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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01779
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: February 16, 2012
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01779
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text









THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2012


YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874


I 75


LIE OF FLORIDA HISTORY
000016 120312 ****3D101T 326*
P0 BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


LAKECITYREPORTER.COM


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia County Sheriff Mark Hunter explains the different types of drug paraphernalia found in what law enforcement agencies are calling 'back-
pack meth labs.' Hunter said that with the crackdown on pill mills, many drug users are going back to meth.




Meth's on the way




back, says sheriff


Laws designed to curb
pill mills had unintended
consequences, he says.

By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia. County Sheriff Mark Hunter
believes legislation that shut down many of
the prescription pill mills in the state may


have had an unintended consequence -.an
increase in methamphetamine manufactur-
ing in the area.
Fifteen meth labs were raided in Columbia
County last year. And the pace appears to be
increasing.
Since Dec. 23, six meth labs have been
shut down in the county,
"We're fighting it on all fronts," Hunter
said. "We can't arrest our way out of this.
It's got to be a concerted effort with law
enforcement and health services across the
state."


It's getting more difficult to find the labs,
however. More meth manufacturers are
choosing to make smaller'quantities ,of the
drug in what Hunter described as "back-
pack ,labs." The labs earned the moniker
. because all the chemicals and materials
to make a batch of the drug can fit into a
backpack.
That means the people making the drug
can do it anywhere a vehicle, motel room,
vacant buildings. And that's what they're
MEH continued on 6A


Businesswoman Parker dead at 87


Never recovered from
injuries sustained in
September car crash.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Earline Parker, a Lake City
businesswoman injured in a
September car crash, died
Tuesday in Illinois, according


to friends of the family. She was
87.
"She'd been comatose" for
about three days," said Tom
Brown, who added Parker will
be buried there in a family plot.
Parker's health had been in
Sa steady decline since a Sept. 6
collision with a Lake City.Police
Department. cruiser.
Janet Horton and Parker were
friends for close to a decade.
"I think she will be remem-


bered for
S, loving her
community,"
said Horton,
of Lake City.
"She spent
her whole life
giving to the
Parker community."
Horton said Parker's death
will be a big loss for the com-
munity.
"She was involved in so many


activities," Horton said. "She is
going to be missed from one end
of the county to the other."
Parker was the former execu-
tive director of United Way of
Suwannee Valley. She was also
the founder and a past director
of the Service Corps of Retired
Executives.
Parker was also a board mem-
ber of Community Concerts,


PARKER continued on 6A


Students

unhurt

in bus

accident

From staff reports

The driver of a Columbia
County school bus may have
suffered a medical episode
that caused the bus to, leave
the roadway and strike a fence
Wednesday, the Florida Highway
Patrol reported. No students
were injured.
According to FHP, Charlotte
C. Baldwin, 62, of Lake City,
was northbound on NW Staten
BUS continued on 3A

OLUSTEE

UPDATE


Stamps

illustrate

history

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
A collector's edition envelope
with an Olustee Festival cancel-
lation from the local post office
will be a lasting memento -om
*the 2012 Olustee Battle Festival
and Re-Enactment In time they'll
become collector's items.
S.TAMPS continued on 6A

Complete schedule
of the weekend's
events, Page 6A.

Inside today's
paper...
Today's edition of the Lake
City Reporter includes a special
supplement detailing the 34th
annual Olustee Battle Festival,
which will take place in down-
town Lake City Friday. and
Saturday. It also contains infor-
mation about the 36th Olustee
Battle Re-Enactment set for 1:30
Sunday at the Olustee Historic
Battlefield, 18 miles east of Lake
City on U.S. 90..


Global Logistics
Academy up and
running at CHS

By LAURA HAMPSON
Ihampson@lakecityreporter.com
Representatives from the state's top
logistics companies toured Columbia High
School's new Global Logistics Academy
building Wednesday.
The school held a ribbon cutting for the
warehouse while hosting a statewide advi-
sory council meeting for the Employ Florida
Banner Center for Global Logistics.
The center helps prepare a workforce
with logistics, and distribution skills for
Florida's industries. Florida Gateway
College is one of three institutions that
make up the center.
For more than a year, CHS logistics
students have traveled 20 minutes each
LOGISTICS continued on 6A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/I e .r, ir.:.:r
Columbia High School teachers, students, staff and local dignitaries participate in a ribbon cutting ceremony at the CHS Global Logistics
Academy Warehouse Wednesday.


Vol. U S: 8,N .127 A O pinio n ............ ... 4A

(386)Fax: 752-1293 People .................
SUBSCRIBE TO T-Storm Chance Obituaries .............. 5A
2 0 1 Fax: 752-9400 W EATHER, 2A Puzzles....... ]2B


TODAY IN COMING
PEOPLE FRIDAY
Houston is Local news
mourned. roundup.


I '

















2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2012


FLORIDA'
wnos


Wednesday:
N/A


I I3. Wednesday: Wednesday: -
Afternoon: 9-2-3 Afternoon: 4-6-1-1
Night: 8-2-8 Night: 4-0-6-1


Tuesday:
1-2-5-15-35


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Houston found under water in tub


BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. Whitney
Houston was underwater and appar-
ently unconscious when she was
pulled from a Beverly Hills hotel
bathtub, and she had prescription
drugs in her room, authorities said
Monday.
Two days after her death,
Houston's body was taken to a small,
Los Angeles-area airport and flown
to New Jersey, where her family was
making arrangements for a funeral
at the end of the week.
An autopsy was done Sunday, and
authorities said there were no indi-
cations of foul play and no obvious
signs of trauma on Houston's body.
It could be weeks, however, before
the coroner's office completes toxi-
cology tests to establish her cause of
death.
The 48-year-old singer had strug-
gled for years with cocaine, mari-
juana and pills, and her behavior had
become erratic.
Houston was found Saturday at
the Beverly Hilton Hotel by a mem- -
ber of her staff about 3:30 p.m., just
hours before she was supposed to
appear at a pre-Grammy Awards
gala, police Lt Mark Rosen said.
She was pulled from the tub by
members of her staff, and hotel
security was promptly notified,
Rosen said. She was pronounced
dead about a half-hour later.
"As of righlit now, it's not a criminal
investigation," Rosen said, refusing
to release further details. "We have
concluded our portion of the investi-
gation at the hotel."
Los Angeles County coroner's
assistant chief Ed Winter said there
were bottles of prescription medi-
cine in the room. He would not give
details except to say: 'There weren't
a lot of prescription bottles. You
probably have just as many prescrip-
tion bottles in your medicine cabi-
net."


Celebrity Birthdays


Singer Patty Andrews
is 94. ,
Actor William Katt is 61.
Rhythm-and-blues
singer James Ingram is 60.
Actor LeVar Burton
is 55.
Actor-rapper Ice-T is
54.
Actress Lisa Loring
is 54.
International Tennis
Hall of Famer John


McEnroe is 53.
M Rock musician Andy
Taylor is 51.
Actress Sarah Clarke
is 41.
Rock musician Taylor
Hawkins (Foo Fighters)
is 40.
Olympic gold medal
runner Cathy Freeman is
39.
Rapper Lupe Fiasco
is 30.


Daily Scripture

"This is love: not that we loved
God, but that he loved us and
sent his Son as an atoning sacri-
fice for our sins.."

1 John 4:10 NIV




Lake City Reporter,


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Annette Armour, from Long Beach, Calif. who is deaf, expresses her sorrow on
Monday at a memorial in Beverly Hills, Calif.
V **


The coroner's office released/the
body to the. family Monday morning.

Dancers boogie in bid for
Soul Train line record
PHILADELPHIA Hundreds of
people boogied, strutted and pop-
and-locked in Philadelphia in a bid to
set a new record for the world's larg-
est "Soul Train" line.
Dancers formed a long line in
front of the Philadelphia Museum of
Art on Monday to recreate a signa-
ture of the long-running television
program in which dancers form two
lines with a space in the middle for
each dancer to strut down.
Philadelphia resident Sheila
Simmons, one of the organizers,
said a total of 3.27 people took part, a
mark that would,eclipse the official
Guinness record of 211 set last year
by a group of Berkeley High School


students, staff and alumni.
The event was to honor Don '
Cornelius, the silkeri-voiced "Soul
Train" host who-died earlier this
month.

Ballet dancer killed by 2
vehicles in Los Angeles
LOS ANGELES Renowned
former ballet dancer, actress and
teacher Zina Bethune was hit by two
vehicles and killed.after getting out
of her car in an apparent attempt to
help a wounded'animal, authorities
said Monday.
Bethune, 66, whose married
name is Zina Feeley, left her Lincoln
Towncar running on Forest Lawn
Drive early Sunday and got out to
help what turned out to be a dead
opossum, police Sgt. Jeffrey Siggers,
told the Los Angeles Times.
(AP)


HOW TO REACH US
Main number........(386) 752-1293
Fax number...............752-9400
Circulation........... .755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, ah affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake-City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part i forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, RFla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING.........754-0417
(ads@lakecityreporter.com)

CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


BUSINESS .
Controller Sue Brannon....754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6-30' a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 730
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10.30 a.m;, next day re-delivey or ser-
vice related credits will be Issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks.................. $26.32
24 Weeks...-............... $48.79
52 Weeks...................$83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mall rates
12 Weeks.................$41.40
24 Weeks.................$82.80
52 Weeks...................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this
space. And thanks for reading.


St. Petersburg mom's
killer executed
STARKE A man who
raped a 29-year-old mother
and left her to drown in the
surf of Tampa Bay more
than three decades ago has
been executed.
Sixty-five-year-old Robert'
Brian Waterhouse died by
lethal injection at 8:22 p.m.
at Florida State Prison near
Starke. He had been on
'death row for 31 years -
longer than any inmate pre-
viously executed in Florida.
The execution was delayed
two hours because of a last-
,minute appeal.
Waterhouse was convict-
ed in 1980 of killing 29-year-
old Deborah Kammerer of
St Petersburg, whose body
was found in the tidal flats
of Tampa Bay. She'd been
beaten, raped and dragged
into the surf. The two had
been seen leaving a bar
together, and blood, hair
and fibers found in his car
linked Waterhouse to the'
slaying.

Senate panel passes
nearly $71M budget
TALLAHASSEE -
The Florida Senate on
Wednesday charged ahead
with a nearly $71 billion
budget, despite complaints
from university students,
hospital lobbyists and even
some Republicans in the
House about some of the
decisions contained in the
spending plan.
The Senate Budget -
Committee voted unani-
mously for the budget
proposal after marathon
all-day session that focused
primarily on the deep cuts
the budget has in store for
the state's 11 public univer-
sities. The legislation also
cuts spending on hospitals,
limits emergency room
visits for poor patients, and
eliminates thousands of
state worker jobs.
"It's a tough budget,"
said Sen. John Thrasher,
R-St. Augustine. "It was a


tough budget last year and
it's even tougher this year."
Some senators wound
up engaging in a back-
and-forth with students
from the University of
South Florida, who were
angered at what they
saw as cuts that targeted
their school because of
an ongoing feud over the
fate of a branch campus
in Lakeland. Sen. J.D.
Alexander, R-Lake Wales
and Senate budget chief,
has been pushing hard
to turn loose the branch
and transform it into the
state's newest stand-alone
university.

OSHA offers two
citations to Publix
JACKSONVILLE -
Publix Supermarkets has
been cited for 16 safety
and health violations after
the hand of a worker was
amputated while cleaning
conveyor equipment at its,
Jacksonville distribution
facility last September.
OSHA on Wednesday
also placed Publix in
its Severe Violator
Enforcement Program
because of repeat viola-
tions. That means the
supermarket chain will be
getting follow-up inspec-
tions from the job safety
agency.
The proposed penalties
issued Wednesday total
$182,000.'
OSHA officials say two of
the citations are for repeat
violations and six Others
are for failing to train ade-
quately employees on cer-
tain procedures. Another
six citations are for failing
to complete injury log and
illness incident reports.

Bill aims to open up
drilling off coast
TALLAHASSEE A
bill ihli.i would encourage
punbil lprivi partnerships
in exploring for oil and gas
in FlMi ind; ow Ias beemi
restricted to il state's


Panhandle.
The amended bill (HB
695) cleared the House
Appropriations Committee
along party lines
Wednesday.
Bill sponsor Clay Ford
said he changed the bill
after hearing concerns
over possible drilling in
the Everglades and other
environmentally-sensitive
areas. The Pensacola
Republican wants to
encourage revenue for the
state while protecting its
natural resources.
Environmental advo-
cates oppose the bill. They
have concerns over explo-
ration in Panhandle con-
servation lands. The bill
would not allow offshore
drilling.

Judge grants
acquittal in case
ORLANDO A former
central Florida teacher
accused of killing her
husband more than two
decades ago has been
acquitted of first-degree
murder.
Following a second day
of testimony in 64-year-
old Delores Laster's trial,
Senior Judge O.H. Eaton
granted the defense
motion for an acquittal
Wednesday before jurors
could render a verdict
The judge said he was
concerned over the scant
evidence of any crime, let
alone premeditated mur-
der.
The Orlando Sentinel
reports that Laster was
arrested in 2009, accused
of fatally shooting her
husband Clarence in 1988.
Laster told investigators at
the time that she returned
home to discover they
had been robbed and her
husband was dead in the
garage. But detectives
found no sign of forced
.entry, and it appeared the
husband was shot in a bed-
room and carried to the
gill .(A
(AP)-


THE WEATHER


S CHANCE CHANCE CHANCE MOSTLY SUNNY
-STORMS -STORMS -STORMS i SUNNY


HI176 L059 HI76L062 HI 78 O158 H168L039 HI69L046


Pensacola
73/57


Talla
73

Pa


.73/
hassee ake
V/60 76/
GCa
namaCity 2
72/61


1 Jadkille City
City, 76/60 Cape Canaveral
R9Y* 76/60 Daytona Beach
/59 Ft. Lauderdale
inesville Daya Beach Fort Myers
77/61 78 64Gainesville
ca l Jacksonville
78.162
Odando Capi Canaveral Key West
82/64 78/64 Lake City
Miami
Tapa Naples
79/63 WestPan Beadch Ocala
81/66 Orlando
FL Lauderdale Panama City
Ft. Myers 8069 Pensacola
84/63 Naples Tallahassee
82/65 Miami Tampa
82/68 Valdosta
Key West W. Palm Beach
80/71


. i


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday
Low Wednesday
Normal high :
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
WkdnesOay
Month total
Year. total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


78
v 62
70
45
85 in 1932
16 in 1899

0.01"
0.10"
0.95"
1.66"
4.97-


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset torn.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


*C
Feb. Feb. Mar
21 29 8
New First Fu


7:10 a.m.
6:19 p.m.
7:09 a.m.
6:20 p.m.

2:51 a.m.
1:24 p.m.
3:47 a.m.
2:25 p.m.


6


30imuelIIteslbn
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0

.. ; -. .


Friday
78/64/sh
79/61/L
81/70/pc
81/65/pc
77/64/sh
74/60/t"
80/71/pc
76/62/sh
82.69,'pc
81,66'pc
77/64/sn
81/62,'c
72. 59.'
683;58,p or
73/59/1
78.'65,,c
74. 58. pr
81/ 68/pc


Saturday
79/69/sh
80/66/pc
81/75/pc
84/66/pc
78/60/sh
79/59/sh
81/73/pc
78/58/sh
82,' 73.'pc
81,' 70. pc
81,62/sn
82/67/pc
70. 55.1I
69. 417.',
74/ 53/t
81,66, p.:
76.54 I
81 72, pc


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.


Lweather.com


ch March Z1.1 Forecasts, data and
1 14 graphics 0 2012 Weather
II Last 1 Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
weather www.weatherpubllsher.com


OIn this date in


1990, thunder-
storms spawned
thirteen tornadoes
near Carrollton,
Georgia. There were
also 121 reports of
large hail or damag-
ing winds.


etConnected


AROUND FLORIDA


'.FC~YCli~i~J~~""~L~L-rrlr --I~- --- -II


WWII Iff -MEACUR l


I I


)0






















What Black history means to me


Education
remains the
single greatest
opportunity for
improvement
with African American stu-
dents. Everyone recalls
the historical case Plessey
v. Ferguson, 163 U.S.
537 (1896), the landmark
United States Supreme
Court decision upholding
the constitutionality of
racial segregation even in
public accommodations
(particularly railroads),
under the doctrine of "sep-
arate but equal."
Then of course we expe-
rienced Brown v. Board of
Education, finding "sepa-
rate but equal" unconstitu-
tional.
Then, along came
'Track Systems." The
named was coined from
the efforts of Carl Hansen,
Superintendent in the D.C
public schools during,
and immediately following
integration. Hansen found
that many teachers had
to deal with a wide range
of student abilities in the
same classroom; some
of the brighter students
were literally years ahead
of some of the slower
ones. The situation was
difficult for the teachers,
the brighter students, and
the slower students. The
problem tied directly into
integration; the vast major-
ity of the brighter students
were white, while nearly
all the slower students
were black. To alleviate
this problem, Carl Hansen,


Bea Coker
Historically Speaking
the superintendent, set up
a "track system." School
officials placed students in
tracks based on I.Q. tests
and on teacher recom-
mendations; students with
an I.Q. below 75 entered
the remedial or "basic"
track, students with an
I.Q. above 120 went to the
"honors" track, and the
rest of the students could
choose between the "gen-
eral" track and the "college
preparatory" track. The
track system had its crit-
ics, but its results spoke
for themselves. Scores on
achievement tests rose by
as much as 14 percentile
points in the first few years
of the system.
Today, "track systems,"
continue to be used in
public schools across the
United States in placement
because of standardized
testing. Surprisingly,
the same results exist.
Lower academic achieve-
ment for black students.
Historically speaking,
the access to resources
suffered an imbalance;
however, today there are
many resources avail-
able for students and
parents across the board.


BUS: No injuries

Continued From Page 1A

Harris Court at 2:45 p.m. when the 2008 Thomas
bus traveled onto the east shoulder and struck
a fence.
Baldwin was transported to Lake City Medical
Center but it is not known if she was admitted.
The bus sustained $1,500 in damage.


The most significant of
those resources, which
researchers say exist in
all successful students
and schools, is parental
involvement Parents
being involved in helping
their students with home-
work, volunteering in the
classrooms, eating lunch
at the schools, attending
field trips, being part of
the booster clubs, parent,
teacher organizations, and
school advisory councils
and mentoring other chil-
dren. There are many
opportunities for parents
to show students that the
education they are receiv-
ing is important.
Too many people fought
for the right to receive
quality education for pre-
ventable student failure
to exist. Get involved
now, and stay involved
later. Students need you,
schools need you and the
community thrives from
success.

Assessing Progress

Mrs. Mozelle Bell
Mrs. Mozelle Bell has
lived in Lake City since
moving from Madison
County in 1939. She
and her late husband
Danielle had five children.
Danielle, Gracelle, Wayne,
Gloria and Mark. She has
many grandchildren, niec-
es, nephews and cousins.
Mrs. Bell attended school
until about 8th grade. Her
mother became sick and
she felt it necessary to


ensure that her mother
was provided care. She
took a job at Lake City
Laundry in the early
40's until about age 17.
Afterwards, she worked
in the hotel industry for
about 30 years until retire-
ment.
Mrs. Bell faithfully
attends Salvation Holiness
Church under the leader-
ship of Kenneth Troupe.
She takes great pride in
her family values. She
lived in New York and
New Jersey. She recalls
working in Pennsylvania
in the 1940s and the
residents being shocked
to see people of color. She
has traveled many places
in her life, and believes the
adventure taught her to
appreciate the value in the
life offered in Lake City.
Mrs. Bell remembers
that parents had much
more control over chil-
dren in her youth. She
expresses concern for the
children today being left
to make too many deci-
sions without their par-
ents' guidance. "Parents
allow the children to be
alone much more than we
were." Mrs. Bell shares.
She recalled being chap-
eroned to be dated. She
recalls that her late
husband proposed many
times before she agreed.
"Daniel made sure that he
could take care of me and
perform the responsibili-
ties I assumed in caring
for my mother," said Mrs.
Bell.


We are so pleased to
have Mrs. Bell as part of
our community. She has
touched many lives, and
continues to share her
wisdom. We love you
Mozelle.

Test Your History
Knowledge

Local History
Reinard Wilson is a
former American college
and professional football
player who was a line-
backer in the National
Football League for six
seasons during the late
1990s and early 2000s. He
played college football at
Florida State University,
and was recognized as
an All-American. He was
picked by the Cincinnati
Bengals in the first round
of the 1997 NFL Draft, and
played professionally for
the Bengals and Tampa


John W Burns III, Agent
234 SW Main Boulevard
Lake City, FL 32056
Bus: 386-752-5866
john.burns.cnj5@statefarmcom


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National History
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Who was the first
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elected to the House of
Representatives?

Answer: Shirley
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Shirley Chisholm was
the first African American
woman elected to the
House of Representatives.
She was elected in 1*68
and represented the state
of New York. She broke
ground again four years
later in 1972 when she
was the first major party
African-American candi-
date and the first female
candidate for president of
the United States.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2012


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428




















OPINION


Thursday, February 16, 2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


ONE ANOTHER


ONE
OPINION


GOP lives

to fight

another day

wallowing hard, con-
gressional Republican
leaders have reversed
course on a position
that was a political
loser from the start and only
growing worse with time.
They agreed Monday to
extend the payroll tax cut,
thereby handing President
Barack Obama a small vic-
tory. Moreover, they dropped
their insistence that the tax
cut, costing about $100 billion
a year, be offset elsewhere in
the budget.
Without that agreement
still subject to approval by
the full Senate and House of
Representatives the pay-
roll tax rate for 160 million
Americans would have revert-
ed to 6.2 percent from the
current 4.2 percent, passed at
the start of 2011 as a stimulus
measure. The White House
estimates the reduction saved
the average American family
$1,000 last year.
The timing of the announce-
ment had to make the GOP
leadership uncomfortable.
On the same day they were
denouncing Obama's budget
for its $1.3 trillion deficit, they
were also acquiescing in add-
ing another $100 billion to
that deficit.
If they had waited another
day, until Tuesday, the frac-
tious House lawmakers would
be returning from a long
weekend's respite from the
_13 !workdays'they've put in
already this year.
GOP leaders have to, con-
vince their rank and file to
go along with the deal or, as
the leadership phrased it in
its announcement, "pending
a conversation with our mem-
bers."
The deal still leaves the two
sides plenty to fight about:
another extension in long-
term unemployment benefits
and the "doc fix," heading
off a steep cut in reimburse-
ments for doctors who treat
Medicare patients.
GOP leaders showed some
political courage in this about-
face; they'll have to show even
more when they explain it to
their members.

m Scripps Howard News Service


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
Slished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
;Community Newspapers Inc.
s We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
Through the teamwork of professionals
h, dedicated to truth,integrity and hard
Work.
S Todd Wilson, publisher
S Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
S Dink NeSmlth, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
S POLICY
-, Letters to the Editor should be
Styped or neatly written and double
Spaced. Letters should not exceed
" 400 words and will be edited for
, length and libel. Letters must be
Assigned and include the writer's name,
Address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
' letters per month published. Letters
- and guest columns are the opinion of
.: the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.


BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL.32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown,
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400,
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Sh, my! I watched
the news again
on TV this morn-
ing. Foreclosures
on homes are up,
unemployment soars, and the
stock market continues to drop.
There were murders and trag-
edies in Detroit, Seattle and
even Florida. So many people
are down and out, or hurting.
What are we to think? When
do we hit bottom?
But how bad off is our
,qoiuntry, really? How about the
"state of the union"? It's true
that the stock market bubble
burst, andstill drops. The real
estate boom fizzled out, and is
going through a painful adjust-
ment Most costs are up, while
wages and fixed incomes d6n't
keep up.
On the other hand, interna-
tional trade continues, and we
both consume and produce
internationally. Americans own
more cars than ever. We're
working on developing green
energy. During the hous-
ing boom, construction of
homes exceeded the demand
for homes, causing home
prices to become more afford-'
able. Interest rates are down.
Although the national popula-
tion grows, there are hundreds
of thousands of new jobs cre-
ated every year. Something
like 75 percent of students
receive some kind of financial


Now that President
Barack Obama
has treated us to
a madcap budget-
ary joke, it's time
to get serious for the sake of
national survival.
To be sure, it's a laugh for
him to act like he wants to
further defurd Social Security
by extending payroll-tax cuts,
especially when you know
Social Security is already in the
red, and entitlements includ-
ing Medicare and Medicaid
- will take up every cent of
revenue by midcentury, minus
restructuring.
Real reform would justify the
move, but Obama's only nod
to lowering the entitlement bill
is to give less money back to
hospitals and doctors for their
services. At some point, some
of them go out of business,
or more doctors quit treating
Medicare patients or find ways
to multiply procedures, getting
just as much money as they
did before for ('i-ssially the
same work. You cannot help
.iiuli l. ing even as you grow
eager for Ih- joke to end.
We are talking about tlhe
richi and the Obama richeme
to tax tl,-i, m,111 in wq ay Ial
will lead to le intvr-.injicit and
fewer job in small bustine@e,
The untfairne8 clod i@ 1 hoot


(o can fixi








Robert Denny
Bob.Denny8@gmail.com

aid, participate in work study
programs, or borrow student
loans at low interest rates.
Unlike the "great depression,"
most Americans don't live in
hobo jungles with kettles of
who-knows-what cooking over
campfires. Most Americans are,
likely to have cell phones, com-
puters and acceptable homes or
apartments. 1
Even though our government
spends billions of dollars on
foreign aid, supports our mili-
tary bases all over the world,
and participates in world trade,
it still responds to the needs of
Americans who are down and
out, disabled or chronically ill,
. retired, homeless, or impover-
ished. Almost every year natu-
ral disasters require federal aid.
How's your situation? You.
might be doing terrible or
great; I don't know. I under-
stand, that yours may be a ter-
rible situation. I hope not. But
bad things sometimes happen
to good people. Sometimes the
best you can do is reach out


Jay Ambrose
Sp~aktojay@aol.com


because the rich already pay
the mother lode of taxes in
this country at much higher
rates than the rest of us. The
instances of the superrich get-
ting by with paying nothing
much are rare, and if you want
to dwell on capital gains, yes,
by all means, let's get univer-
sally tough and tell the baby
boomers that any profit on life
savings is going to cost them
plenty.
I know, I know, you think
all this humor is too much for
easy digestion, but I am not to
the punch line yet, for there
is the business of paying for
infrastructure work through
'iidiin the costly wars in Iraq
and Af:h;iiistn.i.
In ,i iher words, if your debt
is Rocky Mountain high and
yotu finally finish the install-
Oinits on your new car, you
improve your situation by
lviiing 'imi nItIii. else hugi ely
clrifn-ilvr, I don't think so,


and ask for help.
For many of us, there's a thin
line between having a good job
or a family, and being home-
less or alone. My mom always
said, "Poor is an attitude." It's
a way of thinking. It's in how
you choose to see your situa-
tion. We didn't have much, but
we never felt "poor." We had
wholesome meals, but didn't
have pizza delivered or go out
for steak dinners. We made do
with what we had to work with.
We didn't spend more than our
family income.
It may help to choose a
positive*attitude. "Look at the
doughnut; not upon the hole."
"I felt bad that I didn't have new
shoes, until I met a man who
had no feet" Look for the good
news. Look for the opportuni-
ties all around you. Choose
to appreciate what you've got
Make the most of what you've
got to work with. Join with oth-
ers instead of being alone.. Do
what's right. Volunteer. Invest
in yourself: your education,
tools, career, family, home, and
community. You may find that
you're richer than you thought

N Bob Denny has counseled
trouble youth and families in
Florida for 15 years, and teaches
psychology at Florida Gateway
College. Your commerits and
ideas are appreciated at Bob.
Denny@gmail.com.


and at any rate, our infrastruc-
ture problem is mainly a prob-
lem of bureaucratic incompe-
tence and pork.,
Here's another giggle: the
Obama plan to get rid of tax
deductions for oil and gas pro-
duction. Maybe you think that
will mean more revenue, but
there could well be less explo-
ration and less oil and gas
and, therefore, less revenue.
We are at the beginning of a
gas-and-oil boom that could
help make the 21st century as
much the American century as
the 20th was. And we're going
to quell that with wishful think-
ing about replacement-energy
technologies still in swaddling
clothes?
The punch line is that this
president, who is on his way
to having given us four trillion-
dollar deficits in a row, himself
confesses to another $10 tril-
lion worth of debt in 10 years
on top of the current $15 tril-
lion.
Sadly, the beginning of a seri-
ous answer may not arrive until
November.

* Jay Ambrose, formerly
Washington director of editorial
policy for Scripps Howard news-
papers and the editor of dailies in
El Paso, Texas, and Denver, is a
columnist living in Colorado.


4A


ANOTHER
VIEW


The

Romney-

Santorum

footrace

F ormer Gov. Mitt
Romney won
The Washington
Times/CPAC 2012
Presidential Straw
Poll Saturday, with 38 percent
of 3,408 voters saying he's
their first choice to be the
Republican nominee. Former
Sen. Rick Santorum wasn't far
behind at 31 percent That's a.
close call, but a win is a win.
Taking home the crown from
the Conservative Political
Action Conference shows Mr.
Romney is making inroads with
the skeptical conservative base
of the Republican Party.
This GOP race is far from
over, however. A simultaneous
national survey of 600 self-iden-
tified conservatives reflected
an even closer spread, with Mr.
Santorum within two percent-
age points of Mr. Romney's
victorious 27 percent take. Mr.
Santorum's wins in Missouri's
primary and the caucuses in
Minnesota and Colorado indi-
cate he is picking up steam,
while the most recent polls
show him in statistical ties
with Mr. Romney. A New York
Times/CBS survey released
Tuesday morning had the
Pennsylvania politician ahead
by 3 percent, although within
the margin of error.
Competition is healthy, but
this protracted inability to stick
with a front-runner makes
elephants look unfocused and
disorganized. Mr. Santorum is
the latest flavor of the week in
a GOP contest that resembles -
a game of musical chairs more
than a serious effort to choose
a challenger to President
Obama. Santorum fans think
he finally is getting the atten-
tion he needs to become the
"anyone-but-Romney" standard-
bearer for the Tea Party now
that Texas Gov. Rick Perry,
Minnesota Rep. Michele
Bachmann and businessman
Herman Cain have dropped
out, and former Speaker Newt
Gingrich is struggling to retain
supporters.
It's an open question wheth-
er Mr. Santorum can succeed
in securing and maintaining a
lead where numerous preced-
ing front-runners have failed.
The next few weeks are impor-
tant for both candidates, but
the climb is steeper for the
Pennsylvanian, who has less
cash on hand. Mr. Romney
maintains the lead in pledged
delegates with 123 to Mr.
Santorum's 72. The upcom-
ing Arizona and Michigan
primaries on Feb. 28 will
assign a total of 59 delegates.
Mr. Santorum needs to win
both states to secure a seven-
delegate lead on Mr. Romney.
No matter how those contests
turn out, a mother lode of 437
delegates will be awarded a
week later in 10 primaries on
Super Tuesday, when a broad
organization will be key.
The Washington Times/
CPAC straw poll and national
survey held more good news
for Mr. Romney. A majority of
those voting (59 percent in the
straw poll and 56 percent in the
national survey) said a candi-
date's positions on the issues
mattered more than his chanc-
es of defeating Mr. Obama. Up
to this point, the most common
complaint about Mr. Romney
from the conservative base has
been that he is unconvincing
when speaking about his posi-
tions on fundamental issues
such as abortion and repealing
Obamacare. He's not out of the


woods yet, but winning over
important CPAC issues voters
shows Mr. Romney is making
progress in overcoming that
image problem.

* Washington Times


Recession? Poverty?


Obama's budget joke















LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2012 5A


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* Submit Community Calendar
announcements by mail or drop off at
the Reporter office located at 180 E.
Duval St., via fax to (386) 752-9400 or
email Ihampson@lakecityreporter.com


Feb. 16

Money Matters
Want to manage your
money better? The UF/
IFAS Columbia County
Extension Office is offer-
ing a series of four classes
on finances. Classes
include money manage-
ment, credit, FISCO Score
and investment on Feb.
16th, 23rd and March 1st
and 8th from 5:30-6:30 at
the Extension office, 164
SW Mary Ethel Lane,
at the Columbia County
Fairgrounds. Cost is $2 per
class or $5 for the series.
Spaces are limited and reg-
istration date is by Feb. 10.
Please call Jenny Jump at
(386) 752-5384 to register
or for more info.
Retired educators meeting
The'Columbia County
Retired Educators will
meet Thursday, Feb. 16 at
1 p.m. in the school board
adult center, room 120. Any
retired person interested in
education may join us. For
information call 752-2431.
Fellowship
. Every Thursday good fel-
lowship, crocheting classes
and quilting available at
Our Redeemer Lutheran
Church, 5056 SW State
Road 47 at 6:30 p.m.

Feb. 17

Olustee commemoration
The Olustee Battlefield
Historic State Park, Florida's
first state park, will host the
36th Annual Reenactment of
the Battle of Olustee on Feb.
17-19, 2012. Throughout the
weekend, more than 2,000
demonstrators will present
living history impressions
of military and civilian life at
the time of Florida's largest
Civil War. battle.
The Battle of Olustee
was fought on Feb. 20,
1864. Full-scale artillery,
mounted cavalry and three
African American regiments,
took part in the battle that
ended with 2,807 casualties
and a Confederate victory.
The 54th Massachusetts
was among the African
American troops that fought
at Olustee.
The living history week-
end features a Civil War-
era battle reenactment on
Saturday at 3:30 p.m., as well
as the reenactment of the
Battle of Olustee on Sunday
at 1:30 p.m. Period music
concerts, lectures, battlefield
surgical practices and the
lives of both white and black
civilians during the war will
be portrayed by reenactors.
Military camps and drills
by infantry and artillery are


scheduled throughout the
weekend.
On Friday, Feb. 17, educa-
tional programs are planned
for students. School groups
may call (386) 397-7009 to
register for the event. The
fee for Friday will be $2
per person. Admission on
Saturday and Sunday will
be $7 for adults and $3 for
children, pre-school age
children are free. Food con-
cessions will be available.
Pets are not allowed at-the
Olustee Battlefield Historic
State Park during the reen-
actment
The Olustee Battle
Civil War Reenactment is
sponsored by the Florida
Park Service, U.S.DA
Forest Service, Olustee
Battlefield Citizen Support
Organization and The Blue
Grey Army of Florida, Inc.
For more information,
visit www.floridastateparks.
org/olustee or http://bat-
tleofolustee.org.

Sweetheart Dance
The Springville
Community Center, 3710
NW Suwannee Valley Rd,
Annual Sweetheart Dance
is set for Friday, February
17 at 8:30 p.m. The attire
for this event is dressy.
Music will be provided by
DJ Hurricane of Lake City.
Tickets are $8 per person
and may be purchased in
advanced from any Board
member. Please contact
Gloria McIntosh at 755-
1099 or Coretta Ford at
397-1347. Guests may bring
individual refreshment
trays. Sweetheart pictures
will be taken f6r a nominal
fee by IKE productions.
Golden Dragon Acrobats
Direct from Hibei,
China, the Golden Dragon
Acrobats are the reigning
National Association of
Campus Activities enter-
tainers of the year and will
perform at Florida Gateway
College on Feb. 17. Their
performance combines
award-winning acrobatics,
traditional dance, spectacu-
lar costumes, ancient and
contemporary music and
theatrical techniques to
present a show of breath-
taking skill and spellbind-
ing beauty. For more
information or for tickets,
call (386) 754-4340 or visit
www.fgcentertainment
com.

Take Charge of Your
Diabetes
It's not too late to regis-
ter! Take Charge of Your
Diabetes workshop dates
have changed and are now
being offered from Feb
21 to April 17, Tuesday


nights from 5:30 to 7 pm.
Register deadline is Feb 17.
If you have been diagnosed
with type 2 diabetes, are
borderline diabetic, are at
least 21 years old, and are
interested in taking control
of your diabetes, please
call Jenny Jump at the
Columbia Extension office
at (386) 752-5384 or Cathy
Rogers at the Suywannee
County Extension office
at (386) 362-2771 by
February 2nd. The $75*
program fee includes
the educational classes,1
ON 1 NUTRITION
CONSULTATION, pro-
gram materials and health
assessments.

High Springs Community
Theater
High Springs
Community Theater,
130 NE 1st Street, High
Springs, opens their 19th
season February 10, 2012,
with Neil Simon's "The
Odd Couple," directed by
Terry Beauchamp. Neat
freak Felix Unger, sepa-
rated from his wife and in
despair, moves in with
Oscar Madison, an easygo-
ing, slovenly sportswriter.
Riotous situations result
Running for 966 perfor-
mances, this comedy won
several Tony awards, lead-
ing to an Oscar-winning
film and a spin-off TV
sitcom. Performances run
from February 10 through
March 4 with Fridays and
Saturday at 8 p.m. and
Sunday, 2 p.m. Tickets are
$11 for adults and $8 for
children 5 to 12 years old.
Seniors pay $9 on Sundays
only.
Tickets: the Coffee
Clutch in High Springs
(386) 454-7593; The
Framery of Lake City (386)
754-2780 and Online at
highspringscommunitythe-
ater.com and at the door.
For more information, call:
(386) 454-3525.

Feb. 18

70's Party
70's Party, 4-8pm, Annie
Mattox.

Make A Wish volunteer-
training
Training to become
a wish-granting volun-
teer for the Make A
Wish Foundation will be
Saturday, Feb 18 from
9:30 am. to 2:30 p.m. in
Ganesville. Wish grant-
ers work locally in teams
of two and work directly
with children to ascer-
tain and plan wishes, and
work creatively to seek
in-kind goods and services
to implement the wish. .


Registration is required.
Contact (407) 6224673 or
jgross@wishcentral.org for
more information.
Gospel sing
Watertown Congregation
Methodist Church will
feature Southern Joy in
concert Saturday, Feb 18 at
7 p.m. with refreshments.
Call 752-1329 for informa-
tion.
Tuskegee Airman speech
A Tuskegee Airman
mechanic will speak
Saturday, Feb. 18 at 11
a.m. at Macedonia Seventh
Day Adventist Church, 515
Northeast Simms Drive in
Lake City. The free event ,
is a celebration of African-
American History Month
and is open to the public.
For information call (352)
262-1790.
Gospel concert
The Needhams, a nation-.
ally recognized Southern
Gospel music family, will
be in concert Feb. 18 at
Community Presbyterian
Church, 830 Pinewood Way
SE, Live Oak, beginning at
7 p.m. Earlier, a spaghetti
supper with all the trim-
mings will be provided
at the church fellowship
hall beginning at 5 p.m. A
silent auction will begin
at 4 p.m., and will feature
a wide variety of exciting
products donated from
throughout the region.
Money raised by this event
will help finance the many
ongoing food and services
programs of Love, INC, a
Christian service organi-
zation serving Suwannee
County. Tickets for the
entire evening are only
$10 and can be purchased
in advance in Columbia
County by calling Rev. Dr.
Everett L. Parker at 386-
754-8524. Tickets also will
be available at the door.
1947 CHS class reunion
The Columbia High
School class of 1947 will be
celebrating their 65th class
reunion on Feb. 18, All
classmates are invited to
attend. For more informa-
tion contact Whit Spearman
at (904) 744-9060.
Farmers Market
This Saturday, February
18th, downtown Lake City
will be filled with history as
the Olustee Festival takes
over the area. The Lake
DeSoto Farmers Market
will extend its hours to be
open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
for this event. The market
will host live music from
9 a.m. until 1 p.m. with
the return of the popular
Middleground duo.


On Saturday, from noon
to 4 p.m., the farmers mar-
ket's home base, Wilson
Park, will become a time
travelers' dream as decades
of history, ranging from
mid 1800's through WW II,
will come alive through the
research and presentation
of Fort White High School
Thespians' Guild in con-
junction with the Columbia
County Historical Society
and The first Florida Field
Command. These activities
will also be held on Friday,
February 17th, from noon
to 4 p.m. with a skirmish
held at 5 p.m. on Friday.
The Lake DeSoto
Farmers Market is open
every Saturday from 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m. (winter hours) in
Wilson Park located along
Lake DeSoto between
the Columbia County
Courthouse and Shands
Lakeshore Hospital in
downtown Lake City.


Feb. 19


Columbia County fair in
November. Youth do not
have to be currently enrolled
in 4-H but will need to join
($1 fee) prior to receiving
chicks. Participants will
learn how to care for a small
farm animal, prepare them
to show at the fair, earn
premium money at the fair,
and have fresh eggs in about
6 months. The cost for the
6 baby chicks (pullets) will
be $12.00. In order to par-
ticipate, youth must have
attended the Feb. 7 meeting
or attend Feb. 20 at 6 p.m.
at the UF/IFAS Columbia
County Extension Office.
If you have any questions
please contact Derek Barber
or Dr. Cindy Higgins at the
UF/IFAS Columbia County
Extension Office at 386-758-
1030.
Relay for Life team party
There will be a Relay for
Life Team Party Monday,
Feb. 20, 6 p.m. at Quail
Heights Country Club in
Lake City.


Black Heritage Celebration Feb. 21


The Philadelphia Baptist
Church family invites you
to share in our annual
Black Heritage Celebration
on Sunday, February 19 at
11 a.m.Pleasefeel free to
wear your old-fashioned
attire.
Pastor's anniversary
Join the New Dayspring
MBC family as they cel-
ebrate the third anniver-
sary of Pastor Lantz G.
Mills Sr. on Sunday, Feb.
19 at 3 p.m. The speaker
is Rev. Craig P. Riley, the
Pastor of Greater Mt
Pleasant Baptist Church in
Tallahassee. The church
is located on West Long
Street
Black History Program
New St James Baptist
Church will celebrate their
annual Black History pro-
gram on Sunday, Feb. 19 at
11 a.m. The guest speaker
will be Rev. Ken Harris of
St Augustine. He is the
son of the late Doretha
Farmers. Dinner will be
served. Contact Mother-
Pauline Parnell at 752-4521.


Feb. 20
Teen Summit, 3 p.m.-
midnight, Florida Gateway
College.

4-H Laying Hen Project
2012
There will be a manda-
tory 4-H Laying Hen Project
orientation meeting for any
4-H member, ages 5 to 18,
who would like to raise
laying hens to show at the


CARC membership
celebration
The Annual Membership
Celebration for CARC-
Advocates for Citizens
with Disabilities, Inc. will
be Feb. 21 at 7 p.m. at the
First United Methodist
Church, 973 S. Marion
Ave. Members and friends
are invited. Dinner will be
served. RSVP to 386-752-
1880 ext 103 or aleis@
lakecity-carc.com by Feb.
14. This celebration is
sponsored by Anderson
Columbia, Baya Pharmacy
and Columbia Bank.
Disabled sports league
G-ville Headhunters and
Sports Association Inc. will
have open registration for
a disabled sports league on
Feb. 21. It is open to all dis-
abled people to play sports
against other area teams.
There is no fee. For infor-
mation, time and location
call (352) 256-6490.
Art League meeting
The Art League of
North Florida is holding
the monthly meeting on
Tuesday, Feb. 21 at 6:30 p.m.
The meeting will be held in
the Fellowship Hall of the
First Presbyterian Church.
The Public is invited to
the meeting where light
refreshments will be served
before the brief business
meeting. The guest speaker
will be Jiin Valentine, well
known portrait painter
from Bloomington, Illinois.
Additional information call
2888898.


OBITUARIES


William E. Coleman
William E. "Bill" Coleman,
84, High Springs resident,
passed away Feb. 14, 2012
at Shands at Jacksonville.
He was a retired foreman at
FL. Power and Light, a Navy
- veteran and a member of First-
Baptist Church of High Springs.
He is survived by his sons; Wil-
liam Lynn Coleman and Randall
Jon Coleman of High Springs;
Brother; Donald Coleman,
N.C.; 4 grandchildren; Natasha,
Christopher, Dustin and Dale.
Visitation will be on Friday, Feb.
17, 2012 from 10 to 11 AM at
Evans-Carter Chapel, followed
by funeral service at 11AM, with
Bro. Otis Evans and James Gar-
rett officiating. Interment will
be in High Springs Cemetery.
Arrangements are under the
care of EVANS-CARTER
FUNERAL HOME,
High Springs.

Taquisha LaShawn Evans
Taquisha "Shawn" Maeweather-
Evans slept away peacefully
February 13, 2012 in Shands
Hospital Gainesville, Florida.
Taquisha was
bom De-
cember 24,
1974 in Lake
City, Florida
to Phyllis
Latham-Julks
and Johnnie L
Maeweather.
She attended school in Lake
City, FL. and was a graduate of
Columbia High School, class of
1992. She furthered her educa-


tion at Florida Gateway College
and was employed in child care
for several years until her health
failed. Remembering her Chris-
tian values, she joined Olivet
Missionary Baptist Church and
was actively involved with the
editorial committee and assisted
the music ministry. Preceding
her in death: maternal grand-
mother, Naomi Latham-Smith
and paternal grandparents,
Laveme and Leroy Fleming.
She touched the lives of many
through her generosity, sparkling
personality and beautiful smile.
Left to cherish her memories:
A devoted husband, Eric Ev-
ans; loving son, Travaris Mae-
weather; loving mother, Phyllis
Julks (B.L.); caring father, John-
nie Maeweather; three loving
brothers, Kendrick Maeweather,
Anthony Latham, Russell Mae-
weather; devoted grandfather,
Thelman Smith; great-grand-
mother, Gladys Maeweather;
hosts of aunts, uncles, nieces,*
nephews, cousins and friends.
A Celebration of her life will
be held 11:00 A.M., Saturday,
February 18, 2012 at Olivet Mis-
sionary Baptist Church. 901 NE
Davis Street. Lake City, FL.,
Rev. Ronald V. Walters, Pastor.
The family will receive
friends Friday, February
17, 2012 from 6:00 8:00
P.M. at Olivet MB Church.
Arrangements entrusted to
COMBS FUNERAL HOME.
292 NE- Washington Street.
Lake City, FL. (386) 752-4366.
Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D.
"The Caring Professionals"


Emma Mae Kelsey
Emma Mae Kelsey was born
unto the union of Mrs. Idella
Allen Kelsey and the late Mr.
George Kelsey, on Decem-
ber 17, 1933. She received her
education from the Columbia
County School System, Lake
City, Fl. She was a dedicated
member of the Greater Truvine
Baptist Church, Lake City, Fl.,
where she served faithfully until
her recent illness. She diligently
provided au par services for her
family and the community. She
mentored and nurtured many
young people. She departed
this life on February 13, 2012.
She was preceded in death by
her father, George Kelsey and
brother Elvin Kelsey. She leaves
to mourn her passing: Mother;
Idella Kelsey, Lake City, Fl.
Aunt, Grace E. Curry, Lake City,
Fl., Sister and Caregiver, Mattie
L. Kelsey, Lake City, Fl., Two
(2) brothers, Claude (Virestha)
Kelsey, Lake City, Fl., Willie J.
(Rosa) Kelsey, Lake City, Fl.,
Goddaughters, Bessie Kelsey
Whitfield (Niece) Lake City,
Fl., Deleatha Kelsey (niece)
Lake City, Fl., Godsons, Avery
Kelsey (nephew) Lake City, Fl.
and Jarrod Whitfield (nephew),
Atlanta, Ga., a devoted sister-
in-law. Johnnie Kelsey Kamma,
Gainesville, Fl., a devoted cous-
in, Roscoe Kelsey, Atlanta, Ga.,
and a host of nephews, nieces,
cousins and sorrowing friends.
Funeral services for Ms. Kelsey
will be held on February 18,2012,
at 11:00 A.M., at the Truvine
Missionary Baptist Church,
with the internment to follow
in the Fellowship Cemetery.


Ms. Kelsey will be placed in the
church on Saturday 9:30 A.M., to
lie in state until the funeral hour.
The family will begin receiv-
ing friends Friday evening from
6:00-8:00P.M. at Greater Truvine
Missionary Baptist church. THE
TRINITY FUNERAL HOME
OF' PERRY, INC. Anthony M.
White, L.F.D. (850)584-9620

Loice Williams Porter
Mrs. Loice Williams Porter, 96
of Fort White passed away early
Wednesday morning, February
15, 2012 at-her home. She was
the oldest of nine children to the
late Ressie and Matilda Rauler-
son Williams. Mrs. Porter was
a lifelong resident of Fort White
and Columbia County. She mar-
ried Mr. Roy Porter on March 24,
1934 and together theymade their
farming home until his passing
on December 31, 2000. She had
previously worked for numerous
years at the Tanglewood Conva-
lescent Center in Lake City as a
nurse's aid. She enjoyed cook-
ing, gardening, crocheting and
quilting. Mrs. Porter was of the
Baptist faith and longtime mem-
ber of Elim Baptist Church in
Fort White. She was preceded
in death by two sisters, Eura-
lee O'Steen and Thelma Lowe
and four brothers, W.C. Wil-
liams, Jerrell Williams, Charles
Williams and R.B. Williams.
Mrs. Porter was a mother to
many and is survived by two sis-
ters, Eloise Harrison, Fort White
and Adell Torcise, Homestead,
FL, numerous nieces, nephews,
friends and her special, care-
giver, Oneta Beville, Branford.


Funeral services for Mrs. Porter
will be conducted on Saturday,
February 18, 2012 at Siloam
United Methodist Church with
Rev. Larry Sweat, pastor of Elim
Baptist Church officiating. In-
terment will follow at Siloam
Methodist Cemetery. Visitation
' with the family will be Friday
evening from 6-8:00 PM at the
funeral home. In lieu of flowers
donations may be made to the
Elim Baptist Church Building
Fund at P.O. Box 448, Fort White,
FL 32038. Arrangements are
under the direction of GUERRY
FUNERAL HOME, Lake City.
Please sign the guestbook at
www.guerryfuneralhomnie.net

Derrick Ruise
Derrick Ruise of Margaretta,
Florida passed- February 13,
2012. Derrick was the son of El-
der Japan and Sister Edith Ruise.
Funeral services will be held 2:00
P.M. Saturday, February 18,2012
at New Jerusalem C.O.G.I.C.,
Margaretta, Florida. Visitation
with the family, Friday, Febru-
ary 17, 2012 from 6-8:00 P.M.
at New Jerusalem C.O.G.I.C.
Arrangements entrusted to
COMBS FUNERAL HOME.
292 NE Washington Street.
Lake City, FL. (386) 752-4366.
Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D.
"The Caring Professionals".


cal Center in
Gainesville,
Fl. with her
family by her
bedside termi-
nating an ex-
tended illness.
She leaves to
cherish her
memory, Sisters, Edith Tunsil,
St. Petersburg, Fl.; Deloris Tun-
sil, Cassandra Tunsil, Patricia
Davis, of Lake City, Fl.; Broth-
ers, Carlton Tunsil, Lake City,
Fl. Sullivan Tunsil, Jr., Chester
(Estella) Tunsil, Tyrone (Pris-
cilla) Tunsil, Leonard Tunsil, of
St. Petersburg, Fl.; aunts, Flo-
rine (Robert) Tate, Rev. Mar-
ian Wright, of Lake City, Fl.; A
host of nieces, nephews, cous-
ins, other relatives and friends.
Funeral'services for, Mora De-
nise Tunsil, will be 11:00 a.m.,
Saturday, February 18, 2012
at St. Paul Missionary Bap-
tist Church with -Rev. Alvin
Green, pastor, Eulogy: Rev.
Isadore Williams, presiding.
Interment will follow in Pick-
ney Hill Cemetery (Columbia
City),. THE family will receive
friends, Friday, February 17,2012
from 6:00 pm until 7:00 p.m. at
Cooper Funeral Home, Chapel.
Arrangements entrusted to
COOPER FUNERAL HOME,
251 N.E. Washington Street; Lake
City, Fl. Willis 0. Cooper, L.F.D.


Mora Denise Tnnsil


Mora Denise Tunsil,
age 53 resident of Lake City, Fl.
passed away February 11, 2012
at North Florida Regional Medi-


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-,
ment at 752-1293.








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2012


Festival
Events: Downtown
Friday, February 17
9:00am
Civil War Memorial Service
(Oaklawn Cemetery)
9:00am 6:00pm
Vendor booths open
Downtown
Arts/Crafts Booths
Food Booths
Public Service Booths
Commercial Booths
Main Stage Entertainment
Kids Zone Entertainment
12:00 (noon)
Official Opening Ceremonies
for Festival
Main Stage
Dignitaries invited to be on
stage
5:00pm
Battle between the Monitor
and the Merrimac, and
Skirmish
On the shore of Lake Desoto
downtown


Saturday, February 18
7:00am
5K Run

9:00am
Blue Grey One Mile Fun Run
around Lake Desoto, Awards
follow.


9:00am 6:00pm
Vendor Booths
Downtown


Open -


10:30am
Annual Parade
Beginning at South Marion
Street
to US 90 West (Duval Street)
12:00 (noon)
Visiting dignitaries, Parade
Marshal, Olustee Family and
Pioneer family guests recog-
nized, and Miss Olustee win-
ners on stage downtown
7:45pm
Blue/Grey Square Dance
Rountree -Moore Toyota
Showroom
1252 WWest US Highway 90


Festival Events:
Olustee Battlefield

Saturday, February 18
9:00am
Presentation of Colors

9:00am 6:15pm
Park opens to public

1:00pm
Medical Demonstration
2:30pm
Period Music Concert
3:30pmo
Mini Battle Held at the
Battlefield
Sunday, February 19, 2012

9:00am 3:00pmr
Park opens to public

1:30pmr
36th Annual Olustee Battle
Re-enactment


STAMPS: Civil War battle scenes are recreated
Continued From Page 1A


The envelopes and cancellations
have been an annual tradition at
the festival and this year the annual
Olustee Stamp Cancellation will be
sold Saturday. The Olustee Stamp
Cancellations are $5.
'"That's the only day it will be avail-
able," said Adrian Cox McCabe,
co-chair .of the Olustee Stamp
Cancellation committee.
This year's Olustee Stamp
Cancellation will be a set of two
stamps depicting Civil War bat-
tles.
"It will be two stamps commem-
orating the 150th Anniversary of
the Civil War," McCabe said.


The first one is a stamp with
Fort, Sumter and the second
stamp depicts a scene from the
First Battle of Bull Run, also
known as First Manassas.
Only 50 sets of the cancellation
stamps are available for purchase
and they will be sold from 9 a.m.
- 5 p.m. Saturday at the Olustee
Battle Festival. The cancellations
will be sold at the Tourism/Blue-
Grey Army Information tent on
Marion Avenue.
"We've never sold a set of
stamps before," McCabe said.
"Last year people were coming
as early as Friday asking for


the cancellations. Once the can-
cellations got there, they sold
pretty fast. We're hoping since
they're offered in a set this
year, they'll go even faster."
Each set will be numbered and
signed. The envelope features a
copy of the Olustee Battle Re-
Enactment poster created by Duffy
Soto. The cancellation will then be
stamped with the official Olustee
symbol.
Proceeds from the sales of the
cancellations will go to the Lake
City VA Medical Center to be used
to purchase toiletries for veterans
in the VA hospice unit.


LOGISTICS: Training center up and running
Continued From Page 1A


way to work in the school district's
warehouse. Students will now have
more time for hands-on training with
a warehouse on campus, said Terry
Huddleston, CHS principal.
Among other things, logistics is
the movement .of goods overseas to
the end user,'said Joanne Kazmierski,
advisory council chair for the Banner
Center. It is not just physical labor, but
includes jobs in information technol-
ogy, business administration, sales,
human resources and engineering,
she said.
Students in the academy are intro-
duced to high-paying careers. The
average salary is $45,000 for careers
in logistics and international trade,
she said.
"Distribution and logistics is notbox
kicking and label licking anymore,"
said Allan Howie, of the Material
Handling Industry of America, the
industry trade association. The indus-
try has machines to do that, and just
needs skilled workers to run the
machines, he said.
About 90 students are enrolled in
the program this year, up from about
50 in the first year, said Rebecca
Golden, CHS global logistics teacher.
So far logistics academy students
have processed and packaged diction-
aries, U.S. Constitutions, and math
and science kits for local schools,
Golden said.
Students have also distributed
200,000 books to disadvantaged chil-


dren in one year working with First
Book, she said. Last week two CHS
students attended a trade show for
supply chain, manufacturing and
distribution industries in, Atlanta.
Students have also toured several
warehouse facilities.
A school district's goal is to gradu-
ate students who are prepared for
their future, said Michael Millikin,
Columbia County School District
superintendent Logistics is "an area
that will attract and impact a signifi-
cant niche of students," he said.
"Our job at the high school level
is to prepare children' to go into the
workforce," Huddleston said. In the
academy, students have the chance
to leave high school with an industry
certification.
The Global Logistics Associate
(GLA) is a nationally recognized cer-
tification program that acknowledges
completion of rigorous coursework
in logistics and supply chain for entry
level positions.
During the meeting several Florida
high schools shared their experienc- .
es with logistics programs. A growing
number of high schools across the
country are offering programs on
logistics, Howie said.
Columbia County provides quick
access to major highways, while
being about one hour away from the
port in Jacksonville, she said. Once
inland, goods need to be warehoused
and distributed, which requires a


workforce with varying skills.
Experience in logistics could be
useful throughout Florida as the state
has 14 international deepwater sea-
ports, Kazmierski said.
When businesses consider locating
to an area, one of the major determin-
ing factors is the available workforce
and their education, said Deborah
McDowell, of Seaonus, which offers
domestic warehousing, transporta-
tion and marine services. McDowell
is also a Banner Center council mem-
ber.
With logistics training, you can
work nearly anywhere, she said.
"Every business has logistics require-
ments." '
Among other businesses that have
supported the academy, Target views
the program as an investment not
only in students and the commu-
nity, but also as a pipeline for future
employees, said Bryan Rabakon,
senior group leader for Target Food
Distribution Center in Lake City and
advisory council member.
Future industry outlooks show
there will be a lack of skilled workers
to fill an increasing number of logis-
tics jobs, Howie said.
The trade association focuses on
education by providing instructional
materials, teacher training and equip-
ment to prepare a future workforce,
Howie said. "We are just here to sup-
port CHS. They're doing a wonderful
job."


Olustee weekend:


Schedule of events


From staff reports

As Lake City prepares
for the 34th annual
Olustee Battle Festival,
several .downtown
streets will be closed for
food and arts and crafts
vendors to set up their
booths. Some streets will
be closed for a' portion
of the day, while other
streets will be closed
Friday and Saturday for
the annual battle festi-
val.
Justice Street,
Madison Street, Veterans
Street, Hamilton Street,
Hillsborough Street
and Marion Avenue to
Franklin Street will close
today at 5:30 p.m. for fes-
tival preparation.
Columbia Avenue is
the west boundary and
streets are closed from


Columbia Avenue to
Marion Avenue.
A small portion of
Hernando Avenue, adja-
cent to the Columbia'
County Courthouse, will-
also be closed at 5:30
p.m. today.
On Friday at 5 p.m. a
portion of Lake DeSoto
Circle, in between
Hamilton Street and
Northeast Methodist
Terrace will be closed,'
including a portion of
Davis Avenue and a por-
tion of Hillsborough
Street near Wilson Park.
The area will be closed
to. automotive traffic
because of the sched-
uled downtown skir-
mish. The area around
Wilson Park will re-open
after the skirmish.


PARKER: Dies at 87
Continued From Page 1A


chair of the Columbia
County Housing
Authority, a board mem-
ber of the Art League of
North Florida and was
also named Woman of
the Year for 2010 by the
National Association of
Professional Women.
"She was just a phe-
nomenal lady," Horton
said.
Parker owned
Principle Publisher and
has published several
books.
Brown said there may
be a local memorial ser-


vice for Parker.
"I would think we
would have some sort
of local service because
she had lots of friends
here," he said. "A lot
of people received some
sort of assistance from'
her. She was a hard per-
son to say 'no' to."
Parker died at 6:15
p.m. Cental Time in a
hospice facility with her
sister and other family
members present.


METH: Making a comeback, in wake of laws curbing pill mills in Florida

Continued From Page 1A


doing.
Rooms were evacuated at a local motel
in January after a worker smelled a
chemical odor coming from a room and
called authorities. Deputies discovered
the remnants of a meth lab in the room.
Last week, a Lake City man called
police when an overnight guest went
into a vacant trailer on his property with-
out permission. The property owner told
police that he smelled a strong chemical
odor coming from li<.i trailer and believed
an illegal activity was (-"crri rig.
Investigators caught a man hllrowing
materials from thl trailer they said were


being used to manufacture methamphat-
amine.
The ability to move an entire lab
quickly to another location makes it
more difficult for law enforcement offi-
cials to locate and raid a facility.
If Hunter is correct, his prediction of
an increase in meth lab raids could cre-
ate possible budget problems because
the cost to clean up the site where
the drug is manufactured costs at least
$1,000. And the price can be much high-
er, depending on the size of the opera-
tion.
"It could be a substantial stress on the


budget," Hunter said.
Hunter said the state legislature is
considering a bill to help local authori-
ties pay cleanup costs for meth labs.
After the hazardous materials are
removed, the property owner will
have to bear the cost of hiring a pro-
fessional cleaning service to survey
the contamination and clean up the
site, Hunter said.
His department's increase in lab busts
indicates the likelihood of increase meth
use locally, which will lead to an increase
in other crimes, Hunter said.
"You're so addicted, you'll do whatever


you have to to get a fix," he said. "It costs
them everything their careers, their
health, their family relationships. The
addict will chase the high at any cost."
Hunter said the public can play an
important and helpful role in reducing
the amount of meth in the county. Hunter
urged anyone who notices unusual or
suspicious activity, or strong chemical
odors, to contact authorities.
"We're going to continue to work dili-
gently so drug dealers don't want to
operate in Columbia County," lie said. "It
just doesn't affect the user, it affects the
immediate family and community."


House passes

Porter's sales


tax holiday bill


TALLAHASSEE The Florida House on
Wednesday passed CS/HB 737 Tax on Sales,
Use, and Other Transactions by State Rep.
Elizabeth Porter (R-Lake City). The'bill estab-
lishes a 3 day non-recurring Sales Tax Holiday
for the weekend of August 3-
5, 2012, exempting from the
state sales tax certain clothing
priced at $75 or less (employee.
uniforms, school clothes) and
school supplies with a sales
price of $15 or less.
"In the present Florida econ-
Porter omy, our families need every'
opportunity to save and to
stretch their dollars while providing for their
children's school readiness. The residents of
Florida have historically anticipated the State
Sales Tax Holiday and have participated in it
in great numbers. I am proud to be able to
sponsor this year's legislation once again, in
order to give back to the taxpayers of the State
of Florida," Porter said.
According to the Florida Retail Federation,
the Washington Economics Group study from'
2010 shows that the Back-to-School Sales Tax
Holiday is a true win-win for Floridians, stat-
ing this legislation saves money for Florida's
hardworking families and additionally increases
revenue for the state.




Roads closed

starting today

for Festival


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428















LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2012


Study finds MDs

prone to being


overly positive


Patients need to
be clear with their
physician about
how much they
want to know. -

BY LAURAN NEERGAARD
Associated Press
WASHINGTON Trust
your doctor? A survey finds
that some doctors aren't
always completely honest
with their patients.
More than half admitted
describing someone's prog-
nosis in a way they knew
was too rosy. Nearly 20 per-
cent said they hadn't fully
disclosed a medical mistake
for fear of being sued. And
1 in 10 of those surveyed
said they'd told a patient
something that wasn't true
in the past year.
The survey, by
Massachusetts research-
ers and published in this
month's Health Affairs,
doesn't explain why, or what
wasn't true.
"I don't think that phy-
sicians set out to be dis-
honest," said lead research-
er Dr. Lisa lezzoni, a
Harvard Medical School
professor and director of
Massachusetts GenerAl
Hospital's Mongan Institute
for Health Policy. She said
the untruths could have
been to give people hope.
But it takes open com-
munication for patients to
make fully informed deci-
sions about their health
care, as opposed to the
"doctor-knows-best" pater-
Snalism of medicine's past,
lezzoni added.
The survey, offers. "a
reason for patients to be
vigilant and to be very clear
with their physician about
how much they do want to
know," she said.
The findings come from
a 2009 survey of more than
1,800 physicians nationwide
to see if they agree with and
follow certain standards
medical professionalism
issued in 2002. Among the
voluntary standards are that
doctors should be open and
honest about all aspects of
patient care, and promptly
disclose any mistakes.
A third of those surveyed
didn't completely agree
that doctors should 'fess up
about mistakes. That's even
though a growing num-
ber of medical centers are
adopting policies that tell
doctors to say "I'm sorry"


up front, in part because
studies have found patients
less likely to sue when that
happens.
Not revealing a mistake
is "just inexcusable," said
Dr. Arthur Caplan, a promi-
nent medical ethicist at the
University of Pennsylvania.
Beyond decency, "your
care now has to be differ-
ent because of what hap-
pened."
The vast majority of those
surveyed agreed that physi-
cians should fully inform
patients of the risks, not
just the benefits, of treat-
ment options and never tell
a patient something that
isn't true even though
some admitted they hadn't
followed that advice at least
on rare occasions in the
past year.
Perhaps least surprising
is that doctors give over-
ly positive prognoses. It's
hard to deliver bad news,
especially when a patient
has run out of options, and
until recently doctors have
had little training in how
to do so. But lezzoni said
patients with the worst out-
look especially deserve to
know, so they can get their
affairs in order, and patient
studies have found most
want to know.
What else might doctors
not tell? There are shades
of gray, said Caplan, the
ethicist For example, he's
heard doctors ,agonize over
what to tell parents about
a very premature baby's
chances, knowing the odds
are really bad but also know-
ing they've seen miracles.
Doctors prescribe place-
bos sometimes, and telling
the patient could negate
chances of the fake treat-
ment helping, he noted.
Somimes they exaggerate
a health finding to shock
the patient into shaping up.
And sometimes it's a
matter of dribbling out a
hard truth to give patients
a chance to adjust, Caplan
said: "OK, this looks seri-
ous butwe're going to order'
some more tests," when the
doctor already knows just
how grim things are.
Withholding the full story
is getting harder, though,
Iezzoni said. Not only do
more patients Google their
conditions so they know
what to ask, but some doc-
tors who have embraced
electronic medical records
allow patients to log in
and check their own test
results.


Marijuana users twice as

likely to cause car crash


Associated Press
LONDON People who
use marijuana before driv-
ing are nearly twice as like-
ly to cause a car crash as
those not under the influ-
ence of alcohol or drugs,
according to a Canadian
analysis of previous stud-
ies.
Experts at Dalhousie
University in, Canada
reviewed nine studies of
more than 49,000 people
involved in accidents on
public roads involving one
or more motor vehicles,
including cars, -trucks,
buses and .motorcycles.
Marijuana, use was con-
firmed by blood tests or
self-reporting.
Researchers found driv,
ers who had used mari-
juana within three hours
of beginning to drive had
nearly double the risk of
causing a collision, espe-
cially those that were fatal..
Marijuana is the most
widely -used illegal drug
worldwide and rates
of its use in drivers are
increasing. A 2007 study in
Scotland found 15 percent
of 537 drivers aged 17 to 39
had used marijuana within
12 hours.
Some experts said edu-
cation campaigns about


the dangers of doing drugs
before driving wouldn't
work.
People "will also need
to be persuaded that they
are at risk of their can-
nabis use being detected,"
wrote Wayne Hall of the
University of Queensland
in an accompanying edito-
rial.
Hall said more research
was needed' to prove wheth-
er roadside drug testing,
as introduced in parts of
Australia and the U.S., actu-
ally prevents more drug-
related car accidents.
The study was published
Friday in the journal, BMJ.


S, .
-" \- - ) '.. .."
..^ : - ** ^**f -^-- --.i '. l;. '


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This undated two-picture combo provided by Aline Michelle GrOneisen, Lab Manager, Center for Advanced Hindsight, Duke
University shows the same meal, but the photo at left shows a full serving of rice and the other a half serving of rice. A
creative new experiment suggests paring down the side dishes might help a nation of over-eaters shave some calories.
Researchers infiltrated a fast-food Chinese restaurant and found up to a third of diners jumped at the offer of a half-size of the
usual heaping pile of rice or noodles even when the smaller amount cost the same.



Trimming super-size with


half-orders, plate colors


Even 200 fewer
calories can add
up over time.

BY LAURAN NEERGAARD
Associated Press
WASHINGTON Call
it the alter-ego of super-
sizing. Researchers infil-
trated a fast-food Chinese
restaurant and found up to
a third of diners jumped at
the offer of a half-size of the
usual heaping pile of rice or
noodles even when
the smaller amount
cost the same. |
Giant portion sizes cI
are one of the culprits
behind the epidemic
of bulging waistlines, I
and nowhere is the
portion-creep more
evident than in res-
taurants with French
fry-heavy meal deals
or plates overflowing with
pasta. Now scientists are
tapping into the psychology
of eating to find ways to
trim portions without peo-
ple feeling cheated focus-
ing on everything from the
starchy sides to the color ol
the plates.
"The small Coke now is
what .used to be a large
15 years ago," laments psy-
chologist Janet Schwartz,
a marketing professor at
Tulane University who led
the Chinese food study. "We
should ask people what por-
tion size they want," instead
of large being the default
Restaurants are. paying
close attention, says promi-
nent food-science research-
er Brian Wansink of Cornel]
University. His own tests
found children were sat-
isfied with about half the
fries in their Happy Meal
long before McDonald's cul
back the size, and the calo-
ries, last year.
"We'll be seeing some
very creative ways of down-
sizing in the next couple
of years," predicts Wansink,
author of Mindless Eating:
Whly We Eat More Than We
Think.
But let's call it "right-siz-
ing," says Duke University
behavioral economist Dan
Ariely. Right-size suggests
it's a good portion, not a
cut, he says.
Couldn't you. just get a
doggie bag? Sure, if you've
got the willpower to stop
before your plate is most-
ly clean. Lots .of/ research
shows Americans don't We


E( EYE CENTER of North Rorida:
kJ General Eye Care & Surgery,


tend to rely on .visual cues
about how much food is left,
shoveling it in before tihe
stomach-to-brain signal ot
"hey wait, I'm getting full"
can arrive.
So Schwartz and Ariely
tested a different approach:
Could we limit our own
temptation if we focus not
on the tastiest reason we
visited a restaurant the
entree but on the side
t dishes? After all, restaurants
can pile on calorie-dense
starches like rice or pasta or


like a half-order to save 200
calories?" Those who said
yes didn't order a- higher-
'calorie entree to compen-
sate. Weighing leftovers
showed they threw away
the same amount of food as
customers who refused or
weren't offered the option.
A 25-cent discount didn't
spur more takers. Ior did
adding calorie labels so
people could calculate for
themselves, the researchers
report in this month's jour-
nal Health Affairs con-


Now scientists are tapping into the ps
lology of eating to find ways to trim p
tions without people feeling cheated
focusing on everything from the star
sides to the color of the plates.


fries because they're very
inexpensive, filling the plate,
so it looks like a good deal,
Schwartz says.. .
A popular Chinese fran-
chise at Duke University,
with a mix of students, staff
and visitors to the cam-
pus hospital, allowed the;
researchers in at lunch-
time.
In the serving- line, cus-
tomers pick the rice or
noodles first The standard,
serving is a whopping 10
ounces, about 400 calo-
ries' even before ordering
the entree, says Schwartz.
There was no half-size-
option on the menu board.
In a series of experiments,
servers asked 970 custom-
ers after their initial rice or
noodle order: "Would you


cluding the up-front offer
made the difference.
Anywhere from 14 per-.
cent to 33 percent chose the
reduced portions, 'depend-
ing on the day and the mix
of customers.
Even 200 fewer calories
can add up over time. And
other tricks can trim por-
tions without people notic-
ing, whether dining out or
at home. Cornell's Wansink
found people served 18 per-
*cent more pasta with mari-
nara sauce onto a red plate
than a white one and 18;
percent more pasta alfredo
onto a white plate.
A stark contrast "makes
you think twice before you
throw on another scoop,"
explains Wansink. His own
family bought some dark


dinner plates to supplement'
their white ones, because
people tend to overeat white
,starches more than veg-/
gies.
Wansink's other research -
has found:
Switching'from 11-inchi.
plates to 10-inch plates'
makes people take less
food, and waste less' food.
The slightly smaller plate
makes a normal serving
look more satisfying.
People think they're
drinking more from a tall.
skinny glass than:
a short wide one-'
even if both hold
y-" the same volume,.
0or- a finding Wansink,
- says was widely
hy adopted by bars.
y Beware if'
kids eat from the.
adult bowls. He'
found 6-year-olds
serve themselves.
44 percent" more food in
an 18-ounce bowl than a
12-ounce bowl.
Restaurants are starting
to get the message that.
at least some customers
want to eat more sensibly.
Applebees, for example, has'
introduced a line of meals
under 550 calories, includ-'
ing such things as steak.
And a National Restaurant
Association survey found
smaller-portion entrees,
"mini-meals" for adults and
kids, and bite-size desserts,
made a new trend list
It's all consumer demand,
says association nutrition
director Joy Dubost More
diners now are "requesting
the healthier options and
paying attention to their
calories."


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8A LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2012



Chemo possible for pregnant women


Cancer treatment
poses minimal
risk to the fetus.

BY MARIA CHENG
Associated Press
LONDON Researchers have
encouraging news for women
who find themselves in a very
frightening situation: having can-
cer while pregnant Studies sug-
gest that these women can be
treated almost the same as other
cancer patients are, with minimal
risk to the fetus.
Only about 1 in 1,000 preg-
nant women face this dilemma,
but doctors fear that more will
because the risk of cancer rises
with age, and more women are
delaying having children until
they're older.
Doctors have long worried
about how to balance treating
a pregnant woman with cancer
and the need to protect her fetus
from the effects of toxic cancer
drugs and radiation treatments,
and whether it is safe to continue
a pregnancy in certain situations.
A series of papers in the journals
Lancet and Lancet Oncology pub-
lished Friday make several key
contributions:
A Belgian-led study of 70
children in Europe exposed to
chemotherapy while they were in
the womb found they developed
just as well as other children,
according to tests on their hearts,
IQ and general health. They were
assessed at birth, 18 months, and
every few years until age 18.
Chemotherapy after the first
trimester is possible, using extra
ultrasounds to ensure the baby
is developing properly. Radiation
therapy is best done in the first
two trimesters, when the baby is
small enough to be covered with
a lead blanket, according to a


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Thursday, Feb. 9, photo, Caroline Swain poses for photographs
with her sons Max, left, 10, and Luke,.9, at their home in Rayleigh,
England. Swain was diagnosed with breast cancer while 'pregnant with
Luke. She had her left breast and many lymph nodes removed and had
t6 wait until her fetus was 12-weeks-old before starting chemotherapy,
Researchers have encouraging news for women who have cancer while
pregnant. Studies suggest that these women can be treated almost the
same as other cancer patients are, with minimal risk to the fetus. '


review of previous studies, led by
Belgian researchers.
Ending the pregnancy doesn't
improve chances for the mother,
the same study found.


The type of cancer seems
to matter. An Israeli analysis of
past research suggested pregnant
women with blood cancers might
want to terminate an early preg-


nancy when chemotherapy can't
be delayed.
Another review of previous
studies by French and American
researchers concluded doctors
should aim to preserve pregnancy
in women with cervical or ovarian
cancers where possible.
"Many (doctors) aren't keen
to give chemotherapy to preg-
nant women and may even rec-
ommend termination," said Dr.
Frederic Amant of the Leuven
Cancer Institute in Belgium, an
author of two of
the papers. "But
treating a preg- 'Termil
nant woman-
with cancer pregnant
doesn't have, to always ni
be so different
from treating a Dr. Richard
cancer patient fe of
who isn't preg- professor of
nant." Anderson C
Amant, who in T
led the study
of 70 'children,
said most of the
children with cognitive problems
were born premature, and that
was probably the primary cause
of their delayed development'
"Doctors will often err on the
side of caution and deliver a baby
early to avoid the effects of che-
motherapy," said Dr. Catherine
Nelson-Piercy, an obstetric physi-
cian and spokeswomanforBritain's
Royal College of Obstetricians and
Gynaecologists.
'"These data don't say that che-
motherapy is completely safe, but
the baby is better off being in
(the mother) as long as possible,"
she said. Nelson-Piercy was not
linked to the Lancet series and
often works with pregnant women
diagnosed with cancer or other
illnesses.
Dr. Richard Theriault, a pro-
fessor of medicine at the MD
Anderson Cancer Center in
Texas, said he hoped 'the papers


would change how doctors treat
pregnant cancer patients.
'Terminating a pregnancy is not
always necessary," said Theriault,
who heads a program to treat
pregnant women with cancer. He
said a minority of pregnant women
with cancer still get abortions.
He said the placenta seems to
act as a kind of filter for chemo-
therapy drugs, restricting their
effects on the fetus. '"There's the
phenomenon of the bald mother


.who gives birth


eating a
icy is not
necessary '

I Theriault, a
medicine at the
ancer Center
exas.


to a baby with
a full head of
hair," he said.
"It seems to
suggest not as
much gets to
the baby as we
thought"
That was cer-
tainly Caroline
Swain's experi-
ence, who was
diagnosed with
breast cancer
while pregnant
with her sec-


ond son. She had her left breast '
and many lymph nodes removed
and had to wait until her fetus
was 12 weeks old before starting
chemotherapy.
"I was just so grateful it was
possible to have treatment and
keep my baby," said Swain, 45,
who lives near London. "I'was
scared that my child wouldn't
remember me if something hap-
pened to me."
Her son Luke, now 9, weighed
in at 7.4 pounds (3.35 kilograms)
when'he was born, only slightly
lighter, than his older brother
Max a year earlier.
"We had celebrations all
around when Luke came out
absolutely fine," Swain said of
her and her husband Rowland's
relief at the birth. "Luke is no
different from his brother,"-she
said. "They both love Legos and
X-Box."


Sept.11

Experiment
shows sea life
can be harmed.
BY JAY UNDSAY
Associated Press
BOSTON An ocean
experiment that was acci-
dentally, conducted amid
the shipping silence after
Sept. 11 has shown the first
link between underwater
noise and stress in whales,
researchers reported
Wednesday.
The analysis indicated
that a drop in a stress-relat-
ed hormone found in the
right whales was tied to a
dip in ocean noise that fol-
lowed a near-standstill in
ship traffic, due to secu-
rity concerns following the
attacks.
Theworkindicates whales
and other sea life that use
sound to communicate
and travel can be harmed
by the noise. That could
prompt more research and
eventually influence future
ocean traffic and develop-
ment, said New England


Aquarium
scientist
Rosalind
Rolland, the
report's lead
author.
"This is
definitely a
very impor-
tant piece in
the puzzle
that lends
credence to
the idea that


analysis finds links in noise, mor

lii lvi ^-^ln -- .-. -' w


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Sept. 10, 2007 photo released by the New England Aquarium, a right whale dives near a ship in Canada's Bay of
Fundy. A study published in London Feb. 8 shows that reduced ship traffic in the Bay of Fundy after Sept. 11, 2001 resulted in
a significant decrease in underwater noise and a corresponding reduction of stress hormones in right whales.


piece of evidence that says
there's a link between
noise level and stress," said
Christopher Clark, director


The Bay of Fundy. is
bordered primarily by the
Canadian provinces of New
Brunswick and Nova Scotia.


. ... .. .
Stress has long been tied to
longevity, reproduction, disease
i, ,* and other key health
;- ;, .Indicators in whales.

Christopher Clark, director of the bioacoustics
research program.at the Comell Lab of Ornithology.
^.- /' ', :


yes, we potentially have a
problem out there and we
need to learn a lot more
about it," Rolland said.
The report combined
data from two unrelated
experiments in Canada's
Bay of Fundy that happened
to be occurring simultane-
ously. One involved acoustic
recordings of right whales;
the other the collection of
whale feces samples, which
contained, stress-indicating
hormones,
It wasn't until 200 that
Roll.and realized Il.winfornli,-
tion existed for the analysis,
published W-dw-sday in the
British journal Proceedings
ol T i Royal Sboriivy B,
"H.rr- is the first solid


of the bioacoustics research
program at the Cornell Lab
of Ornithology, who was
not a paper co-author. Clark
noted stress has long been
tied to longevity, reproduc-
tion, disease and other key
health indicators in whales.
There's no international'
standard for what ocean
noise levels should be, and
it's been tough to get at
what kinds of problems it
causes, Rolland said.
The use of military sonar
at sea has been one source
of tension between govern-
ments and conservationists,
who claim that such sounds
kill whalc- and oIter marine
life,


Rolland was
there in
September
2001, taking
right whale
fecal sam-
ples in the
midst of a
study on the
health and
reproduction
of the endan-
gered North
Atlantic right
whale.


She remembered getting
word at the waterfront of
the terror attacks, then see-
ing her crew in tears as they
watched the coverage. It
was a brilliant day, and after
a while, the crew decided
to go on with their work,
as a measure of defiance
and also because the bay
was "calming for the soul,"
Rolland said.
"It's like our cathedral,"
she said. "It's a beautiful
place."
That day and those fol-
lowing were like a primal
ocean scene, Rolland said.
"There was nobody out
there except for us and the
whales."


Around the same time,
another researcher, Susan
Parks, was getting acoustic
recordings on mothers and
their calves for research on
the social behavior of the


whales.
The data didn't come
togetheruntillate2009,when
Rolland started researching
stress and.underwater noise
to prepare for a workshop


e stress


organized by the Office of t
" Naval Research. She real
' ized Parks had four days of I
sound recordings from the
bay, two days before and
two days after Sept 11, and
she had five years of data a
on stress hormone levels
for the whales that included
that time.
A hunch, and then quick
analysis by Rolland, showed
a possible correlation
between a drop in sound
and the drop in whale stress I
hormone levels. The naval
office eventually. agreed t
to fund the work that led .
to Wednesday's paper, she
said. i
The more rigorous anal-
ysis showed a significant
decrease in background )
noise in the bay post-Sept i
11, including a drop in the
low frequency sounds that
ships emit and which the
whales use to communi-
cate.
Scientists compared the
stress hormone levels found
in the whale feces during
the five-year period and
found them to be markedly
lower only during the time
when ship traffic was down
immediately after Sept 11. ;
















Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


Thursday. February


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


16.2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


BRIEFS
ADULT SOFrBALL
Coaches meeting
at Girls Club
The Lake City
Recreation Department
has registration for
adult softball set for 8:30
a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays,
through March 2 at Teen
Town Recreation Center.
Leagues (ASA sanc-
tioned) offered are co-ed
church, commercial and
women. Cost is $350 per
team. A coaches/manag-
ers meeting is 6:30 p.m.
today at the Girls Club
Center.
For details, call
Heyward Christie at 754-
3607 or e-mail christieh@
Icfla.com.
YOUTH BASKETBALL
Travel basketball
tryouts set
Lake City Recreation
Department and
Richardson Community
Center/Annie Mattox
Park North, Inc.'s have
tryouts set for USSSA
travel basketball teams
for sixth-graders and
ninth-graders. Ninth-
grade tryouts continue
from 5:30-7 p.m. Friday at
Richardson Commuhnity
Center. Sixth-grade
tryouts continue from
6-7:30 p.m. today at
Richardson Community
Center. Permission forms
are required for tryouts.
Cost is $60 for players
who make the team (ros-
ter limit 12).
For details, call
Heyward Christie at 754-
3607 or Mario Coppock
at 754-7096.
From staff reports

GAMES

Today
Columbia High
tennis vs. Gainesville
High, 3:30 p.m.
Fort White High
track at Suwannee High,
4 p.m.
Fort White High JV
baseball at Buchholz
High, 6 p.m.
Columbia High
basketball at Ridgeview
High in region
quarterfinals, 7 p.m.
Friday
Columbia High
wrestlers in Class 2A
FHSAA Finals at Lakeland
Civic Center, 10,a.m.
Columbia High
tennis vs. Lecanto High at
Central Florida College,
3:30 p.m.
Fort White High
baseball at Suwannee
High, 5 p.m. (JV-6
vs. Melody Christian
Academy)
Columbia High
softball vs. Stanton Prep,
6 p.m.
Columbia High
baseball at Union County
High, TBA
Saturday
Columbia High
wrestlers in Class 2A
FHSAA Finals at Lakeland
Civic Center, 9:30 a.m.
Fort White High
baseball at Branford
High, noon


Playoff push




tod ay for 1


Columbia High's Marcus Amerson (11)


begins




tigers


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
makes his way to the basket by getting around Fort White's Mplton Sanders (22) in a game on Jan. 31.


CHS travels to take on Ridgeview


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia High coach
Horace Jefferson is asking
Tigers' fans to jump on the
bus. ... literally.
The coach has arranged
for a fan bus to leave from
the football stadium at
the high school at 5 p.m.
for a cost of $10 to ride
to today first round playoff
matchflp against
Ridgeview High at
7 p.m. in Orange Park.
"Their community really
comes out to support them
and we want our fans to be
able to go," Jefferson said.
"We'd like to have a big
crowd."
Fans wanting to go must
let the school know by
noon. For more information
contact the school's front


office at 755-8080.
Jeferson expects
the Tigers (19-7) to
match up well with the
Panthers (21-5).
"They're pretty good,"
Jefferson said. "We're famil-
iar with them, because last
year they were in our dis-
trict. During the summer,
they went undefeated in a.
league. They're about our
size, however, and match
up with us as far as athleti-
cism."
Jefferson said the team's
first task will be slowing
down the team's big man
inside. The Panthers will
run a lot of back door
screens looking to create
alley-oop situations. Jordan
Banks will be the player
called up to finish most of
those opportunities.
"He's very athletic and


can jump over the top of
people," Jefferson said.
"They're going to run a
lot of stuff to try to create
alleys."
Kurae Burns will also
be a point of focus for the
Tigers.
"He looks much bigger
than he is listed on tape,"
Jefferson said. "He'll try to
score in transition. He'll use
his athleticism to score, but
he can make it inside and
out. He's very similar to
Morris Marshall."
The Tigers also wantto limit
the Panthers' ability to connect
on the long-range shots.
Hunter Wetherell will
take most of the three-point-
ers for Ridgeview. Jefferson
sees him as a similar player
to one at the University of
Florida a few years ago.
"He reminds me of Nick


Calathis," Jefferson said.
"He can shoot from the
perimeter."
Ridgeview's guards
aren't known for scoring,
but Jefferson said they can
all distribute the ball well to
players on the wings.
"They're pretty quick," he
said. "They're not real scor-
ing threats. They'll look to
penetrate and kick it out."
Jefferson is hoping to
slow the game down so that
he can limit the Panthers'
transition game.
"The key is going to make
this into a half-court game,"
he said. "If we can do that,
well be all right We're not
going to try to do anything
different at this point in the
season except play a little
harder than we did against
Wolfson on Saturday night
I truly believe the best four


teams out of our two districts
are here. Now is the time
when anything can happen."
Jefferson is also looking
for more production out of
his stars.
"We need more than we
got out of Marshall and
Marcus Amerson against
Wolfson," he said. "They
only combined for 15
points. We need more than
that from them obviously. If
we can get both of them in
doubles around 30 points,
we'll be all right. The goal
is to get about four guys in
doubles."
Even still, the Tigers
have proven strong defen-
sively and he hopes that
continues.
"As bad as we played
against Wolfson, we held
them to 50," Jefferson said.
"That's pretty good."


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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2012


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
GOLF
9 am.
TGC European PGATour,Avantha
Masters, first round, at New Delhi (same-
day tape)
12:30 p.m.
TGC LPGA Thailand, first round, at
Chonburi,Thailand (same-day tape)
.3 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Northern Trust
Open, first round, at Los Angeles
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN -Wisconsin at Michigan State
ESPN2 -VirginiaTech at Florida
State 9 p.m.
ESPN -WestVirginia at Pittsburgh
ESPN2 -Vanderbilt at Mississippi
FSN -Arizona at Washington St.
II p.m.
ESPN2 Gonzaga at Santa Clara
FSN -Arizona St. atWashington
NBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
TNT Boston at Chicago
10so0 p.n.
TNT LA. Clippers at Portland

BASKETBALL

NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia '20 9 .690 -
Boston 15 12 .556 4
NewYork 14 IS .483 6
Toronto 9 21 .300 I'h
New Jersey 8 21 .276 12
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 23 7 .767 -
Atlanta 18 II .621 4h
Orlando 18 II .621 4k
Washington 7 22 .241 15'
Charlotte 3 25 .107 19
Central Division
W L Pet GB
Chicago 24 7 .774 -
Indiana 17 II .607 5'A
Milwaukee 12 16 .429 10%
Cleveland 10 16 .385 1 k
Detroit 8 22 .267 15 s
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest DivIsion
S ; W L Pet GB
San Antonio 20 9 .690 -
Dallas 18 II, .621 2
Houston 16 13 .552 4.
Memphis 15 14 .517 5
New Orleans 5 23 .179 14%'
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 22 6 .786, -
Denver 17 12 .586 5S'
Portland . , 14 .517 7k
Utah !t 14 14, .500 8
Minnesota *'4 13 16' .4484 94
Paific Division
W L Pct GB
LA. Clippers 17 9 .654 -
LA. Lakers 17 12 .586 Ik%
Golden State II 14 .440 5'
Phoenix 12 .17 .414 6k
Sacramento 10 18 .357 8

NBA schedule

Tuesday Games
Miami 105, Indiana 90
NewYork 90,Toronto 87
San Antonio 99, Detroit 95
Chicago 121,Sacramento 115
Oklahoma City II I, Utah 85
Memphis 93, Houston 83
Denver 109, Phoenix 92
Washington 124, Portland 109
LA. Lakers 86,Atlanta 78
Wednesday's Games
San Antonio at Toronto (n)
Philadelphia at Orlando (n)
Detroit at Boston (n)


Indiana at Cleveland (n)
Memphis at New Jersey (n)
Sacramento at New York (n)
Oklahoma City at Houston (n)
Charlotte at Minnesota (n)
New Orleans at Milwaukee (n)
Denver at Dallas (n)
Atlanta at Phoenix (n)
Portdarfd at Golden State (n)
Washington at LA. Clippers (n)
Today's Games
New Jersey at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Boston at Chicago, 8 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Portland, 10:30 p.m.


AP Top 25 schedule
Today's Games
No. 5 Duke vs. NC State, 9 p.m.
No. 7 Michigan State vs. No. 15
Wisconsin, 7 p.m.
No. 20 Florida State vs. Virginia
Tech, 7 p.m.
No. 24 Gonzaga at Santa Clara,
II p.m.
Saturday's Games
No. I Kentucky vs. Mississippi, 4 p.m.
No. 3 Missouri at Texas A&M, 2 p.m.
No, 4 Kansas vs.Texas Tech, 8 p.m.
No. 6 Ohio State at No. 17 Michigan,
9 p.m.
No. 8 North Carolina vs. Clemson,
4 p.m.
No. 9.- Baylor vs. Kansas State,
1:45 pjm.
No. 10 -Georgetown at Providence,
7p.m.
No.11 UNLV at New Mexico, I p.m.
No. 12 Marquette vs. UConn at the
XL Center, Hartford, Conn., Noon.
No. 13 San Diego St. at Air Force,
4 p.m.
No. 14 Florida at Arkansas,
6p.m.
No. 16 Murray State vs. No. 21 Saint
Mary's (Cal),6 p.m.
No. 19 Louisville at DePaul, Noon
No. 20 Florida State at NC State,
I p.m.
No. 22Virginia vs. Maryland,'l p.m.
No. 23 Notre Dame at Villanova,
9 p.m.
No. 24 Gonzaga at San Francisco,
8p.m.
No. 24 Wichita State at Davidson,
Noon
Sunday's Games
No. 2 Syracuse at Rutgers, I p.m.
No. 5 Duke at Boston College, 6 p.m.-
No. 7 ilchigan State at Purdue, I p.m.
No. 1IS Wisconsin vs. Penn State,
4p.m. .
No. 18 Indiana at Iowa, 6p.rm.

BASEBALL

Baseball calendar
Through Friday -'Salary arbitration
hearings, St. Petersburg
Friday -Voluntary reporting date for
other Oakland and Seattle players.
Sunday Voluntary reporting date
for other them'ss pitchers, catches and
injured :pjayprs.
Feb. 24 --Voluntary reporting date
for other team's other players. Mandatory
reporting date for Oaldand and Seattle.
March 2 Mandatory reporting date
for other teams.
March 2-11 Teams may. renew
contracts of unsigned players.
March 19 Last day to place a
player on unconditional release waivers
and pay 30 days termination pay instead
of 45 days.
March 28-29 Seattle vs. Oakland
atTokyo.
April 2 Last day to request-
unconditional release waivers on a player
without having to pay his full 2012 salary.
April 4 -- Opening day, St. Louis
at Miami. Active rosters reduced to 25
players.
May 9-10 or 16-17 Owners'
meetings, New York.
June'4 -Amateur draft.
July 10 -AII-Star game, Kansas City,
Mo.


July 13 Deadline for amateur draft
picks to sign.
July 22 Hall of Fame induction,
Cooperstown, N.Y.
July 31 Last day to trade a player
without securing waivers.
Sept. I Active rosters expand to
40 players.

GOLF

Golf week,
PGATOUR
NORTHERN TRUST OPEN
Site: Los Angeles.
Schedule:Today-Sunday.
Course: Riviera Country Club'(7,349
yards, par 71).
Purse: $6.6 million. Winner's share:
$1,188,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Today,
3-6 p.m., 8:30-11:30 p.m.; Friday, 12:30-
3:30 a.m., 316- p.m., 8:30-11:30 p.m.;
Saturday, 12:30-5:30 a.m., 1-2:30 p.m.,
9:30-11:30 p.m. Sunday, 1-2:30 p.m., 9:30-
11:30 p.m.) and CBS (Saturday, 3-6 p.m.;
Sunday, 3-6:30 p.m.).
LPGATOUR
LPGATHAILAND
Site: Pattaya,Thailand.
Schedule:Today-Sunday.
Course: Siam Country Club, Pattaya
Old Course (6,477 yards, par 72).
Purse: $1.5 million. Winner's share:
$225,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Today-
Friday, 12:30-2:30 p.m.; Saturday-Sunday,
3-6 p.m.).
CHAMPIONSTOUR
ACE GROUP CLASSIC
Site: Naples
Schedule: Friday-Sunday.
Course: The TwinEagles Club, Talon
Course (7,193 yards, par 72).
Purse: $1.6 million. Winner's share:
$240,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Friday,
6:30-8:30 p.m.; Saturday, 12:30-2:30 a.m.,
6:30-9:30 p.m.; Sunday, midnight-2 a.m.,
7,9:30 p.m.; Monday, midnight-2 a.m.).
EUROPEAN TOURIASIAN TOUR
AVANTHA MASTERS
Site: New Delhi. '
Schedule:Today-Sunday.
Course: DLF Golf & Country Club
(7,156 yards, par 72).
Purse: $2.37 million. Winner's, share:
4394,710.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Sunday, a.m.- 12:30 p.m.).
NATIONWIDE TOUR
BOGOTA OPEN
Site: Bogota, Colombia.
Schedule:Today-Sunday. .
SCourse: Bogota Country Club (7,237
yards, par 7.1).'.
i. Purse: $600,000. Winner's share:
$108,000.
Television: None.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule
Tuesday's Games
N.Y. Rangers 3, Boston 0
New Jersey 4, Buffalo I
Columbus 2, St. Louis I
Ottawa 4,Tampa Bay 0
Detroit 3, Dallas I
,'Anaheim 2, Minnesota I
Nashville 3'Chicago 2'
N.Y. Islanders 3,Winnipeg. I
Calgary,5,Toronto I -
Wednesday's Games
Anaheim at Pittsburgh (n)
Boston at Montreal (n)
Ottawa at Florida (n)
Toronto at Edmonton (n)
Colo-ado atVancouver (n)
Today's Games
Chicago at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at Philadelphia. 7 p.m.
San Jose at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Winnipeg at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Calgary at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.


BRIEFS


YOUTH SOFTBALL FISHING
Registration set FFA tournament
for Fort White on March 3


Fort White Girls Softball
Association's registration
for its spring season is 5-8
p.m. Friday and 10 aim. to
2 p.m. Saturday at South
Columbia Sports Park and
the Busy Bee store in Fort
White. Leagues offered
are T-ball (starting at age
4) through 16-and-under.
T-ball cost is $45; fees for
other leagues are $55.
For details, call Nora
Harvey at (386) 365-5688.

GSACC spring
registration set

The Girls Softball
Association of Columbia
County has registration
set for its spring recreation
season for girls ages 4-
17. Registration is at the
Girls Softball Complex on
Bascom Norris Drive at 5-7
p.m. Feb. 28, March 1 and
March 5. Players may also
register at Brian's Sports
on U.S. Highway 90 west
Cost is $45 per player or
$65 for siblings.
For 'details, e-
mail information@
girlssoftballassociation.org
or call 755-4271.


The Columbia High FFA
Open Bass Tournament is
March 3 from safe light to
3 p.m. out of Clay Landing.
Entry fee is $70, and there
is a $10 optional Big Bass




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I TAHIF


Pot
Proceeds of the
tournament will be used
toward, a scholarship in
honor of tournament
founder Justin Brown.
For details, call Chris at
288-7633 or Karen Brown
at 961-2526.

From staff reports


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


SI I k II ..R.R.

I FLAWEF J
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Your answer here:
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: YUCKY PRIZE UNFAIR CATTLE
Yesterday's Answer: Some people thought the Wright brothers
were just "PLANE" CRAZY


TCU drug bust includes


four football players


By NOMAAN MERCHANT
Associated Press

FORT WORTH, Texas
Authorities arrested 17
students at Texas Christian
University on Wednesday
as part of a six-month drug
sting, an especially embar-
rassing blow to the school
because it included four
members of the high-pro-
file football team.
Arrest warrants paint-
ed a startling picture of
the Horned Frogs, with
a handful of players who
allegedly arranged mari-
juana sales after class or
around practice and who
told police that most of the
team had failed a surprise
drug test just two weeks
ago.
According to police,
players sold undercover
officers marijuana during
the season and as recently
as last week.
"There are days people
want to be a head foot-
ball coach, but today is not
one of those days," coach
Gary Patterson said in a
prepared statement "As I
heard the news this morn-
ing, I was first shocked,
then hurt and now I'm
mad."
,The 17 people arrest-
ed were caught making
"hand-to-hand" sales of
marijuana, cocaine, ecstasy
and prescription drugs to
undercover officers, police
said. They said the bust
followed an investigation
prompted by complaints.
from students, parents and
others.
TCU has an enrollment
of about 9,500 students, but
the athlete arrests, drew
the most scrutiny. The
'bust came just one day
after a thrilling overtime.
victory by the men's bas-
ketball team over a ranked
opponent and less than 24
hours after TCU released
its football schedule for
next season, its first in the'
Big 12 Conference.
Three prominent defen-
sive players on the team
were arrested: linebacker'
Tanner,. Brock, the lead-
ing tackler two seasons
ago, defensive tackle DJ.
Yendrey and cornerback
Devini Johnson. The other
player is offensive lineman


ACROSS
1 Indiana Jones
quest
4 Concorde
fleet of yore
8 Plummet
12 Female deer
13 Twig juncture
14 Indigo plant
15 Small rodent
17 Fishhook part
18 Fast-food
freebies
19 Educator -
Montessori
21 1040 experts
23 Whisper
loudly
24 Renter's
document
27 Minn.
neighbor
29 Layer
30 Hubbubs
32 Snakes do it
36 1492 caravel
38 Ms. Bombeck
40 Adversity


Ty Horn.
While school Chancellor
Victor Boschini said he
didn't think TCU had a
"football problem," the
arrest affidavits raise the
possibility that other play-
ers were involved.
In November, a Fort
Worth police officer was
-informed that Horn was
selling marijuana to "col-
lege students and foot-
ball players at Texas
Christian." The officer
allegedly bought marijua-
na that day, Nov. 3, two
days before a road game at
Wyoming, from both Horn
and Yendrey.
Officers during the next
several months allegedly
set up drug d als with
the players outside res-
taurants, a grocery store
and other areas around
campus. OnJan. 19, Brock
allegedly sold an officer
$200 worth of marijuana
after Yendrey ran out.
"After a short conversa-
tion about the marijuana,
Brock and I exchanged
phone numbers, telling me
to come to him from now
on instead of (Yendrey),"
according to the affidavits.
Horn and Johnson
scoffed at the Feb. 1
team drug test ordered
by Patterson, police said.
Brock allegedly told an
undercover officer that he
failed the surprise test "for
sure," but that it wouldn't
be a problem because
there "would be about 60
people screwed.",
Horn -lhad looked
through the football ros-
ter and "said' there were
only 20 people that would
pass the test on the team,"
Brock said, according to
the warrant
And six days after the
test, Johnson allegedly
sold an officer $300 worth
of marijuana. Asked about
the test, he .said: "What
can they do, 82 people
failed it"
TCU released 'a state-
ment late Wednesday after-
Snoon that said the school
tests its athletes for drug
use "on a regular basis."
"The comments about
failed drug tests made by
the separated players in
affidavits cannot be veri-
fied simply because they


41 Flourish
43 More cunning
45 Hoagie
47 Jade
49 Fridge maker
51 Dell stock
55 Bleak
56' Nun's place
58 Stanley
Gardner
59 Unsmiling
60 Toward the
stern
61 Looks over
62 Appealing
63 RR terminal

DOWN
1 Explains
further
2 Tree anchor
3 Actress
Deborah -
4 Tender veggie
(2 wds.)
5 The March
King
6 NFL scores


were made in. the context
of a drug buy," the school
said. Patterson declined to
answer questions beyond
his prepared statement
Phone messages left
at the homes of Horn,
Johnson and Yendrey were
not immediately returned.
Brock did not have a listed
home number. All of the
players are 21 except for
Yendrey, who is 20.
,Brock was being held
on $10,000 bond at the
Mansfield city jail. Johnson
and Horn were being
transferred to the jail on
Wednesday afternoon and
Yendrey. had not been
arraigned. -
Police said they had yet
to determine if other foot-
ball players were involved
or would be charged.
Officials said the stu-
dents had been "separated
,from TCU" and criminally
barred from campus, but it
wasn't clear if the players
had been kicked off the
team.
"I expect our student-
athletes to serve as ambas-
sadors for .the university
and will not tolerate behav-
ior that reflects poorly on
TCU, the athletics depart-
ment, our teams or other
student-athletes within
the department," athletic
director Chris Del Conte
said. "Our student-athletes
are a microcosm of soci-
ety and unfortunately that
means some of our play-
ers reflect a culture that
glorifies drugs and drug
use. That mindset is not
reflected by TCU nor will
it be allowed within athlet-
ics."
Brock was the leading
tackler for TCU as a soph-
omore during the 2010
season, when the Horned.
Frogs went 13-0, won the
Rose Bowl and finished the
,,year ranked No. 2.. Brock
started the season opener
at Baylor last September,
but aggravated a foot inju-
ry that required season-
ending surgery.
Yendrey started 12 of
13 games this past season,
when he had 39 tackles
and three sacks. Johnson
played in ,all 13 games,
starting the last eight,
and had 47 tackles with 2\
sacks.


Answer to Previous Puzzle


OOM PAIC BABA
BBA AGA E VIL
OTs NUTSHELL
SECEDE TIC K
ANA HUN




BAR S PLEVNDER
NCAHAILTETIAB
TE L MlP FOCI
OSCAR S Z NE

AR N Y LE J L

RAG OOP E VEIR
LA E GLP S D E-W Y


7 Come off as
8 Linen et al.
9 Writer Nin
10 Italian coins,
once
.11 Attorney's
deg.


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" -books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


16 Rain slickers
20 Happy sighs
22 Cutlasses
24 RN assistant
25 Cotton gin
name
26 Ms. Rand
28 Tenet
31 Fiddle-de -
33 Road map
info
34 Letters in
want ad
35 "The," to
Wolfgang
37 Chalets, often
(hyph.)
39 "Top Hat"
dancer
42 Untold
centuries
44 Triangle sides
45 Escape artist
Houdini
46 Zola's name
48 Give or take
50 Heavy-metal
band
52 LGA postings
53 Bugged out
54 Mile., in
Barcelona
55 Whiz leader
57 Singer -
Rawls


2-16 2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


SCOREBOARD


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420















Page EdItor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2012


DILBERT
WE WERE
THAT TECHNO-
WAS A LOGICALLY
FAST INCOM-
DATE. PATIBLE.


BLONDIE
WE'VE DECIDED TO PUT YEARS OF
SAILING RIVALRY BEHIND
'5RIGHT US WITH A HUGE
THAT'S RIGHT, CELEBRATION
S THE SKY' PARTY



l .


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY


Motorists in the wrong find

ways to make things right


HER INTERNET
CONNECTION IS SLOW, YOU I LIKE TO
AND THERE'S NO 4G COULD I LIKE TO Y
SERVICE WHERE SHE JUST SOURCES.W
LIVES. HOW COULD I TALK. SOURCES.
SPEND ANY r
TIME THERE? i
o11


DEAR ABBY: "Mild-
Mannered Motorist in
Virginia" (Dec. 26) asked
you for a hand signal to
indicate "I'm sorry" to
fellow drivers when he
makes mistakes behind
the wheel. Not long ago, I
made a not-so-serious mis-
take that angered another
driver. When I flashed a
peace sign, then moved
my mouth in an "I'm
sorry," the person's frown
changed to a smile. We
then drove on with pleas-
ant attitudes, and I tried
to watch my driving more
closely.
FAITHFUL READER
IN ARKANSAS
DEAR FAITHFUL
READER I assured "Mild-
Mannered" that my help-
ful readers would step
forward to offer sugges-
tions for an "I'm sorry"
signal. And many, like
you, mentioned giving the
peace, sign. Offering more
options, my newspaper
readers comment
DEAR ABBY: We New
Yorkers have honed silent
signals to a fine art When
I'm at fault in traffic or
other situations where I
can't apologize verbally, I
make eye contact, put my
hand to my chest to accuse
myself, and put my hands
in a prayerful gesture
to ask forgiveness. This
almost always defuses the
situation on the spot Add
a smile and you've made a
friend as well. LORNA,
IN THE CITY


DEAR ABBY: "Mild-
Mannered Motorist's"
letter reminded me of an
incident a few years ago.
Driving home from work, I
was forced to swerve into
an oncoming lane by a car
driven by a young woman
who was pulling onto the
road from a parking lot
She didn't see me because
of traffic in the lane to
my right Fortunately,
there were no oncoming
vehicles, and I was able
to return to my lane and
proceed.
At the traffic signal, I
noticed the "offending" car
was directly behind me.
Turning into my neigh-
borhood, I quickly drove
up my driveway and into
my garage. When I got
out of the car, the young
woman was walking up the
driveway. She then began
profusely apologizing for
having caused a problem
for me.
She had driven miles
out of her way to offer
her apology, which I
gratefully accepted. Then
we both thanked God
for protecting us. I have
never seen her again,
but I hope she knows
I respect her tremen-
dously. PLEASANTLY
SURPRISED IN NORTH
CAROLINA


* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440,-Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ZITS


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


FOR BETTER OR WORSE
waT| |sfs NoIsE, ERE
MoM? 1 ciu
SJO VEL.
UP.

H IOUSE.
0r


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Expand your inter-
ests. Sign up for a class.
or activity that will entitle
you to greater knowledge,
better health or meeting
interesting people. A love
relationship is highlighted.
Someone from your past
will have an impact on you
now. *****
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Put greater emphasis
on financial, health or legal
matters and you will find a
way to advance personally.
Someone you have helped
in the past will honor the
debt and offer you assis-
tance. Make a powerful
impact that will leave a
lasting impression. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Don't get angry or let
your emotions get the bet-
ter of you. Take the high
road and observe how
others perform and you
will separate yourself from
those who take an under-
handed approach. Your
honesty and integrity will
pay off. ***,
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Don't make changes
without thinking matters
through or it could cost
you your reputation or '
professional status. Look
at the past, present and
'future and know what
direction or-side you are
on before you take a leap
of faith. ***


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
-Keep things;simple,>and
you will have a m.ubh
greater impact on the peo-
ple around you. Stick to
methods that have worked
well in the past Offer your
skills and experience, not
your cash. Love is on the
rise. *****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept
22): Do what you can to
make your home more
comfortable or user-friend-
ly. If there is a way to earn
extra income from home,
follow through with your,
plans. Inventing ways to.
subsidize your income will
be more profitable than
anticipated. **
LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct
22): A jointyventure will
pay off, opening up greater
opportunities to raise or
earn money. Don't let
someone close to you limit
what you can do. You have
to make your own deci-
sions and follow through
witi what works best for
you. ****
SCORPIO (Oct 23-Nov.
21): Taking on a simpler
and more moderate way
of living will save yqu
cash and attract the atten-
tion of someone you love.
Working in unison with
someone that you have


known for a long time will
ease your stress and pay
off. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Keep your emo-
tions under control ai~ you
will find your comfort zone.
Don't let others dictate how
you live your life. Someone
as innovative as you will
share your thoughts and
interests, Explore the pos-
sibilities. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Loss is likely if you
believe everything you are ,
told. Do your own research,
especially if the changes.
you are considering entail
using your own finances.
Not everyone you-meet will
have your best interests at
heart Focus on home and
family. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Listen to offers,
but don't agree to move
forward unless your inten-
tions are honorable. You
cannot please everyone,
and you will end up look-
ing bad or upsetting
someone important to your
future if you try. Honesty
is the best policy. *****
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Don't make snap judg-
ments. Expect someone to
disappoint you or to feed
you poor information. Go
back to someone you trust-
ed in the past in order to
get the lowdown on a deal
you want to do now. **


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos-
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are createcdfrom quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in trie cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: R equals K
"VL WFSHOY UOO YS VFUX, GM XFL
OSMN THM, NGJLW HW ASP, LJLM GE
GX GW SMOP ZGKRGMN NTUZLW ST
WSTXGMN XFL OUHMYTP."
- L.C. VFGXL

Previous Solution: "Life expectancy would grow by leaps and bounds if green
vegetables smelled as good as bacon." Doug Larson
2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 2-16


CLASSIC PEANUTS


:, \D LOOK L1M-
yo Lo) OF114
D DornTHis
-rIME- OF I
NIGH"TE


BEIN6 THE

1'6
2-16 O'-F"-


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
DEAR ABBY: I, too,
have made boo-boos while
driving and wish I could
have said "I'm sorry," but
the person is usually too
busy shaking a fist and
screaming what are obvi-
ously obscenities to notice.
I like the idea of a standard
"sorry" gesture.
How about holding one
hand up with your palm
toward your face for just
a second? (As in "I'm
ashamed of what I just
did.") It's simple and lets
you keep your other hand
on the wheel. CAROL IN
HOUSTON
DEAR ABBY: Why not
use the American Sign
Language symbol for
"sorry"? Make a fist with
your right hand, palm
toward the body and place
it over the area of your
heart and move it in small
circles. Of course, the
expression on your face
pulls it all together. Sign
language is used by many
people, and the chance
that the person you offend-
ed may already be familiar
with this sign makes it a
great way to convey the
sentiment. SIGN USER
IN OLD LYME, CONN.


A- SPARE NO EXACTLY, AND
EXPENSE! FIRST IM PICKING LIP
CLASS ALL THE TE TAB
THE WAY! THIS TIME!


OH, LISTEN RIGHT' LIKE YOU J
TO MISS COULD EVER AFFORD
MONEYBAGS, A BASH LIKE THIS!


SWIL.-L-YA?
^"' ~ ~ ~ ~ . r~


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2012


LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415





















LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2012

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Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Adis to Appea Call by: FaxlEiall by:
Tuesday Mon.,10:00 am. Mon.,9:00 a.m.
Wednesday Mon.,0:00a.m. Mon., 9:00 am.
Thursday Wed.,10:00a.m. Wed.,9:00a.m.
Friday Thurs., 10:00 a.m. Thurs.,9:00am.
Saturday Fri., 10:00 am. Fri., 9:00 am.
Sunday Fri., 10:00 a.m. Fri.,9:0 a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad epace
In error. Please call 755-5440
Immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440. -
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit, limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

'In Print and Online
www.lakecityreporter.com


4 lines 6 days t i additional
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totaling $100 or less.





One H tmn per ad addi~t. a
4 lines 6 days ne$ 10
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $00or less.
S Each Item must Include a price.m
This lsa non-refundable rate.




One item per ad 16
4 lines 6 days Each additional
Rate applies to private individuals sling
personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less.
Eh te mast milu a ri apce.
This is a non-refundable Prat:!'




One Item per ad $ 3
4 lines 6 days Each tonal
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totaling $2 or ea S
Each Item must Include a price
This Is a non-refundable rate.




One Item per ad ac a
4 lines 6 days lan$a.55 ass
pRate appIs to private dividuals ling
personal merchandise totalling $4,000 rO lss.
Each item must Include a price.
This Is a nan-refundabte rate.




One tHem per ad
4 lines 6 days Each addi tional
Rate ar-r ,E Ic. k i. ale ind lai m i aii n .-.g
pers na. mnrrnan. Is taI. a d tO or a js
ru Eac n'e. .St e o ru Ie p
Thi ..'. -ro. mi.d era


To Whom It May Concern:
You are hereby notified that the fol-
lowing described livestock, a red
crossbred cow and 1 goat, is now im-
pounded at an authorized Columbia
County Sheriff's Office livestock fa-
cility and the amount due by reason
of such impounding is $183.90 plus
$5.00 per day for care and custody of
said livestock. The above described
livestock will, unless redeemed with-
in 3 days from date hereof, be"of-
fered for sale at public auction to the
highest and best bidder for cash.
Mark Hunter, ,Sheriff
Columbia County, Florida
05530773
February 1, 2012





taena om. l.c r


Lake City Reporter








Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale
Delivery of 100 bales $260
386-688-9156

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
TAXES, RESUMES.
Other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 11-347-CA
SUNSTATE FEDERAL CREDIT
UNION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ROBERT F. BURNS, DECEASED,
Defendant.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
Notice is hereby given that the un-
dersigned, Clerk of Circuit Court,
Columbia County, Florida, will on
the 7th day of March, 2012, at
11:00AM, at the front courthouse
steps at the Columbia County Court-
house, 173 NE Hemando Avenue,
Lake City, Florida, offer for sale and
sell at public outcry, one by one, to
the highest bidder for cash, the prop-
erty located in Columbia County,
Florida, as follows:
Tract 6 of Great South Timber, an
unrecorded subdivision, said Lot be-
ing more particularly described in
Book 865, Page 1244 of the Public
Records of Columbia County, Flori-
da
pursuant to the Final Judgment of
Foreclosure entered on February 1,
2012, in the above-styled cause,
pending in said Court.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
P. DeWitt Cason, Clerk
Clerk of Circuit Court
By:/s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
05530518
February 9, 16, 2012
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 09-617-CA
CAPITAL CITY BANK
Plaintiff,
Vs.
THE ESTATE OF RAYMOND E.
PLATT, DECEASED; THE UN-
KNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEESS,
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIE-
NORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES,
OR OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING
BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST RAYMOND E. PLATT,
DECEASED; RAYMOND E.
PLATT, II; KENNETH P. PLATT;
MELINA SEALI and UNKNOWN
TENANTSS,
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO VICKIE WHITE:
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
to foreclose a mortgage on the fol-
lowing property in Columbia County
Florida: .
Lot 101, HI-Dri Actes, Unit''2, ac-
cording to the plat thereof as rec6id-
ed in Plat Book 4, Page .9 and 9A,
Public Records of Columbia County,
Florida, LESS AND EXCEPT the
North 150 feet thereof.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
GARVIN B. BOWDEN, the plain-
tiffs attorney, whose address is
Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth &
Bowden, P.A., 1300 Thomaswood
Drive, Tallahassee, Florida 32308,
within 30 days of first publication,
and file the original with the clerk of
this court either before service on the
plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint or petition.
DATED JANUARY 25, 2012
P. DEWITI CASON
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
05530370
February 9, 16, 2012


Public Auction to be held
March 24, 2012 at 8AM at
Ozzie's Towing & Auto, LLC 2492
SE Baya Ave. Lake City FL, 32025.
(386)719-5608
Following Vin Numbers:
98 BuickVin#
1G4HR52K1WH474274
05 GMC
Vin# 1GKES16S256181108
05530757
February 16, 2012
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO
SELL
NOTICE IS GIVEN that the Suwan-
.-nee River Water Management Dis-
trict intends to sell certain lands. A
description of the lands is as follows:
PART OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4
AND PART OF THE NORTH-
WEST 1/4 OF SECTION 30,
TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH, RANGE 17
EAST, COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA, BEING MORE PAR-
TICULARLY DESCRIBED AS
FOLLOWS: FOR POINT OF REF-
ERENCE COMMENCE AT THE
SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID
SECTION 30, THENCE RUN
NORTH 02 DEGREES 04 MI-
NUTES 16 SECONDS WEST
ALONG THE WEST LINE OF
SAID SECTION 30, A DISTANCE
OF 2643.88 FEET TO THE
NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID
SOUTHWEST 1/4; THENCE RUN
NORTH 87 DEGREES 25 MI-
NUTES 27 SECONDS EAST
ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF
SAID SOUTHWEST 1/4, A DIS-
TANCE OF 1002.39 FEET TO THE
CENTER OF A BRANCH AND
THE POINT OF BEGINNING;
THENCE RUN ALONG SAID
CENTER OF A BRANCH THE
FOLLOWING COURSES: NORTH
43 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 15
SECONDS EAST, 217.65 FEET;
NORTH 59 DEGREES 54 MI-
NUTES 40 SECONDS EAST,
130.47 FEET; NORTH 39 DE-
GREES 48 MINUTES 42 SEC-
ONDS EAST, 103.77 FEET;
NORTH 25 DEGREES 23 MI-
NUTES 40 SECONDS EAST,
114.63 FEET; NORTH 40 DE-
GREES 18 MINUTES 25 SEC-
ONDS EAST, 848.21 FEET TO
THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-,
WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO.
47 AND THE TERMINUS OF


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVI-
SION
Case No. 09000041 CA
Central Mortgage Company
Plaintiff,
vs.
Jackie Schwartz, et al,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Summary Final Judgment
of Foreclosure Including Award of
Attorney's Fees and Costs dated De-
cember 1, 2011, entered in Case No.
09000041 CA of the Circuit Court of
the THIRD Judicial Circuit in and
for Columbia County, Florida,
wherein Central Mortgage Company
is the Plaintiff and Jackie Schwartz,
et al,. are the Defendants, that the
Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to
the highest and best bidder for cash,
at 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake
City Fl. 32055. 11:00 A.M., on
March 14, 2012, the following de-
scribed property, as set forth in said
Summary Final Judgment of Fore-
closure including Award of Attor-.
neys' Fees and Costs, to-wit:
LOT 10, BLOCK B, CENTURY
OAK, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 4, AT PAGE 68,
OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
Dated this 9th day of February, 2012.
Columbia County Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
05530712
February 16, 23, 2012

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE,
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 11-318-CA
EAGLE ASSETS, LLC
a Florida Corporation
Plaintiff,
JEFFREY S. LINZY, individually,
AND ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN
PARTIES CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED
INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS)
WHO ARE NOT KNOW N TO BE
DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER
SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIM-
ANTS,
Defendants
AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that,
pursuant to a Final Judgment of
Foreclosure date January 24, 2012,
Case No. 11-318-CA; of the Circuit
Court of Columbia County, Florida,
in which EAGLE ASSETS, LLC, A
Florida Corporation, is the Plaintiff,
and JEFFREY S. LINZY, Individu-
ally, is the Defendant, I will sell to
the highest and best bidder for cash
in the lobby at the Front Door of the
Columbia County Courthouse, in
Lake City, Florida, at 11:00 A.M. on
the 7th day of March, 2012, the fol-
lowing described property set forth
in the Order of Final Judgment.
COMM SE COR OF NW 1/4 OF SE
1/4, RUN W 675.90 FT FOR POB,
CONT W 329.12 FT, N 1324.80 FT,
S 1324.99 FT TO POB. (AKA LOT
29 SHILOH RIDGE S/D UNREC)
ORB 842-1189. WD 1018-861,
CWD 1049-1585. WD 1079-2585.
WD 1117-1920. TAX PARCEL
#04226-129. Columbia County, Flor-
ida.
DATED this- 6th day of February,
2012.
CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT
BY:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
05530740
February 16, 23, 2012


CDL Class A Truck Driver.
Flatbed exp. for F/T SE area.
3 years exp or more. Medical
benefits offered. Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773

Collector/Customer Care
for call center. Must be fast friend-
ly & efficient. Apply online at I
www.salliemae.candidatecare.com
or Please send resume
to: 197 SWWaterford Ct. Lake
City, Fl 32025 .Att: Joey Kitaif.
Please send resume for call center
position only. There are no other
positions at this time.
EEO/M/F/V/D

EXPERIENCED SEWING
Machine Operator and
2nd person to cut material.
Hafners 386-755-6481

MECHANIC for busy truck shop.
Experience required with own
tools. Southern Specialized
386-752-9754


New Business Expanding to North
Florida. Looking for motivated
individuals. Will be having
Opportunity Meeting.
Call 386-754-8811 for details

Now accepting resumes for a
general manager for Mochi Frozen
Yogurt. Full time 50-60 hrs per
week. Scheduled to open in
March. Please mail to: 1396 NE
20th Ave. Bldg 300 Ocala, FL
34470 or e-mail to:
bulldog@laloenterprises.com

120n Medical
120 Employment

05530652
Physical Thrapy Center hiring a
Physical Therapist/Physical
Therapist's Assistant or Rehab
Aide. F/T or P/T.
Hands-on training w/some exp.
preferred. Personal training or
fitness background a plus. Basic
knowledge of anatomy and
exercises are a MUST.
Candidate must be confident,
have good people skills,
great attitude and be willing to
learn. Extreme motivation
promotes rapid growth. Send
resume to: pta714@hotmail.com
or fax to 386-755-3165.

05530708
Radiation Therapist PRN
Opening. The Cancer Center at
Lake City is currently seeking
qualified applicants for a Radia-
tion Therapist PRN opening.
Current Radiation Therapist cer-
tification plus
licensure to practice, as a
Radiologic Technologist in the
State of Florida required.
Applicants should submit their
resume to:
Walt.Bagwell@ascresearch.net.
Please include
"Radiation Therapist" in the
subject line of your e-mail.


Legal

SAID COURSES; THENCE RUN
SOUTH 17 DEGREES 09 MI-
NUTES 50 SECONDS EAST
ALONG SAID WESTERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, A DIS-
TANCE, OF 2123.86 FEET;
THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DE-
GREES 32 MINUTES 34 SEC-
ONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF
1519.05 FEET; THENCE RUN
NORTH 02 DEGREES 04 MI-
NUTES 16 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 989.54 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
CONTAINING 45.97 ACRES.
The sale of the above lands shall take
place not less than 30 days nor more
than 45 days after the first publica-
tion of this notice.
This notice is given to comply with
the publication requirements of Sec-
tion 373.089, Florida Statutes.
This notice shall be published on the
following dates: February 2, 2012;
February 9, 2012; February 16, 2012.
Terry E. Demott
Senior Land Resource Coordinator
Suwannee River Water Management
District
9225 CR 49
Live Oak, Florida 32060
(386) 362-1001
05530470
February 2, 9, 16, 2012


020 Lost & Found

FOUND US off Old Country Club
Rd. Female dog. Reddish brown
w/s ome black, short hair, very
friendly, no collar. 386-752-8854

FOUND: Small Black and white
dog. Found in the Defender/Baya
area on Monday the 6th. Please
call to identify 386-752-2492

Lost dog. Fawn (light brown) .
colored min pin (looks like a small
doberman) named prissy. No
collar she has a haze over one of
her eyes. Lost in Eastwood S/D-
Call Brian at 386-365-6171 please.

100n Job
1A0 Opportunities

05530599
Activity Aide
Avalon Healthcare Center is
currently accepting applications
for the part time position of
Activity Aide.
Please apply at Avalon
Healthcare and Rehabilitation
Center, 1270 S.W. Main Blvd.
Lake City, Florida 32055
or fax resume to 386-752-8556
386-752-7900 EOE

Anytime Fitness is looking for a
group exercise instructor.
Experience required.
Call Jackie at 386-754-1402


Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$300 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales'

ESTATE SALE Sat. 7:30-? 621
SE Division Ave. Behind the VA
Medical Center. Farm Equ. Appl.,
tools, more. Everything must GO!


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


SALE EVERY WEEKEND
COUNTRY CLUB ROAD AND
HANOVER PLACE 9AM-2PM
386-697-1946


440 Miscellaneous

GUNSHOW: 02/18 & 02/19
@ The Columbia County
Fairgrounds, Hwy 247 Lake City.
Sat 9am 4pm, Sun 9am-3pm.
Info: 386-325-6114


450 Good Things
5 to Eat







460 Firewood

It's Getting Colder!! Firewood
$65. Truck Load. we will call you
back. We deliver under 20 mi
$100 per load. Over 20 mi $120
per load. Joey 965-0288. Lv mess.

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent

1 BR/1 BA Furnished, all utilities
included + satellite,
$125 week, $125 deposit.
Call 386-758-6939


120 Medical
SEmployment

05530777
Experienced Medical Assistant
needed for busy family practice.
Must be a dependable team
player and have knowledge of
Electronic medical records.
Expereinced only need apply.
Fax resume to: Attn Cheryl
386-754-3657 or email
to office manager: at
primarvcaremedic.com
Medical practice needs
Ophthalmic Technician.
FT or PT. Experience preferred.
Fax resume 386-755-7561.

SSchools &
24 U Education

05530293
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-02/06/10

* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-02/13/12

*LPN 03/12/12
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies

American/English mix puppies. 9
weeks old, Tails docked.
$100.00 each Firm.
386-546-4393

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


407 Computers

DELL Computer,
$100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


420 Wanted toBuy

K&U TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-288-6875.


630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent

2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/1 w/screen porch. CH/A Lg yard
in quiet, clean, safe, well
maintained Owner Operator park.
Water, garbage incl. Ref. Req'd
$475.mo $475.dep. 386-719-9169
2/2 Units.
Free Water,
sewer and trash pickup.
386-984-2025 or 386-984-2063
2BR MH. Good location. CH/A
$395. mo. $200. dep.
386-755-0064
or (904)771-5924
3BR/2BA MH
Water & Garage included No Pets.
$550. mo. $450. security deposit,.
386-752-9898 or 386-33633
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779
Newly remodeled 2/2 MH, Lake
City, FL. Quite area, Ig lot. No
Pets. 1st ($400) & Sec. ($300) due
before move in last month rent will
be split over the first 4 months.
Please call Jenn 386-454-7724

Mobile Homes
640 for Sale

2011 Blowout
4/2 Doublewide only $34,995
On your land or mine
Call John T 386-752-1452

4/2 on 1 ac. New carpet, roof, a/c,
FP, roomy kitchen. Koi pond,
barn/workshop, garage & shed.
MLS 78833 $115,000 Results Re-
alty, Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
4BR/2BA
Over 2000 sq ft.
of living area.
Only $61,900
Call 386-752-3743
Bank Repo!! 3br/2ba Triplewide
$999 Down $377 month.
Call Paula 386-292-6290
E-mail
ammonspaula@yahoo.com
Factory Special 4/3
2280 Sq. Ft.
Home priced to go.
Call Catherine
386-754-6737
Jacobson Homes Factory Outlet
Prices! New 2012 3/2 start at
$39,900 and New 4/2's start at
$49,900. All new homes inc
delivery and set up, ac-skirt and
steps. North Pointe Gainesville
(352)872-5566
Looking for a Quality Home?
Manufactured or Modular
Home at Royals
CallCatherine
386-754-6737
Lot Model Sale
All Show Models
w/Factory Rebate
Call Charles
386-754-6737
Lot Model Specials on 2011
Models making room for 2012
at Royals Homes
Come see Catherine
386-754-6737
Maintained on 10 ac. Two car cov-
ered carport. Back deck & a front
ramp. Wood laminate floors. MLS
79417. $94,900 Results Realty
BrittanyStoeckert 386-397-3473
Modular HomesBuilt
to your Speckscall
Charles at
386-754-6737

Need a Home?
Bad Credit or No Credit?
Call 386-755-2132.
We Finance You
Must have Land.
NEW 2012
28X80
4BR/2BA FACTORY REPO
$61,900
Call 386-7523743
New And Used! North Pointe
Homes in Gainesville has 4 used
homes in stock! Don't delay as
these will go Fast.'
Call North Pointe in Gainesville
(Hwy 441, 6 Blocks north of
Hwy 222) (352)872-5566
NEW SINGLEWIDE
2br/lba set up
w/air $799 DOWN $179. mo!
Owner will Finance!
Call Kevin 386-719-5641
ONLY $59,995
New 2012 4br/2ba 28X80 Inc.
Delivery, set up, A/C,
skirting & steps.
Call 386-752-1452
OWNER FINANCE!
New 4br Doublewide!
Set up on your land
$0 Down/$329. mo
Call Kevin 386-719-6578


I


UYIT --"q


TSEL fT14i

FIDiT.At.HlB

















LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2012


640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
PALM HARBOR
Give Away
$20,000 in Options FREE
All sizes
1-888-313-2899
Palm Harbor Homes
New 2012 Models
$15K Off All Homes
800-622-2832 ext 210
Showcase CloSeout
All Palm Harbor
Lot models
Make Dreams Happen!
386-758-9538
USED DOUBLEWIDE!
3 br/2ba w/Den, SBS Fridge!
One Owner! I Finance!
Call Kevin!
386-719-6574
Used Singlewide
3br/2ba 16x803yrs Old,
Loaded *
Call Charles
386-754-6737
WE HAVE access to
New & Used Homes.
Call 386-755-8854 to make sure.
You are getting your best deal


WOODGATE VILLAGE! 3BR
2BA DWMH w/fenced yd,
carport & wkshop $39,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY
INC. 755-5110 #79078

650 Mobile Home
B650 & Land.
3 br/2ba, DWMH w/lots of space
in Providence close to 175 on 1 ac
fenced, Ig Utility Bldg. MLS#
79810 Eastside Village Realty,
Inc, Denise Bose 386-752-5290
3br/2ba 2.75 ac. w/fish pond.
Small down plus $750 month
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

'710 Unfurnished Apt.
For Rent









Amberwood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmvflapts.com
Brandywine Apartments
Now Renting
1,2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A.
386-752-3033 W. Grandview Ave.
Equal housing Opportunity
TDD Number 1-800-955-8771
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $99.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgrnd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
Greentree Townhouse
Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com
Large & clean. lbr/lba apt.
CH/A lg walk in closet. Close to
town. $395. mo and $350. dep.
(904)563-6208
Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, larg-
er 2/br. for $495. mo. Incl water.
386-755-2423 rigsbyrentals.com
NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled
1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living
room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951


710 Unfurnished Apt. 750 Business &
For Rent Office Rentals


Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $99. Limited time. Pets
welcome. with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.mvflapts.com
The Lakes Apts. Studios & Br's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $99. Spacious bedroom
washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.mvflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Move In Madness! $99. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.mvflapts.com
Winter Special! 1 Month FREE
with 1 year lease. Updated Apt,
w/tile floors/fresh paint.
Greal area. 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.,
720 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730i Unfurnished
J'7 0 Home For Rent

05530651
Century 21/
The Darby Rogers Group
*Totally remodeled in down
town White Springs 3/2
$840./mo.
16884 53rd Road Wellborn
3/2 $800./mo
1306 NW Scenic Lake Drive,
Lake City 3/2 spacious
home/Lake Front $1,650./mo
453 SW Mayflower Glen
Forth White 2/1 $750./mo
Kayla Carbono 386-623-9650

lbr/1.5ba Country Cottage, Cathe-
dral ceilings, brick fireplace, wash-
er/dryer,1 ac fenced, private, some.
pets, lease. 1st, last, sec, ref. Lake
City area $725 mo. Smoke Free
environment. 352-494-1989
2br Apartment.
Close to downtown & shopping.
$485. mo $585 dep.
386-344-2170
2BR/1BA House with yard.
Near College & Airport.
$450 mo. $450. sec. 386-752-0335
Monday -Friday 8A-4P
3BR/1BA w/CH/A, Located in the
country. Credit check required.
$500. mo. $500 Deposit
No Pets!! 386-752-3225
3BR/2BA NEW construction
Lease option. 1st, lastplus $400
sec.$900. mo. South of town.
Credit ref's req'd. 386-755-9476
Brick 3br/2ba Large-yard, garage,
CH/A. 179 SW Stanley Ct. Lake
SCity. $900. mo + $850 dep.
Call 386-365-8543
Spacious 3br/2ba home in town
with large bonus.room, recently
remodeled. $900.mo. includes yard
service. NO PETS. lst/last/sec Dep.
required. 386-867-9231

750 Business&
75 Office Rentals

05530343
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
900 sq' $600/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mth
8300 sq' $5533/mth
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
.Tom Eagle,.GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor


2 Business Offices For lease:
Approximately 11 00sq ft each.
Located SE Baya Ave.
Call 386-755-3456 for info
For Rent or Lease: Former Doc-
tors office, Former professional
office & Lg open space: avail on
East Baya Ave. Competitive rates.
Weekdays 386-984-0622
evenings/weekends 497-4762
Office for Lease, was Dr's office
$8 sqft/2707 sqft
Oak Hill Plaza
Tom 961-1086, DCA Realtor

780 Condos for Sale
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Country Club, 2br/2ba condo. New
granite tops & more. Tennis court
& pool. Elaine K Tolar 386-755-
,6488 MLS# 77219 $129,900

805 Lots for Sale
BANK OWNED- 7 lots in the
Plantation subdivision. Priced to
sell at just $17,900. Call 386-362-
4539 for a list of available lots.
MLS#79509 Poole Realty
Beautiful buildable lot in a estab-
lished neighborhood, site built
homes only MLS# 76668 High &
Dry Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Denise Bose @ 386-752-5290
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children .under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly ,
accept any advertising for real es-`
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
1,330 heated sqft. on 1/2 ac.
Fenced. Garage made into a 4th
BR, New laminate wood floors,
new tile. $104,900 MLS#77003
Carrie Cason 386-623-2806
2 FOR PRICE OF 1! 2 mfg homes
on 4.62 acres, Ig wkshop &
fencing $120,000 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY INC
386-755-5110. #78340
3 Bed/1 Bath home on
Poplar St.
SNice yard and carport.
$48,000 call 484-678-6385
3 br/2 ba brick on a .5 ac lot. Great
area. Built in 1994. 1,468 heated
sqft. Fenced yard & workshop .
w/carport. $115,000 MLS#77717
Carrie Cason 386-623-2806
4/2 on 10 ac in Bell. 2,200 heated
sqft in a country setting. 10x20
frame shed. Bring all offers! MLS
76582 $89,000 Results Realty,
Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473
4BR/2BA CONCRETE BLOCK
Home ONLY $38,500; apply
TLC & make this house a home
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #79477
5 Ac for $7,500! Wooded flag lot
with 5.44 ac. Restricted to site
built homes w/a min of 1500 sqft
climatized. MLS 77872 $7,500
Access Realty 386-623-6896


810 Home for Sale
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
1512 sqft. + 210 sqft Florida room.
remodeled kitchen, paint, floors &
more. $94,500 Lori Giebeig Simp-
son 386-365-5678 MLS# 79839
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4/3, lake in town. Many upgrades,
Elaine K Tolar 386-755-6488 Or
Mary Brown Whitehurst 386-965-
S0887 MLS# 76085 $299,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Split plan. 3/2 Brick, Woodcrest
S/D. Fenced yard. Oversized
garage, Shed. $169,900 Elaine K
Tolar 386-755-6488 MLS# 77708
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
2 story. 4br/3ba + bonus. Mother -
in-law suite. Fenced yard nice
area. Elaine K Tolar 386-755-6488
MLS# 79349 $279,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Superb area, brick 3/2 Ig screen
porch. 2 car garage. Nice back-
yard, $129,900 Lori Giebeig Simp-
son 386-365-5678 MLS# 79763
Custom built. 3/2, 1.37 ac, High
Springs. Real wood floors w/new
SS appl. 340 sq. ft. scr. lanai w/ce-
ramic tile. $178,000 MLS 79601
Access Realty 386-623-6896
FSBO Custom 3br/2.5ba. 1748sqft
Eastside Village. Oversized garage
w/extra garage in rear. Lg master
w/shower & tub. $149,000
386-752-2783 or 904-631-7390
Great investment property in the
city limits. Both units are occupied
w/tenants that want to stay! MLS
79206 $50,000 Results Realty,
Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473
Hallmark Real Estate
LIKE NEW COZY HOME with
excellent storage features,
3/2 Short sale $124,900
Call Ginger Parker 386-365-2135
Hallmark Real Estate TWO
STORY HOME with water access
to Gulfor River. Features boatlifts
for the.angler. Call Teresa
Spradley 386-365-8343
Hallmark Real Estate
WEST OF TOWN near shopping,
medical and banks. 3/2 brick
home with workshop.
Call Janet Creel 386-719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate
SOUTH OF TOWN 3 bedroom
1-1/2 bath home on full acre.
Budget priced $72,000
Call Tanya Shaffer 386-397-4766
Just Reduced 2br/2ba 1 car garage
screen porch, fenced yard, large
utility/ workshop MLS# 76708
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Denise Bose @386-752-5290
LARGE 2,000+ SqFt 3BR/2BA
home near schools & shopping
ONLY $28,500 DANIEL
CRAPPSAGENCY, INC
755-5110 #77505


Lg 4/2 on 1 ac. Granite floors.
Open kitchen & Florida rm. Beau-
tiful yard & wrap around porch!
MLS 77292 $129,000 Results Re-
alty, Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Live on a Golf Course. 3/2 brick
on 1/2 ac. Formal living, dining &
family room. 2 car.garage.'
$129,900 Frank 386-984-5217
MLS 79567 Callaway S/D Well
kept 3br/2ba, vaulted, comer lot,_
SS appl. Fenced yard & double ga-
rage. $175,000 Century 21 The
Darby-Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
MLS 79876 3br/2ba w/many up-
grades. Garage made into a 1 br
studio. 1,760 sqft in Oak Hill
Estates. $90,000 Century 21
The Darby-Rogers Co 752-6575
MLS 79982 3br/2ba, 1,805 sqft,
laminate floors, eat in kitchen
w/breakfast bar. Lg luxurious mas-
ter bath $169,900 Century 21 The
Darby-Rogers Co. 386-752-6575
Poole Realty 4br/3ba, Custom
built Between Live Oak & Lake
City, 10, ac w/planted pines &
hardwoods. $249,000 Kellie
Shirah, 386-208-3847 MLS#78032


Remax Realty Restored Vintage,
zoned comm'l. 3br/2.5ba, 2208 sq.
ft., 2 ac, FP in living & master,
wkshop w/bath. #77141 $209,000
Pam Beauchamp 386-30,3-2505
REO Realty Group, Nancy Rog-
ers 386-867-1271- 4/2, Fairly new
roof, HVAC 3yrs old & additional
insulation. Workshop has two br
MLS 77602 $149,900
REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers
867-1271- 3/1.5. Ceramic counters
& back splashes, wood laminate.
flooring. Landscaping, privacy
fence. MLS 80014 $99,900
REO Realty Group, Nancy Rogers
867-1271- Lake City's Country-
Club 4/3 W/beautiful interior
renovation. 2,328 sq ft.
MLS 78637 $169,900
Rockford Realty Group 3/2, new
cabinets, countertops, updated
baths, paint, flooring.Appr 1 ac
workshop/shed $77,000. Luke
Sparks 386-487-1584 MLS#77208
Rockford Realty Group Short
Sale. Nice older home in the city.
Newer metal roof, open floor plan
w/wood floors. $55,000 MLS#
78018 Luke Sparks. 386-487-1584
Rockford Realty Group. 3/2 split
plan N. Columbia Co. Open kit.,
upgraded cabinets & appl. Cov-
ered patio, fenced yard. MLS#
79720 Jim Curry 386-755-0100


Connected



0


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I Un 1ik l Kl itenirtrI


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for youl
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.


2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.
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Call Lake City Reporter Classifieds!



WE CAN HELP 386-755-5440


810 Home for Sale
Poole Realty Custom 3/2 home,
12 ac.Vaulted cypress ceilings,
hardwood & granite counters,
stone FP, guest cottage. $255,000.
Kellie 386-208-3847 MLS#76293
Poole Realty Just Listed 1,066 sq.
ft., 3 brl ba located South of Lake
City. $57,000. Call for an appoint-
ment. 386-362-4539. MLS#79937
266 Delhia Lane, Lake City
Poole Realty Queen Anne Victori-
an, Live Oak. 3/2, wood floors.
Listed on the historic registry. Lg
yard, 2 car garage. $159,000 Kellie
Shirah 386-208-3847 MLS75212
Price Reduced! 06 Fleetwood An-
niversary Series. 3/2 + retreat off
master, privacy fence. South of
Lake City MLS 78411 $67,900
Access Realty 386-623-6896
PRICE SLASHED! 3BR/2BA
Brick home REMODELED!
Fenced backyard $69,500
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY
INC 755-5110 #78340
Remax Professionals Beautifully
kept in Callaway. Lg beds & baths.
Covered porch w/vinyl fence.
MLS 79005 $190K Missy Zecher
623-0237 www.missyzechei.com
Remax Professionals Brick in
nice S/D w/fencedback yard. High
ceilings, gas fireplace more. MLS
79421 $199:000 Missy Zecher
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Remax Professionals Custom
home. Block construction. Lg.
Master, privacy fence. MLS 79569
$229,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Remax Professionals Nice home
in Woodcrest Split floor plan; Lg
closets, screened porch, shed MLS
79506 $129,000 Missy Zecher
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Remax Professionals Open floor,
plan. Wood burning fireplace.
Fenced back yard. MLS 79330
$115,000 Missy Zecher 623-0237'
www.missyzecher.com
Remax Professionals Well kept &
updated. New paint, carpet, AC &
roof. Lg fenced backyard MLS :
79658 $119,900 Missy Zecher
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com,
Remax Realty Almost new, great
area! 4br/2.5ba/3cg, 3052sq, 5ac,
gas FP, SS appls, hardwood. Front
& back porch #79877 $289,000
Pam Beauchamp 386-303-2505
Remax Realty Country Feel!
Awesome 3br/2ba, brick, /Sac, split
floor plan, Ig master, above ground
pool, 2 sheds, #79789 $219,000
Pam Beauchamp 386-303-2505


810 Home for Sale
Rockford Realty Group. Cypress
Landing. Brick 3br/2ba w/lg
kitchen area, spacious great room a
neat patio. MLS#79775. $124,900.
Call Charlie Sparks. 386-755-0808
Rockford Realty Group. River
Front! 3br/2ba Kit & LR overlooks
Suwannee River. Screen porch,
'Gazebo & dock. MLS#79887
$295,000 Jim Curry 386-755-0100
Rockford Realty GroupCallaway
3br/2ba built in '04. 1,568 sqft liv-
ing area. Bank approved short sale.
Make an offer! $106.800. MLS#
79248 Mark Cook. 386-288-9378
Very well kept, 3 br/2 ba on 1/2 ac
Close to 1-75 for easy commute.
Nice wood cabinetry, open floor &
much more! $169,900 MLS
#78825 Carrie Cason. 623-2806
WELLBORN! 3BR/2BA mfg
Home w/FP on 4.79 acres
$63,000 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY INC 755-5110
#79960

820 Farms&
Acreage
20 ac wooded tract. Nice piece of
land. Property is located approx 10
miles from Cedar Key. MLS
78886 $70,000 Results Realty,
Brittany Stoeckert 386-397-3473
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
Owner Financed land with only
$300 down payment. Half to ten ac
lots. Deas Bullard/BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
Poole Realty 120 ac farm w/spring
fed lake. Old renovated farmhouse.
Lg master, w/wood burning FP,
LR w/FP & updated kit. #76096
$499,000. Kellie 386-208-3847

830 Commercial
Property
Hallmark Real Estate 53.87 ac
zoned resid'l office & resid'l
high density on By-Pass. Bank
Owned. Janet Creel 386-719-0382
or Paula Lawrence 386-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate. Centrally
located lots zoned for retail,
automotive or commercial services
on Waterford Ct. Bank owned.
Call Janet Creel 386-719-0382 or
Paula Lawrence 386-623-1973

Q870 Real Estate
870 Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605

920 Auto Parts
920 & Supplies
4 TIRES with matching
aluminum Rims. 5-lug.
Off F-150. 265/70/17
$175.00 FIRM. 386-365-5099


930 Motorcycles
HARLEY DAVIDSON Electric
Glide Classic. 2006. 12,500 mi
LOADED $12,000.
(734)255-4820


940 Trucks
1999 Dodge Ram 1500 P/U. Sil-
ver, bedliner, flow master exhaust.
Back air shocks. Runs excellent.
115k mi. $3,500. 386-758-7969


I I 'd I - k -- I


I a ''Ll %%- "i I xsJj'%'l I%l


Classified Department: 755-5440


pci~


I


I


I














LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2012


From New York to Asia, Lin is a hoops sensation


By BRIAN MAHONEY
Associated Press

NEW YORK Bigger
than Shaq? Larger than
LeBron? The Knicks as
NBA champions?
(Don't laugh too hard at
that last one. The odds are
getting better, according to
one online sports book.)
Nothing seems too Lin-
conceivable now after
Jeremy Lin's incredible first
week as an NBA starter,
and the story keeps getting
better.
The undrafted player
from Harvard made a 3-
pointer with half a second
left Tuesday night to give
the Knicks .a 90-87 victory
at Toronto. The Knicks
I returned home Wednesday
to host Sacramento, look-
ing for a seventh straight
victory that would get them
back to .500 after an 8-15
start
Lin joined the rotation
only then, starting the last
#five games, so hold off
on making him a Michael
Jordan, Shaquille O'Neal
or LeBron James just yet.
But the Knicks have seen
enough to believe this ride
may last a while longer.
"I don't know when
there's an ending. Maybe
there won't," coach Mike
D'Antoni said.
Lin's story has blown
straight past the New York
sports pages and all their
cute headlines like "Va-Lin-
tine's Day," all the way to
a basketball-crazed conti-
nent on the other side of
the world, where he's been
"kind of like the great Asian
hope," said Orin Starn, pro-
fessor and chair of Cultural
Anthropology at Duke.
And .Linsanity has
reached America's most
powerful basketball fan,
with President Barack
Obama talking about Lin's
winner Wednesday.
White House spokesman
Jay Carney said Lin was
"just a great story, and the


ASSOCIATED PRESS
New York Knicks guard Jeremy Lin (17) celebrates with teammates Tyson Chandler and Landry Fields (2) after his
game-winning 3-pointer against the Toronto Raptors in an NBA basketball game in Toronto on Tuesday.


president was saying as
much this morning."
Lin arrived in New York
in December with no guar-
antee he would last more
than a few weeks. Already
cut by Golden State and
Houston this season, he
was so hesitant to get com-
fortable in his new home
that he refused to even get
his own.
Instead, he slept at his
brother's, place in the city,
and crashed on' teammate


Landry Fields' couch the
- night before his breakout
game against New Jersey
on Feb. 4.
Even an Ivy League edu-
cation couldn't help Lin
explain what's -. happened
since scoring the most
points (129) in any player's
first five games as a starter
since the NBA merged with
the ABA in 1976, and a con-
tract that's guaranteed for
the rest of the season.
"No, but I believe in an


all-powerful and all-know-
ing God who does mira-
cles," Lin said.
If that sounds familiar,
yes, Lin has been frequent-
ly compared to Denver
quarterback Tim Tebow.
Both relied on their faith
as much as their previously
overlooked skills to guide
them through hot streaks
that made them sensations
even beyond their sports.
Tebow carried the
Broncos right into the


playoffs, and now there
are some who believe Lin
can do the same with the
'Knicks.
The Knicks were 40-
1 odds to win the NBA
championship on Bovada.
lv before Lin's run began.
Now, they're down to 18-1
and conjuring up memories
of another New York team.
"A guy like this is great
for the game and has drawn
a lot of interest from bet-
tors on the Knicks games


also," Kevin Bradley, the
sports book's manager, said
in a statement. "I am hav-
ing visions of how the pub-
lic was treating the Giants
going into the Super Bowl
being the hottest team in
the NFL and costing us a
mint, and right now the
Knicks are by far the big-
gest loser for the book."
Not everybody is con-
vinced. Boxer Floyd
Mayweather Jr. played
down Lin mania on Twitter,
saying that Lin is just doing
what plenty of black play-
ers do but is getting more
attention because of his
Asian heritage.
And Lin is certain to cool
off. It's one thing to beat
teams such as the Nets and
Wizards when they've bare-
ly had time to learn your
name. It's another when
NBA defenses are prepared
'to stop you.
"He's a marked man now.
He's not going to sneak
up on anybody, and every
night's going to be tough,"
D'Antoni said.
Then again, Kobe Bryant
had said he wasn't familiar
with Lin's game and would
have to study up on him.
The next night, Lin burned
the Lakers-for 38 points in a
nationally televised victory.
That was a huge moment
in Taiwan, which Lin's par-
ents left in the 1970s. Asia
lost its biggest basketball
star when Yao Ming retired
last summer, but ratings
are up in China, and TV
stations around the conti-
nent have rushed to add
Knicks games to their
broadcasts.
"I like Jeremy Lin (more
than Yao Ming) because Yao
Ming was already famous"
when he started playing in
NBA, said Taiwanese uni-
versity student Zhang Gan-
yu, "For Lin, it's like nobody
had heard of him before.
Kobe gave an interview say-
ing he did- not know who
Lin was. So this is truly a
rising star."


'Monday Night

Football' switching

to 2-man booth


Associated Press

BRISTOL, Conn. -
"Monday Night Football"
'is switching to a two-man
booth.
Analyst Ron Jaworski
has signed a five-year con-
tract extension to appear
on other programming on
ESPN and will no longer
join play-by-play announc-
er Mike Tirico and color
commentator Jon Gruden
on Monday nights, the net-
work said Wednesday.
Jaworski, the former
Philadelphia Eagles quar-
terback, will work various
ESPN studio shows year-
round, often focusing on his
specialty of breaking down
video.
"With him doing one
game each week, we don't
necessarily believe we
were getting the best Ron
Jaworski had to offer to the


network," executive vice
presidentNorbyWilliamson
said.
Jaworski called "Monday
Night Football" games the
past five seasons. Gruden,
the former Raiders and
Buccaneers coach, joined
MNF in 2009 and agreed
to a five-year extension in
October. This is the first
time in 15 years ESPN has
used a two-person lead
team on its NFL game
coverage.
"There was nothing bro-
ken about 'Monday Night
Football,"' Williamson said.
He said network execu-'
tives believed Tirico and
Gruden worked well as a
two-man booth and there
was no need to add a third
person.
"I fully expect Mike
Tirico and Jon Gruden to be
together for the foreseeable
future," Williamson said.


Buccaneers

release DT Albert

Haynesworth


Associated Press

TAMPA-Defensiveline-
man Albert Haynesworth
has been released by the
Tampa Bay Buccaneers,
who signed him after inju-
ries decimated their roster
midway through last sea-
son.
General manager Mark
Dominik announced the
move Wednesday, saying he
appreciated Haynesworth
filling in for seven gainme
after tackle Gerald McCoy
was lost for the year with a
torn right biceps.
While the Bucs limited the


number of days he practiced
to try to keep Haynesworth
healthy for games, his pro-
duction declined steadily
over the final month of a
10-game losing streak that
claimed the job of former
coach Raheem Morris.
Haynesworth's base salary
for next season would have
been more than $6 iiilliui.
so his release didn't come
as a surprise.
"I appreciate Albert play
ing for us a;ui, some key
iiijirin -, 1 ii' past season,"
general manager Mark
Dominik said in a team
statement.


Top-ranked Luke Donald


comes full circle at Riviera


By DOUG FERGUSON'
Associated Press

LOS ANGELES Luke
Donald was on the prac-
tice range at Riviera before
dawn Wednesday, so dark
that only temporary flood-
lights allowed him to see
where the ball was going.
It was a snapshot of the
perks that come with being
No. 1 in the world, and
what got him there. '
The best player gets his
choice of tee times for the
pro-am, and the early spots
go first Along with being


No. 1 in the world, Donald
sits atop both the PGATqur
and European Tour money
lists, the first player ever to
lead the two biggest tours.
As for the work ethic?
Getting to the top wasn't an
accident.
"I think the best part of
being No. 1 is knowing that
my best golf is good enough
to get me to that No. 1 spot,
just from a confidence and
mental standpoint," Donald
said. "'at's gratifying to
know that the hard work is
paying off."
The hardest part might


be the encore.
Donald is coming off a
year he won't ever forget,
and it all began at Riviera
with a round he would like
to erase from his memory.
In his first event, he shot a
79 in the second round to
miss the cut.
Toward the end of his
season, he had won a
career-best four times,
including the most excit-
ing finish this side of a
major when he birdied six
straight holes to start the
back nine at Disney and
closed with a 64 for a two-


shot victory. It gave him
the double money title,
and was enough to make
him a landslide winner of
PGA Tour player of the
year.
Off the course was joy
and grief.
His father, Colin, died
of heart failure just a few
days before Donald's wife
gave birth to. their second
daughter.
"Obviously, a decent
amount of my work had
already been done," Donald
said. "I'd had a great sea-
son up until that point."


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