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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01782
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: February 19, 2012
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01782
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text





YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874


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000015 120312 **3- IT 326
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P0 BOX A 1170071 STORY
2AINESVIUNIV OF FLORIDA
SLLE FL 32611-1943


,y Reporter


.TYREPORTER.COM -------------


SUNDAY CHS grad named
EDITION CFO at Ivy League
medical school.


IC


Club House
'memory bricks'
are for the future.


Schools chief Millikin



won't seek 2nd term


Campaign against
toughest critic ends
before it begins.
By LAURA HAMPSON
Ihampson@lakecityreporter.com
Michael Millikin, Columbia County
School District superintendent, said
Saturday he will not seek re-election,


-in November, end-
ing before it formally
began a, campaign
that was shaping
up as a tough fight
against a school
board member who's
Millikin been highly critical
of his administration.
In an intrevieiv at the offices of the
Lake City Reporter Saturday afternoon,
Millikin said he wants to spend more


time with his family and said politics
had nothing to do with his decision
not to run.
When asked if he would endorse
a candidate for superintendent, he
said he would "remain silent" on the
\matter.
"I wish my successor the best .of
luck," he said. However, he added, "I
think you need to be an educator ulti-
MIWKIN continued on 3A ,


Olustee: Round 2,


JASON MATTHEW WALKE*/Lale Cry Reponer
Confederate soldiers hold the line against their Union counterparts during the 'Mini Battle' Saturday at Olustee Battlefield. The'
conflict:followed yesterday's Skirmish on the banks of Lake DeSoto and sets the stage for today's full-blown re-enactment of the
Battle of Olustee at'1:30 p.m.

'Mini Battle' ends differently


than actual Battle of Olustee


By HANNAH 0. BROWN
Flags held high, the calvary of
Confederate reinactors marched
across a smoky battlefield to con-
front Union forces on Saturday.. In
the trees, faint musket shots began to
sound the prelude to war. The battle
had begun.
The battle displayed this day was
not an historically accurate repre-


sentation of the Olustee battle. It
was shorter in duration and the roles
were switched. On this day, the Union
could look forward to triumph.
Explosions quickened and grew
louder. Suddenly the sound of two
canon shots burst into the open field.
The crowd shook, some gasped,
some exploded into laughter. Heads
swiveled right and left following the
sound and smoke. The bleachers


were completely packed..
"There is a heavy Confederate hold-
ing in families," said Ben Faure, Park
Manager. "A lot of these people that
reinact are a 5th generation family
member of someone who fought and
died at the Battle of Olustee."
Faure insisted that the park service
was very careful and organized in
MINI continued on 3A


Tools of the trade,

or tools of torture?

By LAURA HAMPSON clean as possible," the surge


A surgeon uses a forceps to dig out a piece of shrapnel
from a soldier's chest Saturday during the medical dem-
onstration.


naIIImpsonilakecityreporter.com.ii
A young soldier yells in
agony as a surgeon plunges
forceps deep into his shoulder
wound and pulls out a bloody
bullet Several men hold him
down as the surgeon applies
a hot iron to seal the wound.
The men haul the solider, still
screaming, into the medical
tent "'Try to keep things as


VolI 38a No. IS


I!!!!.1 .111 s o- .. o T
M M CALLUS: *
(386) 752-1293 72 37
SUBSCRIBETO Chance of showers 'p
THE REPORTER:
1 l 8 Voice:7s5-5445 WEATHER, 8A
Fax: 752-9400


tets is iemaie assistant, as le
smokes a cigar. Another sol-
dier is brought from the tent
and laid on the bloodstained
operating table.
The medical demonstra-
tion during the 36th Re-enact-
ment of the Battle of Olustee
Saturday was not for the squea-
mish. About 50 people crowded
TOOLS continued on 3A


Opinion ................
Business ................
Obituaries ..............
Advice .............. . .
Puzzles .................


Jeffery Dillman, 19, kisses three-year-old Tramp dur-
ing a reunion Friday at North Florida Animal Rescue in
Wellborn.


Best friends

meet again

in Wellborn

After more than a year and a half,
Jeffery Dillman had all but given
up hope he'd find his dog Tramp.
By LAURA HAMPSON
Ihampson@lakecityreporter.com
WELLBORN "I don't even know if he'll remem-
ber me or not," said Jeffery Dillman, standing in
the lobby of North Florida Animal Rescue's Anthea
Duron Pet Adoption Center.
Dillman, 19, drove from Jacksonville to Wellborn
Friday to be reunited with Tramp, a dog Dillman
thought he'd never see again.
How Tramp, a Siberian Husky-Labr-ador mix,
survived more than a year and a half away from his
owner will likely always be a mystery. Perhaps kind-
hearted strangers took Tramp in on cold nights and
provided regular dish of kibble. Or maybe Tramp
learned to survive on his own as a stray, hunting in
TRAMP continued on 5A


COURTESY PHOTO
The Wilson S. Rivers Library and Media Center, set to
open Tuesday at Florida Gateway College, will be the
first new building to open on campus in more than 15
years.

New library opens

Tuesday at college
From staff reports

After more than two years of construction, Florida
Gateway College will open its first new building on.
campus in more than 15 years.
The Wilson S. Rivers Library and Media Center
will open Tuesday, Feb. 21 to students and the com-
munity.
Work began on the 38,707-square-foot facility
- about twice the size of the current college
library in November 2009, according to a press
release.
"I think that this new library and media center is
probably one of the most exciting things that has
happened at Florida Gateway College and for the
whole community," said Dr. Charles Hall, president
of Florida Gateway College in a press release.
"Not only do we see it as a great resource for our
students, but we also see it as the regional library
in western Baker County and eastern Columbia
County. We want to invite everyone to come out and
get a library card this is their library too."
The $8.5 million state-of-the-art facility features
more computers for reference work, study rooms
UBRARY continued on 3A

TODAY IN COMING
PEOPLE TUESDAY
Houston's voice Olustee
still soars. wrapup.


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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012


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2A LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012


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Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Wednesday: Wednesday:
19-22-26-29 13 7-19-22-28-29 Afternoon: 6-3-0 Afternoon: 4-7-7-7 29-37-38-39-42-44 11-12-32-52-56 PB 11


AROUND FLORIDA


Clay sheriff: Deputies acted properly in fatal raid


MIDDLEBURG
Nine deputies investigat-
ing a tip about a meth lab at
north Florida home acted
"by the book" in a shootout
that left a detective and a
suspect, dead and another
detective wounded, a sheriff
said.
No one should have been
staying at the Middleburg
home where Clay County
deputies approached
Thursday evening, Sheriff
Rick Beseler said Friday at
a news conference. .
The sheriffs office said
Ted Arthur Tilley answered
when deputies knocked,
then opened fire on them.
Tilley, 36, was fatally shot as
he fled out the back of the
house.
Detective David White,
35, died en route to the
-hospital after the shootout
Detective Matthew Hanlin,
37, was recovering Saturday
from a gunshot wound to
the arm, The Florida Times-
Union reported.
The Florida Department.
of Law Enforcement is
investigating.
Beseler said he's not sure
which or how many depu-
ties fired back at Tilley.
"Everything they did
last night was by the book.
They wore all their protec-
tive gears. They followed
all the proper protocols,"
Beseler said. "Someone that
was intent on hurting them
made this happen."
The homeowner had
given deputies permission
to enter, Beseler said.
Electricity to the home


had been cut off, but squat-
ters had run an extension
cord from a nearby house
for power.
"They had no right to be
there," Beseler said.
Five others in the house
were questioned. A 16-year-
old from Valdosta, Ga., was
charged with felony drug
possession for having meth
in his pocket, the sheriffs
office said.
Tilles criminal history
includes multiple arrests,
including charges of drug
possession and resisting an
officer, according to court
records.
White, who was married
with two young children,
was a nine-year veteran of
the sheriffs office, as well
as an Army veteran.
"He was just one of the ,
finest officers and military
men that I've ever met,"
Beseler said. "He was just
an unbelievably nice individ-
ual that we will sorely miss."
Ice cream shop in Klan
controversy shuts down
OCALA Notoriety over
a costumed ice cream cone
mascot mistaken by pass-
ersby for a Ku Klux Klan
protestor apparently did not
result more customers for a
Florida ice cream shop.
The Ocala Star Banner.
reported Saturday that the
'Ice Cream Family Corner &
Sandwiches had closed for
good.
The shop closed for
roof repairs just before
Christmas but never
reopened. Robert Wilson,


the attorney for the prop-
erty owner, told the news-
paper that the ice cream
shop's lease was terminated
Feb. 2.
The shop garnered
national media attention in
September after the cos-
tume worn by a man hired
to promote the business
was misidentified. The cos-
tume had a brown, waffled
bottom and a fluffy, pointed
white top, flecked with col-
orful sprinkles and looked
nothing like a Klan robe
and hood.
Woman accidentally shot
at church' has died
ST. PETERSBURG -
Authorities say a pastor's
daughter accidentally shot
in the head in a Florida
church has died.
The Pinellas County
Sheriff's Office says
20-year-old Hannah Kelley
died Saturday at-a hospital.
An autopsy is pending.
Kelley had been hospital-
ized since Sunday when
she was struck in the head
by a bullet at her father's
Grace Connection Church
in St. Petersburg.
Investigators have said
Moises Zambrana was
showing his gun in a small
closet to another church
member interested in buy-
ing a firearm. Zambrana
reportedly removed the
/ ,magazine from the Ruger
9mm weapon but did
not know that a bullet
remained in the chamber.
The gun went off, firing a
bullet through a wall.


The sheriffs office says
detectives are still inves-
tigating the shooting. No
charges' have been filed.
Man charged with 144
counts of child porn
MIAMI A South
Florida man is facing 144
counts of child pornography
possession and authorities
say more charges are likely.
Florida Department of
Law Enforcement identi-
fied the suspect Friday as
44-year-old Orville H. Bullitt
of Davie. Agents say Bullitt
was arrested earlier this
week at his mother's home
in Osceola County.,
Authorities say Bullitt has
been targeted in a lengthy
investigation by an FDLE
cybercrime unit. Agents
told the South Florida Sun
Sentinel they were able
to trace images on a file-
sharing network to Bullitt's
home computer.
Records show Bullitt has
been arrested twice before,
on sex-related charges,
resulting in one convic-
tion and one case in which
charges were dropped.
Bullitt was jailed in
Osceola County on $1.4 mil-
lion bail. It wasn't clear,ifhe
had a lawyer Friday.
.Manatees back in Fanning
Springs after cleanup
FANNING SPRINGS -
A $90,000 project to clean
up Fanning Springs to
attract manatees seems to
have worked.
The Gainesville Sun


reports that 20 manatees
were spotted in the springs
this week. State officials
removed sediment from
the bottom of the springs
so the manatees would
have more room. This
allows the animals to get
out of the colder Suwannee
River water and into the
72-degree spring water.
The cleaning started in
early November 2011 after
erosion caused sediment
to collect at the bottom of
the spring creating shallow
levels.
, The project was a joint
effort involving the Fish
and Wildlife Conservation
Commission, The Nature
Conservancy and the
Florida Department of
Environmental Protection.
Prior to the cleanup, only
about five manatees were
spotted in the springs.
FAMU police records show
hazing complaints
ORLANDO-
Documents show that
Florida A&M University
police investigated at least
10 complaints about hazing
involving the school's famed
marching band between
August 2007 and November,
when a band member
died after being hazed, the
Orlando Sentinel reported
Saturday.
The newspaper reported.
that it received the campus
police documents through a
public records request
Among the documents
is a complaint from former
FAMU student Bria:Shante


Hunter days before alleged
hazing ceremonies Oct. 31
and Nov. 1 left her with a
broken leg. Three students
have been charged with
hazing Hunter.
Hunter told campus
police that she complained
to a band employee dur-
ing a band trip to South
Carolina around Oct. 22
about being "battered"
earlier in the semester dur-
ing an initiation by a group
affiliated with the band, the
documents show.
Chuck Hobbs, an attor-
ney for longtime band
director Julian White, said
that if the employee heard a
complaint about hazing, he
should have reported it
"Protocol dictates that
band staff, upon receiv-
ing reports of hazing, are
required to report them
to Dr. White, who immedi-
ately reports any alleged
incidents to FAMU police,"
Hobbs said.
White was not informed
of any hazirig involving
Hunter until her parents
contacted him about her
injuries in November,
Hobbs said.
White is on administra-
tive leave.
The documents detail
hazing Marching 100
band members reported
in the years before ,
Robert Champion died
in November. Authorities
Are still investigating
Champion's death on a
, charter bus during a band
trip to Orlando.
(AP)


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Houston's voice soars at funeral


NEWARK, N.J.
After all the testimonials from
relatives and friends, the songs from
legends and pop stars, the preaching
and even laughter, the raw emotion
of Whitney Houston's funeral came
down to just one moment The sound
of her own voice. '
As the strains of her, biggest
record, "I Will Always Love You,"
filled the New Hope Baptist Church
at the end of the nearly four-hour
service Saturday and her silver-and-
gold casket was lifted in the air, the
weight of the moment was too much
for mother, gospel singer Cissy
Houston, to bear.
As she was held up by two
women, she wailed, "My baby! My
baby!" as she was led out the church -
behind her daughter's body.
A few steps behind her was the
pop icon's daughter, Bobbi Kristina,
also crying uncontrollably as she
was comforted by Houston's close
friend, singer Ray J.
It was the most searing scene on
*a day with mixed moods as fam-
ily, friends and a list celebrities -
sometimes one in the same came
to the humble New Hope Baptist
Church where she first wowed a
congregation to remember one of
music's legends, but also a New
Jersey hometown girl.
Houston died last Saturday in
Beverly Hills, Calif., on the eve of the
Grammys atthe age of 48. Her death
Marked the end of a life that was
marked by stunning achievements:
Blessed with a voice of great power
and beauty, Houston became one of
pop music's most successful artists
over a career that spanned nearly
three decades and segued into film
with hits like "The Bodyguard."
But her struggles with drugs and
very public fall from grace during
tumultuous times, including a union
with ex-husband Bobby Brown, were
among the many valleys in her life.
Both sides of Houston were
recalled at the service at New
Hope, which was filled with about
300 mourners, including Oprah
Winfrey, Tyler Perry, Alicia Keys,
Mariah Carey, Mary J. Blige, Forest


Fans sing Whitney Houston songs as they gather a few blocks from the New Hope
Baptist Church before the singer's funeral in Newark, N.J.


Whitaker, Jennifer Hudson, Diane
Sawyer and Houston's cousin,
Dionne Warwick.
"She was someone with a
charmed and a beautiful life, some-
times misunderstood, even by
herself," said her sister-in-law and
manager, Patricia Houston. "But
a life nevertheless that gave joy,
happiness, enthusiasm, peace and
beautiful music to millions of people
around the world."'
Kevin Costner, her co-star in "The
Bodyguard," said for all of Houston's
beauty and success, she was still
yearning for approval from the pub-
lic and still somewhat insecure, a
superstar who "still wondered, 'Am I
good enough? Am I pretty enough?
Will they like me?'"
"It's a tree we could all hang from
- the unexplainable burden that
comes with fame," he said. "Call it
doubt call it fear. I've had mine. And
I know the famous in the room have
had theirs."
Many who spoke talked about
Houston's unshakable faith in Jesus
Christ, which got her through some
of her most difficult times. Perry
recalled a conversation where
Houston would look sad when
reflecting on her troubles, but then


would hasten to add that God was
taking care of her.
'The other thing I know for
sure and this is more important
than anything that she's done in her
life Whitney Houston loved the
Lord," he said.
Fittingly, music played a major
role in the send-off to one of music's
greatest voices.
Stevie Wonder rewrote lyrics to
"Ribbon in the Sky" for Houston -
"you will always be a ribbon in the
sky," he sang.
So did gospel's the Rev. Kim
Burrell for "A Change is Gonna
Come," which Warwick said was
Houston's favorite song of all time.
R. Kelly brought the New Hope
Baptist Church to its feet with a stir-
ring version of "I Look to You," the
title of Houston's final studio album.
And Keys, her voice breaking at
times, dedicated her song "Send Me
An Angel," to Houston
Brown briefly appeared at her
funeral, walking to the casket, touch-
ing it and walking out He later said
in a statement that he and his chil-
dren were asked repeatedly to move
and he left rather than risk creating
a scene.
(AP)


Singer Smokey
Robinson is 72.
S Actor Jeff Daniels is
57.- h
Talk show host
Lorianne Crook is 55.


NFL Commissioner
Roger Goodell is 53.
Britain's 'Prince
Andrew is 52.e
Actress Justine
Bateman is 46.


Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293 BUSINESS
Fax number .............752-9400 Controller Sue Brannon.... .754-(
Circulation ..............755-5445 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
Online... www.lakecltyreporter.com CIRCULATION
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lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180 should be completed by 6:30
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Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. a.m. on Sunday.
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0419


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5.32
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1.40
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CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this
space. And thanks for reading.


Celebrity Birthdays


Daily Scripture
"For I am convinced that nei-
ther death nor life, neither
angels nor demons, neither
the present nor the future, nor
any powers, neither height nor
depth, nor anything else in all
creation, will be able to sepa-
rate us from the love of God
that is in Christ Jesus our Lord."


- Romans 8:38-39 NIV


..... ....... I .......... ---










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012


Sunday, February 19
9:00am 3:00pm
Park opens to public


1:30pm
36th Annual Olustee Battle
Re-enactment


TOOLS: A brutal, brutal time'
Continued From Page 1A


around the medical tent to see how Civil War-
era surgeons treated wounded soldiers, often
without anesthesia.
The crowd gasped when the surgeon pulled
out a saw to amputate a man's arm and a boy in
the crowd was squirted with "blood," a mixture
of liquid and food coloring.
People are just amazed at how barbaric
medical practices were then, said re-enactor
Adrian Cox McCabe, of Lake City, who played
a surgeon.
"It was a brutal, brutal time," said re-enactor
Mike Bloski, who also played a surgeon.


Bloski said during the performance he
found himself wanting to use terms for mod-
em medical devices, as he works for Manatee
County EMS.
Re-enactors Tyler Dasilva, of Live Oak, and
James Johansen, of Tallahassee, said they did
research before the demonstration to know the
natural reaction to certain wounds. Soldiers
' with head wounds would be too hurt to
yell, said Johansen, who portrayed a sol-
ider with an eye injury.
"Just seeing the way it was 150 years ago
makes you grateful," he said.


Proper technique


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Jay Swisher (left) watches Dwight Sweat, a physical therapist assistant, demonstrates
on Jamin Martin the proper technique to administer a massage during the Pro Motion
Physical Therapy ribbon cutting ceremony Thursday.


MINI: Battle has a different ending than actual Olustee conflict


Continued From Page 1A
planning the reinactment. Archaeologists
are brought in to help with the set-up of
the event, in case archaeological remains are
uncovered-which happens every year or so.
"Ifs one of very few places left where a reinact-
ment takes place on a National Historic site."
Back on the battlefield, Union men on hors-
es broke through the tree line, leading the way
for their calvary. They inched together toward
the Confederates. Both groups drew closer to
the patient crowd that sat watching intently.
Clouds of dirt burst up from the ground,
sending small trees soaring into the air, cush-
ioned by puffs of smoke. Horses pawed at the


earth.
"Ifs a really unique event for the park ser-
vice," said Faure. "Ifs probably the second
largest event in all of Florida Parks. It takes a
lot of people to put it on, we have about 16 dif-
ferent agencies that help us."
Among the spectators sat a group of men
and women in Army uniform. Period costumes
intemingled with blue jeans and sneakers.
Jon Phipps sat on the edge of the field, kneel-
ing in the grass and taking photos. Phipps
hiked on foot from Big Cypress Preserve just
outside of Orlando, he had been traveling for
over a month. Phipps climbed through the


brambles on backwoods trails to make it to the
event He had been planning to attend since he
began his trip.
He watch as soldiers fell down off of their
horses, clutching their "wounds" as they rolled
on the wet earth.
The Union forces moved in closer. Medical
reinactors followed in behind the human shield
to tend to the fallen soldiers.
Victory was sung! A brigade of musicians
march onto the field, spouting a happy tune.
The Union forces won the battle.
In the aftermath, a soldier found a fellow
cavalier who was injured in the fight He tied


a tournaquet on the soldier's arm and the two
limp off away from the battle field, the wound-
ed soldier leaning on his musket for support
Eleven-year-old boy scouts, Cameron Owens
and Conner Arrieta, were first-time attendees
at the Festival. Both hope to be reinactors
when they reach the required age of 16.
"I thought it was pretty cool," said Owens.
"Ifs pretty amazing how there are so many
volunteers that come out and help. I thought it
was going to be a lot less than it was today. But
I thought it was pretty spectacular."


MILLIKIN: Will not seek second term as district superintendent of schools
Continued From Page 1A


mately to serve the school
board."
Millikin's toughest crit-
ic and most vocal oppo-
nent, school board mem-
ber Glenn Hunter, is a
print shop owner. When
asked whether he meant
Hunter was not a qualified
candidate, Millikin said he
meant a superintendent
should have "the heart of
an educator."
Hunter hasn't formally
announced his candidacy
but has made public his
intent to run.
Hunter, who has been
especially critical of
Millikin's role in recent
teacher contract negotia-
tions, was not immediately


available for comment.
Millikin, 54, has worked
for 32 years in public edu-
cation in both Columbia
and Baker counties. Once
retired Millikin said he
plans to spend more time
with family and at his cabin
.in Marion County.
"It's such a commitment
to go another four years,"
he said.
Millikin said. he and his
wife have thought about it
for several months, as he
didn't want to make any
last minute decisions. "I
think ift's time to do some-
thing different"
Millikin said he feels
blessed to be able to retire
at a fairly young age.


He said he will
remain active with First
Presbyterian Church, Lake
City/Columbia County
Habitat for Humanity and
serving the community in
other ways.
With 1,400 employees
and 10,000 students, the
superintendent's job is
huge, he said.
So many families depend
on the district to provide
the best education for their
children and for employ-
ment, he said.
Beginning in 1980,
Millikin has worked as
a middle school teacher,
adult education teacher,
assistant principal, voca-
tional and adult educa-


tion teacher and assis-
tant superintendent. He
was elected superinten-
dent in 2008.
"I'm very pleased with
the direction we are going,"
he said. District gradua-
tion rates are consistently
higher than the state aver-
age. There are eight "A" .
schools in the district and
ten of 13 graded schools
are "A" or "B" schools, he
said. Also record numbers
of students are taking
Advanced Placement and
dual enrollment courses
for college credit. Despite
tough economic times, the
district was able to open
Pinemount Elementary in
August 2009, giving fami-


LIBRARY: Set to open Tuesday on campus of FGC


Continued From Page 1A
and a separate computer
training classroom. It also
boasts a 160-person con-
ference room that can be
divided for multiple meet-
ings, a large atrium with
leisure seating and a coffee


bar, and an enhanced tele-
vision studio.
While the library por-
tion of the facility opens
Tuesday, installation on
the audiovisual side of the
building is still under way


J-5


and will open in the spring.
The college will have a
grand opening event for
the library and media cen-
ter in April.
The current library will
begin its transition into a stu-


t Connected


U 71


dent center, funded by the
FGC Student Government
Association and a grant
from The Foundation for
Florida Gateway College.


Ever Live in NY?
New York Day
Join Us:
Saturday, March 17th
from 12:15 4 pm
at Lake City Shrine Club
for St. Patick's Day Dinner
Entertainment
"2 Peace"
(50's-80's Music)
Call Vern or Maureen Lloyd 752-4885
or Bob Peloni 984-8232
Deadline March 10th


lies in western Columbia
County a neighborhood
school, he said.
With state budget cuts,
the school district is oper-
ating with $11 million less
than when he took office.
School facility mainte-
nance .has really taken a
hit, he said. Projects like
new gym floors, kitchen
renovations at Eastside
Elementary School and an
auditorium at Fort White
High School have been
put on the back burner.


Millikin said he is truly
honored to be superinten-
dent of a district from which
he, his mother, wife and chil-
dren graduated. "I'd like to
be remembered as a true
public servant," he said.
"Reading a book to
a group of children is
still the most fun thing
I do," he said. "Nothing
has changed over the
years, Clifford the Big
Red Dog is still their
favorite."


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OPINION


Sunday, February 19, 2012


ONE


ONE
OPINION


Greece


bridles at


calls for


reform
reek President
Karolos Papoulias
angrily demanded
this week, "Who
: is Mr. Schauble to
insult Greece?"
Wolfgang Schauble had
inplied that leaders like
Papoulias are one reason
Greece is in financial crisis and
that the country might be bet-
ter served by postponing its
scheduled April elections and
letting an interim government
of appointed technocrats run
things for a while the impli-
cation being that they could
hardly do worse than current
management
Schauble can get away with
saying these things because he
is the German finance minister
and a key player in putting
together the $170 billion bailout
package that Greece needs
next month to avoid default
A $140 billion rescue pack-
age last May has proved inad-
equate, and Greece is still reel-
ing from the austerity measures
it was forced to accept to get
that money. Unemployment is
at 20 percent 50 percent for
youth and there have been
deep and painful cuts in wages,
pensions and public-sector jobs.
And now the leaders of
eurozone nations are demand-
ing more reforms and even
greater cuts than the leaders
of the two parties that make up
Greece's coalition government
had agreed to in writing. Such
is the level of distrust between
Greece and its 16 fellow mem-
bers of the eurozone.
France and Germany would
go even further and establish
a special escrow account for
the bailout money, with the
spending overseen by a special
panel. Not surprisingly, Athens
regards this intrusion on its
financial sovereignty as another
insult from creditors that it is
being forced to swallow;.
But to answer the Greek
president's question as to
where Schauble gets off insult-
ing Greece, the answer is sim-
ple: He works for Merkel, the
leader calling all the shots.
N Scripps Howard News Service


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things.done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
SDink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
'400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signedd and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
.verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
'and guest columns are the opinion of


the writers and not necessarily that of
'the Lake City Reporter.
* BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
,180 E. Duval St. downtown.
'* BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
; BY E-MAIL:
* news@lakecityreporter.com


4A


ANO
VI


THEIR
E W.


A one-
0

sided



peace

"' resident Obama is
working to realize the
leftist dream of unilat-
eral nuclear disarma-
ment. This will leave
the United States pitifully weak
and create conditions for cata-
strophic deterrence failure.
The White House has told
the Pentagon to study options
for reducing the number of
U.S. nuclear warheads by as
much as 80 percent The future
nuclear force could have as few
as 300 weapons, far below the
cuts to 1,550 required by the
START 2 nuclear treaty with
Russia. It would give America
an arsenal about the size of
France's Force de Frappe and
raise serious questions on
whether it would have suffi-
cient strength for even minimal
deterrence.
Supporters of radical weap-
ons reduction contend that
. Mr. Obama's "nuclear zero"
is not a unilateralist strategy ,
and that deep cuts would only
come as part of a framework of
global arms reduction. This is
mere rhetoric. No such frame-
work has been established or
is being negotiated, and no
other country in the world is
contemplating such extreme
cuts. START 2, which the
Obama administration claims
is a model for the global frame-
work, committed the United
States to nuclear cuts while
giving Russia the green light
for nuclear-force modernization
and expansion. The weak verifi-
cation regime in the treaty puts
America in the position of hav-
ing to take Moscow's word for
it that Russia is complying with
the agreed-upon terms. Ronald
Reagan counseled 'Trust but
verify," but Mr. Obama signed
off on "Let's just hope they
aren't lying."
Communist China has
never agreed to be part of
any strategic nuclear frame-
work. There are no reliable
official numbers on the size of
Beijing's nuclear forces, though
a 2011 Georgetown University
study concluded the Chinese
already may have the world's
largest nuclear arsenal. The
White House hasn't pursued
any nuclear negotiations with
Beijing and seems to think if
the People's Republic doesn't
mention its strategic forces,
they don't exist
Rising regional powers
aren't buying into Mr. Obama's
anti-nuke line. Pakistan, India,
North Korea and Iran have or
are pursuing nuclear weapons.
As the U.S. arsenal shrinks, the
relative value of their weapons
increases, so they have every
incentive to continue to move
down this path. This illus-
trates a dangerous flaw in Mr.
Obama's thinking. At the same
time he is pushing America
toward "nuclear zero," the
White House is promising to
extend the U.S. nuclear-deter-
rence umbrella to countries
such as Israel and Saudi Arabia
to assuage fears of the nuclear
thi-eat from Tehran. Given this
credibility gap, it's no wonder
many Middle Eastern states
are planning to initiate their
own nuclear programs if Iran
gets the bomb. In this respect,
"nuclear zero" is weakening
deterrence, spurring an arms
race and making conflict more
likely.
It will be left to Mr. Obama's
successor to dump "nuclear
zero" and reverse the danger-
ous erosion of the U.S. nuclear
arsenal. If America rejects the
security responsibilities of a
superpower, it has no business
calling itself one.


* Washington Times


Back around 1600, a
Scottish physician
made so bold as to
write that the king
of England and
Anglican church officials were
answerable to a higher power.
His phraseology was not kind,
and the Court of Star Chamber
ordered his ears cut off.
Even in the United States,
there have always been those
who want to shut you up one
way or the other, the tradi-
tion stretching from the Alien
and Sedition Acts of the John
Adams administration to the
campaign finance laws of today.
There's always an excuse
- maybe that the king has the
divine right to outvote God
and that arguments to the
contrary thwart earthly order.
Journalist Elizabeth Drew, in
raging against super PACs,
has her reasons, too, namely
that the controls she favors are
crucial to democratic elections,
a contradiction holding hands
with several others in an article
in The New York Review of
Books.
The piece referred to here
because it is similar to pieces
by other progressive journalists
- defines super PACs concisely
and well as "political action
committees that collect and
spend unlimited corporate or
individual contributions to pay
for ads that are explicitly for a
specified candidate."
The groups, which are not
supposed to communicate
with candidates, have been
spending millions this election
year, much of it on negative
and sometimes misleading TV
spots.
Campaign finance laws once
prohibited such committees,
even to the extent that a non-


Despite improving
economic data and
the soap opera that
the GOP primary
has become, the
White House has a new worry
- rising oil prices.
Oil is once again over $100 a
barrel, and analysts are warning
that $5-a-gallon gasoline is a seri-
ous possibility. When oil prices
rise, consumers get angry. And
when consumers get angry, they
blame whoever is in the White
House. And when they blame the
president, it is much more diffi-
cult for him to get re-elected.
It matters not that the president
does not control international oil
prices and has few options, short
of tapping strategic oil reserves,
a stopgap measure at best. What
does matter is that pain at the
pump often translates into angst
in the voting booth.


Jay Ambrose
Speaktojoy@ooi.com

profit group was told it could
not show a film making censori-
ous observations about Hillary
Clinton. That was so clearly a
violation of constitutional rights
that the Supreme Court said
oh, yes it can, opening the door
to a further lower court ruling
allowing unrestricted super
PAC spending, which, accord-
ing to Drew, contorts elections,
putting them in the hands of
the rich.
Sure, some super PAC ads
may influence voters, not least
of all when they are on target,
but to think they can trick most
of the voters most of the time
requires you to think the gener-
al populace is a brick short of a
load. Is that what Drew means
by democracy consent of
the stupid? In fact, she herself
writes that the public has been
outraged by some of them, and
there is scads of evidence that
candidates who do the most
spending also do quite a bit of
losing.
Meanwhile, free speech has
boundless good effects, and
no matter what some on the
left say (if not Drew), regulat-
ing the money spent on dis-
course is regulating discourse.
Insist on the contrary and you
are saying it would be no vio-
lation of the First Amendment
for the government to instruct
the New York Review of
Books on how much, if any,


Ann McFeatters
omcfeatters@nationalpress.com
With the housing market still
in the doldrums and millions of
Americans unemployed or under-
employed, tensions over Iran's
nuclear ambitions are translating
into yet another threat to the frag-
ile economic recovery..
Recession-bitten consumers
who have tightened their belts,
curbed their discretionary spend-
ing and stopped saving already
are seeing higher gas prices,
reaching $4 a gallon in some
parts of the country. Consumers


of its revenue it can spend on
editorial product, including
what it pays Drew.
Drew's solution to all this
unabashed liberty is more
government financing of
campaigns, which is to say,
government by consent of
government. That's especially
the case when you figure
incumbents writing the new
laws are never going to give
challengers an even break,
although now we come to
another Drew fear: state laws
requiring photo IDs to vote.
I guess we are back to
the people-are-stupid thesis,
because'Drew sees no way
minorities, the elderly and stu-
dents will be able to comply,
even though the states turn-
ing this direction are making
it easier than a kindergarten
class to get the IDs. What is
Drew to make of the black
vote in Georgia increasing
after ID laws went into effect?
A bipartisan Carter-era com-
mission said such laws would
fortify faith in the system,
encouraging participation.
Just maybe that group was
right.
The other pretense is that
voter fraud is not a U.S. prob-
lem or has been or will be,
which would be very, very
nice if it were true, but it isn't.
Today's autocrats may be
more civilized than the types
who used to cut off ears, but
I'd like them to become more
civilized still, supporting hon-
esty and free speech in elec-
tions.
* Jay Ambrose, formerly
Washington director of editorial
policy for Scripps Howard news-
papers and the editor of dailies in
El Paso, Texas, and Denver, is a
columnist living in Colorado.


who had hoped that this sum-
mer they might take that long-
deferred vacation are watching.
the escalating gas prices with dis-
may. Also, its one thing to travel
closer to home for recreation; its
quite another to face significantly
higher costs to get to work
Businesses that had begun
talking of plans to start hiring
additional personnel are more
likely to put them on hold.
America's dependence on for-
eigners for half of its oil needs is
costly, tiresome and dangerous.
Yet efforts to lower consumption
and produce affordable, renew-
able energy are often blocked.
One day, politicians will get the
message, and historians will
shake their heads at how stupid
we were for so long.
* Scripps Howard columnist
Ann McFeatters has covered
national politics since 1986.


www.lakecityreporter.com


Restricting super PACs


imperils free speech


Rising oil prices fuel fresh

worries for White House











LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012


TRAMP: Finally reunited with owner

Continued From Page 1A


the woods, eating what he could find and
getting into a garbage can or two.
How Tramp went from stray to reunited
pet is no mystery.
In May 2010, Dillman was living in Live
Oak. One morning he woke up to find
Tramp missing. Although he looked for
the dog, Tramp never turned up, Dillman
said. A month later, Dillman moved back
home to Jacksonville. "I pretty much just
thought he was gone," he said.
Fast forward to December 13, 2011,
about 19 months later, when someone
dropped a calm, black and white dog
off at Suwannee County Animal Control.
The person said only that the stray had
roamed onto his or her property, said Joe
Brown, animal control officer.
Brown said he scanned the dog for a
microchip along his neck and back, but
didn't find one.
Animal control held onto the dog, sav-
ing him from euthanasia, which is a fact of.
life at most crowded, underfunded animal
shelters.
Brown said Tramp is such a pretty
dog and his mannerisms made him very
adoptable so they delayed putting him
down, he said.
On Feb. 14, Colleen Burke, of North
Florida Animal Rescue, adopted the black
and white dog, who she called Howard
because he reminded her of Howard
Sprague from The Andy Griffith Show.
Burke said something about Tramp
drew her to him. While other dogs at
animal control were barking, Tramp was
quiet and kept his eyes on her.
"We look for ones that are close to
being out of time," Burke said. North
Florida Animal Rescue selects animals
from animal controls and other facilities
that euthanize adoptable animals due to
lack of space.
At the rescue center, Burke ran a micro-
chip scanner over the dog's entire body.
When she ran it over his leg, the device
chirped and a number popped up on the
screen.
Normally a microchip is between a dog's
shoulder blades, but Tramp's had migrated
down his leg. "Ifs easy to miss," she said.
Burke contacted the microchip compa-
ny, who then contacted Dillman's relative,
whose address and phone number was on
Tramp's microchip:
When Dillman found. out Tramp had
been found, he was speechless, said Jason
Burnett, Dillman's cousin, .who owns
Tramp's mother and siblings.
On Friday, Burke walked Tramp from
the center's kennels to the lobby, where
Dillman was waiting.
. Tramp was at first overwhelmed by the
room full of people, but when Dillman
spoke, Tramp offered tail wags and licks


of affection.
Dogs remember our voices, Burke
said.
Dillman said he took Tramp as a puppy
to No More Homeless Pets in Jacksonville
for shots and to be fixed. Microchipping
was included, but he never thought he'd
need it Now, he's glad Tramp has a
microchip, he said. "I would have never
found him."
Tramp will be 3 years old in November
and has been missing for more than
half his life. Dillman said Tramp usu-
ally stayed close and didn't just run off.
He said he's not sure how he got lost "I
still have pictures of him when he was
smaller," he said.
'"The importance of microchips is right
there," Burke said. "I'm just glad he's
going home,".she said.
"I felt so great that I didn't put him down,"
said Brown of animal control, after finding
out that Tramp had been reunited with his
owner. "From now on, I going to check the
legs and everything else," he said.
North Florida Animal Rescue doesn't
accept privately owned animals, but res-
cues animals from other shelters. The
rescue group's mission is to rescue, reha-
bilitate and re-home abandoned animals,
therefore reducing euthanasia.
"When a dog is in a shelter they lan-
guish and die," Burke said. "That's why
you do it," she said watching Tramp and
Dilliman interact.
After being reunited with his owner,
Tramp stood anxiously at the center's door,
as if ready to leave his life as a stray behind
and begin his secondchance as a pet


Altrusa lends a hand


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Members of Altrusa International Inc, of Lake City donated school supplies including note-
books, paper, pencils, crayons and glue to Niblack Elementary School teachers Wednesday
to use in their classrooms as part of the organization's Teacher's Closet program. Pictured are
Niblack' curriculum resource teacher Tess Soto (back row, from left); first-grade teacher Beven
Lee; Altrusa service committee member Leslie Rogers; Chair Dorna MacRae; member Heather
Mclnnis; kindergarten teacher Allison Lopes; principal William Murphy; and students Titus
Williams (front row, from left), Earnest Burch, Zahara Medina and Arienna Kim.,


Old-time
procession
A horse-drawn hearse
travels down U.S.
Highway 90 during
the Olustee Parade
Saturday. Thousands
were in attendance.


OBITUARIES


Marcus Allen Chestnut
Marcus Allen Chestnut, 55, died
on Sunday, February 12, 2012
at Shands UF in Gainesville.
He was born in Miami, Florida
to the late Welbur Lee & Doris
Tomlinson Chestnut. He has
lived in Lake City for 18 years.
He was a kind and loving father
& grandfather who loved his job
driving trucks for Anderson Co-
lumbia, watching NASCAR and
Florida Gator Football, and lis-
tening to Power Country to hear
the "Swap Shop" on Saturdays
and gospel music on Sunday. He
is preceded in death by his par-
ents and his two brothers, Rob-
ert Lee & Donald R. Chestnut,
and his sister Marie Chestnut.
Survivors include his daughters,
Hope Owen (Melvin Jr.) and Sa-
mantha Chestnut of Lake City,
FL; step son, Keith Shiver and
step daughters, Violet Camp-
bell & Amanda Shiver; sister,
Juanita Hollingsworth ; grand-
children, Sabrina & Thomas
"T.D." Owen also survive.
A memorial service will be


conducted at 11:00 a.m., on
Tuesday, February 21, 2012,
with Pastor Melvin Owen of-
ficiating, in the chapel of
GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME, 3596
South U.S. Hwy 441, Lake City,
Florida 32025, (386) 752-1954.

R. Earline Parker
R. Earline Parker, known to many
throughout
Florida, and
particularly in
North Florida
for more than
two decades,
died peaceful-
ly at 6:15 p.m.
(Illinois time)
on Tuesday, February 14th, 2012.
Earline was a dynamic individ-
ual who had significant impact
within the greater Lake City area
as a volunteer and former Chair-
person of the local SCORE
Chapter 685. Her contributions
to the community also included
being the Executive Director


Classes Starting Soon!
SLimlited Spa tc ..1 ilY'tat, '.'

SLake (:ir Reporter

For Information call Bob Ganzak at (229) 506-1387
or email at bob.ganzak@dalecarnegie.com


of the Suwannee Valley United
Way, Member of the Chamber of
Commerce, served on the board
of Community Concerts, as Chair
of the Housing Authority and
board member of the Art League
of North Florida. A complete bio
of Ms. Parker follows below.
The funeral events are scheduled
for this Saturday, February 18th
at Braun Family Funeral Home,
265 Quarry Road, Columbia, IL
62236 as follows: Family 10-
11 AM; Open viewing 11AM
- 1PM; Funeral Service 1PM
Earline Parker was born and
grew up in St. Louise, Mo.
Her career being a successful
children's shoe buyer in New
York for a national general mer-
chandise house headquartered
in Chicago with branches in
major cities across the country.
As assistant to the Sales Manag-
er, she helped promote a rubber
footware line for Goodyear Rub-
ber Co. in the Midwest and was


involved in developing a sales
force in seven states along with
a warehouse distribution point in
Chicago to support their work.
Along with her husband, she
opened shoe stores across the
southerntierofWisconsin and lat-
er franchised stores in the region.
Ms. Parker was widowed and
remarried, after which, she sold
the shoe business in 1974 and
moved to St. Louis to open a dis-
tribution warehouse. Later she
moved to Ocala, FL where she
volunteered at. the Chamber- of
Commerce and was involved in
the promotion of Marion County
for the committee of 100 (later
changed to Industrial Devel-
opment Council). Ms. Parker
was offered the position of Ex-
ecutive Director of the United
Way of Marion County. While
in this position she increased
contributions from $77,000
to $335,000 in two years.
Ms. Parker then joined the


United Way of Manatee
County as Executive Direc-
tor and increased contributions
from $416,000 to $1,396,000
during her 8 year tenure.
She became a Financial Plan-
ner with Great American
and Northwest Life Insur-
ance and was moved to Lake
City in 1-990 to develop a
sales force in five counties.
Earline then volunteered to help
the United Way of Suwannee
Valley. She established a Plan-
ning Committee to reorganize
the agency from the bottom
up. As Executive Director, she
increased volunteer involve-
ment nearly ten-fold and in-
creased revenue from $186,000
to $598,000 in five years.
Ms. Parker then established Prin-
ciple Publisher, a subsidy pub-
lishing company and published
nine books within the first year
of business. She also wrote two
books entitled "On The Way to


Today How To Write a Memoir"
published by Alegro Press and
"Become a Professional Writer
- How to Make Writing Pay"
Published by Portals Publishing.
Ms. Parker was named
woman of the year 2010-
2011 by the National Asso-
ciation of Professional Women.
Earline Parker is survived by a
brother, Daniel Llyod Wilson; her
sisters, Georgia Palmer and Bar-
bara Jones; stepdaughter, Vern
Mary Garry and step-son, Steve
Garry; several grandchildren
and great grandchildren; many
dedicated and saddened friends.





Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


CITY OF LAKE CITY

NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING

Lake City Fire and Rescue Association


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Lake City shall hold a public
meeting at 10:00 AM on Thursday, February 23, 2012 in the City Council
Chambers located on the second floor of City Hall at 205 North Marion
Avenue, Lake City, Florida.


The purpose of this public meeting is to discuss contract negotiations for the
IAF, Lake City Fire and Rescue Association Local 2288.


All interested persons are invited to attend.


SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: If you require special aid or services as
addressed in the American Disabilities Act, please contact the City Manager's
Office at (386) 719-5768.


AUDREY E SIKES
City Clerk


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428







6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012


The Mini Battle: More scenes from Olustee


JAION MA I Inew Iw ALtrnLaKe Luly reporter
Union soldiers guard their ears while firing a cannon at Confederate soldiers during the mini battle Saturday.


JASON MATITHEW WALKERiLake City Reporter
A member of the Regiment Band of the 11th North Carolina
plays period music Saturday.


aMOUN MAIf I W u..rIML C -Li.t.Aw y nffepori
The Olustee Parade Grand Marshal County Commissioner
Ron Williams and his wife, Gwen, wave from a horse drawn
carriage while participating in the parade Saturday.


.wg~&1



~IF


Confederate soldiers hold the line as a mass of Union fighters advance.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Re-enactors jog back in place along U.S. Highway 90 as they
attempt to keep up in the Olustee Parade Saturday.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City
Reporter
A sole Confederate soldier
breaks the line in frustration
and chargers the Yankee
defenses, only to be mowed
down by a barrage of bullets.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City
Reporter
A surgeon uses a forceps
to dig out a piece of shrap-
nel from a soldier's chest
Saturday during the medical
demonstration.


M Boots Galore

A,@@R7, WOLVERINE
Tumblers
New Guy Harvey T-Shirts


Florida Tax Payers
please research this information.
With our taxes, Florida School Districts will be testing Biology 1 public
school students commencing in 2012 concerning, the blasphemous
fallacy of The Scientific Theory of Evolution, which is contrary to the Word
of God. It teaches hominid evolution which flies in the face of Columbia
High School, Fort White High School and Challenge Learning Center
students and alumni. All of them are offspring of Adam and his female
wife Eve and therefore are created by God, in the image of God. (Compare
Holy Bible versus Florida Biology 1 End-if-Course Assessment Test Items
Specifications, page 32 SC.7.L.15.1; page 52 SC.912.L.15.10
http://fcat.fldoe.org/eoc/pdf/BiologyFL11Sp.pdf)
I challenge the Florida Columbia County School District and all of its teachers
to a public debate between The Scientific Theory of Evolution and the Holy
Bible. Kenny Merriken 386-344-7339, kbmerriken@hotmail.com


In The Year of our Lord 2012


II Timothy 2:15


Paid for by Kenny Merriken











LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012 7A



The Mini Battle: More scenes from Olustee


































JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City
Old Glory flies victoriously

as Union soldiers drive back
their enemies with a series of
deadly volleys Saturday dur- 0./l
ing the mini battle. ., .- .


Bradford High JROTC members Edward
and Cory Johns, 16, dance while visiting
Saturday.


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
A horse looks on a his battle-weary rider succumbs to his wounds in the field while battling Confederate forces.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
While Union cannons fill the air with earth and smoke,
Confederate comrades muster up enough courage to hold the
line.


' We the family of
Annie (Beulah) Anderson
4 Would like to say thank
you to all the friends
L and family members
for all the comfort,
support and prayers in
our time of need. Again
thank you and may
God continue to bless
Syouall.


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8A LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012


THE WEATHER


CHANCE MOSTLY PARTLY
OWNERS SUNNY CLOUDY



172 L37 H.iLI HIL2W0


SJCHANCE 10-CHANCE
O&OWERS OWNERS


173 LO53


*. l *' ld ta city
S72/39 JaclsOmIae Cape Canaveral
T ie City6 75/42 Daytona Beach
72/40 72/37 Ft. Laudlerdale
s Gaes*a Day Bead Fort Myers
63/41 9City 49 Gainesvillel
63/41 67/45 oa. Jacksonville
,Cape"6/42 Key Weqt

: 81/49 80/55 M ia

la a" Naples
78/51 West Pa~Beach Ocala
86/60 : Orlando
S" Lauderdale PanamaCity
Ft.Myers 87/61 Pensacola
81/56 Naples Tallahassee
73/61 pmji Tampa
84/62 Valdosta
Key West W. Palm Beach
82,/7 1


LAKE CTA A C


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday '
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


73
62
70
46
85 In 1962
18 in 1900


0.00"
0.10"
0.95"
2.01"
5.32"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunnse tom.
Sunset tom.


7:07 a.m.
6:22 p.m.
. 7:06 a.m.
6:23 p.m.


MOON
Moonrise today 5:21 a.m.
Moonset today 4:27 p.m.
Moonnse tom. 6:00 a.m.
Moonset tom. 5:27 p.m.



Feb. Feb. March March
21 29 8 14
New First Full Last


[""176L8 55


Monday
68/ 52/s
65/51/s
73/63/s
76/55/s
66/42/s
61/43/s
75/66/s
65/39/s
75/64/s
72/58/s
67/44/s
71/51/s
62/53/s
59/47/pc
67/40/s
70/51/s
651,39/s
71/63/s


Tuesday
75,'59/0c
75/56/pc
77/66/pc
78/60/pc
74/50/pc
71/53/pc'
76/68/pt
72/49/pc
77/67/pc
79/63/pc
75/50/p6'
79/60/pc
65/59/s6t
70/55/t
73/49/pc
76/60/pc
71,47/pc
74. 67,'pc


INATIONAL FORECAST: A low pressure system making its way across the Southeast will
be responsible for scattered precipitation for the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic states. Look
for potentially strong to severe thunderstorms for portions of Florida, Georgia, and South
Carolina, with locally heavy rain extending into the Mid-Atlantic.



NAIOA FORCAT AP3 m toda


Warm Front
in


Warm Front

Stationary
Front
Occluded
Front


S .


Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today


CITY
Albany NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
| Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck
Bolse
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston SC
Charleston WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
ColumbIa SC
a Dallas
Daytona Beach
Denver


HI/Lo/Pcp.
42.'27 0
S45/29/0
25, 15 0
61/47/0
56 28,/0
46/26/0
60 47'0
38/7/0
47, 39, '11
47 34, 0
37.'30, 03
69 41 0'
55.'27'0
64 40. 0
32, 13'0
38/3Q/0
52, 25, 0
41, 35 0
66'38,,0
53 48 56
76 63/.01
3; 14 0


HI/Lo/W
37, 17,'s
51/29/pc
30.'21 rs
58/33/t
41,,32.'sn
40/22/rs
54 31 sh
45/25/pc
40 23.,
41/25/s
30 22, pe
67 41 1
35,'22,, sn
45. 33. r
42 19.,sn
37/27/s
38,23 c
33, 24. s
55./'36'
60 44
81. 9'sh
4.. 26 pc.


CITY
Des Molnes
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks
Greensboro
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson MS
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Uttle Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Mobile
New Orleans
New York
,Oklahoma City


HIVLo/Pcp.
38/21 0
41, 34.0
52/30,'0
0.'-8'-0
60/41/0
46 34,0
74/70, 0
63, 55'1.88
43,,'3. 0
55 48 1 32
70/56 0
42/24/0 .
56'41,'0
1, 45 .0
60,. 47/0
53, i.,0i
81 66.'0
34. 18. 0
62,58/43
;2, 61, 16
46 35 0
47/44/.17


HI/LO/W
42128,.s
34, 22...
69,46 pc
14, 10 Cc
41,29,'r
42 25.-s
81,69/,
65 47 .
37 24 pc
56 36 pc
75142,1
47/32/s
58, 43. pc
52/33/pc
60. 45',
50), 33, pc
84, 62 pc
39, 28. 1
62, 39. pc
62 45, p.:
47 33.'pc
55/40/s


CITY
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland ME
Portland OR
Raleigh
Rapid City
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Spokane
Tampa
Tucson,
Washington


HI/Lo/Pcp.
36 18 0
77/64/0
50/33/0
61/45/0
47/28/0
43/32/0
45'40 08
64/40/0
47.'10 0
50/30/0
59 32,0
54/46/0
45 35 0
44/26/0
59, 55 1 35
*57/52/0
55 50. 0
41/39/.21
37/32/.02
75/66/0
57 37.0
55/34/0


HI/Lo/W
43 31' b
81/49/t
43.'30, rs
72/47/pc
36,21 c
37/26/4q
46, 38,'p
44/31/r
44. 2? c
41/22/pc
40'28. r
59/38/pc
43, 2' p:
39/26/sn
66. 45 s
61/51/s
53, 41. cP
45/40/sh
39/27/c
78/51/pc
67, 42,'PL
40/30/r


Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today


Acapuico
Amsterdam
Athens
Auckland
BelJing
Berlin
Buenos Alres
Cairo
, Geneva
Havana
HelsinkI
Hong Kong
Kingston


1/I/Lo/Prp.
84'72 0
48 43 0
53,33.0
;5 61 0
39,'14,0
46 32 04
95. 79'0
55 48 0
45,23,0
84 59 0
25. 21,.08
61,54 '0
86.75,0


fI/ILo/W
8/,'72,pc
42 32 rs
53.41 'cC
;3 61 *,n
40 24's
42,29 i
86.72/1
61 44,rc
41.,31,/rs
86 67. cc
26/23 sn
65 57 pc
84/74'pc


TITY
La Paz
Lima
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobi
Nassau
New Delhi
Oslo
Panama
Paris


ni/Lo/rcp.
50,-41,0
823. 0
52 41.0
55/25/0
7E'55 '0
36/30/0
14.'3'0
82, 61 0
84, 63, 0
73, 45 0L
36., 16,0
90Q 73 0
52,46'0


niH L/W
48/40, sh
81/69/pc
46.31 pc
58/31/pc
69, 46 DC
28/18/s
17 3'c.
80, 55, ,r.
80. 71 'pL
72 53, .
28 18t pc
90. 73.
44,29 pc


Ill Y
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


n/H Lo/ rPcp.
84 70.'0
59 34. 0
83 72 0
81 72. 0
82 59 0
28 12 0
86, 75 '0
7'5, 66, 0
57, 48,0
3. 32, 01
36 30/0
46 37 0
36 32 .04


KEY TO CONDIONS: -clouay. dr-drizzle, f-fair, fg-fog, h-hazy, i-ice, pc-partly cloudy, r-rain, s-sunny,
.h--r.owers, sn-snow, ts-thunderstorms, w-windy.


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LENDER _


/I La//W
90 71, D
56, 40 sh
81 72 sn
81. 73. sn
84 58 s'
37 28R
84. 77 sh
81, 64, r
57, 43, h
43, 30. pI:
32. 21, pc'
43 31. sr.
34,29.,sr,


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Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom


Sunday, February


Lake City Reporter


SPORTS


19,2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


BRIEFS


Q-back
fundraiser
The Columbia County
Quarterback Club is
sponsoring a fundraiser
at Kazbor's Grille in
Lake City from 5-8:30
p.m. Tuesday. Tickets
are $8 ahd may be
purchased from football
players or at the door.
The next Quarterback
Club meeting is 6 p.m.
March 5 at the Jones
Fieldhouse.
For details, call Joe
Martino at 984-0452.

LCMS, RMS TRAC
Krispy Kreme
fundraiser set
The track teams
at Lake City Middle
School and Richardson
Middle School have a
Krispy Kreme fundraiser
planned on Feb. 24.
Cost is $7 and orders
are being taken by track
athletes at both schools.
For details, call coach
Quinton Jefferson at
755-8130 or e-mail coach
April Morse at eanbz@,
bellsouth.net.

ADULT1SOIFTBAU
Registration
open for league
play
The Lake City
Recreation Department
has registration for adult
softball set for
8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
weekdays through
March 2 at Teen Town
Recreation Center.
Leagues (ASA
sanctioned) offered are
co-ed church,
commercial and women.
Cost is $350 per team. '
For details, call Heyward
Christie at 754-3607 or
e-mail christieh@lcfla.
com.

N From staff reports


GAMES

Monday
Columbia High
baseball at Baker County.
High, 5 p.m. (JV only)
Tuesday
Columbia High
tennis at Ridgeview High,
3:30 p.m.
Columbia High
baseball at Fernandina
Beach, 5 p.m.
Fort White High
softball vs. Bradford
High, 7 p.m.
Fort White High
baseball at Santa Fe
High, 7 p.m.
Columbia High
softball vs. Wolfson High,
7 p.m.
Thursday
Columbia High
girls tennis vs. RP.K. Yonge
School, 3:30 p.m.
Fort White High
softball vs. P.K. Yonge
School, 6 p.m.
Columbia High
JV baseball vs. Melody
Christian, 6 p.m.
Fort White High
baseball at Union County
High, 7 p.m.
Friday
Columbia High
boys tennis at Lecanto
High at Central Florida
College in Ocala, 3:30
p.m.
Fort White High
baseball at Interlachen,
7 p.m.
Columbia High


softball at Santa Fe High,
7 p.m.


Gators roll

over Arkansas


in SEC clash


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida's Bradley Beal (23) is hounded by Vanderbilt's Brad Tinsley (1) during a game on
Feb. 5.


CHS

Fort White falls to
Suwannee High
on road, 2-0.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia High moved to
"2-0 after a Tiger fight with
Union County High on the
road Friday.
The hometown Tigers
defeated Union County's
version in a 2-0 contest in
which Kellan Bailey picked
up his first win of-the year.
Bailey threw five innings
of work without allowing
a run for the Tigers. He
struck out nine batters,
allowed two hits and gave
up one walk.
Jimmy Blakely scored
both of the Tigers' runs
after appearing as a cour-
tesy runner for Bailey in
the fifth inning and as a
pinch runner in the seventh
inning.
Blakely scored off a Ryan
Thomas hit in the fifth
inning to break the score-
less tie and he was walked
in with the bases loaded in
the seventh to give relief
pitcher, Blairie Courson, an
insurance run.
Courson, picked up the
save for the Tigers. He also
had a good night from the
plate with a 2-for4 evening.
Bailey, Levi
Hollingsworth and Andrew
Nettles also had hits in the
game.
"That was probably one of
the best pitchers we will see
all year," Columbia coach
I.T. Clark said. 'Teams


wins


Three players
score more than
20 in UF's win.
By KURT VOIGT
Associated Press
FAYETTEVILLE, Ark.
- Erving Walker scored
a career-high 31 points
and No. 14 Florida ended
Arkansas' perfect home
record with a 98-68 win.
The Gators (21-6, 9-3
Southeastern Conference)
shot a season-high 58.3
percent (28 of 48) from
the field, hitting a 13 of 23


3-pointers.
Walker, who was 2 of 18
from behind the arc over
his last four games, hit his
first four 3-point attempts.
Florida led 53-27 at halftime
after connecting on 9 of 14
3-pointers.
Kenny Boynton had 25
points and Bradley Beal
added 21 for the Gators.
The loss ends a 17-0 startto
the season in Fayetteville for
the Razorbacks (17-10, 5-7),
who were led by BJ Young's
career-high 31 points. It was
Arkansas' worst defeat in
Bud Walton Arena since it
opened in 1993.


Tiger fight


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake Ci y Reponer
Columbia High's Kellan Bailey looks at a ball during a game played last season in Lake City. Bailey went five shutout innings
for the Tigers allowing two hits, striking out nine batters and giving up one walk.'


will probably, continue to
throw their No. 1 pitcher
against us, which will only
make us better. Our bats
might not be lighting itiup
yet, but they will in the long
run."
Columbia (2-0) travels to


Fernandina Beach at 5 p.m.
on Tuesday. -
Indians baseball
Suwannee High picked
off the Fort White High
baseball team in a 2-0 loss


as the Indians travelled to
Live Oak on Friday..
The Bulldogs moved to
4-0 on the season while the
Indians fell to 1-3 early in
the year.
, Mike Cronan picked up
the win as he pitched a one-


hitter for the Bulldogs. He
struck out two batters and
gave up four walks.
The Indians return
toac,,,aption' in a road
contest against
Sanita .Fe.: High at
7 p.m. on Tuesday.


Lady Tigers


looking for


first victory


Columbia tennis
off to 2-0 start
early in season.
From staff reports

Columbia High is still look-
ing for its first victory after
rain cancelled its scheduled
match against Gainesville
High earlier this week.
The Lady Tigers most
recent match came on
Monday as Columbia was
only able to take one court
Chrissie Reichert won
the No. 1 singles match in


an 8-6 victory.
The district match against
Gainesville has not yet been
rescheduled, but coach
Tabatha McMahon wants to
make sure the Lady Tigers
meet the Hurricanes soon.
'That's going to be our
big competition," she said.
"I'm not sure when it will
be, but I'm hoping to insist ;
that it is rescheduled."
Columbia travels to I
Ridgeview High at 3:30 p.m.
on Tuesday.
"They're always great
competition," McMahon JASON MATTHEWWALKER/Lake City Reporter
said. Columbia High's Chrissie Reichert hits a shot in a match played in Lake City last year.


Section B










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
I p.m.
FOX NASCAR, Sprint Cup, pole
qualifying for Daytona 500, at Daytona
Beach, Fla.
9 p.m.
ESPN2 NHRA, Arizona Nationals,
at Chandler, Ariz. (same-day tape)
GOLF
9 am.
TGC European PGA Tour.Avantha
Masters, final round, at Newv Delhi (same-
day tape) j
I p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Northern Trust
Open, final round, at Los Angeles
3 p.m.
CBS PGA Tour, Northern Trust
Open, final round, at Los Angeles
* TGC LPGA Thailand, final round, at
Chonburi, Thailand (same-day tape)
7 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, ACE Group
Classic, final round, at Naples, Fla. (same-,
day tape)
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
I p.m..
CBS Michigan St. at Purdue
ESPN Syracuse at Rutgers
7 p.m.
ESPN2 South Florida at Pittsburgh
7:30 p.m.
FSN Oregon at Stanford
MEN'S COLLEGE LACROSSE
2 p.m.
NBCSN Doubleheader, Ohio St.
vs. Denver, at Jacksonville, Fla.; Navy at
Jacksonville
NBA
I p.m.
ABC Dallas at NewYork
3:30 p.m.
ABC Orlando at Miami
8 p.m.
ESPN Denver at Oklahoma City
NHL
Noon
NBC Pittsburgh at Buffalo,San Jose
at Detroit, or St. Louis at Chicago
3 p.m.
NBC Boston at Minnesota
6 p.m.
NBCSN New Jersey at Montreal
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
I p.m.
FSN Rice at SMU
3 p.m.
ESPN2 Duke at Maryland
FSN UCLA at Southern Cal
5 p.m.
ESPN2 Purdue at Michigan St.
FSN -Washington atArizona

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division '
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 20 II .645 -
Boston 15 14 .517 4
NewYork 15 16 .484 "5
Toronto 9 23 .281 I'h
New Jersey 8 23 .258 12
Southeast Division .
W L Pct GB
Miami 24 7 .774 -
Orlando 20 II .645 4
Atlanta 19 II, .633 41k
Washington 7 24 .226 17
Charlotte 4 26 .133 19
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 25 7 .781 -
Indiana 18 12 .600 6
Milwaukee 12 18 .400 12
Cleveland II 17 .393 12
Detroit 10 22 .313 15
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 21 9 .700 -.
Dallas 20 II .645 I'4
Houston 17 14 .548 4'4
Memphis 17 14 .548 4'A
New Orleans 7 23 .233 14
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 23 7 .767 -
Denver 17 14 .548 6'h
Utah 15 14 .517 7'h
Portland 16 15 .516 7h
Minnesota 15 16 .484 8h'
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 19 9 .679 -
L.A. Lakers 18 12 .600 2
Golden State II 16 .407 7A
Phoenix 12 19 .387 8'/
Sacramento 10 .20 .333 10


Friday's Games
Charlotte 98,Toronto 91
Orlando 94, Milwaukee 85
Miami 111, Cleveland 87
Detroit 114, Sacramento 108
Minnesota II I, Houston 98
Oklahoma City 110, Golden State 87
Memphis 103, Denver 102
New Orleans 89, New York 85
Dallas 82, Philadelphia 75
Utah 114,Washington 100
LA. Lakers II I, Phoenix 99
Saturday's Games
San Antonio 103. LA. Clippers 100,
OT
New Jersey 97, Chicago 85
Golden State at Memphis (n)
Atlanta at Portland (n)
Today's Games
Dallas at New York, I p.m.
Orlando at Miami, 3:30 p.m.
Sacramento at Cleveland, 6 p.m.
Boston at Detroit, 6 p.m.
Charlotte at Indiana, 6 p.m.
Utah at Houston, 7 p.m:
Philadelphia at Minnesota, 7 p.m.
Milwaukee at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
LA. Lakers at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Denver at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
Atlanta at Chicago, 4 p.m.
New Jersey at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Boston at Dallas, 8 p.m.
Memphis at Houston, 8 p.m.
New Orieans at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Orlando at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Denver, 9 p.m.
Washington at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
San Antonio at Utah, 9 p.m.
LA. Clippers at Golden St., 10:30 p.m.
Portland at LA. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.

3-point Shootout

Feb. 25 at Orlando
Ryan Anderson, Orlando
Mario Chalmers, Miami
Joe Johnson,Atlanta
James Jones, Miami
Kevin Love, Minnesota
Anthony Morrow, New Jersey

All-Star Slam Dunk

Feb. 25 at Orlando
Chase Budinger, Houston
Paul George, Indiana
Iman Shumpert, New York
Derrick Williams, Minnesota

AP Top 25 schedule

'Today's Games
No. 2 Syracuse at Rutgers, I p.m.
No. 5 Duke at Boston College, 6 p.m.
No. 7 Michigan State at Purdue, I p.m.
No. 15 Wisconsin vs.. Penn State,
4 p.m.
No. 18 Indiana at Iowa, 6 p.m.

No. 20 FLORIDA ST. 76,
NC STATE 62

At Tallahassee
FLORIDA ST.(19-7)
Gibson 3-6 0-0 6, Loucks 1-6 0-0 3,
Dulkys 3-6 0-0 8,James 3-4 6-6 12, Snaer
2-8 6-6 10,White4-7 2-4 10, Peterson 2-3
0-0 4, Portuondo 0-0 0-0 0, Space 1-2 0-0
2, Miller 6-9 4-5 17,Whisnant II 1-1 0-0 2,
Moreau 0-0 0-0 0, Kreft 1-3 0-0 2. Totals
27-55 18-21 76.
NC STATE (18-9)
Howell 1-6 3-8 5, Brown 2-9 8-8 12,
Leslie 8-14 5-6 21, Wood 1-10 5-5 8,
Williams 3-9 0-0 8, Painter 2-5 2-2 6, A.
Johnson 0-5 2-2 2.Totals 17-58 25-31 62.
Halftime-Florida St. 37-26. 3-Point
Goals-Florida St.4-13 (Dulkys 2-2,Miller
1-2, Loucks 1-4, Peterson 0-1, Snaer 0-2,
White 0-2), NC State 3-12 (Williams 2-4,
Wood 1-6, Brown 0-1, A. Johnson 0-1).
Fouled Out-IHowell. Rebounds-Florida
St. 34 (James 6), NC State 38 (Howell I ).
Assists-Florida St 14 (Snaer 5), NC State
12 (A. Johnson 4).Total Fouls-Florida St.
22, NC State 19.Technlcals--ames, Miller,
Brown.A-1 7,547.
Percentages: FG .491, FT .857.
3-Point Goals: 4-13, .308 (Dulkys 2-
2, Miller 1-2, Loucks 1-4, Peters.on 0-1,
Snaer 0-2,White 0-2).
Team Rebounds: 2.
Blocked Shots: 9 (James 4, Kreft 2,
Space, Dulkys,White).
Turnovers: 16 (James 3, Portuondo 2,
White 2, Kreft 2, Dulkys, Gibson, Snaer,
Miller, Peterson).
Steals: 8 (Loucks 3, KreftWhite, Miller,
Peterson, Snaer).
Technical Fouls:James, Miller.

BASEBALL

Baseball calendar


Sunday Voluntary reporting date
for other team's pitchers, catchers and
injured players.
Feb. 24 Voluntary reporting date
for other team's other players. Mandatory
reporting date for Oakland and Seattle.
March 2 Mandatory reporting
date for teams other than Oakland and
Seattle.
March 2-11 -Teams may renew con-
tracts of unsigned players.
March 19 Last day to place a
player on unconditional release waivers
and pay 30 days termination pay instead
of 45 days.
March 28-29 Seattle vs. Oakland
at Tokyo.
April 2 Last day to request uncon-
ditional release waivers on a player with-
out having to pay his full 2012 salary.
April 4 Opening day, St. Louis
at Miami. Active rosters reduced to 25
players.

GOLF

Golf week
PGATOUR
NORTHERN TRUST OPEN
Site: Los Angeles.
Schedule:Through Sunday.
Course: Riviera Country Club (7,349
yards, par 71).
Purse: $6.6 million. Winner's, share:
$1,13B8,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Today,
12:30-3:30 a.m., 3-6 p.m., 8:30-1 1:30 p.m.;
Saturday, 12:30-5:30 a.m., 1-2:30 p.m.,
9:30-11:30 p.m. Sunday, 1-2:30 p.m., 9:30-
11:30 p.m.) and CBS (Saturday, 3-6 p.m.;
Sunday, 3-6:30 p.m.).
LPGATOUR
LPGATHAILAND
Site: Pattaya.Thailand.
Schedule:Through Sunday.
Course: Siam Country Club, Pattaya
Old Course (6,477 yards, par 72).
Purse: $1.5 million. Winner's share:
$225,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Today,
12:30-2:30 p.m.; Saturday-Sunday,
3-6 p.m.).
CHAMPIONS TOUR
ACE GROUP CLASSIC .
Site: Naples
Schedule:Today-Sunday.
Course: The TwinEagles Club, Talon
Course (7,193 yards, par 72).
Purse: $1.6 million. Winner's share:
$240,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Today,
6:30-8:30 p.m.; Saturday, 12:30-2:30 am.,
'6:30-9:30 p.m.; Sunday, midnight-2 a.m.,
7-9:30 p.m.; Monday, midnight-2 a.m.).
EUROPEAN TOURIASIAN TOUR
AVANTHA MASTERS
Site: New Delhi.
Schedule:Through Sunday.
Course: DLF Golf & Country Club
(7,156 yards, par 72).
Purse: $2.37 million. Winner's share:
$394,710.
Television: Golf Channel (Today-
Sunday,9 a.m.-12:30 p.m.).
NATIONWIDE TOUR
BQGOTA OPEN
Site: Bogota, Colombia.
Schedule:Through Sunday.
Course: Bogota Country Club (7,237
yards, par 71).
Purse: $600,000/$ 108,000.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Friday's Games
New Jersey 3, Anaheim 2,.SO
Montreal 4, Buffalo 3, SO
Carolina 3, San Jose 2
Washington 2, Florida .I
Detroit 2, Nashville I
Winnipeg 4, Boston 2
Colorado 3, Edmonton I
Saturday's Games
Pittsburgh 6, Philadelphia 4
Chicago 6, Columbus I-
Minnesota at St. Louis (n)
Carolina at N.Y. Islanders (n)
Washington atTampa Bay (n)
Toronto at Vancouver (n)
Dallas at Phoenix (n)
Calgary at Los Angeles (n)
Today's Games
Pittsburgh at Buffalo, 12:30 p.m.
San Jose at Detroit, 12:30 p.m.
St. Louis at Chicago, 12:30 p.m.
Boston at Minnesota, 3:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Montreal, 6 p.m.
Anaheim at Florida, 6 p.m.
Nashville at Dallas, 7 p.m.
Columbus at N.Y. Rangers, 8 p.m.
Colorado at Winnipeg, 8:30 p.m.
Vancouver at Edmonton, 9.p.m.
Monday's Games
Otawa at N.Y. Islanders, I p.m.
Washington at Carolina, 7:30 p.m.


BRIEFS


YOUTH BASKETBALL

Travel basketball
tryouts set
Lake City Recreation
Department and
Richardson Community
Center/Annie Mattox Park
North, Inc. final tryout
for its USSSA ninth-grade
travel basketball teams
is 5:30-7 p.m. today at
Richardson Community
Center. Cost is $60 for
players who make the team
(roster limit 12).
For details, call Heyward
Christie at 754-3607 or
Mario Coppock at 754-
7096.

YOUTH SOFTBALL

Registration set
for Fort White

Fort White Girls Softball,
Association's registration


for its spring season is 5-8
p.m. today and 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. Saturday at South
Columbia Sports Park,
or at the Busy Bee store
in Fort White. Leagues
offered are T-ball (starting
at age 4) through 16-and-
under. T-ball cost is $45;
fees for other leagues are
$55.
For details, call Nora
Harvey at (386) 365-5688.


GSACC spring

registration set

The Girls Softball
Association of Columbia
County has registration set
for its spring recreation
season for girls ages 4-
17. Registration is at the
Girls Softball Complex on
Bascom Norris Drive at 5-7
p.m. Feb. 28, March 1 and
March 5. Players may also


register at Brian's Sports
on U.S. Highway 90 west
Cost is $45 per player or
$65 for siblings.
For details, e-
mail information@
girlssoftballassociation.org
or call 7554271.

FISHING

FFA tournament

on March 3

The Columbia High FFA
Open Bass Tournament
is Match 3 from safe
light to 3 p.m. out of Clay
Landing. Entry fee is $70,
and there is a $10 optional
Big Bass Pot Proceeds
of the tournament will be
used toward a scholarship
in honor of tournament
founder Justin Brown.
For details, call Chris at
288-7633 or Karen Brown
at 961-2526.


I




ASSOCIATED PRESS
St. Louis Cardinals starting pitcher Adam Wainwright throws during spring training baseball
Saturday in Jupiter. Wainwright missed all of last season after having Tommy John surgery
during spring training last year.


Minus big names, new-look


Cards say they're ready


By R.B. FALLSTROM
Associated Press

JUPITER So long,
Albert Pujols. Happy trails,
Tony La Russa. Timeout,
Dave Duncan.
The World Series champi-
on St Louis Cardinals have
had plenty of upheaval. Now
they enter spring training
looking for a new No. 3 hit-
ter and breaking in a rookie
manager and pitching coach.
Time for the newcomers to
step forward.
Before meeting with
reporters, just steps from
the closest of six prac-
tice fields at Roger Dean
Stadium,: Mike Matheny,
jokingly checked to make
sure this was where La
Russa usually held court
for 16 springs. Armed with
a cup of coffee instead of
facemask and shin guards,
the former four-time Gold
Glove catcher confessed to.
feeling a bit strange.
Two equipment bags
topped by six boxes of
shoes was stacked in front
of Matt Holliday's locker
stall, which used to be
Pujols' spot As for Pujols'
decision in December to
take -a 10-year,, $254 mil-
lion free-agent deal with
the Angels after 11 Hall
of Fame trajectory seasons
with the team that drafted
him? Old news
Pujols' name never even
came up during Matheny's
wide-ranging 18-minute


ACROSS
1 Upgrade
, 5 Riotous
crowd
8 Gift ribbon
11 M.P. quarry
12 Wading.bird
14 Pedro's river
15 Suit material
17 Famous
numero
18 Big rigs
19 Unisex wear
21 Low voice
23 Rumors,
perhaps
24 Imprecation
27 Driver with a
handle
29 Elec. unit
30 Space
traveler
34 Whined
37 Potato st.
38 Mild expletive
39 Sheath or
sack
41 Too


opening media session.
"It's going to be differ-
ent," pitcher Kyle Lohse
said. "But it's a business
and we have 25 other guys
who'll pull together to win
as many games as we can.
That's the way it goes. And
nobody's going to feel sorry
for us."
The Cardinals antici-
pate a visit in the next few
weeks from La Russa, who
will be assisting longtime
friend Jim Leyland with the
Tigers. La Russa has said
he won't be looking over




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.


Matheny's shoulder.
Just like La Russa,
Matheny plans on short,
activity-filled days before
the spring schedule starts
March 5. He devoted a lot
of Saturday to completing
the routine that likely won't
deviate much from the La
Russa days.
That's no surprise consid-
ering Matheny played for
St Louis for four seasons
and was an instructor in the
organization for two more
years before getting the job
last November.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


A: ^ ^ ^ 1^ ^ < m ^ '^ '^
<^^^^ 1 ^7 17 1^7 ^ ^^^ ^^A.A.


Saturday's J
Al


S3 Teasdale of
poetry
15 Zooms
U7 rings
50 Tarzan pal
51 Totally
absorbed
54 Sort
55 Bird feeder
treat
56 Isle of exile
57 Brown of big
bands
58 Lillie or Arthur
59 Frosh's digs

DOWN
1 Witch, to
Shakespeare
2 - framed!
3 Earring site
4 Camels' kin
5 Thick of
things
6 Teahouse
attire
7 Flour
holders


(Answers tomorrow)
fumbles: STOOD ADUIUT UNPACK BENIGN
answer: The offensive lineman didn't want to remember the
team's loss, so he did this BLOCKED IT OUT

Answer to Previous Puzzle










I AB L IE P EON
AN NN




D I AD EPI

MUONS P IE


8 Willis or
Springsteen
9 Cries from
the sty
10 Lures a
sweetheart


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


13 Real estate
party
16 Exasperate
20 Makes public
22 Sonnet
stanzas
24 Coral
formation
25 Ms. Thurman
of films
26 Tach reading
28 Harmful
30 Mexican Mrs.
31 Scurry along
32 Security
requests
33 Faux -
35 Consumer
gds.
36 Forms a gully
39 Early James
Bond foe
(2 wds.)
40 Sweetened
the pot
41 Popular pie
42 Scallions
44 Ventricle
neighbor
45 Put to sea
46 Cold-shoulder
48 Norwegian
port
49 Midwest st.
52 Slangy
thousand
53 Aswan, e.g.


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420










Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


LAKE CITY REPORTER


SPORTS


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Phil Mickelson hits to the eighth green after taking a free drop when his shot from the eighth fairway landed next to a
hospitality suite during the third round of the Northern Trust Open golf tournament at Riviera Country Club in Los Angeles
Saturday.


Mickelson takes wild ride


into share of the lead


By DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press

LOS ANGELES Phil
Mickelson hit one tree,
threaded a shot through
five trees and hit a drive
that wound up in a specta-
tor's shorts.. He somehow
managed a 1-under 70 on
Saturday to share the lead
with PGA champion Keegan
Bradley in the Northern
Trust Open.
Bradley, inspired by a
Riviera course that is one
of his favorites, took only
five putts over the final five
holes, including a 10-footer
for par on the last hole, for a
5-under 66 that assured him
being in the final group.
The par was meaningful
because he wanted to play
Sunday with Mickelson, a
mentor to him.
There's no telling what
to expect in the final round.
The phrase "routine par"
was not part of Mickelson's
vocabulary on a beauti-
ful afternoon off Sunset
Boulevard.
Mickelson played one
chip well past the hole on
the par-3 sixth so.it would
roll off the bank some 25
feet behind the cup and roll
back. He made a 12-footer
for his par.
The only disappointment


was not taking advantage
of enough -birdie chances,
twice missing birdie putts
inside 8 feet and failing to
give himself a good look
on the 'par-5 17th when his
wedge rolled off the front
of the green.
Mickelson and Bradley
were at 7-under 206, though
this is hardly a two-man
race at Riviera.
A dozen players were
within four shots of the lead
going into the final round,
including defending cham-
pion Aaron Baddeley (66),
Dustin Johnson (67) and
FedEx Cup champion Bill
Haas (68).
Johnson was tied for the
lead until he botched the,
end of his round. He made
bogey from the bunker on
the 16th, then three-putted
for bogey from just outside 3
feet on the 17th. He finished
with a birdie and a small
measure of redemption.
"I'm going to come out
tomorrow and give it every-
thing I've got," Johnson said.
Pat Perez still has a shot,
too. He three-putted from
10 feet for bogey on the
third hole, then took four
putts on'the next hole. His
long birdie try from 60 feet
on the fringe came up 5 feet
short, and Perez took three
more putts from there.


But he kept his patience,
made a few birdies and shot
70. Perez was in the group
one shot out of the lead
along with Jonathan Byrd,
who had a 69, and Bryce
Molder, who one-putted his
last eight greens for a 66..
Bradley surged into a
share of the lead with an 8-
foot birdie on the 16th, and
a pitch to tap-in range on the
next hole. From the right
rough, he came up short of
the 18th and chipped to 10
feet to set up the important
closing par.
"That's kind of why I was
excited to make that putt on
the last hole. I figured that
might be to get in the final
group with Phil," he said.
Bradley always' has
looked up to Mickelson; and
the four-time major cham-
pion invited him to play in
one of his money games at
The Players Championship.
The idea is for young play-
ers to learn to play under
pressure, and it paid off for
Bradley when he captured
the PGA Championship at
the end of the year:
They have played
together in a tournament
only once, the opening two
rounds of The Barclays.
"Nothing like this would
be," Bradley said.
There was a stretch


where Mickelson lived up
to his "Phil the Thrill" repu-
tation at Riviera.
He pulled his tee shot so
far right on the par-3 sixth
that it was headed for the
ivy-covered fence until clip-
ping a tree and dropping
down. Then, instead of hit-
ting a lofted chip that could
run to the pin, he chose to
chip some 25 feet past the
hole, have it run up the"
bank and come down. It
rolled 12 feet past the hole,
and he made it for a par.
On the par-4 eighth,
which gives players the
option of two fairways,
Mickelson found his own
route. He blasted a tee shot
so far left it went over a
white fence and landed at
the base of the stairs of a
corporate tent After getting
a free drop, he threaded a
9-iron through five eucalyp-
tus trees to 12 feet
It would have been one
of the more amazing bird-
ies in his career, except he
missed the putt
He was introduced to a
Bottle Brush on the 10th.
That was the name of the
tree between the pin and
where his tee shot landed.
Mickels6n caught a tiny
branch and didn't reach the
green, but hit a skillful pitch
to 3 feet for par.


NASCAR seizes part of


Johnson's Daytona 500 car


By MARK LONG
Associated Press

DAYTONA BEACH -
Five-time NASCAR cham-
pion Jimmie Johnson and
crew chief Chad Knaus are
back in the spotlight at one
of racing's biggest stages
- and not for the right
reason.
NASCAR confiscated
part of their Daytona 500
car Friday because of illegal
modifications, a rocky start
to Speedweeks for a team
trying to bounce back from
its worst season.
. Sprint Cup Series offi-
cials determined the No.
48 Chevrolet had illegally
modified C-posts, an area
of sheet metal between the
roof and the side windows.
It could lead to penalties for
Knaus and the team.
Officials cut off the C-
posts and .planned to ship
them to NASCAR's research
and development center in
Concord, N.C., for further
testing. In the meantime,
the parts in question were
put on display for other
teams to examine, a routine
procedure for the sanction-
ing body.
NASCAR allowed the
Hendrick Motorsports team
to fix that area of the car
before practice begins for
the Feb. 26 Daytona 500.


Qualifying is scheduled for
Sunday.
"Well, ifs a hell of a way to
start the 2012 season," said
Ken Howes, vice president
of competition at Hendrick
Motorsports. "But the car
obviously failed inspection
and NASCAR has directed
us how they want it fixed
and we're busy doing that
We're waiting on some
parts to arrive and we'll put
it back together and run it
through inspection again."
The No. 48 team could
be fined, docked points or
both following the series'
premier event
"There's always a poten-
tial, but we'll just wait
until after Speedweeks
is over with," said Robin
Pemberton, NASCAR's vice
president of competition.
Knaus has been caught
cheating before.
Most notably, he was
ejected before the 2006
Daytona 500 after NASCAR
found illegal modifications
following a qualifying ses-
sion. Last season, Knaus
was caught on camera tell-*
ing Johnson that if he won
at Talladega he needed to
"crack the back of the car,"
apparently to build an expla-
nation in case the tar did
not pass post-race inspec-
tion. Nothing came of that
situation.


Knaus has been fined'
and penalized several other
times, too.
This situation doesn't
appear to be as serious as it
was in 2006.
"Ejection? No, no, we're
good," Pemberton said.
'"That was a little bit differ-
ent because that was a post-
event we'd already been
in. That wasn't a pre-race
inspection or pre-qualifying
inspection."
Knaus skipped a three-
day testing session at
Daytona last month. He was
on a Hendrick Motorsports-
approved vacation to South
Africa that most who know
the tightly wound crew chief
believe will help him over
the course of NASCAR's
grueling 11-month sched-
ule.
Johnson guessed it had
been almost a decade since
Knaus took his last real vaca-
tion. His commitment paid
off with 55 victories since
2002 and a NASCAR-record
five consecutive champion-
ships. His run with Johnson
was snapped last season by
Tony Stewart, and Johnson
finished a career-low sixth
in the final Sprint Cup
standings.
It's unclear whether
Knaus intentionally broke
the rules or was merely
pushing the limits of tem-


plate tolerances.
Howes said modifying
C-posts would provide an
aerodynamic advantage.
"Yeah, any bodywork
area, everybody's always
looking," Howes said. "It's
an area that you'll go as far
as you can because, yes, it
will affect the performance
of the car. That's the nature
of this kind of racing, espe-
cially at Daytona. That's an
area that teams will work
in. The 48 obviously went
too far."
He said he hasn't asked
Knaus for an explanation
on how or why the modi-
fications were made. He
said it could be that the
template didn't fit properly.
"You work within the
templates the best way
you think and you're try-
ing to do a better job than
the next guy," Howes said.
"And I did not see the grid
on the car, so I can't tell
exactly where it missed,
but NASCAR said it wasn't
right, so it's not right We
don't have an argument
with that."
Series director John
Darby said he believed
the other three Hendrick
Motorsports cars those
driven by Jeff, Gordon,
Dale Earnhardt Jr. and&
Kasey Kahne passed
inspection.


Kadji, Scott lead

Miami past Wake

Forest, 74-56


Associated Press

CORAL GABLES -
Durand Scott shook off
a knee injury and helped
Miami snap a brief losing
skid.
Scott and Kenny Kadji
scored 18 points each to
lead the Hurricanes to a
74-56 victory over Wake
Forest Saturday after-
noon.
Late in Miami's 73-64
loss against North Carolina
Wednesday night, Scott
landed awkwardly driving
to the basket and hyperex-
tended his left knee. Scott's
status for Saturday's game
was uncertain until 30 min-
utes before tipoff.
The junior guard
responded as he shot 7-of-
11 from the field and fin-
ished with seven rebounds
in 30 minutes.
"Ever since the injury I
felt I was going to be out,"
Scott said. "But after the
MRI I got the good news. I
was well taken care of with
treatment
"Coming into the game
I felt ok. As soon as the
game started, I felt slug-
gish. I felt better as the
game progressed."
The Hurricanes
(16-9, 7-5 Atlantic Coast
Conference) wore down
the Deacons with a 13-0
run during a 4:29 span
early in the second half.
Shane Larkin's 3-pointer
with 11:44 left ended the
surge and gave Miami a
5642 advantage.
CJ. Harris' lay-up with
11:31 remaining ended
the Deacons' drought.
Miami outscored Wake
Forest 10-4. in the next
3:31 behind consecutive
3-pointers from Kadji and
Garrius Adams for a 64-48
lead.
"In the second half
we just ran the floor and
played really hard," Kadji
. said. "We went faster and
tried to execute a little bet-
ter. In the first half things
were slow and we had no
energy."
Reggie Johnson's layup
with 5:42 remaining gave
the Hurricanes their first
20-point lead at 70-50.
The win snapped a two-
game losing streak for
the Hurricanes, who had
won five straight until con-
secutive losses to North
Carolina and Florida
State.
"If you focus on the
present, then the score
takes care of itself," Miami
coach Jim Larranaga said
of the Hurricanes' NCAA
tournament aspirations.
"That's what we've asked
the guys to do. We have
to focus on the daily pro-
cess, not whats ahead and
what's behind."
Harris scored 14 points
to lead Wake Forest, which
has lost seven of its last
eight The Deacons (12-15,
3-10) shot 52 percent from


the field in the first half but
30 in the second half.
Miami capitalized
on a 39-24 advantage in
rebounds, including 15-5
on the offensive end.
"They really pounded
the offensive glass on us
in the second half," Wake
Forest coach Jeff Bzdelik
said "We didn't put bod-
ies on people. They were
able to get second chance
points. They got their
separation and we couldn't
recover from that"
The Deacons twice
opened six-point leads
early in the first half as
they converted eight of
their first 12 shots.
Harris' one of two free
throws with 9:21 remain-
ing gave Wake Forest a
23-18 lead before .the
Hurricanes rallied with
nine unanswered points in
the next 2:23.
Scott keyed the run with
four points and Garrius
Adams' 3-pointer with 6:58
left capped the surge and
put Miami ahead, 27-23.
Harris hit consecutive 3-
pointers and Wake Forest
took a 34-32 lead with 1:05
remaining. Kadji's dunk
with 46 seconds left tied it
34-34 at halftime.

LSU 68,
South Carolina 58
COLUMBIA, S.C. -
Justin Hamilton scored 18
points and Storm Warren
added 12 to lead LSU to its
fourth win in five games,
68-58, over South Carolina
on Saturday.
The Tigers (16-10, 6-6
Southeastern Conference)
saw their 11-point lead
slip to 56-52 after Malik
Cooke's consecutive 3-
pointers with 4:07 to play.
But Ha ilton put back
Warren's miss and a South
Carolina turnover led to
Ralston Turner's third
three to give the Tigers
back their comfortable
margin.
The Gamecocks had no
answer for LSU's inside
game. The 7-foot Hamilton
hit five of his eight shots
while Warren made six of
10 shots, most from close
in. Johnny O'Bryant III, a
6-9 freshman, made four of
five baskets in the second
half.
Cooke had 17 points for
the Gamecocks .(10-16, 2-
10).
LSU had a seven-point
lead cut to 38-36 when
South Carolina fresh-
man Brenton Williams
was called for a techni-
cal for hanging on the rim
after his breakaway dunk.
Andre Stringer made two
foul shots and O'Bryant
had three consecutive
inside baskets to push
LSU ahead. After Stringer
hit a jumper and O'Bryant
another uncontested shot
inside, the Tigers were
ahead 50-39.


* WEDNESDAY NIGHT

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4B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012


Florida gets commitment

from Fred Taylor's son,


Associated Press


GAINESVILLE The
son of retired NFL run-
ning back Fred Taylor has
decided to attend Florida,
a potentially significant
recruiting boost for the
Gators.
Kelvin Taylor, who


broke Emmitt Smith's
state high school rush-
ing record as a junior last
season, announced his
non-binding, verbal com-
mitment Saturday morning
at Florida's "Junior Day"
in Gainesville. He chose
Florida over Alabama.
Taylor started playing


high school football as
an eighth grader and has
9,698 yards rushing in four
years at Glades Day High
in Belle Glade. ESPN ranks
him as a five-star recruit.
Kelvin Taylor, a 5-foot-
10, 205-pound back, plans
to enroll in school next
January.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida State's Michael Snaer (21) reacts after ripping the ball away from North Carolina
State's Alex Johnson (3) during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game in
Raleigh, N.C., Saturday. Snaer had 10 points in Florida State's 76-62 win.


Florida State tops


NC State, 76-62


By JOEDY McCREARY
Associated Press
RALEIGH, N.C. Ian
Miller scored 17 points to,
lead No. 20 Florida State
past North Carolina State
76-62 on Saturday.,
Bernard James had
12 points while Okaro
*White and Michael Snaer
each finished with 10 for
the Seminoles (19-7, 10-2
Atlantic Coast Conference).
They never trailed, shot
49 percent, led by double
figures for the entire sec-
ond half, held N.C. State to
29 percent shooting its
worst of the season, by far
and forced 17 turnovers.
That helped Florida State
win its third straight, remain
atop the league, standings
and improve to 4-0 against
the Tobacco Road schools
in North Carolina the
first time it has beaten all
four in the same season.
C.J. Leslie scored 21
points to lead the Wolfpack


(18-9, 7-5), but the rest
of the team combined to
shoot 9 of 44 in their second
straight loss.
The Seminoles, who
haven't lost in Raleigh since
2006, have their defense
largely to thank for their
latest win here.
They entered allowing
teams to shoot just 37 per-
cent second-best in the
ACC and clamped down
on an N.C. State team that
makes nearly 47 percent
of its shots. Much of the
Wolfpack's offense came
from the free throw line,
where they were 25 of 31.
Florida State outscored
N.C. State 18-9 during an
8'%-minute stretch of the
second half, with White's
tip-in with 10 minutes to
play making it a 20-point
game for the first time at
57-37.
The Wolfpack cut it to
12 three times, the last on
Leslie's free throw with 4:25
left. Florida State then re-


established its comfortable
lead by reeling off seven
quick points, with Miller's
layup making it 70-51 with
3M minutes to play.
Lorenzo Brown had 12
points and Richard Howell
added 11 rebounds for N.C.
State. Leading scorer Scott
Wood, who averages 13.2
points, finished with eight
and hit his only field goal
with about 6 minutes left.
The Wolfpack hadn't shot
. worse than 36.8 percent
this season, against No. 8
North Carolina.
This game matched
two teams that were on
the opposite ends of come-
backs last time out Florida
State rallied from 15 points
down with 15 minutes
left to beat Virginia Tech
on Thursday night, a few
hours before the Wolfpack
took a 20-point lead with
11' minutes left against
No. 5 Duke, only to allow
the Blue Devils to storm
back for a 78-73 win.


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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012


CLASSIC PEANUTS/ by Charles Schulz


2/19


0I FEEL VERq
LOVING TODA...I
THINK I'LL K1I5
THOMEOO' ON /
ThE CREEK'!/


A Mi! SOMEBODY GET ME
50ME SOAP AND WATER! I'VE
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-- -- -- --


GET 140T wATER! GET SOME
DISINFECTANT! GET OME IODINE!


01965 Peanuts Worldwide LLC
Dist by Universal Udick


,6RiEF ^ C ^ ^/i


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GARFIELD/ by Jim Davis


LIZIE KEEP-S PUTTING "
E STUFF ON MY SIDE oF
THr CFFETPBLEA)
BBF 'FBrLBB
^l^- lll-~m^ l~lB~TM~in ^9 F-S ,


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(,-,'























...THE ODD KRAKEN THAT, UNFORTUNATELY,
CONTINUES TO INFEST THE NORTHERN SEAS...


by parker and hart


...THE COLOSSAL CRUSTACEANS OF THE
UNCHARTED WEED SEA...


Hank Ketrcham '
Dennis the Aienace

! Growing
--- Pains


GOSH! I1OPE IT
HAPPENS ON A AATURPANY!


1
and


0



BRIAN
and
&RE&
WALKER


THi BElL LISER.




by Art & Chip Sansom




















By 9JEAN)M4 :S,, *JOHM MARSHALL


HAGAR THE HORRIBLE/ by Dik Browne


AND I
I'LL PAINT
THE GUEST i
ROOM NEXT
WEEKEND!
I SWEAR!
SEPIOUSL"/!! ".


2-19


B.C./ by Mastroianni & Hart


SHOE/ by Chris Cassatt & Gary Brookins


1 Mort Walker's

beetle

btaile


ANPTHROW THROW THEM
OUT ALL THosE ALL OUTZ!
COOKIES!



Aat19;
2-I90^


YES! YOU DON'T
KNOW WHAT FILTHY,
CiIRM-RIDDEN LITTLE
SEATS HAVE
BEEN IN HERE!


GIZE&


EYW


www.blondie.com


PORTUNATELV,
I DON'T NEED
COOKiES
COOKIES

0-' '
ba0


S/YUK!' NEVER
REALIZED I
1 COULP BE
I J 'EATING THOSE
SGUYS'GERMSY


& k^c_-








FOXTROT/ by Bill Amend


CLOSE TO HOME/ by John McPherson


i-
R
A
N


E
R
ME
a


GET FUZZY/ by Darby Conley


r :.r l .1 ,.-r . l. ,,- i: i. F .
So AFeT G-T TUTUS OUT HE't JOST
R1E WPStXME TO CPDEP AM 4 LBUM
THwe AsK-) TH COF HIS ONN Love
k IF HE FONIT. ~ S4O AA/D HE WAS
EVER SmAc P JUSTICe OF THE
We PepCEso e COULD
EVEN I^ARY MTH6?V


1J A-W'4 I W
WELL, IN VJHNT. 4
ITHE END HIS TE tAME
S4as WERE F ALL
So W, HeE THAT IS
KUINE THE HOL(, I(
COUPLE'S ltE vapc-T

B~4-p


IF I HAD AN "R" I COULD
HAVE MADE "QUARTZ" ON
A TRIPLE WORD SQUARE!
HAVING LESS THAN A FULL
SET OF "R"s AVAILABLE
TOTALLY MESSED ME UP!
r-











Story ideas?

Contact
Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
rbridges@lakectyreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





BUSINESS


Sunday, February 19, 2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


CHAMBER BUSINESS






Dennille Decker
dennille@lakecitychamber.com


A big year

for the

Chamber
he 2012 year
started off
with a bang
for the Lake
City-Columbia
County Chamber of
Commerce! We had an
exceptional turnout for our
Second Annual Chamber
Ball weekend, had five rib-
bon cuttings, a chamber
mixer, four Leads Club
meetings and 11 new mem-
bers join our organization!
This year, the Chamber
will begin implementa-
tion of its strategic plan
for 2012-2014. This plan
will focus the Chamber's
energy and resources
and ensure that the staff,
Board of Directors, com-
mittees and task forces are
working toward the same
goals. It will also allow the
focus of the organization
to remain on the important
issues for the foreseeable
future. This plan will be
used for one purpose only,
to help. the Lake City -
Columbia County Chamber
of Commerce better serve
our members and the busi-
CHAMBER continued on 2C


Columbia grad
named CFO for Ivy
league med school.

By LAURA HAMPSON
lhampson@lakecityreporter.com
Alan D. Johns, a
1978 Columbia
High School
graduate and
former Lake City
resident, was named associate
vice dean and chief financial
officer of Columbia University
College of Physicians and
Surgeons this month.
Johns has held the posi-
tion on an interim basis
since Oct 2011.
Previously Johns
was the associate
dean for strategic
services at Duke
University School
of Medicine, V
according to
a Columbia
University press
release.
Johns is the
son of Ted and
Sarah Johns, of
Lake City. "He's
always been a
hard worker and
we've always
been extremely
proud of him,"
Sarah Johns said.
Growing up he
played the piano
and the organ, she said. "He
thought he wanted to be a
minister of music, but he
changed to finance," she said.


COURTESY PHOTO
Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons was the first institution in the
country to grant the M.D. degree and is among the most.selective medical schools in the
country. This month Alan D. Johns, a Lake City native, was named associate vice dean and
chief financial officer of the college.,


"He's done well. We are extremely
proud." .
The family owned Ted Johns
Service Center, on Highway 90 in


Lake City. for 34 years, she said.
Since joining the medical
school, Alan Johns has imple-
mented a new financial reporting


process and initiated an enhanced
locus on financial and strategic
resource planning and perfor-
JOHNS continued on 2C


Thursday, Feb. 23rd *Noon
Lifestyle Enrichment Center
628 SE Allison Ct, Lake City, FL 32025


Hands hold the skill to create and renew. They hold the power to heal, which is
why you want to be in the right hands should the need for surgery arise. At Shands
Lake Shore Regional Medical Center, our surgeons are trained in the latest
techniques and procedures to provide more treatment options and reduce recovery
times. We offer some of the most advanced technology and expertise with all the
convenience of staying close to home. If you need the experience of a gifted
surgeon like Dr. Jerzy Polmerski or Dr. Edwin Gonzalez, call Shands Lake Shore
Surgical Specialists, where you're in the right hands.

Our surgeons specialize.in
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Colon and rectal
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Thyroidandparathyroid Jerzy Polmerski, M.D. Edwin Gonzalez, M.D., FACS
Pediatric surgery (ages 2 and up) General Surgery General Surgery

For an appointment, call 386-755-7788


Regional Medical Center


Shands Lake Shore Surgical Specialists
755 SW State Road 47 Lake City, FL 32025
ShandsLakeShore.com


Financial Leader


I -









IC LAECTIEOTR B SN S UDY ERAY1,21


The Motley Fool

To Educate, Amuse & Enrich


Too Few Numbers
QI want to find great stocks.,
Should I look for low P/E
ratios and high dividend yields? -
M.J, Goshen, Ind.
AThose are promising criteria,
but they're not fail-safe. For
one thing, you'll miss outstanding
investments that pay little or no
dividends. For example, Apple and
Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hatha-
way pay no dividends. Companies
also sometimes sport high yields
and low price-to-earnings ratios
.only because their stock price has
tumbled due to some major trouble.
Consider The New York Times
Co. In recent years, its revenue has
shrunk, and its earnings per share
(EPS) has sputtered. Over the past
decade, its stock price dropped.
from the $40s to less than $10 per
share. It kept raising its dividend
during much of that time. until
slashing and then suspending it in
2008 Until that point, its yield was
nsing, looking increasingly attrac-
tive and even topping 5 percent.
But behind the fat vield was a
floundering company.
Never make a purchase
decision based on only a few
numbers The more you learn
about a company, the sounder
our decision should be.

Qls i1 smart to bu) more shares
of a stock when its price has
fallen? L.E. H atertown. SD /
A This is called "averaging
down." It's often regrettable
because there's frequently a good
reason why a stock is dropping.
There are some exceptions to
this rule, though. For example,
perhaps the entire market, has
swooned, taking vour holding
with it. Or maybe the market
seems to have significantly
o% erreacted to your company's
latest news, sending its shares
down sharply If so. you can snap
up some bargain-priced shares.
Before vou average down,
jawais take the time to re-e aluate '
the business.
Got a question lr the Fool' Send it in
,'e Ilrie to1 .L's


CHAMBER: 2012 starting off as a big year

Continued From Page 1C


Company Research 101
Always do your homework before
investing in any company. Below
are the kinds of questions you should
ask about any potential investment.
(Don't be intimidated or discour-
aged by this list You needn't master
everything at once. Beginning inves-
tors should just keep learning slowly.
We can help you at fool.com, and
you can learn a lot from books by
experts like Peter Lynch, too.)
What business is the company
in? What's its business model (that
is, how exactly does it make its
money)? Is it in a profitable and
growing industry?
What's the company's track
record? Has it regularly rewarded
shareholders? Ha\e re% enues and
earnings been increasing in past
years? How do these numbers com-
pare with those of rivals?
What can you learn from its
financial statements? Has its debt
level been nsing or falhng? Are
accounts receivable and inventories
growing no faster than revenues?
Are profit margins healthy and,
*0 * * *


C
C
C
0
0
C
C
C
C
C


ideally, growing? How about return
on equity (ROE), return on assets
(ROA) and other measures? Are
there any red flags to investigate .
further? Is anything in the state-
ments unusually cryptic? (It's often
best to steer clear of companies you
don't understand very well. There
are plenty of profits available in
companies you understand.)
What are the company's conm-
petitive advantages? Does it have
a strong brand? Is it a leader in its
field? Is it gaining market share?
Do you have confidence in manage-
ment and its ability and dedication
to keep the company growing, to
be straight with shareholders and to
look out for shareholder interests?
What are the risks that the com-
pany and its investors face? What
could go wrong?
Is the stock valued attractively?
This is a difficult question to answer
for any stock, and there's usually no
one right answer, either. Still, you
might begin by looking at the com-
pany's current P/E ratio, comparing
it to the firm's historical numbers.
Next week we'll review some
resources to help you answer these
questions.
* * * ** * * * S


Bad Timing
In 2007, I worked in the gypsum
industry and knew that USG was a
great company. I saw that the price
had dropped, and Warren Buffett
was buying shares. So I bought at
$49, figuring that when housing
recovered, USG would soar. Well,
I'm still waiting and it's,
now down near $13. Maybe
housing will recover some-
time in my lifetime, maybe
not. George, online
The Fool Responds: Some-
times we must wait a long time for
depressed stock prices to get back
to more reasonable levels. The
beleaguered housing industry has
kept many companies down, and it
may still be a while before it really
heap up again. There have been.
some promising signs, though. The
homebuilding company Lennar
recently reported a 20 percent jump
in orders which boosted USG's
stock price by 10 percent, as inves-
tors anticipated growing sales of
drywall. The protracted sluggishness
of USG stock is a great reminder
of why we should only invest long-
term money in stocks. In the short
term, anything can happen. We
should focus on where we expect a '
stock to be many years from now.
.\ Do you have an embarrassing
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iBoil it down to 100 words (or
less) and send it to The Motley Fool c/o My
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I trace my roots back to 1869 and a glass jar of grated horseradish.
Today, based in Pittsburgh, I'm a global food giant, focused on condi-
ments and sauces, meals and snacks, and infants and nutrition. I rake in
.more than $11 billion annually and sell more than 650 million bottles' of.
my flagship product, along with roughly two single-serve packets for each
person on Earth. My brands include Lea & Perrins, Classico, Smart Ones,
Bagel Bites and Ore-Ida. I introduced baby foods in 1931 and gave away
pickle pins at the 1893 Chicago World's Fair. Who am I? (Answer: Heinz)

* z W write to Us! Send questions for Ask the Fool, Dumbest (or
Smartest I mn esrments (up to 100 words), and your Trivia entries
to Fool i.'fool.com or via regular mail c/o this newspaper, attn: The
SMotley Fool. Sony, we can'tprovide individualfinancial advice.


The Pentagon Refocuses
The Pentagon recently began cut-
ting billions of dollars from its 2013
budget. Planned cuts range from
delaying orders for a new aircraft
carrier from Huntington Ingalls, to
shrinking the Army by an additional
30,000 soldiers, to slowing down the
rate of purchase of Lockheed Mar-
tin's new F-35 stealth fighter jet
How will America do more with
less? In part, by shifting from high-
cost manned weapons to lower-cost
robotic ones. The U.S. Marine
Corps plans to weaponize more
Textron Shadow unmanned aerial
vehicles (UAVs). Historically, the
Shadow has been unarmed, used pri-
marily for observation. When it saw
a bad guy it would call for a more
robust ally to bomb it. The Marines
now want to cut out the middleman
and turn the Shadow into a "shooter"
in its own right. But at just 11 feet
long with a 14-foot wingspan, the
Shadow is far too small to carry
most conventional munitions. The
solution: Build smaller bombs.
The Pentagon has already tasked
Alliant Techsystems and Ray-
theon with developing miniature
guided bombs (25 pounds or less).
The Marines are testing a differ-
ent munition. If these work and
small UAVs such as the Shadow
can operate as armed drones, this
should result in new sales opportu-
nities for the major defense weap-
ons makers and savings for U.S.
taxpayers. (The Motley Fool owns
shares of Lockheed Martin, Textron.
and Raytheon.)


Name That Company
Founded in 1966 and based in
Minnesota, I'm a $9 billion retailer
of consumer electronics, home office
products, appliances and more. A
superstore pioneer, I operate in the.
United States, Europe, Canada, Mexico
and China. Beside my flagship name, my
other brands include AudioVisions, The
Carphone Warehouse, Five Star, Future Shop
Geek Squad, Magnolia Audio Video, Napster,
Pacific Sales and The Phone House. Until I took
my current name in 1983,1 I was Sound of Music.
I employ about 180,000 people, operate more
than 4,100 stores in various formats and rake in.
some $50 billion annually. Who am I?
Knoi the ani ,er' Send it to us with Foolish Trivia on the top and you'll
L ... .. 4 ..... r- A _1


Bed tax revenues up


ness community. The plan will
allow the Chamber to become
a truly meaningful, relevant
organization to its investors
and to the community in gen-
:" eral.
Six strategic areas of focus
have been identified during
the planning process as criti-
cal to the future vital-
ity and viability of the
Lake City Columbia T
County Chamber of
Commerce and the
business community it Ci
"I serves. The strategic CI
areas of focus and the thr
objectives identified will
set forth the direction
of the Chamber for the St
next three years (2012 tha
2014). The strategic nes
areas of focus are:
Focusing on Our
Members
Serving as the "Voice of
Business"
Assisting Our Business
Community
Ensuring a Qualified, Skilled
Workforce
Staging Community Events
Sharing Our Story
Under the leadership of
Todd Wilson, 2012 Chamber
President, we will begin imple-
menting specific action items
that will allow us concentrate
on these six critical areas.
Please know that neither I, nor


the Board of Directors, can
accomplish these goals alone.
It will require our members
,and community stakeholders to
rally around these'focus areas
to make them a reality. We
need the volunteer resources
that only the investors and
partners of the Chamber can.


he Board of Director
and staff of the Lake
ity Columbia Count
chamber. of Commerc4
oughh the planning pm
ess, have taken a ke1
ep in creating a futui
t will enhance the bi
ss climate for our an


provide. In addition, strategic
partnerships and alliances
will be sought and created
with other organizations that
share the same principles
and goals as the Lake City -
Columbia County Chamber of
Commerce.
Peter Drucker was quoted as
having said, 'The best way to
predict the future... is to cre-
ate it." The Board of Directors
and staff of the Lake City -
Columbia County Chamber of
Commerce, through the plan-


ning process, have taken a key
step in creating a future that
will enhance the business cli-
mate for our area. If you would
like to help us create this plan
by becoming a member, serv-
ing on a committee or if you
would just like more informa-
tion on the details of our plan,
please contact me. There
is a place for everyone.
rS In 2011, we celebrated
our 90th year as a
Chamber of Commerce.
-y In preparing for the cel-
e, ebration, I went back and
rO-' reviewed past articles,
photos, member rosters
Y and individuals who made
re a difference to our orga-
|si iization, people who left a
ea. lasting legacy to our com-
munity. As we start our
91st year, take a moment
to reflect on the legacy,,
you and I will leave behind
for the next generation. What
will we do to leave a lasting
impression in our community?
I urge you to become an active
member in the Lake City -
Columbia County Chamber of
Commerce. Your membership
ensures a strong business com-
munity for many more genera-
tions to come.
Dennille Decker is the execu-.
tive director of the Lake City/
Columbia County Chamber of
Commerce.


I B ed tax col- COUNTY
elections
and occu-
pancy

improvement S
According to the
Florida Department
of Revenue, Local
Option Tourist Harvey C
Development Tax 386-758-1397
(bed tax) collec-
tions totaled $52,809
for November of 2011, compared to
$44,917 for the same month in 2010.
Total collections for the 11 months
of 2011 which have been reported to
this point, in the amount of $558,224
compared to $516,563 for all of 2010. It
should be understood, however, that
collections were at a 2% tax for the first
quarter of 2010 and was raised to 3%
in April.
Meanwhile, occupancy was up
4.7% for December at area hotels with
average daily rate increasing 7.1% to .
$67.44. Revenue per available room
increased 14.1% as did total room rev-
enue..
According to VISIT FLORIDA, total
visitation to the state increased 4.6 dur-
ing the fourth quarter of 2011.

Upcoming area calendar of events
As usual, the spring is a busy time
in the Suwannee River Valley for a
wide array of outdoor events. Listed
below are the dates and contact
information of several of these
activities.


TOURISM


:ampbell


386454-1853'

2012 marketing plans
well underway
The New Year is'
less than two months
old and the Suwannee
River Valley Marketing
Group is well
underway in attending


a variety of consumer
tourism shows. Things
got started at The Villages in Central
Florida on January 13 with their
annual Tourism Expo. It is estimated
that more than 5,000 residents visited
our booth during the six-hour event
Later in January we attended the
Atlanta Camping and RV Show with
attendance estimated at 15,000 for the
three-day event
Starting in late February, we'll have
a representative at four Panhandle
military travel expeditions, including
Pensacola Naval Air Station, Tyndall
Air Force Base, Hurlburt Field and
Eglin Air Force Base. We plan to offer
some attractive discount coupons in
envelopes for the military personnel in
an effort to better gauge the effective-
ness of these shows in drawing visitors
to our area.
March shows will include the
Tampa Tribune Outdoor and military
shows at Mayport, Kings Bay and
Jacksonville Naval Air Station.

TDC named to VISIT FLORIDA
Board of Dkietors


March 3-4
& Patio Show
386438-9635


JOHNS: Columbia grad named CFO


Continued From. Page 1C
mance outcomes measurement, the press
release stated.
At Duke, Johns also served as chief academic
administrative officer during the transition of
Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center to Duke
Cancer Institute. Prior to Duke, Johns held
other senior leadership positions, including
assistant vice president for health sciences at
Virginia Commonwealth University, assistant
dean for budget and financial reporting at Duke
University School of Medicine, and assistant
dean for business and finance for the Nell
Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing at Emory
University.
Johns earned his MPA in' finance and public
policy from the University of North Florida and


a bachelor of science in business administration
from the
University of Florida.
Columbia University College of Physicians
and Surgeons, in New York, New York, has
1,927 full-time faculty, an annual operating bud-
get of $1.4 billion, and more than $400 million
in sponsored research grants from the National
Institutes of Health, other government agen-
cies, and individual foundations, according to
the release.
Established in 1767, Columbia's College of
Physicians and Surgeons was the first institu-
tion in the country to grant the M.D. degree
and is now among the most selective medical
schools in the country.


North Florida Home
Fairgrounds


March 16-18 Florida Gateway Pro
Rodeo Fairgtounds
386-752-8822

March 17 Wild Azalea Festival
White Springs
386-397-2733

March 22-25 Spring Fest
Spirit of Suwannee
386-364-1683

March 30-31 MADDFEST
Olustee Park
386-965-9256

March 31. Springs Celebration
O'Leno State Park


Columbia County Tourist
Development Council staff member
Harvey Campbell has been appointed
to the new Board of Directors for
VISIT FLORIDA by Enterprise Florida
and the Department of Economic
Opportunity. The new 31-member
board is composed of representatives
of the state's largest tourism busi-
nesses, including Universal Studios,
Southwest Airlines, The Florida
Aquarium, Kennedy Space Center and
many-others. Campbell, who has been
at the Columbia County TDC for 24
years, is the only representative from
a rural county on the VISIT FLORIDA
board.

* Harvey Campbell is the execu-
tive director of the Columbia County
Tourist Development Council. He can
be reached at 386-758-1397.


bre einered wit a ,lrawingjor a n y prize!
0 2012 THE MOELEY FOoI/DIsr. sv UNIVERSAL UCLICK (FOR RELEASE 2116/2012)


BIAsktheFol I


..' :..: 1.


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012


2C


0


0


-: I










LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS & HOME SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012 3C


THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW


Weel.y Stock Exchange Highlights





Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights


A NYSE
8,114.51 +122.46


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
AdvAmer 10.38 +2.35 +29.3
BiPNG 4.72 +1.06 +29.0
ChrisBnk 2.78 +.62 +28.7
PennVa 6.10 +1.30 +27.1
DemndMda 7.76 +1.59 +25.8
MKors n 41.82 +8.35 +24.9
ComstkRs 15.25 +2.98 +24.3
Cimarex 82.78+15.95 +23.9
GolUnhas 8.85 +1.57 +21.6
DrxDNGBull45.48 +7.96 +21.2

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
BIdBear 5.96 -2.60 -30.4
Startek 2.04 -.81 -28.4
FstBcpPR 3.77 -1.18 -23.8
CSVlnvNG 39.41-10.60 -21.2
Vonage 2.45 -.62 -20.2
DrONGBear15.19 -3.35 -18.1
CrwfdA 3.89 -.66 -14.5
CrwfdB 5.55 -.89 -13.8
MEMC 4.70 -.69 -12.8
WillisGp 34.10 -4.94 -12.7

Most Active (si or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
BkofAm 16821087 8.02 -.05
S&P500ETF6982927136.41+2.05
SPDR Fncl3358892 14.79 t.23
GenBec 2816563 19.28 +.41
Citigrp rs 2389298 32.92 -.01'
iShEMkts 2322894 43.93 +1.02
iShR2K 2235966 82.79+1.52
SprintNex 1915346 2.30 +.01
FordM 1900291 12.75 +.31
BariPVix 1861489 26.59-1.28

Diary
Advanced 2,263
Declined 888
. New Highs 361
New Lows. 8
Total issues 3,204
Unchanged 53
Volume 18,783,617,731


Amex Nas
2,441.26 +23.27 2,951.78 +47.90


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
HallwdGp 13.00 +2.80 +27.5
MexcoEn 8.32 +1.57 +23.3
Earthstone 21.50+4.00 +22.9
ramidOil 4.75 +.85 +21.8
PldAptCn 7.72 +1.02 +15.2
Sams0&G 2.39 +.31 +14.9
MAGSIvg 9.25 +1.19 +14.8
ChinNEPet 3.01 +.38 +14.4
NewConcEn 2.45 +.30 +14.0
ParkCity 3.34 +.41 +13.9

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
HMG 3.80 -.75 -16.5
Protalix 5.61 -.79 -12.3
BIklQMulT 13.23 -1.40 -9.6
Quepasa 4.33 -.44 -9.2
OrientPap 3.96 -.37 -8.5
ExeterRgs 3.28 -.29 -8.1
DecuSec 4.62 -.40 -8.0
Libbey 13.95 -1.21 -8.0
Augustag 3.03 -.25 -7.6
TrioTch 2.25 -.17 -7.0

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
CheniereEn353255 14.00 +.07
NovaGldg 191883 8.43 -.05
NwGoldg 90685 11.48 -.08
SamsO&G 83155 2.39 +.31
GoldStrg 80619 2.00 +.02
Rentech 66181 1.82 +.04
Vringo 62913 1.27 -.16
NthnO&G 62588 24.19 +1.10
RareEleg 59308 6.44 +.12
NA Pall g 55985' 2.65 +.04

Diary
Advanced 264
Declined 247
New Highs 51
New Lows 9
Total issues 530
Unchanged 19
Volume 403,017,734


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
BlueDolph 10.30 +5.13 +99.0
Cybexintlh 2.42 +.97 +66.9
LCA Vis 7.51 +2.31 +44.4
HeliosM rs 2.80 +.84 +42.9
AdeptTch 4.15 +1.18 +39.7
DARABioh 2.60 +.73 +39.0
Jingwei 2.02 +.56 +38.7
GravityCo 2.89 +.79 +37.6
WSBHIdgs 4.10 +1.10 +36.7
FstUtdCp 5.12 +1.37 +36.5

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
ChelseaTh 3.35 -1.64 -32.9
NaturtAlt 7.33 -3.07 -29.5
DigitalGen 10.33 -4.16 -28.7
PMFG 16.98 -6.60 -28.0
RealPage 20.71 -6.39 -23.6
Ancestry 24.34 -6.62 -21.4
HorizPh n 3.36 -.84 -20.0
HghwyH 2.20 -.50 -18.5
ArthroCre 25.00 -5.25 -17.4
MackFn 6.15 -1.28 -17'

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol(00) Last Chg
PwShs QQQ327878963.4 96
Microsoft 2989767 31.25 96
Cisco 2164128 20.29 4F
FrontierCm2102147 4.78 *74
Intel 1948935 27.2"7 .,t
Yahoo 1612590 15.01 -1.13
SiriusXM 1515992 2.15
Oracle 1495580 28.79 +.29
DryShips 1481392 3.71 +.71
MicronT 1361809, 8.43 +.53


Diary
Advanced 1,827
Declined 847
New Highs 261
New Lows 44
Total issues 2,737
Unchanged 63
Volume 9,344,926,209


Name Ex Div Last


Wkly Wkly YTD
Chg %Chg %Chg


The Week in Review


Weekly Dow Jones


Dow Jones Industrials 72.81 4.24 -97.33 123.13 45.79
Close: 12,949.87 I I) 4
1-week change: 148.64 (1.2%) MON TUES WED THUR FRI
13 ,0 00 ............................................ .



12,000


11,000 ...


10,000. ,


S 0 N D J F....


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex DIv Last Chg %Chg %Chg
AT&T nc NY 1.76 30.01 +.17 +0.6 -.8
AlcatelLuc NY ... 2.45 +.26 +11.9 +57.1
Apple Inc Nasd ... 502.12 +8.70 +1.8 +24.0
AutoZone NY ... 360.21 +6.11 +1.7 +10.8
BkofAin NY .04 8.02 -.05 -0.6 +44.2
Bar iPVix NY ... 26.59 -1.28 -4.6 -25.1
BobEvans Nasd 1.00 38.40 +2.02 +5.5 +14.5
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 15.90 +.03 +0.2 +.8
CSXs NY .48 21.59 -.46 -2.1 +2.5
Chevron NY 3.24 106.66 +2.19 +2.1 +.2
Cisoo Nasd .32 20.29 +.40 +2.0 +12.6
Citigrprs NY .04 32.92 -.01 ... +25.1
CocaCola NY 2.04 69.05 +1.11 +1.6 -1.3
CSVS2xVxSNY 17.05 -2.00 -10.5 -46.6
Delhaize NY 2.45 57.08 +1.21 +2.2 +1.3
DrSCBrrs NY ... 18.34 -1.16 -6.0 -30.7
DryShips Nasd .12 3.71 +.71 +23.7 +85.5
EMCCp NY ... 27.10 +.90 +3.4 +25.8
FamilyDIr NY .84 54.88 -2.77 -4.8 -4.8
FordM NY .20 12.75 +.31 +2.5 +18.5
FrontierCmNasd .40 4.78 +.74 +18.3 -7.2
GenElec NY .68 19.28 +.41 +2.1 +7.6
HomeDp NY 1.16 46.71 +1.38 +3.0 +11.1
ShEMkts NY .81 43.93 +1.02 +2.4 +15.8
ShR2K NY 1.02 82.79 +1.52 +1.9 +12.3
Intel Nasd .84 27.37 +.68 +2.5 +12.9
JPMorgChNY 1.00 38.47 +.86 +2.3 +15.7
owes NY .56 27.68 +.59 +2.2 +9.1


McDnlds NY 2.80 99.99 +.52 +0.5 -.3
MicronT Nasd ... 8.43 +.53 +6.6 +34.0
Microsoft Nasd .80 31.25 +.96 +3.2 +20.4
MorgStan NY .20 19.16 -.50 -2.5 +26.6
NY Times NY ... 7.29 +.03 +0.4 -5.7
NextEraEnNY 2.40 60.22 -.14 -0.2 -1.1
NobltyHIf Nasd ... 7.08 +.68 +10.6 +34.1
NokiaCp NY 1.26 5.49 +.53 +10.7 +13.9
Nvidia Nasd 15.85 -'05 -0.3 +14.4
OcciPet NY 2.16 103.92 +1.22 +1.2 +10.9
Oracle Nasd .24 28.79 +.29 +1.0 +12.2
Penney NY .80 42.68 +.24 +0.6 +21.4
PepsiCo NY 2.06 62.68 -1.27 -2.0 -5.5
Pfizer NY .88 21.19 +.14 +0.7 -2.1
Potashs NY .56 46.11 +1.41 +3.2 +11.7
PwShsQQQNasd .46 63.43 +.96 +1.5 +13.6
Ryder NY 1.16 53.70 +.19 +0.4 +1.1
S&P500ETFNY 2.58 136.41 +2.05 +1.5 +8.7
SearsHldgsNasd .33 54.53 +6.96 +14.6 +71.6
SidriusXM Nasd ... 2.15 ... ... +17.9
SouthnCo NY 1.89 44.38 -.23 -0.5 -4.1
SprintNex NY ... 2.30 +.01 +0.4 -1.7
SPDR FndclNY .22 14.79 +.23 +1.5 +13.8
TimeWam NY 1.04 37.70 '+.18 +0.5 +4.3
USNGsrsNY ... 5.61 +.34 +6.5 -13.2
WalMart NY 1.46 62.48 +.58 +0.9 +4.6
WellsFargoNY .48 31.09 +.83 +2.7 +12.8
Yahoo Nasd ... 15.01 -1.13 -7.0 -6.9


otRetls Cl
TotStldx LB
Instldxl LB
ontra LG
Funds GrihAAm LG
Funds CaplncBuA m IH
.cmAlTI LB
Funi: IrickmnrA m MA
ITlc.1lAdm LB
Fundc CpWidlGnA m WS
Fu'i.L; intCt.AgnA m LB
Fund.: WAMuilr.A m LV
:,', Sio.,' LV
I. IrnIS FV
a in! [Pius I B
n-Frarwkr, i r,'+, A m CA
TolStllns LB
TotBdAdml Cl
Funds BalA m MA
itRetAdm b Cl
Funds FninvA m LB
Totlntl d FB
WelltnAdm MA
Funds EurPacGrA m FB
Funds NewPerspA m WS
p-Templeton GIBondAdv IB
itRetA m Cl


149,075
65,094
62,387
56,729
56,202
55,268
54,136
53,653
52,167
45,986
44,121
38,964
38,384
37,981
36,777
36,463
32,382
31,945
31,812
31,617
31,515
31,509
31,306
30,278
29,106
26,871
26,725


+6.6/D
+3.2/B
+3.7/A
+3.1/B
+0.1/D
+4.5/A
+3.7/B
+5.2/A
+3.4/B,
-2.7/C
+0.9/D
+7.0/A
-2.0/1
-9.8/C
+3.7/A
+2.0/D
+3.3/B
+8.7/A
+5.4/A
+6.3/D
+0.2/D
-7.9/C
+4.9/A
-6.8/B
-2.5/C
+3.8/D
46.1/D


+8.5/A
+1.3/B
+0.9/B
+3.7/B
+1.1/D
+1.1/C
+0.8/B
+2.0/C
+1.4/A
+0.2/B
+0.3/C
+0.6/B
-2.7/D
-2.2/A
+0.9/B
+3.0/D
+1.5/A
+6.4/B
+3.2/B
+8.2/A
+1.5/A
-2.1/B
+4.3/A
0.0/A
+2.1/A
+10.8/A
+8.0/A


NL 1,000,000
NL 3,000
NL 5,000,000
NL 2,500
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 10,000
5.75 250
NL 10,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 2,500
NL 2,500
NL 200,000,000
4.25 1,000
NL 5,000,000
NL 10,000
5.75 250.
NL 1,000,000
5.75 250
NL 3,000
NL 50,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 50,000
3.75 1,000


MUTUAL FUNDS .
Total Assets Total Retum/Rank Pct Min Init
Name ObI ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt


PIMCO T
Vanguard
Vanguard
Fidelity C
Amedcan


American
Sloci Footnotes: g =sDrdj rds an earrarn,. ,r. Carnllan ia: r-,= '-s r l A...,.-i-. -lI.,j, .'ard A V -r'.,n.j
i = IdLe 0alb rtit, SEC n : NeJ in prasi 2 wevcs l = Pr2,srre r.. = slo, na. ur: n ,'n a r r a trr i:I.,1 i Arr,-n:ar,.
oi ao lees? O1 prWe-n i i rdr, 0.ipa 9 n3i n -: Righ0r t.uv :usrif i a c.p Wpid pill'f, = ? K. is q .r 31 V3ar~Jird
le. 20 pa.c *,r irr, 1i tial year un = U, r = I b3r.krul-y Oi, rm.crer.rp wa = Wrir. daruled a, : &AT'n.r,
Wr.6r, Igub wl = Warrar,16 Ame.:r,
Mutual Fund Footnotesa t, = Fee coa-.nnng rr.er6i cos. ~ i d 1 rom furd 1;. s = D.,rr.3l 5l.c" 't. .r.r ia.lr:u "r
rnbo.pfn.r.iO = =ufrom 11 ia sales cnagesrL m M =uMrdie ar m cr.er']d NA = jaI:.h I aublr e = pre viouns ady I i n,,ar,
nel ass i aue t = lunTa splm eriais nunng ina k x : =i+ paal gi aaIritruiain aurrig vL *o ak Gainers and U.MCj- S I
Losers meal e en ai m lean a 2 a b n Islea i 1t.-is d a In Most Actles arnuis on A, a i-a1 i vcIuri,, 1.1 W. i
runaraia o0 u.ara-. Source: Tn.y As oculas Presss faia., urges are unonciai Vanjuarad
-----------------------------_______________ _.__I_ IF,____ r.N- TA. _.


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week


Prime Rate


3.25 3.25


Discount Rate u0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-25
Treasuries
3-month 0.077 0.088
6-month 0.12 0.12


5-vear


U.86 0.82


10-year 2.00 1.98
30-vear 3.15 3.14


CurrenciesV
Last Pvs Day


Australia


.9330


.9293


Britain .1.5843 1.5804
Canada .9960 .9958
Euro .7600 .7609
Japan 79.46 78.90
Mexico 12.7741 12.8059
Switzerind .9187 .9186
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


r ijllr lli
Vanguard
Vanguard
American
PIMCO To
American
Vanguard
Vanguard
American
American
FrankTemn
PIMCO To


CA -Consewervat Alocalion, CI -Intermnediate-Term Bond, ES -Europe Stock, FB .Foreign Large Blnd, FG -Foren LageGrowth, FV -Foreisn
Large Vakie, IH -WoddAllocaion, LB -Large Bend, LG -Lage Growth, LV -Large Wue, MA .Moderae AMocalion, MB -MidCap led, M-
Mid p Value, SH -Spedalylhea, WS -Worbd Stok, Totl Reun: Cn In mNAV ir dividends areinvesied.Rank: How fund perfaned vs.
Slnere wit sane objeidve: A Is I sp 20%, E in bottom 20%. Min Int Invt minimum $ needed to invest I lord Source. Msn:gslar.


Name DIv YId
ABB Ltd .64 3.0
AES'Corp ...
AFLAC 1.32 2.7
AK Steel .20 2.5
AT&T Inc 1.76 5.9
AbtLab 1.92 3.4
AberFdtc .70 1.4
AdvAmer .25 2.4
AMD ... ...
Aetna .70 1.5
Agilent .40 .9
Agnico g .80 2.3
AlcatelLuc ...
Alcoa .12 1.2
Allstate .84 2.7
AlphaNRs ...
Altria 1.64 5.5
AMovilLs .28 1.2
AEagleOut .44 3.0
AEP 1.88 4.7
AmExp .72 1.4
AmlntlGrp ...
AmTower ...
AmeriBrgn .52 1.4
Anadarko .36 .4
Annaly 2.43 14.6
Aon Corp .60 1.3
Apache .68 .6
ArcelorMit .75 3.5
ArchCoal .44 3.1
ArchDan .70 2.2
ArmourRsdl.32 18.8
ATMOS 1.38 4.3
Avon .92 4.8
BB&TCp .64 2.1
BakrHu .60 1.2
BcoBrades .81 4.5
BcoSantSA .84 9.9
BcoSBrasil 1.50 14.0
BkofAm .04 .5
BkNYMel .52 2.4
Barclay .39 2.5
Bar iPVix ... ...
BarrickG .60 1.3
BeazerHm ...
BerkH B ... ...
BestBuy .64 2.5
Boeing 1.76 2.3
BostonSci ...
BrMySq 1.36 4.1,
CBRE Grp .. ...
CBS B .40 "1.4
CMS Eng .96 -4.5
CSX s .48 2.2
CVR Engy .32 1.1
CVS Care .65 1.5
CabotOG s .08 .2
Calpine
CdnNRsgs .36
CapOne .20 .4
CapitlSrce .04 .6
Camival 1.00 3.2
Caterpillar 1.84 1.6
Cemex
CenterPnt .81 4.3
CntryUnk 2.90 7.4
ChesEng .35 1.4
Chevron 3.24 3.0
Chicos .20 1.5
Chimera .51 17.0
Cigna .04 .1
Citigrp rs .04 .1
CliffsNRs 1.12 1.7
CobaitlEn ...
CocaCola 2.04 3.0
CocaCE .64 2.2
ComstkRs ...
ConAgra .96 3.6
ConocPhil 2.64 3.6


Wkly D Wy Wkly
PE Chg %Chg Last Name Div Yld PE Cha


... -.45 +11.7
21 +.82 +15.7
10 +.01 +11.0
... -.03 -1.6
45 +.17 -.8
16 +1.5 +.2
21 +3.41 -.7
11 +2.35 +16.0
5 +.37 +37.4
9 +1.38 +11.6
15 -1.00 +23.5
18 +.73 -2.4
... +.26 +57.1
15 -.14 +17.3
21 +.42 +14.5
47 -.93 -1.6
18 +.44
11 -.37 +3.8
15 +.67 -5.6
10 +.43 -3.8
13 +1.05 +12.1
... +.57 +17.4
91 -.79 +4.1
14 -1.79 -1.4
... +1,01 +15.4
34 +.12 +4.4
17 -.94 +1.8
10 +4.32 +20.8
16 -.59 +17.8
19 -.20 -2.2
14 +.96 +9.6
15 +.02 -.4
14 +.24 -4,6
16 +1.32 +9.8
17 +1.00 +20.5
13 +2.44 +2.9
... -.03 +8.8
... -.08 +12.5.
... +.51 +31.3
-.05 +44.2
11 +.59 +10.5
... +1.05 +44.3
...-1.28 -25.1
10 -1.12 +3.9
.--.14 +40.7
17 +.63 +4.1
9 +.63 +10.0
14 +.40 +2.7
21 +.16 +14.0
15 +1.22 -6.0
19 +1.20 +25.3
15 -.31 +9.0
14 -.09 -2.4
13 -.46 +2.5
9 +1.93 +55.0
17 +1.09 +8.6
63 +3.07 .-3.5
-.72 -6.0
-.10 +.5
7 -+.55 +15.5
23 -.31 +.4
13 -.08 -5.1
15 +2.20 +25.8 1
... +.10 +58.1
15 +.27 -5.5
24 +1.24 +5:5
7 +2.58 +10.9
8 +2.19 +.2 1
16 +1.04 +17.0
6 +.07 +19.5
9 +1.39 +7.0
9 -.01 +25.1
6 -6.55 +7.0
... +2.35+119.3
19 +1.11, -1.3
13 +1.57 +12.5
... +2.98 -.3
15 -.17 +.3
8 +1.77 +.7


21.03
13.70
48.01
8.13
30.01
56.36
48.48
10.38
7.42
47.08
43.14
35.44
2.45
10.15
31.39
20.11
29.65
23.46
14.44
39.73
52.86
27.23
62.50
36.68
88.05
16.66
47.62
109.45
21.42
.14.19
31.35
7.02
31.80
19.19
30.33
50.06
18.13
8.46
10.69
8.02
22.01
15.86
26.59
47.03
3.49
79.42
25.71
75.35
6.09
33.12
19.07
29.59
21.54
21.59
29.03
44.27
36.64
15.35
37.56
48.83
6.73
30.97
113.95
8.52
18.98
39.26
24.71
106.66
13.03
3.00
44.93
32.92
66.72
34.03
69.05
29.00
15.25
26.48'
73.36


ConsolEngy .50
ConEd 2.42
ConstellEn .96
Coming .30
CSVS2xVxS...
CSVelVSts...
DCT Indl .28
DDR Corp .48
DR Horton .15
DTE 2.35
DanaHIdg ...
Danaher .10
DeanFds ...
Deere 1.64
DelphiAu n ...
DeltaAir ...
DenburyR ...
DevonE .80
DxFnBul rs ...
DrSCBr rs ..
DirFnBrrs ...
DirxSCBull ...
Discover .40
Disney .60
DomRescs2.11
DowChm 1.00
DukeEngy 1.00
EMC Cp ...
EOG Res .68
Eaton s 1.52
ElPasoCp .04
EldorGldg .18
EmersonEl 1.60
EnCana g .80
ExcoRes .16
Exelon 2.10
ExxonMbl 1.88
FMC Tchs ...
FidNatlnfo .80
FstHorizon .04
FirstEngy 2.20
FordM .20
ForestOils ...
FMCG 1.25
Fusion-ion ..
GMX Rs ...
Gafisa SA .29
GameStop .60
GannettB .32
Gap .45
GenGrPrp .40,
GenMills 1.22
GenMotors...
GenOn En ..
Genworth ...
Gerdau .20
GoldFLtd .24
Golderp g .54
GoldmanS 1.40
Goodyear. ...
GpTelevisa .15
HCA Hid n 2.00
Hallibrtn .36
HartfdFn .40
HItMgmt -
Heckmann ...
HeclaM .02
Heinz 1.92
Hertz
Hess .40
HewlettP .48
HollyFrt s .40
HomeDp 1.16
HonwlllntI 1.49
Hospira
HostHotls .20
Huntsmn .40
Hyperdyn ..
ING


YTD Wkly
%Cha Last


12 +1.23 +1.5 37.26
16 -.65 -6.7,57.87
-.06 -8.2 36.40
8 +.24 +6.6 13.84
...-2.00 -46.6 17.05
... +27 +28.3 8.35
... +.08 +11.5 5.71
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38 ... +13.6 14.33
13 +.35 -.3 54.30
37 +1.19 +35.4 16.45
17 +.90 +11.5 52.43,
... +1.38 +7.8 12.07
12 -3.68 +8.4 83.87
... +1.25 +45.3 31.29
9 -.06 +33.9 10.83.
*15 +.41 +29.5 19.56
7+10.30 +20.9 74.95.
... +3.77 +41.6 91.86
-1.16 -30.7 18.34
...-1.23 -31.9 25.44
... +3.24 +39.2 62.41
7 +1.36 +23.1 29.54
16 +.30 +11.3 41.75
17 +.66 -4.7 50.57
17 +1.00 +21.7 35.00
16 -.33 -5.0 20.90
27 +.90 +25.8 27.10
29 +2.52* +16,1 114.35
13 -.62 +16.7 50.82
... -.02 +2.2 27.16
26 +.08 -1.2 13.55
16 -.30 +10.5 51.50
36 +1.12 +8.5 20.10
85 +.59 -26.9 7.64
10 -.04 -9.5 39.27
10 +1.82 +1.0 85.62
31 -2.63 -1.6 51.38
16 +2.05 +15.5 30.70
17 +.28 +19.9 9.59
14 +.73 -2.1 43.38
7 +.31 +18.5 12.75
13' +.70 +3.9 14.08
9 -1.90 +17.0 43.04
... +4.35 +16.9 28.30
... +.37 +50.4 1.88
... +.47 +35.9 6.25
8 +.45 -3.9 23.18
8 +.34 +11.8 14.95
13 +1.13 +22.5 22.72
... +.39 +15.0 16.79
16 -.75 -5.1 38.34
6 +1.84 +34.9 27.34
... +.03 -12.6 2.28
33 +.49 +40.8 9.22
... +32.5 10.35
2 -.57 +4.3 15.90
22 +1.22 +6.3 47.04
26 +1.79 +28.2 115.91
11 -.46 -5.3 13.42
... +1.47 +.9 21.26
5 -.75 +13.8 25.08
12 +.23 +5.2 36.29
12 +1.75 +33.2 21.65
8 +.17 -4.9 7.01
... +.62 -20.0 5.32
13 -.07 -4.0 5.02
18 +2.60 +.8 54.47
16" -.84 +18.2 13.85
13 +3.33 +14.7 65.15
9" +.89 +14.9 29.59
6 -.39 +41.9 33.21
20 +1.38 +11.1 46.71
23 +.77 +10.6 60,10
...+3.36 +22.3 37.15
-.28 +11.0 16.40
14 +.41 +37.9 13.79
-.91 -43.7 1.38
+.56 +26.9 9.10


New York Stock Exchange


WHY GO ANYWHERE ELSE?

When it comes to meeting your financial goals. you really
only need to see one person. At Edward Jones, we strive
to meet all your financial services needs white providing
exceptional personalized service.

Because we serve individual investors and business
owners, all of our energy and resources are dedicated to
helping you reach your long-term financial goals. That's
why we live and work in your community. We meet with
you fare,to face todiscuss the key steps to creating your
financial strategy.

You talk, we listen, and we get to know you.


Estate Plannlng*


Business Retirement Plans


Steve Jones, CFP*
Financial Advisor
2929 West US Highway 90
Suite 114
L aPeClry..FL 32055


IL7-
Name Div
ION Geoph
iShGold
iSAstla, 1.09
iShBraz 1.50
iShGer .67
iSh HK .41
iShJapn .20
iSTaiwn .47
iShSilver
iShChina25 .77
iSSP500 2.60
iShEMkts' .81
iShB20 T 3.90
iS Eafe 1.71
iShR2K 1.02
IShREst 2.17
IngerRd .64
IBM 3.00
IntlGame .24
IntPap 1.05
Interpublic .24
Ir)vesco .49
ItauUnibH .84
JPMorgCh 1.00
Jabil .32
JanusCap .20
JohnJn 2.28
JohnsnCtl .72
JnprNtwk ...
KB Home .25
Kellogg 1.72
KeyEngy ...


m- 3-i752-3847s


---- y "lU WKiY
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
31 -.89 +16.8 7.16
... +.03 +10.3 16.80
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1.6 16 -.73 -14.1 14.78
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... 25 +1.48 +18.6 24.20
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3.3 '16 +2.72 +3.9 52.5J
... 12 +1.28 +3.5 16.01


www.edwardjones.com mmtripswec


Name Div
Keycorp .12
Kimco .76
Kinross g .16,
KodiakO g ...
Kohls 1.00
Kraft 1.16
LSI Corp ...
LVSands 1.00
LennarA .16
UllyEli 1.96
UncNat .32
Linkedin n...
LizClaib ...
LaPac
LyonBas A 1.00
MEMC
MFA Fncl 1.00 1
MAGIC
MGM Rsts ...
Macys .80
MagHRes ...
Manitowoc .08
ManpwrGp .80
Manulife g .52
MarathnO s .68
MarathP n 1.00
MklVGold .15
MV OilSvs ...
MktVRus .58
MarintA .40
MarshM- .88
Masco .30


Yld PE Chg %Chg
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4.0 75 +.39 +15.6
1.5 ... +.17 -3.9
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Last


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Dlv YId PE Cha %Cho Last


Mechel
MedcoHlth .
Medtmic .97 2.4
Merck 1.68 4.4
MetUfe .74 1.9
MetroPCS ...
MKorsn ...
MonstrWw ...
MorgStan .20 1.0
Mosaic .20 .4
MotrlaMob ... ...
NCR Corp .. ...
NYSE Eur 1.20 4.1
Nabors ...
NatGrid 3.00 5.9
NOilVarco .48 .6
NY CmtyB 1.00 7.7
NewmtM 1.40 2.4
NextEraEn 2.40 4.0
NiSource .92 3.9
NobleCorp .54 1.4
NokiaCp 1.26 23.0
Nordstrm 1.08 2.1
NorflkSo 1.88 2.7
Novartis 2.46 4.3
OcciPet 2.16 2.1
OfficeDpt
OwensCom ...
PG&E Cp 1.82 4.3
PPLCorp 1.44 5.1
PatriotCoal ..
PeabdyE .34 .9
Penney .80 1.9
PepsiCo 2.06 3.3
PetrbrsA 1.28 4.6
Petrobras 1.28 4.4
Pfizer .88 4.2
PhilipMor 3.08 3.8
PitnyBw 1.50 8.4
Potash s .56 1.2
PS USDBull... ...
PrUShS&P ...
ProUltQQQ... .0 "
PrUShQQQrs...
ProlitSP .31 .6
ProUShL20 ...
ProUSSP500...
ProUSSIvrs...
ProgsvCp .41 1.9
Prudent 1.45 2.4
PulteGrp ...
QksilvRes .. .
Rackspace .
RadianGrp .01 .3
RadioShk .50 6.3
Raytheon 1.72 3.4
RegalEnt .84 6.2
RegionsFn .04 .7
Renrenn
RepubSvc .88 3.0
RiteAid
SpdrDJIA 3.48 2.7
SpdrGold ...
S&P500ETF2.58 1.9
SpdrHome .15 .7
SpdrLehHY3.73 8.8
SpdrRetl .50 .8
SpdrOGEx .59 1.0
SpdrMetM .46 .9
Safeway .58 2.5
SandRdge ... ...
SaraLee .46 2.3
Schlmbrg 1.10 1.4
Schwab .24 1.9
SealAir .52 2.5
SiderurNac .81 7.9
SilvWhtn g .18 .5
SouthnCo 1.89 4.3
SwstAid .02 .2


... -.02 +25.4 10.66
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13 ... +9.9 21.44
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... +.12 +41.2 8.91
3 +.80 -10.3 6.02
96 +4.42 +23.1 52.93
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35 +.33 +39.5 6.00
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Wkly YTD Wkly
DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


SwstnEngy .. .
SprintNex ...
$P Malls 74, 2.0
SP HIthC .67 1.8
SPCnSt .88 '2.7
SP Consum .61 1.4
SPEngy 1.07 1.4
SPDR Fncl .22 1.5
SP Inds .73. 2.0
SP Tech .38 1.3
SPUtil 1.38 3.9
StdPac
StateStr .72 1.8
Suncor gg .44 ...
Suntech
SunTrst .20 .9
SupEnrgy .
Supvalu .35 5.0
Synovus .04 2.0
Sysoo 1.08 3.7,
TJXs .38 1.1
TaiwSemi .52 3.6
TalismEg .27 ...
Target 1.20 2.3
TataMotors .45 1.6
TeckRes g .80
TeekayTnk .72 16.3
TelefEsp 2.14 12.4
TenetHIth ...
Teradyn
Terex
Tesoro
Textron .08 .3
TimeWarn 1.04 2.8
Transocn 3.16 6.2
TrinaSolar...
TwoHrbInv 1.60 15.7
Tycolntl 1.00 2.0
Tyson .16 .8
UBSAG ...
USAirwy ...
UltraPtg ...
UnionPac 2.40 2.2
UtdConti ...
UPS B 2.28 3.0
USBancip .50 1.7
US NGsrs ... ...
US OiIFd ..
USSteel .20 .7
UtdhlthGp .65 1.2
Vale SA 1.55 6.2
Vale SApf 1.55 6.3
ValeroE .60 2.4
VangEmg .91 2.1
VerizonCm 2.00 5.2
Visa .88 .8
Vonage
WPX En n ... ...
Walgm ,90 2.6
WsteMInc 1.42 4.1
Weathflntl ...
WtWatch .70 .9
WellsFargo .48 1.5
WDigital ... ...
WstnRefin .04 ...
WstnUnion .40 2.2
Weyerhsr .60 2.9
WmsCos 1.04 3.6
WillisGp 1.08 3.2
XLGrp .44 2.2
Xerox .17 2.0
Yamanag .20 1.2
YingliGm ...
YumBmds 1.14 1.7


20 +1.95 +11.3
.. +.01 -1.7
... +.32 +11.6
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... +.45 +1.8
... +.65 +10.1
.. +1.83 +8.3
... +.23 +13.8
... +.31 +10.5
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... -.05 +41.5
11 -.41 -.1
10 +.49 +18.9
33 -.38 +65.2
21 +.66 +28.2
16 +.47 +2.1
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20 +.51 '+8.0
... +.78 +13.2
... +1.35 +7.1
12 +.51 +2.8
... +1.96 +64.3
... -1.75 +9.2


35.54
2.30
37.37
36.24
33.06
42.96
74.87
14.79
37.28
28.52
35.05
4.50
40.25
'34.29
3.65
22.69
29.04
7.06
1.99
29.47
34.87
14.62
13.66
52.64
27.76
38.44


.. +.47 +25.6 4.42
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13 -.06 +10.3 5.66
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68 +3.19 +89.9 25.66
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1 -.62 ... 2.45
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Nasdaq Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Cha %Cha Last


...+1.41 +11.7 46.66
... +.68 +.1 7.37
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44 -1.39 +19.8 22.18
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18 -.57 +6.3 27.50
23 +.17 +14.8 11.94
... -.04 +6.0 1.23
26 +2.92 +10.4 74.66


Name


Wkly YD Wkly
DIv Yld PE Chg %Chg Last


CeolTher rsh...
ChelseaTh ...
CienaCorp ...
Cisco .32
Clearwire .,.
Comcast .65
Come spcl .65
CmplGnom ..
Comverse ...
Cree Inc
Dell Inc
Dndreon
DiamndFif .18
DirecTVA ...
DonlleyRR 1.04
DryShips .12
E-Trade
eBay
EagleBulk ..
ElectArts
EngyConv ...
EricsnTel .37
Expedia s .36
ExpScripts ...
Fastenal s .68
FifthThird .32
FstNiagara .32
FstSolar ...
Flextm
Fossil Inc ...
FrontierCm .40
GT AdvTc ...
GileadSci ...
GreenMtC ...
Grouponn ...
HalconR rs ...
HercOffsh ..
HutlsCitv .32


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... -1.64 -34.7
+.76 +40.5
16 +.40 +12.6
... +.13 +13.9
19 +2.00 +23.0
19 +2.30 +20.5
... +.63 +33.8
.. -.03 -7.4
54 +1.82 +36.9
9 +.41 +24.1
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... +.98 -24.1
13 -.53 +5.2
8 +.79 -8.3
... +.71 +85.5
28 +.14 +17.5
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-1.14 +4.0
... +.36 -1.9
14 -.47 +14.0
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42 +2.31 +16.3
12 +.46 +8.5
15 +.30 +14.0
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26+17.70 +48.9
28 +.74 -7.2
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13 -6.75 +14.8
35 +6.16 +53.9
... -.77 -1.8
47 -.59 +21.2
. +.20 +19.8
-.01 +12.2


Name


HumGen
Illumina
Incyte
Intel .84
JA Solar ...
JDS Uniph...
JetBlue
KLA Tnc 1.40
UbtyintA ...
LifeTech ...
MarvellT
Mattel 1.24
Maximlntg .88
MelcoCrwn ...
Microchp 1.40
Micromet ...
MicronT
Microsoft .80
NetApp
Netflix
NewsCpA .17
NewsCpB .17
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Nvidia
OCZ Tech ..
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Oracle .24
PMC Sra ...
Paccar .72
PacEth rs ...
PattUTI .20
PeopUtdF .63
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Qualcom .86
Questcor ...


AMEX Most Active


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StarScient ...
Starbucks .68
StlDynam .40
Symantec ...
TD Ameritr .24
Taleo A
Tellabs .08
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Texinst .68
ThrshdPhm ...
TiVo Inc ...
TripAdvn ...
TriQuint
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ViacomB 1.00
VirgnMda h .16
Vivus
Vodafone 2.10
Wendys Co .08
Windstrm 1.00
Wynn 2.00
Xilinx .76
Yahoo
ZionBcp .04


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...... -.03 +37.8 2.26


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Amgen 1.44 2.1
AmkorTIf ...
Amylin
Ancestry
A123 Sys ...
Apollolnv .80 11.1
Apple Inc ...
ApidMatl .32 2.5
ArenaPhm ...
AriadP
ArmHId .16 .6
ArubaNet ...
Atmel
AutoData 1.58 P.9
AvisBudg ...
Baidu
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BrcdeCm ...
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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

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4 lines 6 days Each additional
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Rate applies to private Individuoals selling
Personal merchandise ing er 000 ss.
Each Item mDuval Street. a price
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ing only,
4 lines, one month....192.00
$10.80 each additional line
EMAIncludes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.,



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In Print and Online
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Legal

NOTICE OF INTENT BY THE
SCHOOL BOARD OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY
TO ADOPT RULE AND SET PUB-
LIC HEARING
The School Board of Columbia
County will hold a public hearing on
Tuesday, March 27, 2012 at 7:00
p.m., at the School Board Adminis-
trative Complex, 372 West Duval
Street, Lake City, Florida, on pro-
posed amendments to rules, regula-
tions and procedures for the opera-
tion of the Columbia County School
District. The public is invited to at-
tend. Action is anticipated at this
meeting.
Persons with disabilities who require
assistance to participate in the public
hearing are requested to notify the
Office of the Superintendent at 755-
8000 at least 48 hours in advance so
that their needs can be accommodat-
ed.
TITLE: Policy 2.14 Prohibition
of Harassment REPEAL
PURPOSE AND EFFECT: Redun-
dant language with existing policy
2.16 at the recommendation of De-
partment of Education
SPECIFIC LEGAL AUTHORITY:
1001.41; 1000.21; 1012.22, Florida
Statutes
A complete text of the proposed
amended rules, regulations and pro-
cedures can be obtained at the Office
of the Superintendent of Schools,
372 W. Duval St., Lake City, FL, be-
tween the hours of 8:00 a.m. and
4:00 p.nr. Monday Friday. Eco-
nomic impact statements, where ap-
plicable, are on file in the Office of
Superintendent at the above
listed address.
DATED THIS 14th DAY OF FEB-
RUARY, 2012.
SCHOOL BOARD OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY
BY: Steve Nelson, Chairman
ATTEST: Michael F. Millikin, Su-
perintendent
05530794
February 19, 2012

020 Lost & Found
FOUND US off Old Country Club
Rd. Female dog. Reddish brown
w/s ome black, short hair, very
friendly, no collar. 386-752-8854
FOUND: Small Black and white
dog. Found in the Defender/Baya
area on Monday the 6th. Please
call to identify 386-752-2492


060 Services

Title Mobile Rust Repair.
Cut out rust and reweld new metal
www.floorpanrepairs.vpweb.com
(727)253-0658


100 Job
Opportunities

05530592
Maintenance Manager needed
for a chain of convenience
stores. Comm'l Refrigeration
Exp, & Universal EPA Card
req'd. Responsibilities include
but not limited to Refigeration,'
Heat/Air, Plumbing, & Ele.
Salary Neg. approx. $16-$18 hr
depending on knowledge & exp.
Applications avail at the Jiffy
Store Office. 1102
Howard Street, East, Live Oak,
FL or iiffyfoodstores.com.
Please return application to the
address listed above.

05530792
RECREATION SPECIALIST




The Florida Sheriffs Boys
Ranch is seeking a Recreation
Specialist to work with youth
within our residential program
in Live Oak. High School
Diploma or GED required,
preference will be given to
applicants with experience in
indoor and outdoor recreation,
physical education, or leisure
activities. Base salary $11.30
per hour with excellent benefits.
Contact Linda Mather
(lmather@youthranches.org) at
386/842-5555. Fax resume to
386/842-1029
EOE/Drug Free Work Place


Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale
Delivery of 100 bales $260
386-688-9156

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
TAXES, RESUMES.
Other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.

Need Protection? Gateway To
Florida Security 386-438-8282.
gatewaytofloridasecuritva gmnail.com.
Our security guards specialize in
Honesty, Courtesy & Alertness.


100 Job
0 Opportunities

05530819
TIMCO
aviation services

Facilities Maintenance
Mechanic
Full-time positions available for
individuals with roof coating
and sealing experience. Apply
online at www.timco.aero
AAP / EEO Employer


05530833
Credit Administration Asst.
position available with First
Federal Bank of Florida. The
candidate will provide oversight
to ensure credit files meet policy
guidelines.Assist with commit-
tee meetings including organiza-
tion of committee packages,
take minutes and facilitate
amendments. Assist with the
credit review process and loan
review/quality control support.
Requires excellent organization-
al skills with strong attention to
detail. Minimum of three years
previous administrative
experience required. Must be
proficient in Word, Excel and
Outlook. Able to proofread and
make grammatical and spelling
corrections on routine
correspondence;type 40+ WPM
College degree preferred.
Lending experience/exposure
preferred. Full benefits package.
Applications may be obtained
from any First Federal Branch
and submitted to Human
Resources, PO Box 2029, Lake
City, FL 32056 or email resume
to Turbeville.J(ffsb.com.
Bilingual candidates encouraged
to apply Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer.

05530835
Appointment Setters
Outstanding opportunity to work
with an authorized service
provider for a Fortune 500 home
improvement company.
We are looking for energetic,
motivated appointment setters to
work in a retail location in Lake
City. Applicant must be drug
free & pass a criminal
background screening.
Full or Part time available +
$12.00 hourly + Outstanding
Weekly and Monthly Bonuses.
Positions start immediately.
Call'386-754-0033, or send a
resume to A & B Marketing,
Inc. by fax to 904-268-9663 or
email your resume to
hrdept@abmrktg.com

CDL Class A Truck Driver.
Flatbed exp. for F/T SE area.
3 years exp or more. Medical
benefits offered. Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773
MECHANIC for busy truck shop..
Experience required with own
tools. Southern Specialized
386-752-9754 :
Now accepting resumes' for a
general manager for Mochi Frozen
Yogurt. Full time 50-60 hrs per
week. Scheduled to open in
March. Please mail to: 1396 NE
20th Ave. Bldg 300 Ocala, FL
34470 or email to:
bulldog@laloenterprises.com
05530754
Facilities Maintenance
Assistant-High School Diploma
or GED, Minimum one year
experience in related facilities
maintenance field, Valid Florida
driver's license. Must meet
insurability requirements,
Must clear Department of
Children and Families
background screening
requirements, Must Pass
physical. Apply in person to:
236 S.W. Columbia Avenue,
Lake City or maillfax resume to:
PO Box 2637, Lake City, FL
32056-2637
(386) 754-2220. EOE

Sales Position available for
motivated individual Rountree -
Moore Toyota, Great benefits, paid
training/vacation. Exp. a plus but
not necessary: Call Anthony
Cosentino 386-623-7442

120 Medical
Employment

05530652
Physical Thrapy Center hiring a
Physical Therapist/Physical
Therapist's Assistant or Rehab
Aide. F/T or P/T.
Hands-on training w/some exp.
preferred. Personal training or
fitness background a plus. Basic
knowledge of anatomy and
exercises are a MUST.
Candidate must be confident,-
have good people skills,
great attitude and be willing to
learn. Extreme motivation
promotes rapid growth. Send
resume to: pta714@hotmail.com
or fax to 386-755-3165.

05530777
Experienced Medical Assistant
needed for busy family practice.
Must be a dependable team
player and have knowledge of
Electronic medical records.
Expereinced only need apply.
Fax resume to: Attn Cheryl
386-754-3657 or email


to office manager: at
primarvcaremedic.com

Medical practice needs
Ophthalmic Technician.
FT or PT. Experience preferred.
Fax resume 386-755-7561.


120 Medical
120 Employment

05530834
Full Time Registered Nurse
The World's leader in dialysis
services is seeking a Registered
Nurse for our out-patient dialy-
sis center in Lake City.
Apply at: fmcnacareers.com

05530838
J UNIVERSITY of
UF FLORIDA
Jacksonville Healthcare, Inc.
Jacksonville Physicians, Inc.

UF Lake City
Cardiovascular Center
Wanted Certified and
Experienced Medical Assistant
to work both the front and
back office of this small
cardiology practice.
Please send resume to
pam.nowlin@jax.ufl.edu.
An Equal Opportunity
Institution
Drug-Free Workplace


05530839
RN, Unit Supervisor
Baya Pointe Nursing & Rehab
Center is now hiring for a RN
with Long Term Care and
Supervisory experience.
Position is full time with
excellent pay and benefits.
Certified Dietary Manager
Must have experience and
current CDM certificate.
Strong supervisory
skills a must.
Please apply 587 SE Ermine
Ave., Lake City, Fl 32025 or
fax resume to 386-752-7337


240 Schools &
240 Education

05530293
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-03/05/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-03/12/12

*LPN 03/12/12
Fees incl. boqks, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

407 Computers
DELL Computer,
$100.00
.386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170
HP 17" Flat Screen Monitor,
w/built in speakers. $60.00 obo
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Furniture
Chest of Drawers.
Really nice.
$25.00
386-365-0262
Wood dining table w/extension.
2 pholstered chairs on casters.
$25.00
386-365-0262

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-288-6875.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$300 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid:

SUNDAY ONLY 7 AM-6 PM,
422 NW Nickle Glen, Wellborn.
Lake Jeffrey Rd to Union Park Rd
south, follow signs, 386-965-2231

440 Miscellaneous
GUNSHOW: 02/18 & 02/19
@ The Columbia County
Fairgrounds, Hwy 247 Lake City.
Sat 9am 4pm, Sun 9am-3pm.
Info: 386-325-6114

450 Good Things
450 to Eat
The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420

460 Firewood
It's Getting Colder!! Firewood .
$65. Truck Load. we will call you
back. We deliver under 20 mi
$100 per load. Over 20 mi $120
per load. Joey 965-0288. Lv mess.

Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Units.
Free Water,
-sewer and trash pickup.
386-984-2025 or 386-984-2063
2BR MH. Good location. CH/A
$395. mo. $200. dep.
386-755-0064
or (904)771-5924
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779

Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
2011 Blowout
4/2 Doublewide only $34,995
On your land or mine
Call John T 386-752-1452

4/ 2 on 1 ac. New carpet, roof, a/c,
FP, roomy kitchen. Koi pond,
barn/workshop, garage & shed.
MLS 78833 $115,000 Results Re-
alty, Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473


640 Mobile Homes
640 ifor Sale _
4BR/2BA
Over 2000 sq ft.
of living area.
Only $61.900
Call 386-752-3743
Bank Repo!! 3br/2ba Triplewide
$999 Down $377 month.
Call Paula 386-292-6290
E-mail
ammonspaula@yahoo.com
Factory Special 4/3
2280 Sq. Ft.
Home priced to go.
Call Catherine
386- 754-6737
Jacobson Homes Factory Outlet
Prices! New 2012 3/2 start at
$39,900 and New 4/2's start at
$49,900. All new homes inc
delivery and set up, ac-skirt and
steps. North Pointe Gainesville
(352)872-5566
Looking for a Quality Home?
Manufactured or Modular
Home at Royals
CallCatherine
386-754-6737
Lot Model Sale
All Show Models
w/Factory Rebate
Call Charles
386-754-6737
Lot Model Specials on 2011
Models making room for 2012
at Royals Homes
Come see Catherine
386-754-6737
Maintained on 10 ac. Two car cov-
ered carport. Back deck & a front
ramp. Wood laminate floors. MLS
79417 $94,900 Results Realty
Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473
Modular HomesBuilt
to your Speckscall
Charles at
386-754-6737

Need a Home?
Bad Credit or No Credit?
Call 386-755-2132.
We Finance You
Must have Land.
NEW 2012
28X80
4BR/2BA FACTORY REPO
$61,900
Call 386-7523743
New And Used! North Pointe
Homes in Gainesville has 4 used
homes in stock! Don't delay as
these will go Fast.
Call North Pointe in Gainesville
(Hwy 441, 6 Blocks north of
Hwy 222) (352)872-5566
NEW SINGLEWIDE
i2br/lba set up
w/air $799 DOWN $179. mo!
Owner will Finance!
Call Kevin 386-719-5641
ONLY $59,995
New 2012 4br/2ba 28X80 Inc.
Delivery, set up, A/C,
skirting & steps.
Call 386-752-1452
OWNER FINANCE!
New 4br Doublewide!
Set up on your land
$0 Down/$329. mo
Call Kevin 386-719-6578
PALM HARBOR
Give Away
$20,000 in Options FREE
All sizes
1-888-313-2899,
Palm Harbor Homes
New Home Stimulus
5K For Your Used Mobile Home-
Any Condition
800-622-2832 ext 210


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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012


640 MobileHomes
640 for Sale
Showcase Closeout
All Palm Harbor
Lot models
Make Dreams Happen!
386-758-9538
USED DOUBLEWIDE!
3 br/2ba w/Den, SBS Fridge!
One Owner! I Finance!
Call Kevin!
386-719-6574
Used Singlewide
3br/2ba 16x803yrs Old,
Loaded
Call Charles
386-754-6737
WE HAVE access to
New & Used Homes.
Call 386-755-8854 to make sure.
You are getting your bpst deal

WOODGATE VILLAGE! 3BR
2BA DWMH w/fenced yd,
carport & wkshop $39,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY
INC. 755-5110 #79078

O650 Mobile Home .
650 & Land
3 br/2ba, DWMH w/lots of space
in Providence close to 175 on I ac
fenced, Ig Utility Bldg. MLS#
Inc, Deise Bose 386-752-5290
3br/2ba 2.75 ac. w/fish pond.
Small down plus $725 month .
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

710 Unfurnished Apt.
71' For Rent









A Landlord You Can Love!
2 brApts $550. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Amberwood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com
Brandywine Apartments
Now Renting
1,2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A.
386-752-3033 W:Grandview Ave.
Equal housing Opportunity
TDD Number 1-800-955-8771,
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
.mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $99.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300. sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgrnd qhk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
Greentree Townhouse
Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com
Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, larg-
er 2/br. for $495. mo. Incl water.
386-755-2423 rigsbyrentals.com
NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled
1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living
room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951
Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $99. Limited time. Pets
welcome. with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
The.Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable.incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $99. Spacious bedroom
washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Move In Madness! $99. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Winter Special! 1 Month FREE
with 1 year lease. Updated Apt,
w/tile floors/fresh paint.
Great area. 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150.-weekly
386-752-5808


730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

05530814
Century 21/
The Darby Rogers Group
Totally remodeled in down
town White Springs 3/2
$840./mo.
16884 53rd Road Wellborn
3/2 $800./mo
1306 NW Scenic Lake Drive,
Lake City 3/2 spacious
home/Lake Front $1,650./mo
453 SW Mayflower Glen
Forth White 2/1 $750./mo
Kayla Carbono 386-623-9650

lbr/1.5ba Country Cottage, Cathe-
dral ceilings, brick fireplace, wash-
er/dryer,1 ac fenced, private, some
pets, lease. 1st, last, sec, ref. Lake
City area $725 mo. Smoke Free
environment. 352-494-1989
2br Apartment.
Close to downtown & shopping.'
$485. mo $585 dep.
386-344-2170
3BR/2BA NEW construction
Lease option. 1st, last plus $400
sec.$900. mo. South of town. -
Credit ref's req'd. 386-755-9476
Brick 3br/2ba Large yard, garage,
CH/A. 179 SW Stanley Ct. Lake
City. $900. mo + $850 dep.
Call 386-365-8543
Spacious 3br/2ba home in town
with large bonus room, recently
remodeled. $900.mo. includes yard
service. NO PETS. lst/last/sec Dep.
required. 386-867-9231

7 0 Business &
S JU Office Rentals

05530343
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
900 sq' $600/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mth
8300 sq' $5533/mth
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor

2 Business Offices For.lease:
Approximately 1100sq ft each.
Located SE Baya Ave.
Call 386-755-3456 for info
For Rent or Lease: Former Doc-
tors office, Former professional
office & Lg open space: avail on
East Baya Ave. Competitive rates.
Weekdays 386-984-0622
eenings/%%eekends 497-4762.,
Office for Lease, was Dr'soffice.
$8 sqft/2707sqft
Oak Hill Plaza. '
Tom 961-1086, DCA Realtor

780 Condos for Sale
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Country Club, 2br/2ba condo. New
granite tops & more. Tennis court
& pool. Elaine K Tolar 386-755-
6488 MLS# 77219 $129,900

805 Lots for Sale.
BANK OWNED- 7, lots in the,
Plantation subdivision. Priced to
sell at just $17,900. Call 386-362-
4539 for a list of available lots.
MLS#79509 Poole Realty
Beautiful buildable lot in a estab-
lished neighborhood, site built
homes only MLS# 76668 High &
Dry Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Denise Bose @ 386-752-5290
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll.free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.
To place your
classified ad call

m755-5440


810 Home for Sale
1,330 heated sqft. on 1/2 ac.
Fenced. Garage made into a 4th
BR, New laminate wood floors,
new tile. $104,900 MLS#77003
Carrie Cason 386-623-2806
2 FOR PRICE OF 1! 2 mfg homes
on 4.62 acres, Ig wkshop &
fencing $120,000 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY INC
386-755-5110. #78340
3 Bed/i Bath home on
Poplar St.
Nice yard and carport.
$48,000 call 484-678-6385
3 br/2 ba brick on a .5 ac lot. Great
area. Built in 1994. 1,468 heated
sqff. Fenced yard & workshop
w/carport. $115,000 MLS#77717
Carrie Cason 386-623-2806
4/2 on 10 ac in Bell. 2,200 heated
sqft in a country setting. 10x20
frame shed. Bring all offers! MLS
76582 $89,000 Results Realty,
Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473
4BR/2BA CONCRETE BLOCK
Home ONLY $38,500; apply
TLC & make this house a home
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #79477
5 Ac for $7,500! Wooded flag lot
with 5.44 ac. Restricted to site
built homes w/a min of 1500 sqft
climatized. MLS 77872 $7,500
Access Realty 386-623-6896


810 Home for Sale
Just Reduced 2br/2ba 1 car garage
screen porch, fenced yard, large
utility/ workshop MLS# 76708
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Denise Bose @386-752-5290
LARGE 2,000+ SqFt 3BR/2BA
home near schools & shopping
ONLY $28,500 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC
755-5110 #77505
Lg 4/2 on 1 ac. Granite floors.
Open kitchen & Florida rm. Beau-
tiful yard & wrap around porch!
MLS 77292 $129,000 Results Re-
alty, Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Live on a Golf Course. 3/2 brick
on 1/2 ac. Formal living, dining &
family room. 2 car garage.
$129,900 Frank 386-984-5217
MLS 79567 Callaway S/D Well
kept 3br/2ba, vaulted, corner lot,
SS appl. Fenced yard & double ga-
rage. $175,000 Century 21 The
Darby-Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
MLS 79876 3br/2ba w/many up-
grades. Garage made into a 1 br
studio. 1,760 sqft in Oak Hill
Estates. $90,000 Century 21
The Darby-Rogers Co 752-6575
MLS 79982 3br/2ba, 1,805 sqft,
laminate floors, eat in kitchen
w/breakfast bar. Lg luxurious mas-
ter bath $169,900 Century 21 The
Darby-Rogers Co. 386-752-6575


,-Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty Poole Realty 4br/3ba, Custom
1512 sqft. + 210 sqft Florida room. built Between Live Oak & Lake
remodeled kitchen, paint, floors & City, 10 ac w/planted pines &.
more. $94,500 Lori Giebeig Simp- hardwoods. $249,000 Kellie
son 386-365-5678 MLS# 79839. Shirah, 386-208-3847 MLS#78032


Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4/3, lake in town. Many upgrades,
Elaine K Tolar 386-755-6488 Or
Mary Brown Whitehurst 386-965-
0887 MLS# 76085 $299,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Split plan. 3/2 Brick, Woodcrest
S/D; Fenced yard. Oversized
garage, Shed. $169,900 Elaine K
Tolar 386-755-6488 MLS# 77708,
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
2 story. 4br/3ba + bonus. Mother -
in-law suite. Fenced yard nice
area. Elaine K Tolar 386-755-6488
MLS# 79349 $279,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Superb area, brick 3/2 Ig screen,
porch. 2 car garage. Nice back-
yard, $129,900 Lori Giebeig Simp-'
son 386-365-5678,MLS# 79763.


Custom built. 3/2, 1.37 ac, High'
Springs. Real wood floors w/new
SS appl. 340 sq. ft. scr. lanai w/ce-
ramic tile. $178,000 MLS 79601
Access Realty 386-623-6896 :,


FSBO Custom 3br/2.5ba. 1748sqft
Eastside Village. Oversized garage
w/extra garage in rear. Lg master
w/shower & tub. $149,000
386-752-2783 or 904-631-7390
Great investment property in the
city limits. Both units are occupied
w/tenants that want to stay! MLS
79206 $50,000 Results Realty,
Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473
Hallmark Real Estate
LIKE NEW COZY HOME with
excellent storage features,
3/2 Short sale $124,900
Call Ginger Parker 386-365-2135
Hallmark Real Estate TWO*
STORY HOME with water access ,
to Gulf or River. Features boatlifts
for the angler. Call Teresa
Spradley 386-365-8343
Hallmark Real Estate
WEST OF TOWN near shopping,
medical and banks. 3/2 brick
home with workshop.
Call Janet Creel 386-719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate
SOUTH OF TOWN 3 bedroom
1-1/2 bath home on full acre.
Budget priced $72,000
Call Tanya Shaffer 386-397-4766


















Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
Ad runs 10 consecutive.days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
You must include vehicle price.
All ads are prepaid.
Private party only.





2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 1.0 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run,


Poole Realty Custom 3/2 home,
12 ac.Vaulted cypress ceilings,
hardwood & granite counters,
stone FP, guest cottage. $255,000.
Kellie 386-208-3847 MLS#76293
Poole Realty Just Listed 1,066 sq.
ft., 3 brl ba located South of Lake
City. $57,000. Call for an appoint-
ment. 386-362-4539. MLS#79937
266 Delhia Lane, Lake City
Poole Realty Queen Anne Victori-
an, Live Oak. 3/2, wood floors.
Listed on the historic registry. Lg
yard, 2 car garage. $159,000 Kellie
Shirah 386-208-3847 MLS75212
Price Reduced! 06 Fleetwood An-
niversary Series. 3/2 + retreat off
master, privacy fence. South of
Lake City MLS 78411 $67,900
Access Realty 386-623-6896


PRICE SLASHED! 3BR/2BA
Brick home REMODELED!
Fenced backyard $69,500
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY
INC 755-5110 #78340


Remax Professionals Beautifully
kept in Callaway. Lg beds & baths.
Covered porch w/vinyl fence.
MLS 79005 $190K Missy Zecher
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Remax Professionals Brick in
nice S/D w/fenced back yard. High
ceilings, gas fireplace, more. MLS
79421 199,000 Missy Zecher
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Remax Professionals Custom'
..home. Blockiconstruction. Lg.
Master, privacy fence. MLS 79569
$229,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237
www.missyzecher.com


810 Home fbr Sale
Remax Professionals Nice home
in Woodcrest. Split floor plan. Lg
closets, screened porch, shed MLS
79506 $129,000 Missy Zecher
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Remax Professionals Open floor
plan. Wood burning fireplace.
Fenced back yard. MLS 79330
$115,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Remax Professionals Well kept &
updated. New paint, carpet, AC &
roof. Lg fenced backyard MLS
79658 $119,900 Missy Zecher
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Remax Realty Almost new, great
area! 4br/2.5ba/3cg, 3052sq, 5ac,
gas FP, SS appls, hardwood. Front
& back porch #79877 $289,000
Pam Beauchamp 386-303-2505
Remax Realty Country Feel!
Awesome 3br/2ba, brick, 5ac, split
floor plan, lg master, above ground
pool, 2 sheds, #79789 $219,000
Pam Beauchamp 386-303-2505
Remax Realty Restored Vintage,
zoned comm'l. 3br/2.5ba, 2208 sq.
ft., 2 ac, FP in living & master,
wkshop w/bath. #77141 $209,000
Pam Beauchamp 386-303-2505
REO Realty Group, Nancy Rog-
ers 386-867-1271- 4/2, Fairly new
roof, HVAC 3yrs old & additional
Insulation. Workshop has two br
MLS 77602 $149,900
REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers
867-1271- 3/1.5. Ceramic counters
& back splashes, wood laminate
flooring. Landscaping, privacy
fence. MLS 80014 $99,900
REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers
867-1271- Lake City's Country
Club 4/3 W/beautiful interior
renovation. 2,328 sq ft.
MLS 78637 $169,900
Rockford Realty Group 3/2, new
cabinets, countertops, updated
baths, paint, flooring.Appr 1 ac
workshop/shed $77,000. Luke
Sparks 386-487-1584 MLS#77208
Rockford Realty Group Short
Sale. Nice older home in the city.
Newer metal roof, open floor plan
*w/wood floors. $55,000 MLS#
78018 Luke Sparks. 386-487-1584
Rockford Realty Group. 3/2 split
plan N. Columbia Co. Open kit.,
upgraded cabinets & appl. Cov-
ered patio, fenced yard. MLS#
79720 Jim Curry 386-755-0100
Rockford Realty Group. Cypress
Landing. Brick 3br/2ba w/lg
kitchen area; spacious great room a
neat patio. MLS#79775. $124,900..
Call Charlie Sparks. 386-755-0808
Rockford Realty Group. River
'Front! 3br/2ba Kit & LR overlooks
Suwannee River. Screen porch,
Gazebo & dock. MLS#79887 .
1$295,000 Jim Curry 386-755-0100
Rockford Realty GroupCallaway
3br/2ba built in '04. 1,568 sqft liv-
ing area. Bank approved short sale.
Make an offer! $106.800. MLS#
79248 Mark Cook. 386-288-9378
Very well kept, 3 br/2 ba on,1/2 ac
Close tq Jr,75 for,esyq nm pte.
Nice wood cabinetry, open floor &
much more! $169,900 MLS
#78825 Carrie Cason. 623-2806
t


810 Home for Sale
WELLBORN! 3BR/2BA mfg
Home w/FP on 4.79 acres
$63,000 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY INC 755-5110
#79960

O8 Farms &
820 Acreage
20 ac wooded tract. Nice piece of
land. Property is located approx 10
miles from Cedar Key. MLS
78886 $70,000 Results Realty,
Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
Owner Financed land with only
$300 down payment. Half to ten a'.
lots. Deas Bullard/BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
Poole Realty 120 ac farm w/spring
fed lake. Old renovated farmhouse.
Lg master, w/wood burning FP,
LR w/FP & updated kit..#76096
$499j000. Kellie 386-208-3847

83O Commercial
830 Property
Hallmark Real Estate 53.87 ac
zoned resid'l office & resid'l
high den.;ity on By-Pass.. Bank
Owned. Janet Creel 386-719-0382
or Paula Lawrence 386-623-1973
'Hallmark Real Estate. Centrally
located lots zoned for retail,
automotive or commercial services
on Waterford Ct. Bank owned.
Call Janet Creel 386-719-0382 or
Paula Lawrence 386-623-1973

870 Real Estate
870 Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605

0 Auto Parts
920 & Supplies

4 TIRES with matching
aluminum Rims. 5-lug.
Off F-150. 265/70/17
$175.00 FIRM. 386-365-5099

930 Motorcycles
HARLEY DAVIDSON Electric,
Glide Classic. 2006. 12,500 mi
LOADED $12,009.'
(734)255-4820


RECYCLE

YOUR
PAPER


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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012


NEED HELP!


Classifed Ad


Gifts Galore
386-466-1888
,1034 SWin Blvd., (next to the Money Mn)Lake City, FL 32055

.Loasted at SHANIDS Lake City S Live Oak Florida

S \ CHANDLER MMOHAN, MD IMAD ATTA, MD
ANN MARIA. 1EN9H CNM
S36 386-466-1106 O B-GYN
w,4myoboa.MLom
0u8TSTRIC & SGYNECOLOGY MENOPAUSE & INCONTINENCE
S' *MPENATAL CARE & ULTRASOUND WEIGHT LOSS & 40 ULTRASOUNDS'70.00
S4. STD' & tPV TEaSIN *BOTOX & LASER HAIR REMOVAL '70.00
B UIRTH CONTROL & INFERTILITY 0 NO INSURANCE VISITS $5&00
FRII Prepogna irsound WITH THIS AD
ALL MAJOR INSURANCB1 ACCEPTBD INCLUDING MEDICAID & MBDICARB


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arecfty.com










Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
rbridges@jokectyreporter.com


LIFE


Sunday, February 19, 2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


Genie Norman and
Mary Kay
Hollingsworth
TasteBuddiesLakeCity@gmnail.com
An apology from
the Taste Buddies
We have just learned
that Mickey L's in Live Oak
has closed. Our review
of Mickey L's ran in last
week's Sunday paper.
Please accept our apolo-
gies for any inconvenience
this may have caused you.
We had written our review
before Christmas and had
been there twice. We
enjoyed our meals there
and had wanted to share
our experience with you.
Apparently, this restaurant
was unable to continue
sharing their good food in
Live Oak.
We would like to make
up any inconvenience you
might have had by shar-
ing an extra Taste Buddies
review with you this
month. Look for another
column in next week's Lake
City Reporter
Taste Buddies


If you see the

'Open' sign,
don't pass by
Cox's BBQ
A t first you may
not notice it
or just think,
oh, that's just a
o-hum mobile
kitchen/restaurant, as
you're traveling down Main
Boulevard between US 90
and Baya Avenue. Cox's
BBQ serves up some of the
best-tasting barbeque in
town. Owned by Ken Cox,
Jr. who after several years
as an insurance executive
decided to start his "restau-
rant" business and boy are
we glad he did!
There isn't anything
fancy about the place; just
a walk up window, a few
covered picnic tables for
the folks that aren't in a
mad dash back to the office
and the food is served in
regular to-go-boxes but
don't let that fool you! The
food is top notch. The only
downside is that the joint
has very limited hours -
lunch time only and not
every day.
Recently after a near
noontime meeting, we were
hunting for a quick bite to
eat. We tried out the pulled
pork and rib sandwiches.
The pulled pork sandwich
is served on a regular bun
and piled high with butter
soft smoked pork that is '
lightly seasoned and comes
with a side of yummy,
slightly sweet homemade
barbeque sauce. The rib
sandwich comes either
with the standard burr or
you can get it on garlicky
Texas toast and you get
the rib bones too! You can
either eat the ribs separate-
ly or pull the meat off the
bone to make a tasty sand-
wich. The ribs are so ten-
der, it doesn't take much
effort Either way, it's a
messy affair but worth the
trouble, for sure! Sandwich
plates include a bag of
chips. Being the chow
hounds we are, we added a
few side items to round out
our meal cole slaw, potato
salad and BBQ beans. Our
hands down favorite was
the BBQ beans with lus-
cious pieces of pulled pork
TASTE BUDDIES
continued on 2D


Exterior view of'the Club House in downtown Lake City.


COURTESY PHOTO


COURTESY PHOTO
Above: To restore and preserve The Club House, the
Lake City Garden Club and the Women's Club of Lake City
are selling memery-bricks tllIt1 amOi
porch and sidewalk, as well as pay off renovation debts.
Bricks can be engraved with a four-line message. At left:
Members of the Lake City Women's Club pose for a picture
around 1948. The photograph was taken by Bill Roy.


'Memory Bricks'


Club House
project is for
the future.

By LAURA HAMPSON
lhampson@lakecityreporter.
corn
he Club
House in
downtown
Lake City has
hosted count-
less brides on their wed-
ding days, entertained 1
troops during World
Word II and provided a
community gathering
spot for generations of
residents.
Now the community
has a chance to leave Memt
their mark on the histori- side T
cally significant house.
The Lake City Garden
' Club and the Women's Club of
Lake City are working to sell 600
memory bricks that will enhance
the house's sidewalk and porch
in addition to paying off renova-
tion debts.
Home to. both clubs, The Club
House on Hernando Avenue


GARDEN TALK


Nichelle
Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu


COURTESY Pf
bers of the Lake City Garden Club and the Women's Club of Lake City gather o
*he Club House to promote sales of 600 memory bricks.


is more than 80 years old and
has undergone several improve-
ments in the past years.
Recently the clubs have
renovated the house's kitchen,
front porch, brick facade, win-
dows, vinyl siding and garden.
Through other fundraisers and
renting out the house for events,


the clubs have payed off about .
half of the renovation debt, but
they still owe $40,000, said Tina
Roberts, chairwomen of the
Garden Club's brick committee.
Memory bricks give the com-
munity a way to be part of this
landmark's restoration,-she said.
The bricks are for anyone who


has fond memories of the
house or wants to support
the historic building. Bricks
can be in memory to a
loved one, show support for
the clubs or commemorate
a past event held at the
house, Roberts said.
"My first memory
of going to the Woman's
Club was in the 1940's. I
was in high school," said
Ann Darby, of Lake City.
'The girls would get all
dressed up and feel so
glamourous. Lots of young
men from the naval air sta-
tion would come and dance
with all of us girls. They
were really good dancers."
Bricks that;will be laid
HOT0 on the houses porch cost
)ut- $50 and bricks laid on the
outside sidewalk cost $100.
They can be engraved
with names and messages,
Roberts said. Up to four
lines and 22 characters, includ-
ing space and punctuation, can
be engraved on each brick.
About 100 bricks are already
sold, but the additional 600
will be on sale until May. The
Garden Club and Woman's Club
BRICKS continued on 2D


Nesting boxes for birds to raise their young


A attracting birds
to our back-
yards adds
another dimen-
sion of beauty
and enjoyment to our own
little world. The greater
diversity of life in the gar-
den also helps the environ-
ment maintain a. natural
balance. If you feed the
birds, consider providing


them with a nesting box to
raise their young.
Cavity nesters tradition-
ally use tree holes created
by woodpeckers, or they
nest in natural cavities
found in live or dead trees.
Land clearing practices
eliminate many of these
natural nesting sites and
make it difficult for cav-,
ity nesters to find suitable


places to raise their young.
There are 40 different
species of cavity nesting
birds in Florida, including
the bluebird, tufted tit-
mouse, chickadee, wood-
pecker and nuthatch. A
few species are beginning
to scout for homes this
month, and some have
begun their mating rituals.
Pileated woodpeckers will


soon be announcing ter-
ritories by drumming on
objects including houses
and telephone poles.
Hanging a birdhouse,
or nesting box, may sound
like a simple task, but all
birdhouses are not created
equally. Features such as
the size of the entrance
GARDEN TALK
continued on 2D











2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012



Boy genius' book reveals life in college at age 8


ASUWAI TIED PRI
In this May 2, 2008 file photo, Moshe Kai Cavalin, 10, strikes a
martial arts position as he poses for photos at his home studio in
Downey, Calif. At age 11, Cavalin became the youngest person
ever to earn an Associate in Arts degree from East Los Angeles
College and now, at 14, is poised to graduate with honors from
UCLA later this year.


Key message of
the book is to
stay focused.
By JOHN ROGERS
Associated Press
LOS ANGELES -
The one thing 14-year-
old Moshe Kai Cavalin
dislikes is being called a
genius.
All he did, after all, was
enroll in college at age 8
and earn his first of two
Associate of Arts degrees
from East Los Angeles
Community College in
2009 at age 11, graduating
with a perfect 4.0 grade
point average.
Now, at 14, he's poised
to graduate from UCLA
this year. He's also just
published an English edi-
tion of his first book, "We
Can Do."
The 100-page guideline
explains how other young
people can accomplish
what Cavalin did through
such simple acts as keep-
ing themselves focused
and approaching every-
thing with total commit-
ment. He's hoping it will
show people there's no
genius involved, just hard
work.
'That's always the ques-
tion that bothers me,"
Cavalin, who turned 14


on Valentine's I
when the G-word
"People need to ]
don't really need
genius. You just
work hard and
accomplish anyth
And maybe
some of the TV.
Although he's
of Jackie Chan
movies, Cavalin
says he limits
his television
time to four
hours a week.
Not that he
lacks for rec-
reational activi-
ties or feels
that his parents
pressured him
into studying
constantly. He
writes in "We
Can Do" of lea
scuba dive, and
soccer and mar
He used to part
the latter sport
was younger, wit
phies for his ag
until his UCLA st
his writing made
little too hectic.
Indeed one of
messages of his
to stay focused a
take on any ende
heartedly.
"I was able to
stars, but others


Day, says
is raised.
know you
d to be a
t have to
you can
hling."
cut out

a big fan


the 'Milky Way," he tells
readers.
It was a professor
at his first institution of
higher learning, East Los
Angeles City College, who
inspired him, Cavalin says.
He didn't like the subject
but managed to get an A
in it anyway, by applying


Publisl
the bo
well in
and M
several
South(
Asian
then 1
English
ket.


The 100-page guideline
explains how other young
people can accomplish
what Cavalin did through
such simple acts as keep-
ing themselves focused and
approaching everything
with total commitment.
-

irning to himself and seeing how degre(
he loves enthusiastic his teacher, plans t
rtial arts. Richard Avila, was about school
icipate in the subject tually
when he Avila, he says, inspired Afte
inning tro- him to write a book sure. I
ge group,, explaining his methods he's st
udies and for success so he could. ager.
e things a motivate others. "Wh
It took four years to chuck]
f the key finish, in part because of wha
s book is Cavalin, whose mother is hood.
nd to not Chinese, decided to pub- tant fu
avor half- lish it in Chinese, and much]
doing the translation him- next fe
reach the self was laborious. far int'
can reach Han Shian Culture to see.


thing of Taiwan put
ok in print, and it did
Taiwan, Singapore
[alaysia, as well in
al bookstores in
ern California's
communities. He
brought it out in
h for the U.S. mar-

Because of his
heavy study load,
Cavalin has had
little opportu-
nity to promote
the book, other
than a signing at
UCLA, where he
also lives in stu-
dent housing with
his parents and
attends the school
on a scholarship.
After earning
his bachelor's
e, the math major
to enroll in graduate
with hopes of even-
earning a doctorate.
r that, he's not so
He points out that
ill just barely a teen-

1o knows?" he says,
ding at the thought
t lies ahead in adult-
"That's a very dis-
ture, and I'm pretty
planning for just the
ew years. That's too
o the future for me
"


GARDEN TALK: Bird nesting boxes


In this image made from video provided by NASA, commander of the International 'Space
Station, Daniel Burbank, shakes hands with Robonaut aboard the station in orbit around
the earth. It's the first handshake ever between a human and a humanoid in space. NASA's
Robonaut was launched aboard space shuttle Discovery last February. Crews have been test-
ing it to see how it one day might help astronauts perform space station chores.


Human and humanoid robot


unite and

By MARCIA DUNN
AP Aerospace Writer
CAPE CANAVERAL -
Astronauts and robots have
united in space with a healthy
handshake.
The commander of the
International Space Station,
Daniel Burbank, shook hands
Wednesday with Robonaut
It's the first handshake ever
between a human and a
humanoid in space.
NASA's Robonaut was
launched aboard space shut-
tle Discovery last February
Crews have been testing it to
.see how it one day might help
astronauts perform space sta-
tion chores.
On Wednesday, ground
controllers activated com-
puter software that enabled
the robot to extend its right
hand, fingers outstretched.
Burbank took the mechanical


shake hands in space
hand and pumped it up and a message Hello world ...
down, as the robot's fingers in sign language!" Robonaut
tightened around his hand. tweeted. "What a day! I passed
"The first' human-human- my tests with flying colors!!!"
oid handshake in space," Dutch space station astro-
Burbank proclaimed. naut Andre Kuipers couldn't
A cheer went up in the con- resist a little robot humor.
trol room in Huntsville, Ala. "Now lets hope he's never
"For the record, it was a heard 6f HAL9000, Skynet or
firm handshake," Burbank Cylons," Kuipers wrote in a
radioed. "Quite an impressive tweet
robot" HAL was the conspir-
Robonaut the first ing computer in "2001: A
humanoid in space, built from Space Odyssey." The people-
thewaistup-saidviaTwitter hating artificial intelligence
that it was an awesome expe- system Skynet is from the
rience, then followed up with 'Terminator" films, while
some sign language. Cylons are cyber-warriors
'The handshake was defi- from "Battleship Gallactica."
nitely one of the highlights Robonaut spends most of
of the day, but I'm not done its time in hibernation aboard
yet," Robonaut said in a tweet the space station. The astro-
(A NASA spokeswoman actu- nauts bring the humanoid
ally files the tweets under the out every so often for test-
handle AstroRobonaut) ing, it was awakened in space
"Did you catch that? I don't last August and made its first
have a voice, but I sent you motion in October.


TASTE BUDDIES: Don't pass by Cox's


Continued From Page 1D
lightly laced throughout The cole slaw
came in as a close second, with just the
right amount of dressing that wasn't too
sweet or too tangy. The potato salad'
boasted perfectly cooked potatoes and
a creamy dressing but was just a tad bit
under-seasoned for our tastes.
Cox's BBQ also offers dinner plates
of pulled pork, beef (not available every
day), turkey, ribs or chicken with a
cfioice of one small side, garlic bread and
that delicious homemade barbeque sauce.
You can get a combo meal of Ribs and
Chicken or Ribs and pulled pork, if you're
really hungry.
If you're in the market for a quick din-
ner for your family, call ahead and order a
slab of ribs, a chicken or big portions of
pulled pork or smoked beef brisket. Add
a small, medium or large side of potato
salad, green beans, cole slaw or barbeque


beans.. Round out with a few slices of
toasted garlic bread and "that's what's for
dinner!"
Cox's BBQ can also cook up a memora-
ble meal for your next party, you just need
to call in a few days in advance to make
sure he's ready when you are.
So the next time you're in a hurry for
a delicious, quick bite to eat that you can't
get at any chain drive-thru or you need a
really fast dinner, give Cox's BBQ a call
to make sure they are open and order
away. We certainly enjoyed it and know
you will too. Cox's BBQ phone number
758-8107.
N Genie Norman and Mary Kay Hollingsworth
are Columbia County residents who love
good food and fun, at home and out. Their
column on area restaurants
appears twice monthly. You can contact them
at TasteBuddiesLakeCity@ gmail.com.


ContinuedFrom Page 1L
hole, the height pf the hole,
and the total height of the
box will determine which
bird species will end up
nesting inside. Placement is
also important Purple mar-
tins prefer to be suspended
high above open ground,
while red-headed wood-
peckers, like to be about a
foot off the ground on the'
edge of woods.
The little chickadee and
tufted titmouse will use a
1 /4" diameter, entrance
hole that larger birds can't
squeeze through. Kestrels,
on the other hand, need
large 3" diameter holes
to be able to get inside.
Smaller birds feel safe in the'
birdhouse with an entrance
made just for them. In other
words, don't expect a blue-
bird to use the birdhouse
that you put up if it has a 1
'/4" opening or a 3" opening.
They'll feel right at home
with a front entrance diam-
eter of 1 2".
If you had a birdhouse
out for last year's nesting,
ifs time to get it cleaned
out and ready for a new fam-
ily. Remove and discard the
old nesting material, brush


down the -inside walls and
floor, and spray the inside
with a mild solution of
bleach water. Leave the box
open for a couple days to
dry out before closing and
putting it back in use.
Depending on your visit-
ing species, the birds may
breed three or four times
per year. Hatchling blue-
birds, for instance, will stay
in the nest for about two
weeks. When the muscles
and feathers have devel-
oped sufficiently for flight,
they are called fledglings
and will leave the nest The
parents continue to feed
them for awhile, giving
you time to clean the nest
out before the female lays


another clutch of eggs.
Birds spend lots of time
gathering nesting mate-
rial. Hang a mesh onion
bag filled with string, yarn,
dryer lint, leaves, twigs,
pine needles and pieces of
material right outside your
window. Watch the differ-
ent birds keep returning
for pieces of their favorite
nest building material. To
Sind more ways to enjoy and
help our feathered friends,
visit http://www.birds.cor-
nell.edu
* D. Nichelle Demorest is
a horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


BRICKS: For the future


Continued From Page 1L
will work together to have
an open house on Saturday,
April 14 with refreshments
and tours of inside and
outside projects that have
been completed so far.
For more information
or to purchase a brick, call


Tina Roberts at 755-0948
or Martha Ann Ronsonet at
752-4111. Forms can also
be picked up at the Lake
City Columbia County
Chamber of Commerce,
162 S. Marion Ave.


Stop by the

Lake City Reporter JV.

foryouricomplimentaiy-.

engagement package.






,,-







"
.'













Complimentary

Engagement Package


,


A









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012


DEAR ABBY


Telltale burns prove smoker


hasn't cleaned up his act


DEAR ABBY: "Dwayne,"
my boyfriend of eight years,
insists on smoking in his
bedroom. In our last apart-
ment he'd fall asleep with a
lit cigarette and ended up
burning holes in our couch,
numerous blankets and pil-
lows as well as the carpet.
When we moved, Dwayne
assured me he had stopped,
but a month ago I noticed
his blanket and mattress
have burn holes and so does
the carpet by his bed.
We live together with our
6-year-old son and, needless
to say, I'm scared to death
Dwayne will burn this place
down. I have talked to him
about it numerous times. All
he does is yell and say it won't
happen because cigarettes are
"safer now."
I have discussed this with
qur landlord to no avail. I
thought about calling social
services, but I don't want to
get him in trouble. I could
really use some good advice.
- SCARED FOR MY LIFE IN
MILWAUKEE
DEAR SCARED: Because
Dwayne is unwilling to be
more responsible, ifs time to
consider your son's safety and
your own. Your boyfriend is
not only addicted to tobacco,
he is also misguided. If ciga-
rettes were "safer now" there
wouldn't be burn holes in his
bedding and the area sur-
rounding where he sleeps. If
moving isn't feasible, at least
make sure there are work-
ing smoke detectors in your


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com

apartment and an extra one
outside Dwayne's bedroom
door.
Frankly, it would be
healthier for you and the
boy if Dwayne didn't smoke
at all in your apartment
because the Environmental
Protection Agency has clas-
sified secondhand smoke as
a Group A carcinogen. To
verify this, and get further
information, contact the
American Cancer Society
(800-227-2345) or the
American Heart Association
(800-242-8721).
** ** **
DEAR ABBY: My hus-
band died 13 years ago.
Since then I have pretty
much lost everything,
except the grief. Recently it
occurred to me that I have
some photographs his sib-
lings and nieces might like
copies of.
I don't want them to know
where I live in a battered
old ti-ailer because I'm
ashamed. They are all well-to-
do and never seemed to like
me. No one has spoken to me
since my husband's death.


I don't want it to seem
like I'm expecting anything
in return because I'm not,
nor do I want to see them
socially. I know I don't fit
in with them. I'd just like to
do something nice since we
all loved him. From expe-
rience I think they'll find
some way to misinterpret
or misunderstand the ges-
ture. 'll be hurt and, added
to the depression and grief,
I don't think I could handle
it. What do you advise?
- MISSING MY MAN IN
CALIFORNIA
DEAR MISSING YOUR
MAN: Please accept my
sympathy' for the loss of
your husband. You have
given me four valid reasons
not to reach out to your
husband's family, the most
important of which is that
if you get another round of
rejection from them it will
crush you. That's why I
advise against it.
Because they haven't spo-
ken to you or included you
in 13 years, on top of the fact
you never felt accepted in
the first place (your words) -
- the healthy thing for you to
do is to keep your distance.
However, because in all this
time you have been unable
to finish your grieving pro-
cess, I urge you to consider
grief counseling.

E Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Follow your heart and do
what you feel is right Helping
someone experiencing some
of the problems you have
encountered in the past will
lead to an interesting offer and
a positive change in the way
you do things. *****
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Don't let your emo-
tions get the better of you.
Overreacting to a situation
that can jeopardize your posi-
tion or reputation must be
avoided. Keep your thoughts
to yourself and observe how
others react to the same set
of circumstances. **
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): You'll learn a lot from a
respected person who has
taught you in the past A
relationship that offers love,
romance and companionship
will be prevalent in helping
you help others. Open up spiri-
tually, emotionally or philo-
sophically and you will get
positive results. *****- -
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Do things differently. A
unique approach to how you
use your skills will enable
you to diversify in ways that
can become quite lucrative.


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

A chance to learn something
new or change your sur-
roundings will motivate you
to branch out ***
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Expand your mind. Look at
different lifestyles, cultures
or methods and you will dis-
cover a way to impress some-
one you have been trying to
do business with or get to
know better personally. Self-
improvement projects will be
successful. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept 22):
Don't let emotions stand in
the way of your productivity.
There is plenty to learn and
to contribute if you keep an
open mind. Jealousy is likely
to develop if someone feels
threatened by the choices
you make. ***
LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct 22):
Spend time nurturing important
relationships or doing some-
thing that will make you feel
good about who you are and
what you have to offer. Sharing
and caring should be your top
priority. Love and romance are
highlighted. *****


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are ated from quotations by famous peoplet.past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODA Y'S CLUE: G equals P
"CL Bc JS WCYZ WJXP ZXJS PF, B JS'WW
HDMZ HCVADMZV. RSA CL BJS WZDOX
LOJH AFZH, BJS'WW RZ D RZAAZO
GZOVJX." RCWW TWCXAJX'

Previous Solution: "The chief product of an automated society Is a widespread
and deepening sense of boredom." C. Northcote Parkinson
@ 2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 2-20


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


SCORPIO (Oct 23-Nov.
21): Follow through with the
ideas you have and avoid
anyone trying to alter your
plans. Expect someone to use
emotional tactics to lead you
in a different direction. Don't
neglect the responsibility you
owe to yourself. Put your goals
and your needs first **
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): Avoid dealing with
authority figures or traveling
anywhere that might put you
at risk. Protect your assets
and your physical well-being.
Stick close to home and
spend time with people who
make you feel comfortable
and less stressed. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Past experience will play
an important role in the deci-
sions you make now. Added
responsibility may feel like a
burden, but you will benefit
from the lesson you learn.
Visitors or changing your
surroundings at home will
bring positive results. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Set a strict budget and
re-evaluate your overhead.
You should be able to cut
corners enough to accommo-
date something you want to
do or purchase in the future.
A unique talent you have can
be turned into a prosperous
venture. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Courage will help you
establish equality in a part-
nership you want to develop.
Make clear what you have to
offer and what you want in
return and you will be able to
achieve your goals. Optimism
and enthusiasm will bring
success. -A-


ADDITIONAL READING By Kurt Mueller / Edited by Will Shortz 1 -23-- 41 16 1 8[910 11 12 13 1 4 15,


Across
1 Handsome, as
Henri
4 Lucky end?
.7 Hyundai sedan
S12 Mata ___ (spy)
16 G.P.'s group
17 Some nerve
19 They're all the
*same
20 Each
21 Send over some
Bibles? '
,24 Tour org.
25 Really want
26 Largest, as a sum
27 Things .that may'
have to be
cleared
29 Mark Messier,
for 12 years
30 Actress Gilpin of
"Frasier"
31 Graybeards
33 Dolt's football
game plans?
,38 Bar, legally
39 Cinco follower
40 Drum set set
42 Huffs
45 Word affixed to
web "or handy
48 Police
investigator:
Abbr.
49 Comet rival
51 Ogle
52 Curved molding
54 The truth about a
popular Internet
community?
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
phone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


59 Reveal, in poetry
60 Put down
62 "C'est __"
63, Sea of __ (arm .a
of the Black Sea)
64 Stimpy's pal
65 "The gloves are
off!"
67 Jack's inferior
68 Albanian money-
70 Decodes
72 Singer/actress
With a
'simultaneous- #1
album and #1
film, familiarly
73 Warden's charge
75 Fracas
77 Rathskeller
-vessel
79 'Velvet finish?
80 Egotistical
author's request
to a reader?
84 Tiny bits of pasta
85 Live
86 Frees
87 Ike's' W.W. II
command
89 __ T. (big name
in .1960s music)-
90 Like certain
passages
93 Professorial
96 Start of some
Italian church
names
98 Avid reader
100 Annual
publications for
burros?
105 Monotony
108 Whence Zeno
109 Mistreatment
110 Cut down to
size
111 Best in business


115 Russian retreat
116 "The Mikado"
baritone
117 Dust cover
made'of 100%
.aluminum,
perhaps?
121 As previously
.mentioned, in
bibliographies
122 Comparatively
stupid
123 Room in Clue
124 Diminutive
suffix
125 Gobi-like
126 Showed over
127 Black '__
(some military
activities)
128 Platoon V.I.P.:

Down
1 Half of an
interrogation
.team
2 "There'sa Chef in
My Soup!"
writer
3 Chorus syllables
4 Lug
5 Orch. section
6 Successful
swinger
7 Shampoo
ingredient
8 Where the wild
things are?
9 Put an ___
10 Engage again for
a gig
11 Father-and-son
rulers of Syria
12 One-named
fashion designer
13 Aid for record-
keeping at Mrs.
Smith's?


14 "Copy that"
15 Bridge
declaration
17 Like some flights
18 Sarkozy's
predecessor
19 Film special
effects, briefly
22 Actresses Dana
and Judith
23 Enlighten
28 Believers
30 Mail-related
32 1987 Broadway
sensation,
colloquially
34 Landed estate
35 Old Spanish card
game
36 The duck in
Prokofiev's
"Peter and the
Wolf"
37 Superboy's
sweetie
41 Magic, once
43 It's measured in
points
44 Spotted
45 Rimsky-
Korsakov's "Le
d'Or"
46 Christina of non


47 Get toget
your bet
50 "Believe
Not!"
53 Some trai
55 Pamper
56 Cain raise
57 Sign the
58 Part of Y.
61 Ship's rec
66 Film wha
68 Writer Wa


her with 69 Jeff Lynne's
taker? band, for short
71 Start of a Vol. I
--- heading
72 ___ Kennedy
ins Smith (sister of
J.F.K.,)
er 74 They come from
Mars
register 75,Classic fragrance
S.L. sold in France as
cord Mon Pech6
le 76 Macedonian city
with Greek and
allace Roman ruins


78 Opposite of'
"and"
81 Type
82 __ forte (less
loud, in music)
83 Judge's order
88 Dosage
frequency,
frequently
'91 "Gnarly, man!"
92 Star or wolf
preceder
94 Shooting match
95 Homer's home


97 Supply at a
French smoke
shop
99 Western
evergreen
101 Hail in a loud
voice
102 Brouhaha
103 Volume, holder
104 Washington
-airport
105 Sushi bar
servings: Var.


106.Dwelling
107 Like some
energy
112 Bone under a
watch,
113 Govt.
gangbusters
114 To be, to
Benicio
118 One, in Orleans
119 Fill completely,
in a way
120 Law degs.


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.


^^ N|O|L|O DA I|S|Y I|S|E|L|I|N
NJ 0 1|| LP|E~jR A I I INS ETR~MY||A|


ROM AO PERL S I G RT E AT
LROUSE R ET ES AD SA



AL A P E T I GUNST A ND
L O B SPL T ASNA ENN SR


1 2 3


5 3 8


9 2 7


78 6 1 4


496 3


64 5 1


7 6


4 8 2


9 178 5


9 V 8 L L Z9 E6


Z L C 8 9 6 7i 8



6 L8L L 8 8- 96




8 8 9 6 1 L 9 LI


1 L 9Z 6 8 L




8 6 Z6 L L 9 9



9 Z 6- L 8 L V


-I-I- c |A-L|Y|E


I I I I I I I


Page Editor: Robert Bridges 754-0428


ERR R|S T E N T
INIC I ISE OID I JE


I, I I I










4D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012


Crazy heels required


Fashion Week's always
tough on the feet

By JOCELYN NOVECK
AP National Writer
NEW YORK It's a blustery day
February tends to be that way in
New York and Marian Kihogo,
a fashion stylist and blogger from
London, is dashing from one runway
show to another, from the tents at
Lincoln Center to studios and galler-
ies scattered around Manhattan.
As she strides by on her "architec-
tural heels" by Nicholas Kirkwood for
Peter Pilotto, the heels hollowed out
for artistic effect, this reporter dares
to suggest she might be more com-
fortable in running shoes.
She laughs. "Running shoes! That
would be fashion suicide. I think the
fashion powers-that-be would stone
me!"
An exaggeration? Maybe just a bit
Kihogo is merely giving a colorful ren-
dition of an unspoken rule at Fashion
Week: It's all about the shoes. And
we're not talking about the models.
We're talking about the audience.
Never mind the snow, rain or sleet
Never mind the subway steps or those
dashes for a cab. Never mind the long
hours on, one's feet Most Fashion
Week regulars wouldn't be caught dead
without a pair of statement heels.
Ifs all a little intimidating for the
uninitiated, who may find themselves
panicking the first time they sit in the
front row of a runway show. For us,
the command, "Uncross your legs!"
induces something akin to terror,
Thafs what the pack of photogra-
phers at the foot of the runway calls
out to ensure their camera shots won't
be ruined by a dangling foot But it's
also the moment that all eyes shift
downward, and suddenly one's feet
feel naked.
Scratch that Bare feet would actu-
ally be better than a scruffy pair of boo-
ties with worn-down heels and cracked
toes. (Sorry Aerosoles, they were love-
ly six years ago when I bought them.)
Or, the Land's End children's rain
boots your 11-year-old has grown out
of, but still fit you.
Now, we don't mean to exagger-
ate. Sometimes you can find a pair
of sneakers ,in the front row. Usually


Marian Kihogo, a fashion stylist and blogger from London, shows off a pair of her
shoes during Fashion Week, in New York Tuesday.

they're studded, perhaps part of an are plenty of flats tucked away in tote
overall grunge look belonging to some bags," says Ken Downing, fashion
handsome and hip young man, or to director for Neiman Marcus, with a
a woman on crutches. Although, last wink. "And sitting in the back seats of
year, this reporter witnessed a woman sedans." Let's face it, says Downing,
on crutches at a fashion show, the "We all know what a beating Fashion
injured foot in an orthopedic boot, the Week can be on the feet"
other in ... wait for it ... a stiletto. Downing scans the front row of the
"Wow," says an admiring Pamela, Cushnie et Ochs runway show, where
Pekerman, who's covering fashion for', we're sitting. There's barely a flat in
AfterBuzz TV, hearing the anecdote, .sight, but he points out a colleague,
"That's going for it" Roopal Patel, who's wearing black
Pekermanthinksshe'sfoundahappy high-top Louboutin sneakers with sil-
medium a pair of Brian Atwood ver studs. And she's on crutches. She
heels in lavender that she bought on injured her knee two weeks ago.
sale at Saks Fifth Avenue and swears "It sent me into a panic what was
are comfortable. "I could run for you I going to wear to Fashion Week?" says
right now, I really could," she says. Patel, fashion director of the online
We'll take her word for it retail site modaoperandi.com. "Ninety
' "I've seen a lot of crazy shoes here percent of my closet is heels. Ballerina
that belong in the circus," Pekermnan flats? Not my style." But a colleague
says. "People are wobbling around., suggested the Louboutins "the per-
But some girls, they just want to stick fect solution." She'll be wearing them
out" As she speaks, one such woman to the upcoming shows in London,
teeters behind her, stepping rhyth- Milan and Paris.
mically but gingerly across Lincoln Downing, of Nieman Marcus, says
Center Plaza and over to 65th Street, there's a good reason for all the dress-
where we pray the traffic light gives ing up. After all, the fashionistas who
her enough time to cross. form most of the audience at runway
Pekerman does have one little secret shows buyers, stylists, major cli-
- foot petals, basically soft pads you ents and of course celebrities have
sneak into your shoes to provide a rather a duty to, well, take one for the
little cushioning. But some women, team. (Easy for him to say.) "Listen,"
says one fashion insider, have another, Downing says, "footwear is a true indi-
darker secret. cator of style, and where fashion is,
"I know from experience that there and where its going.


Gov't to carmakers:

Harness dashboard

technology for safety


By JOAN LOWY
Associated Press
WASHINGTON -
Carmakers should design
potentially distracting dash-
board technology so itfs
automatically disabled while
the vehicle is in motion,
federal safety officials said
Thursday.
In recent
years auto-
makers 'The gu
have been are a gc
loading step t
high-end
cars with reducir
an array of distra
built-in gad-
gets that Barbar
enable driv- executive
ers to multi- the Govern
task behind Safety As
the wheel
equip-
ment that
enables text-messaging,
Internet browsing, GPS
navigation and phone dial-
ing. But this technological
advance has raised con-
cerns that drivers' attention
'will be diverted from the
road.
The new dashboard
technology guidelines,
proposed by the National
Highway Traffic Safety
Administration, would
exempt electronic-warning
systems that alert drivers to
potential collisions or lane,
changes, however.
The guidelines also
include recommendations
on how to make dashboard
devices less distracting and
time-consuming to use,
including reducing the need
for drivers to turn their eyes
away from the road. The
guidelines are aimed at pas-
senger cars and sport utility
vehicles, not trucks.
"We recognize that
vehicle manufacturers
want to build vehicles that


include the tools and con-
veniences expected by
today's American drivers,"
said NHTSA Administrator
David Strickland. "The
guidelines we're propos-
ing would offer real-world
guidance to automakers
to help them develop elec-
tronic devices that provide
features
consum-
idelines ers want
without
Dod first disrupting
towardd a driver's
g driver attention
or sacrific-
ctions.' ing safety."
T h e
a Harsha, guidelines
director of are a good
ors Highway first step
sociation. toward
redu c -
ing driver
distractions, said Barbara
Harsha, executive director
of the Governors Highway
Safety Association, which
represents state highway
safety offices.
But "the safest thing is
for drivers is, not use these
systems at all both hands
on the wheel arid the mind
focused solely on driving,"
she said.
NHTSA is also consid-
ering future guidelines to
address portable electronic
devices drivers carry with
them in cars, including GPS
navigation systems, smart
phones, electronic tablets
and pads, and other mobile
communication devices. -*
In December, the,
National Transportation
Safety Board, which inves-
tigation highway accidents,
said that texting, mailing
or chatting on a cellphone
while driving is. simply too
dangerous to be allowed
and urged all states to
impose total bans except
for emergencies.


"A lot of doctors talk, but don't listen. I have a great doctor
that's very willing to listen"

James Johndro Cancer survivor



LAKE CITY

MEDICAL CENTER
Read James' full story online at LakeCityMedical.com


Jeffrey C. Glenn, DO
Lake City Medical Center is pleased to welcome Jeffrey C. Glenn, DO.
Dr. Glenn is a board-certified orthopedic surgeon Fellowship trained in
adult reconstructive surgery. Services provided:


* Fracture Care
* Hip Replacement
* Knee Replacement
* Pr il Knee
Replacement


* Trigger Finqrer
* Sports injury Care
* A nt'ror,-copic Knee &
Shoulder Surgery
* On-site X-ray
* Carpel Tunnel


Dr. Glenn and his staff are ready and equipped to treat your orthopedic
concerns. To schedule your new patient appointment or for more
information, please call (386) 755-9720.
Office Hours: Monday-Thursday, 8am to 4:30pm / Friday, 8am to 12pm
Accepting Most Insurance Plans
www. LakeCityMedicalcom


LAKE CITY

BONE & JOINT
An affiliate of Lake City Medical Center
3140 NW Medical Center Lane, Suite 130, Lake City FL 32055


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