be eligible
for judging in this show.
Additional information
contact Jim Whiteside at
housesnoops2005@hotmail.
com.
Fish dinner
A fish dinner will be
available at Our Redeemer
Lutheran Church, 5056 SW
State Road 47, Feb. 24 and"
every Friday starting at 3
p.m.
Columbia Top Talent
The Columbia Top
Talent show for Fort White
High School will be Friday,
Feb. 24 at 7 p.m. at the
school. Come out and enjoy
some wonderful singing
from these young adilts.
Local landscape event
Lowe's Home
Improvement, 3463 NW
Bascom Norris Drive in
Lake City, will host a local
landscape event from noon
to 2 p.m on Feb. 24. There
will be vendors, samples,
and information for com-
mercial and home garden-
ers. Open to the public.
Feb. 25

Police Ball
The Lake City Police
Department's 19th annual
Police Ball Charity Gala to
benefit Haven Hospice will
be Saturday, Feb. 25' from 7
to. 11 p.m. Join us for good
food, music and felloW-- '
ship,,The attire is formal.
Individual tickets are $50.
Reserved tables and spon-
sorships are available. Call
719-5742 for information.
Community Concerts
The UNF Chamber
Singers perform 3 p.m.
Feb. 25 at the Levy
Performing Arts Center.
This elite singing ensemble
from the University of
North Florida performs
world music, vocal jazz,
and other choral gems.-
Ticket and membership
information is available at
www. communityconcerts.
info.
Banquet
The 7th Annual
Fundraising Banquet will
be held on Saturday, Feb.
25 at the Great Lake City
Community Development
Corporation. This is a
"Black Tie Affair". Hope to
see you there.
Tickets are $30. For
tickets and information
contact CDC 386-752-9785,


Betty Powell 386-755-7377,
David Turner 386-697-4752,
or Marlette Robinson 386-
288-1856.
Race Day
Gulf Coast Financial
Services presents
First Annual Catherine
Kuykendall Race Day 5K
to benefit the Pancreatic
Cancer Action Network
on Saturday, Feb. 25 at
Rountree Moore Toyota,
1232 US Highway 90 West
Race starts at 8:15. Register
online active.com.
Zumbathon
There will be a
Zumbathon on Feb. 25
from 9 to 10:30 a.m. at the
Skating Palace. All, pro-
ceeds from the $10 dona-
tion willhelp C02 Student
Ministries' teens go to
Summer Missions Camp!
Come GLOW so they can
GO! Wear fluorescent,
white or anything that will
glow in black light Contact
Sarah Sandlin for more
info: lakecityzumba@gmail.
com or 386-758-0009.


The Greater Lake City
Community Development
Corp. will host the 7th
Annual Fundraising
Banquet Saturday, Feb. 25
at 6 p.m. a the Columbia
County Fairgrounds exhibi-
tion hall, 438 SW Branford
Highway. Tickets are $30
and Allison Megrath of:
Plum Creek will be the key-
note speaker. For informa-
tion call (386) 752-9785.
Feb. 26

Race Day Fair
Catherine Kuykendall
Race Day Fair. Sunday,
February 26, 1:00 p.m.
to 5:30 p.m. at Rountree
, Moore Toyota. Watch the
-Daytona: 500 inside the
Toyota showroom! Enter
the Parkview Baptist Pie-
Cake Contest to try for
the $100 prize! Enter the
Christ Central ROC Hot
Dog Eating Contest! See
the race cars and other
tricked-out vehicles!
Cheer the kids entered
into the BoxCar Car Show
(elementary age kids pick
up boxes for decoration
at Lowe's). The school
with the most participa-
tion in the BoxCar Car
Show wins $100 for their
Teachers' Supply Closet!
Drop off your school sup-
plies at GulfCoast Financial
Services, SunState Federal
Credit Union, or Rountree
Moore Toyota until Friday,
February 24. Community
donated school supplies
will be divided equally
between all the elementary
schools with kids partici-
pating in the BoxCar Car
Show! Play the games,.
enjoy the bounce houses,
get a health-pheck with
Lake City Medical Center,
talk about your old gold
with Grace Estate Buyers,


visit with Haven Hospice
staff, see who takes home
the 2012 Camry in the
giveaway, and learn about
the silent killer-pancreatic
cancer!
General admission tick-
ets $25. Camry/admission
Gold tickets $100. For
the benefit of Pancreatic
Cancer Action Network.
To enter Pie-Cake Contest
contact Lanita. Bishop 386-
752-5202. Contact Dustin
Busscher 386-867-1615 to
enter hot dog contest For
more info call Melanie
Cosentino, GulfCoast
Financial Services, 386-
755-9018 or mcosentino@
gulfcoastfinancial.net
Free concert
First Baptist Church, 182
NE Justice St., will host a
free piano concert at 6 p.m.
on Sunday, Feb. 26 by Lee
Turner, a member of the
Hendricks Avenue Baptist
Church in Jacksonville.
Turner and his wife Dianne
collaborate under the name
Turnersong and have
been featured in the Billy
Graham Crusade.


Shiloh Missionary
Baptist Church, 948 NE
Aberdeen Ave in Lake City,
will celebrate their annual
Black History Program
on Sunday Feb. 26 at.
11:30 a.m. The speaker
for the hour will be Elder
Curtis Ruise of Sanderson,
Florida. Please come share
with us!
Pastor's anniversary


Help the New Dayspring
Church family cele-
brate Pastor Lantz G. Mills,
Sr.'s three year anniversary
Sunday, Feb. 26 at 11 a.m.
with Pastor Willie Caison of
Macedonia Baptist Church
in Gainesville and the 4
p.m. speaker will be Pastor
Larry G. Mills of Mt. Sinai
Baptist Church, Orlando.
100 Men in Black
Mt. Tabor A.M.E.
Church presents an eve-
ning of "100 Men in Black"
on Sunday, Feb. 26 at 3:30
p.m. The speaker will be
Pastor Louis Kirkland,
Fountain Chapel A.M.E.
Church of Jacksonville.
The community is invited. '
Feb. 27

FFA Alumni meeting
Columbia FFA Alumni
will have a meeting
Monday, Feb. 27 at the
Columbia High FFA Land
Lab, behind the school.
Dinner is at 6:30 p.m.
and the meeting at 7
p.m. Please join us as we
make plans to support the
Columbia FFA Chapters.,
Feb. 28

SCORE workshop
SCORE of Suwannee
-Valley presents a workshop
dedicated to manufactur-
ing Tuesday Feb. 28 at


Guangdong Restaurant,
Price is only $20 and
includes dinner. Speakers
and dinner from 5:30 pm
to 7:30 p.m., Q&A and dis-
plays 7:30 from 8:00 p.m.
The keynote speaker is
Mr. Robert Morgan, inter-
national manufacturing
consultant, as well as pre-
sentations from two local
manufacturing companies.
There will be a display of
products produced by local
manufacturers, along-with
a question/answer session
at the end for all to openly
participate. Manufacturing
is a business opportunity
often overlooked because
of start up expenses. Meet
local manufacturers and lis-
ten to their success stories.

Growing fruits and
vegetables course
Grocery bill too high?
Learn how to grow nutri-
tious fruits and vegetables
for you and your fam-
ily in your own home
garden with Back to
Basics: Growing Food
for the Family. The UF/
IFAS Columbia County
Extension Office is offer-
ing a series of five classes
every Tuesday beginning
on February 28th through
March 27th. Course fee is
$15 and covers program'
materials and snacks for'
all 5 gardening sessions.
Husband and wife teams
sharing materials is $20.
Includes a free soil test
"from UF Soils Lab. Class
topics being offered are;
Soils, Spring Vegetable
Gardens, Alternative
Gardening Methods,
Fruits and Nuts and Edible
Landscaping. Classes will
be offered at two separate
locations; at the Columbia
County Extension Office,
Lake City on Tuesday
evenings 6:30 to 8 p.m. or
at the Fort White Public'
Library on Tuesday after-
noons 2:30 to 4 p.m. For
more information contact
Nichelle Demorest or
Linda Brown at the UF/,
IFAS Columbia County,
Extension Office located on
164 SW Mary Ethel Lane
at the Columbia County
Fairgrounds at 386 752-
5384.
Black history program-
Shands LakeShore
Regional Medical Center
will host a National Black
History Month program
Feb. 28 at 4:30 p.m. in
the LakeShore Cafe. The
theme focuses on the
-contributions of African-
American women and Rev.
Joy Gallmon of Mt Pisgah
AME Chuch will be the.
speaker.
Lenten lunch
First Presbyterian
Church Lake City, 697
SW Baya Dr., invites the
community fo Tuesday
Lenten Lunches from noon
to 1 p.m. starting Feb. 28
through March 27. Soup
and laughter will be abun-


dant. Donations will Be
Accepted. Monologues:
Voices of Lent by Jeri
Shumate. For additional
information 752-0670.

Local Invasive Plants: ID
and Control Workshop
UF/IFAS Columbia
County Extension will host
a free Invasive Plants ID
and Control Workshop in
partnership with Suwannee
River Water Management'
on Feb 28 at the Ft. White
Library at 6:30pm during
National Invasive Species
Awareness Week. For more
information contact the
Columbia Co. Extension
office to register by
February 26 at 386-752-
5384 or dlbarber@ufl.edu.
Feb. 29
Elders Banquet,
Closing Ceremony, 6 pm,
Richardson Comm. Center.
Lunch and learn
American Cancer Society
will host a Lunch & Learn
"Get Healthy for the Ones
you Love" on Wednesday,
Feb. 29 at noon at Quail
Heights Country Club in
Lake City. The speaker will
be Dr. Kahn, a nutrition-
ist as well as a 60 year old
aerobics instructor, who
will share easy at home
exercise tips for everyone.
March 1

Money Matters
Want to manage your
money better? The UF/
IFAS Columbia County
Extension Office is offer-
ing a.series of four classes
on finances. Classes
include money manage-
mert, credit, FISCO Score
and investment on Feb.
16th, 23rd and March 1st
and 8th-from 5:30-6:30 at
the Extension office, 164
SW Mary Ethel Lane,
at the Columbia Codinty'
Fairgrounds. Cost is $2 per
class or $5 for the series.
Spaces are limited and reg-
istration date is by Feb. 10.
Please call Jenny Jump at
(386) 752-5384 to register
or for more info.
Movie night
Our Redeemer Lutheran
Church, 5056 SW State
Road 47, will host a movie
night March 1. The movie
is Soul Surfer and popcorn
will be available.
March 2

Barrage
A high-octane fiddle-fest
that features an interna-
tional, multi-talented cast
performing an eclectic mix
of music; song and dance,
Barrage will perform at
Florida Gateway College
on March 2. This is their
last tour before a multi-
year stop in Las Vegas. For
more information or for
tickets, call (386) 754-4340
or visit www.fgcentertain-
mentcom.


OBITUARIES


Alice Alvina Otto Herbst
Alice Alvina Otto Herbst passed
from this earth to Heaven on June
21, 2011. This notice was held at
the request of ,
her husband. r
Alice was born
on August 4
20, 1922 on a
dairy farm near
Lark, Wiscon-
sin to Alvina i f
Heinrich Otto
and Anton Otto. She was a grad-
uate of Bellin Hospital School
of Nursing the class of 1944.
She worked as a nurse manager
there after graduation. She mar-
ried Rodger Herbst on March
2, 1946; they were partners for
65 years. They had two Jaugh-
ters, Valerie (Lee) and Nathalie.
In 1963 the family relocated to
Ft. Lauderdale where Alice was
employed as Site Director for
the Hollywood Clinic of the
Broward County Health Depart-
ment. She took an active role
raising her three grandchildren.
In 1984 she and Rodger retired
to Lake City. Alice was a vol-
unteer at the VA Hospital and
was active in the Women's Club.
She attended Our Redeemer
Lutheran Church. Alice had the


soul of a true gardener; all those
under her care flourished and'
grew strong. She had an enor-
mous capacity for joy and shared
laughter wherever she went. Her
light shone brightly in this world
and will continue undiminished
in the Next. She is mourned by
her daughters Nathalie and Val-
erie; her grandchildren; Rodger
(Ria) Hughes, Michael (Tam-
my) Hughes, Jennifer Rutt; her
great grandchildren, Joshua,
Jordan and Jayden Hughes; her
sister, Marjorie (Frank) Wes-
sely; adopted family Tommy
and Edna Munroe; many nieces
and nephews residing in Wis-
consin; and all the birds she lov-
ingly tended around her home.
Rodger. Edward Herbst
Rodger Edward Herbst went to
join his wife in Paradise February
11, 2012. He was born July 30,
1922 in Green
Bay, Wiscon-
sin to Lydia
Kraynick
Herbst and Ed-
ward Herbst.
At age 16 he
joined the
Army. He be-


came a Sergeant -
at 18 years of
age. He was part -.
of the Allied Ex- .- "' '
petition Force
in 194Z and served in combat
in New Guinea. He attained the
rank of corporal. He continued
to serve in the National Guard
until retirement. After the war
he worked at Northern Transpor- .
station as a diesel mechanic. He
married Alice Otto on March 2,
1946, a union which lasted 65
years. He had two daughters,
Valerie (Lee) and Nathalie. In
1963 he moved to Ft. Lauder-
dale, Florida to escape the brutal
northern winters. While there he
worked at DeWind Tractor Trail-
er repairing large diesel engines.
He retired to his "little house on
the hill" in Lake City in 1984.
In his spare time he built HO
gage railroads and scale mod-
els. He was an ardent military
historian. He was a born to the
breed Packer fan. He was fasci-
nated by how things worked and
could fix almost anything. Rod-
ger was a Lutheran by faith. He
was a good man and a good sol-
dier -- loyal, brave, humble and
intelligent. He is mourned by
his daughters, Valerie and Na-
thalie; his grandchildren, Rod-


ger (Ria) and Michael (Tammy)
Hughes, Jennifer Rutt; great
grandchildren, Joshua, Jordan,
Jayden Hughes; nephew Dustin
(Daphne) Herbst; adopted fam-
ily Edna and Tommy Munroe;
and his three grey tom cats.

James Howard Smith, Sr.
Mr. James Howard Smith, Sr.
74, died Saturday February 11,
2012 at the Gainesville Health
Care Center. He was the son
of the late Thomas and Clara
Hines Smith. He was preceded
in death by one daughter Peggy
Smith. He had made his home
in Lake City for the past twenty-
seven years after moving here
from Daytona Beach, Florida.
He was of the Baptist faith and a
member of the Big Horn Hunt-
ing club and enjoyed fishing.
He is survived by his wife of
fifty-two years Emma Smith
Lake City, FL.; three sons
James Lester Smith (Shelly)
Franklin, TN, Calvin Smith,
Franklin, TN, James Howard
Smith, Jr. (Kimberly) Lake
City, FL. two daughters Maria
Sedani, Daytona Beach, FL.,
Cindy Houston (Dale) Lake
City, FL. one brother Jerry


Smith (Linda) Shelbyville,TN,
Ten grandchildren and nineteen
great-grandchildren also survive.
A memorial service will be held
Monday February 27, 2012 at
11:00 A.M. in the Dees-Parrish
Family funeral home chapel
with the Reverend Jim Steele
officiating. Arrangements
are under the direction of fhe


DEES-PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME,, 458 S.
Marion Ave., Lake City, FL
32025 (386)752-1234 please sign
ounon-line family guestbook at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome.com

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Become A

Mentor
THERAPEUTIC
FOSTER PARENT .
For teens and schol-aged
children in Columia, i.
Alachua, Putnam, Levy
Suwannee, Madison, Dixie,
and Gilchrist Couniles.

Florida Pre-service training is required.
M E NTOR Please contact:
-X V NT ILMFLORIDA MENTOR
Supporting Individuals, Enhancing Lives. 1-352-332-8600
Strengthening Rdationships 1 -A i da3- 360 6
7731 W. Newberry Rd., Suite 1-A Gainesville, Florida 32606


Community development Black history program
banquet,


----,---









6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2012



Regional science fair winners announced


2012 Suwannee Valley
Regional Science &
Engineering Fair Awards

ABBREVIATIONS: LBMS-
Lake Butler Middle School,
RMS-Richardson Middle
School, LCMS-Lake City
Middle School, FWMS-Fort
White Middle School, ECS-
Epiphany Catholic School,
BMS-Baker Middle School,
UCHS-Union County High
School, HCHS-Hamilton County
High School
Appreciation is extended to
S&S'Food Stores for a grant to
support the Awards Ceremony.

Junior Division:
Behavioral and Social
Sciences
3rd place Tara Parrish
(LBMS)-Music and Testing
Scores
2nd place Charlie Parker
(RMS) Handedness vs.
Gender Roles
1st place Ashley Hard.s
(LBMS) Does Music Effect
the Lay Rate of a White
Plymouth Rock Chicken?

Medicine and Health
3rd Place Taylor Beatty
(LBMS) What Effect Does
Music Have on 6th Graders
Blood Pressure?
2nd Place Timothy Pierce
(LCMS) The Ticking of Your
. Ticker
1st Place Klara Fletcher
(Baker County Home School) -
Music Effects on Running

Environmental Science
3rd Place Mariah Griner
(LBMS) Comparing the
Effect of Trisodium Phosphate
on Plant and
Animal Life in a Freshwater
Ecosystem
2nd Place Montine
Humphries (FWMS) Water,
Water Everywhere; but is there
a Drop to Drink
1st Place Dylan Thomas
(RMS) Saving Energy

Physics and Math
3rd Place Mary Alice Klenk
(ECS) Softball in Motion
2nd Place Braxton Norton
(LCMS) Keeping the Cool
1st Place Deneb Delos
Trinos (LCMS) Sun Catchers
Chemistry
3rd Place Hunter Dang
(LBMS) Fingerprints
2nd Place Angel Bowen
(RMS) Hard or Soft Fizzing
Bubbles
1st Place Christian Collins
(LCMS) Curds and Weigh

Engineering
3rd Place (tie) Chance
Oody (LBMS) Impactor vs.
Impactee


Like us on
Facebook


(BMS) Under the Cover of
Darkness
1st Place Ethan Goodrich
(RMS) Does Your Roof Make
You Cool?

Botany
3rd Place Krysten
Rosenberger (BMS) -The
Effects of Caffeine on Plant
Growth
2nd Place Griffin Phelps
(ECS) Effects of Microwave
Water on Plant Growth
1st Place Garet Dicks
(RMS) Are We Driving Our
Plants to Death?

Zoology
3rd Place Tessa Ricker
(BMS) What Lived In Your
Backyard 20 Million Years Ago?
2nd Place Angel Bennet
(BMS) Do Hens Produce a
Greater Number of Eggs in,the
Presence of a Rooster?
1st Place Shelby Bundy
(FWMS) Gimpy Litter

Senior Divisioni
Biological Sciences
3rd Place Case Emerson
(UCHS) Meat Its What's for
Dinner
2nd Place Trey Norris
(HCHS)- Are Girls or Boys More
Attentive to Details? Year 2
1st Place Holly Tucker
(UCHS) Does the Resin
Content in Pine Feedstock
Effect its Energy Output? Year
3

Medicine and Health
3rd Place Andrea-Rhea
Whitmore (HCHS) Hypnotic
Herbs
2nd Place Ismelda Alvarez
(HCHC) Oranges vs. Milk
1st Place Santos Rodriguez
(UCHS) Bacterial Growth
through Volatile Hydrogen
Compounds in the Exhaled
Breath

Environmental Science
3rd Place Charles Cameron
(HCHS) Got Gas?
2nd Place Matt Brown
(UCHS) E-Waste: A Disposal
Dilemma
1st Place Tyler Warfel
(HCHS) The Environmental
Impact Farmlands have on the
Ecosystem: A 3-Year Study

Physical Science
3rd Place Breanna
Bryan (UCHS) Does the
Temperature of Cooling Effect
the Size Potential of the Alum
Crystal?
2nd Place Katay Godwin
(HCHS) Which Moo Makes
the Best Glue?
1st Place Kelly Gray and
James Brown (UCHS) Effect
of Surface Coatings on DBD
Actuator Performance


Farmlands have on the
Ecosystem
459 Deneb Delos Trinos
(LCMS) Sun Catchers

American Psychological
Association certificate
101 Trey Norris (HCHS)
Are Girls or Boys More
Attentive to Details? A 2-Year
Study

ASM Materials Science
Award certificate
404 Kelly Gray and James
Brown (UCHS) Effect of
Surface Coatings on DBD
Actuator Performance

Association for Women
Geoscientists certificate
460 Anasha Kapasi (LCMS)
Solar Power

Intel Excellence in
Computer Science Award -
certificate and $200 award
103- Holly Tucker (UCHS)
Does the Resin Content
in Pine Feedstock Effect its
Energy Output?

Mu Alpha Theta certifi-
cate
103 Holly Tucker (UCHS)
Does the Resin Content
in Pine Feedstock Effect its
Energy Output?

National Society of
Professional Engineers
656 Ethan Goodrich (RMS)
- Does Your Roof Make You
Cool?

National Oceanic and '
Atmospheric Administration
'-Taking the Pulse of the
Planet" Certificate/medal-
lion
303- Tyler Warfel (HCHS)
- The Environmental Impact
Farmlands have on the
Ecosystem

RICOH-Sustainable
Development Award
(Environment/Pollution
Prevention) certificate,
752 Garet Dicks (RMS) -
Are We Driving Our Plants to
Death?

US Metric Association -
certificate
459 Deneb Delos Trinos
(LCMS) Sun Catchers

Society for In Vitro
Biology certificate
254 Timothy Pierce
(LCMS) The Ticking of Your
Ticker

Yale Science and


Engineering Award (11th
grade Physical Science pro
ect) certificate and meda
lion


j-


COUPON REQUIRED EXPIRES FEBRUARY 29 2012


7NOW






Includes lenses & frames.
Some Restrictions Apply.
.COUPON REQUIRE. EXPIRES FEBRUARY 29 2012


351 Montine Humphries
(FWMS) Water, Water,
Everywhere; but is there a
Drop to Drink?
354 Mariah Griner (LBMS)
Comparing the Effect of
Trisodium Phosphate on Plant
and Animal life in a Freshwater
Ecosystem
303- Tyler Warfel (HCHS)
The Environmental Impact
Farmlands have on the
Ecosystem

Florida Association of
Science Teachers Jr & Sr
winners, $25
(r) 551 Christian Collins
(LCMS) Curds and Weigh
(Sr) 304 Matt Brown
(UCHS) E-Waste: A Disposal
Dilemma

Broadcom Masters for
outstanding Jr division project
presentations. Winners will
complete an online applica-
tion for the opportunity to
win an expense paid trip to
Washington, DC.
There are 7 winners:
653 Chance Oody (LBMS)
' Impactor vs. Impactee
459 Deneb Delos Trinos
(LCMS) Sun Catchers
453 Montana Parrish
(LBMS) Expensive vs.
Inexpensive Ammunition
254 Timothy Pierce
(LCMS) The Ticking of Your
Ticker
751 Griffin Phelps (ECS) -
Effects of Microwave Water on
Plant Growth
152 Ashley Harris (LBMS)
Does Music Effect Lay
Rate of White Plymouth Rock
Chickens?
656 Ethan Goodrich (RMS)
Does Your Roof Make You
Cool?,

U.S Air Force Awards -
4 Packets consisting of an
awards certificate and.........
103 Holly Tucker (UCHS) -
Does the Resin Content in Pine
Feedstock Effect its Energy
Output?
303- Tyler Warfel (HCHS)
S-The Environmental Impact
Farmlands have on the
Ecosystem
404 Kelly Gray and James
Brown (UCHS) Effect of
Surface Coatings on DBD
Actuator Performance

Special Trip Awards:
I-SWEEEP International
Sustainable World 2012 to be
held in May in Houston, TX


This trip award is an invitation
to compete in the competition
and when certified, includes hotel
and meal expenses.
404- Kelly Gray and James
Brown (UCHS) Effect of
Surface Coatings on DBD
Actuator Performance
Genius Science Olympiad For
Environmental Science Research
this event will be held June
24-29 in Oswego, New York
Two project winners will
stay on the campus of the State
University of New York, receive
meals on campus, and a trip to
Niagra Falls.
103 Holly Tucker (UCHS) -
Does the Resin Content in Pine
Feedstock Effect its Energy
Output?
303- Tyler Warfel (HCHS)
-The Environmental Impact
Farmlands have on the
Ecosystem

State Delegates:
The Florida Science Science
and Engineering Fair will be
held in Lakeland April 3-5. The
following entrants are selected
to advance to State competition:
Junior Division:
Ashley Harris (LBMS)
Charlie Parker (RMS).
Dylan Thomas (RMS)
Montine Humphries
(FWMS)
Klara Fletcher (Baker
County Home School)
Timothy Pierce (LCMS)
Taylor Beatty (LBMS)
Braxton Norton (LCMS)
Deneb Delos Trinos (LCMS)
Christian Collins (LCMS)
Angel Bowen (RMS)
Ethan Goodrich (RMS)
Alec Harden (BMS)
Madison Adams (LBMS)
James Olin (LCMS)
Chance Oody (LBMS)
Garet Dicks (RMS)
Shelby Bundy (FWMS)
Senior Division:
Holly Tucker (UCHS)
Trey Norris (HCHS)
Case Emerson (UCHS)
Santos Rodriguez (UCHS)'
Tyler Warfel (HCHS)
Matt Brown (UCHS)
Kelly Gray and James Brown
(UCHS)

Best Overall Winners -
will receive a plaque and $50.
These awards are sponsored
by the Reichert Family of Lake
City, a family that produced
many past regional award win-
ners.
Junior Division:
Best Biological Science


Project Avward -
752 Garet Dicks (RMS) Are
We Driving Our Plants to Death?
Best Physical Science
Project Award -
656 Ethan Goodrich (RMS):*
Does Your Roof Make You Cool?"
Best in Fair award for the
Junior Division is a trophy sp -n-,
sored by the Florida Gateway
College Foundation.
752 Garet Dicks (RMS) Ard
We Driving Our Plants to Death?

Senior Division: -
The top two senior divi-
sion projects will represent *
the Suwannee Valley Region
at the International Science *
and Engineering Fair to be
held in May in Pittsburgh, .
Pennsylvania. These delegates
are sponsored by Florida -
Power and Light, represented:
by Mr. Dave Cobb and PCS`
Phosphate, represented by ,:
Mr Mike Williams. Delegates,
will receive $1,000 toward trip:
expenses to the International:
Fair.

Best Biological Science
Project and International:
Delegate Award -
103 Holly Tucker (UCHS)Y-
Does the Resin Content in Pine
Feedstock Effect its Energy "
Output?

Best Physical Science
Project and International
Delegate Award -
404 Kelly Gray and James
Brown (UCHS) Effect of
Surface Coatings on DBD
Actuator Performance

The Florida Gateway College
Foundation Best in Fair Senior:,
Division Award goes to
404 Kelly Gray and James
Brown (UCHS) Effect of
Surface Coatings on DBD
Actuator Performance

Kelly Gray is a senior
who is competing in her last
regional fair. Kelly has repre-
sented our region at the State:
Science Fair since her 9th
grade year and placed at the:
state fair in the 10th and llth:
grades. She was an I-SWEEP-
delegate for the past two years
and placed 3rd at that competi:
tion last year as well as 3rd at,'
the Genius Science Olympiad.;
in New York this past summer,
She won a $60,000 scholarship
to FIT at the International
Science Fair in Los Angeles
last May.


[. t *Lrr,


Thursday, Feb. 23rd Noon'


2 SE A1Iisoni Ct~, Liake City FL 32025


' 4%-lL ' '
. .L


(tie) James Olin (LCMS) James Brown (UCHS) -
Pulley Power Special Awards Effects of Surface Coatings o01
(tie) Madison Adams American Meteorological DBD Actuator Performance
(LBMS) Bow and Arrows vs. Society 2 certificates
Bullets 303 Tyler Warfel (HCHS) Stockholm Junior Water
2nd Place Alec Harden The Environmental Impact Prize 3 award winners


1 n EI P' m i i m irl m Im ur m m m l4


II
I I
.| N
....N.. ....


Si.


i Includes Lenses & Frames .
SSome Restrictions Apply.
COUPON REQUIRED EXPIRES FEBRUARY 29,2012
m m n m m 1 n m 1 mn mm mm



Buy one complete air of glasses at I
S regular price & receive a





N wo e. estrct.on App.y...
I -Aly


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Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@Jlkecityreportercom


Lake City Reporter






SPORTS


Wednesday, February 22, 2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS


GOLF
Branford Rotary
tourney March 3
The Branford Rotary
Club's annual golf
tournament is March 3
at Quail Heights Country
Club, with an 8 a.m.
shotgun start. Format is
three-person scramble
and entry fee of $50
includes golf, lunch and
a prize. Team prizes
and door prizes will be
awarded. There will be
a hole-in-one contest on
Creeks No. 8
sponsored by Barnes
Pine Straw. A winner
would receive $10,000
towards an ATV from
McDuffie Marine &
Sporting Goods.
For details, call John
Lacquey at 935-1705.

SEMI-PRO FOOTBALL
Falcons at home
on Saturday
The Lake City Falcons
will host the Tampa
Bay Bengals at 5 p.m.
Saturday at Memorial,
Stadium. Admission is $6
for adults and $3 for
students with no charge
for children 10 and
under.
For details, call Elaine
at 292-3039.

ADULT SOFTBALL
County offers
league sign-up
The Columbia County
Recreation Department
is offering adult
softball leagues for men,
women, church, co-ed
and D.O.T. leagues. Cost
is $350 with registration
at Brian's Sports and the
Impact Zone.
For details, call Tad
Cervantes at 365-4810.

City leagues
registration open
The Lake City
Recreation Department
registration for adult
softball is 8:30 a.m. to
5 p.m. weekdays at Teen
Town Recreation Center.
Leagues are co-ed
church, commercial and
women. Cost is $350 per
team.
For details, call
Heyward Christie at
754-3607.

* From staff reports

GAMES

Thursday
E Columbia High girls
tennis vs. P.K. Yonge
Schoo), 3:30 p.m.
Fort White High
softball vs. P.K. Yonge
School, 6 p.m.
Columbia High JV
baseball vs. Melody
Christian Academy,
6 p.m.
Fort White High
baseball at Union County
High, 7 p.m. (JV-4)
Friday
Columbia High boys
tennis vs. Lecanto High at
Central Florida College,
3:30 p.m.
Columbia High
softball at Santa Fe High,
7 p.m.
Fort White High
baseball at Interlachen
High, 7 p.m. (JV-4)
Fort White High
softball vs. Williston High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Saturday
Columbia High
baseball vs. Auburndale
High, 1 p.m.
Fort White High track
at Wildcat Invitational in
Ocala, TBA


CHS dominates
Wolfson in 18-0
win on Tuesday.

By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com

Columbia High put the
peddle to the floor against
Wolfson High before a new
FHSAA rule put the breaks
on the game.
The Lady Tigers scored
18 runs in three innings
to bring in the new 15-run
mercy rule for the first time
in the teams history in an
18-0 win in Lake City on
Tuesday.
Columbia used three
pitchers, each going an
inning, to combine for the
shutout.
Taylor Douglass got the
start and struck out two
batters.
Kayli Kvistad pitched
the second inning allowing
one hit and striking out one
batter.
Brandy Morgan closed
the game with no hits and
a strikeout.
The highlight of the
scorefest came in the sec-
ond inning. With the Lady
Tigers looking to end the
game early, Stephanie
Pilkington hit her third
home run of the year. The
only difference in this
homer is it came inside the
park.
The home run tied
her with Kvistad for the
team lead with three for the
year.
"She hustled right out of
the batter's box," Columbia
head coach Jimmy Williams
said. "That's just the way
she plays. She's going to
give everything 100 per-
cent. She gives every pitch
100 percent. She's just
doing a good job of leading
our team."
Pilkington ,.also had a
triple in the game.
Each of Columbia's nine
batters scored at least one
run in the contest.
Morgan and Kvistad each
scored three times for the
Lady Tigers.
Kvistad also led the Lady
Tigers in RBI's with three
in the contest
Columbia (6-0, 2-0
district) will travel to take on
Santa Fe High in a rematch
of an early-season win at
7 p.m. on Friday.


Boynton connects
for 20 points in
'Gators' SEC win.

By MARK LONG
Associated Press

GAINESVILLE Kenny
Boynton was part of a hot
'shooting night for No. 12
Florida, scoring 20 points
as the Gators overcome 18
turnovers and beat Auburn
63-47 Tuesday night
Boynton made 7 of 11
shots from the field, includ-
ing 6 of 9 from 3-point
range.
Florida shot 53.5 from
the field, including 11-of-21
from 3-point range.
The Gators (22-6, 10-3
Southeastern Conference)
needed it, too. They had
15 turnovers in the first
27 minutes, an error-filled


Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
ABOVE: Columbia High's Taylor Douglass looks to make a pitch in a game earlier this
season. BELOW: Fort White's Cecile Gomez (21) throws a pitch while playing Bradford
Tuesday.


start that had coach Billy
Donovan seething and the
Tigers (14-13, 4-9) leading.
Florida eventually settled
down and used a 26-4 run
to turn a one-point deficit
into a double-digit lead.
Bradley Beal and Erving
Walker were huge in the
spurt They finished with
13 points apiece. Walker
added seven rebounds and
five assists.
Boynton and Beal capped
the big run with consecu-
tive 3s that sent many of the
home fans home.
Florida's biggest concern
after that was the health of
forward Will Yeguete, who
injured his left ankle with a
little more than 10 minutes
to play.
Adrian Forbes ledAuburn
with 11 points. He was the
team's only player in double
figures. Kenny Gabriel fell


hard to the court twice, and
Chris Denson was helped
to the locker room with an
apparent knee injury.
Denson injured his right
knee on a driving layup just
before halftime. His basket
put the Tigers ahead 30-27
and surely gave Donovan
more ammunition to rip his
players during the break.
Florida, coming off its
best game of the season, a
30-point win at Arkansas,
responded. But it didn't hap-
pen until after Auburn led
37-36 with 13:40 remaining.
Beal and Boynton started
the turnaround with back-
to-back 3s.
Beal added a driving
layup and a putback. Walker
went coast to coast and got
through three defenders for
a basket. Even seldom-used
guard Scottie Wilbekin got
in on the scoring, with a 3.


Fort White High
falls to Bradford
High, 14-0.

By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

FORT WHITE Fort
White High received a rude
welcome into district play,
as visiting Bradford High
beat the Lady Indians 14-0
on Tuesday.
The Tornadoes (5-0, 2-0)
built a 4-0 lead after four
inning when Fort White
ace Cecile Gomez left the
game. Gomez was hit by a
ball during infield practice
and coach Cassie Sparks
decided to take her out'
"Cecile is OK," Sparks
said. "She started getting a
little dizzy. When she stops
talking, you know some-
thing is wrong. She wanted
to stay in and we left her in
a bit, but we were not going
to take a chance."
In the four innings,
Gomez gave up four hits
and two earned runs with
three walks and three
strikeouts.
Bradford scored 10, runs
in the fifth inning as Indians'
reliever Alice Walker had to
take the punishment.
Bradford'sAshtonAdkins
was theppitchingr.stmavShe
gave, up .a leadoff single to
Ali Wrench, then retired 15
of the last 16 batters. The
only blemish during that
stretch was when Wrench
reached on an error in the
third inning.
Adkins struck out four
and the Lady Indians did
not have a batted ball reach
the outfield.
Leanna Norman was 2-
for-3 for Bradford including
a Grand Slam. She had five
RBI's.
Adkins had two doubles
on balls by misjudged in
the outfield. She h'ad three
RBI's. Taylor Cruce also
was 2-for-3 with an RBI and
two runs scored.
"We were missing rou-
tine balls and the funny
thing is we've been work-
ing on that," Sparks said.
"The girls have to reevalu-
ate. Some give it 100 per-
cent all the time. The only
good thing is if we learn
from it."
Fort White (3-1, 0-1)
hosts P.K Yonge School at
6 p.m. Thursday.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida's Casey Prather (24) makes a shot over Vanderbilt's
Jeffery Taylor (44) in a game on Feb. 4.


m


Florida pulls away from


Auburn, wins 63-47












LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2012


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
Noon
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
practice for Daytona 500, at Daytona
Beach
2:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
practice for Daytona 500, at Daytona
Beach
GOLF
Noon
TGC PGA Tour-WGC, Accenture
Match Play Championship, first round
matches, at Marana,Ariz.
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m..
ESPN2 West Virginia at Notre
Dame
9 p.m.
ESPN2 Kansas at Texas A&M
II p.m.
ESPN2 UC Santa Barbara at Long
Beach St.
NBA BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN Boston at Oklahoma City
9:30 p.m.
ESPN LA. Lakers at Dallas
NHL HOCKEY
9 p.m.
NBCSN Los Angeles at Colorado
SOCCER
2:30 p.m.
FSN UEFA Champions Leagee,
Bayern Munich at Basel
8 p.m.
FSN UEFA Champions League,
Inter Milan at Marseille (same-day tape)

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Monday's Games
Chicago 90,Atlanta 79
New Jersey 100, New York 92
Dallas 89, Boston 73
Houston 97, Memphis 93
Oklahoma City 101, New Orleans,93
Orlando 93, Milwaukee 90
Denver 103, Minnesota 10I, OT
Phoenix 104,Washington 88
San Antonio 106, Utah 102
Golden State 104, LA. Clippers 97
LA. Lakers 103, Portland 92
Tuesday's Games
Detroit at Cleveland (n)
New Orleans at Indiana (n)
Sacramento at Miami (n)
Philadelphia at Memphis (n)
San Antonio at Portland (n)
Today's Games
Boston at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.
Indiana at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
New Orleans at Cleveland, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Sacramento at Washington, 7 p.m.
Orlando at New Jersey. 7:30 p.m.
Atlanta at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Philadelphia at Houston, 8 p.m.
Utah at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Golden State at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Dallas, 9:30 p.m.
Denver at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
Thursday's Games
NewYork at Miami, 7 p.m.
Orlando at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
San Antonio at Denver, 9 p.m.
'L.A. Lakers at Oklahoma City,
9:30 p.m.

AP Top 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. 2 Syracuse vs. So. Florida, 7 p.m.
No. 4 Kansas at Texas A&M, 9 p.m.
No. 6 Michigan State at Minnesota,
8:30 p.m.
No. 10'Marquette vs. Rutgers, 8 p.m.
No. 19 Wichita State at Illinois State,
8:05 p.m.
No. 20 Notre Dame vs.West Virginia,
7 p.m.
No. 21 UNLV vs. Boise State, 10 p.m.
No. 22 Temple at La Salle, 7 p.m.
No. 23 Indiana vs. N.C. Central, 7 p.m.
No. 24 San Diego State vs. Wyoming,
10:30 p.m.
Thursday's Games
No. 5 Duke4 at No. 15 Florida
State, 7 p.m.-
No. 14 Murray State at Tennessee
State, 8:30 p.m.
No. 16 Wisconsin at Iowa, 9 p.m.
-No. 17 Louisville at Cincinnati, 9 p.m.

BASEBALL

College polls

BASEBALL AMERICA
DURHAM, N.C.-The top 25 teams
in the Baseball America poll with records
through Feb. 19 and previous ranking
(voting by the staff of Baseball America):
Record Pvs
I.Florida 2-1 I
2.Stanford 3-0 2
3. South Carolina. 3-0 3
4.Arkansas 3-0 4
5.Rice 3-0 6
6.Texas A&M 3-0 7
7. Louisiana State 3-0 8
8.Arizona 2-1 5
9. Georgia 3-0 1
10. North Carolina 2-1 9
I1. GeorgiaTech 3-I 12
12.Texas 2-1 .13
13.Arizona State 3-0 17
14.Miami 3-0 18
15.Texas Christian 1-1 15I
16.Clemson 2-1 16
17.Vanderbilt 0-3 10
18. Florida State 3-0 20
19. Central Florida3-0 21
20. Mississippi 1-1 22
21. Oregon State 3-1 23


22. UCLA 1-2 14
23. Oklahoma 1-2 19
24. Louisville 2-1 24
25. Baylor 3-0 NR
COLLEGIATE BASEBALL
TUCSON, Ariz. The Collegiate
Baseball poll with records through Feb. 19,
points and previous rank.Voting is done
by coaches, sports writers and sports
information directors:


I.Florida
2. South Carolina
3. Stanford


Record Pts Pvs
2-1 495 I
3-0' 494 2
3-0 493 3


4.Texas A&M 3-0 490 6
5. Rice 3-0 487 7
6. North Carolina 2-1 485 4
7.Texas 2-1 482 5
S.Arkansas 3-0 480 8
9. Louisiana St. 3-0 479 12
10. Georgia Tech 3-I 477 9
11. Florida St. 3-0 475 13
12. Miami 3-0 473 14
13.Arizona St. 3-0 471 17
14. Georgia 3-0 468 18
I5.Texas Christian 1I- 467 10
16. Louisville 2-1 464 15
17. Oklahoma 1-2 461 16
18. St.John's 1-2 458 II
19. Cal St Fullerton 1-2 457 21
20. California 3-0 454 22
21.Oregon St. 3-1 449 24
22.Arizona 2-1 447 20
23. Stetson 3-0 444 26
24. Oregon 2-1 442 27
25. Clemson 2-1 439 25
26. Baylor 3-0 437 28
27. U.C. Irvine 3-0 436 29.
28. Southern Miss. 2-1 433 30
29. Coll. of Charleston3-0 429 -
30. Georgia Southern 3-0 426 -

GOLF

Golf week

WORLD GOLF CHAMPIONSHIPS
ACCENTURE MATCH PLAY
CHAMPIONSHIP
Site: Marana,Ariz.
Schedule:Today-Sunday.
Course: Dove. Mountain, The Ritz-
Carlton Golf Club (7,791 .yards, par 72).
Purse: $8.5 million. Winner's share:
$1.4 million.
Television: Golf Channel (Today, noon-
6 p.m., 7:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m.; Thursday,
2-6 p.m., 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m.; Friday,
2-6 p.m., 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m.; Saturday,
noon-2 p.m., 8:30 p.m.- 12:30 a.m.; Sunday,
9 a.m.-I p.m., 9:30-11:30 p.m.) and NBC
(Saturday:Sunday, 2-6 p.m.).
Online: http://www.pgatour.com
PGA European Tour site: http://llwww.
europedntour.com
PGATOUR
MAYAKOBA GOLF CLASSIC
Site: Playa Del Carmen, Mexico.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Mayakoba Resort, El Camaleon
Golf Club (6,923 yards, par 70).
Purse: $3.7 million. Winner's share:
$660,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday,
6:30-8:30 p.m.; Friday, 1:30-3:30 a.m., 6:30-
8:30 p.m.; Saturday, 2:30-4:30 a.m., 6:30-
8:30 p.m.; Sunday, 1-3 a.m., 6:30-8:30 p.m.;
Monday, 1-3 a.m.).
Last week: Bill Haas won the
Northern Trust Open at Riviera, beating
Phil Mickelson and Keegan Bradley with
a 45-foot birdie putt on the second hole.
of a playoff. Mickelson and Bradley birdied
the final hole of regulation to force the
playoff.... South Africa's Jbe Kruger won
the Avantha Masters in India for his first
European Tour title, beating Spain's Jorge
Campillo and Germany's Marcel Siem by
tw o strokes;- ;-'
'LPGATOURA
HSB1 WOMEN'S CHAMPIONS
Site: Singapore.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Tanah Merah Country Club,
Garden Course (6,547 yards, par 72).
Purse-. $1.4 million. Winner's share:
$210,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Friday, 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.; Saturday,
2-6 p.m.; Sunday, 1:30-6 p.m,).
Last week:Top-ranked Yani Tseng suc-
cessfully defended her LPGA Thailand
title for her 13th LPGATour victory, bird-
ieing the final two holes to hold off play-
ing partner Ai Miyazato by a stroke. The
23-year-old Tseng, a seven-time winner
last year on the LPGA Tour, has 33 career'
worldwide professional'victories.
Online: http://www.lpga.com
CHAMPIONSTOUR
Next event Toshiba Classic, March
16-18, Newport Beach Country Club,
Newport Beach, Calif.
Last week: Kenny Perry won the ACE
Group Classic in Naples for his second
Champions Tour title, beating 2011 win-
ner Bernhard Langer by five strokes.
Perry closed with a 70 after opening with
rounds of 64 and 62 to break the tour's
36-hole record at 18-under 126.
NATIONWIDE TOUR
Next event Panama Championship,
March 1-4, Panama Golf Club, Panama
City.
Last week: Skip Kendall holed a 25-
foot birdie putt on the final hole for a
one-stroke victory in the season-opening
Colombia Championship in Bogota.At 47
years, 5 months, 10 days, Kendall became
the fourth-oldest winner in Nationwide
history.
OTHER TOURNAMENTS
MEN *
eGOLF PROFESSIONAL TOUR:
Oldfield Open, Today-Saturday, Oldfield
Country Club and Chechessee Creek
Club, Okatie, S.C. Online: http://www.
egolomfessionaltour.com
NGATOUR: Members Only Shootout,



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I LVEAV I


@2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.

SPETW




SOHDAW




SLUDOH
7 ^7^ '
__ "s>1 __ _


Today-Friday, Black Bear Golf Club, Eustis.
Online: http:ll/www.ngatour.com

Match Play tee times

Today's first round
(Seeds in parentheses)
9:25 a.m.-- Graeme McDowell (12),
Northern Ireland, vs.Y.E.Yang (53), South
Korea.
9:35 a.m. Hunter Mahan (21),
United States, vs. Zach Johnson (44),
United States.
9:45 a.m. Bill Haas (I I), United
States, vs. Ryo Ishikawa (54),Japan.
9:55 a.m.-- Justin Rose (22), England,
vs. Paul Lawrie (43), Scotland.
10:05 a.m:. Dustin Johnson (9),
United States, vs. Jim Furyk (56), United
States.
10:15 a.m. Thomas Bjorn (24),
Denmark, vs. Francesco Molinari (41),
Italy.
10:25 a.m. Charl Schwartzel (10),
South Africa, vs. Gary Woodland (55),
United States.
10:35 a.m. lan Poulter (23), England,
vs. Bae Sang-moon (42), South Korea
10:45 a.m.- Steve Stricker (5), United
States, vs. Kevin Na (60), United States.
: 10:55 a.m. Louis Oosthuizen (28),
South Africa,. vs. Aaron Baddeley (37),
Australia.
11:05 a.m. Webb Simpson (6),
United States, vs. Matteo Manassero (59),
Italy.
11:15 a.m. Alvaro Quiros (27),
Spain, vs. Martin Laird (38), Scotland.
11:25 a.m.-Adam Scott (8),Australia,
vs. Robert Rock (57), England.
11:35 a.m.- BoVan Pelt (25), United
States, vs. Mark Wilson (40), United
States.
S11:45 a.m. Jason Day (7), Australia,
vs. Rafael Cabrera Bello (58), Spain.
11:55 a.m. Simon Dyson (26),
England, vs. John Senden (39),Australia.
12:05 p.m. Matt Kuchar (13),
United States, vs. Jonathan Byrd (52),
United States.
12:15 p.m. Bubba Watson (20),
United States, vs. Ben Crane (45), United
States.
12:25 p.m. Nick Watney (14),
United States, vs. Darren Clarke (51),
Northern Ireland.. ,
12:35 p.m. Tiger Woods (19),
United States, vs. Gonzalo Fernandez-
Castano (46), Spain.
12:45 p.m. K.J. Choi (16), South
Korea, vs. Kyle Stanley (49), United
States.
12:55 p.m. Brandt Snedeker (17),
United States, vs. Retief Goosen (48),
South Africa.
1:05 p.m.- Sergio Garcia (15), Spain,
vs. Miguel Angel Jimenez (50),.Spain.
1:15 p.m. Keegan Bradley (18),
United States, vs. Geoff Ogilvy (47),
Australia.
1:25 p.m. Martin Kaymer (4),
Germany, vs.' Greg Chalmers (61),
Australia.
1:35 p.m. David Toms (29), United
States, vs. Rickie Fowler (36), United
States.
1:45 p.m. Lee Westwood (3),
England, vs. Nicolas Colsaerts (62),
Belgium.
1:55 p.m. Robert Karlsson (30),
Sweden, vs. Fredrik Jacobson (35),
Sweden.
2:05 p.m. Luke Donald (I), England,
vs. Ernie Els (64), South Africa.
2:15 p.m. Jason Dufner (32), United
States, vs. Peter Hanson (33), Sweden.
2:25 p.m. Rory Mcllroy (2),
Northern Ireland, vs. George Coetzee
(63), South Africa.
2:35 p.m. K.T. Kim (31), South
Korea, vs.Anders Hansen (34), Denmark.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Monday's Games
Ottawa 6, N.Y. Islanders 0
Carolina 5,Washington 0
Tuesday's Games
N.Y. Islanders at Buffalo (n)
New Jersey at Toronto (n)
N.Y. Rangers at Pittsburgh (n)
San Jose at Columbus (n)
Philadelphia at Winnipeg (n)
Dallas at Montreal (n)
Anaheim at Tampa Bay (n)
Vancouver at Nashville (n)
Detroit at Chicago (n)
Edmonton at Calgary (n)
Los Angeles at Phoenix (n)
Today's Games
Washington at Ottawa,7 p.m.
Boston at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Los Angeles at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Thursday's Games
San Jose at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Anaheim at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Vancouver at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
St. Louis at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Tampa Bay atWinnipeg, 8:30 p.m.
Dallas at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Calgary, 9 p.m.
Philadelphia at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


THE PRISON PI.AY WANT
GOINC WEtL- BECAL)5E THEY
ALL- WANTED TO --
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer: THE
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: PANDA MOOSE FIGURE TACKLE
Answer: He started putting predictions into cookies because
he wanted to do this MAKE A FORTUNE


GOLF REPORTS



Mixed scramble tiebreaker


It took a scorecard
regression to find the
winners after three teams
posted 66 in the monthly
mixed scramble.
The team of Natalie
Bryant, Ed Snow, Susie
Peterson and Andy
Peterson finally took the
top spot.
Second place went to the
team of Bette Carlson, Bob
Carlson, Ann Bormolini
and Art Hutchinson, fol-
lowed by the team of Yves
Pelletier, Lise Pelletier,
Michel Lauzon and
Francine Lauzon in third.
The A flight in the
Wednesday blitz was won
by Joe Paul at +7. The trio
of Dennis Crawford, Jordan
Hale,. and Steve Patterson
finished in a three-way tie
for second place at +5.
John Raulerson grabbed
the B flight win at +6,
two shots ahead of Mike
McCranie, Donald Roberts
and Mike Jacobs in the
day's second three-way tie
for the runner-up position.
Mike Gough shared the
skins pot with Bob Randall
and Patterson. Randall's
skin also picked up a pot


COUNTRY CLUB
at LAKE CITY
Ed Goff


hole purse, courtesy of
Lynn Smith.
Smith matched Randall's
birdie, but wasn't in the pot
hole game. Two big pot
holes carried over.
Donald Roberts (+10)
won a hotly contested battle
with Donnie Thomas (+9)
and Greg Lyons (+8) to take
the A flight in Saturday's
blitz. Bob Randall (+6) was
fourth.
Mickey Wilcox (+5)
claimed the B flight over
Ron Bennett, Dave Mehl
and Charlie Timmons, who
tied at +3.
Dennis Crawford led the
skins hunt with two. Terry
Hunter, Jerry West and
Mehl had the other skins.
The Good Old Boys team
matches were all competi-
tive, starting with match
one where Jerry West,
Jim McGriff and Nick
Whitehurst edged Marc
Risk, Bobby Simmons and
Bill Wheeler, 4-3.
The second contest was


another one-point win in
favor of Ed Snow, Joe
Persons, Merle Hibbard
and Tony Branch, 3-2,
over Stan Woolbert, Tom
Elmore, Hugh Sherrill and
Howard Whitaker.
Monty Montgomery,
Terry Mick, Mike Spencer
and Bill Rogers took match
three, 5-3, over Dennis
Hendershot, Paul Davis,
Dave Cannon and Dan
Stephens.
Montgomery had the
week's low round with
37-37-74. Risk (76),
Woolbert (78) and
Hendershot had the other
top 18-hole scores.
West (38) had a front-
nine win over Stephens
and McGriff, both with
39. Whitaker's 39 took the
back side.
SallyRivers, Dottie Rogers
and Nicole Ste-Marie had
an easy time winning the
LGA best ball match. Their
net 58 was seven strokes
better than. second-place
finishers Natalie Bryant,
Katrina Counts and Judy
McGrath.
The MGA's BU-BB
tournament is March 3.


Carter wins Queen of Hearts


The Queen of Hearts
Tournament on Saturday
was a format for all ages, as
the first-place winner was
11-year-old Tiara. Carter
and the runner-up was
75-year-old Joe Herring.
Both Carter and Herring
played' fantastic rounds
and, with the full handicap
format, they dominated the
field.
Herring always says the
great thing about golf is it
is a game you can play for
a lifetime, and he is living
proof. That being the case,
Carter has a lifetime of
golf to look forward to and
many more tournaments to
win.
Third place was taken by
Todd Carter (Tiara's dad)
and fourth by golf beginner
Amanda Odom in.her first


QUAIL HEIGHTS Pete Skantzos, Bill Ryan,
COONTRY CLUB -Bob Wheary and Brian
Pete Sands .Snead.
ete Sans There was no pot winner
and it carries over.
golf tournament Girls practice group
The age and gender putting contest winners
differences in our win- were Gillian Norris, first;
ners shows golf is a game Rachael Blanton, second;
everyone can compete in Allison Kranhke, third.
and enjoy, and 'we invite Congratulations to
everybody to our weekly or Tiara Carter and Gillian
monthly tournaments. Norris who competed in
Wednesday Blitz the North Florida Junior
winners: Emerson. Darst Golf tournament at Hidden
+9, first; Gary Croxton and Hills Couintry Club in
Garrett Shay +7, tied for Jacksonville on Sunday.'
second; Shelton Keen +6,. They represented Lake
fourth. .. .City well, taking fourth and
Friday Dog Fight sixth place, respectively.
winners: Jack Tuggle, first; Weather conditions were
Bob McGraw, second; cold and blustery and they
Emerson Darst, third. were playing this tough
The Sunday Scramble course for the first time.
was won by the team of A job well done.


cGet C
Bil g ~


ACROSS
1 Kind of show
5 Duelers'
marks
10 Jeeplike-
vehicle
12 Frozen
dessert
13 Young child
14 Monet or
Debussy
15 Japanese
soup
16 Mr. Manning
of football
18 Atlas abbr.
19 Rickety
22 Auburn
tint
25 Silly laugh
29 Mortarboard
wearers
30 Power
.systems
32 Makes less
wild
33 Brownish
pigment
34 Unruffled


37 Caravan
stops
38 Imperative
40 Not worth a -
43 Dinny's rider
44 Hockey feint
48 Rapunzel, for
instance
50 Peron's third
wife
52 Temper, as
glass
53 Four-postpr
accessory
54 Second-story
job
55 Portable
shelter

DOWN
1 Je ne sais -
2 Foul-ball


www.lakecltyreporter.com




Answer to Previous Puzzle


EDAM MOA TRAP
GOBBLEUP TOGA






S ION DDRA W L S
OLD PRAIN
EEP IOU E VE.S
OS C N DOSE





AR E ONS
VEC UUIU E
PASS BED ERAT


callers 8 Tulip colors
Like stray dogs 9 Sault Marie
Mark of Zorro 10 Thoughtful
Earth's star murmur
Burn the 11 66 and 1-80, e.g.
midnight oil 12 UFO movie
Lie adjacent (hyph.)


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com
1 In tSo I4 0 In 6 17 In 1


2-22 2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


17 Not keep up
20 Bahamas
resort
21 Incites
(2 wds.)
22 Driver's
license abbr.
23 Geologic
divisions
24 Point the
finger at
26 Large dog
(2 wds.)
27 They may be
read
28 Adams or
Brickell
31 Airline based
in Stockholm
35 Fish from a
boat
36 Arrogance
39 Film
spectacular
40 Mentally
healthy
41 Old Dodge
model
42 Functions
45 Poet's black
46 Retained
47 Famous
cathedral
town
48 Telegraph
syllable
49 Snack
51 Took a
load off


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


j










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2012


S COURTESY PHOTO
Participants in the 2012 Blue Grey Fun Run gather at Olustee Park on Saturday.


Tucker, Pierce top Blue Grey run


From staff reports

The 2012 Blue Grey
Fun Run was Saturday ini
downtown Lake City
as a part of the Olustee
Festival.
Overall winners for the
annual run were Emma
Tucker and Timmothy
Pierce. Both also won first
place in their 13-14 age


group. -
Nichole Morris and
Samantha Ziegaus placed
second and third in the
13-14 age group, as did
Sean Ziegaus and Jonathan
Harris for the boys.
The top three girls and
boys runners in other age
groups follow:
11-12 Bridget
Morris, Jillian Morris


and Bernita Brown;
Tyler Pierce, Joshua Lewis
and Hal Courso;
9-10 Lucy Giebeig,
Sarah Ziegaus and
Isbell Archer; Sean Zieguas,
Finn Tucker and Gavin
Sands;
7-8 Taylor Shipp,
Samantha Corby and
Brooklyn Brokowsky;
Tanner Pierce, Matthew


Dumas and Deven Couey;
5-6 Skyler Ziegaus,
Sarah Simpson and Sydney
Guetherman; Joseph
Corby, Brayden Dupree and
J.D. Dumas;
4-under Madison
Bailey with Anna Belle
Dansby and Ava Christie
tied for second; Whyatt
Holton, Nathan Matsbura
and Whyatt Cummings.


Florida State chasing 1st



ACC regular season title


By BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE All
the tickets are sold and lit-
tle remains except the wait
for Florida State's game
against fifth-ranked Duke
on Thursday in what has
shaped up as one of the
most important games in
Florida State basketball
history.
The 15th-ranked
Seminoles (19-7, 10-2 ACC)
have already defeated
the Blue Devils (23-4, 10-
2), North Carolina State,
Wake Forest and No. 7
North Carolina this season.
Florida State needs a second
win over Duke to complete
a sweep of its rivals from
the state of North Carolina
and keep its hopes alive
for the school's first ACC
regular season
championship.
The high stakes have'
made Duke's visit one of
the most highly anticipated
games for Florida State in
decades.
One might have to go
all the way back to Jan.
27, 1970 at tiny Tully Gym
where the Seminoles hand-
ed Jacksonville University
*its only regular season
loss that year with an 89-
83 win that the Dolphins
avenged 85-81 three weeks
later. It was a JU team led
by 7-2 Artis Gilmore that
finished second to UCLA
while Florida State finished
its season 23-3 and then
two years later also lost to
UCLA in the NCAA title
game. Both games that
winter are remembered as
classics.
Former coach Dean
Smith's North Carolina Tar
Heels completed a sweep of
the Seminoles in the 1992-93


season to lock up the regu-
lar season ACC title with
an 86-76 victory on Feb.
27, 1993. The Semifioles
advanced to the final eight
that season before losing to
Kentucky.
Duke, on the other hand,
lives off of big games days
and hostile crowds.
"They generate that kind'
of hype regardless of where
they go," FloridaState coach
Leonard Hamilton said
Tuesday. "They've been in
these type of games over
and over and over again."
Hamilton said Duke has
improved since Florida
State's last-second 76-73
win last month in Durham,
N.C. on Michael Snaer's 3-
pointer as time expired.
"They have gotten them-
selves into a rhythm they
seem to be comfortable
with," Hamilton said. "We're
playing at a high level and
they are too."
The emergence of sopho-
more guard Ian Miller as
a difference maker along
with Hamilton's decision to
move 6-8 Okaro White back
to power forward has paid
big dividends in Florida
State's stretch drive. Miller,
who missed the first 11
games while academically
ineligible, is second in scor-
ing at 10.5 points a game
while averaging a bit over
23 minutes playing time.
Snaer is the leading scorer
at 13.5 points a game.
"This team is really
deep," Duke coach Mike'
Krzyzewski said during
the weekly ACC coaches'
conference call on Monday.
"They come at you with
nine or ten guys so they are
fresh."
The Seminoles have won
10 of their last 11 games
and are no longer able to


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida State's Luke Loucks (3) drives down the court while
playing against Florida on Dec. 22.


ambush anyone, establish-
ing themselves over the
past four seasons with the
third best record in ACC
play. Since the start of the
2008-2009 season, Florida
State is 41-19 in ACC regu-
lar season play, trailing only
Duke and North Carolina.
Not only is first place at
stake Thursday night with
the regular season wind-
ing down, so are a couple


of smaller streaks of lesser
significance.
The Seminoles are 6-0
at home in the ACC while
Duke is 6-0 on the road in
conference games. Florida
State is after its third
straight win in the series.
"It's the next step for an
ACC championship," Miller
said. "We can't be compla-
cent. We have to turn it up
a notch."


Quinn sorry for Tebow comments


By ARNIE STAPLETON
Associated Press

DENVER Brady
Quinn is apologizing to Tim
Tebow for unflattering com-
ments Quinn made about
the Denver Broncos' start-
ing quarterback in a GQ
article.
The article on
Tebowmania was writ-
ten by Michael Silver and
titled "The year of Magical
Stinking: An Oral History
of Tebow Time."


In it, Quinn was quoted
as saying, "We've had a lot
of, I guess, luck, to put it
simply." He also said he felt
the fans were the reason
Tebow leapfrogged him on
the depth chart when sup-
planting Kyle Orton as the
starter after a 1-4 start.
"I felt like the fans had a
lot to do with that," Quinn
said in the article. "Just
'cause they were chanting
his name. There was a big
calling for him. No, I don't
have any billboards. That


would have been nice."
Quinn also said in
the article that the way
Tebow expresses his faith
doesn't "seem very hum-
ble to me." Both men are
Christians.
Quinn took to Twitter
after the article's release
Tuesday, saying the com-
ments attributed to him did
not reflect his opinion of
Tebow.
Tebow "deserves a lot of
credit for our success and
I'm happy for him and what


he accomplished. Most
importantly, he is a great
teammate," Quinn wrote.
Quinn said he's reached
out to Tebow directly "to
clear this up," adding, "I
apologize to anyone who
feels I was trying to take
anything away from our
team's or Tim's success
this season."
Quinn is an unre-
stricted free agent
whom the Broncos are
considering bringing back
to Denver.


B- BOWLING


League reports
Results of league bowling at Lake
City Bowl:
WATERGUARD
High scratch game: 1. Lome
Geiger 197; 2: Linda Oliver 181;
3. Debbie Walters 175. 1. Luke
Milton 246; 2. Tom Sewejkis 227;
3. Frank Miller 221.
High scratch series: 1. Lome
Geiger 545; 2. Debbie Walters 499;
3. Mary Lobaugh 498. 1. Tom
Sewejkis 588; 2. Frank Miller 572;
3. Luke Milton 563.
High handicap game: 1. Staci
Greaves 252; 2. Beth Koppa 245;
3. Diane Madsen 229. 1. Luke Milton
264; 2. Steven Hayes 252; 3. Frank
Miller 245.
High handicap series: 1. Linda
Oliver 649; 2. Debbie Walters 643;
3. Lome Geiger 635.1. Jim Lobaugh
664; 2. Ken Watson 650; 3. Eddie
Hillhouse 647.
High average: Mary Lobaugh 183,
Mark Davis 194.
(results from Feb. 14)
SEXY SENIORS
Team standings: 1. Perky Pals
(70.5-33.5); 2. Farmers (63.5-40.5);
3. Pin Busters (56.5-47.5).
High handicap game: 1. Jeanne,
Sireci 231; 2. Shirley Yates 223;
3. Joanne Denton 220. 1. Jim
Hawkins 233; 2. Ray Denton 229;
3. Wendal Shay 226.
High handicap series: 1. Yvonne
Finley 625; 2. Pat Hale 617; 3. Sandl
Johns 616. 1. Eari Hayward 658;
2. Joe Peterson 653; 3. Johnnie
Croft 617.
(results from Feb. 14)
GOLDEN ROLLERS
Team standings: 1. 4 S's (69-
35); 2. Ups and Downs (59.5-44.5);
3. Quirky Quad (58.5-45.5, 61,357
pins); 4. Wild Things (58.5-45.5,
60,832 pins).
High handicap game: '1. Jane
Sommerfeld 247; 2. Joan Carman
240; 3. Louise Atwood 234. 1. Wayne
Johns 240; 2. David. Duncan 230;
3. Jerry Crandal 222.
High handicap series: 1. Yvonne
Finley 710; 2. Amy Musselwhite 651;
3. Betty Carmichael 632. 1. Earl
Hayward 686; 2. Ronnie Grey 642;
3. Jerry Ellis 615.
High average: 1. Elaine Nemeth
154.2; 2. Shirley Highsmith 152.45;
3. Jane Sommerfeld 151.55. 1. David
Duncan 191.77; 2. Bill Dolly 184.55;
3. George Mulligan 178.65.
(results from Feb. 16)
HIT & MISS
Team standings: 1. Silver Ladies
(17-7); 2. Git Up & Bowl (13-11);
3. Legal Ladies (12-12, 562 average);
4. Oddballs (12-12, 547 average).
High handicap game: 1; Cythe
Shiver 232; 2. Joanne Knutsen 230;
3. Iva "Jean" Dukes 227.
High handicap series: 1. Pat
Warne 647; 2. Ruth Heims 632;
3. Karen Clampett 616.
(results from Feb. 14)
SUNDAY NITE MERCHANTS
Team standings: 1. Pintimidators
(13-7); 2. TAZ (12-8, 46,242 pins);
3. McGhghy's Navy (12-8, 44,434
pins).
High scratch game: 1. Di Drehoff
200; 2. Elaine McNair 192; 3. Amber
Tompkins 177. 1. Leonard Randall
249; 2. Mark Moore 235; 3. Mark
Moore 226.
High scratch series: 1. Elaine


McNair 502; 2. Norma Yeingst 494;
3. Cheryl Jacks 473. 1. Mark Moore
634; 2. Leonard Randall 595; 3. Mike
Wetherington 584.
High average: 1. Norma Yeingst
168.67; 2. Cheryl Jacks 161.14;
3. Jennifer Freeman 151.91. 1. Dan
McNair 199.48; 2. A.J. Dariano
192.7; 3. Mark Moore 192.6.
(results from Feb. 12)
MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS
Team standings: 1. Rountree-
Moore (116.5-63.5); 2. Ronsonet
Buick/GMC (116-64); 3. Team 2
(115.5-64.5).
High scratch game: 1. Dale
Coleman 265; 2. Gregg Moravec
255; 3. Zech Strohl 245.
High scratch series: 1. Dale
Coleman 712; 2. Zech Strohl 690;
3. Gregg Moravec 684.
High handicap game: 1. Luis
Riviera 287; 2. Gregg Moravec 266;
3, Dale Coleman 265.
High handicap series: 1. Luis
Riviera 743; 2. George Mulligan 740;
3. George Rye Jr. 724.
High average: 1. Dale Coleman
221.03; 2. Zech Strohl 218.97;
3. Robert Stone 214.44.
(results from Feb. 6)

Youth leagues
MAJORS SCRATCH
Team standings; 1. Gary's
Got Back (47.5-32.5); 2. Madison
Stephens (46.5-33.5); 3. I Can't
Believe Its Not (40.5-39.5).
High scratch game: 1. Courtney
Schmitt 202; 2. Courtney Schmitt
192; 3. Victoria Wise 190. 1. Dalton
Coar 242; 2. Colin Madden 222;
3. Colin Madden 221.
High scratch series: 1. Courtney
SchmItt 557; 2. Lauren Snipes
489; 3. Victoria Wise 472. 1. Colin
Madden 646; 2. Cody Stuart 634;
3. Gary Beames 592.,
MAJOqS
Team standings: 1. Three Man
Wolfpack (49.5-30.5); 2. Pin Killerslll
(47.5-32.5); 3. Turks (44.5-35.5).
High handicap game: 1. Chelsea
Williarris 235; 2. Amanda Storms
219; 3. Tiffany Ritch 214. 1. Josh
Johns 266; 2. Zach Mauldin 240;
3. Franklin Shepard 228.
High handicap series: .1. Amanda
Storms 602; 2. Allison Dukes 589;
3. Sara Johns 588. 1. Zach Mauldin
672; 2. Josh Johns 660; 3. David
Senokossoff 617.
JUNIORS
Team standings: 1. Crazy Kids
(55.5-24.5); 2. Lighting Pins (51.5-
28.5); 3. The Bud Lites (48-28).
High handicap game:
1. Amanda Schmitt 208; 2. Savannah
Barr 204; 3. Noel Kieckhafer 200.
1. Chase Wiliams 229; 2. (tie) Vincent
Westphal, Jeremy Burch 204.
High handicap series: 1. Amanda
Schmitt 618; 2. Savannah Barr 558;
3. Alexis Menna 535. 1. Chase
Williams 596; 2. Jeremy Burch 560;
3. Jarret Moehl 558.
BANTAMS
High handicap game: 1. Jadyn
Freeman 193; 2. Heaven Camacho
153.1. Carson Lyons 157; 2. Antonio
Perez 146.
High handicap series: 1. Jadyn
Freeman 528; 2. Heaven Camacho
442. 1. Antonio Pprez 417; 2. Carson
Lyons 382.
(results from Feb. 4)


BRIEFS


RUNNING
Kuykendall 5K
run Saturday
The Catherine
Kuykendall Race Day
5K run is 8:15 a.m.
Saturday from Rountree
Moore Toyota Scion.
Online registration is at
active.com and costs $20.
plus a transaction fee.
GulfCoast Financial
Services is presenting
the race for the benefit of
Pancreatic Cancer Action
Network.
Sponsorships are
available.
For details, call Melanie
at 755-9018.


FISHING
FFA tournament
on March 3
The Columbia
High FFA Open Bass
Tournament is March 3
from safe light to 3 p.m.
out of Clay Landing. Entry
fee is $70, and there is a
$10 optional Big Bass Pot.
Proceeds of the
tournament will be used
toward a scholarship in
honor of tournament
founder Justin Brown.
For details, call Chris at
288-7633 or Karen Brown
at 961-2526.

* From staff reports


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420










LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2012


DILBERT

YOU NEVER
ANSWER WHEN
I CALL YOUR, MfY
CELL. BATTERY
15 DEAD. I

L E


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


"MAYBE
YOU SHOULD
CHARGE IT
FOR ONCE.


I qj.


I DON'T
HAVE
TIE FOR
THAT.
(


SI


WHAT
DO YOU
DO ALL
DAY THAT
MAKES YOU
SO BUSY?


FOR
STARTERS,
I HAVE
THIS CON-
VERSATION
A LOT.


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Ex-girlfriend wants to remain

friends, but without benefits


DEAR ABBY: I dated a
guy named "Jake" for two
years. He was my first love
and he meant everything to
me. Well, things happened
and he broke my heart
After a year of not really
talking, Jake is now texting
and calling to convince me
to be his "friend with ben-
efits." He tries to sweet-
talk me by calling me pet
names. Of course, I say no
over and over each time
he asks on the phone. But
the minute we come face-.
to-face or hang out, I just
give in.
There will always be a
soft spot for Jake in my
heart, and I don't know
what to do. I want to
stay friends because he's
important to me, but I
don't want to be his FWB.
It brings back painful
memories.
How do I say no? Am
I overreacting? Should I
go with the flow because
it's not a big deal? I feel
like I'm in a script for a
bad movie. WANTS TO
MOVE ON IN HOUSTON
DEAR WANTS TO
MOVE ON: Your ex-
boyfriend appears to be
a super salesman. The
best way not to buy what
he's selling is not to listen
to his pitch. The sooner
you accept you can't be
"friends" because you lose
control whenever you see
him, the sooner you'll be
able to write a happy end-
ing to this drama. As long


going to the doctor. My
own lower teeth could
use some work, so maybe
I could suggest we both
get braces. I'm not sure
what to do. BRACING
FOR AN ANSWER IN
BOULDER
DEAR BRACING: By
all means talk to your
boyfriend about the condi-
tion of his mouth as well
as good dental health. If
his teeth are as crooked
as you have described,
his bite is probably also
off which can cause jaw
problems when he's older.
Your idea of getting braces
with him is a good one,
and I agree it's worth pur-
suing because you won't
appear to be criticizing
him. I hope he heeds your
suggestion.

, DEAR ABBY: My
landlord likes to wander
around the yard and
driveway wearing only a
towel around his waist
Sometimes he goes out
of his way to talk with me
while "dressed" that way.
Should I be concerned? -
CALIFORNIA RENTER
DEAR RENTER:
Probably not, unless his
towel "slips," or California
experiences more gale-
force winds such as the
ones that occurred last
December.
Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Refuse to let anyone
coerce you into doing
something you don't want
to do, Taking drastic mea-
sures to avoid someone or
something will backfire.
Face whatever situation
arises honestly, swiftly and
without compromising
your integrity. ***
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): You don't have to be
a superstar. Ask for help,
if that's what you need. A
creative suggestion should
be considered, even if it
is unorthodox. A peer,
colleague or boss will be
impressed with your astute
and competent actions.

GEMINI (May 21-June
20): You'll come up against
some stiff competition or
opposition. Don't wait for
someone to beat you at
your own game. Jump in
and do everything in.your
power to excel. Love is on
the rise. Participation will
help you attract attention.

CANCER (June 21-July
22): Apply your knowledge
and experience to a ser-
vice you can offer to sub-
sidize your income. There
is money to be made if
you can find a way to fill a
demand that is typical of
the average person's situa-
tion. *****
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Take on what you know


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

you are capable of doing.
Making unrealistic prom-
ises will lead to stress and
a poor reputation. Time
spent with someone you
love will make your rela-
tionship better and. lead
to an interesting personal
proposition. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Socialize with col-
leagues or people who
share your interests and
you will discover a new
way to promote what you
have to offer. Updating
your approach or your
presentation to fit the eco-
nomic climate will lead to a
prosperous venture. ***
LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct
22): Watch what others are
doing and you will come
up with a better way to .
achieve the same results.
Your insight and compe-
tence will lead to positive
changes professionally.
Invest more time in devel-
oping your skills. Love is
in the stars. ***
SCORPIO (Oct 23-
Nov. 21): You've got the
right moves to captivate
an audience. Don't hold
back. Discuss your plans
passionately and you will
get interesting feedback.
A proposal or partnership
is worth considering. A
change to your. personal


life will motivate you.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): Avoid dangerous
situations or people looking
for an argument. Stick close
to home and make whatever
changes are necessary to
protect your -assets and your
family. A problem with a
child, relative or neighbor is
likely to develop. **
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Problems while
traveling or dealing with
someone who is unpredict-
able must be avoided. You
can make positive changes
to your home that will
accommodate your chang-
ing family or situation.
Recycle old ideas and items
to save money. ****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Stick to your bud-
get Moderation will help
you control a potentially
troublesome,'scenario. A
romantic situation with
someone from your past
will tempt you to make an
abrupt change in your life-
style or your geographical
location. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): You hold the key
to your future. You can
choose to fight and vie
for attention, or you can
choose to be a team player,
sharing your knowledge
and being open to sugges-
tions. Much can be accom-
plished if you compromise,
forgive and forget ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: D equals X
"WPYX ALT, MPZZPVHOS EBX XDLYUZX
PM EBX JOHEXA WELEXW PM LYXGHKL,
EBXGX VHZZ RX L JOHEXA WELEXW PM
XJGPUX." -- SXPGSX VLWBHOSEPO

Previous Solution: "Staying on your own path means that you are on the right
track. Don't let anyone deter you from that." Eartha Kitt
2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 2-22


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


HOROSCOPES


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
as you sleep with Jake you
will not be able to replace
him with someone who
can give you what you
want and deserve, which is
a real relationship.
** ** **
DEAR ABBY: My
boyfriend of three years,
"Patrick," is smart, suc-
cessful and wonderful in
every way. He dresses
extremely well with atten-
tion to detail. Many of his
friends call him a "metro-
sexual."
Patrick never had
braces as a child. Now, as
an adult, his teeth have
caved in and are very unat-
tractive. It surprises me
that he would let his teeth
go or hasn't noticed how
crooked and deformed
they are. I'm afraid to men-
tion it in case it would hurt
his feelings. As we are
thinking about marriage,
the prospect of having to
look at Patrick's bad teeth,
that will likely worsen with
age, is a deterrent
Am I being petty and
superficial or should I sug-
gest adult braces? Patrick
can more than afford them
and isn't afraid of pain or


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


CLASSIC PEANUTS

I / HAVE AN MIE1














olumbia,

Your marketplace source for Lake City and Columbia


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2012


LAKE CITY REPORTER


1C


Visit the pros at Radiant Skin Solutions


From staff reports

The people at
'Radiant Skin
Solutions/
Medispa are
health care
professionals who special-
ize in the rejuvenation,
healing, revitalization and
treatment of skin issues
facing people today.
Radiant Skin Solutions/
Medispa offers a variety
of medical skin treatments
that utilize the Palomar
IPL (Intense Pulsed Light)
Laser unit.
The state-of-the-art
equipment aids in the dras-
tic reduction of surgical
and accidental scarring,
stretch marks and acne
scarring. It is the latest
treatment for the laser hair
reduction, scar reduction
and the reduction of age
spots and fine lines.
"Our facility also offers
treatment for people
of darker skin tones.
Inflammation in the skin
creates a darker lesion
on the skin and we utilize,
a very precise laser that
can remove and even
out the skin tones," said
Rodney Scyphers, Family
Nurse Practitioner and
owner. "Our technology
is used fdr the treatment
and reduction of brown
spots, age spots and hyper-
pigmentations through
a two-fold treatment of
topical application and
photo-rejuvenation. This
treatment targets the dark-


Trannie Lacquey of Branford speaks with Karen Fowler, an employee at Radiant Skin Solutions/Medispa.


ened area by preventing
future hyper-pigmentation
and lightening the affected
area on the skin."
In addition the facility
offers Botox and dermal
fillers for clients seeking
immediate visible results


and facial resurfacing for
those people looking for a
more youthful appearance
overall. This service targets
fine line, uneven skin tone
and large pores through a
series of laser treatments.
Radiant Skin Solutions/


Medispa operates with
eight staff members,
including Scyphers.
"Lake City is perfect,"
he said. "It has a small
town feel with enough
sophistication to under-
stand what we do. It is


small enough to have
personal relationships with
people, unlike New York
or Detroit."
Office hours are 9 a.m.
- 5 p.m. Monday'- Friday.
Saturday hours are 10 a.m.
- 2 p.m. Located at 125 SW


Midtown Place, off Sisters
Welcome Road, Radiant
Skin Solutions has been in
Columbia County for about
a year.
A complimentary con-
sultation can be scheduled
by calling (386) 719-9227.


Do'9 Ms. Ti


MARCH 3RD & 41




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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2012

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantageof the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


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Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad Is to Appear: Call by: Fax/Emall by:
Tuesday Mon.,l10:00a.m. Mon.,9:00 a.m.
Wednesday Mon., 10:00a.m. Mon., 9:00a.m.
Thursday Wed., 10:00 a.m. Wed., 9:00 a.m.
Friday Thurs., 10:00a.m. Thurs., 9:00 a.m.
Saturday 'Fi, 10:00am., Fri., 9:00 a.m.
Sunday Fri., 10:00a.m. Fi.,9:00a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damage(
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of dirondri-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodation, StanJdard
abbreviations are ax;cepteble, how-
ever, the first word of w-h di maey
not be abbreviated

In Print aiiil Oinlinr
WWH.l.Iin.t ;il r ot hl-.h t ,111


Legal

NOTICE TO BIDDERS
THE COLUMBIA COUNTY
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMIS-
SION WILL RECEIVE BIDS FOR
THE FOLLOWING:
BID NO. 2012-B WESTSIDE COM-
MUNITY CENTER BIRLEY AVEr
NUE COLUMBIA COUNTY-
BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY WILL ACT AS
THE GENERAL CONTRACTOR
FOR 2012-B WESTSIDE COM-
MUNITY CENTER, BUT DESIRES
BIDS ON THE TWENTY-FIVE
(25) SCOPES OF WORK IDENTI-
FIED IN THE BID PACKET. CON-
TRACTORS MAY BID ON ANY
NUMBER OF SCOPES FOR
WHICH THEY ARE QUALIFIED.
THE BID PACKAGE CAN BE
DOWNLOADED AT WWW.CO-
LUMBIACOUNTYFLA.COM UN-
DER THE PURCHASING TAB.
HARD COPIES MAY BE PUR-
CHASED AT CONTRACTOR EX-
PENSE FROM HUNTER PRINT-
ING 1330 SW MAIN BLVD, LAKE
CITY, FL 32025.
SEALED BIDS WILL BE DUE
MARCH 8, 2012 AT 2:00 PM IN
STHE BOARD OF COUNTY COM-
MISION OFFICE LOCATED AT,
135 NE HERNANDO AVE, ROOM
203 LAKE CITY, FL 32055. BIDS
.WILL BE OPENED AT 3:00 PM
ON MARCH 8 AT THE SOUTH-
SIDE COACH'S BUILDING LO-
CATED AT 1114 SW KUHN RD.,
LAKE CITY, FL 32025 IN THE
SOUTHSIDE RECREATION
COMPLEX. ALL BIDS MUST BE
CLEARLY MARKED AS A
, SEALED, BID' FOR PROJECT
.2012-B, MUST IDENTIFY THE
SCOPE BEING BID,' AND IN-
CLUDE THE NAME OF THE BID-
DER. FAXED BIDS 'WILL NOT BE
ACCEPTED THERE WILL BE A
MANDATORY PRE-BID CON-
FERENCE ON FEBRUARY 28,
2012 AT THE COLUMBIA COUN-
TY SCHOOL BOARD AUDITORI-
UMI LOCATED AT 372 W. DUV-
AL ST., LAKE CITY. FL 32055.
ALL CONTR ACTORS .WISHING
TO BID THIS PROJECT MUST
SUBMIT THE COMPLETED CON-
TRACTOR'S QUALIFICATIONS
FORMS WITH THEIR BID. THE
FORMS ARE INCLUDED IN THE
BID PACKAGE.
COLUMBIA COUNTY RE-
SERVES THE RIGHT TO WAIVE
IRREGULARITIES AND/OR IN-
FORMALITIES IN ANY BID AND
TO REJECT ANY OR ALL BIDS
IN WHOLE OR IN PART, WITH
OR WITHOUT CAUSE, AND/OR
ACCEPT THE BID THAT IN ITS
JUDGMENT WILL BE FOR THE
BEST INTEREST OF THE CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY BOARD OF
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS.
A LOCAL BUSINESS PREFER-
ENCE ALLOWENCE OF 5% IS
AVAILABLE FOR THIS PROJECT
AND, WILL BE APPLIED AC-'
CORDING TO THE POLICY AND
PROCEDURES OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY.
NON-CONSTRUCTION RELAT-
ED QUESTIONS SHOULD BE DI-
RECTED -TO THE' COLUMBIA







Land Clearing.

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale
Delivery of 100 bales $260
386-688-9156

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
TAXES, RESUMES.
Other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.

Need Protection? Gateway To
Florida Security 386-438-8282.
gatewaytofloridasecurity& gmail.com.
Our security guards specialize in
Honesty, Courtesy & Alertness.


Legal

COUNTY PURCHASING DE-
PARTMENT AT 386-719-2028.
CONSTRUCTION RELATED
QUESTIONS SHOULD BE DI-
RECTED TO TOMMY MAT-
THEWS, CONSTRUCTION MAN-
AGER, AT 386-758-1039.
Dates of Advertisement February 17
& 22 '
FOR THE COLUMBIA COUNTY
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMIS-
SION
By: Scarlet Frisina, Chairperson
05530793
February 17, 22, 2012


020 Lost & Found

FOUND US off Old Country Club
Rd. Female dog. Reddish brown
w/s ome black, short hair, very
friendly, no collar. 386-752-8854

FOUND: Small Black and white
dog. Found in the Defender/Baya
area on Monday the 6th. Please
call to identify 386-752-2492


060 Services

Title Mobile Rust Repair.
Cut out rust and reweld new metal
www.floorpanrepairs.vpweb.com
(727)253-0658

10i Job
Opportunities

05530592
Maintenance Manager needed
for a chain of convenience
stores. Comm'l Refrigeration
Exp, & Universal EPA Card
req'd. Responsibilities include
but not limited to Refigeration,
'Heat/Air, Plumbing, & Ele.
Salary Neg. approx. $16-$18 hr
depending on knowledge & exp.
Applications avail at the Jiffy
Store Office. 1102
Howard Street, East, Live Oak,
FL or jiffvfoodstores.com.
Please return application to the
address listed above.
05530817
EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY
COLUMBIA COUNTY
Columbia County is accepting
applications for a Custodian.
Position's primary responsibility
is moderately heavy manual
work in routine housekeeping,
grounds keeping & general
maintenance work. Minimum
Experience: High School
graduate or equivalent preferred,
at least 18 years of age & one-
year experience in housekeeping
or similar custodial work; or any
equivalent combination of
training & experience. Valid
Florida Drivers License
required. Salary: $7.87 per hr.
plus benefits. Successful
applicant must pass a pre-
employment physical, drug
screening, & criminal history
check. Applications available at
the Human Resources Office,
Board of County Commission-
ers, 135 NE Hemrnando, Suiie
203, Lake City, FL 32056,
(386)719-2025, TDD
(386)758-2139, or online at
www.columbiacountvfla.com.
Deadline for receiving
applications: 03/09/2012.
Columbia County is an
AA/EEO/ADA/VP employer.

05530819
TIMCO
aviation services

Facilities Maintenance
Mechanic
Full-time positions available for
individuals with roof coating
and sealing experience. Apply
online at www.timco.aero
AAP / EEO Employer

MECHANIC for busy track shop.
Experience required with own
tools. Southern Specialized
386-752-9754


100 Job
Opportunities

05530883
FANTASTIC
OPPORTUNITY
Housekeeping PT/FT
MUST have a strong work ethic,
DEPENDABLE, good
communication skills, and
willingness to learn. MUST be a
team player and able to work a
flexible schedule including
weekends and holidays.
We offer Competitive Pay and
Health Benefits. Hotel
Experience Highly Preferred.
Only thoseseeking long term
employment apply in person
at Comfort Suites 3690 W US
HWY 90. Please do not call the
hotel regarding your application.

CDL Class A Truck Driver.
Flatbed exp. for F/T SE area.
3 years exp or more. Medical
benefits offered. Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773
Drivers- Professionals willing to
Team. $4500-5500/mo avg.
Great Benefits, Hometime!
HAZ Freight & Explosives.
CDL-A. 800-835-9471.
New Business Expanding to North
Florida. Looking for motivated
individuals. Will be having
Opportunity Meeting.
Call 386-754-8811 for details
Now accepting resumes for a
general manager for Mochi Frozen
Yogurt. Full time 50-60 hrs per
week. Scheduled to open in,
March. Please mail to: 1396 NE
20thAve. Bldg 300 Ocala, FL
34470 or email to:
bulldog@laloenterprises,com
Part time. CNA Needed for Home
Care. Could develop into more
hours. Please FAX reply to:
386-438-8725
Preschool Teacher
Apply in person at Bullfrogs and
Butterflies 1226 SW.Grandview
St. Lake City.
Sales Position available for -
motivated individual Rountree -
Moore Toyota, Great benefits, paid
training/vacation. Exp. a plus but
not necessary. Call Anthony
Cosentino 386-623-7442

120 Medical
120 Employment

05530652
Physical Thrapy Center hiring a
Physical Therapist/Physical
Therapist's Assistant or Rehab
Aide. F/T or P/T.
Hands-on tamining w/some exp.
preferred. Personal training or
fitness background a plus. Basic-
knowledge of anatomy and
exercises are a MUST.
Candidate must be confident,
have good people skills,
great attitude and be willing to
learn. Extreme motivation
proniotes rapid-growth. Send
resume to: pta714@hotmail.com
or fax to 386-755-3165.

05530834
Full Time Registered Nurse
The World's leader in dialysis
services is seeking a Registered
Nurse for our out-patient dialy-
sis center in Lake City.
Apply at: fmcnacareers.com

05530846
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328


120 Medical
120 Employment

05530838
1i UNI \'l:RSITY of
UF FLORIDA
iack onville H'ealthcar. Inc.
Jaick.onivile Physicins1, Inc.
UF Lake City
Cardiovascular Center
Wanted Certified and
Experienced Medical Assistant
to work both the front and
back office of this small
cardiology practice.
Please send resume to
pam.nowlin(@jax.ufl.edu.
An Equal Opportunity
Institution.
Drug-Free Workplace


05530839 *
RN, Unit Supervisor
Baya Pointe Nursing & Rehab
Center, a 90 bed skilled nursing
facility is now hiring for a RN
with experience in Long Term
Care and Supervisory Skills.
Position is full time with
excellent pay and benefits.
Please apply 587 SE Ermine
Ave., Lake City, FI 32025 or
fax resume to 386-752-7337.
EOE/DFWP

05530840
Certified Dietary Manager
For 90 bed skilled Nursing
Facility. Must have experience
and current CDM certificate.
Strong supervisory skills a must.
Please apply Baya Pointe
Nursing & Rehab Center,
587 SE Ermine Ave.,
Lake City, Fl 32025 or
fax resume to 386-752-7337.
EOE/DFWP

Medical practice needs
Ophthalmic Technician.
FT or PT. Experience preferred.
Fax resume 386-755-7561.

2 Schools &
240 Education

05530293
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-03/05/10,
* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-03/12/12
* LPN 03/12/12
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies-


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Fiorida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line
www.Ilakecityreporter.com


401 Antiques
ANTIQUE DUNCAN
Fife Desk.
$500. obo
386-590-1206
Antique Duncan
Fife Server.
Good condition. $600. obo.
386-590-1206
Antique Duncan Fife Dining
Table and 4 chairs, Very large
China Cabinet. In fair condition.
$1000. obo. 386-590-1206

407 Computers

DELL Computer,
$100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170
HP 17" Flat Screen Monitor,
w/built in speakers. $60.00 obo
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

408 Furniture
4 Postered, dark wood queen bed-
room set. Dresser w/ mirror, chest,
night stand & mattress (King coil
pillow top). $800. 386-590-1206
Chest of Drawers.
Really nice.
$25.00
386-365-0262
Complete dark wood Queen
bedroom set. Dresser, night stand,
chest of drawers. $650.obo
386-590-1206
FULL SIZE Serta mattress
and box springs. $500.
386-590-1206

Wood dining table w/extension.
2 pholstered chairs on casters.
$25.00
386-365-0262

420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-288-6875.
- Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$300 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
Like new 20 inch
Chrome Wheels. 6 lug.
Come off GMC Sierra.
$500 obo. 386-623-5219

460 Firewood
It's Getting Colder!! Firewood
$65. Truck Load. we will call you
back. We deliver under 20 mi
$100 per load. Over 20 mi $120
per load. Joey 965-0288. Lv mess.

To place your
classified ad call ,

755-5440
EI RMREMwRm


Set yoursi

onsorn.eth]r9






SITEL
Apply in person or online


confused?


Call Lake City Reporter Classifieds!



WE CAN HELP 386-755-5440


---I


m^iBU


SELL iiT


laFINDIT^








LAKE CITY REPORTER -CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2012


0630' Mobile Homes
for Rent
1 BR/1 BA Furnished, all utilities
included + satellite,
$125 week, $125 deposit.
Call 386-758-6939
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Units.
Free Water,
sewer and trash pickup.
386-984-2025 or 386-984-2063
2BR MH. Good location. CH/A
$395. mo. $200. dep.
386-755-0064
or (904)771-5924
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779
640 Mobile Homes
0 for Sale
Jacobson Homes Factory Outlet
Prices! New 2012 3/2 start at
$39,900 and New 4/2's start at
$49,900. All new homes inc
delivery and set up, ac-skirt and
steps. North Pointe Gainesville
(352)872-5566
New And Used! North Pointe
Homes in Gainesville has 4 used
homes in stock! Don't delay as
these will go Fast.
Call North Pointe in Gainesville
(Hwy 441, 6 Blocks north of
Hwy 222) (352)872-5566
Palm Harbor Homes
New Home Stimulus
_5K For Your Used Mobile Home-
Any Condition
800-622-2832 ext 210
6 0 Mobile Home
650 &Land
3br/2ba 2.75 ac. w/fish pond.
Small down plus $725 month
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproerties.com
710 Unfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent







Brandywine Apartments
Now Renting
1, 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A.
386-752-3033 W. Grandview Ave.
EqpatLhousing Opportunity
TDD Number 1-800-955-8771
Duplex w/garage spacious,: 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgrnd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
Great area W of 1-75, spacious'
deluxe 2br apts, some w/garage.
W/D hookups, patio, $600-750 +
Sec. 386-965-3775 or 965-5560
Mo,ye in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, larg-
-er-2/br.-for $495. mo hl-owater.
386-755-2423 rigsbyrentals.com


f710 Unfurnished Apt.
1 U For Rent
NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled
1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living
room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951 .

720 Furnished Apts.
SFor Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
SUnfurnished
730 Home For Rent
05530814
Century 21/
The Darby Rogers Group
Totally remodeled in down
town White Springs 3/2
$840./mo.
16884 53rd Road Wellborn
3/2 $800./mo
1306 NW Scenic Lake Drive,
Lake City 3/2 spacious
home/Lake Front $1,650./mo
*453 SW Mayflower Glen
Forth White 2/1 $750./mo
Kayla Carbono 386-623-9650
lbr/1.5ba Country Cottage, Cathe-
dral ceilings, brick fireplace, wash-
er/dryer,1 ac fenced, private, some
pets, lease.. 1st, last, sec, ref. Lake
City area $725 mo. Smoke Free
environment. 352-494-1989
2BR/1BA DUPLEX, Carport
Off Branford Hwy
$595. mo. $595. dep. Very clean.
Contact 386-752-7578
3BR/2BA NEW construction
Lease option. 1st, last plus $400
sec.$900. mo. South of town.
Credit ref's req'd. 386-755-9476
Brick 3br/2ba Large yard, garage,
CH/A. 179 SW Stanley Ct. Lake
City. $900. mo + $850 dep.
Call 386-365-8543
CUTE & CONVENIENT
2br Apartment.
$485. mo $585 dep.
386-344-2170


k730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
Spacious 3br/2ba home irt town
with large bonus room, recently
remodeled. $900.mo. includes yard
service. NO PETS. Ist/last/sec Dep.
required. 386-867-9231

750 Business &
Office Rentals
05530343
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
900 sq $600/mth
3568 sq'$2973/mth
8300 sq' $5533/mth
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor
2 Business Offices For lease:
Approximately l00sq ft each.
Located SE Baya Ave.
Call 386-755-3456 for info
For Rent or Lease: Former Doc-
tors office, Former professional
office & Lg open space: avail on
East Baya Ave. Competitive rates.
Weekdays 386-984-0622
eveningg/weekends 497-4762

805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es- .
tate which is in violation of the
To place your
classified ad call
755-5440


High Visibility
All utilities furnished including Internet
Kitchen and bathroom facilities included
Partially furnished
Several size offices available

GREAT LOCATION FOR
PERSONAL SERVICE BUSINESS
Please call Buddy Slay@386-755-1666
or Dale DeRopia@386-623-3004


SOI5


IT


FAST IN THE




CLASSIFIED


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from the Lake City Reporter Classifieds.

Let our sales team help you place
an ad today, in print and online!


Call 386-755-5440 or go to www.lakecityreporter.com



Lake City Reporter

lakecityreporter.com CURRENTS magazine


805 Lots for Sale
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
3 Bed/1 Bath home on
Poplar St.
Nice yard and carport.
$48,000 call 484-678-6385
FSBO Custom 3br/2.5ba. 1748sqft
Eastside Village. Oversized garage
w/extra garage in rear. Lg master
w/shower & tub. $149,000
386-752-2783 or 904-631-7390 "
Live on a Golf Course. 3/2 brick
on 1/2 ac. Formal living, dining &
family room. 2 car garage.
$129,900 Frank 386-984-5217

820 Farms &
* Acreage
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
Owner Financed land with only
$300 down payment. Half to ten ac
lots. Deas Bullard/BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com


870 Real Estate
Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605
920 Auto Parts
2 & Supplies
4 TIRES with matching
aluminum Rims. 5-lug.
Off F-150. 265/70/17
$175.00 FIRM. 386-365-5099

930 Motorcycles
HARLEY DAVIDSON Electric
Glide Classic. 2006. 12,500 mi
LOADED $12,000.
(734)255-4820

950 Cars for Sale
2003 ACURA TL3.2. Loaded.
Midnight blue. New stereo.
179k miles. Good condition.
$4,200. obo. 386-590-1206 .


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* OPINION I

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* COMMUNITY

*,ENtERTAINMENT

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Classified Department: 755-5440





Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2012


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SExanm and Necessary


tXra
X-rays


150, DU33.)
FHrsi-time
patient
Reg. $136 SAVINGS OF $107
Expires Februar) 29, 2012


www.aspenlakecity.com


STimELESS YEmORIES
YourPlace For Quality

Pre-Owned Furniture

& New
Gifts Galore
*W 4 386-466-1888
1034 SW Main Blvd., (next to the Money Man)Lake City, FL 32055 _

.ted at SHANDS LL ak i.,


CHANDL


or)b


ER MOHAN, MD
ANN MARIE iEN;,


/ . 386-466-11, C7
imp. & i_ n www.myobcare.com
-, OBSTRETRICS & GYNECOLOGY MENOPAUSE & INCONTINENCE
PRENATAL CARE & ULTRASOUNDS WEIGHT LOSS 1&4D ULTRASOUNDS $70
STD'S & HPV TESTING BOTOX & LASER HAIR REMOVAL $70
BIRTH CONTROL & INFERTILITY NO INSURANCE VISITS s50
i- FREE Pregnancy Ultrasour -IS AD*
'Insurance billing may occur
ALL MAJOR INSURANCES ACCEPTED INCLUDING MEDICAID & MEDICARE


Ask About Our Cabin Rentals
or Stay the Night In Our Famous Tree House!
A .41 ,1.


Race Day 5K Walk-Run


L-evffi'n W7 As f kr* I/onreda fatewai 6o//w


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I ake City Reporter I


L-Su'nday, February 26,2012
Race Dav Fair/*


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